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Sample records for adapted swimming pool reactor austria

  1. Backfitting swimming pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roebert, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Calculations based on measurements in a critical assembly, and experiments to disclose fuel element surface temperatures in case of accidents like stopping of primary coolant flow during full power operation, have shown that the power of the swimming pool type research reactor FRG-2 (15 MW, operating since 1967) might be raised to 21 MW within the present rules of science and technology, without major alterations of the pool buildings and the cooling systems. A backfitting program is carried through to adjust the reactor control systems of FRG-2 and FRG-1 (5 MW, housed in the same reactor hall) to the present safety rules and recommendations, to ensure FRG-2 operation at 21 MW for the next decade. (author)

  2. Lip and tooth injuries at public swimming pools in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Katharina; Connert, Thomas; Kühl, Sebastian; Filippi, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    There is an increased risk of orofacial injuries in swimming pool facilities. Nevertheless, only a few studies have addressed this issue. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of lip and tooth injuries at public swimming pools in Austria. A further aim was to examine which gender and age groups were affected, where and why these injuries occurred, and whether pool attendants had sufficient knowledge of dental first-aid measures. A total of 764 pool attendants in Austria were contacted by telephone and 689 participated in the study (90.2%). The attendants were interviewed retrospectively about accident occurrences in 2014 by a standardized questionnaire. Responses to the provision of first aid and choice of storage medium for avulsed teeth were subsequently evaluated. The frequency of lip injuries was 19.0%, and tooth injuries were 11.3%. Male bathers (P < .05) and children under 12 years (P < .001) most frequently suffered injuries. The waterslide was the most common accident site. The most common cause of lip injuries was slipping on wet surfaces (39.0%), and for tooth injuries it was collisions with other persons or objects (each 28.1%). The pool attendants' responses were predominantly good or sufficient on first aid, with the exception of what storage medium to choose. Tooth rescue boxes were available in only 8.6% of all pool facilities. Orofacial injuries are a frequently occurring problem in swimming pool facilities. The pool attendants' knowledge on first-aid care of tooth injuries could still be improved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Swimming pool reactor reliability and safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhaohuan

    1997-01-01

    A reliability and safety analysis of Swimming Pool Reactor in China Institute of Atomic Energy is done by use of event/fault tree technique. The paper briefly describes the analysis model, analysis code and main results. Meanwhile it also describes the impact of unassigned operation status on safety, the estimation of effectiveness of defense tactics in maintenance against common cause failure, the effectiveness of recovering actions on the system reliability, the comparison of occurrence frequencies of the core damage by use of generic and specific data

  4. Core neutronics of a swimming pool research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannan, M.A.; Mondal, M.A.W.; Pervini, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    The initial cores of the 5 MW swimming pool research reactor of the Nuclear Research Centre, Tehran have been analyzed using the computer codes METHUSELAH and EQUIPOISE. The effective multiplication factor, critical mass, moderator temperature and void coefficients of the core have been calculated and compared with vendor's values. Calculated values agree reasonably well with the vendor's results. (author)

  5. Analysis of SBO accident for a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guimin; Li Weiwei; Li Ning; Guo Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    The RELAP5/MOD3.3 code was adopted to compute the SBO accident condition of a swimming pool reactor. The coolant flow reversal process was calculated, and the influence of parameters of the flow between the core leakage and components on the flow reversal in the SBO accident condition was analyzed. The calculated results show that in the situation the reactor loses all forced flow, the residual heat of the reactor can be removed by the natural circulation flow, and the fuel subassembly will not be damaged. (authors)

  6. Some equipment for graphite research in swimming pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguin, M.; Arragon, Ph.; Dupont, G.; Gentil, J.; Tanis, G.

    1964-01-01

    The irradiation devices described are used for research concerning reactors of the natural uranium type, moderated by graphite and cooled by carbon dioxide. The devices are generally designed for use in swimming pool reactors. The following points have been particularly studied: - maximum use of the irradiation volume, - use of the simplest technological solutions, - standardization of certain constituent parts. This standardization calls for precision machining and careful assembling; these requirements are also true when a relatively low irradiation temperature is required and the nuclear heating is pronounced. Finally, the design of these devices is suitable for the irradiation of other fissile or non-fissile materials. (authors) [fr

  7. Justify of implementation of a hot water layer system in swimming pool research reactor IEA-R1m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Eduardo Yoshio; Gordon, Ana Maria Pinho Leite; Sordi, Gian-Maria A.A.

    2001-01-01

    The IPEN/CNEN-SP has a swimming pool research reactor (IEA-R1m) in operation since 1957 at 2 MW. In 1998, after some modifications, its nominal power increased to 5 MW. Among these modifications some adaptations had to be accomplished in the radiological protection and operational procedure. The present work aim to study the need of implementation of a hot water layer in order to reduce the dose in the workers in the vicinity of the reactor swimming pool. Applying the principles of radioprotection optimization, it was concluded that the decision of the construction of one hot water layer system in the reactor swimming pool, is not necessary. (author)

  8. Gamma spectrum measurement in a swimming-pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pla, E.

    1969-01-01

    After recalling the various modes of interaction of gamma rays with matter, the authors describe the design of a spectrometer for gamma energies of between 0.3 and 10 MeV. This spectrometer makes use of the Compton and pair-production effects without eliminating them. The collimator, the crystals and the electronics have been studied in detail and are described in their final form. The problem of calibrating the apparatus is then considered ; numerous graphs are given. The sensitivity of the spectrometer for different energies is determined mainly for the 'Compton effect' group. Finally, in the last part of the report, are given results of an experimental measurement of the gamma spectrum of a swimming-pool type reactor with new elements. (author) [fr

  9. Remote maintenance considerations for swimming pool tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niikura, S.; Yamada, M.; Kasai, M.

    1983-01-01

    Swimming Pool Tokamak Reactor (SPTR) is one of the candidate devices which are expected to demonstrate physical and engineering feasibility for fusion power reactors. In SPTR, water shield is adopted instead of solid shield structures. Among the advantages of SPTR are, from viewpoint of remote maintenance, small handling weight and high space availability between TF coils and a vacuum vessel. On the other hand, high dose rate during reactor repair and adverse effects on remote maintenance equipment by the shielding water might be the disadvantage of SPTR, where it is assumed that the shielding water is drained during reactor repair. Since the design of SPTR is still at the preliminary stage, for remote maintenance, much effort has been directed to clarification of design conditions such as environment and handling weight. As for the remote maintenance system concepts, studies have been focussed on those for a vacuum vessel and its internal structure (blanket, divertor and protection walls) expected to be repaired more frequently. The vacuum vessel assembly is divided into 21 sectors and number of TF coils is 14. A pair of TF coils are connected with each other by antitorque beams on the whole side surface. Vacuum vessel cassettes and associated blanket, divertor and protection walls are replaced through seven windows between TF coils pairs. Therefore each vacuum vessel cassette is required moving mechanisms in toroidal and radial directions. Options for slide mechanisms are wheels, balls, rollers and water bearings. Options for driving the cassette are self-driving by hydraulic motors and external driving by rack-pinion, wires or specific vehicles. As a result of studies, the moving mechanism with wheels and hydraulic motors has been selected for the reference design, and the system with water bearings and rack-pinion as an alternative. Furthermore typical concepts have been obtained for remote maintenance equipment such as wall-mounted manipulators, tools for

  10. Analysis of key hardware factors and countermeasure for restricting 49-2 swimming pool reactor lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yadong; Guo Yue; Yang Xiao; Wang Yiwei; Wang Zhanwen

    2013-01-01

    Safe operation is the most important factor to determine the lifetime of aged 49-2 swimming pool reactor. In this paper, the hardware factors of lifetime were analyzed, such as the pool concrete aging, corrosion of aluminum container and primary coolant system, and graphite swelling etc., and then the corresponding measures such as surveillance, prevention and maintenance were purposed. The results show that 49-2 swimming pool reactor can continue to operate safely due to that container is safe under 8 degree earthquake, the reactor is safe on flood level of once per millennium, adding dam break, and the ageing condition of primary coolant system and container is acceptable. (authors)

  11. An analysis of postulated accident for 49-2 Swimming Pool Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongqing; Cu Shaochu; Wang Liugui; Zhang Zengqing

    1990-01-01

    The thermal hydrodynamic code RETRAN-02 is used for safety analysis of Swimming Pool Reactor. Accident of partial-loss of flow, loss of offsite electric power and unexpected reactivity insertion are analysed and discussed. These results will be helpful for operation safety of the reactor

  12. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  13. Swimming pool granuloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001357.htm Swimming pool granuloma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin ...

  14. Determination of n, γ radiation field around the building of the swimming-pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jinling; Wen Youqin; Chen Changmao

    1986-01-01

    This work has measured the dose distribution of n, gamma radiation field around the building of the swimming-pool reactor by use of the highly sensitive neutron Rem counter and PTB-H 7907 exposure ratemeter. The measured datum show that the maximum value of n, gamma dose are 3-4 times greater than the background on certain distance from the building. Generally, the neutron doses are 2-3 times larger than gamma doses on most points

  15. Determination of 16N and 19O activities in loop water of swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Shengyao; Xu Kun; Yu Baosheng; Ling Yude

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of activities for 16 N and 19 O nuclei in the loop water of swimming pool reactor at China Institute of Atomic Energy were carried out. In order to verify the experiment results, a calculation for same purpose was also performed. The results show their coincidence is well in uncertainty range. The evaluated recommendation data for 18 O(n, γ) 19 O reaction cross sections are also given in the paper. (authors)

  16. Swimming-pool piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trioulaire, M.

    1959-01-01

    In France two swimming-pool piles, Melusine and Triton, have just been set in operation. The swimming-pool pile is the ideal research tool for neutron fluxes of the order of 10 13 . This type of pile can be of immediate interest to many research centres, but its cost must be reduced and a break with tradition should be observed in its design. It would be an advantage: - to bury the swimming-pool; - to reject the experimental channel; - to concentrate the cooling circuit in the swimming-pool; - to carry out all manipulations in the water; - to double the core. (author) [fr

  17. Production and release of {sup 14}C from a swimming pool reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamoorthy, T M [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Environmental Assessment Div.; Sadarangani, S H [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiation Safety Systems Div.; Doshi, G R [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Health Physics Div.

    1994-04-01

    The annual production rate of {sup 14}C in the Apsara swimming pool reactor works out to be about 2.94 mCi. The concentration distribution of {sup 14}C in different compartments viz. pool water, reactor hall air and ion-exchange resin ranged from 200 to 440 pCi/l, 0.09 to 0.38 pCi/l, an average concentration of 8.16 pCi/g respectively. The mean residence time of {sup 14}C in pool water is evaluated to be about 7 days taking into account various sinks. The study revealed atmospheric exchange at the air-water interface as the dominant process responsible for the loss of {sup 14}C from the pool water. (author). 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Probabilistic analysis of some safety aspects of a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieber, K.; Nicolescu, T.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic risk analysis of some safety aspects without the investigation of radioactivity release has been performed for the 10 MW (thermal) swimming-pool research reactor SAPHIR. Our presentation is focused on the 7 internal initiating events found to be relevant with respect to accident sequences that could result with core melt due to loss of coolant or overcriticality. The results are given by the core melt frequencies for the investigated accident sequences. It could be demonstrated by our investigation that the core melt hazard of the reactor is extremely low. (author)

  19. Analysis of SBO accident and natural circulation of 49-2 swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yuanyuan; Liu Tiancai; Sun Wei

    2012-01-01

    The transient thermal hydraulic characteristics of 49-2 Swimming Pool Reactor (SPR) were analyzed by RELAP5/MOD3.3 code to verify the capability of natural circulation and minus reactivity feedback for accident mitigation under the condition of station blackout (SBO). Then, the effects on accident consequence and sequence for core channels and primary pumps were briefly discussed. The calculation results show that the reactor can be shutdown by the effect of minus reactivity feedback, and the residual heat can be removed through the stable natural circulation. Therefore, it demonstrates that the 49-2 SPR is safe during the accident of SBO. (authors)

  20. Effect of reactivity insertion rate on peak power and temperatures in swimming pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.A.; Jabbar, A.; Anwar, A.R.; Ahmad, N.

    1998-01-01

    It is essential to study the reactor behavior under different accidental conditions and take proper measures for its safe operation. We have studied the effect of reactivity insertion, with and without scram conditions, on peak power and temperatures of fuel, cladding and coolant in typical swimming pool type research reactor. The reactivity ranging from 1 $ to 2 $ and insertion times from 0.25 to 1 second have been considered. The computer code PARET has been used and results are presented in this article. (author)

  1. Design and computational analysis of passive siphon breaker for 49-2 swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Zhiting; Song Yunpeng; Liu Xingmin; Zou Yao; Wu Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Based on safety considerations, a passive siphon breaker will be added to the primary cooling system of 49-2 Swimming Pool Reactor (SPR). With the breaker location determined, the capability of siphon breakers with diameters of 1.5 cm and 2.0 cm was calculated and analyzed respectively by RELAP5/MOD3.3 code. The results show that in the condition of large break loss of coolant accident these two sizes of siphon breakers are able to break the siphon phenomena, and maintain the pool water level above the reactor core when the reactor and the pump are shutdown. In the end, to be conservative, the siphon breaker with diameter of 2.0 cm is adopted. (authors)

  2. Siloe, Osiris, and the future perspective of swimming-pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatoux, J.; Denielou, G.; Lerouge, B.

    1964-01-01

    Siloe and Osiris are two new general purpose research reactors of the 'Commissariat a l'energie Atomique'. Siloe, located within the 'Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires' of Grenoble is a swimming pool reactor of the same type as Melusine and Triton. It operates, at a nominal power of 15 MW thermal and has reached the peak power of 20 MW thermal with two thirds of its cooling system working. The fast flux above 1 MeV, which is maximum at the center of the core at 15 MW thermal is 1,2. 10 14 . The core, quite open, is downward cooled. Average specific power is 159 kW/l. Osiris is under construction at Saclay. Designed for 50 MW thermal, this reactor is upward cooled. The fast flux at the center of the core above 1 MeV is calculated to be 2, 5.10 14 . The average designed specific power is 280 kW/l. A fixed zircaloy gamma shield makes a box round the core. Future perspectives open to non-pressurised swimming-pool reactors are examined. Ways are suggested for neutronic; thermal and shielding modifications which make possible further improvements in the performances and economy of these devices. (authors) [fr

  3. Swimming Pool Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Swimming Pool Safety Page Content ​What is the best way to ...

  4. Swimming pool special; Zwembadspecial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-05-15

    This issue includes a few articles and messages on the use of heat pump systems in swimming pools. [Dutch] Dit nummer bevat onder meer een paar artikelen over het gebruik van warmtepompsystemen in zwembaden.

  5. Radiation shielding considerations for the repair and maintenance of a swimming pool-type tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Y.; Mori, S.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation shielding relevant to the repair and maintenance of a swimming pool-type tokamak reactor is considered. The dose rate during the reactor operation can be made low enough for personnel access into the reactor room if a 2m thick water layer is installed above the magnet cryostat. The dose rate 24 h after shutdown is such that the human access is allowed above the magnet cryostat. Sufficient water layer thickness is provided in the inboard space for the operation of automatic welder/cutter while retaining the magnet shielding capability. Some forced cooling is required for the decay heat removal in the first wall. The penetration shield thickness around the neutral beam injector port is estimated to be barely sufficient in terms of the magnet radiation damage. (orig.)

  6. Application of neutron noise analysis to a swimming pool research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behringer, K.; Lescano, V.H.; Meier, F.; Phildius, J.; Winkler, H.

    1982-01-01

    This work is part of a programme of establishing practical applications of neutron noise techniques to a swimming pool research reactor and deals with two different items: (1) The identification of local boiling caused e.g. by a partial blockage of the coolant flow in a fuel element. Local boiling can easily lead to a burn-out situation. The onset of boiling can be detected by neutron noise analysis and a boiling detection system is presently under development. (2) The measurement of the time evolution of the reactivity induced by xenon after reactor shut-down by an on-line reactivity meter based on neutron noise analysis. From the data, the prompt neutron decay constant at delayed critical, the equilibrium xenon reactivity worth, and an estimate of the average steady-state power flux in the core before reactor shut-down were obtained. (author)

  7. Effect of coolant flow rate on the power at onset of nucleate boiling in a swimming pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of flow rate of coolant on power of Onset Nucleate Boiling (ONB) in a reference core of a swimming pool type research reactor has been studied using a as standard computer code PARET. It has been found that the decrease in the coolant flow rate results in a corresponding decrease in power at ONB. (author)

  8. Swimming Pools and Molluscum Contagiosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travelers’ Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Swimming Pools Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... often ask if molluscum virus can spread in swimming pools. There is also concern that it can ...

  9. Solar swimming pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This report examines the feasibility of using solar collectors to heat the water in a previously unheated outdoor swimming pool. The solar system is used in conjunction with a pool blanket, to conserve heat when the pool is not in use. Energy losses through evaporation can be reduced by as much as 70% by a pool blanket. A total of 130 m{sup 2} of highly durable black synthetic collectors were installed on a support structure at a 30{degree} angle from the horizontal, oriented to the south. Circulation of pool water though the collectors, which is controlled by a differential thermostat, was done with the existing pool pump. Before installation the pool temperature averaged 16{degree}C; after installation it ranged from 20{degree} to 26{degree}C. It was hard to distinguish how much pool heating was due to the solar system and how much heat was retained by the pool blanket. However, the pool season was extended by five weeks and attendance tripled. 2 figs.

  10. Reactivity worth of the thermal column of a MTR type swimming pool research reactor using low enriched uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali Khan, L.; Ahmad, N.

    2002-01-01

    The reactivity worth of the thermal column of a typical MTR type swimming pool research reactor using low enriched uranium fuel has been determined by modeling the core using standard computer codes. It was also measured experimentally by operating the reactor in the stall and open ends. The calculated value of the reactivity worth of the thermal column is about 14% greater than the experimentally determined value

  11. An experimental study of the behaviour of fission products following an accident on a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadillon, J.

    1976-11-01

    In the estimation of nuclear risks connected with the running of a reactor an essential factor, sometimes neglected because insufficiently known, is the knowledge of the type, amount and behaviour of the contamination actually released inside the containment in the case of an accident. In the special case of swimming pool reactors the cooling fluid proves to be a very efficient barrier against contamination. Three experiments were carried out in the reactor CABRI, during which several fuel element plates were melted inside the core itself. (Author)

  12. Presentation of a calorigenic swimming-pool reactor and study of its use for urban heating, desalination of water, and other industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, B.

    The design characteristics of the heat-producing swimming pool reactor are discussed together with economic and technical considerations related to its utilization in the areas of district heating, process heat production, and desalination

  13. On-site releases of noble gases and iodine in the event of core meltdown in a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montaignac, E. de.

    1976-10-01

    Research aimed at defining a standard model accident for swimming pool type reactors, has led to the adoption to the so-called BORAX accident which involves complete meltdown of the reactor core. This type of accident-an accident related to dimensional problems- is useful for calculations concerning reactor components which have to withstand the mechanical forces resulting from the accident. A study of the radiobiological consequences of this type of accident, involving the entire reactor core, required research to determine as accurately as possible how the iodine, noble gases and solid fission products are distributed between the melted core and the site. The joint document in the annexure served as the basis for discussion at the meeting (BEVS/SESR) on 9th March 1973, at which the SESR set the standard parameter values to be used for estimating fission product distributions on the site. (author)

  14. An estimate of radiation fields in a gamma irradiation facility using fuel elements from a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narain, Rajendra

    2002-01-01

    A simple gamma irradiation facility set up using a few irradiated or partially irradiated swimming pool elements can be assembled to provide a convenient facility for irradiation of small and medium sized samples for research. The paper presents results of radiation levels with an arrangement using four elements from a reactor core operating at a power of 20 MW. A maximum gamma field of higher than 1 KGy/h at locations adjacent to fuel elements with negligible neutron contamination can be achieved. (author)

  15. Grundfoss: Chlorination of Swimming Pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Hogan, John; Andreassen, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools.......Grundfos asked for a model, describing the problem of mixing chemicals, being dosed into water systems, to be developed. The application of the model should be dedicated to dosing aqueous solution of chlorine into swimming pools....

  16. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Swimming pools. 1250.89 Section 1250.89 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.89 Swimming pools. (a) Fill and draw swimming pools shall not be installed or used. (b) Swimming pools of the recirculation type shall be...

  17. Determination of neutron energy spectrum at a pneumatic rabbit station of a typical swimming pool type material test research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkawi, S.R.; Ahmad, N.

    2002-01-01

    The method of multiple foil activation was used to measure the neutron energy spectrum, experimentally, at a rabbit station of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1), which is a typical swimming pool type material test research reactor. The computer codes MSITER and SANDBP were used to adjust the spectrum. The pre-information required by the adjustment codes was obtained by modelling the core and its surroundings in three-dimensions by using the one dimensional transport theory code WIMS-D/4 and the multidimensional finite difference diffusion theory code CITATION. The input spectrum covariance information required by MSITER code was also calculated from the CITATION output. A comparison between calculated and adjusted spectra shows a good agreement

  18. Evaluation of LOCA in a swimming-pool type reactor using the 3D-AIRLOCA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagler, A.; Gilat, J.; Hirshfeld, H.

    1991-01-01

    The 3D-AIRLOCA code was used to calculate core temperature evolution curves in the wake of a full LOCA in a swimming pool type reactor, resulting in complete core exposure and dryout within about 1000 sec of the initiating event. The results show that fuel integrity loss thresholds (450 C for softening and 650 C for melting) are reached and exceeded over large fractions of the core at powr levels as low as 2 MW. At 4.5 MW, the softening threshold is reached even when the accident occurs up to 12 hours after reactor shutdown for continuous operation, and up to 2 hrs after shutdown for intermittent (6 hrs/day, 4 days a week) operation. The situation is even more severe in blockage cases, when the air flow through the core is blocked by residual water at the grid plate level. It is concluded that substantial fission product releases are quite likely in this class of accidents. (orig.)

  19. Maintenance operation by divers on a swimming-pool type reactor (Osiris, CEN Saclay). Technical and medical prevention: an example of multidisciplinary ergonomic step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnould, C.; Martin, L.

    1979-01-01

    Maintenance works in a swimming-pool reactor was performed by a team of divers. A multidisciplinary ergonomic study had previously defined the working procedure. The ergonomic approach is analysed. The divers' working techniques are described. After work, medical tests showed that previsions were verified and proved the methods as safe. This technique by divers' interventions should open new possibilities in nuclear industry [fr

  20. 1968 Listing of Swimming Pool Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Testing Lab.

    An up-to-date listing of swimming pool equipment including--(1) companies authorized to display the National Sanitation Foundation seal of approval, (2) equipment listed as meeting NSF swimming pool equipment standards relating to diatomite type filters, (3) equipment listed as meeting NSF swimming pool equipment standard relating to sand type…

  1. Some equipment for graphite research in swimming pool reactors; Quelques dispositifs d'etude du graphite dans les piles piscines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguin, M; Arragon, Ph; Dupont, G; Gentil, J; Tanis, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The irradiation devices described are used for research concerning reactors of the natural uranium type, moderated by graphite and cooled by carbon dioxide. The devices are generally designed for use in swimming pool reactors. The following points have been particularly studied: - maximum use of the irradiation volume, - use of the simplest technological solutions, - standardization of certain constituent parts. This standardization calls for precision machining and careful assembling; these requirements are also true when a relatively low irradiation temperature is required and the nuclear heating is pronounced. Finally, the design of these devices is suitable for the irradiation of other fissile or non-fissile materials. (authors) [French] Les dispositifs d'irradiation decrits servent aux etudes relatives a la filiere des reacteurs a uranium naturel, moderes au graphite et refroidis par le gaz carbonique. Ils sont generalement concus pour etre utilises dans des piles piscines. L'accent a ete mis sur: - l'utilisation au maximum du volume d'irradiation, - le recours aux solutions technologiques les plus simples, - la standardisation de certaines parties constitutives. Cette standardisation impose un usinage precis et un montage soigne, lesquels sont egalement necessaires lorsqu'on doit obtenir une temperature d'irradiation relativement basse alors que l'echauffement nucleaire est important. Enfin, la conception de ces dispositifs est valable pour irradier d'autres materiaux non fissiles ou fissiles. (auteurs)

  2. Database of operation history for fuel elements in swimming pool research reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Jiang Yanwei

    2006-01-01

    It is to cooperate with the original data preparation of ORIGEN2 that the database of operation history in SPRR -300 is built with Microsoft Access. Only one table is used to record the history of the reactor after simplifications. Table of every assembly records only its load history, which will not exceed 20. Tables in the database are linked by the field of Load ID. It is confirmed that errors occurred during statistic and/or input can be classified into two kinds while inquiries are built for them to check errors automatically. Inquiry is also built for every assembly, while data of any assembly are collected from the table of total reactor history according to the given table of assembly load history. After those data are exported to pure text files, a program named Operation Data Processing Program is developed to treat them into operation history data needed by ORIGEN2 calculation. (authors)

  3. Gamma spectrum measurement in a swimming-pool-type reactor; Mesure du spectre {gamma} d'une pile piscine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    After recalling the various modes of interaction of gamma rays with matter, the authors describe the design of a spectrometer for gamma energies of between 0.3 and 10 MeV. This spectrometer makes use of the Compton and pair-production effects without eliminating them. The collimator, the crystals and the electronics have been studied in detail and are described in their final form. The problem of calibrating the apparatus is then considered ; numerous graphs are given. The sensitivity of the spectrometer for different energies is determined mainly for the 'Compton effect' group. Finally, in the last part of the report, are given results of an experimental measurement of the gamma spectrum of a swimming-pool type reactor with new elements. (author) [French] Apres un rappel des differents modes d'interaction des rayons gamma avec la matiere, nous decrivons la conception d'un spectrometre pour les energies gamma s'etendant de 0,3 a 10 MeV. Ce spectrometre utilise les effets Compton et creation de paires sans les eliminer. Le collimateur, les cristaux et l'electronique sont entierement etudies et decrits dans leur realisation definitive. Ensuite, le probleme de l'etalonnage de l'appareil est envisage; de nombreuses courbes sont donnees. La sensibilite du spectrometre pour les differentes energies est determinee principalement pour le groupe ''effet Compton''. Enfin, les resultats d'une experience de mesure du spectre gamma d'une pile piscine avec elements neufs sont donnes dans la derniere partie. (auteur)

  4. Irradiations under magnetic field. Measurement of resistivity sample irradiations between 100 and 500 deg C in a swimming-pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauleve, J.; Marchand, A.; Blaise, A.

    1964-01-01

    An oven is described which enables the irradiation of small samples in the maximum neutron flux of a swimming-pool reactor of 15 MW (Siloe), at temperatures of between 100 and 500 deg.C defined to ± 0,5 deg.C, The oven is very simple from the technological point of view, and has a diameter of only 27 mm, This permits resistivity measurements to be carried out under irradiation in the reactor, or as another example, it enables irradiations in a magnetic field of 5000 oersteds, created by an immersed solenoid. (authors) [fr

  5. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuhashi, Shimpei; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Ryo; Takano, Takao; Seko, Noriaki; Naganawa, Hirochika; Kuroki, Ryota; Saegusa, Jun

    2012-07-01

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  6. Guide for decontaminating swimming pool at schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuhashi, Shimpei; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Ryo; Takano, Takao; Seko, Noriaki; Naganawa, Hirochika; Kuroki, Ryota; Saegusa, Jun

    2012-07-15

    Because of TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake, a huge amount of radioactive materials was widely dispersed and precipitated into the environment. Swimming pools in Fukushima prefectures were contaminated with the radioactives. We JAEA carried out several demonstration tests to decontaminate the radioactives and discharge the pool water safely. We concluded the results obtained from the tests as 'Guide for decontaminating Swimming Pool at School' and released it quickly. Following this, we also released the guide in English. This manuscript, as an experimental report of the swimming pool water decontamination, is consisted from the guide in Japanese and English prepared. (author)

  7. Experimental and computational analysis of the hot water layer for the radiological protection in swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Rogerio.

    1995-01-01

    Pool reactors are research reactors, which allow easy access to the core and rare simple to operate. Reactors of this kind operating at power levels higher than about one megawatt need a hot water layer at the surface of the pool, in order to keep surface activity below acceptable levels and enable free access to the upper part of the reactor. An experimental apparatus was constructed to study the hot water layer stability. Thermocouples were used to measure the temperature field. A numerical analysis was conducted simultaneously. Regarding experimental results, representative temperature contour lines of the hot water layer were plotted. The temperature field was determined in the numerical analysis and temperature contour lines corresponding to those of the experimental results were plotted. The hot water layer kept stable for experimental and numerical results. Good agreement between the results for the hot water layer position and thickness has been obtained. (author). 21 refs., 40 figs., 15 tabs

  8. Ingestion of swimming pool water by recreational

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Swimming pool water ingestion data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Dufour, A., L. Wymer, M. Magnuson, T. Behymer, and R. Cantu. Ingestion...

  9. Principle of a liquid nitrogen irradiation device and its realization for use in a swimming-pool type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochirol, L.; Doulat, J.; Weil, L.

    1961-01-01

    The problem of pile irradiation of samples immersed in liquid nitrogen has been solved with total elimination of explosion hazards and high reliability (no moving parts). The principle of the device is that of a double bath: one of high purity nitrogen cools the samples at the level of the core; a second of commercial nitrogen is located above the first one, outside the high radiation field, and works as a continuous condenser for the pure nitrogen, the flow-back of which is provided simply by gravity. The apparatus described in detail here has been designed for a swimming-pool pile. It was so designed as to provide absolute protection against radiations and to allow the irradiated samples to be easily removed in the cold condition. This apparatus has been in operation for several months. In a fast flux greater than 10 13 neutrons/cm 2 .s and a γ-flux of the order of 10 8 roentgens/h, the consumption of liquid nitrogen is of the order of 100 liters a day. (author) [fr

  10. Swimming level of pupils from elementary schools with own swimming pool

    OpenAIRE

    Zálupská, Klára

    2012-01-01

    Title: Swimming level of pupils from primary school with private swimming pool. Work objectives: The aim is to identify assess level of swimming of pupils from first to ninth grade of primary school with a private pool in Chomutov district using continuous swimming test with regular swimming lessons, which is started in the first grade and persists until the ninth grade. The condition was organizing a school swimming lessons once a week for 45 minutes in all grades. Methodology: Swimming leve...

  11. Swimming-pool piles; Piles piscines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trioulaire, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    In France two swimming-pool piles, Melusine and Triton, have just been set in operation. The swimming-pool pile is the ideal research tool for neutron fluxes of the order of 10{sup 13}. This type of pile can be of immediate interest to many research centres, but its cost must be reduced and a break with tradition should be observed in its design. It would be an advantage: - to bury the swimming-pool; - to reject the experimental channel; - to concentrate the cooling circuit in the swimming-pool; - to carry out all manipulations in the water; - to double the core. (author) [French] En France, deux piles piscines, Melusine et Triton, viennent d'entrer en service. La pile piscine est l'outil de recherche ideal pour des flux de neutrons de l'ordre de 10{sup 13}. Ce type de pile peut interesser des maintenant de nombreux centres de recherches mais il faut reduire son prix de revient et rompre avec le conformisme de sa conception. Il y a avantage: - a enterrer la piscine; - a supprimer les canaux experimentaux; - a concentrer le circuit de refrigeration dans la piscine; - a effectuer toutes les manipulations dans l'eau; - a doubler le coeur. (auteur)

  12. Infections Unlikely to be Spread Through Swimming Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Water Home Infections Unlikely to be Spread Through Swimming Pools Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... included below. Infections Unlikely to be Spread by Swimming Pools Head Lice Head lice are unlikely to ...

  13. Strategies for chemically healthy public swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht

    spreading of pathogens between swimmers because of its residual disinfection effect. In addition to potential contamination of pathogenic microorganisms, swimming pool water is polluted by organic matter deposited from the bathers such as saliva, urine, sweat, hair and personal care products. Since chlorine...... is a strong oxidant it oxidizes the organic matter in the pool water and forms disinfection byproducts (DBPs). More than 100 different DBPs have been identified. Some of these have been found to be genotoxic and may pose an increased cancer risk for the bathers. The aim of this thesis was to give an overview...... of the strategies which can be used to achieve microbiological safe water with low levels of DBPs to ensure healthy environment for bathers. There are different approaches to achieve healthy environment in public swimming pools which in this thesis are divided into three strategies: alternatives to chlorination...

  14. (Important hygienic aspects for swimming pools (author's transl))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somosi, G

    1981-01-01

    The major epidemics which occurred in Hungary and originated from water in swimming pools are reported. The difficulties encountered in producing epidemiological evidence and in monitoring infections originating from water in swimming pools are mentioned. The possibilities of controlling the water quality in swimming pools and of preventing infections are discussed. Reference is made to the existing bacteriological limit values in Hungary to be observed in the recirculation of water in swimming pools.

  15. Research reactors in Austria - Present situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Musilek, A.; Villa, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the past decades Austria operated three research reactors, the 10 MW ASTRA reactor at Seibersdorf, the 250 kW TRIGA reactor at the Atominstitut and the 1 kW Argonaut reactor at the Technical University in Graz. Since the shut down of the ASTRA on July 31th, 1999 and its immediate decommissioning reactor and the shut down of the Argonaut reactor in Graz on August 31st, 2004 only one reactor remains operational for keeping nuclear competence in Austria which is the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor. (author)

  16. Introduction to the study of boiling in swimming-pool reactors. Measurement of the efficiency of a CC5 chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froelicher, B.

    1967-01-01

    The efficiency of a CC5 ionisation chamber has been evaluated by a rough measurement: by integrating the relationship P(f) = ε F0 (1 + ε A) over the band width of the apparatus, it is possible to show the influence of ε. This conventional method of operation is not very precise and so a more realistic value of the efficiency will be derived later using the plot of the low power transfer function of the reactor Ulysse, this being a more exact method. (author) [fr

  17. The determination of the space distribution, energy spectrum and dose parameters of thermal column beam resulting from swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changmao; Xie Jianlun; Leng Ruiping; Song Shushou; Su Jingling

    1991-01-01

    The axial and radial distribution, epithermal energy spectrum and dose equivalent rate of thermal column beam resulting from SPR have been determined in the Institute of Atomic Energy. The results show that the neutron fluence rate along the axial direction decreases as the distance increases outside the thermal column channel, and the trend of fluence rate attenuation follows approximately the inverse square law of a point source. When the reactor thermal power rate is 3 MW, at a distance of 50 cm to the channel, the thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate are about 1.61 x 10 7 and 6.1 x 10 4 n/cm 2 · s respectively; dose equivalent rates are some 62 and 2.9 cSv/h respectively. At the end of the chennal, γ dose equivalent rate is 60 cSv/h or so

  18. Pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a pool nuclear reactor fitted with a perfected system to raise the buckets into a vertical position at the bottom of a channel. This reactor has an inclined channel to guide a bucket containing a fuel assembly to introduce it into the reactor jacket or extract it therefrom and a damper at the bottom of the channel to stop the drop of the bucket. An upright vertically movable rod has a horizontally articulated arm with a hook. This can pivot to touch a radial lug on the bucket and pivot the bucket around its base in a vertical position, when the rod moves up [fr

  19. Thermal analyses of solar swimming pool heating in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.

    2011-01-01

    Hotels and swimming clubs in Pakistan pay huge gas bills for heating Swimming pools in winter. Winter days in most parts of Pakistan remain sunny and unglazed low cost solar collectors may be used to extend the swimming season. Installing the pool in a wind-protected area, which receives unobstructed solar radiation, may further reduce the size of the solar collectors required to heat the swimming pools. The pools should be covered with plastic sheet to eliminate evaporative heat losses and to prevent dust and tree leaves falling in the pool. The results of the thermal analysis show that in some parts of the country, a solar exposed pool can maintain comfortable temperature simply by using a plastic sheet on the pool surface. On the other hand, there are cities where solar collector array equal to twice the surface area of the pool is required to keep desired temperature in winter. (author)

  20. Solar collectors for swimming pools still going strong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    According to the opinion of the experts, solar energy heating may be technically 'mature' but the profitability is by no means that far. However, solar systems are a good alternative for heating the water in swimming pools. Four solar collector systems developed by different firms to heat swimming pools, including prices, are presented.

  1. Neutronics design of the next tokamak. (Swimming pool type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Y.; Iida, H.; Kitamura, K.; Minato, A.; Sako, K.; Mori, S.; Nishida, H.

    1983-01-01

    A swimming pool type tokamak reactor (SPTR) has been proposed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute as a candidate for the next generation tokamak reactor after the JT-60. The concept of the SPTR evolved from an incentive to relieve the difficulties of repair and maintenance procedures of a tokamak reactor. After about two years of the reactor design studies, several advantages of the SPTR over the conventional tokamak reactors such as the ease of penetration shielding, reduction in solid radwaste have been shown. On the other hand, some drawbacks and uncertainties of the SPTR have also been pointed out but so far no serious defect negating the concept has been found. This paper describes the neutronics aspect of the SPTR based mostly on the result of one dimensional calculations. At first, the radiation shielding capability of water is compared with those of other candidate materials used in the blanket and shield of fusion reactors. Based on the result of the comparison and other requirements such as tritium breeding, thermal mechanical design, repair and maintenance procedures, the material arrangements of the blanket and shield are determined. The result of the blanket neutronics calculations, the radiation shielding calculations for the superconducting magnets, shutdown dose calculations are given together with major penetration shielding considerations. (author)

  2. Estimated environmental radionuclide transfer and deposition into outdoor swimming pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, Kazumi; Nagata, Izumi; Sueki, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, a large radioactive discharge occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. This plant is located within a climatically temperate region where outdoor swimming pools are popular. Although it is relatively easy to decontaminate pools by refilling them with fresh water, it is difficult to maintain safe conditions given highly contaminated diurnal dust falls from the surrounding contaminated ground. Our objectives in this paper were to conduct daily radioactivity measurements, to determine the quantity of radioactive contaminants from the surrounding environment that invade outdoor pools, and to investigate the efficacy of traditional pool cleaners in removing radioactive contaminants. The depositions in the paper filterable particulates ranged from 0 to 62,5 Bq/m 2 /day, with the highest levels found in the southern Tohoku District containing Fukushima Prefecture and in the Kanto District containing Tokyo Metro. They were approximately correlated with the ground contamination. Traditional pool cleaners eliminated 99% of contaminants at the bottom of the pool, reducing the concentration to 41 Bq/m 2 after cleaning. Authors recommended the deposition or the blown radionuclides into outdoor swimming pools must be considered into pool regulations when the environments exactly polluted with radionuclides. - Highlights: • Deposition into outdoor swimming pool in a habitable areas estimated 72 Bq/m 2 /day. • More than 500 Bq/m 2 /day deposition will exceed our national guideline (10 Bq/l) of swimming pool. • Vacuum pool cleaner eliminates 99% radionuclides deposition

  3. Life cycle environmental implications of residential swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Nigel; Williams, Eric

    2010-07-15

    Ownership of private swimming pools in the U.S. grew 2 to 4% per annum from 1997 to 2007. The environmental implications of pool ownership are analyzed by hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) for nine U.S. cities. An operational model is constructed estimating consumption of chemicals, water, and energy for a typical residential pool. The model incorporates geographical climatic variations and upstream water and energy use from electricity and water supply networks. Results vary considerably by city: a factor of 5-6 for both water and energy use. Water use is driven by aridness and length of the swimming season, while energy use is mainly driven by length of the swimming season. Water and energy impacts of pools are significant, particularly in arid climates. In Phoenix for example pools account for 22% and 13% of a household's electricity and water use, respectively. Measures to reduce water and energy use in pools such as optimizing the pump schedule and covering the pool in winter can realize greater savings than many common household efficiency improvements. Private versus community pools are also compared. Community pools in Phoenix use 60% less swimming pool water and energy per household than subdivisions without community pools.

  4. Allegheny County Public Swimming Pool, Hot Tub, and Spa Inspections

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Public swimming pool, hot tub, and spa facilities are licensed and inspected once each year to assure proper water quality, sanitation, lifeguard coverage and...

  5. Health impact of disinfection by-products in swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. Villanueva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on the epidemiological evidence on the health impacts related to disinfection by-products (DBPs in swimming pools, which is a chemical hazard generated as an undesired consequence to reduce the microbial pathogens. Specific DBPs are carcinogenic, fetotoxic and/or irritant to the airways according to experimental studies. Epidemiological evidence shows that swimming in pools during pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of reproductive outcomes. An epidemiological study suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer with swimming pool attendance, although evidence is inconclusive. A higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms including asthma is found among swimming pool workers and elite swimmers, although the causality of this association is unclear. The body of evidence in children indicates that asthma is not increased by swimming pool attendance. Overall, the available knowledge suggests that the health benefits of swimming outweigh the potential health risks of chemical contamination. However, the positive effects of swimming should be enhanced by minimising potential risks.

  6. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Swimming Pools, Atlanta, Georgia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dan Rutz speaks with Dr. Joan Shields, a guest researcher with the Healthy Swimming Program at CDC, about an article in June 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases reporting on the results of a test of swimming pools in the greater Atlanta, Georgia area. Dr. Shields tested 160 pools in metro Atlanta last year for Cryptosporidium and Giardia. These germs cause most recreational water associated outbreaks.

  7. Study on water evaporation rate from indoor swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzeźnik Ilona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The air relative humidity in closed spaces of indoor swimming pools influences significantly on users thermal comfort and the stability of the building structure, so its preservation on suitable level is very important. For this purpose, buildings are equipped with HVAC systems which provide adequate level of humidity. The selection of devices and their technical parameters is made using the mathematical models of water evaporation rate in the unoccupied and occupied indoor swimming pool. In the literature, there are many papers describing this phenomena but the results differ from each other. The aim of the study was the experimental verification of published models of evaporation rate in the pool. The tests carried out on a laboratory scale, using model of indoor swimming pool, measuring 99cm/68cm/22cm. The model was equipped with water spray installation with six nozzles to simulate conditions during the use of the swimming pool. The measurements were made for conditions of sports pools (water temperature 24°C and recreational swimming pool (water temperature 34°C. According to the recommendations the air temperature was about 2°C higher than water temperature, and the relative humidity ranged from 40% to 55%. Models Shah and Biasin & Krumm were characterized by the best fit to the results of measurements on a laboratory scale.

  8. Device and process for recovery and disposal of radioactive wastes underwater in a swimming pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guironnet, L.; Bline, M.

    1990-01-01

    The device comprises a suction head and a filter fixed to a pole, for safe removing of loose parts (even brittle ones like nuclear fuel) in the core or on the bottom of the swimming pool during reactor shut down for maintenance [fr

  9. Non-electric applications of pool-type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Cherkashov, Yu.M.; Romenkov, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper recommends the use of pool-type light water reactors for thermal energy production. Safety and reliability of these reactors were already demonstrated to the public by the long-term operation of swimming pool research reactors. The paper presents the design experience of two projects: Apatity Underground Nuclear Heating Plant and Nuclear Sea-Water Desalination Plant. The simplicity of pool-type reactors, the ease of their manufacturing and maintenance make this type of a heat source attractive to the countries without a developed nuclear industry. (author). 6 figs, 1 tab

  10. Indoor swimming pools. Humidity caused problems and suggested solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Reports have been received from across Canada on premature deterioration and other problems of indoor swimming pool buildings. This technical paper has been prepared to assist pool managers to solve these problems, which typically include leaking roofs, condensation on inside walls, peeling paint, efflorescence, rusting of metal elements, deterioration of concrete block structures, and high costs for pool heating. An effective insulation and vapor barrier system for a swimming pool roof is described, and the high relative humidity of the typical pool building is discussed as the primary cause of most problems. Proper sealing to cut down air infiltration is recommended, along with proper maintenance and painting. High energy costs are often due to low insulation values and to excessive ventilation used for decreasing the humidity. By using dehumidifiers capable of heat recovery, and by placing an insulating blanket on the pool after operating hours, it is shown that substantial cost savings are possible. 10 figs.

  11. Mathematical modelling and simulation of the thermal performance of a solar heated indoor swimming pool

    OpenAIRE

    Mančić Marko V.; Živković Dragoljub S.; Milosavljević Peđa M.; Todorović Milena N.

    2014-01-01

    Buildings with indoor swimming pools have a large energy footprint. The source of major energy loss is the swimming pool hall where air humidity is increased by evaporation from the pool water surface. This increases energy consumption for heating and ventilation of the pool hall, fresh water supply loss and heat demand for pool water heating. In this paper, a mathematical model of the swimming pool was made to assess energy demands of an indoor swimming po...

  12. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Swimming Pools, Atlanta, Georgia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-29

    In this podcast, Dan Rutz speaks with Dr. Joan Shields, a guest researcher with the Healthy Swimming Program at CDC, about an article in June 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases reporting on the results of a test of swimming pools in the greater Atlanta, Georgia area. Dr. Shields tested 160 pools in metro Atlanta last year for Cryptosporidium and Giardia. These germs cause most recreational water associated outbreaks.  Created: 5/29/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 5/29/2008.

  13. Mathematical modeling of the energy consumption of heated swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bel, C.; Millette, J. [LTE Shawinigan, Shawinigan, PQ (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    A mathematical model was developed to estimate the water temperature of a residential swimming pool. The model can compare 2 different situations and, if local climatic conditions are known, it can accurately predict energy costs of the pool relative to the total energy consumption of the house. When used with the appropriate energy transfer coefficient and weather file, the model can estimate the water temperature of a residential swimming pool having specific characteristics, such as in-ground, above-ground, heated or non-heated. The model is suitable for determining residential loads. It can be applied to different pool types and sizes, for different water heating scenarios and different climatic regions. Data obtained from the monitoring of water temperature and electricity use of 57 residential swimming pools was used to validate the model. In addition, 5 above-ground pools were installed on the property of LTE Shawinigan to allow for a more detailed study of the parameters involved in the thermal balance of a pool. The mathematical model, based on a global heat transfer coefficient, can determine the effect of a solar blanket and the effect of water volume. 14 refs., 5 tabs., 11 figs.

  14. Decontamination of outdoor school swimming pools in Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, Jun

    2013-01-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident following the Great East Japan Earthquake, many school swimming pools in Fukushima have suspended water discharge, due to concerns that pool water which contains radioactive fallout is discharged into a river or waterway for agricultural use. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency conducted researches and examinations on the existing absorbent method and the flocculation method as ways for decontaminating pool water. By reviewing and improving these methods through decontamination demonstrations at eight pools in Fukushima, a practical decontamination method for outdoor pools has been established. This report summarizes the methods and results of the decontamination demonstrations carried out at the schools. Also, the surface density of fallout estimated at one of the pools is also presented and discussed in connection with the overall collection ratio of radiocesium at the pool. (author)

  15. A swimming pool array for ultra high energy showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yodh, Gaurang B.; Shoup, Anthony; Barwick, Steve; Goodman, Jordan A.

    1992-11-01

    A very preliminary design concept for an array using water Cherenkov counters, built out of commercially available backyard swimming pools, to sample the electromagnetic and muonic components of ultra high energy showers at large lateral distances is presented. The expected performance of the pools is estimated using the observed lateral distributions by scintillator and water Cherenkov arrays at energies above 1019 eV and simulations.

  16. Swimming pools and intra-city climates: Influences on residential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While determinants such as household income, regional climate, water price, property size and household occupancy have been comprehensively studied and modelled, other determinants such as swimming pools and intra-city climates have not. This study examines residential water consumption in the City of Cape Town ...

  17. Public Swimming Pools | Florida Department of Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illness Disease Reporting and Surveillance Bureau of Public Health Laboratories Environmental Health Air Air Monitoring Carbon Monoxide Indoor Air Quality Mold Radon Water Aquatic Toxins Beach Water Quality purification, testing, treatment, and disinfection procedures. To ensure that the pool technicians are

  18. Swimming pool attendance and respiratory symptoms and allergies among Dutch children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.H.; Fuertes, E.; Krop, E.J.M.; Spithoven, J.; Tromp, P.; Heederik, D.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe associations among swimming, respiratory health, allergen sensitisation and Clara cell protein 16 (CC16) levels in Dutch schoolchildren. Trichloramine levels in swimming pool air were determined to assess potential exposure levels. METHODS Respiratory health and pool

  19. Indoor swimming pool attendance and respiratory and dermal health in schoolchildren: HITEA Catalonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Font-Ribera, L.; Villanueva, C.M.; Gracia-Lavedan, E.; Borràs-Santos, A.; Kogevinas, M.; Zock, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health benefits of swimming in pools may outweigh adverse health outcomes in children, but evidence from epidemiological studies is scarce or inconclusive for different health outcomes. We evaluated the association between indoor swimming pool attendance during childhood and respiratory

  20. ENERGY SAVING AT OPERATION OF OUTDOOR SWIMMING POOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Ivin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Energy saving is a major problem in modern power engineering and various energy-consuming devices. They include outdoor swimming pools. In order to maintain them in working condition, especially in winter period, it takes significant amount of thermal energy. Task of heat loss substantial decrease in open swimming pools is considered in the article (on DNURT example. Methodology. The method of determining the mass and heat loss on the basis of criteria equations of heat and mass transfer theory is used. Findings. Calculations of the actual DNURT pool heat loss for different seasons, as for natural convection both for air forced motion above the free water surface are performed. It is shown that for the adiabatic evaporation conditions of water from the pool in winter during blow-off with wind the heat loss can be up to 2 kW/m2 on surface. To reduce these losses it is offered to cover water surface in a pool with a special material with low thermal conductivity on the basis of porous polyethylene during the time when the pool is not used for other purposes. It is shown that the implementation of these standards will reduce the actual heat loss, at least 5-6 times. Originality. The solution of important environmental and energy problem thanks to reducing heat losses by the pool in different times of a year and correspondingly lower emissions of power generating enterprises. Practical value. It is shown that the coating surface of the pool with poorly heat-conducting and easy to install coating will let, at a minimum, to reduce the actual heat loss on 5-6 times and reduce the emissions of power plants generating energy for pool heating.

  1. Software for the Design of Swimming Pool Dehumidifiers Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubina, Aleš; Blasinski, Petr; Tesař, Zdeněk

    2013-06-01

    The article deals with the description and solution of physical phenomena taking place during evaporation of water. The topicality of the theme is given a number of built indoor swimming pool and wellness centers at present. In addressing HVAC systems serving these areas, it is necessary to know the various design parameters in the interior including the water temperature as the pool temperature and humidity. Following is a description of the calculation module, air handling units, including optimizing the settings of the physical changes in order to ensure the lowest energy consumption for air treatment and required maintaining internal microclimate parameters.

  2. Disinfection Methods for Swimming Pool Water: Byproduct Formation and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Ilyas

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive and critical comparison of 10 disinfection methods of swimming pool water: chlorination, electrochemically generated mixed oxidants (EGMO, ultraviolet (UV irradiation, UV/chlorine, UV/hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, UV/H2O2/chlorine, ozone (O3/chlorine, O3/H2O2/chlorine, O3/UV and O3/UV/chlorine for the formation, control and elimination of potentially toxic disinfection byproducts (DBPs: trihalomethanes (THMs, haloacetic acids (HAAs, haloacetonitriles (HANs, trihaloacetaldehydes (THAs and chloramines (CAMs. The statistical comparison is carried out using data on 32 swimming pools accumulated from the reviewed studies. The results indicate that O3/UV and O3/UV/chlorine are the most promising methods, as the concentration of the studied DBPs (THMs and HANs with these methods was reduced considerably compared with chlorination, EGMO, UV irradiation, UV/chlorine and O3/chlorine. However, the concentration of the studied DBPs including HAAs and CAMs remained much higher with O3/chlorine compared with the limits set by the WHO for drinking water quality. Moreover, the enhancement in the formation of THMs, HANs and CH with UV/chlorine compared with UV irradiation and the increase in the level of HANs with O3/UV/chlorine compared with O3/UV indicate the complexity of the combined processes, which should be optimized to control the toxicity and improve the quality of swimming pool water.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking (Standard Astm G 30-90) in stainless steel 08X18H10T of swimming-pool that contain nuclear fuel in reactors V.V.E.R.-440

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora R, L.; Herrera, V.

    1998-01-01

    The standard recommended practice for making and using 'U' bend stress corrosion test specimens; Designation G30-90 has been used as a laboratory tool to study the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels and the other materials of test of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The experiment has been development in a similar conditions of the chemical regime, the swimming-pool that containing nuclear fuel in borated water reactors VVER-440 in general this cladding by two films, one of carbon steel (04T26) and other with austenitic stainless steel 08X18HT (similar type 321) stabilized with titanium, the thickness of filler metals was to 4 to 8 mm. The specimens was prepare one plate with this characteristics, the welding was put in the part central with the following measurements of 160x15x5 mm. The specimens strips bent approximately 180 degrees around radius of curvature of R=14.5 mm and ε 1 = 17.2% and maintained in this plastically deformed condition during the test. And then preparing metallographically and exposure in environment of 12 and 40 gr./l of H 3 BO 3 70 Centigrade with or noting contaminants of NaCl. The results showed the initial cracks. (Author)

  4. Swimming pool hydraulics and their significance for public pools. Bedeutung der Beckenhydraulik in oeffentlichen Schwimmbaedern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gansloser, G

    1989-11-01

    The term of swimming pool hydraulics means the process of letting in and drawing off water to and from the pool while ensuring that no inadmissible water-borne contaminant concentrations will occur anywhere within the pool. Measurements were performed on a pool to study the significance of correct pool hydraulics. The author points out that a wrong water recirculation design will bring to nought the effects of an elaborate water treatment system; by contrast, poor pool water quality can be greatly improved by redesigning the pool water hydraulics approach. In principle, systems with with water inlet at one side and water outlet at the far side will fall short of hygienic requirements. (BWI).

  5. Presence and select determinants of organophosphate flame retardants in public swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, Tiffany L.L., E-mail: tiffany.teo@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Kensington NSW 2052 (Australia); Coleman, Heather M., E-mail: h.coleman@ulster.ac.uk [Nanotechnology and Integrated BioEngineering Centre, School of Engineering, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, County Antrim BT37 0QB, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Khan, Stuart J., E-mail: s.khan@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Kensington NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-11-01

    The occurrence of five organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) consisting of tributyl phosphate (TNBP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP), tris(1.3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) in swimming pools were investigated. Fifteen chlorinated public swimming pools were sampled, including indoor pools, outdoor pools and spa pools. The analyses were carried out using isotope dilution gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. All five PFRs were detected in swimming pool waters with concentrations ranging from 5–27 ng/L (TNBP), 7–293 ng/L (TCEP), 62–1180 ng/L (TCIPP), 10–670 ng/L (TDCIPP) and 8–132 ng/L (TPHP). The concentrations of PFRs were generally higher in indoor swimming pools compared to outdoor swimming pools. In municipal water supplies, used to fill the swimming pools in three of the sampling locations, the five PFRs were all below the limit of quantifications, eliminating this as the source. Potential leaching of PFRs from commonly used swimming equipment, including newly purchased kickboards and swimsuits was investigated. These experiments revealed that PFRs leached from swimsuits, and may be a source of PFRs in swimming pools. A quantitative risk assessment revealed that the health risk to PFRs via swimming pools was generally low and below commonly applied health risk benchmarks. - Highlights: • TNBP, TCEP, TCIPP, TDCIPP and TPHP were detected in chlorinated swimming pools. • PFRs were below the LOQ in fill water samples collected from 3 locations. • TCIPP was observed to have the highest concentrations in swimming pools. • PFRs are leaching from swimsuits and may be a source in swimming pools. • Health risks through oral and dermal exposure to PFRs in swimming pools were low.

  6. Presence and select determinants of organophosphate flame retardants in public swimming pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, Tiffany L.L.; Coleman, Heather M.; Khan, Stuart J.

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of five organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) consisting of tributyl phosphate (TNBP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP), tris(1.3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) in swimming pools were investigated. Fifteen chlorinated public swimming pools were sampled, including indoor pools, outdoor pools and spa pools. The analyses were carried out using isotope dilution gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. All five PFRs were detected in swimming pool waters with concentrations ranging from 5–27 ng/L (TNBP), 7–293 ng/L (TCEP), 62–1180 ng/L (TCIPP), 10–670 ng/L (TDCIPP) and 8–132 ng/L (TPHP). The concentrations of PFRs were generally higher in indoor swimming pools compared to outdoor swimming pools. In municipal water supplies, used to fill the swimming pools in three of the sampling locations, the five PFRs were all below the limit of quantifications, eliminating this as the source. Potential leaching of PFRs from commonly used swimming equipment, including newly purchased kickboards and swimsuits was investigated. These experiments revealed that PFRs leached from swimsuits, and may be a source of PFRs in swimming pools. A quantitative risk assessment revealed that the health risk to PFRs via swimming pools was generally low and below commonly applied health risk benchmarks. - Highlights: • TNBP, TCEP, TCIPP, TDCIPP and TPHP were detected in chlorinated swimming pools. • PFRs were below the LOQ in fill water samples collected from 3 locations. • TCIPP was observed to have the highest concentrations in swimming pools. • PFRs are leaching from swimsuits and may be a source in swimming pools. • Health risks through oral and dermal exposure to PFRs in swimming pools were low.

  7. Investigation on the applicability of Piety's on-line PSD-pattern recognition algorithm to boiling detection by neutron-noise at a swimming-pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behringer, K.; Spiekerman, G.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1984-11-01

    The neutron noise signal of an initiation-of-boiling experiment performed at the SAPHIR reactor has been analyzed by the PSD-pattern recognition algorithm of Piety (1977); the results indicate that the onset of boiling can be detected by this method. Improved confidence statements for the statistical decision discriminants are given. (Auth.)

  8. Reactor instrumentation renewal of the TRIGA reactor Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Weiss, H.; Hood, W.E.; Hyde, W.K.

    1992-01-01

    The TRIGA Mark-II reactor at the Atominstitut in Vienna, Austria is replacing its twenty-four year old instrumentation system with a microprocessor based control system supplied by General Atomics. Ageing components, new governmental safety requirements and a need for state of the art instrumentation for training students has spurred the demand for new reactor instrumentation. In Austria a government appointed expert is assigned the responsibility of reviewing the proposed installation and verifying all safety aspects. After a positive review, final assembly and checkout of the instrumentation system may commence. The instrumentation system consists of three basic modules: the control system console, the data acquisition console and the NH-1000 wide range channel. Digital communications greatly reduce interwiring requirements. Hardwired safety channels are independent of computer control, thus, the instrumentation system in no way relies on any computer intervention for safety function. In addition, both the CSC and DAC computers are continuously monitored for proper operation via watchdog circuits which are capable of shutting down the reactor in the event of computer malfunction. Safety channels include two interlocked NMP-1000 multi-range linear channels for steady state mode, an NPP-1000 linear safety channel for pulse mode and a set of three independent fuel temperature monitoring channels. The microprocessor controlled wide range NM- 1000 digital neutron monitor (fission chamber based) functions as a startup/operational channel, and provides all power level related Interlocks. The Atominstitut TRIGA reactor is configured for four modes of operation: manual mode, automatic mode (servo control), pulsing mode and square wave mode. Control of the standard control rods is via stepping motor control rod drives, which offers the operator the choice of which control rods are operated by the servo system in automatic and square wave model. (author)

  9. Evaluation and Treatment of Swimming Pool Avoidance Exhibited by an Adolescent Girl with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, John T.; Vollmer, Timothy R.; Hovanetz, Alyson N.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated and treated swimming pool avoidance that was exhibited by a 14-year-old girl diagnosed with autism. In part, treatment involved blocking for flopping (dropping to the ground) and elopement (running away from the pool) and access to food for movements toward a swimming pool. Treatment also involved reinforcement for exposure to various…

  10. Hygiene trap in swimming pools? Planning decisions with consequences; Hygienefalle Wasseraufbereitung in Schwimmbaedern. Planungsentscheidungen mit Folgen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schellhorn, Martin [SHK-Presseagentur Kommunikations-Management Schellhorn GmbH, Haltern am See (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Planning decisions often can be influenced by a domino effect. A causality pulls the other causality up until clear problems for example in a technical operational sequence are developed. A typical example for this is a water treatment plant in swimming pools. Finally, here it is decided how well the bather feels, how much bathers use the swimming pool and how large the economic success is. Just in the water purification and filtering of swimming pools the market shows a strongly differentiated picture.

  11. Environmental burdens of a Finnish indoor swimming pool; Uimahallin ympaeristoekuormitukset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaahterus, T.; Saari, A.

    2001-07-01

    In this study the environmental burdens of a Finnish indoor swimming pool generated by its energy consumption were calculated. The calculations were made by using a calculation method based on LCA methodology. Calculations were made of 50 years period. The energy consumption dating from the time of the indoor swimming pool causes towards the gross-floor area a nearly four times bigger environmental load than for example a block of flats and indoor ice- skating rink. On a block of flats and indoor ice-skating rink the energy consumption dating from the time of the use causes more than 90 % of the environmental burdens of the whole life span. One can suppose that at the indoor swimming pool the share of the energy consumption dating from the time of the use only is emphasized. In this study confine therefore to dealing with the environmental loads caused only by the energy consumption dating from the time of the use. The results of these calculations showed that the energy flow of the life cycle energy consumption was 193 000 MJ/brm{sup 2}. 11,2 ton per gross-floor area CO{sub 2} equivalents, 21 kg per gross-floor area SO{sub 2} equivalents and 290 g per gross-floor area ethene equivalents of environmental burdens were caused. The main factor causing the most environmental loads were the need of heating energy. The need of heating energy produced 75 % of the CO{sub 2} equivalents, 70 % of the SO{sub 2} equivalents and 59 % of the ethene equivalents. The need of the electric energy produced 23 % of the CO{sub 2} equivalents, 23 % of the SO{sub 2} equivalents and 17 % of the ethene equivalents. Of the heating energy the share of the warming of water was 56 %. The most significant part of the electric energy were consumed in the use of the sauna stoves and vapor sauna (31 %) and heating pumps and water elements (30 %). Almost all (87 %) of the energy, consumed during the life cycle, was produced with non-renewable energy sources. The source information of the energy was

  12. Swimming Lessons: Learning, New Materialisms, Posthumanism, and Post Qualitative Research Emerge through a Pool Poem

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Lucinda

    2016-01-01

    This article shifts from the formal learning spaces of school and university to an Australian public swimming pool to playfully engage some of the dilemmas that recent theory poses for curriculum studies. The article enacts multiple diffractions (Barad, 2007) as theory becomes swimming and swimming becomes theory, and ideas and movements are…

  13. Livermore pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, L.G.

    1977-01-01

    The Livermore Pool-Type Reactor (LPTR) has served a dual purpose since 1958--as an instrument for fundamental research and as a tool for measurement and calibration. Our early efforts centered on neutron-diffraction, fission, and capture gamma-ray studies. During the 1960's it was used for extensive calibration work associated with radiochemical and physical measurements on nuclear-explosive tests. Since 1970 the principal applications have been for trace-element measurements and radiation-damage studies. Today's research program is dominated by radiochemical studies of the shorter-lived fission products and by research on the mechanisms of radiation damage. Trace-element measurement for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program is the major measurement application today

  14. Study of the formation and of the distribution of dissolved gases and hydrogen peroxide in water from a swimming-pool reactor (triton) (1961); Etude de la formation et de la repartition des gaz dissous et de l'eau oxygenee dans l'eau d'un reacteur piscine (triton) (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenouard, J; Rozenberg, J; Dolle, L; Dirian, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    In order to determine experimentally the amount of radiolysis in the swimming-pool reactor Triton, direct measurements have been made of the quantity of radiolysis gas and hydrogen peroxide in the water, at the entry and exit of the core. The concentration distribution of these gases in the reactor was also determined. An explanation is given as to why no gases evolution is seen in the swimming-pool reactors of the C.E.A. The overall amount of radiolysis is zero, and a simple interpretation of this result is possible. The real amount of radiolysis occurring in the reactor core can be calculated. This is in satisfactory agreement with certain measurement mad elsewhere. (authors) [French] Pour determiner experimentalement le taux de radiolyse dans la pile piscine Triton, des mesures directes de la quantite de gaz de radiolyse et d'eau oxygenee dans l'eau a l'entree et a la sortie du coeur ont ete faites. La repartition de la concentration de ces gaz dans la piscine a egalement ete determinee. On explique pourquoi aucun degagement gazeux n'est observe dans les piles piscines du CE.A. Le taux de radiolyse global est nul, et une interpretation simple de ce resultat est possible. Un taux de radiolyse reel dans le coeur du reacteur peut etre calcule. Celui-ci est en accord satisfaisant avec certaines determinations faites ailleurs. (auteurs)

  15. Blanket and vacuum vessel design of the next tokamak. (Swimming pool type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, H.; Minato, A.; Kitamura, K.

    1983-01-01

    The structural design study of a reactor module for a swimming pool type reactor (SPTR) was conducted. Since pool water plays the role of radiation shielding in the SPTR, the module does not have a solid shield. It consists of tritium breeding blankets, divertor collector plates and a vacuum vessel. The object of this study is to show the reactor module design which has a simple structure and a sufficient tritium breeding ratio. A large coverage of the plasma chamber surface with tritium breeding blanket is essential in order to obtain a high tritium breeding ratio. A breeding blanket is also placed behind the divertor collector plate, i.e. in the upper and lower region, as well as in the outboard and inboard regions of the module. A concept in which the first wall is an integral part of the blanket is employed to minimize the thickness of structural and cooling material brazed in front of the breeding material (Li 2 O) and to enhance the tritium breeding capability. In order to simplify the module structure the vacuum vessel and breeding blanket is also integrated in the inboard region. One of the features inherent in the swimming pool type reactor is an additional external force on the vacuum vessel, namely hydraulic pressure. A detailed structural analysis of the vacuum vessel is performed. Divertor collector plates are assemblies of co-axial tubes. They minimize the electromagnetic force on the plate induced by the plasma disruption. A thermal and structural analysis and life time estimation of the first wall and divertor collector plates are performed. (author)

  16. Disinfection by-product formation of UV treated swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Water samples from 3 indoor swimming pool facilities were tested to evaluate UV-induced effects on swimming pool water chemistry. Concentration change of several DBPs was investigated in experiments including medium pressure UV treatment with and without chlorine and post-UV chlorination. Post-UV...

  17. Genotoxic Effects in Swimmers Exposed to Disinfection By-products in Indoor Swimming Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has been associated with cancer risk, and a recent study found an increased bladder cancer risk among subjects attending swimming pools. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether swimming in pools is associated with ...

  18. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Zortea, R.; Piketty, A.; Rodriguez Vega, S.; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported to be found in swimming pool water: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform, dichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, dibromoacetronitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, trich...

  19. Solar-heated municipal swimming pools, a case study: Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, M.

    1981-09-01

    The installation of a solar energy system to heat the water in the swimming pool in one of Dade County, Florida's major parks is described. The mechanics of solar heated swimming pools are explained. The solar heating system consists of 216 unglazed polypropylene tube collectors, a differential thermostat, and the distribution system. The systems performance and economics as well as future plants are discussed.

  20. Benefits of carbon dioxide as pH reducer in chlorinated indoor swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomà, Anton; Guisasola, Albert; Tayà, Carlota; Baeza, Juan A; Baeza, Mireia; Bartrolí, Albert; Lafuente, Javier; Bartrolí, Jordi

    2010-06-01

    Carbon dioxide is seldom used as pH reducer in swimming pools. Nevertheless it offers two interesting advantages. First, its use instead of the usual hydrochloric acid avoids the characteristic and serious accident of mixing the disinfectant with that strong acid, which forms a dangerous chlorine gas cloud and, second, it allows the facility to become slightly a depository of that greenhouse gas. This work introduces the experience of using CO(2) as pH reducer in real working swimming pools, showing three more advantages: lower chlorine consumption, lower presence of oxidants in the air above the swimming pool and a diminished formation of trihalomethanes in the swimming pool water. Experiments lasted 4years and they were run in three swimming pools in the Barcelona area, where the conventional system based upon HCl and a system based upon CO(2) were consecutively exchanged.

  1. Survey of bacterial contamination of environment of swimming pools in Yazd city, in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jafari Mansoorian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infections are readily transmitted as a result of bacterial contamination of swimming pools. Therefore, hygiene and preventing the contamination of swimming pools is of particular importance. The objective of this study was to determine the amount of bacterial contamination in indoor pools of Yazd in 2013. Methods: In this descriptive and analytical study, all indoor swimming pools of Yazd (12 pools were evaluated during the spring and summer of 2013, in terms of bacterial contamination. In order to determine contamination, a sterile cotton swab was used for sampling. On average, 45 samples were taken from different surfaces in each pool (shower, dressing room, sitting places in sauna, platforms and around the pool. In total, about 540 samples from all pools were tested for bacterial contamination. Results: The results show that from 540 samples, bacterial contamination was observed in about 93 samples (17.22%; and was seen more in showers, edges of the pool and jacuzzis, and the slippers used in swimming pools. The most important isolated bacteria types were E. coli, Actinobacteria, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia. Conclusion: The results indicate the presence of bacterial contamination on the surface of these places. It is recommended that health authorities should pay more attention to cleaning and disinfecting surfaces around the pool, showers, dressing rooms etc, to prevent infectious disease transfer as a result of contact with contaminated swimming pool surfaces.

  2. Analysis of implementing phase change materials in open-air swimming pools

    OpenAIRE

    Zsembinszki, Gabriel; Farid, Mohammed M.; Cabeza, Luisa F.

    2012-01-01

    Open-air swimming pools in Mediterranean climate regions are heated by direct solar radiation with no auxiliary heating systems. In order to extend the swimming season or improve comfort conditions, solar collectors or pool coverings may be used. In this paper, another approach was followed through the use of phase change materials (PCM). Two methods of introducing the PCM were considered: (1) encapsulated in the sidewalls and bottom of the pool, and (2) use the PCM in an external he...

  3. Swimming pools as heat sinks for air conditioners: Model design and experimental validation for natural thermal behavior of the pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolley, Jonathan; Harrington, Curtis; Modera, Mark [University of California Davis, Western Cooling Efficiency Center, 1450 Drew Avenue, Suite 100, Davis, CA 95618 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Swimming pools as thermal sinks for air conditioners could save approximately 40% on peak cooling power and 30% of overall cooling energy, compared to standard residential air conditioning. Heat dissipation from pools in semi-arid climates with large diurnal temperature shifts is such that pool heating and space cooling may occur concurrently; in which case heat rejected from cooling equipment could directly displace pool heating energy, while also improving space cooling efficiency. The performance of such a system relies on the natural temperature regulation of swimming pools governed by evaporative and convective heat exchange with the air, radiative heat exchange with the sky, and conductive heat exchange with the ground. This paper describes and validates a model that uses meteorological data to accurately predict the hourly temperature of a swimming pool to within 1.1 C maximum error over the period of observation. A thorough review of literature guided our choice of the most appropriate set of equations to describe the natural mass and energy exchange between a swimming pool and the environment. Monitoring of a pool in Davis, CA, was used to confirm the resulting simulations. Comparison of predicted and observed pool temperature for all hours over a 56 day experimental period shows an R-squared relatedness of 0.967. (author)

  4. Water treatment in public swimming pools - reduction of energy consumption; Vandbehandling i svoemmebade - reduktion af energiforbrug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerich, H.; Radisch, N. (Ramboell, Koege (Denmark)); Olesen, Jens Christian (Gladsaxe Sportscenter, Gladsaxe (Denmark)) (and others)

    2010-04-15

    Measurements were made in five public swimming baths, and energy savings were achieved using new filters, pumps, water treatment control depending on bather load, etc. In a 50 metre pool, electricity consumption for water treatment decreased by 50%, and in a hot-water/paddling pool, electricity consumption decreased by 30-40% while still maintaining satisfactory water quality - even during periods of heavy bather load. In another swimming bath, ventilation electricity consumption was reduced by 15%. The results will e.g. be used to revise the Danish executive order on swimming pools and water quality to allow bather load-dependent water circulation. (ln)

  5. Mathematical modelling and simulation of the thermal performance of a solar heated indoor swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mančić Marko V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Buildings with indoor swimming pools have a large energy footprint. The source of major energy loss is the swimming pool hall where air humidity is increased by evaporation from the pool water surface. This increases energy consumption for heating and ventilation of the pool hall, fresh water supply loss and heat demand for pool water heating. In this paper, a mathematical model of the swimming pool was made to assess energy demands of an indoor swimming pool building. The mathematical model of the swimming pool is used with the created multi-zone building model in TRNSYS software to determine pool hall energy demand and pool losses. Energy loss for pool water and pool hall heating and ventilation are analyzed for different target pool water and air temperatures. The simulation showed that pool water heating accounts for around 22%, whereas heating and ventilation of the pool hall for around 60% of the total pool hall heat demand. With a change of preset controller air and water temperatures in simulations, evaporation loss was in the range 46-54% of the total pool losses. A solar thermal sanitary hot water system was modelled and simulated to analyze it's potential for energy savings of the presented demand side model. The simulation showed that up to 87% of water heating demands could be met by the solar thermal system, while avoiding stagnation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 42006: Research and development of energy and environmentally highly effective polygeneration systems based on using renewable energy sources

  6. Titanium distribution in swimming pool water is dominated by dissolved species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Holbrook, R.; Motabar, Donna; Quiñones, Oscar; Stanford, Benjamin; Vanderford, Brett; Moss, Donna

    2013-01-01

    The increased use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO 2 ) in consumer products such as sunscreen has raised concerns about their possible risk to human and environmental health. In this work, we report the occurrence, size fractionation and behavior of titanium (Ti) in a children's swimming pool. Size-fractionated samples were analyzed for Ti using ICP-MS. Total titanium concentrations ([Ti]) in the pool water ranged between 21 μg/L and 60 μg/L and increased throughout the 101-day sampling period while [Ti] in tap water remained relatively constant. The majority of [Ti] was found in the dissolved phase (<1 kDa), with only a minor fraction of total [Ti] being considered either particulate or microparticulate. Simple models suggest that evaporation may account for the observed variation in [Ti], while sunscreen may be a relevant source of particulate and microparticule Ti. Compared to diet, incidental ingestion of nano-Ti from swimming pool water is minimal. -- Highlights: •Total titanium concentrations in unfiltered swimming pool water ranged between 21 and 60 μg/L. •Evaporation of the swimming pool water is suspected of causing a temporal increase in [Ti]. •The vast majority of Ti is found in the dissolved phase (<1 kD). •Swimming pools are not a significant Ti source for human exposure via ingestion. -- In children's swimming pool water, the majority of titanium is found in the dissolved phase

  7. Short-Term Changes in Respiratory Biomarkers after Swimming in a Chlorinated Pool

    OpenAIRE

    Font-Ribera, Laia; Kogevinas, Manolis; Zock, Jan-Paul; G?mez, Federico P.; Barreiro, Esther; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Fernandez, Pilar; Lourencetti, Carolina; P?rez-Olabarr?a, Maitane; Bustamante, Mariona; Marcos, Ricard; Grimalt, Joan O.; Villanueva, Cristina M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Swimming in chlorinated pools involves exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) and has been associated with impaired respiratory health. Objectives We evaluated short-term changes in several respiratory biomarkers to explore mechanisms of potential lung damage related to swimming pool exposure. Methods We measured lung function and biomarkers of airway inflammation [fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), eight cytokines, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in exhaled...

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Swimming Pool Water: Evidences and Perspectives for a New Control Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Guida, Marco; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Gall?, Francesca; Gesuele, Renato; Valeriani, Federica; Liguori, Renato; Romano Spica, Vincenzo; Liguori, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is frequently isolated in swimming pool settings. Nine recreational and rehabilitative swimming pools were monitored according to the local legislation. The presence of P. aeruginosa was correlated to chlorine concentration. The ability of the isolates to form a biofilm on plastic materials was also investigated. In 59.5% of the samples, microbial contamination exceeded the threshold values. P. aeruginosa was isolated in 50.8% of these samples. The presence of P. aerugi...

  9. A sustainable swimming pool, an example for society; Een duurzaam zwembad, een voorbeeld voor de samenleving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klok, T. [DWA installatie- en energieadvies, Bodegraven (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    Swimming pools are public buildings. Generally, the local authorities are responsible for their housing. New constructions or renovations are usually based on high ambitions for environmental conservation, partly because no other building uses as much energy as a swimming pool. [Dutch] Een zwembad is een publiek gebouw. Meestal is de gemeentelijke overheid verantwoordelijk voor de huisvesting. Bij nieuwbouw of renovatie zijn de ambities met betrekking tot milieubesparing vaak hoog, mede omdat bijna geen enkel gebouw is zo energie-intensief als een zwembad.

  10. Internal exposure by natural radiation and decontamination of swimming pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    This explanation concerns the scientific knowledge and finding of the title subjects for general public to understand their present radiation environment, id est (i.e.), at about 1 year after the Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant Accident (FDPPA). The first described is the world history of radiation exposure, where A-bomb explosion in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Three Mile Island Power Plant Accident and Chernobyl Accident are told about their teachings and about internal nuclides at FDPPA: the author points out the natural high abundance of K-40 in contrast to the release of I-131, and Cs-137/-134 in the accident. The second is described about the effect of radiations on human cells, where characteristics, measurements, unit and their derived radionuclides of alpha, beta and gamma rays are explained together with their biological influences. Also explained are hydroxy-radical formation by alpha and beta rays in the internal exposure, and comparison of external photons, gamma and more risky ultraviolet rays. Third, the author mentions about man's natural functions to protect radiation hazard. Presented are an easy calculation and a comparison of K-40 and Cs-137 contents (weight and Bq) in the body and in the swimming pool with reference to Chernobyl standards. Internal exposure by natural radionuclides like K-40 and others, is also calculated, which is found equivalent to 0.29 mSv/y based on about 5,630 Bq/60 kg body weight. Finally, explained are the knowledge and practice of decontamination, where various adsorbents like zeolite (molecular sieve), ion exchanger, charcoal and natural zeolites (alumino-silicate) are compared and the last agent, clay easily and economically available, is recommended for decontamination. Clay material is said to adsorb 87% of Cs-137 at as low level as 750 mg/L and the author has an experience to use it successfully for decontamination of the pool. Importantly, the radioactivity of the resultant sludge should not exceed 8,000 Bq/kg. (T.T.)

  11. Pore diffusion limits removal of monochloramine in treatment of swimming pool water using granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibinski, Bertram; Götze, Christoph; Worch, Eckhard; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2018-04-01

    Overall apparent reaction rates for the removal of monochloramine (MCA) in granular activated carbon (GAC) beds were determined using a fixed-bed reactor system and under conditions typical for swimming pool water treatment. Reaction rates dropped and quasi-stationary conditions were reached quickly. Diffusional mass transport in the pores was shown to be limiting the overall reaction rate. This was reflected consistently in the Thiele modulus, in the effect of temperature, pore size distribution and of grain size on the reaction rates. Pores <2.5 times the diameter of the monochloramine molecule were shown to be barely accessible for the monochloramine conversion reaction. GACs with a significant proportion of large mesopores were found to have the highest overall reactivity for monochloramine removal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pool type liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, B.M.

    1978-08-01

    Various technical aspects of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), specifically pool type LMFBR's, are summarized. The information presented, for the most part, draws upon existing data. Special sections are devoted to design, technical feasibility (normal operating conditions), and safety (accident conditions). A survey of world fast reactors is presented in tabular form, as are two sets of reference reactor parameters based on available data from present and conceptual LMFBR's. (auth)

  13. Health effects from swimming training in chlorinated pools and the corresponding metabolic stress pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Hua Li

    Full Text Available Chlorination is the most popular method for disinfecting swimming pool water; however, although pathogens are being killed, many toxic compounds, called disinfection by-products (DBPs, are formed. Numerous epidemiological publications have associated the chlorination of pools with dysfunctions of the respiratory system and with some other diseases. However, the findings concerning these associations are not always consistent and have not been confirmed by toxicological studies. Therefore, the health effects from swimming in chlorinated pools and the corresponding stress reactions in organisms are unclear. In this study, we show that although the growth and behaviors of experimental rats were not affected, their health, training effects and metabolic profiles were significantly affected by a 12-week swimming training program in chlorinated water identical to that of public pools. Interestingly, the eyes and skin are the organs that are more directly affected than the lungs by the irritants in chlorinated water; instead of chlorination, training intensity, training frequency and choking on water may be the primary factors for lung damage induced by swimming. Among the five major organs (the heart, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys, the liver is the most likely target of DBPs. Through metabolomics analysis, the corresponding metabolic stress pathways and a defensive system focusing on taurine were presented, based on which the corresponding countermeasures can be developed for swimming athletes and for others who spend a lot of time in chlorinated swimming pools.

  14. Simulation of a pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Andre Felipe da Silva de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic is used to simulate natural circulation condition after a research reactor shutdown. A benchmark problem was used to test the viability of usage such code to simulate the reactor model. A model which contains the core, the pool, the reflector tank, the circulation pipes and chimney was simulated. The reactor core contained in the full scale model was represented by a porous media. The parameters of porous media were obtained from a separate CFD analysis of the full core model. Results demonstrate that such studies can be carried out for research and test of reactors design. (author)

  15. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Zortea, R.; Piketty, A.

    2013-01-01

    in a swimming pool. In an investigated public pool the UV dose was equivalent to an applied electrical energy of 1.34 kWh m− 3 d− 1 and the UV dose required to removed 90% of trichloronitromethane was 0.4 kWh m− 3 d− 1, while 2.6 kWh m− 3 d− 1 was required for chloral hydrate and the bromine containing......Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported...... to be found in swimming pool water: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform, dichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, dibromoacetronitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, trichloronitromethane, dichloropropanone, trichloropropanone, and chloral hydrate. First order photolysis constants...

  16. An approach to optimised control of HVAC systems in indoor swimming pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Eliseu M. A.; Jorge, Humberto M. M.; Quintela, Divo A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Indoor swimming pools are recognised as having a high level of energy consumption and present a great potential for energy saving. The energy is spent in several ways such as evaporation heat loss from the pool, high rates of ventilation required to guarantee the indoor air quality, and ambient temperatures with expressive values (typically 28-30°C) required to maintain conditions of comfort. This paper presents an approach to optimising control of heat ventilation and air conditioning systems that could be implemented in a building energy management system. It is easily adapted to any kind of pool and results in significant energy consumption reduction. The development and validation of the control model were carried out with a building thermal simulation software. The use of this control model in the case study building could reduce the energy efficiency index by 7.14 points (7.4% of total) which adds up to an energy cost saving of 15,609€ (7.5% of total).

  17. Laboratory studies on the effect of ozonation on THM formation in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram

    2015-01-01

    Water samples from indoor swimming pool were ozonated at different pH values to evaluate the effect of pH on decomposition of ozone in swimming pool water. Furthermore, drinking and pool water were repeatedly ozonated followed by chlorination to evaluate THM formation. Decomposition of ozone...... was not affected by pH in the range relevant to swimming pools (pH 6.8 – 7.8) and a half-life time at 10-12 min was obtained. Repeating the ozonation, the decomposition of ozone increased at the second dose of ozone added (t½,2=8 min) and then decreased again at the third and fourth dose of ozone (t½,3=17 min; t...... chlorine for drinking water as lower TTHM formation occurred than in non-ozonated samples. For pool water, a higher TTHM formation was observed in ozonated than non-ozonated pool water. Thus, it was observed that ozone reacts markedly different in swimming pool water from the known pattern in drinking...

  18. Determination of Monochloroacetic Acid in Swimming Pool Water by Ion Chromatography-Conductivity Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pythias B. Espino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an analytical method involving ion chromatography with conductivity detection was developed and optimized for the determination of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water. The ion chromatographic method has a detection limit of 0.02 mg L-1 and linear range of 0.05 to 1.0 mg L-1 with correlation coeff icient of 0.9992. The method is reproducible with percent RSD of 0.052% (n=10. The recovery of monochloroacetic acid spiked in different water types (bottled, tap and swimming pool water ranged from 28 to 122%. In dilute solutions, chloride and bromide were simultaneously analyzed along with monochloroacetic acid using the optimized method. Chloride and bromide have detection limits of 0.01 to 0.05 mg L-1, respectively. The usefulness of the ion chromatographic method was demonstrated in the analysis of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water samples. In such highly-chlorinated samples, an Ag/H cartridge was used prior to the ion chromatographic determination so as to minimize the signal due to chloride ion. Monochloroacetic acid was detected in concentrations between 0.020 and 0.093 mg L-1 in three of the six swimming pool water samples studied. The presence of monochloroacetic acid in the swimming pool water samples suggests the possible occurrence of other disinfection by-products in these waters.

  19. Determination of Monochloroacetic Acid in Swimming Pool Water by Ion Chromatography-Conductivity Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pythias B. Espino

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an analytical method involving ion chromatography with conductivity detection was developed and optimized for the determination of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water. The ion chromatographic method has a detection limit of 0.02 mg L-1 and linear range of 0.05 to 1.0 mg L-1 with correlation coeff icient of 0.9992. The method is reproducible with percent RSD of 0.052% (n=10. The recovery of monochloroacetic acid spiked in different water types (bottled, tap and swimming pool water ranged from 28 to 122%. In dilute solutions, chloride and bromide were simultaneously analyzed along with monochloroacetic acid using the optimized method. Chloride and bromide have detection limits of 0.01 to 0.05 mg L-1, respectively. The usefulness of the ion chromatographic method was demonstrated in the analysis of monochloroacetic acid in swimming pool water samples. In such highly-chlorinated samples, an Ag/H cartridge was used prior to the ion chromatographic determination so as to minimize the signal due to chloride ion. Monochloroacetic acid was detected in concentrations between 0.020 and 0.093 mg L-1 in three of the six swimming pool water samples studied. The presence of monochloroacetic acid in the swimming pool water samples suggests the possible occurrence of other disinfection by-products in these waters.

  20. Solar thermal space heating combined with swimming pool heating: A promising solution for southern Europe climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, M.J.; Neves, Ana [INETI/DER, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2006-07-01

    The system concept evaluation performed focused on systems that can provide hot water, space heating and swimming-pool heating, and are designed for application in southern climates specifically for single-family houses. Due to the climate characteristics of southern Europe, space heating is required only for a few months in the year. In this evaluation it was considered a six month period for space heating and, on the other six months, swimming pool heating was considered. This type of systems are applicable to a niche market of people who are building their houses as single-family houses and want also to take profit of the good climate conditions for the use of solar energy. It is common that the construction of a swimming pool is also planned and constructed. The evaluation is made considering as reference system a factory made with 4m{sup 2} collector area and 300 l storage tank. The system in evaluation offers extra service - space heating and swimming pool heating and is formed by a collector field and a combistore providing solar hot water preparation and space heating in the winter period and providing also swimming pool heating in the summer period. The evaluation made shows that in southern Europe climates this system will give extra service in comparison to the traditional solar systems used and can be economically interesting.

  1. Monitoring organic loading to swimming pools by fluorescence excitation–emission matrix with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seredynska-Sobecka, Bozena; Stedmon, Colin; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence Excitation–Emission Matrix spectroscopy combined with parallel factor analysis was employed to monitor water quality and organic contamination in swimming pools. The fluorescence signal of the swimming pool organic matter was low but increased slightly through the day. The analysis...... revealed that the organic matter fluorescence was characterised by five different components, one of which was unique to swimming pool organic matter and one which was specific to organic contamination. The latter component had emission peaks at 420nm and was found to be a sensitive indicator of organic...... loading in swimming pool water. The fluorescence at 420nm gradually increased during opening hours and represented material accumulating through the day....

  2. Design and Construction of Pool Door for Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kwangsub; Lee, Sangjin; Choi, Jinbok; Oh, Jinho; Lee, Jongmin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The pool door is a structure to isolate the reactor pool from the service pool for maintenance. The pool door is installed before the reactor pool is drained. The pool door consists of structural component and sealing component. The main structures of the pool door are stainless steel plates and side frames. The plates and frames are assembled by welded joints. Lug is welded at the top of the plate. The pool door is submerged in the pool water when it is used. Materials of the pool door should be resistive to corrosion and radiation. Stainless steel is used in structural components and air nozzle assemblies. Features of design and construction of the pool door for the research reactor are introduced. The pool door is designed to isolate the reactor pool for maintenance. Structural analysis is performed to evaluate the structural integrity during earthquake. Tests and inspections are also carried out during construction to identify the safety and function of the pool door.

  3. Design and Construction of Pool Door for Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kwangsub; Lee, Sangjin; Choi, Jinbok; Oh, Jinho; Lee, Jongmin

    2016-01-01

    The pool door is a structure to isolate the reactor pool from the service pool for maintenance. The pool door is installed before the reactor pool is drained. The pool door consists of structural component and sealing component. The main structures of the pool door are stainless steel plates and side frames. The plates and frames are assembled by welded joints. Lug is welded at the top of the plate. The pool door is submerged in the pool water when it is used. Materials of the pool door should be resistive to corrosion and radiation. Stainless steel is used in structural components and air nozzle assemblies. Features of design and construction of the pool door for the research reactor are introduced. The pool door is designed to isolate the reactor pool for maintenance. Structural analysis is performed to evaluate the structural integrity during earthquake. Tests and inspections are also carried out during construction to identify the safety and function of the pool door

  4. The Leuze mineral water swimming pool - purposefully optimized energy utilization. Mineralbad Leuze: Sinnvoll optimierte Energienutzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-04-01

    The mineral-water swimming pool in Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt is fed by mineral springs. The author reports on the design and energy technology used in this indoor swimming pool (photographs), pool hall (feed and exhaust air), treatment basin, showers, locker rooms (air throughput rate, feed and exhaust air management), cafeteria, kitchen, gymnastics and technical services rooms, toilets, chemicals storage room, cooling system and heat pump (heat recovery from drained pool water up to 50%). District heating steam (18 bar) is used for heat supply (reducing station). The author comments on the temperature levels required for different heating cycles (hot-pool hall, hot-water basin, skylight heating, space heating) and on thermal output requirements (kW). (HWJ).

  5. Automation of water supply and recirculation-filtration of water at a swimming pool using Zelio PLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniş, C. M.; Popa, G. N.; Iagăr, A.

    2018-01-01

    The paper proposes the use of the Zelio PLC for the automation of the water supply and recirculation-filtration system of a swimming pool. To do this, the Zelio SR3B261BD - 24V DC with 10 digital inputs (24V DC) and 10 digital outputs (relay contacts) was used. The proposed application makes the control of the water supply pumps and the water recirculation-filtration from a swimming pool. The recirculation-filtration systems for pools and swimming pools are designed to ensure water cleaning and recirculation to achieve optimum quality and lasting service life. The water filtration process is one of the important steps in water treatment in polls and swimming pools. It consists in recirculation of the entire volume of water and begins by absorbing the water in the pool by means of a pump followed by the passing of water through the filter, disinfectant and pH dosing, and reintroducing the water back into the pool or swimming pool through the discharge holes. Filters must to work 24 hours a day to remove pollutants from pools or swimming pools users. Filtration removes suspension particles with different origins. All newly built pools and swimming pools must be fitted with water recirculation systems, and existing ones will be equipped with water recirculation and water treatment systems.

  6. Control Rods in high-Flux Swimming-Pool Reactors; Les Barres de Controle dans les Piles Piscines a Haut Flux; Reguliruyushchie sterzhni dlya reaktorov bassejnovogo tipa s vysokoj plotnost'yu nejtronnogo potoka; Las Barras de Control en los Reactores Tipo Piscina de Flujo Elevado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageroni, P.; Blum, P.; Denielou, G.; Denis, P.; Meunier, C. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble (France)

    1964-06-15

    Control-rod problems in open swimming-pool high-flux and high specific power research reactors are examined in the light of the calibrations and experiments made during the construction of the SILOE reactor. Control-rod operating experience for this reactor at 13 MW is also described. 2. The following are considered in turn: (a) Reactivity balances and reactivity values for the different types of rod tested (cadmium, B4C , rare earths and combinations of these different elements). (b) Flux peaks set up in the core by the presence of the control rods, their incidence on the specific power, the fast fluxes that can be obtained and means of increasing them. (c ) The technological problems involved in constructing the rods. (d) In-pile cooling, vibration, deformation and scram-time problems. 3. In conclusion, current studies on control rods in open swimming-pool reactors operating in the 10 - 30 1W range are briefly summarized. (author) [French] 1. Les problemes poses par les barres de controle dans les reacteurs de recherche de type piscine ouverte a haute puissance specifique et haut flux sont examines a la lumiere des calculs et des experiences effectues pendant la construction du reacteur SILOE. Les resultats de l'experience de fonctionnement a 13 MW de ce reacteur sont egalement presentes en ce qui concerne les barres de controle. 2. On examine successivement: a) les bilans de reactivite et les valeurs en reactivite des differents types de barres qui ont ete essayes (Cadmium, B 4C , terres rares et combinaisons de ces differents elements). b) Les pics de flux crees dans le coeur par la presence de barres de controle, leur incidence sur la puissance specifique, et les flux rapides que l'on peut obtenir ainsi que les moyens correspondants d'accroitre ces flux. c) Les problemes technologiques poses par la construction des barres. d) Les problemes de refrigeration, de vibration, de deformation, de temps de chute en pile. 3. En conclusion on decrit sommairement les

  7. Mathematical model development of heat and mass exchange processes in the outdoor swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Shaptala

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Currently exploitation of outdoor swimming pools is often not cost-effective and, despite of their relevance, such pools are closed in large quantities. At this time there is no the whole mathematical model which would allow assessing qualitatively the effect of energy-saving measures. The aim of this work is to develop a mathematical model of heat and mass exchange processes for calculating basic heat and mass losses that occur during its exploitation. Methodology. The method for determination of heat and mass loses based on the theory of similarity criteria equations is used. Findings. The main types of heat and mass losses of outdoor pool were analyzed. The most significant types were allocated and mathematically described. Namely: by evaporation of water from the surface of the pool, by natural and forced convection, by radiation to the environment, heat consumption for water heating. Originality. The mathematical model of heat and mass exchange process of the outdoor swimming pool was developed, which allows calculating the basic heat and mass loses that occur during its exploitation. Practical value. The method of determining heat and mass loses of outdoor swimming pool as a software system was developed and implemented. It is based on the mathematical model proposed by the authors. This method can be used for the conceptual design of energy-efficient structures of outdoor pools, to assess their use of energy-intensive and selecting the optimum energy-saving measures. A further step in research in this area is the experimental validation of the method of calculation of heat losses in outdoor swimming pools with its use as an example the pool of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V. Lazaryan. The outdoor pool, with water heating- up from the boiler room of the university, is operated year-round.

  8. A study of some radioprotection apparatuses used in the case of pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robien, E. de; Choudens, H. de; Delpuech, J.

    1965-01-01

    Various problems of radioprotection concerning swimming-pool reactors in Grenoble have led us to study adequate solutions: a) The automatic verification of the staff-radioactivity when coming out of Melusine or Siloe has been realized thanks to a βγ gate which is insensitive to the ambient background in the reactor-hall; b) The automatic verification of the contamination of the shoes of the agents working in these reactors has been realized with a dedicated device; c) The necessity to measure precisely γ doses with the help of an autonomous apparatus has led to the making of a plastic-scintillator γ dosimeter; d) The obligation to forbid the opening of doors in some places where there might be a great intensity of radiation, has led us to make doors open according to the intensity of radiation inside the rooms; e) The releases of radioactive iodine have been measured with activated charcoal cartridges that surround a scintillator connected with a unique channel selector; f) Finally the control of reactor safety rod fall in case of a radioactive accident has been secured by a chain whose detector is a chamber immersed in the swimming-pool, which offers, in the particular case of the hot thickness swimming-pool reactor a double advantage: first it enables us to regulate the upper hot water layer, second to get free of transitory radiations which appear in the reactor hall as the experimental apparatuses are taken out from the core. (authors) [fr

  9. Particles in swimming pool filters – Does pH determine the DBP formation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Willach, Sarah; Mosbæk, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The formation was investigated for different groups of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during chlorination of filter particles from swimming pools at different pH-values and the toxicity was estimated. Specifically, the formation of the DBP group trihalomethanes (THMs), which is regulated in many...... or initial free chlorine concentrations the particles were chlorinated at different pH-values in the relevant range for swimming pools. THM and HAA formations were reduced by decreasing pH while HAN formation increased with decreasing pH. Based on the organic content the relative DBP formation from...

  10. Microbial quality of swimming pool water with treatment without disinfection, with ultrafiltration, with UV-based treatment and with chlorination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuten, M.G.A.; Peters, M.C.F.M.; van Dijk, J.C.; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2017-01-01

    Swimming pools are traditionally disinfected with a residual disinfectant such as sodium hypochlorite. Nowadays, swimming water without a residual disinfectant is increasingly popular, as can be seen by the growing number of (natural) swimming ponds (Weilandt 2015), but health risks for bathers do

  11. Perceived health problems in swimmers according to the chemical treatment of water in swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Luna, Álvaro; Burillo, Pablo; Felipe, José Luis; del Corral, Julio; García-Unanue, Jorge; Gallardo, Leonor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine which chemical treatment used for disinfecting water in indoor swimming pools had the least impact on users' perceptions of health problems, and which generated the greatest satisfaction with the quality of the water. A survey on satisfaction and perceived health problems was given to 1001 users at 20 indoor swimming pools which used different water treatment methods [chlorine, bromine, ozone, ultraviolet lamps (UV) and salt electrolysis]. The findings suggest that there is a greater probability of perceived health problems, such as eye and skin irritation, respiratory problems and skin dryness, in swimming pools treated with chlorine than in swimming pools using other chemical treatment methods. Pools treated with bromine have similar, although slightly better, results. Other factors, such as age, gender, time of day of use (morning and afternoon) and type of user (competitive and recreational), can also affect the probability of suffering health problems. For all of the above, using combined treatment methods as ozone and UV, or salt electrolysis produces a lower probability of perceived health problems and greater satisfaction.

  12. Structure of pool in reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shigeki.

    1997-01-01

    Shielding walls made of iron-reinforced concrete having a metal liner including two body walls rigidly combined to the upper surface of a reactor container are disposed at least to one of an equipment pool or spent fuel storage pool in a reactor building. A rack for temporarily placing an upper lattice plate is detachably attached at least above one of a steam dryer or a gas/liquid separator temporarily placed in the temporary pool, and the height from the bottom portion to the upper end of the shielding wall is determined based on the height of an upper lattice plate temporary placed on the rack and the water depth required for shielding radiation from the upper lattice plate. An operator's exposure on the operation floor can be reduced by the shielding wall, and radiation dose from the spent fuels is reduced. The increase of the height of a pool guarder enhances bending resistance as a ceiling. In addition, the total height of them is made identical with the depth of the spent fuel storage pool thereby enabling to increase storage area for spent fuels. (N.H.)

  13. Cooling device for reactor suppression pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togasaki, Susumu; Kato, Kiyoshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a cooling device of a reactor suppression pool, when a temperature of pool water is abnormally increased and a heat absorbing portion is heated by, for example, occurrence of an accident, coolants are sent to the outside of the reactor container to actuates a thermally operating portion by the heat energy of coolants and drive heat exchanging fluids of a secondary cooling system. If the heat exchanging fluids are sent to a cooling portion, the coolants are cooled and returned to the heat absorbing portion of the suppression pool water. If the heat absorbing portion is heat pipes, the coolants are evaporated by heat absorbed from the suppression pool water, steams are sent to the thermally operating portion, then coolants are liquefied and caused to return to the heat absorbing portion. If the thermal operation portion is a gas turbine, the gas turbine is operated by the coolants, and it is converted to a rotational force to drive heat exchanging fluids by pumps. By constituting the cooling portion with a condensator, the coolants are condensed and liquefied and returned to the heat absorbing portion of the suppression pool water. (N.H.)

  14. Principle of a liquid nitrogen irradiation device and its realization for use in a swimming-pool type reactor; Principe d'un dispositif d'irradiation a azote liquide et sa realisation pour utilisation dans une pile piscine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochirol, L; Doulat, J; Weil, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The problem of pile irradiation of samples immersed in liquid nitrogen has been solved with total elimination of explosion hazards and high reliability (no moving parts). The principle of the device is that of a double bath: one of high purity nitrogen cools the samples at the level of the core; a second of commercial nitrogen is located above the first one, outside the high radiation field, and works as a continuous condenser for the pure nitrogen, the flow-back of which is provided simply by gravity. The apparatus described in detail here has been designed for a swimming-pool pile. It was so designed as to provide absolute protection against radiations and to allow the irradiated samples to be easily removed in the cold condition. This apparatus has been in operation for several months. In a fast flux greater than 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2}.s and a {gamma}-flux of the order of 10{sup 8} roentgens/h, the consumption of liquid nitrogen is of the order of 100 liters a day. (author) [French] On a resolu le probleme de l'irradiation en pile d'echantillons immerges dans l'azote liquide en construisant un appareil d'un fonctionnement sur (aucune partie n'est mobile) qui elimine completement les dangers d'explosion. Le principe de l'appareil est celui d'un double bain: l'un, d'azote pur, refroidit les echantillons au niveau du coeur du reacteur; l'autre, d'azote commercial, est situe au-dessus du premier, hors du champ de rayonnement intense, et sert de condenseur continu pour l'azote pur. Ce dernier ainsi reliquefie regagne son bain par simple gravite. L'appareil decrit en detail ici, est concu pour une pile piscine. Il a ete etudie de facon a ne creer aucune fuite de rayonnement et a permettre la recuperation aisee des echantillons irradies sans rechauffage de ceux-ci. Cet appareil est en fonctionnement depuis plusieurs mois. Dans un flux rapide superieur a 10{sup 13} neutrons/cm{sup 2}.s et un flux {gamma} de l'ordre de 10{sup 8} roentgens/h, la consommation d

  15. Occurrence and simulation of trihalomethanes in swimming pool water: A simple prediction method based on DOC and mass balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Di; Saravia, Florencia; Abbt-Braun, Gudrun; Horn, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Trihalomethanes (THM) are the most typical disinfection by-products (DBPs) found in public swimming pool water. DBPs are produced when organic and inorganic matter in water reacts with chemical disinfectants. The irregular contribution of substances from pool visitors and long contact time with disinfectant make the forecast of THM in pool water a challenge. In this work occurrence of THM in a public indoor swimming pool was investigated and correlated with the dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Daily sampling of pool water for 26 days showed a positive correlation between DOC and THM with a time delay of about two days, while THM and DOC didn't directly correlate with the number of visitors. Based on the results and mass-balance in the pool water, a simple simulation model for estimating THM concentration in indoor swimming pool water was proposed. Formation of THM from DOC, volatilization into air and elimination by pool water treatment were included in the simulation. Formation ratio of THM gained from laboratory analysis using native pool water and information from field study in an indoor swimming pool reduced the uncertainty of the simulation. The simulation was validated by measurements in the swimming pool for 50 days. The simulated results were in good compliance with measured results. This work provides a useful and simple method for predicting THM concentration and its accumulation trend for long term in indoor swimming pool water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mathematical model development of heat and mass exchange processes in the outdoor swimming pool

    OpenAIRE

    M. V. Shaptala; D. E. Shaptala

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Currently exploitation of outdoor swimming pools is often not cost-effective and, despite of their relevance, such pools are closed in large quantities. At this time there is no the whole mathematical model which would allow assessing qualitatively the effect of energy-saving measures. The aim of this work is to develop a mathematical model of heat and mass exchange processes for calculating basic heat and mass losses that occur during its exploitation. Methodology. The m...

  17. The effect of UV treatment on highly polluted and normal operated swimming pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Water samples from 2 indoor public swimming pool facilities with significantly different organic matter concentrations in the recirculation were tested to evaluate UV-induced effects on water chemistry. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of poor water quality due to increased...

  18. Color Fringes Bordering Black Stripes at the Bottom of a Swimming Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Gonzalo; Rojas, Roberto; Slüsarenko, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    We have observed a nice example of chromatic dispersion due to refraction in water, in the form of color fringes bordering the black stripes that exist at the bottom of a swimming pool. Here we give a qualitative description of the phenomenon, explaining the role of the black stripes and the dispersive index of refraction of water.

  19. Swimming Pool Hygiene: Self-Monitoring, Task Clarification, and Performance Feedback Increase Lifeguard Cleaning Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Henry M. S.; Ludwig, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of task clarification, self-monitoring, and performance feedback on cleaning behaviors of 9 lifeguards in 3 performance areas (vacuuming, lobby tidying, and pool deck maintenance) were investigated using an ABA reversal design at a county swim complex. A specific task in each performance area was used as a behavioral control. Following…

  20. Childhood Asthma and Environmental Exposures at Swimming Pools: State of the Science and Research Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent studies have explored the potential for swimming pool disinfection byproducts (DBPs) which are respiratory irritants to cause asthma in young children. While these studies raise concerns, gaps still exist in our knowledge regarding the exact causal agents and mechanisms f...

  1. Diatomite Type Filters for Swimming Pools. Standard No. 9, Revised October, 1966.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Pressure and vacuum diatomite type filters are covered in this standard. The filters herein described are intended to be designed and used specifically for swimming pool water filtration, both public and residential. Included are the basic components which are a necessary part of the diatomite type filter such as filter housing, element supports,…

  2. Analysis of an open-air swimming pool solar heating system by using an experimentally validated TRNSYS model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Elisa; Martinez, Pedro J. [Universidad Miguel Hernandez - Edificio Torreblanca, Avda. de la Universidad s/n, 03202 Elche (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    In the case of private outdoor swimming pools, seldom larger than 100 m{sup 2}, conventional auxiliary heating systems are being installed less and less. Solar heating is an option to extend the swimming season. The temperature evolution of an open-air swimming pool highly depends on the wind speed directly on the water surface, which at the same time is influenced by the surroundings of the pool. In this paper, the TRNSYS model of a private open-air pool with a 50-m{sup 2} surface was validated by registering the water temperature evolution and the meteorological data at the pool site. Evaporation is the main component of energy loss in swimming pools. Six different sets of constants found in literature were considered to evaluate the evaporative heat transfer coefficient with the purpose of finding the most suitable one for the TRNSYS pool model. In order to do that, the evolution of the pool water temperature predicted by the TRNSYS pool model was compared with the experimentally registered one. The simulation with TRNSYS of the total system, including the swimming pool and the absorber circuit integrated into the existing filter circuit, provided information regarding the increase of the pool temperature for different collector areas during the swimming season. This knowledge, together with the economic costs, support the decision about the absorber field size. (author)

  3. Mitigating the impact of swimming pools on domestic water demand

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    need to implement desalination schemes by ensuring water is used in in a 'fit for purpose' manner. This study therefore aims to better understand the impact that pools have on residential water demand through the analysis of metered water demand records and end-use modelling. The study site was the Liesbeek.

  4. The Ineffectiveness of Manual Treatment of Swimming Pools NNAJI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    there was a level of dissatisfaction among the swimmers. Some of ... period, the COD was above 80mg/l, the pH was between 6.2 and 7.1 as against 7.2 to 7.8 recommended by .... Fig 6: Chemical oxygen Demand of the Pool for Three Months.

  5. An Investigation on Physicochemical and Microbial Water Quality of Swimming Pools in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Dehvari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Disrespect of health regulations and proper disinfection of water and swimming pools is effective in incidence of health problems and transfer of infectious diseases to swimmers. The aim of this research was to investigate water of swimming pools in Yazd city and compare the results with national standards. Methods: In this study, 11 active covered swimming pools of Yazd city were sampled as census. Parameters of temperature, pH, amount of free and Combined chlorine residual, turbidity, alkalinity, hardness, the population of heterotrophic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, fecal streptococci, and fecal coliforms were studied. Sampling has been conducted every two weaks for 3 months and samples were analyzed under standard procedures. Results: In this research, amount of pH in 84.73%, free residual chlorine in 44.18%, Combined residual chlorine in 72.45%, alkalinity in19.82%, turbidity in 86.36%, hardness in 57.18% and temperature in 13.73% Samples were desirable. The fecal streptococci bacteria was not shown in all the swimming pools and population of heterotrophic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and fecal coliforms in 56.73%, 93.27%, 79.36% and 91.45% cases were desirable, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that there is a direct relationship between Water turbidity and population of heterotraphic bacteria. Conclusion: According to the results, the parameters of heterotrophic bacteria population, also the alkalinity and temperature had the least compliant with the standards that shows the necessity for continuous monitoring of physical, chemical and microbial parameters and also control of filtration and disinfection of water condition of swimming pools.

  6. Enhancing swimming pool safety by the use of range-imaging cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerardyn, D.; Boulanger, S.; Kuijk, M.

    2015-05-01

    Drowning is the cause of death of 372.000 people, each year worldwide, according to the report of November 2014 of the World Health Organization.1 Currently, most swimming pools only use lifeguards to detect drowning people. In some modern swimming pools, camera-based detection systems are nowadays being integrated. However, these systems have to be mounted underwater, mostly as a replacement of the underwater lighting. In contrast, we are interested in range imaging cameras mounted on the ceiling of the swimming pool, allowing to distinguish swimmers at the surface from drowning people underwater, while keeping the large field-of-view and minimizing occlusions. However, we have to take into account that the water surface of a swimming pool is not a flat, but mostly rippled surface, and that the water is transparent for visible light, but less transparent for infrared or ultraviolet light. We investigated the use of different types of 3D cameras to detect objects underwater at different depths and with different amplitudes of surface perturbations. Specifically, we performed measurements with a commercial Time-of-Flight camera, a commercial structured-light depth camera and our own Time-of-Flight system. Our own system uses pulsed Time-of-Flight and emits light of 785 nm. The measured distances between the camera and the object are influenced through the perturbations on the water surface. Due to the timing of our Time-of-Flight camera, our system is theoretically able to minimize the influence of the reflections of a partially-reflecting surface. The combination of a post image-acquisition filter compensating for the perturbations and the use of a light source with shorter wavelengths to enlarge the depth range can improve the current commercial cameras. As a result, we can conclude that low-cost range imagers can increase swimming pool safety, by inserting a post-processing filter and the use of another light source.

  7. Prevalence of dental erosion in adolescent competitive swimmers exposed to gas-chlorinated swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowska-Radlińska, J; Łagocka, R; Kaczmarek, W; Górski, M; Nowicka, A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence of dental erosion among competitive swimmers of the local swimming club in Szczecin, Poland, who train in closely monitored gas-chlorinated swimming pool water. The population for this survey consisted of a group of junior competitive swimmers who had been training for an average of 7 years, a group of senior competitive swimmers who had been training for an average of 10 years, and a group of recreational swimmers. All subjects underwent a clinical dental examination and responded to a questionnaire regarding aspects of dental erosion. In pool water samples, the concentration of calcium, magnesium, phosphate, sodium, and potassium ions and pH were determined. The degree of hydroxyapatite saturation was also calculated. Dental erosion was found in more than 26 % of the competitive swimmers and 10 % of the recreational swimmers. The lesions in competitive swimmers were on both the labial and palatal surfaces of the anterior teeth, whereas erosions in recreational swimmers developed exclusively on the palatal surfaces. Although the pH of the pool water was neutral, it was undersaturated with respect to hydroxyapatite. The factors that increase the risk of dental erosion include the duration of swimming and the amount of training. An increased risk of erosion may be related to undersaturation of pool water with hydroxyapatite components. To decrease the risk of erosion in competitive swimmers, the degree of dental hydroxyapatite saturation should be a controlled parameter in pool water.

  8. A scale model to evaluate water evaporation from indoor swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asdrubali, F. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Perugia, Via G. Duranti 67, 06125 Perugia (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    The evaluation of water evaporation from indoor swimming pools is a topic of considerable practical interest, since evaporation may cause the highest energy consumption of the pool plant. A purposely designed experimental apparatus was used to measure the water evaporation rate from a pool scale model inserted into a climatic chamber to control environmental conditions. The experimental data were obtained varying various parameters such as water temperature, air temperature, relative humidity and air velocity. The results were used to propose a prediction model for water evaporation which was compared to other methods found in the literature, showing a good agreement. (author)

  9. Optimization of heat pump system in indoor swimming pool using particle swarm algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wen-Shing; Kung, Chung-Kuan [Department of Energy and Refrigerating Air-Conditioning Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, 1, Section 3, Chung-Hsiao East Road, Taipei (China)

    2008-09-15

    When it comes to indoor swimming pool facilities, a large amount of energy is required to heat up low-temperature outdoor air before it is being introduced indoors to maintain indoor humidity. Since water is evaporated from the pool surface, the exhausted air contains more water and specific enthalpy. In response to this indoor air, heat pump is generally used in heat recovery for indoor swimming pools. To reduce the cost in energy consumption, this paper utilizes particle swarm algorithm to optimize the design of heat pump system. The optimized parameters include continuous parameters and discrete parameters. The former consists of outdoor air mass flow and heat conductance of heat exchangers; the latter comprises compressor type and boiler type. In a case study, life cycle energy cost is considered as an objective function. In this regard, the optimized outdoor air flow and the optimized design for heating system can be deduced by using particle swarm algorithm. (author)

  10. Titanium distribution in swimming pool water is dominated by dissolved species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Holbrook, R; Motabar, Donna; Quiñones, Oscar; Stanford, Benjamin; Vanderford, Brett; Moss, Donna

    2013-10-01

    The increased use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in consumer products such as sunscreen has raised concerns about their possible risk to human and environmental health. In this work, we report the occurrence, size fractionation and behavior of titanium (Ti) in a children's swimming pool. Size-fractionated samples were analyzed for Ti using ICP-MS. Total titanium concentrations ([Ti]) in the pool water ranged between 21 μg/L and 60 μg/L and increased throughout the 101-day sampling period while [Ti] in tap water remained relatively constant. The majority of [Ti] was found in the dissolved phase (microparticulate. Simple models suggest that evaporation may account for the observed variation in [Ti], while sunscreen may be a relevant source of particulate and microparticule Ti. Compared to diet, incidental ingestion of nano-Ti from swimming pool water is minimal. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Kamilla M.S.; Zortea, Raissa; Piketty, Aurelia; Vega, Sergio Rodriguez; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported to be found in swimming pool water: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform, dichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, dibromoacetronitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, trichloronitromethane, dichloropropanone, trichloropropanone, and chloral hydrate. First order photolysis constants ranged 26-fold from 0.020 min −1 for chloroform to 0.523 min −1 for trichloronitromethane. The rate constants generally increased with bromine substitution. Using the UV removal of combined chlorine as an actinometer, the rate constants were recalculated to actual treatment doses of UV applied in a swimming pool. In an investigated public pool the UV dose was equivalent to an applied electrical energy of 1.34 kWh m −3 d −1 and the UV dose required to removed 90% of trichloronitromethane was 0.4 kWh m −3 d −1 , while 2.6 kWh m −3 d −1 was required for chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes ranged from 0.6 to 3.1 kWh m −3 d −1 . It was predicted thus that a beneficial side-effect of applying UV for removing combined chlorine from the pool water could be a significant removal of trichloronitromethane, chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes. - Highlights: ► UV irradiation is able to degrade all 12 investigated disinfection by-products. ► Bromine species are easier to remove than their chlorinated analogues. ► UV dose used for combined chlorine was comparable with doses required for DBP removal. ► Significant removal of some disinfection by-products in swimming pools is indicated

  12. Potential risks of TiO{sub 2} and ZnO nanoparticles released from sunscreens into outdoor swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Soo-kyung [Center for Water Resource Cycle, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Energy Environment Policy and Technology, Green School, Korea University (KU)-Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-ju [Center for Water Resource Cycle, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaesang [Energy Environment Policy and Technology, Green School, Korea University (KU)-Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seunghak, E-mail: seunglee@kist.re.kr [Center for Water Resource Cycle, Green City Technology Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Energy Environment Policy and Technology, Green School, Korea University (KU)-Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Nanoparticles from sunscreen products can be released into public pools. • Nanoparticles and organic ingredients can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). • A negative impact of ROS should not be significant in swimming pool. - Abstract: The potential risks of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens being released into swimming water were evaluated by a series of laboratory experiments simulating the fate and transport of NPs in outdoor swimming pools. NPs released from sunscreen-applied skin were estimated using pig skins covered with five different commercial sunscreens containing TiO{sub 2}, ZnO, or both at various concentrations. Assuming that the swimming water treatment processes consisted of filtration, UV irradiation, heating, and chlorination, possible removal of the released NPs by each process was estimated. Generation of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) by the NPs under sunlight and after UV photochemical treatment were measured, and the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration possibly present in the swimming pool was calculated based on some specific scenarios of operating an outdoor swimming pool. It was found that a significant amount of the NPs in sunscreens could be released into the swimming water, and accumulate during circulation through the treatment system. However, the concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} possibly present in the swimming pool should be below the level at which an adverse effect to bathers is concerned.

  13. Potential risks of TiO_2 and ZnO nanoparticles released from sunscreens into outdoor swimming pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Soo-kyung; Kim, Eun-ju; Lee, Jaesang; Lee, Seunghak

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanoparticles from sunscreen products can be released into public pools. • Nanoparticles and organic ingredients can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). • A negative impact of ROS should not be significant in swimming pool. - Abstract: The potential risks of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens being released into swimming water were evaluated by a series of laboratory experiments simulating the fate and transport of NPs in outdoor swimming pools. NPs released from sunscreen-applied skin were estimated using pig skins covered with five different commercial sunscreens containing TiO_2, ZnO, or both at various concentrations. Assuming that the swimming water treatment processes consisted of filtration, UV irradiation, heating, and chlorination, possible removal of the released NPs by each process was estimated. Generation of hydrogen peroxide (H_2O_2) by the NPs under sunlight and after UV photochemical treatment were measured, and the H_2O_2 concentration possibly present in the swimming pool was calculated based on some specific scenarios of operating an outdoor swimming pool. It was found that a significant amount of the NPs in sunscreens could be released into the swimming water, and accumulate during circulation through the treatment system. However, the concentration of H_2O_2 possibly present in the swimming pool should be below the level at which an adverse effect to bathers is concerned.

  14. Gene expression changes in blood RNA after swimming in a chlorinated pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Lucas A; Font-Ribera, Laia; Bustamante, Mariona; Sumoy, Lauro; Grimalt, Joan O; Bonnin, Sarah; Aguilar, Maria; Mattlin, Heidi; Hummel, Manuela; Ferrer, Anna; Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBP) such as trihalomethanes (THM) in swimming pools has been linked to adverse health effects in humans, but their biological mechanisms are unclear. We evaluated short-term changes in blood gene expression of adult recreational swimmers after swimming in a chlorinated pool. Volunteers swam 40min in an indoor chlorinated pool. Blood samples were drawn and four THM (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform) were measured in exhaled breath before and after swimming. Intensity of physical activity was measured as metabolic equivalents (METs). Gene expression in whole blood mRNA was evaluated using IlluminaHumanHT-12v3 Expression-BeadChip. Linear mixed models were used to evaluate the relationship between gene expression changes and THM exposure. Thirty-seven before-after pairs were analyzed. The median increase from baseline to after swimming were: 0.7 to 2.3 for MET, and 1.4 to 7.1μg/m 3 for exhaled total THM (sum of the four THM). Exhaled THM increased on average 0.94μg/m 3 per 1 MET. While 1643 probes were differentially expressed post-exposure. Of them, 189 were also associated with exhaled levels of individual/total THM or MET after False Discovery Rate. The observed associations with the exhaled THM were low to moderate (Log-fold change range: -0.17 to 0.15). In conclusion, we identified short-term gene expression changes associated with swimming in a pool that were minor in magnitude and their biological meaning was unspecific. The high collinearity between exhaled THM levels and intensity of physical activity precluded mutually adjusted models with both covariates. These exploratory results should be validated in future studies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Primary system thermal-hydraulic simulation of a experimental pool type research fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, E.M.; Braz Filho, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    The first step of the Fast Reactor Program (REARA) is the design of an experimental reactor. To this end a 5 MW t pool type reactor was adapted. The objective of this work is to evaluate the reactor behaviour at the on set protected accidents. The program NALAP was used in this study and the results showed the outstanding safety margins that this reactor type presents inherently. (author)

  16. The role of risk management in decrease of lawsuits of swimming pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Izadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to study of risk management practices in decrease of lawsuits in public and private swimming pools in Tehran. The statistical population of the research included 310 managers of public and private swimming pools which 119 were selected as statistical samples by means of random sampling. The research method was descriptive and survey, and in measurement form. 2 questionnaires were used, on relating to demographic data and general information and the other to risk management practices and their validity was determined by alpha Cronbach method. The required information was collected by personal interviews during the time acting of managers in pools gathered and the data was analyzed by using person correlation coefficient. The result of this study indicated that: Significant relationship existed between incidents of accidents/injuries and lawsuits in swimming pools in Tehran. Significant relationship existed between risk management practice and accidents/injuries and lawsuits. Significant relationship existed between risk management practice and lawsuits and lawsuits.

  17. Evaluating performance from spiral polyethylene tubes as solar collectors for heating swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanelli, Anderson Thiago Pontes; Marchi Neto, Ismael de; Scalon, Vicente Luiz; Padilha, Alcides [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho, Bauru, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica], e-mails: scalon@feb.unesp.br, padilha@feb.unesp.br

    2010-07-01

    The solar energy is very common in the daily of citizens from different regions in world. Environmental questions and the consequent Development of renewable energy techniques were a decisive factor for expanding this market. Currently, the solar energy is present in many different devices: as direct conversion through photovoltaic panels as in solar domestic for hot water systems(SDHWS). Another common use is in the heating system for swimming pools, that could be utilized for therapeutic or comfort reasons. The main aspect that increments this use is the economy for operation of these systems. On the other hand, these systems need a high initial investment. Reducing this cost without reduction in collector efficiency using new materials and / or alternative projects is important target for new researches. Thus, this paper aims to analyze the efficiency of one of these alternative models for heating swimming pools. The conceptual device evaluated is a low cost model. It could be made from polyethylene tubes forming spiral heat exchangers. Analysis of the system is based on a dynamic model using differential equations system including solar collector and swimming pool. Experimental radiation and other environmental conditions in the region of Bauru-SP are used for analyse the dynamic behavior of the system. The simulations are based on analysis of three main parameters: number of collectors, the pump drive time and wall thickness of the collector of polyethylene. Based on these numerical tests one can conclude that this new model of solar collector for swimming pool has a better cost benefit ratio when superficial area is equal to 80% of pool area, pump operation is alternating with four minutes turned on and 28 turned off and the polyethylene wall thickness is 1.5 mm (author)

  18. Effect of ozonation of swimming pool water on formation of volatile disinfection by-products - A laboratory study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Cheema, Waqas Akram

    2016-01-01

    Ozonation experiments were performed using unchlorinated tap water used for filling municipal swimming pools, actual pool water and pool water polluted by addition of fresh tap water and artificial body fluid to evaluate ozone kinetics and water quality effects on formation of volatile disinfecti...

  19. Bacterial populations on silicone hydrogel and hydrogel contact lenses after swimming in a chlorinated pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jennifer; Vuu, Kathy; Bergenske, Peter; Burnham, Kara; Smythe, Jennifer; Caroline, Patrick

    2005-02-01

    A number of reports have indicated an association between swimming with contact lenses and subsequent eye infection. This study tests whether a hydrophilic contact lens worn while swimming accumulates bacteria present in the water. It was of interest to determine whether lens type (silicone hydrogel vs. hydrogel) affected the result. Fifteen healthy noncontact lens wearers swam for 30 minutes with a silicone hydrogel lens (PureVision, Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY) on one eye and a hydrogel lens (Acuvue 2, Vistakon Inc., Jacksonville, FL) on the other. Lenses were removed aseptically and placed in sterile vials 10 minutes after the subjects left the water. Microbial growth was enumerated for total numbers of colonies and categorized by species present. Numbers of colonies were compared between the two lens groups and with a water sample taken from the pool at the time of the experiment. Eight of the subjects returned on a different day and wore new lenses for 50 minutes in normal room conditions. Two lenses were lost while swimming. Twenty-seven of the remaining 28 lenses worn while swimming showed colonization, principally with Staphylococcus epidermidis, which was also by far the most common species identified from the water itself. Small numbers of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus salivarius were also present in the water and on the lenses. Numbers of colonies varied among subjects (range, 0 to 230), but no differences were observed between the two lens groups. Lenses removed after 30 minutes of wear without swimming were mostly sterile, with 3 of 16 lenses showing just two colonies each. It appears that wearing a hydrophilic lens while swimming allows accumulation of microbial organisms on or in the lens, regardless of lens material. Swimmers should be advised to wear tight-fitting goggles if lenses are worn while swimming, and thorough disinfection of the lenses before overnight wear seems prudent.

  20. Payroll System in Swimming Pool Tasa Using Visual Basic .Net 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Parcel Natalnael Hutabarat; Rahayu Noveandini, SKom, MM

    2008-01-01

    With the proposed payroll system built on this design, it can replace the manual system to process payroll, and expect to be able to overcome the weaknesses that have been faced by TASA and the swimming pool is also a way to simplify payroll activities TASA which during the many weaknesses . With the system that uses computer services is expected to help TASA employee wage freeze.

  1. Short-term changes in respiratory biomarkers after swimming in a chlorinated pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font-Ribera, Laia; Kogevinas, Manolis; Zock, Jan-Paul; Gómez, Federico P; Barreiro, Esther; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Fernandez, Pilar; Lourencetti, Carolina; Pérez-Olabarría, Maitane; Bustamante, Mariona; Marcos, Ricard; Grimalt, Joan O; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2010-11-01

    Swimming in chlorinated pools involves exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) and has been associated with impaired respiratory health. We evaluated short-term changes in several respiratory biomarkers to explore mechanisms of potential lung damage related to swimming pool exposure. We measured lung function and biomarkers of airway inflammation [fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), eight cytokines, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in exhaled breath condensate], oxidative stress (8-isoprostane in exhaled breath condensate), and lung permeability [surfactant protein D (SP-D) and the Clara cell secretory protein (CC16) in serum] in 48 healthy nonsmoking adults before and after they swam for 40 min in a chlorinated indoor swimming pool. We measured trihalomethanes in exhaled breath as a marker of individual exposure to DBPs. Energy expenditure during swimming, atopy, and CC16 genotype (rs3741240) were also determined. Median serum CC16 levels increased from 6.01 to 6.21 microg/L (average increase, 3.3%; paired Wilcoxon test p = 0.03), regardless of atopic status and CC16 genotype. This increase was explained both by energy expenditure and different markers of DBP exposure in multivariate models. FeNO was unchanged overall but tended to decrease among atopics. We found no significant changes in lung function, SP-D, 8-isoprostane, eight cytokines, or VEGF. We detected a slight increase in serum CC16, a marker of lung epithelium permeability, in healthy adults after they swam in an indoor chlorinated pool. Exercise and DBP exposure explained this association, without involving inflammatory mechanisms. Further research is needed to confirm the results, establish the clinical relevance of short-term serum CC16 changes, and evaluate the long-term health impacts.

  2. Influence of a swimming-pool on fertility in buffalo species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Zicarelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the effect of a swimming-pool on reproductive efficiency in buffalo species. The trial was performed in a commercial buffalo farm, where lactating buffaloes were divided into two groups (G1 and G2, and only in G1 a swimming-pool was available. Data of a 4-years period (1999–2002 were analysed. Statistical analysis of calving-conception interval (CCI of a first 3-years period (1999–2001, after logarithmic conversion, was performed by “t” Student’s Test while the percentage data were analyzed by Chi-square test. Animals in G1 showed higher conception rate within 120 days post calving (53.7% vs. 39.9%; P<0.001 in both deliveries of January-March and April-August. During the first 2 years (1999–2000 the CCI of buffaloes that delivered in January- March period was longer (P<0.001 than that of April-August. Furthermore, on the total of the 3 years the CCI was longer (P<0.01 in buffaloes of G2 compared to G1. Because of the presence of a swimming- pool also for G2 from 2002 May, the conception rate of not pregnant subjects characterized by more than 40 days open in 2001 and 2002 was also calculated and the favourable effect was confirmed. These results highlight the beneficial effect of a swimming-pool on fertility in buffalo species.

  3. Design of a tool for extracting a plexiglass falls to the bottom of the reactor pool TRIGA MKI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kankunku, P.K.; Lukanda, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a particular problem, of extracting a plexiglas from the bottom of thr reactor swimming pool. With rudimentary techniques of extraction (two attempts), we noticed that these techniques were unsuccessful, by the way we proceeded in designing a tool made of steel which solved the problem of plexiglas extraction

  4. New method for determination of trihalomethanes in exhaled breath: Applications to swimming pool and bath environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourencetti, Carolina; Ballester, Clara; Fernandez, Pilar; Marco, Esther; Prado, Celia; Periago, Juan F.; Grimalt, Joan O.

    2010-01-01

    A method for the estimation of the human intake of trihalomethanes (THMs), namely chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform, during showering and bathing is reported. The method is based on the determination of these compounds in exhaled breath that is collected by solid adsorption on Tenax using a device specifically designed for this purpose. Instrumental measurements were performed by automatic thermal desorption coupled to gas chromatography with electron capture detection. THMs in exhaled breath samples were determined during showering and swimming pool attendance. The levels of these compounds in indoor air and water were also determined as reference for interpretation of the exhaled breath results. The THM concentrations in exhaled breath of the volunteers measured before the exposure experiments showed a close correspondence with the THMs levels in indoor air where the sampler was located. Limits of detection in exhaled breath were dependent on THM analytes and experimental sites. They ranged between 170 and 710 ng m -3 in the swimming pool studies and between 97 and 460 ng m -3 in the showering studies. Application of this method to THMs determination during showering and swimming pool activities revealed statistically significant increases in THMs concentrations when comparing exhaled breath before and after exposure.

  5. Degradation of Organic UV filters in Chlorinated Seawater Swimming Pools: Transformation Pathways and Bromoform Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasfi, Tarek; Coulomb, Bruno; Ravier, Sylvain; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-12-05

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are used in sunscreens and other personal-care products to protect against harmful effects of exposure to UV solar radiation. Little is known about the fate of UV filters in seawater swimming pools disinfected with chlorine. The present study investigated the occurrence and fate of five commonly used organic UV filters, namely dioxybenzone, oxybenzone, avobenzone, 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate, and octocrylene, in chlorinated seawater swimming pools. Pool samples were collected to monitor the variation of UV filter concentrations during pool opening hours. Furthermore, laboratory-controlled chlorination experiments were conducted in seawater spiked with UV filters to investigate the reactivity of UV filters. Extracts of chlorination reaction samples were analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry and electron-capture detection to identify the potentially formed byproducts. In the collected pool samples, all the UV filters except dioxybenzone were detected. Chlorination reactions showed that only octocrylene was stable in chlorinated seawater. The four reactive UV filters generated brominated transformation products and disinfection byproducts. This formation of brominated products resulted from reactions between the reactive UV filters and bromine, which is formed rapidly when chlorine is added to seawater. Based on the identified byproducts, the transformation pathways of the reactive UV filters were proposed for the first time. Bromoform was generated by all the reactive UV filters at different yields. Bromal hydrate was also detected as one of the byproducts generated by oxybenzone and dioxybenzone.

  6. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kamilla M S; Zortea, Raissa; Piketty, Aurelia; Vega, Sergio Rodriguez; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2013-01-15

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported to be found in swimming pool water: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform, dichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, dibromoacetronitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, trichloronitromethane, dichloropropanone, trichloropropanone, and chloral hydrate. First order photolysis constants ranged 26-fold from 0.020 min(-1) for chloroform to 0.523 min(-1) for trichloronitromethane. The rate constants generally increased with bromine substitution. Using the UV removal of combined chlorine as an actinometer, the rate constants were recalculated to actual treatment doses of UV applied in a swimming pool. In an investigated public pool the UV dose was equivalent to an applied electrical energy of 1.34 kWh m(-3) d(-1) and the UV dose required to removed 90% of trichloronitromethane was 0.4 kWh m(-3) d(-1), while 2.6 kWh m(-3) d(-1) was required for chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes ranged from 0.6 to 3.1 kWh m(-3) d(-1). It was predicted thus that a beneficial side-effect of applying UV for removing combined chlorine from the pool water could be a significant removal of trichloronitromethane, chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Decontamination of outdoor school swimming pools in Fukushima after the nuclear accident in March 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saegusa, J; Kurikami, H; Yasuda, R; Kurihara, K; Arai, S; Kuroki, R; Matsuhashi, S; Ozawa, T; Goto, H; Takano, T; Mitamura, H; Nagano, T; Naganawa, H; Yoshida, Z; Funaki, H; Tokizawa, T; Nakayama, S

    2013-03-01

    Because of radioactive fallout resulting from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident, water discharge from many outdoor swimming pools in Fukushima was suspended out of concern that radiocesium in the pool water would flow into farmlands. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has reviewed the existing flocculation method for decontaminating pool water and established a practical decontamination method by demonstrating the process at eight pools in Fukushima. In this method, zeolite powder and a flocculant are used for capturing radiocesium present in pool water. The supernatant is discharged if the radiocesium concentration is less than the targeted level. The radioactive residue is collected and stored in a temporary storage space. Radioactivity concentration in water is measured with a NaI(Tl) or Ge detector installed near the pool. The demonstration results showed that the pool water in which the radiocesium concentration was more than a few hundred Bq L was readily purified by the method, and the radiocesium concentration was reduced to less than 100 Bq L. The ambient dose rates around the temporary storage space were slightly elevated; however, the total increase was up to 30% of the background dose rates when the residue was shielded with sandbags.

  8. Acute changes in serum immune markers due to swimming in a chlorinated pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaanderen, Jelle; van Veldhoven, Karin; Font-Ribera, Laia; Villanueva, Cristina M; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Portengen, Lützen; Grimalt, Joan O; Zwiener, Christian; Heederik, Dick; Zhang, Xiangru; Vineis, Paolo; Kogevinas, Manolis; Vermeulen, Roel

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to disinfectants and disinfection byproducts (DBPs) due to swimming in chlorinated water has been associated with allergic and respiratory health effects, including asthma. Biological mechanisms contributing to these associations are largely unknown. We hypothesized a potential pathway involving modulation of the immune system. We assessed levels of immune markers (CCL11, CCL22, CXCL10, CRP, EGF, GCSF, IL-8, IL-17, IL-1RA, MPO, VEGF, Periostin) in serum collected from 30 women and 29 men before and after 40min of swimming in a chlorinated pool. Exposure to DBPs was assessed by measuring bromodichloromethane, bromoform, chloroform, and dibromochloromethane in exhaled breath before and after swimming. Covariate data including information on physical activity was available through questionnaires and measurements. We assessed the association between indicators of swimming in a chlorinated pool and changes in serum immune marker concentrations using linear regression with bivariate normal distributions and adjusted for multiple comparisons by applying the Benjamini-Hochberg procedure. We observed a significant decrease in serum concentrations of IL-8 (-12.53%; q=2.00e-03), CCL22 (-7.28%; q=4.00e-04), CCL11 (-7.15%; q=9.48e-02), CRP (-7.06%; q=4.68e-05), and CXCL10 (-13.03%; q=6.34e-14) and a significant increase in IL-1RA (20.16%; q=4.18e-06) from before to after swimming. Associations with quantitative measurements of DBPs or physical activity were similar in direction and strength. Most of the observed associations became non-significant when we adjusted the effects of exposure to DBPs for physical activity or vice-versa. Our study indicates that swimming in a chlorinated pool induces perturbations of the immune response through acute alterations of patterns of cytokine and chemokine secretion. The observed effects could not be uniquely attributed to either exposure to DBPs or physical activity. Evidence in the literature suggests that observed decreases in

  9. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Kamilla M.S. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Zortea, Raissa [Department of Land, Environment and Geotechnology Engineering, Polytechnic University of Turin (Italy); Piketty, Aurelia [Institute of Chemistry, Industrial and Chemical Engineering and Technology (INP-ENCIACET), National Polytechnic Institute of Toulouse (France); Vega, Sergio Rodriguez [Chemical Engineering, Complutense University of Madrid (Spain); Andersen, Henrik Rasmus, E-mail: Henrik@ndersen.net [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark)

    2013-01-15

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported to be found in swimming pool water: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform, dichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, dibromoacetronitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, trichloronitromethane, dichloropropanone, trichloropropanone, and chloral hydrate. First order photolysis constants ranged 26-fold from 0.020 min{sup −1} for chloroform to 0.523 min{sup −1} for trichloronitromethane. The rate constants generally increased with bromine substitution. Using the UV removal of combined chlorine as an actinometer, the rate constants were recalculated to actual treatment doses of UV applied in a swimming pool. In an investigated public pool the UV dose was equivalent to an applied electrical energy of 1.34 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1} and the UV dose required to removed 90% of trichloronitromethane was 0.4 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1}, while 2.6 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1} was required for chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes ranged from 0.6 to 3.1 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1}. It was predicted thus that a beneficial side-effect of applying UV for removing combined chlorine from the pool water could be a significant removal of trichloronitromethane, chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes. - Highlights: ► UV irradiation is able to degrade all 12 investigated disinfection by-products. ► Bromine species are easier to remove than their chlorinated analogues. ► UV dose used for combined chlorine was comparable with doses required for DBP removal. ► Significant removal of some disinfection by-products in swimming pools is indicated.

  10. Evaporation rate measurement in the pool of IEAR-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Walmir Maximo; Cegalla, Miriam A.; Baptista Filho, Benedito Dias

    2000-01-01

    The surface water evaporation in pool type reactors affects the ventilation system operation and the ambient conditions and dose rates in the operation room. This paper shows the results of evaporation rate experiment in the pool of IEA-R1 research reactor. The experiment is based on the demineralized water mass variation inside cylindrical metallic recipients during a time interval. Other parameters were measured, such as: barometric pressure, relative humidity, environmental temperature, water temperature inside the recipients and water temperature in the reactor pool. The pool level variation due to water contraction/expansion was calculated. (author)

  11. Combined UV treatment and ozonation for the removal of by-product precursors in swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Both UV treatment and ozonation are used to reduce different types of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in swimming pools. UV treatment is the most common approach, as it is particularly efficient at removing combined chlorine. However, the UV treatment of pool water increases chlorine reactivity...

  12. Effect of selection of pH in swimming pool on formation of chlorination by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Willach, Sarah; Mosbæk, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Chlorine is used as disinfection agent in public swimming pools, but also reacts with organic matter in the water forming chlorinat ed disinfection by-products. In order to evaluate the effect of choice of pHsetpoint in the pool we investigated the effect of chlorination of artificial body fluid...

  13. Kick, Stroke and Swim: Complement Your Swimming Program by Engaging the Whole Body on Dry Land and in the Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Susan; Duell, Kelly; Dehaven, Carole; Heidorn, Brent

    2017-01-01

    The Kick, Stroke and Swim (KSS) program can be used to engage students in swimming-skill acquisition and fitness training using a variety of modalities, strategies and techniques on dry land. Practicing swim strokes and techniques on land gives all levels of swimmers--from beginner to competitive--a kinesthetic awareness of the individual…

  14. Assessment of air and water contamination by disinfection by-products at 41 indoor swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardif, Robert; Catto, Cyril; Haddad, Sami; Simard, Sabrina; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the profiles (occurrence and speciation) of disinfection by-product (DBP) contamination in air and water of a group of 41 public indoor swimming pools in Québec (Canada). The contaminants measured in the water included the traditional DBPs [i.e., four trihalomethanes (THMs), six haloacetic acids (HAAs)] but also several emergent DBPs [i.e., halonitriles, halonitromethanes, haloketones and nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)]. Those measured in the air comprised THMs and chloramines (CAMs). Overall, extremely variable DBP levels were found from one pool to another (both quantitatively and in terms of speciation). For instance, in water, among the four THMs, chloroform was usually the most abundant compound (37.9±25.7µg/L). Nevertheless, the sum of the three other brominated THMs represented more than 25% of total THMs at almost half the facilities visited (19 cases). In 13 of them, the levels of brominated THMs (66±24.2µg/L) even greatly outweighed the levels of chloroform (15.2±6.31µg/L). Much higher levels of HAAs (294.8±157.6µg/L) were observed, with a consistent preponderance of brominated HAAs in the swimming pools with more brominated THMs. NDMA levels which were measured in a subset of 8 pools ranged between 2.8ng/L and 105ng/L. With respect to air, chloroform was still the most abundant THM globally (119.4±74.2µg/m(3)) but significant levels of brominated THMs were also observed in various cases, particularly in the previously evoked group of 13 swimming pools with preponderant levels of brominated THMs in water. CAM levels (0.23±0.15mg/m(3)) varied highly, ranging from not detected to 0.56mg/m(3). Overall, the levels were generally relatively high compared to current guidelines or reference values from several countries, and they point to a relatively atypical presence of brominated compounds, and to significant levels of emergent DBPs for which health risk is less documented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Swimming Pool Water: Evidences and Perspectives for a New Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Guida

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is frequently isolated in swimming pool settings. Nine recreational and rehabilitative swimming pools were monitored according to the local legislation. The presence of P. aeruginosa was correlated to chlorine concentration. The ability of the isolates to form a biofilm on plastic materials was also investigated. In 59.5% of the samples, microbial contamination exceeded the threshold values. P. aeruginosa was isolated in 50.8% of these samples. The presence of P. aeruginosa was not correlated with free or total chlorine amount (R2 < 0.1. All the isolates were moderate- to strong-forming biofilm (Optical Density O.D.570 range 0.7–1.2. To control biofilm formation and P. aeruginosa colonization, Quantum FreeBioEnergy© (QFBE, FreeBioEnergy, Brisighella, Italy, has been applied with encouraging preliminary results. It is a new, promising control strategy based on the change of an electromagnetic field which is responsible for the proliferation of some microorganisms involved in biofilm formation, such as P. aeruginosa.

  16. A survey of fungi and some indicator bacteria in chlorinated water of indoor public swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, R.; Hirn, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-four water samples, of volume 500 ml, originating from six public indoor fresh water swimming pools were examined for the presence of fungi and some indicator bacteria by a membrane-filter method. Sabouraud-dextrose agar and selective Candida albicans-medium were used for isolation and identification of fungi. In all but one of the samples the free chlorine content was above 0.40 mg/l. No Candida albicans were detected. Molds and unidentified yeasts were isolated from 29 of the samples. The following species were recorded: Acremonium spp., ALternaria sp., Aspergillus spp., Candida guilliermondii, Chaetomium sp., Cladosporium spp., Clasterosporium sp., Fusarium spp., Geotrichium sp., Penicillium spp., Petriellidium boydii and Phoma spp. Their occurrence was sporadic, each species mostly appearing as single colonies only, with a maximum of 5 colonies. Bacterial growth was noticed in 15 samples, but only in the sample of low free chlorine content did this reach significant proportions. The study indicates that the standard of chlorination is, at least in general, an adequate measure against fungal contamination of swimming pool water. However, the spectrum of mold species encountered encourages a further search for possible indicator species among these organisms.

  17. [Investigation and comparison of behaviours of adults and children in swimming pools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, M; Bodina, A; Bonali, D; Bascucci, B; Pellino, P; Castaldi, S

    2011-01-01

    The swimmers health's protection must be achieved through the implementation of structures that respect safety standards, the best management of the structures and the users'compliance with rules that minimize the potential risks to health, now clearly identified by the World Health Organization in specific guidelines and by the national and regional legislation. An anonymous questionnaire has been used in order to detect the level of knowledge of hygienic risks and the behaviour of costumers (adults and children) of swimming pool. Comparing the answers, statistically significant differences in the behaviours of adults and children were found in order to protect their own and others' health. In particular children do shower and go through footbath before entering the swimming pool more than adults (respectively 89.2% versus 77.4% and 89.2% versus 79.4%). No differences in the behaviours of the two groups were found in the use of dedicated footwear and caps. Children are predisposed to follow the rules because they are more loyal to duty, while adults comply with the rules only when it is clear the advantage to protect their health. This paper underline the importance of health education programs that can help people to understand the importance of adopting certain behaviours in order to prevent risks and promote health for the benefit of all.

  18. What's in The Pool? A Comprehensive Identification Of Disinfection By-Products and Assessment of Mutagenicity of Chlorinated and Brominated Swimming Pool Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in the water and related that to mutagenicity. We performed a compreh...

  19. What's in the pool? A comprehensive identification of disinfection by-products and assessment of mutagenicity of chlorinated and brominated swimming pool water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, S.D.; Demarini, D.M.; Kogevinas, M.; Fernandez, P.; Marco, E.; Lourencetti, C.; Balleste, C.; Heederik, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Meliefste, K.; McKague, A.B.; Marcos, R.; Font-Ribera, L.; Grimalt, J.O.; Villanueva, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in the water and related that to mutagenicity. OBJECTIVES: We performed a

  20. Comparison of swimming pools alternative passive and active heating systems based on renewable energy sources in Southern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsaprakakis, Dimitris Al.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines different passive and active heating systems for swimming pools. The passive systems introduced in this article are: * The swimming pools' enclosure. * The placement of floating insulating covers on the pools' surfaces whenever they are not used. The examined active systems in this article are: * A biomass heater. * A biomass heater and solar collectors combi-system. * Vertical geothermal heat exchangers (GHE) co-operating with geothermal heat pumps (GHP). The methodology employed for the introduced systems' evaluation is the arithmetic computational simulation of the swimming pools' annual heating, using annual time series of averaged hourly values for the available solar radiation and the calculated pools' thermal power demand (heating loads). The dimensioning of the active systems aims at the maximisation of the heating production from R.E.S. (renewable energy sources). and the optimisation of the corresponding investments' economic indexes. The examined systems are evaluated technically and economically versus fundamental criteria. It is proved that significant reduction of the heating loads is achieved with the introduced passive systems. The reduced swimming pools' heating loads can be successfully covered by the proposed R.E.S. active systems. The fossil fuels consumption is eliminated. The corresponding investments' payback periods can be lower than 5 years. - Highlights: • The passive solar systems reduce the swimming pools heating loads more than 90%. • The examined active heating system exhibit payback periods lower than 3.5 years. • The energy saving is maximised with a biomass heater – solar collectors system. • Single biomass heaters exhibits the shortest payback period. • GHE–GHP can be used in cases of low solar radiation and lack of biomass fuels

  1. Radon measurements in air in waterworks and indoor swimming pools - a primary mapping project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinko, J.; Mjoenes, L.; Soederman, A.-L.

    2004-01-01

    In 2001 the Swedish Work Environment Authority asked five regional offices around the country; Falun, Malmoe, Vaexjoe, Umeaa and Oerebro, to measure radon in air in workplaces where water was likely to enhance radon levels indoors. Track etch detectors were used and placed in workplaces according to the SSI measurement protocol for determining the annual average radon concentration in homes. Rooms that are frequently used by employees were measured. The detectors were exposed between 1 to 3 months. 225 detectors were used in the project and analysed at the same laboratory. The results showed that the radon concentration in waterworks often is high. Measurements were made in 60 waterworks. Levels exceeding 1000 Bq/m 3 were found in 49 of them and levels exceeding 4000 Bq/m 3 were found in 21 waterworks. The variation between waterworks may be a result of the radon concentration in the raw water, the amount of radon gas escaping to the air when water is treated, the air exchange rate in the building and where the detectors were deployed. Measurements were made in 28 indoor swimming baths. The maximum level was 290 Bq/m 3 , but most concentrations were between 30 to 70 Bq/m 3 . The conclusion is that high radon levels do not seem to be a problem in indoor swimming baths. Maybe this is due to good ventilation or the fact that water often has been treated for radon before it is used in swimming pools. The results from measurement in food industries such as breweries showed no extreme radon levels except for a fish farm where levels over 1000 Bq/m 3 were measured in the farming room and 790 Bq/m 3 in the office. The radon concentrations in laundries were relatively low, between 30 and 170 Bq/m 3

  2. Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) spent fuel pool conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fazli Zakaria; Tonny Lanyau; Ahmad Nabil Ab Rahim

    2010-01-01

    Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) is the one and only research reactor in Malaysia that has been safely operated and maintained since 1982. In order to enhance technical capabilities and competencies especially in nuclear reactor engineering a feasibility study on RTP power upgrading was proposed to serve future needs for advance nuclear science and technology in the country with the capability of designing and develop reactor system. The need of a Spent Fuel Pool begins with the discharge of spent fuel elements from RTP for temporary storage that includes all activities related to the storage of fuel until it is either sent for reprocessed or sent for final disposal. To support RTP power upgrading there will be major RTP systems replacement such as reactor components and a new temporary storage pool for fuel elements. The spent fuel pool is needed for temporarily store the irradiated fuel elements to accommodate a new reactor core structure. Spent fuel management has always been one of the most important stages in the nuclear fuel cycle and considered among the most common problems to all countries with nuclear reactors. The output of this paper will provide sufficient information to show the Spent Fuel Pool can be design and build with the adequate and reasonable safety assurance to support newly upgraded TRIGA PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor. (author)

  3. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini [Water ApS, Farum Gydevej 64, 3520 Farum (Denmark); Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, Kamilla M.S., E-mail: kmsh@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Henrik R. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljøvej, Building 113, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-07-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  4. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla M.S.; Andersen, Henrik R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  5. Simplified analysis of trasients in pool type liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The conceptual design of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor will require a great effort of development in several technical disciplines. One of them is the thermal-hydraulic design of the reactor and of the heat and fluid transport components inside the reactor vessel. A simplified model to calculate the maximum sodium temperatures is presented in this paper. This model can be used to optimize the layout of components inside the reactor vessel and was easily programmed in a small computer. Illustrative calculations of two transients of a typical hot pool type fast reactor are presented and compared with the results of other researchers. (author) [pt

  6. Quantitative microbial risk assessment for an indoor swimming pool with chlorination compared to a UV-based treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, M.C.F.M.; Keuten, M.G.A.; de Kreuk, M.K.; Vrouwenvelder, J.S.; Rietveld, L.C.; Medema, G.

    2017-01-01

    Aims Most swimming pools use residual disinfectants like chlorine for disinfection. The use of chlorine has several drawbacks: some waterborne-pathogens are chlorine resistant and disinfection by-products (DBPs) may be formed which are associated with various health risks. Therefore, an alternative

  7. Sleeping Beauty. Revitalisation of the old indoor swimming pool Heidelberg; Sleeping Beauty. Revitalisierung des alten Hallenbads Heidelberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Jochen

    2010-07-01

    Since its closure before nearly 30 years due to safety aspects, the monument protected indoor swimming pool in Heidelberg (Federal Republic of Germany) dilapidated appreciably. Only after moving away of the local council from its demand of the wet use, an investor could be found.

  8. Assessment of forest nutrient pools in view of biomass potentials - a case study from Austria oak stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, S.; Bruckman, V. J.; Glatzel, G.; Hochbichler, E.

    2012-04-01

    As one of the renewable energy forms, bio-energy could help to relieve the pressure which is caused by growing global energy demand. In Austria, large area of forests, traditional utilization of biomass and people's desire to live in a sound environment have supported the positive development of bio-energy. Soil nutrient status is in principle linked with the productivity of the aboveground biomass. This study focuses on K, Ca and Mg pools in soils and aboveground biomass in order to learn more on the temporal dynamics of plant nutrients as indicators for biomass potentials in Quercus dominated forests in northeastern Austria. Three soil types (according to WRB: eutric cambisol, calcic chernozem and haplic luvisol) were considered representative for the area and sampled. We selected nine Quercus petraea dominated permanent plots for this study. Exchangeable cations K, Ca and Mg in the soils were quantified in our study plots. Macronutrients pools of K, Ca and Mg in aboveground biomass were calculated according to inventory data and literature review. The exchangeable cations pool in the top 50 cm of the soil were 882 - 1,652 kg ha-1 for K, 2,661 to 16,510 kg ha-1 for Ca and 320 - 1,850 kg ha-1 for Mg. The nutrient pool in aboveground biomass ranged from 29 to 181 kg ha-1 for K, from 56 to 426 kg ha-1 for Ca and from 4 to 26 kg ha-1 for Mg. The underground exchangeable pools of K, Ca and Mg are generally 10, 22 and 58 times higher than aboveground biomass nutrient pools. Our results showed that the nutrient pools in the mineral soil are sufficient to support the tree growth. The levels of soil nutrients in particular K, Ca and Mg in our study areas are reasonably high and do not indicate the necessity for additional fertilization under current silvicultural practices and biomass extraction rate. The forest in our study areas is in favorable condition to supply biomass as raw material for energy utilization.

  9. In-service inspection of pool type research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajamani, K.

    2002-01-01

    In the case of Apsara Reactor, it has been proposed to carry out major modifications in the near future. It is planned to modify the core suitably with a heavy water reflector tank to demonstrate the Multiple Purpose Research Reactor concept. The core structure will be a stationary one and will be located at the 'B' position of the pool. The modified reactor will be operated at 1 MW power level. Suitable methodologies are evolved for carrying out a planned ISI for this modified reactor

  10. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipaun, Susan, E-mail: susan@nm.gov.my [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Industrial Technology Division, Blok 29T, Bangi 43200, Selangor (Malaysia); Usman, Shoaib, E-mail: usmans@mst.edu [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Nuclear Engineering, 222 Fulton Hall 301 W.14th St., Rolla 64509 MO (United States)

    2016-01-22

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system’s performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm{sup −3}. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR’s nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s{sup −1} from the 4” pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C.

  11. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipaun, Susan; Usman, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U3Si2Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system's performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm-3. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR's nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s-1 from the 4" pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C.

  12. Evaporation-preventive device for nuclear reactor pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurusu, Yoshihisa; Akabori, Shiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent pool water from evaporating by a great amount in a reactor pool such as a spent fuel storing pool. Constitution: Air discharge and in-take ports are disposed just above the surface of the pool water and charge and discharge of airs are forcively carried out to form air curtains above the pool water. Water vapor evaporated from the surface of the pool water does not diffuse above the air curtains due to the air stream of the curtains, but is intaken into the intake port and then condensated into water by a steam condensator and re-supplied to the pool. Since diffusion of water vapor and radioactive materials are suppressed above the air curtains, the working circumstance in the pool chamber can be maintained desirably thereby keeping the radioactivity dose in the atmosphere. Further, incorporation of dusts from above into the pool can also be prevented by the air curtains to provide an effect for the prevention of radioactive contamination. Further, since covers are not used, visual observation can be insured. (Kawakami, Y.)

  13. Destruction of disinfection byproducts and their precursors in swimming pool water by combined UV treatment and ozonation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    Both UV treatment and ozonation are used to reduce different types of disinfection byproducts (DBP) in swimming pools. UV treatment is most common as it is particularly efficient in removing the repulsive chlorine like smelling chloramines (combined chlorine). UV treatment of a pool water increased...... chlorine reactivity and formation of chlor-organic DBP such as trihalomethanes. Based on the similar selective reactivity of ozone and chlorine we hypothesized that the created reactivity towards chlorine by UV treatment of dissolved organic matter in pool water might also be expressed as an increased...... reactivity towards ozone and that ozonation might saturate the chlorine reactivity created by UV treatment and mitigate the increased DBP formation. By experimentally treating pool water samples, we found that UV treatment makes pool water highly reactive to ozone. The created reactivity towards chlorine...

  14. Thermal analysis and modeling of a swimming pool heating system by utilizing waste energy rejected from a chiller unit of an ice rink

    OpenAIRE

    Kuyumcu Muhammed Enes; Yumrutaş Recep

    2017-01-01

    This study deals with the thermal analysis and modeling of a swimming pool heating system in which the waste energy rejected from the chiller unit of an ice rink is used as an energy source. The system consists of a swimming pool and an ice rink coupled by a chiller unit. The swimming pool and the ice rink both indoor types and were constructed in city of Gaziantep, Turkey. The thermal energy requirement for each section is determined by thermal analysis of each component of the system. Effec...

  15. Optimal pH in chlorinated swimming pools - balancing formation of by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify the optimal pH range for chlorinated swimming pools the formation of trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles and trichloramine was investigated in the pH-range 6.5–7.5 in batch experiments. An artificial body fluid analogue was used to simulate bather load as the precursor for by-products....... The chlorine-to-precursor ratio used in the batch experiments influenced the amounts of by-products formed, but regardless of the ratio the same trends in the effect of pH were observed. Trihalomethane formation was reduced by decreasing pH but haloacetonitrile and trichloramine formation increased....... To evaluate the significance of the increase and decrease of the investigated organic by-products at the different pH values, the genotoxicity was calculated based on literature values. The calculated genotoxicity was approximately at the same level in the pH range 6.8–7.5 and increased when pH was 6...

  16. Electromagnetic Interference from Swimming Pool Generator Current Causing Inappropriate ICD Discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Samuel Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic interference (EMI includes any electromagnetic field signal that can be detected by device circuitry, with potentially serious consequences: incorrect sensing, pacing, device mode switching, and defibrillation. This is a unique case of extracardiac EMI by alternating current leakage from a submerged motor used to recycle chlorinated water, resulting in false rhythm detection and inappropriate ICD discharge. A 31-year-old female with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and Medtronic dual-chamber ICD placement presented after several inappropriate ICD shocks at the public swimming pool. Patient had never received prior shocks and device was appropriate at all regular follow-ups. Intracardiac electrograms revealed unique, high-frequency signals at exactly 120 msec suggestive of EMI from a strong external source of alternating current. Electrical artifact was incorrectly sensed as a ventricular arrhythmia which resulted in discharge. ICD parameters including sensing, pacing thresholds, and impedance were all normal suggesting against device malfunction. With device failure and intracardiac sources excluded, EMI was therefore strongly suspected. Avoidance of EMI source brought complete resolution with no further inappropriate shocks. After exclusion of intracardiac interference, device malfunction, and abnormal settings, extracardiac etiologies such as EMI must be thoughtfully considered and excluded. Elimination of inappropriate shocks is to “first, do no harm.”

  17. Test of precoat filtration technology for treatment of swimming pool water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Klausen, Morten Møller; Christensen, Peter Vittrup

    2018-02-01

    The technical performance of a precoat filter was compared with that of a traditional sand filter. Particle concentration and size distribution were measured before and after the filtration of swimming pool water. Both the sand and precoat filters could reduce the particle concentration in the effluent. However, higher particle removal efficiency was generally observed for the precoat filter, especially for particles smaller than 10 μm in diameter. Adding flocculant improved the removal efficiency of the sand filter, resulting in removal efficiencies comparable to those of the precoat filter. Three powders, i.e., two types of perlite (Harbolite ® and Aquatec perlite) and cellulose fibers (Arbocel ® ), were tested for the precoat filter, but no significant difference in particle removal efficiency was observed among them. The maximum efficiency was reached within 30-40 min of filtration. The energy required for the pumps increased by approximately 35% over a period of 14 days. The energy consumption could be reduced by replacing the powder on the filter cloth. The sand filter was backwashed once a week, while the powder on the precoat filter was replaced every two weeks. Under these conditions, it was possible to reduce the water used for cleaning by 88% if the precoat filter was used instead of the sand filter.

  18. Modifying the food supply at a community swimming pool: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Beverley; Dumbrell, Susan

    2011-04-01

    We report on a process evaluation of a project that aimed to replace energy-dense, nutrient-poor (EDNP) items at a community swimming pool kiosk. The analytic framework was the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity (ANGELO). To contribute to health promotion practice in recreational settings, the process evaluation sought to determine the extent to which project'controversies' modified project objectives and strategies. The case study method captured the project narrative. The primary data were interviews with key project participants, supplemented with project records and media articles.These were analysed thematically. The socio-cultural and political environments, particularly the capacity to exercise choice in relation to ENDP products, had considerable influence on the project. In the face of two controversies -"I thought everyone was signed up to it"and "We can't deny the kiddies their ice-cream" it was necessary for the project partners to modify the objectives and strategies and substantially change the target. The setting is highly responsive to both the micro and macro socio-cultural and political aspects of the environment.

  19. Prevalence of Ocular, Respiratory and Cutaneous Symptoms in Indoor Swimming Pool Workers and Exposure to Disinfection By-Products (DBPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmina Fantuzzi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported respiratory, ocular and cutaneous symptoms in subjects working at indoor swimming pools and to assess the relationship between frequency of declared symptoms and occupational exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs. Twenty indoor swimming pools in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy were included in the study. Information about the health status of 133 employees was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Subjects working at swimming pools claimed to frequently experience the following symptoms: cold (65.4%, sneezing (52.6%, red eyes (48.9% and itchy eyes (44.4%. Only 7.5% claimed to suffer from asthma. Red eyes, runny nose, voice loss and cold symptoms were declared more frequently by pool attendants (lifeguards and trainers when compared with employees working in other areas of the facility (office, cafe, etc.. Pool attendants experienced generally more verrucas, mycosis, eczema and rash than others workers; however, only the difference in the frequency of self-declared mycosis was statistically significant (p = 0.010. Exposure to DBPs was evaluated using both environmental and biological monitoring. Trihalomethanes (THMs, the main DBPs, were evaluated in alveolar air samples collected from subjects. Swimming pool workers experienced different THM exposure levels: lifeguards and trainers showed the highest mean values of THMs in alveolar air samples (28.5 ± 20.2 µg/m3, while subjects working in cafe areas (17.6 ± 12.1 µg/m3, offices (14.4 ± 12.0 µg/m3 and engine rooms (13.6 ± 4.4 µg/m3 showed lower exposure levels. Employees with THM alveolar air values higher than 21 µg/m3 (median value experienced higher risks for red eyes (OR 6.2; 95% CI 2.6–14.9, itchy eyes (OR 3.5; 95% CI 1.5–8.0, dyspnea/asthma (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.0–27.2 and blocked nose (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.0–4.7 than subjects with less exposure. This study confirms

  20. Swimming training induces liver mitochondrial adaptations to oxidative stress in rats submitted to repeated exhaustive swimming bouts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico D Lima

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Although acute exhaustive exercise is known to increase liver reactive oxygen species (ROS production and aerobic training has shown to improve the antioxidant status in the liver, little is known about mitochondria adaptations to aerobic training. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the aerobic training on oxidative stress markers and antioxidant defense in liver mitochondria both after training and in response to three repeated exhaustive swimming bouts. METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into training (n = 14 and control (n = 14 groups. Training group performed a 6-week swimming training protocol. Subsets of training (n = 7 and control (n = 7 rats performed 3 repeated exhaustive swimming bouts with 72 h rest in between. Oxidative stress biomarkers, antioxidant activity, and mitochondria functionality were assessed. RESULTS: Trained group showed increased reduced glutathione (GSH content and reduced/oxidized (GSH/GSSG ratio, higher superoxide dismutase (MnSOD activity, and decreased lipid peroxidation in liver mitochondria. Aerobic training protected against exhaustive swimming ROS production herein characterized by decreased oxidative stress markers, higher antioxidant defenses, and increases in methyl-tetrazolium reduction and membrane potential. Trained group also presented higher time to exhaustion compared to control group. CONCLUSIONS: Swimming training induced positive adaptations in liver mitochondria of rats. Increased antioxidant defense after training coped well with exercise-produced ROS and liver mitochondria were less affected by exhaustive exercise. Therefore, liver mitochondria also adapt to exercise-induced ROS and may play an important role in exercise performance.

  1. Design guide for Category III reactors: pool type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, W.J.; Lobner, P.R.; Powell, R.W.; Straker, E.A.

    1978-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) in the ERDA Manual requires that all DOE-owned reactors be sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate consideration to health and safety factors. Specific guidance pertinent to the safety of DOE-owned reactors is found in Chapter 0540 of the ERDA Manual. The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirement of Category III reactor structures, components, and systems

  2. Pitting Corrosion of the Resistance Welding Joints of Stainless Steel Ventilation Grille Operated in Swimming Pool Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Szala

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the pitting corrosion of ventilation grilles operated in swimming pool environments. The ventilation grille was made by resistance welding of stainless steel rods. Based on the macroscopic and microscopic examinations, the mechanism of the pitting corrosion was confirmed. Chemical composition microanalysis of sediments as well as base metal using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS method was carried out. The weldments did not meet the operating conditions of the swimming pool environment. The wear due to the pitting corrosion was identified in heat affected zones of stainless steel weldment and was more severe than the corrosion of base metal. The low quality finish of the joints and influence of the welding process on the weld metal microstructure lead to accelerated deposition of corrosion effecting elements such as chlorine.

  3. Structural analysis of the reactor pool for the RRRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberro, J.G.; Abbate, A.D.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present document is to describe the structural design of the Reactor Pool relevant to the RRRP (Replacement Research Reactor Project) for the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. The structural analysis required coordinated design, engineering, analysis, and fabrication efforts. The pool has been designed, manufactured, and inspected following as guideline the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which defines the requirements for the pool to withstand hydrostatic and mechanical forces, ensuring its integrity throughout its lifetime. Standard off-the-shelf finite element programs (Nastran and Ansys codes) were used to evaluate the pool and further qualify the design and its construction. Both global and local effect analyses were carried out. The global analysis covers the structural integrity of the pool wall (6 mm thick) considering the different load states acting on it, namely hydrostatic pressure, thermal expansion, and seismic event. The local analysis evaluates the structural behaviour of the pool at specific points resulting from the interaction among components. It is confirmed that maximum stresses and displacements fall below the allowable values required by the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The water pressure analysis was validated by means of a hydrostatic test. (authors)

  4. Thermal analysis and modeling of a swimming pool heating system by utilizing waste energy rejected from a chiller unit of an ice rink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuyumcu Muhammed Enes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the thermal analysis and modeling of a swimming pool heating system in which the waste energy rejected from the chiller unit of an ice rink is used as an energy source. The system consists of a swimming pool and an ice rink coupled by a chiller unit. The swimming pool and the ice rink both indoor types and were constructed in city of Gaziantep, Turkey. The thermal energy requirement for each section is determined by thermal analysis of each component of the system. Effects of different design parameters such as ceiling insulation thickness, ceiling emissivity, Carnot efficiency factor and size of the ice rink on the thermal energy requirements and coefficient of performance of the chiller unit are investigated. As a result of analyses of the system, the minimum ice rink area is determined in order to meet annual total heat energy demand of the olympic-sized swimming pool.

  5. Pump/heat exchanger assembly for pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathenson, R.D.; Slepian, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    A heat exchanger and pump assembly comprising a heat exchanger including a housing for defining an annularly shaped cavity and supporting therein a plurality of heat transfer tubes. A pump is disposed beneath the heat exchanger and is comprised of a plurality of flow couplers disposed in a circular array. Each flow coupler is comprised of a pump duct for receiving a first electrically conductive fluid, i.e. the primary liquid metal, from a pool thereof, and a generator duct for receiving a second electrically conductive fluid, i.e. the intermediate liquid metal. The primary liquid metal is introduced from the reactor pool into the top, inlet ends of the tubes, flowing downward therethrough to be discharged from the tubes' bottom ends directly into the reactor pool. The primary liquid metal is variously introduced into the pump ducts directly from the reactor pool, either from the bottom or top end of the flow coupler. The intermediate fluid introduced into the generator ducts via the inlet duct and inlet plenum and after leaving the generator ducts passes through the annular cavity of the exchanger to cool the primary liquid in the tubes. The annular magnetic field of the pump is produced by a circular array of electromagnets having hollow windings cooled by a flow of the intermediate metal. (author)

  6. Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... back on them. Then you'll know what's coming. Water Parks Kids love water parks — and why shouldn't they? Wave pools, giant slides, and squirting fountains are a lot of fun. To stay safe, find out what each attraction is like and how deep the water is. ...

  7. Removal of spike frequency adaptation via neuromodulation intrinsic to the Tritonia escape swim central pattern generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, P S; Frost, W N

    1997-10-15

    For the mollusc Tritonia diomedea to generate its escape swim motor pattern, interneuron C2, a crucial member of the central pattern generator (CPG) for this rhythmic behavior, must fire repetitive bursts of action potentials. Yet, before swimming, repeated depolarizing current pulses injected into C2 at periods similar those in the swim motor program are incapable of mimicking the firing rate attained by C2 on each cycle of a swim motor program. This resting level of C2 inexcitability is attributable to its own inherent spike frequency adaptation (SFA). Clearly, this property must be altered for the swim behavior to occur. The pathway for initiation of the swimming behavior involves activation of the serotonergic dorsal swim interneurons (DSIs), which are also intrinsic members of the swim CPG. Physiologically appropriate DSI stimulation transiently decreases C2 SFA, allowing C2 to fire at higher rates even when repeatedly depolarized at short intervals. The increased C2 excitability caused by DSI stimulation is mimicked and occluded by serotonin application. Furthermore, the change in excitability is not caused by the depolarization associated with DSI stimulation or serotonin application but is correlated with a decrease in C2 spike afterhyperpolarization. This suggests that the DSIs use serotonin to evoke a neuromodulatory action on a conductance in C2 that regulates its firing rate. This modulatory action of one CPG neuron on another is likely to play a role in configuring the swim circuit into its rhythmic pattern-generating mode and maintaining it in that state.

  8. Removal of haloacetic acids from swimming pool water by reverse osmosis and nanofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linyan; She, Qianhong; Wan, Man Pun; Wang, Rong; Chang, Victor W-C; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies report high concentrations of haloacetic acids (HAAs), a prevalent class of toxic disinfection by-products, in swimming pool water (SPW). We investigated the removal of 9 HAAs by four commercial reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes. Under typical SPW conditions (pH 7.5 and 50 mM ionic strength), HAA rejections were >60% for NF270 with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) equal to 266 Da and equal or higher than 90% for XLE, NF90 and SB50 with MWCOs of 96, 118 and 152 Da, respectively, as a result of the combined effects of size exclusion and charge repulsion. We further included 7 neutral hydrophilic surrogates as molecular probes to resolve the rejection mechanisms. In the absence of strong electrostatic interaction (e.g., pH 3.5), the rejection data of HAAs and surrogates by various membranes fall onto an identical size-exclusion (SE) curve when plotted against the relative-size parameter, i.e., the ratio of molecular radius over membrane pore radius. The independence of this SE curve on molecular structures and membrane properties reveals that the relative-size parameter is a more fundamental SE descriptor compared to molecular weight. An effective molecular size with the Stokes radius accounting for size exclusion and the Debye length accounting for electrostatic interaction was further used to evaluate the rejection. The current study provides valuable insights on the rejection of trace contaminants by RO/NF membranes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Influence of physical activity in the intake of trihalomethanes in indoor swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Esther; Lourencetti, Carolina; Grimalt, Joan O; Gari, Mercè; Fernández, Pilar; Font-Ribera, Laia; Villanueva, Cristina M; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2015-07-01

    This study describes the relationship between physical activity and intake of trihalomethanes (THMs), namely chloroform (CHCl3), bromodichloromethane (CHCl2Br), dibromochloromethane (CHClBr2) and bromoform (CHBr3), in individuals exposed in two indoor swimming pools which used different disinfection agents, chlorine (Cl-SP) and bromine (Br-SP). CHCl3 and CHBr3 were the dominant compounds in air and water of the Cl-SP and Br-SP, respectively. Physical exercise was assessed from distance swum and energy expenditure. The changes in exhaled breath concentrations of these compounds were measured from the differences after and before physical activity. A clear dependence between distance swum or energy expenditure and exhaled breath THM concentrations was observed. The statistically significant relationships involved higher THM concentrations at higher distances swum. However, air concentration was the major factor determining the CHCl3 and CHCl2Br intake in swimmers whereas distance swum was the main factor for CHBr3 intake. These two causes of THM incorporation into swimmers concurrently intensify the concentrations of these compounds into exhaled breath and pointed to inhalation as primary mechanism for THM uptake. Furthermore, the rates of THM incorporation were proportionally higher as higher was the degree of bromination of the THM species. This trend suggested that air-water partition mechanisms in the pulmonary system determined higher retention of the THM compounds with lower Henry's Law volatility constants than those of higher constant values. Inhalation is therefore the primary mechanisms for THM exposure of swimmers in indoor buildings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exciting Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  11. Assessment of structural materials inside the reactor pool of the Dalat research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Nhi Dien; Luong Ba Vien; Nguyen Minh Tuan; Trang Cao Su

    2010-01-01

    Originally the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) was a 250-kW TRIGA MARK II reactor, started building from early 1960s and achieved the first criticality on February 26, 1963. During the 1982-1984 period, the reactor was reconstructed and upgraded to 500kW, and restarted operation on March 20, 1984. From the original TRIGA reactor, only the pool liner, beam ports, thermal columns, and graphite reflector have been remained. The structural materials of pool liner and other components of TRIGA were made of aluminum alloy 6061 and aluminum cladding fuel assemblies. Some other parts, such as reactor core, irradiation rotary rack around the core, vertical irradiation facilities, etc. were replaced by the former Soviet Union's design with structural materials of aluminum alloy CAV-1. WWR-M2 fuel assemblies of U-Al alloy 36% and 19.75% 235 U enrichment and aluminum cladding have been used. In its original version, the reactor was setting upon an all-welded aluminum frame supported by four legs attached to the bottom of the pool. After the modification made, the new core is now suspended from the top of the pool liner by means of three aluminum concentric cylindrical shells. The upper one has a diameter of 1.9m, a length of 3.5m and a thickness of 10mm. This shell prevents from any visual access to the upper part of the pool liner, but is provided with some holes to facilitate water circulation in the 4cm gap between itself and the reactor pool liner. The lower cylindrical shells act as an extracting well for water circulation. As reactor has been operated at low power of 500 kW, it was no any problem with degradation of core structural materials due to neutron irradiation and thermal heat, but there are some ageing issues with aluminum liner and other structures (for example, corrosion of tightening-up steel bolt in the fourth beam port and flood of neutron detector housing) inside the reactor pool. In this report, the authors give an overview and assessment of

  12. Replacement of thermal column elastomeric gasket in pool type research reactors based on ageing and radiation degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garai, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    Pool type research reactors are designed with Thermal column facilities to irradiate samples at different flux levels of thermal neutrons. The sealing of demineralised pool water between stainless steel lined pool wall and the Aluminium Thermal column plate is achieved by an elastomeric gasket. The gasket joint is subjected to pool water temperature ranging from 25degC to 45degC and radiation field of the order of 104 -106 R/hr. The gasket loses its sealing properties due to ageing and radiation degradation after a few years, leading to the leakage and loss of the pool water. Though degradation of the gasket is, generally, predictable, some amount of uncertainty always remains in the leakage rate. The paper describes the study of a few elastomers in radiation environment and replacement of the Thermal column gasket of a swimming pool type research reactor. It includes the details of features like planning and scheduling, the actual sequential execution of the job, various problems encountered and corrective measures applied, engineering and radiological safety measures adopted, development of remote tools, disassembly and reassembly procedure and finally satisfactory completion of the site job in high radiation environment with minimum time and man rem consumption. (author)

  13. Observation of fallout deposition in an outdoor swimming pool 50 km away from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, Jun; Yasuda, Ryo; Kurikami, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP), outdoor school swimming pools at Fukushima were decontaminated to curb the redistribution of radioactivity into downstream farmlands. In the process, the radioactivity concentrations of the pool water and sediment substances (residue) were measured to estimate the deposition density of the fallout. At a pool situated 50 km away from the NPP, the average concentrations of radiocesium ( 134+137 Cs) for the water and residue were quantified as 170 Bq L −1 and 3.6 × 10 5 Bq kg −1 , respectively. Taking account of the radioactivity concentrations and of the water balance in and around the pool, the deposition density of radiocesium, as of August 2011, was precisely determined to be 0.32 ± 0.03 MBq m −2 (k = 1). The density corroborated the previous results obtained by other methods, i.e., airborne surveys, in-situ Ge surveys and soil samplings at neighboring locations. Other than radiocesium, the only gamma-emitting nuclide detected was 110m Ag, with a concentration of 560 Bq kg −1 in the residue. The radioactivity concentrations of 89 Sr, 90 Sr, 238 Pu and 239+240 Pu in the water were all less than the minimum detectable activities – 2, 0.1, 0.002 and 0.002 Bq L −1 , respectively. - Highlights: • Deposition density of radiocesium was estimated at a swimming pool in Fukushima. • The density was determined with a small standard uncertainty of approximately 10%. • Water balance was simulated for estimating radioactivity budget in the pool. • Detected gamma-emitting nuclide was 110m Ag other than radiocesium. • Radiocesium was much dominant compared with 89 Sr, 90 Sr, 110m Ag, 238 Pu and 239+240 Pu

  14. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs

  15. Plenum separator system for pool-type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    This invention provides a plenum separator system for pool-type nuclear reactors which substantially lessens undesirable thermal effects on major components. A primary feature of the invention is the addition of one or more intermediate plena, containing substantially stagnant and stratified coolant, which separate the hot and cold plena and particularly the hot plena from critical reactor components. This plenum separator system also includes a plurality of components which together form a dual pass flow path annular region spaced from the reactor vessel wall by an annular gas space. The bypass flow through the flow path is relatively small and is drawn from the main coolant pumps and discharged to an intermediate plenum

  16. Wastewater treatment in a compact intensified wetland system at the Badboot: a floating swimming pool in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oirschot, D; Wallace, S; Van Deun, R

    2015-09-01

    The Badboot (Dutch for swimming pool boat) is a floating swimming pool located in the city center of Antwerp in Belgium. The overall design consists of a recycled ferry boat that serves as a restaurant and next to that a newly built ship that harbours an Olympic size swimming pool, sun decks, locker rooms with showers, and a party space. A major design goal of the project was to make the ship as environmentally friendly as possible. To avoid discharge of contaminated waste water in the Antwerp docks, the ship includes onsite treatment of wastewater in a compact constructed wetland. The treatment wetland system was designed to treat wastewater from visitor locker rooms, showers, toilets, two bars, and the wastewater from the restaurant kitchen. Due to the limited space on board the ship, only 188 m(2) could be allocated to a wetland treatment system. As a result, part of the design included intensification of the wetland treatment process through the use of Forced Bed Aeration, which injects small quantities of air in a very uniform grid pattern throughout the wetland with a mechanical air compressor. The system was monitored between August 2012 and March 2013 (with additional sampling in the autumn of 2014). Flows and loads to the wetland were highly variable, but removal efficiency was extremely high; 99.5 % for chemical oxygen demand (COD), 88.6 % for total nitrogen and 97.2 % for ammonia. The treatment performance was assessed using a first-order, tanks-in-series model (the P-k-C* model) and found to be roughly equivalent to similar intensified wetlands operating in Germany. However, treatment performance was substantially better than data reported on passive wetlands, likely as a result of intensification. Even with mechanically assisted aeration, the total oxygen delivered to the treatment wetlands was insufficient to support conventional nitrification and denitrification, so it is likely that alternate nitrogen removal pathways, such as anammox, are

  17. Dynamic simulation and thermo-economic analysis of a PhotoVoltaic/Thermal collector heating system for an indoor–outdoor swimming pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonomano, Annamaria; De Luca, Giuseppina; Figaj, Rafal Damian; Vanoli, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A PV/T heating system for indoor–outdoor swimming pools is proposed. • A comparison among some thermal pool models available in literature is carried out. • Dynamic simulations of the thermal behavior of the swimming-pools are performed. • PV/T thermal energy is used to heat the swimming pool and for DHW production. • Energy and economic parametric analyses of the proposed system are presented. - Abstract: This paper presents an analysis of an innovative renewable energy plant serving an existing indoor/outdoor swimming pool located in Naples. The proposed solar hybrid system is designed in order to balance the remarkable energy demand of the swimming pool facility and to ensure suitable comfort conditions for swimmers. With the aim to accomplish such goals, the dynamic thermal behavior of the swimming pool was analyzed as a function of the thermo-hygrometric conditions of the indoor space and on the meteorological conditions of the pool site. In order to properly design and size the proposed renewable energy system, different thermal pool loss formulations for the calculation of the swimming pool thermal balance, in indoor and outdoor regimes, are adopted. The solar hybrid system consists of a water cooled photovoltaic/thermal collectors plant (PV/T), designed to meet a part of the facility demands of electricity and heat. Electricity is completely utilized by the facility, while the produced thermal energy is primarily used to meet the pool thermal demand and secondarily for sanitary hot water scopes. In order to carry out dynamic simulations and sensitivity analyses, the system performance is designed and dynamically simulated in TRNSYS environment. The developed simulation model enables the calculation of both the indoor and outdoor swimming pool thermal losses and the overall energy and economic system performance. Such results are obtained as a function of the thermo-hygrometric conditions of the environment, of the occupants and the

  18. Reliability assessment of emergency exhaust system in a pool-type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    The reliability of an extract system in a swimming-pool-type research reactor has been assessed. A global fault-tree analysis technique has been utilized. The basic event reliability data is based on both generic and reactor specific informations. The unavailability of the extract system is quantified in terms of the unavailability of the various functional requirements of the system. The unavailability is expressed as the probability of failure on demand. The computer system unavailability is determined from the minimal cutsets of the system. It is found that only three events have a major contribution to the top event, i.e., failures of compressed air supply, electric power supply and solenoid valve. A sensitivity analysis is performed to show the effects of variations in the data values of the dominant cutsets. An uncertainty analysis was also performend on the fault tree. The evaluations show that the reactor extract system lacks diversity and redundance in most of its components. It is tolerant of most minor degradations, as these are taken care of by the operating policies and procedures. However, it can not tolerate common cause failures, e.g. simultaneous compressed air and electric power supply failure. Based upon the results obtained, some recommendations are made. (orig.)

  19. The market penetration of solar and heat pump systems in Austria 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faninger, G.

    1992-02-01

    The market penetration of solar and heat pump systems in Austria in 1991 shows a high interest for solar systems as well as for swimming-pool heating as for domestic hot-water preparation and also an increase in the field of heat pumps especially for space heating. (author)

  20. Chemical Safety Alert: Safe Storage and Handling of Swimming Pool Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazards of pool water treatment and maintenance chemicals (e.g., chlorine), and the protective measures pool owners should take to prevent fires, toxic vapor releases, and injuries. Triggered by improper wetting, mixing, or self-reactivity over time.

  1. Evaluation of biological and physico-chemical quality of public swimming pools, Hamadan (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edris Hoseinzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: As results showed the residual chlorine in pools water was lower than standard level and as regard to microbial contamination in pool water, it can be concluded that the disinfection system has been impaired.

  2. Decommissioning of the pool reactor Thetis in Ghent, Belgium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortenbosch, Geert; Mommaert, Chantal [Bel V, Brussels (Belgium); Tierens, Hubert; Monsieurs, Myriam; Meierlaen, Isabelle; Strijckmans, Karel [Ghent Univ. (Belgium)

    2016-11-15

    The Thetis research pool reactor (with a nominal power of 150 kW) of the Ghent University was operational from 1967 till December 2003. The first phase of the decommissioning of the reactor, the removal of the spent fuel from the site, took place in 2010. The cumulative dose received was only 404 man . μSv. During the second phase, the transition period between the removal of the spent fuel in 2010 and the start of the decommissioning phase in March 2013, 3-monthly internal inspections and inspections by Bel V, were performed. The third and final decommissioning phase started on March 18, 2013. The total dose received between March 2013 and August 2013 was 1561 man . μSv. The declassification from a Class I installation to a Class II installation was possible by the end of 2015. The activated concrete in the reactor pool will remain under regulatory control until the activation levels are lower than the limits for free release.

  3. Stabilization of reactor fuel storage pool-TTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevigny, G.

    1994-10-01

    The proposed work includes evaluating standard and improved technologies an designing an integrated demonstration system to clean the water and sludge the fuel storage pools. The water released would meet drinking water standards and tritium standards. The volume of radioactive sludge would be reduced by partial separation of the sludge and radionuclides and eventual solidification of the hazardous and radioactive waste. The scope of the wo includes a survey of needs and applicable technologies, system engineering evaluation, conceptual design, detailed design, fabrication of the integrat demonstration system, and testing of the system. The survey task will locate potential specific customers within the DOE complex, and outside of the DOE complex throughout the United States, that be able to utilize the narrowly focused technology to stabilize/shutdown reactor fuel storage pools, responsible parties will be located and asked respond to a survey about their specific process requirements. Literature searches will be run through technical and scientific databases to locate technologies that may be an improvement over the standard baselined technol for cleanup of radioactively-contaminated pools. Systems engineering will provide decision analysis support for the development, evaluation, design, test functions of the treatment of pool water and sludge

  4. Stabilization of reactor fuel storage pool-TTP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, G.

    1994-10-01

    The proposed work includes evaluating standard and improved technologies an designing an integrated demonstration system to clean the water and sludge the fuel storage pools. The water released would meet drinking water standards and tritium standards. The volume of radioactive sludge would be reduced by partial separation of the sludge and radionuclides and eventual solidification of the hazardous and radioactive waste. The scope of the wo includes a survey of needs and applicable technologies, system engineering evaluation, conceptual design, detailed design, fabrication of the integrat demonstration system, and testing of the system. The survey task will locate potential specific customers within the DOE complex, and outside of the DOE complex throughout the United States, that be able to utilize the narrowly focused technology to stabilize/shutdown reactor fuel storage pools, responsible parties will be located and asked respond to a survey about their specific process requirements. Literature searches will be run through technical and scientific databases to locate technologies that may be an improvement over the standard baselined technol for cleanup of radioactively-contaminated pools. Systems engineering will provide decision analysis support for the development, evaluation, design, test functions of the treatment of pool water and sludge.

  5. ‘Right now, Sophie *swims in the pool?!’: Brain potentials of grammatical aspect processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique eFlecken

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether brain potentials of grammatical aspect processing resemble semantic or morpho-syntactic processing, or whether they instead are characterized by an entirely distinct pattern in the same individuals. We studied aspect from the perspective of agreement between the temporal information in the context (temporal adverbials, e.g., Right now and a morpho-syntactic marker of grammatical aspect (e.g., progressive is swimming. Participants read questions providing a temporal context that was progressive (What is Sophie doing in the pool right now? or habitual (What does Sophie do in the pool every Monday?. Following a lead-in sentence context such as Right now, Sophie…, we measured ERPs time-locked to verb phrases in four different conditions, e.g., (a is swimming (control; (b *is cooking (semantic violation; (c *are swimming (morpho-syntactic violation; or (d?swims (aspect mismatch; …in the pool. The collected ERPs show typical N400 and P600 effects for semantics and morpho-syntax, while aspect processing elicited an Early Negativity (250-350 ms. The aspect-related Negativity was short-lived and had a central scalp distribution with an anterior onset. This differentiates it not only from the semantic N400 effect, but also from the typical (LAN (Left Anterior Negativity, that is frequently reported for various types of agreement processing. Moreover, aspect processing was not accompanied by a clear P600 modulation.We argue that the specific context for each item in this experiment provided a trigger for agreement checking with temporal information encoded on the verb, i.e., morphological aspect marking. The aspect-related Negativity obtained for aspect agreement mismatches reflects a violated expectation concerning verbal inflection (in the example above, the expected verb phrase was Sophie is X-ing rather than Sophie X-s in condition d. The absence of an additional P600 for aspect processing suggests that the mismatch did not

  6. Refurbishment of Pakistan research reactor (PARR-1) for stainless steel lining of the reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahuddin, A.; Israr, M.; Hussain, M.

    2002-01-01

    Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) is a pool-type research reactor. Reactor aging has resulted in the increase of water seepage from the concrete walls of the reactor pool. To stop the seepage, it was decided to augment the existing pool walls with an inner lining of stainless steel. This could be achieved only if the pool walls could be accessed unhindered and without excessive radiation doses. For this purpose a partial decommissioning was done by removing all active core components including standard/control fuel elements, reflector elements, beam tubes, thermal shield, core support structure, grid plate and the pool's ceramic tiles, etc. An overall decommissioning program was devised which included procedures specific to each item. This led to the development of a fuel transport cask for transportation, and an interim fuel storage bay for temporary storage of fuel elements (until final disposal). The safety of workers and the environment was ensured by the use of specially designed remote handling tools, appropriate shielding and pre-planned exposure reduction procedures based on the ALARA principle. During the implementation of this program, liquid and solid wastes generated were legally disposed of. It is felt that the experience gained during the refurbishment of PARR-1 to install the stainless steel liner will prove useful and better planning and execution for the future decommissioning of PARR-1, in particular, and for other research reactors like PARR-2 (27 kW MNSR), in general. Furthermore, due to the worldwide activities on decommissioning, especially those communicated through the IAEA CRP on 'Decommissioning Techniques for Research Reactors', the importance of early planning has been well recognized. This has made possible the implementation of some early steps like better record keeping, rehiring of trained manpower, and creation of interim and final waste storage. (author)

  7. Performance of a swimming pool heating system by utilizing waste energy rejected from an ice rink with an energy storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuyumcu, Muhammed Enes; Tutumlu, Hakan; Yumrutaş, Recep

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An analytical model of the system, and a computational program were developed. • Transient behavior of the water in the buried energy storage tank was simulated. • Effects of various system parameters on the system performance were investigated. • Long period performance of the system was analyzed and obtained periodic condition. • Optimum ice rink size is determined for a semi-Olympic size swimming pool heating. - Abstract: This study deals with determining the long period performance of a swimming pool heating system by utilizing waste heat energy that is rejected from a chiller unit of ice rink and subsequently stored in an underground thermal energy storage (TES) tank. The system consists of an ice rink, a swimming pool, a spherical underground TES tank, a chiller and a heat pump. The ice rink and the swimming pool are both enclosed and located in Gaziantep, Turkey. An analytical model was developed to obtain the performance of the system using Duhamel’s superposition and similarity transformation techniques. A computational model written in MATLAB program based on the transient heat transfer is used to obtain the annual variation of the ice rink and the swimming pool energy requirements, the water temperature in the TES tank, COP, and optimum ice rink size depending on the different ground, TES tank, chiller, and heat pump characteristics. The results obtained from the analysis indicate that 6–7 years’ operational time span is necessary to obtain the annual periodic operation condition. In addition, an ice rink with a size of 475 m"2 gives the optimum performance of the system with a semi-Olympic size swimming pool (625 m"2).

  8. Research reactors - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Physiological Adaptations to Training in Competitive Swimming: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Mário J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize longitudinal studies on swimming physiology and get implications for daily practice. A computerized search of databases according to the PRISMA statement was employed. Studies were screened for eligibility on inclusion criteria: (i present two testing points; (ii on swimming physiology; (iii using adult elite swimmers; (iv no case-studies or with small sample sizes. Two independent reviewers used a checklist to assess the methodological quality of the studies. Thirty-four studies selected for analysis were gathered into five main categories: blood composition (n=7, endocrine secretion (n=11, muscle biochemistry (n=7, cardiovascular response (n=8 and the energetic profile (n=14. The mean quality index was 10.58 ± 2.19 points demonstrating an almost perfect agreement between reviewers (K = 0.93. It can be concluded that the mixed findings in the literature are due to the diversity of the experimental designs. Micro variables obtained at the cellular or molecular level are sensitive measures and demonstrate overtraining signs and health symptoms. The improvement of macro variables (i.e. main physiological systems is limited and may depend on the athletes’ training background and experience.

  10. Adaptation of the pituitary-adrenal axis to daily repeated forced swim exposure in rats is dependent on the temperature of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabasa, Cristina; Delgado-Morales, Raúl; Gómez-Román, Almudena; Nadal, Roser; Armario, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Comparison of exposure to certain predominantly emotional stressors reveals a qualitatively similar neuroendocrine response profile as well as a reduction of physiological responses after daily repeated exposure (adaptation). However, particular physical components of the stressor may interfere with adaptation. As defective adaptation to stress can enhance the probability to develop pathologies, we studied in adult male rats (n = 10/group) swimming behavior (struggling, immobility and mild swim) and physiological responses (ACTH, corticosterone and rectal temperature) to daily repeated exposure to forced swim (20 min, 13 d) at 25 or 36 °C (swim25 or swim36). Rats were repeatedly blood-sampled by tail-nick and hormones measured by radioimmunoassay. Some differences were observed between the two swim temperature groups after the first exposure to forced swim: (a) active behaviors were greater in swim25 than swim36 groups; (b) swim25 but not swim36 caused hypothermia; and (c) swim36 elicited the same ACTH response as swim25, but plasma corticosterone concentration was lower for swim36 at 30 min post-swim. After daily repeated exposure, adaptation in ACTH secretion was observed with swim36 already on day 4, whereas with swim25 adaptation was not observed until day 13 and was of lower magnitude. Nevertheless, after repeated exposure to swim25 a partial protection from hypothermia was observed and the two swim conditions resulted in progressive reduction of active behaviors. Thus, daily repeated swim at 25 °C impairs adaptation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as compared to swim at 36 °C, supporting the hypothesis that certain physical components of predominantly emotional stressors can interfere with the process of adaptation.

  11. The future of the low temperature district heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yingzhong; Wang Dazhong; Ma Changwen; Dong Duo; Tian Jiafu.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, the role, development and situation of the low temperature district heating reactor (LTDHR) are briefly summarized. There are four types of LTDHR. They are PWR, reactor with boiling in the chimney, organic reactor and swimming pool reactor. The features of these reactors are introduced. The situation and role of the LTDHR in the future of the energy system are also discussed. The experiment on nuclear district heating with the swimming pool reactor in Qinghua Univ. is described briefly. (Author)

  12. Pump/heat exchanger assembly for pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathenson, R.D.; Slepian, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a heat exchanger and pump assembly for transferring thermal energy from a heated, first electrically conductive fluid to a pumped, second electrically conductive fluid and for transferring internal energy from the pumped, second electrically conductive fluid to the first electrically conductive fluid, the assembly adapted to be disposed within a pool of the first electrically conductive fluid and comprising: a heat exchanger comprising means for defining a first annularly shaped cavity for receiving a flow of the second electrically conductive fluid and a plurality of tubes disposed within the cavity, whereby the second electrically conductive fluid in the cavity is heated, each of the tubes having an input and an output end. The input ends being disposed at the top of the heat exchanger for receiving from the pool a flow of the first electrically conductive fluid therein. The output ends being disposed at the bottom of and free of the cavity defining means for discharging the first electrically conductive fluid directly into the pool; a pump disposed beneath the heat exchanger and comprised of a plurality of flow couplers disposed in a circular array, each flow coupler comprised of a pump duct for receiving the first electrically conductive fluid and a generator duct for receiving the second electrically conductive fluid

  13. Operational and research activities of Tsing Hua open pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, T.-K.; Tseng, D.-L.; Chou, H.-P.; Onyang Minsun

    1988-01-01

    Tsing Hua Open Pool Reaction (THOR) is the first nuclear reactor to become operational in Taiwan. It reached its first critical on April 13, 1961. Until now, THOR has been operated successfully for 27 years. The major missions of THOR include radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, nuclear science and engineering researches, education, and personnel training. The THOR was originally loaded with HEU MTR-type fuels. A gradual fuel replacing program using LEU TRIGA fuel to replace MTR started in 1977. By 1987, THOR was loaded with all TRIGA fuels. This paper gives a brief history of THOR, its current status, the core conversion work, some selected research topics, and its improvement plan. (author)

  14. Design of the Demineralized Water Make-up Line to Maintain the Normal Pool Water Level of the Reactor Pool in the Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyun Gi; Choi, Jung Woon; Yoon, Ju Hyeon; Chi, Dae Young

    2012-01-01

    In many research reactors, hot water layer system (HWLS) is used to minimize the pool top radiation level. Reactor pool divided into the hot water layer at the upper part of pool and the cold part below the hot water layer with lower temperature during normal operation. Water mixing between these layers is minimized because the hot water layer is formed above cold water. Therefore the hot water layer suppresses floatation of cold water and reduces the pool top radiation level. Pool water is evaporated form the surface to the building hall because of high temperature of the hot water layer; consequently the pool level is continuously fallen. Therefore, make-up water is necessary to maintain the normal pool level. There are two way to supply demineralized water to the pool, continuous and intermittent methods. In this system design, the continuous water make-up method is adopted to minimize the disturbance of the reactor pool flow. Also, demineralized water make-up is connected to the suction line of the hot water layer system to raise the temperature of make-up water. In conclusion, make-up demineralized water with high temperature is continuously supplied to the hot water layer in the pool

  15. Modifications for water management guidance based on an assessment of swimming pool water consumption of an operational facility in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, L; Chew, J; Woodley, I; Colbourne, J; Pond, K

    2015-01-01

    Water use is a significant operational cost factor for large swimming pool facilities, however it has been overshadowed by the recent focus on energy consumption and carbon emissions. Currently it is difficult for operators to make decisions in relation to water efficiency due to the lack of information on the relationship between pool operation and water use. This study has started to address this issue by reviewing water use at a fully operational facility. The analysis of the consumption d...

  16. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Eight Annual Meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    The Eighth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Past Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 15 to 18 April 1975. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMPBR’s and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  17. The risk of contracting infectious diseases in public swimming pools: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsófia Barna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A review of pathogenic microorganisms presenting risk of infection in pool based artificial recreational water venues is extracted from the available scientific literature. The microorganisms are grouped both according to their way of spread and their survival and growth strategies and their characteristics relevant for the pool and spa based recreation are discussed. In order to put the proposed risks on a solid basis, among others a ten year excerpt of the waterborne disease statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC is used throughout the article.

  18. From Source Water to Tap Water to Spa and Swimming Pool Water: Effects of Disinfectanta and Precursors and Implications for Exposure and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction The current study investigated the effect of different disinfection treatments on the disinfection by-products (DBPs) formed in finished drinking water vs. tap water vs. swimming pool water vs. spa waters. To this end, samples across the complete water pathway (untr...

  19. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile...

  20. Video quality pooling adaptive to perceptual distortion severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jincheol; Seshadrinathan, Kalpana; Lee, Sanghoon; Bovik, Alan Conrad

    2013-02-01

    It is generally recognized that severe video distortions that are transient in space and/or time have a large effect on overall perceived video quality. In order to understand this phenomena, we study the distribution of spatio-temporally local quality scores obtained from several video quality assessment (VQA) algorithms on videos suffering from compression and lossy transmission over communication channels. We propose a content adaptive spatial and temporal pooling strategy based on the observed distribution. Our method adaptively emphasizes "worst" scores along both the spatial and temporal dimensions of a video sequence and also considers the perceptual effect of large-area cohesive motion flow such as egomotion. We demonstrate the efficacy of the method by testing it using three different VQA algorithms on the LIVE Video Quality database and the EPFL-PoliMI video quality database.

  1. Recovery effects after extinction in the Morris swimming pool navigation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, José; Manteiga, Raúl D; Sansa, Joan

    2003-08-01

    In three experiments in which rats were used as subjects, we developed an extinction procedure using a Morris pool. The animals were trained to find a hidden platform located at a fixed position and were then given extinction trials in which the platform was removed from the pool. When training and extinction were carried out in the same context and time was allowed to elapse between extinction and test, spontaneous recovery of learning was observed. On the other hand, those rats that received extinction in a context different from the one used for training failed to show spontaneous recovery of learning when tested in the extinction context after an interval of 96 h. However, they did show renewal of spatial learning when tested in the training context. These results show that extinction in the spatial domain behaves like extinction in standard conditioning preparations.

  2. Board Diving Regulations in Public Swimming Pools and Risk of Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Odin, Louise

    2016-06-01

    Public session access to diving boards is one of the stepping stones for those wishing to develop their skills in the sport of diving. The extent to which certain dive forms are considered risky (forward/backward/rotations) and therefore not permitted is a matter for local pool managers. In Study 1, 20 public pools with diving facilities responded to a U.K. survey concerning their diving regulation policy and related injury incidence in the previous year. More restrictive regulation of dive forms was not associated with a decrease in injuries (rs [42] = -0.20, p = 0.93). In Study 2, diving risk perception and attitudes towards regulation were compared between experienced club divers (N = 22) and nondivers (N = 22). Risk was perceived to be lower for those with experience, and these people favored less regulation. The findings are interpreted in terms of a risk thermostat model, where for complex physical performance activities such as diving, individuals may exercise caution in proportion to their ability and previous experience of success and failure related to the activity. Though intuitively appealing, restrictive regulation of public pool diving may be ineffective in practice because risk is not simplistically associated with dive forms, and divers are able to respond flexibly to risk by exercising caution where appropriate. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  3. Study of Microbial Contamination of the Public Swimming Pools with Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Their Physical Parameters in Kermanshah, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Haghmorad Korasti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Public swimming pools' waters are contaminated with a wide variety of pathogenic microorganisms and are a suitable environment for transmission of different diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the microbial contamination of the public swimming pools' waters with Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and to determine certain parameters such as residual chlorine, pH, temperature and turbidity in these pools' waters in Kermanshah. In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, 129 water samples were taken from all active pools in Kermanshah and their bacteriologic and physicochemical properties were investigated. Phosphatase alkaline (PHO-A gene was used for molecular confirmation of E. coli isolates, and exotoxin A (ETA gene in PCR was employed to confirm pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa isolates. Data were analyzed by chi-square and t-test. p0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that appropriate amount of residual chlorine caused reduction in microbial contamination in the public swimming pools' waters in Kermanshah.

  4. Dynamic real-time monitoring of chloroform in an indoor swimming pool air using open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M-J; Duh, J-M; Shie, R-H; Weng, J-H; Hsu, H-T

    2016-06-01

    This study used open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy to continuously assess the variation in chloroform concentrations in the air of an indoor swimming pool. Variables affecting the concentrations of chloroform in air were also monitored. The results showed that chloroform concentrations in air varied significantly during the time of operation of the swimming pool and that there were two peaks in chloroform concentration during the time of operation of the pool. The highest concentration was at 17:30, which is coincident with the time with the highest number of swimmers in the pool in a day. The swimmer load was one of the most important factors influencing the chloroform concentration in the air. When the number of swimmers surpassed 40, the concentrations of chloroform were on average 4.4 times higher than the concentration measured without swimmers in the pool. According to the results of this study, we suggest that those who swim regularly should avoid times with highest number of swimmers, in order to decrease the risk of exposure to high concentrations of chloroform. It is also recommended that an automatic mechanical ventilation system is installed to increase the ventilation rate during times of high swimmer load. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Safety classification of systems, structures, and components for pool-type research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ryong [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Structures, systems, and components (SSCs) important to safety of nuclear facilities shall be designed, fabricated, erected, and tested to quality standards commensurate with the importance of the safety functions. Although SSC classification guidelines for nuclear power plants have been well established and applied, those for research reactors have been only recently established by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Korea has operated a pool-type research reactor (the High Flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor) and has recently exported another pool-type reactor (Jordan Research and Training Reactor), which is being built in Jordan. Korea also has a plan to build one more pool-type reactor, the Kijang Research Reactor, in Kijang, Busan. The safety classification of SSCs for pool-type research reactors is proposed in this paper based on the IAEA methodology. The proposal recommends that the SSCs of pool-type research reactors be categorized and classified on basis of their safety functions and safety significance. Because the SSCs in pool-type research reactors are not the pressure-retaining components, codes and standards for design of the SSCs following the safety classification can be selected in a graded approach.

  6. Estimation of reactor pool water temperature after shutdown in JRR-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Masahiro; Sato, Mitsugu; Kakefuda, Kazuhiro

    1999-01-01

    The reactor pool water temperature increasing by the decay heat was estimated by calculation. The reactor pool water temperature was calculated by increased enthalpy that was estimated by the reactor decay heat, the heat released from the reactor biological shielding concrete, reactor pool water surface, the heat conduction from the canal and the core inlet piping. These results of calculation were compared with the past measured data. As the results of estimation, after the JRR-3M shutdown, the calculated reactor pool temperature first increased sharply. This is because the decay heat was the major contribution. And then, rate of increased reactor pool temperature decreased. This is because the ratio of heat released from reactor biological shielding concrete and core inlet piping to the decay heat increased. Besides, the calculated reactor pool water temperature agreed with the past measured data in consequence of correcting the decay heat and the released heat. The corrected coefficient k 1 of decay heat was 0.74 - 0.80. And the corrected coefficient k 2 of heat released from the reactor biological shielding concrete was 3.5 - 4.5. (author)

  7. Design and manufacture of mechanical forceps to pick up objects at the bottom of the pool reactor TRIGA MK II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kankunku, K.P.; Lukanda, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    This design helps us to pick up any objects felt in bottom of swimming pool, which is a radioactive area, due to the presence of spent nuclear fuel. Its great advantage is its sample designing and made with local material.

  8. Seismic responses of a pool-type fast reactor with different core support designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    In designing the core support system for a pool-type fast reactor, there are many issues which must be considered in order to achieve an optimum and balanced design. These issues include safety, reliability, as well as costs. Several design options are possible to support the reactor core. Different core support options yield different frequency ranges and responses. Seismic responses of a large pool-type fast reactor incorporated with different core support designs have been investigated. 4 refs., 3 figs

  9. Overcoming the challenges of conventional dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction: analysis of THMs in chlorinated swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Hakim; Helalizadeh, Masoumeh; Kordi, Mohammad Reza

    2018-01-01

    A rapid, simple, and sensitive approach to the analysis of trihalomethanes (THMs) in swimming pool water samples has been developed. The main goal of this study was to overcome or to improve the shortcomings of conventional dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and to maximize the realization of green analytical chemistry principles. The method involves a simple vortex-assisted microextraction step, in the absence of the dispersive solvent, followed by salting-out effect for the elimination of the centrifugation step. A bell-shaped device and a solidifiable solvent were used to simplify the extraction solvent collection after phase separation. Optimization of the independent variables was performed by using chemometric methods in three steps. The method was statistically validated based on authentic guidance documents. The completion time for extraction was less than 8 min, and the limits of detection were in the range between 4 and 72 ng L -1 . Using this method, good linearity and precision were achieved. The results of THMs determination in different real samples showed that in some cases the concentration of total THMs was more than threshold values of THMs determined by accredited healthcare organizations. This method indicated satisfactory analytical figures of merit. Graphical Abstract A novel green microextraction technique for overcoming the challenges of conventional DLLME. The proposed procedure complies with the principles of green/sustainable analytical chemistry, comprising decreasing the sample size, making easy automation of the process, reducing organic waste, diminishing energy consumption, replacing toxic reagents with safer reagents, and enhancing operator safety.

  10. Diarrhea and Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 888) 232-6348 Contact CDC–INFO Healthy Swimming Health Benefits of Water-based Exercise Swimmer Protection Steps of ... Disinfection Microbial Testing & Disinfection Swimming Pool Chemicals Injuries & Outdoor Health International Recreational Water RWIs, Swimmer Hygiene, & Behavioral ...

  11. Swimming pool exposure is associated with autonomic changes and increased airway reactivity to a beta-2 agonist in school aged children: A cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciência, Inês; Silva, Diana; Martins, Carla; Madureira, Joana; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo; Padrão, Patrícia; Moreira, Pedro; Delgado, Luís; Moreira, André

    2018-01-01

    Background Endurance swimming exercises coupled to disinfection by-products exposure has been associated with increased airways dysfunction and neurogenic inflammation in elite swimmers. However, the impact of swimming pool exposure at a recreational level on autonomic activity has never been explored. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate how swimming pool attendance is influencing lung and autonomic function in school-aged children. Methods A total of 858 children enrolled a cross sectional survey. Spirometry and airway reversibility to beta-2 agonist, skin-prick-tests and exhaled nitric oxide measurements were performed. Pupillometry was used to evaluate autonomic nervous function. Children were classified as current swimmers (CS), past swimmers (PS) and non-swimmers (NS), according to the amount of swimming practice. Results Current swimmers group had significantly lower maximum and average pupil constriction velocities when compared to both PS and NS groups (3.8 and 5.1 vs 3.9 and 5.3 vs 4.0 and 5.4 mm/s, p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively). Moreover, affinity to the beta-2 agonist and levels of exhaled nitric oxide were significantly higher in CS when compared to NS (70 vs 60 mL and 12 vs 10 ppb, pswimming practice, particularly in atopic individuals (β = 1.12, 1.40 and 1.31, respectively). After case-case analysis, it was possible to observe that results were not influenced by the inclusion of individuals with asthma. Conclusions Concluding, swimming pool attendance appears to be associated with autonomic changes and increased baseline airway smooth muscle constriction even in children without asthma. PMID:29529048

  12. Modelling and mapping climate change adaptability in the historic tourism region of the Salzkammergut in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Stefan; Lang, Stefan; Pernkopf, Lena

    2017-04-01

    Climate change adaptability of a region due to climate change (CC) is of growing concern due to its irreversible character and the multitude of factors supporting or hampering the capability to adapt. Research on climate change adaptation, in its complex character and its global (in terms of both societal and environmental implications), involves several schools according to [Miller et al. 2010]: (1) the 'vulnerability' community with its two to three main pillars (exposure, adaptive capacity, sensitivity) following the actor-oriented IPCC approach [IPCC 2007], investigating the degree to which a system is susceptible to, and unable to cope with, adverse effects of climate change; and (2) the 'resilience' community emerging from the (eco-)systems approach with its dual function [Folke 2006] of absorbing disturbance and self-renewal/-organisation. The concept of 'transformability' seems to be the appropriate overarching one to accommodate either notion. Here we treat climate change (CC) adaptability/transformability as a latent phenomenon to be operationalized by decomposition [Weinberg 1975]. After this we re-compose a meta-indicator based on a scale-specific spatial set of regions characterised by uniform response to the phenomenon under concern. In [Lang et al. 2014] we showed how gridded fine-scale data being integrated and regionalised can support ambitious policy interventions in the so-called geon approach. Spatializing a multi-dimensional indicator set using scale-specific regionalisation shall aim for a policy-driven 'unitisation' of the intervention space. We focus our study on a tourism region called Salzkammergut, situated in inner Austria and historically grown. Nowadays intersecting three federal states without an explicit administrative body, this region can be considered 'latent' itself. The region, a historic tourism area since the Austrian Empire has received its recognition since the early 19th century. Then being confined to an area around the

  13. Geothermal heat for Erding. 2. Energy and wellness, geothermal heating station and hot-water indoor swimming pool; Geowaerme fuer Erding 2. Energie und Wellness, Geothermieheizwerk und Thermalbad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenzer, H. (comp.); Bussmann, W.

    1999-07-01

    This 17:20 minute VHS-PAL video film describes the project 'Geothermal heat for Erding 2', i.e. the construction of the geothermal heating station and a modern hot-water indoor swimming pool. [German] Der vorliegende VHS-PAL-Videofilm beschreibt innerhalb von 17:20 Min. Lauflaenge das Projekt 'Geowaerme fuer Erding 2'. Gezeigt werden die Entstehungsphasen dieses Projektes bestehend aus einem Geothermieheizwerk und einem modernen Thermalbad. (AKF)

  14. Swimming pools and shower rooms - sealing directly under the tiles avoids hygienically serious water accumulations. Schwimmbecken und Duschraeume - Abdichtung direkt unter den Fliesen vermeidet hygienisch bedenkliche Wasseransammlungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon,

    1990-12-14

    Swimming pool seals are to carry out according to the DIN 18195 part 7 in which sealing with strips and foils is required; at the bottom of the pool a sufficiently dimensioned protective coating under the tiles and in the wall area using the following construction from the outside to the inside: tiles, mortar, face brickwork of at least half brick thickness and behind it a 4 cm shell joint. Then as the next layer follows the seal with foils or sealing strips. The total construction facing the water is thus with a total layer thickness of about 10 cm permanently exposed to water with all the thus resulting consequences. (orig.).

  15. Coping with the Forced Swim Stressor: Towards Understanding an Adaptive Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloet, E R; Molendijk, M L

    2016-01-01

    In the forced swim test (FST) rodents progressively show increased episodes of immobility if immersed in a beaker with water from where escape is not possible. In this test, a compound qualifies as a potential antidepressant if it prevents or delays the transition to this passive (energy conserving) behavioural style. In the past decade however the switch from active to passive "coping" was used increasingly to describe the phenotype of an animal that has been exposed to a stressful history and/or genetic modification. A PubMed analysis revealed that in a rapidly increasing number of papers (currently more than 2,000) stress-related immobility in the FST is labeled as a depression-like phenotype. In this contribution we will examine the different phases of information processing during coping with the forced swim stressor. For this purpose we focus on the action of corticosterone that is mediated by the closely related mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in the limbic brain. The evidence available suggests a model in which we propose that the limbic MR-mediated response selection operates in complementary fashion with dopaminergic accumbens/prefrontal executive functions to regulate the transition between active and passive coping styles. Upon rescue from the beaker the preferred, mostly passive, coping style is stored in the memory via a GR-dependent action in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. It is concluded that the rodent's behavioural response to a forced swim stressor does not reflect depression. Rather the forced swim experience provides a unique paradigm to investigate the mechanistic underpinning of stress coping and adaptation.

  16. Human adaptive behavior in common pool resource systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Brandt

    Full Text Available Overexploitation of common-pool resources, resulting from uncooperative harvest behavior, is a major problem in many social-ecological systems. Feedbacks between user behavior and resource productivity induce non-linear dynamics in the harvest and the resource stock that complicate the understanding and the prediction of the co-evolutionary system. With an adaptive model constrained by data from a behavioral economic experiment, we show that users' expectations of future pay-offs vary as a result of the previous harvest experience, the time-horizon, and the ability to communicate. In our model, harvest behavior is a trait that adjusts to continuously changing potential returns according to a trade-off between the users' current harvest and the discounted future productivity of the resource. Given a maximum discount factor, which quantifies the users' perception of future pay-offs, the temporal dynamics of harvest behavior and ecological resource can be predicted. Our results reveal a non-linear relation between the previous harvest and current discount rates, which is most sensitive around a reference harvest level. While higher than expected returns resulting from cooperative harvesting in the past increase the importance of future resource productivity and foster sustainability, harvests below the reference level lead to a downward spiral of increasing overexploitation and disappointing returns.

  17. Integrated impact assessment of climate change, land use, and adaptation policies on water quality in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautvetter, Helen; Schoenhart, Martin; Parajaka, Juraj; Schmid, Erwin; Zessner, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is one of the major challenges of our time and adds considerable stress to the human society and environment. A change in climate will not only shift general weather patterns, but might also increase the recurrence of extreme weather events such as drought and heavy rainfall. These changes in climatic conditions will affect the quality and quantity of water resources both directly as well as indirectly through autonomous adaptation by farmers (e.g. cultivar choices, fertilization intensity or soil management). This will influence the compliance with the good ecological and chemical status according to the EU Water Framework Directive. We present results from an integrated impact modelling framework (IIMF) to tackle those direct and indirect impacts and analyze policy options for planned adaptation in agricultural land use and sustainable management of land and water resources until 2040. The IIMF is the result of an interdisciplinary collaboration among economists, agronomists, and hydrologists. It consists of the bio-physical process model EPIC, the regional land use optimization model PASMA[grid], the quantitative precipitation/runoff TUWmodel and the surface water emission model MONERIS. Scenarios have been developed and parameterized in collaboration with stakeholders in order to facilitate multi-actor knowledge transfer. The set of climate change scenarios until 2040 includes three scenarios with equal temperature changes but varying precipitation patterns. They are combined with potential socio-economic and policy development. The latter include water protection measures on fertilization management, soil management, or crop rotation choices. We will presented the development of interfaces among the research, the definition of scenarios and major scenario results for Austria. We will focus on nutrient emissions to surface waters, which are the major link between the different models. The results, available at watershed level indicate the

  18. Experimental Investigation of the Hot Water Layer Effect on Upward Flow Open Pool Reactor Operability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Elmaaty, T.

    2014-01-01

    The open pool reactor offers a high degree of reliability in the handling and manoeuvring, the replacement of reactor internal components and the suing of vertical irradiation channels. The protection of both the operators and the reactor hall environment against radiation hazards is considered a matter of interest. So, a hot water layer is implemented above many of the research reactors main pool, especially those whose flow direction is upward flow. An experimental work was carried out to ensure the operability of the upward flow open pool research reactor with / without the hot water layer. The performed experiment showed that, the hot water layer is produced an inverse buoyant force make the water to diffuse downward against the ordinary natural circulation from the reactor core. An upward flow - open pool research reactor (with a power greater than 20 M watt) could not wok without a hot water layer. The high temperature of the hot water layer surface could release a considerable amount of water vapour into the reactor hall, so a heat and mass transfer model is built based on the measured hot water layer surface temperature to calculate the amount of released water vapour during the reactor operating period. The effects of many parameters like the ambient air temperature, the reactor hall relative humidity and the speed of the pushed air layer above the top pool end on the evaporation rate is studied. The current study showed that, the hot water layer system is considered an efficient shielding system against Gamma radiation for open pool upward flow reactor and that system should be operated before the reactor start up by a suitable period of time. While, the heat and mass transfer model results showed that, the amount of the released water vapour is increased as a result of both the increase in hot water layer surface temperature and the increase in air layer speed. As the increase in hot water layer surface temperature could produce a good operability

  19. Experimental Investigation of the Hot Water Layer Effect on Upward Flow Open Pool Reactor Operability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Elmaaty, T.

    2015-01-01

    The open pool reactor offers a high degree of reliability in the handling and manoeuvring, the replacement of reactor internal components and the swing of vertical irradiation channels. The protection of both the operators and the reactor hall environment against radiation hazards is considered a matter of interest. So, a hot water layer implemented above many of the research reactors main pool, especially those whose flow direction is upward flow. An experimental work was carried out to ensure the operability of the upward flow open pool research reactor with / without the hot water layer. The performed experiment showed that, the hot water layer produced an inverse buoyant force making the water to diffuse downward against the ordinary natural circulation from the reactor core. An upward flow-open pool research reactor (with a power greater than 20 Mw) could not wok without a hot water layer. The high temperature of the hot water layer surface could release a considerable amount of water vapour into the reactor hall, so a heat and mass transfer model is built based on the measured hot water layer surface temperature to calculate the amount of released water vapour during the reactor operating period. The effects of many parameters like the ambient air temperature, the reactor hall relative humidity and the speed of the pushed air layer above the top pool end on the evaporation rate is studied. The current study showed that, the hot water layer system is considered an efficient shielding system against gamma radiation for open pool upward flow reactor and that system should be operated before the reactor start up by a suitable period of time. While, the heat and mass transfer model results showed that, the amount of the released water vapour is increased as a result of both the increase in hot water layer surface temperature and the increase in air layer speed. As the increase in hot water layer surface temperature could produce a good operability conditions from

  20. Development of system design and seismic performance evaluation for reactor pool working platform of a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwag, Shinyoung; Lee, Jong-Min; Oh, Jinho; Ryu, Jeong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Design of reactor pool working platform (RPWP) is newly proposed for an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor. • Main concept of RPWP is to minimize the pool top radiation level. • Framework for seismic performance evaluation of nuclear SSCs in a deterministic and a probabilistic manner is proposed. • Structural integrity, serviceability, and seismic margin of the RPWP are evaluated during and after seismic events. -- Abstract: The reactor pool working platform (RPWP) has been newly designed for an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor, and its seismic response, structural integrity, serviceability, and seismic margin have been evaluated during and after seismic events in this paper. The main important concept of the RPWP is to minimize the pool top radiation level by physically covering the reactor pool of the open-tank-in-pool type research reactor and suppressing the rise of flow induced by the primary cooling system. It is also to provide easy handling of the irradiated objects under the pool water by providing guide tubes and refueling cover to make the radioisotopes irradiated and protect the reactor structure assembly. For this concept, the new three dimensional design model of the RPWP is established for manufacturing, installation and operation, and the analytical model is developed to analyze the seismic performance. Since it is submerged under and influenced by water, the hydrodynamic effect is taken into account by using the hydrodynamic added mass method. To investigate the dynamic characteristics of the RPWP, a modal analysis of the developed analytical model is performed. To evaluate the structural integrity and serviceability of the RPWP, the response spectrum analysis and response time history analysis have been performed under the static load and the seismic load of a safe shutdown earthquake (SSE). Their stresses are analyzed for the structural integrity. The possibility of an impact between the RPWP and the most

  1. Detection of fission products release in the research reactor 'RA' spent fuel storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.V.; Vukadin, Z.; Pavlovic, S.; Maksin, T.; Idakovic, Z.; Marinkovic, N.

    1997-05-01

    Spent fuel resulting from 25 years of operating the 6.5/10 MW thermal heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor RA at the VINCA Institute is presently all stored in the temporary spent fuel storage pool in the basement of the reactor building. In 1984, the reactor was shut down for refurbishment, which for a number of reasons has not yet been completed. Recent investigations show that independent of the future status of the research reactor, safe disposal of the so far irradiated fuel must be the subject of primary concern. The present status of the research reactor RA spent fuel storage pool at the VINCA Institute presents a serious safety problem. Action is therefore initiated in two directions. First, safety of the existing spent fuel storage should be improved. Second, transferring spent fuel into another, presumably dry storage space should be considered. By storing the previously irradiated fuel of the research reactor RA in a newly built storage space, sufficient free space will be provided in the existing spent fuel storage pool for the newly irradiated fuel when the reactor starts operation again. In the case that it would be decided to decommission the research reactor RA, the newly built storage space would provide safe disposal for the fuel irradiated so far

  2. Nuclear policies in Central Europe. Environmental policy and enlargement of the European Union: Austria's policies towards Nuclear Reactors in neighboring countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getzner, M.

    2003-01-01

    Austria's anti-nuclear policies are rooted in the successful anti-nuclear referendum on the Zwentendorf nuclear power plant (Lower Austria) in 1978 and the great impact of the Chernobyl catastrophe on Austria in 1986. Since about 1990, official Austria has pursued anti-nuclear policies not only at home but also abroad. In particular, reactors in Central and Eastern European Countries (CEEC) are the focal points of Austria's foreign anti-nuclear policies. Strategies include increasing nuclear safety, promoting energy efficiency and sustainable energy sources (such as renewable resources), and extending international legal frameworks to account for nuclear safety. Involvement in domestic energy issues in other countries is not an easy task, and while Austrian policy makers have had some success in increasing awareness of nuclear safety in Europe, they have also made a number of strategic mistakes. Notwithstanding real and substantiated concerns regarding nuclear safety, Austrian policies have lost credibility during recent years. This book explores the history and the development of Austrian anti-nuclear policies, and discusses the political economy of such policies. Particular emphasis is laid on the 2002 referendum against the Temelin reactor in the neighboring Czech Republic. (orig.)

  3. Rational energy utilization and utilization of solar energy in the open-air swimming pool and in the multiple purpose hall at Wiehl. Final report. Pt. G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouillon, H; Jensch, K; Jensch, W; Biasin, K; Dreisbach, K; Fruehauf, H J

    1982-12-01

    The research- and demonstration project in Wiehl consists mainly of an open-air swimming pool heated by solar energy and of a multiple purpose hall which is chiefly used as an ice-sport hall. The ice-field is cooled by means of a refrigeration system. The waste heat developing during freezing is used for water heating, space heating and hall-air heating for the multiple purpose hall and for after-heating of the pool water in the open-air swimming pool. In artificial ice-fields operated without interruptions during quite a long time, the subsoil may freeze. In this case there is the risk of the field constructions being damaged by the tensile forces of the frozen subsoil. In order to avoid this heating coils are installed below the fields in many cases today, due to which part of the waste heat developing during ice-production can be used to heat the field subsoil and thus avoid the risk of destruction.

  4. Efficient heating of a swimming pool. High-efficiency boiler and solar system at Blaubeuren; Effiziente Freibad-Beheizung. Brennwert-Solartechnik in Blaubeuren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trobisch, Jens [Bosch Thermotechnik GmbH, Wernau (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The ''Blautopf'' karst spring near Blaubeuren is a wonder of nature and widely known even across the borders of Baden-Wuerttemberg. Few visitors, however, are aware that just a few steps away, there is another tourist attraction, i.e. the town's new outdoor swimming pool. In May 2008, a modern gas-fuelled high-efficiency boiler combined with a solar system was installed to heat the shower water for about 60,000 visitors per year. Optimised control ensures energy savings of up to 75 percent. The first season was highly successful. (orig.)

  5. Rational energy utilization and utilization of solar energy in the open-air swimming pool and in the multiple purpose hall at Wiehl. Final report. Pt. E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouillon, H; Jensch, K; Pentenrieder, J; Biasin, K; Dreisbach, K; Fruehauf, H J

    1982-12-01

    The test operation in Wiehl has shown that the waste heat utilization of an ice-sport ground especially in connection with the heat supply of an open-air swimming pool can be technically and functionally performed. Unter the given operating conditions annual cost savings of approx. 45.000 DM are yielded as against conventional systems. In addition to this advantage regarding works-economy the heat pump system also offers the advantage of considerable primary energy conservation. Apart from these very important findings also essential knowledge of details with regard to design, control, energy consumption and behaviour of the individual systems of this complex system have been obtained.

  6. Development, Implementation and Experimental Validations of Activation Products Models for Water Pool Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petriw, S.N.

    2001-01-01

    Some parameters were obtained both calculations and experiments in order to determined the source of the meaning activation products in water pool reactors. In this case, the study was done in RA-6 reactor (Centro Atomico Bariloche - Argentina).In normal operation, neutron flux on core activates aluminium plates.The activity on coolant water came from its impurities activation and meanly from some quantity of aluminium that, once activated, leave the cladding and is transported by water cooling system.This quantity depends of the 'recoil range' of each activation reaction.The 'staying time' on pool (the time that nuclides are circulating on the reactor pool) is another characteristic parameter of the system.Stationary state activity of some nuclides depends of this time.Also, several theoretical models of activation on coolant water system are showed, and their experimental validations

  7. Consequences in a long time of the forced loss of coolant in a pool type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The fuel and pool water temperatures are calculated as a function of time using unidimensional models of heat conduction and momentum conservation, to simulate the natural convection flow of the coolant. The reactor building pressure due to the pool water evaporation is calculated using a homogeneous model with thermal equilibrium. The heat loss from the three main components of the building volume (liquid water, air, and steam) to solid surfaces such as the building walls are taking into account. (Author) [pt

  8. Impact of nuclear power and public acceptance. Licensing of nuclear reactors and public acceptance in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plochl, Gerhardt.

    1977-01-01

    This paper first reviews the main stages in the development of nuclear activities in Austria and recalls the principal legal and regulatory texts adopted in this field. In this context, the author describes the circumstances which, following announcement of the project for a second nuclear power plant in 1974, gave rise to hostile reactions and led to the organisation by the federal authorities of a wide public information campaign in 1976 and 1977. This resulted in increasing the number of opponents to nuclear energy and raised the question of the long term storage of radioactive waste, for which at present Austrian regulations provide no satisfactory solution. (NEA) [fr

  9. Activity of corrosion products in pool type reactors with ascending flow in the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade e Silva, Graciete S. de; Queiroz Bogado Leite, Sergio de

    1995-01-01

    A model for the activity of corrosion products in the water of a pool type reactor with ascending flow is presented. The problem is described by a set of coupled differential equations relating the radioisotope concentrations in the core and pool circuits and taking into account two types of radioactive sources: i) those from radioactive species formed in the fuel cladding, control elements, reflector, etc, and afterwards released to the primary stream by corrosion (named reactor sources) and ii) those formed from non radioactive isotopes entering the primary stream by corrosion of the circuit components and being activated when passing through the core (named circuit sources). (author). 6 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  10. Effect of medium-pressure UV-lamp treatment on disinfection by-products in chlorinated seawater swimming pool waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheema, Waqas Akram; Manasfi, Tarek; Kaarsholm, Kamilla Marie Speht

    2017-01-01

    Several brominated disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed in chlorinated seawater pools, due to the high concentration of bromide in seawater. UV irradiation is increasingly employed in freshwater pools, because UV treatment photodegrades harmful chloramines. However, in freshwater pools it has...

  11. Radiological performance of hot water layer system in open pool type reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Abdelhady

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the calculated dose rate carried out by using MicroShield code to show the importance of hot water layer system (HWL in 22 MW open pool type reactor from the radiation protection safety point of view. The paper presents the dose rate profiles over the pool surface in normal and abnormal operations of HWL system. The results show that, in case of losing the hot water layer effect, the radiation dose rate profiles over the pool surface will increase from values lower than the worker permissible dose limits to values very higher than the permissible dose limits.

  12. Radiological performance of hot water layer system in open pool type reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Amr Abdelhady

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the calculated dose rate carried out by using MicroShield code to show the importance of hot water layer system (HWL) in 22 MW open pool type reactor from the radiation protection safety point of view. The paper presents the dose rate profiles over the pool surface in normal and abnormal operations of HWL system. The results show that, in case of losing the hot water layer effect, the radiation dose rate profiles over the pool surface will increase from values lower than th...

  13. Experience on Maintenance of Thai Research Reactor's 'Small-Section' Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tippayakul, Chanatip

    2013-01-01

    The reactor pool of TRR-1/M1 has been used since 1962 when the reactor building was constructed. Periodic maintenance of the reactor pool has been conducted by cleaning the pool surface and re-painting with epoxy coating. The TRR-1/M1 pool basically consists of two sections referred as 'large-section' and 'small-section'. The latest re-painting activity of the 'large-section' pool was performed in 2006 but the 'small-section' pool had not been re-painted for more than 10 years. Therefore, to assure that the 'small-section' pool can maintain leak-proof condition, the re-painting of the 'small-section' pool was performed in the early 2012. A project team was organized specially for this project and a detailed execution plan was developed. The project activities include removing foreign objects and highly activated materials from the pool section, cleaning, inspecting, re-painting the pool surface and testing for water leaks. Preparation of the repainting activities had begun 2 years in advance. During the time, the reactor core had been relocated to operate in the large-section pool away from the working area in order to minimize radioactivity. The challenge of this project was to handle 4 sets of highly radioactive bolts and nuts which support the weight of the 'void tank' irradiation facility. These bolts and nuts were made from stainless steel and had been in the flux region since the installation of the 'void tank' irradiation facility approximately 30 years ago. Dose rate measurement at the contacts of these bolts and nuts were found to be in the range of 10 . 20 R/hr. The strategy to minimize the dose rate of the workers to conduct the pool repainting in the area was to remove the bolts and nuts and replace with new ones before entering the area. Special tools were improvised in order to remove the bolts and nuts under water. During the execution of the project, close radiation monitoring was performed by the radiation protection team. The project was conducted

  14. Statistical evaluation of potential damage to the Al(OH)3 layer on nTiO2 particles in the presence of swimming pool and seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virkutyte, Jurate; Al-Abed, Souhail R.

    2012-01-01

    Nanosized TiO 2 particles (nTiO 2 ) are usually coated with an Al(OH) 3 layer when used in sunscreen to shield against the harmful effects of free radicals that are generated when these particles are exposed to UV radiation. Therefore, it is vital to insure the structural stability of these particles in the environment where the protective layer may be damaged and adverse health and environmental effects can occur. This study utilized X-ray analysis (SEM–EDS) to provide a qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of the chemical and physical characteristics of Al(OH) 3 -coated original and damaged nTiO 2 particles (used in sunscreen lotion formulations) in the presence of both swimming pool and seawater. Also, by utilizing statistical tools, a distribution of Al/Ti (%) on the particle surface was determined and evaluated. It was found that 45 min of treatment with swimming pool and seawater significantly induced the redistribution of Al/Ti (%), which changed the surface characteristics of particles and, therefore, may have induced undesired photo-activity and the consequent formation of free radicals.

  15. “Saving lives”: Adapting and adopting Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Katharina T.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination against the sexually transmitted Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), a necessary agent for the development of cervical cancer, has triggered much debate. In Austria, HPV policy turned from “lagging behind” in 2008 into “Europe's frontrunner” by 2013. Drawing on qualitative research, the article shows how the vaccine was transformed and made “good enough” over the course of five years. By means of tinkering and shifting storylines, policy officials and experts disassociated the vaccine from gender, vaccine manufacturers, and youth sexuality. Ultimately, the HPV vaccine functioned to strengthen the national immunization program. To this end, preventing an effective problematization of the extant screening program was essential. PMID:26921834

  16. Storage of water reactor spent fuel in water pools. Survey of world experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Following discharge from a nuclear reactor, spent fuel has to be stored in water pools at the reactor site to allow for radioactive decay and cooling. After this initial storage period, the future treatment of spent fuel depends on the fuel cycle concept chosen. Spent fuel can either be treated by chemical processing or conditioning for final disposal at the relevant fuel cycle facilities, or be held in interim storage - at the reactor site or at a central storage facility. Recent forecasts predict that, by the year 2000, more than 150,000 tonnes of heavy metal from spent LWR fuel will have been accumulated. Because of postponed commitments regarding spent fuel treatment, a significant amount of spent fuel will still be held in storage at that time. Although very positive experience with wet storage has been gained over the past 40 years, making wet storage a proven technology, it appears desirable to summarize all available data for the benefit of designers, storage pool operators, licensing agenices and the general public. Such data will be essential for assessing the viability of extended water pool storage of spent nuclear fuel. In 1979, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD jointly issued a questionnaire dealing with all aspects of water pool storage. This report summarizes the information received from storage pool operators

  17. 3-dimensional thermohydraulic analysis of KALIMER reactor pool during unprotected accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Hahn Do Hee

    2003-01-01

    During a normal reactor scram, the heat generation is reduced almost instantaneously while the coolant flow rate follows the pump coastdown. This mismatch between power and flow results in a situation where the core flow entering the hot pool is at a lower temperature than the temperature of the bulk pool sodium. This temperature difference leads to thermal stratification. Thermal stratification can occur in the hot pool region if the entering coolant is colder than the existing hot pool coolant and the flow momentum is not large enough to overcome the negative buoyancy force. Since the fluid of hot pool enters IHXs, the temperature distribution of hot pool can alter the overall system response. Hence, it is necessary to predict the pool coolant temperature distribution with sufficient accuracy to determine the inlet temperature conditions for the IHXs and its contribution to the net buoyancy head. Therefore, two-dimensional hot pool thermohydraulic model named HP2D has been developed. In this report code-to-code comparison analysis between HP2D and COMMIX-1AR/P has been performed in the case of steady-state and UTOP.

  18. Roof loading and response following a HCDA in a pool-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancefield, M.J.; Leigh, K.M.; Potter, R.; Staniforth, R.

    1979-01-01

    In a pool-type reactor the loading and response of the roof structure to a HCDA is important to safety analysis and design. The U.K. programme of experimental and theoretical work on this topic is described. Good progress in understanding and evaluating the complex processes has been made and this is illustrated by results from experimental and theoretical work. 5 refs

  19. CFD aided analysis of a scaled down model of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweizer, Fernando L.A.; Lima, Claubia P.B.; Costa, Antonella L.; Veloso, Maria A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Research reactors are commonly built inside deep pools that provide radiological and thermal protection and easy access to its core. Reactors with thermal power in the order of MW usually use an auxiliary thermal-hydraulic circuit at the top of its pool to create a purified hot water layer (HWL). Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the flow configuration in the pool and HWL is paramount to insure radiological protection. A useful tool for these analyses is the application of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). To obtain satisfactory results using CFD it is necessary the verification and validation of the CFD numerical model. Verification is divided in code and solution verifications. In the first one establishes the correctness of the CFD code implementation and in the former estimates the numerical accuracy of a particular calculation. Validation is performed through comparison of numerical and experimental results. This paper presents a dimensional analysis of the RMB (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) pool to determine a scaled down experimental installation able to aid in the HWL numerical investigation. Two CFD models were created one with the same dimensions and boundary conditions of the reactor prototype and the other with 1/10 proportion size and boundary conditions set to achieve the same inertial and buoyant forces proportions represented by Froude Number between the two models. Results comparing the HWL thickness show consistence between the prototype and the scaled down model behavior. (author)

  20. Osiris reactor descriptive report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    OSIRIS is a swimming pool reactor of 70 MW thermal power. Its main purpose is the irradiation of reactor materials in high neutron flux. A description is given of the air conditioning, ventilation, and radioactive gas removal system. (R.L.)

  1. Physical principle and engineering features of the deep pool reactor for residential heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Gong; Zhao Zhaoyi; Guo Jingren; Tian Jiafu

    1999-01-01

    The use of nuclear energy for low temperature heating is confronted with challenges of safety and economy. The deep pool reactor, a low temperature heating reactor based on novel design principles, has been studied in detail. Results show that it has excellent safety and economic features, and is very suitable for low temperature heating purposes. The whole heating system including the nuclear reactor will be a simple and easy engineering system with the characteristics of reliability, safety and economy because the system and all its devices are based on low temperature and ordinary pressure

  2. Corrosion of aluminium alloy test coupons in water of spent fuel storage pool at RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Maksin, T.; Jordanov, G.; Dobrijevic, R.

    2004-12-01

    Study on corrosion of aluminium cladding, of the TVR-S type of enriched uranium spent fuel elements of the research reactor RA in the storage water pool is examined in the framework nr the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) 'Corrosion of Research Reactor Clad-Clad Spent Fuel in Water' since 2002. Standard racks with aluminium coupons are exposed to water in the spent fuel pools of the research reactor RA. After predetermined exposure times along with periodic monitoring of the water parameters, the coupons are examined according to the strategy and the protocol supplied by the IAEA. Description of the standard corrosion racks, experimental protocols, test procedures, water quality monitoring and compilation of results of visual examination of corrosion effects are present in this article. (author)

  3. Winter-swimming as a building-up body resistance factor inducing adaptive changes in the oxidant/antioxidant status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubkowska, Anna; Dołęgowska, Barbara; Szyguła, Zbigniew; Bryczkowska, Iwona; Stańczyk-Dunaj, Małgorzata; Sałata, Daria; Budkowska, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our research was to examine whether winter-swimming for five consecutive months results in adaptational changes improving tolerance to stress induced by exposure to cryogenic temperatures during whole-body cryostimulation (WBC). The research involved 15 healthy men, with normal bodyweight, who had never been subjected to either WBC or cold water immersion. During the experiment, the participants were twice subjected to WBC (3 min/- 130°C), namely before the winter-swimming season and after the season. Blood was taken seven times: In the morning before each cryostimulation, 30 min after each cryostimulation and the next morning. Additionally, control blood was collected in the middle of the winter season, in February. Our analysis concerned changes in hematological parameters as well as in reduced glutathione and oxidized glutathione, total oxidant status, total antioxidant status and in components of the antioxidant system: Superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase and 8-Isoprostanes as a sensitive indicator of oxidative stress. We found significant changes in hemoglobin concentration, the number of red blood cells, the hematocrit index and mean corpuscular volume of red blood cell and the percentage of monocytes and granulocytes after the winter swimming season. The response to cryogenic temperatures was milder after five months of winter-swimming. The obtained results may indicate positive adaptive changes in the antioxidant system of healthy winter-swimmers. These changes seem to increase the readiness of the human body to stress factors.

  4. "Saving lives": Adapting and adopting Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Katharina T

    2016-03-01

    Vaccination against the sexually transmitted Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), a necessary agent for the development of cervical cancer, has triggered much debate. In Austria, HPV policy turned from "lagging behind" in 2008 into "Europe's frontrunner" by 2013. Drawing on qualitative research, the article shows how the vaccine was transformed and made "good enough" over the course of five years. By means of tinkering and shifting storylines, policy officials and experts disassociated the vaccine from gender, vaccine manufacturers, and youth sexuality. Ultimately, the HPV vaccine functioned to strengthen the national immunization program. To this end, preventing an effective problematization of the extant screening program was essential. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Design of make-up water system for Tehran research reactor spent nuclear fuels storage pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghoyeh, Reza Gholizadeh [Reactor Research Group, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI), North Amirabad, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, Hosein, E-mail: hkhalafi@aeoi.org.i [Reactor Research Group, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI), North Amirabad, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Spent nuclear fuels storage (SNFS) is an essential auxiliary system in nuclear facility. Following discharge from a nuclear reactor, spent nuclear fuels have to be stored in water pool of SNFS away from reactor to allow for radioactive to decay and removal of generated heat. To prevent corrosion damage of fuels and other equipments, the storage pool is filled with de-ionized water which serves as moderator, coolant and shielding. The de-ionized water will be provided from make-up water system. In this paper, design of a make-up water system for optimal water supply and its chemical properties in SNFS pool is presented. The main concern of design is to provide proper make-up water throughout the storage time. For design of make-up water system, characteristics of activated carbon purifier, anionic, cationic and mixed-bed ion-exchangers have been determined. Inlet water to make-up system provide from Tehran municipal water system. Regulatory Guide 1.13 of the and graver company manual that manufactured the Tehran research reactor (TRR) make-up water system have been used for make-up water system of TRR spent nuclear fuels storage pool design.

  6. Design of make-up water system for Tehran research reactor spent nuclear fuels storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghoyeh, Reza Gholizadeh; Khalafi, Hosein

    2010-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuels storage (SNFS) is an essential auxiliary system in nuclear facility. Following discharge from a nuclear reactor, spent nuclear fuels have to be stored in water pool of SNFS away from reactor to allow for radioactive to decay and removal of generated heat. To prevent corrosion damage of fuels and other equipments, the storage pool is filled with de-ionized water which serves as moderator, coolant and shielding. The de-ionized water will be provided from make-up water system. In this paper, design of a make-up water system for optimal water supply and its chemical properties in SNFS pool is presented. The main concern of design is to provide proper make-up water throughout the storage time. For design of make-up water system, characteristics of activated carbon purifier, anionic, cationic and mixed-bed ion-exchangers have been determined. Inlet water to make-up system provide from Tehran municipal water system. Regulatory Guide 1.13 of the and graver company manual that manufactured the Tehran research reactor (TRR) make-up water system have been used for make-up water system of TRR spent nuclear fuels storage pool design.

  7. Design of neutron radiography facility in pool for the reactor RA-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peirone, M.; Coleff, A.; Sanchez, F.; Chiaraviglio, N.

    2013-01-01

    RA-10 project consists in the design and construction of a multipurpose reactor for multiple applications, including radioisotopes production, material testing and an in pool facility for neutron imaging. Neutron imaging is a powerful tool for studies of materials and offer several advantages among other attenuation-based techniques. In this study mechanical and neutronic requirements for the RA-10 in pool neutron imaging facility are described. The MCNP neutronic model and the mechanical design satisfying these requirements in a first engineering stage are described. (author)

  8. Consideration of climate change impacts and adaptation in EIA practice — Perspectives of actors in Austria and Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiricka, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra.jiricka@boku.ac.at [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Department of Landscape, Spatial and Infrastructure Sciences, Institute for Landscape Development, Recreation and Conservation Planning, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Formayer, Herbert; Schmidt, Anna [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Department of Landscape, Spatial and Infrastructure Sciences, Institute for Landscape Development, Recreation and Conservation Planning, Peter-Jordan-Straße 82, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Völler, Sonja; Leitner, Markus [Environment Agency Austria, Environmental Impact Assessment and Climate Change, Spittelauer Lände 5, 1090 Wien (Austria); Fischer, Thomas B. [Environmental Assessment and Management, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, 74 Bedford Street South, Liverpool L69 7ZQ (United Kingdom); Wachter, Thomas F. [Büro für Umweltplanung Dr. Wachter, Wiesnerring 2c, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Current political discussions and developments indicate the importance and urgency of incorporating climate change considerations into EIA processes. The recent revision of the EU Directive 2014/52/EU on Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) requires changes in the EIA practice of the EU member states. This paper investigates the extent to which the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) can contribute to an early consideration of climate change consequences in planning processes. In particular the roles of different actors in order to incorporate climate change impacts and adaptation into project planning subject to EIA at the appropriate levels are a core topic. Semi-structured expert interviews were carried out with representatives of the main infrastructure companies and institutions responsible in these sectors in Austria, which have to carry out EIA regularly. In a second step expert interviews were conducted with EIA assessors and EIA authorities in Austria and Germany, in order to examine the extent to which climate-based changes are already considered in EIA processes. This paper aims to discuss the different perspectives in the current EIA practice with regard to integrating climate change impacts as well as barriers and solutions identified by the groups of actors involved, namely project developers, environmental competent authorities and consultants (EIA assessors/practitioners). The interviews show that different groups of actors consider the topic to different degrees. Downscaling of climate change scenarios is in this context both, a critical issue with regards to availability of data and costs. Furthermore, assistance for the interpretation of relevant impacts, to be deducted from climate change scenarios, on the specific environmental issues in the area is needed. The main barriers identified by the EIA experts therefore include a lack of data as well as general uncertainty as to how far climate change should be considered in the process without

  9. Consideration of climate change impacts and adaptation in EIA practice — Perspectives of actors in Austria and Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiricka, Alexandra; Formayer, Herbert; Schmidt, Anna; Völler, Sonja; Leitner, Markus; Fischer, Thomas B.; Wachter, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Current political discussions and developments indicate the importance and urgency of incorporating climate change considerations into EIA processes. The recent revision of the EU Directive 2014/52/EU on Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) requires changes in the EIA practice of the EU member states. This paper investigates the extent to which the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) can contribute to an early consideration of climate change consequences in planning processes. In particular the roles of different actors in order to incorporate climate change impacts and adaptation into project planning subject to EIA at the appropriate levels are a core topic. Semi-structured expert interviews were carried out with representatives of the main infrastructure companies and institutions responsible in these sectors in Austria, which have to carry out EIA regularly. In a second step expert interviews were conducted with EIA assessors and EIA authorities in Austria and Germany, in order to examine the extent to which climate-based changes are already considered in EIA processes. This paper aims to discuss the different perspectives in the current EIA practice with regard to integrating climate change impacts as well as barriers and solutions identified by the groups of actors involved, namely project developers, environmental competent authorities and consultants (EIA assessors/practitioners). The interviews show that different groups of actors consider the topic to different degrees. Downscaling of climate change scenarios is in this context both, a critical issue with regards to availability of data and costs. Furthermore, assistance for the interpretation of relevant impacts, to be deducted from climate change scenarios, on the specific environmental issues in the area is needed. The main barriers identified by the EIA experts therefore include a lack of data as well as general uncertainty as to how far climate change should be considered in the process without

  10. The full spectrum of climate change adaptation: testing an analytical framework in Tyrolean mountain agriculture (Austria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüneis, Heidelinde; Penker, Marianne; Höferl, Karl-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Our scientific view on climate change adaptation (CCA) is unsatisfying in many ways: It is often dominated by a modernistic perspective of planned pro-active adaptation, with a selective focus on measures directly responding to climate change impacts and thus it is far from real-life conditions of those who are actually affected by climate change. Farmers have to simultaneously adapt to multiple changes. Therefore, also empirical climate change adaptation research needs a more integrative perspective on real-life climate change adaptations. This also has to consider "hidden" adaptations, which are not explicitly and directly motivated by CCA but actually contribute to the sector's adaptability to climate change. The aim of the present study is to develop and test an analytic framework that contributes to a broader understanding of CCA and to bridge the gap between scientific expertise and practical action. The framework distinguishes three types of CCA according to their climate related motivations: explicit adaptations, multi-purpose adaptations, and hidden adaptations. Although agriculture is among the sectors that are most affected by climate change, results from the case study of Tyrolean mountain agriculture show that climate change is ranked behind other more pressing "real-life-challenges" such as changing agricultural policies or market conditions. We identified numerous hidden adaptations which make a valuable contribution when dealing with climate change impacts. We conclude that these hidden adaptations have not only to be considered to get an integrative und more realistic view on CCA; they also provide a great opportunity for linking adaptation strategies to farmers' realities.

  11. Effect of medium-pressure UV-lamp treatment on disinfection by-products in chlorinated seawater swimming pool waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Waqas A; Manasfi, Tarek; Kaarsholm, Kamilla M S; Andersen, Henrik R; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-12-01

    Several brominated disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed in chlorinated seawater pools, due to the high concentration of bromide in seawater. UV irradiation is increasingly employed in freshwater pools, because UV treatment photodegrades harmful chloramines. However, in freshwater pools it has been reported that post-UV chlorination promotes the formation of other DBPs. To date, UV-based processes have not been investigated for DBPs in seawater pools. In this study, the effects of UV, followed by chlorination, on the concentration of three groups of DBPs were investigated in laboratory batch experiments using a medium-pressure UV lamp. Chlorine consumption increased following post-UV chlorination, most likely because UV irradiation degraded organic matter in the pool samples to more chlorine-reactive organic matter. Haloacetic acid (HAA) concentrations decreased significantly, due to photo-degradation, but the concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetonitriles (HANs) increased with post-UV chlorination. Bromine incorporation in HAAs was significantly higher in the control samples chlorinated without UV irradiation but decreased significantly with UV treatment. Bromine incorporation was promoted in THM and HAN after UV and chlorine treatment. Overall, the accumulated bromine incorporation level in DBPs remained essentially unchanged in comparison with the control samples. Toxicity estimates increased with single-dose UV and chlorination, mainly due to increased HAN concentrations. However, brominated HANs are known in the literature to degrade following further UV treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. ADAPTIVE CONTROL SYSTEM OF INDUSTRIAL REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav K. Mayevski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a mathematical model of an industrial chemical reactor for production of synthetic rubber. During reactor operation the model parameters vary considerably. To create a control algorithm performed transformation of mathematical model of the reactor in order to obtain a dependency that can be used to determine the model parameters are changing during reactor operation.

  13. Sodium pool fire analysis of sodium-cooled fast reactor by calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hong; Xu Mi; Jin Degui

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical models were established according to the characteristic of sodium pool fire, and the SPOOL code was created independently. Some transient processes in sodium pool fire were modeled, including chemical reaction of sodium and oxygen; sodium combustion heat transfer modes in several kids of media; production, deposition and discharge of sodium aerosol; mass and energy exchange between different media in different ventilating conditions. The important characteristic parameters were calculated, such as pressure and temperature of gas, temperature of building materials, mass concentration of sodium aerosol, and so on. The SPOOL code, which provided available safety analysis tool for sodium pool fire accidents in sodium-cooled fast reactor, was well demonstrated with experimental data

  14. Eddy current testing of PWR fuel pencils in the pool of the Osiris reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, M.; Marchand, L.

    1983-12-01

    A nondestructive testing bench is described. It is devoted to examination of high residual power fuel pencils without stress on the cladding nor interference with cooling. Guiding by fluid bearings decrease the background noise. Scanning speed is limited only by safety criteria and data acquisition configuration. Simultaneous control of various parameters is possible. Associated to an irradiation loop, loaded and unloaded in a reactor swinning pool, this bench can follow fuel pencil degradation after each irradiation cycle [fr

  15. Trace element analysis at the Livermore pool-type reactor using neutron activation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragaini, R.C.; Ralston, R.; Garvis, D.

    1975-01-01

    The capabilities of trace element analysis at the Livermore Pool-Type Reactor (LPTR) using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) are discussed. A description is given of the technology and the methods employed, including sample preparation, irradiation, and analysis. Applications of the INAA technique in past and current projects are described. A computer program, GAMANAL, has been used for nuclide identification and quantification. (U.S.)

  16. Simulation of the Gamma Dose Rate in Loss of Pool Water Accident of the Second Egyptian Research Reactor ETRR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, E.; Saleh, H.; Ashoub, N.

    2000-01-01

    The Second Egyptian Research Reactor ETRR-2, is a pool type reactor, a sudden loss of pool water resulting of leaving the core region un-covered. The reactor core is surrounded by chimney chambers whose water is isolated from pool water. This accident would lead to significant external dose. A model is developed and is used to calculate the dose rates for key access and traffic plans from indirect line of sight of the core have a maximum dose rate. The model developed uses the discrete ordinate method as implemented in the code DOT 3.5

  17. Spectacular energy technology: Panorama-Sauna Holzweiler. KfW funds indoor swimming pools as 'process heat'; Energetisch spektakulaer: Panorama-Sauna Holzweiler. KfW foerdert Schwimmbaeder als 'Prozesswaerme'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Rolf

    2008-11-15

    The ''Panorama-Sauna'' at Grafschaft is a big indoor swimming pool and Sauna centre in a rural region not far from Cologne and Koblenz. The charm of this spectacular solar project is in its minimalism. Conventional solar thermal power systems, in contrast, tend to be complex and prone to failure. (orig.)

  18. Conceptual design of reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) spent fuel pool cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonny Lanyau; Mazleha Maskin; Mohd Fazli Zakaria; Mohmammad Suhaimi Kassim; Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim; Phongsakorn Prak Tom; Mohd Fairus Abdul Farid; Mohd Huzair Hussain

    2012-01-01

    After undergo about 30 years of safe operation, Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) was planned to be upgraded to ensure continuous operation at optimum safety condition. In the meantime, upgrading is essential to get higher flux to diversify the reactor utilization. Spent fuel pool is needed for temporary storage of the irradiated fuel before sending it back to original country for reprocessing, reuse after the upgrading accomplished or final disposal. The irradiated fuel elements need to be secure physically with continuous cooling to ensure the safety of the fuels itself. The decay heat probably still exist even though the fuel elements not in the reactor core. Therefore, appropriate cooling is required to remove the heat produced by decay of the fission product in the irradiated fuel element. The design of spent fuel pool cooling system (SFPCS) was come to mind in order to provide the sufficient cooling to the irradiated fuel elements and also as a shielding. The spent fuel pool cooling system generally equipped with pumps, heat exchanger, water storage tank, valve and piping. The design of the system is based on criteria of the primary cooling system. This paper provides the conceptual design of the spent fuel cooling system. (author)

  19. IEA-R1 reactor - Spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattos, J.R.L. De

    1996-01-01

    Brazil currently has one Swimming Pool Research Reactor (IEA-R1) at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - Sao Paulo. The spent fuel produced is stored both at the Reactor Pool Storage Compartment and at the Dry Well System. The present situation and future plans for spent fuel storage are described. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  20. Trihalometanos en el agua de piscinas en cuatro zonas de España participantes en el proyecto INMA Trihalomethanes in swimming pool water in four areas of Spain participating in the INMA project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Font-Ribera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: La natación es uno de los deportes más practicados en España, por personas de todas las edades y condiciones físicas. También es una vía de exposición a subproductos de la desinfección, compuestos potencialmente tóxicos. Su concentración en el agua de las piscinas no está legislada y es poco conocida. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir la concentración de trihalometanos en el agua de piscinas de los municipios de cuatro cohortes del estudio INMA. Métodos: En julio de 2009 se analizaron los trihalometanos en el agua de piscinas (n=27 de Asturias, Granada, Valencia y Sabadell. Resultados: La concentración media de trihalometanos totales fue de 42,7µg/l (desviación estándar [DE]=19,1 en las piscinas interiores y de 151,2µg/l (DE=80,7 en las exteriores, predominando siempre el cloroformo. Granada tuvo los valores más bajos. Conclusión: La concentración de trihalometanos en el agua de piscinas presenta una gran variabilidad. Las piscinas exteriores tienen valores más altos, superando mayoritariamente los límites legales establecidos para el agua de consumo.Objective: Swimming is one of the most widely practiced sports in Spain among people of all ages and physical conditions. This activity is also a source of exposure to disinfection by-products (DBP, which are potentially toxic. The DBP concentration in swimming pool water is not regulated and is poorly known. The aim of this study was to describe trihalomethane concentrations in swimming pool water in the municipalities of four cohorts of the INMA project. Methods: In July 2009, trihalomethanes were analyzed in water from 27 swimming pools in Asturias, Granada, Valencia and Sabadell. Results: The mean total trihalomethane concentration was 42.7µg/L (standard deviation [SD]=19.1 in indoor pools and 151.2µg/L (SD=80.7 in outdoor pools. In all pools, the most abundant trihalomethane was always chloroform. The lowest levels were found in Granada. Conclusion

  1. Adaptive nonlinear control for a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez R, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    Linearization by feedback of states is based on the idea of transform the nonlinear dynamic equation of a system in a linear form. This linear behavior can be achieve well in a complete way (input state) or in partial way (input output). This can be applied to systems of single or multiple inputs, and can be used to solve problems of stabilization and tracking of references trajectories. Comparing this method with conventional ones, linearization by feedback of states is exact in certain region of the space of state, instead of linear approximations of the equations in a certain point of the operation. In the presence of parametric uncertainties in the model of the system, the introduction of adaptive schemes provide a type toughness to the control system by nonlinear feedback, which gives as result the eventual cancellation of the nonlinear terms in the dynamic relationship between the output and the input of the auxiliary control. In the same way, it has been presented the design of a nonlinearizing control for the non lineal model of a TRIGA Mark III type reactor, with the aim of tracking a predetermined power profile. The asymptotic tracking of such profile is, at the present moment, in the stage of verification by computerized simulation the relative easiness in the design of auxiliary variable of control, as well as the decoupling action of the output variable, make very attractive the utilization of the method herein presented. (Author)

  2. Measurement and analysis of the neutron noise of the pool research reactor at IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoes, Graciete Pedro

    1979-01-01

    Variations in the neutron density or power of a nuclear reactor (the neutron noise) operating at nominally constant power are generally random and can only be described in terms of statistical parameters. Random variations in the power of a power reactor are produced by one or more driving functions. In this work the neutron noise of the pool reactor IEAR-1 (2 MW nominal power) has been studied using two compensated ionization chambers ( Westinghouse VJL6377) and related to three possible-driving functions, namely vibration of the control bar and reactor support bridge and the temperature of the water entering the core. The CIC detectors were located in rigid tubes in turn positively located in the reactor lattice plate. Conventional accelerometers were used. Temperature measurements were made with a NiCr/Ni thermocouple (wire diam ∼ 0.2mm) located 10 mm above the top of a fuel element. Although the correlation between the measured neutron signals was high ( > 0,4) for frequencies in the range 0 to 10 Hz no resonances were identified in the neutron noise. A significant correlation (> 0,4) between the control bar acceleration and the neutron flux was obtained in the frequency range 0 to 10 Hz. The measured correlation between the neutron noise and both the bridge vibration and the reactor water inlet temperature was insignificant. (author)

  3. A study of some radioprotection apparatuses used in the case of pool reactors; Etude de quelques dispositifs de radioprotection en service aupres des piles piscines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robien, E de; Choudens, H de; Delpuech, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Various problems of radioprotection concerning swimming-pool reactors in Grenoble have led us to study adequate solutions: a) The automatic verification of the staff-radioactivity when coming out of Melusine or Siloe has been realized thanks to a {beta}{gamma} gate which is insensitive to the ambient background in the reactor-hall; b) The automatic verification of the contamination of the shoes of the agents working in these reactors has been realized with a dedicated device; c) The necessity to measure precisely {gamma} doses with the help of an autonomous apparatus has led to the making of a plastic-scintillator {gamma} dosimeter; d) The obligation to forbid the opening of doors in some places where there might be a great intensity of radiation, has led us to make doors open according to the intensity of radiation inside the rooms; e) The releases of radioactive iodine have been measured with activated charcoal cartridges that surround a scintillator connected with a unique channel selector; f) Finally the control of reactor safety rod fall in case of a radioactive accident has been secured by a chain whose detector is a chamber immersed in the swimming-pool, which offers, in the particular case of the hot thickness swimming-pool reactor a double advantage: first it enables us to regulate the upper hot water layer, second to get free of transitory radiations which appear in the reactor hall as the experimental apparatuses are taken out from the core. (authors) [French] Differents problemes de radioprotection se posant aupres des piles piscines de Grenoble, ils ont necessite l'etude de solutions particulieres: a) le controle automatique de la radioactivite du personnel sortant de Melusine ou de Siloe a ete realise a l'aide d'un portique {beta}{gamma} insensible au bruit de fond ambiant du hall des piles; b) le controle automatique de la contamination des souliers des agents travaillant dans ces piles a ete realise par une passerelle pieds {beta}{gamma}; c) la

  4. A building technical management system optimizes the energy recovery in a swimming pool-skating rink complex; Une GTB optimise la recuperation d'energie d'un complexe piscine-patinoire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-04-01

    The municipal skating rink of La Roche-sur-Yon (France) is supplied by a direct expansion refrigerating system. The energy recovered from this system allows to heat the sport complex made of a 25 m swimming pool and of a ludic pool. A technical management system ensures the control and management of the overall technical equipments. The automation of the system has permitted to optimize the energy costs which have remained practically unchanged since 20 years, even after the extension of the main pool and the increase of the number of visitors. (J.S.)

  5. Science-policy interface in transformative adaptive flood risk management - decision-making in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Thomas; Attems, Marie-Sophie; Rauter, Magdalena; Fuchs, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Facing the challenges of climate change, this paper aims to analyse and to evaluate the multiple use of flood alleviation schemes with respect to social transformation in communities exposed to flood hazards in Europe. The overall goals are: (1) the identification of indicators and parameters necessary for strategies to increase societal resilience, (2) an analysis of the institutional settings needed for societal transformation, and (3) perspectives of changing divisions of responsibilities between public and private actors necessary to arrive at more resilient societies. As such, governance is done by people interacting and defining risk mitigation measures as well as climate change adaptation are therefore simultaneously both outcomes of, and productive to, public and private responsibilities. Building off current knowledge this paper focussed on different dimensions of adaptation and mitigation strategies based on social, economic and institutional incentives and settings, centring on the linkages between these different dimensions and complementing existing flood risk governance arrangements. As such, the challenges of adaptation to flood risk will be tackled by converting scientific frameworks into practical assessment and policy advice. This paper used the Formative Scenario Analysis (FSA) as a method to construct well-defined sets of assumptions to gain insight into a system and its potential future development, based on qualitatively assessed impact factors and rated quantitative relations between these factors, such as impact and consistency analysis. The purpose of this approach was to develop scenarios, where participations develop their own strategies how to implement a transformative adaptation strategy in flood risk management. In particular, the interaction between researcher, the public and policy makers was analysed. Challenges and limitations were assessed, such as benefits on costs of adaptation measures, for the implementation of visions to

  6. Adapting Dynamic Mathematical Models to a Pilot Anaerobic Digestion Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Haugen, R. Bakke, and B. Lie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic model has been adapted to a pilot anaerobic reactor fed diarymanure. Both steady-state data from online sensors and laboratory analysis anddynamic operational data from online sensors are used in the model adaptation.The model is based on material balances, and comprises four state variables,namely biodegradable volatile solids, volatile fatty acids, acid generatingmicrobes (acidogens, and methane generating microbes (methanogens. The modelcan predict the methane gas flow produced in the reactor. The model may beused for optimal reactor design and operation, state-estimation and control.Also, a dynamic model for the reactor temperature based on energy balance ofthe liquid in the reactor is adapted. This model may be used for optimizationand control when energy and economy are taken into account.

  7. Dominant seismic sloshing mode in a pool-type reactor tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    Large-diameter LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor) tanks contain a large volume of sodium coolant and many in-tank components. A reactor tank of 70 ft. in diameter contains 5,000,000 of sodium coolant. Under seismic events, the sloshing wave may easily reach several feet. If sufficient free board is not provided to accommodate the wave height, several safety problems may occur such as damage to tank cover due to sloshing impact and thermal shocks due to hot sodium, etc. Therefore, the sloshing response should be properly considered in the reactor design. This paper presents the results of the sloshing analysis of a pool-type reactor tank with a diameter of 39 ft. The results of the fluid-structure interaction analysis are presented in a companion paper. Five sections are contained in this paper. The reactor system and mathematical model are described. The dominant sloshing mode and the calculated maximum wave heights are presented. The sloshing pressures and sloshing forces acting on the submerged components are described. The conclusions are given

  8. Experimental evaluation of a heat pump for the water-supply heating of a public swimming pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, R; Vaca, M; Terres, H; Lizardi, A; Morales, J; Chávez, S

    2017-01-01

    In this work the analysis of the thermodynamic behavior of heat pumps (HP) which supply the energy needed in the public pool at the Aquatic Center of Azcapotzalco was performed. There are 18 installed HP’s but only those needed to provide the energy required are alternately activated. The evaluation was conducted during May and June of 2015. We selected one of the HP to implement temperature and pressure gauges at the inlet and outlet of the compressor. The measurements were made every day at three times, 6:30, 13:00 and 18:00 hours. In a period of 24 hours, 1 000 L evaporated, there was no variation registered overnight, since the pool was covered with plastic to avoid loss of the fluid. The heat pump provided 150 kW to maintain the water temperature at the right level of operation, namely 28 °C. The coefficients of performance (COP) of the HP were 6.39 at 6:30, 7.42 at 13:00 and 7:32 at 18:00 hrs., values which are very close to the one provided by the manufacturer. (paper)

  9. Experimental evaluation of a heat pump for the water-supply heating of a public swimming pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, R.; Vaca, M.; Terres, H.; Lizardi, A.; Morales, J.; Chávez, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work the analysis of the thermodynamic behavior of heat pumps (HP) which supply the energy needed in the public pool at the Aquatic Center of Azcapotzalco was performed. There are 18 installed HP’s but only those needed to provide the energy required are alternately activated. The evaluation was conducted during May and June of 2015. We selected one of the HP to implement temperature and pressure gauges at the inlet and outlet of the compressor. The measurements were made every day at three times, 6:30, 13:00 and 18:00 hours. In a period of 24 hours, 1 000 L evaporated, there was no variation registered overnight, since the pool was covered with plastic to avoid loss of the fluid. The heat pump provided 150 kW to maintain the water temperature at the right level of operation, namely 28 °C. The coefficients of performance (COP) of the HP were 6.39 at 6:30, 7.42 at 13:00 and 7:32 at 18:00 hrs., values which are very close to the one provided by the manufacturer.

  10. Online failed fuel identification using delayed neutron detector signals in pool type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Chandra Kant; Sivaramakrishna, M.; Nagaraj, C.P.; Madhusoodanan, K.

    2011-01-01

    In todays world, nuclear reactors are at the forefront of modern day innovation and reactor designs are increasingly incorporating cutting edge technology. It is of utmost importance to detect failure or defects in any part of a nuclear reactor for healthy operation of reactor as well as the safety aspects of the environment. Despite careful fabrication and manufacturing of fuel pins, there is a chance of clad failure. After fuel pin clad rupture takes place, it allows fission products to enter in to sodium pool. There are some potential consequences due to this such as Total Instantaneous Blockage (TIB) of coolant and primary component contamination. At present, the failed fuel detection techniques such as cover gas monitoring (alarming the operator), delayed neutron detection (DND-automatic trip) and standalone failed fuel localization module (FFLM) are exercised in various reactors. The first technique is a quantitative measurement of increase in the cover gas activity background whereas DND system causes automatic trip on detecting certain level of activity during clad wet rupture. FFLM is subsequently used to identify the failed fuel subassembly. The later although accurate, but mainly suffers from downtime and reduction in power during identification process. The proposed scheme, reported in this paper, reduces the operation of FFLM by predicting the faulty sector and therefore reducing reactor down time and thermal shocks. The neutron evolution pattern gets modulated because fission products are the delay neutron precursors. When they travel along with coolant to Intermediate heat Exchangers, experienced three effects i.e. delay; decay and dilution which make the neutron pulse frequency vary depending on the location of failed fuel sub assembly. This paper discusses the method that is followed to study the frequency domain properties, so that it is possible to detect exact fuel subassembly failure online, before the reactor automatically trips. (author)

  11. Effect of pH on the formation of disinfection byproducts in swimming pool water – Is less THM better?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Willach, Sarah; Antoniou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the formation and predicted toxicity of different groups of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from human exudates in relation to chlorination of pool water at different pH values. Specifically, the formation of the DBP groups trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs......), haloacetonitriles (HANs) and trichloramine (NCl3), resulting from the chlorination of body fluid analog, were investigated at 6.0 ≤ pH ≤ 8.0. Either the initial concentration of active chorine or free chlorine was kept constant in the tested pH range. THM formation was reduced by decreasing pH but HAN, and NCl3...... formation was investigated and found to follow the same pH dependency as without bromide present, with the overall DBP formation increasing, except for HAAs. Estimation of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of the chlorinated human exudates showed that among the quantified DBP groups, HAN formation were...

  12. Influence of reactor design on the establishment of natural circulation in pool-type LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, M.E.

    1976-01-01

    The general principles involved in establishing natural circulation in a pool-type liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor following loss of a.c. supplies are elucidated and the effects of design features by use of the computer code MELANI are quantified. It is shown that natural circulation can provide a feasible means of emergency core cooling in addition to that provided by pony motors. The choice of primary pump rundown time has a significant effect in controlling peak core outlet temperatures in the hypothetical case of natural circulation alone being the core heat removal process. (author)

  13. Use of heterogeneous finite elements generated by collision probability solutions to calculate a pool reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, C.R.; Grant, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    This work presents comparisons between measured fluxes obtained by activation of Manganese foils in the light water, enriched uranium research pool reactor RA-2 MTR (Materials Testing Reactors) fuel element) and fluxes calculated by the finite element method FEM using DELFIN code, and describes the heterogeneus finite elements by a set of solutions of the transport equations for several different configurations obtained using the collision probability code HUEMUL. The agreement between calculated and measured fluxes is good, and the advantage of using FEM is showed because to obtain the flux distribution with same detail using an usual diffusion calculation it would be necessary 12000 mesh points against the 2000 points that FEM uses, hence the processing time is reduced in a factor ten. An interesting alternative to use in MTR fuel management is presented. (Author) [es

  14. Implementation and adaption of the Computer Code ECOSYS/EXCEL for Austria as OECOSYS/EXCEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hick, H.; Suda, M.; Mueck, K.

    1998-03-01

    During 1989, under contract to the Austrian Chamber of the Federal Chancellor, department VII, the radioecological forecast model OECOSYS was implemented by the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf on a VAX computer using VAX Fortran. OECOSYS allows the prediction of the consequences after a large scale contamination event. During 1992, under contract to the Austrian Federal Ministry of Health, Sports and Consumer Protection, department III OECOSYS - in the version of 1989 - was implemented on PC's in Seibersdorf and the Ministry using OS/2 and Microsoft -Fortran. In March 1993, the Ministry ordered an update which had become necessary and the evaluation of two exercise scenarios. Since that time the prognosis model with its auxiliary program and communication facilities is kept on stand-by and yearly exercises are performed to maintain its readiness. The current report describes the implementation and adaption to Austrian conditions of the newly available EXCEL version of the German ECOSYS prognosis model as OECOSYS. (author)

  15. Adaptive robust control of the EBR-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, M.A.; Edwards, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Simulation results are presented for an adaptive H ∞ controller, a fixed H ∞ controller, and a classical controller. The controllers are applied to a simulation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II primary system. The controllers are tested for the best robustness and performance by step-changing the demanded reactor power and by varying the combined uncertainty in initial reactor power and control rod worth. The adaptive H ∞ controller shows the fastest settling time, fastest rise time and smallest peak overshoot when compared to the fixed H ∞ and classical controllers. This makes for a superior and more robust controller

  16. Dessau-Soprin cultural and sport complex arena, restaurant, community room, swimming pool and curling : municipality of La Peche new construction project, feasibility study and energy saving project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heon, K. [Dessau-Soprin Inc., Longueuil, PQ (Canada)

    2004-07-27

    The Cultural and sport complex of La Peche is a new construction project which in its first phase will consist of an arena and a community room. The second phase will include a swimming pool and curling facilities. A description of the complex was provided in this paper, including details of square footage, seating, offices and service rooms. An energy consumption analysis was conducted, with details of mechanical and electrical installations, refrigeration system options, and a complete list of architectural options with reference to the commercial building incentive program. Detailed evaluations of scenarios were provided. A reference model was provided with details of standard operational data concerning issues such as lighting density and resurfacings. Two types of heating systems were simulated in the reference model: electric and natural gas with details of consumption levels estimated for both. Later modifications to the reference model were made concerning energy efficiency saving measures. Three compressor types were also evaluated: modular, screw and reciprocating. The most profitable measures reviewed in this document were the following: radiant floor heating; make-up air recovery; central management systems; smaller secondary refrigerant fluid pumps and a low emissivity ceiling. A 20 year period life cycle cost comparison revealed that the complex would recover 20 per cent of the energy rejected by compressors. The use of a 100 per cent heat recovery system would result in savings of $33,962 per year. tabs., figs.

  17. Detectability prediction for a thermoacoustic sensor in the breazeale nuclear reactor pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hrisko, Joshua [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Garrett, Steven [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory experiments have suggested that thermoacoustic engines can be in- corporated within nuclear fuel rods. Such engines would radiate sounds that could be used to measure and acoustically-telemeter information about the op- eration of the nuclear reactor (e.g., coolant temperature or uxes of neutrons or other energetic particles) or the physical condition of the nuclear fuel itself (e.g., changes in temperature, evolved gases) that are encoded as the frequency and/or amplitude of the radiated sound [IEEE Measurement and Instrumen- tation 16(3), 18-25 (2013)]. For such acoustic information to be detectable, it is important to characterize the vibroacoustical environments within reactors. Measurements will be presented of the background noise spectra (with and with- out coolant pumps) and reverberation times within the 70,000 gallon pool that cools and shields the fuel in the 1 MW research reactor on Penn State's campus using two hydrophones, a piezoelectric projector, and an accelerometer. Sev- eral signal-processing techniques will be demonstrated to enhance the measured results. Background vibrational measurement were also taken at the 250 MW Advanced Test Reactor, located at the Idaho National Laboratory, using ac- celerometers mounted outside the reactor's pressure vessel and on plumbing will also be presented. The detectability predictions made in the thesis were validated in September 2015 using a nuclear ssion-heated thermoacoustic sensor that was placed in the core of the Breazeale Nuclear Reactor on Penn State's campus. Some features of the thermoacoustic device used in that experiment will also be revealed. [Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. The Influence of RSG-GAS Primary Pump Operation Concerning the Rise Water Level of Reactor Pool in 15 MW Reactor Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djunaidi

    2004-01-01

    The expansion of air volume in the delay chamber shows in rise water level of reactor pool during the operation. The rises of water level in the reactor pool is not quite from the expansion of air volume in the delay chamber, but some influence the primary pump operation. The purpose evaluated of influence primary pump is to know the influence primary pump power concerning the rise water level during the reactor operation. From the data collection during 15 MW power operation in the last core 42 the influence of primary pump operation concerning the rise water level in the reactor pool is 34.48 % from the total increased after operation during 12 days. (author)

  19. Application of stable adaptive schemes to nuclear reactor systems, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukuda, Toshio

    1979-01-01

    The parameter identification and adaptive control schemes applied in a previous study to a nonlinear point reactor are extended to the case of a loosely-coupled-core reactor with internal feedbacks, constituting a nonlinear overall system. Both schemes are shown to be stable, with the system newly represented on the pattern of the Model Reference Adaptive System (MRAS) with use made of the Lyapunov's method. For either parameter identification or adaptive control of a loosely-coupled-core reactor, there exists no canonical form of multiple input-multiple output system which can be directly applied for deriving the MRAS with the matrix version of the Kalman-Yakubovich lemma as it was in the case of the point reactor. This difficulty is circumvented by the practical assumption that the neutron density can be directly measured on each core as reactivity change is applied as input into the coupled core as a whole. For parameter identification, the model parameters are adaptively adjusted to those of each core, while for the adaptive control, plant parameters of each core can be adaptively compensated, again through control inputs, to asymptotically reduce the output error between the model and the plant. The point reactor is shown to correspond to a special case. (author)

  20. Analysis of a total loss of pool water accident in MTR-type research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmazer, A.; Yavuz, H.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the transient in which the pool water is lost throughout one or more of the main coolant pipes which are supposed to be broken guillotine-like is investigated for the TR-2 research reactor in Istanbul. The applicability of the methods used for other similar types of research reactors is shown. Decrease of the pool water level until the top of the core, and from the top to the bottom of the core are examined as two successive phases of the accident. Finite difference scheme and integral methods are employed to solve energy equations and the results of both methods are compared. The finite difference solution uses an explicit form for the analysis of the first phase, and a moving boundary approach for the second phase. The integral method is based on the assumption that the temperatures appearing in the energy equations have the same profiles during the transient as the steady state ones. Analyses are done both for nominal and hot channel, and the results of both methods are observed to be in agreement. (orig.)

  1. Analysis of a total loss of pool water accident in MTR-type research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmazer, A. [Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey). Nuclear Engineering Department; Yavuz, H. [Istanbul Technical University (Turkey). Energy Institute

    2004-08-01

    In this study, the transient in which the pool water is lost throughout one or more of the main coolant pipes which are supposed to be broken guillotine-like is investigated for the TR-2 research reactor in Istanbul. The applicability of the methods used for other similar types of research reactors is shown. Decrease of the pool water level until the top of the core, and from the top to the bottom of the core are examined as two successive phases of the accident. Finite difference scheme and integral methods are employed to solve energy equations and the results of both methods are compared. The finite difference solution uses an explicit form for the analysis of the first phase, and a moving boundary approach for the second phase. The integral method is based on the assumption that the temperatures appearing in the energy equations have the same profiles during the transient as the steady state ones. Analyses are done both for nominal and hot channel, and the results of both methods are observed to be in agreement. (orig.)

  2. Criticality analysis of the CAREM-25 reactor irradiated fuel elements storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albornoz, A.F.; Jatuff, F.E.; Gho, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    A criticality safety analysis of the irradiated fuel element pool storage of the CAREM-25 reactor was performed. The CAREM project is property of the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentine, and it is being executed by INVAP S.E. difficult evaluation of the CAREM core (relatively high -3,4%- enriched U O 2 , Gd 2 O 3 burnable absorber in different densities, or criticality achievement with as few as 7 fuel elements is inherited by the pool storage. The lattice code CONDOR 1.1 was used for investigating the problem scene, and some results compared on the Monte Carlo codes MONK 5.0 and MONK 6.3. Circular and square tubes of 304-L stainless steel, borated steel and boral B 4 C in Al) were tested as suitable channels for fuel element containment, in square and hexagonal arrays; in addition, burnup, burnable absorber concentration, Sm and leakage credits were determined. It was found that the critical is strongly dependent on the separation of the fuel elements in the pool. Out-of-nominal conditions were investigated too, showing that the loss of coolant and the change in temperature and density conditions in the storage lead to an increase in reactivity, but the system's reactivity remains near the safety limits. (author)

  3. Thermal hydraulics in the hot pool of Fast Breeder Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmakumar, G.; Pandey, G.K.; Vaidyanathan, G.

    2009-01-01

    Sodium cooled Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) of 40 MWt/13 MWe capacity is in operation at Kalpakkam, near Chennai. Presently it is operating with a core of 10.5 MWt. Knowledge of temperatures and flow pattern in the hot pool of FBTR is essential to assess the thermal stresses in the hot pool. While theoretical analysis of the hot pool has been conducted by a three-dimensional code to access the temperature profile, it involves tuning due to complex geometry, thermal stresses and vibration. With this in view, an experimental model was fabricated in 1/4 scale using acrylic material and tests were conducted in water. Initially hydraulic studies were conducted with ambient water maintaining Froude number similarity. After that thermal studies were conducted using hot and cold water maintaining Richardson similitude. In both cases Euler similarity was also maintained. Studies were conducted simulating both low and full power operating conditions. This paper discusses the model simulation, similarity criteria, the various thermal hydraulic studies that were carried out, the results obtained and the comparison with the prototype measurements.

  4. Local flow distribution analysis inside the reactor pools of KALIMER-600 and PDRC performance test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ji Hwan; Hwang, Seong Won; Choi, Kyeong Sik

    2010-05-01

    In the study, 3-dimensional thermal hydraulic analysis was carried out focusing on the thermal hydraulic behavior inside the reactor pools for both KALIMER-600 and one-fifth scale-down test facility. STAR-CD, one of the commercial CFD codes, was used to analyze 3-dimensional incompressible steady-state thermal hydraulic behavior in both designs of KALIMER-600 and the scale-down test facility. In the KALIMER-600 CFD analysis, the pressure drops in the core and IHX gave a good agreement within 1% error range. It was found that the porous media model was appropriate to analyze the pressure distribution inside reactor core and IHX. Also, a validation analysis showed the pressure drop through the porous media under the condition of 80% flow rate and thermal power was calculated 64% less than in 100% condition giving a physically reasonable analytic result. Since the temperatures in the hot-side pool and cold-side pool were estimated to be very close to 540 and 390 .deg. C specified on the design values respectively, the CFD models of heat source and sink was confirmed. Through the study, the methodology of 3-dimensional CFD analysis about KALIMER-600 has been established and proven. Performed with the methodology, the analysis data such as flow velocity, temperature and pressure distribution were compared by normalizing those data for the actual sized modeling and scale-down modeling. As a result, the characteristics of thermal hydraulic behavior were almost identical for the actual sized modeling and scale-down modeling and the similarity scaling law used in the design of the sodium test facility by KAERI was found to be correct

  5. Evaluation of Total Coliform, Fecal Coliform and Residual Chlorine in Swimming Pools in Kermanshah on the Season, the type of Pool, Disinfection System and Source of Water Supply in the during of three years (2010-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K SHarafi

    2014-11-01

    From the results , although the pools of water quality parameters has been studied in almost ideal But in summer, especially on a female pools and pools with wells water supply source than other pools , to be more oversight .

  6. Toward a conceptual understanding of acute cultural adaptation: A preliminary examination of ACA in female swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Haapanen, Saara; Mosek, Shwiko

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers a novel approach to researching adaptation in transnational athletes. The first part introduces a conceptualisation of acute cultural adaptation (ACA), which extends the current literature in sport psychology by offering original insights into mechanisms underpinning adaptive...

  7. Pressure drop calculation in a fuel element of a pool type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassance, Victor; Oliveira, Andre F.; Moreira, Maria de L.

    2013-01-01

    Even with the advances of hardware in computer sciences, sometimes it is necessary to simplify the simulation in order to optimize the results given the same calculation runtime. The object of this study is a thermodynamic analysis of the core of a pool type research reactor, focusing on natural circulation. Due to the high geometrical complexity of the core, the scale transfer process becomes an essential step to the thermodynamic study of the reactor. This process takes place by determining the effective equivalent properties obtained from a detailed simulation of the core and transferring them to a porous medium having a coarse mesh while preserving the overall characteristics. In this way, it will be able to obtain the quadratic resistance coefficient KQ by calculating the pressure drop inside the fuel element. To observe in detail the behavior of this flow, longitudinal and transversal cross sections will be made in different points, thereby observing the velocity and pressure distributions. The analysis will provide detailed data on the fluid flow between the fuel plates enabling the observation of possible critical points or undesired behavior. The whole analysis was made by using the commercial code ANSYS CFX ver. 12.1. This is study will provide data, as a first step to enable future simulations which will consider the entire reactor. (author)

  8. Methodology for thermal-hydraulics analysis of pool type MTR fuel research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umbehaun, Pedro Ernesto

    2000-01-01

    This work presents a methodology developed for thermal-hydraulic analysis of pool type MTR fuel research reactors. For this methodology a computational program, FLOW, and a model, MTRCR-IEAR1 were developed. FLOW calculates the cooling flow distribution in the fuel elements, control elements, irradiators, and through the channels formed among the fuel elements and among the irradiators and reflectors. This computer program was validated against experimental data for the IEA-R1 research reactor core at IPEN-CNEN/SP. MTRCR-IEAR1 is a model based on the commercial program Engineering Equation Solver (EES). Besides the thermal-hydraulic analyses of the core in steady state accomplished by traditional computational programs like COBRA-3C/RERTR and PARET, this model allows to analyze parallel channels with different cooling flow and/or geometry. Uncertainty factors of the variables from neutronic and thermalhydraulic calculation and also from the fabrication of the fuel element are introduced in the model. For steady state analyses MTRCR-IEAR1 showed good agreement with the results of COBRA-3C/RERTR and PARET. The developed methodology was used for the calculation of the cooling flow distribution and the thermal-hydraulic analysis of a typical configuration of the IEA-R1 research reactor core. (author)

  9. Effects of Short-Interval and Long-Interval Swimming Protocols on Performance, Aerobic Adaptations, and Technical Parameters: A Training Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalamitros, Athanasios A; Zafeiridis, Andreas S; Toubekis, Argyris G; Tsalis, George A; Pelarigo, Jailton G; Manou, Vasiliki; Kellis, Spiridon

    2016-10-01

    Dalamitros, AA, Zafeiridis, AS, Toubekis, AG, Tsalis, GA, Pelarigo, JG, Manou, V, and Kellis, S. Effects of short-interval and long-interval swimming protocols on performance, aerobic adaptations, and technical parameters: A training study. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2871-2879, 2016-This study compared 2-interval swimming training programs of different work interval durations, matched for total distance and exercise intensity, on swimming performance, aerobic adaptations, and technical parameters. Twenty-four former swimmers were equally divided to short-interval training group (INT50, 12-16 × 50 m with 15 seconds rest), long-interval training group (INT100, 6-8 × 100 m with 30 seconds rest), and a control group (CON). The 2 experimental groups followed the specified swimming training program for 8 weeks. Before and after training, swimming performance, technical parameters, and indices of aerobic adaptations were assessed. ΙΝΤ50 and ΙΝΤ100 improved swimming performance in 100 and 400-m tests and the maximal aerobic speed (p ≤ 0.05); the performance in the 50-m swim did not change. Posttraining V[Combining Dot Above]O2max values were higher compared with pretraining values in both training groups (p ≤ 0.05), whereas peak aerobic power output increased only in INT100 (p ≤ 0.05). The 1-minute heart rate and blood lactate recovery values decreased after training in both groups (p training in both groups (p ≤ 0.05); no changes were observed in stroke rate after training. Comparisons between groups on posttraining mean values, after adjusting for pretraining values, revealed no significant differences between ΙΝΤ50 and ΙΝΤ100 for all variables; however, all measures were improved vs. the respective values in the CON (p training.

  10. Declassification of radioactive water from a pool type reactor after nuclear facility dismantling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, J. M.; Sancho, M.; García-Fayos, B.; Verdú, G.; Serrano, C.; Ruiz-Martínez, J. T.

    2017-09-01

    This work is aimed to the treatment of the radioactive water from a dismantled nuclear facility with an experimental pool type reactor. The main objective of the treatment is to declassify the maximum volume of water and thus decrease the volume of radioactive liquid waste to be managed. In a preliminary stage, simulation of treatment by the combination of reverse osmosis (RO) and evaporation have been performed. Predicted results showed that the combination of membrane and evaporation technologies would result in a volume reduction factor higher than 600. The estimated time to complete the treatment was around 650 h (25-30 days). For different economical and organizational reasons which are explained in this paper, the final treatment of the real waste had to be reduced and only evaporation was applied. The volume reduction factor achieved in the real treatment was around 170, and the time spent for treatment was 194 days.

  11. Effect of turbulent natural convection on sodium pool combustion in the steam generator building of a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karthikeyan, S.; Sundararajan, T.; Shet, U.S.P.; Selvaraj, P.

    2009-01-01

    A computational model is proposed to simulate sodium pool combustion considering the effect of turbulent natural convection in a vented enclosure of the steam generator building (SGB) of a fast breeder reactor. The model is validated by comparing the simulated results with the experimental results available in literature for sodium pool combustion in a CSTF vessel. After validation, the effects of vents and the location of the pool on the burning rate of sodium and the associated heat transfer to the walls are studied in an enclosure comparable in size to one floor of the steam generator building. In the presence of ventilation, the burning rate of sodium increases, but the total heat transferred to the walls of the enclosure is reduced. It is also found that the burning rate of sodium pool and the heat transfer to the walls of the enclosures vary significantly with the location of sodium pool.

  12. Characterization of radioactive contaminants and water treatment trials for the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chun-Ping; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Chiao, Ling-Huan; Chen, Hong-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Deal with a practical radioactive contamination in Taiwan Research Reactor spent fuel pool water. ► Identify the properties of radioactive contaminants and performance test for water treatment materials. ► The radioactive solids were primary attributed by ruptured spent fuels, spent resins, and metal debris. ► The radioactive ions were major composed by uranium and fission products. ► Diatomite-based ceramic depth filter can simultaneously removal radioactive solids and ions. - Abstract: There were approximately 926 m 3 of water contaminated by fission products and actinides in the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool (TRR SFP). The solid and ionic contaminants were thoroughly characterized using radiochemical analyses, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in this study. The sludge was made up of agglomerates contaminated by spent fuel particles. Suspended solids from spent ion-exchange resins interfered with the clarity of the water. In addition, the ionic radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, U, and α-emitters, present in the water were measured. Various filters and cation-exchange resins were employed for water treatment trials, and the results indicated that the solid and ionic contaminants could be effectively removed through the use of <0.9 μm filters and cation exchange resins, respectively. Interestingly, the removal of U was obviously efficient by cation exchange resin, and the ceramic depth filter composed of diatomite exhibited the properties of both filtration and adsorption. It was found that the ceramic depth filter could adsorb β-emitters, α-emitters, and uranium ions. The diatomite-based ceramic depth filter was able to simultaneously eliminate particles and adsorb ionic radionuclides from water.

  13. E-SCAPE: A scale facility for liquid-metal, pool-type reactor thermal hydraulic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tichelen, Katrien, E-mail: kvtichel@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Mirelli, Fabio, E-mail: fmirelli@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Greco, Matteo, E-mail: mgreco@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Viviani, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgiaviviani@gmail.com [University of Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The E-SCAPE facility is a thermal hydraulic scale model of the MYRRHA fast reactor. • The focus is on mixing and stratification in liquid-metal pool-type reactors. • Forced convection, natural convection and the transition are investigated. • Extensive instrumentation allows validation of computational models. • System thermal hydraulic and CFD models have been used for facility design. - Abstract: MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a flexible fast-spectrum research reactor under design at SCK·CEN. MYRRHA is a pool-type reactor with lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) as primary coolant. The proper understanding of the thermal hydraulic phenomena occurring in the reactor pool is an important issue in the design and licensing of the MYRRHA system and liquid-metal cooled reactors by extension. Model experiments are necessary for understanding the physics, for validating experimental tools and to qualify the design for the licensing. The E-SCAPE (European SCAled Pool Experiment) facility at SCK·CEN is a thermal hydraulic 1/6-scale model of the MYRRHA reactor, with an electrical core simulator, cooled by LBE. It provides experimental feedback to the designers on the forced and natural circulation flow patterns. Moreover, it enables to validate the computational methods for their use with LBE. The paper will elaborate on the design of the E-SCAPE facility and its main parameters. Also the experimental matrix and the pre-test analysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and system thermal hydraulics codes will be described.

  14. Adaptive Controller Design for Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    K. Prabhu; V. Murali Bhaskaran

    2014-01-01

    Continues Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is an important issue in chemical process and a wide range of research in the area of chemical engineering. Temperature Control of CSTR has been an issue in the chemical control engineering since it has highly non-linear complex equations. This study presents problem of temperature control of CSTR with the adaptive Controller. The Simulation is done in MATLAB and result shows that adaptive controller is an efficient controller for temperature control of C...

  15. Application of stable adaptive schemes to nuclear reactor systems, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Toshio

    1978-01-01

    Parameter identification and adaptive control schemes are presented for a point reactor with internal feedbacks which lead to the nonlinearity of the overall system. Both are shown stable with new representation of the system, which corresponds to the nonminimal system representation, in the vein of the Model Reference Adaptive System (MRAS) via the Lyapunov's method. For the sake of the parameter identification, model parameters can be adjusted adaptively as soon as measurements start, while plant parameters can also adaptively be compensated through control input to reduce the output error between the model and the plant for the case of the adaptive control. In the case of the adaptive control, control schemes are presented for two cases, the case of the unknown decay constant of the delayed neutron and the case of the known constant. The adaptive control scheme for the latter case is shown extremely simpler than that for the former. Furthermore, when plant parameters vary slowly with time, computer simulations show that the proposed adaptive control scheme works satisfactorily enough to stabilize an unstable reactor and that it does even in the noise with small variance. (auth.)

  16. Assessment of fuel damage of pool type research reactor in the case of fuel plates blockage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalil, Jafari; Samad, Khakshournia [AEOI, Karegar Ave. School of R and D of Nuclear Reactors and Accelerators, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); D' Auria, F. [Pisa Univ., DIMNP (Italy)

    2007-07-01

    Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) is a pool type 5 MW research reactor. It is assumed that external objects or debris that may fall down to reactor core cause obstruction of coolant flow through one of the fuel assemblies. Thermal hydraulic analysis of this event, using the RELAP5 system code has been studied. The reported transient is related to the partial and total obstruction of a single Fuel Element (FE) cooling channel of 27 FE equilibrium core of TRR. Such event constitutes a severe accident for this type of reactor since it may lead to local dryout and eventually to loss of the FE integrity. Two scenarios are analysed to emphasize the severity of the accident. The first one is a partial blockage of an average FE considering four different obstruction levels: 25%, 50%, 75% and 97% of nominal flow area. The second one is an extreme scenario consisting of total blockage of the same FE. This study constitutes the first step of a larger work which consists of performing a 3-dimensional simulation using the Best Estimate coupled code technique. However, as a first approach the instantaneous reactor power is derived through the point kinetic calculation included in the RELAP5 code. Main results obtained from the RELAP5 calculations are as following. First, in the case of flow blockage under 97% of the nominal flow area of an average FE, only an increase of the coolant and clad temperatures is observed without any consequences for the integrity of the FE. The mass flow rate remains sufficient to cool the clad safely. Secondly, in the case of total obstruction of the nominal flow area, it is seen that transient turns out to be a severe accident due to the dryout conditions are reached shortly and melting of the cladding occurs. Thirdly, the use of the point kinetic approach leads to conservative results. A best estimate simulation of such kind of transients requires the use of 3-dimensional kinetic calculations, which could be done using the current Coupled Codes

  17. Bakteri Legionella pneumophila Terdeteksi pada Air Kolam Renang di Kota Surabaya dengan Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA BACTERIADETECTED IN SWIMMING POOL WATER OF SURABAYA BY USING NESTED POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardus Bimo Aksono

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative bacillus that causes nosocomial and community-acquired pneumonia. The aim of this research was to detect the presence of bacteria of L. pneumophila species in the swimming pools water of Surabaya city by using nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR assay of a specific gene for L. pneumophila (mip gene. This study used purposive sampling method. A total of 10 water samples were collected from five swimming pools consisting of 200 mL water for each swimming pool. The results showed that of 10 samples tested by nested PCR, one sample was positive for L. pneumophila, and nine samples were negative. L. pneumophila were found in pool water samples with a higher temperature (>30ºC.Serogrouping analysis of positive sample that L. pneumophila bacteria detected in the water sample of swimming pool in Surabaya was L. pneumophila serogroup 9 (98% and serogroup 10 (98%. L. pneumophila detection of bacteria is expected to raise the awareness of physician and microbiologists about the transmission of L. pneumophila and will also be useful for controlling the agents. ABSTRAK Legionella pneumophila adalah bakteri Gram-negatif berbentuk batang yang dapat menyebabkan penyakit nosokomial dan pneumonia. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mendeteksi keberadaan bakteri L. pneumophila pada air kolam renang di Kota Surabaya dengan menggunakan nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR berbasis gen spesifik L. pneumophila (mip gene. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode purposive sampling. Sebanyak sepuluh sampel diambil dari lima kolam renang. Sampel diambil sebanyak 200 mL dari air kolam renang di setiap lokasi. Hasil dari 10 sampel yang diuji menggunakan nested PCR, satu sampel menunjukkan hasil positif untuk L.pneumophila, dan sembilan sampel menunjukkan hasil negatif. Bakteri L. pneumophila ditemukan pada sampel air kolam dengan suhu yang lebih tinggi (>30ºC. Satu sampel positip tersebut ketika dilanjutkan terhadap analisis serogrup

  18. Feasibility analysis of the Primary Loop of Pool-Type Natural Circulating Nuclear Reactor Dedicated to Seawater Desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woonho; Jeong, Yong Hoon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the feasibility of natural circulation was evaluated for the reference plant AHR400 (Advanced Heating Reactor 400MWth). AHR400 is a pool-type desalination-dedicated nuclear reactor. As a consequence, AHR400 has low operating pressure and temperature which provides large safety margin. Removal of the reactor coolant pump from the AHR400 will enforce integrity of the reactor vessel and passive safety feature. Therefore, the study also tried to find out optimized primary loop design to achieve total natural circulation of the coolant. Natural circulation capacity of the primary loop of the desalination dedicated nuclear reactor AHR400 was evaluated. It was concluded that to remove RCP from the AHR400 and operates the reactor only by natural circulation of the coolant is impossible. Decreased core power as half make removal of RCP possible with 15m central height difference between the core and IHXs. Furthermore, validation and modification of pressure loss coefficients by small-scaled natural circulation experiment at a pool-type reactor would provide more accurate results.

  19. The analysis of the RA reactor irradiated fuel cooling in the spent fuel pool; Analiza hladjenja ozracenog goriva u bazenu za odlaganje reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrhovac, M; Afgan, N; Spasojevic, D; Jovic, V [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1985-07-01

    According to the RA reactor exploitation plan the great quantity of the irradiated spent fuel will be disposed in the reactor spent fuel pool after each reactor campaign which will including the present spent fuel inventory increase the residual power level in the pool and will soon cause the pool capacity shortage. To enable the analysis of the irradiated fuel cooling the pool and characteristic spent fuel canister temperature distribution at the residual power maximum was done. The results obtained under the various spent fuel cooling conditions in the pit indicate the normal spent fuel thermal load even in the most inconvenient cooling conditions. (author)

  20. Evaluation of an experiment modelling heat transfer from the melt pool for use in VVER 440/213 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skop, J.

    2003-12-01

    The strategy of confining core melt within the reactor vessel is among promising strategies to mitigate severe accidents of VVER 440/213 reactors. This strategy consists in residual heat removal from the melt by external vessel cooling from the outside, using water from the flooded reactor downcomer. This approach can only be successful if the critical heat flux on the external vessel surface is not exceeded. This can be assessed based on the parameters of heat transfer from the core melt pool in the conditions of natural circulation within the pool. Those parameters are the subject of the report. A basic description of the terms and physical basis of the strategy of confining core melt inside the vessel is given in Chapter 2, which also briefly explains similarity theory, based on which the results obtained on experimental facilities, using simulation materials, can be related to the actual situation inside a real reactor. Chapter 3 presents an overview of experimental work addressing the characteristics of heat transfer from the core melt pool in natural circulation conditions and a description of the experimental facilities. An overview of the results emerging from the experiments and their evaluation with respect to their applicability to reactors in Czech nuclear power plants are given in Chapter 4

  1. The radionuclides of primary coolant in HANARO and the recent activities performed to reduce the radioactivity or reactor pool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minjin [HANARO Research Reactor Centre, Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    In HANARO reactor, there have been activities to identify the principal radionuclides and to quantify them under the normal operation. The purposes of such activities were to establish the measure by which we can reduce the radioactivity of the reactor pool water and detect, in early stage, the abnormal symptoms due to the leakage of radioactive materials from the irradiation sample or the damage of the nuclear fuel, etc. The typical radionuclides produced by the activation of reactor coolant are N{sup 16} and Ar{sup 41}. The radionuclides produced by the activation of the core structural material consist of Na{sup 24}, Mn{sup 56}, and W{sup 187}. Of the various radionuclides, governing the radiation level at the pool surface are Na{sup 24}, Ar{sup 41}, Mn{sup 58}, and W{sup 187}. By establishing the hot water layer system on the pool surface, we expected that the radionuclides such as Ar{sup 41} and Mn{sup 56} whose half-life are relatively short could be removed to a certain extent. Since the content of radioactivity of Na{sup 24} occupies about 60% of the total radioactivity, we assumed that the total radiation level would be greatly reduced if we could decrease the radiation level of Na{sup 24}. However the actual radiation level has not been reduced as much as we expected. Therefore, some experiments have been carried out to find the actual causes afterwards. What we learned through the experiments are that any disturbance in reactor pool water layer causes increase of the pool surface radiation level and even if we maintain the hot water layer well, reactor shutdown will be very much likely to happen once the hot water layer is disturbed. (author)

  2. Evaluation of filters in RSPCS (Reactor Service Pool Cooling System) and HWL (Hot Water Layer) in OPAL research reactor at ANSTO (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization) using Gamma Spectrometry System and Liquid Scintillation Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jim In; Foy, Robin; Jung, Seong Moon; Park, Hyeon Suk; Ye, Sung Joon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization(ANSTO) has a research reactor, OPAL (Open Pool Australian Lightwater reactor) which is a state-of-art 20 MW reactor for various purposes. In OPAL reactor, there are many kinds of radionuclides produced from various reactions in pool water and those should be identified and quantified for the safe use of OPAL. To do that, it is essential to check the efficiency of filters which are able to remove the radioactive substance from the reactor pool water. There are two main water circuits in OPAL which are RSPCS (Reactor Service Pool Cooling System) and HWL (Hot Water Layer) water circuits. The reactor service pool is connected to the reactor pool via a transfer canal and provides a working area and storage space for the spent and other materials. Also, HWL is the upper part of the reactor pool water and it minimize radiation dose rates at the pool surface. We collected water samples from these circuits and measured the radioactivity by using Gamma Spectrometry System (GSS) and Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC) to evaluate the filters. We could evaluate the efficiency of filters in RSPCS and HWL in OPAL research reactor. Through the measurements of radioactivity using GSS and LSC, we could conclude that there is likely to be no alpha emitter in water samples, and for beta and gamma activity, there are very big differences between inlet and outlet results, so every filter is working efficiently to remove the radioactive substance.

  3. Study on the Safety Classification Criteria of Mechanical Systems and Components for Open Pool-Type Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belal, Al Momani [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Jong Chull [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This paper describes a new compromised safety classification approach based on the comparative study of the different practices in safety classification of mechanical systems and components of open pool-type RRs, which have been adopted by several developed countries in the nuclear power area. It is hoped that the proposed safety classification criteria will be used to develop a harmonized consensus international standard. Different safety classification criteria for systems, structures, and components (SSCs) of nuclear reactors are used among the countries that export or import nuclear reactor technology, which may make the nuclear technology trade and exchange difficult. Thus, such various different approaches of safety classification need to be compromised to establish a global standard. This article proposes practicable optimized criteria for safety classification of SSCs for open pool-type research reactors (RRs)

  4. Study on the Safety Classification Criteria of Mechanical Systems and Components for Open Pool-Type Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belal, Al Momani; Jo, Jong Chull

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a new compromised safety classification approach based on the comparative study of the different practices in safety classification of mechanical systems and components of open pool-type RRs, which have been adopted by several developed countries in the nuclear power area. It is hoped that the proposed safety classification criteria will be used to develop a harmonized consensus international standard. Different safety classification criteria for systems, structures, and components (SSCs) of nuclear reactors are used among the countries that export or import nuclear reactor technology, which may make the nuclear technology trade and exchange difficult. Thus, such various different approaches of safety classification need to be compromised to establish a global standard. This article proposes practicable optimized criteria for safety classification of SSCs for open pool-type research reactors (RRs)

  5. Seismic sloshing experiments of large pool-type fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, A.; Masuko, Y.; Kurihara, C.; Ishihama, K.; Yashiro, T.; Rodwell, E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of seismic sloshing experiments performed on large pool-type LMFBR vessels. Two types of tests were performed. The first type of test was designed to understand the basis phenomena of sloshing (limited to linear sloshing only) and evaluate the effects of the deck-mounted components (i.e., IHXs, pumps, and UIS) on sloshing wave heights using a 1/10-scale model (diameter 2.23 m x H 1.03 m) of the LSPB 1340 MWe pool plant. The second type of test was designed to evaluate the structural integrity of the thermal baffles of the roof-deck to withstand sloshing impulsive pressures (focused on nonlinear sloshing), using a two-dimensional 1/3-scale model (L 8 m x W 3 m x H 2.6 m) of a typical 1000 MWe pool plant. The results of the linear sloshing tests have shown that: 1. the vessel wall stiffness has no effect on the sloshing natural frequency; 2. sloshing wave heights are lowered by 30% to 50% in the presence of the deck-mounted components; and 3. damping factors of sloshing are not influenced by the wall stiffness while they are increased by the presence of the deck-mounted components. The results of the nonlinear sloshing tests are that: 1. the maximum impulsive pressure occurs when the first effective wave strikes at the roof-deck, and thereafter the impulsive pressure decreases irrespective of the impact velocity of the fluid; 2. the first effective wave refers to the case in which the height of the fluid free surface becomes nearly twice the height of the cover gas space; and 3. the structural integrity of the thermal baffles for the roof-deck against the sloshing load was confirmed. In addition to these results, two sloshing-caused problems were identified. The first one is the spillover of hot sodium into the gas-dam type thermal insulator. The second one is cover-gas entrainment into sodium which might lead to a transient overpower (TOP) incident because of the presence of gas bubbles in the reactor core. (orig./HP)

  6. Farewell to a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skanborg, P.

    1976-01-01

    Denmark's second reactor, DR 2, whose first criticality took place the night of 18/19 December 1958 was shut down for the last time on 31 October 1975. It was a light-water moderrated and cooled reactor of swimming-pool type with a thermal power of 5 MW, using 90% enriched uranium. The operation is described. The reactor and auxiliary equipment are now being put 'in store' - all fuel elements sent for reprocessing, the reactor tank and cooling circuits emptied, and a lead shielding placed over the tank opening. The rest of the equipment will remain in place. (B.P.)

  7. Study on the seismic response of reactor vessel of pool type LMFBR including fluid-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, K.; Ito, T.; Fujita, K.; Kurihara, C.; Sawada, Y.; Sakurai, A.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents the seismic response of reactor vessel of pool type LMFBR with fluid-structure interaction. The reactor vessel has bottom support arrangement, the same core support system as Super-Phenix in France. Due to the bottom support arrangement, the level of core support is lower than that of the side support arrangement. So, in this reactor vessel, the displacement of the core top tends to increase because of the core's rocking. In this study, we investigated the vibration and seismic response characteristics of the reactor vessel. Therefore, the seismic experiments were carried out using one-eighth scale model and the seismic response including FSI and sloshing were investigated. From this study, the effect of liquid on the vibration characteristics and the seismic response characteristics of reactor vessel were clarified and sloshing characteristics were also clarified. It was confirmed that FEM analysis with FSI can reproduce the seismic behavior of the reactor vessel and is applicable to seismic design of the pool type LMFBR with bottom support arrangement. (author). 5 refs, 14 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Post shut-down decay heat removal from nuclear reactor core by natural convection loops in sodium pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajamani, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Sundararajan, T., E-mail: tsundar@iitm.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Prasad, B.V.S.S.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Parthasarathy, U.; Velusamy, K. [Nuclear Engineering Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Transient simulations are performed for a worst case scenario of station black-out. • Inter-wrapper flow between various sub-assemblies reduces peak core temperature. • Various natural convection paths limits fuel clad temperatures below critical level. - Abstract: The 500 MWe Indian pool type Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) has a passive core cooling system, known as the Safety Grade Decay Heat Removal System (SGDHRS) which aids to remove decay heat after shut down phase. Immediately after reactor shut down the fission products in the core continue to generate heat due to beta decay which exponentially decreases with time. In the event of a complete station blackout, the coolant pump system may not be available and the safety grade decay heat removal system transports the decay heat from the core and dissipates it safely to the atmosphere. Apart from SGDHRS, various natural convection loops in the sodium pool carry the heat away from the core and deposit it temporarily in the sodium pool. The buoyancy driven flow through the small inter-wrapper gaps (known as inter-wrapper flow) between fuel subassemblies plays an important role in carrying the decay heat from the sub-assemblies to the hot sodium pool, immediately after reactor shut down. This paper presents the transient prediction of flow and temperature evolution in the reactor subassemblies and the sodium pool, coupled with the safety grade decay heat removal system. It is shown that with a properly sized decay heat exchanger based on liquid sodium and air chimney stacks, the post shutdown decay heat can be safely dissipated to atmospheric air passively.

  9. Potential market and characteristics of low-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, B.

    1975-01-01

    The low-temperature (100 to 200 deg C) heat market for industrial applications and district heating is very important. Two main studies have been developed: a swimming pool reactor delivering water at 110 deg C and a prestressed concrete vessel reactor delivering water at 200 deg C [fr

  10. Status of national programmes on fast breeder reactors. Eighteenth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 16-19 April 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    The Eighteenth Annual Meeting on the Status of National Programmes in Member States of the IAEA on Fast Breeder Reactors had been held in April 1985. The representatives of the Member States and international organizations reported status and activities in the field of fast breeder reactors development and operation. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 12 presentations of the meeting

  11. Geneva 24 hours swim

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  12. Geneva 24 Hours Swim

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  13. Adaptation of GRS calculation codes for Soviet reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenbuch, S.; Petri, A.; Steinborn, J.; Stenbok, I.A.; Suslow, A.I.

    1994-01-01

    The use of ATHLET for incident calculation of WWER has been tested and verified in numerous calculations. Further adaptation may be needed for the WWER 1000 plants. Coupling ATHLET with the 3D nuclear model BIPR-8 for WWER cores clearly improves studies of the influence of neutron kinetics. In the case of FBMK reactors ATHLET calculations show that typical incidents in the complex RMBK reactors can be calculated even though verification still has to be worked on. Results of the 3D-core model QUABOX/CUBBOX-HYCA show good correlation of calculated and measured values in reactor plants. Calculations carried out to date were used to check essential parameters influencing RBMK core behaviour especially dependence of effective voidre activity on the number of control rods. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Sink or Swim: Adapting to the Hydrologic Impacts of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleick, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Climate changes lead to a wide range of societal and environmental impacts; indeed, strong evidence has accrued that such impacts are already occurring, as summarized by the newest National Climate Assessment and other analyses. Among the most important will be alterations in the hydrologic cycle, changes in water supply and demand, and impacts on existing water-related infrastructure. Because of the complexity of our water systems, adaptation responses will be equally complex. This problem has made it difficult for water managers and planners to develop and implement adaptation strategies. This talk will address three ways to think about water-related adaptation approaches to climate change: (1) strategies that are already being implemented to address population and economic changes without climate change; (2) whether these first-line strategies are appropriate for additional impacts that might result from climatic changes; and (3) new approaches that might be necessary for new, non-linear, or threshold impacts. An effort will also be made to differentiate between adaptation strategies that influence the hydrologic cycle directly (e.g., cloud seeding), those that influence supply management (e.g., construction of additional reservoirs or water-distribution systems), and those that affect water demand (e.g., removal of outdoor landscaping, installation of efficient irrigation systems).

  15. Experimental study on size effect of siphon-breaking hole in the real-scaled reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Soon Ho; Ahn, Ho Seon; Kim, Ji Min; Kim, Moo Hwan; Lee, Kwon Yeong; Seo, Kyoung Woo; Chi, Dae Young

    2012-01-01

    A rupture in the primary piping of a cooling system with a heat source or in a research reactor could lead to a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). However, if the water level of the reactor pool could be sustained and a reactor scram follows, the heat source could be cooled by natural convection, and significant accidents could be avoided. When a piping-system rupture accident occurs, the coolant starts to siphon out of the reactor pool until the pressure head between the inlet and outlet is removed or the siphon flow is interrupted. Therefore, a siphon-breaker mechanism can be adopted as a passive safety device to maintain the reactor water level. The gas entrainment is used to block the continuous loss of coolant by interrupting the siphon flow. Siphon breaking is complicated due to the transient, turbulent, two-phase flow mode, so suitable models or correlations that describe this phenomenon do not exist, and no general analysis been developed. Previous researchers have conducted experiments and numerical simulations to design a siphon breaker to meet their needs. Previous research on siphon breaking has not been conducted systemically, and no literature exists, even though the topic is greatly concerned with hydraulic safety. In this study, siphon-breaking holes were used as siphon breakers, and their performance was evaluated by the residual water quantity. Flow visualization was conducted to interpret the siphon-breaking phenomenon

  16. A small research reactor for the 1980's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglin, C.; Collis-Smith, J.A.; Mitchell, B.; Roskilly, T.

    1978-01-01

    In 1960, GEC together with Imperial College, designed and built the Consort reactor which is still in daily use at the London University Reactor Centre, Silwood Park. In 1977, GEC-REL chose the Consort reactor as a prototype for the development of a modern swimming pool research reactor, designed to meet the needs of countries or organisations starting in the field of Nuclear Technology. This paper outlines some of the topics which arose in the course of this project. (author)

  17. Design studies of Tokamak power reactor in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, T.; Nishikawa, M.; Tanaka, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Recent design studies of tokamak power reactor and related activities conducted in JAERI are presented. A design study of the SPTR (Swimming-Pool Type Reactor) concept was carried out in FY81 and FY82. The reactor design studies in the last two years focus on nuclear components, heat transport and energy conversion systems. In parallel of design studies, tokamak systems analysis code is under development to evaluate reactor performances, cost and net energy balance

  18. Three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction dynamics of a pool-reactor in-tank component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    The safety evaluation of reactor-components often involves the analysis of various types of fluid/structural components interacting in three-dimensional space. For example, in the design of a pool-type reactor several vital in-tank components such as the primary pumps and the intermediate heat exchangers are contained within the primary tank. Typically, these components are suspended from the deck structure and largely submersed in the sodium pool. Because of this positioning these components are vulnerable to structural damage due to pressure wave propagation in the tank during a CDA. In order to assess the structural integrity of these components it is necessary to perform a dynamic analysis in three-dimensional space which accounts for the fluid-structure coupling. A model is developed which has many of the salient features of this fluid-structural component system

  19. Statistical evaluation of potential damage to the Al(OH){sub 3} layer on nTiO{sub 2} particles in the presence of swimming pool and seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virkutyte, Jurate [Pegasus Technical Services, Inc (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R., E-mail: al-abed.souhail@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Nanosized TiO{sub 2} particles (nTiO{sub 2}) are usually coated with an Al(OH){sub 3} layer when used in sunscreen to shield against the harmful effects of free radicals that are generated when these particles are exposed to UV radiation. Therefore, it is vital to insure the structural stability of these particles in the environment where the protective layer may be damaged and adverse health and environmental effects can occur. This study utilized X-ray analysis (SEM-EDS) to provide a qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of the chemical and physical characteristics of Al(OH){sub 3}-coated original and damaged nTiO{sub 2} particles (used in sunscreen lotion formulations) in the presence of both swimming pool and seawater. Also, by utilizing statistical tools, a distribution of Al/Ti (%) on the particle surface was determined and evaluated. It was found that 45 min of treatment with swimming pool and seawater significantly induced the redistribution of Al/Ti (%), which changed the surface characteristics of particles and, therefore, may have induced undesired photo-activity and the consequent formation of free radicals.

  20. The solar heating system of the sport centre 'Guillamo Swimming Pool' in Sierre, Switzerland; Installation solaire thermique. Complexe sportif de la piscine de Guillamo - Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This illustrated report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy describes the refurbishment and the extension of the sport centre 'Guillamo Swimming Pool' in Sierre, Switzerland. The original building built in 1978 included three swimming pools (two indoor and one small outdoor). In 2005 a three-room fitness centre, a wellness centre and a bar were added to the compound and the old building and technical installations refurbished. At the same time a 591 m{sup 2} solar collector array was added. Unglazed selective solar absorbers were mounted on the 5{sup o} tilted flat roof. They insure at the same time the water tightness of the roof, a feature that lead to a significant cost reduction of the project. Before 2005 the natural gas consumption of the centre was 1.3 to 1.7 GWh/year. After the construction work the consumption was about 1.6 GWh, including a contribution of 0.06 GWh from the solar collectors. This last figure is disappointing. The reasons for this are mainly attributed by the authors to a very poor integration of the solar collectors into the conventional heat generation and distribution system, which do not enable the solar collectors to deliver the heat quantity they should. Changes should be made on the hydraulics of the whole system and on the control algorithms and settings.

  1. Simulation of the gamma dose rate in a loss of pool water accident of the second Egyptian research reactor ET-RR-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, E.; Saleh, H.G.; Ashoub, N.

    2002-01-01

    The second Egyptian research reactor ET-RR-2, is a pool type reactor. A sudden loss of pool water would leave the core region uncovered. The reactor core is surrounded by chimney chambers with water isolated from the pool water. This accident would lead to significant external doses. A model is developed and used to calculate the dose rates for key access-areas and traffic plans from indirect line of sight of the core which have a maximum dose rate. The model developed uses the discrete ordinate method as implemented in the code DOT3.5. (orig.) [de

  2. Reinforced confinement in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, H.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention concerns a nuclear reactor containing a reactor core, a swimming pool space that is filled and pressurized with a neutron-absorbing solution, a reactor tank, at least one heat exchanger, at least one inlet line, at least one return line and at least one circulation pump, where the said reactor tank is confined in the said swimming pool space and designed to be cooled with the aid of relatively pure water, which is fed by means of the said at least one circulating pump to the said reactor tank from the said heat exchanger via the said at least one inlet line and is returned to the heat exchanger via the said at least one return line. The problem that is to be solved by the invention is to design a reactor of the above type in such a way that a complete confinement of the primary circuit of the reactor is achieved at relatively low extra cost. This problem is solved by providing the reactor with a special confinement space that confines the heat exchanger, but not the reactor tank, with the confinement space and the swimming pool space being fashioned in the same concrete body

  3. Computational simulation of the natural circulation occurring in an experimental test section of a pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Francisco R.T. do; Lima Junior, Carlos A.S.; Oliveira, Andre F.S. de; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Faccini, Jose L.H.; Moreira, Maria L.

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents a computational simulation of the natural circulation phenomenon developing in an experimental test section of a pool type research reactor. The test section has been designed using a reduced scale in height 1:4.7 in relation to a pool type 30 MW research reactor prototype. It comprises a cylindrical vessel, which is opened to atmosphere, and representing the reactor pool; a natural circulation pipe, a lower plenum, and a heater containing electrical resistors in rectangular plate format, which represents the fuel elements, with a chimney positioned on the top of the resistor assembly. In the computational simulation, it was used a commercial CFD software, without any turbulence model. Besides, in the presence of the natural circulation, a laminar flow has been assumed and the equations of the mass conservation, momentum and energy were solved by the finite element method. In addition, the results of the simulation are presented in terms of velocities and temperatures differences, respectively: at inlet and outlet of the heater and of the natural circulation pipe. (author)

  4. Computational simulation of the natural circulation occurring in an experimental test section of a pool type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Francisco R.T. do; Lima Junior, Carlos A.S.; Oliveira, Andre F.S. de; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Faccini, Jose L.H.; Moreira, Maria L., E-mail: rogerio.tdn@gmail.com, E-mail: souzalima_ca@ien.gov.br, E-mail: oliveira.afelipe@gmail.com, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: faccini@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The present work presents a computational simulation of the natural circulation phenomenon developing in an experimental test section of a pool type research reactor. The test section has been designed using a reduced scale in height 1:4.7 in relation to a pool type 30 MW research reactor prototype. It comprises a cylindrical vessel, which is opened to atmosphere, and representing the reactor pool; a natural circulation pipe, a lower plenum, and a heater containing electrical resistors in rectangular plate format, which represents the fuel elements, with a chimney positioned on the top of the resistor assembly. In the computational simulation, it was used a commercial CFD software, without any turbulence model. Besides, in the presence of the natural circulation, a laminar flow has been assumed and the equations of the mass conservation, momentum and energy were solved by the finite element method. In addition, the results of the simulation are presented in terms of velocities and temperatures differences, respectively: at inlet and outlet of the heater and of the natural circulation pipe. (author)

  5. Reactor physics innovations of the advanced CANDU reactor core: adaptable and efficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, P.S.W.; Hopwood, J.M.; Bonechi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) is designed to have a benign, operator-friendly core physics characteristic, including a slightly negative coolant-void reactivity and a moderately negative power coefficient. The discharge fuel burnup is about three times that of natural uranium fuel in current CANDU reactors. Key features of the reactor physics innovations in the ACR core include the use of H 2 O coolant, slightly enriched uranium (SEU) fuel, and D 2 O moderator in a reduced lattice pitch. These innovations result in substantial improvements in economics, as well as significant enhancements in reactor performance and waste reduction over the current reactor design. The ACR can be readily adapted to different power outputs by increasing or decreasing the number of fuel channels, while maintaining identical fuel and fuel-channel characteristics. The flexibility provided by on-power refuelling and simple fuel bundle design enables the ACR to easily adapt to the use of plutonium and thorium fuel cycles. No major modifications to the basic ACR design are required because the benign neutronic characteristics of the SEU fuel cycle are also inherent in these advanced fuel cycles. (author)

  6. Reactor science and technology: operation and control of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Junlong

    1994-01-01

    This article is a collection of short reports on reactor operation and research in China in 1991. The operation of and research activities linked with the Heavy Water Research Reactor, Swimming Pool Reactor and Miniature Neutron Source Reactor are briefly surveyed. A number of papers then follow on the developing strategies in Chinese fast breeder reactor technology including the conceptual design of an experimental fast reactor (FFR), theoretical studies of FFR thermo-hydraulics and a design for an immersed sodium flowmeter. Reactor physics studies cover a range of topics including several related to work on zero power reactors. The section on reactor safety analysis is concerned largely with the assessment of established, and the presentation of new, computer codes for use in PWR safety calculations. Experimental and theoretical studies of fuels and reactor materials for FBRs, PWRs, BWRs and fusion reactors are described. A final miscellaneous section covers Mo-Tc isotope production in the swimming pool reactor, convective heat transfer in tubes and diffusion of tritium through plastic/aluminium composite films and Li 2 SiO 3 . (UK)

  7. Water Penetration into Middle Ear Through Ventilation Tubes in Children While Swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Che Wang

    2009-02-01

    Conclusion: Water penetration into the middle ear through ventilation tubes and middle ear infection are not likely when surface swimming. Children with ventilation tubes can enjoy swimming without protection in clean chlorinated swimming pools.

  8. Design study of an IHX support structure for a POOL-TYPE Sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Gyu; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Jae Han

    2009-01-01

    The IHX (Intermediate Heat eXchanger) for a pool-type SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor) system transfers heat from the primary high temperature sodium to the intermediate cold temperature sodium. The upper structure of the IHX is a coaxial structure designed to form a flow path for both the secondary high temperature and low temperature sodium. The coaxial structure of the IHX consists of a central downcomer and riser for the incoming and outgoing intermediate sodium, respectively. The IHX of a pool-type SFR is supported at the upper surface of the reactor head with an IHX support structure that connects the IHX riser cylinder to the reactor head. The reactor head is generally maintained at the low temperature regime, but the riser cylinder is exposed in the elevated temperature region. The resultant complicated temperature distribution of the co-axial structure including the IHX support structure may induce a severe thermal stress distribution. In this study, the structural feasibility of the current upper support structure concept is investigated through a preliminary stress analysis and an alternative design concept to accommodate the IHTS (Intermediate Heat Transport System) piping expansion loads and severe thermal stress is proposed. Through the structural analysis it is found that the alternative design concept is effective in reducing the thermal stress and acquiring structural integrity

  9. Fractionated BNCT for locally recurrent head and neck cancer: Experience from a phase I/II clinical trial at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ling-Wei; Chen, Yi-Wei; Ho, Ching-Yin; Hsueh Liu, Yen-Wan; Chou, Fong-In; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Liu, Hong-Ming; Peir, Jinn-Jer; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Chang, Chi-Wei; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Yen, Sang-Hue

    2014-01-01

    To introduce our experience of treating locally and regionally recurrent head and neck cancer patients with BNCT at Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor in Taiwan, 12 patients (M/F=10/2, median age 55.5 Y/O) were enrolled and 11 received two fractions of treatment. Fractionated BNCT at 30-day interval with adaptive planning according to changed T/N ratios was feasible, effective and safe for selected recurrent head and neck cancer in this trial. - Highlights: • We treated 12 patients with recurrent Head and Neck (H and N) cancer after radical surgery and radiotherapy since 2010. • Four complete response (CR) and 3 partial response (PR) were found. Total response rate was 58%. • Two patients had local control longer than one year. • No grade 4 or higher toxicity was noted for both acute and chronic effects

  10. Exercise-training intervention studies in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspenes, Stian Thoresen; Karlsen, Trine

    2012-06-01

    Competitive swimming has a long history and is currently one of the largest Olympic sports, with 16 pool events. Several aspects separate swimming from most other sports such as (i) the prone position; (ii) simultaneous use of arms and legs for propulsion; (iii) water immersion (i.e. hydrostatic pressure on thorax and controlled respiration); (iv) propulsive forces that are applied against a fluctuant element; and (v) minimal influence of equipment on performance. Competitive swimmers are suggested to have specific anthropometrical features compared with other athletes, but are nevertheless dependent on physiological adaptations to enhance their performance. Swimmers thus engage in large volumes of training in the pool and on dry land. Strength training of various forms is widely used, and the energetic systems are addressed by aerobic and anaerobic swimming training. The aim of the current review was to report results from controlled exercise training trials within competitive swimming. From a structured literature search we found 17 controlled intervention studies that covered strength or resistance training, assisted sprint swimming, arms-only training, leg-kick training, respiratory muscle training, training the energy delivery systems and combined interventions across the aforementioned categories. Nine of the included studies were randomized controlled trials. Among the included studies we found indications that heavy strength training on dry land (one to five repetitions maximum with pull-downs for three sets with maximal effort in the concentric phase) or sprint swimming with resistance towards propulsion (maximal pushing with the arms against fixed points or pulling a perforated bowl) may be efficient for enhanced performance, and may also possibly have positive effects on stroke mechanics. The largest effect size (ES) on swimming performance was found in 50 m freestyle after a dry-land strength training regimen of maximum six repetitions across three

  11. Two-component HLMC-gas flow instability and inhomogeneity phenomena in open-pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergey I Shcherbakov

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Consideration is being given to two-component gas-liquid flows with inhomogeneous gas content. The inhomogeneity of gas content over flow space can be caused by local mixing of gas and liquid, gas injection, gas-containing liquid jet penetration into the bulk of liquid without gas. The paper presents the computational results obtained using the direct non-stationary calculation with the TURBO-FLOW computer code. The results refer to flows near the liquid level, flows in downcomer gaps, collectors, elements with varying geometry (jet outlet into space, flow turn) for the pool-type reactors and experimental models. The following processes have been shown and discussed: formation of new liquid levels, entrainment of gas from the level, change in density composition of gas, flow stratification, effect of gas emergence rate and density convection on flow pattern. At gas phase transfer by liquid, two phenomena governing this transfer proceed: gas slip in liquid and density convection of non-uniformly aerated liquid. In horizontal flows, a vertical stratification of gas content always occurs. If the flow changes its direction to an upward one (collector at core inlet), the gas content maximum would be observed in channels nearest to the inlet. At the liquid level, the processes of gas separation from liquid and gas entrainment take place. The separation is a self-sustained process due to circulations arising near the level. The rate of gas entrainment is proportional to the rate of overflow and inversely proportional to the height of liquid level. At the downcomer region in case of its expansion, there occurs the instability of flow resulting in formation of liquid level and falling jet. The level is lower the more the gas content at inlet. The accumulation of gas occurs at sharp turns, encumbered regions (tube bundle), at all regions with upper (ceiling) constraints of flow. The flow instability being often observed in gas-liquid flows

  12. Calculation and mapping of gamma radiation field in the pool of Apsara reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Tej; Singh, Kanchhi; Sharma, ARchana; Somakumar, K.; Raina, V.K.; Srinivasan, P.; Prasad, S.K.; Babu, D.A.R.; Sharma, D.N.

    2007-12-01

    Theoretical simulation of the radiation transport occurring in the Apsara core and bulk shield was carried out using two different radiation transport codes, MCNP and QADCG. The MCNP is a Monte Carlo based statistical method solving Boltzmann transport equation, where as the latter code QADCG is a point kernel based deterministic method with build-up factor correction. The aim of the simulation was to do a dose mapping and estimate the expected value of gamma dose rates at various locations where experimental measurements were conducted. Details regarding the simulation techniques employed by both the MCNP and QADCG software with reference to the Apsara core and shield geometry and source gamma energy distribution in the fuel plates are presented in this report. Different types of particle tallies requested in MCNP and QADCG are discussed. Details of variance reduction methods employed in reducing the statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo simulation are also mentioned in the report. The statistical errors associated with Monte Carlo based simulation varied between 3% - 6% in most of the energy bins that contribute to the total fluence and hence to the dose rates. It was observed that the experimental values and the theoretically simulated values match each other closely following a similar trend except for certain experimental locations which had photon flux contributions from extraneous sources like the N-16 activity present in water, beam tubes and pool liner towards shielding corner. It is seen that the theoretical values are found to be larger than experimental values by factors ranging from 1.1 to 3 depending on the water shield thickness. This study served in validation of the experimental measurements conducted by GM counter based teletector and dipole based detectors. In addition, the comparison provided a confirmation of the accuracy of the radiation transport simulation techniques used for dose rate evaluation in case of complex source geometries and

  13. THE STUDY OF VITAMINS B1, B6, AND B12 EFFECTS ON ADRENAL CORTEX ADAPTATION BY MONITORING SOME ENZYME SYSTEMS IN RATS TRAINED BY SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Veličković

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The adrenal hormones play a central role in response to environmental stimuli, both internal and external. We analyzed enzymes activities (LDH- lactate dehydrogenase, GLDHglutamate dehydrogenase and AcPh – acid phosphatase in adrenal cortex through swimming exercises and under the influence of B-group vitamins. The analyzed cases in the experiment revealed significant increase of enzyme activities, namely in the zona fasciculata and zona reticularis of the adrenal cortex. Physical exertion is a form of stress and causes steroidogenesis process expression. The vitamins used take part as co-ferments in production of a lot of enzymes and in their activities as well. Improvement of the enzyme system in adrenal glands in animals through swimming training with addition of vitamins B1, B6 and B12 leads to faster and long-term production of hormones necessary for stress response known as General Adaptation Syndrome

  14. An Assessment of Fission Product Scrubbing in Sodium Pools Following a Core Damage Event in a Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucknor, M.; Farmer, M.; Grabaskas, D.

    2017-06-26

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated that mechanistic source term (MST) calculations are expected to be required as part of the advanced reactor licensing process. A recent study by Argonne National Laboratory has concluded that fission product scrubbing in sodium pools is an important aspect of an MST calculation for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). To model the phenomena associated with sodium pool scrubbing, a computational tool, developed as part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program, was utilized in an MST trial calculation. This tool was developed by applying classical theories of aerosol scrubbing to the decontamination of gases produced as a result of postulated fuel pin failures during an SFR accident scenario. The model currently considers aerosol capture by Brownian diffusion, inertial deposition, and gravitational sedimentation. The effects of sodium vapour condensation on aerosol scrubbing are also treated. This paper provides details of the individual scrubbing mechanisms utilized in the IFR code as well as results from a trial mechanistic source term assessment led by Argonne National Laboratory in 2016.

  15. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro, R.; Ahnert, C.; Esteban Naudin, A.; Martinez Fanegas, R.; Minguez, E.; Rovira, A.

    1976-01-01

    The analysis of neutronics (both statics and kinetics), of the 10 Mwt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E. is included. A short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental cheking, carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-1 and JEN-2 of Junta de Energia Nuclear, is given in each of these chapters. (author) [es

  16. Contaminación del aire interior y del agua de baño en piscinas cubiertas de Guipúzcoa Indoor air and bathing water pollution in indoor swimming pools in Guipúzcoa (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Santa Marina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir los niveles de contaminantes presentes en las piscinas cubiertas de Guipúzcoa, tanto en el agua de baño como en el aire, y estudiar la relación entre estos contaminantes y otras variables relacionadas con los sistemas de ventilación y el uso de las instalaciones. Métodos: De las 35 piscinas cubiertas registradas en Guipúzcoa se estudiaron las 20 más utilizadas por nadadores. Cada instalación se muestreó 2 días no consecutivos y se midieron los niveles de cloro libre y combinado y trihalometanos en el agua, así como los de cloro total y cloroformo en el aire. Como indicador de la renovación del aire se midió el dióxido de carbono (CO2. Resultados: El nivel medio de cloro en el aire fue de 0,4mg/m³ y el de cloroformo de 22µg/m³. Los valores de cloro libre y combinado de todas las piscinas se mantuvieron dentro de los valores reglamentarios. El nivel medio de cloroformo del agua de baño fue de 13,7µg/l. El valor del cloroformo del aire puede predecirse razonablemente (R²=0,85, y las variables predictoras son el cloroformo del agua, el CO2 y el número de bañistas del día. Conclusiones: Los niveles de contaminantes en el agua y en el aire de las piscinas de Guipúzcoa son inferiores a los descritos en otros estudios. Sin embargo, utilizando la concentración de 0,5mg/m³ de cloro total en aire, propuesta como valor de referencia para la protección de los nadadores con actividad intensa, un 20% de las instalaciones superarían dicho valor.Objective: To describe levels of pollutants found in indoor swimming pools in Guipúzcoa (Basque Country, Spain, both in the bathing water and in the air, and to study the association between these pollutants and other variables related to ventilation systems and the use of installations. Methods: Of the 35 indoor swimming pools registered in Guipúzcoa, the 20 most frequently used by swimmers were studied. Each installation was sampled on two nonconsecutive days. Free and

  17. Heat-pipe liquid-pool-blanket concept for the Tandem Mirror Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Werner, R.W.; Johnson, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    The blanket concept for the tandem mirror reactor described in this paper was developed to produce the medium temperature heat (approx. 850 to 950 K) for the General Atomic sulfur-iodine thermochemical process for producing hydrogen. This medium temperature heat from the blanket constitutes about 81% of the total power output of the fusion reactor

  18. The life-extension and upgrade program of the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) and its research prospectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, J.-J.

    1992-01-01

    The Tsing Hua Open-Pool Reactor (THOR) has been operated for thirty years. It is the regulations of the ROCAEC that any reactor shall be decommissioned after forty-year operation since the first fuel loading. Therefore, for extending the lifetime of THOR, it is necessary to have a life-extension program to be approved by the ROCAEC and also completed by the year of 1997. At the same time, for proceeding new research purposes, it is planed to upgrade the thermal power of THOR from 1 Wth up to 3 Wth and hopefully to reach the maximum thermal neutron flux of 5x10 13 n/cm 2 .s and the fast flux close to that order. New research directions involve (a) boron-captured neutron cancer therapy (BNCT) (b) small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). (author)

  19. Undulatory fish swimming : from muscles to flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, U.K.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Undulatory swimming is employed by many fish for routine swimming and extended sprints. In this biomechanical review, we address two questions: (i) how the fish's axial muscles power swimming; and (ii) how the fish's body and fins generate thrust. Fish have adapted the morphology of their axial

  20. Description of the RA-3 research reactor as a model facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicens, Hugo E.; Quintana, Jorge A.

    2001-01-01

    The Argentine RA-3 reactor is described as a model facility for the information to be provided to the IAEA in accordance with the requirements of the Model Additional Protocol. RA-3 reactor was designed as a 5 MW swimming pool reactor, moderated and cooled with light water. Its fuel was 90% enriched uranium. The reactor started its operation in 1967, has been modified and improved in many components, including the core, that now is fueled with moderately enriched uranium

  1. Criteria for recladding of spent light water reactor fuel before long term pool storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.; Jansson, L.

    1979-01-01

    The question of the need for any special treatment of failed fuel elements prior to long term pool storage has been studied. It is concluded that the main problem appears to be hydride embrittlement of failed fuel rods, which may lead to increased damage during handling and transport of the failed fuel. Some mechanisms for the degradation of failed fuel rods have been identified. They can all be considered as relatively improbable, but further experimental evidence is needed before it can be concluded that these degradation mechanisms are insignificant during pool storage. The report also contains a review of methods for identification of leaking fuel bundles and fuel rods. (Auth.)

  2. Criteria for recladding of spent light water reactor fuel before long term pool storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.; Jansson, L.

    1979-06-01

    The question of the need for any special treatment of failed fuel elements prior to long term pool storage has been studied. It is concluded that the main problem appears to be hydride embrittlement of failed fuel rods, which may lead to increased damage during handling and transport of the failed fuel. Some mechanisms for the degradation of failed fuel rods have been identified. They can all be considered as relatively improbable, but further experimental evidence is needed before it can be concluded that thede degradation mechanisms are insignificant during pool storage. The report also contains a review of methods for identification of leaking fuel bundles and fuel rods.(author)

  3. Practical experience for liquid radioactive waste treatment from spent fuel storage pool on RA reactor in Vinca Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Pavlovic, R.; Pavlovic, S.

    2002-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of the preliminary removal of sludge from the bottom of the spent fuel storage pool in the RA reactor, mechanical filtration of the pool water and sludge conditioning and storage. Yugoslavia is a country without a nuclear power plant (NPP) on its territory. The law which strictly forbids NPP construction is still valid, but, nevertheless we must handle and dispose radioactive waste. This is not only because of radwaste originating from the use of radioactive materials in medicine and industry, but also because of the waste generated by research in the Nuclear Sciences Institute Vinca. In the last forty years, in the Vinca Institute, as a result of two research reactors being operational, named RA and RB, and as a result of the application of radionuclides in medicine, industry and agriculture, radioactive waste materials of different levels of specific activity were generated. As a temporary solution, radioactive waste materials are stored in two interim storages. Radwaste materials that were immobilized in the inactive matrices are to be placed in concrete containers, for further manipulation and disposal.(author)

  4. Establishment and validation of the model of molten pool in fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shufeng; Luo Rui; Wang Zhou; Shi Xiaobo; Yang Xianyong

    2007-01-01

    Running under the beyond design base accidental condition, sodium boiling and dry-out will soon be brought about in LMFBR. If not stopped timely, the fuel pins of the subassembly will be melt and broken to form a molten pool at the bottom of the subassembly. to present a reasonable analysis about the molten pool accident, a method of establishing model according to the mechanism is selected, by which an integral model of the molten pool is established. Validated on the three power groups of BF1 experiments which belong to the France SCARABEE series experimenters, the model shows good results. After compared with the models of GEYSER and BF2 experiments which had been validated before, some conclusions about mechanism of molten pool are derived. Moreover, through comparing the relative parameters such as the discharged heat and the increment of temperature etc., a reasonable analysis about the type of heat transfer is present, on the basis of which some conclusions are derived as well. (authors)

  5. Upgradation of Apsara reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammen, S.; Mukherjee, P.; Bhatnagar, A.; Sasidharan, K.; Raina, V.K.

    2009-01-01

    Apsara is a 1 MW swimming pool type research reactor using high enriched uranium as fuel with light water as coolant and moderator. The reactor is in operation for more than five decades and has been extensively used for basic research, radioisotope production, neutron radiography, detector testing, shielding experiments etc. In view of its long service period, it is planned to carry out refurbishment of the reactor to extend its useful life. During refurbishment, it is also planned to upgrade the reactor to a 2 MW reactor to improve its utilization and to upgrade the structure, system and components in line with the current safety standards. This paper gives a brief account of the design features and safety aspects of the upgraded Apsara reactor. (author)

  6. Safety aspects of the cleaning and conditioning of radioactive sludge from spent fuel storage pool on 'RA' Research reactor in the Vinca Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, R; Pavlovic, S.; Plecas, I.

    1999-01-01

    Spent fuel elements from nuclear reactors in the Vinca Institute have been temporary stored in water filled storage pool. Due to the fact that the water in the spent fuel elements storage pool have not been purified for a long time, all metallic components submerged in the water have been hardly corroded and significant amount of the sludge has been settled on the bottom of the pool. As a first step in improving spent fuel elements storage conditions and slowing down corrosion in the storage spent fuel elements pool we have decided to remove the sludge from the bottom of the pool. Although not high, but slightly radioactive, this sludge had to be treated as radioactive waste material. Some safety aspects and radiation protection measures in the process of the spent fuel storage pool cleaning are presented in this paper

  7. Scaled Facility Design Approach for Pool-Type Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Small Modular Reactor Utilizing Natural Circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sangrok; Shin, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Jueun; Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In low carbon era, nuclear energy is the most prominent energy source of electricity. For steady ecofriendly nuclear energy supply, Generation IV reactors which are future nuclear reactor require safety, sustainability, economics and non-proliferation as four criteria. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of these reactor type and Generation IV international forum (GIF) adapted three reference LFR systems which are a small and movable systems with long life without refueling, intermediate size and huge electricity generation system for power grid. NUTRECK (Nuclear Transmutation Energy Center of Korea) has been designed reactor called URANUS (Ubiquitous, Rugged, Accident-forgiving, Non-proliferating, and Ultra-lasting Sustainer) which is small modular reactor and using lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. To prove natural circulation capability of URANUS and analyze design based accidents, scaling mock-up experiment facility will be constructed. In this paper, simple specifications of URANUS will be presented. Then based on this feature, scaling law and scaled facility design results are presented. To validate safety feature and thermodynamics characteristic of URANUS, scaled mockup facility of URANUS is designed based on the scaling law. This mockup adapts two area scale factors, core and lower parts of mock-up are scaled for 3D flow experiment. Upper parts are scaled different size to reduce electricity power and LBE tonnage. This hybrid scaling method could distort some thermal-hydraulic parameters, however, key parameters for experiment will be matched for up-scaling. Detailed design of mock-up will be determined through iteration for design optimization.

  8. Evaluation of aluminum pit corrosion in oak ridge research reactor pool by quantitative imaging and thermodynamic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ping-Rey; Arunkumar, Rangaswami; Lindner, Jeffrey S.; Long, Zhiling; Mott, Melissa A.; Okhuysen, Walter P.; Monts, David L.; Su, Yi; Kirk, Paula G.; Ettien, John

    2007-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORRR) was operated as an isotope production and irradiation facility from March 1958 until March 1987. The US Department of Energy permanently shut down and removed the fuel from the ORRR in 1987. The water level must be maintained in the ORRR pool as shielding for radioactive components still located in the pool. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) needs to decontaminate and demolish the ORRR as part of the Oak Ridge cleanup program. In February 2004, increased pit corrosion was noted in the pool's 6 mm (1/4'')-thick aluminum liner in the section nearest where the radioactive components are stored. If pit corrosion has significantly penetrated the aluminum liner, then DOE EM must accelerate its decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D) efforts or look for alternatives for shielding the irradiated components. The goal of Mississippi State University's Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) was to provide a determination of the extent and depth of corrosion and to conduct thermodynamic modeling to determine how further corrosion can be inhibited. Results from the work will facilitate ORNL in making reliable disposition decisions. ICET's inspection approach was to quantitatively estimate the amount of corrosion by using Fourier - transform profilometry (FTP). FTP is a non-contact 3- D shape measurement technique. By projecting a fringe pattern onto a target surface and observing its deformation due to surface irregularities from a different view angle, the system is capable of determining the height (depth) distribution of the target surface, thus reproducing the profile of the target accurately. ICET has previously demonstrated that its FTP system can quantitatively estimate the volume and depth of removed and residual material to high accuracy. The results of our successful initial deployment of a submergible FTP system into the ORRR pool are reported here as are initial thermodynamic

  9. Seismic analysis of a large pool-type LMR [liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Y.; Gvildys, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the seismic study of a 450-MWe liquid metal reactor (LMR) under 0.3-g SSE ground excitation. Two calculations were performed using the new design configuration. They deal with the seismic response of the reactor vessel, the guard vessel and support skirt, respectively. In both calculations, the stress and displacement fields at important locations of those components are investigated. Assessments are also made on the elastic and inelastic structural capabilities for other beyond-design basis seismic loads. Results of the reactor vessel analysis reveal that the maximum equivalent stress is only about half of the material yield stress. For the guard vessel and support skirt, the stress level is very small. Regarding the analysis if inelastic structural capability, solutions of the Newmark-Hall ductility modification method show that the reactor vessel can withstand seismics with ground ZPAs ranging from 1.015 to 1.31 g, which corresponds to 3.37 to 4.37 times the basic 0.3-g SSE. Thus, the reactor vessel and guard vessel are strong enough to resist seismic loads. 4 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Feynman-α technique for measurement of detector dead time using a 30 kW tank-in-pool research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaho, E.H.K.; Intsiful, J.D.K.; Maakuu, B.T.; Anim-Sampong, S.; Nyarko, B.J.B.

    2002-01-01

    Reactor noise analysis was carried out for Ghana Research Reactor-1 GHARR-1, a tank-in-pool type reactor using the Feynman-α technique (variance-to-mean method). Measurements made at different detector positions and under subcritical conditions showed that the technique could not be used to determine the prompt decay constant for the reactor which is Be reflected with photo-neutron background. However, for very low dwell times the technique was used to measure the dead time of the detector which compares favourably with the value obtained using the α-conventional method

  11. Feynman-alpha technique for measurement of detector dead time using a 30 kW tank-in-pool research reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Akaho, E H K; Intsiful, J D K; Maakuu, B T; Nyarko, B J B

    2002-01-01

    Reactor noise analysis was carried out for Ghana Research Reactor-1 GHARR-1, a tank-in-pool type reactor using the Feynman-alpha technique (variance-to-mean method). Measurements made at different detector positions and under subcritical conditions showed that the technique could not be used to determine the prompt decay constant for the reactor which is Be reflected with photo-neutron background. However, for very low dwell times the technique was used to measure the dead time of the detector which compares favourably with the value obtained using the alpha-conventional method.

  12. Comparison of decay heat exchangers placing in the primary circuit of pool type fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birbraer, P.N.; Gorbunov, V.S.; Zotov, V.G.; Kuzavkov, N.G.; Pykhonin, V.A.; Sobolev, V.A.; Ryzhov, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Description of two alternative arrangements of decay beat exchangers (DHXs) in the fast reactor tank is presented: in 'hot' cavity and in 'cold' cavity. The results of calculation for the two alternative arrangements as regards static and dynamic parameters in the primary circuit on 1-D program are given. (author)

  13. Use of adaptive diffusion theory based monitors in optimizing boiling water reactor core designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congdon, S.P.; Martin, C.L.; Crowther, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional coarse mesh models are routinely used to predict the performance of boiling water reactors. In the adaptive monitory model, the three-dimensional solutions are permanently adapted to incore probe data. The corrections resulting from the adaptive process lead to reliable predictions of future reactor states. The corrections can also be carried forward to future operating cycles. This can shorten the time required to introduce an validate new design and operating strategy improvements. (orig.) [de

  14. Measuring regional resilience towards fossil fuel supply constraints. Adaptability and vulnerability in socio-ecological Transformations-the case of Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exner, Andreas; Politti, Emilio; Schriefl, Ernst; Erker, Susanna; Stangl, Rosemarie; Baud, Sacha; Warmuth, Hannes; Matzenberger, Julian; Kranzl, Lukas; Paulesich, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Resilience has become a prominent concept to understand system vulnerabilities and flexible ways of adapting to crises. Recently, it gained importance in discussions about the possible peak in oil production (peak oil) and its consequences, which might affect economic performance, social well-being and political stability, and thus also the energy transition to a low-carbon economy. The paper presents a new way of measuring resilience as absolute resilience related to a best practice-model of a resilient society. The resilience model is grounded in explicit theoretical assumptions. All indicators are justified by theoretical and empirical arguments. We present a case study of Austrian municipalities and broader-scale spatial types, which were defined according to their degree of urbanization. The mean resilience of Austrian municipalities is moderate, the difference between resilience values of municipalities is small. Significant differences between spatial types exist. Higher resilience is displayed by less urbanized types due to a higher share of agricultural activities and a more favorable level of GDP per capita. Austria has considerable latitude to improve resilience. Corresponding policies should target resilience components with the lowest values first. A sole focus on regionalization is not recommended. These conclusions are applicable to OECD countries in general. - Highlights: •Mean resilience of Austrian municipalities towards peak oil is moderate. •The difference between resilience values of municipalities is small. •Significant differences in resilience between spatial types exist. •Higher resilience is displayed by less urbanized types. •Policies should target resilience components with the lowest values first.

  15. Optimisation of the flow path in a conceptual pool type reactor under natural circulation with lead coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, R.; Anglart, H.

    2014-01-01

    This contribution investigates the effects of a bypass flow blocking bottom plate and the influence of the heat transfer between the hot and cold leg in a small pool type reactor cooled through natural convection with lead coolant. The computations are carried out using 3D computational fluid dynamics, where small-detail parts, such as the core and heat exchangers are modeled using a porous media approach. The introduction of full conjugate heat transfer shows that the heat transfer between the hot and cold leg can deteriorate flow in the cold leg and lead to recirculation zones. These zones become even more pronounced with the introduction of a bottom plate, which on the other hand also increases the flow through the core and lowers the maximum temperature in the core by approximately 150 K. Based on the results, redesign suggestions for the bottom plate and the internal wall are made. (author)

  16. Motivation and drives in bottom-up developments in natural hazards management: multiple-use of adaptation strategies in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Thomas; Fuchs, Sven

    2015-04-01

    Losses from extreme hydrological events, such as recently experienced in Europe have focused the attention of policymakers as well as researchers on vulnerability to natural hazards. In parallel, the context of changing flood risks under climate and societal change is driving transformation in the role of the state in responsibility sharing and individual responsibilities for risk management and precaution. The new policy agenda enhances the responsibilities of local authorities and private citizens in hazard management and reduces the role of central governments. Within the objective is to place added responsibility on local organisations and citizens to determine locally-based strategies for risk reduction. A major challenge of modelling adaptation is to represent the complexity of coupled human-environmental systems and particularly the feedback loops between environmental dynamics and human decision-making processes on different scales. This paper focuses on bottom-up initiatives to flood risk management which are, by definition, different from the mainstream. These initiatives are clearly influenced (positively or negatively) by a number of factors, where the combination of these interdependences can create specific conditions that alter the opportunity for effective governance arrangements in a local scheme approach. In total, this study identified six general drivers which encourage the implementation of flood storages, such as direct relation to recent major flood frequency and history, the initiative of individual stakeholders (promoters), political pressures from outside (e.g. business companies, private households) and a strong solidarity attitude of municipalities and the stakeholders involved. Although partnership approach may be seen as an 'optimal' solution for flood risk management, in practice there are many limitations and barriers in establishing these collaborations and making them effective (especially in the long term) with the consequences

  17. Characterization of radioactive contaminants and water treatment trials for the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chun-Ping, E-mail: chunping@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Road, Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Tzung-Yi; Chiao, Ling-Huan; Chen, Hong-Bin [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Road, Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-09-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deal with a practical radioactive contamination in Taiwan Research Reactor spent fuel pool water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identify the properties of radioactive contaminants and performance test for water treatment materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radioactive solids were primary attributed by ruptured spent fuels, spent resins, and metal debris. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radioactive ions were major composed by uranium and fission products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diatomite-based ceramic depth filter can simultaneously removal radioactive solids and ions. - Abstract: There were approximately 926 m{sup 3} of water contaminated by fission products and actinides in the Taiwan Research Reactor's spent fuel pool (TRR SFP). The solid and ionic contaminants were thoroughly characterized using radiochemical analyses, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in this study. The sludge was made up of agglomerates contaminated by spent fuel particles. Suspended solids from spent ion-exchange resins interfered with the clarity of the water. In addition, the ionic radionuclides such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, U, and {alpha}-emitters, present in the water were measured. Various filters and cation-exchange resins were employed for water treatment trials, and the results indicated that the solid and ionic contaminants could be effectively removed through the use of <0.9 {mu}m filters and cation exchange resins, respectively. Interestingly, the removal of U was obviously efficient by cation exchange resin, and the ceramic depth filter composed of diatomite exhibited the properties of both filtration and adsorption. It was found that the ceramic depth filter could adsorb {beta}-emitters, {alpha}-emitters, and uranium ions. The diatomite-based ceramic depth filter was able to simultaneously

  18. Sloshing of water in torus pressure-suppression pool of boiling water reactors under earthquake ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Godden, W.G.; Scalise, D.T.

    1978-08-01

    This report presents an analytical and experimental investigation into the sloshing of water in torus tanks under horizontal earthquake ground motions. This study was motivated because of the use of torus tanks for pressure-suppression pools in Boiling Water Reactors. Such a pressure-suppression pool would typically have 80 ft and 140 ft inside and outside diameters, a 30 ft diameter section, and a water depth of 15 ft. A general finite element analysis was developed for all axisymmetric tanks and a computer program was written to obtain time-history plots of sloshing displacements of water and dynamic pressures. Tests were carried out on a 1/60th scale model under sinusoidal as well as simulated earthquake ground motions. Tests and analytical results regarding natural frequencies, surface water displacements, and dynamic pressures were compared and a good agreement was found within the range of displacements studied. The computer program gave satisfactory results within a maximum range of sloshing displacements in the full-size prototype of 30 in. which is greater than the value obtained under the full intensity of the El Centro earthquake (N-S component 1940). The range of linear behavior was studied experimentally by subjecting the torus model to increasing intensities of the El Centro earthquake

  19. Sloshing of water in annular pressure-suppression pool of boiling water reactors under earthquake ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Godden, W.G.; Scalise, D.T.

    1979-10-01

    This report presents an analytical investigation of the sloshing response of water in annular-circular as well as simple-circular tanks under horizontal earthquake ground motions, and the results are verified with tests. This study was motivated because of the use of annular tanks for pressure-suppression pools in Boiling Water Reactors. Such a pressure-suppression pool would typically have 80 ft and 120 ft inside and outside diameters and a water depth of 20 ft. The analysis was based upon potential flow theory and a computer program was written to obtain time-history plots of sloshing displacements of water and the dynamic pressures. Tests were carried out on 1/80th and 1/15th scale models under sinusoidal as well as simulated earthquake ground motions. Tests and analytical results regarding the natural frequencies, surface water displacements, and dynamic pressures were compared and a good agreement was found for relatively small displacements. The computer program gave satisfactory results as long as the maximum water surface displacements were less than 30 in., which is roughly the value obtained under full intensity of El Centro earthquake

  20. Development of a Two-dimensional Thermohydraulic Hot Pool Model and ITS Effects on Reactivity Feedback during a UTOP in Liquid Metal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Jeong, Hae Yong; Cho, Chung Ho; Kwon, Young Min; Ha, Kwi Seok; Chang, Won Pyo; Suk, Soo Dong; Hahn, Do Hee

    2009-01-01

    The existence of a large sodium pool in the KALIMER, a pool-type LMR developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, plays an important role in reactor safety and operability because it determines the grace time for operators to cope with an abnormal event and to terminate a transient before reactor enters into an accident condition. A two-dimensional hot pool model has been developed and implemented in the SSC-K code, and has been successfully applied for the assessment of safety issues in the conceptual design of KALIMER and for the analysis of anticipated system transients. The other important models of the SSC-K code include a three-dimensional core thermal-hydraulic model, a reactivity model, a passive decay heat removal system model, and an intermediate heat transport system and steam generation system model. The capability of the developed two-dimensional hot pool model was evaluated with a comparison of the temperature distribution calculated with the CFX code. The predicted hot pool coolant temperature distributions obtained with the two-dimensional hot pool model agreed well with those predicted with the CFX code. Variations in the temperature distribution of the hot pool affect the reactivity feedback due to an expansion of the control rod drive line (CRDL) immersed in the pool. The existing CRDL reactivity model of the SSC-K code has been modified based on the detailed hot pool temperature distribution obtained with the two-dimensional pool model. An analysis of an unprotected transient over power with the modified reactivity model showed an improved negative reactivity feedback effect

  1. Criticality safety assessment of a TRIGA reactor spent-fuel pool under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glumac, B.; Ravnik, M.; Logar, M.

    1997-01-01

    Additional criticality safety analysis of a pool-type storage for TRIGA spent fuel at the Jozef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana, Slovenia, is presented. Previous results have shown that subcriticality is not guaranteed for some postulated accidents (earthquake with subsequent fuel rack disintegration resulting in contact fuel pitch) under the assumption that the fuel rack is loaded with fresh 12 wt% standard fuel. To mitigate this deficiency, a study was done on replacing a certain number of fuel elements in the rack with cadmium-loaded absorber rods. The Monte Carlo computer code MCNP4A with an ENDF/B-V library and detailed three-dimensional geometrical model of the spent-fuel rack was used for this purpose. First, a minimum critical number of fuel elements was determined for contact pitch, and two possible geometries of rack disintegration were considered. Next, it was shown that subcriticality can be ensured when pitch is decreased from a rack design pitch of 8 cm to contact, if a certain number of fuel elements (8 to 20 out of 70) are replaced by absorber rods, which are uniformly mixed into the lattice. To account for the possibility that random mixing of fuel elements and absorber rods can occur during rack disintegration and result in a supercritical configuration, a probabilistic study was made to sample the probability density functions for random absorber rod lattice loadings. Results of the calculations show that reasonably low probabilities for supercriticality can be achieved (down to 10 -6 per severe earthquake, which would result in rack disintegration and subsequent maximum possible pitch decrease) even in the case where fresh 12 wt% standard TRIGA fuel would be stored in the spent-fuel pool

  2. Significance of coast down time on safety and availability of a pool type fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Velusamy, K.; Selvaraj, P.; Chellapandi, P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Plant dynamics studies for quantifying the benefits of flow coast down time. • Establishment of minimum flow coast down time required for safety. • Assessment of influence of flow coast down on enhancing plant availability. • Synthesis of thermo mechanical benefits of flow coast down time on component design. - Abstract: Plant dynamic investigation towards establishing the influence of flow coast down time of primary and secondary sodium systems on safety and availability of plant has been carried out based on one dimensional analysis. From safety considerations, a minimum flow coast down time for primary sodium circuit is essential to be provided to limit the consequences of loss of flow event within allowable limits. Apart from safety benefits, large primary coast down time also improves plant availability by the elimination of reactor SCRAM during short term power failure events. Threshold values of SCRAM parameters also need optimization. By suitably selecting the threshold values for SCRAM parameters, significant reduction in the inertia of pumping systems can be derived to obtain desirable results on plant availability. With the optimization of threshold values and primary flow coast down behaviour equivalent to a halving time of 8 s, there is a possibility to eliminate reactor SCRAM during short term power failure events extending up to 0.75 s duration. Benefits of secondary flow halving on reducing transient thermal loading on components have also been investigated and mixed effects have been observed

  3. Impact Orientation in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt SPEER

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of impact orientation within the public sector constitutes an en-tirely new approach of governance. Until recently – and in many cases still so – public administration was primarily input-oriented, which means focusing on the resources (financial, personnel etc. needed to fulfil existing public tasks instead of focusing on the results and final effects which are intended to be reached ultimately by these often long ago defined assignments. As experience shows, the pressing challenge of increasing steadily the effectiveness and efficiency within public administration cannot be reached by such a one-sided and consequently limited approach. Thus, a wider and more comprehensive concept is necessary to optimize the public sector in all its dimensions. As a result of prevalent budget crises, increasing pressure of stakeholders towards public administration and generally less room for manoeuver due to a growing regulatory burden, new/adapted and more flexible ways of thinking and acting within the public sector are required. Hence, modern concepts of steering and control – not only in Europe but in a larger number of OECD countries – now tend to give more importance to the targets and effects of public administration and its activities within the societal context. This rather new concept – the so called “impact orientation” which has been introduced in Austria as core element of the Federal Budget Law Reform 2009/2013 – requires a fundamental alignment of governmental actions and a new focus on the outputs and even on the outcomes of political and administrative strategies. The results until now have been primarily “outwardly-oriented” reform concepts concentrating on the external societal effects of politico-administrative actions. However, recent research results show for Austria, that this external dimension has to be linked more closely with internal reform efforts and internal impact targets in order to

  4. Numerical investigation of the reactor pressure vessel behaviour under severe accident conditions taking into account the combined processes of the vessel creep and the molten pool natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loktionov, V.D.; Mukhtarov, E.S.; Yaroshenko, N.I.; Orlov, V.E.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the WWER lower head behaviour and its failure has been performed for several molten pool structures and internal overpressure levels in a reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The different types of the molten pools (homogeneous, conventionally homogeneous, conventionally stratified, stratified) cover the bounding scenarios during a hypothetical severe accident. The parametric investigations of the failure mode and RPV behaviour for various molten pool types, its heights and internal overpressure levels are presented herein. A coupled treatment in this investigation includes: (i) a 2-D thermohydraulic analysis of a molten pool natural convection. Domestic NARAUFEM code has been used in this detailed analysis for prediction of the heat flux from the molten pool to the RPV inner surface; and (ii) a detailed 3-D transient thermal analysis of the RPV lower head. Domestic 3-D ASHTER-VVR finite element code has been used for the numerical simulations of the high temperature creep and failure of the lower head. The effect of an external RPV cooling, temperature-dependent physical properties of the molten pool and vessel steel, the hydrostatic forces and vessel dead-weight were taken into account in this study. The obtained results show that lower head failure occurs as a result of the vessel creep process which is significantly dependent on both an internal overpressure level and the type of molten pool structure. In particular, it was found that there were combinations of 'overpressure-molten pool structure' when the vessel failure started at the 'hot' layers of the vessel. (orig.)

  5. Computational study of the mixed cooling effects on the in-vessel retention of a molten pool in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Seok; Sohn, Chang Hyun; Ahn, Kwang Il

    2004-01-01

    The retention of a molten pool vessel cooled by internal vessel reflooding and/or external vessel reactor cavity flooding has been considered as one of severe accident management strategies. The present numerical study investigates the effect of both internal and external vessel mixed cooling on an internally heated molten pool. The molten pool is confined in a hemispherical vessel with reference to the thermal behavior of the vessel wall. In this study, our numerical model used a scaled-down reactor vessel of a KSNP (Korea Standard Nuclear Power) reactor design of 1000 MWe (a pressurized water reactor with a large and dry containment). Well-known temperature-dependent boiling heat transfer curves are applied to the internal and external vessel cooling boundaries. Radiative heat transfer has been considered in the case of dry internal vessel boundary condition. Computational results show that the external cooling vessel boundary conditions have better effectiveness than internal vessel cooling in the retention of the melt pool vessel failure

  6. Evaluation of the aptitude for the service of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino C, J.; Gachuz M, M.; Diaz S, A.; Arganis J, C.; Gonzalez R, C.; Nava G, T.; Medina R, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    This work describes the evaluation of the structural integrity of the pool of the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico, which was realized in July 2001, as an element to determine those actions for preventive and corrective maintenance which owner must do it for a safety and efficient operation of the component in the next years. (Author)

  7. Accident conditions analysis of spent fuel storage pool RA research reactor in Vinca; Analiza udesnih stanja u odlagalistu isluzenog goriva istrazivackog rektora RA u Vinci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovic, V; Jovic, L [Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2000-07-01

    Based on Safety analysis of the spent fuel pool RA research reactor in Vinca, conditions and possibilities accident sequences in present configuration storage facility are considered (author) [Serbo-Croat] Na osnovu Analize sigurnosti odlagalista isluzenog goriva istrazivackog reaktora RA u Vinci razmatraju se uslovi i mogucnosti pojave udesnih stanja u postojecoj konfiguraciji odlagalista (author)

  8. Optical inspections of research reactor tanks and tank components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Hammer, J.

    1988-01-01

    By the end of 1987 worldwide there were 326 research reactors in operation, 276 of them operating more than 10 years, and 195 of them operating more than 20 years. The majority of these reactors are swimming-pool type or tank type reactors using aluminium as structural material. Although aluminium has prooven its excellent properties for reactor application in primary system, it is however subjected to various types of corrosion if it gets into contact with other materials such as mild steel in the presence of destilled water. This paper describes various methods of research reactor tank inspections, maintenance and repair possibilities. 9 figs. (Author)

  9. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the operating license for the Worcester Polytechnic Institute open-pool training reactor, Docket No. 50-134

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) for a renewal of Operating License R-61 to continue to operate the WPI 10-kW open-pool training reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by the Worcester Polytechnic Institute and is located on the WPI campus in Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts. The staff concludes that the reactor facility can continue to be operated by WPI without endangering the health and safety of the public

  10. Fukushima - calculation of the reactor core inventory and storage pools Dai-ichi 1 to Dai-ichi 4, an estimation of a source term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krpelanova, M.; Carny, P.

    2011-01-01

    Inventory of the reactor core and spent fuel storage pool of the reactors at Dai-ichi 1 to Dai-ichi 4 was determined to need a realistic estimate of the source (released into the atmosphere environment) and modelling of radiological impact of the events in Fukushima NPP. Calculations of inventories were carried out by the methodology that is used in systems to support emergency response and crisis management anymore. Calculations were made based on a model that respects knowledge of real fuels and fuel cycles for individual reactors Dai-ichi. Necessary input data for training the model and calculate inventories are obtained from the IAEA PRIS database.

  11. Design Modification of Double Acting Positioning Mechanism Inside a Research Reactor Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Bahrawy, A.H.A.

    2002-01-01

    One of the major problems that can face the designers of long actuators is the blocking due to high friction and severe wear of sliding parts, when the case become metal to metal in contact. The present work is an optimum solution for a typical blocking problem that had been raised during the commissioning test of the fission counter three positioning mechanisms inside MPR research reactor at Inshas. A detailed technical investigation had been made in order to define precisely the main reasons behind the problem. High misalignment values of piston and piston rod assembly inside the hydraulic cylinders due to poor design has been discovered to be the main source of the problem. The author has introduced a new design idea, and other mechanisms have been manufactured based on the new design to replace the old ones. The system was tested and found to function with good performance

  12. Proposed Advanced Reactor Adaptation of the Standard Review Plan NUREG-0800 Chapter 4 (Reactor) for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors and Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Poore, III, Willis P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Flanagan, George F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holbrook, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Moe, Wayne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sofu, Tanju [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This report proposes adaptation of the previous regulatory gap analysis in Chapter 4 (Reactor) of NUREG 0800, Standard Review Plan (SRP) for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR [Light Water Reactor] Edition. The proposed adaptation would result in a Chapter 4 review plan applicable to certain advanced reactors. This report addresses two technologies: the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (mHTGR). SRP Chapter 4, which addresses reactor components, was selected for adaptation because of the possible significant differences in advanced non-light water reactor (non-LWR) technologies compared with the current LWR-based description in Chapter 4. SFR and mHTGR technologies were chosen for this gap analysis because of their diverse designs and the availability of significant historical design detail.

  13. Summary of the contributions to reactor safety research commissioned by the Republic of Austria and done by the Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf from 1987 to 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonneck, G.; Sdouz, G.

    1991-09-01

    In 1987 the Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf was commissioned by the Republic of Austria with the collaboration in the Nuclear Safety Research Index, the OECD-LOFT-Programme and the International Coordinated Assessment and Application Programme (ICAAP). This report summarises the work done from 1987 to 1990, mainly in the field of thermal hydraulics, fuel rod behaviour and source term. Besides some analyses for experiments done in loops based on BWRs and PWRs of western design the work concentrated on safety researchs for WWERS. (Authors)

  14. Psychometric evaluation of the EORTC computerized adaptive test (CAT) fatigue item pool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten Aa; Giesinger, Johannes M; Holzner, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms associated with cancer and its treatment. To obtain a more precise and flexible measure of fatigue, the EORTC Quality of Life Group has developed a computerized adaptive test (CAT) measure of fatigue. This is part of an ongoing project developing a CAT...

  15. Protection system for minimizing the consequences of a flow blockage incident at a pool-type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Vries, J.W.; van Dam, H.; Gysler, G.

    1990-01-01

    Safety analysis activities were performed for the HOR, a pool-type research reactor with plate-type fuel elements and a maximum licensed power of 3 MW. Following internationally accepted guidelines, a wide variety of possible process disturbances has been considered. For the HOR the most aggravating accident conditions could result from a sudden flow blockage of cooling channels. If this event occurs in the high power density region of the core, a decrease of the hot channel flow either causes flow reversal or prompts burnout. Unless the reactor is scrammed in time, the fuel plates will heat up rapidly and local melting will occur with possible propagation of voiding and burnout to adjacent channels. In the analysis, melting of the cladding has been considered by using a simplified model approach. The number of voided coolant channels, as well as the propagation rate of fuel plates reaching locally the melting temperature, were calculated for different conditions of operation. In order to reduce the risk of a fuel melt accident occurring at the HOR, the protection system features a special design option. The system recognizes cooling channel voiding by detection of a sudden decrease of neutron flux. In the present work, it has been shown that a flow blockage incident can be detected in the early stages of development. Also, in accordance with the results of experimental tests, it can be concluded that in many cases melting of fuel plates will be effectively prevented. If such an accident occurs on a very fast time scale, at least the radiological consequences are significantly mitigated by preventing propagation, thus limiting the number of molten fuel plates

  16. Gifted Education in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyringer, Sieglinde

    2013-01-01

    In Austria, gifted education and the education of highly gifted and talented children have been receiving an increasing public awareness and social acceptance over the past decade. The article highlights the existing ideas of giftedness in Austria, and it presents several initiatives having triggered and influenced this positive development. The…

  17. Chernobyl and its consequences for Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenhofer, F.; Ecker, W.; Hojesky, H.; Junger, W.; Kienzl, K.; Nowak, H.; Riss, A.; Vychytil, P.; Zechner, J.

    1986-11-01

    First there is a short version of 16 pages. Then a detailed account is given mainly on the activities of the Federal Environment Office and the radiation burden to the population. The chapter headings are 1) The Chernobyl reactor accident 2) The meteorological situation 3) Monitoring of the radioactive contamination in Austria 4) Aims of the radiation measurement activities 5) Initial situation in Austria and first measurements 6) Environmental control 7) Food control 8) Fodder 9) Measures taken to minimise the radiation burden - a chronology 10) Comparison with nuclear tests fallout 11) Dose estimation 12) Radioactive contamination in other European countries. (G.Q.)

  18. Review on the seismic safety of JRR-3 according to the revised regulatory code on seismic design for nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Araki, Masaaki; Ohba, Toshinobu; Torii, Yoshiya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Takeuchi, Masaki [Nuclear Safety Commission (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    JRR-3(Japan Research Reactor No.3) with the thermal power of 20MW is a light water moderated and cooled, swimming pool type research reactor. JRR-3 has been operated without major troubles. This paper presents about review on the seismic safety of JRR-3 according to the revised regulatory code on seismic design for nuclear reactors. In addition, some topics concerning damages in JRR-3 due to the Great East Japan Earthquake are presented. (author)

  19. Assessing and Exploiting Functional Diversity in Germplasm Pools to Enhance Abiotic Stress Adaptation and Yield in Cereals and Food Legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Sangam L.; Scheben, Armin; Edwards, David; Spillane, Charles; Ortiz, Rodomiro

    2017-01-01

    There is a need to accelerate crop improvement by introducing alleles conferring host plant resistance, abiotic stress adaptation, and high yield potential. Elite cultivars, landraces and wild relatives harbor useful genetic variation that needs to be more easily utilized in plant breeding. We review genome-wide approaches for assessing and identifying alleles associated with desirable agronomic traits in diverse germplasm pools of cereals and legumes. Major quantitative trait loci and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with desirable agronomic traits have been deployed to enhance crop productivity and resilience. These include alleles associated with variation conferring enhanced photoperiod and flowering traits. Genetic variants in the florigen pathway can provide both environmental flexibility and improved yields. SNPs associated with length of growing season and tolerance to abiotic stresses (precipitation, high temperature) are valuable resources for accelerating breeding for drought-prone environments. Both genomic selection and genome editing can also harness allelic diversity and increase productivity by improving multiple traits, including phenology, plant architecture, yield potential and adaptation to abiotic stresses. Discovering rare alleles and useful haplotypes also provides opportunities to enhance abiotic stress adaptation, while epigenetic variation has potential to enhance abiotic stress adaptation and productivity in crops. By reviewing current knowledge on specific traits and their genetic basis, we highlight recent developments in the understanding of crop functional diversity and identify potential candidate genes for future use. The storage and integration of genetic, genomic and phenotypic information will play an important role in ensuring broad and rapid application of novel genetic discoveries by the plant breeding community. Exploiting alleles for yield-related traits would allow improvement of selection efficiency and

  20. Assessing and Exploiting Functional Diversity in Germplasm Pools to Enhance Abiotic Stress Adaptation and Yield in Cereals and Food Legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangam L. Dwivedi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to accelerate crop improvement by introducing alleles conferring host plant resistance, abiotic stress adaptation, and high yield potential. Elite cultivars, landraces and wild relatives harbor useful genetic variation that needs to be more easily utilized in plant breeding. We review genome-wide approaches for assessing and identifying alleles associated with desirable agronomic traits in diverse germplasm pools of cereals and legumes. Major quantitative trait loci and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with desirable agronomic traits have been deployed to enhance crop productivity and resilience. These include alleles associated with variation conferring enhanced photoperiod and flowering traits. Genetic variants in the florigen pathway can provide both environmental flexibility and improved yields. SNPs associated with length of growing season and tolerance to abiotic stresses (precipitation, high temperature are valuable resources for accelerating breeding for drought-prone environments. Both genomic selection and genome editing can also harness allelic diversity and increase productivity by improving multiple traits, including phenology, plant architecture, yield potential and adaptation to abiotic stresses. Discovering rare alleles and useful haplotypes also provides opportunities to enhance abiotic stress adaptation, while epigenetic variation has potential to enhance abiotic stress adaptation and productivity in crops. By reviewing current knowledge on specific traits and their genetic basis, we highlight recent developments in the understanding of crop functional diversity and identify potential candidate genes for future use. The storage and integration of genetic, genomic and phenotypic information will play an important role in ensuring broad and rapid application of novel genetic discoveries by the plant breeding community. Exploiting alleles for yield-related traits would allow improvement of selection

  1. Adaptive control method for core power control in TRIGA Mark II reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri Minhat, Mohd; Selamat, Hazlina; Subha, Nurul Adilla Mohd

    2018-01-01

    The 1MWth Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) Mark II type has undergone more than 35 years of operation. The existing core power control uses feedback control algorithm (FCA). It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands to meet the safety demand of RTP due to the sensitivity of nuclear research reactor operation. Currently, the system is not satisfied with power tracking performance and can be improved. Therefore, a new design core power control is very important to improve the current performance in tracking and regulate reactor power by control the movement of control rods. In this paper, the adaptive controller and focus on Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) and Self-Tuning Control (STC) were applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, adaptive controller model, and control rods selection programming. The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on point kinetics model, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The adaptive control model was presented using Lyapunov method to ensure stable close loop system and STC Generalised Minimum Variance (GMV) Controller was not necessary to know the exact plant transfer function in designing the core power control. The performance between proposed adaptive control and FCA will be compared via computer simulation and analysed the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  2. Contributions of research Reactors in science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, N.M.; Bashir, J.

    1992-12-01

    In the present paper, after defining a research reactor, its basic constituents, types of reactors, their distribution in the world, some typical examples of their uses are given. Particular emphasis in placed on the contribution of PARR-I (Pakistan Research Reactor-I), the 5 MW Swimming Pool Research reactor which first became critical at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) in Dec. 1965 and attained its full power in June 1966. This is still the major research facility at PINSTECH for research and development. (author)

  3. Application of JAERI research reactors to education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Shigeru; Morozumi, Minoru

    1987-01-01

    At the dawning of the atomic age in Japan, training on reactor operation and reactor engineering experiments has been started in 1958 using JRR-1 (a 50 kW water boiler type reactor with liquid fuel), which was the first research reactor in Japan. The role of the training has been transferred to JRR-4 (a 3500 kW swimming pool type reactor with ETR type fuel) since 1969 due to the decommission of JRR-1. The training courses which have been held are: JRR-1 Short-Term Course for Operation (1958 ∼ 1963) General Course (1961 ∼ ) Reactor Engineering Course (1976 ∼ ) Training Course in Nuclear Technology (International course)(1986 ∼ ). And individual training concerning research reactors for the participants of scientist exchange program sponsored by Science and Technology Agency and of bilateral agreement have been initiated in 1985. The graduates of these courses work as staff members in various fields in nuclear industry. (author)

  4. Experimental and inspection facilities in post-irradiation of spent fuel pools for the analysis of the behaviour of nuclear fuels in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggirello, G.; Zawerucha, A.

    1992-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Atomic Nuclear Reactors (PHWR) Atucha I and Embalse in Argentine are employed different techniques for the knowing of the fuel bundles performances. It is detailed the facilities on post-irradiation examination. The techniques described are: online measurements, visual inspections, identifications of defective fuels and rods assemblies in spent fuel pools. This controls have made possible the feed-back to the manufactory process and the changes in the manufactory quality controls. (author)

  5. Welcoming Address & Opening Remarks [International Conference on Research Reactors: Safe Management and Effective Utilization, Vienna (Austria), 16-20 November 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudakov, M.

    2017-01-01

    For more than 60 years, research reactors have been centres of innovation and productivity for nuclear science and technology programmes in 67 countries around the world. Research reactors provide a multidisciplinary environment to catalyse scientific, industrial, medical and agricultural development. They are facilities for nuclear education and training of young scientists and technicians, and they can contribute to the development of nuclear power programmes. According to the IAEA Research Reactor Database, there are 246 research reactors currently in operation in 55 countries, and close to 30 new research reactor projects are at different stages of implementation. Many of the operating reactors are several decades old and face ageing management issues. These reactors must be operated and maintained with due regard to safety and security. Some reactors face challenges with sustainable supply of fresh fuel. Others are looking to improve utilization, which is linked to justifying adequate resources for operation, maintenance and refurbishment. As some of the fuel return programmes are expected to wind down in the near term, the community will need to find solutions for spent fuel and waste management. And taking into account the large number of reactors, about 140, no longer in operation, as well as ageing reactors coming to the end of their lifecycles, decommissioning is an important area of sharing experience and best practice. You will have an opportunity to discuss these and other issues over the course of the conference.

  6. Successful scaling-up of self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass under pool-type reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Juferi; Shirai, Yoshihito; Andou, Yoshito; Mohd Ali, Ahmad Amiruddin; Othman, Mohd Ridzuan; Ibrahim, Izzudin; Yamamoto, Akio; Yasuda, Nobuhiko; Hassan, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    An appropriate technology for waste utilisation, especially for a large amount of abundant pressed-shredded oil palm empty fruit bunch (OFEFB), is important for the oil palm industry. Self-sustained pyrolysis, whereby oil palm biomass was combusted by itself to provide the heat for pyrolysis without an electrical heater, is more preferable owing to its simplicity, ease of operation and low energy requirement. In this study, biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis of oil palm biomass in the form of oil palm empty fruit bunch was tested in a 3-t large-scale pool-type reactor. During the pyrolysis process, the biomass was loaded layer by layer when the smoke appeared on the top, to minimise the entrance of oxygen. This method had significantly increased the yield of biochar. In our previous report, we have tested on a 30-kg pilot-scale capacity under self-sustained pyrolysis and found that the higher heating value (HHV) obtained was 22.6-24.7 MJ kg(-1) with a 23.5%-25.0% yield. In this scaled-up study, a 3-t large-scale procedure produced HHV of 22.0-24.3 MJ kg(-1) with a 30%-34% yield based on a wet-weight basis. The maximum self-sustained pyrolysis temperature for the large-scale procedure can reach between 600 °C and 700 °C. We concluded that large-scale biochar production under self-sustained pyrolysis was successfully conducted owing to the comparable biochar produced, compared with medium-scale and other studies with an electrical heating element, making it an appropriate technology for waste utilisation, particularly for the oil palm industry. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Retrieval of Brain Tumors by Adaptive Spatial Pooling and Fisher Vector Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Yang, Wei; Huang, Meiyan; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Jun; Zhou, Yujia; Yang, Ru; Zhao, Jie; Feng, Yanqiu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2016-01-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) techniques have currently gained increasing popularity in the medical field because they can use numerous and valuable archived images to support clinical decisions. In this paper, we concentrate on developing a CBIR system for retrieving brain tumors in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI images. Specifically, when the user roughly outlines the tumor region of a query image, brain tumor images in the database of the same pathological type are expected to be returned. We propose a novel feature extraction framework to improve the retrieval performance. The proposed framework consists of three steps. First, we augment the tumor region and use the augmented tumor region as the region of interest to incorporate informative contextual information. Second, the augmented tumor region is split into subregions by an adaptive spatial division method based on intensity orders; within each subregion, we extract raw image patches as local features. Third, we apply the Fisher kernel framework to aggregate the local features of each subregion into a respective single vector representation and concatenate these per-subregion vector representations to obtain an image-level signature. After feature extraction, a closed-form metric learning algorithm is applied to measure the similarity between the query image and database images. Extensive experiments are conducted on a large dataset of 3604 images with three types of brain tumors, namely, meningiomas, gliomas, and pituitary tumors. The mean average precision can reach 94.68%. Experimental results demonstrate the power of the proposed algorithm against some related state-of-the-art methods on the same dataset.

  8. Einstein and Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    This text was written by Engelbert Broda in 1979 and is about Albert Einstein and his relation to Austria. This text is split in different sections which are amongst others: Einstein und Mach; Einstein und Boltzmann; Positivism, Atoms and Relativity; Einstein as an Austrian professor; Einstein’s visits to Austria; Einstein and Viennese friends; Einstein and Friedrich Adler; Einstein and the Austrian mentality; (nowak)

  9. Development of Power Controller System based on Model Reference Adaptive Control for a Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Sabri Minhat; Izhar Abu Hussin; Ridzuan Abdul Mutalib

    2014-01-01

    The Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP)-type TRIGA Mark II was installed in the year 1982. The Power Controller System (PCS) or Automated Power Controller System (APCS) is very important for reactor operation and safety reasons. It is a function of controlled reactivity and reactor power. The existing power controller system is under development and due to slow response, low accuracy and low stability on reactor power control affecting the reactor safety. The nuclear reactor is a nonlinear system in nature, and it is power increases continuously with time. The reactor parameters vary as a function of power, fuel burnup and control rod worth. The output power value given by the power control system is not exactly as real value of reactor power. Therefore, controller system design is very important, an adaptive controller seems to be inevitable. The method chooses is a linear controller by using feedback linearization, for example Model Reference Adaptive Control. The developed APCS for RTP will be design by using Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC). The structured of RTP model to produce the dynamic behaviour of RTP on entire operating power range from 0 to 1MWatt. The dynamic behavior of RTP model is produced by coupling of neutronic and thermal-hydraulics. It will be developed by using software MATLAB/Simulink and hardware module card to handle analog input signal. A new algorithm for APCS is developed to control the movement of control rods with uniformity and orderly for RTP. Before APCS test to real plant, simulation results shall be obtained from RTP model on reactor power, reactivity, period, control rod positions, fuel and coolant temperatures. Those data are comparable with the real data for validation. After completing the RTP model, APCS will be tested to real plant on power control system performance by using real signal from RTP including fail-safe operation, system reliable, fast response, stability and accuracy. The new algorithm shall be a satisfied

  10. Malfunction diagnosis and applications of stable adaptive schemes for a nuclear reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Toshio; Shibata, Heki.

    1979-01-01

    Malfunction diagnosis concerns a method to detect the abnormal phenomena during nuclear reactor operations, while stable adaptive schemes does the application of Model Reference Adaptive System (MRAS) to the nonlinear dynamics of a reactor for parameter identification and control. The new method for the malfunction diagnosis consists of the following ideas; an index defined as the sum of ratios of the square of a factor score to the contribution weight of the factor, which is evaluated by applying the multi-factor analysis technique to the data of the state of nuclear reactor systems like neutron flux, temperature, flow rate and so on. The excess of the index over some given threshold shows the reactor system would be in an abnormal state. Then a theory of optimal filtering by Kalman with the aid of the stochastic approximation is applied to estimate the neutron flux distribution at its abnormal state and subsequently the squared sum of difference between desirable and estimated flux distributions shows the spot at which the abnormal phenomena would have occurred in terms of the peak of its distribution. Parameter identification and adaptive control schemes are presented for a point reactor and a loosely-coupled-core reactor with internal feedbacks which lead to the nonlinearity of the overall system. Both schemes are shown stable with new representations of the systems, which correspond to the nonminimal system representation, in the vein of the MRAS via the Lyapunov's method. For the sake of the parameter identification, model parameters can be adjusted adaptively as soon as measurements start, while plant parameters can also adaptively be compensated through control input to reduce the output error between the model and the plant for the case of the adaptive control. Some experiments of parameter identification for the thermal-hydraulic system are carried out successfully using a simplified channel in which flow rate is varied in a binary form. (J.P.N.)

  11. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E.-Part I; Analisis neutronico y termohidraulico del reactor C.E.N.E. Parte I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, R; Ahnert, C; Naudin, A E; Martinez Fanegas, R; Minguez, E; Rovira, A

    1976-07-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics (both statics and kinetics), of the 10 MWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E, is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking, carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs.

  12. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E. Part II; Analisis neutronico y termohidraulico del reactor C.E.N.E. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, R

    1976-07-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics thermohydraulics and shielding of the 10 HWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs.

  13. Piscina cubierta, en Viena, Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünberger, Friedrich

    1969-03-01

    Full Text Available This project includes the following: The main building contains the basement, a laundry, the heating and air conditioning installations. The ground floor has men's dressing rooms and showers. The first floor has ladies dressing rooms and individual bathrooms. On the 2nd and 3rd floors there are sauna facilities for men and women and also ladies and gentlemen's hairdressing saloons. The top level is utilized for sunbathing. The intermediate building has two swimming pools, one for learners, and the other for children. Finally the covered swimming pool itself has a full sized pool and a diving structure, 5 m in height. The most outstanding features of this sporting facility are the structures of the buildings, which are made with prestressed concrete.El conjunto construido comprende: El edificio principal, que alberga en el sótano: una lavandería, los cuartos para la calefacción y aire acondicionado; en la planta baja: los vestuarios para hombres, con sus duchas correspondientes; en la 1.ª planta: los vestuarios y duchas para mujeres y los servicios de «baños» individuales; en las plantas 2.ª y 3.ª: «saunas» para mujeres y para hombres, y una peluquería masculina y otra femenina. El nivel superior es utilizado para tomar «baños de sol». El pabellón intermedio contiene las piscinas: para los que aprenden a nadar, y de niños. Finalmente, el edificio de la «Piscina cubierta» propiamente dicha aloja: una piscina reglamentaria y su correspondiente torre de saltos de 5 m de altura. Lo más destacable de este complejo son las estructuras de los edificios y de la piscina, realizadas con hormigón pretensado.

  14. Adapting a reactor safety assessment system for specific plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, T.L.; Cordes, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, the University of Maryland (UofM) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for use in the NRC Operations center. RSAS is designed to help the Reactor Safety Team monitor and project core status during an emergency at a licensed nuclear power plant. Analysis uses a hierarchical plant model based on equipment availability and automatically input parametric plant information. There are 3 families of designs of pressurized water reactors and 75 plants using modified versions of the basic design. In order to make an RSAS model for each power plant, a generic model for a given plant type is used with differences being specified by plant specific files. Graphical displays of this knowledge are flexible enough to handle any plant configuration. A variety of tools have been implemented to make it easy to modify a design to fit a given plant while minimizing chance for error. 3 refs., 4 figs

  15. The use and evolution of the CEA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossillon, F.; Chauvez, C.

    1964-01-01

    The authors successively examine the different research reactors in use in the French C.E.A. Nuclear Centres. They trace briefly their histories, describing how they have been used up to the present, and how they have been adapted to changes in programme by means of certain modifications. They also describe the reasons which have led to the elaboration of the project for the new reactor Osiris. Zoe, the oldest reactor in the CEA, has been in service in the Centre de Fontenay-aux-Roses since 1948. It is used mainly for measurements of absorption cross-sections in graphite, and for various short irradiations which do not require high fluxes. The reactor EL 2, in service since 1952, was used for the first studies on gas cooling. It has also been widely used for the production of radioisotopes and for a large number of experiments in the fields of physics, metallurgy and physical chemistry. The ageing of certain elements of the reactor has led to the decision to close it down in the near future The reactor EL 3 has been widely used for experiments in physics and in the investigation of fuels. The possibilities of the reactor in fast neutron irradiations will be considerably improved by the adoption of a new type of core (the 'snow crystal' structure). Triton-I, a 2 MW swimming-pool reactor, is used for the most part for fast neutron and gamma irradiations. The modifications being carried out on it at present should result in an increase in the power of the reactor up to 4 or 5 MW. In a neighbouring compartment is housed Triton-II which is of the same general structure, as Triton-I, but whose maximum power is 100 kW. Triton-II is used solely for studies on shielding. Melusine, a 2 MW swimming-pool reactor, has been in use in the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble since 1959. It has supported a very high programme concerned mainly with solid state physics, fundamental research into refractory fissile materials and special graphites, and the study of the behaviour of

  16. Design of hydrotherapy exercise pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, R F; Abidin, M R; Becker, D G; Pavlovich, L J; Dang, M T

    1988-01-01

    Several hydrotherapy pools have been designed specifically for a variety of aquatic exercise. Aqua-Ark positions the exerciser in the center of the pool for deep-water exercise. Aqua-Trex is a shallow underwater treadmill system for water walking or jogging. Swim-Ex generates an adjustable laminar flow that permits swimming without turning. Musculoskeletal conditioning can be accomplished in the above-ground Arjo shallow-water exercise pool. A hydrotherapy pool also can be custom designed for musculoskeletal conditioning in its shallow part and cardiovascular conditioning in a deeper portion of the pool. Regardless of the type of exercise, there is general agreement that the specific exercise conducted in water requires significantly more energy expenditure than when the same exercise is performed on land.

  17. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro, R.

    1976-01-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics thermohydraulics and shielding of the 10 HWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs

  18. Neutronics and thermohydraulics of the reactor C.E.N.E.-Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro, R.; Ahnert, C.; Naudin, A. E.; Martinez Fanegas, R.; Minguez, E.; Rovira, A.

    1976-01-01

    In this report the analysis of neutronics (both statics and kinetics), of the 10 MWt swimming pool reactor C.E.N.E, is included. In each of these chapters is given a short description of the theoretical model used, along with the theoretical versus experimental checking, carried out, whenever possible, with the reactors JEN-I and JEN-II of Junta de Energia Nuclear. (Author) 11 refs

  19. Front crawl swimming analysis using accelerometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espinosa, Hugo G; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Thiel, David V

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical characteristics such as stroke rate and stroke length can be used to determine the velocity of a swimmer and can be analysed in both a swimming pool and a flume. The aim of the present preliminary study was to investigate the differences between the acceleration data collected from...... a swimming pool with that collected from a flume, as a function of the swimmer's stroke rate and stroke count, with the objective of identifying the impact on the swimmer's performance. The differences were determined by the analysis of the stroke's features, comparing several strokes normalized to one...

  20. The Good, the Bad, and the Volatile - Can We Have Both Healthy Pools and Healthy People?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given the popularity of swimming for recreation and sport, it is remarkable that we are only in the early stages of understanding swimming pool chemistry, human exposure(s), and potential health risks. This is partly due to the complexity of swimming pool water chemistry, which i...

  1. Adaptive fuzzy control of neutron power of the TRIGA Mark III reactor; Control difuso adaptable de la potencia neutronica del reactor Triga Mark III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas R, E.

    2014-07-01

    The design and implementation of an identification and control scheme of the TRIGA Mark III research nuclear reactor of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) of Mexico is presented in this thesis work. The identification of the reactor dynamics is carried out using fuzzy logic based systems, in which a learning process permits the adjustment of the membership function parameters by means of techniques based on neural networks and bio-inspired algorithms. The resulting identification system is a useful tool that allows the emulation of the reactor power behavior when different types of insertions of reactivity are applied into the core. The identification of the power can also be used for the tuning of the parameters of a control system. On the other hand, the regulation of the reactor power is carried out by means of an adaptive and stable fuzzy control scheme. The control law is derived using the input-output linearization technique, which permits the introduction of a desired power profile for the plant to follow asymptotically. This characteristic is suitable for managing the ascent of power from an initial level n{sub o} up to a predetermined final level n{sub f}. During the increase of power, a constraint related to the rate of change in power is considered by the control scheme, thus minimizing the occurrence of a safety reactor shutdown due to a low reactor period value. Furthermore, the theory of stability in the sense of Lyapunov is used to obtain a supervisory control law which maintains the power error within a tolerance region, thus guaranteeing the stability of the power of the closed loop system. (Author)

  2. PROPERTIES OF SWIMMING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun KIR

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Swimming waters may be hazardous on human health. So, The physicians who work in the facilities, which include swimming areas, are responsible to prevent risks. To ensure hygiene of swimming water, European Swimming Water Directive offers microbiological, physical, and chemical criteria. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2004; 3(5.000: 103-104

  3. Adaptive control using a hybrid-neural model: application to a polymerisation reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cubillos F.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the use of a hybrid-neural model for predictive control of a plug flow polymerisation reactor. The hybrid-neural model (HNM is based on fundamental conservation laws associated with a neural network (NN used to model the uncertain parameters. By simulations, the performance of this approach was studied for a peroxide-initiated styrene tubular reactor. The HNM was synthesised for a CSTR reactor with a radial basis function neural net (RBFN used to estimate the reaction rates recursively. The adaptive HNM was incorporated in two model predictive control strategies, a direct synthesis scheme and an optimum steady state scheme. Tests for servo and regulator control showed excellent behaviour following different setpoint variations, and rejecting perturbations. The good generalisation and training capacities of hybrid models, associated with the simplicity and robustness characteristics of the MPC formulations, make an attractive combination for the control of a polymerisation reactor.

  4. Swimming training induces liver adaptations to oxidative stress and insulin sensitivity in rats submitted to high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacarias, Aline Cruz; Barbosa, Maria Andrea; Guerra-Sá, Renata; De Castro, Uberdan Guilherme Mendes; Bezerra, Frank Silva; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Cardoso, Leonardo M; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza Dos; Campagnole-Santos, Maria José; Alzamora, Andréia Carvalho

    2017-11-01

    Oxidative stress, physical inactivity and high-fat (FAT) diets are associated with hepatic disorders such as metabolic syndrome (MS). The therapeutic effects of physical training (PT) were evaluated in rats with MS induced by FAT diet for 13 weeks, on oxidative stress and insulin signaling in the liver, during the last 6 weeks. FAT-sedentary (SED) rats increased body mass, retroperitoneal fat, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR), and total cholesterol, serum alanine aminotransferase, glucose and insulin. Livers of FAT-SED rats increased superoxide dismutase activity, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, protein carbonyl and oxidized glutathione (GSSG); and decreased catalase activity, reduced glutathione/GSSG ratio, and the mRNA expression of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and serine/threonine kinase 2. FAT-PT rats improved in fitness and reduced their body mass, retroperitoneal fat, and glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, MAP and HR; and their livers increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, the reduced glutathione/GSSG ratio and the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and insulin receptor compared to FAT-SED rats. These findings indicated adaptive responses to PT by restoring the oxidative balance and insulin signaling in the liver and certain biometric and biochemical parameters as well as MAP in MS rats.

  5. Avoiding Swimming Sickness (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Pools, water parks, and other recreational water venues are popular places to relax and stay cool, but they can be sources of serious illness. In this podcast, Ashley Andujar discusses ways to stay safe while going swimming this summer.

  6. Reracking of fuel pools, experience with improved codes and design for reactor sites with high seismic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banck, J.; Wirtz, K.

    1998-01-01

    Reracking of existing pools to the maximum extent is desirable from the economical point of view. Although the load onto the storage rack structure and the fuel pool bottom will be increased, new improved codes, optimized structural qualification procedures and advanced design enable to demonstrate the structural integrity for all normal and accident conditions so that the design provides a safe compact storage of spent fuel under any condition.(author)

  7. Swimming Against the Current: A Qualitative Review of the Work Experiences and Adaptations made by Employees with Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purc-Stephenson, R J; Dostie, Jessica; Smith, Hailey J

    2018-01-30

    To describe the experiences and strategies of employees with arthritis (EwA) to maintain employment and to use this information to build a conceptual model. We conducted a systematic review of qualitative studies that examined the work experiences of EwA. Published studies on arthritis and employment were searched from electronic databases (1980-2017) and bibliographical reviews of relevant studies. We used meta-ethnography to synthesize the findings. We reviewed 17 studies reporting on the experiences of 873 employees. We identified 11 main themes that highlight common issues experienced by EwA, and grouped these into four higher-order categories: nature of the disease (emotional issues, cognitive struggles, physical symptoms), intrapersonal issues (personal meaning of work, preserving a work identity), interpersonal issues (managing disclosure, gaining co-worker support, organizational culture issues), and work-sustainability strategies (making personal adjustments, using social support, using workplace accommodations). Using these themes, we developed the Job Sustainability Model to illustrate how disease, personal, and work-related factors interact to influence what type of coping behaviors are used and when. Initially, EwA rely on making personal adjustments, using social support, and medical intervention. However, when these coping behaviors fail to be effective, they draw upon workplace accommodations and resources. Arthritis disrupts an employee's work life by impairing his or her capacity to be a productive worker. Our results highlight how EwA make strategic adaptations to maintain a productive work life for as long as possible. The findings of this study have implications for work-related interventions aimed at preserving employment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. The nuclear debate in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weish, P.

    1977-01-01

    This report was published during the debate about the construction of nuclear-power-plants in Austria and before the national referendum, which prevented the implementing of “Zwentendorf”, Austria´s first nuclear-power-plant. The report gives a view over the events in the discussion about Austria´s nuclear-future. (kancsar)

  9. Thai research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramrattana, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  10. Protocol of actuation before occurrence of 'molluscum contagiosum' for use in public swimming pools Protocolo de actuación ante la aparición de casos de molusco contagioso en piscinas de uso público

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ángel Bautista Cotorruelo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective is to develop a protocol for the disinfection of episodes of Molluscum contagiosum and establish an objective indicator. Molluscum contagiosum is a virus of Poxviridae Family. This virus produces a common infection in children that occurs when they come into direct contact with a lesion or with contaminated objects. In November 2008 is received at the Servicio de Sanidad Ambiental (Dirección General de Salud Pública, Consejería de Sanidad y Consumo, Comunidad Autónoma de la Región de Murcia a telephone call from the Epidemiology Service, which reported the existence of about 12-15 cases of children affected by Molluscum contagiosum. In addition, they indicated us that the suspicions fell on the Municipal Pool Cover Alhama de Murcia. Immediately we contacted the responsible staff and we send them a protocol developed with information from several sources. The analysis of articles used for water activities showed absence of Molluscum contagiosum. We selected "absence of molds and yeasts” as indicator. All this coincided with the disappearance of the cases. Months later, in March 2009 we detected new cases of children affected in another pool in the town of Alcantarilla. Due to the success of the methodology used in the earlier incident we performed the same actions and we obtained the same results. The protocol developed by this Service is effective to avoid the occurrence of more cases. We propose the “absence of molds and yeasts” as an indicator to evaluate the presence of Molluscum contagiosum. Coinciding with the update of the rules of public swimming pools in our Region we have introduced an article that indicates that the objects used for water activities must be disinfected after each use.El objetivo principal fue elaborar un protocolo de actuación para el caso de episodios de infección de molusco contagioso y un indicador objetivo, que nos permita hacer un seguimiento. El virus del molusco contagioso

  11. Nondestructive testing of PWR type fuel rods by eddy currents and metrology in the OSIRIS reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, M.; Marchand, L.

    1985-02-01

    The Saclay Reactor Department has developed a nondestructive test bench, now installed above channel 1 of the OSIRIS reactor. As part of investigations into the dynamics of PWR fuel degradation, a number of fuel rods underwent metrological and eddy current inspection, after irradiation [fr

  12. Evaluation of final vapor pressures in the loss of flow accident in an irradiation device of a pool reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verri, A.

    1987-01-01

    The reliability feature, are described for a device containing samples, at a temperatures of 300 grade centigrades, in a reactor core for a long time. After an examination of the maximum accident event, the maximum vapour pressure originated by the inlet of reactor cooling water into the experimental device, is evaluated

  13. Activities for extending the lifetime of MINT research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhari, Adnan; Kassim, Mohammad Suhaimi [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Kajang (Malaysia)

    1998-10-01

    MINT TRIGA Reactor is a 1-MW swimming pool nuclear reactor commissioned in June 1982. Since then, it has been used for research, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography and manpower training. The total operating time till the end on September 1997 is 16968 hours with cumulative total energy release of 11188 MW-hours. After more than fifteen years of successful operation, some deterioration in components and associated systems has been observed. This paper describes some of the activities carried out to increase the lifetime and to reduce the shutdown time of the reactor. (author)

  14. Neutron noise measurement technique in a coupled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genoud, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    Describes work carried out on the swimming pool reactor at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at Braunschweig. The reactor has two multiplying zones, is light water moderated, with 90% enriched 235 U fuel. There is a D 2 0 reservoir between the two parts of the reactor. Signal/noise ratio obtained by means of ionisation chamber type neutron detectors of 10 -13 amp/u.f. sensitivity is of the order of 40 dB and band frequency 1.5 kHz. Spectral density of the interzone interaction energy was obtained by use of Fourier transforms, previously corrected by a Hanning window. (S.W.)

  15. Thermal limits validation of gamma thermometer power adaption in CFE Laguna Verde 2 reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas V, G.; Banfield, J. [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC, Global Nuclear Fuel, Americas LLC, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmingtonm, North Carolina (United States); Avila N, A., E-mail: Gabriel.Cuevas-Vivas@ge.com [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This paper presents the status of GEH work on Gamma Thermometer (GT) validation using the signals of the instruments installed in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. The long-standing technical collaboration between Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas LLC (GNF) and GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC (GEH) is moving forward with solid steps to a final implementation of GTs in a nuclear reactor core. Each GT is integrated into a slightly modified Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) assembly. Six instrumentation strings are equipped with two gamma field detectors for a total of twenty-four bundles whose calculated powers are adapted to the instrumentation readings in addition to their use as calibration instruments for LPRMs. Since November 2007, the six GT instrumentation strings have been operable with almost no degradation by the strong neutron and gamma fluxes in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. In this paper, the thermal limits, Critical Power Ratio (CPR) and maximum Linear Heat Generation Rate (LHGR), of bundles directly monitored by either Traverse In-core Probes (TIPs) or GTs are used to establish validation results that confirm the viability of TIP system replacement with automatic fixed in-core probes (AFIPs, GTs, in a Boiling Water Reactor. The new GNF steady-state reactor core simulator AETNA02 is used to obtain power and exposure distribution. Using this code with an updated methodology for GT power adaption, a reduced value of the GT interpolation uncertainty is obtained that is fed into the LHGR calculation. This new method achieves margin recovery for the adapted thermal limits for use in the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) or any other BWR in the future that employs a GT based AFIP system for local power measurements. (Author)

  16. Thermal limits validation of gamma thermometer power adaption in CFE Laguna Verde 2 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas V, G.; Banfield, J.; Avila N, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the status of GEH work on Gamma Thermometer (GT) validation using the signals of the instruments installed in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. The long-standing technical collaboration between Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas LLC (GNF) and GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC (GEH) is moving forward with solid steps to a final implementation of GTs in a nuclear reactor core. Each GT is integrated into a slightly modified Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) assembly. Six instrumentation strings are equipped with two gamma field detectors for a total of twenty-four bundles whose calculated powers are adapted to the instrumentation readings in addition to their use as calibration instruments for LPRMs. Since November 2007, the six GT instrumentation strings have been operable with almost no degradation by the strong neutron and gamma fluxes in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. In this paper, the thermal limits, Critical Power Ratio (CPR) and maximum Linear Heat Generation Rate (LHGR), of bundles directly monitored by either Traverse In-core Probes (TIPs) or GTs are used to establish validation results that confirm the viability of TIP system replacement with automatic fixed in-core probes (AFIPs, GTs, in a Boiling Water Reactor. The new GNF steady-state reactor core simulator AETNA02 is used to obtain power and exposure distribution. Using this code with an updated methodology for GT power adaption, a reduced value of the GT interpolation uncertainty is obtained that is fed into the LHGR calculation. This new method achieves margin recovery for the adapted thermal limits for use in the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) or any other BWR in the future that employs a GT based AFIP system for local power measurements. (Author)

  17. Irish Literature in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faerber, Gerda

    After a brief description of some historical and cultural interchanges between Ireland and Austria, the paper examines Irish fiction that has been translated into German and Irish plays that have been performed in Vienna over the past 25 years. The paper also describes German translations of Irish children's fiction, including classics like…

  18. Austria: Media Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signitzer, Benno

    1978-01-01

    Describes the Austrian broadcast industry which is dominated by foreign influences. Suggests the restoration of autonomy of Austria's media through a system of promotion of and subsidies to Austrian media efforts, as well as a decentralization of foreign influence to increase the quality and competitiveness of domestic production. (JMF)

  19. Education Policy Outlook: Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Diana Toledo; Golden, Gillian; Giovinazzo, Manon; Peterka, Judith; Ullmann, Marie

    2017-01-01

    This policy profile on education in Austria is part of the "Education Policy Outlook" series, which presents comparative analysis of education policies and reforms across OECD countries. Building on the OECD's substantial comparative and sectoral knowledge base, the series offers a comparative outlook on education policy by providing…

  20. Nuclear reactors and fuel storage pools security in France and in Belgium, and the associated reinforcement measures. Press kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnard, Manon; Marignac, Yves; Boilley, David; MacKerron, Gordon; Becker, Oda; Lyman, Ed; Zerbib, Jean-Claude; Sotty, Meryl

    2017-10-01

    This report on the security of nuclear reactors and fuel storage pools in France and Belgium draws on the contributions of seven experts from France, Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States - specialists in nuclear safety, security, radioprotection and economics - to bring together the full range of expertise necessary to analyse the problem. Each contributor is only responsible for his/her contribution in the form it was commissioned and separately delivered to Greenpeace France. This report looks at an eminently sensitive subject in an extremely delicate context. Critical analysis and independent expertise must, in line with this, be approached in a way which conciliates two conflicting requirements. The first is that of democratic choice. The security of nuclear facilities in the face of external attacks must be open to public debate. There is no justifiable reason for this issue, a major factor in the assessment of risks related to different industrial and energy options, to be excluded from the democratic process. The public has a fundamental right to information about the risks associated with the operation of nuclear facilities, which includes assessing the risk of external attacks in all its dimensions. It is thus the responsibility of non-institutional experts to contribute to this debate. The second requirement, equally fundamental, is the preservation of public security. Contributing to this debate in a way that enhances the risk of an external attack on nuclear facilities, or, even worse, favours the success of a possible attack by revealing any flaws in the system, is of course out of the question. It is therefore also the responsibility of non-institutional experts to ensure that the protection of such facilities is not impaired by the information they collect or the analyses they produce and make available to the public. It is particularly difficult to strike this balance in the French context, since the authorities responsible for nuclear

  1. A Heat Transfer Model for a Stratified Corium-Metal Pool in the Lower Plenum of a Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohal, M.S.; Siefken, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    This preliminary design report describes a model for heat transfer in a corium-metal stratified pool. It was decided to make use of the existing COUPLE model. Currently available correlations for natural convection heat transfer in a pool with and without internal heat generation were obtained. The appropriate correlations will be incorporated in the existing COUPLE model. Heat conduction and solidification modeling will be done with existing algorithms in the COUPLE. Assessment of the new model will be done by simple energy conservation problems

  2. Opening Remarks by Mr. Yury A. Sokolov [International Conference on Opportunities and Challenges for Water Cooled Reactors in the 21. Century, Vienna (Austria), 27-30 October 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Y.A.

    2011-01-01

    On behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, I would like to welcome you to this important international Conference on Opportunities and Challenges for Water Cooled Reactors in the 21st Century. First, I would like to express our sincere appreciation to the European Commission, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the World Nuclear Association and the International Electrotechnical Commission for their cooperation and the assistance provided in the organization of this conference. Challenges and opportunities, like the poles of a magnet, do not exist separately. Furthermore, what some perceive as an opportunity may be a challenge for others, and a challenge today will probably become an opportunity tomorrow. All these complexities are fully applicable to the nuclear industry and its future. Water Cooled Reactors have been the keystone of the nuclear industry in the 20th Century. As we move into the 21st Century and face new challenges such as the growth in world energy demand or the threat of global climate change, nuclear energy has been identified as one of the sources that could substantially and sustainably contribute to power the world. Many projections forecast significant growth in the use of nuclear energy both in countries currently taking advantage of it and in countries considering its use for the first time. As we look into the future with the development of advanced and innovative reactor designs and fuel cycles, it seems clear that Water Cooled Reactors will play an important role in the future too. In recent times, there has been a two prong approach on the expansion of nuclear power. - On one hand, countries with existing nuclear power programmes have made a large effort towards making the most of their current nuclear assets by capitalizing in many years of operational excellence, as well as by extending and optimizing their operational life. - On the other hand, and despite these life management efforts, there is a clear need to eventually

  3. 1st IAEA research coordination meeting on tritium retention in fusion reactor plasma facing components. October 5-6, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the 1st IAEA research Coordination Meeting on ''Tritium Retention in Fusion Reactor Plasma Facing Components'' held on October 5 and 6, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the retention, release and removal of tritium from plasma facing components, a summary of data evaluation, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). 4 tabs

  4. Final IAEA research coordination meeting on plasma-interaction induced erosion of fusion reactor materials. October 9-11, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the Final IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on ''Plasma-interaction Induced Erosion of Fusion Reactor Materials'' held on October 9, 10 and 11, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the erosion of plasma facing components and in-vessel materials, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  5. Some particular aspects of control in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vathaire, F. de; Vernier, Ph.; Pascouet, A.

    1964-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience acquired in France on the question, of reactor safety. Since a special paper is being presented on reactors of the graphite gas type, the safety of the other types studied in France is discussed here: - heavy water-gas reactors, - fast neutron reactors, - water research reactors of the swimming-pool and tank types. The safety rules peculiar to the different types are explained, with emphasis on their influence on the reactor designs and on the power limits they impose. The corresponding safety studies are presented, particular stress being placed on the original work developed in these fields. Special mention is made of the experimental systems constructed for these studies: the reactor CABRI, pile loop for depressurization tests, loops outside the pile, mock-ups etc. (authors) [fr

  6. Country policy profile - Austria. October 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-10-01

    Renewable energy policy in Austria exists on three levels: the Federal level, the regional level of the provinces (Bundeslaender) and the local level of municipalities. In Austria, electricity from renewable sources is supported mainly through a feed-in tariff. Since 2002, the Eco Electricity Act (Oekostromgesetz) sets feed-in tariffs for different renewable energy sources. The levels of feed-in tariffs are annually adapted and set in the Eco Electricity Ordinance (Oekostromverordnung). No use is made of any other instruments, such as quotas or certificates. Feed-in tariffs are basically set in annual regulations and may be set for several years. There is a special annual reduction in the feed-in tariff (8 %) for photovoltaic systems. Unless new tariffs are set, the feed-in tariff is reduced by 1 % per annum for all other technologies. Measures in individual provinces (investment funds and support programmes on state level) most notably in the renewable heat sectors are further important support schemes. The most substantial form of supporting small-scale RES heating and cooling is provided by the Environmental Assistance in Austria (UFI) programme. There are special investment incentives for solar thermal installations, heat pumps, geothermal and biomass heating plants. In Austria, the main support scheme for renewable energy sources used in transport is a quota system

  7. Country policy profile - Austria. August 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-08-01

    Renewable energy policy in Austria exists on three levels: the Federal level, the regional level of the provinces (Bundeslaender) and the local level of municipalities. In Austria, electricity from renewable sources is supported mainly through a feed-in tariff. Since 2002, the Eco Electricity Act (Oekostromgesetz) sets feed-in tariffs for different renewable energy sources. The levels of feed-in tariffs are annually adapted and set in the Eco Electricity Ordinance (Oekostromverordnung). No use is made of any other instruments, such as quotas or certificates. Feed-in tariffs are basically set in annual regulations and may be set for several years. There is a special annual reduction in the feed-in tariff for photovoltaic systems. Unless new tariffs are set, the feed-in tariff is reduced by 1 % per annum for all other technologies. Measures in individual provinces (investment funds and support programmes on state level) most notably in the renewable heat sectors are further important support schemes. The most substantial form of supporting small-scale RES heating and cooling is provided by the Environmental Assistance in Austria (UFI) programme. There are special investment incentives for solar thermal installations, heat pumps, geothermal and biomass heating plants. In Austria, the main support scheme for renewable energy sources used in transport is a quota system

  8. Investigation of the thermal performance of a vertical two-phase closed thermosyphon as a passive cooling system for a nuclear reactor spent fuel storage pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusuma, Mukhsinun Hadi; Putra, Nandy; Imawan, Ficky Augusta [Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering Universitas Indonesia, Kampus (Indonesia); Antariksawan, Anhar Riza [Centre for Nuclear Reactor Safety and Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong (Indonesia)

    2017-04-15

    The decay heat that is produced by nuclear reactor spent fuel must be cooled in a spent fuel storage pool. A wickless heat pipe or a vertical two-phase closed thermosyphon (TPCT) is used to remove this decay heat. The objective of this research is to investigate the thermal performance of a prototype model for a large-scale vertical TPCT as a passive cooling system for a nuclear research reactor spent fuel storage pool. An experimental investigation and numerical simulation using RELAP5/MOD 3.2 were used to investigate the TPCT thermal performance. The effects of the initial pressure, filling ratio, and heat load were analyzed. Demineralized water was used as the TPCT working fluid. The cooled water was circulated in the water jacket as a cooling system. The experimental results show that the best thermal performance was obtained at a thermal resistance of 0.22°C/W, the lowest initial pressure, a filling ratio of 60%, and a high evaporator heat load. The simulation model that was experimentally validated showed a pattern and trend line similar to those of the experiment and can be used to predict the heat transfer phenomena of TPCT with varying inputs.

  9. Conceptual design of multipurpose compact research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Hiroshi; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Hori, Naohiko; Kaminaga, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    Conceptual design of the high-performance and low-cost multipurpose compact research reactor which will be expected to construct in the nuclear power plant introduction countries, started from 2010 in JAEA and nuclear-related companies in Japan. The aims of this conceptual design are to achieve highly safe reactor, economical design, high availability factor and advanced irradiation utilization. One of the basic reactor concept was determined as swimming pool type, thermal power of 10MW and water cooled and moderated reactor with plate type fuel element same as the JMTR. It is expected that the research reactors are used for human resource development, progress of the science and technology, expansion of industry use, lifetime extension of LWRs and so on. (author)

  10. Safety features of TR-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuerker, T.

    2001-01-01

    TR-2 is a swimming pool type research reactor with 5 MW thermal power and uses standard MTR plate type fuel elements. Each standard fuel element consist of 23 fuel plates with a meat + cladding thickness of 0.127 cm, coolant channel clearance is 0.21 cm. Originally TR-2 is designed for %93 enriched U-Al. Alloy fuel meat.This work is based on the preparation of the Final Safety Analyses Report (FSAR) of the TR-2 reactor. The main aspect is to investigate the behaviour of TR-2 reactor under the accident and abnormal operating conditions, which cowers the accident spectrum unique for the TR-2 reactor. This presentation covers some selected transient analyses which are important for the safety aspects of the TR-2 reactor like reactivity induced startup accidents, pump coast down (Loss of Flow Accident, LOFA) and other accidents which are charecteristic to the TR-2

  11. The reactor Cabri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ailloud, J.; Millot, J.P.

    1964-01-01

    It has become necessary to construct in France a reactor which would permit the investigation of the conditions of functioning of future installations, the choice, the testing and the development of safety devices to be adopted. A water reactor of a type corresponding to the latest CEA constructions in the field of laboratory or university reactors was decided upon: it appeared important to be able to evaluate the risks entailed and to study the possibilities of increasing the power, always demanded by the users; on the other hand, it is particularly interesting to clarify the phenomena of power oscillation and the risks of burn out. The work programme for CABRI will be associated with the work carried out on the American Sperts of the same type, during its construction, very useful contacts were made with the American specialists who designed the se reactors. A brief description of the reactor is given in the communication as well as the work programme for the first years with respect to the objectives up to now envisaged. Rough description of the reactor. CABRI is an open core swimming-pool reactor without any lateral protection, housed in a reinforced building with controlled leakage, in the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache. It lies alone in the middle of an area whose radius is 300 meters long. Control and measurements equipment stand out on the edge of that zone. It consumes MTR fuel elements. The control-safety rods are propelled by compressed air. The maximum flow rate of cooling circuit is 1500 m 3 /h. Transient measurements are recorded in a RW330 unit. Aims and work programme. CABRI is meant for: - studies on the safety of water reactors - for the definition of the safety margins under working conditions: research of maximum power at which a swimming-pool reactor may operate with respect to a cooling accident, of local boiling effect on the nuclear behaviour of the reactor, performances of the control and safety instruments under exceptional

  12. Fluid flow and heat transfer investigation of pebble bed reactors using mesh-adaptive LES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Lathouwers, Danny

    2013-01-01

    The very high temperature reactor is one of the designs currently being considered for nuclear power generation. One its variants is the pebble bed reactor in which the coolant passes through complex geometries (pores) at high Reynolds numbers. A computational fluid dynamics model with anisotropic mesh adaptivity is used to investigate coolant flow and heat transfer in such reactors. A novel method for implicitly incorporating solid boundaries based on multi-fluid flow modelling is adopted. The resulting model is able to resolve and simulate flow and heat transfer in randomly packed beds, regardless of the actual geometry, starting off with arbitrarily coarse meshes. The model is initially evaluated using an orderly stacked square channel of channel-height-to-particle diameter ratio of unity for a range of Reynolds numbers. The model is then applied to the face-centred cubical geometry. coolant flow and heat transfer patterns are investigated

  13. Analysis of ASTEC code adaptability to severe accident simulation for CANDU type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Rizoiu, Andrei

    2008-01-01

    In order to prepare the adaptation of the ASTEC code to CANDU NPP severe accident analysis two kinds of activities were performed: - analyses of the ASTEC modules from the point of view of models and options, followed by CANDU exploratory calculation for the appropriate modules/models; - preparing the specifications for ASTEC adaptation for CANDU NPP. The paper is structured in three parts: - a comparison of PWR and CANDU concepts (from the point of view of severe accident phenomena); - exploratory calculations with some ASTEC modules- SOPHAEROS, CPA, IODE, CESAR, DIVA - for CANDU type reactors specific problems; - development needs analysis - algorithms, methods, modules. (authors)

  14. EFFECTS OF THREE FEEDBACK CONDITIONS ON AEROBIC SWIM SPEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pérez Soriano

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold: (a to develop an underwater chronometer capable to provide feedback while the athlete is swimming, as well as being a control tool for the coach, and (b to analyse its feedback effect on swim pace control compared with feedback provided by the coach and with no feedback, in 25 m and 50 m swimming pools. 30 male swimmers of national level volunteer to participate. Each swimmer swam 3 x 200 m at aerobic speed (AS and 3 x 200 m just under the anaerobic threshold speed (AnS, each swam repetition with a different feedback condition: chronometer, coach and without feedback. Results (a validate the chronometer system developed and (b show that swimmers pace control is affected by the type of feedback provided, the swim speed elected and the size of the swimming pool

  15. Laryngoscopy during swimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsted, Emil S; Swanton, Laura L; van van Someren, Ken

    2017-01-01

    that precipitates their symptoms. This report provides the first description of the feasibility of performing continuous laryngoscopy during exercise in a swimming environment. The report describes the methodology and safety of the use of continuous laryngoscopy while swimming. Laryngoscope, 2017....

  16. Adaptive genomic divergence under high gene flow between freshwater and brackish-water ecotypes of prickly sculpin (Cottus asper) revealed by Pool-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennenmoser, Stefan; Vamosi, Steven M; Nolte, Arne W; Rogers, Sean M

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the genomic basis of adaptive divergence in the presence of gene flow remains a major challenge in evolutionary biology. In prickly sculpin (Cottus asper), an abundant euryhaline fish in northwestern North America, high genetic connectivity among brackish-water (estuarine) and freshwater (tributary) habitats of coastal rivers does not preclude the build-up of neutral genetic differentiation and emergence of different life history strategies. Because these two habitats present different osmotic niches, we predicted high genetic differentiation at known teleost candidate genes underlying salinity tolerance and osmoregulation. We applied whole-genome sequencing of pooled DNA samples (Pool-Seq) to explore adaptive divergence between two estuarine and two tributary habitats. Paired-end sequence reads were mapped against genomic contigs of European Cottus, and the gene content of candidate regions was explored based on comparisons with the threespine stickleback genome. Genes showing signals of repeated differentiation among brackish-water and freshwater habitats included functions such as ion transport and structural permeability in freshwater gills, which suggests that local adaptation to different osmotic niches might contribute to genomic divergence among habitats. Overall, the presence of both repeated and unique signatures of differentiation across many loci scattered throughout the genome is consistent with polygenic adaptation from standing genetic variation and locally variable selection pressures in the early stages of life history divergence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Radon in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedmann, H.

    2000-01-01

    Several projects in Austria deal with the problem of enhanced radon exposure to the public. The Austrian Radon Project is the largest project within this task, with the aim of investigating the radon concentrations in Austrian homes. Another project concerns mitigation methods. According to the EU directive EURATOM 96/29 it is also necessary to check working places for possibly enhanced radon concentrations. These projects are and will be funded by the government. The federal government of Upper Austria sponsored a project to test the indoor air quality in kindergartens including radon measurements. Within an EU research project, the radon concentrations in Austrian springs and groundwater were systematically listed and analyzed. Additional investigations will focus on methods to improve the radon potential maps from the Austrian Radon Project by including geological and other information. (author)

  18. Physics in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlotzky, F.

    1985-07-01

    This catalogue gives the results of an investigation on research institutes in Austria in the field of physics, including nuclear physics, which was performed by the Austrian Physical Society. The main part is on university institutes, but also other research institutes are listed. For each institute the name of the head, number of researchers, a short description of the scientific work and an overview of national and international cooperation is given. Various registers and indexes are attached. (A.N.)

  19. SWIMMING CLASSES IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ OPINION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bielec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of modern physical education is not only to develop motor abilities of the students, but most of all prevent them from epidemic youth diseases such as obesity or postural defects. Positive attitudes to swimming as a long-life physical activity, instilled in adolescence should be beneficial in adult life. The group of 130 boys and 116 girls of 7th grade junior high school (mean age 14.6 was asked in the survey to present their opinion of obligatory swimming lessons at school. Students of both sexes claimed that they liked swimming classes because they could improve their swimming skills (59% of answers and because of health-related character of water exercises (38%. 33% of students regarded swimming lessons as boring and monotonous, and 25% of them complained about poor pool conditions like chlorine smell, crowded lanes, too low temperature. Majority of the surveyed students saw practical role of swimming in saving others life.

  20. Experiment of IEA-R1 reactor core cooling by air convection after pool water loss accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Walmir Maximo; Baptista Filho, Benedito Dias

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a study of a Emergency Core Cooling to be applied to the IEA-R1 reactor. This system must have the characteristics of passive action, with water spraying over the core, and feeding by gravity from elevated reservoirs. In the evaluation, this system must demonstrate that when the reservoirs are emptied, the core cooling must assure to be fulfilled by air natural convection. This work presents the results of temperature distribution in a test section with plates electrically heated simulation the heat generation conditions on the most heated reactor element

  1. Standard irradiation facilities for use in TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolbasov, B.N.; Luse, R.A.

    1972-01-01

    The standard neutron irradiation facility (SNIP) was developed under IAEA and FAO co-ordinated research program for the standardization of neutron irradiation facilities for radiobiological research, resulting in the possibility to use fast neutrons from pool-type reactors for radiobiological studies. The studies include irradiation of seeds for crop improvement, of Drosophila for genetic studies, and of microorganisms for developing industrially useful mutants, as well as fundamental studies in radiation biology. The facilities, located in the six pool-type reactors (in Austria, Bulgaria, India, Philippines, Thailand and Taiwan), have been calibrated and utilized to compare the response to fast neutrons of barley seeds (variety Himalaya CI 000620) which were selected as a standard biological monitor by which to estimate neutron fluxes in different reactors. These comparative irradiation studies showed excellent agreement and reproducibility

  2. Third Joint GIF–IAEA Workshop on Safety Design Criteria for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors, 26-27 February 2013, Vienna, Austria. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The main objectives of the meeting were to: • Present and share information on the work carried out by GIF, the IAEA and the Member States on the definition of safety design criteria for SFR, including safety approach and requirements on general plant design; • Present the document prepared by the GIF-SFR Task Force on Safety Design Criteria; • Present and discuss safety design concepts of SFRs under development in Member States, with particular emphasis on design measures against Design Basis Accidents and Design Extended Conditions, as well as the associated safety evaluations and supporting R&D; • Draft a room document which should be the basis of the discussion for the Panel on Safety Design Criteria of the FR13 Conference in Paris. • Discuss the results and agree on the future actions of the 3rd Joint GIF-IAEA Workshop on Safety of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

  3. Swimming Safely (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-22

    Almost 4,000 people die from drowning each year in the U.S. You can also get sick at the pool. This podcast discusses swimming pool safety tips.  Created: 5/22/2014 by MMWR.   Date Released: 5/22/2014.

  4. Adaptive fuzzy control of neutron power of the TRIGA Mark III reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas R, E.

    2014-01-01

    The design and implementation of an identification and control scheme of the TRIGA Mark III research nuclear reactor of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) of Mexico is presented in this thesis work. The identification of the reactor dynamics is carried out using fuzzy logic based systems, in which a learning process permits the adjustment of the membership function parameters by means of techniques based on neural networks and bio-inspired algorithms. The resulting identification system is a useful tool that allows the emulation of the reactor power behavior when different types of insertions of reactivity are applied into the core. The identification of the power can also be used for the tuning of the parameters of a control system. On the other hand, the regulation of the reactor power is carried out by means of an adaptive and stable fuzzy control scheme. The control law is derived using the input-output linearization technique, which permits the introduction of a desired power profile for the plant to follow asymptotically. This characteristic is suitable for managing the ascent of power from an initial level n o up to a predetermined final level n f . During the increase of power, a constraint related to the rate of change in power is considered by the control scheme, thus minimizing the occurrence of a safety reactor shutdown due to a low reactor period value. Furthermore, the theory of stability in the sense of Lyapunov is used to obtain a supervisory control law which maintains the power error within a tolerance region, thus guaranteeing the stability of the power of the closed loop system. (Author)

  5. Photon and fast neutron dosimetry using aluminium oxide thermoluminescence dosemeters in a pool-type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, J.P.; Marques, J.G.; Fernandes, A.C.; Osvay, M.

    2007-01-01

    Al 2 O 3 :Mg,Y thermoluminescence (TL) dosemeters were used to measure photon and fast neutron doses in the mixed radiation field of the Portuguese Research Reactor. The dosemeters were irradiated in core positions under a photon dose rate of the order of 10 4 Gy/h and a fast neutron flux in the range of 10 9 -10 11 n/cm 2 /s. In order to evaluate the ability of the TL dosemeters for mixed field dosimetry at the research reactor, the measurements were compared with results obtained via conventional methods. The agreement between the different methods is better than 13% for the determination of photon doses and within 5% for the determination of neutron fluxes in mixed fields

  6. Intercomparison of the finite difference and nodal discrete ordinates and surface flux transport methods for a LWR pool-reactor benchmark problem in X-Y geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, R.D.; Stepanek, J.; Wagner, M.R.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to compare and discuss the three of the most advanced two dimensional transport methods, the finite difference and nodal discrete ordinates and surface flux method, incorporated into the transport codes TWODANT, TWOTRAN-NODAL, MULTIMEDIUM and SURCU. For intercomparison the eigenvalue and the neutron flux distribution are calculated using these codes in the LWR pool reactor benchmark problem. Additionally the results are compared with some results obtained by French collision probability transport codes MARSYAS and TRIDENT. Because the transport solution of this benchmark problem is close to its diffusion solution some results obtained by the finite element diffusion code FINELM and the finite difference diffusion code DIFF-2D are included

  7. Opening address by A. Sokolov [International Conference on the Management of Spent Fuel from Nuclear Power Reactors, Vienna (Austria), 31 May - 4 June 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Y.

    2015-01-01

    At the time of the last conference in 2006, expectations had started rising for the future of nuclear power, and they have kept rising, year by year, since then. Moreover, specific plans for new nuclear power plants have increased. The existing plants are expected to operate longer and new plants are planned in a number of countries, including both countries that already have nuclear power, such as China, India and the United Kingdom, and countries planning to build their first plant, such as Jordan, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and some others. In addition, a large number of countries have turned to the IAEA to better understand what it would mean to have nuclear power and what infrastructure it would require. Most of the focus is on what is needed for a new country to build and start operating nuclear power plants to produce electricity — that is, the legal, regulatory, educational, operational and industrial infrastructure. Much attention has also been given to the security of the fuel supply. Are uranium resources adequate? Will the fuel supply be assured? Are there political risks that fuel supplies could be cut off, and so on? Less attention has been given so far to strategies for spent fuel management, but it must be recognized that within months of starting a new reactor, spent fuel will be discharged. Adequate capacity for storage needs to be built. Considerations need to be given to the final disposition of the fuel. Will it be seen as a resource and recycled, or will it be seen as a waste and disposed of after some 30–40 years of storage? This is a difficult issue and only a few of the present nuclear power countries have made that choice definitively. Any country embarking on nuclear power must therefore be prepared for long term storage of spent fuel and, depending on developments in the rest of the world, possibly also for ultimate disposal

  8. Cash pooling

    OpenAIRE

    Lozovaya, Karina

    2009-01-01

    This work makes a mention of cash management. At next chapter describes two most known theoretical models of cash management -- Baumol Model and Miller-Orr Model. Principal part of work is about cash pooling, types of cash pooling, cash pooling at Czech Republic and influence of cash pooling over accounting and taxes.

  9. The CRDL model of SSC-K code for the safety improvement of a pool-type liquid metal-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, H. Y.; Ha, K. S.; Jang, W. P.; Hu, S.; Lee, Y. B.

    2004-01-01

    With the increased thermal power of KALIMER-600, it becomes important to model accurately the reactivity feedback effects due to the thermal expansion of a fuel rod and internal structure during a transient. In KALIMER design, the fuel axial expansion, core radial expansion, and the control rod drive line/reactor vessel (CRDL/RV) thermal expansion are the important reactivity feedback mechanisms. It is required to develop a more detailed CRDL/RV model for the accurate analysis of the KALIMER-600 transient because the control rod drive line of 9.5 m is immersed in the hot pool. For this a new CRDL/RV model was developed to model the effect of expansion of CRDL utilizing the temperature distribution obtained with the hot-pool 2-D model of SSC-K code. It is estimated that the developed model describes more realistically the negative reactivity insertion effect due to the initial temperature change during the UTOP transient of KALIMER-150

  10. Adaptive polynomial chaos techniques for uncertainty quantification of a gas cooled fast reactor transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perko, Z.; Gilli, L.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification plays an increasingly important role in the nuclear community, especially with the rise of Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty methodologies. Sensitivity analysis, surrogate models, Monte Carlo sampling and several other techniques can be used to propagate input uncertainties. In recent years however polynomial chaos expansion has become a popular alternative providing high accuracy at affordable computational cost. This paper presents such polynomial chaos (PC) methods using adaptive sparse grids and adaptive basis set construction, together with an application to a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor transient. Comparison is made between a new sparse grid algorithm and the traditionally used technique proposed by Gerstner. An adaptive basis construction method is also introduced and is proved to be advantageous both from an accuracy and a computational point of view. As a demonstration the uncertainty quantification of a 50% loss of flow transient in the GFR2400 Gas Cooled Fast Reactor design was performed using the CATHARE code system. The results are compared to direct Monte Carlo sampling and show the superior convergence and high accuracy of the polynomial chaos expansion. Since PC techniques are easy to implement, they can offer an attractive alternative to traditional techniques for the uncertainty quantification of large scale problems. (authors)

  11. Ciliary-propelling mechanism, effect of temperature and viscosity on swimming speed, and adaptive significance of ‘jumping’ in the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Larsen, Poul Scheel

    2009-01-01

    , hence increasing viscosity, from 9.6 +/- 0.3 mm/s at 21C to 5.2 +/- 0.7 mm/s at 9.8C for seawater, and down to 3.7 +/- 0.5 mm/s at a temperature equivalent Te = 5.8C for PVP-manipulated viscosity, and further, the swimming velocity was found to decrease with increasing viscosity according to the power...

  12. Safe new reactor for radionuclide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, P.L.

    1995-01-01

    In late 1995, DOE is schedule to announce a new tritium production unit. Near the end of the last NPR (New Production Reactors) program, work was directed towards eliminating risks in current designs and reducing effects of accidents. In the Heavy Water Reactor Program at Savannah River, the coolant was changed from heavy to light water. An alternative, passively safe concept uses a heavy-water-filled, zircaloy reactor calandria near the bottom of a swimming pool; the calandria is supported on a light-water-coolant inlet plenum and has upflow through assemblies in the calandria tubes. The reactor concept eliminates or reduces significantly most design basis and severe accidents that plague other deigns. The proven, current SRS tritium cycle remains intact; production within the US of medical isotopes such as Mo-99 would also be possible

  13. Saksa skandaal ja Austria / Heiki Suurkask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Suurkask, Heiki, 1972-

    2000-01-01

    Saksamaa korruptsiooniskandaal. J. Haideri Vabaduspartei valitsuse koosseisus. Kumb on suurem ohu allikas? Vt. samas art. Habsburg: Austria ei ole banaanivabariik. Austria mitteametliku troonipärija arvamus

  14. Chernobyl - 30 years thereafter. Experiences and lessons learned in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, Franz Josef; Hajek, Michael; Steger, Ferdinand; Hefner, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    During the severe reactor accident in Chernobyl in 1986 large amounts of radioactive materials have been released to the environment. Unfavorable atmospheric circulation conditions have transported about 2%of the released radioactive matter to Austria. The contribution describes the measures and actions for dose reduction performed in Austria. The measured cs-137 distribution is illustrated (in some areas more the 100 Bq/m2 were deposited). Experiences considering the measurements in consequence of the contamination are discussed and improvements of the emergency planning are summarized.

  15. Study of new structures adapted to gas-graphite and gas-heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.; Roche, R.

    1964-01-01

    The experience acquired as a result of the operation of the Marcoule reactors and of the construction and start-up of the E.D.F. reactors on the one hand, and the conclusions of research and tests carried out out-of-pile on the other hand, lead to a considerable change in the general design of reactors of the gas-graphite type. The main modifications envisaged are analysed in the paper. The adoption of an annular fuel element and of a down-current cooling will make it possible to increase considerably the specific power and the power output of each channel; as a result there will be a considerable reduction in the number of the channels and a corresponding increase in the size of the unit cell. The graphite stack will have to be adapted to there new conditions. For security reasons, the use of prestressed concrete for the construction of the reactor vessel is becoming more widespread; they could lead to the exchangers and the fuel-handling apparatus becoming integrated inside the vessel (the so-called 'attic' device). A full-size mode) of this attic has been built at Saclay with the participation of EURATOM; the operational results obtained are presented as well as a new original design for the control rods. As for as the gas-heavy-water system is concerned, the research is carried out on two points of design; the first, which retains the use of horizontal pressure tubes, takes into account the experience acquired during the construction of the EL 4 reactor of which it will constitute an extrapolation; the second, arising from the research carried out on the gas-graphite system, will use a pre-stressed concrete vessel for holding the pressure, the moderator being almost at the same pressure as the cooling fluid and the fuel being placed in vertical channels. The relative merits of these two variants are analysed in the present paper. (authors) [fr

  16. School accidents in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalamon, Johannes; Eberl, Robert; Ainoedhofer, Herwig; Singer, Georg; Spitzer, Peter; Mayr, Johannes; Schober, Peter H; Hoellwarth, Michael E

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain information about the mechanisms and types of injuries in school in Austria. Children between 0 and 18 years of age presenting with injuries at the trauma outpatient in the Department of Pediatric Surgery in Graz and six participating hospitals in Austria were evaluated over a 2-year prospective survey. A total of 28,983 pediatric trauma cases were registered. Personal data, site of the accident, circumstances and mechanisms of accident and the related diagnosis were evaluated. At the Department of Pediatric Surgery in Graz 21,582 questionnaires were completed, out of which 2,148 children had school accidents (10%). The remaining 7,401 questionnaires from peripheral hospitals included 890 school accidents (12%). The male/female ratio was 3:2. In general, sport injuries were a predominant cause of severe trauma (42% severe injuries), compared with other activities in and outside of the school building (26% severe injuries). Injuries during ball-sports contributed to 44% of severe injuries. The upper extremity was most frequently injured (34%), followed by lower extremity (32%), head and neck area (26%) and injuries to thorax and abdomen (8%). Half of all school related injuries occur in children between 10 and 13 years of age. There are typical gender related mechanisms of accident: Boys get frequently injured during soccer, violence, and collisions in and outside of the school building and during craft work. Girls have the highest risk of injuries at ball sports other than soccer.

  17. Fast-neutron dosimetry in the seed-irradiation facility, ASTRA reactor, Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnstroem, G.; Burtscher, A.; Casta, J.

    1967-01-01

    An important part of the co-ordinated programme on the neutron irradiation of seeds has been the construction of a fast-neutron irradiation facility for swimming-pool reactors. This facility was installed around 70 cm from the core in the ASTRA reactor swimming-pool at the end of December, 1966. Also, for this programme a pair of constant potential ionization chambers have been constructed at the Institute of Biochemistry, Stockholm University. These chambes are of the type described in the technical annex and are the same size as the seed-irradiation vials to be used in the seed-irradiation container (diam. =15 mm, length = 60 mm). Some preliminary dosimetry experiments were undertaken to test the irradiation facility and the ionization chambers, and to investigate the usefulness of the dosimetry instructions in the Technical Annex. The results of these experiments are discussed in this paper. 3 refs, 6 figs, 7 tabs

  18. Estudo das condições sanitárias das águas de piscinas públicas e particulares, na cidade de Araraquara, SP, Brasil Sanitary conditions of private and public swimming-pools in Araraquara, State of S. Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Pechmann Mendonça

    1978-06-01

    Full Text Available Levando-se em consideração que a natação é um exercício excelente para a saúde e tem sido um esporte preferido por pessoas de várias idades de ambos os sexos; e que a massa líquida, contida em tanques, pode veicular doenças, procurou-se estudar as condições sanitárias de algumas piscinas públicas e particulares da Cidade de Araraquara, SP (Brasil. Em 36 tomadas de amostras de águas de piscinas públicas e 22 de piscinas particulares, constatou-se que, embora recebendo tratamento específico, elas não mantêm os níveis de cloro suficiente para impedir a proliferação de bactérias, algumas das quais perigosas para a saúde dos freqüentadores. Verificou-se que os níveis de cloretos estavam altos, indicando contaminação das águas por urina ou mesmo suor do corpo, e concluiu-se que o banhista deveria receber instruções a respeito.Taking into account that swimming is excelent exercise for health in general, and has been prefered as a sport by people of all ages and both sexes, and that the liquid mass contained in tanks can transmit diseases, a study was undertaken in order to verify the hygienic conditions of some of the public and private swimming pools in the City of Araraquara, State of S. Paulo, Brazil. Thirty-six samples of water from public swimming pools and 22 from private ones were taken. It was verified that, although receiving a specific treatment, they did not maintain sufficient chlorine levels to restrain the proliferation of bacteria, some of which dangerous to the health of bathers. Likewise, chloride levels were seen to be high, which indicate that the water was contaminated by urine or even by sweat, leading to the conclusion that bathers must receive adequate instruction.

  19. Is swimming during pregnancy a safe exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Mette; Kogevinas, Manolis; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2010-01-01

    ,486 singleton pregnancies. Recruitment to The Danish National Birth Cohort took place 1996-2002. Using Cox, linear and logistic regression analyses, depending on the outcome, we compared swimmers with physically inactive pregnant women; to separate a possible swimming effect from an effect of exercise......BACKGROUND: Exercise in pregnancy is recommended in many countries, and swimming is considered by many to be an ideal activity for pregnant women. Disinfection by-products in swimming pool water may, however, be associated with adverse effects on various reproductive outcomes. We examined......, bicyclists were included as an additional comparison group. RESULTS: Risk estimates were similar for swimmers and bicyclists, including those who swam throughout pregnancy and those who swam more than 1.5 hours per week. Compared with nonexercisers, women who swam in early/mid-pregnancy had a slightly...

  20. Fuel shuffling optimization for the Delft research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geemert, R. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands); Quist, A.J. [Delft Univ., Fac. of Applied Mathematics and Informatics, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-07-01

    A fuel shuffling optimization procedure is proposed for the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) in Delft, the Netherlands, a 2 MWth swimming-pool type research reactor. In order to cope with the fluctuatory behaviour of objective functions in loading pattern optimization, the proposed cyclic permutation optimization procedure features a gradual transition from global to local search behaviour via the introduction of stochastic tests for the number of fuel assemblies involved in a cyclic permutation. The possible objectives and the safety and operation constraints, as well as the optimization procedure, are discussed, followed by some optimization results for the HOR. (author) 5 figs., 4 refs.