WorldWideScience

Sample records for adaptive developmental delay

  1. Adaptive Function in Preschoolers in Relation to Developmental Delay and Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Insights from a Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Susan L.; McDonald, Jenny L.; Comino, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to explore the relationship between developmental ability, autism and adaptive skills in preschoolers. Adaptive function was assessed in 152 preschoolers with autism, with and without developmental delay, and without autism, with and without developmental delay. Their overall adaptive function, measured by the general adaptive…

  2. The Adaptive Project of Parenting: South Asian Families with Children with Developmental Delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Chemba; Weisner, Thomas S.; Patel, Devindra

    1999-01-01

    This study compared patterns of family adaptation to children with developmental delays of South Asian families living in California with similar Euro-American families. Analysis of parent interviews found differences in family support, spousal relations, gender roles, cultural identity, and spirituality. Similarities were found in hope for…

  3. 34 CFR 303.10 - Developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental delay. 303.10 Section 303.10 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH...

  4. Risk factors of ophthalmic disorders in children with developmental delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandfeld, L.N.; Jensen, H.; Skov, L.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify diagnoses that increase the risk of ophthalmic disorders in developmentally delayed children. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 1126 Danish children with developmental delay (IQ Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12......PURPOSE: To identify diagnoses that increase the risk of ophthalmic disorders in developmentally delayed children. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 1126 Danish children with developmental delay (IQ Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  5. OCULAR DISORDERS IN CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DELAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Suresh Joshi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In India, an estimated 1.5-2.5% children below 2 years of age are developmentally delayed. A higher incidence of ocular disability is seen in these children, refractive errors and strabismus being most common. These can add to the overall burden of health as most of them have developmental comorbidities. The aim of the study is to study the ocular disorders in children with developmental delay. MATERIALS AND METHODS We studied 112 children between the 2-12 years of age diagnosed to have developmental delay. All the subjects underwent a detailed ophthalmic evaluation including visual acuity testing using Snellen’s charts (3m and 6m and Log MAR charts (recorded as per Snellen’s vision testing to maintain uniformity, cycloplegic refraction, torchlight and slit-lamp evaluation and dilated fundus examination. The data was tabulated and represented using bar diagrams, Pie charts and graphs. The results were expressed as percentages. Design-Cross-sectional, observational study. RESULTS 66 boys and 46 girls (total 112 were evaluated. The mean age of the study population was 7.8 years ± 2.4 SD. The aetiology of developmental delay was cerebral palsy (64%, Down syndrome (22%, autism (7%, intellectual disability (4.5% and 1 case each of congenital hypothyroidism and ataxia telangiectasia. The prevalence of ocular disorders was found to be 84.8%, which was slightly higher in girls (87% as compared to boys (83%. Refractive error (79.5% was the commonest ocular disorder followed by strabismus (46.4%. Astigmatism (44.6% was the commonest refractive error, which was divided into myopic astigmatism (19.6%, hyperopic astigmatism (13.8% and mixed astigmatism (11.2%. Simple hyperopia was seen in 21.9% subjects and simple myopia in 12.1%. Exotropia (52% was commoner than esotropia (48%. Other ocular abnormalities included optic atrophy, nystagmus, epicanthal folds, cataract, mongoloid slant, ptosis, telecanthus, conjunctival telangiectasia and

  6. Developmental evolution facilitates rapid adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Kazlauskas, Romas J; Travisano, Michael

    2017-11-21

    Developmental evolution has frequently been identified as a mode for rapid adaptation, but direct observations of the selective benefits and associated mechanisms of developmental evolution are necessarily challenging to obtain. Here we show rapid evolution of greatly increased rates of dispersal by developmental changes when populations experience stringent selection. Replicate populations of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma citrinoviride underwent 85 serial transfers, under conditions initially favoring growth but not dispersal. T. citrinoviride populations shifted away from multicellular growth toward increased dispersal by producing one thousand times more single-celled asexual conidial spores, three times sooner than the ancestral genotype. Conidia of selected lines also germinated fifty percent faster. Gene expression changed substantially between the ancestral and selected fungi, especially for spore production and growth, demonstrating rapid evolution of tight regulatory control for down-regulation of growth and up-regulation of conidia production between 18 and 24 hours of growth. These changes involved both developmentally fixed and plastic changes in gene expression, showing that complex developmental changes can serve as a mechanism for rapid adaptation.

  7. Accuracy of caregiver identification of developmental delays among young children involved with child welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Molly Curtin; Leslie, Laurel K; Stahmer, Aubyn C

    2006-08-01

    Underidentification of developmental delays among young children involved with child welfare/child protective services (CW) is problematic. Caregivers of young children involved with CW may help increase identification of young children with developmental delays, but the accuracy of caregiver identification in this population and whether this varies by caregiver type is not known. This study uses data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being to determine if (1) caregivers of young children involved with CW accurately identify children with developmental delays and (2) foster caregivers are better able to identify developmental delays compared with other caregivers. Close to half the children had a delay in language, cognitive, and/or adaptive behavior (45%). Overall sensitivity for caregiver identification was 35% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 29%, 41%); specificity was 84% (95% CI: 80%, 87%). After controlling for certain child and caregiver characteristics, in-home caregivers had 0.15 times the odds of identifying a child with a developmental delay compared with foster caregivers (95% CI 0.1, 0.4). Results suggest that caregiver identification of developmental delays is specific but not sensitive, and that foster caregivers were more likely to identify a child with a developmental delay compared with in-home caregivers. Policy implications include improving educational programs regarding child development and developmental services for foster, kinship, as well as in-home caregivers in the hopes of increasing sensitivity of caregiver identification of developmental delays for the population of young children involved with CW.

  8. Developmental trends in adaptive memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L; Smeets, Tom; Garner, Sarah R

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that memory is enhanced when information is processed for fitness-related purposes. The main objective of the current experiments was to test developmental trends in the evolutionary foundation of memory using different types of stimuli and paradigms. In Experiment 1, 11-year-olds and adults were presented with neutral, negative, and survival-related DRM word lists. We found a memory benefit for the survival-related words and showed that false memories were more likely to be elicited for the survival-related word lists than for the other lists. Experiment 2 examined developmental trends in the survival processing paradigm using neutral, negative, and survival-related pictures. A survival processing advantage was found for survival-related pictures in adults, for negative pictures in 11/12-year-olds, and for neutral pictures in 7/8-year-olds. In Experiment 3, 11/12-year-olds and adults had to imagine the standard survival scenario or an adapted survival condition (or pleasantness condition) that was designed to reduce the possibilities for elaborative processing. We found superior memory retention for both survival scenarios in children and adults. Collectively, our results evidently show that the survival processing advantage is developmentally invariant and that certain proximate mechanisms (elaboration and distinctiveness) underlie these developmental trends.

  9. Menstrual management in developmentally delayed adolescent females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Irene; McRae, Alexandra; Matthews, Kim; Maguire, Ann M; Steinbeck, Katharine

    2017-06-01

    Requests for assistance in menstrual management and menstrual suppression are a common, emotive and sometimes controversial aspect of adolescent disability care. To review the uptake and outcomes of menstrual suppression among adolescent patients with developmental delay. A retrospective review of the medical records of adolescent females with intellectual disability referred for menstrual management to the Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology Clinic, Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, for the three-year period between January 1, 2010 and January 1, 2013. Eighty adolescent patients with developmental delay were identified. A third (n = 28) of the patients were pre-menarcheal at first review with parent/caregivers seeking anticipatory advice. Of the post-menarcheal patients, the median age of menarche was 12 years (range 10-15 years). First and second line interventions were documented as were reasons for change where applicable. The combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP) was the most frequently used therapy (67%), and 19 patients in total had a levonorgestrel releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) inserted (31%). Our study population differs from similar previously published groups in the marked absence of the use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate or the subdermal etonogestrel releasing device. As a paediatrician, it is important to address menstrual management issues and allay caregiver concerns with appropriate advice. Our study supports the use of the COCP as sound first line management in achieving menstrual suppression. The LNG-IUS appears to be a favourable second line option. Further investigation into longer-term outcomes and potential complications of device insertion is recommended. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  10. Telepresence, time delay, and adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Richard; Durlach, Nathaniel

    1989-01-01

    Displays are now being used extensively throughout the society. More and more time is spent watching television, movies, computer screens, etc. Furthermore, in an increasing number of cases, the observer interacts with the display and plays the role of operator as well as observer. To a large extent, the normal behavior in the normal environment can also be thought of in these same terms. Taking liberties with Shakespeare, it might be said, all the world's a display and all the individuals in it are operators in and on the display. Within this general context of interactive display systems, a discussion is began with a conceptual overview of a particular class of such systems, namely, teleoperator systems. The notion is considered of telepresence and the factors that limit telepresence, including decorrelation between the: (1) motor output of the teleoperator as sensed directly via the kinesthetic/tactual system, and (2) the motor output of the teleoperator as sensed indirectly via feedback from the slave robot, i.e., via a visual display of the motor actions of the slave robot. Finally, the deleterious effect of time delay (a particular decorrelation) on sensory-motor adaptation (an important phenomenon related to telepresence) is examined.

  11. A clinical approach to developmental delay and intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Pradeep; Suri, Mohnish

    2017-12-01

    Global developmental delay and intellectual disability are phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous and a specific diagnosis is not reached in many cases. This paper outlines a systematic approach to global developmental delay and intellectual disability. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  12. Visual Abilities in Children with Developmental Delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welinder, Lotte G; Baggesen, Kirsten L

    Purpose:  To investigate the visual abilities of students with severe developmental delay (DD) age 6-8 starting in special needs education. Methods:  Between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2008, we screened all students with severe DD starting in special needs schools in Northern Jutland, Denmark...... for vision. All students with visual acuities ≤6/12 were refractioned and examined by an ophthalmologist. Results:  Of 502 students, 56 (11%) had visual impairment (VI) [visual acuity (VA) ≤ 6/18], of which 21 had been previously undiagnosed. Legal blindness was found in 15 students (3%), of whom three had....... The number of students with decreased vision identified by screening decreased significantly during the study period (r = 0.724, p = 0.028). The number of students needed to be screened to find one student with VI was 24 and to identify legal blindness 181 needed to be screened. Conclusion:  Visual...

  13. Smart Toys Designed for Detecting Developmental Delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Diego; García, Antonio; Alarcos, Bernardo; Velasco, Juan R; Ortega, José Eugenio; Martínez-Yelmo, Isaías

    2016-11-20

    In this paper, we describe the design considerations and implementation of a smart toy system, a technology for supporting the automatic recording and analysis for detecting developmental delays recognition when children play using the smart toy. To achieve this goal, we take advantage of the current commercial sensor features (reliability, low consumption, easy integration, etc.) to develop a series of sensor-based low-cost devices. Specifically, our prototype system consists of a tower of cubes augmented with wireless sensing capabilities and a mobile computing platform that collect the information sent from the cubes allowing the later analysis by childhood development professionals in order to verify a normal behaviour or to detect a potential disorder. This paper presents the requirements of the toy and discusses our choices in toy design, technology used, selected sensors, process to gather data from the sensors and generate information that will help in the decision-making and communication of the information to the collector system. In addition, we also describe the play activities the system supports.

  14. Smart Toys Designed for Detecting Developmental Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Rivera

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the design considerations and implementation of a smart toy system, a technology for supporting the automatic recording and analysis for detecting developmental delays recognition when children play using the smart toy. To achieve this goal, we take advantage of the current commercial sensor features (reliability, low consumption, easy integration, etc. to develop a series of sensor-based low-cost devices. Specifically, our prototype system consists of a tower of cubes augmented with wireless sensing capabilities and a mobile computing platform that collect the information sent from the cubes allowing the later analysis by childhood development professionals in order to verify a normal behaviour or to detect a potential disorder. This paper presents the requirements of the toy and discusses our choices in toy design, technology used, selected sensors, process to gather data from the sensors and generate information that will help in the decision-making and communication of the information to the collector system. In addition, we also describe the play activities the system supports.

  15. [Neuropsychomotor developmental delay: conceptual map, term definitions, uses and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornelas, Lílian de Fátima; Duarte, Neuza Maria de Castro; Magalhães, Lívia de Castro

    2015-01-01

    To retrieve the origin of the term neuropsychomotor developmental delay" (NPMD), its conceptual evolution over time, and to build a conceptual map based on literature review. A literature search was performed in the SciELO Brazil, Web of Science, Science Direct, OneFile (GALE), Pubmed (Medline), Whiley Online, and Springer databases, from January of 1940 to January of 2013, using the following keywords NPMD delay, NPMD retardation, developmental delay, and global developmental delay. A total of 71 articles were selected, which were used to build the conceptual map of the term. Of the 71 references, 55 were international and 16 national. The terms developmental delay and global developmental delay were the most frequently used in the international literature and, in Brazil, delayed NPMD was the most often used. The term developmental delay emerged in the mid 1940s, gaining momentum in the 1990 s. In Brazil, the term delayed NPMD started to be used in the 1980s, and has been frequently cited and published in the literature. Delayed development was a characteristic of 13 morbidities described in 23 references. Regarding the type of use, 19 references were found, with seven forms of use. Among the references, 34 had definitions of the term, and 16 different concepts were identified. Developmental delay is addressed in the international and national literature under different names, various applications, and heterogeneous concepts. Internationally, ways to improve communication between professionals have been indicated, with standardized definition of the term and use in very specific situations up to the fifth year of life, which was not found in Brazilian publications. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. A Developmental Study on Delay of Gratification

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Sayoko; Mitsumoto, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to investigate development of delay of gratification. In Study 1, the personal delay of gratification test, social delay of gratification inventory and personality inventory were administered to kindergarteners aged 3 to 6 years. The personal delay of gratification test included three reward pairs and subjects were instructed to choose between a less valuable reward which was immediately available and a more valuable reward which was available tomorrow. In the perso...

  17. Maternal Obesity: Risks for Developmental Delays in Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffany, Kathleen O'Connor; McVeigh, Katharine H; Kershaw, Trace S; Lipkind, Heather S; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2016-02-01

    To assess the risk for neurodevelopmental delays for children of mothers who were obese (≥200 pounds) prior to pregnancy, and to characterize delays associated with maternal obesity among children referred to and found eligible to receive Early Intervention Program services. We conducted a retrospective cohort study (N = 541,816) using a population-based New York City data warehouse with linked birth and Early Intervention data. Risks for children suspected of a delay and 'significantly delayed', with two moderate or one severe delay, were calculated. Among the group of children eligible by delay for Early Intervention, analyses assessed risk for being identified with a moderate-to-severe delay across each of five functional domains as well as risks for multiple delays. Children of mothers who were obese were more likely to be suspected of a delay (adjusted RR 1.19 [CI 1.15-1.22]) and borderline association for 'significantly delayed' (adjusted RR 1.01 [CI 1.00-1.02). Among children eligible by delay, children of mothers who were obese evidenced an increased risk for moderate-to-severe cognitive (adjusted RR 1.04 [CI 1.02-1.07]) and physical (adjusted RR 1.04 [CI 1.01-1.08]) delays and for global developmental delay (adjusted RR 1.05 [CI 1.01-1.08]). Maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of developmental delay in offspring. Among children with moderate or severe delays, maternal obesity is associated with increased risk of cognitive and physical delays as well as with increased risk for global developmental delay. While causation remains uncertain, this adds to the growing body of research reporting an association between maternal obesity and neurodevelopmental delays in offspring.

  18. Developmental delay of infants and young children with and without ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Developmental delay of infants and young children with and without fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in the Northern Cape Province, South Africa. L Davies, M Dunn, M Chersich, M Urban, C Chetty, L Olivier, D Viljoen ...

  19. Promoting Healthy Weight among Children with Developmental Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Ruby R.; Camejo, Stephanie T.; Asfour, Lila; Uhlhorn, Susan B.; Delamater, Alan; Messiah, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    An extensive body of research demonstrates a higher prevalence of obesity among children with developmental delays (DD) versus children without delays. This analysis examined the effectiveness of a randomized controlled trial to promote healthy weight in a subsample of preschool-age children with DD (n = 71) on the adoption of quality nutrition…

  20. Clinical profile of children with developmental delay and microcephaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Aggarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the profile of children with developmental delay and microcephaly. Materials and Methods: Children attending child development clinic with developmental delay were evaluated as per protocol. Z scores of head circumference were calculated using WHO charts. Clinical, radiological and etiological profile of those with microcephaly and those without was compared. Results: Of the 414 children with developmental delay 231 had microcephaly (z score ≤ -3. Mean age of children with microcephaly was 35.1 ± 27.9 months (range 4-184, males (72.7%. Comorbidities were epilepsy (42.9%, visual abnormality (26.4%, hearing abnormality (16.9%. Mean DQ was 29.75 + 17.8 in those with microcephaly was significantly lower compared to the rest (P = 0.002. Secondary microcephaly was associated with cerebral palsy in 69.7%. Other causes were congenital infections (4, inborn error of metabolism (3, post-meningoencephalitis (5, malformations (12, and syndromic (13. Neuroimaging was done in 118 (51.1% cases of which 104 (88.1% were abnormal. On comparison children with microcephaly had more epilepsy, lower developmental quotient, vision abnormalities findings as compared to normocephalic children with developmental delay (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Microcephaly was associated with lower, DQ, higher comorbidities in children with developmental delay. Spastic CP is commonly associated with microcephaly.

  1. Movement Exploration as a Technique for Teaching Pre-Swimming Skills to Students with Developmental Delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buis, Joyce M.; Schane, Catherine S.

    1980-01-01

    Background, rationale, and techniques for using movement exploration to teach preswimming skills to developmentally delayed persons are given. Objectives (beyond the primary one of safety) of such a program include body awareness, spatial awareness, movement, and perceptual motor functions. Guidelins for activity selection and adaptation are…

  2. Meiotic multivalent orientation and cell developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybenga, J; Hsiao, C; de Vries, J M

    1989-01-01

    In the heterozygote for the combination of an interchange (662W;3R/6R) and a Robertsonian split (3R) of rye, one type of adjacent orientation leads to trisomy in the progeny. Pollen mother cells with adjacent orientation of the translocation quinquivalent or with a trivalent and a bivalent were delayed in their development and appeared at prometaphase and metaphase later than cells with alternate quinquivalents. Delay in cell development is ascribed to unfavorable (early) prophase positioning of chromosomes.

  3. Delayed developmental language milestones in children with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrulnik, Shana E; Fee, Robert J; De Vivo, Darryl C; Goldstein, Edward; Hinton, Veronica J

    2007-05-01

    To document the attainment of developmental milestones in children with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) and to determine whether early delays are associated with later performance on measures of cognition. Retrospective parental report was utilized to document the acquisition of 10 common developmental milestones in children with DMD (n = 130) and their unaffected siblings (n = 59). Children completed tests of cognitive functioning. Parents rated children with DMD as delayed on achieving both language and motor milestones more frequently than their unaffected siblings. Furthermore, those children with DMD who were rated as late talkers or late walkers performed more poorly on tests of cognitive function than their on-time peers. In addition to the commonly reported delays in motor milestones, the current study documents delays in the acquisition of language milestones as well. These early delays are associated with significant impairments in later cognitive functioning.

  4. Maternal Communication Style with Developmentally Delayed Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcovitch, Sharon; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Videotaped interactions of 98 mother-child dyads (40 with Down syndrome, 23 with neurological problems, and 35 with delays of unknown etiology) were examined for mothers' language facilitation strategies (modeling or eliciting) in two situations (play and teaching). Mothers emphasized modeling strategies more than eliciting techniques. This…

  5. Developmental profiles of preschool children with delayed language development

    OpenAIRE

    Eun, Jeong Ji; Lee, Hyung Jik; Kim, Jin Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study examines changes in developmental profiles of children with language delay over time and the clinical significance of assessment conducted at age 2-3 years. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 70 children (62 male, 8 female), who had visited the hospital because of delayed language development at 2-3 years, and were reassessed at ages 5-6. Language and cognitive abilities were assessed using multiple scales at the initial and follow-up visits. Results...

  6. Correlation between high-risk pregnancy and developmental delay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The future development of children is considered more than ever now due to the advances in medical knowledge and thus the increase in survival rates of high-risk infants. This study investigated the correlation between high-risk pregnancy and developmental delay in children aged 4- 60 months. Methods: ...

  7. Developmentally Delayed Musical Savant's Sensitivity to Tonal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Leon K.

    1987-01-01

    A five-year-old developmentally delayed, musically gifted child with no formal musical training was asked to repeat passages on the piano. Analysis of responses to melodies in each of the 24 major and minor keys indicated sensitivity to aspects of diatonic structure exhibited by mature listeners. (Author)

  8. Developmental delay of infants and young children with and without ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    areas.3-6 Few studies have assessed developmental delay within ... FASD at two time periods, 7-12 months (N= 392; 45 FASD) and 17-21 months of age (N= 83, 35 FASD) were assessed ... high rates of poverty and maternal depression after childbirth, are ..... been shown to be amongst the strongest predictors of poor.

  9. Preeclampsia, placental insufficiency, and autism spectrum disorder or developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Cheryl K; Krakowiak, Paula; Baker, Alice; Hansen, Robin L; Ozonoff, Sally; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2015-02-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and many forms of developmental delay (DD) originate during fetal development. Preeclampsia may trigger aberrant neurodevelopment through placental, maternal, and fetal physiologic mechanisms. To determine whether preeclampsia is associated with ASD and/or DD. The Childhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment (CHARGE) study is a population-based, case-control investigation of ASD and/or DD origins. Children from 20 California counties aged 24 to 60 months at the time of recruitment and living in catchment areas with a biological parent fluent in English or Spanish were enrolled from January 29, 2003, through April 7, 2011. Children with ASD (n = 517) and DD (n = 194) were recruited through the California Department of Developmental Services, the Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (MIND) Institute, and referrals. Controls with typical development (TD) (n = 350) were randomly selected from birth records and frequency matched on age, sex, and broad geographic region. Physicians diagnosing preeclampsia were masked to neurodevelopmental outcome, and those assessing neurodevelopmental function were masked to preeclampsia status. Preeclampsia and placental insufficiency were self-reported and abstracted from medical records. The Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule and Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised were used to confirm ASD, whereas children with DD and TD were confirmed by Mullen Scales of Early Learning and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales and were free of autistic symptoms. Hypotheses were formulated before data collection. Children with ASD were twice as likely to have been exposed in utero to preeclampsia as controls with TD after adjustment for maternal educational level, parity, and prepregnancy obesity (adjusted odds ratio, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.18-4.68); risk increased with greater preeclampsia severity (test for trend, P = .02). Placental

  10. Growth and nutritional risk in children with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, C; Sharif, F; Glennon-Slattery, C

    2016-11-01

    Nutritional risk impacts outcome in developmental delay. The main objectives were to identify the incidence and factors contributing to growth faltering. Clinical data review was completed for 500 patients with developmental delay accepted to an Early Intervention service. Data was collected using the standardised parent nutrition screening checklist prior to and at time of initial dietary assessment. Data was compared to nutritional assessment data, GOSH and FSAI dietary guidelines. Weight category was determined using RCPCH growth and BMI charts. Statistical analysis was conducted using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 (IBM Statistics 20.0). Nutritional risk was identified in 48.6 %. Weight categories were growth faltering (13.5 %), underweight (7.7 %), overweight (8.4 %) and obesity (4.3 %) at initial assessment. Growth faltering was correlated with age nutritional risk in 22.7 % of those assessed. Nutritional difficulties were common: 4.2 % were enterally fed, 7.7 % were on prescribed nutritional supplements, 29.1 % (n = 121) had feeding difficulties and 13.9 % (n = 58) had behavioural feeding difficulties. Iron intake did not meet the recommended intake in 20.9 % (n = 87), calcium in 4.5 % (n = 19). The prevalence of constipation was 21.6, 11.8 % of whom required medical management. Developmental delay predisposes to nutritional deficits which influence outcome. Screening, assessment and timely interventions are warranted to prevent poorer developmental outcomes.

  11. Brain MR imaging in children with psychomotor developmental delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, Toshinori; Korogi, Yukunori; Sakamoto, Yuji; Furusawa, Mitsuhiro; Hamatake, Satoshi; Takahashi, Mutsumasa (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with developmental delay of unknown cause underwent MR imaging of the brain. Their ages ranged from 5 months to 22 years, with a mean of 2.2 years. Thirty-seven (71%) had positive MR findings, including nine with congenital malformation, nine with atrophy, six with white matter lesion, five with delayed myelination, five with atrophy and delayed myelination, two with acquired injury of corpus callosum, and one with ulegyria. Congenital malformations obtained included holoprosencephaly, polymicrogyria, dysgenesis of corpus callosum, hypoplasia of cerebellum, and tuberous sclerosis. Abnormal MR findings were frequently observed both in the children with neurologic physical findings and in generally retarded children, while in the children with suspected autism, MR imaging did not demonstrate any abnormalities. Of 24 patients with epilepsy, abnormal MR findings were obtained in 17 patients (71%). The frequency of white matter lesion and atrophy was slightly higher in the patients with epilepsy. However, no significant correlations were found between MR findings and the presence of epilepsy. Also, no significant correlations were obtained between MR findings and the degree of developmental quotient (DQ). Severely injured cases did not necessarily show abnormal findings on MRI. (author).

  12. Developmental delay at 12 months in children born extremely preterm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, Ane; Klamer, Anja; Jonsbo, Finn

    2005-01-01

    , Copenhagen, were interviewed by telephone when their child was 1 y of age, corrected for preterm birth. A fully structured questionnaire on psychomotor function was used (Revised Prescreening Developmental Questionnaire (R-PDQ)). The parents of 30 children born at term without complications were interviewed...... to use by staff and well accepted by parents. The mean score in the preterm group was 14.9+/-3.9 vs 17.7+/-2.7 in the term group (pdevelopmental scores below-2 SD. The R-PDQ score was associated with the ASQ score 2 y later. CONCLUSION: A structured questionnaire administrated...... by telephone is an alternative and usable tool for assessing neurodevelopmental deficit in children born extremely preterm. The mean developmental delay in the preterm group compared to the term group (about-1 SD) was close to expectations....

  13. Visual abilities in students with severe developmental delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welinder, Lotte G; Baggesen, Kirsten L

    Purpose:  To investigate the visual abilities of students with severe developmental delay (DD) age 6-8 starting in special needs education. Methods:  Between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2008, we screened all students with severe DD starting in special needs schools in Northern Jutland, Denmark....... The number of students with decreased vision identified by screening decreased significantly during the study period (r = 0.724, p = 0.028). The number of students needed to be screened to find one student with VI was 24 and to identify legal blindness 181 needed to be screened. Conclusion:  Visual...

  14. Coloboma hyperactive mutant exhibits delayed neurobehavioral developmental milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyser, C J; Wilson, M C; Gold, L H

    1995-11-21

    The coloboma mutation (Cm) is a neutron-irradiation induced gene deletion located on the distal portion of mouse chromosome 2. This deletion region includes a gene encoding the synaptic vesicle docking fusion protein, synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). The resulting mutation is semi-dominant with heterozygote mice exhibiting a triad of phenotypic abnormalities that comprise profound spontaneous hyperactivity, head bobbing and a prominent eye dysmorphology. Because the expression pattern of two SNAP-25 isoforms begins to change during the first postnatal week, neurobehavioral developmental milestones were examined in order to determine if the expression of the coloboma behavioral phenotype could be detected during this period of postnatal development. The early classification of coloboma mutant offspring may help to further describe the penetrance of this mutation as well as the contribution of developmental changes to the adult behavioral phenotype. The coloboma mutation resulted in delays in some tests of complex motor skills including righting reflex and bar holding. In addition, coloboma mutants were characterized by body weight differences (first appearance day 7) and hyperreactivity to touch (day 11) and head bobbing (day 14). These data demonstrate disruptions in the time course of attaining developmental milestones in coloboma mutants and provide further evidence supporting the hypotheses that alterations in Snap gene expression are associated with functional behavioral consequences in developing offspring.

  15. Musical stimulation in the developmentally delayed child: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, N L; Molnar, E T; Knasel, A L

    1987-08-01

    Music is a convenient way of bypassing barriers of communication and eliciting responses that may be helpful in the diagnoses and treatment of illness. The use of background music in elevators, in doctors' offices, and in stores are good examples of how music can be used to affect the subconscious mind. In this pilot study drums were used to better define the effects of particular elements of music and sound. When repetitive rhythms are presented as background music to a group of severely developmentally delayed children, three out of four subjects show a definite change in level of development in the unstructured task of free drawing. To discover more about the effects of the various elements of music and to better identify patterns in the environment that are conducive to optimal functioning, further studies are indicated.

  16. Developmental delays in preschool children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Erkan; Soylu, Nusret; Polat, Cahit; Sakallıoğlu, Öner; Uçur, Ömer; Bozdoğan, Gökçe

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of adenotonsillar hypertrophy on general development, as well as fine and gross motor capabilities, social communication, and language development in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy by applying the Denver Developmental Screening Test-II. The study included 30 patients (12 boys, 18 girls; mean age 53.3±12.2 months; range 32 to 72 months) who were indicated for adenotonsillectomy due to adenotonsillar hypertrophy between February 2013 and July 2013. The control group comprised 30 children participants (12 boys, 18 girls; mean age 53.1±12.8 months; range 32 to 72 months) with no adenotonsillectomy indication. All participants included in the study were performed routine physical examination, flexible fiberoptic nasopharyngoscopy, and tympanometry. Brodsky scale and fiberendoscopic findings were used to categorize tonsil and adenoid sizes, respectively. Following ear, nose, and throat evaluation, a psychologist conducted Denver Developmental Screening Test-II in all participants blindly. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy patients had higher abnormal levels of general development (c2=7.13, p=0.028). Although patients and controls had similar levels of fine motor, gross motor, and personal-social development levels, there was a statistically borderline difference between them in terms of language development (t=1.82, p=0.074). The possibility of adenotonsillar hypertrophy should definitely be considered in children with delayed general and language developments.

  17. Cognitive outcomes and familial stress after cochlear implantation in deaf children with and without developmental delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghalai, John S.; Caudle, Susan E.; Bentley, Barbara; Abaya, Homer; Lin, Jerry; Baker, Dian; Emery, Claudia; Bortfeld, Heather; Winzelberg, Jody

    2012-01-01

    Objective The benefits of cochlear implantation for children with developmental delays (DD) are often unclear. We compared cognition, adaptive behavior, familial stress, and communication in children with and without DD. Study Design Retrospective review Setting Two tertiary care pediatric hospitals Patients 204 children who underwent cochlear implantation assessed before and >1 year after implantation Main Outcome Measures The Mullen Scales of Early Learning (MSEL), Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS), Parental Stress Index (PSI), and Preschool Language Scale (PLS). Results We developed a specific definition of DD for hearing-impaired children based upon DSM-IV criteria for mental retardation; 60 children met the criteria for DD and 144 children did not. Prior to implantation, multiple linear regression demonstrated that children with DD had lower scores in every domain of the MSEL and VABS (p0.1) compared to children without DD. After implantation, children without DD demonstrated significant improvements in intelligence as measured by the MSEL, age-appropriate improvements in adaptive behavior as evaluated by the VABS, and their familial stress levels were not increased after cochlear implantation. In contrast, children with DD underwent implantation at a later age and demonstrated less comprehensive developmental improvements after cochlear implantation and higher stress levels. However, when the age differences were taken into account using multiple linear regression analyses, the differences between two cohorts were reduced. Conclusions These data indicate that our definition of DD is a reliable method of stratifying deaf children. While children with DD have a normal developmental rate of adaptive behavior after cochlear implantation, their developmental rate of intelligence is lower and they have higher stress levels than children without DD. However, our data suggest that if children with DD could be implanted as early as children without DD, their

  18. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in relation to autism and developmental delay: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessah Isaac

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs are flame retardants used widely and in increasing amounts in the U.S. over the last few decades. PBDEs and their metabolites cross the placenta and studies in rodents demonstrate neurodevelopmental toxicity from prenatal exposures. PBDE exposures occur both via breastfeeding and hand-to-mouth activities in small children. Methods Participants were 100 children from the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risk from Genetics and the Environment Study, a case-control epidemiologic investigation of children with autism/autism spectrum disorder, with developmental delay and from the general population. Diagnoses of autism were confirmed by the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule and Autism Diagnostic Inventory-Revised, and of developmental delay using the Mullen's Scales of Early Learning and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales. Typically developing controls were those with no evidence of delay, autism, or autism spectrum disorder. Eleven PBDE congeners were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry from serum specimens collected after children were assessed. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between plasma PBDEs and autism. Results Children with autism/autism spectrum disorder and developmental delay were similar to typically developing controls for all PBDE congeners, but levels were high for all three groups. Conclusions Plasma samples collected post-diagnosis in this study may not represent early life exposures due to changes in diet and introduction of new household products containing PBDEs. Studies with direct measurements of prenatal or infant exposures are needed to assess the possible causal role for these compounds in autism spectrum disorders.

  19. Sleep Problems and Early Developmental Delay: Implications for Early Intervention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuck, Karen; Grant, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disorders negatively impact behavior, cognition, and growth--the same areas targeted by early intervention. Conversely, developmental delays and disabilities may themselves precipitate sleep disorders. Young children with developmental delays experience sleep disorders at a higher rate than do typically developing children; the most common…

  20. An operant procedure for improving vocabulary definition performances in developmentally delayed children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, A W; Montague, J; Farb, J; Throne, J M

    1980-02-01

    This report describes a training program in which operant procedures were used to improve the identification and definition of selected vocabulary words in three developmentally delayed children. Generalization from the training words was well established, as determined by responses to untrained vocabulary performance words. The results of this procedure suggest its application with other developmentally delayed children.

  1. Child Care Providers' Competence and Confidence in Referring Children at Risk for Developmental Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Diane; Bingham, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Despite the benefits of early intervention for children, the majority of children with developmental delays are not identified prior to the age of 5 years. Child care providers could aid in recognition of children at risk for developmental delays; however, there is little research on this topic. This article reports on a qualitative research study…

  2. Developmental delays in emotion regulation strategies in preschoolers with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuske, Heather J; Hedley, Darren; Woollacott, Alexandra; Thomson, Phoebe; Macari, Suzanne; Dissanayake, Cheryl

    2017-11-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) commonly present with difficulty regulating negative emotions, which has been found to impact their behavioral and mental health. Little research has documented the strategies that children with ASD use to regulate their emotion to understand whether they use qualitatively different strategies to children without ASD, whether these are developmentally delayed, or both. Forty-four children with ASD and 29 typically-developing children (2-4 years) were given tasks designed to mimic everyday life experiences requiring children to manage low-level stress (e.g., waiting for a snack) and children's emotion regulation strategies were coded. Parents reported on their child's mental health, wellbeing, and self-development. The results suggest differences in using emotion regulation strategies in children with ASD, reflecting a delay, rather than a deviance when compared to those used by children without ASD. Only children with ASD relied on their family members for physical and communicative soothing; the typically developing children relied on people outside of their family for help regulating their emotion. More frequent approach/less frequent avoidance was related to a higher self-evaluation in both groups, but was only additionally related to higher self-recognition and autonomy in the ASD group. These findings help to identify important emotion regulation intervention targets for this population, including supporting communication with people outside of the family and independence. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1808-1822. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Results suggest that children with autism had more difficulty using communication strategies to manage stress only with people outside the family; they used these strategies with family members as often as children without autism. For all children, more task approach/less avoidance was related to children's higher self-evaluation. These

  3. Effects of Risperidone and Parent Training on Adaptive Functioning in Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders and Serious Behavioral Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Lawrence; McDougle, Christopher J.; Aman, Michael G.; Johnson, Cynthia; Handen, Benjamin; Bearss, Karen; Dziura, James; Butter, Eric; Swiezy, Naomi G.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Stigler, Kimberly A.; Sukhodolsky, Denis D.; Lecavalier, Luc; Pozdol, Stacie L.; Nikolov, Roumen; Hollway, Jill A.; Korzekwa, Patricia; Gavaletz, Allison; Kohn, Arlene E.; Koenig, Kathleen; Grinnon, Stacie; Mulick, James A.; Yu, Sunkyung; Vitiello, Benedetto

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDDs) have social interaction deficits, delayed communication, and repetitive behaviors as well as impairments in adaptive functioning. Many children actually show a decline in adaptive skills compared with age mates over time. Method: This 24-week, three-site, controlled clinical trial…

  4. CDK10 Mutations in Humans and Mice Cause Severe Growth Retardation, Spine Malformations, and Developmental Delays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windpassinger, Christian; Piard, Juliette; Bonnard, Carine; Alfadhel, Majid; Lim, Shuhui; Bisteau, Xavier; Blouin, Stéphane; Ali, Nur'Ain B.; Ng, Alvin Yu Jin; Lu, Hao; Tohari, Sumanty; Talib, S. Zakiah A.; van Hul, Noémi; Caldez, Matias J.; van Maldergem, Lionel; Yigit, Gökhan; Kayserili, Hülya; Youssef, Sameh A.; Coppola, Vincenzo; de Bruin, Alain; Tessarollo, Lino; Choi, Hyungwon; Rupp, Verena; Roetzer, Katharina; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Altmüller, Janine; Roy, Sudipto; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Ganger, Rudolf; Grill, Franz; Ben Chehida, Farid; Wollnik, Bernd; Altunoglu, Umut; Al Kaissi, Ali; Reversade, Bruno; Kaldis, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    In five separate families, we identified nine individuals affected by a previously unidentified syndrome characterized by growth retardation, spine malformation, facial dysmorphisms, and developmental delays. Using homozygosity mapping, array CGH, and exome sequencing, we uncovered bi-allelic

  5. Mutations in TRNT1 cause congenital sideroblastic anemia with immunodeficiency, fevers, and developmental delay (SIFD)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chakraborty, Pranesh K; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Kennedy, Erin K; Mamady, Hapsatou; Naas, Turaya; Durie, Danielle; Campagna, Dean R; Lau, Ashley; Sendamarai, Anoop K; Wiseman, Daniel H; May, Alison; Jolles, Stephen; Connor, Philip; Powell, Colin; Heeney, Matthew M; Giardina, Patricia-Jane; Klaassen, Robert J; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Thuret, Isabelle; Thompson, Alexis A; Marques, Laura; Hughes, Stephen; Bonney, Denise K; Bottomley, Sylvia S; Wynn, Robert F; Laxer, Ronald M; Minniti, Caterina P; Moppett, John; Bordon, Victoria; Geraghty, Michael; Joyce, Paul B M; Markianos, Kyriacos; Rudner, Adam D; Holcik, Martin; Fleming, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    ... in the pathogenesis of the congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs). We recently described a syndromic form of CSA associated with B-cell immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and developmental delay (SIFD...

  6. Ptosis of eyelids, strabismus, diastasis recti, hip defect, cryptorchidism, and developmental delay in two sibs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, F; Krajewska, G; Fischetto, R; Greco, M G; Bonvino, A

    1989-06-01

    We report a distinct syndrome of eyelid ptosis, convergent strabismus, abdominal muscle defect, hip dislocation, cryptorchidism and developmental delay in two brothers. Consanguinity in their parents suggests autosomal recessive inheritance.

  7. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in developmentally delayed young boys with or without autism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.; Grond, J. van der; Daalen, E. van; Buitelaar, J.K.; Engeland, H. van

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study is to investigate whether brain metabolism of boys with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is altered compared to boys with a developmental delay without autism if corrected for patient age and developmental level. STUDY DESIGN: 25 boys with ASD (with or without

  8. Parent-Implemented Language Interventions for Children with a Developmental Delay: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Os, D.; Jongmans, M.J.; Volman, M.J.M.; Lauteslager, P.

    2017-01-01

    Young children with a developmental delay (DD) show significant delays in communication and language development. Although several parent-implemented language intervention programs have been developed to facilitate the communication and language abilities of children with a DD, no systematic review

  9. Discrimination Acquisition in Children with Developmental Disabilities under Immediate and Delayed Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Jolene R.; Vollmer, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the discrimination acquisition of individuals with developmental disabilities under immediate and delayed reinforcement. In Experiment 1, discrimination between two alternatives was examined when reinforcement was immediate or delayed by 20 s, 30 s, or 40 s. In Experiment 2, discrimination between 2 alternatives was compared across an…

  10. Delayed processing of global shape in developmental prosopagnosia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian; Klargaard, Solja K.; Starrfelt, Randi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There is accumulating evidence suggesting that the central deficit in developmental prosopagnosia (DP), a disorder characterized by lifelong difficulties with face recognition, concerns impaired holistic processing. Some of this evidence comes from studies using Navon's paradigm where...

  11. Delayed axonal pruning in the ant brain: a study of developmental trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seid, Marc A; Wehner, Rüdiger

    2009-05-01

    The coordination of neuronal maturation and behavioral development is a vital component of survival. The degradation of excessive axonal processes and neuronal networks is a ubiquitous developmental process. In Drosophila, a great portion of axonal pruning occurs during metamorphosis and transpires within hours after pupation. In contrast, we show, using EM-serial sectioning and 3D-reconstructions, that axonal pruning occurs after eclosion and over the course of 60 days in Cataglyphis albicans. Using the mushroom bodies of the brains of Cataglyphis, which have well-developed lip (olfactory integrator) and collar (visual integrator) regions, we show that axonal pruning is dependent upon the differences in the developmental trajectory of the lip and the collar brain regions and happens after eclosion. The elimination of the axonal boutons is most delayed in the collar region, where it is postponed until the ant has had extensive visual experience. We found that individual brain components within a single neuropil can develop at different rates that correlate with the behavioral ecology of these ants and suggest that glia may be mediating the axonal pruning. Our study provides evidence that adult ants may have relatively neotenous brains, and thus more flexibility, allowing them to neuronally adapt to the environment. This neoteny may, in part, explain the neural basis for age-dependent division of labor and the amazing behavioral flexibility exhibited by ants.

  12. The social context of parenting 3-year-old children with developmental delay in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, E; Graham, H; McCulloch, A; Blacher, J; Hatton, C; Llewellyn, G

    2009-01-01

    Children with intellectual or developmental disability have significantly poorer health and mental health than their non-disabled peers and are at high risk of social exclusion. The aim of the present paper is to provide information on the circumstances in which 3-year-old children at risk of intellectual or developmental disability are growing up in the UK. Secondary analysis of data on 12 689 families in English-speaking monolingual households from the first two waves of the UK's Millennium Cohort Study. A total of 440 children (3% of the weighted sample) were identified as being developmentally delayed. When compared with other children, children with developmental delays were more disadvantaged on every indicator of social and economic disadvantage examined. Two out of three children with developmental delays had been exposed to repeated disadvantage as measured by income poverty, material hardship, social housing and receipt of means-tested benefits. The effect of repeated disadvantage on the risk of developmental delay remained after account was taken of parental education and occupational status. Young children with delayed development in the UK are likely to be exposed to repeated socio-economic disadvantage. Implications for policy and understanding the nature of the link between poverty and child disability are discussed.

  13. The differences in clinical aspect between specific language impairment and global developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Woo; Jeon, Ha Ra; Park, Eun Ji; Chung, Hee Jung; Song, Jung Eun

    2014-12-01

    To compare and analyze the clinical characteristics of children with delayed language acquisition due to two different diagnoses, which were specific language impairment (SLI, a primarily delayed language development) and global developmental delay (GDD, a language delay related to cognitive impairment). Among 1,598 children who had visited the developmental delay clinic from March 2005 to February 2011, 467 children who were diagnosed with GDD and 183 children who were diagnosed with SLI were included in this study. All children were questioned about past, family, and developmental history, and their language competences and cognitive function were assessed. Some children got electroencephalography (EEG), in case of need. The presence of the perinatal risk factors showed no difference in two groups. In the children with GDD, they had more delayed acquisition of independent walking and more frequent EEG abnormalities compared with the children with SLI (planguage development was more prevalent in children with SLI (planguage ability, the quotient of receptive language and expressive language did not show any meaningful statistical differences between the two groups. Analyzing in each group, the receptive language quotient was higher than expressive language quotient in both group (planguage delay could not differentiate between SLI and GDD. The clinicians needed to be aware of these developmental issues, and history taking and clinical evaluation, including cognitive assessment, could be helpful to diagnose adequately and set the treatment plan for each child.

  14. Developmental adaptations to gravity in animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, Alan R.

    1991-01-01

    Terrestrial animals have adapted to a constant gravitational stress over millions of years. Tissues of the cardiovascular system and lumbar spine in tall species of animals such as the giraffe are particularly well adapted to high and variable vectors of gravitational force. Swelling of the leg tissues in the giraffe is prevented by a variety of physiological mechanisms including (1) a natural 'antigravity suit', (2) impermeable capillaries, (3) arterial-wall hypertrophy, (4) variable blood pressures during normal activity, and (5) a large-capacity lymphatic system. These adaptations, as well as a natural hypertension, maintain blood perfusion to the giraffe's brain. The intervertebral disk is another tissue that is uniquely adapted to gravitational stress. Tall and large terrestrial animals have higher swelling pressures than their smaller or aquatic counterparts. Finally, the meniscus of the rabbit knee provides information on the effects of aging and load-bearing on cartilaginous tissues. Such tissues within the joints of animals are important for load-bearing on Earth; these connective tissues may degenerate during long-duration space flight.

  15. Correlation between high-risk pregnancy and developmental delay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-21

    Sep 21, 2012 ... reproductive history (the recent pregnancy and pre- vious ones). Other information was collected from pregnancy medical reports based on the designed checklist. The developmental status of children was measured in five areas using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire. This questionnaire has been used ...

  16. Radiological findings in autistic and developmentally delayed children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.; Grond, J. van der; Durston, S.; Nievelstein, R.J.; Witkamp, T.; Daalen, E. van; Buitelaar, J.K.; Engeland, H.V.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of brain abnormalities in a group of young children with developmental disorders, specifically including children that came to the attention of a child psychiatrist before the age of 3 years. METHODS: Forty-five children participated in

  17. Delayed Developmental Language Milestones in Children with Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrulnik, Shana E.; Fee, Robert J.; De Vivo, Darryl C.; Goldstein, Edward; Hinton, Veronica J.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To document the attainment of developmental milestones in children with Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy (DMD) and to determine whether early delays are associated with later performance on measures of cognition. Study design Retrospective parental report was utilized to document the acquisition of 10 common developmental milestones in children with DMD (n = 130) and their unaffected siblings (n = 59). Children completed tests of cognitive functioning. Results Parents rated children with DMD as delayed on achieving both language and motor milestones more frequently than their unaffected siblings. Furthermore, those children with DMD who were rated as late talkers or late walkers performed more poorly on tests of cognitive function than their on-time peers. Conclusions In addition to the commonly reported delays in motor milestones, the current study documents delays in the acquisition of language milestones as well. These early delays are associated with significant impairments in later cognitive functioning. PMID:17452219

  18. Correlation between high-risk pregnancy and developmental delay in children aged 4–60 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Amiri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The future development of children is considered more than ever now due to the advances in medical knowledge and thus the increase in survival rates of high-risk infants. This study investigated the correlation between high-risk pregnancy and developmental delay in children aged 4–60 months. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on 401 mothers and their children (4–60 months who visited health service centers affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, in 2011. Sampling was carried out in several stages, and the Ages and Stage Questionnaire was completed by the participants. Data were analyzed with SPSS 18 software and independent t-test; Mann-Whitney and logistic-regression tests were used. Results: The average age of children in the low-risk pregnancy group was 22±16 months, and that in the high-risk pregnancy group was 18.9±14.8 months. The majority of children were female (53.1%. The prevalence of high-risk pregnancies was 80.5%, and the prevalence of developmental delay was 18.7%. Multiple pregnancies, low birth weight, habitual abortions, maternal medical disorders in pregnancy, and gestational diabetes had significant correlations with developmental delay in children (P<0.04. In the logistic model, male gender, low birth weight, family marriage, and maternal medical disorders during pregnancy showed significant correlations with developmental delay in children (P<0.05. Additionally, abnormal body mass index (BMI and social and economic status showed probability values close to the significance level (P = 0.05, whereas other high-risk pregnancy variables had no correlation with developmental delay in children. A correlation between high-risk pregnancy and developmental delay (P = 0.002 and fine motor delay was observed (P = 0.02, but no correlation was observed between high-risk pregnancy and other developmental domains. Conclusion: This study showed that some high-risk pregnancy variables had a

  19. When Do Adaptive Developmental Mechanisms Yield Maladaptive Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenhuis, Willem E.; Del Giudice, Marco

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses 3 ways in which adaptive developmental mechanisms may produce maladaptive outcomes. First, natural selection may favor risky strategies that enhance fitness on average but which have detrimental consequences for a subset of individuals. Second, mismatch may result when organisms experience environmental change during…

  20. Delayed processing of global shape information in developmental prosopagnosia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian; Klargaard, Solja K.; Petersen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence suggesting that a central deficit in developmental prosopagnosia (DP), a disorder characterized by profound and lifelong difficulties with face recognition, concerns impaired holistic processing. Some of this evidence comes from studies using Navon’s paradigm where...... individuals with DP in Navon’s paradigm we find evidence of a reduced global precedence effect: The DPs are slower than controls to process global but not local shape information. Importantly, and in contrast to previous studies, we demonstrate that the DPs perform normally in a comprehensive test of visual...

  1. Environmental Enrichment Decreases Asphyxia-Induced Neurobehavioral Developmental Delay in Neonatal Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kiss

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal asphyxia during delivery produces long-term disability and represents a major problem in neonatal and pediatric care. Numerous neuroprotective approaches have been described to decrease the effects of perinatal asphyxia. Enriched environment is a popular strategy to counteract nervous system injuries. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether enriched environment is able to decrease the asphyxia-induced neurobehavioral developmental delay in neonatal rats. Asphyxia was induced in ready-to-deliver mothers by removing the pups by caesarian section after 15 min of asphyxia. Somatic and neurobehavioral development was tested daily and motor coordination weekly. Our results show that rats undergoing perinatal asphyxia had a marked developmental delay and worse performance in motor coordination tests. However, pups kept in enriched environment showed a decrease in the developmental delay observed in control asphyctic pups. Rats growing up in enriched environment did not show decrease in weight gain after the first week and the delay in reflex appearance was not as marked as in control rats. In addition, the development of motor coordination was not as strikingly delayed as in the control group. Short-term neurofunctional outcome are known to correlate with long-term deficits. Our results thus show that enriched environment could be a powerful strategy to decrease the deleterious developmental effects of perinatal asphyxia.

  2. Early Intervention with Developmentally Delayed Infants and Preschool Children in Newfoundland and Labrador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfo, Kofi; And Others

    A study of Newfoundland's and Labrador's Direct Home Services Program (DHSP) for families of developmentally delayed infants and preschool-age children evaluated current efforts and obtained data for use in the development of strategies for future interventions. The study had six purposes: (1) to examine parents' early experiences pertaining to…

  3. Maternal Directiveness in Interactions with Developmentally Delayed Children: A Correlational Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfo, Kofi

    Interactions between 25 mothers and their developmentally delayed children (ages 2-5) during 15 minutes of semi-structured free play were coded independently with a global rating scale and a behavior count coding scheme. Correlational analyses were performed around three central themes: (1) the nature of the relationship between maternal…

  4. The Friendships of Young Children with Developmental Delays: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guralnick, Michael J.; Neville, Brian; Hammond, Mary A.; Connor, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the social interactions of children with mild developmental (cognitive) delays with friends across the early childhood and early elementary years. Results revealed increases in many forms of social exchange with effect sizes in the moderate range, but no changes in sustained interactive play. Social interaction…

  5. Developmental Delay in Moderately Preterm-Born Children with Low Socioeconomic Status : Risks Multiply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potijk, Marieke R; Kerstjens, Jorien M; Bos, Arend F; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; de Winter, Andrea F

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess separate and joint effects of low socioeconomic status (SES) and moderate prematurity on preschool developmental delay. Study design Prospective cohort study with a community-based sample of preterm-and term-born children (Longitudinal Preterm Outcome Project). We assessed SES on

  6. Plantar lipomatosis, unusual facies, and developmental delay : Confirmation of Pierpont syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudesluijs, GG; Hordijk, R; Boon, M; Sijens, PE; Hennekam, RCM

    2005-01-01

    In 1998, Pierpont et al. reported on two unrelated boys with plantar lipomatosis, unusual facial phenotype, and developmental delay as a possible new MR/MCA syndrome. Here we report on a 2-year-old boy with similar manifestations: axial hypotonia in the first few months, prolonged feeding problems,

  7. Emotion Discourse, Social Cognition, and Social Skills in Children with and without Developmental Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenning, Rachel M.; Baker, Bruce L.; Juvonen, Jaana

    2011-01-01

    This study examined parent-child emotion discourse, children's independent social information processing, and social skills outcomes in 146 families of 8-year-olds with and without developmental delays. Children's emergent social-cognitive understanding (internal state understanding, perspective taking, and causal reasoning and problem solving)…

  8. Microarray as a First Genetic Test in Global Developmental Delay: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakadis, Yannis; Shevell, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Microarray technology has a significantly higher clinical yield than karyotyping in individuals with global developmental delay (GDD). Despite this, it has not yet been routinely implemented as a screening test owing to the perception that this approach is more expensive. We aimed to evaluate the effect that replacing karyotype with…

  9. Effects of Parent-based Video Home Training in children with developmental language delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balkom, L.J.M. van; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Weerdenburg, M.W.C. van; Stoep, J.M.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    An efficacy study of an indirect or Parent-based intervention programme involving Video Home Training (PVHT) was conducted with a focus on parental strategies to (re-)establish coherence in conversations between young children with Developmental Language Delay (DLD) and their parents or caregivers.

  10. Maternal and pregnancy-related factors associated with developmental delay in moderately preterm-born children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstjens, Jorien M; de Winter, Andrea F; Sollie, Krystyna M; Bocca-Tjeertes, Inger F; Potijk, Marieke R; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Bos, Arend F

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the association between preexisting maternal and pregnancy-related factors and developmental delay in early childhood in moderately preterm-born children. METHODS: We measured development with the Ages and Stages Questionnaire at age 43-49 months in 834 moderately preterm-born

  11. Early Language Patterns of Toddlers on the Autism Spectrum Compared to Toddlers with Developmental Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis Weismer, Susan; Lord, Catherine; Esler, Amy

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized early language abilities in toddlers with autism spectrum disorders (n = 257) using multiple measures of language development, compared to toddlers with non-spectrum developmental delay (DD, n = 69). Findings indicated moderate to high degrees of agreement among three assessment measures (one parent report and two direct…

  12. Marital Satisfaction, Parental Stress, and Child Behavior Problems among Parents of Young Children with Developmental Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Merideth; Neece, Cameron L.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have found that low marital satisfaction, parenting stress, and child behavior problems are linked in families of children with developmental delays (DD). However, previous investigations examining the relationships between parenting stress, child behavior problems, and marital satisfaction rarely examine the interrelationships of these…

  13. Limited access to special education services for school-aged children with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twardzik, Erica; Smit, Ellen; Hatfield, Bridget; Odden, Michelle C; Dixon-Ibarra, Alicia; MacDonald, Megan

    2018-01-01

    Current policy in Oregon limits eligibility of children diagnosed with developmental delay for school-based services. Due to eligibility definitions, children with developmental delay may face additional barriers transitioning from early intervention/early childhood special education into school-based special education services. Examine the relationship between enrollment in school-based special education programs given a change in primary disability diagnosis. Logistic regression models were fit for children who enrolled in early intervention/early childhood special education services with a primary disability diagnosis of developmental delay and changed primary disability diagnosis before third grade (n=5076). Odds of enrollment in future special education were greater in children with a change in primary disability diagnosis after the age of five in comparison to children that had a change in primary disability diagnosis before the age of five, while adjusting for demographic characteristics (adjusted odds ratio: 2.37, 95% CI 1.92, 2.92). Results suggest that children who are diagnosed with a developmental delay and exit early childhood special education due to maximum age of eligibility are more likely to enroll in special education compared to children without a gap in service access. Gaps in service access during early development are associated with the need for supportive services later on in life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Formula Switch Leads to Enteral Feeding Tolerance Improvements in Children With Developmental Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Minor MMS, PA-C

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children with developmental delays are often dependent on enteral nutrition. The aim of our study was to evaluate improvement in tolerance parameters in these children who were switched from an intact protein formula to a 100% whey, peptide-based formula. Methods: A retrospective chart review of children with developmental delays who were failing to reach adequate nutritional goals on standard polymeric formulas were switched to a 100% whey peptide-based formula. Enteral volume goals, caloric goals, and change in medication used to improve feeding tolerance were assessed before and after formula switch. Results: Medical records of 13 children (aged 8.4 ± 4.6 years met criteria. All children had a primary diagnosis of developmental delay, and 77% were fed via gastrostomy tube. Of the 13 children assessed, 92% experienced improved feeding tolerance, and 75% of these reported the time to improvement within 1 week after formula switch. Feeding tolerance parameters that improved were vomiting (86%, gagging and retching (75%, high residual volumes (63%, constipation (43%, diarrhea (100%, and poor weight gain (100%. Conclusion: Switching to a 100% whey, peptide-based formula improved symptoms of feeding intolerance in the majority of these developmentally delayed children.

  15. Formula Switch Leads to Enteral Feeding Tolerance Improvements in Children With Developmental Delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Gerard; Ochoa, Juan B; Storm, Heidi; Periman, Seletha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with developmental delays are often dependent on enteral nutrition. The aim of our study was to evaluate improvement in tolerance parameters in these children who were switched from an intact protein formula to a 100% whey, peptide-based formula. Methods: A retrospective chart review of children with developmental delays who were failing to reach adequate nutritional goals on standard polymeric formulas were switched to a 100% whey peptide-based formula. Enteral volume goals, caloric goals, and change in medication used to improve feeding tolerance were assessed before and after formula switch. Results: Medical records of 13 children (aged 8.4 ± 4.6 years) met criteria. All children had a primary diagnosis of developmental delay, and 77% were fed via gastrostomy tube. Of the 13 children assessed, 92% experienced improved feeding tolerance, and 75% of these reported the time to improvement within 1 week after formula switch. Feeding tolerance parameters that improved were vomiting (86%), gagging and retching (75%), high residual volumes (63%), constipation (43%), diarrhea (100%), and poor weight gain (100%). Conclusion: Switching to a 100% whey, peptide-based formula improved symptoms of feeding intolerance in the majority of these developmentally delayed children.

  16. Preschool Children with and without Developmental Delay: Risk, Parenting, and Child Demandingness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mallory A.; McIntyre, Laura Lee; Crnic, Keith A.; Baker, Bruce L.; Blacher, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Although past literature has established relations between early child risk factors, negative parenting, and problematic child behavior, the nature of these interrelations and pathways of influence over time remains largely unknown, especially in children with developmental delays or disabilities. In the current study, data were drawn from the…

  17. Facilitating prelinguistic communication skills in young children with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, S F; Yoder, P J; Gazdag, G E; Kim, K; Jones, H A

    1993-02-01

    Very little research has focused on the development and evaluation of intervention strategies designed to facilitate the acquisition of prelinguistic communication skills. We conducted two experiments to determine the effects of a milieu teaching approach on the acquisition and generalization of specific prelinguistic communication skills. In the first experiment, we utilized this intervention approach within a multiple baseline design to teach prelinguistic requesting, commenting, and vocal imitation to a single subject with Down syndrome and language delay. The results indicated that the intervention approach was effective at facilitating the child's use of these skills within the treatment setting. Therefore, in the second experiment we conducted a more comprehensive analysis of this approach with 4 subjects with mental retardation. Three of these subjects were taught to request, and 1 subject was taught both to request and to comment. The effects were experimentally evaluated with multiple baseline across subjects design. The results indicated that the intervention was effective in eliciting the intervention targets within the training setting for all 4 subjects. All 4 subjects showed evidence of generalization across stimulus materials, setting, teachers, and interaction style. There was also evidence of reciprocal effects on how classroom teachers in the generalization setting interacted with the subjects as a result of changes in the child's communication behavior.

  18. Developmentally Delayed Male with Mincer Blade Obstructing the Oesophagus for a Period of Time Suspected to Be 6 Months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian Grønhøj; Charabi, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Sharp, retained foreign bodies in the oesophagus are associated with severe complications. Developmentally delayed patients are especially subject to foreign objects. We describe a 37-year-old, developmentally delayed male with a mincer blade obstructing the oesophagus. Six months p...

  19. The effects of early positive parenting and developmental delay status on child emotion dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norona, A N; Baker, B L

    2017-02-01

    Emotion regulation has been identified as a robust predictor of adaptive functioning across a variety of domains (Aldao et al. ). Furthermore, research examining early predictors of competence and deficits in ER suggests that factors internal to the individual (e.g. neuroregulatory reactivity, behavioural traits and cognitive ability) and external to the individual (e.g. caregiving styles and explicit ER training) contribute to the development of ER (Calkins ). Many studies have focused on internal sources or external sources; however, few have studied them simultaneously within one model, especially in studies examining children with developmental delays (DD). Here, we addressed this specific research gap and examined the contributions of one internal factor and one external factor on emotion dysregulation outcomes in middle childhood. Specifically, our current study used structural equation modelling (SEM) to examine prospective, predictive relationships between DD status, positive parenting at age 4 years and child emotion dysregulation at age 7 years. Participants were 151 families in the Collaborative Family Study, a longitudinal study of young children with and without DD. A positive parenting factor was composed of sensitivity and scaffolding scores from mother-child interactions at home and in the research centre at child age 4 years. A child dysregulation factor was composed of a dysregulation code from mother-child interactions and a parent-report measure of ER and lability/negativity at age 7 years. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that positive parenting would mediate the relationship between DD and child dysregulation. Mothers of children with DD exhibited fewer sensitive and scaffolding behaviours compared with mothers of typically developing children, and children with DD were more dysregulated on all measures of ER. SEM revealed that both DD status and early positive parenting predicted emotion dysregulation in middle childhood. Furthermore

  20. Chronic Lung Disease and Developmental Delay at 2 Years of Age in Children Born Before 28 Weeks' Gestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughon, Matthew; O'Shea, Michael T.; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Bose, Carl; Kuban, Karl; Van Marter, Linda J.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Leviton, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Extremely low gestational age newborns (ELGANs) are at increased risk of chronic lung disease (CLD) and of developmental delay. Some studies have suggested that CLD contributes to developmental delay. Patients and Methods We examined data collected prospectively on 915 infants born before the 28th week of gestation in 2002–2004 who were assessed at 24 months of age with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-2nd Edition or the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales. We excluded infants who were not able to walk independently (Gross Motor Function Classification System score mechanical ventilation (MV) (CLD without MV) or receiving MV (CLD with MV). Results Forty-nine percent of ELGANs had CLD; of these, 14% were receiving MV at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. ELGANs without CLD had the lowest risk of a Mental Developmental Index (MDI) or a Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) of <55, followed by ELGANs with CLD not receiving MV, and ELGANs with CLD receiving MV (9%, 12%, and 18% for the MDI and 7%, 10%, and 20% for the PDI, respectively). In time-oriented multivariate models, the risk of an MDI of <55 was associated with the following variables: gestational age of <25 weeks; single mother; late bacteremia; pneumothorax; and necrotizing enterocolitis. The risk of a PDI of <55 was associated with variables such as single mother, a complete course of antenatal corticosteroids, early and persistent pulmonary dysfunction, pulmonary deterioration during the second postnatal week, pneumothorax, and pulmonary interstitial emphysema. CLD, without or with MV, was not associated with the risk of either a low MDI or a low PDI. However, CLD with MV approached, but did not achieve, nominal statistical significance (odds ratio: 1.9 [95% confidence interval: 0.97–3.9]) for the association with a PDI of <55. Conclusions Among children without severe gross motor delays, risk factors for CLD account for the association between CLD and developmental delay. Once those

  1. The relationship of early communication concerns to developmental delay and symptoms of autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turygin, Nicole; Matson, Johnny L; Konst, Matthew; Williams, Lindsey

    2013-08-01

    Parental concerns related to communication are an oft-cited reason that children present to early intervention clinics. We examine the relationship between early communication first concerns (FCs) and symptoms of ASD. The present study included 3173 toddlers at risk for developmental delay. The Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd edition and the Baby and Infant Screen for Children with aUtIsm Traits (BISCUIT) were used to examine developmental quotient scores and autism symptoms. Significant results were observed with respect to FC group and gender. A significant effect of FC-Communication group was observed with respect to developmental quotient overall and subscale scores, as well as autism symptom scores. Those with communication disorders are a heterogeneous population and do not account for all children who will meet criteria for a diagnosis of an ASD.

  2. Parenting stress and psychological functioning among mothers of preschool children with autism and developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Annette; Munson, Jeffrey; Dawson, Geraldine; Koehler, Elizabeth; Zhou, Xiao-Hua; Abbott, Robert

    2009-07-01

    Parents of children with developmental disabilities, particularly autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), are at risk for high levels of distress. The factors contributing to this are unclear. This study investigated how child characteristics influence maternal parenting stress and psychological distress. Participants consisted of mothers and developmental-age matched preschool-aged children with ASD (N = 51) and developmental delay without autism (DD) ( N = 22). Evidence for higher levels of parenting stress and psychological distress was found in mothers in the ASD group compared to the DD group. Children's problem behavior was associated with increased parenting stress and psychological distress in mothers in the ASD and DD groups. This relationship was stronger in the DD group. Daily living skills were not related to parenting stress or psychological distress. Results suggest clinical services aiming to support parents should include a focus on reducing problem behaviors in children with developmental disabilities.

  3. Menstrual suppression with the levonorgestrel intrauterine system in girls with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillard, Paula J Adams

    2012-10-01

    To describe the experiences of 21 girls with developmental delay accompanied by multiple other medical problems, seen over a 3-year interval, who underwent insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) for menstrual suppression. Retrospective chart review. A referral pediatric and adolescent gynecology clinic within a tertiary care medical center with referrals from community pediatricians, pediatric subspecialists including developmental and behavioral pediatricians, community gynecologists, and adolescent medicine specialists. Adolescents and young women with developmental delay and multiple comorbid conditions who were seen for consultation with their families requesting menstrual suppression. Participants were offered hormonal options, for menstrual suppression including the LNG-IUS. Satisfaction with menstrual suppression among families electing the LNG-IUS. Adolescents and young women seen at CCHMC with developmental delay and multiple comorbid conditions with requests for menstrual suppression were offered hormonal options, including the LNG-IUS. Twenty-one families chose this option. Fifteen of 21 girls had previously used hormonal menstrual suppression. General anesthesia was required for 20 of 21 insertions, and 9 of 20 of these insertions were combined with other surgical procedures. There were no unsuccessful insertions or major complications. Mean duration of follow-up was 11 months, and families were satisfied with this option for menstrual suppression. There was 1 request for removal. LNG-IUS for menstrual suppression, in girls with developmental delay and multiple comorbid medical conditions for which amenorrhea is desirable and therapeutic, appears promising. Copyright © 2012 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Facilitating relational framing in children and individuals with developmental delay using the relational completion procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sinead; Horgan, Jennifer; May, Richard J; Dymond, Simon; Whelan, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Relational Completion Procedure is effective for establishing same, opposite and comparative derived relations in verbally able adults, but to date it has not been used to establish relational frames in young children or those with developmental delay. In Experiment 1, the Relational Completion Procedure was used with the goal of establishing two 3-member sameness networks in nine individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (eight with language delay). A multiple exemplar intervention was employed to facilitate derived relational responding when required. Seven of nine participants in Experiment 1 passed tests for derived relations. In Experiment 2, eight participants (all of whom, except one, had a verbal repertoire) were given training with the aim of establishing two 4-member sameness networks. Three of these participants were typically developing young children aged between 5 and 6 years old, all of whom demonstrated derived relations, as did four of the five participants with developmental delay. These data demonstrate that it is possible to reliably establish derived relations in young children and those with developmental delay using an automated procedure. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  5. Oral Health Characteristics and Dental Rehabilitation of Children with Global Developmental Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Global developmental delay (GDD is a chronic neurological disturbance which includes defects in one or more developmental domains. The developmental domain can be motor, cognitive, daily activities, speech or language, and social or personal development. The etiology for GDD can be prenatal, perinatal, or postnatal. It can be diagnosed early in childhood as the delay or absence of one or more developmental milestones. Hence the role of pedodontist and pediatricians becomes more crucial in identifying this condition. The diagnosis of GDD requires a detailed history including family history and environmental risk factors followed by physical and neurological examinations. Investigations for GDD include diagnostic laboratory tests, brain imaging, and other evidence-based evaluations. GDD affects multiple developmental domains that not only have direct bearing on maintenance of oral health, but also require additional behavior management techniques to deliver optimal dental care. This paper describes two different spectra of children with GDD. Since the severity of GDD can vary, this paper also discusses the different behavior management techniques that were applied to provide dental treatment in such children.

  6. Developmental and adaptive functioning in children with retinoblastoma: a longitudinal investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Victoria W; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Chen, Si; Zhang, Hui; Brennan, Rachel; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Wilson, Matthew W; Phipps, Sean

    2014-09-01

    To determine the developmental trajectory of early cognitive and adaptive skills in young children with retinoblastoma from diagnosis to 5 years of age. Ninety-four patients with retinoblastoma treated according to an institutional protocol underwent serial assessments of cognitive and adaptive functioning at age 6 months and 1, 2, 3, and 5 years. Data were analyzed by treatment strata, with patients with 13q deletion analyzed separately. At baseline, across all patients (except those with 13q deletion), developmental functioning was comparable with the normative mean, with mean scores for all strata within the average range. However, at age 5 years, developmental functioning was in the low average range and significantly below normative means. The trajectories of developmental functioning demonstrated significant decline over time, although this varied by treatment group/strata. Patients treated with enucleation only evidenced the greatest decline in cognitive functioning; significant change was not observed in patients treated with other modalities. Notable declines in parent-reported communication skills were observed in the majority of patients. Patients with 13q deletion evidenced delayed cognitive functioning at baseline, but minimal declines were observed through age 3 years. However, significant decreases in adaptive functioning were demonstrated over time for the 13q deletion subset. The declines in functioning observed in this study were unexpected, as was the poorer performance of the enucleation-only group. This highlights the necessity of continuing to assess cognitive functioning in patients with retinoblastoma as they age. Additional research is necessary to determine the long-term trajectory of cognitive development in this population. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Obesity, hypothyroidism, craniosynostosis, cardiac hypertrophy, colitis, and developmental delay: a novel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tiong Yang; Amor, David J

    2007-01-15

    We describe in two brothers an apparently novel syndrome comprising obesity, congenital hypothyroidism, neonatal colitis, cardiac biventricular hypertrophy, craniosynostosis, and developmental delay. The first brother presented with neonatal colitis and congenital hypothyroidism and died at age 5 weeks of fulminant colitis. The second brother presented neonatally with the same condition, but survived and subsequently developed severe obesity, sagittal and coronal synostosis, and developmental delay. Both pregnancies had been complicated by hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP syndrome). Exhaustive genetic and metabolic investigations have failed to provide a unifying pathogenesis. This unique combination of manifestations appears to represent a new syndrome with probable autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive inheritance. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  8. Toilet training children with autism and developmental delays: an effective program for school settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchiola, Michael A; Martino, Gayle M; Dwyer, Lisa J; Demezzo, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Current research literature on toilet training for children with autism or developmental delays focuses on smaller case studies, typically with concentrated clinical support. Limited research exists to support an effective school-based program to teach toileting skills implemented by public school staff. We describe an intervention program to toilet train 5 children with autism or developmental delays who demonstrated no prior success in the home or school setting. Intervention focused on (a) removal of diapers during school hours, (b) scheduled time intervals for bathroom visits, (c) a maximum of 3 min sitting on the toilet, (d) reinforcers delivered immediately contingent on urination in the toilet, and (e) gradually increased time intervals between bathroom visits as each participant met mastery during the preceding, shorter time interval. The program was effective across all 5 cases in a community-based elementary school. Paraprofessional staff implemented the program with minimal clinical oversight.

  9. Efficacy of Intensive Neurodevelopmental Treatment for Children With Developmental Delay, With or Without Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyoung-Hwan; Park, Jinwoo; Lee, Hojun; Nam, Kiyeun; Park, Tae June; Kim, Hee Jae; Kwon, Bumsun

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of intensive neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT) on gross motor function for the children having developmental delay (DD), with or without cerebral palsy (CP). Methods Forty-two children had intensive NDT three times weekly, 60 minutes a day, for 3 months, immediately followed by conventional NDT once or twice a week, 30 minutes a day, for another 3 months. We assessed Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) over three time points: before conventional NDT, b...

  10. The Friendships of Young Children with Developmental Delays: A Longitudinal Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Guralnick, Michael J.; Neville, Brian; Hammond, Mary A.; Connor, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the social interactions of children with mild developmental (cognitive) delays with friends across the early childhood and early elementary years. Results revealed increases in many forms of social exchange with effect sizes in the moderate range, but no changes in sustained interactive play. Social interaction patterns, difficulties in identifying friends to participate in the study, and concerns evident in children’s peer and friendship networks suggest the ...

  11. Mandarin parents' evaluation of developmental status in the detection of delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Teck-Hock; Lim, Boon-Chuan; Bujang, Mohamad Adam Bin; Haniff, Jamaiyah; Wong, See-Chang; Abdullah, Muhamad Rais

    2017-08-01

    We examined the parental perception and accuracy of the Mandarin translation of the Parents' Evaluation of Developmental Status, a screening questionnaire for parent concerns about children's various developmental skills. The questionnaire was translated into Mandarin. Upon enrollment, caregivers completed the Mandarin PEDS and answered four questions about its acceptability and usefulness, and its ease of understanding and completion. The Mandarin PEDS was independently evaluated by a pediatrician and a community nurse, and classified as high risk (≥two predictive concerns), medium risk (one predictive concern), low risk (any non-predictive concerns) or no risk (if no concern) for developmental delays. The caregivers repeated Mandarin PEDS at a 2 week interval for test-retest reliability, while the children underwent testing for accuracy using a developmental assessment test. The majority (≥85%) of the 73 caregivers perceived the Mandarin PEDS as acceptable and useful, as well as easy to understand and complete. Fifteen (20.5%) and 24 responses (33.9%) were classified as high and moderate risk, respectively. The test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities were excellent, with an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.812 (95% CI: 0.701-0.881, P < 0.001) and a kappa value of 0.870 (P < 0.001), respectively. Mandarin PEDS was 80.0% sensitive and 83.8% specific for those in the high-risk category (adjusted OR, 64.68; 95% CI: 1.33-3,139.72; P = 0.035). Mandarin PEDS was well received by the caregivers, and was reliable and accurate in detecting developmental delays in the Mandarin-speaking subjects. We recommend it for early detection of children with developmental and behavioral problems. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  12. Developmental evidence for obstetric adaptation of the human female pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseynov, Alik; Zollikofer, Christoph P E; Coudyzer, Walter; Gascho, Dominic; Kellenberger, Christian; Hinzpeter, Ricarda; Ponce de León, Marcia S

    2016-05-10

    The bony pelvis of adult humans exhibits marked sexual dimorphism, which is traditionally interpreted in the framework of the "obstetrical dilemma" hypothesis: Giving birth to large-brained/large-bodied babies requires a wide pelvis, whereas efficient bipedal locomotion requires a narrow pelvis. This hypothesis has been challenged recently on biomechanical, metabolic, and biocultural grounds, so that it remains unclear which factors are responsible for sex-specific differences in adult pelvic morphology. Here we address this issue from a developmental perspective. We use methods of biomedical imaging and geometric morphometrics to analyze changes in pelvic morphology from late fetal stages to adulthood in a known-age/known-sex forensic/clinical sample. Results show that, until puberty, female and male pelves exhibit only moderate sexual dimorphism and follow largely similar developmental trajectories. With the onset of puberty, however, the female trajectory diverges substantially from the common course, resulting in rapid expansion of obstetrically relevant pelvic dimensions up to the age of 25-30 y. From 40 y onward females resume a mode of pelvic development similar to males, resulting in significant reduction of obstetric dimensions. This complex developmental trajectory is likely linked to the pubertal rise and premenopausal fall of estradiol levels and results in the obstetrically most adequate pelvic morphology during the time of maximum female fertility. The evidence that hormones mediate female pelvic development and morphology supports the view that solutions of the obstetrical dilemma depend not only on selection and adaptation but also on developmental plasticity as a response to ecological/nutritional factors during a female's lifetime.

  13. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 11 (p14.3q21) associated with developmental delays, hypopigmented skin lesions and abnormal brain MRI findings - a new case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachor, D.A.; Lofton, M. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States)

    1994-09-01

    We report 3 year old male, referred for evaluation of developmental delays. Pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios, proteinuria and prematurity. Medical history revealed: bilateral inguinal hernia, small scrotal sac, undescended testes, developmental delays and behavioral problems. The child had: microcephaly, facial dysmorphic features, single palmar creases, hypopigmented skin lesions of variable size, intermittent exotropia and small retracted testes. Neurological examination was normal. Cognitive level was at the average range with mild delay in his adaptive behavior. Expressive language delays and severe articulation disorder were noted, as well as clumsiness, poor control and precision of gross and fine motor skills. Chromosomal analysis of peripheral leukocytes indicated that one of the number 11 chromosomes had undergone a pericentric inversion with breakpoints on the short (p) arm at band p14.3 and the long (q) arm at band q21. An MRI of the brain showed mild delay in myelinization pattern of white matter. Chromosome 11 inversion in other sites was associated with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and several malignancies. To our knowledge this is the first description of inv(11)(p14.3q21) that is associated with microcephaly, dysmorphic features, hypopigmented skin lesions and speech delay. This inversion may disrupt the expression of the involved genes. However, additional cases with the same cytogenetic anomaly are needed to explore the phenotypic significance of this disorder.

  14. Why wait? Three mechanisms selecting for environment-dependent developmental delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M F; Otto, S P

    2014-10-01

    Many species delay development unless particular environments or rare disturbance events occur. How can such a strategy be favoured over continued development? Typically, it is assumed that continued development (e.g. germination) is not advantageous in environments that have low juvenile/seedling survival (mechanism 1), either due to abiotic or competitive effects. However, it has not previously been shown how low early survival must be in order to favour environment-specific developmental delays for long-lived species. Using seed dormancy as an example of developmental delays, we identify a threshold level of seedling survival in 'bad' environments below which selection can favour germination that is limited to 'good' environments. This can be used to evaluate whether observed differences in seedling survival are sufficient to favour conditional germination. We also present mathematical models that demonstrate two other, often overlooked, mechanisms that can favour conditional germination in the absence of differences in seedling survival. Specifically, physiological trade-offs can make it difficult to have germination rates that are equally high in all environments (mechanism 2). We show that such trade-offs can either favour conditional germination or intermediate (mixed) strategies, depending on the trade-off shape. Finally, germination in every year increases the likelihood that some individuals are killed in population-scale disturbances before reproducing; it can thus be favourable to only germinate immediately after a disturbance (mechanism 3). We demonstrate how demographic data can be used to evaluate these selection pressures. By presenting these three mechanisms and the conditions that favour conditional germination in each case, we provide three hypotheses that can be tested as explanations for the evolution of environment-dependent developmental delays. © 2014 European Society for Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014

  15. Developmental exposure to an environmental PCB mixture delays the propagation of electrical kindling from the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, Suren B; Sadowski, Renee N; Schantz, Susan L; Gilbert, Mary E

    2017-01-01

    Developmental PCB exposure impairs hearing and induces brainstem audiogenic seizures in adult offspring. The degree to which this enhanced susceptibility to seizure is manifest in other brain regions has not been examined. Thus, electrical kindling of the amygdala was used to evaluate the effect of developmental exposure to an environmentally relevant PCB mixture on seizure susceptibility in the rat. Female Long-Evans rats were dosed orally with 0 or 6mg/kg/day of the PCB mixture dissolved in corn oil vehicle 4 weeks prior to mating and continued through gestation and up until postnatal day (PND) 21. On PND 21, pups were weaned, and two males from each litter were randomly selected for the kindling study. As adults, the male rats were implanted bilaterally with electrodes in the basolateral amygdala. For each animal, afterdischarge (AD) thresholds in the amygdala were determined on the first day of testing followed by once daily stimulation at a standard 200μA stimulus intensity until three stage 5 generalized seizures (GS) ensued. Developmental PCB exposure did not affect the AD threshold or total cumulative AD duration, but PCB exposure did increase the latency to behavioral manifestations of seizure propagation. PCB exposed animals required significantly more stimulations to reach stage 2 seizures compared to control animals, indicating attenuated focal (amygdala) excitability. A delay in kindling progression in the amygdala stands in contrast to our previous finding of increased susceptibility to brainstem-mediated audiogenic seizures in PCB-exposed animals in response to a an intense auditory stimulus. These seemingly divergent results are not unexpected given the distinct source, type, and mechanistic underpinnings of these different seizure models. A delay in epileptogenesis following focal amygdala stimulation may reflect a decrease in neuroplasticity following developmental PCB exposure consistent with reductions in use-dependent synaptic plasticity that

  16. Exponential Antisynchronization Control of Stochastic Memristive Neural Networks with Mixed Time-Varying Delays Based on Novel Delay-Dependent or Delay-Independent Adaptive Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The global exponential antisynchronization in mean square of memristive neural networks with stochastic perturbation and mixed time-varying delays is studied in this paper. Then, two kinds of novel delay-dependent and delay-independent adaptive controllers are designed. With the ability of adapting to environment changes, the proposed controllers can modify their behaviors to achieve the best performance. In particular, on the basis of the differential inclusions theory, inequality theory, and stochastic analysis techniques, several sufficient conditions are obtained to guarantee the exponential antisynchronization between the drive system and response system. Furthermore, two numerical simulation examples are provided to the validity of the derived criteria.

  17. Relation of polymorphism of arsenic metabolism genes to arsenic methylation capacity and developmental delay in preschool children in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ru-Lan; Su, Chien-Tien; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Jen; Huang, Shiau-Rung; Lin, Ying-Chin; Lin, Ming-I; Mu, Shu-Chi; Chen, Ray-Jade; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2017-04-15

    Inefficient arsenic methylation capacity has been associated with developmental delay in children. The present study was designed to explore whether polymorphisms and haplotypes of arsenic methyltransferase (AS3MT), glutathione-S-transferase omegas (GSTOs), and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) affect arsenic methylation capacity and developmental delay. A case-control study was conducted from August 2010 to March 2014. All participants were recruited from the Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Teaching Hospital. In total, 179 children with developmental delay and 88 children without delay were recruited. Urinary arsenic species, including arsenite (AsIII), arsenate (AsV), monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV) were measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. The polymorphisms of AS3MT, GSTO, and PNP were performed using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform with iPLEX Gold chemistry. Polymorphisms of AS3MT genes were found to affect susceptibility to developmental delay in children, but GSTO and PNP polymorphisms were not. Participants with AS3MT rs3740392 A/G+G/G genotype, compared with AS3MT rs3740392 A/A genotype, had a significantly lower secondary methylation index. This may result in an increased OR for developmental delay. Participants with the AS3MT high-risk haplotype had a significantly higher OR than those with AS3MT low-risk haplotypes [OR and 95% CI, 1.59 (1.08-2.34)]. This is the first study to show a joint dose-response effect of this AS3MT high-risk haplotype and inefficient arsenic methylation capacity on developmental delay. Our data provide evidence that AS3MT genes are related to developmental delay and may partially influence arsenic methylation capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Social determinants of state variation in special education participation among preschoolers with developmental delays and disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Beth M; Carle, Adam C; Acevedo-Garcia, Dolores; Ganz, Michael; Hauser-Cram, Penny; McCormick, Marie C

    2011-03-01

    Children with developmental disabilities are at risk for secondary complications and lower academic performance, which contributes to lower health and well-being and may be ameliorated by access to special education services. This paper examines state variability in preschool special education participation among a United States population-based cohort with parent-reported developmental delays and disabilities. Analyses explore the extent to which observed variability can be explained by state socio-economic attributes and special education policy and funding. Rates of special education varied significantly across states and were highest in states with least income inequality and lowest in states with most income inequality. Place variation in preschool special education participation stems, in part, from child characteristics, but to a larger extent, from state socio-economic attributes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Proximal trisomy 1q in a girl with developmental delay and minor anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furforo, L. [Hospital Materno Infantil Ramon Sarda, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]|[Instituto Nacional de Genetica Medica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rittler, M. [Hospital Materno Infantil Ramon Sarda, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Slavutsky, I.R. [Academia Nacional de Medicina, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1996-09-06

    We report on a girl with developmental delay, macrocephaly, facial asymmetry, small downturned palpebral fissures, high and narrow palate, micrognathia, short neck, a heart defect, and unilateral renal agenesis. Cytogenetic analysis showed a proximal tandem duplication of the long arm of chromosome one (1q12{r_arrow}q21.3). This abnormality was suggested by G-and C-banding but it was specifically characterized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Clinical findings in our patient are compared with those of the literature in an attempt to delineate the phenotype in patients with proximal 1q duplication. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Ring chromosome 9 in a girl with developmental delay and dysmorphic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour Sibbesen, Else; Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Alosi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe a female child with dysmorphic features and developmental delay. Chromosome microarray analysis followed by conventional karyotyping revealed a ring chromosome 9 with a 12 Mb deletion at 9pter-p23 and a 540 kb deletion at 9q34.3-qter. Four percent of the analyzed cells...... had monosomy 9. The patient has the features of both the Kleefstra syndrome and the chromosome 9p-syndrome, including trigonocephaly, long philtrum, hypertelorism, and retro-/micronagthia. The deletion of the patient overlaps with several of the proposed critical regions for the 9p deletion syndrome....

  1. Emotion discourse, social cognition, and social skills in children with and without developmental delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenning, Rachel M; Baker, Bruce L; Juvonen, Jaana

    2011-01-01

    This study examined parent-child emotion discourse, children's independent social information processing, and social skills outcomes in 146 families of 8-year-olds with and without developmental delays. Children's emergent social-cognitive understanding (internal state understanding, perspective taking, and causal reasoning and problem solving) was coded in the context of parent-child conversations about emotion, and children were interviewed separately to assess social problem solving. Mothers, fathers, and teachers reported on children's social skills. The proposed strengths-based model partially accounted for social skills differences between typically developing children and children with delays. A multigroup analysis of the model linking emotion discourse to social skills through children's prosocial problem solving suggested that processes operated similarly for the two groups. Implications for ecologically focused prevention and intervention are discussed. © 2011 The Authors. Child Development © 2011 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  2. Emotion Discourse, Social Cognition, and Social Skills in Children with and without Developmental Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenning, RM; Baker, BL; Juvonen, J

    2009-01-01

    This study examined parent-child emotion discourse, children’s independent social information processing, and social skills outcomes in 146 families of 8-year-olds with and without developmental delays. Children’s emergent social-cognitive understanding (internal state understanding, perspective taking, and causal reasoning/problem solving) was coded in the context of parent-child conversations about emotion, and children were interviewed separately to assess social problem solving. Mothers, fathers, and teachers reported on children’s social skills. The proposed strengths-based model partially accounted for social skills differences between typically developing children and children with delays. A multigroup analysis of the model linking emotion discourse to social skills through children’s prosocial problem solving suggested that processes operated similarly across the two groups. Implications for ecologically focused prevention and intervention are discussed. PMID:21410465

  3. Analysis and Design of Adaptive Synchronization of a Complex Dynamical Network with Time-Delayed Nodes and Coupling Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Miao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the study of synchronization problems in uncertain dynamical networks with time-delayed nodes and coupling delays. First, a complex dynamical network model with time-delayed nodes and coupling delays is given. Second, for a complex dynamical network with known or unknown but bounded nonlinear couplings, an adaptive controller is designed, which can ensure that the state of a dynamical network asymptotically synchronizes at the individual node state locally or globally in an arbitrary specified network. Then, the Lyapunov-Krasovskii stability theory is employed to estimate the network coupling parameters. The main results provide sufficient conditions for synchronization under local or global circumstances, respectively. Finally, two typical examples are given, using the M-G system as the nodes of the ring dynamical network and second-order nodes in the dynamical network with time-varying communication delays and switching communication topologies, which illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller design methods.

  4. Peer-related communicative competence of preschool children: developmental and adaptive characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guralnick, M J; Paul-Brown, D

    1989-12-01

    The peer-related communicative interactions of nonhandicapped 3- and 4-year-old children as well as a group of 4-year-old mildly developmentally delayed children were investigated in a cross-sectional descriptive study. Adjustments of speakers to companions varying in terms of chronological age and developmental status were of interest, as were comparisons among the three groups. All three groups made adjustments in communicative functions (directives and information statements), interactive style (strong and joint directives), and communications involving affect (disagreements), but only to mildly delayed children. Adjustments to mildly delayed children were more closely related to interpersonal and social status factors than to children's developmental levels. The communicative interactions of mildly delayed children were highly similar to the developmentally matched nonhandicapped group on all measures except for a lower level of speech complexity. Significant differences between 3- and 4-year-old nonhandicapped children were obtained only for measures of speech complexity.

  5. TCP-ADaLR: TCP with adaptive delay and loss response for broadband GEO satellite networks

    OpenAIRE

    Omueti, Modupe Omogbohun

    2007-01-01

    Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) performance degrades in broadband geostationary satellite networks due to long propagation delays and high bit error rates. In this thesis, we propose TCP with algorithm modifications for adaptive delay and loss response (TCP-ADaLR) to improve TCP performance. TCP-ADaLR incorporates delayed acknowledgement mechanism recommended for Internet hosts. We evaluate and compare the performance of TCP-ADaLR, TCP SACK, and TCP NewReno, with and without delayed ackno...

  6. Effects of Ordinary and Adaptive Toys on Pre-School Children with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsieh-Chun

    2008-01-01

    Toys help children in mastering developmental tasks. This study investigated toy effect on children with developmental disabilities as they engage in using ordinary and adaptive toys. A single-subject design was used to identify the effects on their toy play abilities. Differences in toy effects between playing ordinary and adaptive toys were…

  7. Pitt-Hopkins syndrome: Mental retardation, psychomotor and developmental delays with facial dysmorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avina Fierro, Jorge Arturo; Avina, Daniel Alejandro Hernández

    2014-01-01

    The Pitt-Hopkins syndrome is a very rare and severe genetic disease characterized by mental retardation, psychomotor and developmental delays with facial dysmorphism. It was first described in 1978 in patients with mental retardation and crisis of intermittent hyperventilation. The genetic cause is haploinsufficiency of the TCF4 (transcription factor 4) gene that affects the neurodevelopment in both sexes; the majority of patients have spontaneous molecular defects by point mutations or deletions in chromosome 18 at the region 18q21. The syndrome is characterized by neurological abnormalities that affect the motor coordination and balance, in patients with mental and developmental delays. The phenotype includes a peculiar face by specific craniofacial anomalies: prominent square forehead, deep-set eyes with ocular hypertelorism; prominent large nose beaked and broad flat nasal bridge; mouth wide and large, thick fleshy lips, tented bow-shaped upper lip and everted lower lip; cup-shaped ears with dysplastic broad overfolded helix. We review the literature and the photographs of 44 published patients from 2007 to 2012, to resume the principal features of craniofacial anomalies, attempting to delineate the syndrome phenotype and score the specific dysmorphism than help to achieve the early clinical diagnosis. PMID:27625870

  8. Diagnostic outcome following routine genetics clinic referral for the assessment of global developmental delay.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shahdadpuri, R

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the diagnostic yield following a routine genetics clinic referral for the assessment of global developmental delay. Detailed retrospective review of 119 complete consecutive case notes of patients referred to one single clinical geneticist over a 14 month time period was undertaken (n = 119; 54 males, 65 females). The age at initial review ranged from 2 months to 37 years 3 months (mean 8 y 3 mo [SD 7 y 10 mo]). We made a diagnosis in 36\\/119 (30%); 21\\/36 were new diagnoses and 15\\/36 were confirmations of diagnoses. We removed a wrong diagnostic label in 8\\/119 (7%). In 3\\/8 we were able to achieve a diagnosis but in 5\\/8 no alternative diagnosis was reached. We had a better diagnostic rate where the patients were dysmorphic (odds ratio [OR] 1.825; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.065 to 3.128, p = 0.044). In the majority, the diagnosis was made by clinical examination only. Molecular diagnosis was reached in seven cases. Five cases were confirmed by cytogenetic analysis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a diagnosis in three cases. This study confirms the importance of a clinical genetics assessment in the investigation of global developmental delay.

  9. Vibrio cholerae hemolysin is required for lethality, developmental delay, and intestinal vacuolation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hediye Nese Cinar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cholera toxin (CT and toxin-co-regulated pili (TCP are the major virulence factors of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 strains that contribute to the pathogenesis of disease during devastating cholera pandemics. However, CT and TCP negative V. cholerae strains are still able to cause severe diarrheal disease in humans through mechanisms that are not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine the role of other virulence factors in V. cholerae pathogenesis, we used a CT and TCP independent infection model in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and identified the hemolysin A (hlyA gene as a factor responsible for animal death and developmental delay. We demonstrated a correlation between the severity of infection in the nematode and the level of hemolytic activity in the V. cholerae biotypes. At the cellular level, V. cholerae infection induces formation of vacuoles in the intestinal cells in a hlyA dependent manner, consistent with the previous in vitro observations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data strongly suggest that HlyA is a virulence factor in C. elegans infection leading to lethality and developmental delay presumably through intestinal cytopathic changes.

  10. Chediak-Higashi syndrome with early developmental delay resulting from paternal heterodisomy of chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Irini; Golas, Gretchen; Westbroek, Wendy; Vilboux, Thierry; Markello, Thomas C; Introne, Wendy; Maynard, Dawn; Pederson, Ben; Tsilou, Ekaterini; Jordan, Michael B; Hart, P Suzanne; White, James G; Gahl, William A; Huizing, Marjan

    2010-06-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by variable oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, mild bleeding diathesis, and an accelerated lymphoproliferative state. Abnormal lysosome-related organelle membrane function leads to the accumulation of large intracellular vesicles in several cell types, including granulocytes, melanocytes, and platelets. This report describes a severe case of CHS resulting from paternal heterodisomy of chromosome 1, causing homozygosity for the most distal nonsense mutation (p.E3668X, exon 50) reported to date in the LYST/CHS1 gene. The mutation is located in the WD40 region of the CHS1 protein. The patient's fibroblasts expressed no detectable CHS1. Besides manifesting the classical CHS findings, the patient exhibited hypotonia and global developmental delays, raising concerns about other effects of heterodisomy. An interstitial 747 kb duplication on 6q14.2-6q14.3 was identified in the propositus and paternal samples by comparative genomic hybridization. SNP genotyping revealed no additional whole chromosome or segmental isodisomic regions or other dosage variations near the crossover breakpoints on chromosome 1. Unmasking of a separate autosomal recessive cause of developmental delay, or an additive effect of the paternal heterodisomy, could underlie the severity of the phenotype in this patient. Published 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Homozygous variegate porphyria presenting with developmental and language delay in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, V A E; Holden, S T; Deshpande, C; Siddiqui, A; Mellerio, J E; Wraige, E; Powell, A M

    2013-10-01

    Variegate porphyria is an autosomal dominant disorder that usually presents with photosensitivity and acute neurological crises in adulthood. It is caused by heterozygous mutations in the protoporphyrinogen oxidase gene (PPOX). A rarer variant, homozygous variegate porphyria (HVP), presents in childhood with recurrent skin blisters and scarring. More variable features of HVP are short stature, brachydactyly, nystagmus, epilepsy, developmental delay and mental retardation. We describe a child who presented with nystagmus, developmental delay and ataxia, combined with a photosensitive eruption. Analysis of porphyrins in plasma, urine and stool supported a clinical diagnosis of HVP. DNA from the patient showed that he is compound heterozygous for two novel missense mutations in the PPOX coding region: c.169G>C (p.Gly57Arg) and c.1259C>G (Pro420Arg). Interestingly, cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed an absence of myelin, a feature not previously reported in HVP, which expands the differential diagnosis of childhood hypomyelinating leucoencephalopathies. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  12. Virtual unit delay for digital frequency adaptive T/4 delay phase-locked loop system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Zhou, Keliang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    T/4 Delay PLL system. The proposed VUD adopts linear interpolation polynomial to approximate the fractional delay induced by the varying grid frequency in such a way that the control performance is enhanced. The proposed VUD has been demonstrated on a digitally controlled T/4 Delay PLL system......Digital micro-controllers/processors enable the cost-effective control of grid-connected power converter systems in terms of system monitoring, signal processing (e.g., grid synchronization), control (e.g., grid current and voltage control), etc. Normally, the control is implemented in a micro-controller....../processor with a fixed sampling rate considering the cost and complexity, where the number of unit delays that have been adopted should be an integer. For instance, in conventional digital control systems, a single-phase T/4 Delay Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) system takes 50 unit delays (i.e., in a 50-Hz system...

  13. No differences in MR-based volumetry between 2- and 7-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder and developmental delay.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.; Pol, H.H.; Durston, S.; Nederveen, H.; Schnack, H.; Daalen, E. van; Dietz, C.; Engeland, H.M. van; Buitelaar, J.K.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study brain volumes in children with ASD as compared to children with a mental retardation or a language delay (developmentally delayed). In addition, to study the association of intellectual functioning on brain volumes in children with ASD or developmental delay. METHODS: Thirty-four

  14. Developmentally Delayed Male with Mincer Blade Obstructing the Oesophagus for a Period of Time Suspected to Be 6 Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Grønhøj Larsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sharp, retained foreign bodies in the oesophagus are associated with severe complications. Developmentally delayed patients are especially subject to foreign objects. We describe a 37-year-old, developmentally delayed male with a mincer blade obstructing the oesophagus. Six months prior to surgical intervention, the patient was hospitalized in a condition of sepsis and pneumonia where the thoracic X-ray reveals a foreign body in the proximal oesophagus. When rehospitalized 6 months later, a mincer blade of the type used in immersion blenders was surgically removed. During these 6 months the patient’s main symptoms were dysphagia, weight loss, and diarrhoea. When developmentally delayed patients present with dysphagia, we strongly encourage the awareness of the possible presence of foreign bodies. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of a mincer blade in the oesophagus.

  15. Intelligence quotient discrepancy indicates levels of motor competence in preschool children at risk for developmental delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzu-Ying; Chen, Kuan-Lin; Chou, Willy; Yang, Shu-Han; Kung, Sheng-Chun; Lee, Ya-Chen; Tung, Li-Chen

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to establish 1) whether a group difference exists in the motor competence of preschool children at risk for developmental delays with intelligence quotient discrepancy (IQD; refers to difference between verbal intelligence quotient [VIQ] and performance intelligence quotient [PIQ]) and 2) whether an association exists between IQD and motor competence. Children's motor competence and IQD were determined with the motor subtests of the Comprehensive Developmental Inventory for Infants and Toddlers and Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence™ - Fourth Edition. A total of 291 children were included in three groups: NON-IQD (n=213; IQD within 1 standard deviation [SD]), VIQ>PIQ (n=39; VIQ>PIQ greater than 1 SD), and PIQ>VIQ (n=39; PIQ>VIQ greater than 1 SD). The results of one-way analysis of variance indicated significant differences among the subgroups for the "Gross and fine motor" subdomains of the Comprehensive Developmental Inventory for Infants and Toddlers, especially on the subtests of "body-movement coordination" (F=3.87, PPIQ group than in the NON and PIQ>VIQ groups. Significant negative correlations between IQD and most of the motor subtests (r=0.31-0.46, PPIQ group. This study demonstrates that 1) IQD indicates the level of motor competence in preschoolers at risk for developmental delays and 2) IQD is negatively associated with motor competence in preschoolers with significant VIQ>PIQ discrepancy. The first finding was that preschoolers with VIQ>PIQ discrepancy greater than 1 SD performed significantly worse on motor competence than did preschoolers without significant IQD and preschoolers with PIQ>VIQ discrepancy greater than 1 SD. However, preschoolers with significant PIQ>VIQ discrepancy performed better on motor competence than did preschoolers without significant IQD, though the difference was not statistically significant. The second finding was that preschoolers with larger VIQ>PIQ discrepancy had worse motor

  16. Adaptive Rate-Scheduling with Reactive Delay Control for Next Generation CDMA Wireless Mobile Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available To minimize QoS degradations during nonstationary packet loadings, predictive rate schedulers adapt the operation according to anticipated packet arrival rates deduced via specified estimation algorithm. Existing predictive rate schedulers are developed under the assumption of perfect estimation, which may not be possible in future CDMA-based cellular networks characterized with highly nonstationary and bursty traffic. Additional shortcoming of existing rate schedulers is the coupling of delay and bandwidth, that is, close interdependence of delay and bandwidth (rate, whereby controlling one is accomplished solely by changing the other. In order to mitigate for the arrival rate estimation errors and delay-bandwidth coupling, this paper presents the feedback-enhanced target-tracking weighted fair queuing (FT-WFQ rate scheduler. It is an adaptive rate scheduler over multiclass CDMA systems with predictive adaptation control to adapt to nonstationary loadings; and feedback-enhanced reactive adaptation control to counteract arrival rate estimation errors. When the predictive adaptation control is not able to maintain long-term delay targets, feedback information will trigger reactive adaptation control. The objective of FT-WFQ scheduler is to minimize deviations from delay targets subject to maximum throughput utilization. Analytical and simulation results indicate that FT-WFQ is able to substantially reduce degradations caused by arrival rate estimation errors and to minimize delay degradations during nonstationary loading conditions.

  17. Binge consumption of ethanol during pregnancy leads to significant developmental delay of mouse embryonic brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheendran, Narendran; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-03-01

    Consumption of alcohol during pregnancy can be severely detrimental to the development of the brain in fetuses. This study explores the usage of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to the study the effects of maternal consumption of ethanol on brain development in mouse fetuses. On gestational day 14.5, fetuses were collected and fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. A swept-source OCT (SSOCT) system was used to acquire 3D images of the brain of ethanol-exposed and control fetuses. The volume of right and left brain ventricles were measured and used to compare between ethanol-exposed and control fetuses. A total of 5 fetuses were used for each of the two groups. The average volumes of the right and left ventricles were measured to be 0.35 and 0.15 mm3 for ethanol-exposed and control fetuses, respectively. The results demonstrated that there is an alcohol-induced developmental delay in mouse fetal brains.

  18. Sensory features and repetitive behaviors in children with autism and developmental delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Brian A; Baranek, Grace T; Sideris, John; Poe, Michele D; Watson, Linda R; Patten, Elena; Miller, Heather

    2010-04-01

    This study combined parent and observational measures to examine the association between aberrant sensory features and restricted, repetitive behaviors in children with autism (N=67) and those with developmental delays (N=42). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to empirically validate three sensory constructs of interest: hyperresponsiveness, hyporesponsiveness, and sensory seeking. Examining the association between the three derived sensory factor scores and scores on the Repetitive Behavior Scales--Revised revealed the co-occurrence of these behaviors in both clinical groups. Specifically, high levels of hyperresponsive behaviors predicted high levels of repetitive behaviors, and the relationship between these variables remained the same controlling for mental age. We primarily found non-significant associations between hyporesponsiveness or sensory seeking and repetitive behaviors, with the exception that sensory seeking was associated with ritualistic/sameness behaviors. These findings suggest that shared neurobiological mechanisms may underlie hyperresponsive sensory symptoms and repetitive behaviors and have implications for diagnostic classification as well as intervention.

  19. Increasing pre-kindergarten early literacy skills in children with developmental disabilities and delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pears, Katherine C; Kim, Hyoun K; Fisher, Philip A; Yoerger, Karen

    2016-08-01

    Two hundred and nine children receiving early childhood special education services for developmental disabilities or delays who also had behavioral, social, or attentional difficulties were included in a study of an intervention to increase school readiness, including early literacy skills. Results showed that the intervention had a significant positive effect on children's literacy skills from baseline to the end of summer before the start of kindergarten (d=.14). The intervention also had significant indirect effects on teacher ratings of children's literacy skills during the fall of their kindergarten year (β=.09). Additionally, when scores were compared to standard benchmarks, a greater percentage of the children who received the intervention moved from being at risk for reading difficulties to having low risk. Overall, this study demonstrates that a school readiness intervention delivered prior to the start of kindergarten may help increase children's early literacy skills. Copyright © 2016 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutation in ATG5 reduces autophagy and leads to ataxia with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myungjin; Sandford, Erin; Gatica, Damian; Qiu, Yu; Liu, Xu; Zheng, Yumei; Schulman, Brenda A; Xu, Jishu; Semple, Ian; Ro, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Boyoung; Mavioglu, R Nehir; Tolun, Aslıhan; Jipa, Andras; Takats, Szabolcs; Karpati, Manuela; Li, Jun Z; Yapici, Zuhal; Juhasz, Gabor; Lee, Jun Hee; Klionsky, Daniel J; Burmeister, Margit

    2016-01-26

    Autophagy is required for the homeostasis of cellular material and is proposed to be involved in many aspects of health. Defects in the autophagy pathway have been observed in neurodegenerative disorders; however, no genetically-inherited pathogenic mutations in any of the core autophagy-related (ATG) genes have been reported in human patients to date. We identified a homozygous missense mutation, changing a conserved amino acid, in ATG5 in two siblings with congenital ataxia, mental retardation, and developmental delay. The subjects' cells display a decrease in autophagy flux and defects in conjugation of ATG12 to ATG5. The homologous mutation in yeast demonstrates a 30-50% reduction of induced autophagy. Flies in which Atg5 is substituted with the mutant human ATG5 exhibit severe movement disorder, in contrast to flies expressing the wild-type human protein. Our results demonstrate the critical role of autophagy in preventing neurological diseases and maintaining neuronal health.

  1. Mutations in TRNT1 cause congenital sideroblastic anemia with immunodeficiency, fevers, and developmental delay (SIFD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Pranesh K; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Kennedy, Erin K; Mamady, Hapsatou; Naas, Turaya; Durie, Danielle; Campagna, Dean R; Lau, Ashley; Sendamarai, Anoop K; Wiseman, Daniel H; May, Alison; Jolles, Stephen; Connor, Philip; Powell, Colin; Heeney, Matthew M; Giardina, Patricia-Jane; Klaassen, Robert J; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Thuret, Isabelle; Thompson, Alexis A; Marques, Laura; Hughes, Stephen; Bonney, Denise K; Bottomley, Sylvia S; Wynn, Robert F; Laxer, Ronald M; Minniti, Caterina P; Moppett, John; Bordon, Victoria; Geraghty, Michael; Joyce, Paul B M; Markianos, Kyriacos; Rudner, Adam D; Holcik, Martin; Fleming, Mark D

    2014-10-30

    Mutations in genes encoding proteins that are involved in mitochondrial heme synthesis, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, and mitochondrial protein synthesis have previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of the congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs). We recently described a syndromic form of CSA associated with B-cell immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and developmental delay (SIFD). Here we demonstrate that SIFD is caused by biallelic mutations in TRNT1, the gene encoding the CCA-adding enzyme essential for maturation of both nuclear and mitochondrial transfer RNAs. Using budding yeast lacking the TRNT1 homolog, CCA1, we confirm that the patient-associated TRNT1 mutations result in partial loss of function of TRNT1 and lead to metabolic defects in both the mitochondria and cytosol, which can account for the phenotypic pleiotropy.

  2. Integrated Backstepping Design of Missile Guidance andControl with Time delay Adaptive Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    Guidance and Control with Time-delay Adaptive Scheme Seong-Min Hong 1 , Min-Guk Seo 1 , Chang-Hun Lee 2 and Min-Jea Tahk 1 1 Department...engagement kinematics are merged. Control input for the overall system is derived by backstepping approach. The stability of control logic is proved...estimated by using a time-delay adaptive control law. The performance of designed controller is investigated by numerical simulation. Keywords

  3. Adaptive Synchronization of Fractional Neural Networks with Unknown Parameters and Time Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyuan Ma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the parameters identification and synchronization problem of fractional-order neural networks with time delays are investigated. Based on some analytical techniques and an adaptive control method, a simple adaptive synchronization controller and parameter update laws are designed to synchronize two uncertain complex networks with time delays. Besides, the system parameters in the uncertain network can be identified in the process of synchronization. To demonstrate the validity of the proposed method, several illustrative examples are presented.

  4. Cellular and developmental adaptations to hypoxia: a Drosophila perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Nuria Magdalena; Dekanty, Andrés; Wappner, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a widely utilized genetic model, is highly resistant to oxygen starvation and is beginning to be used for studying physiological, developmental, and cellular adaptations to hypoxia. The Drosophila respiratory (tracheal) system has features in common with the mammalian circulatory system so that an angiogenesis-like response occurs upon exposure of Drosophila larvae to hypoxia. A hypoxia-responsive system homologous to mammalian hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) has been described in the fruit fly, where Fatiga is a Drosophila oxygen-dependent HIF prolyl hydroxylase, and the basic helix-loop-helix Per/ARNT/Sim (bHLH-PAS) proteins Sima and Tango are, respectively, the Drosophila homologues of mammalian HIF-alpha (alpha) and HIF-beta (beta). Tango is constitutively expressed regardless of oxygen tension and, like in mammalian cells, Sima is controlled at the level of protein degradation and subcellular localization. Sima is critically required for development in hypoxia, but, unlike mammalian model systems, it is dispensable for development in normoxia. In contrast, fatiga mutant alleles are all lethal; however, strikingly, viability to adulthood is restored in fatiga sima double mutants, although these double mutants are not entirely normal, suggesting that Fatiga has Sima-independent functions in fly development. Studies in cell culture and in vivo have revealed that Sima is activated by the insulin receptor (InR) and target-of-rapamycin (TOR) pathways. Paradoxically, Sima is a negative regulator of growth. This suggests that Sima is engaged in a negative feedback loop that limits growth upon stimulation of InR/TOR pathways.

  5. Predictors of Poor School Readiness in Children Without Developmental Delay at Age 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bergen B; Dudovitz, Rebecca N; Coker, Tumaini R; Barnert, Elizabeth S; Biely, Christopher; Li, Ning; Szilagyi, Peter G; Larson, Kandyce; Halfon, Neal; Zimmerman, Frederick J; Chung, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Current recommendations emphasize developmental screening and surveillance to identify developmental delays (DDs) for referral to early intervention (EI) services. Many young children without DDs, however, are at high risk for poor developmental and behavioral outcomes by school entry but are ineligible for EI. We developed models for 2-year-olds without DD that predict, at kindergarten entry, poor academic performance and high problem behaviors. Data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), were used for this study. The analytic sample excluded children likely eligible for EI because of DDs or very low birth weight. Dependent variables included low academic scores and high problem behaviors at the kindergarten wave. Regression models were developed by using candidate predictors feasibly obtainable during typical 2-year well-child visits. Models were cross-validated internally on randomly selected subsamples. Approximately 24% of all 2-year-old children were ineligible for EI at 2 years of age but still had poor academic or behavioral outcomes at school entry. Prediction models each contain 9 variables, almost entirely parental, social, or economic. Four variables were associated with both academic and behavioral risk: parental education below bachelor's degree, little/no shared reading at home, food insecurity, and fair/poor parental health. Areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve were 0.76 for academic risk and 0.71 for behavioral risk. Adding the mental scale score from the Bayley Short Form-Research Edition did not improve areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for either model. Among children ineligible for EI services, a small set of clinically available variables at age 2 years predicted academic and behavioral outcomes at school entry. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. [Diagnostic evaluation of the developmental level in children identified at risk of delay through the Child Development Evaluation Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli-Córdoba, Antonio; Campos-Maldonado, Martha Carmen; Vélez-Andrade, Víctor Hugo; Delgado-Ginebra, Ismael; Baqueiro-Hernández, César Iván; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Ojeda-Lara, Lucía; Davis-Martínez, Erika Berenice; O'Shea-Cuevas, Gabriel; Aceves-Villagrán, Daniel; Carrasco-Mendoza, Joaquín; Villagrán-Muñoz, Víctor Manuel; Halley-Castillo, Elizabeth; Sidonio-Aguayo, Beatriz; Palma-Tavera, Josuha Alexander; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre

    The Child Development Evaluation (or CDE Test) was developed in Mexico as a screening tool for child developmental problems. It yields three possible results: normal, slow development or risk of delay. The modified version was elaborated using the information obtained during the validation study but its properties according to the base population are not known. The objective of this work was to establish diagnostic confirmation of developmental delay in children 16- to 59-months of age previously identified as having risk of delay through the CDE Test in primary care facilities. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in one Mexican state. CDE test was administered to 11,455 children 16- to 59-months of age from December/2013 to March/2014. The eligible population represented the 6.2% of the children (n=714) who were identified at risk of delay through the CDE Test. For inclusion in the study, a block randomization stratified by sex and age group was performed. Each participant included in the study had a diagnostic evaluation using the Battelle Development Inventory, 2 nd edition. From the 355 participants included with risk of delay, 65.9% were male and 80.2% were from rural areas; 6.5% were false positives (Total Development Quotient ˃90) and 6.8% did not have any domain with delay (Domain Developmental Quotient Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Rates of early intervention referral and significant developmental delay, by birthweight and gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Allison E; Pfeiffer, Melissa R; Slopen, Meredith E; McVeigh, Katharine H

    2012-07-01

    Though correlated, birthweight (BW) and gestational age (GA) have independent effects on cognitive and neurological outcomes. Jurisdictions vary in their inclusion of these two characteristics in their list of established conditions for automatic eligibility for Early Intervention (EI) services, which may lead them to miss important high-risk groups. We evaluated the relationship between BW-GA combinations and both EI referral rates and risk of EI-diagnosed significant developmental delay in a population of New York City (NYC) births. We linked birth certificates of children born in NYC to resident mothers during 1999-2001 and surviving the first 28 days of life (n = 339,522) to EI administrative data. We calculated EI referral rates for various BW-GA categories, and used a logistic model to directly estimate the predicted risk of delay. EI referral rates of over 50% were observed in children born 2,500 g and 39+ weeks. A BW threshold of guide determination of automatic eligibility criteria.

  8. Sports participation of children with or without developmental delay: prediction from child and family factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Willa A; Baker, Bruce L

    2015-02-01

    Sports participation is beneficial to health and socioemotional adjustment in youth across development. While there is some evidence indicating lower sports participation for children with developmental delays (DD) as compared with their typically developing (TD) peers, little is known as to the predictors of this differential participation. Given the increased risk of physical and mental health difficulties for children with DD, understanding more about this disparity is important. We examined sports participation in elementary school-aged children with or without DD and examined child and family predictors of three indices of sports participation: number of sports and highest relational sport at ages 6 and 8, and consistent sports from 6 to 8. Children with TD were significantly higher on all three indicators. Mother and child factors related significantly to sports participation indices. The number of sports related positively to mother education and positive perceptions and negatively to mother employment. Relational sports were higher in boys, children with higher social skills, and lower behavior problems. In regression analyses at child age 8 that included these other variables, delay status (DD or TD) did not have a significant effect. Perspectives on varying influences on sports participation and implications for intervention are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Robust Adaptive Time Delay Estimation for Speaker Localization in Noisy and Reverberant Acoustic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Doclo

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Two adaptive algorithms are presented for robust time delay estimation (TDE in acoustic environments with a large amount of background noise and reverberation. Recently, an adaptive eigenvalue decomposition (EVD algorithm has been developed for TDE in highly reverberant acoustic environments. In this paper, we extend the adaptive EVD algorithm to noisy and reverberant acoustic environments, by deriving an adaptive stochastic gradient algorithm for the generalized eigenvalue decomposition (GEVD or by prewhitening the noisy microphone signals. We have performed simulations using a localized and a diffuse noise source for several SNRs, showing that the time delays can be estimated more accurately using the adaptive GEVD algorithm than using the adaptive EVD algorithm. In addition, we have analyzed the sensitivity of the adaptive GEVD algorithm with respect to the accuracy of the noise correlation matrix estimate, showing that its performance may be quite sensitive, especially for low SNR scenarios.

  10. The effectiveness of multimedia visual perceptual training groups for the preschool children with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Nan; Lin, Chin-Kai; Wei, Ta-Sen; Liu, Chi-Hsin; Wuang, Yee-Pay

    2013-12-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of three approaches to improving visual perception among preschool children 4-6 years old with developmental delays: multimedia visual perceptual group training, multimedia visual perceptual individual training, and paper visual perceptual group training. A control group received no special training. This study employed a pretest-posttest control group of true experimental design. A total of 64 children 4-6 years old with developmental delays were randomized into four groups: (1) multimedia visual perceptual group training (15 subjects); (2) multimedia visual perceptual individual training group (15 subjects); paper visual perceptual group training (19 subjects); and (4) a control group (15 subjects) with no visual perceptual training. Forty minute training sessions were conducted once a week for 14 weeks. The Test of Visual Perception Skills, third edition, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. Paired-samples t-test showed significant differences pre- and post-test among the three groups, but no significant difference was found between the pre-test and post-test scores among the control group. ANOVA results showed significant differences in improvement levels among the four study groups. Scheffe post hoc test results showed significant differences between: group 1 and group 2; group 1 and group 3; group 1 and the control group; and group 2 and the control group. No significant differences were reported between group 2 and group 3, and group 3 and the control group. The results showed all three therapeutic programs produced significant differences between pretest and posttest scores. The training effect on the multimedia visual perceptual group program and the individual program was greater than the developmental effect Both the multimedia visual perceptual group training program and the multimedia visual perceptual individual training program produced significant effects on visual perception. The

  11. Cross-Cultural Adaptation of a Developmental Assessment for Arabic-Speaking Children with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrine, Sheila L.; Heji, Hayat; Sabri, Amel; Dalton, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Developmental screening has become an established component of child health programs in many developed countries. The research objective of this project was to translate and adapt a developmental assessment (Oregon Project Skills Inventory) for use with young children with visual impairments who speak Arabic. The study was prompted by the lack of…

  12. Temporal recalibration in vocalization induced by adaptation of delayed auditory feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yamamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We ordinarily perceive our voice sound as occurring simultaneously with vocal production, but the sense of simultaneity in vocalization can be easily interrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF. DAF causes normal people to have difficulty speaking fluently but helps people with stuttering to improve speech fluency. However, the underlying temporal mechanism for integrating the motor production of voice and the auditory perception of vocal sound remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the temporal tuning mechanism integrating vocal sensory and voice sounds under DAF with an adaptation technique. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Participants produced a single voice sound repeatedly with specific delay times of DAF (0, 66, 133 ms during three minutes to induce 'Lag Adaptation'. They then judged the simultaneity between motor sensation and vocal sound given feedback. We found that lag adaptation induced a shift in simultaneity responses toward the adapted auditory delays. This indicates that the temporal tuning mechanism in vocalization can be temporally recalibrated after prolonged exposure to delayed vocal sounds. Furthermore, we found that the temporal recalibration in vocalization can be affected by averaging delay times in the adaptation phase. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest vocalization is finely tuned by the temporal recalibration mechanism, which acutely monitors the integration of temporal delays between motor sensation and vocal sound.

  13. Stability of adaptive cruise control systems taking account of vehicle response time and delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, L.C., E-mail: ldavis7@mailaps.org [10244 Normandy Dr., Plymouth, MI 48170 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    The region of string stability of a platoon of adaptive cruise control vehicles, taking into account the delay and response of the vehicle powertrain, is found. An upper bound on the explicit delay time as a function the first-order powertrain response time constant is determined. The system is characterized by a headway time constant, a sensitivity parameter, relative (to the vehicle immediately in front) velocity control, and delayed-velocity feedback or acceleration feedback. -- Highlights: ► I find the region of stability for a realistic adaptive cruise control system. ► Vehicle response time and explicit delay are included in the analysis. ► Delayed-feedback enlarges the parameter space that gives string stability.

  14. Social-Emotional Competence in Young Children with Developmental Delays: Our Reflection and Vision for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William H.; Conroy, Maureen A.

    2011-01-01

    The authors provide a brief historical reflection on social-emotional competence intervention research along with their vision for future directions of intervention investigations for young children with developmental delays and difficulties. Specifically, they summarize "what we 'know'" and "what we "need to know"" in the area of social-emotional…

  15. OJKO-project : Longitudinal study on the development of young children with a serious cognitive and motor developmental delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalen, Gertruud Henrike; Visser, Linda; van der Putten, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a longitudinal project on the development of children with a serious cognitive and motor developmental delay has started in Belgium and the Netherlands. The aims of this study are to evaluate the cognitive, motor, communicative and social-emotional abilities of young children with a severe

  16. OJKO-project: Longitudinal study on the development of young children with a serious cognitive and motor developmental delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colla, Stephy; Van Keer, Ines; Schalen, Gertruud Henrike; van der Putten, Annette; Visser, Linda; Maes, Bea; Vlaskamp, Carla; van der Meulen, Bieuwe

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a longitudinal project on the development of children with a serious cognitive and motor developmental delay has started in Belgium and the Netherlands. The aims of this study are to evaluate the cognitive, motor, communicative and social-emotional abilities of young children with a severe

  17. Developmental Delay: Review of Research and Future Directions. Policy Forum Proceedings Document (Alexandria, Virginia, July 19-21, 2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineham, Patrice

    This document is the outcome of a conference that examined promising practices in services for children with developmental delays (DD) and gathered input for making policy recommendations related to the implementation of DD as a specific disability category for children ages 3 through 9. It begins by discussing changes to the Individuals with…

  18. Effectiveness of Contrasting Approaches to Response-Contingent Learning among Children with Significant Developmental Delays and Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Melinda; Dunst, Carl J.; Hamby, Deborah W.

    2016-01-01

    Findings from a randomized controlled design study of an ability-based versus needs-based approach to response-contingent learning among children with significant developmental delays and disabilities who did not use instrumental behavior to produce reinforcing consequences are reported. The ability-based intervention and needs-based intervention…

  19. Mothers' Perceived Physical Health during Early and Middle Childhood: Relations with Child Developmental Delay and Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhower, Abbey; Blacher, Jan; Baker, Bruce L.

    2013-01-01

    The self-perceived physical health of mothers raising children with developmental delay (DD; N = 116) or typical development (TD; N = 129) was examined across child ages 3-9 years, revealing three main findings. First, mothers of children with DD experienced poorer self-rated physical health than mothers of children with TD at each age. Latent…

  20. Teaching Language Skills to Preschool Students with Developmental Delays and Autism Spectrum Disorder Using Language for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Margaret M.; Schweck, Kelly B.; Hinton, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Language intervention using Direct Instruction (DI) has shown positive results. There is a growing body of investigation of Language for Learning (LL), a DI program, on the performance of students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and students with developmental delays (DD). There is need for replication and extension of research to include…

  1. De novo interstitial deletion of 9q32-34.1 with mental retardation, developmental delay, epilepsy, and cortical dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, T; Alp, M Y; Karacan, C D

    2014-01-01

    In this report we describe a 10 year-old female patient with interstitial deletion of 9q32-q34.1 associated with mental retardation, developmental delay, short stature, mild facial dysmorphism, epilepsy, abnormal EEG and brain MRI findings consistent with focal cortical dysplasia. Interstitial de...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain in the diagnostic evaluation of developmental delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbruggen, Krijn T.; Meiners, Linda C.; Sijens, Paul E.; Lunsing, Roelineke J.; van Spronsen, Francjan J.; Brouwer, Oebele F.

    Aim: To assess the contribution of MRI and proton spectroscopy (1HMRS) in establishing an etiological diagnosis in children with developmental delay (DD) and to assess whether the chance of finding specific abnormalities correlates with the presence of neurological signs and/or abnormal head

  3. Does it Pay to Delay? Flesh Flies Show Adaptive Plasticity in Reproductive Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristal, Ross; Netter, Fleta; Hatle, John D.; Hahn, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Life-history plasticity is widespread among organisms. However, an important question is whether this plasticity is adaptive, enhancing the organism’s fitness. Most models for plasticity in life-history timing predict that once they have reached the minimal nutritional threshold animals under poor conditions will accelerate timing to development or reproduction. Adaptive delays in reproductive timing are not common, especially in short-lived species. Examples of adaptive reproductive delays exist in mammalian populations experiencing strong interspecific (e.g. predation) and intraspecific (e.g. infanticide) competition. But are there other environmental factors that may trigger an adaptive delay in reproductive timing? We show that the short-lived flesh fly Sarcophaga crassipalpis will delay reproductive timing under nutrient poor conditions, even though it has already met the minimal nutritional threshold for reproduction. We test if this delay strategy is consistent with an adaptive response allowing the scavenger time to locate more resources by providing additional protein pulses (early, mid and late) throughout the reproductive delay period. Flies receiving additional protein produced more eggs and larger eggs, demonstrating a benefit of the delay. In addition, by tracking the allocation of carbon from the pulses using stable isotopes, we show that flies receiving earlier pulses incorporated more carbon into eggs and somatic tissue than those provided a later pulse. These results indicate that the reproductive delay in S. crassipalpis is consistent with adaptive post-threshold plasticity, a nutritionally-linked reproductive strategy that has not been previously reported in an invertebrate species. PMID:20953961

  4. Adaptive Asymptotical Synchronization for Stochastic Complex Networks with Time-Delay and Markovian Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueling Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of adaptive asymptotical synchronization is discussed for the stochastic complex dynamical networks with time-delay and Markovian switching. By applying the stochastic analysis approach and the M-matrix method for stochastic complex networks, several sufficient conditions to ensure adaptive asymptotical synchronization for stochastic complex networks are derived. Through the adaptive feedback control techniques, some suitable parameters update laws are obtained. Simulation result is provided to substantiate the effectiveness and characteristics of the proposed approach.

  5. Robust chaos synchronization based on adaptive fuzzy delayed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Choon Ki Ahn. Research Articles Volume 78 Issue 3 March 2012 pp 361-374 ... It is shown that the design of the AFDFHS controller with adaptive law can be achieved by solving a linear matrix inequality (LMI), which can be easily facilitated by using some standard numerical packages. An illustrative example is given to ...

  6. Intelligence quotient discrepancy indicates levels of motor competence in preschool children at risk for developmental delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu TY

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tzu-Ying Yu,1 Kuan-Lin Chen,2,3 Willy Chou,4,5 Shu-Han Yang,4 Sheng-Chun Kung,4 Ya-Chen Lee,2 Li-Chen Tung4,6,7 1Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 2Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, 5Department of Recreation and Health Care Management, Cha Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, 6School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, 7School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan Purpose: This study aimed to establish 1 whether a group difference exists in the motor competence of preschool children at risk for developmental delays with intelligence quotient discrepancy (IQD; refers to difference between verbal intelligence quotient [VIQ] and performance intelligence quotient [PIQ] and 2 whether an association exists between IQD and motor competence.Methods: Children’s motor competence and IQD were determined with the motor subtests of the Comprehensive Developmental Inventory for Infants and Toddlers and Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence™ – Fourth Edition. A total of 291 children were included in three groups: NON-IQD (n=213; IQD within 1 standard deviation [SD], VIQ>PIQ (n=39; VIQ>PIQ greater than 1 SD, and PIQ>VIQ (n=39; PIQ>VIQ greater than 1 SD.Results: The results of one-way analysis of variance indicated significant differences among the subgroups for the “Gross and fine motor” subdomains of the Comprehensive Developmental Inventory for Infants and Toddlers, especially on the subtests of “body-movement coordination” (F=3.87, P<0.05 and “visual-motor coordination” (F=6.90, P<0.05. Motor competence was significantly

  7. Mother-father differences in screening for developmental delay in infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepanec, Maja; Lice, Karolina; Simleša, Sanja

    2012-01-01

    In most cases, caregiver questionnaires are completed by mothers and seldom by fathers. Although parents tend to have moderate to high congruence, some studies suggest that differences between the mothers' and the fathers' answers can complicate diagnostic decision-making. The aim of this study was to determine mother-father response differences on a widely used screening checklist and to describe possible clinical implications of the observed differences. The Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales Developmental Profile Infant-Toddler Checklist, a screening and evaluation tool, is commonly used in many countries to identify developmental delays in infants and toddlers. A Croatian version of the CSBS-DP checklist was completed by 422 parents (211 mothers and 211 fathers). The mean age of children was 15.4 months (6-24 months). Inter-rater reliability and mother-father differences were calculated. An item-by-item analysis was performed, and the relationship between the parental concern and the score a child achieved was also examined. Mothers and fathers did not differ in Total Scores (p=.165). Item-by-item analysis showed that the level of congruence between mothers' and fathers' scores was, on average, 78%. However, in 10-15% of cases, the parent scores placed a child in different clinical categories (above vs. below the cut-off score). In cases of discordance, fathers placed a child below criterion level more often than mothers, and this trend was more pronounced for girls than boys. The level of parental concern was found to be relatively low and not well balanced with the scores children achieved. Our findings suggest that the level of parental concern is not a very reliable indicator of delayed or deviant childhood development. Furthermore, in 10-15% of cases, parents differ in the extent to which their responses place a child in different clinical groups. The reader will: (1) recognize the importance of early communication skills assessment in infants and

  8. Lethality and developmental delay in Drosophila melanogaster larvae after ingestion of selected Pseudomonas fluorescens strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika H Olcott

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a well-established model organism for probing the molecular and cellular basis of physiological and immune system responses of adults or late stage larvae to bacterial challenge. However, very little is known about the consequences of bacterial infections that occur in earlier stages of development. We have infected mid-second instar larvae with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens to determine how infection alters the ability of larvae to survive and complete development.We mimicked natural routes of infection using a non-invasive feeding procedure to study the toxicity of the three sequenced P. fluorescens strains (Pf0-1, SBW25, and Pf-5 to Drosophila melanogaster. Larvae fed with the three strains of P. fluorescens showed distinct differences in developmental trajectory and survival. Treatment with SBW25 caused a subset of insects to die concomitant with a systemic melanization reaction at larval, pupal or adult stages. Larvae fed with Pf-5 died in a dose-dependent manner with adult survivors showing eye and wing morphological defects. In addition, larvae in the Pf-5 treatment groups showed a dose-dependent delay in the onset of metamorphosis relative to control-, Pf0-1-, and SBW25-treated larvae. A functional gacA gene is required for the toxic properties of wild-type Pf-5 bacteria.These experiments are the first to demonstrate that ingestion of P. fluorescens bacteria by D. melanogaster larvae causes both lethal and non-lethal phenotypes, including delay in the onset of metamorphosis and morphological defects in surviving adult flies, which can be decoupled.

  9. Developmental pathways to antisocial behavior: the delayed-onset pathway in girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverthorn, P; Frick, P J

    1999-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that there are two distinct trajectories for the development of antisocial behavior in boys: a childhood-onset pathway and an adolescent-onset pathway. After reviewing the limited available research on antisocial girls, we propose that this influential method of conceptualizing the development of severe antisocial behavior may not apply to girls without some important modifications. Antisocial girls appear to show many of the correlates that have been associated with the childhood-onset pathway in boys, and they tend to show impaired adult adjustment, which is also similar to boys in the childhood-onset pathway. However, antisocial girls typically show an adolescent-onset to their antisocial behavior. We have proposed that these girls show a third developmental pathway which we have labeled the "delayed-onset" pathway. This model rests on the assumption that many of the putative pathogenic mechanisms that contribute to the development of antisocial behavior in girls, such as cognitive and neuropsychological deficits, a dysfunctional family environment, and/or the presence of a callous and unemotional interpersonal style, may be present in childhood, but they do not lead to severe and overt antisocial behavior until adolescence. Therefore, we propose that the delayed-onset pathway for girls is analogous to the childhood-onset pathway in boys and that there is no analogous pathway in girls to the adolescent-onset pathway in boys. Although this model clearly needs to be tested in future research, it highlights the need to test the applicability of current theoretical models for explaining the development of antisocial behavior in girls.

  10. The activation of visual face memory and explicit face recognition are delayed in developmental prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parketny, Joanna; Towler, John; Eimer, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Individuals with developmental prosopagnosia (DP) are strongly impaired in recognizing faces, but the causes of this deficit are not well understood. We employed event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to study the time-course of neural processes involved in the recognition of previously unfamiliar faces in DPs and in age-matched control participants with normal face recognition abilities. Faces of different individuals were presented sequentially in one of three possible views, and participants had to detect a specific Target Face ("Joe"). EEG was recorded during task performance to Target Faces, Nontarget Faces, or the participants' Own Face (which had to be ignored). The N250 component was measured as a marker of the match between a seen face and a stored representation in visual face memory. The subsequent P600f was measured as an index of attentional processes associated with the conscious awareness and recognition of a particular face. Target Faces elicited reliable N250 and P600f in the DP group, but both of these components emerged later in DPs than in control participants. This shows that the activation of visual face memory for previously unknown learned faces and the subsequent attentional processing and conscious recognition of these faces are delayed in DP. N250 and P600f components to Own Faces did not differ between the two groups, indicating that the processing of long-term familiar faces is less affected in DP. However, P600f components to Own Faces were absent in two participants with DP who failed to recognize their Own Face during the experiment. These results provide new evidence that face recognition deficits in DP may be linked to a delayed activation of visual face memory and explicit identity recognition mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Online Algorithms for Adaptive Optimization in Heterogeneous Delay Tolerant Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissam Chahin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Delay Tolerant Networks (DTNs are an emerging type of networks which do not need a predefined infrastructure. In fact, data forwarding in DTNs relies on the contacts among nodes which may possess different features, radio range, battery consumption and radio interfaces. On the other hand, efficient message delivery under limited resources, e.g., battery or storage, requires to optimize forwarding policies. We tackle optimal forwarding control for a DTN composed of nodes of different types, forming a so-called heterogeneous network. Using our model, we characterize the optimal policies and provide a suitable framework to design a new class of multi-dimensional stochastic approximation algorithms working for heterogeneous DTNs. Crucially, our proposed algorithms drive online the source node to the optimal operating point without requiring explicit estimation of network parameters. A thorough analysis of the convergence properties and stability of our algorithms is presented.

  12. Robust Adaptive Exponential Synchronization of Stochastic Perturbed Chaotic Delayed Neural Networks with Parametric Uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the robust adaptive exponential synchronization in mean square of stochastic perturbed chaotic delayed neural networks with nonidentical parametric uncertainties. A robust adaptive feedback controller is proposed based on Gronwally’s inequality, drive-response concept, and adaptive feedback control technique with the update laws of nonidentical parametric uncertainties as well as linear matrix inequality (LMI approach. The sufficient conditions for robust adaptive exponential synchronization in mean square of uncoupled uncertain stochastic chaotic delayed neural networks are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs. The effect of nonidentical uncertain parameter uncertainties is suppressed by the designed robust adaptive feedback controller rapidly. A numerical example is provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. PARP10 deficiency manifests by severe developmental delay and DNA repair defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrour, Maher Awni; Nicolae, Claudia M; Edvardson, Simon; Ashhab, Motee; Galvan, Adri M; Constantin, Daniel; Abu-Libdeh, Bassam; Moldovan, George-Lucian; Elpeleg, Orly

    2016-10-01

    DNA repair mechanisms such as nucleotide excision repair (NER) and translesion synthesis (TLS) are dependent on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a DNA polymerase accessory protein. Recently, homozygosity for p.Ser228Ile mutation in the PCNA gene was reported in patients with neurodegeneration and impaired NER. Using exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous deleterious mutation, c.648delAG, in the PARP10 gene, in a patient suffering from severe developmental delay. In agreement, PARP10 protein was absent from the patient cells. We have previously shown that PARP10 is recruited by PCNA to DNA damage sites and is required for DNA damage resistance. The patient cells were significantly more sensitive to hydroxyurea and UV-induced DNA damage than control cells, resulting in increased apoptosis, indicating DNA repair impairment in the patient cells. PARP10 deficiency joins the long list of DNA repair defects associated with neurodegenerative disorders, including ataxia telangiectasia, xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome, and the recently reported PCNA mutation.

  14. Pica in a Four-Year-Old Girl with Global Developmental Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi Hui; Pesch, Megan H; Lumeng, Julie C; Stein, Martin T

    2015-01-01

    Emily is a 4 and half-year-old girl whose foster mother is concerned about her odd eating behaviors. Emily has been with her foster mother for 1 year after exposure to domestic violence. Emily's habit of eating nonfood items led to her foster mother providing "100% supervision." Emily constantly picks up, smells, and tastes nonfood items, particularly rocks and things made of metal. She "explores everything with her tongue." Emily scoops dirt and gravel from sidewalk crevices into her mouth. Although toileting, she catches and licks urine in her hand and searches for stool to put in her mouth. With redirection, Emily stopped putting feces into her mouth, but after spending time with her biological family, this behavior recurred.Emily does not like to eat foods that are hard or require chewing. She does not choke or gag on solid foods or liquids. She likes foods that are sweet. She refuses to eat vegetables and foods with certain textures. Emily pulls food apart with her hands before putting it in her mouth.Emily has global developmental delay, cerebral palsy, contractures in her legs, and strabismus. A medical workup resulted in a diagnosis of trisomy 4p and monosomy 9p. Emily works with a physical therapist and occupational therapist; she attends preschool in a special day class. She is an alert, playful, and socially engaging girl who walks with an abnormal gait, speaks in short sentences, and follows simple directions.

  15. Detection of Chromosomal Breakpoints in Patients with Developmental Delay and Speech Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, Kagistia H.; Hillmer, Axel M.; Aksoy, Irene; Chew, Elaine G. Y.; Teo, Audrey S. M.; Zhang, Zhenshui; Lee, Charlie W. H.; Chen, Pauline J.; Seng, Chan Chee; Ariyaratne, Pramila N.; Rouam, Sigrid L.; Soo, Lim Seong; Yousoof, Saira; Prokudin, Ivan; Peters, Gregory; Collins, Felicity; Wilson, Meredith; Kakakios, Alyson; Haddad, Georges; Menuet, Arnaud; Perche, Olivier; Tay, Stacey Kiat Hong; Sung, Ken W. K.; Ruan, Xiaoan; Ruan, Yijun; Liu, Edison T.; Briault, Sylvain; Jamieson, Robyn V.; Davila, Sonia; Cacheux, Valere

    2014-01-01

    Delineating candidate genes at the chromosomal breakpoint regions in the apparently balanced chromosome rearrangements (ABCR) has been shown to be more effective with the emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. We employed a large-insert (7–11 kb) paired-end tag sequencing technology (DNA-PET) to systematically analyze genome of four patients harbouring cytogenetically defined ABCR with neurodevelopmental symptoms, including developmental delay (DD) and speech disorders. We characterized structural variants (SVs) specific to each individual, including those matching the chromosomal breakpoints. Refinement of these regions by Sanger sequencing resulted in the identification of five disrupted genes in three individuals: guanine nucleotide binding protein, q polypeptide (GNAQ), RNA-binding protein, fox-1 homolog (RBFOX3), unc-5 homolog D (C.elegans) (UNC5D), transmembrane protein 47 (TMEM47), and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP). Among them, XIAP is the causative gene for the immunodeficiency phenotype seen in the patient. The remaining genes displayed specific expression in the fetal brain and have known biologically relevant functions in brain development, suggesting putative candidate genes for neurodevelopmental phenotypes. This study demonstrates the application of NGS technologies in mapping individual gene disruptions in ABCR as a resource for deciphering candidate genes in human neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). PMID:24603971

  16. Efficacy of Intensive Neurodevelopmental Treatment for Children With Developmental Delay, With or Without Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Park, Jin Woo; Lee, Ho Jun; Nam, Ki Yeun; Park, Tae June; Kim, Hee Jae; Kwon, Bum Sun

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of intensive neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT) on gross motor function for the children having developmental delay (DD), with or without cerebral palsy (CP). Forty-two children had intensive NDT three times weekly, 60 minutes a day, for 3 months, immediately followed by conventional NDT once or twice a week, 30 minutes a day, for another 3 months. We assessed Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) over three time points: before conventional NDT, before and after intensive NDT, and after 3 months of additional conventional NDT. The GMFM score in DD children significantly improved after intensive NDT, and the improvement maintained after 3 months of conventional NDT (pintensive NDT (ptreatment efficacy between the two groups. When we calculate the absence rate for comparing the compliance between intensive and conventional NDT, the absence rate was lower during the intensive NDT. Intensive NDT showed significantly improved gross motor function and higher compliance than conventional NDT. Additionally, all improvements were maintained through subsequent short-term conventional NDT. Thus, we recommend the intensive NDT program by day-hospital centers for children with DD, irrespective of accompanying CP.

  17. Comprehensive evaluation of the child with intellectual disability or global developmental delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeschler, John B; Shevell, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Global developmental delay and intellectual disability are relatively common pediatric conditions. This report describes the recommended clinical genetics diagnostic approach. The report is based on a review of published reports, most consisting of medium to large case series of diagnostic tests used, and the proportion of those that led to a diagnosis in such patients. Chromosome microarray is designated as a first-line test and replaces the standard karyotype and fluorescent in situ hybridization subtelomere tests for the child with intellectual disability of unknown etiology. Fragile X testing remains an important first-line test. The importance of considering testing for inborn errors of metabolism in this population is supported by a recent systematic review of the literature and several case series recently published. The role of brain MRI remains important in certain patients. There is also a discussion of the emerging literature on the use of whole-exome sequencing as a diagnostic test in this population. Finally, the importance of intentional comanagement among families, the medical home, and the clinical genetics specialty clinic is discussed. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. [Association between neontal morbidity, gestational age and developmental delays in moderate to late preterm children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonhaut, Luisa; Pérez, Marcela; Muñoz, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that children born moderate-to-late preterm (MLP) have a higher risk of hospitalisation, neonatal morbidity, and developmental delay (DD). To determine the association between DD, gestational age, and neonatal morbidity in MLP children. A case control study design nested in a cohort of MLP children born between 2006 and 2009 at a private hospital located in the Metropolitan area of Santiago. The children were assessed with the Bayley-III Scales of Infant Development at 8 or 18 months corrected age, or at 30 months of chronological age. Neonatal records were retrospectively reviewed. A multivariate analysis was performed to determine the effect of neonatal morbidity on development. A total of 130 MLP children, 25 cases and 105 controls, were studied. Most of them (83.8%) were hospitalised during the neonatal period. Significant differences between cases and controls regarding maternal age and symptomatic hypoglycaemia were observed (crude OR 3.5, adjusted OR 8.18). It was concluded that the variables that negatively affect the rate of development are male gender, being a twin, and gestational age. Symptomatic hypoglycaemia is the main risk factor for DD, while being a twin, male gender, and gestational age influenced the total development rate obtained. It is essential to develop strategies for prevention, screening, and early management of this metabolic disorder to prevent future DD. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. De novo KCNH1 mutations in four patients with syndromic developmental delay, hypotonia and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukai, Ryoko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Sakai, Yasunari; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Hubshman, Monika Weisz; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-05-01

    The voltage-gated Kv10.1 potassium channel, also known as ether-a-go-go-related gene 1, encoded by KCNH1 (potassium voltage-gated channel, subfamily H (eag related), member 1) is predominantly expressed in the central nervous system. Recently, de novo missense KCNH1 mutations have been identified in six patients with Zimmermann-Laband syndrome and in four patients with Temple-Baraitser syndrome. These syndromes were historically considered distinct. Here we report three de novo missense KCNH1 mutations in four patients with syndromic developmental delay and epilepsy. Two novel KCNH1 mutations (p.R357Q and p.R357P), found in three patients, were located at the evolutionally highly conserved arginine in the channel voltage-sensor domain (S4). Another mutation (p.G496E) was found in the channel pore domain (S6) helix, which acts as a hinge in activation gating and mainly conducts non-inactivating outward potassium current. A previously reported p.G496R mutation was shown to produce no voltage-dependent outward current in CHO cells, suggesting that p.G496E may also disrupt the proper function of the Kv channel pore. Our report confirms that KCNH1 mutations are associated with syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder, and also support the functional importance of the S4 domain.

  20. Comparative study of occupational performance in children with global developmental delay at 3 and 5 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Isabel Candeias Fernandes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aims to compare the occupational performance of children with global developmental delay, inserted in SNIPI, and children with typical development, at 3 and 5 years of age, and to verify what functional areas children with global developmental delay feature more difficulties. Method: This is a comparative descriptive study including a sample of 40 participants, and 20 show Typical Development with 20 presenting diagnosis of Global Development Delay. These two groups were divided into two age subgroups of 10 children (aged 3 to 5 years. Results: The Inventory Pediatric Evaluation of Disability was filled out by parents and the results show that occupational performance of children with developmental delay, inserted in SNIPI is lower than those with typical development, with 3 and 5 years old, in the areas personal, mobility and socialization autonomy. Conclusion: The publication of more studies related to the practice of occupational therapy in Portugal is crucial, thus contributing to the knowledge of professionals and students in this scientific area. In addition, more and more evidence-based practice is an approach adopted by health professionals, including occupational therapists, and to this end it is extremely important to carry out newer studies locally in Portugal.

  1. Finite-Time Stabilization and Adaptive Control of Memristor-Based Delayed Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leimin; Shen, Yi; Zhang, Guodong

    Finite-time stability problem has been a hot topic in control and system engineering. This paper deals with the finite-time stabilization issue of memristor-based delayed neural networks (MDNNs) via two control approaches. First, in order to realize the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, a delayed state feedback controller is proposed. Then, a novel adaptive strategy is applied to the delayed controller, and finite-time stabilization of MDNNs can also be achieved by using the adaptive control law. Some easily verified algebraic criteria are derived to ensure the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, and the estimation of the settling time functional is given. Moreover, several finite-time stability results as our special cases for both memristor-based neural networks (MNNs) without delays and neural networks are given. Finally, three examples are provided for the illustration of the theoretical results.Finite-time stability problem has been a hot topic in control and system engineering. This paper deals with the finite-time stabilization issue of memristor-based delayed neural networks (MDNNs) via two control approaches. First, in order to realize the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, a delayed state feedback controller is proposed. Then, a novel adaptive strategy is applied to the delayed controller, and finite-time stabilization of MDNNs can also be achieved by using the adaptive control law. Some easily verified algebraic criteria are derived to ensure the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, and the estimation of the settling time functional is given. Moreover, several finite-time stability results as our special cases for both memristor-based neural networks (MNNs) without delays and neural networks are given. Finally, three examples are provided for the illustration of the theoretical results.

  2. Adaptation to Delayed Speech Feedback Induces Temporal Recalibration between Vocal Sensory and Auditory Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yamamoto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We ordinarily perceive our voice sound as occurring simultaneously with vocal production, but the sense of simultaneity in vocalization can be easily interrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF. DAF causes normal people to have difficulty speaking fluently but helps people with stuttering to improve speech fluency. However, the underlying temporal mechanism for integrating the motor production of voice and the auditory perception of vocal sound remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the temporal tuning mechanism integrating vocal sensory and voice sounds under DAF with an adaptation technique. Participants read some sentences with specific delay times of DAF (0, 30, 75, 120 ms during three minutes to induce ‘Lag Adaptation’. After the adaptation, they then judged the simultaneity between motor sensation and vocal sound given feedback in producing simple voice but not speech. We found that speech production with lag adaptation induced a shift in simultaneity responses toward the adapted auditory delays. This indicates that the temporal tuning mechanism in vocalization can be temporally recalibrated after prolonged exposure to delayed vocal sounds. These findings suggest vocalization is finely tuned by the temporal recalibration mechanism, which acutely monitors the integration of temporal delays between motor sensation and vocal sound.

  3. Control of input delayed pneumatic vibration isolation table using adaptive fuzzy sliding mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Khazaee

    Full Text Available AbstractPneumatic isolators are promising candidates for increasing the quality of accurate instruments. For this purpose, higher performance of such isolators is a prerequisite. In particular, the time-delay due to the air transmission is an inherent issue with pneumatic systems, which needs to be overcome using modern control methods. In this paper an adaptive fuzzy sliding mode controller is proposed to improve the performance of a pneumatic isolator in the low frequency range, i.e., where the passive techniques have obvious shortcomings. The main idea is to combine the adaptive fuzzy controller with adaptive predictor as a new time delay control technique. The adaptive fuzzy sliding mode control and the adaptive fuzzy predictor help to circumvent the input delay and nonlinearities in such isolators. The main advantage of the proposed method is that the closed-loop system stability is guaranteed under certain conditions. Simulation results reveal the effectiveness of the proposed method, compared with other existing time -delay control methods.

  4. Cytogenetic Studies of Rwandan Pediatric Patients Presenting with Global Developmental Delay, Intellectual Disability and/or Multiple Congenital Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwineza, Annette; Hitayezu, Janvier; Jamar, Mauricette; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Murorunkwere, Seraphine; Janvier, Ndinkabandi; Bours, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Global developmental delay (GDD) is defined as a significant delay in two or more developmental domains: gross or fine motor, speech/language, cognitive, social/personal and activities of daily living. Many of these children will go on to be diagnosed with intellectual disability (ID), which is most commonly defined as having an IQ Patau syndrome. Other identified chromosomal abnormalities included 47,XX,+del(9)(q11), 46,XY,del(13)(q34) and 46,XX,der(22)t(10;22)(p10;p10)mat. In conclusion, our results highlight the high frequency of cytogenetically detectable abnormalities in this series, with implications for the burden on the healthcare. This study demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic analysis in patients with GDD/ID and MCA. PMID:26507407

  5. Cytogenetic Studies of Rwandan Pediatric Patients Presenting with Global Developmental Delay, Intellectual Disability and/or Multiple Congenital Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwineza, Annette; Hitayezu, Janvier; Jamar, Mauricette; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Murorunkwere, Seraphine; Janvier, Ndinkabandi; Bours, Vincent; Mutesa, Leon

    2016-02-01

    Global developmental delay (GDD) is defined as a significant delay in two or more developmental domains: gross or fine motor, speech/language, cognitive, social/personal and activities of daily living. Many of these children will go on to be diagnosed with intellectual disability (ID), which is most commonly defined as having an IQ Patau syndrome. Other identified chromosomal abnormalities included 47,XX,+del(9)(q11), 46,XY,del(13)(q34) and 46,XX,der(22)t(10;22)(p10;p10)mat. In conclusion, our results highlight the high frequency of cytogenetically detectable abnormalities in this series, with implications for the burden on the healthcare. This study demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic analysis in patients with GDD/ID and MCA. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Delay-aware adaptive sleep mechanism for green wireless-optical broadband access networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruyan; Liang, Alei; Wu, Dapeng; Wu, Dalei

    2017-07-01

    Wireless-Optical Broadband Access Network (WOBAN) is capacity-high, reliable, flexible, and ubiquitous, as it takes full advantage of the merits from both optical communication and wireless communication technologies. Similar to other access networks, the high energy consumption poses a great challenge for building up WOBANs. To shot this problem, we can make some load-light Optical Network Units (ONUs) sleep to reduce the energy consumption. Such operation, however, causes the increased packet delay. Jointly considering the energy consumption and transmission delay, we propose a delay-aware adaptive sleep mechanism. Specifically, we develop a new analytical method to evaluate the transmission delay and queuing delay over the optical part, instead of adopting M/M/1 queuing model. Meanwhile, we also analyze the access delay and queuing delay of the wireless part. Based on such developed delay models, we mathematically derive ONU's optimal sleep time. In addition, we provide numerous simulation results to show the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism.

  7. The Impact of Short-Term Video Games on Performance among Children with Developmental Delays: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ru-Lan; Lee, Wen-Chung; Lin, Jui-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    This prospective, randomized controlled study investigated the effects of short-term interactive video game playing among children with developmental delays participating in traditional rehabilitation treatment at a rehabilitation clinic. One hundred and one boys and 46 girls with a mean age of 5.8 years (range: 3 to 12 years) were enrolled in this study. All patients were confirmed to suffer from developmental delays, and were participating in traditional rehabilitation treatment. Children participated in two periods of 4 weeks each, group A being offered intervention of eight 30-minute sessions of interactive video games in the first period, and group B in the second, in addition to the traditional rehabilitation treatment. The physical, psychosocial, and total health of the children was periodically assessed using the parent-reported Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory-Generic Core Scales (PedsQL); and the children's upper extremity and physical function, transfer and basic mobility, sports and physical functioning, and global functioning were assessed using the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument. Parental impact was evaluated using the PedsQL-Family Impact Module for family function, PedsQL-Health Satisfaction questionnaire for parents' satisfaction with their children's care and World Health Organization-Quality of Life-Brief Version for quality of life. Compared with the baseline, significant improvements of physical function were observed in both groups (5.6 ± 19.5, p = 0.013; 4.7 ± 13.8, p = 0.009) during the intervention periods. No significant improvement of psychosocial health, functional performance, or family impact was observed in children with developmental delays. Short-term interactive video game play in conjunction with traditional rehabilitation treatment improved the physical health of children with developmental delays. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02184715.

  8. The Impact of Short-Term Video Games on Performance among Children with Developmental Delays: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru-Lan Hsieh

    Full Text Available This prospective, randomized controlled study investigated the effects of short-term interactive video game playing among children with developmental delays participating in traditional rehabilitation treatment at a rehabilitation clinic. One hundred and one boys and 46 girls with a mean age of 5.8 years (range: 3 to 12 years were enrolled in this study. All patients were confirmed to suffer from developmental delays, and were participating in traditional rehabilitation treatment. Children participated in two periods of 4 weeks each, group A being offered intervention of eight 30-minute sessions of interactive video games in the first period, and group B in the second, in addition to the traditional rehabilitation treatment. The physical, psychosocial, and total health of the children was periodically assessed using the parent-reported Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory-Generic Core Scales (PedsQL; and the children's upper extremity and physical function, transfer and basic mobility, sports and physical functioning, and global functioning were assessed using the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument. Parental impact was evaluated using the PedsQL-Family Impact Module for family function, PedsQL-Health Satisfaction questionnaire for parents' satisfaction with their children's care and World Health Organization-Quality of Life-Brief Version for quality of life. Compared with the baseline, significant improvements of physical function were observed in both groups (5.6 ± 19.5, p = 0.013; 4.7 ± 13.8, p = 0.009 during the intervention periods. No significant improvement of psychosocial health, functional performance, or family impact was observed in children with developmental delays. Short-term interactive video game play in conjunction with traditional rehabilitation treatment improved the physical health of children with developmental delays.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02184715.

  9. Adaptive developmental plasticity: what is it, how can we recognize it and when can it evolve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettle, Daniel; Bateson, Melissa

    2015-08-07

    Developmental plasticity describes situations where a specific input during an individual's development produces a lasting alteration in phenotype. Some instances of developmental plasticity may be adaptive, meaning that the tendency to produce the phenotype conditional on having experienced the developmental input has been under positive selection. We discuss the necessary assumptions and predictions of hypotheses concerning adaptive developmental plasticity (ADP) and develop guidelines for how to test empirically whether a particular example is adaptive. Central to our analysis is the distinction between two kinds of ADP: informational, where the developmental input provides information about the future environment, and somatic state-based, where the developmental input enduringly alters some aspect of the individual's somatic state. Both types are likely to exist in nature, but evolve under different conditions. In all cases of ADP, the expected fitness of individuals who experience the input and develop the phenotype should be higher than that of those who experience the input and do not develop the phenotype, while the expected fitness of those who do not experience the input and do not develop the phenotype should be higher than those who do not experience the input and do develop the phenotype. We describe ancillary predictions that are specific to just one of the two types of ADP and thus distinguish between them. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. Our experience with the aetiological diagnosis of global developmental delay and intellectual disability: 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pisón, J; García-Jiménez, M C; Monge-Galindo, L; Lafuente-Hidalgo, M; Pérez-Delgado, R; García-Oguiza, A; Peña-Segura, J L

    2014-09-01

    Global developmental delay (GDD) and intellectual disability (ID) are common reasons for consultation in paediatric neurology. Results from aetiological evaluations of children with GDD/ID vary greatly, and consequently, there is no universal consensus regarding which studies should be performed. We review our experience with determining aetiological diagnoses for children with GDD/ID who were monitored by the paediatric neurology unit over the 5-year period between 2006 and 2010. During the study period, 995 children with GDD/ID were monitored. An aetiological diagnosis was established for 309 patients (31%), but not in 686 (69%), despite completing numerous tests. A genetic cause was identified in 142 cases (46% of the total aetiologies established), broken down as 118 cases of genetic encephalopathy and 24 of metabolic hereditary diseases. Our data seem to indicate that diagnosis is easier when GDD/ID is associated with cerebral palsy, epilepsy, infantile spasms/West syndrome, or visual deficit, but more difficult in cases of autism spectrum disorders. Genetic studies provide an increasing number of aetiological diagnoses, and they are also becoming the first step in diagnostic studies. Array CGH (microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation) is the genetic test with the highest diagnostic yield in children with unexplained GDD/ID. The cost-effectiveness of complementary studies seems to be low if there are no clinically suspected entities. However, even in the absence of treatment, aetiological diagnosis is always important in order to provide genetic counselling and possible prenatal diagnosis, resolve family (and doctors') queries, and halt further diagnostic studies. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. [Functional performance of school children diagnosed with developmental delay up to two years of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornelas, Lílian de Fátima; Magalhães, Lívia de Castro

    2016-01-01

    To compare the functional performance of students diagnosed with developmental delay (DD) up to two years of age with peers exhibiting typical development. Cross-sectional study with functional performance assessment of children diagnosed with DD up to two years of age compared to those with typical development at seven to eight years of age. Each group consisted of 45 children, selected by non-random sampling, evaluated for motor skills, quality of home environment, school participation and performance. ANOVA and the Binomial test for two proportions were used to assess differences between groups. The group with DD had lower motor skills when compared to the typical group. While 66.7% of children in the typical group showed adequate school participation, receiving aid in cognitive and behavioral tasks similar to that offered to other children at the same level, only 22.2% of children with DD showed the same performance. Although 53.3% of the children with DD achieved an academic performance expected for the school level, there were limitations in some activities. Only two indicators of family environment, diversity and activities with parents at home, showed statistically significant difference between the groups, with advantage being shown for the typical group. Children with DD have persistent difficulties at school age, with motor deficit, restrictions in school activity performance and low participation in the school context, as well as significantly lower functional performance when compared to children without DD. A systematic monitoring of this population is recommended to identify needs and minimize future problems. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional performance of school children diagnosed with developmental delay up to two years of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornelas, Lílian de Fátima; Magalhães, Lívia de Castro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare the functional performance of students diagnosed with developmental delay (DD) up to two years of age with peers exhibiting typical development. Methods: Cross-sectional study with functional performance assessment of children diagnosed with DD up to two years of age compared to those with typical development at seven to eight years of age. Each group consisted of 45 children, selected by non-random sampling, evaluated for motor skills, quality of home environment, school participation and performance. ANOVA and the Binomial test for two proportions were used to assess differences between groups. Results: The group with DD had lower motor skills when compared to the typical group. While 66.7% of children in the typical group showed adequate school participation, receiving aid in cognitive and behavioral tasks similar to that offered to other children at the same level, only 22.2% of children with DD showed the same performance. Although 53.3% of the children with DD achieved an academic performance expected for the school level, there were limitations in some activities. Only two indicators of family environment, diversity and activities with parents at home, showed statistically significant difference between the groups, with advantage being shown for the typical group. Conclusions: Children with DD have persistent difficulties at school age, with motor deficit, restrictions in school activity performance and low participation in the school context, as well as significantly lower functional performance when compared to children without DD. A systematic monitoring of this population is recommended to identify needs and minimize future problems. PMID:26553573

  13. Functional performance of school children diagnosed with developmental delay up to two years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lílian de Fátima Dornelas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To compare the functional performance of students diagnosed with developmental delay (DD up to two years of age with peers exhibiting typical development. Methods: Cross-sectional study with functional performance assessment of children diagnosed with DD up to two years of age compared to those with typical development at seven to eight years of age. Each group consisted of 45 children, selected by non-random sampling, evaluated for motor skills, quality of home environment, school participation and performance. ANOVA and the Binomial test for two proportions were used to assess differences between groups. Results: The group with DD had lower motor skills when compared to the typical group. While 66.7% of children in the typical group showed adequate school participation, receiving aid in cognitive and behavioral tasks similar to that offered to other children at the same level, only 22.2% of children with DD showed the same performance. Although 53.3% of the children with DD achieved an academic performance expected for the school level, there were limitations in some activities. Only two indicators of family environment, diversity and activities with parents at home, showed statistically significant difference between the groups, with advantage being shown for the typical group. Conclusions: Children with DD have persistent difficulties at school age, with motor deficit, restrictions in school activity performance and low participation in the school context, as well as significantly lower functional performance when compared to children without DD. A systematic monitoring of this population is recommended to identify needs and minimize future problems.

  14. Microstructural callosal abnormalities in normal-appearing brain of children with developmental delay detected with diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xiao-Qi [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hannover (Germany); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Sun, Yimeng; Illies, Till; Zeumer, Hermann; Fiehler, Jens [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Kruse, Bernd [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Pediatrics, Hamburg (Germany); Lanfermann, Heinrich [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hannover (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Callosal fibres play an important role in psychomotor and cognitive functions. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible microstructural abnormalities of the corpus callosum in children with developmental delay, who have normal conventional brain MR imaging results. Seventeen pediatric patients (aged 1-9 years) with developmental delay were studied. Quantitative T2 and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were measured at the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum (CC). Fibre tracking, volumetric determination, as well as fibre density calculations of the CC were also carried out. The results were compared with those of the age-matched healthy subjects. A general elevation of T2 relaxation times (105 ms in patients vs. 95 ms in controls) and reduction of the FA values (0.66 in patients vs. 0.74 in controls) at the genu of the CC were found in patients. Reductions of the fibre numbers (5,464 in patients vs. 8,886 in controls) and volumes (3,415 ml in patients vs. 5,235 ml in controls) of the CC were found only in patients older than 5 years. The study indicates that despite their inconspicuous findings in conventional MRI microstructural brain abnormalities are evident in these pediatric patients suffering from developmental delay. (orig.)

  15. EMOTIONAL AVAILABILITY IN EARLY MOTHER-CHILD INTERACTIONS FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS, OTHER PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS, AND DEVELOPMENTAL DELAY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Hesna; Erol, Nese; Akin, Duygu Pamir; Gullu, Belgin Ustun; Akcakin, Melda; Alpas, Başak; Öner, Özgür

    2016-01-01

    Emotional availability (EA) is a method to assess early parent-child dyadic interactions for emotional awareness, perception, experience, and expression between child and parent that describe global relational quality (Z. Biringen & M. Easterbrooks, 2012). The current study aimed to examine the effects of an infant's diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), other psychiatric disorders (OPD), and developmental delay (DD) on the maternal EA Scale (EAS; Z. Biringen & M. Easterbrooks, 2012; Z. Biringen, J.L. Robinson, & R.N. Emde, 2000) scores and the relative contributions of infant's age, gender, diagnosis, developmental level, and maternal education on EAS scores in a clinical Turkish sample. Three hundred forty-five infant-mother dyads participated in this study. Results of the research indicated that EAS adult scores were associated with maternal education and infant's diagnosis whereas child scores were associated with infant's age, diagnosis, and developmental level. Infants' involvement and responsiveness to the mother were lower in the group with ASD. Children with OPD, particularly when their mothers have lower education, might be at increased risk of having problems in parent-child interactions. Young ASD subjects with developmental delay are in greatest need of support to increase reactions toward their mother. These findings underscore the importance of using all of the EA dimensions rather than only one measure on children in high-risk populations. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  16. Cognitive development in children with language impairment, and correlation between language and intelligence development in kindergarten children with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Su-Fen; Liu, Jui-Ching; Hsu, Chun-Ling; Chang, Ming-Yuh; Chang, Tung-Ming; Cheng, Helen

    2015-01-01

    We performed a retrospective review of 65 children with developmental delay. The male-to-female ratio was 2.25 : 1, and the mean age was 5.8 years; performance IQ was 94.8, verbal IQ was 83, and full-scale IQ was 87.4. Twenty-three (35%) children had normal language development, 13 (20%) had below average language development, and 29 (45%) had developmental language disorder. Performance IQ was significantly better than verbal IQ in all children (P language groups. The performance IQ (P = .007) of children with developmental language disorder and specific language impairment was significantly lower than that of children with normal language development. Performance IQ was found to be correlated with language score (r = .309, P = .012). The children with language impairment were associated with lower IQ scores. The discrepancy between performance IQ and verbal IQ persisted in children with developmental delay, not only in children with language disorder. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Solving delay differential equations in S-ADAPT by method of steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert J; Mo, Gary; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2013-09-01

    S-ADAPT is a version of the ADAPT program that contains additional simulation and optimization abilities such as parametric population analysis. S-ADAPT utilizes LSODA to solve ordinary differential equations (ODEs), an algorithm designed for large dimension non-stiff and stiff problems. However, S-ADAPT does not have a solver for delay differential equations (DDEs). Our objective was to implement in S-ADAPT a DDE solver using the methods of steps. The method of steps allows one to solve virtually any DDE system by transforming it to an ODE system. The solver was validated for scalar linear DDEs with one delay and bolus and infusion inputs for which explicit analytic solutions were derived. Solutions of nonlinear DDE problems coded in S-ADAPT were validated by comparing them with ones obtained by the MATLAB DDE solver dde23. The estimation of parameters was tested on the MATLB simulated population pharmacodynamics data. The comparison of S-ADAPT generated solutions for DDE problems with the explicit solutions as well as MATLAB produced solutions which agreed to at least 7 significant digits. The population parameter estimates from using importance sampling expectation-maximization in S-ADAPT agreed with ones used to generate the data. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Becoming a Coach in Developmental Adaptive Sailing: A Lifelong Learning Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Tiago; Culver, Diane M

    2014-10-02

    Life-story methodology and innovative methods were used to explore the process of becoming a developmental adaptive sailing coach. Jarvis's (2009) lifelong learning theory framed the thematic analysis. The findings revealed that the coach, Jenny, was exposed from a young age to collaborative environments. Social interactions with others such as mentors, colleagues, and athletes made major contributions to her coaching knowledge. As Jenny was exposed to a mixture of challenges and learning situations, she advanced from recreational para-swimming instructor to developmental adaptive sailing coach. The conclusions inform future research in disability sport coaching, coach education, and applied sport psychology.

  19. Becoming a Coach in Developmental Adaptive Sailing: A Lifelong Learning Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Tiago; Culver, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Life-story methodology and innovative methods were used to explore the process of becoming a developmental adaptive sailing coach. Jarvis's (2009) lifelong learning theory framed the thematic analysis. The findings revealed that the coach, Jenny, was exposed from a young age to collaborative environments. Social interactions with others such as mentors, colleagues, and athletes made major contributions to her coaching knowledge. As Jenny was exposed to a mixture of challenges and learning situations, she advanced from recreational para-swimming instructor to developmental adaptive sailing coach. The conclusions inform future research in disability sport coaching, coach education, and applied sport psychology. PMID:25210408

  20. Infant born preterm have delayed development of adaptive postural control in the first 5 months of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusing, Stacey C; Thacker, Leroy R; Galloway, James C

    2016-08-01

    Infants born preterm are at increased risk of developmental disabilities, that may be attributed to their early experiences and ability to learn. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the ability of infants born preterm to adapt their postural control to changing task demands. This study included 18 infants born at 32 weeks of gestation or less whose posture was compared in supine under 2 conditions, with and without a visual stimulus presented. The postural variability, measured with root mean squared displacement of the center of pressure, and postural complexity, measured with the approximate entropy of the center of pressure displacement were measured longitudinally from 2.5 to 5 months of age. The infants looked at the toys in midline for several months prior to adapting their postural variability in a manner similar to full term infants. Only after postural variability was reduced in both the caudal cephalic and medial lateral direction in the toy condition did the infants learn to reach for the toy. Postural complexity did not vary between conditions. These findings suggest that infants used a variety of strategies to control their posture. In contrast to research with infants born full term, the infants born preterm in this study did not identify the successful strategy of reducing movement of the center of pressure until months after showing interest in the toy. This delayed adaptation may impact the infants ability to learn over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Delayed Hepatic Adaptation to Weaning in ACBP(-/-) Mice Is Caused by Disruption of the Epidermal Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neess, Ditte; Bek, Signe; Bloksgaard, Maria

    2013-01-01

    in the skin rather than in the liver. Similarly to ACBP(-/-) mice, K14-ACBP(-/-) mice exhibit an increased transepidermal water loss, and we show that the hepatic phenotype is caused specifically by the epidermal barrier defect, which leads to increased lipolysis in white adipose tissue. Our data demonstrate......We previously reported that mice deficient in acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) display a delayed metabolic adaptation to weaning. This includes a delayed activation of the hepatic lipogenic gene program, which may result from hepatic accumulation of triacylglycerol and/or cholesteryl esters...... in the late suckling period. To further investigate the basis for this phenotype, we generated mice deficient in ACBP in hepatocytes (Alb-ACBP(-/-)) and keratinocytes (K14-ACBP(-/-)). Surprisingly, the delayed adaptation to weaning, including hepatic lipid accumulation, is caused by ACBP deficiency...

  2. Developmental prosopagnosia and adaptative compensatory strategies: Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anair Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Prosopagnosia is a type of visual agnosia with inability to identify faces, usually secondary to brain lesion in associative cortex areas, but there is also a congenital form known as developmental prosopagnosia. Objectives: To describe a case of developmental prosopagnosia that illustrates the specificity of the pathways for perception of faces in the visual system. Also, we will describe possible mechanisms of recognition used by this patient. Methods: R.S., a 50 year-old woman, was referred for neuropsychological assessment due to difficulties in perception of familiar faces since childhood, unexplained by any loss of visual acuity. Results: The exam showed good performance for comprehension, reasoning, concept formation, constructional abilities, criticism, judgment, mental control, memory and visual perception for other kinds of stimuli. No difficulties were seen regarding identification of ethnicity, age and types of animals. The patient was able to match celebrities' faces in different positions, but could not identify the matching pictures for unknown people. Conclusions: These findings indicate the patient had developed strategies, throughout life, to recognize familiar faces (relatives, celebrities from memorized fragments, but still had difficulties in identifying non-familiar faces holistically.

  3. The use of MR imaging and spectroscopy of the brain in children investigated for developmental delay: What is the most appropriate imaging strategy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Paul D. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Batty, Ruth; Raghavan, Ashok; Connolly, Daniel J.A. [Sheffield Children' s Hospital Trust, Department of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Warren, Daniel; Hart, Anthony [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Sharrard, Mark [Sheffield Children' s Hospital Trust, Department of Paediatrics, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Mordekar, Santosh R. [Sheffield Children' s Hospital Trust, Department of Paediatric Neurology, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    Developmental delay is a common problem in paediatric practice and many children with developmental delay are referred for MR imaging. Our study was performed as part of a continuing audit process to optimise our MR protocol and case selection. We performed MR imaging and spectroscopy protocol on 157 children with developmental delay. We analysed the effect of these interventions by looking at the overall detection rate of relevant pathology and in particular subgroups of the children. 71% of the children had normal MR imaging, 10% had non-specific findings and 19% had specific abnormalities on MR imaging. The overall risk of having a specific structural abnormality with isolated developmental was 7.5% but if other neurological symptoms/signs were present the risk was 28%. Two children had abnormal spectroscopic findings, one with tuberous sclerosis and the other with absent brain creatine. Case selection for MR imaging is important in children with developmental delay. The best strategies for selecting children for MR are either; not performing MR with developmental delay in one domain only or performing MR with developmental delay in three or four domains or if there are other neurological features. (orig.)

  4. The Effects of Direct Instruction Flashcard System and Model, Lead, and Test on Numeral Identification for a Nonverbal Preschool Girl with Developmental Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay DeLong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the Direct Instruction (DI flashcard system combined with model, lead, and test on the mastery of numerical identification for a nonverbal preschool girl with developmental delay. The research was carried out in a self-contained preschool classroom. The classroom enrolled children with delays in the skill areas of preacademic, expressive communication, receptive communication, gross motor, fine motor, or adaptive. Our participant was a 4-year-old girl scheduled to be placed into an integrated preschool containing a combination of children with delays in one or more area and their typically developing peers the following year. She was behind her typically developing peers in the area of numeral identification. A single-subject, multiple baseline design across three sets of target numerals was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the DI flashcard procedure. A functional relationship was shown between numeral recognition and the implementation of our intervention. Suggestions for future research were made.

  5. Special Physical Education: Adapted, Individualized, Developmental. Seventh Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, John M.

    This text on physical education for children and adolescents with disabilities attempts to bring together current research findings and best educational practices from the fields of adapted physical education, special education, psychology, medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and therapeutic recreation. The book is organized into…

  6. Adaptive Behavioral Outcomes in Adolescents with Developmental Language Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Deborah; Paul, Rhea

    Eighteen people (with ages ranging from 7 to 22 years) who had been diagnosed as aphasic 10 years previously were assessed in terms of current functioning to test the hypothesis that, since the subjects had a specific language disorder, other areas of adaptive development should be relatively spared, and communication scores should be…

  7. Adaptive control for time-delay teleoperation systems with uncertain dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Zhang, Xia; Zheng, Wenfeng; Yang, Bo

    2017-08-01

    In most teleoperation systems, the dynamics are uncertain and the communications exhibit time delays. In order to confront these problems, this paper reports a position error-based bilateral adaptive controller, in which the unknown operator dynamical parameters and environmental dynamical parameters are included in the unknown vector of the system to be evaluated, adaptive estimate laws are compensated by estimate errors and dissipation by time delays are compensated. By using Lyapunov-Krasovskii stability theorem, it is proved that both position errors and velocities of the teleoperation system asymptotically convergent to zero. Simulations are performed to compare the performance of the proposed controller with the traditional adaptive controller and to demonstrate the efficiency of the developed teleoperation control system.

  8. Increased risk of schizophrenia from additive interaction between infant motor developmental delay and obstetric complications: evidence from a population-based longitudinal study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clarke, Mary C

    2011-12-01

    Obstetric complications and developmental delay are well-established risk factors for schizophrenia. The authors investigated whether these risk factors interact in an additive manner to further increase risk for schizophrenia.

  9. A randomized controlled trial of routines-based early intervention for children with or at risk for developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ai-Wen; Chao, Mei-Yuan; Liu, Shu-Wen

    2013-10-01

    Routines-based early intervention (RBEI) for children with or at risk for developmental delay encourages collaboration between professionals and families to enhance children's participation in family routines with family-selected goals. We conducted the first single-blinded randomized control trial to examine the effectiveness of a 6-month RBEI vs. traditional home visiting (THV), which uses a curriculum focused on children's developmental domains. Thirty-one families with children aged 5-30 months (mean age 17.4 months) with or at risk for developmental delay were randomly assigned to an RBEI group (n=15) or a THV group (n=16). The enrolled children were evaluated using the Chinese version of Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI-C) and the Comprehensive Development Inventory for Infants and Toddlers (CDIIT) at 5 time points. Two-way mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine the group by stage interactions. Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) were applied to explore between-group differences on individualized goal achievement. PEDI-C showed that the RBEI group had a faster progress rate in self-care functions and independence in social functions in the first 3 months of intervention and at the 6-month follow-up. The RBEI group also scored higher on the GAS in the first 3 months of intervention. However, between-group differences in changes in the developmental domains on the CDIIT were not significant. Thus, RBEI was more effective than THV in promoting functional outcomes and reaching family-selected goals, while both interventions allowed equal improvement in developmental domains. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Adaptation to delayed auditory feedback induces the temporal recalibration effect in both speech perception and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kosuke; Kawabata, Hideaki

    2014-12-01

    We ordinarily speak fluently, even though our perceptions of our own voices are disrupted by various environmental acoustic properties. The underlying mechanism of speech is supposed to monitor the temporal relationship between speech production and the perception of auditory feedback, as suggested by a reduction in speech fluency when the speaker is exposed to delayed auditory feedback (DAF). While many studies have reported that DAF influences speech motor processing, its relationship to the temporal tuning effect on multimodal integration, or temporal recalibration, remains unclear. We investigated whether the temporal aspects of both speech perception and production change due to adaptation to the delay between the motor sensation and the auditory feedback. This is a well-used method of inducing temporal recalibration. Participants continually read texts with specific DAF times in order to adapt to the delay. Then, they judged the simultaneity between the motor sensation and the vocal feedback. We measured the rates of speech with which participants read the texts in both the exposure and re-exposure phases. We found that exposure to DAF changed both the rate of speech and the simultaneity judgment, that is, participants' speech gained fluency. Although we also found that a delay of 200 ms appeared to be most effective in decreasing the rates of speech and shifting the distribution on the simultaneity judgment, there was no correlation between these measurements. These findings suggest that both speech motor production and multimodal perception are adaptive to temporal lag but are processed in distinct ways.

  11. Case report of 5 siblings: malnutrition? Rickets? DiGeorge syndrome? Developmental delay?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris William

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parents of six children are facing a trial on charges of aggravated manslaughter in the care a 5 1/2 month old infant who died suddenly and neglect of their four older children for causing them to be malnourished by feeding them all an exclusively raw foods vegan diet. Both parents declined plea bargains and plan to defend themselves in court. Case presentation The fifth child born to a married couple was breast-fed until 2 1/2 months. Subsequently, the parents fed the baby an exclusively raw foods diet prepared in a blender at home. The four older children, ages 18 months – 6 1/2 years also ate an exclusively raw foods vegan diet. None of the four older children had significant previous injuries or serious illnesses. At autopsy, the infant weighed 3180 mg (6.99 pounds and appeared emaciated. The thymus gland was absent and parathyroid glands were not located. The lungs were "congested." DiGeorge anomaly cannot be ruled out from these findings. Although, the coroner ruled that "malnutrition" was the sole cause of death, malnutrition, according to the World Health Organization definition, cannot be diagnosed in this infant. Compared with standard growth charts, the older children fell 2.1–4.1 standard deviations below the mean for North American children in height and weight. Labs were normal except for a low cholesterol level in all and a low prealbumin in one of three children tested. Therefore, malnutrition cannot be diagnosed in these children. The pediatrician diagnosed rickets in the four-year-old. However, chest x-rays were normal in all and long bone x-rays showed minimal changes in one child – no sign of rickets. The clinical diagnosis of rickets was not confirmed by the Center for Disease Control's criteria. A psychologist diagnosed the 18-month-old as developmentally delayed to the level of a 15-month-old, but this diagnosis is questionable. Conclusion The raw foods vegan diet and possibly inherited small

  12. The Nature and Control of Postural Adaptations of Boys with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przysucha, Eryk P.; Taylor, M. Jane; Weber, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the nature of postural adaptations and control tendencies, between 7 (n = 9) and 11-year-old boys (n = 10) with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and age-matched, younger (n = 10) and older (n = 9) peers in a leaning task. Examination of anterior-posterior, medio-lateral, maximum and mean area of sway, and path length…

  13. Review of Adaptive Behavior Studies in Mentally Retarded Persons with Autism/Pervasive Developmental Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraijer, Dirk

    2000-01-01

    A review of research on the adaptive behavior of persons with both mental retardation and autism/pervasive developmental disorder finds the performances of these dually disabled individuals to be particularly poor in the domain of social skills/socialization and somewhat less poor in the communication domain. In addition, autistic mentally…

  14. Physiological mechanisms of adaptive developmental plasticity in Rana temporaria island populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burraco, Pablo; Valdés, Ana Elisa; Johansson, Frank; Gomez-Mestre, Ivan

    2017-07-07

    Adaptive plasticity is essential for many species to cope with environmental heterogeneity. In particular, developmental plasticity allows organisms with complex life cycles to adaptively adjust the timing of ontogenetic switch points. Size at and time to metamorphosis are reliable fitness indicators in organisms with complex cycles. The physiological machinery of developmental plasticity commonly involves the activation of alternative neuroendocrine pathways, causing metabolic alterations. Nevertheless, we have still incomplete knowledge about how these mechanisms evolve under environments that select for differences in adaptive plasticity. In this study, we investigate the physiological mechanisms underlying divergent degrees of developmental plasticity across Rana temporaria island populations inhabiting different types of pools in northern Sweden. In a laboratory experiment we estimated developmental plasticity of amphibian larvae from six populations coming from three different island habitats: islands with only permanent pools, islands with only ephemeral pools, and islands with a mixture of both types of pools. We exposed larvae of each population to either constant water level or simulated pool drying, and estimated their physiological responses in terms of corticosterone levels, oxidative stress, and telomere length. We found that populations from islands with only temporary pools had a higher degree of developmental plasticity than those from the other two types of habitats. All populations increased their corticosterone levels to a similar extent when subjected to simulated pool drying, and therefore variation in secretion of this hormone does not explain the observed differences among populations. However, tadpoles from islands with temporary pools showed lower constitutive activities of catalase and glutathione reductase, and also showed overall shorter telomeres. The observed differences are indicative of physiological costs of increased developmental

  15. Adaptive Constrained Control for Uncertain Nonlinear Time-Delay System with Application to Unmanned Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a class of nonlinear time-delayed systems with output prescribed performance constraint. The neural network and DOB (disturbance observer are designed to tackle the uncertainties and external disturbance, and prescribed performance function is constructed for the output prescribed performance constrained problem. Then the robust controller is designed by using adaptive backstepping method, and the stability analysis is considered by using Lyapunov-Krasovskii. Furthermore, the proposed method is employed into the unmanned helicopter system with time-delay aerodynamic uncertainty. Finally, the simulation results illustrate that the proposed robust prescribed performance control system achieved a good control performance.

  16. The Efficacy of Arabic Version of the Developmental Assessment of Young Children Second Edition (DAYC-2) Scale in Detecting Developmental Delay among Jordanian Children Aged Birth to 71 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Rawan M. Abu; Smadi, Jamil M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of the developmental assessment of young children second edition (DAYC-2) Scale in detecting Developmental Delay among Jordanian children aged birth to 71 months. Firstly, the scale was translated and reviewed for language and cultural appropriateness. Secondly, the Arabic Jordanian version of the scale was…

  17. Participation in Early Childhood Educational Environments for Young Children with and Without Developmental Disabilities and Delays: A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Tanya E; Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G; Little, Lauren M; Davies, Patricia L; Khetani, Mary A

    2017-02-01

    This mixed methods study examined: 1) how young children with and without developmental disabilities and delays participate in daycare or preschool activities; 2) similarities and differences in environmental factors impacting daycare or preschool participation; and 3) strategies used by parents who desired a change in their child's participation. Data were drawn from 129 parents of young children with and without developmental disabilities and delays (mean age = 49.3 months) residing in North America. Summary and item-level group differences based on disability status were assessed for participation and environmental supports to participation. Narrative data on parental strategies were content coded, transformed into numerical counts, and summarized to identify strategies commonly employed by parents to promote their child's participation. Moderate to large disability related group differences in participation and environmental support to participation were found even after controlling for confounding effects of child age, child gender, and family income. Parents commonly described strategies focused on "child care tasks" and "child peer groups," irrespective of the type(s) of change they desired. Study findings suggest that discrepancies in school participation between young children with and without disabilities and delays can be detected and intervened on during the early childhood period.

  18. Diapause: delaying the developmental clock in response to a changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiesari, Luca; O'Connor, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal changes can induce organisms to modify their developmental growth. Many holometabolous insects, especially Lepidoptera, trigger diapause, an "actively induced" dormancy, for overwintering. Diapause is an alternative developmental pathway that reversibly blocks developmental growth during specific transitions and enhances the hibernating potential of the organism. Changes in environmental cues, such as light and temperature, trigger modifications in the levels, or in the timing, of developmental hormones. These in turn switch the developmental trajectory (diapause or direct development), strongly altering larval/pupal growth and inducing the appearance of diapause-bound seasonal morphs (polyphenism). We also discuss an example of vertebrate diapause using the killifish embryo as an example where diapause is an environmentally determined developmental switch analogous to that observed in lepidopteran dormancy. Based on the examples discussed here, we propose that the complex physiological responses leading to diapause might evolve quickly by relatively limited genetic changes in the regulation of hormonal signals that program normal developmental transitions. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Developmental delay associated with normal thyroidal function and long-term amiodarone therapy during fetal and neonatal life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikovic, Zeljko; Karadzov, Natasa; Jovanovic, Ida; Milic, Vedrana; Tomovic, Branislav; Egic, Amira; Dragovic Lukic, Gordana

    2010-07-01

    We reported a case of a child with neurodevelopment delay induced by long-term amiodarone exposure due to a treatment of fetal supraventricular tachycardia (FSVT), subtype permanent junctional reciprocating tachycardia (PJRT) with the normal thyroidal function. Refractory persistent FSVT was treated intrautero with digoxin (0.5 mg QD) until delivery and amiodarone (100 mg QD) from 26 to 35 weeks of gestation. A baby weighing 3550 g with normal acid-base status was delivered at 38 weeks of gestation. The PJRT recurred 28 hours after delivery and reverted to sinus rhythm with amiodarone and propranolol for another 24 months. The neurological disturbances were manifested at the age of 12 months, when hypotonia and delayed motor milestones were recognised. At the age of 18 months, the child had mildly neurological development delay with hypotonia, ataxia and foot deformities. At the age of 24 months, motor milestones were mildly delayed with the usage of a few words without the ability to connect them into the sentence. The developmental quotient (DQ) was 68. Electroencephalogram and magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system were all normal. At the age of 30 months, motor milestones were still delayed together with speech development and language delay, only some words were used, not distinctly, DQ was 78. Thyroid function was normal on each examination. All blood and urine analyses were in normal ranges. Chromosome analysis did not show any abnormalities. Since we excluded all possible reasons, we could only bring an indirect link between the long-term amiodarone exposure during fetal and postnatal life and neurodevelopment delay. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome fluctuations in cyanobacteria reflect evolutionary, developmental and adaptive traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria belong to an ancient group of photosynthetic prokaryotes with pronounced variations in their cellular differentiation strategies, physiological capacities and choice of habitat. Sequencing efforts have shown that genomes within this phylum are equally diverse in terms of size and protein-coding capacity. To increase our understanding of genomic changes in the lineage, the genomes of 58 contemporary cyanobacteria were analysed for shared and unique orthologs. Results A total of 404 protein families, present in all cyanobacterial genomes, were identified. Two of these are unique to the phylum, corresponding to an AbrB family transcriptional regulator and a gene that escapes functional annotation although its genomic neighbourhood is conserved among the organisms examined. The evolution of cyanobacterial genome sizes involves a mix of gains and losses in the clade encompassing complex cyanobacteria, while a single event of reduction is evident in a clade dominated by unicellular cyanobacteria. Genome sizes and gene family copy numbers evolve at a higher rate in the former clade, and multi-copy genes were predominant in large genomes. Orthologs unique to cyanobacteria exhibiting specific characteristics, such as filament formation, heterocyst differentiation, diazotrophy and symbiotic competence, were also identified. An ancestral character reconstruction suggests that the most recent common ancestor of cyanobacteria had a genome size of approx. 4.5 Mbp and 1678 to 3291 protein-coding genes, 4%-6% of which are unique to cyanobacteria today. Conclusions The different rates of genome-size evolution and multi-copy gene abundance suggest two routes of genome development in the history of cyanobacteria. The expansion strategy is driven by gene-family enlargment and generates a broad adaptive potential; while the genome streamlining strategy imposes adaptations to highly specific niches, also reflected in their different functional capacities. A few

  1. Application of fuzzy adaptive control to a MIMO nonlinear time-delay pump-valve system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhounian; Wu, Peng; Wu, Dazhuan

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a control strategy to balance the reliability against efficiency is introduced to overcome the common off-design operation problem in pump-valve systems. The pump-valve system is a nonlinear multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) system with time delays which cannot be accurately measured but can be approximately modeled using Bernoulli Principle. A fuzzy adaptive controller is applied to approximate system parameters and achieve the control of delay-free model since the system model is inaccurate and the direct feedback linearization method cannot be applied. An extended Smith predictor is introduced to compensate time delays of the system using the inaccurate system model. The experiment is carried out to verify the effectiveness of the control strategy whose results show that the control performance is well achieved. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Predictors of Poor School Readiness in Children Without Developmental Delay at Age 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Bergen B; Dudovitz, Rebecca N; Coker, Tumaini R; Barnert, Elizabeth S; Biely, Christopher; Li, Ning; Szilagyi, Peter G; Larson, Kandyce; Halfon, Neal; Zimmerman, Frederick J; Chung, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    ...) for referral to early intervention (EI) services. Many young children without DDs, however, are at high risk for poor developmental and behavioral outcomes by school entry but are ineligible for EI...

  3. Quantitative analysis of the corpus callosum in children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay: correlation with cerebral white matter volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panigrahy, Ashok [Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Barnes, Patrick D. [Stanford University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Lucile Salter Packard Children' s Hospital, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Robertson, Robert L. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Sleeper, Lynn A. [New England Research Institute, Watertown, MA (United States); Sayre, James W. [UCLA Medical Center, Departments of Radiology and Biostatistics, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-12-01

    This study was conducted to quantitatively correlate the thickness of the corpus callosum with the volume of cerebral white matter in children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay. Material and methods: A clinical database of 70 children with cerebral palsy and developmental delay was established with children between the ages of 1 and 5 years. These children also demonstrated abnormal periventricular T2 hyperintensities associated with and without ventriculomegaly. Mid-sagittal T1-weighted images were used to measure the thickness (genu, mid-body, and splenium) and length of the corpus callosum. Volumes of interest were digitized based on gray-scale densities to define the hemispheric cerebral white matter on axial T2-weighted and FLAIR images. The thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum was correlated with cerebral white matter volume. Subgroup analysis was also performed to examine the relationship of this correlation with both gestational age and neuromotor outcome. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance and Pearson correlation coefficients. There was a positive correlation between the thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum and the volume of cerebral white matter across all children studied (R=0.665, P=0.0001). This correlation was not dependent on gestational age. The thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum was decreased in the spastic diplegia group compared to the two other groups (hypotonia and developmental delay only; P<0.0001). Within each neuromotor subgroup, there was a positive correlation between thickness of the mid-body of the corpus callosum and volume of the cerebral white matter. (orig.)

  4. Adaptive Neural Control for a Class of Outputs Time-Delay Nonlinear Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruliang Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers an adaptive neural control for a class of outputs time-delay nonlinear systems with perturbed or no. Based on RBF neural networks, the radius basis function (RBF neural networks is employed to estimate the unknown continuous functions. The proposed control guarantees that all closed-loop signals remain bounded. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  5. The Diagnostic Yield of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization Is High Regardless of Severity of Intellectual Disability/Developmental Delay in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arrigo, Stefano; Gavazzi, Francesco; Alfei, Enrico; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Montomoli, Cristina; Corso, Barbara; Buzzi, Erika; Sciacca, Francesca L; Bulgheroni, Sara; Riva, Daria; Pantaleoni, Chiara

    2016-05-01

    Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization is a method of molecular analysis that identifies chromosomal anomalies (or copy number variants) that correlate with clinical phenotypes. The aim of the present study was to apply a clinical score previously designated by de Vries to 329 patients with intellectual disability/developmental disorder (intellectual disability/developmental delay) referred to our tertiary center and to see whether the clinical factors are associated with a positive outcome of aCGH analyses. Another goal was to test the association between a positive microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization result and the severity of intellectual disability/developmental delay. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization identified structural chromosomal alterations responsible for the intellectual disability/developmental delay phenotype in 16% of our sample. Our study showed that causative copy number variants are frequently found even in cases of mild intellectual disability (30.77%). We want to emphasize the need to conduct microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization on all individuals with intellectual disability/developmental delay, regardless of the severity, because the degree of intellectual disability/developmental delay does not predict the diagnostic yield of microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Marginal and internal adaptation of class II restorations after immediate or delayed composite placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietschi, Didier; Monasevic, Manuela; Krejci, Ivo; Davidson, Carel

    2002-01-01

    Direct class II composite restorations still represent a challenge, particularly when proximal limits extend below the CEJ. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of the type of adhesive and the delay between adhesive placement and composite insertion on restoration adaptation. Direct class II MOD box-shaped composite restorations (n=8 per group) were placed on intact human third molars, with proximal margins 1mm above or under CEJ. All cavities were filled with a horizontal layering technique, immediately after adhesive placement (IP) or after a 24h delay (DP). A filled three-component adhesive (OptiBond FL: OB) and a single-bottle, unfilled one (Prime & Bond 2.1: PB) were tested. Marginal adaptation was assessed before and after each phase of mechanical loading (250000 cycles at 50 N, 250000 cycles at 75 N and 500000 cycles at 100 N); internal adaptation was evaluated after test completion. Gold-plated resin replicas were observed in the SEM and restoration quality evaluated in percentages of continuity (C) at the margins and within the internal interface, after sample section. Adaptation to beveled enamel proved satisfactory in all groups. After loading, adaptation to gingival dentin degraded more in PB-IP (C=55.1%) than PB-DP (C=86.9%) or OB-DP (C=89%). More internal defects were observed in PB samples (IP: C=79.2% and DP: C=86.3%) compared to OB samples (IP: C=97.4% and DP: C=98.3%). The filled adhesive (OB) produced a better adaptation than the 'one-bottle' brand (PB), hypothetically by forming a stress-absorbing layer, limiting the development of adhesive failures. Postponing occlusal loading (such as the indirect approach) improved also restoration adaptation.

  7. Correlates of self-injurious, aggressive and destructive behaviour in children under five who are at risk of developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, J L; Bacarese-Hamilton, M; Davies, L E; Oliver, C

    2014-01-01

    Several behavioural correlates of self-injury, aggression and destructive behaviour have been identified in children and young adults with intellectual disabilities. This cross-sectional study aimed to further explore these correlates in very young children with developmental delay. Parents of 56 children (40 male) under the age of five years (mean age 2 years 10 months) completed a questionnaire about their child's behaviour and the presence of behavioural correlates, including repetitive, over-active or impulsive behaviour and more severe developmental delay. Parents reported very high prevalence of self-injurious, aggressive and destructive behaviour: 51%, 64% and 51%, respectively. A binary logistic regression revealed that a higher score on a measure of overactive and impulsive behaviour significantly predicted the presence of destructive behaviour. A multiple linear regression revealed that both repetitive behaviour and number of health problems approached significance as independent predictors of severe self-injurious behaviour. Despite the very small sample, several factors emerged as potential predictors of self-injurious, aggressive and destructive behaviour. These findings support the need for further investigation in a larger sample. Confirmation in this age group could help guide the development of targeted early intervention for these behaviours by identifying behavioural risk markers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. De novo deletion of HOXB gene cluster in a patient with failure to thrive, developmental delay, gastroesophageal reflux and bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajusalu, Sander; Reimand, Tiia; Uibo, Oivi; Vasar, Maire; Talvik, Inga; Zilina, Olga; Tammur, Pille; Õunap, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    We report a female patient with a complex phenotype consisting of failure to thrive, developmental delay, congenital bronchiectasis, gastroesophageal reflux and bilateral inguinal hernias. Chromosomal microarray analysis revealed a 230 kilobase deletion in chromosomal region 17q21.32 (arr[hg19] 17q21.32(46 550 362-46 784 039)×1) encompassing only 9 genes - HOXB1 to HOXB9. The deletion was not found in her mother or father. This is the first report of a patient with a HOXB gene cluster deletion involving only HOXB1 to HOXB9 genes. By comparing our case to previously reported five patients with larger chromosomal aberrations involving the HOXB gene cluster, we can suppose that HOXB gene cluster deletions are responsible for growth retardation, developmental delay, and specific facial dysmorphic features. Also, we suppose that bilateral inguinal hernias, tracheo-esophageal abnormalities, and lung malformations represent features with incomplete penetrance. Interestingly, previously published knock-out mice with targeted heterozygous deletion comparable to our patient did not show phenotypic alterations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Developmental delay referrals and the roles of Fragile X testing and molecular karyotyping: a New Zealand perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Elaine; O'Connor, Rachel; Zhang, Anna; Lim, Christina; Love, Jennifer M; Ashton, Fern; Claxton, Karen; Gregersen, Nerine; George, Alice M; Love, Donald R

    2013-05-01

    Global developmental delay (GDD) affects ~1-3% of children, many of whom will also have intellectual disability (ID). Fragile X is the major genetic cause of GDD with mental retardation (MR) in males, accounting for ~20% of all X-linked MR. As Fragile X has serious genetic implications, the overwhelming majority of developmental delay (DD) cases referred to our laboratory are concerned with the exclusion of a diagnosis of Fragile X, along with simultaneous karyotype analysis to confirm chromosome aberrations. Critically, molecular laboratories have generally experienced a falling positive detection frequency of Fragile X. In this context, the recent implementation of array‑based techno-logy has significantly increased the likelihood of detecting chromosome aberrations that underpin DD. In the current study, we report a Fragile X mutation detection frequency for DD referrals that is comparable with the falling UK detection frequencies. In addition, we find that there is a 9‑fold greater likelihood of detecting clinically significant chromosomal aberrations than of detecting a full Fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene CGG repeat expansion in cases referred on the basis of DD. We propose a more efficent sequential testing algorithm that involves an initial molecular karyotype, cascading to FMR1 gene analysis in the event of a negative result.

  10. Parent Training for Children With or at Risk for Developmental Delay: The Role of Parental Homework Completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Rosmary; Hernandez, Jennifer; Graziano, Paulo A; Bagner, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which parental homework completion during behavioral parent training (BPT) for children with or at risk for developmental delay contributed to parenting and child outcomes. Parents of 48 children (Mage=44.17 months, SD=14.29; 73% male; 72% White) with developmental delay (IQhomework completion was measured using parental report of home practice of treatment skills collected weekly by therapists. Parents also reported on child externalizing behavior problems and levels of parenting stress, while parenting skills were observed during a 5-min child directed play and child compliance was observed during a 5-min cleanup situation. Results indicated that higher rates of parental homework completion predicted parenting outcomes (i.e., increased positive parenting skills and decreased levels of parenting stress) and child outcomes (i.e., lower levels of externalizing behavior problems). Additionally, although limited by temporal precedence, there was an indirect effect of reductions in parenting stress on the negative association between parental homework completion and child externalizing behavior problems. These findings highlight the importance of parents practicing skills learned during BPT for optimizing treatment outcome. Parenting stress was also identified as a potential mechanism by which high levels of parental homework completion contributed to reductions in child externalizing behavior problems. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Suppression of severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans by the p.Thr651Pro mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Kandamurugu; Donoghue, Daniel J; Meyer, April N; Snyder, Pamela J; Prior, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans (SADDAN) is an extremely rare severe skeletal dysplasia characterized by significant developmental delay, brain structural abnormalities, hearing loss, and acanthosis nigricans. The disorder is the result of a single missense mutation at codon 650 (p.Lys650Met) in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene (FGFR3). We describe a child who initially presented with a mild achondroplasia or hypochondroplasia like phenotype. Molecular analysis of the FGFR3 gene showed the common SADDAN mutation and a second novel mutation at codon 651 (p.Thr651Pro). Both mutations were shown to occur on the same allele (cis) and de novo. Transient transfection studies with FGFR3 double mutant constructs show that the p.Thr651Pro mutation causes a dramatic decrease in constitutive receptor kinase activity than that observed by the p.Lys650Met mutation. Our data suggest that the molecular effect by the p.Thr651Pro is to elicit a conformational change that decreases the FGFR3 tyrosine kinase activity, which is constitutively activated by the SADDAN mutation. Due to the inheritance of both a gain-of-function and a loss-of-function mutation, we conclude that a reduction of constitutive activation caused the milder skeletal phenotype. Although the occurrence of double mutations are expected to be rare, the presence of other FGFR3 modifiers may be responsible for some of the clinically discrepant skeletal dysplasia cases. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Continued use of an interactive computer game-based visual perception learning system in children with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsien-Cheng; Chiu, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Yenming J; Wuang, Yee-Pay; Chen, Chiu-Ping; Wang, Chih-Chung; Huang, Chien-Ling; Wu, Tang-Meng; Ho, Wen-Hsien

    2017-11-01

    This study developed an interactive computer game-based visual perception learning system for special education children with developmental delay. To investigate whether perceived interactivity affects continued use of the system, this study developed a theoretical model of the process in which learners decide whether to continue using an interactive computer game-based visual perception learning system. The technology acceptance model, which considers perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and perceived playfulness, was extended by integrating perceived interaction (i.e., learner-instructor interaction and learner-system interaction) and then analyzing the effects of these perceptions on satisfaction and continued use. Data were collected from 150 participants (rehabilitation therapists, medical paraprofessionals, and parents of children with developmental delay) recruited from a single medical center in Taiwan. Structural equation modeling and partial-least-squares techniques were used to evaluate relationships within the model. The modeling results indicated that both perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness were positively associated with both learner-instructor interaction and learner-system interaction. However, perceived playfulness only had a positive association with learner-system interaction and not with learner-instructor interaction. Moreover, satisfaction was positively affected by perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and perceived playfulness. Thus, satisfaction positively affects continued use of the system. The data obtained by this study can be applied by researchers, designers of computer game-based learning systems, special education workers, and medical professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Postpartum depression, delayed maternal adaptation, and mechanical infant caring: a phenomenological hermeneutic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jennieffer Anne

    2008-03-01

    With 10-15 percent of mothers experiencing postpartum depression this mental health problem is a significant public health issue. One concern is that normal infant development is at risk. Understanding how Postpartum depression impacts on mothering is important knowledge in managing this health problem. To: Explore what is it like to become a mother, and examine how postpartum depression impacts on maternal adaptation. A hermeneutic approach was used guided by the philosophical works of Heidegger and Gadamer A relatively affluent metropolitan area, including surrounding rural areas within Australia. Via purposeful, maximum variation sampling, eleven women who had been medically diagnosed with postpartum depression following childbirth but who were not experiencing psychosis participated in the study. In-depth interviews and reflective journaling. Mothers with postpartum depression become "stuck" in a liminal state, an incomplete process of the rite of passage. Therefore, adaptation to the social role of a mother was found to be delayed. Additionally, a delay in becoming competent in parenting skills was evident. A lack of maternal-infant attachment was noted, however, mothers continued to care for their infants but in an unthinking manner that was labelled "mechanical infant caring". The distress caused by the delay in adapting to being a mother could be addressed by providing a mentor to at-risk women. The mentor should be a mother who has previously recovered from postpartum depression and would act as a symbol of hope. Additionally, on-going education and the insight that occurs during the liminal phase can facilitate mothers with postpartum depression to adapt appropriately.

  14. Rapamycin treatment causes developmental delay, pigmentation defects, and gastrointestinal malformation on Xenopus embryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Yuki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Ohata, Yoshihisa [Department of Education (Sciences), Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Mori, Shoko [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Matsukawa, Shinya [Department of Education (Sciences), Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Michiue, Tatsuo [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Asashima, Makoto [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Research Center for Stem Cell Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Baien, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Kuroda, Hiroki, E-mail: ehkurod@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Department of Education (Sciences), Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Does famous anti-aging drug rapamycin work from the beginning of life? The answer is yes. {yields} This study shows that developmental speed of frog embryo was dose-dependently decreased by rapamycin treatment. {yields} In additions, morphogenetic effects such as less pigmentations and gut malformation are occurred by rapamycin. -- Abstract: Rapamycin is a drug working as an inhibitor of the TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling pathway and influences various life phenomena such as cell growth, proliferation, and life span extension in eukaryote. However, the extent to which rapamycin controls early developmental events of amphibians remains to be understood. Here we report an examination of rapamycin effects during Xenopus early development, followed by a confirmation of suppression of TOR downstream kinase S6K by rapamycin treatment. First, we found that developmental speed was declined in dose-dependent manner of rapamycin. Second, black pigment spots located at dorsal and lateral skin in tadpoles were reduced by rapamycin treatment. Moreover, in tadpole stages severe gastrointestinal malformations were observed in rapamycin-treated embryos. Taken together with these results, we conclude that treatment of the drug rapamycin causes enormous influences on early developmental period.

  15. Doxapram and developmental delay at 12 months in children born extremely preterm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, Ane; Klamer, Anja; Jonsbo, Finn

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the relation of doxapram to a developmental score achieved by a structured telephone interview in a group of extremely-preterm-born children. METHODS: Parents of 88 children born extremely preterm were contacted by telephone and interviewed by a structured questionnaire (R-PDQ) when...

  16. Developmental Exposure to an Environmental PCB Mixture Delays the Propagation of Kindling in the Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental PCB exposure impairs hearing and induces brainstem audiogenic seizures in adult offspring. The degree to which this enhanced susceptibility to seizure is manifest in other brain regions has not been examined. Thus, electrical kindling of the amygdala was used to eva...

  17. Effects of an App Incorporating Systematic Instruction to Teach Spelling to Students with Developmental Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Melinda Jones; Baggerman, Melanie A.; Horn, Channon K.

    2017-01-01

    This study used a multiple probe (conditions) design across behaviors to investigate the effects of an app for the tablet computer to teach spelling of academic content words to four students with developmental disabilities. The app delivered instruction using a model-lead-test format and students typed on the on-screen keyboard. The study also…

  18. A Case Study on Vocal Loudness With a Young Adult With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Amanda; Colozzo, Paola; Bernhardt, B May; Radanov, Bosko; Rosebush, Riley; Marinova-Todd, Stefka H

    2015-11-01

    This clinical focus article describes an exploratory case study addressing reduction of vocal loudness in a young adult with a history of autism spectrum disorder and developmental delay. The need for a short-term pullout individual intervention arose from his participation in the Advancing Language and Literacy group, a program that provides support for enhancement of speech, language, and literacy skills for young adults with developmental disabilities. The participant attended individual treatment sessions weekly for 9 sessions, all of which were digitally audio-recorded. Client awareness of different loudness levels was first established using nonspeech sounds and speech samples. Loudness in spontaneous speech was monitored with support of verbal and visual feedback in the individual sessions and tracked in individual sessions as well as sessions of the Advancing Language and Literacy group, which served as a generalization context. In the individual sessions, the participant's spontaneous production of acceptable volume improved from 42% to 92% of utterances. Observation of group participation indicated generalization, with the majority of utterances produced posttreatment at an acceptable volume. This clinical focus article emphasizes suprasegmental aspects as a dimension of communicative competence and highlights the need for continued intervention research and services for young adults with developmental disabilities.

  19. Adaptive filter design based on the LMS algorithm for delay elimination in TCR/FC compensators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Rahmat Allah; Torabian Esfahani, Mahdi

    2011-04-01

    Thyristor controlled reactor with fixed capacitor (TCR/FC) compensators have the capability of compensating reactive power and improving power quality phenomena. Delay in the response of such compensators degrades their performance. In this paper, a new method based on adaptive filters (AF) is proposed in order to eliminate delay and increase the response of the TCR compensator. The algorithm designed for the adaptive filters is performed based on the least mean square (LMS) algorithm. In this design, instead of fixed capacitors, band-pass LC filters are used. To evaluate the filter, a TCR/FC compensator was used for nonlinear and time varying loads of electric arc furnaces (EAFs). These loads caused occurrence of power quality phenomena in the supplying system, such as voltage fluctuation and flicker, odd and even harmonics and unbalancing in voltage and current. The above design was implemented in a realistic system model of a steel complex. The simulation results show that applying the proposed control in the TCR/FC compensator efficiently eliminated delay in the response and improved the performance of the compensator in the power system. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Synchronization transitions induced by the fluctuation of adaptive coupling strength in delayed Newman-Watts neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Gong, Yubing; Wu, Yanan

    2015-11-01

    Introducing adaptive coupling in delayed neuronal networks and regulating the dissipative parameter (DP) of adaptive coupling by noise, we study the effect of fluctuations of the changing rate of adaptive coupling on the synchronization of the neuronal networks. It is found that time delay can induce synchronization transitions for intermediate DP values, and the synchronization transitions become strongest when DP is optimal. As the intensity of DP noise is varied, the neurons can also exhibit synchronization transitions, and the phenomenon is delay-dependent and is enhanced for certain time delays. Moreover, the synchronization transitions change with the change of DP and become strongest when DP is optimal. These results show that randomly changing adaptive coupling can considerably change the synchronization of the neuronal networks, and hence could play a crucial role in the information processing and transmission in neural systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Three Positive Parenting Practices and Their Correlation with Risk of Childhood Developmental, Social, or Behavioral Delays: An Analysis of the National Survey of Children's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cprek, Sarah E; Williams, Corrine M; Asaolu, Ibitola; Alexander, Linda A; Vanderpool, Robin C

    2015-11-01

    (1) Investigate the relationship between three specific positive parenting practices (PPP)-reading to children, engaging in storytelling or singing, and eating meals together as a family-and parent-reported risk of developmental, behavioral, or social delays among children between the ages of 1-5 years in the US. (2) Determine if a combination of these parenting practices has an effect on the outcome. Chi square and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to analyze cross-sectional data from the National Survey of Children's Health 2011/2012 in regards to the relationship between each of the three individual PPP as well as a total PPP score and the child's risk of being developmentally, socially, or behaviorally delayed (N = 21,527). Risk of delay was calculated using the Parents' Evaluation of Developmental Status Questionnaire, which is a parental self-report measure that has been correlated with diagnosed child delays. These analyses controlled for poverty and parental education. All analyses were completed using SAS Version 9.3. A strong correlation was found between each of the three PPP as well as the total PPP score and the child's risk of developmental, social, or behavioral delays (p response relationship (p < 0.05 in all but one analysis). Daily engagement in PPP could possibly reduce children's risk of delay, and specifically engaging in all three PPP may have greater benefit.

  2. An Evaluation of the Total Communication Approach for Teaching Language Skills to Developmentally Delayed Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Janet L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    In a study involving 20 Down's Syndrome children and 4 normal but language delayed preschoolers, standardized change score analyses revealed that the total communication group scored significantly higher on the Expressive scale and in the number of acquired signs. (Author/CL)

  3. Maternal diabetes causes developmental delay and death in early-somite mouse embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J. (Jing); Hakvoort, T.B.M. (Theodorus B. M.); J.M. Ruijter (Jan); Jongejan, A. (Aldo); Koster, J. (Jan); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid); Sokolovic, A. (Aleksandar); W.H. Lamers (Wouter)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractMaternal diabetes causes congenital malformations and delays embryonic growth in the offspring. We investigated effects of maternal diabetes on mouse embryos during gastrulation and early organogenesis (ED7.5-11.5). Female mice were made diabetic with streptozotocin, treated with

  4. Simple Mindreading Abilities Predict Complex Theory of Mind: Developmental Delay in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Maria Chiara; Mazza, Monica; Mariano, Melania; Peretti, Sara; Dimitriou, Dagmara; Masedu, Francesco; Valenti, Marco; Franco, Fabia

    2017-01-01

    Theory of mind (ToM) is impaired in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The aims of this study were to: (i) examine the developmental trajectories of ToM abilities in two different mentalizing tasks in children with ASD compared to TD children; and (ii) to assess if a ToM simple test known as eyes-test could predict performance on…

  5. The biology of developmental plasticity and the Predictive Adaptive Response hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Patrick; Gluckman, Peter; Hanson, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Many forms of developmental plasticity have been observed and these are usually beneficial to the organism. The Predictive Adaptive Response (PAR) hypothesis refers to a form of developmental plasticity in which cues received in early life influence the development of a phenotype that is normally adapted to the environmental conditions of later life. When the predicted and actual environments differ, the mismatch between the individual's phenotype and the conditions in which it finds itself can have adverse consequences for Darwinian fitness and, later, for health. Numerous examples exist of the long-term effects of cues indicating a threatening environment affecting the subsequent phenotype of the individual organism. Other examples consist of the long-term effects of variations in environment within a normal range, particularly in the individual's nutritional environment. In mammals the cues to developing offspring are often provided by the mother's plane of nutrition, her body composition or stress levels. This hypothetical effect in humans is thought to be important by some scientists and controversial by others. In resolving the conflict, distinctions should be drawn between PARs induced by normative variations in the developmental environment and the ill effects on development of extremes in environment such as a very poor or very rich nutritional environment. Tests to distinguish between different developmental processes impacting on adult characteristics are proposed. Many of the mechanisms underlying developmental plasticity involve molecular epigenetic processes, and their elucidation in the context of PARs and more widely has implications for the revision of classical evolutionary theory. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  6. Effects of Adapted Dialogic Reading on Oral Language and Vocabulary Knowledge of Latino Preschoolers at Risk for English Language Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Vivian I.; Lo, Ya-Yu; Godfrey-Hurrell, Kristi; Swart, Katie; Baker, Doris Luft

    2015-01-01

    In this single-case design study, we examined the effects of an adapted dialogic reading intervention on the oral language and vocabulary skills of four Latino preschool children who were at risk for English language delays. We used adapted dialogic reading strategies in English and two literacy games that included a rapid naming activity and…

  7. Adaptive Control for Autonomous Navigation of Mobile Robots Considering Time Delay and Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, Stephen Kofi

    Autonomous control of mobile robots has attracted considerable attention of researchers in the areas of robotics and autonomous systems during the past decades. One of the goals in the field of mobile robotics is development of platforms that robustly operate in given, partially unknown, or unpredictable environments and offer desired services to humans. Autonomous mobile robots need to be equipped with effective, robust and/or adaptive, navigation control systems. In spite of enormous reported work on autonomous navigation control systems for mobile robots, achieving the goal above is still an open problem. Robustness and reliability of the controlled system can always be improved. The fundamental issues affecting the stability of the control systems include the undesired nonlinear effects introduced by actuator saturation, time delay in the controlled system, and uncertainty in the model. This research work develops robustly stabilizing control systems by investigating and addressing such nonlinear effects through analytical, simulations, and experiments. The control systems are designed to meet specified transient and steady-state specifications. The systems used for this research are ground (Dr Robot X80SV) and aerial (Parrot AR.Drone 2.0) mobile robots. Firstly, an effective autonomous navigation control system is developed for X80SV using logic control by combining 'go-to-goal', 'avoid-obstacle', and 'follow-wall' controllers. A MATLAB robot simulator is developed to implement this control algorithm and experiments are conducted in a typical office environment. The next stage of the research develops an autonomous position (x, y, and z) and attitude (roll, pitch, and yaw) controllers for a quadrotor, and PD-feedback control is used to achieve stabilization. The quadrotor's nonlinear dynamics and kinematics are implemented using MATLAB S-function to generate the state output. Secondly, the white-box and black-box approaches are used to obtain a linearized

  8. Endocrine and cardiovascular rhythms differentially adapt to chronic phase-delay shifts in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Michal; Molcan, Lubos; Herichova, Iveta; Okuliarova, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in regular circadian oscillations can have negative effects on cardiovascular function, but epidemiological data are inconclusive and new data from animal experiments elucidating critical biological mechanisms are needed. To evaluate the consequences of chronic phase shifts of the light/dark (LD) cycle on hormonal and cardiovascular rhythms, two experiments were performed. In Experiment 1, male rats were exposed to either a regular 12:12 LD cycle (CONT) or rotating 8-h phase-delay shifts of LD every second day (SHIFT) for 10 weeks. During this period, blood pressure (BP) was monitored weekly, and daily rhythms of melatonin, corticosterone, leptin and testosterone were evaluated at the end of the experiment. In Experiment 2, female rats were exposed to the identical shifted LD schedule for 12 weeks, and daily rhythms of BP, heart rate (HR) and locomotor activity were recorded using telemetry. Preserved melatonin rhythms were found in the pineal gland, plasma, heart and kidney of SHIFT rats with damped amplitude in the plasma and heart, suggesting that the central oscillator can adapt to chronic phase-delay shifts. In contrast, daily rhythms of corticosterone, testosterone and leptin were eliminated in SHIFT rats. Exposure to phase shifts did not lead to increased body weight and elevated BP. However, a shifted LD schedule substantially decreased the amplitude and suppressed the circadian power of the daily rhythms of BP and HR, implying weakened circadian control of physiological and behavioural processes. The results demonstrate that endocrine and cardiovascular rhythms can differentially adapt to chronic phase-delay shifts, promoting internal desynchronization between central and peripheral oscillators, which in combination with other negative environmental stimuli may result in negative health effects.

  9. Unique pattern of dietary adaptation in the dentition of Carnivora: its advantage and developmental origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kazuyuki; Kishida, Takushi; Takahashi, Katsu; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Carnivora is a successful taxon in terms of dietary diversity. We investigated the dietary adaptations of carnivoran dentition and the developmental background of their dental diversity, which may have contributed to the success of the lineage. A developmental model was tested and extended to explain the unique variability and exceptional phenotypes observed in carnivoran dentition. Carnivorous mammalian orders exhibited two distinct patterns of dietary adaptation in molars and only Carnivora evolved novel variability, exhibiting a high correlation between relative molar size and the shape of the first molar. Studies of Bmp7-hetero-deficient mice, which may exhibit lower Bmp7 expression, suggested that Bmp7 has pleiotropic effects on these two dental traits. Its effects are consistent with the pattern of dietary adaptation observed in Carnivora, but not that observed in other carnivorous mammals. A molecular evolutionary analysis revealed that Bmp7 sequence evolved by natural selection during ursid evolution, suggesting that it plays an evolutionary role in the variation of carnivoran dentition. Using mouse experiments and a molecular evolutionary analysis, we extrapolated the causal mechanism of the hitherto enigmatic ursid dentition (larger M2 than M1 and M3). Our results demonstrate how carnivorans acquired novel dental variability that benefits their dietary divergence.

  10. A novel syndrome of congenital sideroblastic anemia, B-cell immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and developmental delay (SIFD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Daniel H; May, Alison; Jolles, Stephen; Connor, Philip; Powell, Colin; Heeney, Matthew M; Giardina, Patricia J; Klaassen, Robert J; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Geraghty, Michael T; Major-Cook, Nathalie; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Thuret, Isabelle; Thompson, Alexis A; Marques, Laura; Hughes, Stephen; Bonney, Denise K; Bottomley, Sylvia S; Fleming, Mark D; Wynn, Robert F

    2013-07-04

    Congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders identified by pathological erythroid precursors with perinuclear mitochondrial iron deposition in bone marrow. An international collaborative group of physicians and laboratory scientists collated clinical information on cases of CSA lacking known causative mutations, identifying a clinical subgroup of CSA associated with B immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and development delay. Twelve cases from 10 families were identified. Median age at presentation was 2 months. Anemia at diagnosis was sideroblastic, typically severe (median hemoglobin, 7.1 g/dL) and markedly microcytic (median mean corpuscular volume, 62.0 fL). Clinical course involved recurrent febrile illness and gastrointestinal disturbance, lacking an infective cause. Investigation revealed B-cell lymphopenia (CD19⁺ range, 0.016-0.22 × 10⁹/L) and panhypogammaglobulinemia in most cases. Children displayed developmental delay alongside variable neurodegeneration, seizures, cerebellar abnormalities, sensorineural deafness, and other multisystem features. Most required regular blood transfusion, iron chelation, and intravenous immunoglobulin replacement. Median survival was 48 months, with 7 deaths caused by cardiac or multiorgan failure. One child underwent bone marrow transplantation aged 9 months, with apparent cure of the hematologic and immunologic manifestations. We describe and define a novel CSA and B-cell immunodeficiency syndrome with additional features resembling a mitochondrial cytopathy. The molecular etiology is under investigation.

  11. A novel syndrome of congenital sideroblastic anemia, B-cell immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and developmental delay (SIFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Alison; Jolles, Stephen; Connor, Philip; Powell, Colin; Heeney, Matthew M.; Giardina, Patricia J.; Klaassen, Robert J.; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Geraghty, Michael T.; Major-Cook, Nathalie; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Thuret, Isabelle; Thompson, Alexis A.; Marques, Laura; Hughes, Stephen; Bonney, Denise K.; Bottomley, Sylvia S.; Fleming, Mark D.; Wynn, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders identified by pathological erythroid precursors with perinuclear mitochondrial iron deposition in bone marrow. An international collaborative group of physicians and laboratory scientists collated clinical information on cases of CSA lacking known causative mutations, identifying a clinical subgroup of CSA associated with B immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and development delay. Twelve cases from 10 families were identified. Median age at presentation was 2 months. Anemia at diagnosis was sideroblastic, typically severe (median hemoglobin, 7.1 g/dL) and markedly microcytic (median mean corpuscular volume, 62.0 fL). Clinical course involved recurrent febrile illness and gastrointestinal disturbance, lacking an infective cause. Investigation revealed B-cell lymphopenia (CD19+ range, 0.016-0.22 × 109/L) and panhypogammaglobulinemia in most cases. Children displayed developmental delay alongside variable neurodegeneration, seizures, cerebellar abnormalities, sensorineural deafness, and other multisystem features. Most required regular blood transfusion, iron chelation, and intravenous immunoglobulin replacement. Median survival was 48 months, with 7 deaths caused by cardiac or multiorgan failure. One child underwent bone marrow transplantation aged 9 months, with apparent cure of the hematologic and immunologic manifestations. We describe and define a novel CSA and B-cell immunodeficiency syndrome with additional features resembling a mitochondrial cytopathy. The molecular etiology is under investigation. PMID:23553769

  12. Parental Attributions of Control for Child Behaviour and Their Relation to Discipline Practices in Parents of Children with and Without Developmental Delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Myrthe; Marks Woolfson, Lisa; Hunter, Simon C

    2017-01-01

    Children with developmental delays (DD) are at risk for developing behavior problems. Research suggests that parents' causal attributions for child behavior are related to parenting. This study investigated this association in parents of children with DD compared to parents of typically developing (TD) children. It specifically focused on attributions of child control by separating these from attributions of responsibility, blame and intent, and from attributions of parent control and responsibility. Fifty-one parents of children with DD and 69 parents of TD children completed two questionnaires. The Written Analogue Questionnaire measured causal attributions. The Parenting Scale measured dysfunctional discipline practices. Parents of children with DD viewed the child's role in problematic behavior more positively while also viewing misbehavior as more fixed than parents of TD children. Parents of TD children who viewed their child as more in control over misbehavior used less dysfunctional discipline, but this association was not found for parents of children with DD. The results advance understanding of how parents perceive behavior problems in children with DD and the important role these perceptions play in parental behavior management strategies. More importantly, these perceptions relate to discipline practices differently for parents of children with DD compared to parents of TD children, highlighting that parent interventions should be adapted to the specific needs of parents of children with DD.

  13. A Novel Adaptive H∞ Filtering Method with Delay Compensation for the Transfer Alignment of Strapdown Inertial Navigation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Weiwei; Cheng, Xianghong

    2017-11-28

    Transfer alignment is always a key technology in a strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) because of its rapidity and accuracy. In this paper a transfer alignment model is established, which contains the SINS error model and the measurement model. The time delay in the process of transfer alignment is analyzed, and an H∞ filtering method with delay compensation is presented. Then the H∞ filtering theory and the robust mechanism of H∞ filter are deduced and analyzed in detail. In order to improve the transfer alignment accuracy in SINS with time delay, an adaptive H∞ filtering method with delay compensation is proposed. Since the robustness factor plays an important role in the filtering process and has effect on the filtering accuracy, the adaptive H∞ filter with delay compensation can adjust the value of robustness factor adaptively according to the dynamic external environment. The vehicle transfer alignment experiment indicates that by using the adaptive H∞ filtering method with delay compensation, the transfer alignment accuracy and the pure inertial navigation accuracy can be dramatically improved, which demonstrates the superiority of the proposed filtering method.

  14. Prenatal and postnatal presentation of severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans (SADDAN) due to the FGFR3 Lys650Met mutation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zankl, A.; Elakis, G.; Susman, R.D.; Inglis, G.; Gardener, G.; Buckley, M.F.; Roscioli, T.

    2008-01-01

    We present prenatal and postnatal features of a patient with severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans (SADDAN). Mutation analysis confirmed the clinical diagnosis by detecting the FGFR3 Lys650Met mutation. This case, one of only six with molecular analysis reported in

  15. Implementing a Family Centered Program for Physically Impaired/Developmentally Delayed Preschool Children To Bridge the Therapeutic Gap between School and Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Karen P.

    This practicum addresses the problem of limited interaction between physical therapists and families of developmentally delayed/physically impaired preschool-age children. A program was developed in which the physical therapist was videotaped handling and exercising a child, while explaining the purpose of the movements and instructing the parent…

  16. Is Maternal Influenza or Fever During Pregnancy Associated with Autism or Developmental Delays? Results from the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and Environment) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbo, Ousseny; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Walker, Cheryl; Ozonoff, Sally; Hansen, Robin L.; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed data from case groups of 538 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and 163 with developmental delays (DD), and from 421 typically developing controls to assess associations with maternal influenza or fever during pregnancy. Exposure information was obtained by telephone interviews, and outcomes were clinically confirmed. Though…

  17. Parent Perceptions of the Language Development of Toddlers with Developmental Delays before and after Participation in Parent-Coached Language Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romski, MaryAnn; Sevcik, Rose A.; Adamson, Lauren B.; Smith, Ashlyn; Cheslock, Melissa; Bakeman, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined parent perception of early communication development before and after participation in language intervention. Method: Fifty-three parents of toddlers with developmental delays and fewer than 10 spoken words completed the Parent Perception of Language Development, an experimental measure, before and after the children…

  18. Modeling Skills, Signs and Lettering for Children with Down Syndrome, Autism and Other Severe Developmental Delays by Video Instruction in Classroom Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biederman, G. B.; Freedman, B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses optimal strategies in teaching essential life and communication skills to children with Down syndrome, autism and other developmental delays. Evidence from the literature concerning the relative efficacy of hand-over-hand (self-modeling) in contrast to passive observational teaching techniques (e.g., video modeling) shows the…

  19. Mitigating the Effects of Poverty and Crime: The Long-Term Effects of an Early Intervention Programme for Children Who Were Developmentally Delayed and Prenatally Exposed to Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Mary Anne; Gonzalez, Antonio; Katz, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the long-term impact on participation in the Linda Ray Intervention Program (LRIP) for children (n = 54) who were developmentally delayed and prenatally exposed to cocaine. By identifying a group of programme graduates from a high crime/high poverty neighbourhood in Miami-Dade County using ArcGIS 10.2 software, a…

  20. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for Parents of Young Children with Developmental Delays: Implications for Parental Mental Health and Child Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neece, Cameron L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parents of children with developmental delays (DD) typically report elevated levels of parental stress compared with parents of typically developing children. Children with DD are also at high risk for exhibiting significant behaviour problems. Parental stress has been shown to impact the development of these behaviour problems;…

  1. Effectiveness of Direct Instruction for Teaching Statement Inference, Use of Facts, and Analogies to Students with Developmental Disabilities and Reading Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Margaret Munro; Ganz, Jennifer B.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a Direct Instruction (DI) reading comprehension program implemented with students who had developmental disabilities, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and reading delays. There is little research in the area of reading comprehension for students with ASD and no research as to the effectiveness of…

  2. Salivary Alpha Amylase and Cortisol Levels in Children with Global Developmental Delay and Their Relation with the Expectation of Dental Care and Behavior during the Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Marcio Jose Possari; Bernabe, Daniel Galera; Nakamune, Ana Claudia de Melo Stevanato; Perri, Silvia Helena Venturoli; de Aguiar, Sandra Maria Herondina Coelho Avila; de Oliveira, Sandra Helena Penha

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the alpha-amylase (sAA) and cortisol levels in children with Global developmental delay (GDD) before and after dental treatment and its association with the children's behavior during treatment. The morning salivary cortisol levels and activity of sAA of 33 children with GDD were evaluated before and after…

  3. The Effects of Constant Time Delay Embedded into Teaching Activities for Teaching the Names of Clothes for Preschool Children with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odluyurt, Serhat

    2011-01-01

    The general purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of constant time delay embedded in activities for teaching clothes name for preschool children with developmental disabilities. This study included four participants having Down syndrome with an age range of 43-46 months. All experimental sessions were conducted in one to one…

  4. Screening for developmental delay in preschool-aged children using parent-completed Ages and Stages Questionnaires: additional insights into child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo El Elella, Soheir S; Tawfik, Maha A M; Abo El Fotoh, Wafaa Moustafa M; Barseem, Naglaa Fathy

    2017-10-01

    Developmental delay is a delay in areas of speech, language, motor, social and cognitive development. Because of the negative impact of intellectual and learning disabilities, early identification of children with developmental and behavioral problems using appropriate screening tests is crucial. Utilization of parent-completed Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQs) for detecting the developmental delay in preschool age children and clarification of possible associated risk factors. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 1012 children aged 24-60 months enrolled from six centers (n=608) and six villages (n=404) located in Menoufia Governorate, Egypt. All children were screened by nine age-based questionnaires in the first stage of assessment. Children whose scores were ≤ cut-off points in one or more of the screened developmental areas were considered to have suspected developmental delay (SDD) and underwent further evaluation in the second stage assessment. Among the 1012 studied children aged 24-60 months, 978 (96.4%) had normal development. SDD had an overall prevalence of 3.4%, with the highest rates of SDD in problem-solving (3%), followed by communication (2.4%), fine motor skills (2.2%) and social-personal domain (1%), with no SDD in gross motor skills. SDD was more commonly observed in boys, with a significant association with both parental education and consanguinity. Problems with learning (32.3%) was the most commonly observed provisional diagnosis, followed by language disorders (29.4%). Children with SDD in more than one area of ASQ skills also had mild to borderline IQ scores. The use of of parent-completed ASQs showed an overall prevalence of developmental delay in children aged 24-60 months of3.4%. Male gender, consanguinity and parental education were identified as risk factors for developmental delay. Family counselling about the child's developmental state is needed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the

  5. Channel noise-induced temporal coherence transitions and synchronization transitions in adaptive neuronal networks with time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yubing; Xie, Huijuan

    2017-09-01

    Using spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), we study the effect of channel noise on temporal coherence and synchronization of adaptive scale-free Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks with time delay. It is found that the spiking regularity and spatial synchronization of the neurons intermittently increase and decrease as channel noise intensity is varied, exhibiting transitions of temporal coherence and synchronization. Moreover, this phenomenon depends on time delay, STDP, and network average degree. As time delay increases, the phenomenon is weakened, however, there are optimal STDP and network average degree by which the phenomenon becomes strongest. These results show that channel noise can intermittently enhance the temporal coherence and synchronization of the delayed adaptive neuronal networks. These findings provide a new insight into channel noise for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  6. Self-Adaptive Context Aware Routing Protocol for Unicast Communication in Delay and Tolerant Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbo Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available At present, most of research works in mobile network focus on the network overhead of the known path which exists between the sender and the receiver. However, the trend of the current practical application demands is becoming increasingly distributed and decentralized. The Delay and Tolerant Network (DTN just comes out of such background of the conflicts between them. The DTN could effectively eliminate the gap between the mobile network and the practical application demands. In this paper, a Self-Adaptive Context Aware Routing Protocol (SACARP for the unicast communication in delay and tolerant networks is presented. Meanwhile, according to the real-time context information of DTN, the Kalman filter theory is introduced to predict the information state of mobility for the optional message ferrying node, and then gives the optimal selection strategy of the message ferrying nodes. The simulation experiments have shown that, compared to the familiar single- copy and multi-copy protocols, the SACARP proposed in this paper has better transmission performance and stability, especially when the network is free, the protocol would keep a good performance with fewer connections and less buffer space.

  7. Italy: Delayed adaptation of social institutions to changes in family behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Laura Zanatta

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering its very low fertility and high age at childbearing, Italy stands alone in the European context and can hardly be compared with other countries, even those in the Southern region. The fertility decline occurred without any radical change in family formation. Individuals still choose (religious marriage for leaving their parental home and rates of marital dissolution and subsequent step-family formation are low. Marriage is being postponed and fewer people marry. The behaviours of young people are particularly alarming. There is a delay in all life cycle stages: end of education, entry into the labour market, exit from the parental family, entry into union, and managing an independent household. Changes in family formation and childbearing are constrained and slowed down by a substantial delay (or even failure with which the institutional and cultural framework has adapted to changes in economic and social conditions, in particular to the growth of the service sector, the increase in female employment and the female level of education. In a Catholic country that has been led for almost half a century by a political party with a Catholic ideology, the paucity of attention to childhood and youth seems incomprehensible. Social policies focus on marriage-based families already formed and on the phases of life related to pregnancy, delivery, and the first months of a newborn's life, while forming a family and childbearing choices are considered private affairs and neglected.

  8. Corticoreticular tract lesion in children with developmental delay presenting with gait dysfunction and trunk instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Min Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The corticoreticular tract (CRT is known to be involved in walking and postural control. Using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT, we investigated the relationship between the CRT and gait dysfunction, including trunk instability, in pediatric patients. Thirty patients with delayed development and 15 age-matched, typically-developed (TD children were recruited. Fifteen patients with gait dysfunction (bilateral trunk instability were included in the group A, and the other 15 patients with gait dysfunction (unilateral trunk instability were included in the group B. The Growth Motor Function Classification System, Functional Ambulation Category scale, and Functional Ambulation Category scale were used for measurement of functional state. Fractional anisotropy, apparent diffusion coefficient, fiber number, and tract integrity of the CRT and corticospinal tract were measured. Diffusion parameters or integrity of corticospinal tract were not significantly different in the three study groups. However, CRT results revealed that both CRTs were disrupted in the group A, whereas CRT disruption in the hemispheres contralateral to clinical manifestations was observed in the group B. Fractional anisotropy values and fiber numbers in both CRTs were decreased in the group A than in the group TD. The extents of decreases of fractional anisotropy values and fiber numbers on the ipsilateral side relative to those on the contralateral side were greater in the group B than in the group TD. Functional evaluation data and clinical manifestations were found to show strong correlations with CRT status, rather than with corticospinal tract status. These findings suggest that CRT status appears to be clinically important for gait function and trunk stability in pediatric patients and DTT can help assess CRT status in pediatric patients with gait dysfunction.

  9. Depressive and anxiety symptom trajectories from school age through young adulthood in samples with autism spectrum disorder and developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotham, Katherine; Brunwasser, Steven M; Lord, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to model growth in anxiety and depressive symptoms from late school age through young adulthood in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and controls with developmental delay (DD), and to assess relationships among internalizing growth patterns, participant characteristics, baseline predictors, and distal outcomes. Data were collected between ages 6 and 24 years in 165 participants (n = 109 with ASD; n = 56 with nonspectrum DD), most of whom received diagnostic evaluations in both childhood and early adulthood. Questionnaires were collected approximately every 3 to 6 months between ages 9 and 24 years. Parent-rated Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), Adult Behavior Checklist (ABCL), and Developmental Behaviour Checklist anxiety- and depression-related subscale distributions were modeled with mixed-effects Poisson models, covarying diagnosis, age, verbal IQ (VIQ), gender, and significant 2- and 3-way interactions. Anxiety was positively associated with VIQ, and controlling for VIQ, both anxiety and depressive symptoms were greater in ASD than nonspectrum participants. Female gender predicted greater increases over time in anxiety and depressive symptoms for both diagnostic groups. Lower maternal education was associated with increasing internalizing symptoms in a subset of less verbal individuals with ASD. In exploratory post hoc analyses, internalizing symptoms were associated with poorer emotional regulation in school age, and with lower life satisfaction and greater social difficulties in early adulthood. Findings support previous claims that individuals with ASD are at particular risk for affect- and anxiety-specific problems. Although symptom levels in females increase at a faster rate throughout adolescence, males with ASD appear to have elevated levels of depressive symptoms in school age that are maintained into young adulthood. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by

  10. Screening for attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, and developmental delay in Taiwanese aboriginal preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan HL

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hsiang-Lin Chan,1,2,* Wen-Sheng Liu,3–6,* Yi-Hsuan Hsieh,1,2 Chiao-Fan Lin,1,2 Tiing-Soon Ling,2,7 Yu-Shu Huang1,2 1Department of Child Psychiatry, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 2College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, 3Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Taipei City Hospital, Zhong-Xing Branch, Taipei, Taiwan; 4School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Institute of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 6College of Science and Engineering, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan; 7Department of Family Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objectives: This study aimed to estimate the percentages of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and autism spectrum disorder (ASD in Taiwanese aboriginal preschool children. Child development level was compared between the two groups. Methods: Teachers completed screening questionnaires for ADHD, ASD, and development level for 36- to 72-month-old children in kindergartens in Taiwan. The questionnaire results were compared between the aboriginal and nonaboriginal children. One child psychiatrist then interviewed the aboriginal preschool children to determine if they had ADHD and/or ASD. Results: We collected 93 questionnaires from the aboriginal group and 60 from the nonaboriginal group. In the aboriginal group, 5.37% of the children were identified to have ADHD, while 1.08% were identified to have ASD. Significantly fewer aboriginal children had developmental delays for situation comprehension and personal–social development (P=0.012 and 0.002, respectively than nonaboriginal children. Conclusion: Aboriginal children in Taiwan had typical percentages of ADHD and ASD compared to those published in the literature. Aboriginal children showed relative strengths in situation

  11. L∞-gain adaptive fuzzy fault accommodation control design for nonlinear time-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huai-Ning; Qiang, Xiao-Hong; Guo, Lei

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, an adaptive fuzzy fault accommodation (FA) control design with a guaranteed L(∞)-gain performance is developed for a class of nonlinear time-delay systems with persistent bounded disturbances. Using the Lyapunov technique and the Razumikhin-type lemma, the existence condition of the L(∞) -gain adaptive fuzzy FA controllers is provided in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). In the proposed FA scheme, a fuzzy logic system is employed to approximate the unknown term in the derivative of the Lyapunov function due to the unknown fault function; a continuous-state feedback control strategy is adopted for the control design to avoid the undesirable chattering phenomenon. The resulting FA controllers can ensure that every response of the closed-loop system is uniformly ultimately bounded with a guaranteed L(∞)-gain performance in the presence of a fault. Moreover, by the existing LMI optimization technique, a suboptimal controller is obtained in the sense of minimizing an upper bound of the L(∞)-gain. Finally, the achieved simulation results on the FA control of a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) show the effectiveness of the proposed design procedure.

  12. Specific characteristics of spontaneous movements in preterm infants at term age are associated with developmental delays at age 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemaru, Nao; Watanabe, Hama; Kihara, Hideki; Nakano, Hisako; Takaya, Rieko; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Nakano, Junji; Taga, Gentaro; Konishi, Yukuo

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the characteristics of spontaneous movements in preterm infants at term age and developmental delay at 3 years of age. We analysed video recordings of the spontaneous movements in the supine position of 124 preterm infants (44 males, 80 females) at 36 to 44 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA). The infants were born preterm (22-36wks PMA; birthweight 489-1696g) and had not received a diagnosis of a neurological or developmental disorder by the age of 3 years. The recorded spontaneous movements were quantified using six movement indices, which were calculated from two-dimensional trajectories of all limbs. The infants were divided into three developmental groups, normal, borderline, or delayed, based on their developmental quotient as calculated using the Kyoto Scale of Psychological Development 2001 (Kyoto Scale) at 3 years of age. Group differences in the movement indices were analysed. In the delayed group, average velocity of arms and legs were significantly lower (ppreterm infants. © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  13. Factors Influencing the Gross Motor Outcome of Intensive Therapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bo Young; Jo, Leechan; Kim, Joon Sung; Lim, Seong Hoon; Bae, Jung Min

    2017-05-01

    The study was designed to identify factors influencing the short term effect of intensive therapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy or developmental delay. Retrospectively, total Gross Motor Function Measure-88 (GMFM-88) scores measured during the first and last weeks of intensive therapy were analyzed (n = 103). Good and poor responder groups were defined as those in the top and bottom 25% in terms of score difference, respectively. The GMFM-88 score increased to 4.67 ± 3.93 after 8 weeks of intensive therapy (P therapy. Age (≥ 36 months; OR = 2.737, 95% CI = 1.003-7.471, P = 0.049) and GMFCS level (I-II vs. IV-V; OR = 0.189, 95% CI = 0.057-0.630, P = 0.007; and III vs. IV-V; OR = 0.095, 95% CI = 0.011-0.785, P = 0.029) were significantly associated with a poor response. GMFCS level is the most important prognostic factor for the effect of intensive therapy on gross motor function. In addition, age ≥ 36 months, is associated with a poor outcome. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  14. Diagnosis and fine mapping of a deletion in distal 11q in two Chinese patients with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Taoyun; Wu, Ye; Wang, Huifang; Wang, Jingmin; Jiang, Yuwu

    2010-08-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JBS) is a haploinsufficiency syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. It is characterized by developmental delay (DD)/mental retardation (MR), physical growth retardation, facial dysmorphism, visceral malformations and thrombocytopenia. We report two JBS patients from China out of a total of 451 patients with unexplained DD/MR. The genotypes of these patients were compared with earlier reported patients in North America and Europe. Both patients presented with severe DD, microcephaly and facial dysmorphism; one patient had a low birth weight, congenital heart disease and structural brain abnormalities. Neither patient was thrombocytopenic at the time of diagnosis. The two deletions were 4.1 and 12.8 Mb. The 4.1 Mb deletion is the smallest of all pathogenic regions earlier reported in JBS. Therefore, the critical region underlying DD/MR might be located in the distal portion of the chromosomal segment within 4.1 Mb of the telomere. Candidate genes for DD/MR in this region include SNX19, THYN1, OPCML, NCAPD3 and NTM. One of the critical regions for craniofacial abnormalities may be within 130.3-134.4 Mb in chromosome 11q. Further analysis of Chinese JBS patients would elucidate the relation of phenotype to genotype further.

  15. Benign, pathogenic and copy number variations of unknown clinical significance in patients with congenital malformations and developmental delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaylova M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The high frequency (3.0-5.0% of congenital anomalies (CA and intellectual disabilities (IDs, make them a serious problem, responsible for a high percentage (33.0% of neonatal mortality. The genetic cause remains unclear in 40.0% of cases. Recently, molecular karyotyping has become the most powerful method for detection of pathogenic imbalances in patients with multiple CAs and IDs. This method is with high resolution and gives us the opportunity to investigate and identify candidate genes that could explain the genotype-phenotype correlations. This article describes the results from analysis of 81 patients with congenital malformations (CMs, developmental delay (DD and ID, in which we utilized the CytoChip ISCA oligo microarray, 4 × 44 k, covering the whole genome with a resolution of 70 kb. In the selected group of patients with CAs, 280 copy number variations (CNVs have been proven, 41 were pathogenic, 118 benign and 121 of unknown clinical significance (average number of variations 3.5. In six patients with established pathogenic variations, our data revealed eight pathogenic aberrations associated with the corresponding phenotype. The interpretation of the other CNVs was made on the basis of their frequency in the investigated group, the size of the variation, content of genes in the region and the type of the CNVs (deletion or duplication.

  16. A patient with lissencephaly, developmental delay, and infantile spasms, due to de novo heterozygous mutation of KIF2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guoling; Cristancho, Ana G; Dubbs, Holly A; Liu, Grant T; Cowan, Nicholas J; Goldberg, Ethan M

    2016-11-01

    Microtubules are dynamic polymers of α/β tubulin heterodimers that play a critical role in cerebral cortical development, by regulating neuronal migration, differentiation, and morphogenesis. Mutations in genes that encode either α- or β-tubulin or a spectrum of proteins involved in the regulation of microtubule dynamics lead to clinically devastating malformations of cortical development, including lissencephaly. This is a single case report or a patient with lissencephaly, developmental delay, nystagmus, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, and infantile spasms, and undertook a neurogenetic workup. We include studies of mutant function in Escherichia coli and HeLa cells. The patient was found to have a novel de novo mutation in kinesin family member 2A (KIF2A). This mutation results in a substitution of isoleucine at a highly conserved threonine residue within the ATP-binding domain. The KIF2A p.Thr320Ile mutant protein exhibited abnormal solubility, and KIF2A p.Thr320Ile overexpression in cultured cells led to the formation of aberrant microtubule networks. Findings support the pathogenic link between KIF2A mutation and lissencephaly, and expand the range of presentation to include infantile spasms and congenital anomalies.

  17. Delayed growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4 years Developmental milestones record - 5 years Causes Constitutional growth delay refers to children who are small ... nutrition expert who can help you choose the right foods to offer your child. What to Expect ...

  18. Interstitial deletion of 14q24.3-q32.2 in a male patient with plagiocephaly, BPES features, developmental delay, and congenital heart defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cingöz, Sultan; Bache, Iben; Bjerglund, Lise

    2011-01-01

    with developmental delay, language impairment, plagiocephaly, BPES features (blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus), and congenital heart defect. The deletion breakpoints were fine mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and the size of the deletion is estimated to be approximately 23¿Mb. Based...... on genotype-phenotype comparisons of the 10 previously published patients and the present case, we suggest that the shortest regions for deletion overlap may include candidate genes for speech impairment, mental retardation, and hypotonia....

  19. Parental Attributions of Control for Child Behaviour and Their Relation to Discipline Practices in Parents of Children with and Without Developmental Delays

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, Myrthe; Marks Woolfson, Lisa; Simon C. Hunter

    2017-01-01

    Children with developmental delays (DD) are at risk for developing behavior problems. Research suggests that parents? causal attributions for child behavior are related to parenting. This study investigated this association in parents of children with DD compared to parents of typically developing (TD) children. It specifically focused on attributions of child control by separating these from attributions of responsibility, blame and intent, and from attributions of parent control and respons...

  20. Reduced cortical complexity in children with Prader-Willi Syndrome and its association with cognitive impairment and developmental delay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akvile Lukoshe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS is a complex neurogenetic disorder with symptoms involving not only hypothalamic, but also a global, central nervous system dysfunction. Previously, qualitative studies reported polymicrogyria in adults with PWS. However, there have been no quantitative neuroimaging studies of cortical morphology in PWS and no studies to date in children with PWS. Thus, our aim was to investigate and quantify cortical complexity in children with PWS compared to healthy controls. In addition, we investigated differences between genetic subtypes of PWS and the relationship between cortical complexity and intelligence within the PWS group. METHODS: High-resolution structural magnetic resonance images were acquired in 24 children with genetically confirmed PWS (12 carrying a deletion (DEL, 12 with maternal uniparental disomy (mUPD and 11 age- and sex-matched typically developing siblings as healthy controls. Local gyrification index (lGI was obtained using the FreeSurfer software suite. RESULTS: Four large clusters, two in each hemisphere, comprising frontal, parietal and temporal lobes, had lower lGI in children with PWS, compared to healthy controls. Clusters with lower lGI also had significantly lower cortical surface area in children with PWS. No differences in cortical thickness of the clusters were found between the PWS and healthy controls. lGI correlated significantly with cortical surface area, but not with cortical thickness. Within the PWS group, lGI in both hemispheres correlated with Total IQ and Verbal IQ, but not with Performance IQ. Children with mUPD, compared to children with DEL, had two small clusters with lower lGI in the right hemisphere. lGI of these clusters correlated with cortical surface area, but not with cortical thickness or IQ. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that lower cortical complexity in children with PWS partially underlies cognitive impairment and developmental delay, probably due to

  1. A comparison of receptive-expressive language profiles between toddlers with autism spectrum disorder and developmental language delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Kyeong In; Song, Seung Ha; Kim, Ka Lim; Oh, Seung Taek; Kim, Young Tae; Im, Woo Young; Song, Dong Ho; Cheon, Keun-Ah

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that expressive language impairment is commonly less severe than receptive language impairment in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, this result is based on experiments in Western countries with Western language scales. This study tries to find whether the result above is applicable for toddlers in a non-Western country; more specifically, in Korea with non-Western language scales. The participants were 166 toddlers aged between 20 months and 50 months who visited the clinic from December 2010 to January 2013. The number of toddlers diagnosed as ASD and developmental language delay (DLD) was 103 and 63, respectively. Language development level was assessed using Sequenced Language Scale for Infants (SELSI), a Korean language scale. Using SELSI, each group was divided into 3 sub-groups. Moreover, the group difference by age was observed by dividing them into three age groups. Chi-square test and linear-by-linear association was used for analysis. Receptive language ability of the DLD group was superior to that of the ASD group in all age groups. However, expressive language ability in both groups showed no difference in all age groups. A greater proportion of expressive dominant type was found in ASD. The 20-29 months group in ASD showed the largest proportion of expressive language dominant type in the three age groups, suggesting that the younger the ASD toddler is, the more severe the receptive language impairment is. These findings suggest that receptive-expressive language characteristics in ASD at earlier age could be useful in the early detection of ASD.

  2. Therapeutic adherence and competence scales for Developmentally Adapted Cognitive Processing Therapy for adolescents with PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Gutermann

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The assessment of therapeutic adherence and competence is often neglected in psychotherapy research, particularly in children and adolescents; however, both variables are crucial for the interpretation of treatment effects. Objective: Our aim was to develop, adapt, and pilot two scales to assess therapeutic adherence and competence in a recent innovative program, Developmentally Adapted Cognitive Processing Therapy (D-CPT, for adolescents suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD after childhood abuse. Method: Two independent raters assessed 30 randomly selected sessions involving 12 D-CPT patients (age 13–20 years, M age=16.75, 91.67% female treated by 11 therapists within the pilot phase of a multicenter study. Results: Three experts confirmed the relevance and appropriateness of each item. All items and total scores for adherence (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICC]=0.76–1.00 and competence (ICC=0.78–0.98 yielded good to excellent inter-rater reliability. Cronbach's alpha was 0.59 for the adherence scale and 0.96 for the competence scale. Conclusions: The scales reliably assess adherence and competence in D-CPT for adolescent PTSD patients. The ratings can be helpful in the interpretation of treatment effects, the assessment of mediator variables, and the identification and training of therapeutic skills that are central to achieving good treatment outcomes. Both adherence and competence will be assessed as possible predictor variables for treatment success in future D-CPT trials.

  3. Short-term family-centered workshop for children with developmental delays enhances family functioning and satisfaction: A prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ru-Lan; Hsieh, Wen-Huei; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the clinical efficacy on family functioning and parental satisfaction of a short-term family-centered workshop for children with developmental delays.A total of 32 children with developmental delays and their parents participated in 2-hour weekly group therapy sessions over 6 weeks. The workshop was conducted by rehabilitation professionals and teachers using a family-centered multidisciplinary approach. Both before and after the 6-week workshop, the parents were administered the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) Family Impact Module, the PedsQL Healthcare Satisfaction Module, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life brief assessment instrument. Overall satisfaction with the workshop was also evaluated.Significant improvements were noted in physical aspect (P = 0.03), communication (P = 0.002), and daily activities (P = 0.04) in the PedsQL Family Impact Module, and in communication (P = 0.03) and technical skills (P = 0.05) in the PedsQL Healthcare Satisfaction Module. Overall satisfaction with the workshop was rated as very high. There was no significant effect on psychological distress or quality of life.Short-term family-centered workshops for children with developmental delays improved family functioning and the parental perception of satisfaction, including health care satisfaction.

  4. The Fault in Their Stars-Accumulating Astrocytic Inclusions Associated With Clusters of Epileptic Spasms in Children With Global Developmental Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Robyn; AlMehmadi, Sameer; McCoy, Bláthnaid; Yau, Ivanna; Ochi, Ayako; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Weiss, Shelly K; Rutka, James; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Snead, O Carter; Go, Cristina

    2017-08-01

    The presence of cerebral astrocytic inclusions recently has been described in a subset of children with early-onset refractory epilepsy, with or without structural brain malformations, and varying degrees of developmental delay. We describe two new individuals with epilepsy with astrocytic inclusions and suggest that in some children this disorder may represent a unique hemispheric epilepsy. We review previously reported individuals with epilepsy with astrocytic inclusions. Two children with early onset epilepsy with astrocytic inclusions had refractory clusters of epileptic spasms, developmental delay, abnormal neuroimaging, and hemispheric or diffuse interictal epileptiform discharges. In both children, the initial focal resection of the putative epileptogenic zone was unsuccessful and pathology failed to show astrocytic inclusions. Subsequently, both children underwent functional hemispherectomy due to ongoing clusters of epileptic spasms, and the presence of multilobar astrocytic inclusions was demonstrated. Postoperatively, both children have remained seizure free in the short-term with improved development. We highlight that functional hemispherectomy may be required for seizure control in a select subset of children with clusters of epileptic spasms, astrocytic inclusions, and global developmental delay. Given the small number of documented patients, however, ongoing collaboration is needed to better understand the pathophysiology of this condition and determine the optimal way to diagnose and manage these children. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ’07 for the population of Polish children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak Agata

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The purpose of this article is to present the cultural adaptation of the DCDQ’07 (Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire as one of the popular and most frequently-used diagnostic instruments for diagnosing DCD in school-age children.

  6. Developmental adaptation of central nervous system to extremely high acetylcholine levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Farar

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase (AChE is a key enzyme in termination of fast cholinergic transmission. In brain, acetylcholine (ACh is produced by cholinergic neurons and released in extracellular space where it is cleaved by AChE anchored by protein PRiMA. Recently, we showed that the lack of AChE in brain of PRiMA knock-out (KO mouse increased ACh levels 200-300 times. The PRiMA KO mice adapt nearly completely by the reduction of muscarinic receptor (MR density. Here we investigated changes in MR density, AChE, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE activity in brain in order to determine developmental period responsible for such adaptation. Brains were studied at embryonal day 18.5 and postnatal days (pd 0, 9, 30, 120, and 425. We found that the AChE activity in PRiMA KO mice remained very low at all studied ages while in wild type (WT mice it gradually increased till pd120. BChE activity in WT mice gradually decreased until pd9 and then increased by pd120, it continually decreased in KO mice till pd30 and remained unchanged thereafter. MR number increased in WT mice till pd120 and then became stable. Similarly, MR increased in PRiMA KO mice till pd30 and then remained stable, but the maximal level reached is approximately 50% of WT mice. Therefore, we provide the evidence that adaptive changes in MR happen up to pd30. This is new phenomenon that could contribute to the explanation of survival and nearly unchanged phenotype of PRiMA KO mice.

  7. Developmental trajectories of symptom severity and adaptive functioning in an inception cohort of preschool children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmari, Peter; Georgiades, Stelios; Duku, Eric; Bennett, Teresa A; Bryson, Susan; Fombonne, Eric; Mirenda, Pat; Roberts, Wendy; Smith, Isabel M; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Volden, Joanne; Waddell, Charlotte; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Thompson, Ann

    2015-03-01

    Symptom severity and adaptive functioning are fundamental domains of the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) phenotype. To date, the longitudinal association between these 2 domains has not been examined. To describe the developmental trajectories of autistic symptom severity and adaptive functioning in a large inception cohort of preschool children with ASD. The sample consisted of 421 newly diagnosed preschool children with ASD 2 to 4 years old (355 boys; mean age at study enrollment, 39.87 months) participating in a large Canadian multisite longitudinal study (Pathways in ASD Study). Prospective data collected at 4 points from time of diagnosis to age 6 years were used to track the developmental trajectories of children. Autistic symptom severity was indexed using the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Adaptive functioning was indexed using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Second Edition. Two distinct trajectory groups provided the best fit to the autistic symptom severity data. Group 1 (11.4% of the sample) had less severe symptoms and an improving trajectory (P adaptive functioning data. Group 1 (29.2% of the sample) showed lower functioning and a worsening trajectory, group 2 (49.9% of the sample) had moderate functioning and a stable trajectory, and group 3 (20.9% of the sample) had higher functioning and an improving trajectory (P adaptive functioning groups was low (φ = 0.13, P adaptive functioning trajectories. Trajectories of both symptom severity and adaptive functioning predicted several different outcomes at age 6 years. Findings confirm the heterogeneous nature of developmental trajectories in ASD. Change in adaptive functioning suggests that improvement is possible in roughly 20% of the sample. Autistic symptom severity appears to be more stable, with roughly 11% of the sample showing a marked decrease in symptom severity. During the preschool years, there appears to be only a small amount of "yoking" of developmental trajectories

  8. Research on Adaptive Neural Network Control System Based on Nonlinear U-Model with Time-Varying Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengxia Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available U-model can approximate a large class of smooth nonlinear time-varying delay system to any accuracy by using time-varying delay parameters polynomial. This paper proposes a new approach, namely, U-model approach, to solving the problems of analysis and synthesis for nonlinear systems. Based on the idea of discrete-time U-model with time-varying delay, the identification algorithm of adaptive neural network is given for the nonlinear model. Then, the controller is designed by using the Newton-Raphson formula and the stability analysis is given for the closed-loop nonlinear systems. Finally, illustrative examples are given to show the validity and applicability of the obtained results.

  9. Output Feedback Adaptive Dynamic Surface Control of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Uncertain Time Delays via RBFNN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on an adaptive dynamic surface control based on the Radial Basis Function Neural Network for a fourth-order permanent magnet synchronous motor system wherein the unknown parameters, disturbances, chaos, and uncertain time delays are presented. Neural Network systems are used to approximate the nonlinearities and an adaptive law is employed to estimate accurate parameters. Then, a simple and effective controller has been obtained by introducing dynamic surface control technique on the basis of first-order filters. Asymptotically tracking stability in the sense of uniformly ultimate boundedness is achieved in a short time. Finally, the performance of the proposed control has been illustrated through simulation results.

  10. Predictors of distress and well-being in parents of young children with developmental delays and disabilities: the importance of parent perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnes, P; Perry, A; Weiss, J A

    2015-06-01

    Moving from family-centred to child-centred models of service delivery can be stressful for parents as their young children with developmental delays and disabilities transition into school. The purpose of this paper was to explore and compare predictors of both distress and well-being in parents during this transition period. A sample of 155 mothers of 113 boys and 42 girls participated in the study. The mean age of the children was 4.9 years and their diagnoses included autism spectrum disorder (52%); unspecified intellectual disability/developmental delay (26%); Down syndrome (12%); other genetic conditions (4%) and other diagnoses (6%). Participants completed surveys primarily online focusing on child characteristics, family resources, parent coping strategies, parental distress and positive gain. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine predictors of parent reported distress and positive gain. Parent coping variables were the strongest predictors of both positive gain and parental distress, with reframing emerging as a predictor of positive gain and parent empowerment emerging as a predictor of both greater positive gain and lower parental distress. The results of this study highlight not only the importance of including positive as well as negative outcomes in research with parents but also the importance of including parent characteristics such as coping strategies (e.g. reframing and empowerment/self-efficacy) as potential predictors of outcome in such studies. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Studies on effects of feedback delay on the convergence performance of adaptive time-domain equalizers for fiber dispersive channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qun; Xu, Bo; Qiu, Kun

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive time-domain equalizer (TDE) is an important module for digital optical coherent receivers. From an implementation perspective, we analyze and compare in detail the effects of error signal feedback delay on the convergence performance of TDE using either least-mean square (LMS) or constant modulus algorithm (CMA). For this purpose, a simplified theoretical model is proposed based on which iterative equations on the mean value and the variance of the tap coefficient are derived with or without error signal feedback delay for both LMS- and CMA-based methods for the first time. The analytical results show that decreased step size has to be used for TDE to converge and a slower convergence speed cannot be avoided as the feedback delay increases. Compared with the data-aided LMS-based method, the CMA-based method has a slower convergence speed and larger variation after convergence. Similar results are confirmed using numerical simulations for fiber dispersive channels. As the step size increases, a feedback delay of 20 clock cycles might cause the TDE to diverge. Compared with the CMA-based method, the LMS-based method has a higher tolerance on the feedback delay and allows a larger step size for a faster convergence speed.

  12. Rolling bearing fault diagnosis based on time-delayed feedback monostable stochastic resonance and adaptive minimum entropy deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jimeng; Li, Ming; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2017-08-01

    Rolling bearings are the key components in the modern machinery, and tough operation environments often make them prone to failure. However, due to the influence of the transmission path and background noise, the useful feature information relevant to the bearing fault contained in the vibration signals is weak, which makes it difficult to identify the fault symptom of rolling bearings in time. Therefore, the paper proposes a novel weak signal detection method based on time-delayed feedback monostable stochastic resonance (TFMSR) system and adaptive minimum entropy deconvolution (MED) to realize the fault diagnosis of rolling bearings. The MED method is employed to preprocess the vibration signals, which can deconvolve the effect of transmission path and clarify the defect-induced impulses. And a modified power spectrum kurtosis (MPSK) index is constructed to realize the adaptive selection of filter length in the MED algorithm. By introducing the time-delayed feedback item in to an over-damped monostable system, the TFMSR method can effectively utilize the historical information of input signal to enhance the periodicity of SR output, which is beneficial to the detection of periodic signal. Furthermore, the influence of time delay and feedback intensity on the SR phenomenon is analyzed, and by selecting appropriate time delay, feedback intensity and re-scaling ratio with genetic algorithm, the SR can be produced to realize the resonance detection of weak signal. The combination of the adaptive MED (AMED) method and TFMSR method is conducive to extracting the feature information from strong background noise and realizing the fault diagnosis of rolling bearings. Finally, some experiments and engineering application are performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed AMED-TFMSR method in comparison with a traditional bistable SR method.

  13. 46,XY disorder of sex development and developmental delay associated with a novel 9q33.3 microdeletion encompassing NR5A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Tracy; Blanchard, Leah; Desai, Khyati; Nimkarn, Saroj; Cohen, Ninette; Edelmann, Lisa; Mehta, Lakshmi

    2013-11-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) is a nuclear receptor encoded by the NR5A1 gene. SF1 affects both sexual and adrenal development through the regulation of target gene expression. Genotypic male and female SF1 knockout mice have adrenal and gonadal agenesis with persistent Müllerian structures and early lethality. There have been several reports of NR5A1 mutations in individuals with 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis (CGD) or other disorders of sex development (DSD) with or without an adrenal phenotype. To date microdeletions involving NR5A1 have been reported in only two patients with DSDs. We report a novel microdeletion encompassing NR5A1 in a patient with 46,XY DSD and developmental delay. The phenotypically female patient initially presented with mild developmental delay and dysmorphisms. Chromosome analysis revealed a 46,XY karyotype. A 1.54 Mb microdeletion of chromosome 9q33.3 including NR5A1 was detected by array CGH and confirmed by FISH. Normal maternal FISH results indicated that this was most likely a de novo event. Since most NR5A1 mutations have been ascertained through gonadal or adrenal abnormalities, the additional findings of developmental delay and minor facial dysmorphisms are possibly related to haploinsufficiency of other genes within the 1.54 Mb deleted region. This report further confirms the role of NR5A1 deletions in 46,XY DSD and reinforces the utility of aCGH in the work up of DSDs of unclear etiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Developmental Trajectories of Adaptive Behaviors from Early Childhood to Adolescence in a Cohort of 152 Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdadli, Amaria; Assouline, Brigitte; Sonie, Sandrine; Pernon, Eric; Darrou, Celine; Michelon, Cecile; Picot, Marie-Christine; Aussilloux, Charles; Pry, Rene

    2012-01-01

    This study examines change in 152 children over an almost 10-year period (T1: 4.9 (plus or minus 1.3) years; T2: 8.1 (plus or minus 1.3) years; T3: 15(plus or minus 1.6) years) using a group-based, semi-parametric method in order to identify distinct developmental trajectories. Important deficits remain at adolescence in the adaptive abilities of…

  15. [Delayed visual maturation--a differential diagnostic challenge. A follow-up study of 13 children with delayed visual development with or without other developmental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diderichsen, J

    1996-10-10

    Early visual impairment represents several diagnostic possibilities from specific delayed visual maturation (type 1) with an excellent prognosis to more complex conditions with other ocular or neurological signs (type 2-4). Visual attention and interaction has been an interesting field of study in the interaction between biologically pre-programmed neonatal competencies and social facilitation. From these studies we can probably learn more about ((cloudy)) diagnoses such as cortical visual impairment, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism. Investigations and follow-up of 13 infants who did not show any visual interest at 6 - 12 weeks old are presented, along with proposals for the clinical management of these problems.

  16. Adapting Self-Selected Reading Practices for College-Level Developmental Reading Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flink, Patrick J.

    2017-01-01

    Reading comprehension and fluency issues are the most significant challenges facing adult, developmental reading students in community colleges. While a great deal of focus has been on improving developmental reading instruction, there is a lack of attention, and research, on how to best improve students' actual reading. Self-selected reading…

  17. Modulating Tone to Promote Motor Development Using a Neurofacilitation of Developmental Reaction (NFDR) Approach in Children with Neurodevelopmental Delay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vijay Batra; Meenakshi Batra; Ravindra Mohan Pandey; Vijai Prakash Sharma; Girdhar Gopal Agarwal

    2015-01-01

      [...]assessments of muscle tone and primitive reflex status are crucial parts of motor examinations and the formulation of intervention strategies for children with neurodevelopmental delay (3,4...

  18. An FPGA Implementation of a Polychronous Spiking Neural Network with Delay Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runchun; Cohen, Gregory; Stiefel, Klaus M.; Hamilton, Tara Julia; Tapson, Jonathan; van Schaik, André

    2013-01-01

    We present an FPGA implementation of a re-configurable, polychronous spiking neural network with a large capacity for spatial-temporal patterns. The proposed neural network generates delay paths de novo, so that only connections that actually appear in the training patterns will be created. This allows the proposed network to use all the axons (variables) to store information. Spike Timing Dependent Delay Plasticity is used to fine-tune and add dynamics to the network. We use a time multiplexing approach allowing us to achieve 4096 (4k) neurons and up to 1.15 million programmable delay axons on a Virtex 6 FPGA. Test results show that the proposed neural network is capable of successfully recalling more than 95% of all spikes for 96% of the stored patterns. The tests also show that the neural network is robust to noise from random input spikes. PMID:23408739

  19. Adaptability and resilience predict with „youth homeless” group in local system on prevention in context of Urie Bronfenbrenner developmental ecological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Michel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article includes the analysis of possibility specific adaptability and resilience predict with „youth homeless” group in Local System of Prevention in context of Urie Bronfenbrenner developmental ecological model.

  20. Whole-exome sequencing in an individual with severe global developmental delay and intractable epilepsy identifies a novel, de novo GRIN2A mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Sunita; Myers, Ken A; Smith, Amanda C; Beaulieu, Chandree L; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy A; Majewski, Jacek; Bulman, Dennis; Boycott, Kym M; Dyment, David A

    2014-07-01

    We present a 4-year-old girl with profound global developmental delay and refractory epilepsy characterized by multiple seizure types (partial complex with secondary generalization, tonic, myoclonic, and atypical absence). Her seizure semiology did not fit within a specific epileptic syndrome. Despite a broad metabolic and genetic workup, a diagnosis was not forthcoming. Whole-exome sequencing with a trio analysis (affected child compared to unaffected parents) was performed and identified a novel de novo missense mutation in GRIN2A, c.2449A>G, p.Met817Val, as the likely cause of the refractory epilepsy and global developmental delay. GRIN2A encodes a subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor that mediates excitatory transmission in the central nervous system. A significant reduction in the frequency and the duration of her seizures was observed after the addition of topiramate over a 10-month period. Further prospective studies in additional patients with mutations in GRIN2A will be required to optimize seizure management for this rare disorder. This report expands the current phenotype associated with GRIN2A mutations. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization in 190 Korean Patients with Developmental Delay and/or Intellectual Disability: A Single Tertiary Care University Center Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cha Gon; Park, Sang-Jin; Yun, Jun-No; Ko, Jung Min; Kim, Hyon-Ju; Yim, Shin-Young

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study analyzed and evaluated the demographic, clinical, and cytogenetic data [G-banded karyotyping and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH)] of patients with unexplained developmental delay or intellectual disability at a single Korean institution. Materials and Methods We collected clinical and cytogenetic data based on retrospective charts at Ajou University Medical Center, Suwon, Korea from April 2008 to March 2012. Results A total of 190 patients were identified. Mean age was 5.1±1.87 years. Array CGH yielded abnormal results in 26 of 190 patients (13.7%). Copy number losses were about two-fold more frequent than gains. A total of 61.5% of all patients had copy number losses. The most common deletion disorders included 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, 15q11.2q12 deletion and 18q deletion syndrome. Copy number gains were identified in 34.6% of patients, and common diseases among these included Potocki-Lupski syndrome, 15q11-13 duplication syndrome and duplication 22q. Abnormal karyotype with normal array CGH results was exhibited in 2.6% of patients; theses included balanced translocation (n=2), inversion (n=2) and low-level mosaicism (n=1). Facial abnormalities (pabnormal CGH findings. Conclusion Array CGH is a useful diagnostic tool in clinical settings in patients with developmental delay or intellectual disability combined with facial abnormalities or failure to thrive. PMID:24142652

  2. Deletion of human GP1BB and SEPT5 is associated with Bernard-Soulier syndrome, platelet secretion defect, polymicrogyria, and developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ingrid; Sandrock, Kirstin; Lanza, Francois; Nurden, Paquita; Hainmann, Ina; Pavlova, Anna; Greinacher, Andreas; Tacke, Uta; Barth, Michael; Busse, Anja; Oldenburg, Johannes; Bommer, Martin; Strahm, Brigitte; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Zieger, Barbara

    2011-09-01

    The bleeding disorder Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BSS) is caused by mutations in the genes coding for the platelet glycoprotein GPIb/IX receptor. The septin SEPT5 is important for active membrane movement such as vesicle trafficking and exocytosis in non-dividing cells (i.e. platelets, neurons). We report on a four-year-old boy with a homozygous deletion comprising not only glycoprotein Ibβ (GP1BB) but also the SEPT5 gene, located 5' to GP1BB. He presented with BSS, cortical dysplasia (polymicrogyria), developmental delay, and platelet secretion defect. The homozygous deletion of GP1BB and SEPT5, which had been identified by PCR analyses, was confirmed by Southern analyses and denaturing HPLC (DHPLC). The parents were heterozygous for this deletion. Absence of GPIbβ and SEPT5 proteins in the patient's platelets was illustrated using transmission electron microscopy. Besides decreased GPIb/IX expression, flow cytometry analyses revealed impaired platelet granule secretion. Because the bleeding disorder was extremely severe, the boy received bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from a HLA-identical unrelated donor. After successful engraftment of BMT, he had no more bleeding episodes. Interestingly, also his mental development improved strikingly after BMT. This report describes for the first time a patient with SEPT5 deficiency presenting with cortical dysplasia (polymicrogyria), developmental delay, and platelet secretion defect.

  3. Menstrual and contraceptive issues among young women with developmental delay: a retrospective review of cases at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizon, Christine D; Allen, Lisa M; Ornstein, Melanie P

    2005-06-01

    To define the clinical characteristics of, and management options offered to, young women with developmental delay referred to The Hospital for Sick Children gynecology clinic in Toronto for menstrual suppression and contraception. To review the primary caregiver concerns and preferences with regards to menstruation and contraception. A retrospective chart review of hospital records of young women with developmental delay referred to the gynecology clinic at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto from 1998 to 2003. A total of 72 charts were reviewed from clinic visits between 1998 to 2003. Ages range from 8 to 17 years with an unknown cause of their cognitive disability in 44% and medium to high support needs in the majority. Forty-three percent were still premenarcheal when first brought to the gynecology clinic by their families or caregivers. The main reason for consult was menstrual-related in 90%, with concerns related to hygiene and problems coping. Caregivers often approach physicians for menstrual suppression prior to menarche with a primary concern of personal hygiene. Medical suppression of menstruation can be successfully achieved. Depo-Provera was the most commonly prescribed and accepted method of menstrual suppression within our population.

  4. Risk sensitivity for amounts of and delay to rewards: adaptation for uncertainty or by-product of reward rate maximising?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Martin S; Schuck-Paim, Cynthia; Kacelnik, Alex

    2012-02-01

    Observations that humans and other species are sensitive to variability in the outcome of their choices has led to the widespread assumption that this sensitivity reflects adaptations to cope with risk (stochasticity of action consequences). We question this assumption in experiments with starlings. We show that choices between outcomes that are risky in both amount and delay to food are predictable from preferences in the absence of risk. We find that the overarching best predictor of an option's value is the average of the ratios of amount to delay across its (frequency weighted) outcomes, an expression known as "Expectation of the Ratios", or EoR. Most tests of risk sensitivity focus on the predicted impact of energetic state on preference for risk. We show instead that under controlled state conditions subjects are variance- and risk-neutral with respect to EoR, and this implies variance neutrality for amounts and variance-proneness for delays. The weak risk aversion for amounts often reported requires a small modification of EoR. EoR is consistent with associative learning: acquisition of value for initially neutral stimuli is roughly proportional to the magnitude of their consequences and inversely proportional to the interval between the stimulus and its consequence's onset. If, as is likely, the effect of amount on acquisition is sublinear, the result is a deviation from EoR towards risk aversion for amount. In 3 experiments, we first establish individual birds' preferences between pairs of fixed options that differ in both amount and delay (small-sooner vs. large-later), and then examine choices between stochastic mixtures that include these options. Experiment 1 uses a titration to establish certainty equivalents, while experiments 2 and 3 measure degree of preference between options with static parameters. The mixtures differ in the coefficient of variation of amount, delay, or both, but EoR is sufficient to predict all results, with no additional

  5. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Specific Phobias with a Child Demonstrating Severe Problem Behavior and Developmental Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Thompson E., III; Kurtz, Patricia F.; Gardner, Andrew W.; Carman, Nicole B.

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral treatments (CBTs) are widely used for anxiety disorders in typically developing children; however, there has been no previous attempt to administer CBT for specific phobia (in this case study, one-session treatment) to developmentally or intellectually disabled children. This case study integrates both cognitive-behavioral and…

  6. Abnormal truncal muscle tone as a useful early marker for developmental delay in low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieff, M K; Bernbaum, J C; Hoffman-Williamson, M; Daft, A

    1986-05-01

    Thirty-four outborn premature infants of appropriate gestational ages with birth weights less than 1,750 g were seen in follow-up at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months, corrected age to assess the incidence of abnormalities of muscle tone and the relationship of the site of early abnormalities to 18-month developmental status. The incidence of abnormal tone was most common at 3 months and declined with increasing age. The percentages of infants with abnormal tone at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively, were: increased lower extremity tone--62%, 71%, 38%, 9%; decreased lower extremity tone--3%, 3%, 6%, 9%; increased truncal tone--41%, 15%, 6%, 0%; decreased truncal tone--21%, 18%, 15%, 6%. Infants with truncal hypertonicity at 3 months had significantly lower Bayley motor and mental scores at 18 months when compared with infants with normal truncal tone (P less than .05). However, infants with lower extremity hypertonicity at 3 months were no different developmentally at 18 months from infants with normal tone. Infants with truncal or lower extremity hypotonicity fared the worst developmentally (P less than .05). We conclude that there is a high incidence of abnormal muscle tone in premature infants up to 18 months of age and that early truncal tone abnormalities are associated with a worse developmental outcome.

  7. The Role of American Sign Language in Improving Behavioral Functioning in Developmentally Delayed Children with Communication Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Deborah

    This thesis investigated the effects of adding the learning of American Sign Language (ASL) signs (as part of the Applied Behavior Analysis) on the negative behaviors of seven developmentally disabled children (aged 8-13 years). The children were measured on the following: overall disruptive behavior; aggressive behavior; tantrums; and the use of…

  8. CO2 induced seawater acidification impacts sea urchin larval development I: elevated metabolic rates decrease scope for growth and induce developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpp, M; Wren, J; Melzner, F; Thorndyke, M C; Dupont, S T

    2011-11-01

    Anthropogenic CO(2) emissions are acidifying the world's oceans. A growing body of evidence is showing that ocean acidification impacts growth and developmental rates of marine invertebrates. Here we test the impact of elevated seawater pCO(2) (129 Pa, 1271 μatm) on early development, larval metabolic and feeding rates in a marine model organism, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Growth and development was assessed by measuring total body length, body rod length, postoral rod length and posterolateral rod length. Comparing these parameters between treatments suggests that larvae suffer from a developmental delay (by ca. 8%) rather than from the previously postulated reductions in size at comparable developmental stages. Further, we found maximum increases in respiration rates of +100% under elevated pCO(2), while body length corrected feeding rates did not differ between larvae from both treatments. Calculating scope for growth illustrates that larvae raised under high pCO(2) spent an average of 39 to 45% of the available energy for somatic growth, while control larvae could allocate between 78 and 80% of the available energy into growth processes. Our results highlight the importance of defining a standard frame of reference when comparing a given parameter between treatments, as observed differences can be easily due to comparison of different larval ages with their specific set of biological characters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evolutionary Developmental Soft Robotics As a Framework to Study Intelligence and Adaptive Behavior in Animals and Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Corucci

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a comprehensive methodology and simulation framework will be reviewed, designed in order to study the emergence of adaptive and intelligent behavior in generic soft-bodied creatures. By incorporating artificial evolutionary and developmental processes, the system allows to evolve complete creatures (brain, body, developmental properties, sensory, control system, etc. for different task environments. Whether the evolved creatures will resemble animals or plants is in general not known a priori, and depends on the specific task environment set up by the experimenter. In this regard, the system may offer a unique opportunity to explore differences and similarities between these two worlds. Different material properties can be simulated and optimized, from a continuum of soft/stiff materials, to the interconnection of heterogeneous structures, both found in animals and plants alike. The adopted genetic encoding and simulation environment are particularly suitable in order to evolve distributed sensory and control systems, which play a particularly important role in plants. After a general description of the system some case studies will be presented, focusing on the emergent properties of the evolved creatures. Particular emphasis will be on some unifying concepts that are thought to play an important role in the emergence of intelligent and adaptive behavior across both the animal and plant kingdoms, such as morphological computation and morphological developmental plasticity. Overall, with this paper, we hope to draw attention on set of tools, methodologies, ideas and results, which may be relevant to researchers interested in plant-inspired robotics and intelligence.

  10. From parent-child mutuality to security to socialization outcomes: developmental cascade toward positive adaptation in preadolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghag; Boldt, Lea J; Kochanska, Grazyna

    2015-01-01

    A developmental cascade from positive early parent-child relationship to child security with the parent to adaptive socialization outcomes, proposed in attachment theory and often implicitly accepted but rarely formally tested, was examined in 100 mothers, fathers, and children followed from toddler age to preadolescence. Parent-child Mutually Responsive Orientation (MRO) was observed in lengthy interactions at 38, 52, 67, and 80 months; children reported their security with parents at age eight. Socialization outcomes (parent- and child-reported cooperation with parental monitoring and teacher-reported school competence) were assessed at age 10. Mediation was tested with PROCESS. The parent-child history of MRO significantly predicted both mother-child and father-child security. For mother-child dyads, security mediated links between history of MRO and cooperation with maternal monitoring and school competence, controlling for developmental continuity of the studied constructs. For father-child dyads, the mediation effect was not evident.

  11. A Comparison of working memory in low-functioning children with autism and children with non-specific developmental delay

    OpenAIRE

    Wooton, Imogen

    2006-01-01

    A sequential learning task was used to investigate the existence of a specific working memory profile in 14 autistic participants (aged 6-12 years). Their performance was compared to 11 chronologically age-matched children and 11 IQ-matched children (with non-specific developmental disorder). The task successfully engaged all children and allowed in-depth analysis of working memory through sub-division of the participants into high-scoring and low-scoring according to their per...

  12. Hybrid Adaptive/Nonadaptive Delayed Signal Cancellation-Based Phase-Locked Loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Guerrero, Josep M.; Quintero, Juan Carlos Vasquez

    2017-01-01

    To improve the disturbance rejection capability of phase-locked loops (PLLs), which are undoubtedly the most common synchronization tool in power and energy applications, using different filtering techniques have been suggested in the literature. Among these filtering strategies, the delayed signal......, a compensator is designed and cascaded with them. The proposed filter requires a low computational burden for the implementation and ensures a fast dynamic response and high filtering capability for the PLL. The effectiveness of this technique is verified through experimental results....

  13. The South African developmental landscape: restricted potentials or expansive, complex adaptive opportunities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C J Burman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the South African developmental landscape is currently locked into an overly technical, path dependent paradigm that is unlikely to be capable of embracing the complex challenges identified by the recent National Development Plan. The article explores the internal logic of the existing path dependent, technical condition from the perspective of complexity, in the context of the Department of Science and Technology’s Fifth Grand Challenge and “continuous change”. It is argued that drawing ideas from complexity into future developmental trajectories can add value to the National Development Plan: Vision 2030, but to do so will require dynamic mind-set shifts across multiple developmental scales and interfaces if new approaches to managing development that embraces complexity, rather than denies it, is to emerge. Keywords: development; complexity; path dependency; epistemological vigilance; sense-making; National Development Plan Disciplines: Complexity Studies; Transdisciplinary studies; Management studies; Public management; Political studies; Economics; Development Studies

  14. Adapting to foreign-accented speech: The role of delay in testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteman, M.J.; Bardhan, N.; Weber, A.C.; McQueen, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding speech usually seems easy, but it can become noticeably harder when the speaker has a foreign accent. This is because foreign accents add considerable variation to speech. Research on foreign-accented speech shows that participants are able to adapt quickly to this type of variation.

  15. Parental adaptation to out-of-home placement of a child with severe or profound developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jeffrey B; Roper, Susanne Olsen

    2014-05-01

    Utilizing grounded theory qualitative research methods, a model was developed for describing parental adaptation after voluntary placement of a child with severe or profound developmental disabilities in out-of-home care. Interviews of parents from 20 families were analyzed. Parents' cognitive appraisals of placement outcomes were classified as either inducing emotional stress (i.e., guilt, sadness, fear and worry, anger and frustration, and uncertainty) or relief. Parental appraisals of responses to placement by children, extended family, and friends were identified as factors affecting the parents' adaptation to placement. The primary coping methods used by parents to decrease emotional stress and increase relief consisted of reappraisals regarding the necessity of placement, involvement in the child's life, psychotherapy, and the passage of time.

  16. Unexplained developmental delay/learning disability: guidelines for best practice protocol for first line assessment and genetic/metabolic/radiological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, J J; Lynch, S A; Treacy, E P; King, M D; Betts, D R; Mayne, P D; Sharif, F

    2016-02-01

    Investigation of patients, particularly children, with unexplained global developmental delay (GDD)/learning disability (LD) has been challenging due to a lack of clear guidance from specialised centres. Limited knowledge of rare diseases and a poor understanding of the purpose or limitations of appropriate investigations have been some of the principal reasons for this difficulty. A guideline development group was formed to recommend on appropriate, first line metabolic, genetic and radiological investigations for children and adults with unexplained GDD/ID. A comprehensive literature search was conducted, evaluated and reviewed by the guideline committee and a best practice protocol for first line assessment and genetic, metabolic and radiological investigations was decided upon after considering diagnostic yield, practicality, treatability and costs. It is hoped that these recommendations will become national guidelines for the first line metabolic, genetic and radiological investigation of patients presenting with unexplained GDD/ID.

  17. Adaptive Fuzzy Tracking Control for Uncertain Nonlinear Time-Delay Systems with Unknown Dead-Zone Input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang-Cheng Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The tracking control problem of uncertain nonlinear time-delay systems with unknown dead-zone input is tackled by a robust adaptive fuzzy control scheme. Because the nonlinear gain function and the uncertainties of the controlled system including matched and unmatched uncertainties are supposed to be unknown, fuzzy logic systems are employed to approximate the nonlinear gain function and the upper bounded functions of these uncertainties. Moreover, the upper bound of the uncertainty caused by the fuzzy modeling error is also estimated. According to these learning fuzzy models and some feasible adaptive laws, a robust adaptive fuzzy tracking controller is developed in this paper without constructing the dead-zone inverse. Based on the Lyapunov stability theorem, the proposed controller not only guarantees that the robust stability of the whole closed-loop system in the presence of uncertainties and unknown dead-zone input can be achieved, but it also obtains that the output tracking error can converge to a neighborhood of zero exponentially. Some simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness and performance of the proposed approach.

  18. Lerner's theory on the genetic relationship between heterozygosity, genomic co-adaptation, and developmental instability revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertoldi, Cino; Sorensen, Jesper G.; David, Jean R.

    2006-01-01

    inbreeding is likely to have purged the genome of some of its genetic load and its most deleterious variants. The greater developmental instability in the parthenogenetic and inbred strains implies a non-linear relationship between heritability (h(2)) and additive genetic variance (sigma(2)(a)) (which...

  19. Developmental specialization of the left parietal cortex for the semantic representation of Arabic numerals: An fMR-adaptation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan E. Vogel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The way the human brain constructs representations of numerical symbols is poorly understood. While increasing evidence from neuroimaging studies has indicated that the intraparietal sulcus (IPS becomes increasingly specialized for symbolic numerical magnitude representation over developmental time, the extent to which these changes are associated with age-related differences in symbolic numerical magnitude representation or with developmental changes in non-numerical processes, such as response selection, remains to be uncovered. To address these outstanding questions we investigated developmental changes in the cortical representation of symbolic numerical magnitude in 6- to 14-year-old children using a passive functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation design, thereby mitigating the influence of response selection. A single-digit Arabic numeral was repeatedly presented on a computer screen and interspersed with the presentation of novel digits deviating as a function of numerical ratio (smaller/larger number. Results demonstrated a correlation between age and numerical ratio in the left IPS, suggesting an age-related increase in the extent to which numerical symbols are represented in the left IPS. Brain activation of the right IPS was modulated by numerical ratio but did not correlate with age, indicating hemispheric differences in IPS engagement during the development of symbolic numerical representation.

  20. WAC loss-of-function mutations cause a recognisable syndrome characterised by dysmorphic features, developmental delay and hypotonia and recapitulate 10p11.23 microdeletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSanto, Cori; D'Aco, Kristin; Araujo, Gabriel C; Shannon, Nora; Vernon, Hilary; Rahrig, April; Monaghan, Kristin G; Niu, Zhiyv; Vitazka, Patrik; Dodd, Jonathan; Tang, Sha; Manwaring, Linda; Martir-Negron, Arelis; Schnur, Rhonda E; Juusola, Jane; Schroeder, Audrey; Pan, Vivian; Helbig, Katherine L; Friedman, Bethany; Shinawi, Marwan

    2015-11-01

    Rare de novo mutations have been implicated as a significant cause of idiopathic intellectual disability. Large deletions encompassing 10p11.23 have been implicated in developmental delay, behavioural abnormalities and dysmorphic features, but the genotype-phenotype correlation was not delineated. Mutations in WAC have been recently reported in large screening cohorts of patients with intellectual disability or autism, but no full phenotypic characterisation was described. Clinical and molecular characterisation of six patients with loss-of-function WAC mutations identified by whole exome sequencing was performed. Clinical data were obtained by retrospective chart review, parental interviews, direct patient interaction and formal neuropsychological evaluation. Five heterozygous de novo WAC mutations were identified in six patients. Three of the mutations were nonsense, and two were frameshift; all are predicted to cause loss of function either through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay or protein truncation. Clinical findings included developmental delay (6/6), hypotonia (6/6), behavioural problems (5/6), eye abnormalities (5/6), constipation (5/6), feeding difficulties (4/6), seizures (2/6) and sleep problems (2/6). All patients exhibited common dysmorphic features, including broad/prominent forehead, synophrys and/or bushy eyebrows, depressed nasal bridge and bulbous nasal tip. Posteriorly rotated ears, hirsutism, deep-set eyes, thin upper lip, inverted nipples, hearing loss and branchial cleft anomalies were also noted. Our case series show that loss-of-function mutations in WAC cause a recognisable genetic syndrome characterised by a neurocognitive phenotype and facial dysmorphism. Our data highly suggest that WAC haploinsufficiency is responsible for most of the phenotypic features associated with deletions encompassing 10p11.23. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Paternal deletion 6q24.3: a new congenital anomaly syndrome associated with intrauterine growth failure, early developmental delay and characteristic facial appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowaczyk, Małgorzata J M; Carter, Melissa T; Xu, Jie; Huggins, Marlene; Raca, Gordana; Das, Soma; Martin, Christa Lese; Schwartz, Stuart; Rosenfield, Robert; Waggoner, Darrel J

    2008-02-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 6 are relatively uncommon and to date minimal genotype-phenotype correlations have been observed. We report on three unrelated patients with de novo paternal interstitial deletions of 6q24.3. FISH mapping was used to delineate the minimal region of overlap between these three patients. Although all three patients had different size deletions and different breakpoints, two of the patients shared a 2.5 Mb region of overlap and strikingly similar facial features including a triangular face, frontal bossing with metopic prominence, short and upward-slanting palpebral fissures, asymmetry of upper eyelids, hooded eyelids, shallow orbits, prominent inferior orbital crease, wide mouth, and long and flat philtrum. They also had redundant skin, joint laxity, a small thorax, and early developmental delay. The smallest region of overlap between all three patients was a region of deletion less than 1 Mb; all had a history of IUGR and postnatal short stature without overt radiologic skeletal anomalies. The dysmorphic features, early developmental and growth delay may be due to the hemizygous state for one of the genes in the deleted region of two of the patients or to a long range effect of the deletion on expression of other genes. In addition, since imprinted genes have been reported in this region, paternal deletion of an imprinted gene in all three patients may contribute to the growth phenotype. We propose that this is a new congenital malformation syndrome associated with a paternal deletion of 6q24.3.

  2. Structural Changes Associated with Delayed Dark Adaptation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laíns, Inês; Miller, John B; Park, Dong H; Tsikata, Edem; Davoudi, Samaneh; Rahmani, Safa; Pierce, Jonathan; Silva, Rufino; Chen, Teresa C; Kim, Ivana K; Vavvas, Demetrios; Miller, Joan W; Husain, Deeba

    2017-09-01

    To examine the relationship between dark adaptation (DA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based macular morphology in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Prospective, cross-sectional study. Patients with AMD and a comparison group (>50 years) without any vitreoretinal disease. All participants were imaged with spectral-domain OCT and color fundus photographs, and then staged for AMD (Age-related Eye Disease Study system). Both eyes were tested with the AdaptDx (MacuLogix, Middletown, PA) DA extended protocol (20 minutes). A software program was developed to map the DA testing spot (2° circle, 5° superior to the fovea) to the OCT B-scans. Two independent graders evaluated the B-scans within this testing spot, as well as the entire macula, recording the presence of several AMD-associated abnormalities. Multilevel mixed-effects models (accounting for correlated outcomes between 2 eyes) were used for analyses. The primary outcome was rod-intercept time (RIT), defined in minutes, as a continuous variable. For subjects unable to reach RIT within the 20 minutes of testing, the value of 20 was assigned. We included 137 eyes (n = 77 subjects), 72.3% (n = 99 eyes) with AMD and the remainder belonging to the comparison group. Multivariable analysis revealed that even after adjusting for age and AMD stage, the presence of any abnormalities within the DA testing spot (ß = 4.8, P dark-adapt. Subretinal drusenoid deposits and ellipsoid zone changes seem to be strongly associated with impaired dark adaptation. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. European-French Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire and Pretest in French-Speaking Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray-Kaeser, Sylvie; Satink, Ton; Andresen, Mette; Martini, Rose; Thommen, Evelyne; Bertrand, Anne Martine

    2015-05-01

    The Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ'07) is a Canadian-English instrument recommended for screening children aged 5 to 15 years who are at risk for developmental coordination disorder. While a Canadian-French version of the DCDQ'07 presently exists, a European-French version does not. To produce a cross-cultural adaptation of the DCDQ'07 for use in areas of Europe where French is spoken and to test its cultural relevance in French-speaking Switzerland. Cross-cultural adaptation was done using established guidelines. Cultural relevance was analyzed with cognitive interviews of thirteen parents of children aged 5.0 to 14.6 years (mean age: 8.5 years, SD = 3.4), using think-aloud and probing techniques. Cultural and linguistic differences were noted between the European-French, the Canadian-French, and the original versions of the DCDQ'07. Despite correct translation and expert committee review, cognitive interviews revealed that certain items of the European-French version were unclear or misinterpreted and further modifications were needed. After rewording items as a result of the outcomes of the cognitive interview, the European-French version of the DCDQ'07 is culturally appropriate for use in French-speaking Switzerland. Further studies are necessary to determine its psychometric properties.

  4. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) IA, developmental delay and autism related disorder in a boy with duplication (17)(p11.2p12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moog, U; Engelen, J J; Weber, B W; Van Gelderen, M; Steyaert, J; Baas, F; Sijstermans, H M; Fryns, J P

    2004-01-01

    We present a 6-year-old boy with moderate developmental delay, gait disturbance, autism related disorder and mild dysmorphic features. He was seen for evaluation of his retardation since the age of 2.8 years. At first sight, a cytogenetic analysis showed a normal 46,XY karyotype. Neurological examination at the age of 5.5 years revealed a motor and sensory polyneuropathy. A quantitative Southern blot with probes PMP22 and VAW409 specific for Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 (CMT1) disclosed a duplication which confirmed the diagnosis HMSN Ia. Subsequently, GTG banded metaphases were re-evaluated and a small duplication 17p was seen on retrospect. Additional FISH with probe LSISMS (Vysis) specific for the Smith-Magenis region at 17p11.2 again showed a duplication. Both parents had a normal karyotype and the duplication test for CMT1 showed normal results for both of them. The boy had a de novo 46,XY,dup(17)(p11.2p12) karyotype. The present observation confirms previous findings of mild psychomotor delay, neurobehavioural features and minor craniofacial anomalies as the major phenotypic features of dup(17)(p11.2) and dup(17)(p11.2p12); in cases of duplications comprising the PMP22 locus HMSN1 is associated. A recognizable facial phenotype emerges characterized by a broad forehead, hypertelorism, downslant of palpebral fissures, smooth philtrum, thin upper lip and ear anomalies.

  5. Placental adaptations to the maternal-fetal environment: implications for fetal growth and developmental programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandovici, Ionel; Hoelle, Katharina; Angiolini, Emily; Constância, Miguel

    2012-07-01

    The placenta is a transient organ found in eutherian mammals that evolved primarily to provide nutrients for the developing fetus. The placenta exchanges a wide array of nutrients, endocrine signals, cytokines and growth factors with the mother and the fetus, thereby regulating intrauterine development. Recent studies show that the placenta is not just a passive organ mediating maternal-fetal exchange. It can adapt its capacity to supply nutrients in response to intrinsic and extrinsic variations in the maternal-fetal environment. These dynamic adaptations are thought to occur to maximize fetal growth and viability at birth in the prevailing conditions in utero. However, some of these adaptations may also affect the development of individual fetal tissues, with patho-physiological consequences long after birth. Here, this review summarizes current knowledge on the causes, possible mechanisms and consequences of placental adaptive responses, with a focus on the regulation of transporter-mediated processes for nutrients. This review also highlights the emerging roles that imprinted genes and epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation may play in placental adaptations to the maternal-fetal environment. Copyright © 2012 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A developmentally informed adaptation of minority stress for sexual minority adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbach, Jeremy T; Gibbs, Jeremy J

    2017-02-01

    Sexual minority adolescents (lesbian, gay, bisexual) experience disparities in behavioral health outcomes compared to their heterosexual peers, generally attributed to minority stress. Although evidence of the applicability of the minority stress model among adolescents exists, it is based on a primarily adult literature. Developmental and generational differences demand further examination of minority stress to confirm its applicability. Forty-eight life history interviews with sexual minority adolescents in California (age 14-19; M = 19.27 SD = 1.38; 39.6% cismale, 35.4% cisfemale, 25% other gender) were completed, recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis in QSR NVivo. Following a consensus model, all transcripts were double coded. Results suggest that minority stress is appropriate for use with adolescents; however, further emphasis should be placed on social context, coping resources, and developmental processes regarding identity development. A conceptual model is provided, as are implications for research and practice. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adaptation and Extension of the European Recommendations (EACD) on Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) for the UK context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Anna L; Hill, Elisabeth L; Kirby, Amanda; Sugden, David A

    2015-05-01

    Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) affects the learning and performance of everyday motor skills. It commonly co-occurs with other developmental disorders and a range of associated psycho-social impairments. Recent evidence-based guidelines on diagnosis, assessment, and intervention provide valuable information for practitioners. However these are directed primarily at German-speaking countries and focus on work with children. The aim of this project was to consider the application of these guidelines in the UK and to extend them for use with adults with DCD. Individuals with DCD, parents, and professionals from a wide range of disciplines were invited to two workshops to discuss and debate the guidelines, to adapt them for the UK and produce dissemination materials. A working definition of DCD was agreed, minor revisions were made to the guidelines to reflect the UK context, an extension for adults was compiled and a series of leaflets was produced to disseminate this information to health and education professionals, parents, and employers. This work will raise awareness of the condition across different professional groups. It provides information to help those working with children and adults with DCD in the UK to assist in the process of diagnosis, assessment, and intervention.

  8. Developmental exposure to bisphenol A modulates innate but not adaptive immune responses to influenza A virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Roy

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is used in numerous products, such as plastic bottles and food containers, from which it frequently leaches out and is consumed by humans. There is a growing public concern that BPA exposure may pose a significant threat to human health. Moreover, due to the widespread and constant nature of BPA exposure, not only adults but fetuses and neonates are also exposed to BPA. There is mounting evidence that developmental exposures to chemicals from our environment, including BPA, contribute to diseases late in life; yet, studies of how early life exposures specifically alter the immune system are limited. Herein we report an examination of how maternal exposure to a low, environmentally relevant dose of BPA affects the immune response to infection with influenza A virus. We exposed female mice during pregnancy and through lactation to the oral reference dose for BPA listed by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and comprehensively examined immune parameters directly linked to disease outcomes in adult offspring following infection with influenza A virus. We found that developmental exposure to BPA did not compromise disease-specific adaptive immunity against virus infection, or reduce the host's ability to clear the virus from the infected lung. However, maternal exposure to BPA transiently reduced the extent of infection-associated pulmonary inflammation and anti-viral gene expression in lung tissue. From these observations, we conclude that maternal exposure to BPA slightly modulates innate immunity in adult offspring, but does not impair the anti-viral adaptive immune response, which is critical for virus clearance and survival following influenza virus infection.

  9. A Bayesian adaptive Phase I-II clinical trial for evaluating efficacy and toxicity with delayed outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Modiano, Jaime

    2014-02-01

    In traditional Phase-I oncology trials, the safety of a new chemotherapeutic agent is tested in a dose escalation study to identify the maximum tolerated dose, which is defined as the highest dose with acceptable toxicity. An alternate approach is to jointly model toxicity and efficacy and allow dose finding to be directed by a prespecified trade-off between efficacy and toxicity. With this goal in mind, several designs have been proposed to jointly model toxicity and efficacy in a Phase I-II dose escalation study. A factor limiting the use of these designs is that toxicity and efficacy must be observed in a timely manner. One approach to overcoming this problem is to model toxicity and efficacy as time-to-event outcomes. This would allow new subjects to be enrolled before full information is available for previous subjects while incorporating partial information when adaptively assigning new subjects to a dose level. We propose a Phase I-II dose escalation study for evaluating toxicity and efficacy with delayed outcomes by jointly modeling toxicity and efficacy as time-to-event outcomes. We apply our proposed design to a Phase I-II clinical trial of a novel targeted toxin for canine hemangiosarcoma. Our simulation results show that our design identifies the optimal dose at a similar rate to dose finding that treats toxicity and efficacy as binary outcomes, but with substantial savings in study duration. Our proposed design has acceptable operating characteristics and dramatically reduces the trial duration compared to a design that considers toxicity and efficacy as binary outcomes, but comes at the cost of enrolling additional subjects when all dose levels are unacceptable. We developed a novel Phase I-II design that accounts for delayed outcomes by modeling toxicity and efficacy as time-to-event outcomes. Our design has similar operating characteristics to efficacy/toxicity trade-off designs that consider efficacy and toxicity as binary outcomes, but with a

  10. Thyroid Allostasis–Adaptive Responses of Thyrotropic Feedback Control to Conditions of Strain, Stress, and Developmental Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Chatzitomaris

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus–pituitary–thyroid feedback control is a dynamic, adaptive system. In situations of illness and deprivation of energy representing type 1 allostasis, the stress response operates to alter both its set point and peripheral transfer parameters. In contrast, type 2 allostatic load, typically effective in psychosocial stress, pregnancy, metabolic syndrome, and adaptation to cold, produces a nearly opposite phenotype of predictive plasticity. The non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS or thyroid allostasis in critical illness, tumors, uremia, and starvation (TACITUS, commonly observed in hospitalized patients, displays a historically well-studied pattern of allostatic thyroid response. This is characterized by decreased total and free thyroid hormone concentrations and varying levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH ranging from decreased (in severe cases to normal or even elevated (mainly in the recovery phase TSH concentrations. An acute versus chronic stage (wasting syndrome of TACITUS can be discerned. The two types differ in molecular mechanisms and prognosis. The acute adaptation of thyroid hormone metabolism to critical illness may prove beneficial to the organism, whereas the far more complex molecular alterations associated with chronic illness frequently lead to allostatic overload. The latter is associated with poor outcome, independently of the underlying disease. Adaptive responses of thyroid homeostasis extend to alterations in thyroid hormone concentrations during fetal life, periods of weight gain or loss, thermoregulation, physical exercise, and psychiatric diseases. The various forms of thyroid allostasis pose serious problems in differential diagnosis of thyroid disease. This review article provides an overview of physiological mechanisms as well as major diagnostic and therapeutic implications of thyroid allostasis under a variety of developmental and straining conditions.

  11. Mixed H∞ and passive projective synchronization for fractional-order memristor-based neural networks with time delays via adaptive sliding mode control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shuai; Song, Xiaona; Balsera, Ines Tejado

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the mixed H∞ and passive projective synchronization problem for fractional-order (FO) memristor-based neural networks with time delays. Our aim is to design a controller such that, though the unavoidable phenomena of time delay and external disturbances is fully considered, the resulting closed-loop system is stable with a mixed H∞ and passive performance level. By combining sliding mode control and adaptive control methods, a novel adaptive sliding mode control strategy is designed for the synchronization of time-delayed FO dynamic networks. Via the application of FO system stability theory, the projective synchronization conditions are addressed in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Based on the conditions, a desired controller which can guarantee the stability of the closed-loop system and also ensure a mixed H∞ and passive performance level is designed. Finally, two simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Forskolin suppresses delayed-rectifier K+ currents and enhances spike frequency-dependent adaptation of sympathetic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis I Angel-Chavez

    Full Text Available In signal transduction research natural or synthetic molecules are commonly used to target a great variety of signaling proteins. For instance, forskolin, a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase, has been widely used in cellular preparations to increase the intracellular cAMP level. However, it has been shown that forskolin directly inhibits some cloned K+ channels, which in excitable cells set up the resting membrane potential, the shape of action potential and regulate repetitive firing. Despite the growing evidence indicating that K+ channels are blocked by forskolin, there are no studies yet assessing the impact of this mechanism of action on neuron excitability and firing patterns. In sympathetic neurons, we find that forskolin and its derivative 1,9-Dideoxyforskolin, reversibly suppress the delayed rectifier K+ current (IKV. Besides, forskolin reduced the spike afterhyperpolarization and enhanced the spike frequency-dependent adaptation. Given that IKV is mostly generated by Kv2.1 channels, HEK-293 cells were transfected with cDNA encoding for the Kv2.1 α subunit, to characterize the mechanism of forskolin action. Both drugs reversible suppressed the Kv2.1-mediated K+ currents. Forskolin inhibited Kv2.1 currents and IKV with an IC50 of ~32 μM and ~24 µM, respectively. Besides, the drug induced an apparent current inactivation and slowed-down current deactivation. We suggest that forskolin reduces the excitability of sympathetic neurons by enhancing the spike frequency-dependent adaptation, partially through a direct block of their native Kv2.1 channels.

  13. Subtelomeric rearrangements in Indian children with idiopathic intellectual disability/developmental delay: Frequency estimation & clinical correlation using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthi Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Subtelomeres are prone to deleterious rearrangements owing to their proximity to unique sequences on the one end and telomeric repetitive sequences, which increase their tendency to recombine, on the other end. These subtelomeric rearrangements resulting in segmental aneusomy are reported to contribute to the aetiology of idiopathic intellectual disability/developmental delay (ID/DD. We undertook this study to estimate the frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements in children with ID/DD. Methods: One hundred and twenty seven children with idiopathic ID/DD were tested for subtelomeric rearrangements using karyotyping and FISH. Blood samples were cultured, harvested, fixed and GTG-banded using the standard protocols. Results: Rearrangements involving the subtelomeres were observed in 7.8 per cent of the tested samples. Detection of rearrangements visible at the resolution of the karyotype constituted 2.3 per cent, while those rearrangements detected only with FISH constituted 5.5 per cent. Five deletions and five unbalanced translocations were detected. Analysis of parental samples wherever possible was informative regarding the inheritance of the rearrangement. Interpretation & conclusions: The frequency of subtelomeric rearrangements observed in this study was within the reported range of 0-35 per cent. All abnormal genotypes were clinically correlated. Further analysis with array technologies presents a future prospect. Our results suggest the need to test individuals with ID/DD for subtelomeric rearrangements using sensitive methods such as FISH.

  14. An unusual phenotype of X-linked developmental delay and extreme behavioral difficulties associated with a mutation in the EBP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartill, Verity L; Tysoe, Carolyn; Manning, Nigel; Dobbie, Angus; Santra, Saikat; Walter, John; Caswell, Richard; Koster, Janet; Waterham, Hans; Hobson, Emma

    2014-04-01

    We report on a family in which four males over three generations are affected with X-linked recessive developmental delay, learning difficulties, severe behavioral difficulties and mild dysmorphic features. Plasma sterol analysis in three of the four affected males demonstrated increased concentrations of 8-dehydrocholesterol (8-DHC) and cholest-8(9)-enol. All four affected males had a novel hemizygous missense mutation, p.W47R (c.139T>C), in EBP. Functional studies showed raised levels of cholest-8(9)-enol in patient's cultured fibroblast cells, which were suppressed when the cells were incubated with simvastatin. EBP encodes 3β-hydroxysteroid-delta8, delta7-isomerase, a key enzyme involved in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Mutations in EBP have previously been associated with Conradi-Hunermann-Happle syndrome (CHH), an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by skeletal dysplasia, skin, and ocular abnormalities, which is usually lethal in males. Four previous reports describe X-linked recessive multiple anomaly syndromes associated with non-mosaic EBP mutations in males, two at the same amino acid position, p.W47C. This phenotype has previously been described as "MEND" syndrome (male EBP disorder with neurological defects). The family reported herein represent either a novel phenotype, or an expansion of the MEND phenotype, characterized by extreme behavioral difficulties and a scarcity of structural anomalies. Simvastatin therapy is being evaluated in two males from this family. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Mindfulness-based stress reduction for parents of young children with developmental delays: implications for parental mental health and child behavior problems.

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    Neece, Cameron L

    2014-03-01

    Parents of children with developmental delays (DD) typically report elevated levels of parental stress compared with parents of typically developing children. Children with DD are also at high risk for exhibiting significant behaviour problems. Parental stress has been shown to impact the development of these behaviour problems; however, it is rarely addressed in interventions aimed at reducing child behaviour problems. The current study examined the efficacy of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) for parents of children with DD by investigating whether this intervention is effective in reducing parenting stress and whether decreases in parenting stress lead to reductions in behaviour problems among children with DD. Forty six parents of children with DD were randomly assigned to an immediate treatment or wait list-control group. Participants completed questionnaires assessing parental stress and child behaviour problems at intake and at a second assessment, which took place after only the immediate treatment group had received the MBSR. Parents who participated in MBSR reported significantly less stress and depression as well as greater life satisfaction compared with wait list-control parents. Regarding child outcomes, children whose parents participated in MBSR were reported to have fewer behaviour problems following the intervention, specifically in the areas of attention problems and ADHD symptomatology. Results indicated that MBSR may be an effective intervention for ameliorating parental stress and mental health problems among parents of children with DD. Additionally, these benefits may 'spill over' and improve behaviour challenges among these children. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Partial monosomy of 11q22.2q22.3 including the SDHD gene in individuals with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelavarthi, Krishna; Cabral, Huong; Wilson, Golder N; Rohena, Luis; Risheg, Hiba; Penton, Andrea; Schleede, Justin; Burnside, Rachel D

    2015-04-01

    Deletions in the middle portion of 11q are not as well described in the literature as terminal 11q deletions that result in Jacobsen syndrome. One confounding factor in the older literature is that the G-banding pattern of 11q13q21 is very similar to 11q21q23. The advent of fluorescence in situ hybridization and later microarray technologies have allowed for a better resolution of many of these deletions, but genotype-phenotype correlations are still difficult since these deletions are rare events. We present five individuals who presented with developmental delays with de novo 11q22.2q23.3 deletions. Deletions were observed by standard G-banded chromosome analysis with clarification of breakpoints and gene content by SNP microarray analysis. Of note, all individuals had identical distal breakpoints. All deletions include SDHD, which is implicated in hereditary paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma, for which the patients will need to be monitored in adulthood. In spite of the large deletions of 8.6 Mb (Patients 1 and 3), 13.98 Mb (Patient 2), and 12.6 Mb (Patients 4 and 5) all patients show somewhat mild intellectual disability and dysmorphism. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Expanding the spectrum of phenotypes associated with germline PIGA mutations: a child with developmental delay, accelerated linear growth, facial dysmorphisms, elevated alkaline phosphatase, and progressive CNS abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Crabben, Saskia N; Harakalova, Magdalena; Brilstra, Eva H; van Berkestijn, Frédérique M C; Hofstede, Floris C; van Vught, Adrianus J; Cuppen, Edwin; Kloosterman, Wigard; Ploos van Amstel, Hans Kristian; van Haaften, Gijs; van Haelst, Mieke M

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidyl inositol glycan (PIG) enzyme subclasses are involved in distinct steps of glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol anchor protein biosynthesis. Glycolsyl phosphatidyl inositol-anchored proteins have heterogeneous functions; they can function as enzymes, adhesion molecules, complement regulators and co-receptors in signal transduction pathways. Germline mutations in genes encoding different members of the PIG family result in diverse conditions with (severe) developmental delay, (neonatal) seizures, hypotonia, CNS abnormalities, growth abnormalities, and congenital abnormalities as hallmark features. The variability of clinical features resembles the typical diversity of other glycosylation pathway deficiencies such as the congenital disorders of glycosylation. Here, we report the first germline missense mutation in the PIGA gene associated with accelerated linear growth, obesity, central hypotonia, severe refractory epilepsy, cardiac anomalies, mild facial dysmorphic features, mildly elevated alkaline phosphatase levels, and CNS anomalies consisting of progressive cerebral atrophy, insufficient myelinization, and cortical MRI signal abnormalities. X-exome sequencing in the proband identified a c.278C>T (p.Pro93Leu) mutation in the PIGA gene. The mother and maternal grandmother were unaffected carriers and the mother showed 100% skewing of the X-chromosome harboring the mutation. These results together with the clinical similarity of the patient reported here and the previously reported patients with a germline nonsense mutation in PIGA support the determination that this mutation caused the phenotype in this family. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Developmental Changes of TGF-β1 and Smads Signaling Pathway in Intestinal Adaption of Weaned Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Kan; Song, Ze-He; Jiao, Le-Fei; Ke, Ya-Lu; Hu, Cai-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Weaning stress caused marked changes in intestinal structure and function. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and canonical Smads signaling pathway are suspected to play an important regulatory role in post-weaning adaptation of the small intestine. In the present study, the intestinal morphology and permeability, developmental expressions of tight junction proteins and TGF-β1 in the intestine of piglets during the 2 weeks after weaning were assessed. The expressions of TGF-β receptor I/II (TβRI, TβRII), smad2/3, smad4 and smad7 were determined to investigate whether canonical smads signaling pathways were involved in early weaning adaption process. The results showed that a shorter villus and deeper crypt were observed on d 3 and d 7 postweaning and intestinal morphology recovered to preweaning values on d 14 postweaning. Early weaning increased (Pweaning. Compared with the pre-weaning stage (d 0), tight junction proteins level of occludin and claudin-1 were reduced (Pweaning, and ZO-1 protein was reduced (Pweaning. An increase (Pweaning. Although there was an increase (Pweaning stress. The increased intestinal endogenous TGF-β1 didn't activate the canonical Smads signaling pathway. PMID:25170924

  19. Normal perception of Mooney faces in developmental prosopagnosia: Evidence from the N170 component and rapid neural adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towler, John; Gosling, Angela; Duchaine, Bradley; Eimer, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with developmental prosopagnosia (DP) have a severe difficulty recognizing the faces of known individuals in the absence of any history of neurological damage. These recognition problems may be linked to selective deficits in the holistic/configural processing of faces. We used two-tone Mooney images to study the processing of faces versus non-face objects in DP when it is based on holistic information (or the facial gestalt) in the absence of obvious local cues about facial features. A rapid adaptation procedure was employed for a group of 16 DPs. Naturalistic photographs of upright faces were preceded by upright or inverted Mooney faces or by Mooney houses. DPs showed face-sensitive N170 components in response to Mooney faces versus houses, and N170 amplitude reductions for inverted as compared to upright Mooney faces. They also showed the typical pattern of N170 adaptation effects, with reduced N170 components when upright naturalistic test faces were preceded by upright Mooney faces, demonstrating that the perception of Mooney and naturalistic faces recruits shared neural populations. Our findings demonstrate that individuals with DP can utilize global information about face configurations for categorical discriminations between faces and non-face objects, and suggest that face processing deficits emerge primarily at more fine-grained higher level stages of face perception. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  20. The Adaptation of a School-Based Health Promotion Programme for Youth with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Community-Engaged Research Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Kristie L.; Bandini, Linda G.; Folta, Sara C.; Wansink, Brian; Must, Aviva

    2014-01-01

    Background: Evidenced-based health promotion programmes for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) are notably absent. Barriers include a lack of understanding of how to adapt existing evidence-based programmes to their needs, maximize inclusion and support mutual goals of health and autonomy. Methods: We undertook a…

  1. Assessing Adolescents’ Attachment Hierarchies: Differences Across Developmental Periods and Associations With Individual Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Natalie L.; Kobak, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents’ attachment hierarchies were assessed in a sample of 212 high school and 198 college students. The Important People Interview (IPI) differentiated attachment bonds from other supportive or affiliative relationships and indicated that adolescents show a hierarchical ordering of preferences for multiple attachment figures. Differences in the composition and structure of adolescents’ attachment hierarchies were found between the early high school (9th and 10th grades), later high school (11th and 12th grades), and college samples. In the college sample, romantic partners were placed in higher positions in adolescents’ hierarchies, fathers were placed in lower positions, and the structure of adolescents’ hierarchies were less differentiated than in the high school samples. Individual differences in the composition of adolescents’ hierarchies were associated with adjustment outcomes. Friends’ placement in higher positions and fathers’ exclusion from or placement in quaternary positions was associated with increased behavior problems. Findings demonstrate that the IPI provides a measure of adolescents’ attachment hierarchies that is sensitive to developmental stage and individual differences. PMID:22545000

  2. Children with Williams syndrome: Developmental trajectories for intellectual abilities, vocabulary abilities, and adaptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B; Pitts, C Holley

    2015-06-01

    To examine longitudinal trajectories of intellectual abilities, single-word vocabulary abilities, and adaptive behavior for 76 children with Williams syndrome (WS) aged 4-15 years, we compared their standard scores (SSs) at two time points approximately 3 years apart on the same standardized measures. At the group level, mean SS declined significantly for 8 of the 12 measures and showed a slight (nonsignificant) increase or decrease for 4 measures. However, for most measures significant changes in SS were found for only a small proportion of the children, with some children evidencing significant declines and a smaller proportion evidencing significant increases. Significant SS changes were most common for adaptive behavior. For all measures, the mean magnitude of SS change was smaller for older children (>7.5 years at Time 1) than for younger children (group were not making the expected amount of progress relative to their general population peers who earned the same SS at Time 1, there was little evidence either of regression (loss of skills) or stagnation (failure to increase raw scores). The relations of these results to those of previous smaller-sample longitudinal studies of children with WS and the implications of the findings are considered. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Mandarin Chinese version of the Beach Centre Family Quality of Life Scale: development and psychometric properties in Taiwanese families of children with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, S-J; Chen, P-T; Chou, Y-T; Chien, L-Y

    2017-04-01

    Early intervention (EI) practitioners provide individualised family-centred services to enhance the quality of life (QOL) of families of children with developmental delay (DD). Family QOL (FQOL) could be an important outcome indictor for EI, but there is no measurement tool for FQOL in Mandarin Chinese. The purpose of this study was to translate the Beach Centre FQOL Scale (BCFQOL) into Mandarin Chinese and to examine the psychometric properties of the scale in families of children with DD. Two independent translations were performed by two bilingual professors whose mother tongue was Mandarin, and two back-translations were performed by two bilingual professionals whose mother tongue was English. The translated and back-translated questionnaires were reviewed to revise the questionnaire. Five experts assessed the accuracy, equivalence and cultural appropriateness of the scale, and 10 parents of children with DD were interviewed to examine its readability, clarity and cultural appropriateness. From July to November 2014, we recruited 360 primary caregivers of children with DD who were receiving EI in northern Taiwan to validate the scale. The participants completed the BCFQOL as well as a one item overall ratings of their FQOL. Item analysis was performed to assess each item. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the following five-factor structure as in the original scale: family interaction, parenting, emotional well-being, physical/material well-being and disability-related support. The scale exhibited excellent internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.96) and test-retest reliability at a 2-week interval (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.92). Contrasted group validity was supported by significantly higher BCFQOL scores in the top quartile of the overall FQOL rating than the lowest quartile. The convergent validity was supported by the significant correlation between the FQOL item and the BCFQOL (r = 0.608, p families of children with

  4. Early-Emerging Social Adaptive Skills in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Item Analysis

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    Ventola, Pamela; Saulnier, Celine A.; Steinberg, Elizabeth; Chawarska, Katarzyna; Klin, Ami

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with ASD have significant impairments in adaptive skills, particularly adaptive socialization skills. The present study examined the extent to which 20 items from the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-Socialization Domain differentiated between ASD and developmentally delayed (DD) groups. Participants included 108 toddlers with ASD or…

  5. Identification of a rare 17p13.3 duplication including the BHLHA9 and YWHAE genes in a family with developmental delay and behavioural problems

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    Capra Valeria

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletions and duplications of the PAFAH1B1 and YWHAE genes in 17p13.3 are associated with different clinical phenotypes. In particular, deletion of PAFAH1B1 causes isolated lissencephaly while deletions involving both PAFAH1B1 and YWHAE cause Miller-Dieker syndrome. Isolated duplications of PAFAH1B1 have been associated with mild developmental delay and hypotonia, while isolated duplications of YWHAE have been associated with autism. In particular, different dysmorphic features associated with PAFAH1B1 or YWHAE duplication have suggested the need to classify the patient clinical features in two groups according to which gene is involved in the chromosomal duplication. Methods We analyze the proband and his family by classical cytogenetic and array-CGH analyses. The putative rearrangement was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results We have identified a family segregating a 17p13.3 duplication extending 329.5 kilobases by FISH and array-CGH involving the YWHAE gene, but not PAFAH1B1, affected by a mild dysmorphic phenotype with associated autism and mental retardation. We propose that BHLHA9, YWHAE, and CRK genes contribute to the phenotype of our patient. The small chromosomal duplication was inherited from his mother who was affected by a bipolar and borderline disorder and was alcohol addicted. Conclusions We report an additional familial case of small 17p13.3 chromosomal duplication including only BHLHA9, YWHAE, and CRK genes. Our observation and further cases with similar microduplications are expected to be diagnosed, and will help better characterise the clinical spectrum of phenotypes associated with 17p13.3 microduplications.

  6. Deletion of exon 20 of the Familial Dysautonomia gene Ikbkap in mice causes developmental delay, cardiovascular defects, and early embryonic lethality.

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    Paula Dietrich

    Full Text Available Familial Dysautonomia (FD is an autosomal recessive disorder that affects 1/3,600 live births in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, and leads to death before the age of 40. The disease is characterized by abnormal development and progressive degeneration of the sensory and autonomic nervous system. A single base pair substitution in intron 20 of the Ikbkap gene accounts for 98% of FD cases, and results in the expression of low levels of the full-length mRNA with simultaneous expression of an aberrantly spliced mRNA in which exon 20 is missing. To date, there is no animal model for the disease, and the essential cellular functions of IKAP--the protein encoded by Ikbkap--remain unknown. To better understand the normal function of IKAP and in an effort to generate a mouse model for FD, we have targeted the mouse Ikbkap gene by homologous recombination. We created two distinct alleles that result in either loss of Ikbkap expression, or expression of an mRNA lacking only exon 20. Homozygosity for either mutation leads to developmental delay, cardiovascular and brain malformations, accompanied with early embryonic lethality. Our analyses indicate that IKAP is essential for expression of specific genes involved in cardiac morphogenesis, and that cardiac failure is the likely cause of abnormal vascular development and embryonic lethality. Our results also indicate that deletion of exon 20 abolishes gene function. This implies that the truncated IKAP protein expressed in FD patients does not retain any significant biological function.

  7. Submicroscopic chromosome imbalance in patients with developmental delay and/or dysmorphism referred specifically for Fragile X testing and karyotype analysis

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    Docherty Zoe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microdeletion syndromes are generally identified because they usually give rise to specific phenotypic features; many of these deletions are mediated by duplicons or LCRs. The phenotypes associated with subtelomeric deletions are also becoming recognised. However, reciprocal duplication events at these loci are less easily recognised and identified, as they may give rise to milder phenotypic features, and the individuals carrying them may not therefore be referred for appropriate testing. 403 patients with developmental delay and/or dysmorphism, referred to our Genetics Centre for karyotyping and Fragile X expansion testing, were assessed for chromosome imbalance by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA. Two MLPA kits were used, one containing probes for the subtelomere regions, and one containing probes for common microdeletion loci. 321 patients were tested with both kits, 75 with the subtelomere kit alone, and 7 with the microdeletion kit alone. Results 32 patients had abnormal results; the overall abnormality detection rate was 2.5% for karyotype analysis and 7.2% for MLPA testing; 5.5% of subtelomere tests and 2.1% of microdeletion tests gave abnormal results. Of the abnormal MLPA results, 5 were in cases with cytogenetically visible abnormalities; of the remaining, submicroscopic, changes, 3 results were established as de novo and 8 were inherited; parental samples were not available for the remaining cases. None of the patients was found to have a Fragile X expansion. Conclusion Karyotype analysis in combination with MLPA assays for subtelomeres and microdeletion loci may be recommended for this patient group.

  8. Procedural Adaptations for Use of Constant Time Delay to Teach Highly Motivating Words to Beginning Braille Readers

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    Ivy, Sarah E.; Guerra, Jennifer A.; Hatton, Deborah D.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Constant time delay is an evidence-based practice to teach sight word recognition to students with a variety of disabilities. To date, two studies have documented its effectiveness for teaching braille. Methods: Using a multiple-baseline design, we evaluated the effectiveness of constant time delay to teach highly motivating words to…

  9. Developmental modes and developmental mechanisms can channel brain evolution

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    Christine J Charvet

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Anseriform birds (ducks and geese as well as parrots and songbirds have evolved a disproportionately enlarged telencephalon compared with many other birds. However, parrots and songbirds differ from anseriform birds in their mode of development. Whereas ducks and geese are precocial (e.g., hatchlings feed on their own, parrots and songbirds are altricial (e.g., hatchlings are fed by their parents. We here consider how developmental modes may limit and facilitate specific changes in the mechanisms of brain development. We suggest that altriciality facilitates the evolution of telencephalic expansion by delaying telencephalic neurogenesis. We further hypothesize that delays in telencephalic neurogenesis generate delays in telencephalic maturation, which in turn foster neural adaptations that facilitate learning. Specifically, we propose that delaying telencephalic neurogenesis was a prerequisite for the evolution of neural circuits that allow parrots and songbirds to produce learned vocalizations. Overall, we argue that developmental modes have influenced how some lineages of birds increased the size of their telencephalon and that this, in turn, has influenced subsequent changes in brain circuits and behavior.

  10. Delayed Rod-Mediated Dark Adaptation Is a Functional Biomarker for Incident Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald; Clark, Mark E; Jackson, Gregory R; Callahan, Michael A; Kline, Lanning B; Witherspoon, C Douglas; Curcio, Christine A

    2016-02-01

    To examine whether slowed rod-mediated dark adaptation (DA) in adults with normal macular health at baseline is associated with the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) 3 years later. Prospective cohort. Adults aged ≥60 years were recruited from primary care ophthalmology clinics. Both eyes were required to be step 1 (normal) on the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 9-step AMD classification system based on color fundus photographs graded by experienced and masked evaluators. Rod-mediated DA was assessed at baseline in 1 eye after a photobleach using a computerized dark adaptometer with targets centered at 5° on the inferior vertical meridian. Speed of DA was characterized by the rod-intercept value, with abnormal DA defined as rod-intercept ≥12.3 minutes. Demographic characteristics, best-corrected visual acuity, and smoking status were also assessed. Log-binomial regression was used to calculate unadjusted and adjusted risk ratios (RRs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between baseline DA and incident AMD. Presence of AMD at the 3-year follow-up visit for the eye tested for DA at baseline. Both baseline and follow-up visits were completed by 325 persons (mean age, 67.8 years). At baseline, 263 participants had normal DA with mean rod-intercept of 9.1 (standard deviation [SD], 1.5), and 62 participants had abnormal DA with mean rod-intercept of 15.1 (SD, 4.0). After adjustment for age and smoking, those with abnormal DA in the tested eye at baseline were approximately 2 times more likely to have AMD in that eye (RR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.03-3.62) by the time of the follow-up visit, compared with those who had normal DA at baseline. Delayed rod-mediated DA in older adults with normal macular health is associated with incident early AMD 3 years later, and thus is a functional biomarker for early disease. The biological relevance of this test is high, because it assesses translocation of vitamin A derivatives across the

  11. Influence of self-adaptive hairy flaps on the stall delay of an airfoil in ramp-up motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brücker, Christoph; Weidner, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    It is known in the case of some birds that the coverts on the upper side of their wings pop-up under critical flight conditions such as the landing approach, thus acting like a brake on the spread of flow separation. Taking experimental investigations as its basis, this paper deals with the influence of various configurations of self-adaptable hairy flaplets located on the lower half of the wing and with chord-length c (dense rows of slender elastomeric flaps, L=0.05c, 0.1c, 0.2c) on the flow around an NACA0020 airfoil at low Reynolds number flow (Re=77×103). Flow evolution along the airfoil when in ramp-up motion (α0=0, αs=20°, reduced frequency k=0.12) was measured with and without hairy flaps, with growth in the chord-normal thickness of the separation region above the airfoil investigated in order to determine stall onset time Ts. Whereas small flaps with L=0.05c do not change the overall stall process, it was possible to use configurations with L=0.1c (double-row, triple-row configuration) to delay stall onset Ts by a factor of around 2-4 when compared with the clean airfoil. The motion of the flaps and the flow field were measured simultaneously at high temporal resolution using high-speed PIV. Correlation between flap motion and velocity distribution showed that backflow induced by vortex structures is indeed prevented by the hairy flaps. A significant difference was identified in the shear-layer roll-up process, which was almost regular and locked with the fundamental frequency on the covered airfoil with no signs of non-linear growth over longer periods. By way of contrast, in the case of the clean airfoil the early merging of the shear-layer vortices and a rapid increase in the thickness of the separation region were observed. It is therefore concluded that mode locking is achieved between flap rows with an interspacing of 0.15c-0.2c, while the fundamental shear-layer roll-up wavelength measured (λ0≈0.15c-0.2c) indicates the relevance of flap row

  12. Adaptive Fuzzy Fault-Tolerant Output Feedback Tracking Control of Uncertain Stochastic Nonlinear Systems with Unknown Time-Delay and Tracking Error Constrained

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    Shuai Sui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of tracking error constrained adaptive fuzzy output feedback control is investigated for a class of single-input and single-output (SISO stochastic nonlinear systems with actuator faults, unknown time-delay, and unmeasured states. The considered faults are modeled as both loss of effectiveness and lock-in-place. The fuzzy logic systems are used to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions, and a fuzzy adaptive observer is designed for estimating the unmeasured states. By transforming the tracking errors into new virtual error variables and based on backstepping recursive design technique, a new fuzzy adaptive output feedback control method is developed. It is shown that all the signals of the resulting closed-loop system are bounded in probability and the tracking error remains an adjustable neighborhood of the origin within the prescribed bounds. The simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  13. European-French cross-cultural adaptation of the developmental coordination disorder questionnaire and pretest in French-speaking Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ray-Kaeser, S.; Satink, T.J.; Andresen, M.; Martini, R.; Thommen, E.; Bertrand, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ'07) is a Canadian-English instrument recommended for screening children aged 5 to 15 years who are at risk for developmental coordination disorder. While a Canadian-French version of the DCDQ'07 presently exists, a European-French version

  14. PREVALENCE OF REFRACTIVE ERROR, STRABISMUS AND AMBLYOPIA AMONG CHILDREN WITH NORMAL DEVELOPMENT OR GLOBAL DEVELOPMENTAL DELAY/INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY ATTENDING OPHTHALMOLOGY OPD AT KLES HOSPITAL, BELAGAVI- A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

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    Smitha K. S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Global developmental delay/intellectual disability are on a rise in children in the present time. Ocular and visual anomalies are frequently associated with it of which refractive errors are the most frequent. This if goes unnoticed leads to strabismus and amblyopia. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study aims to assess the prevalence of refractive error, strabismus and amblyopia among children with normal development or global developmental delay/intellectual disability attending ophthalmology OPD at KLES Hospital, Belagavi. Case records of all 200 new patients less than or equal to 12 years of age group who attended KLES, Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital between January 2015 and December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS The male:female ratio was 1.22:1. Out of the total evaluated 200 cases, 130 cases were with normal development and 70 with GDD/ID. Refractive errors were 85%, whereas the cases of amblyopia was 45.50% and strabismus 39.50%. Amblyopia with refractive error having GDD/ID was stastically significant as compared to amblyopia with refractive error having normal development (p=0.001. CONCLUSION Refractive error was the most common ocular disorder seen. Refractive error with amblyopia is more in children with GDD/ID as compared to normal children. Owing to the high percentage of visual anomalies, ophthalmological referral becomes essential in children with developmental anomalies.

  15. Designing a delay-based adaptive congestion control mechanism using control theory and system identification for TCP/IP networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Mitsushige; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Murata, Masayuki

    2002-07-01

    In the Internet, TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) has been used as an end-to-end congestion control mechanism. Of all several TCP implementations, TCP Reno is the most popular implementation. TCP Reno uses a loss-based approach since it estimates the severity of congestion by detecting packet losses in the network. On the contrary, another implementation called TCP Vegas uses a delay-based approach. The main advantage of a delay-based approach is, if it is properly designed, packet losses can be prevented by anticipating impending congestion from increasing packet delays. However, TCP Vegas was designed using not a theoretical approach but an ad hock one. In this paper, we therefore design a delay-based congestion control mechanism by utilizing the classical control theory. Our rate-based congestion control mechanism dynamically adjusts the packet transmission rate to stabilize the round-trip time for utilizing the network resources and also for preventing packet losses in the network. Presenting several simulation results in two network configurations, we quantitatively show the robustness and the effectiveness of our delay-based congestion control mechanism.

  16. Lag synchronization of unknown chaotic delayed Yang-Yang-type fuzzy neural networks with noise perturbation based on adaptive control and parameter identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yonghui; Yang, Zijiang; Han, Maoan

    2009-07-01

    This paper considers the lag synchronization (LS) issue of unknown coupled chaotic delayed Yang-Yang-type fuzzy neural networks (YYFCNN) with noise perturbation. Separate research work has been published on the stability of fuzzy neural network and LS issue of unknown coupled chaotic neural networks, as well as its application in secure communication. However, there have not been any studies that integrate the two. Motivated by the achievements from both fields, we explored the benefits of integrating fuzzy logic theories into the study of LS problems and applied the findings to secure communication. Based on adaptive feedback control techniques and suitable parameter identification, several sufficient conditions are developed to guarantee the LS of coupled chaotic delayed YYFCNN with or without noise perturbation. The problem studied in this paper is more general in many aspects. Various problems studied extensively in the literature can be treated as special cases of the findings of this paper, such as complete synchronization (CS), effect of fuzzy logic, and noise perturbation. This paper presents an illustrative example and uses simulated results of this example to show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed adaptive scheme. This research also demonstrates the effectiveness of application of the proposed adaptive feedback scheme in secure communication by comparing chaotic masking with fuzziness with some previous studies. Chaotic signal with fuzziness is more complex, which makes unmasking more difficult due to the added fuzzy logic.

  17. Exploring the motor development of young children with possible severe to profound cognitive and motor developmental delay by means of a questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalen, Gertruud Henrike; van der Putten, Annette; Maes, Bea; Vlaskamp, Carla

    Aim: Early motor stimulation may be valuable for children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), however limited knowledge of their typical motor developmental trajectory may be currently restraining the efficacy and specificity of this intervention. Research on young children

  18. Using Community-based Participatory Research to Adapt keepin’ it REAL: Creating a Socially, Developmentally, and Academically Appropriate Prevention Curriculum for 5th Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harthun, Mary L.; Dustman, Patricia A.; Reeves, Leslie J.; Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Hecht, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a process in which program designers, classroom teachers, and students worked together to adapt the 7th grade “keepin’ it REAL” prevention curriculum to a developmentally, socially, and academically appropriate curriculum for 5th graders. A Community-Based Participatory Research methodology (CBPR), combined with a 9-step adaptation model, emphasized a collaborative approach, both transformative and empowering. Essential adaptation elements were the Risk-to-Resiliency Continuum; the teaching of a wide range of skills including risk assessment, decision making, and resistance strategies; and, maintaining the theoretical grounding of Narrative Theory, Communication Competence, and Focus Theory of Norms. This paper describes how CBPR methodology can be conducted successfully while focusing on sustained theoretical grounding and effective research practices in a school-based setting. PMID:21057596

  19. Using Community-based Participatory Research to Adapt keepin' it REAL: Creating a Socially, Developmentally, and Academically Appropriate Prevention Curriculum for 5 Graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harthun, Mary L; Dustman, Patricia A; Reeves, Leslie J; Marsiglia, Flavio F; Hecht, Michael L

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports on a process in which program designers, classroom teachers, and students worked together to adapt the 7(th) grade "keepin' it REAL" prevention curriculum to a developmentally, socially, and academically appropriate curriculum for 5(th) graders. A Community-Based Participatory Research methodology (CBPR), combined with a 9-step adaptation model, emphasized a collaborative approach, both transformative and empowering. Essential adaptation elements were the Risk-to-Resiliency Continuum; the teaching of a wide range of skills including risk assessment, decision making, and resistance strategies; and, maintaining the theoretical grounding of Narrative Theory, Communication Competence, and Focus Theory of Norms. This paper describes how CBPR methodology can be conducted successfully while focusing on sustained theoretical grounding and effective research practices in a school-based setting.

  20. A maternally inherited 16p13.11-p12.3 duplication concomitant with a de novo SOX5 deletion in a male patient with global developmental delay, disruptive and obsessive behaviors and minor dysmorphic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintela, Ines; Barros, Francisco; Lago-Leston, Ramon; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Carracedo, Angel; Eiris, Jesus

    2015-06-01

    We detail here the clinical description and the family genetic study of a male patient with global developmental delay, disruptive and obsessive behaviors and minor dysmorphic features and a combination of two rare genetic variants: a maternally inherited 16p13.11-p12.3 duplication and a de novo 12p12.1 deletion affecting SOX5. The 16p13.11 microduplication has been implicated in several neurodevelopmental and behavioral disorders and is characterized by variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. The causes of this variation in phenotypic expression are not fully clear, representing a challenge in genetic diagnosis and counseling. However, several authors have proposed the two-hit model as one of the underlying mechanisms for this phenotypic heterogeneity. Our data could also support this two-hit model in which the 16p13.11-p12.3 duplication might contribute to the phenotype, not only as a single event but also in association with the SOX5 deletion. The SOX5 gene plays important roles in various developmental processes and has been associated with several neurodevelopmental disorders, mainly intellectual disability, developmental delay and language and/or speech delay as well as with behavior problems and dysmorphic features. However, many of the physical features and behavioral manifestations as well as language deficiencies present in our patient are consistent with those previously reported for SOX5 deletions. Patients carrying multiple genomic variants, as the one presented here, illustrate the difficulty in analyzing genotypes when the contribution of each variant results in overlapping phenotypes and/or, alternatively, in the modification of the clinical manifestations defined by the coexisting variant. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Recessive loss-of-function mutations in AP4S1 cause mild fever-sensitive seizures, developmental delay and spastic paraplegia through loss of AP-4 complex assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardies, Katia; May, Patrick; Djémié, Tania

    2015-01-01

    We report two siblings with infantile onset seizures, severe developmental delay and spastic paraplegia, in whom whole-genome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous mutations in the AP4S1 gene, encoding the σ subunit of the adaptor protein complex 4 (AP-4). The effect of the predicted loss-of-...... in reported patients, highlighting that seizures are part of the clinical manifestation of the AP-4 deficiency syndrome. We also hypothesize that endosomal trafficking is a common theme between heritable spastic paraplegia and some inherited epilepsies....

  2. Adaptive generalized function matrix projective lag synchronization between fractional-order and integer-order complex networks with delayed coupling and different dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hao; Si, Gangquan; Jia, Lixin; Zhang, Yanbin

    2013-11-01

    This paper investigates generalized function matrix projective lag synchronization between fractional-order and integer-order complex networks with delayed coupling, non-identical topological structures and different dimensions. Based on Lyapunov stability theory, generalized function matrix projective lag synchronization criteria are derived by using the adaptive control method. In addition, the three-dimensional fractional-order chaotic system and the four-dimensional integer-order hyperchaotic system as the nodes of the drive and the response networks, respectively, are analyzed in detail, and numerical simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  3. Adaptive Fuzzy Output-Feedback Method Applied to Fin Control for Time-Delay Ship Roll Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Bai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ship roll stabilization by fin control system is considered in this paper. Assuming that angular velocity in roll cannot be measured, an adaptive fuzzy output-feedback control is investigated. The fuzzy logic system is used to approximate the uncertain term of the controlled system, and a fuzzy state observer is designed to estimate the unmeasured states. By utilizing the fuzzy state observer and combining the adaptive backstepping technique with adaptive fuzzy control design, an observer-based adaptive fuzzy output-feedback control approach is developed. It is proved that the proposed control approach can guarantee that all the signals in the closed-loop system are semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded (SGUUB, and the control strategy is effective to decrease the roll motion. Simulation results are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  4. Adaptive Transmission Opportunity Scheme Based on Delay Bound and Network Load in IEEE 802.11e Wireless LANs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The IEEE 802.11e EDCA (Enhanced Distributed Channel Access is able to provide QoS (Quality of Service by adjusting the transmission opportunities (TXOPs, which control the period to access the medium. The EDCA has a fairness problem among competing stations, which support multimedia applications with different delay bounds. In this paper, we propose a simple and effective scheme for alleviating the fairness problem. The proposed scheme dynamically allocates the TXOP value based on the delay bounds of the data packets in a queue and the traffic load of network. Performance of the proposed scheme is investigated by simulation. Our results show that compared to conventional scheme, the proposed scheme significantly improves network performance, and achieves a high degree of fairness among stations with different multimedia applications.

  5. Adaptive iterative learning control of a class of nonlinear time-delay systems with unknown backlash-like hysteresis input and control direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianming; Zhang, Youan; Sun, Meimei; Geng, Baoliang

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an adaptive iterative learning control scheme for a class of nonlinear systems with unknown time-varying delays and control direction preceded by unknown nonlinear backlash-like hysteresis. Boundary layer function is introduced to construct an auxiliary error variable, which relaxes the identical initial condition assumption of iterative learning control. For the controller design, integral Lyapunov function candidate is used, which avoids the possible singularity problem by introducing hyperbolic tangent funciton. After compensating for uncertainties with time-varying delays by combining appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii function with Young's inequality, an adaptive iterative learning control scheme is designed through neural approximation technique and Nussbaum function method. On the basis of the hyperbolic tangent function's characteristics, the system output is proved to converge to a small neighborhood of the desired trajectory by constructing Lyapunov-like composite energy function (CEF) in two cases, while keeping all the closed-loop signals bounded. Finally, a simulation example is presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Norms for developmental milestones using VABS-II and association with anthropometric measures among apparently healthy urban Indian preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, Sumithra; Thomas, Tinku; Shetty, Priya; Zhu, Jianjun; Raman, Vijaya; Khanna, Deepti; Mehra, Ruchika; Kurpad, Anura V; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2016-12-01

    Assessment of developmental milestones based on locally developed norms is critical for accurate estimate of overall development of a child's cognitive, behavioral, social, and emotional development. A cross-sectional study was done to develop age specific norms for developmental milestones using Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS-II) (Sparrow, Cicchetti, & Balla, 2005) for apparently healthy children from 2 to 5 years from urban Bangalore, India, and to examine its association with anthropometric measures. Mothers (or caregivers) of 412 children participated in the study. Age-specific norms using inferential norming method and adaptive levels for all domains and subdomains were derived. Low adaptive level, also called delayed developmental milestone, was observed in 2.3% of the children, specifically 2.7% in motor and daily living skills and 2.4% in communication skills. When these children were assessed on the existing U.S. norms, there was a significant overestimation of delayed development in socialization and motor skills, whereas delay in communication and daily living skills were underestimated (all p developmental scores for communication and motor skills compared with normal children (β coefficient ranges from 2.6-5.3; all p developmental delay could either be under- or overestimated using Western norms. Thus, locally referenced norms are critical for reliable assessments of development in children. Stunted and underweight children are more likely to have poorer developmental scores compared with healthy children. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Variable Delay With Directly-Modulated R-SOA and Optical Filters for Adaptive Antenna Radio-Fiber Access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prince, Kamau; Presi, Marco; Chiuchiarelli, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    We present an all-optical adaptive-antenna radio over fiber transport system that uses proven, commercially-available components to effectively deliver standard-compliant optical signaling to adaptive multiantenna arrays for current and emerging radio technology implementations. The system is based...... types of signals defined in IEEE 802.16 (WiMAX) standard for wireless networks: a 90 Mbps single-carrier signal (64-QAM at 2.4 GHz) and a 78 Mbps multitone orthogonal frequency-division multiple access (OFDMA) signal. The power budget of this configuration supports a 4-element antenna array....

  8. The Effectiveness of the Constant Time Delay Procedure in Teaching Pre-School Academic Skills to Children with Developmental Disabilities in a Small Group Teaching Arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemir, Ozgul; Gursel, Oguz

    2014-01-01

    Children with developmental disabilities are trained using different teaching arrangements. One of these arrangements is called small-group teaching. It has been ascertained that a small-group teaching arrangement is more effective than a one-to-one teaching arrangement. In that sense, teaching academic skills to pre-school children in small-group…

  9. Adaptive fuzzy decentralized control for large-scale nonlinear systems with time-varying delays and unknown high-frequency gain sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shaocheng; Liu, Changliang; Li, Yongming; Zhang, Huaguang

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, an adaptive fuzzy decentralized robust output feedback control approach is proposed for a class of large-scale strict-feedback nonlinear systems without the measurements of the states. The nonlinear systems in this paper are assumed to possess unstructured uncertainties, time-varying delays, and unknown high-frequency gain sign. Fuzzy logic systems are used to approximate the unstructured uncertainties, K-filters are designed to estimate the unmeasured states, and a special Nussbaum gain function is introduced to solve the problem of unknown high-frequency gain sign. Combining the backstepping technique with adaptive fuzzy control theory, an adaptive fuzzy decentralized robust output feedback control scheme is developed. In order to obtain the stability of the closed-loop system, a new lemma is given and proved. Based on this lemma and Lyapunov-Krasovskii functions, it is proved that all the signals in the closed-loop system are uniformly ultimately bounded and that the tracking errors can converge to a small neighborhood of the origin. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is illustrated from simulation results.

  10. Delayed visual maturation and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, R; Ashby, L

    1990-09-01

    Three boys are described with a mixed developmental disorder, which so far appears to have a relatively good prognosis. Each boy presented in early infancy with visual unresponsiveness, which spontaneously resolved. This delayed visual maturation was accompanied or followed by severe autistic impairment, general developmental delay, hypotonia and clumsiness. Subsequent progress has been unexpectedly favourable, with striking improvements in language, play, social interest and social competence. Widespread, patchy delay in brain maturation could possibly account for this combination of delayed visual maturation and autism, with a good prognosis.

  11. Developmental trajectories and reciprocal associations between career adaptability and vocational identity : A three-wave longitudinal study with adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negru-Subtirica, Oana; Pop, Eleonora Ioana; Crocetti, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal study was two-fold. First, we investigated patterns of stability and change in career adaptability and vocational identity in adolescents. Second, we examined reciprocal associations between career adaptability and vocational identity. In addressing both research

  12. Computerized adaptive testing for measuring development of young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobusse, G.; Buuren, S. van

    2007-01-01

    Developmental indicators that are used for routine measurement in The Netherlands are usually chosen to optimally identify delayed children. Measurements on the majority of children without problems are therefore quite imprecise. This study explores the use of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) to

  13. Vagal Tone and Children���s Delay of Gratification: Differential Sensitivity Across Resource Poor and Resource Rich Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Sturge-Apple, Melissa L.; Suor, Jennifer H.; Davies, Patrick T.; Cicchetti, Dante; Skibo, Michael A.; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2016-01-01

    Socioeconomic disparities in children���s delay of gratification exist, with impoverished children displaying greater difficulties in this developmental domain. The present paper examined the role of vagal tone in predicting the ability to delay gratification across resource rich and resource poor environments. Embedding hypotheses within evolutionary models of children���s conditional adaptation to proximal rearing contexts, Study 1 tested whether elevated vagal tone was associated with lowe...

  14. Biochemical Measurements of Free Opsin in Macular Degeneration Eyes: Examining the 11-CISRetinal Deficiency Hypothesis of Delayed Dark Adaptation (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanneken, Anne; Neikirk, Thomas; Johnson, Jennifer; Kono, Masahiro

    2017-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that delayed dark adaptation in patients with macular degeneration is due to an excess of free unliganded opsin (apo-opsin) and a deficiency of the visual chromophore, 11 -cis retinal, in rod outer segments. A total of 50 human autopsy eyes were harvested from donors with and without macular degeneration within 2-24 hrs. postmortem. Protocols were developed which permitted dark adaptation of normal human eyes after death and enucleation. Biochemical methods of purifying rod outer segments were optimized and the concentration of rhodopsin and apo-opsin was measured with UV-visible scanning spectroscopy. The presence of apo-opsin was calculated by measuring the difference in the rhodopsin absorption spectra before and after the addition of 11 -cis retinal. A total of 20 normal eyes and 16 eyes from donors with early, intermediate and advanced stages of macular degeneration were included in the final analysis. Dark adaptation was achieved by harvesting whole globes in low light, transferring into dark (light-proof) canisters and dissecting the globes using infrared light and image converters for visualization. Apo-opsin was readily detected in positive controls after the addition of 11 -cis retinal. Normal autopsy eyes showed no evidence of apo-opsin. Eyes with macular degeneration also showed no evidence of apo-opsin, regardless of the severity of disease. Methods have been developed to study dark adaptation in human autopsy eyes. Eyes with age-related macular degeneration do not show a deficiency of 11 -cis retinal or an excess of apo-opsin within rod outer segments.

  15. Adaptive PSF fitting - a highly performing photometric method and light curves of the GLS H1413+117: time delays and micro-lensing effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhunov, T. A.; Wertz, O.; Elyiv, A.; Gaisin, R.; Artamonov, B. P.; Dudinov, V. N.; Nuritdinov, S. N.; Delvaux, C.; Sergeyev, A. V.; Gusev, A. S.; Bruevich, V. V.; Burkhonov, O.; Zheleznyak, A. P.; Ezhkova, O.; Surdej, J.

    2017-03-01

    We present new photometric observations of H1413+117 acquired during seasons between 2001 and 2008 in order to estimate the time delays between the lensed quasar images and to characterize at best the on-going micro-lensing events. We propose a highly performing photometric method called the adaptive point spread function fitting and have successfully tested this method on a large number of simulated frames. This has enabled us to estimate the photometric error bars affecting our observational results. We analysed the V- and R-band light curves and V-R colour variations of the A-D components which show short- and long-term brightness variations correlated with colour variations. Using the χ2 and dispersion methods, we estimated the time delays on the basis of the R-band light curves over the seasons between 2003 and 2006. We have derived the new values: ΔtAB = -17.4 ± 2.1, ΔtAC = -18.9 ± 2.8 and ΔtAD = 28.8 ± 0.7 d using the χ2 method (B and C are leading, D is trailing) with 1σ confidence intervals. We also used available observational constraints (resp. the lensed image positions, the flux ratios in mid-IR and two sets of time delays derived in the present work) to update the lens redshift estimation. We obtained z_l = 1.95^{+0.06}_{-0.10} which is in good agreement with previous estimations. We propose to characterize two kinds of micro-lensing events: micro-lensing for the A, B, C components corresponds to typical variations of ∼10-4 mag d-1 during all the seasons, while the D component shows an unusually strong micro-lensing effect with variations of up to ∼10-3 mag d-1 during 2004 and 2005.

  16. Adaptive Backstepping Control for a Class of Uncertain Nonaffine Nonlinear Time-Varying Delay Systems with Unknown Dead-Zone Nonlinearity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Dong Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive backstepping controller is constructed for a class of nonaffine nonlinear time-varying delay systems in strict feedback form with unknown dead zone and unknown control directions. To simplify controller design, nonaffine system is first transformed into an affine system by using mean value theorem and the unknown nonsymmetric dead-zone nonlinearity is treated as a combination of a linear term and a bounded disturbance-like term. Owing to the universal approximation property, fuzzy logic systems (FLSs are employed to approximate the uncertain nonlinear part in controller design process. By introducing Nussbaum-type function, the a priori knowledge of the control gains signs is not required. By constructing appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals, the effect of time-varying delay is compensated. Theoretically, it is proved that this scheme can guarantee that all signals in closed-loop system are semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded (SUUB and the tracking error converges to a small neighbourhood of the origin. Finally, the simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  17. A de novo Pericentric Inversion in Chromosome 4 Associated with Disruption of PITX2 and a Microdeletion in 4p15.2 in a Patient with Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome and Developmental Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldžienė, Živilė; Preikšaitienė, Eglė; Ignotienė, Salomėja; Kapitanova, Natalija; Utkus, Algirdas; Kučinskas, Vaidutis

    2017-01-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of autosomal dominantly inherited malformations that predominantly affect the eye but are also associated with craniofacial dysmorphism and dental abnormalities. A broad spectrum of genetic alterations involving PITX2 and FOXC1 lead to ARS. We report on a 4-year-old girl with clinical features of ARS and developmental delay due to a de novo apparently balanced pericentric inversion in chromosome 4. This report emphasizes that complementary investigations are necessary to precisely characterize chromosomal rearrangements. Elucidation of the exact genetic cause of ARS is important for comprehensive genetic counseling of the family members and for better patient management. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Early versus delayed insertion of tympanostomy tubes for persistent otitis media: developmental outcomes at the age of three years in relation to prerandomization illness patterns and hearing levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradise, Jack L; Feldman, Heidi M; Campbell, Thomas F; Dollaghan, Christine A; Colborn, D Kathleen; Bernard, Beverly S; Rockette, Howard E; Janosky, Janine E; Pitcairn, Dayna L; Sabo, Diane L; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Smith, Clyde G

    2003-04-01

    Whether prompt insertion of tympanostomy tubes in children with persistent early life otitis media prevents or minimizes subsequent developmental impairment has been the subject of conflicting opinions and differing approaches to management. We randomly assigned 429 children with persistent middle ear effusion (MEE) before the age of 3 years to have tympanostomy tubes inserted either as soon as possible or up to 9 months later if MEE persisted. In 402 of these children, we found no significant differences at age 3 years between the 2 treatment groups in mean scores on any measure of speech, language and cognition and in 401 of the children no significant differences in measures of psychosocial development. We then examined outcomes within subgroups of children who might have been the most severely affected, namely those who had been randomized on the basis of bilateral, continuous MEE rather than unilateral and/or discontinuous MEE and those who had the greatest degrees of hearing loss. In none of the subgroups we considered were scores on any outcome measure significantly more favorable in children in the early treatment group than in children in the late treatment group. In otherwise normal children who have MEE, during the first 3 years of life within the durations we studied, prompt insertion of tympanostomy tubes does not measurably improve developmental outcomes at age 3 years, irrespective of whether MEE has been continuous or discontinuous and unilateral or bilateral and whether or not MEE has been accompanied by mild to moderate hearing loss.

  19. A mitochondrial tRNA(Met) mutation causing developmental delay, exercise intolerance and limb girdle phenotype with onset in early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Duno, Morten; Rafiq, Jabin

    2015-01-01

    A 10-year-old girl presented with exercise intolerance, learning difficulty, and muscle weakness in a limb girdle distribution. She had delayed achievement of motor milestones and difficulties with social interaction at pre-school age. Muscle biopsy showed no myopathic or dystrophic features......DNA extracted from muscle and skin fibroblast, and could not be found in other tissues or in the mother. This is the second patient reported in the literature with a mitochondrial myopathy due to a mt-tRNA(Met) mutation. The first patient, a 30-year-old woman, presented with exercise intolerance, limb girdle...

  20. The Effects of Model, Lead, and Test with Reward To Teach a Preschool Student with a Developmental and Language Delays to Demonstrate an Understanding of Number Quantity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mortensen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to teach a 4-year-old preschooler with developmental disabilities number quantity. Demonstrating an understanding in number quantity is a component part in the hierarchy of math in the public schools. A student must obtain this skill before moving on to a general education classroom kindergarten. This study was also carried out to support the math skills and the student’s transition to kindergarten in the following year. The model, lead, and test error correction strategy from direct instruction was paired with a reward to teach our participant number quality. A multiple baseline design across three groups of number was employed to evaluate our intervention. The overall results indicated increases in student performance during model, lead, and test with a reward.

  1. Improved motor development and good long-term glycaemic control with sulfonylurea treatment in a patient with the syndrome of intermediate developmental delay, early-onset generalised epilepsy and neonatal diabetes associated with the V59M mutation in the KCNJ11 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingerland, A. S.; Nuboer, R.; Hadders-Algra, M.; Hattersley, A. T.; Bruining, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Activating mutations in the KCNJ11 gene encoding the Kir6.2 subunit of the K-ATP channels in pancreatic beta cells are a common cause of neonatal diabetes. One-third of patients also have developmental delay, which probably results from mutated K-ATP channels in muscle, nerve and

  2. Developmental adaptations of trypanosome motility to the tsetse fly host environments unravel a multifaceted in vivo microswimmer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Sarah; Krüger, Timothy; Subota, Ines; Thusek, Sina; Rotureau, Brice; Beilhack, Andreas; Engstler, Markus

    2017-08-15

    The highly motile and versatile protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma brucei undergoes a complex life cycle in the tsetse fly. Here we introduce the host insect as an expedient model environment for microswimmer research, as it allows examination of microbial motion within a diversified, secluded and yet microscopically tractable space. During their week-long journey through the different microenvironments of the fly´s interior organs, the incessantly swimming trypanosomes cross various barriers and confined surroundings, with concurrently occurring major changes of parasite cell architecture. Multicolour light sheet fluorescence microscopy provided information about tsetse tissue topology with unprecedented resolution and allowed the first 3D analysis of the infection process. High-speed fluorescence microscopy illuminated the versatile behaviour of trypanosome developmental stages, ranging from solitary motion and near-wall swimming to collective motility in synchronised swarms and in confinement. We correlate the microenvironments and trypanosome morphologies to high-speed motility data, which paves the way for cross-disciplinary microswimmer research in a naturally evolved environment.

  3. Rate of maturation of the hippocampus and the developmental progression of children's performance on the delayed non-matching to sample and visual paired comparison tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, A

    1990-01-01

    Although it has been widely speculated that the hippocampus, and the type of memory dependent upon the hippocampus, develops late in primates just as it does in rats (e.g., Nadel & Zola-Morgan, 1984; Bachevalier & Mishkin, 1984; Schacter & Moscovitch, 1984), the evidence to date would not seem to support this. Instead, there is behavioral evidence of very early recognition memory and anatomical evidence of very early hippocampal maturation in human and non-human primates. It is true, however, that the standard delayed non-matching to sample task, which requires recognition memory, is not mastered until quite late. The reason for this late mastery would appear to be the late emergence of some other ability required for the task, not recognition memory. The candidates for what that ability might be are (1) the capacity to plan and execute an indirect, two-action sequence, (2) the capacity to understand that the object stands for the reward, but is not the reward itself, (3) the ability to deduce an abstract rule, (4) the ability to make explicit on testing what can be shown implicitly during play, (5) the ability to quickly encode visual stimuli (speed of encoding), and (6) the ability to resist interference. Only empirical work will enable us to decide among these candidate abilities; that work is currently underway.

  4. Does adaptive strategy for delayed seed dispersion affect extinction probability of a desert species? an assessment using the population viability analysis and glass house experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Mathur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Canopy seed bank is an important adaptive evolutionary trait that provides various types of protection to the seeds. However, costing of such evolutionary trait on plant survival is largely unknown. Present investigation provided a new insight on the serotonious habit of Blepharis sindica associated with its endangerment status. Extinction probabilities of two available population of B. sindica were quantified using two types of census data, i.e., fruiting body number and actual population size. Population Viability Analysis (PVA revealed that delayed seed release tendency (higher fruiting body number was not synchronized with actual ground conditions (lower population size. PVA analysis based on actual population size indicated that both the available populations would vanish within 20 years. The mean time of extinction calculated from both type census data indicated its extinction within 48 years. For assessing the conservation criteria, a glass house experiment was carried out with different soil types and compositions. Pure sand and higher proportions of sand -silt were more suitable compared to clay; further, gravelly surface was the most unsuitable habitat for this species. Collection of the seeds from mature fruits/capsule and their sowing with moderate moisture availability with sandy soil could be recommended.

  5. Translational Arrest Due to Cytoplasmic Redox Stress Delays Adaptation to Growth on Methanol and Heterologous Protein Expression in a Typical Fed-Batch Culture of Pichia pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Jones, Bryn; Aw, Rochelle; Barton, Geraint R.; Tredwell, Gregory D.; Bundy, Jacob G.; Leak, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Results We have followed a typical fed-batch induction regime for heterologous protein production under the control of the AOX1 promoter using both microarray and metabolomic analysis. The genetic constructs involved 1 and 3 copies of the TRY1 gene, encoding human trypsinogen. In small-scale laboratory cultures, expression of the 3 copy-number construct induced the unfolded protein response (UPR) sufficiently that titres of extracellular trypsinogen were lower in the 3-copy construct than with the 1-copy construct. In the fed-batch-culture, a similar pattern was observed, with higher expression from the 1-copy construct, but in this case there was no significant induction of UPR with the 3-copy strain. Analysis of the microarray and metabolomic information indicates that the 3-copy strain was undergoing cytoplasmic redox stress at the point of induction with methanol. In this Crabtree-negative yeast, this redox stress appeared to delay the adaptation to growth on methanol and supressed heterologous protein production, probably due to a block in translation. Conclusion Although redox imbalance as a result of artificially imposed hypoxia has previously been described, this is the first time that it has been characterised as a result of a transient metabolic imbalance and shown to involve a stress response which can lead to translational arrest. Without detailed analysis of the underlying processes it could easily have been mis-interpreted as secretion stress, transmitted through the UPR. PMID:25785713

  6. Adaptation of ovarian cancer cells to the peritoneal environment: Multiple mechanisms of the developmental patterning gene HOXA9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Song Yi; Naora, Honami

    2014-11-13

    The lethality of ovarian cancer stems from its propensity to involve the peritoneal cavity. However, the mechanisms that enable ovarian cancer cells to readily adapt to the peritoneal environment are not well understood. Here, we describe our recent studies in which we identified the mechanisms by which the transcription factor encoded by the patterning gene HOXA9 promotes the aggressive behavior of ovarian cancer. Firstly, we identified that HOXA9 promotes ovarian tumor growth and angiogenesis by activating the gene encoding transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2), which in turn stimulates peritoneal fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells to acquire features of cancer-associated fibroblasts. Secondly, by inducing TGF-β2 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, HOXA9 stimulates peritoneal macrophages to acquire an immunosuppressive phenotype. Thirdly, HOXA9 stimulates attachment of ovarian cancer cells to peritoneal mesothelial cells by inducing expression of P-cadherin. By inducing P-cadherin, HOXA9 also enables floating cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity to form aggregates and escape anoikis. Together, our studies demonstrate that HOXA9 enables ovarian cancer cells to adapt to the peritoneal environment and 'educates' different types of stromal cells to become permissive for tumor growth. Our studies provide new insights into the regulation of tumor-stroma interactions in ovarian cancer and implicate several key effector molecules as candidate therapeutic targets.

  7. Multilevel risk factors and developmental assets for internalizing symptoms and self-esteem in disadvantaged adolescents: modeling longitudinal trajectories from the Rural Adaptation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokowski, Paul R; Guo, Shenyang; Rose, Roderick; Evans, Caroline B R; Cotter, Katie L; Bacallao, Martica

    2014-11-01

    The current study filled significant gaps in our knowledge of developmental psychopathology by examining the influence of multilevel risk factors and developmental assets on longitudinal trajectories of internalizing symptoms and self-esteem in an exceptionally culturally diverse sample of rural adolescents. Integrating ecological and social capital theories, we explored if positive microsystem transactions are associated with self-esteem while negative microsystem transactions increase the chances of internalizing problems. Data came from the Rural Adaptation Project, a 5-year longitudinal panel study of more than 4,000 middle school students from 28 public schools in two rural, disadvantaged counties in North Carolina. Three-level hierarchical linear modeling models were estimated to predict internalizing symptoms (e.g., depression, anxiety) and self-esteem. Relative to other students, risk for internalizing problems and low self-esteem was elevated for aggressive adolescents, students who were hassled or bullied at school, and those who were rejected by peers or in conflict with their parents. Internalizing problems were also more common among adolescents from socioeconomically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods, among those in schools with more suspensions, in students who reported being pressured by peers, and in youth who required more teacher support. It is likely that these experiences left adolescents disengaged from developing social capital from ecological microsystems (e.g., family, school, peers). On the positive side, support from parents and friends and optimism about the future were key assets associated with lower internalizing symptoms and higher self-esteem. Self-esteem was also positively related to religious orientation, school satisfaction, and future optimism. These variables show active engagement with ecological microsystems. The implications and limitations were discussed.

  8. A-to-I RNA editing is developmentally regulated and generally adaptive for sexual reproduction in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiquan; Li, Yang; Chen, Daipeng; Qi, Zhaomei; Wang, Qinhu; Wang, Jianhua; Jiang, Cong; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2017-09-12

    Although fungi lack adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing was reported recently in Fusarium graminearum during sexual reproduction. In this study, we profiled the A-to-I editing landscape and characterized its functional and adaptive properties in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa A total of 40,677 A-to-I editing sites were identified, and approximately half of them displayed stage-specific editing or editing levels at different sexual stages. RNA-sequencing analysis with the Δstc-1 and Δsad-1 mutants confirmed A-to-I editing occurred before ascus development but became more prevalent during ascosporogenesis. Besides fungal-specific sequence and secondary structure preference, 63.5% of A-to-I editing sites were in the coding regions and 81.3% of them resulted in nonsynonymous recoding, resulting in a significant increase in the proteome complexity. Many genes involved in RNA silencing, DNA methylation, and histone modifications had extensive recoding, including sad-1, sms-3, qde-1, and dim-2. Fifty pseudogenes harbor premature stop codons that require A-to-I editing to encode full-length proteins. Unlike in humans, nonsynonymous editing events in N. crassa are generally beneficial and favored by positive selection. Almost half of the nonsynonymous editing sites in N. crassa are conserved and edited in Neurospora tetrasperma Furthermore, hundreds of them are conserved in F. graminearum and had higher editing levels. Two unknown genes with editing sites conserved between Neurospora and Fusarium were experimentally shown to be important for ascosporogenesis. This study comprehensively analyzed A-to-I editing in N. crassa and showed that RNA editing is stage-specific and generally adaptive, and may be functionally related to repeat induced point mutation and meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA.

  9. A transactional framework for pediatric rehabilitation: shifting the focus to situated contexts, transactional processes, and adaptive developmental outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gillian; Imms, Christine; Stewart, Debra; Freeman, Matt; Nguyen, Tram

    2017-04-11

    A paradigm shift is taking place in pediatric rehabilitation research, practice, and policy - a shift towards the real-life contexts of clients rather than requiring clients to navigate the world of pediatric rehabilitation. This article proposes a conceptual framework to bring about a broader awareness of clients' lives and transactional processes of change over the life course. The framework draws attention to transactional processes by which individuals, situated in life contexts, change and adapt over the life course and, in turn, influence their contextual settings and broader environments. This framework is based on (a) basic tenets derived from foundational theories taking a life course perspective to change, and (b) transactional processes identified from relevant pediatric rehabilitation models that bring these foundational theories into the pediatric rehabilitation sphere. The framework identifies three types of transactional processes relevant to pediatric rehabilitation: facilitative, resiliency, and socialization processes. These processes describe how contexts and people mutually influence each other via opportunities and situated experiences, thus facilitating capacity, adaptation to adversity, and socialization to new roles and life transitions. The utility of the framework is considered for research, practice, service organizations, and policy. Implications for Rehabilitation The framework supports practitioners going beyond person and environment as separate entities, to provide services to the "situated person" in real-life contexts The framework shifts the focus from "body structures/functions" and "person in activity" to "person in changing and challenging life contexts" Working from a transactional perspective, practitioner-client conversations will change; practitioners will view client situations through a lens of opportunities and experiences, assess client experiences in real-life contexts, and strive to create context-based therapy

  10. Developmental milestones record - 2 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002012.htm Developmental milestones record - 2 years To use the sharing features ... two years. www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/actearly/milestones/milestones-2yr.html . ... T. Global developmental delay and regression. In: Daroff RB, Jankovich J, ...

  11. 9 Mb familial duplication in chromosome band Xp22.2-22.13 associated with mental retardation, hypotonia and developmental delay, scoliosis, cardiovascular problems and mild dysmorphic facial features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sismani, Carolina; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Kousoulidou, Ludmila; Parkel, Sven; Koumbaris, George; Zilina, Olga; Bashiardes, Stavros; Spanou, Elena; Kurg, Ants; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2011-01-01

    We report on a family with syndromic X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) caused by an Xp22.2-22.13 duplication. This family consists of a carrier mother and daughter and four affected sons, presenting with mental retardation, developmental delay, cardiovascular problems and mild dysmorphic facial features. Female carriers have normal intelligence and some common clinical features, as well as different clinical abnormalities. Cytogenetic analysis of the mother showed an Xp22.2 duplication which was passed to all her offspring. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) using whole chromosome paint and Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) clones covering Xp22.12-Xp22.3 region, confirmed the X chromosome origin and the size of the duplication. Two different targeted microarray methodologies were used for breakpoint confirmation, resulting in the localization of the duplication to approximately 9.75-18.98 Mb. Detailed description of such rare duplications provides valuable data for the investigation of genetic disease etiology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Coarctation of the aorta and mild to moderate developmental delay in a child with a de novo deletion of chromosome 15(q21.1q22.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters Sarika U

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion of 15q21q22 is a rare chromosomal anomaly. To date, there have been nine reports describing ten individuals with different segmental losses involving 15q21 and 15q22. Many of these individuals have common features of growth retardation, hypotonia and moderate to severe mental retardation. Congenital heart disease has been described in three individuals with interstitial deletion involving this region of chromosome 15. Case presentation We report a child with coarctation of the aorta, partial agenesis of corpus callosum and mild to moderate developmental delay, with a de novo deletion of 15q21.1q22.2, detected by the array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH. We utilized chromosome 15-specific microarray-based CGH to define the chromosomal breakpoints in this patient. Conclusion This is the first description of mapping of an interstitial deletion involving the chromosome 15q21q22 segment using the chromosome 15-specific array-CGH. The report also expands the spectrum of clinical phenotype associated with 15q21q22 deletion.

  13. Developmental Science: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of developmental science is to describe, explain, and optimize intraindividual changes in adaptive developmental regulations and, as well, interindividual differences in such relations, across life. The history of developmental science is reviewed and its current foci, which are framed by relational developmental systems models that…

  14. Associação entre déficit de crescimento e retardo maturacional de crianças e adolescentes infectados Association between stunting and developmental delay in helminth-infected children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaisy Cristina Honorato Santos Alves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a influência do déficit de crescimento sobre o retardo maturacional de crianças e adolescentes com infecção helmíntica. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de um estudo transversal, em que participaram 1 764 indivíduos de 7 a 17 anos de idade, de ambos os sexos, infectados por Schistosoma mansoni isoladamente ou Schistosoma mansoni associado a geohelmintos, residentes na cidade de Jequié (BA. Os participantes foram submetidos a avaliação antropométrica, dos estágios de desenvolvimento puberal e a exame parasitológico de fezes. Foram coletadas informações referentes às condições sanitárias do domicílio e socioeconômicas da família. Optou-se pela análise de regressão logística multivariada para as análises estatísticas de interesse. RESULTADOS: Os resultados deste trabalho mostraram uma prevalência de 15,4% de déficit estatural entre os integrantes do estudo. O déficit de crescimento físico associou-se ao atraso da puberdade (0R=4,01; IC95%1,01-15,8. Esta associação pode ser explicada pelo impacto negativo que a desnutrição exerce sobre a produção de hormônios associados ao crescimento e sobre a produção dos hormônios sexuais. CONCLUSÃO: Estes achados sugerem que as condições inadequadas de nutrição contribuem para o retardo maturacional. Ressalta-se assim, a importância de estratégias de intervenção que possam garantir melhores condições de vida, saúde e nutrição para o desenvolvimento adequado das potencialidades vitais.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to assess the influence of stunting on the developmental delay of helminth-infected children and adolescents. METHODS: The sample of this cross-sectional study consisted of 1,764 subjects of both sexes from the city of Jequié (Bahia, Brazil, aged 7 to 17 years, infected with helminths (either Schistosoma mansoni alone or associated with associated with geohelminths. All subjects underwent anthropometric and Tanner stage assessment

  15. Developmental Milestones in Toddlers with Atypical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horovitz, Max; Matson, Johnny L.

    2011-01-01

    The attainment of developmental milestones was examined and compared in 162 infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities, including Down Syndrome (n = 26), Cerebral Palsy (n = 19), Global Developmental Delay (n = 22), Premature birth (n = 66), and Seizure Disorder (n = 29). Toddlers in the Seizures Disorder group began crawling at a…

  16. Adaptive significance of amylase polymorphism in drosophila, XV: Examination of genotype-by-environment interactions on the viability, developmental time and stability of drosophila subobscura homozygous for Amy during exposure to nutritional changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Tatjana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the direct interaction between enzyme and substrate, the amylase system can provide valuable information on the relationship between homozygosity and developmental homeostasis under a changing environment in several Drosophila species, The adaptive significance of the relationship between genetic variability and environmental change manifests through the well-known polymorphism of the amylase locus (Amy. We examined the effect of gradual and abrupt changes in starch concentration in the nutritional substrate, on the developmental time, egg-to-adult viability and phenotypic plasticity in the progeny of Drosophila subobscura that was homozygous for “fast” (AmyF/AmyF and “slow” (AmyS/AmyS Amy alleles. Our findings show that gradual and abrupt nutritional changes exert a significant effect on developmental time and viability. A high heterogeneity among genotypes in fluctuating asymmetry (FA and no direct association between FA and fitness components under the two experimental regimes of environmental change were observed.

  17. Developmental Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bye,” and pointing to something interesting are all developmental milestones, or things most children can do by a ... screening are ways to look for your child’s developmental milestones. Developmental Monitoring Developmental Screening WHO: You — parents, grandparents, ...

  18. From stepping stones to milestones. Developmental assessment in infants and toddlers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenis, L.J.P.

    2015-01-01

    The development of most children proceeds without problems, although a small percentage experiences a developmental delay. Luckily, children with a developmental delay often benefit from early intervention. Timely identification is therefore crucial and adequate instruments measuring early child

  19. Hyperekplexia, Apneas, Developmental Delay, and Genetic Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at Swansea University and other centers in the UK, Australia, and Belgium studied the genotype-phenotype correlations in 97 individuals with a clinical diagnosis of hyperekplexia; 61 cases had mutations in GLRA1, 24 cases in SLC6A5 and 12 in GLRB.

  20. Early Intervention in Children with Developmental Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Developmental disabilities consist of conditions that delay or impair the physical, cognitive, and/or psychological development of children. If not intervened at the earliest, these disabilities will cause significant negative impact on multiple domains of functioning such as learning, language, self-care and capacity for independent living. Common developmental disabilities include autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, developmental delay and cerebral palsy. About one fourth of young children in developing countries are at risk for or have developmental delay or disabilities. Inadequate stimulation has significant negative impact on physical, socioemotional and cognitive development of children. Hence early scientific intervention programs are necessary in the management of children at risk for developmental delay.

  1. Brief Report: The Relationship between Language Skills, Adaptive Behavior, and Emotional and Behavior Problems in Pre-Schoolers with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Carlie J.; Yelland, Gregory W.; Taffe, John R.; Gray, Kylie M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between structural language skills, and communication skills, adaptive behavior, and emotional and behavior problems in pre-school children with autism. Participants were aged 3-5 years with autism (n = 27), and two comparison groups of children with developmental delay without autism (n = 12) and typically…

  2. Tooth formation - delayed or absent

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tooth formation; Teeth - delayed or absent formation Images Tooth anatomy Development of baby teeth Development of permanent teeth References ... MO: Elsevier Mosby; 2016:chap 19. Tinanoff N. Development and developmental anomalies of the teeth. In: Kliegman RM, ... NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Read more ...

  3. Evolutionary Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, David C.; Bjorklund, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Describes evolutionary developmental psychology as the study of the genetic and ecological mechanisms that govern the development of social and cognitive competencies common to all human beings and the epigenetic (gene-environment interactions) processes that adapt these competencies to local conditions. Outlines basic assumptions and domains of…

  4. Delayed Puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolby, Nanna; Busch, Alexander Siegfried; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Delayed puberty can be a source of great concern and anxiety, although it usually is caused by a self-limiting variant of the normal physiological timing named constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP). Delayed puberty can, however, also be the first presentation of a permanent condition...... of diagnostic evaluation today remain in distinguishing the benign CDGP from underlying pathological causes such as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Several techniques have been investigated for this purpose and are reviewed in this chapter; however, no single test is yet...

  5. Delayed Ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bladder rather than out of the penis Psychological causes of delayed ejaculation include: Depression, anxiety or other mental health conditions Relationship problems due to stress, poor communication or other concerns ...

  6. Delayed Ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of stress Delayed ejaculation Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  7. What Is a Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrician?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including cerebral palsy, spina bifi da, mental retardation, autism spectrum disorders, and visual and hearing impairments Delayed development in speech, language, motor skills, and thinking ability Behavioral and developmental problems complicating the full range ...

  8. Gastrostomy Tube Feeding after Neonatal Complex Cardiac Surgery Identifies the Need for Early Developmental Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, M Florencia; Alton, Gwen Y; Ross, David B; Dicken, Bryan J; Moddemann, Diane M; Robertson, Charlene M T

    2016-02-01

    To compare the proportion of developmental delay in early complex cardiac surgery (CCS) survivors with and without gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF). To explore acute care predictors of GTF that might help improve care in CCS survivors. This comparison study of 2 groups within an inception cohort included 334 CCS survivors after cardiopulmonary bypass at ≤6 weeks of age (2005-2012) who did not require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or heart transplantation. Children were assessed at 21 ± 3 months with the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-Third Edition and the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-Second Edition: general adaptive composite score. Delay was determined by scores >2 SD below mean. The χ(2) test compared groups. Predictors of GTF were analyzed using multiple logistic regression analysis, results expressed as OR with 95% CI. Of the survivors, 67/334 (20%) had GTF any time before the 21-month assessment. Developmental delays in children with GTF were cognitive in 16 (24%), motor in 18 (27%), language in 24 (36%) vs without GTF in 7 (3%), 8 (3%), and 32 (12%), respectively (P early developmental intervention. The described mostly nonmodifiable predictors may guide counseling of these children's families. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Twins and virtual twins: Do genetic (as well as experiential) factors affect developmental risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Nancy L; Tan, Tony Xing; Graham, Jamie L

    2015-08-01

    Factors underlying developmental delays and psychosocial risks are of interest to international adoption communities. The current study administered a Pre-Adoption Adversity (PAA) Questionnaire to mostly American parents raising (a) adopted Chinese twins or (b) same-age unrelated adopted siblings. A goal was to replicate earlier analyses of pre-adoption adversity/adjustment among adopted preschool-age Chinese girls. A second goal was to conduct genetic analyses of four content areas (Developmental Delays at Adoption, Initial Adaptation to Adoption, Crying/Clinging, and Refusal/Avoidance) derived from the PAA Questionnaire. A key finding was that age at adoption added less than other predictors to adoptees' externalizing and internalizing behaviors. Family factors (e.g., parental education) contributed significantly to behavioral outcomes among the adopted Chinese twins. Genetic effects were indicated for all four content areas, with shared environmental effects evident for Developmental Delays at Adoption and Crying/Clinging. Future investigators should consider incorporating genetically sensitive designs into developmental research programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Vagal Tone and Children’s Delay of Gratification: Differential Sensitivity Across Resource Poor and Resource Rich Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturge-Apple, Melissa L.; Suor, Jennifer H.; Davies, Patrick T.; Cicchetti, Dante; Skibo, Michael A.; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2016-01-01

    Socioeconomic disparities in children’s delay of gratification exist, with impoverished children displaying greater difficulties in this developmental domain. The present paper examined the role of vagal tone in predicting the ability to delay gratification across resource rich and resource poor environments. Embedding hypotheses within evolutionary models of children’s conditional adaptation to proximal rearing contexts, Study 1 tested whether elevated vagal tone was associated with lower delay of gratification within impoverished children. Study 2 compared the relative role of vagal tone across two groups of children, one which experienced greater impoverishment and one which was relatively middle-class. Results indicated that within resource rich environments, high vagal tone was associated with greater delay of gratification. In contrast, high vagal tone in children living within resource poor environments was associated with reduced delay of gratification. The results are interpreted within evolutionary-developmental models of children’s stress response system functioning and adaptive behavior across varying contexts of economic risk. PMID:27117276

  11. Adaptive Behavior of Sheltered Homeless Children in the French ENFAMS Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbeda, Stéphane; Falissard, Bruno; Orri, Massimiliano; Barry, Caroline; Melchior, Maria; Chauvin, Pierre; Vandentorren, Stéphanie

    2018-02-22

    To describe the adaptive behaviors in a large sample of homeless children and identify factors associated with developmental delay. Data were from a cross-sectional survey of 557 children younger than 6 years randomly sampled among homeless sheltered families in the Paris, France, region (January-May 2013). An interviewer and a psychologist conducted face-to-face interviews to collect information on sociodemographic and health characteristics. We assessed adaptive behaviors using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II). The mean VABS-II composite score (SD) was 75.4 (12.0), and most participating children (80.9%) were considered developmentally delayed. Characteristics negatively associated with children's developmental score were age, birth in a country other than France, low birth weight, and past-year hospitalization. There is a high prevalence of developmental delays among children growing up homeless. Public Health Implications. Long-term integrated programs improving parenting and children's opportunities for stimulation and socialization should be developed in daycare centers, schools, shelters, and medical practices to minimize negative effects of early living conditions on children's development. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print February 22, 2018: e1-e8. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2017.304255).

  12. Breeding poplars with durable resistance to Melampsora larici-populina leaf rust: a multidisciplinary approach to understand and delay pathogen adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    V. Jorge Dowkiw; M. Villar; E. Voisin; V. Guérin; P. Faivre-Rampant; A. Bresson; F. Bitton; S. Duplessis; P. Frey; B. Petre; C. Guinet; C. Xhaard; B. Fabre; F. Halkett; C. Plomion; C. Lalanne; C. Bastien

    2012-01-01

    During the last decades, European poplar breeders learned the hard way that Melampsora larici-populina (commonly abbreviated as Mlp…) has an impressive adaptive potential (McDonald and Linde 2002). This fungal pathogen defeated all the deployed cultivars carrying qualitative (i.e., complete) resistances inherited from the...

  13. Developmental Milestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Early Initiative Act Early Ambassadors Research and evaluation Developmental Milestones Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... first time, and waving “bye bye” are called developmental milestones. Children reach milestones in how they play, learn, ...

  14. Developmental reversals in recognition memory in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Julien; Gardiner, Beatrix; Hayne, Harlene

    2016-01-01

    Older members of a given species typically exhibit superior learning and memory abilities relative to younger members, however, the developmental difference does not always occur in this younger-to-older direction. Developmental reversals are thought to reflect adaptive responses to the unique challenges imposed by the infant's niche. In humans, identification of developmental reversals has largely been precluded because infants, children, and adults are rarely tested using the same experimental procedures. Here, we adapted the visual recognition memory task and tested 3-year-olds and adults using one set of child-oriented stimuli and one set of adult-orientated stimuli. When tested immediately, children and adults exhibited recognition memory for both stimuli. When tested after a 1-week delay, children exhibited recognition memory for the child-oriented stimuli, but not for the adult-oriented stimuli and adults exhibited recognition memory for the adult-oriented stimuli, but not for the child-oriented stimuli. These data have important implications for current theories of memory development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Transgenerational developmental programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Catherine E; Ozanne, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    The concept of developmental programming suggests that the early life environment influences offspring characteristics in later life, including the propensity to develop diseases such as the metabolic syndrome. There is now growing evidence that the effects of developmental programming may also manifest in further generations without further suboptimal exposure. This review considers the evidence, primarily from rodent models, for effects persisting to subsequent generations, and evaluates the mechanisms by which developmental programming may be transmitted to further generations. In particular, we focus on the potential role of the intrauterine environment in contributing to a developmentally programmed phenotype in subsequent generations. The literature was systematically searched at http://pubmed.org and http://scholar.google.com to identify published findings regarding transgenerational (F2 and beyond) developmental programming effects in human populations and animal models. Transmission of programming effects is often viewed as a form of epigenetic inheritance, either via the maternal or paternal line. Evidence exists for both germline and somatic inheritance of epigenetic modifications which may be responsible for phenotypic changes in further generations. However, there is increasing evidence for the role of both extra-genomic components of the zygote and the interaction of the developing conceptus with the intrauterine environment in propagating programming effects. The contribution of a suboptimal reproductive tract environment or maternal adaptations to pregnancy may be critical to inheritance of programming effects via the maternal line. As the effects of age exacerbate the programmed metabolic phenotype, advancing maternal age may increase the likelihood of developmental programming effects being transmitted to further generations. We suggest that developmental programming effects could be propagated through the maternal line de novo in generations

  16. Developmental Care Rounds: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Support Developmentally Appropriate Care of Infants Born with Complex Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisanti, Amy Jo; Cribben, Jeanne; Connock, Erin McManus; Lessen, Rachelle; Medoff-Cooper, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Newborn infants with complex congenital heart disease are at risk for developmental delay. Developmental care practices benefit prematurely born infants in neonatal intensive care units. Cardiac intensive care units until recently had not integrated developmental care practices into their care framework. Interdisciplinary developmental care rounds in our center have helped in the promotion of developmentally supportive care for infants before and after cardiac surgery. This article discusses basic principles of developmental care, the role of each member of the interdisciplinary team on rounds, common developmental care practices integrated into care from rounds, and impacts to patients, families, and staff. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Delayed Puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolby, Nanna; Busch, Alexander Siegfried; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    or a symptom of an underlying disease. The diagnosis delayed puberty is made if there are no signs of puberty at an age corresponding to 2 SD above the population mean age at pubertal onset, often translated into 14 years in boys. Delayed puberty among boys is a frequent presentation in pediatrics....... The underlying reasons for the large variation in the age at pubertal onset are not fully established; however, nutritional status and socioeconomic and environmental factors are known to be influencing, and a significant amount of influencing genetic factors have also been identified. The challenges...... of diagnostic evaluation today remain in distinguishing the benign CDGP from underlying pathological causes such as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Several techniques have been investigated for this purpose and are reviewed in this chapter; however, no single test is yet...

  18. Performance analysis of low-complexity adaptive frequency-domain equalization and MIMO signal processing for compensation of differential mode group delay in mode-division multiplexing communication systems using few-mode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yi; He, Xuan; Pan, Zhongqi

    2016-02-01

    Mode-division multiplexing (MDM) transmission systems utilizing few-mode fibers (FMF) have been intensively explored to sustain continuous traffic growth. The key challenges of MDM systems are inter-modal crosstalk due to random mode coupling (RMC), and largely-accumulated differential mode group delay (DMGD), whilst hinders mode-demultiplexer implementation. The adaptive multi-input multi-output (MIMO) frequency-domain equalization (FDE) can dynamically compensate DMGD using digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms. The frequency-domain least-mean squares (FD-LMS) algorithm has been universally adopted for high-speed MDM communications, mainly for its relatively low computational complexity. However, longer training sequence is appended for FD-LMS to achieve faster convergence, which incurs prohibitively higher system overhead and reduces overall throughput. In this paper, we propose a fast-convergent single-stage adaptive frequency-domain recursive least-squares (FD-RLS) algorithm with reduced complexity for DMGD compensation at MDM coherent receivers. The performance and complexity comparison of FD-RLS, with signal-PSD-dependent FD-LMS method and conventional FD-LMS approach, are performed in a 3000 km six-mode transmission system with 65 ps/km DMGD. We explore the convergence speed of three adaptive algorithms, including the normalized mean-square-error (NMSE) per fast Fourier transform (FFT) block at 14-30 dB OSNR. The fast convergence of FD-RLS is exploited at the expense of slightly-increased necessary tap numbers for MIMO equalizers, and it can partially save the overhead of training sequence. Furthermore, we demonstrate adaptive FD-RLS can also be used for chromatic dispersion (CD) compensation without increasing the filter tap length, thus prominently reducing the DSP implementation complexity for MDM systems.

  19. Asymptotic Delay Analysis for Cross-Layer Delay-Based Routing in Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Jacquet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of the evaluation of the delay distribution via analytical means in IEEE 802.11 wireless ad hoc networks. We show that the asymptotic delay distribution can be expressed as a power law. Based on the latter result, we present a cross-layer delay estimation protocol and we derive new delay-distribution-based routing algorithms, which are well adapted to the QoS requirements of real-time multimedia applications. In fact, multimedia services are not sensitive to average delays, but rather to the asymptotic delay distributions. Indeed, video streaming applications drop frames when they are received beyond a delay threshold, determined by the buffer size. Although delay-distribution-based routing is an NP-hard problem, we show that it can be solved in polynomial time when the delay threshold is large, because of the asymptotic power law distribution of the link delays.

  20. Delayed growth, motor function and learning in preterm pigs during early postnatal life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders D.; Sangild, Per T.; Munch, Sara L.

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth interrupts normal fetal growth with consequences for postnatal growth and organ development. In preterm infants, many physiological deficits adapt and disappear with advancing postnatal age, but some may persist into childhood. We hypothesized that preterm birth would induce impaired...... organ growth and function during the first postnatal week in pigs, while motor abilities and behavioral characteristics would show more persistent developmental delay. Cesarean-delivered preterm (n = 112, 90% gestation) or term (n = 56, 100% gestation) piglets were reared under identical conditions......, and learning, relative to term pigs (all P physiological characteristics of immaturity disappeared by 4 wk, while some neurodevelopmental deficits remained...

  1. Adaptive management of energy consumption, reliability and delay of wireless sensor node: Application to IEEE 802.15.4 wireless sensor node.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheick Tidjane Kone

    Full Text Available Designing a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN to achieve a high Quality of Service (QoS (network performance and durability is a challenging problem. We address it by focusing on the performance of the 802.15.4 communication protocol because the IEEE 802.15.4 Standard is actually considered as one of the reference technologies in WSNs. In this paper, we propose to control the sustainable use of resources (i.e., energy consumption, reliability and timely packet transmission of a wireless sensor node equipped with photovoltaic cells by an adaptive tuning not only of the MAC (Medium Access Control parameters but also of the sampling frequency of the node. To do this, we use one of the existing control approaches, namely the viability theory, which aims to preserve the functions and the controls of a dynamic system in a set of desirable states. So, an analytical model, describing the evolution over time of nodal resources, is derived and used by a viability algorithm for the adaptive tuning of the IEEE 802.15.4 MAC protocol. The simulation analysis shows that our solution allows ensuring indefinitely, in the absence of hardware failure, the operations (lifetime duration, reliability and timely packet transmission of an 802.15.4 WSN and one can temporarily increase the sampling frequency of the node beyond the regular sampling one. This latter brings advantages for agricultural and environmental applications such as precision agriculture, flood or fire prevention. Main results show that our current approach enable to send more information when critical events occur without the node runs out of energy. Finally, we argue that our approach is generic and can be applied to other types of WSN.

  2. Adaptive management of energy consumption, reliability and delay of wireless sensor node: Application to IEEE 802.15.4 wireless sensor node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kone, Cheick Tidjane; Mathias, Jean-Denis; De Sousa, Gil

    2017-01-01

    Designing a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) to achieve a high Quality of Service (QoS) (network performance and durability) is a challenging problem. We address it by focusing on the performance of the 802.15.4 communication protocol because the IEEE 802.15.4 Standard is actually considered as one of the reference technologies in WSNs. In this paper, we propose to control the sustainable use of resources (i.e., energy consumption, reliability and timely packet transmission) of a wireless sensor node equipped with photovoltaic cells by an adaptive tuning not only of the MAC (Medium Access Control) parameters but also of the sampling frequency of the node. To do this, we use one of the existing control approaches, namely the viability theory, which aims to preserve the functions and the controls of a dynamic system in a set of desirable states. So, an analytical model, describing the evolution over time of nodal resources, is derived and used by a viability algorithm for the adaptive tuning of the IEEE 802.15.4 MAC protocol. The simulation analysis shows that our solution allows ensuring indefinitely, in the absence of hardware failure, the operations (lifetime duration, reliability and timely packet transmission) of an 802.15.4 WSN and one can temporarily increase the sampling frequency of the node beyond the regular sampling one. This latter brings advantages for agricultural and environmental applications such as precision agriculture, flood or fire prevention. Main results show that our current approach enable to send more information when critical events occur without the node runs out of energy. Finally, we argue that our approach is generic and can be applied to other types of WSN.

  3. Adaptive and maladaptive correlates of repetitive behavior and restricted interests in persons with down syndrome and developmentally-matched typical children: a two-year longitudinal sequential design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David W; Kleinpeter, F Lee; Slane, Mylissa M; Boomer, K B

    2014-01-01

    We examined the course of repetitive behavior and restricted interests (RBRI) in children with and without Down syndrome (DS) over a two-year time period. Forty-two typically-developing children and 43 persons with DS represented two mental age (MA) levels: "younger" 2-4 years; "older" 5-11 years. For typically developing younger children some aspects of RBRI increased from Time 1 to Time 2. In older children, these aspects remained stable or decreased over the two-year period. For participants with DS, RBRI remained stable or increased over time. Time 1 RBRI predicted Time 2 adaptive behavior (measured by the Vineland Scales) in typically developing children, whereas for participants with DS, Time 1 RBRI predicted poor adaptive outcome (Child Behavior Checklist) at Time 2. The results add to the body of literature examining the adaptive and maladaptive nature of repetitive behavior.

  4. Adaptive and maladaptive correlates of repetitive behavior and restricted interests in persons with down syndrome and developmentally-matched typical children: a two-year longitudinal sequential design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Evans

    Full Text Available We examined the course of repetitive behavior and restricted interests (RBRI in children with and without Down syndrome (DS over a two-year time period. Forty-two typically-developing children and 43 persons with DS represented two mental age (MA levels: "younger" 2-4 years; "older" 5-11 years. For typically developing younger children some aspects of RBRI increased from Time 1 to Time 2. In older children, these aspects remained stable or decreased over the two-year period. For participants with DS, RBRI remained stable or increased over time. Time 1 RBRI predicted Time 2 adaptive behavior (measured by the Vineland Scales in typically developing children, whereas for participants with DS, Time 1 RBRI predicted poor adaptive outcome (Child Behavior Checklist at Time 2. The results add to the body of literature examining the adaptive and maladaptive nature of repetitive behavior.

  5. Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Vasilij; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Chernev, Petko; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a very efficient photochemical process. Nevertheless, plants emit some of the absorbed energy as light quanta. This luminescence is emitted, predominantly, by excited chlorophyll a molecules in the light-harvesting antenna, associated with Photosystem II (PS II) reaction centers. The emission that occurs before the utilization of the excitation energy in the primary photochemical reaction is called prompt fluorescence. Light emission can also be observed from repopulated excited chlorophylls as a result of recombination of the charge pairs. In this case, some time-dependent redox reactions occur before the excitation of the chlorophyll. This delays the light emission and provides the name for this phenomenon-delayed fluorescence (DF), or delayed light emission (DLE). The DF intensity is a decreasing polyphasic function of the time after illumination, which reflects the kinetics of electron transport reactions both on the (electron) donor and the (electron) acceptor sides of PS II. Two main experimental approaches are used for DF measurements: (a) recording of the DF decay in the dark after a single turnover flash or after continuous light excitation and (b) recording of the DF intensity during light adaptation of the photosynthesizing samples (induction curves), following a period of darkness. In this paper we review historical data on DF research and recent advances in the understanding of the relation between the delayed fluorescence and specific reactions in PS II. An experimental method for simultaneous recording of the induction transients of prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence and decay curves of DF in the millisecond time domain is discussed.

  6. Evolutionary developmental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ashley C; Bjorklund, David F

    2010-02-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental psychology can potentially broaden the horizons of mainstream evolutionary psychology by combining the principles of Darwinian evolution by natural selection with the study of human development, focusing on the epigenetic effects that occur between humans and their environment in a way that attempts to explain how evolved psychological mechanisms become expressed in the phenotypes of adults. An evolutionary developmental perspective includes an appreciation of comparative research and we, among others, argue that contrasting the cognition of humans with that of nonhuman primates can provide a framework with which to understand how human cognitive abilities and intelligence evolved. Furthermore, we argue that several aspects of childhood (e.g., play and immature cognition) serve both as deferred adaptations as well as imparting immediate benefits. Intense selection pressure was surely exerted on childhood over human evolutionary history and, as a result, neglecting to consider the early developmental period of children when studying their later adulthood produces an incomplete picture of the evolved adaptations expressed through human behavior and cognition.

  7. Developmental Dysphasia

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1989-01-01

    The neuropatho1ogica1 findings in a seven year old girl with developmental dysphasia who died of complications of infectious mononucleosis are reported from the Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics and the Department of Pathology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA.

  8. Developmental Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Kees; Kortland, Koos

    2015-01-01

    Developmental research is a particular way of addressing the basic questions of why and how to teach what to whom. It involves a cyclical process of small-scale in-depth development and evaluation, at a content-specific level, of exemplary teaching-learning sequences. It aims to produce an

  9. Developmental Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels; Hvid, Helge; Kristensen, Tage Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    Human Deveoplment and Working Life - Work for Welfare explores whether the development of human resources at company level can improve individuals' quality of life, companies' possibilities of development, and welfare and democracy in society. Chapter two discuss the concept "developmental work......" from theoretical and empirical perspectives....

  10. Diagnostic delays in children with early-onset epilepsy: impact, reasons, and opportunities to improve care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Anne T.; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Baca, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Delayed diagnosis of early-onset epilepsy is a potentially important and avoidable complication in epilepsy care. We examined the frequency of diagnostic delays in young children with newly presenting epilepsy, their developmental impact, and reasons for delays. Methods Children who developed epilepsy before their third birthday were identified in a prospective community-based cohort. An interval ≥1 month from second seizure to diagnosis was considered a delay. Testing of development at baseline and for up to three years after and of IQ 8–9 years later was performed. Detailed parental baseline interview accounts and medical records were reviewed to identify potential reasons for delays. Factors associated with delays included the parent, child, pediatrician, neurologist, and scheduling. Results Diagnostic delays occurred in 70/172 (41%) children. Delays occurred less often if children had received medical attention for the first seizure (p<0.0001), previously had neonatal or febrile seizures (p=0.02), had only convulsions before diagnosis (p=0.005) or had a college-educated parent (p=0.01). A ≥1 month diagnostic delay was associated with an average 7.4 point drop (p=0.02) in the Vineland Scales of Adaptive Behavior motor score. The effect was present at diagnosis, persisted for at least three years, and was also apparent in IQ scores 8–9 years later which were lower in association with a diagnostic delay by 8.4 points (p=0.06) for processing speed up to 14.5 points (p=0.004) for full scale IQ, after adjustment for parental education and other epilepsy-related clinical factors. Factors associated with delayed diagnosis included parents not recognizing events as seizures (N=47), pediatricians missing or deferring diagnosis (N=15), neurologists deferring diagnosis (N=7), and scheduling problems (N=11). Significance Diagnostic delays occur in many young children with epilepsy. They are associated with substantial decrements in development and IQ later

  11. Health-related quality of life and psychosocial developmental trajectory in young female beneficiaries with JIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverman, Lotte; Verhoof, Eefje J; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Heymans, Hugo S A; Gerlag, Daniëlle M; van Rossum, Marion A J; Grootenhuis, Martha A

    2012-02-01

    It is generally recognized that for all children the fulfilling of age-specific psychosocial developmental tasks in childhood is of great importance to adjustment in adult life, including participation in society. For young adults with JIA this is more difficult. We assume that the achievement of psychosocial milestones while growing up (psychosocial developmental trajectory) is also related to labour participation. A proportion of all young adults with JIA have to apply for disability benefits. This study assessed the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the psychosocial developmental trajectory of young female beneficiaries with JIA compared with peers from the Dutch general population. Young females with disability benefits because of JIA completed the RAND-36 (HRQOL) and the Course of Life Questionnaire (psychosocial developmental trajectory). Differences between respondents and the peer group were tested using analysis of variance and logistic regression analysis by group and age. The beneficiaries reported worse HRQOL than the peer group and achieved fewer milestones, or achieved the milestones at a later age than the peer group in the autonomy, social and psychosexual domain. Young females with JIA who have to apply for disability benefits are at risk for impaired HRQOL and a delay in their psychosocial developmental trajectory. Parents, physicians and other health-care providers should pay systematic attention to the development of social and independent functioning of children with JIA in order to optimize their adaptation to society at the time of transition to adulthood.

  12. Interstitial deletion of 1p22.2p31.1 and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency in a patient with global developmental delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maegawa, Gustavo H B; Poplawski, Nicola K; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2008-01-01

    We report on a 6-year-old girl who presented at 6 months of age with seizures, delayed psychomotor development and mild facial dysmorphism. A small muscular ventricular septal defect was documented on echocardiogram and brain MRI showed a frontal brain anomaly. Urine organic acid analysis revealed...... dicarboxylic aciduria, and plasma acylcarnitine analysis showed marked elevation of octanoyl (C8) and decanoyl (C10) carnitines with C8:C10 ratio of 9:1. These results were indicative of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. ACADM gene sequencing showed an apparent homozygous c.166G > C (Ala31Pro...

  13. Vagal Tone and Children's Delay of Gratification: Differential Sensitivity in Resource-Poor and Resource-Rich Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturge-Apple, Melissa L; Suor, Jennifer H; Davies, Patrick T; Cicchetti, Dante; Skibo, Michael A; Rogosch, Fred A

    2016-06-01

    Children from different socioeconomic backgrounds have differing abilities to delay gratification, and impoverished children have the greatest difficulties in doing so. In the present study, we examined the role of vagal tone in predicting the ability to delay gratification in both resource-rich and resource-poor environments. We derived hypotheses from evolutionary models of children's conditional adaptation to proximal rearing contexts. In Study 1, we tested whether elevated vagal tone was associated with shorter delay of gratification in impoverished children. In Study 2, we compared the relative role of vagal tone across two groups of children, one that had experienced greater impoverishment and one that was relatively middle-class. Results indicated that in resource-rich environments, higher vagal tone was associated with longer delay of gratification. In contrast, high vagal tone in children living in resource-poor environments was associated with reduced delay of gratification. We interpret the results with an eye to evolutionary-developmental models of the function of children's stress-response system and adaptive behavior across varying contexts of economic risk. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Adaptive Behavior and Development of Infants and Toddlers with Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M. Kirchner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a neurodevelopmental disorder that causes deficits in adaptive behavior, difficulties eating and sleeping, cognitive delays, and delayed development. Although researchers have conducted characterizations of children and adults with WS, less is known about young children with this disorder. This study characterizes the developmental and adaptive behavior features of 16 infants and toddlers with WS aged 3 months - 5 years. Data for this project was obtained from 2007-2014, and includes parent report data and standardized developmental testing. Thirty-one percent (31.3% of parents reported that their infant/toddler with WS had sleeping problems and 58.3% reported feeding difficulties. Levels of adaptive behavior were in the Mildly Delayed range as measured by the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, Second Edition. Self care skills such as feeding or dressing oneself were significantly weaker than skills needed to function in the community, such as recognizing his/her home or throwing away trash. The difficulty with self-care skills is hypothesized to be related to the reported difficulties with eating and sleeping. Motor skills were significantly lower than both cognitive and language skills on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition. The current study highlights the need for early intervention in these young children across all areas of development, particularly in self-care skills.

  15. Developmental dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, R S; Weirtman, R; Amir, N

    1988-12-01

    We conducted a neurobehavioral evaluation on eleven children with developmental dyscalculia in order to determine which aspects of arithmetic processes are affected in this disorder. Our results indicate that memorization of numerical facts in these children was poor or virtually non-existent and the ability to solve simple arithmetic exercises impaired. By contrast, comprehension and production of number functions were intact. Although all children had been referred for evaluation of selective deficits in arithmetic skills, they also displayed a mild degree of dyslexia, dysgraphia, anomia, and grapho-motor dysfunction. We conclude that cognitive mechanisms underlying arithmetic ability can be dissociated developmentally and suggest that remediation programs be designed only after detailed analyses of arithmetic and associated cognitive skills.

  16. Tissue damage disrupts developmental progression and ecdysteroid biosynthesis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer F Hackney

    Full Text Available In humans, chronic inflammation, severe injury, infection and disease can result in changes in steroid hormone titers and delayed onset of puberty; however the pathway by which this occurs remains largely unknown. Similarly, in insects injury to specific tissues can result in a global developmental delay (e.g. prolonged larval/pupal stages often associated with decreased levels of ecdysone - a steroid hormone that regulates developmental transitions in insects. We use Drosophila melanogaster as a model to examine the pathway by which tissue injury disrupts developmental progression. Imaginal disc damage inflicted early in larval development triggers developmental delays while the effects are minimized in older larvae. We find that the switch in injury response (e.g. delay/no delay is coincident with the mid-3rd instar transition - a developmental time-point that is characterized by widespread changes in gene expression and marks the initial steps of metamorphosis. Finally, we show that developmental delays induced by tissue damage are associated with decreased expression of genes involved in ecdysteroid synthesis and signaling.

  17. Developmental Apraxia of Speech: I. Descriptive and Theoretical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Discusses developmental apraxia of speech (DAS), a putative diagnostic category for children whose speech errors differ from errors of children with developmental speech delay and resemble errors of adults with acquired apraxia of speech. A study of 148 children with language impairments investigated the diagnosis of DAS. (Author/CR)

  18. Developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robin L; Pennington, Bruce F

    2015-01-01

    This review uses a levels-of-analysis framework to summarize the current understanding of developmental dyslexia's etiology, brain bases, neuropsychology, and social context. Dyslexia is caused by multiple genetic and environmental risk factors as well as their interplay. Several candidate genes have been identified in the past decade. At the brain level, dyslexia is associated with aberrant structure and function, particularly in left hemisphere reading/language networks. The neurocognitive influences on dyslexia are also multifactorial and involve phonological processing deficits as well as weaknesses in other oral language skills and processing speed. We address contextual issues such as how dyslexia manifests across languages and social classes as well as what treatments are best supported. Throughout the review, we highlight exciting new research that cuts across levels of analysis. Such work promises eventually to provide a comprehensive explanation of the disorder as well as its prevention and remediation.

  19. Phenotypic differentiation is associated with gender plasticity and its responsive delay to environmental changes in Alternanthera philoxeroides--phenotypic differentiation in alligator weed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is common in many taxa, and it may increase an organism's fitness in heterogeneous environments. However, in some cases, the frequency of environmental changes can be faster than the ability of the individual to produce new adaptive phenotypes. The importance of such a time delay in terms of individual fitness and species adaptability has not been well studied. Here, we studied gender plasticity of Alternanthera philoxeroides to address this issue through a reciprocal transplant experiment. We observed that the genders of A. philoxeroides were plastic and reversible between monoclinous and pistillody depending on habitats, the offspring maintained the maternal genders in the first year but changed from year 2 to 5, and there was a cubic relationship between the rate of population gender changes and environmental variations. This relationship indicates that the species must overcome a threshold of environmental variations to switch its developmental path ways between the two genders. This threshold and the maternal gender stability cause a significant delay of gender changes in new environments. At the same time, they result in and maintain the two distinct habitat dependent gender phenotypes. We also observed that there was a significant and adaptive life-history differentiation between monoclinous and pistillody individuals and the gender phenotypes were developmentally linked with the life-history traits. Therefore, the gender phenotypes are adaptive. Low seed production, seed germination failure and matching phenotypes to habitats by gender plasticity indicate that the adaptive phenotypic diversity in A. philoxeroides may not be the result of ecological selection, but of gender plasticity. The delay of the adaptive gender phenotype realization in changing environments can maintain the differentiation between gender systems and their associated life-history traits, which may be an important component in evolution of novel

  20. Examining the Criterion-Related Validity of the Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorris, Carly A.; Perry, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    The Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior Inventory is a questionnaire designed to aid in the diagnosis of pervasive developmental disorders or autism spectrum disorders. The Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior Inventory assesses adaptive and maladaptive behaviors associated with pervasive developmental disorders and provides an…

  1. Developmental robotics: manifesto and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Terry; Shadbolt, Nigel R

    2003-10-15

    We argue that all embodied organisms, whether robots or animals, face the same challenge: of adapting to bodies, brains and environments that undergo constant and inevitable change. After highlighting the evidence for the universal role of a class of molecular factors called neurotrophic factors in the response of animals to this challenge, we suggest that implementing models of neurotrophic interactions on robots may confer on them the adaptability and robustness exhibited by animals. We briefly review a mathematical model of neurotrophic interactions and then discuss its application in a robotic context. Finally, we examine the potential, or otherwise, of our approach to developmental robotics.

  2. Developmental dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucian, Karin; von Aster, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Numerical skills are essential in our everyday life, and impairments in the development of number processing and calculation have a negative impact on schooling and professional careers. Approximately 3 to 6 % of children are affected from specific disorders of numerical understanding (developmental dyscalculia (DD)). Impaired development of number processing skills in these children is characterized by problems in various aspects of numeracy as well as alterations of brain activation and brain structure. Moreover, DD is assumed to be a very heterogeneous disorder putting special challenges to define homogeneous diagnostic criteria. Finally, interdisciplinary perspectives from psychology, neuroscience and education can contribute to the design for interventions, and although results are still sparse, they are promising and have shown positive effects on behaviour as well as brain function. In the current review, we are going to give an overview about typical and atypical development of numerical abilities at the behavioural and neuronal level. Furthermore, current status and obstacles in the definition and diagnostics of DD are discussed, and finally, relevant points that should be considered to make an intervention as successful as possible are summarized.

  3. Psychosocial developmental milestones in men with classic galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbels, Cynthia Sophia; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Berry, Gerard Thomas; Bosch, Annet Maria; Waisbren, Susan; Rubio-Gozalbo, Maria Estela; Grootenhuis, Martha Alexandra

    2011-04-01

    Patients with classic galactosemia suffer from several long term effects of their disease. Research in a group of mainly female patients has shown that these patients may also have a developmental delay with regard to their social aptitude. To study if male galactosemia patients achieve psychosocial developmental milestones more slowly than male peers from the general Dutch population, we assessed their development with the Course of Life Questionnaire (CoLQ). A total of 18 male galactosemia patients participated in this study (response rate 69%): 11 Dutch patients and seven American patients. We found severe delays in the social and psychosexual scales of this questionnaire, but not on the autonomy axis. These results are comparable to an earlier study with a limited number of male patients. The observed delays could be secondary to less developed social skills, cognitive dysfunction, or disrupted language development. We strongly recommend screening of galactosemia patients for developmental delays, to ensure early intervention through social skills training.

  4. Early support developmental journal for children with visual impairment: the case for a new developmental framework for early intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, N; Salt, A

    2007-11-01

    Congenital visual impairment has serious consequences for early development, particularly in those with the most profound impairment. Although there is individual variation, developmental delays and risks, including 'developmental setback', are widespread. There is no scientifically robust developmental framework grounded in contemporary theory and scientific knowledge to guide early intervention which may prevent or minimize the risk factors and developmental difficulties. The UK governmental initiative, Early Support, gave the impetus for developing a new developmental framework for babies and young children with visual impairment. This paper reports on the scientific literature that underpins the new framework and the limitations of existing intervention materials. The case for focusing on particular vulnerable areas and developing a new developmental framework, the Early Support Developmental Journal for babies and children with severe visual impairment, is presented. The future direction for service delivery and evaluation is briefly described.

  5. Delay compensation using Smith predictor for wireless network control system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Gamal

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a delay compensation scheme using classical and adaptive Smith predictor is applied to wireless NCS. The Markov model is proposed to compute the estimated network delay used in the classical predictor. In the adaptive predictor, the channel delay statistics using shift register is proposed to update the estimated delay. To evaluate the proposed schemes, a DC-motor controller system based on IEEE 802.15.4 is built using True Time Matlab software. The system performance with and without the proposed delay compensation scheme is studied. It is also compared to other delay compensation schemes. The results show that the proposed scheme improves the NCS performance significantly and reduces the effect of the delay on the system.

  6. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire for brazilian children Adaptação transcultural do Questionário de Transtorno do Desenvolvimento da Coordenação para crianças brasileiras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSS Prado

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD is considered a major health problem among school-aged children worldwide. Although there are several instruments to identify children with DCD, none of them are translated into Portuguese and validated to be used in Brazil. OBJECTIVES: Considering that a parent questionnaire is a simple and effective method to screen children with DCD, this study describes the adaptation of the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ and the pilot testing with Brazilian children. METHODS:Translation of the DCDQ into Portuguese was conducted according to current guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation of instruments. The questionnaire was completed by parents of 15 children with motor coordination problems and parents of 30 children who were typically developing, matched for age. Five parents randomly selected from each group completed the questionnaire twice, to examine test-retest reliability. The parent's opinion regarding the quality of the questionnaire was recorded. RESULTS: 91% of Brazilian parents reported no difficulty in completing the DCDQ. Examination of psychometric properties revealed that two items had limitations due to cultural differences. After item substitution, sensitivity increased from 0.66 to 0.73 and test-retest reliability from 0.95 to 0.97. Internal consistency also increased from 0.91 to 0.92. CONCLUSIONS:The translated instrument shows potential as a screening tool for children in Brazil and should be further examined. Research with a larger sample is needed in order to define cut-off scores and verify the instrument's validity and clinical utility. The use of the DCDQ will allow the comparison of epidemiological data from different countries.CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: O transtorno do desenvolvimento da coordenação (TDC é considerado, em vários países, um grande problema de saúde para crianças. Apesar de existirem vários instrumentos para identificar o TDC, nenhum

  7. Delayed Orgasm and Anorgasmia

    OpenAIRE

    JENKINS, Lawrence C.; Mulhall, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Delayed orgasm/anorgasmia defined as the persistent or recurrent difficulty, delay in, or absence of attaining orgasm after sufficient sexual stimulation, which causes personal distress. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia are associated with significant sexual dissatisfaction. A focused medical history can shed light on the potential etiologies; which include: medications, penile sensation loss, endocrinopathies, penile hyperstimulation and psychological etiologies, amongst others. Unfortunately, ...

  8. Developmental milestones among Aboriginal children in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Leanne; Kohen, Dafna; Miller, Anton

    2014-05-01

    Windows of achievement provide age ranges for the attainment of early developmental skills. Group-specific research is warranted given that development may be influenced by social or cultural factors. To examine developmental milestones for Inuit, Métis and off-reserve First Nation children in Canada, based on developmental domains collected from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey. Sociodemographic and health predictors of risk for developmental delay were also examined. The ranges in which children achieve certain developmental milestones are presented. Gross motor and self-help skills were found to be achieved earlier (across the three Aboriginal groups), whereas language skills were achieved slightly later than in Canadian children in general. Furthermore, health factors (eg, low birth weight, chronic health conditions) were associated with late achievement of developmental outcomes even when sociodemographic characteristics were considered. Findings suggest that the timing of milestone achievement may differ for Aboriginal children, highlighting the importance of establishing culturally specific norms and standards rather than relying on those derived from general populations. This information may be useful for practitioners and parents interested in identifying the age ranges for development, as well as age ranges indicating potential for developmental risk and opportunities for early intervention among Aboriginal children.

  9. Speech and Language Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... editorial staff Categories: Family Health, Kids and TeensTags: autism, cerebral palsy, developmental disability, Early Language Milestone Scale, elective mutism, expressive language disorder, hearing ...

  10. Developmental outcomes of children with congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a multicenter prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Julia; Aspelund, Gudrun; Zygmunt, Annette; Stolar, Charles JH.; Mychaliska, George; Butcher, Jennifer; Lim, Foong-Yen; Gratton, Teresa; Potoka, Douglas; Brennan, Kate; Azarow, Ken; Jackson, Barbara; Needelman, Howard; Crombleholme, Timothy; Zhang, Yuan; Duong, Jimmy; Arkovitz, Marc S.; Chung, Wendy K.; Farkouh, Christiana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine developmental outcomes and associated factors in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) at two years of age. Methods This is a multicenter prospective study of a CDH birth cohort. Clinical and socioeconomic data were collected. Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID-III) and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS-II) were performed at two years of age. Results BSID-III and VABS-II assessments were completed on 48 and 49 children, respectively. The BSID-III mean cognitive, language, and motor scores were significantly below the norm mean with average scores of 93 +/− 15, 95 +/−16, and 95 +/− 11. Ten percent (5/47) scored more than two standard deviations below the norm on one or more domains. VABS-II scores were similar to BSID-III scores with mean communication, daily living skills, social, motor, adaptive behavior scores of 97 +/−14, 94+/−16, 93 +/− 13, 97+/− 10, and 94 +/− 14. For the BSID-III, supplemental oxygen at 28 days, a prenatal diagnosis, need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and exclusive tube feeds at time of discharge were associated with lower scores. At two years of age, history of hospital readmission and need for tube feeds were associated with lower scores. Lower socioeconomic status correlated with lower developmental scores when adjusted for significant health factors. Conclusion CDH patients on average have lower developmental scores at two years of age compared to the norm. A need for ECMO, oxygen at 28 days of life, ongoing health issues and lower socioeconomic status are factors associated with developmental delays. PMID:24094947

  11. Developmental outcomes of children with congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a multicenter prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Julia; Aspelund, Gudrun; Zygmunt, Annette; Stolar, Charles J H; Mychaliska, George; Butcher, Jennifer; Lim, Foong-Yen; Gratton, Teresa; Potoka, Douglas; Brennan, Kate; Azarow, Ken; Jackson, Barbara; Needelman, Howard; Crombleholme, Timothy; Zhang, Yuan; Duong, Jimmy; Arkovitz, Marc S; Chung, Wendy K; Farkouh, Christiana

    2013-10-01

    To determine developmental outcomes and associated factors in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) at 2 years of age. This is a multicenter prospective study of a CDH birth cohort. Clinical and socioeconomic data were collected. Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID-III) and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS-II) were performed at 2 years of age. BSID-III and VABS-II assessments were completed on 48 and 49 children, respectively. The BSID-III mean cognitive, language, and motor scores were significantly below the norm mean with average scores of 93 ± 15, 95 ± 16, and 95 ± 11. Ten percent (5/47) scored more than 2 standard deviations below the norm on one or more domains. VABS-II scores were similar to BSID-III scores with mean communication, daily living skills, social, motor, adaptive behavior scores of 97 ± 14, 94 ± 16, 93 ± 13, 97 ± 10, and 94 ± 14. For the BSID-III, supplemental oxygen at 28 days, a prenatal diagnosis, need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and exclusive tube feeds at time of discharge were associated with lower scores. At 2 years of age, history of hospital readmission and need for tube feeds were associated with lower scores. Lower socioeconomic status correlated with lower developmental scores when adjusted for significant health factors. CDH patients on average have lower developmental scores at 2 years of age compared to the norm. A need for ECMO, oxygen at 28 days of life, ongoing health issues and lower socioeconomic status are factors associated with developmental delays. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Brief report: The relationship between language skills, adaptive behavior, and emotional and behavior problems in pre-schoolers with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Carlie J; Yelland, Gregory W; Taffe, John R; Gray, Kylie M

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the relationship between structural language skills, and communication skills, adaptive behavior, and emotional and behavior problems in pre-school children with autism. Participants were aged 3-5 years with autism (n = 27), and two comparison groups of children with developmental delay without autism (n = 12) and typically developing children (n = 20). The participants were administered standardised tests of structural language skills, and parents completed the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales and the Developmental Behaviour Checklist. Results indicated that for children with autism, communication skills, and in particular receptive communication skills, were associated with social and daily living skills, and behavior problems. Receptive structural language skills were associated with expressive communication skills. There were no associations found between structural language skills and social or daily living skills, nor behavior problems. The results of this study suggest that communication skills are more closely linked to functional and behavioral outcomes in autism than structural language skills.

  13. Developmental delay of infants and young children with and without ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Centre for Health Policy, School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand, South Africa. 3International Centre ... the groups widens with low maternal education, maternal depression, high parity and previous loss of sibling/s influencing development ... effects of prenatal alcohol exposure, yet little is known of the early.

  14. Developmental delay of infants and young children with and without ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Centre for Health Policy, School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand, South Africa. 3International Centre for ... and overall child development.26-29 The bonding relationship said to commence immediately after birth is ..... environment, Firstly, that of the emotional state of the mother and her responsiveness to her ...

  15. Auditory spatial localization: Developmental delay in children with visual impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappagli, Giulia; Gori, Monica

    2016-01-01

    For individuals with visual impairments, auditory spatial localization is one of the most important features to navigate in the environment. Many works suggest that blind adults show similar or even enhanced performance for localization of auditory cues compared to sighted adults (Collignon, Voss, Lassonde, & Lepore, 2009). To date, the investigation of auditory spatial localization in children with visual impairments has provided contrasting results. Here we report, for the first time, that contrary to visually impaired adults, children with low vision or total blindness show a significant impairment in the localization of static sounds. These results suggest that simple auditory spatial tasks are compromised in children, and that this capacity recovers over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dysgraphia in Children: Lasting Psychomotor Deficiency or Transient Developmental Delay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C. M.; Van Galen, Gerard P.

    1997-01-01

    Used writing tasks recorded on a computer-monitored XY tablet to differentiate between normal variations in psychomotor development and dysgraphia in 16 young children. Found that control of spatial accuracy, not allograph retrieval or size control, discriminated dysgraphic children from others. Poor writers were less accurate than proficient…

  17. Drosophila as a Developmental Paradigm of Regressive Brain Evolution: Proof of Principle in the Visual System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedrich, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary developmental biology focuses heavily on the constructive evolution of body plan components, but there are many instances such as parasitism, cave adaptation, or postembryonic growth rate...

  18. Using Developmental Trajectories to Understand Developmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael S. C.; Annaz, Dagmara; Ansari, Daniel; Scerif, Gaia; Jarrold, Chris; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the authors present a tutorial on the use of developmental trajectories for studying language and cognitive impairments in developmental disorders and compare this method with the use of matching. Method: The authors assess the strengths, limitations, and practical implications of each method. The contrast between the…

  19. Leaf development and photosynthetic properties of three tropical tree species with delayed greening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Z.Q.; Slot, M.; Fan, Z.X.

    2005-01-01

    Leaf developmental patterns were characterized for three tropical tree species with delayed greening. Changes in the pigment contents, photosynthetic capacity, stomata development, photosystem 2 efficiency, rate of energy dissipation, and the activity of partial protective enzymes were followed in

  20. Teacher-child relationships as a developmental issue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuengel, C.

    2012-01-01

    Teacher-child relationships may be a developmental issue in its own right, instead of an aspect of wider developmental issues such as attachment or adaptation to school. This paper discusses research findings on teacher-child relationships to argue that teacher-child relationships are important for

  1. Developmental milestones record

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002002.htm Developmental milestones record To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Developmental milestones are behaviors or physical skills seen in infants ...

  2. Delays in thick targets

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, J R J

    2002-01-01

    The delays in the emission of radioactive particles from a thick target bombarded by high-energy protons is discussed in relation to the basic physical processes of diffusion and effusion through the target and ioniser. The delay time, relative to the decay time, is crucial to the efficiency of particle release at the exit of the ioniser. The principles of minimizing the delay times are discussed with reference to a mathematical model of the process, and some experimental examples are given.

  3. Infant developmental milestones and subsequent cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Graham K; Jones, Peter B; Kuh, Diana; Richards, Marcus

    2007-08-01

    Developmental delay is associated with a subsequent diagnosis of learning disability. However, the relationship between the age of reaching infant developmental milestones and later intellectual function within the general population remains unresolved. We hypothesized that earlier attainment of developmental milestones would be associated with better subsequent intellectual performance throughout the range of abilities, rather than confined to extremes. Developmental data were obtained at age 2 years in the National Survey of Health and Development, a representative sample of 5,362 children born in the United Kingdom in 1946. Data on intellectual function and educational attainment at ages 8, 26, and 53 years were also obtained. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression were used to analyze the effect of age of reaching developmental milestones on subsequent cognition and educational attainment. The age of reaching developmental milestones was associated with intellectual performance at ages 8, 26, and 53 years; for every month earlier a child learned to stand, there was, on average, a gain of one half of one intelligence quotient point at age 8. Speech development had a small but statistically significant effect on subsequent educational attainment (later developers were less likely to progress beyond basic education); this effect was not apparent for motor development. Effect sizes were reduced when the slowest developers were excluded, but many effects remained significant. The association between later development and poorer subsequent intellectual function is small, but it does have theoretical implications; we suggest it is secondary to suboptimal cortical-subcortical connectivity.

  4. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Lawrence C; Mulhall, John P

    2015-11-01

    Delayed orgasm/anorgasmia defined as the persistent or recurrent difficulty, delay in, or absence of attaining orgasm after sufficient sexual stimulation, which causes personal distress. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia are associated with significant sexual dissatisfaction. A focused medical history can shed light on the potential etiologies, which include medications, penile sensation loss, endocrinopathies, penile hyperstimulation, and psychological etiologies. Unfortunately, there are no excellent pharmacotherapies for delayed orgasm/anorgasmia, and treatment revolves largely around addressing potential causative factors and psychotherapy. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. American Dream Delayed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorunzhina, Natalia; Miller, Robert A.

    This paper investigates the delay in homeownership and a subsequent reduction in homeownership rate observed over the past decades. We focus on the delay in giving birth to children and increased labor market participation as contributing factors to homeownership dynamics for prime-age female hou...

  6. Using Signs to Facilitate Vocabulary in Children with Language Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Susan Hendler; Battaglia, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore recommended practices in choosing and using key word signs (i.e., simple single-word gestures for communication) to facilitate first spoken words in hearing children with language delays. Developmental, theoretical, and empirical supports for this practice are discussed. Practical recommendations for…

  7. The Child with Delayed Language: Assessment and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Tervo, Raymond C.; Kinney, Cheryl A.

    1981-01-01

    Speech and language disorders are the most common developmental problems among preschool children. Early detection and remediation of delayed language development are important in helping the child establish appropriate social behavior and acquire additional information about the world through the use of language.

  8. Intolerance to Delayed Reward in Girls with Multiple Suicide Attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Charles W.; Dougherty, Donald M.; James, Lisa M.; Richard, Dawn M.; Dawes, Michael A.; Acheson, Ashley; Hill-Kapturczak, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Impulsivity has been conceptualized as influencing the expression of suicidal behavior. Adolescence is a developmental period characterized both by a relatively high rate of suicide attempts and a high level of impulsivity. The current study examined two behavioral measures (delay reward and disinhibition) and one self-report measure of…

  9. Psychosocial developmental milestones in men with classic galactosemia

    OpenAIRE

    Gubbels, Cynthia Sophia; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Berry, Gerard Thomas; Bosch, Annet Maria; Waisbren, Susan; Rubio-Gozalbo, Maria Estela; Grootenhuis, Martha Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Patients with classic galactosemia suffer from several long term effects of their disease. Research in a group of mainly female patients has shown that these patients may also have a developmental delay with regard to their social aptitude. To study if male galactosemia patients achieve psychosocial developmental milestones more slowly than male peers from the general Dutch population, we assessed their development with the Course of Life Questionnaire (CoLQ). A total of 18 male galactosemia ...

  10. 22q11.2DS deletion syndrome: developmental milestones in infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roizen, Nancy J; Antshel, Kevin M; Fremont, Wanda; AbdulSabur, Nuria; Higgins, Anne Marie; Shprintzen, Robert J; Kates, Wendy R

    2007-04-01

    The majority of children with 22q11.2DS deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have learning disabilities, and a substantial number have mental retardation. Although cognitive data have been reported on several samples of children with 22q11.2DS, data on their early developmental milestones are limited. The present study used a retrospective design and asked parents to recall developmental milestones. The participants were 88 children with 22q11.2DS, 47 community controls, and 29 sibling controls. Although very early gross motor and expressive language milestones did not differ significantly from comparison groups, subsequent gross motor and expressive language milestones did, suggesting that children with 22q11.2DS may begin to lag behind their peers sometime after the first year of life in these two domains. These patterns were also apparent when a subset of intellectually comparable children (22q11.2DS, n = 40 vs community controls, n = 24) was analyzed. We further found that receptive language and social adaptive milestones did not differ from comparison samples in either the early or later period. Receptive language delays were predictive of later Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition Perceptual Organization Index scores, particularly in girls with 22q11.2DS. This suggests that although receptive language may be an area of relative strength in the developmental profile of young children with 22q11.2DS, even mild receptive delays should not be overlooked in early interventions with children with this disorder.

  11. International adoption: a health and developmental prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Patrick; Narad, Christine

    2005-02-01

    Adoptions from international countries have become an option for many US families, with over 150,000 children adopted in the past 14 years. Typically, internationally adopted children present with a host of medical and developmental concerns. Issues such as growth stunting, abnormal behaviors, and significant delays in motor, speech, and language development are likely directly related to the prenatal and early postnatal environment experienced prior to adoption. The new family and its health-care team must quickly work to identify and address these issues to aid the child's integration into his or her new family. This article will examine potential issues seen in children who are being adopted, including the impact of early environment on subsequent development. We will summarize early and long-term medical issues and review the extent of developmental delays seen in children adopted internationally. Finally, we will discuss possible mechanisms leading to the observed delays, including the impact of stress on subsequent development. By understanding the extent of expected delays and the mechanisms likely causing the issues, the health-care team will be in a good position to quickly identify and develop intervention protocols that will foster the child's assimilation into his or her new family.

  12. The syndrome of infantile-onset saccade initiation delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Michael S; Ikeda, Kristin M

    2013-03-01

    Infantile-onset saccade initiation delay (ISID), also known as congenital ocular motor apraxia, is characterized by the inability to initiate volitional horizontal saccades. Other abnormalities including developmental delay and ataxia have been reported. The frequency of these abnormalities is unknown. We performed a detailed review of the medical literature to quantify features of ISID. We searched the English medical literature for articles related to ISID from 1952 to 2010. Whenever possible, patients were excluded if they had acquired SID, Joubert syndrome or neurodegenerative conditions. The minimum prevalence was calculated for each abnormality. Sixty-six articles with information on 288 patients were included in the analysis. Head thrusts were reported in 84.7%. Blinks without head thrusts were used to initiate saccades in 41%. The fast phases of the optokinetic response and vestibulo-ocular reflex were impaired in 69.8% and 34.4% respectively. Smooth ocular pursuit was abnormal in 33%. Global developmental delay occurred in 41.3%, speech or language delay in 36.5%, cognitive delay in 17%, hypotonia in 35.8%, motor delay in 48.6%, and ataxia/clumsiness in 49.3% of patients. Neuroimaging was performed on 197 patients and was normal in 39.1%. Abnormalities involved the cerebellum (24.9%), cerebrum (15.7%), other infratentorial structures (11.7%), and corpus callosum (6.1%). Infantile-onset saccade initiation delay is frequently associated with deficits in reflexive saccades and less frequently with impaired smooth ocular pursuit. Developmental delay, hypotonia, and ataxia occur frequently in ISID, suggesting more global brain impairment and not just a saccadic disorder.

  13. CAESAR models for developmental toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piclin Nadège

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The new REACH legislation requires assessment of a large number of chemicals in the European market for several endpoints. Developmental toxicity is one of the most difficult endpoints to assess, on account of the complexity, length and costs of experiments. Following the encouragement of QSAR (in silico methods provided in the REACH itself, the CAESAR project has developed several models. Results Two QSAR models for developmental toxicity have been developed, using different statistical/mathematical methods. Both models performed well. The first makes a classification based on a random forest algorithm, while the second is based on an adaptive fuzzy partition algorithm. The first model has been implemented and inserted into the CAESAR on-line application, which is java-based software that allows everyone to freely use the models. Conclusions The CAESAR QSAR models have been developed with the aim to minimize false negatives in order to make them more usable for REACH. The CAESAR on-line application ensures that both industry and regulators can easily access and use the developmental toxicity model (as well as the models for the other four endpoints.

  14. An investigation into prospective memory in children with developmental dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Azizuddin

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia hinders reading and writing acquisition of around 5–10% of the children all over the world. However, little is known about role of prospective memory among dyslexics. Prospective memory is realization of delayed intention. Realization of delayed intention requires self initiated process. The present study explored the role of memory (prospective and retrospective memory), meta-memory and attention among dyslexic's children. One hundred and fifteen children (51 dyslexics...

  15. An investigation into prospective memory in children with developmental dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Azizuddin eKhan; Azizuddin eKhan

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia hinders reading and writing acquisition of around 5-10 % of the children all over the world. However, little is known about role of prospective memory among dyslexics. Prospective memory is realization of delayed intention. Realization of delayed intention requires self initiated process. The present study explored the role of memory (prospective and retrospective memory), meta-memory and attention among dyslexic’s children. One hundred and fifteen children (51 dyslexic...

  16. Delay Choice vs. Delay Maintenance: Different Measures of Delayed Gratification in Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella)

    OpenAIRE

    Addessi, Elsa; Paglieri, Fabio; Beran, Michael J.; Evans, Theodore A.; Macchitella, Luigi; De Petrillo, Francesca; Focaroli, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Delaying gratification involves two components: (i) delay choice (selecting a delayed reward over an immediate one), and (ii) delay maintenance (sustaining the decision to delay gratification even if the immediate reward is available during the delay). In primates, two tasks most commonly have explored these components, the Intertemporal choice task and the Accumulation task. It is unclear whether these tasks provide equivalent measures of delay of gratification. Here, we compared the perform...

  17. Developmental hip dysplasia in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors define adolescence and developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH. Special attention is paid to pathological findings characteristic of DDH in adolescence (unrecognized and untreated DDH; treated DDH, but non-terminated treatment; DDH diagnosed with delay, inadequately treated, with complications. The authors emphasise that DDH treatment has to be successfully terminated well before the adolescence; possibilities are explained on management modes at the time of adolescence, and possible persons guilty for the persistence of later hip problems are indicated. Based on the authors' experience and having in mind all surgical possibilities for the treatment (pelvic osteotomies, femoral osteotomies, trochanteroplasties, leg length equalization procedures the authors propose treatment protocols. The intention is to provide better treatment results and to prevent secondary hip arthrosis. Furthermore, how to improve the struggle against DDH is suggested.

  18. Using Time-Delay to Improve Social Play Skills with Peers for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liber, Daniella B.; Frea, William D.; Symon, Jennifer B. G.

    2008-01-01

    Interventions that teach social communication and play skills are crucial for the development of children with autism. The time delay procedure is effective in teaching language acquisition, social use of language, discrete behaviors, and chained activities to individuals with autism and developmental delays. In this study, three boys with autism,…

  19. Treadmill interventions in children under six years of age at risk of neuromotor delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentín-Gudiol, Marta; Mattern-Baxter, Katrin; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa Maria

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delayed motor development may occur in children with Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, general developmental delay or children born preterm. It limits the child's exploration of the environment and can hinder cognitive and social-emotional development. Literature suggests that task-specific

  20. Treadmill interventions in children under six years of age at risk of neuromotor delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentin-Gudiol, Marta; Mattern-Baxter, Katrin; Girabent-Farres, Montserrat; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Maria Angulo-Barroso, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Background: Delayed motor development may occur in children with Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, general developmental delay or children born preterm. It limits the child's exploration of the environment and can hinder cognitive and social-emotional development. Literature suggests that task-specific

  1. Adult Consequences of Self-Limited Delayed Puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia; Chan, Yee-Ming

    2017-06-01

    Delayed puberty is a common condition defined as the lack of sexual maturation by an age ≥2 SD above the population mean. In the absence of an identified underlying cause, the condition is usually self-limited. Although self-limited delayed puberty is largely believed to be a benign developmental variant with no long-term consequences, several studies have suggested that delayed puberty may in fact have both harmful and protective effects on various adult health outcomes. In particular, height and bone mineral density have been shown to be compromised in some studies of adults with a history of delayed puberty. Delayed puberty may also negatively affect adult psychosocial functioning and educational achievement, and individuals with a history of delayed puberty carry a higher risk for metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. In contrast, a history of delayed puberty appears to be protective for breast and endometrial cancer in women and for testicular cancer in men. Most studies on adult outcomes of self-limited delayed puberty have been in small series with significant variability in outcome measures and study criteria. In this article, we review potential medical and psychosocial issues for adults with a history of self-limited delayed puberty, discuss potential mechanisms underlying these issues, and identify gaps in knowledge and directions for future research. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Delayed Puberty (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... developed later than usual, too. This is called constitutional delay (or being a late bloomer), and it ... eventually — and even when you believe they're right — it's difficult to wait for something that can ...

  3. Delayed Sequence Intubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weingart, Scott D; Trueger, N Seth; Wong, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    , patients were paralyzed and intubated. The primary outcome of this study was the difference in oxygen saturations after maximal attempts at preoxygenation before delayed sequence intubation compared with saturations just before intubation. Predetermined secondary outcomes and complications were also...... assessed. RESULTS: A total of 62 patients were enrolled: 19 patients required delayed sequence intubation to allow nonrebreather mask, 39 patients required it to allow NIPPV, and 4 patients required it for nasogastric tube placement. Saturations increased from a mean of 89.9% before delayed sequence...... intubation to 98.8% afterward, with an increase of 8.9% (95% confidence interval 6.4% to 10.9%). Thirty-two patients were in a predetermined group with high potential for critical desaturation (pre-delayed sequence intubation saturations ≤93%). All of these patients increased their saturations post...

  4. Delayed puberty in boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Allan CA, McLachlan RI. Androgen deficiency disorders. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et ... 350. Haddad NG, Eugster EA. Delayed puberty. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et ...

  5. Developmental Prosopagnosia: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Kress; Irene Daum

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the published literature on developmental prosopagnosia, a condition in which the ability to recognize other persons by facial information alone has never been acquired. Due to the very low incidence of this syndrome, case reports are sparse. We review the available data and suggest assessment strategies for patients suffering from developmental prosopagnosia. It is suggested that developmental prosopagnosia is not a unitary condition but rather consists of different subf...

  6. Developmental Prosopagnosia: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Thomas; Daum, Irene

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the published literature on developmental prosopagnosia, a condition in which the ability to recognize other persons by facial information alone has never been acquired. Due to the very low incidence of this syndrome, case reports are sparse. We review the available data and suggest assessment strategies for patients suffering from developmental prosopagnosia. It is suggested that developmental prosopagnosia is not a unitary condition but rather consists of different subforms that can be dissociated on the grounds of functional impairments. On the basis of the available evidence, hypotheses about the aetiology of developmental prosopagnosia as well as about the selectivity of deficits related to face recognition are discussed. PMID:14757987

  7. Developmental Prosopagnosia: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kress

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the published literature on developmental prosopagnosia, a condition in which the ability to recognize other persons by facial information alone has never been acquired. Due to the very low incidence of this syndrome, case reports are sparse. We review the available data and suggest assessment strategies for patients suffering from developmental prosopagnosia. It is suggested that developmental prosopagnosia is not a unitary condition but rather consists of different subforms that can be dissociated on the grounds of functional impairments. On the basis of the available evidence, hypotheses about the aetiology of developmental prosopagnosia as well as about the selectivity of deficits related to face recognition are discussed.

  8. Reproductive and developmental toxicology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Ramesh C

    2011-01-01

    .... Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology is a comprehensive and authoritative resource providing the latest literature enriched with relevant references describing every aspect of this area of science...

  9. Evolutionary developmental psychology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, Ashley C; Bjorklund, David F

    2010-01-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental psychology can potentially broaden the horizons of mainstream evolutionary psychology by combining the principles of Darwinian evolution by natural selection...

  10. Gender differences in the developmental outcomes of children with congenital cardiac defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majnemer, Annette; Limperopoulos, Catherine; Shevell, Michael; Rohlicek, Charles; Rosenblatt, Bernard; Tchervenkov, Christo

    2012-10-01

    This study compares the developmental and functional outcomes at school entry between boys and girls born with a congenital cardiac defect who required early surgical correction. A prospective cohort of 94 children, including 49 percent boys, were followed up to 5 years of age and assessed for developmental progress. Developmental measures included Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence - cognitive; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test - receptive language; Peabody Developmental Motor Scale - motor; and Child Behaviour Checklist - behaviour. Measures of function included the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale and Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM). The mean scores of the boys on the WeeFIM subscales, such as self-care, mobility, cognition, were significantly lower than that of the girls. There was a trend for a greater proportion of boys to have abnormalities on neurological examination (boys 37.5 percent abnormal, girls 19.5 percent abnormal). Verbal, performance, and full scale Intellectual Quotients were 5-7 points lower in boys but did not reach significance (full scale Intellectual Quotient: boys 87.7 plus or minus 22.2; girls 93.9 plus or minus 19.3). Boys were more likely to have fine motor delays (50 percent, 82.7 plus or minus 16.5) compared with girls (28.2 percent, 87.0 plus or minus 15.8). There were no gender differences in receptive language or behavioural difficulties. Boys born with congenital heart disease requiring early surgical repair appear to be at enhanced risk for neuromotor impairments and activity limitations. Findings support gender differences in the pathogenesis of early brain injury following hypoxic-ischaemic insults. This has implications for neuroprotective strategies to prevent brain injury.

  11. Career adapt-abilities scale - Netherlands form: psychometric properties and relationships to ability, personality, and regulatory focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vianen, A.E.M.; Klehe, U.-C.; Koen, J.; Dries, N.

    2012-01-01

    The Career Adapt-Abilities Scale (CAAS) — Netherlands Form consists of four scales, each with six items, which measure concern, control, curiosity, and confidence as psychosocial resources for managing occupational transitions, developmental tasks, and work traumas. Internal consistency estimates

  12. The developmental sequence of social-communicative skills in young children with autism: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Chin; Chiang, Chung-Hsin

    2014-05-01

    To explore the different developmental trajectories of social-communicative skills in children with autism and typically developing infants, two longitudinal studies were conducted. In Study 1, we examined the developmental sequence of social-communicative skills in 26 typically developing infants when they were 9 months old and reexamined them when they were 12 and 15 months old. The results indicated a reliable developmental sequence of social-communicative skills in infants with typical development. In Study 2, we explored the emergence sequence of social-communicative skills of 23 children with autism and 23 children with developmental delay between the ages of 2 and 4 years. The results demonstrated that the developmental sequence of social-communicative skills in young children with autism and children with developmental delays was different.

  13. Resilient Parenting of Children at Developmental Risk Across Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bruce L.; Blacher, Jan; Crnic, Keith

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on factors that might influence positive parenting during middle childhood when a parent faces formidable challenges defined herein as “resilient parenting.” Data were obtained from 162 families at child age 5 and 8 years. Using an adapted ABCX model, we examined three risk domains (child developmental delay, child ADHD/ODD diagnosis, and low family income) and three protective factors (mother’s education, health, and optimism). The outcome of interest was positive parenting as coded from mother-child interactions. We hypothesized that each of the risk factors would predict poorer parenting and that higher levels of each protective factor would buffer the risk-parenting relationship. Positive parenting scores decreased across levels of increasing risk. Maternal optimism appeared to be a protective factor for resilient parenting concurrently at age 5 and predictively to age 8, as well as a predictor of positive change in parenting from age 5 to age 8, above and beyond level of risk. Maternal education and health were not significantly protective for positive parenting. Limitations, future directions, and implications for intervention are discussed. PMID:24713516

  14. Developmental Changes in Cognitive and Behavioural Functioning of Adolescents with Fragile-X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolli, A.; Piscopo, S.; Conson, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individuals with fragile-X syndrome exhibit developmental delay, hyperexcitation and social anxiety; they also show lack of attention and hyperactivity. Few studies have investigated whether levels of functioning change with increasing age. Here, we explored developmental changes across adolescence in the cognitive and behavioural…

  15. Time-delayed chameleon: Analysis, synchronization and FPGA implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Karthikeyan; Jafari, Sajad; Laarem, Guessas

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we report a time-delayed chameleon-like chaotic system which can belong to different families of chaotic attractors depending on the choices of parameters. Such a characteristic of self-excited and hidden chaotic flows in a simple 3D system with time delay has not been reported earlier. Dynamic analysis of the proposed time-delayed systems are analysed in time-delay space and parameter space. A novel adaptive modified functional projective lag synchronization algorithm is derived for synchronizing identical time-delayed chameleon systems with uncertain parameters. The proposed time-delayed systems and the synchronization algorithm with controllers and parameter estimates are then implemented in FPGA using hardware-software co-simulation and the results are presented.

  16. Flood adaptive traits and processes : An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voesenek, Laurentius A C J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074850849; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Unanticipated flooding challenges plant growth and fitness in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Here we describe mechanisms of developmental plasticity and metabolic modulation that underpin adaptive traits and acclimation responses to waterlogging of root systems and submergence of aerial

  17. Comparing Active Delay and Procrastination from a Self-Regulated Learning Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkin, Danya M.; Yu, Shirley L.; Lindt, Suzanne F.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have proposed that the act of postponing academic work may be divided into a traditional definition of procrastination, viewed as maladaptive, and adaptive forms of delay. Adaptive forms of delay may be more consistent with certain facets of self-regulated learning. The current study investigated this issue by examining whether the…

  18. Genetics and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

  19. 'developmental' local government to

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1. DEVELOPMENTAL CHALLENGES. FACING SOUTH AFRICAN. URBAN REGIONS AND. GOVERNMENTS. As an introduction to this article it would be appropriate to begin the discussion with some developmental acumen from the office of the Presidency. The new Green Paper: National Strategic. Planning, published by ...

  20. How evolution learns to generalise: Using the principles of learning theory to understand the evolution of developmental organisation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kouvaris, Kostas; Clune, Jeff; Kounios, Loizos; Brede, Markus; Watson, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    .... Such variability is crucial for evolvability, but poorly understood. In particular, how can natural selection favour developmental organisations that facilitate adaptive evolution in previously unseen environments...

  1. Developmental Apraxia of Speech: II. Toward a Diagnostic Marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Discusses a study that compared speech and prosody-voice profiles of children (ages 4-14) with suspected developmental apraxia of speech (DAS) to profiles of 73 children with speech delay. Also describes a second study of 20 children (ages 3-9) that investigated whether stress was a diagnostic marker of DAS. (Author/CR)

  2. Psychosocial developmental milestones in men with classic galactosemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbels, Cynthia Sophia; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Berry, Gerard Thomas; Bosch, Annet Maria; Waisbren, Susan; Rubio-Gozalbo, Maria Estela; Grootenhuis, Martha Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Patients with classic galactosemia suffer from several long term effects of their disease. Research in a group of mainly female patients has shown that these patients may also have a developmental delay with regard to their social aptitude. To study if male galactosemia patients achieve psychosocial

  3. Romantic Relationship Patterns in Young Adulthood and Their Developmental Antecedents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauer, Amy J.; Pettit, Gregory S.; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Bates, John E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    The delayed entry into marriage that characterizes modern society raises questions about young adults' romantic relationship trajectories and whether patterns found to characterize adolescent romantic relationships persist into young adulthood. The current study traced developmental transitions into and out of romantic relationships from age…

  4. Stripe delay filters

    OpenAIRE

    Zakharov, Alexander V.; Ilchenko, Mykhailo Ye.; Trubarov, Igor V.; Pinchuk, Ludmila S.

    2016-01-01

    There are considered constructions of microsized stripe delay filters, which are realized on a basis of ceramic materials with high dielectric permittivity. Delay time of non-minimal phase filters is 7–12 ns at frequencies of 1900 MHz with relative bandwidth of 3.6–3.85%. Filters dimensions are comparable with ones used in portable communication devices. Dimensions of researched three-resonator filter at frequency of 1900 MHz are 8.4×5×2 mm with material dielectric permittivity εr = 92, and 5...

  5. Eliminating common PACU delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jamie

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how one hospital identified patient flow delays in its PACU By using lean methods focused on eliminating waste, the team was able to improve patient flow. Lean thinking required the team to keep issues that were important to patients at top of mind. The improvements not only saved staff time, but they also helped the department prepare for the addition of six beds by focusing on methods to eliminate delays. The team, assigned by the vice president of surgical services, included a process engineer two decision support analysts, the PACU charge nurse, the nursing manager and ad hoc department nurses. The team recommended and implemented changes to improve operational effectiveness.

  6. Recall Memory in Children with Down Syndrome and Typically Developing Peers Matched on Developmental Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojevich, H.; Lukowski, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Whereas research has indicated that children with Down syndrome (DS) imitate demonstrated actions over short delays, it is presently unknown whether children with DS recall information over lengthy delays at levels comparable with typically developing (TD) children matched on developmental age. Method: In the present research, 10…

  7. Feedback delays eliminate auditory-motor learning in speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Ludo; Maffett, Derek G

    2015-03-30

    Neurologically healthy individuals use sensory feedback to alter future movements by updating internal models of the effector system and environment. For example, when visual feedback about limb movements or auditory feedback about speech movements is experimentally perturbed, the planning of subsequent movements is adjusted - i.e., sensorimotor adaptation occurs. A separate line of studies has demonstrated that experimentally delaying the sensory consequences of limb movements causes the sensory input to be attributed to external sources rather than to one's own actions. Yet similar feedback delays have remarkably little effect on visuo-motor adaptation (although the rate of learning varies, the amount of adaptation is only moderately affected with delays of 100-200ms, and adaptation still occurs even with a delay as long as 5000ms). Thus, limb motor learning remains largely intact even in conditions where error assignment favors external factors. Here, we show a fundamentally different result for sensorimotor control of speech articulation: auditory-motor adaptation to formant-shifted feedback is completely eliminated with delays of 100ms or more. Thus, for speech motor learning, real-time auditory feedback is critical. This novel finding informs theoretical models of human motor control in general and speech motor control in particular, and it has direct implications for the application of motor learning principles in the habilitation and rehabilitation of individuals with various sensorimotor speech disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Developmental Screening of Refugees: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroening, Abigail L H; Moore, Jessica A; Welch, Therese R; Halterman, Jill S; Hyman, Susan L

    2016-09-01

    Refugee children are at high developmental risk due to dislocation and deprivation. Standardized developmental screening in this diverse population is challenging. We used the Health Belief Model to guide key-informant interviews and focus groups with medical interpreters, health care providers, community collaborators, and refugee parents to explore key elements needed for developmental screening. Cultural and community-specific values and practices related to child development and barriers and facilitators to screening were examined. We conducted 19 interviews and 2 focus groups involving 16 Bhutanese-Nepali, Burmese, Iraqi, and Somali participants, 7 community collaborators, and 6 providers from the Center for Refugee Health in Rochester, New York. Subjects were identified through purposive sampling until data saturation. Interviews were recorded, coded, and analyzed using a qualitative framework technique. Twenty-one themes in 4 domains were identified: values/beliefs about development/disability, practices around development/disability, the refugee experience, and feedback specific to the Parents' Evaluation of Developmental Status screen. Most participants denied a word for "development" in their primary language and reported limited awareness of developmental milestones. Concern was unlikely unless speech or behavior problems were present. Physical disabilities were recognized but not seen as problematic. Perceived barriers to identification of delays included limited education, poor healthcare knowledge, language, and traditional healing practices. Facilitators included community navigators, trust in health care providers, in-person interpretation, visual supports, and education about child development. Refugee perspectives on child development may influence a parent's recognition of and response to developmental concerns. Despite challenges, standardized screening was supported. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Life Span Developmental Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eryilmaz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Life Span Developmental Approach examines development of individuals which occurs from birth to death. Life span developmental approach is a multi-disciplinary approach related with disciplines like psychology, psychiatry, sociology, anthropology and geriatrics that indicates the fact that development is not completed in adulthood, it continues during the life course. Development is a complex process that consists of dying and death. This approach carefully investigates the development of individuals with respect to developmental stages. This developmental approach suggests that scientific disciplines should not explain developmental facts only with age changes. Along with aging, cognitive, biological, and socioemotional development throughout life should also be considered to provide a reasonable and acceptable context, guideposts, and reasonable expectations for the person. There are three important subjects whom life span developmental approach deals with. These are nature vs nurture, continuity vs discontinuity, and change vs stability. Researchers using life span developmental approach gather and produce knowledge on these three most important domains of individual development with their unique scientific methodology.

  10. Mastering developmental transitions in immigrant adolescents: the longitudinal interplay of family functioning, developmental and acculturative tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Anne K; Motti-Stefanidi, Frosso; Asendorpf, Jens B

    2014-03-01

    Immigrant youth differ in their adaptation, which is judged on the basis of how well they deal with developmental and acculturative tasks. While immigrant adolescents are faced with the realities of 2 different cultures, they also have to master age-salient tasks, such as self-efficacy and identity development. To get a better insight into the interplay of developmental and acculturative tasks and their relationship with family functioning, we used 3-wave longitudinal data over a 2-year period from 13-year-old immigrant students (N = 609) in Athens, Greece. Cross-lagged models revealed that family functioning and acculturation were resources for the mastery of developmental tasks. Involvement in the host culture prospectively predicted self-efficacy beliefs, and involvement in the ethnic culture prospectively predicted ethnic identity. These effects increased over time. Family functioning prospectively predicted self-efficacy and ethnic identity. These effects decreased over time. The findings suggest that a well-functioning family, for early adolescents, and being involved in the host culture and in ethnic cultures, for middle adolescents, are particularly important resources to master the tasks of their developmental period. Our findings underscore the importance of developmentally sensitive approaches and the need to account for acculturative challenges in order to understand individual differences in immigrant youth adaptation. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the association between radiation therapy and severe capsular contracture or reoperation after 717 delayed breast implant reconstruction procedures (288 1- and 429 2-stage procedures) identified in the prospective database of the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast during...... reconstruction approaches other than implants should be seriously considered among women who have received radiation therapy....

  12. Permissible Delay in Payments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Fu Huang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper wants to investigate the optimal retailer's lot-sizing policy with two warehouses under partially permissible delay in payments within the economic order quantity (EOQ framework. In this paper, we want to extend that fully permissible delay in payments to the supplier would offer the retailer partially permissible delay in payments. That is, the retailer must make a partial payment to the supplier when the order is received. Then the retailer must pay off the remaining balance at the end of the permissible delay period. In addition, we want to add the assumption that the retailer's storage space is limited. That is, the retailer will rent the warehouse to store these exceeding items when the order quantity is larger than retailer's storage space. Under these conditions, we model the retailer's inventory system as a cost minimization problem to determine the retailer's optimal cycle time and optimal order quantity. Three theorems are developed to efficiently determine the optimal replenishment policy for the retailer. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate these theorems and obtained a lot of managerial insights.

  13. Delayed visual maturation.

    OpenAIRE

    Harel, S; Holtzman, M; Feinsod, M

    1983-01-01

    Three infants, recognised as blind during the first 4 months of life, were found to be normal on neurological and ophthalmological examinations. Visual electro-diagnostic studies showed normal retinal responses, but delayed conduction velocities and impaired visually-evoked responses over the occipital cortex. After age 6 months, normal vision developed gradually and all abnormalities disappeared.

  14. Delayed visual maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, S; Holtzman, M; Feinsod, M

    1983-01-01

    Three infants, recognised as blind during the first 4 months of life, were found to be normal on neurological and ophthalmological examinations. Visual electro-diagnostic studies showed normal retinal responses, but delayed conduction velocities and impaired visually-evoked responses over the occipital cortex. After age 6 months, normal vision developed gradually and all abnormalities disappeared. PMID:6189454

  15. Both maternal and pup genotype influence ultrasonic vocalizations and early developmental milestones in tsc2 (+/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene-Colozzi, Emily A; Sadowski, Abbey R; Chadwick, Elyza; Tsai, Peter T; Sahin, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by tumor growth and neuropsychological symptoms such as autistic behavior, developmental delay, and epilepsy. While research has shed light on the biochemical and genetic etiology of TSC, the pathogenesis of the neurologic and behavioral manifestations remains poorly understood. TSC patients have a greatly increased risk of developmental delay and autism spectrum disorder, rendering the relationship between the two sets of symptoms an extremely pertinent issue for clinicians. We have expanded on previous observations of aberrant vocalizations in Tsc2 (+/-) mice by testing vocalization output and developmental milestones systematically during the early postnatal period. In this study, we have demonstrated that Tsc2 haploinsufficiency in either dams or their pups results in a pattern of developmental delay in sensorimotor milestones and ultrasonic vocalizations.

  16. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos Get to Know NICHD Podcasts and Audio Social Media Join NICHD Listservs About NICHD Organization Office of ... IDDs; and the effect of individual factors on social interactions, behavior, and emotions. Common Name Intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs) Medical ...

  17. Reproductive and developmental toxicology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Ramesh C

    2011-01-01

    .... With a special focus on placental toxicity, this book is the only available reference to connect the three key risk stages, and is the only resource to include reproductive and developmental toxicity in domestic animals, fish, and wildlife.

  18. Facts about Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an autism spectrum disorder. Low birthweight , premature birth, multiple birth, and infections during pregnancy are associated with an increased risk for many developmental disabilities. Untreated newborn jaundice (high levels of bilirubin in ...

  19. The response of the neuronal adaptive system to background illumination and readaptation to dark in the immature retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; El Azazi, Mildred; Eklund, Anders; Burstedt, Marie; Wachtmeister, Lillemor

    2015-03-01

    Developmental characteristics of the neuronal adaptive system of the retina, focusing on background light (BGL) adaptation and readaptation functions, were studied by measuring the oscillatory response (SOP) of the electroretinogram (ERG). Digitally filtered and conventional ERGs were simultaneously recorded. Rats aged 15 and 17 days were studied during exposure to BGLs of two mesopic intensities and during readaptation to dark. Results were compared to adult rats. In 'low mesopic' BGL SOP instantly dropped significantly to about half of its dark-adapted (DA) value contrary to mature rats, in which the SOP significantly increased. In 'high mesopic' BGL SOP decreased to about 20% and 30% of DA values in immature and adult rats, respectively. The process of recovery of SOP in darkness lacked the transient enhancement immediately as BGL was turned off, characteristic of adult rats. There were no major age differences in adaptive behaviour of a-wave. In young rats, recovery of b-wave was relatively slower. Properties of BGL adaptation and readaptation functions of the neuronal adaptive system in baby retina differed compared to the adult one by being less forceful and more restrained. Handling of mesopic illumination and recovery in the dark was immature. Development of these functions of the neuronal adaptive system progresses postnatally and lags behind that of the photoreceptor response and seems to be delayed also compared to that of the bipolar response. © 2014 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Infantile-onset saccade initiation delay (congenital ocular motor apraxia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Michael S

    2015-05-01

    Infantile-onset saccade initiation delay, also known as congenital ocular motor apraxia, typically presents in early infancy with horizontal head thrusts once head control is achieved. Defective initiation of horizontal saccades and saccade hypometria with normal saccadic velocity are characteristic findings. Isolated impairment of vertical saccades is rare. Impaired smooth ocular pursuit may be seen. Other relatively common features include developmental delay, hypotonia, ataxia, or clumsiness. Brain MRI may be normal or show a diverse range of abnormalities, most commonly involving the cerebellum. Defective slow phases of the optokinetic response are commonly associated with brain MRI abnormalities. Isolated defect of vertical saccade initiation may indicate supratentorial brain abnormalities on MRI. Joubert syndrome, a developmental midbrain-hindbrain malformation, and ataxia telangiectasia are both commonly associated with defective volitional and reflexive saccade initiation, saccade hypometria, and head thrusts. Both horizontal and vertical saccades are impaired in these two disorders.