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Sample records for adaptation metabolic profiling

  1. Metabolism as means for hypoxia adaptation: metabolic profiling and flux balance analysis

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    Paternostro Giovanni

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular hypoxia is a component of many diseases, but mechanisms of global hypoxic adaptation and resistance are not completely understood. Previously, a population of Drosophila flies was experimentally selected over several generations to survive a chronically hypoxic environment. NMR-based metabolomics, combined with flux-balance simulations of genome-scale metabolic networks, can generate specific hypotheses for global reaction fluxes within the cell. We applied these techniques to compare metabolic activity during acute hypoxia in muscle tissue of adapted versus "naïve" control flies. Results Metabolic profiles were gathered for adapted and control flies after exposure to acute hypoxia using 1H NMR spectroscopy. Principal Component Analysis suggested that the adapted flies are tuned to survive a specific oxygen level. Adapted flies better tolerate acute hypoxic stress, and we explored the mechanisms of this tolerance using a flux-balance model of central metabolism. In the model, adapted flies produced more ATP per glucose and created fewer protons than control flies, had lower pyruvate carboxylase flux, and had greater usage of Complex I over Complex II. Conclusion We suggest a network-level hypothesis of metabolic regulation in hypoxia-adapted flies, in which lower baseline rates of biosynthesis in adapted flies draws less anaplerotic flux, resulting in lower rates of glycolysis, less acidosis, and more efficient use of substrate during acute hypoxic stress. In addition we suggest new specific hypothesis, which were found to be consistent with existing data.

  2. Urinary Metabolite Profiles in Premature Infants Show Early Postnatal Metabolic Adaptation and Maturation

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    Sissel J. Moltu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Early nutrition influences metabolic programming and long-term health. We explored the urinary metabolite profiles of 48 premature infants (birth weight < 1500 g randomized to an enhanced or a standard diet during neonatal hospitalization. Methods: Metabolomics using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR was conducted on urine samples obtained during the first week of life and thereafter fortnightly. Results: The intervention group received significantly higher amounts of energy, protein, lipids, vitamin A, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid as compared to the control group. Enhanced nutrition did not appear to affect the urine profiles to an extent exceeding individual variation. However, in all infants the glucogenic amino acids glycine, threonine, hydroxyproline and tyrosine increased substantially during the early postnatal period, along with metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (succinate, oxoglutarate, fumarate and citrate. The metabolite changes correlated with postmenstrual age. Moreover, we observed elevated threonine and glycine levels in first-week urine samples of the small for gestational age (SGA; birth weight < 10th percentile for gestational age as compared to the appropriate for gestational age infants. Conclusion: This first nutri-metabolomics study in premature infants demonstrates that the physiological adaptation during the fetal-postnatal transition as well as maturation influences metabolism during the breastfeeding period. Elevated glycine and threonine levels were found in the first week urine samples of the SGA infants and emerged as potential biomarkers of an altered metabolic phenotype.

  3. Transcriptome profiles of the protoscoleces of Echinococcus granulosus reveal that excretory-secretory products are essential to metabolic adaptation.

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    Wei Pan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cystic hydatid disease (CHD is caused by the larval stages of the cestode and affects humans and domestic animals worldwide. Protoscoleces (PSCs are one component of the larval stages that can interact with both definitive and intermediate hosts. Previous genomic and transcriptomic data have provided an overall snapshot of the genomics of the growth and development of this parasite. However, our understanding of how PSCs subvert the immune response of hosts and maintains metabolic adaptation remains unclear. In this study, we used Roche 454 sequencing technology and in silico secretome analysis to explore the transcriptome profiles of the PSCs from E. granulosus and elucidate the potential functions of the excretory-secretory proteins (ESPs released by the parasite.A large number of nonredundant sequences as unigenes were generated (26,514, of which 22,910 (86.4% were mapped to the newly published E. granulosus genome and 17,705 (66.8% were distributed within the coding sequence (CDS regions. Of the 2,280 ESPs predicted from the transcriptome, 138 ESPs were inferred to be involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, while 124 ESPs were inferred to be involved in the metabolism of protein. Eleven ESPs were identified as intracellular enzymes that regulate glycolysis/gluconeogenesis (GL/GN pathways, while a further 44 antigenic proteins, 25 molecular chaperones and four proteases were highly represented. Many proteins were also found to be significantly enriched in development-related signaling pathways, such as the TGF-β receptor pathways and insulin pathways.This study provides valuable information on the metabolic adaptation of parasites to their hosts that can be used to aid the development of novel intervention targets for hydatid treatment and control.

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of metabolic adaptation

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    van Hoek, M.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we study how organisms adapt their metabolism to a changing environment. Metabolic adaptation occurs at different timescales. Organisms adapt their metabolism via metabolic regulation, which happens in the order of minutes to hours and via evolution, which takes many generations. Here

  5. Origins of metabolic profiling.

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    Robinson, Arthur B; Robinson, Noah E

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative metabolic profiling originated as a 10-year project carried out between 1968 and 1978 in California. It was hypothesized and then demonstrated that quantitative analysis of a large number of metabolites - selected by analytical convenience and evaluated by computerized pattern recognition - could serve as a useful method for the quantitative measurement of human health. Using chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods to measure between 50 and 200 metabolites in more than 15,000 human specimens, statistically significant and diagnostically useful profiles for several human diseases and for other systematic variables including age, diet, fasting, sex, and other variables were demonstrated. It was also shown that genetically distinct metabolic profiles for each individual are present in both newborn infants and adults. In the course of this work, the many practical and conceptual problems involved in sampling, analysis, evaluation of results, and medical use of quantitative metabolic profiling were considered and, for the most part, solved. This article is an account of that research project. PMID:21207281

  6. Multi-omic profiling of EPO-producing Chinese hamster ovary cell panel reveals metabolic adaptation to heterologous protein production

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    Ley, Daniel; Kazemi Seresht, Ali; Engmark, Mikael;

    2015-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred production host for many therapeutic proteins. The production of heterologous proteins in CHO cells imposes a burden on the host cell metabolism and impact cellular physiology on a global scale. In this work, a multi-omics approach was applied...... the existence of production bottlenecks in energy metabolism (i.e., glycolytic metabolites, NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ and ANPs) in batch culture or in the secretory protein production pathway (i.e., gene dosage, transcription and post-translational processing of EPO) in chemostat culture at specific productivities up...... to 5 pg/cell/day. Time-course analysis of high- and low-producing clones in chemostat culture revealed rapid adaptation of transcription levels of amino acid catabolic genes in favor of EPO production within nine generations. Interestingly, the adaptation was followed by an increase in specific EPO...

  7. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

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    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  8. Adaptations in the energy metabolism of parasites

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    van Grinsven, K.W.A.

    2009-01-01

    For this thesis fundamental research was performed on the metabolic adaptations found in parasites. Studying the adaptations in parasite metabolisms leads to a better understanding of parasite bioenergetics and can also result in the identification of new anti-parasitic drug targets. We focussed on

  9. Adaptive diversity: hormones and metabolism in freshwaters.

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    Laudet, Vincent

    2010-12-01

    Genes underlying the evolution of morphological traits have recently been identified in a number of model species. In the stickleback, the metabolic adaptations to a freshwater habitat have now been linked to a well-known hormonal system. PMID:21145015

  10. The evolution of metabolic profiling in parasitology.

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    Holmes, E

    2010-08-01

    The uses of metabolic profiling technologies such as mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in parasitology have been multi-faceted. Traditional uses of spectroscopic platforms focused on determining the chemical composition of drugs or natural products used for treatment of parasitic infection. A natural progression of the use of these tools led to the generation of chemical profiles of the parasite in in vitro systems, monitoring the response of the parasite to chemotherapeutics, profiling metabolic consequences in the host organism and to deriving host-parasite interactions. With the dawn of the post-genomic era the paradigm in many research areas shifted towards Systems Biology and the integration of biomolecular interactions at the level of the gene, protein and metabolite. Although these technologies have yet to deliver their full potential, metabolic profiling has a key role to play in defining diagnostic or even prognostic metabolic signatures of parasitic infection and in deciphering the molecular mechanisms underpinning the development of parasite-induced pathologies. The strengths and weaknesses of the various spectroscopic technologies and analytical strategies are summarized here with respect to achieving these goals.

  11. Metabolic Profiling of Alpine and Ecuadorian Lichens

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    Verena K. Mittermeier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-targeted 1H-NMR methods were used to determine metabolite profiles from crude extracts of Alpine and Ecuadorian lichens collected from their natural habitats. In control experiments, the robustness of metabolite detection and quantification was estimated using replicate measurements of Stereocaulon alpinum extracts. The deviations in the overall metabolite fingerprints were low when analyzing S. alpinum collections from different locations or during different annual and seasonal periods. In contrast, metabolite profiles observed from extracts of different Alpine and Ecuadorian lichens clearly revealed genus- and species-specific profiles. The discriminating functions determining cluster formation in principle component analysis (PCA were due to differences in the amounts of genus-specific compounds such as sticticin from the Sticta species, but also in the amounts of ubiquitous metabolites, such as sugar alcohols or trehalose. However, varying concentrations of these metabolites from the same lichen species e.g., due to different environmental conditions appeared of minor relevance for the overall cluster formation in PCA. The metabolic clusters matched phylogenetic analyses using nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS sequences of lichen mycobionts, as exemplified for the genus Sticta. It can be concluded that NMR-based non-targeted metabolic profiling is a useful tool in the chemo-taxonomy of lichens. The same approach could also facilitate the discovery of novel lichen metabolites on a rapid and systematical basis.

  12. Endocrine and metabolic adaptations to pregnancy; impact of obesity.

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    Mouzon, Sylvie Hauguel-de; Lassance, Luciana

    2015-10-01

    Adaptations of maternal endocrine and metabolic homeostasis are central to successful pregnancy. They insure that an adequate and continuous supply of metabolic fuels is available for the growing fetus. Healthy pregnancy is classically described as a mild diabetogenic state with significant adjustments in both insulin production and sensitivity. The placenta contributes to the endocrine adaptations to pregnancy through the synthesis of various hormones which may impact insulin action. Obesity has the highest prevalence among metabolic disease in pregnancy. This article summarizes the literature addressing the endocrine and metabolic adaptations implemented during normal pregnancy. Mechanisms of regulation are further examined in the context of maternal obesity.

  13. Adaptive evolution of complex innovations through stepwise metabolic niche expansion.

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    Szappanos, Balázs; Fritzemeier, Jonathan; Csörgő, Bálint; Lázár, Viktória; Lu, Xiaowen; Fekete, Gergely; Bálint, Balázs; Herczeg, Róbert; Nagy, István; Notebaart, Richard A; Lercher, Martin J; Pál, Csaba; Papp, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    A central challenge in evolutionary biology concerns the mechanisms by which complex metabolic innovations requiring multiple mutations arise. Here, we propose that metabolic innovations accessible through the addition of a single reaction serve as stepping stones towards the later establishment of complex metabolic features in another environment. We demonstrate the feasibility of this hypothesis through three complementary analyses. First, using genome-scale metabolic modelling, we show that complex metabolic innovations in Escherichia coli can arise via changing nutrient conditions. Second, using phylogenetic approaches, we demonstrate that the acquisition patterns of complex metabolic pathways during the evolutionary history of bacterial genomes support the hypothesis. Third, we show how adaptation of laboratory populations of E. coli to one carbon source facilitates the later adaptation to another carbon source. Our work demonstrates how complex innovations can evolve through series of adaptive steps without the need to invoke non-adaptive processes. PMID:27197754

  14. Exercise Effects on White Adipose Tissue: Beiging and Metabolic Adaptations.

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    Stanford, Kristin I; Middelbeek, Roeland J W; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2015-07-01

    Regular physical activity and exercise training have long been known to cause adaptations to white adipose tissue (WAT), including decreases in cell size and lipid content and increases in mitochondrial proteins. In this article, we discuss recent studies that have investigated the effects of exercise training on mitochondrial function, the "beiging" of WAT, regulation of adipokines, metabolic effects of trained adipose tissue on systemic metabolism, and depot-specific responses to exercise training. The major WAT depots in the body are found in the visceral cavity (vWAT) and subcutaneously (scWAT). In rodent models, exercise training increases mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in both these adipose tissue depots. Exercise training also increases expression of the brown adipocyte marker uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in both adipose tissue depots, although these effects are much more pronounced in scWAT. Consistent with the increase in UCP1, exercise training increases the presence of brown-like adipocytes in scWAT, also known as browning or beiging. Training results in changes in the gene expression of thousands of scWAT genes and an altered adipokine profile in both scWAT and vWAT. Transplantation of trained scWAT in sedentary recipient mice results in striking improvements in skeletal muscle glucose uptake and whole-body metabolic homeostasis. Human and rodent exercise studies have indicated that exercise training can alter circulating adipokine concentration as well as adipokine expression in adipose tissue. Thus, the profound changes to WAT in response to exercise training may be part of the mechanism by which exercise improves whole-body metabolic health.

  15. The metabolic profile of long-lived Drosophila melanogaster

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    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Pedersen, Simon Metz; Nielsen, Niels Christian;

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the age-related changes in the metabolic profile of male Drosophila melanogaster and compared the metabolic profile of flies selected for increased longevity to that of control flies of equal age. We found clear differences in metabolite composition between selection regimes and a...

  16. Metabolic Adaptation after Whole Genome Duplication

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    Hoek, M.J.A. van; Hogeweg, P.

    2009-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGDs) have been hypothesized to be responsible for major transitions in evolution. However, the effects of WGD and subsequent gene loss on cellular behavior and metabolism are still poorly understood. Here we develop a genome scale evolutionary model to study the dynamics

  17. Development of personalised functional foods needs metabolic profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Claus, Sandrine Paule

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review There is growing interest in applying metabolic profiling technologies to food science as this approach is now embedded into the foodomics toolbox. This review aims at exploring how metabolic profiling can be applied to the development of functional foods. Recent findings One of the biggest challenges of modern nutrition is to propose a healthy diet to populations worldwide that must suit high inter-individual variability driven by complex gene-nutrient-environment...

  18. An Enhanced Profile Management System to Support Adaptability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ting; Yang Yun

    2008-01-01

    An integrated management architecture which called Adaptive Agent and Profile Management System (AAPMS) was proposed here. Using this system, users can get an adaptive service list according to their current condition (terminal capability, user preference, etc.). After choosing a service, the users only need to download a simple service agent to their mobile device and install it, and then the service agent will connect to the corresponding service provider. The users and the service providers can also manage their profiles using AAPMS.

  19. Metabolic adaptations for desert survival in the Bedouin goat.

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    Choshniak, I; Ben-Kohav, N; Taylor, C R; Robertshaw, D; Barnes, R J; Dobson, A; Belkin, V; Shkolnik, A

    1995-05-01

    Energy conservation is a key adaptation for desert survival in the Bedouin goat. When food is scarce, metabolism is reduced and body weight can be maintained indefinitely on less than one-half of normal intake. We hypothesized that metabolism would be turned down during both rest and exercise, but it was not. It was low when animals rested and returned to normal during exercise. We expected catecholamines and thyroid hormones would modulate metabolism, but they did not. The reduction in metabolism preceded any change in thyroid hormone concentrations, and infusions of epinephrine did not restore reduced metabolism to normal levels. Finally, we expected the gut would be the major organ system involved in the metabolic reduction because less food is eaten, processed, and absorbed. Contrary to our expectations, we found that muscle is the primary organ system responsible for the reduction. It appears that the adaptations of the Bedouin goat for surviving on limited food supplies involve different organ systems and different modulators to reduce metabolism from those known for other mammals. PMID:7771568

  20. Global network reorganization during dynamic adaptations of Bacillus subtilis metabolism

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    Buescher, Joerg Martin; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Jules, Matthieu;

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation of cells to environmental changes requires dynamic interactions between metabolic and regulatory networks, but studies typically address only one or a few layers of regulation. For nutritional shifts between two preferred carbon sources of Bacillus subtilis, we combined statistical and...

  1. Energetic Metabolism and Biochemical Adaptation: A Bird Flight Muscle Model

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    Rioux, Pierre; Blier, Pierre U.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to measure the activity of two metabolic enzymes in crude extract from bird pectoral muscle and to relate the differences to their mode of locomotion and ecology. The laboratory is adapted to stimulate the interest of wildlife management students to biochemistry. The enzymatic activities of cytochrome…

  2. MetAssimulo:Simulation of Realistic NMR Metabolic Profiles

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    De Iorio Maria

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probing the complex fusion of genetic and environmental interactions, metabolic profiling (or metabolomics/metabonomics, the study of small molecules involved in metabolic reactions, is a rapidly expanding 'omics' field. A major technique for capturing metabolite data is 1H-NMR spectroscopy and this yields highly complex profiles that require sophisticated statistical analysis methods. However, experimental data is difficult to control and expensive to obtain. Thus data simulation is a productive route to aid algorithm development. Results MetAssimulo is a MATLAB-based package that has been developed to simulate 1H-NMR spectra of complex mixtures such as metabolic profiles. Drawing data from a metabolite standard spectral database in conjunction with concentration information input by the user or constructed automatically from the Human Metabolome Database, MetAssimulo is able to create realistic metabolic profiles containing large numbers of metabolites with a range of user-defined properties. Current features include the simulation of two groups ('case' and 'control' specified by means and standard deviations of concentrations for each metabolite. The software enables addition of spectral noise with a realistic autocorrelation structure at user controllable levels. A crucial feature of the algorithm is its ability to simulate both intra- and inter-metabolite correlations, the analysis of which is fundamental to many techniques in the field. Further, MetAssimulo is able to simulate shifts in NMR peak positions that result from matrix effects such as pH differences which are often observed in metabolic NMR spectra and pose serious challenges for statistical algorithms. Conclusions No other software is currently able to simulate NMR metabolic profiles with such complexity and flexibility. This paper describes the algorithm behind MetAssimulo and demonstrates how it can be used to simulate realistic NMR metabolic profiles with

  3. Association between Metabolite Profiles, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity Status.

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    Allam-Ndoul, Bénédicte; Guénard, Frédéric; Garneau, Véronique; Cormier, Hubert; Barbier, Olivier; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Underlying mechanisms associated with the development of abnormal metabolic phenotypes among obese individuals are not yet clear. Our aim is to investigate differences in plasma metabolomics profiles between normal weight (NW) and overweight/obese (Ov/Ob) individuals, with or without metabolic syndrome (MetS). Mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling was used to compare metabolite levels between each group. Three main principal components factors explaining a maximum of variance were retained. Factor 1's (long chain glycerophospholipids) metabolite profile score was higher among Ov/Ob with MetS than among Ov/Ob and NW participants without MetS. This factor was positively correlated to plasma total cholesterol (total-C) and triglyceride levels in the three groups, to high density lipoprotein -cholesterol (HDL-C) among participants without MetS. Factor 2 (amino acids and short to long chain acylcarnitine) was positively correlated to HDL-C and negatively correlated with insulin levels among NW participants. Factor 3's (medium chain acylcarnitines) metabolite profile scores were higher among NW participants than among Ov/Ob with or without MetS. Factor 3 was negatively associated with glucose levels among the Ov/Ob with MetS. Factor 1 seems to be associated with a deteriorated metabolic profile that corresponds to obesity, whereas Factors 2 and 3 seem to be rather associated with a healthy metabolic profile. PMID:27240400

  4. Association between Metabolite Profiles, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity Status

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    Bénédicte Allam-Ndoul

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Underlying mechanisms associated with the development of abnormal metabolic phenotypes among obese individuals are not yet clear. Our aim is to investigate differences in plasma metabolomics profiles between normal weight (NW and overweight/obese (Ov/Ob individuals, with or without metabolic syndrome (MetS. Mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling was used to compare metabolite levels between each group. Three main principal components factors explaining a maximum of variance were retained. Factor 1’s (long chain glycerophospholipids metabolite profile score was higher among Ov/Ob with MetS than among Ov/Ob and NW participants without MetS. This factor was positively correlated to plasma total cholesterol (total-C and triglyceride levels in the three groups, to high density lipoprotein -cholesterol (HDL-C among participants without MetS. Factor 2 (amino acids and short to long chain acylcarnitine was positively correlated to HDL-C and negatively correlated with insulin levels among NW participants. Factor 3’s (medium chain acylcarnitines metabolite profile scores were higher among NW participants than among Ov/Ob with or without MetS. Factor 3 was negatively associated with glucose levels among the Ov/Ob with MetS. Factor 1 seems to be associated with a deteriorated metabolic profile that corresponds to obesity, whereas Factors 2 and 3 seem to be rather associated with a healthy metabolic profile.

  5. Ensemble Kinetic Modeling of Metabolic Networks from Dynamic Metabolic Profiles

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    Gengjie Jia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic modeling of metabolic pathways has important applications in metabolic engineering, but significant challenges still remain. The difficulties faced vary from finding best-fit parameters in a highly multidimensional search space to incomplete parameter identifiability. To meet some of these challenges, an ensemble modeling method is developed for characterizing a subset of kinetic parameters that give statistically equivalent goodness-of-fit to time series concentration data. The method is based on the incremental identification approach, where the parameter estimation is done in a step-wise manner. Numerical efficacy is achieved by reducing the dimensionality of parameter space and using efficient random parameter exploration algorithms. The shift toward using model ensembles, instead of the traditional “best-fit” models, is necessary to directly account for model uncertainty during the application of such models. The performance of the ensemble modeling approach has been demonstrated in the modeling of a generic branched pathway and the trehalose pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using generalized mass action (GMA kinetics.

  6. Metabolic Profile Analysis of Zebrafish Embryos

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    Gibert, Yann; McGee, Sean L.; Ward, Alister C.

    2013-01-01

    A growing goal in the field of metabolism is to determine the impact of genetics on different aspects of mitochondrial function. Understanding these relationships will help to understand the underlying etiology for a range of diseases linked with mitochondrial dysfunction, such as diabetes and obesity. Recent advances in instrumentation, has enabled the monitoring of distinct parameters of mitochondrial function in cell lines or tissue explants. Here we present a method for a rapid and sensitive analysis of mitochondrial function parameters in vivo during zebrafish embryonic development using the Seahorse bioscience XF 24 extracellular flux analyser. This protocol utilizes the Islet Capture microplates where a single embryo is placed in each well, allowing measurement of bioenergetics, including: (i) basal respiration; (ii) basal mitochondrial respiration (iii) mitochondrial respiration due to ATP turnover; (iv) mitochondrial uncoupled respiration or proton leak and (iv) maximum respiration. Using this approach embryonic zebrafish respiration parameters can be compared between wild type and genetically altered embryos (mutant, gene over-expression or gene knockdown) or those manipulated pharmacologically. It is anticipated that dissemination of this protocol will provide researchers with new tools to analyse the genetic basis of metabolic disorders in vivo in this relevant vertebrate animal model. PMID:23353983

  7. Adaptive Guidance based on Context Profile for Software Process Modeling

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    Hamid Khemissa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to define an adaptive guidance for software process modeling. The proposed guidance approach is based on development’s profile context (actor’s role in the process, actor’s qualification and related activities in progress. We introduce new guidance concepts through adaptive guidance meta-model (AGM allowing specific assistance interventions (corrective, constructive and automatic guidance. We illustrate our guidance approach using SPEM formalism extended with these new guidance concepts.

  8. Metabolic profiling of the response to an oral glucose tolerance test detects subtle metabolic changes.

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    Suzan Wopereis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight is increasing globally and has become a serious health problem. Low-grade chronic inflammation in overweight subjects is thought to play an important role in disease development. Novel tools to understand these processes are needed. Metabolic profiling is one such tool that can provide novel insights into the impact of treatments on metabolism. METHODOLOGY: To study the metabolic changes induced by a mild anti-inflammatory drug intervention, plasma metabolic profiling was applied in overweight human volunteers with elevated levels of the inflammatory plasma marker C-reactive protein. Liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometric methods were used to detect high and low abundant plasma metabolites both in fasted conditions and during an oral glucose tolerance test. This is based on the concept that the resilience of the system can be assessed after perturbing a homeostatic situation. CONCLUSIONS: Metabolic changes were subtle and were only detected using metabolic profiling in combination with an oral glucose tolerance test. The repeated measurements during the oral glucose tolerance test increased statistical power, but the metabolic perturbation also revealed metabolites that respond differentially to the oral glucose tolerance test. Specifically, multiple metabolic intermediates of the glutathione synthesis pathway showed time-dependent suppression in response to the glucose challenge test. The fact that this is an insulin sensitive pathway suggests that inflammatory modulation may alter insulin signaling in overweight men.

  9. Adaptive Sensing Based on Profiles for Sensor Systems

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    Yoshiteru Ishida

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a profile-based sensing framework for adaptive sensor systems based on models that relate possibly heterogeneous sensor data and profiles generated by the models to detect events. With these concepts, three phases for building the sensor systems are extracted from two examples: a combustion control sensor system for an automobile engine, and a sensor system for home security. The three phases are: modeling, profiling, and managing trade-offs. Designing and building a sensor system involves mapping the signals to a model to achieve a given mission.

  10. OVCAR-3 spheroid-derived cells display distinct metabolic profiles.

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    Kathleen A Vermeersch

    Full Text Available Recently, multicellular spheroids were isolated from a well-established epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, and were propagated in vitro. These spheroid-derived cells displayed numerous hallmarks of cancer stem cells, which are chemo- and radioresistant cells thought to be a significant cause of cancer recurrence and resultant mortality. Gene set enrichment analysis of expression data from the OVCAR-3 cells and the spheroid-derived putative cancer stem cells identified several metabolic pathways enriched in differentially expressed genes. Before this, there had been little previous knowledge or investigation of systems-scale metabolic differences between cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and no knowledge of such differences in ovarian cancer stem cells.To determine if there were substantial metabolic changes corresponding with these transcriptional differences, we used two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to measure the metabolite profiles of the two cell lines.These two cell lines exhibited significant metabolic differences in both intracellular and extracellular metabolite measurements. Principal components analysis, an unsupervised dimensional reduction technique, showed complete separation between the two cell types based on their metabolite profiles. Pathway analysis of intracellular metabolomics data revealed close overlap with metabolic pathways identified from gene expression data, with four out of six pathways found enriched in gene-level analysis also enriched in metabolite-level analysis. Some of those pathways contained multiple metabolites that were individually statistically significantly different between the two cell lines, with one of the most broadly and consistently different pathways, arginine and proline metabolism, suggesting an interesting hypothesis about cancerous and stem-like metabolic phenotypes in this pair of cell lines.Overall, we demonstrate for the first time that metabolism

  11. Expression profiling and comparative sequence derived insights into lipid metabolism

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    Callow, Matthew J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2001-12-19

    Expression profiling and genomic DNA sequence comparisons are increasingly being applied to the identification and analysis of the genes involved in lipid metabolism. Not only has genome-wide expression profiling aided in the identification of novel genes involved in important processes in lipid metabolism such as sterol efflux, but the utilization of information from these studies has added to our understanding of the regulation of pathways participating in the process. Coupled with these gene expression studies, cross species comparison, searching for sequences conserved through evolution, has proven to be a powerful tool to identify important non-coding regulatory sequences as well as the discovery of novel genes relevant to lipid biology. An example of the value of this approach was the recent chance discovery of a new apolipoprotein gene (apo AV) that has dramatic effects upon triglyceride metabolism in mice and humans.

  12. Comparative Metabolic Flux Profiling of Melanoma Cell Lines

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    Scott, David A.; Richardson, Adam D.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Knutzen, Christine A.; Chiang, Gary G.; Ronai, Ze'ev A.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic rewiring is an established hallmark of cancer, but the details of this rewiring at a systems level are not well characterized. Here we acquire this insight in a melanoma cell line panel by tracking metabolic flux using isotopically labeled nutrients. Metabolic profiling and flux balance analysis were used to compare normal melanocytes to melanoma cell lines in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. All melanoma cells exhibited the Warburg phenomenon; they used more glucose and produced more lactate than melanocytes. Other changes were observed in melanoma cells that are not described by the Warburg phenomenon. Hypoxic conditions increased fermentation of glucose to lactate in both melanocytes and melanoma cells (the Pasteur effect). However, metabolism was not strictly glycolytic, as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was functional in all melanoma lines, even under hypoxia. Furthermore, glutamine was also a key nutrient providing a substantial anaplerotic contribution to the TCA cycle. In the WM35 melanoma line glutamine was metabolized in the “reverse” (reductive) direction in the TCA cycle, particularly under hypoxia. This reverse flux allowed the melanoma cells to synthesize fatty acids from glutamine while glucose was primarily converted to lactate. Altogether, this study, which is the first comprehensive comparative analysis of metabolism in melanoma cells, provides a foundation for targeting metabolism for therapeutic benefit in melanoma. PMID:21998308

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of tumor oxygenation and metabolic profile

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    Krishna, Murali C.; Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita;

    2013-01-01

    an exogenous contrast agent: electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) and Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI). Tumor metabolic profile can be assessed by a third method, hyperpolarized metabolic MR, based on injection of hyperpolarized biological molecules labeled with 13C or 15N and MR...... which can characterize such features non-invasively and repeatedly will be of significant value in planning treatment as well as monitoring response to treatment. The three techniques based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are reviewed here. Tumor pO2 can be measured by two MRI methods requiring...

  14. Metabolic profiling detects early effects of environmental and lifestyle exposure to cadmium in a human population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis James K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 'exposome' represents the accumulation of all environmental exposures across a lifetime. Top-down strategies are required to assess something this comprehensive, and could transform our understanding of how environmental factors affect human health. Metabolic profiling (metabonomics/metabolomics defines an individual's metabolic phenotype, which is influenced by genotype, diet, lifestyle, health and xenobiotic exposure, and could also reveal intermediate biomarkers for disease risk that reflect adaptive response to exposure. We investigated changes in metabolism in volunteers living near a point source of environmental pollution: a closed zinc smelter with associated elevated levels of environmental cadmium. Methods High-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy (metabonomics was used to acquire urinary metabolic profiles from 178 human volunteers. The spectral data were subjected to multivariate and univariate analysis to identify metabolites that were correlated with lifestyle or biological factors. Urinary levels of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine were also measured, using mass spectrometry, as a marker of systemic oxidative stress. Results Six urinary metabolites, either associated with mitochondrial metabolism (citrate, 3-hydroxyisovalerate, 4-deoxy-erythronic acid or one-carbon metabolism (dimethylglycine, creatinine, creatine, were associated with cadmium exposure. In particular, citrate levels retained a significant correlation to urinary cadmium and smoking status after controlling for age and sex. Oxidative stress (as determined by urinary 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine levels was elevated in individuals with high cadmium exposure, supporting the hypothesis that heavy metal accumulation was causing mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions This study shows evidence that an NMR-based metabolic profiling study in an uncontrolled human population is capable of identifying intermediate biomarkers of response to toxicants at true environmental

  15. Adaptations to pressure in the RBC metabolism of diving mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, M A; Castellini, J M; Rivera, P M

    2001-07-01

    Marine mammals are known to dive up to 2000 m and, therefore, tolerate as much as 200 atm. of hydrostatic pressure. To examine possible metabolic adaptations to these elevated pressures, fresh blood samples from marine and terrestrial mammals were incubated for 2 h at 37 degrees C under 136 atm (2000 psi) of hydrostatic pressure. The consumption of plasma glucose and the production of lactate over the 2-h period were used to assess glycolytic flux in the red cells. The results indicate that glycolytic flux as measured by lactate production under pressure can be significantly depressed in most terrestrial mammals and either not altered or accelerated in marine mammals. The data also suggest that there is a significant shift in the ratio of lactate produced to glucose consumed under pressure. Interestingly, human and dolphin blood do not react to pressure. These combined data imply a metabolic adaptation to pressure in marine mammal RBC that may not be necessary in human or dolphin cells due to their unique patterns of glucose metabolism.

  16. Adaptive Benefits of Storage Strategy and Dual AMPK/TOR Signaling in Metabolic Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeuty, Benjamin; Thommen, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism must ensure that supply of nutrient meets the biosynthetic and bioenergetic needs. Cells have therefore developed sophisticated signaling and regulatory pathways in order to cope with dynamic fluctuations of both resource and demand and to regulate accordingly diverse anabolic and catabolic processes. Intriguingly, these pathways are organized around a relatively small number of regulatory hubs, such as the highly conserved AMPK and TOR kinase families in eukaryotic cells. Here, the global metabolic adaptations upon dynamic environment are investigated using a prototypical model of regulated metabolism. In this model, the optimal enzyme profiles as well as the underlying regulatory architecture are identified by combining perturbation and evolutionary methods. The results reveal the existence of distinct classes of adaptive strategies, which differ in the management of storage reserve depending on the intensity of the stress and in the regulation of ATP-producing reaction depending on the nature of the stress. The regulatory architecture that optimally implements these adaptive features is characterized by a crosstalk between two specialized signaling pathways, which bears close similarities with the sensing and regulatory properties of AMPK and TOR pathways. PMID:27505075

  17. Olive phenolic compounds: metabolic and transcriptional profiling during fruit development

    OpenAIRE

    Alagna Fiammetta; Mariotti Roberto; Panara Francesco; Caporali Silvia; Urbani Stefania; Veneziani Gianluca; Esposto Sonia; Taticchi Agnese; Rosati Adolfo; Rao Rosa; Perrotta Gaetano; Servili Maurizio; Baldoni Luciana

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Olive (Olea europaea L.) fruits contain numerous secondary metabolites, primarily phenolics, terpenes and sterols, some of which are particularly interesting for their nutraceutical properties. This study will attempt to provide further insight into the profile of olive phenolic compounds during fruit development and to identify the major genetic determinants of phenolic metabolism. Results The concentration of the major phenolic compounds, such as oleuropein, demethyloleu...

  18. Determination of Ancylostoma caninum ova viability using metabolic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, P; Beale, D J; Ahmed, W; Karpe, A V; Magalhaes, R J Soares; Morrison, P D; Palombo, E A

    2016-09-01

    Differentiation between viable and non-viable hookworm ova in environmental samples is necessary in order to implement strategies to mitigate re-infections in endemic regions. In this study, an untargeted metabolic profiling method was developed that utilised gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in order to investigate hookworm ova viability. Ancylostoma caninum was used to investigate the metabolites within viable and non-viable ova. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses of the data resulted in the identification of 53 significant metabolites across all hookworm ova samples. The major compounds observed in viable and non-viable hookworm ova were tetradecanoic acid, commonly known as myristic acid [fold change (FC) = 0.4], and dodecanoic acid, commonly known as lauric acid (FC = 0.388). Additionally, the viable ova had self-protecting metabolites such as prostaglandins, a typical feature absent in non-viable ova. The results of this study demonstrate that metabolic profiling using GC-MS methods can be used to determine the viability of canine hookworm ova. Further studies are needed to assess the applicability of metabolic profiling using GC-MS to detect viable hookworm ova in the mixed (viable and non-viable) populations from environmental samples and identify the metabolites specific to human hookworm species. PMID:27236650

  19. Intercultural Profiles and Adaptation Among Immigrant and Autochthonous Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguglia, Cristiano; Musso, Pasquale

    2015-02-01

    Few studies examine relationships between intercultural strategies and adaptation among adolescents using a person-oriented approach. Framed from an intercultural psychology perspective, this study used such an approach in order to examine the influence of intercultural profiles, patterns of relationships among variables related to intercultural strategies, on the adaptation of adolescents of both non-dominant and dominant groups. Two hundred and fifty-six adolescents living in Italy and aged from 14 to 18 participated to the study: 127 immigrants from Tunisia (males = 49.61%) and 129 autochthonous (males = 44.19%). Data were collected through self-report questionnaires. Using cluster analytic methods to identify profiles, the results showed that immigrant adolescents were divided in two acculturation profiles, ethnic and integrated-national, with adolescents belonging to the latter showing higher self-esteem, life satisfaction and sociocultural competence than the former. Also among autochthonous adolescents two acculturation expectation profiles were identified, not-multicultural and multicultural, with adolescents belonging to the latter showing higher self-esteem and life satisfaction than the former. Findings highlight the importance of using multiple indicators in order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the acculturation process as well as suggesting implications for the social policies in this field. PMID:27247643

  20. Intercultural Profiles and Adaptation Among Immigrant and Autochthonous Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Inguglia

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Few studies examine relationships between intercultural strategies and adaptation among adolescents using a person-oriented approach. Framed from an intercultural psychology perspective, this study used such an approach in order to examine the influence of intercultural profiles, patterns of relationships among variables related to intercultural strategies, on the adaptation of adolescents of both non-dominant and dominant groups. Two hundred and fifty-six adolescents living in Italy and aged from 14 to 18 participated to the study: 127 immigrants from Tunisia (males = 49.61% and 129 autochthonous (males = 44.19%. Data were collected through self-report questionnaires. Using cluster analytic methods to identify profiles, the results showed that immigrant adolescents were divided in two acculturation profiles, ethnic and integrated-national, with adolescents belonging to the latter showing higher self-esteem, life satisfaction and sociocultural competence than the former. Also among autochthonous adolescents two acculturation expectation profiles were identified, not-multicultural and multicultural, with adolescents belonging to the latter showing higher self-esteem and life satisfaction than the former. Findings highlight the importance of using multiple indicators in order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the acculturation process as well as suggesting implications for the social policies in this field.

  1. Intercultural Profiles and Adaptation Among Immigrant and Autochthonous Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguglia, Cristiano; Musso, Pasquale

    2015-02-01

    Few studies examine relationships between intercultural strategies and adaptation among adolescents using a person-oriented approach. Framed from an intercultural psychology perspective, this study used such an approach in order to examine the influence of intercultural profiles, patterns of relationships among variables related to intercultural strategies, on the adaptation of adolescents of both non-dominant and dominant groups. Two hundred and fifty-six adolescents living in Italy and aged from 14 to 18 participated to the study: 127 immigrants from Tunisia (males = 49.61%) and 129 autochthonous (males = 44.19%). Data were collected through self-report questionnaires. Using cluster analytic methods to identify profiles, the results showed that immigrant adolescents were divided in two acculturation profiles, ethnic and integrated-national, with adolescents belonging to the latter showing higher self-esteem, life satisfaction and sociocultural competence than the former. Also among autochthonous adolescents two acculturation expectation profiles were identified, not-multicultural and multicultural, with adolescents belonging to the latter showing higher self-esteem and life satisfaction than the former. Findings highlight the importance of using multiple indicators in order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the acculturation process as well as suggesting implications for the social policies in this field.

  2. Adaptation of Myocardial Substrate Metabolism to a Ketogenic Nutrient Environment*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Anna E.; d'Avignon, D. André; Weber, Mary L.; Cotter, David G.; Doherty, Jason M.; Kerns, Robnet; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Reddy, Naveen; Sambandam, Nandakumar; Crawford, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Heart muscle is metabolically versatile, converting energy stored in fatty acids, glucose, lactate, amino acids, and ketone bodies. Here, we use mouse models in ketotic nutritional states (24 h of fasting and a very low carbohydrate ketogenic diet) to demonstrate that heart muscle engages a metabolic response that limits ketone body utilization. Pathway reconstruction from microarray data sets, gene expression analysis, protein immunoblotting, and immunohistochemical analysis of myocardial tissue from nutritionally modified mouse models reveal that ketotic states promote transcriptional suppression of the key ketolytic enzyme, succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT; encoded by Oxct1), as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α-dependent induction of the key ketogenic enzyme HMGCS2. Consistent with reduction of SCOT, NMR profiling demonstrates that maintenance on a ketogenic diet causes a 25% reduction of myocardial 13C enrichment of glutamate when 13C-labeled ketone bodies are delivered in vivo or ex vivo, indicating reduced procession of ketones through oxidative metabolism. Accordingly, unmetabolized substrate concentrations are higher within the hearts of ketogenic diet-fed mice challenged with ketones compared with those of chow-fed controls. Furthermore, reduced ketone body oxidation correlates with failure of ketone bodies to inhibit fatty acid oxidation. These results indicate that ketotic nutrient environments engage mechanisms that curtail ketolytic capacity, controlling the utilization of ketone bodies in ketotic states. PMID:20529848

  3. Isotopologue profiling of the listerial N-metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Erika; Kern, Tanja; Felsl, Angela; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2016-04-01

    The nitrogen (N-) sources and the relative contribution of a nitrogenous nutrient to the N-pool of the gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes are largely unknown. Therefore, (15) N-isotopologue profiling was established to study the N-metabolism of L. monocytogenes. The pathogen was grown in a defined minimal medium supplemented with potential (15) N-labeled nutrients. The bacteria were harvested and hydrolysed under acidic conditions, and the resulting amino acids were analysed by GC-MS, revealing (15) N-enrichments and isotopomeric compositions of amino acids. The differential (15) N-profiles showed the substantial and simultaneous usage of ammonium, glutamine, methionine, and, to a lower extent, the branched-chain amino acids valine, leucine, and isoleucine for anabolic purposes, with a significant preference for ammonium. In contrast, arginine, histidine and cysteine were directly incorporated into proteins. L. monocytogenes is able to replace glutamine with ethanolamine or glucosamine as amino donors for feeding the core N-metabolism. Perturbations of N-fluxes caused by gene deletions demonstrate the involvement of ethanolamine ammonia lyase, and suggest a role of the regulator GlnK of L. monocytogenes distinct from that of Escherichia coli. The metabolism of nitrogenous nutrients reflects the high flexibility of this pathogenic bacterium in exploiting N-sources that could also be relevant for its proliferation during infection. PMID:26699934

  4. Untargeted metabolic profiling of Vitis vinifera during fungal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpe, Avinash V; Beale, David J; Morrison, Paul D; Harding, Ian H; Palombo, Enzo A

    2015-05-01

    This paper illustrates the application of an untargeted metabolic profiling analysis of winery-derived biomass degraded using four filamentous fungi (Trichoderma harzianum, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium chrysogenum and P. citrinum) and a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Analysis of the metabolome resulted in the identification of 233 significant peak features [P 2 and signal-to-noise ratio >50] using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry followed by statistical chemometric analysis. Furthermore, A. niger and P. chrysogenum produced higher biomass degradation due to considerable β-glucosidase and xylanase activities. The major metabolites generated during fungal degradation which differentiated the metabolic profiles of fungi included sugars, sugar acids, organic acids and fatty acids. Although, P. chrysogenum could degrade hemicelluloses due to its high β-glucosidase and xylanase activities, it could not utilize the resultant pentoses, which A. niger and P. citrinum could do efficiently, thus indicating a need of mixed fungal culture to improve the biomass degradation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a non-cellulose degrader, exhibited sugar accumulation during the fermentation. Penicillium chrysogenum was observed to degrade about 2% lignin, a property not observed in other fungi. This study emphasized the differential fungal metabolic behavior and demonstrated the potential of metabolomics in optimizing degradation or manipulating pathways to increase yields of products of interest. PMID:25868913

  5. Functional profiling of cyanobacterial genomes and its role in ecological adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabha, Ratna; Singh, Dhananjaya P; Somvanshi, Pallavi; Rai, Anil

    2016-09-01

    With the availability of complete genome sequences of many cyanobacterial species, it is becoming feasible to study the broad prospective of the environmental adaptation and the overall changes at transcriptional and translational level in these organisms. In the evolutionary phase, niche-specific competitive forces have resulted in specific features of the cyanobacterial genomes. In this study, functional composition of the 84 different cyanobacterial genomes and their adaptations to different environments was examined by identifying the genomic composition for specific cellular processes, which reflect their genomic functional profile and ecological adaptation. It was identified that among cyanobacterial genomes, metabolic genes have major share over other categories and differentiation of genomic functional profile was observed for the species inhabiting different habitats. The cyanobacteria of freshwater and other habitats accumulate large number of poorly characterized genes. Strain specific functions were also reported in many cyanobacterial members, of which an important feature was the occurrence of phage-related sequences. From this study, it can be speculated that habitat is one of the major factors in giving the shape of functional composition of cyanobacterial genomes towards their ecological adaptations. PMID:27408818

  6. Raster image adaptation for mobile devices using profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, René; Hamann, Bernd

    2012-02-01

    Focusing on digital imagery, this paper introduces a strategy to handle heterogeneous hardware in mobile environments. Constrained system resources of most mobile viewing devices require contents that are tailored to the requirements of the user and the capabilities of the device. Appropriate image adaptation is still an unsolved research question. Due to the complexity of the problem, available solutions are either too resource-intensive or inflexible to be more generally applicable. The proposed approach is based on scalable image compression and progressive refinement as well as data and user profiles. A scalable image is created once and used multiple times for different kinds of devices and user requirements. Profiles available on the server side allow for an image representation that is adapted to the most important resources in mobile computing: screen space, computing power, and the volume of the transmitted data. Options for progressively refining content thereby allow for a fluent viewing experience during adaptation. Due to its flexibility and low complexity, the proposed solution is much more general compared to related approaches. To document the advantages of our approach we provide empirical results obtained in experiments with an implementation of the method.

  7. Adaptation from interactions between metabolism and behaviour: self-sensitive behaviour in protocells

    OpenAIRE

    Egbert, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This thesis considers the relationship between adaptive behaviour and metabolism, using theoretical arguments supported by computational models to demonstrate mechanisms of adaptation that are uniquely available to systems based upon the metabolic organisation of self-production. It is argued how, by being sensitive to their metabolic viability, an organism can respond to the quality of its environment with respect to its metabolic well-being. This makes possible simple but powerful ‘self...

  8. The adaptability of career decision-making profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadassi, Reuma; Gati, Itamar; Dayan, Amira

    2012-10-01

    The Career Decision-Making Profiles questionnaire (CDMP; Gati, Landman, Davidovitch, Asulin-Peretz, & Gadassi, 2010) uses a new model for characterizing the way individuals make decisions based on the simultaneous use of 11 dimensions. The present study investigated which pole of each dimension is more adaptive. Using the data of 383 young adults who were about to make a career choice, we assessed the individuals' decision status and the associations of the dimensions Emotional and Personality-related Career decision-making Difficulties (EPCD; Saka, Gati, & Kelly, 2008) and personality factors (NEO Personality Inventory-Revised; Costa & McCrae, 1992). The results suggest that, as hypothesized, comprehensive Information gathering, analytic Information processing, a more internal Locus of control, more Effort invested, less Procrastination, greater Speed of making the final decision, less Dependence on others, and less Desire to please others were more adaptive in making career decisions. However, contrary to our hypotheses, high Aspiration for an ideal occupation was more adaptive for the decision-making process, Willingness to compromise was not associated with more adaptive decision making, and the results regarding Consulting with others were mixed. Gender differences in the CDMP dimensions and counseling implications are discussed. PMID:22746185

  9. Influence of the season on the metabolic profile in Chios sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Dzadzovski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chios is a breed of sheep selected for milk production, with metabolic features typical for a dairy sheep breed. The energy requirements of pregnant sheep is increase in the last weeks of gestation. Metabolic imbalance in the late pregnancy in sheep, usually causea metabolic disorder known as pregnancy toxemia. Additionally, a pregnant sheep exposed to low environmental temperatures has increased energy demands, due to its adaptation to undesirable environmental conditions. The aim of this study was to compare the metabolic profile of Chios sheep exposed to different environmental conditions. Two groups of ewes were instigated. First group included 8 pregnant ewes with clinical signs of pregnancy toxemia exposed to cold stress during the winter season. The second group included 8 non-pregnant, clinically healthy ewes, that were examined during the non-breeding period, in the spring season. Blood samples were taken and serum concentrations of glucose, beta-hydroxybutirate (BHBA, total protein, albumin, urea, creatinine, triglyceride and cholesterol, as well as activity of AST and ALP were determined. Pregnant ewes exposed to cold stress had significantly lower levels of glucose and total protein, and significantly higher levels of BHBA, albumin and AST in the serum compared to non-pregnant ewes that were in optimal environmental conditions. There was no significant difference between the serum levels of urea, creatinine, cholesterol, triglycerides and ALP among the groups. In conclusion, low environmental temperature and poor feeding during the winter season caused metabolic distress in pregnant ewes during the early winter season.

  10. Metabolic and antioxidant profiles of herbal infusions and decoctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotakis, Charalambos; Tsigrimani, Diamantina; Tsiaka, Thalia; Lantzouraki, Dimitra Z; Strati, Irini F; Makris, Constantinos; Tagkouli, Dimitra; Proestos, Charalampos; Sinanoglou, Vassilia J; Zoumpoulakis, Panagiotis

    2016-11-15

    This study implements NMR metabolomics and spectrophotometric studies (Folin-Ciocalteu, FRAP, ABTS) to infusions and decoctions of ten plant species in order to assess and compare the metabolic and antioxidant profiles for each botanical family. Multivariate and univariate data analyses highlighted the differences among the samples and pinpointed specific classes of compounds for each plant species as well as infusions and decoctions. The identified phenolic compounds by NMR, as well as the antioxidant profile, framed a trend of increased values in infusions compared to the decoctions. Moreover, the infusion procedure positively affected the extractability of the phenolic compounds compared to decoctions. The highest total phenolic content was found in Mentha spicata, while the lowest in Matricaria chamomilla preparations, irrespective of the preparation method. The preparation time for the decoctions was examined showing that the 15min preparations were generally found richer in phenolics and of higher antioxidant capacity. PMID:27283718

  11. Quantifying environmental adaptation of metabolic pathways in metagenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gianoulis, Tara A; Raes, Jeroen; Patel, Prianka V;

    2009-01-01

    of particular pathways and subnetworks reflects the adaptation of microbial communities across environments and habitats-i.e., how network dynamics relates to environmental features. Previous research has treated environments as discrete, somewhat simplified classes (e.g., terrestrial vs. marine), and searched......Recently, approaches have been developed to sample the genetic content of heterogeneous environments (metagenomics). However, by what means these sequences link distinct environmental conditions with specific biological processes is not well understood. Thus, a major challenge is how the usage...... of weighted pathways that maximally covaries with a combination of environmental variables (many-to-many), which we term a metabolic footprint. Applied to available aquatic datasets, we identified footprints predictive of their environment that can potentially be used as biosensors. For example, we show...

  12. Metabolic Profiling Regarding Pathogenesis of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun Pyo; Lee, Sae Bom; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Hyung Min; Hong, Ji Yeon; Lee, Won Jun; Choi, Chang Woo; Shin, Hwa Kyun; Kim, Do-Jin; Koh, Eun Suk; Park, Choon-Sik; Kwon, Sung Won; Park, Sung-Woo

    2016-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, eventually fatal disease characterized by fibrosis of the lung parenchyma and loss of lung function. IPF is believed to be caused by repetitive alveolar epithelial cell injury and dysregulated repair process including uncontrolled proliferation of lung (myo) fibroblasts and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins in the interstitial space; however, the pathogenic pathways involved in IPF have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we attempted to characterize metabolic changes of lung tissues involved in the pathogenesis of IPF using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model generated from metabolite data was able to discriminate between the control subjects and IPF patients (R(2)X = 0.37, R(2)Y = 0.613 and Q(2) (cumulative) = 0.54, receiver operator characteristic AUC > 0.9). We discovered 25 metabolite signatures of IPF using both univariate and multivariate statistical analyses (FDR 1). These metabolite signatures indicated alteration in metabolic pathways: adenosine triphosphate degradation pathway, glycolysis pathway, glutathione biosynthesis pathway, and ornithine aminotransferase pathway. The results could provide additional insight into understanding the disease and potential for developing biomarkers. PMID:27052453

  13. Metabolic profiling of hypoxic cells revealed a catabolic signature required for cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Frezza

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is one of the features of poorly vascularised areas of solid tumours but cancer cells can survive in these areas despite the low oxygen tension. The adaptation to hypoxia requires both biochemical and genetic responses that culminate in a metabolic rearrangement to counter-balance the decrease in energy supply from mitochondrial respiration. The understanding of metabolic adaptations under hypoxia could reveal novel pathways that, if targeted, would lead to specific death of hypoxic regions. In this study, we developed biochemical and metabolomic analyses to assess the effects of hypoxia on cellular metabolism of HCT116 cancer cell line. We utilized an oxygen fluorescent probe in anaerobic cuvettes to study oxygen consumption rates under hypoxic conditions without the need to re-oxygenate the cells and demonstrated that hypoxic cells can maintain active, though diminished, oxidative phosphorylation even at 1% oxygen. These results were further supported by in situ microscopy analysis of mitochondrial NADH oxidation under hypoxia. We then used metabolomic methodologies, utilizing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS, to determine the metabolic profile of hypoxic cells. This approach revealed the importance of synchronized and regulated catabolism as a mechanism of adaptation to bioenergetic stress. We then confirmed the presence of autophagy under hypoxic conditions and demonstrated that the inhibition of this catabolic process dramatically reduced the ATP levels in hypoxic cells and stimulated hypoxia-induced cell death. These results suggest that under hypoxia, autophagy is required to support ATP production, in addition to glycolysis, and that the inhibition of autophagy might be used to selectively target hypoxic regions of tumours, the most notoriously resistant areas of solid tumours.

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of Lactobacillus plantarum ZJ316 reveals its genetic adaptation and potential probiotic profiles* #

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Li, Xuan; Gu, Qing; Lou, Xiu-yu; Zhang, Xiao-mei; Song, Da-feng; Zhang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In previous studies, Lactobacillus plantarum ZJ316 showed probiotic properties, such as antimicrobial activity against various pathogens and the capacity to significantly improve pig growth and pork quality. The purpose of this study was to reveal the genes potentially related to its genetic adaptation and probiotic profiles based on comparative genomic analysis. Methods: The genome sequence of L. plantarum ZJ316 was compared with those of eight L. plantarum strains deposited in GenBank. BLASTN, Mauve, and MUMmer programs were used for genome alignment and comparison. CRISPRFinder was applied for searching the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Results: We identified genes that encode proteins related to genetic adaptation and probiotic profiles, including carbohydrate transport and metabolism, proteolytic enzyme systems and amino acid biosynthesis, CRISPR adaptive immunity, stress responses, bile salt resistance, ability to adhere to the host intestinal wall, exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis, and bacteriocin biosynthesis. Conclusions: Comparative characterization of the L. plantarum ZJ316 genome provided the genetic basis for further elucidating the functional mechanisms of its probiotic properties. ZJ316 could be considered a potential probiotic candidate. PMID:27487802

  15. INFLUENCE FEEDING AND TRAINING ON THE METABOLIC PROFIL SPORT HORSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M HALO

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In a group of 11 sport horses, the effect of the traianig process, inclunding training and resting periods, on the metabolic profile. Training proces was divided into four part: I. End of the sport season, II. End of the resting period, III. End of the quantitative training charged and IV. End of the qualitative training charged. The level glucose in the blood serum of the observed horses was stated within the reference limits, with the tendency towards the inncreased values in the 2-st and 4-st period (4,34 – 5,03 mmol.l-1. The average values global lipid and cholesterol was stated whitin the reference limits.

  16. Dynamic Metabolite Profiling in an Archaeon Connects Transcriptional Regulation to Metabolic Consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia Todor

    Full Text Available Previous work demonstrated that the TrmB transcription factor is responsible for regulating the expression of many enzyme-coding genes in the hypersaline-adapted archaeon Halobacterium salinarum via a direct interaction with a cis-regulatory sequence in their promoters. This interaction is abolished in the presence of glucose. Although much is known about the effects of TrmB at the transcriptional level, it remains unclear whether and to what extent changes in mRNA levels directly affect metabolite levels. In order to address this question, here we performed a high-resolution metabolite profiling time course during a change in nutrients using a combination of targeted and untargeted methods in wild-type and ΔtrmB strain backgrounds. We found that TrmB-mediated transcriptional changes resulted in widespread and significant changes to metabolite levels across the metabolic network. Additionally, the pattern of growth complementation using various purines suggests that the mis-regulation of gluconeogenesis in the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose results in low phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP levels. We confirmed these low PRPP levels using a quantitative mass spectrometric technique and found that they are associated with a metabolic block in de novo purine synthesis, which is partially responsible for the growth defect of the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose. In conclusion, we show how transcriptional regulation of metabolism affects metabolite levels and ultimately, phenotypes.

  17. Dynamic Metabolite Profiling in an Archaeon Connects Transcriptional Regulation to Metabolic Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Horia; Gooding, Jessica; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Schmid, Amy K

    2015-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated that the TrmB transcription factor is responsible for regulating the expression of many enzyme-coding genes in the hypersaline-adapted archaeon Halobacterium salinarum via a direct interaction with a cis-regulatory sequence in their promoters. This interaction is abolished in the presence of glucose. Although much is known about the effects of TrmB at the transcriptional level, it remains unclear whether and to what extent changes in mRNA levels directly affect metabolite levels. In order to address this question, here we performed a high-resolution metabolite profiling time course during a change in nutrients using a combination of targeted and untargeted methods in wild-type and ΔtrmB strain backgrounds. We found that TrmB-mediated transcriptional changes resulted in widespread and significant changes to metabolite levels across the metabolic network. Additionally, the pattern of growth complementation using various purines suggests that the mis-regulation of gluconeogenesis in the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose results in low phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) levels. We confirmed these low PRPP levels using a quantitative mass spectrometric technique and found that they are associated with a metabolic block in de novo purine synthesis, which is partially responsible for the growth defect of the ΔtrmB mutant strain in the absence of glucose. In conclusion, we show how transcriptional regulation of metabolism affects metabolite levels and ultimately, phenotypes.

  18. Metabolic analysis of adaptation to short-term changes in culture conditions of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz A Bromke

    Full Text Available This report describes the metabolic and lipidomic profiling of 97 low-molecular weight compounds from the primary metabolism and 124 lipid compounds of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. The metabolic profiles were created for diatoms perturbed for 24 hours with four different treatments: (I removal of nitrogen, (II lower iron concentration, (III addition of sea salt, (IV addition of carbonate to their growth media. Our results show that as early as 24 hours after nitrogen depletion significant qualitative and quantitative change in lipid composition as well as in the primary metabolism of Thalassiosira pseudonana occurs. So we can observe the accumulation of several storage lipids, namely triacylglycerides, and TCA cycle intermediates, of which citric acid increases more than 10-fold. These changes are positively correlated with expression of TCA enzymes genes. Next to the TCA cycle intermediates and storage lipid changes, we have observed decrease in N-containing lipids and primary metabolites such as amino acids. As a measure of counteracting nitrogen starvation, we have observed elevated expression levels of nitrogen uptake and amino acid biosynthetic genes. This indicates that diatoms can fast and efficiently adapt to changing environment by altering the metabolic fluxes and metabolite abundances. Especially, the accumulation of proline and the decrease of dimethylsulfoniopropionate suggest that the proline is the main osmoprotectant for the diatom in nitrogen rich conditions.

  19. Metabolic analysis of adaptation to short-term changes in culture conditions of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromke, Mariusz A; Giavalisco, Patrick; Willmitzer, Lothar; Hesse, Holger

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the metabolic and lipidomic profiling of 97 low-molecular weight compounds from the primary metabolism and 124 lipid compounds of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. The metabolic profiles were created for diatoms perturbed for 24 hours with four different treatments: (I) removal of nitrogen, (II) lower iron concentration, (III) addition of sea salt, (IV) addition of carbonate to their growth media. Our results show that as early as 24 hours after nitrogen depletion significant qualitative and quantitative change in lipid composition as well as in the primary metabolism of Thalassiosira pseudonana occurs. So we can observe the accumulation of several storage lipids, namely triacylglycerides, and TCA cycle intermediates, of which citric acid increases more than 10-fold. These changes are positively correlated with expression of TCA enzymes genes. Next to the TCA cycle intermediates and storage lipid changes, we have observed decrease in N-containing lipids and primary metabolites such as amino acids. As a measure of counteracting nitrogen starvation, we have observed elevated expression levels of nitrogen uptake and amino acid biosynthetic genes. This indicates that diatoms can fast and efficiently adapt to changing environment by altering the metabolic fluxes and metabolite abundances. Especially, the accumulation of proline and the decrease of dimethylsulfoniopropionate suggest that the proline is the main osmoprotectant for the diatom in nitrogen rich conditions. PMID:23799147

  20. Study of protein and metabolic profile of sugarcane workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polachini, G.M.; Tajara, E.H. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil); Santos, U.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Zeri, A.C.M.; Paes Leme, A.F. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The National Alcohol Program (Proalcool) is a successful Brazilian renewable fuel initiative aiming to reduce the country's oil dependence. Producing ethanol from sugar cane, the program has shown positive results although accompanied by potential damage. The environmental impact mainly derives from the particulate matter emissions due to sugarcane burning, which is potentially harmful to human health. The physical activity of sugarcane workers is repetitive and exhaustive and is carried out in presence of dust, smoke and soot. The efforts by the sugarcane workers during the labor process result in increased risks of nervous, respiratory and cardiovascular system diseases and also in premature death. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of occupational stress on protein and metabolic profile of sugarcane workers. Forty serum samples were analyzed by 1-DE and LC MS/MS proteomic shotgun strategy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). A set of proteins was found to be altered in workers after crops when compared with controls. The analysis of NMR spectra by Chenomx also showed differences in the expression of metabolites. For example, lactate displayed higher levels in control subjects than in sugarcane workers, and vice versa for the acetate. The concentrations of the two metabolites were lower after the crop, except in the case of acetate, which remained uniform in the control subjects before and after the crop. The present findings can have important application for rational designs of preventive measures and early disease detection in sugarcane workers. (author)

  1. Study of protein and metabolic profile of sugarcane workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The National Alcohol Program (Proalcool) is a successful Brazilian renewable fuel initiative aiming to reduce the country's oil dependence. Producing ethanol from sugar cane, the program has shown positive results although accompanied by potential damage. The environmental impact mainly derives from the particulate matter emissions due to sugarcane burning, which is potentially harmful to human health. The physical activity of sugarcane workers is repetitive and exhaustive and is carried out in presence of dust, smoke and soot. The efforts by the sugarcane workers during the labor process result in increased risks of nervous, respiratory and cardiovascular system diseases and also in premature death. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of occupational stress on protein and metabolic profile of sugarcane workers. Forty serum samples were analyzed by 1-DE and LC MS/MS proteomic shotgun strategy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). A set of proteins was found to be altered in workers after crops when compared with controls. The analysis of NMR spectra by Chenomx also showed differences in the expression of metabolites. For example, lactate displayed higher levels in control subjects than in sugarcane workers, and vice versa for the acetate. The concentrations of the two metabolites were lower after the crop, except in the case of acetate, which remained uniform in the control subjects before and after the crop. The present findings can have important application for rational designs of preventive measures and early disease detection in sugarcane workers. (author)

  2. Viticultural practice and winemaking effects on metabolic profile of Negroamaro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascali, Sandra Angelica; Coletta, Antonio; Del Coco, Laura; Basile, Teodora; Gambacorta, Giuseppe; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2014-10-15

    Metabolic profiles of 32 Negroamaro red wines were analysed using (1)H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analyses (Principal Component Analysis, PCA, and Orthogonal Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis, OPLS-DA). Among winemaking technologies three were compared: ultrasounds (U; 12 samples), cryomaceration using dry ice (C; 12 samples) and traditional (T; 8 samples). Moreover, each vinification technology was used for grapes grown by two different soil management practices, soil tillage (ST; 16 samples) and cover crop (CC; 16 samples), and by two different training systems, monolateral (M; 16 samples) and bilateral Guyot (B; 16 samples). All statistical models applied on NMR data revealed a good separation between ST (soil tillage) and CC (cover crop), showing a higher influence of the soil management practices compared to the winemaking technologies (ultrasound, cryomaceration and traditional). The differentiation among samples, due to soil management practices, was mainly caused by metabolites such as glycerol, 2,3-butanediol, malic acid, α/β-glucose and phenolic compounds, such as tyrosine and caffeic acid.

  3. Metabolomic and Proteomic Profiles Reveal the Dynamics of Primary Metabolism during Seed Development of Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Fu, Jinlei; Li, Ming; Fragner, Lena; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Yang, Pingfang

    2016-01-01

    Sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) belongs to the Nelumbonaceae family. Its seeds are widely consumed in Asian countries as snacks or even medicine. Besides the market value, lotus seed also plays a crucial role in the lotus life cycle. Consequently, it is essential to gain a comprehensive understanding of the development of lotus seed. During its development, lotus seed undergoes cell division, expansion, reserve accumulation, desiccation, and maturation phases. We observed morphological and biochemical changes from 10 to 25 days after pollination (DAP) which corresponded to the reserve synthesis and accumulation phase. The volume of the seed expanded until 20 DAP with the color of the seed coat changing from yellow-green to dark green and gradually fading again. Starch and protein rapidly accumulated from 15 to 20 DAP. To further reveal metabolic adaptation, primary metabolites and proteins profiles were obtained using mass spectrometry based platforms. Metabolites and enzymes involved in sugar metabolism, glycolysis, TCA cycle and amino acid metabolism showed sequential dynamics enabling the clear separation of the different metabolic states during lotus seed development. The integration of the data revealed a highly significant metabolic switch at 15 DAP going through a transition of metabolically highly active tissue to the preparation of storage tissue. The results provide a reference data set for the evaluation of primary metabolism during lotus seed development. PMID:27375629

  4. Metabolomic and proteomic profiles reveal the dynamics of primary metabolism during seed development of lotus (Nelumbo nucifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingfang eYang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera belongs to Nelumbonaceae family. Its seeds are widely consumed in Asia countries as snacks or even medicine. Besides the market values, lotus seed also plays crucial roles in lotus life cycle. Consequently, it is essential to gain a comprehensive understanding of the development of lotus seed. During its development, lotus seed undergoes cell division, expansion, reserve accumulation, desiccation and maturation phases. We observed morphological and biochemical changes from 10 to 25 days after pollination (DAP which was corresponding to the reserve synthesis and accumulation phase. The volume of the seed expanded until 20 DAP with the color of the seed coat changing from yellow-green to dark green and gradually fading again. Starch and protein rapidly accumulated from 15 to 20 DAP. To further reveal the metabolism adaptation, primary metabolites and proteins profiles were obtained using mass spectrometry based platforms. Metabolites and enzymes involved in sugar metabolism, glycolysis, TCA cycle and amino acids metabolism showed sequential dynamics enabling the clear separation of the different metabolic states during lotus seed development. The integration of the data revealed a highly significant metabolic switch at 15 DAP going through a transition of metabolically highly active tissue to the preparation of storage tissue. The results provide reference data set for the evaluation of primary metabolism during lotus seed development.

  5. Metabolomic and Proteomic Profiles Reveal the Dynamics of Primary Metabolism during Seed Development of Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Fu, Jinlei; Li, Ming; Fragner, Lena; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Yang, Pingfang

    2016-01-01

    Sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) belongs to the Nelumbonaceae family. Its seeds are widely consumed in Asian countries as snacks or even medicine. Besides the market value, lotus seed also plays a crucial role in the lotus life cycle. Consequently, it is essential to gain a comprehensive understanding of the development of lotus seed. During its development, lotus seed undergoes cell division, expansion, reserve accumulation, desiccation, and maturation phases. We observed morphological and biochemical changes from 10 to 25 days after pollination (DAP) which corresponded to the reserve synthesis and accumulation phase. The volume of the seed expanded until 20 DAP with the color of the seed coat changing from yellow-green to dark green and gradually fading again. Starch and protein rapidly accumulated from 15 to 20 DAP. To further reveal metabolic adaptation, primary metabolites and proteins profiles were obtained using mass spectrometry based platforms. Metabolites and enzymes involved in sugar metabolism, glycolysis, TCA cycle and amino acid metabolism showed sequential dynamics enabling the clear separation of the different metabolic states during lotus seed development. The integration of the data revealed a highly significant metabolic switch at 15 DAP going through a transition of metabolically highly active tissue to the preparation of storage tissue. The results provide a reference data set for the evaluation of primary metabolism during lotus seed development.

  6. Metabolic Adaptations of White Lupin Roots and Shoots under Phosphorus Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Julia; Gödde, Victoria; Niehaus, Karsten; Zörb, Christian

    2015-01-01

    White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) is highly adapted to phosphorus-diminished soils. P-deficient white lupin plants modify their root architecture and physiology to acquire sparingly available soil phosphorus. We employed gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for metabolic profiling of P-deficient white lupins, to investigate biochemical pathways involved in the P-acquiring strategy. After 14 days of P-deficiency, plants showed reduced levels of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in shoots. Phosphorylated metabolites such as glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, myo-inositol-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate were reduced in both shoots and roots. After 22 days of P-deficiency, no effect on shoot or root sugar metabolite levels was found, but the levels of phosphorylated metabolites were further reduced. Organic acids, amino acids and several shikimate pathway products showed enhanced levels in 22-day-old P-deficient roots and shoots. These results indicate that P-deficient white lupins adapt their carbohydrate partitioning between shoot and root in order to supply their growing root system as an early response to P-deficiency. Organic acids are released into the rhizosphere to mobilize phosphorus from soil particles. A longer period of P-deficiency leads to scavenging of Pi from P-containing metabolites and reduced protein anabolism, but enhanced formation of secondary metabolites. The latter can serve as stress protection molecules or actively acquire phosphorus from the soil. PMID:26635840

  7. Cold adaptation increases rates of nutrient flow and metabolic plasticity during cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Caroline M; McCue, Marshall D; Sunny, Nishanth E; Szejner-Sigal, Andre; Morgan, Theodore J; Allison, David B; Hahn, Daniel A

    2016-09-14

    Metabolic flexibility is an important component of adaptation to stressful environments, including thermal stress and latitudinal adaptation. A long history of population genetic studies suggest that selection on core metabolic enzymes may shape life histories by altering metabolic flux. However, the direct relationship between selection on thermal stress hardiness and metabolic flux has not previously been tested. We investigated flexibility of nutrient catabolism during cold stress in Drosophila melanogaster artificially selected for fast or slow recovery from chill coma (i.e. cold-hardy or -susceptible), specifically testing the hypothesis that stress adaptation increases metabolic turnover. Using (13)C-labelled glucose, we first showed that cold-hardy flies more rapidly incorporate ingested carbon into amino acids and newly synthesized glucose, permitting rapid synthesis of proline, a compound shown elsewhere to improve survival of cold stress. Second, using glucose and leucine tracers we showed that cold-hardy flies had higher oxidation rates than cold-susceptible flies before cold exposure, similar oxidation rates during cold exposure, and returned to higher oxidation rates during recovery. Additionally, cold-hardy flies transferred compounds among body pools more rapidly during cold exposure and recovery. Increased metabolic turnover may allow cold-adapted flies to better prepare for, resist and repair/tolerate cold damage. This work illustrates for the first time differences in nutrient fluxes associated with cold adaptation, suggesting that metabolic costs associated with cold hardiness could invoke resource-based trade-offs that shape life histories. PMID:27605506

  8. A Supporting System for Adaptive Peer Review based on Learners' Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Crespo García, Raquel; Pardo Sánchez, Abelardo

    2010-01-01

    Intelligent tutoring systems cover a wide range of educational processes. There are however scarce attempts to apply those principles for adapting peer review processes according to the student's profile in the educational settings. In this paper, the Adaptive Peer Review methodology is reviewed, paying special attention to the problem of building the student profile. A supporting system based on such Adaptive Peer Review methodology is then introduced, which should facilitate teachers the ad...

  9. Dynamical feedback between circadian clock and sucrose availability explains adaptive response of starch metabolism to various photoperiods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Gabriel Feugier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants deal with resource management during all their life. During the day they feed on photosynthetic carbon, sucrose, while storing a part into starch for night use. Careful control of carbon partitioning, starch degradation and sucrose export rates is crucial to avoid carbon starvation, insuring optimal growth whatever the photoperiod. Efficient regulation of these key metabolic rates can give an evolutionary advantage to plants. Here we propose a model of adaptive starch metabolism in response to various photoperiods. We assume the three key metabolic rates to be circadian regulated in leaves and that their phases of oscillations are shifted in response to sucrose starvation. We performed gradient descents for various photoperiod conditions to find the corresponding optimal sets of phase shifts that minimize starvation. Results at convergence were all consistent with experimental data: i diurnal starch profile showed linear increase during the day and linear decrease at night; ii shorter photoperiod tended to increase starch synthesis speed while decreasing its degradation speed during the longer night; iii sudden early dusk showed slower starch degradation during the longer night. Profiles that best explained observations corresponded to circadian regulation of all rates. This theoretical study would establish a framework for future research on feedback between starch metabolism and circadian clock as well as plant productivity.

  10. Metabolic insight into mechanisms of high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Ri-Li; Simonson, Tatum S.; Cooksey, Robert C.; Tanna, Uran; Qin, Ga; Huff, Chad D.; WITHERSPOON, DAVID J.; Xing, Jinchuan; Zhengzhong, Bai; Prchal, Josef T.; Jorde, Lynn B.; McClain, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have identified genes involved in high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans. Genetic variants/haplotypes within regions containing three of these genes (EPAS1, EGLN1, and PPARA) are associated with relatively decreased hemoglobin levels observed in Tibetans at high altitude, providing corroborative evidence for genetic adaptation to this extreme environment. The mechanisms that afford adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia, however, remain unclear. Considering the strong metabolic dema...

  11. AMPKα in Exercise-Induced Substrate Metabolism and Exercise Training-Induced Metabolic and Mitochondrial Adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz, Joachim

    metabolic capacity through several mechanisms. Some of the most important are increases in muscle capillarization and in expression of metabolic and mitochondrial proteins that transport and metabolize glucose and fatty acids. The protein AMPK is a trimeric protein composed of an  α-, β- and a y...

  12. Exercise, PGC-1α and metabolic adaptation in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Zhen

    2009-01-01

    Endurance exercise promotes skeletal muscle adaptation, and exercise-induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1α (Pgc-1α) gene expression may play a pivotal role in the adaptive processes. Recent applications of mouse genetic models and in vivo imaging in exercise studies started to delineate the signaling-transcription pathways that are involved in the regulation of the Pgc-1α gene. These studies revealed the importance of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/...

  13. Glucocorticoids, metabolic adaptations and recovery : studies in specific mouse models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auvinen, Hanna Elina

    2013-01-01

    Today’s Western society and work promotes a sedentary lifestyle. This, coupled with high caloric food availability has increased obesity followed by an increased prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Epidemiological data show a clear as

  14. Adaptations to climate in candidate genes for common metabolic disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Hancock

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary pressures due to variation in climate play an important role in shaping phenotypic variation among and within species and have been shown to influence variation in phenotypes such as body shape and size among humans. Genes involved in energy metabolism are likely to be central to heat and cold tolerance. To test the hypothesis that climate shaped variation in metabolism genes in humans, we used a bioinformatics approach based on network theory to select 82 candidate genes for common metabolic disorders. We genotyped 873 tag SNPs in these genes in 54 worldwide populations (including the 52 in the Human Genome Diversity Project panel and found correlations with climate variables using rank correlation analysis and a newly developed method termed Bayesian geographic analysis. In addition, we genotyped 210 carefully matched control SNPs to provide an empirical null distribution for spatial patterns of allele frequency due to population history alone. For nearly all climate variables, we found an excess of genic SNPs in the tail of the distributions of the test statistics compared to the control SNPs, implying that metabolic genes as a group show signals of spatially varying selection. Among our strongest signals were several SNPs (e.g., LEPR R109K, FABP2 A54T that had previously been associated with phenotypes directly related to cold tolerance. Since variation in climate may be correlated with other aspects of environmental variation, it is possible that some of the signals that we detected reflect selective pressures other than climate. Nevertheless, our results are consistent with the idea that climate has been an important selective pressure acting on candidate genes for common metabolic disorders.

  15. Preadipocyte factor-1 is associated with metabolic profile in severe obesity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, J

    2011-04-01

    Dysfunctional adipose tissue has been proposed as a key pathological process linking obesity and metabolic disease. Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1) has been shown to inhibit differentiation in adipocyte precursor cells and could thereby play a role in determining adipocyte size, adipose tissue functioning, and metabolic profile in obese individuals.

  16. Adaptation to different types of stress converge on mitochondrial metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahtvee, Petri-Jaan; Kumar, Rahul; Hallstrom, B. M.;

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cell factories encounter physical and chemical stresses when used for industrial production of fuels and chemicals. These stresses reduce productivity and increase bioprocess costs. Understanding the mechanisms of the stress response is essential for improving cellular robustness in platform......-level analysis, we found that most stress responses converge on mitochondrial processes. Our analysis revealed that stress-specific factors differ between applied stresses; however, they are underpinned by an increased ATP demand. We found that when ATP demand increases to high levels, respiration cannot provide...... sufficient ATP, leading to onset of respirofermentative metabolism. Although stress-specific factors increase ATP demand for cellular growth under stressful conditions, increased ATP demand for cellular maintenance underpins a general stress response and is responsible for the onset of overflow metabolism....

  17. Metabolic Risk Profile and Cancer in Korean Men and Women

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Seulki; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Kim, Dongwoo; Kim, A-Rim; Kim, Eun-Jung; Seo, Hye-Young

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Associations between metabolic syndrome and several types of cancer have recently been documented. Methods: We analyzed the sample cohort data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service from 2002, with a follow-up period extending to 2013. The cohort data included 99 565 individuals who participated in the health examination program and whose data were therefore present ...

  18. Fungal Inositol Pyrophosphate IP7 Is Crucial for Metabolic Adaptation to the Host Environment and Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Sophie; Li, Cecilia; Desmarini, Desmarini; Saiardi, Adolfo; Fewings, Nicole L.; Schibeci, Stephen D.; Sharma, Raghwa; Sorrell, Tania C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inositol pyrophosphates (PP-IPs) comprising inositol, phosphate, and pyrophosphate (PP) are essential for multiple functions in eukaryotes. Their role in fungal pathogens has never been addressed. Cryptococcus neoformans is a model pathogenic fungus causing life-threatening meningoencephalitis. We investigate the cryptococcal kinases responsible for the production of PP-IPs (IP7/IP8) and the hierarchy of PP-IP importance in pathogenicity. Using gene deletion and inositol polyphosphate profiling, we identified Kcs1 as the major IP6 kinase (producing IP7) and Asp1 as an IP7 kinase (producing IP8). We show that Kcs1-derived IP7 is the most crucial PP-IP for cryptococcal drug susceptibility and the production of virulence determinants. In particular, Kcs1 kinase activity is essential for cryptococcal infection of mouse lungs, as reduced fungal burdens were observed in the absence of Kcs1 or when Kcs1 was catalytically inactive. Transcriptome and carbon source utilization analysis suggested that compromised growth of the KCS1 deletion strain (Δkcs1 mutant) in the low-glucose environment of the host lung is due to its inability to utilize alternative carbon sources. Despite this metabolic defect, the Δkcs1 mutant established persistent, low-level asymptomatic pulmonary infection but failed to elicit a strong immune response in vivo and in vitro and was not readily phagocytosed by primary or immortalized monocytes. Reduced recognition of the Δkcs1 cells by monocytes correlated with reduced exposure of mannoproteins on the Δkcs1 mutant cell surface. We conclude that IP7 is essential for fungal metabolic adaptation to the host environment, immune recognition, and pathogenicity. PMID:26037119

  19. Cognitive and adaptive behavior profiles of children with Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sarika U; Goddard-Finegold, Jan; Beaudet, Arthur L; Madduri, Niru; Turcich, Marie; Bacino, Carlos A

    2004-07-15

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by maternal deficiency of the UBE3A gene that encodes E6-AP ubiquitin-protein ligase. Expression of the UBE3A gene from the maternal chromosome is essential to prevent AS. AS is characterized by severe mental retardation, ataxia, and a defined behavioral pattern characterized mainly by happy/sociable disposition. This study used the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales to examine the cognitive abilities and adaptive behavior of children (n = 20) with the four known molecular classes of AS, including patterns of strengths and weaknesses across adaptive behavior domains, and the relationship between adaptive behavior and overall cognitive abilities. Cognitive skills fell within the severe to profound range of mental deficiency. Differences in cognitive skills according to genetic subtype only partially supported previous research and suggest that there is overlap in abilities across genetic subtypes of AS. Adaptive behavior skills were also significantly delayed, with participants demonstrating a significant strength in socialization, and a weakness in motor skills. Strong, positive correlations emerge between cognitive ability scores and adaptive behaviors scores. These results provide further delineation of a cognitive/behavioral phenotype in AS.

  20. Recovery of Phenotypes Obtained by Adaptive Evolution through Inverse Metabolic Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Kuk-Ki; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    In a previous study, system level analysis of adaptively evolved yeast mutants showing improved galactose utilization revealed relevant mutations. The governing mutations were suggested to be in the Ras/PKA signaling pathway and ergosterol metabolism. Here, site-directed mutants having one of the...... the identification of specific mutations by systems biology can direct new metabolic engineering strategies for improving galactose utilization by yeast....

  1. Metabolic adaptation of skeletal muscles to gravitational unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Y.; Yasui, W.; Kariya, F.; Wakatsuki, T.; Nakamura, K.; Asakura, T.; Edgerton, V. R.

    Responses of high-energy phosphates and metabolic properties to hindlimb suspension were studied in adult rats. The relative content of phosphocreatine (PCr) in the calf muscles was significantly higher in rats suspended for 10 days than in age-matched cage controls. The Pi/PCr ratio, where Pi is inorganic phosphate, in suspended muscles was less than controls. The absolute weights of soleus and medial gastrocnemius (MG) were approximately 40% less than controls. Although the % fiber distribution in MG was unchanged, the % slow fibers decreased and the % fibers which were classified as both slow and fast was increased in soleus. The activities (per unit weight or protein) of succinate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in soleus were unchanged but those of cytochrome oxidase, β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase, and citrate synthase were decreased following unloading. None of these enzyme activities in MG changed. However, the total levels of all enzymes in whole muscles decreased by suspension. It is suggested that shift of slow muscle toward fast type by unloading is associated with a decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis. Further, gravitational unloading affected the levels of muscle proteins differently even in the same mitochondrial enzymes. Unloading-related atrophy is prominent in red muscle or slow-twitch fiber 1, 2. Such atrophy is accompanied by a shift of contractile properties toward fast-twitch type 2-9. Further, inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism in these muscles is also reported by some studies 10-14 suggesting a lowered mitochondrial biogenesis, although results from some studies do not necessarily agree 1, 7, 15. However, the precise mechanism responsible for such alterations of muscle properties in response to gravitational unloading is unclear. On the contrary, mitochondrial biogenesis, suggested by mitochondrial enzyme activities and/or mass, is stimulated in muscles with depleted high-energy phosphates by cold exposure 16 and/or by feeding

  2. Role of AMPK in skeletal muscle metabolic regulation and adaptation in relation to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck; Richter, Erik; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    during exercise as well as in adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise training. The first part of this review is focused on different mechanisms regulating AMPK activity during muscle work such as alterations in nucleotide concentrations, availability of energy substrates and upstream AMPK kinases. We...... in relation to adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise training.......The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a potent regulator of skeletal muscle metabolism and gene expression. AMPK is activated both in response to in vivo exercise and ex vivo contraction. AMPK is therefore believed to be an important signalling molecule in regulating muscle metabolism...

  3. Predicting enzyme targets for cancer drugs by profiling human Metabolic reactions in NCI-60 cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Wai-Ki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drugs can influence the whole metabolic system by targeting enzymes which catalyze metabolic reactions. The existence of interactions between drugs and metabolic reactions suggests a potential way to discover drug targets. Results In this paper, we present a computational method to predict new targets for approved anti-cancer drugs by exploring drug-reaction interactions. We construct a Drug-Reaction Network to provide a global view of drug-reaction interactions and drug-pathway interactions. The recent reconstruction of the human metabolic network and development of flux analysis approaches make it possible to predict each metabolic reaction's cell line-specific flux state based on the cell line-specific gene expressions. We first profile each reaction by its flux states in NCI-60 cancer cell lines, and then propose a kernel k-nearest neighbor model to predict related metabolic reactions and enzyme targets for approved cancer drugs. We also integrate the target structure data with reaction flux profiles to predict drug targets and the area under curves can reach 0.92. Conclusions The cross validations using the methods with and without metabolic network indicate that the former method is significantly better than the latter. Further experiments show the synergism of reaction flux profiles and target structure for drug target prediction. It also implies the significant contribution of metabolic network to predict drug targets. Finally, we apply our method to predict new reactions and possible enzyme targets for cancer drugs.

  4. Adaptive robust control of longitudinal and transverse electron beam profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeizadeh, Amin; Schilcher, Thomas; Smith, Roy S.

    2016-05-01

    Feedback control of the longitudinal and transverse electron beam profiles are considered to be critical for beam control in accelerators. In the feedback scheme, the longitudinal or transverse beam profile is measured and compared to a desired profile to give an error estimate. The error is then used to act on the appropriate actuators to correct the profile. The role of the transverse feedback is to steer the beam in a particular trajectory, known as the "orbit." The common approach for orbit correction is based on approximately inverting the response matrix, and in the best case, involves regulating or filtering the singular values. In the current contribution, a more systematic and structured way of handling orbit correction is introduced giving robustness against uncertainties in the response matrix. Moreover, the input bounds are treated to avoid violating the limits of the corrector currents. The concept of the robust orbit correction has been successfully tested at the SwissFEL injector test facility. In the SwissFEL machine, a photo-injector laser system extracts electrons from a cathode and a similar robust control method is developed for the longitudinal feedback control of the current profile of the electron bunch. The method manipulates the angles of the crystals in the laser system to produce a desired charge distribution over the electron bunch length. This approach paves the way towards automation of laser pulse stacking.

  5. Metabolic profiling as a tool for prioritizing antimicrobial compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Changsheng; Choi, Young Hae; van Wezel, Gilles P.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is an analytical technique that allows scientists to globally profile low molecular weight metabolites between samples in a medium- or high throughput environment. Different biological samples are statistically analyzed and correlated to a bioactivity of interest, highlighting different

  6. Learner Profile Management for Collaborative Adaptive eLearning Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrifai, Mohammad; Dolog, Peter; Nejdl, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive Learning Systems would perform better if they would be able to exchange as many relevant fragments of information about the learner as possible. The use of Web Services standards is recently gaining the attention of many researches as a promising solution for the problem of interfacing a...

  7. Distribution of Metabolically Active Prokaryotes (Archaea and Bacteria) throughout the Profiles of Chernozem and Brown Semidesert Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, M. V.; Manucharova, N. A.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2016-02-01

    The distribution of metabolically active cells of archaea and bacteria in the profiles of typical chernozems (Voronezh oblast) and brown semidesert soils (Astrakhan oblast) of natural and agricultural ecosystems was studied using the method of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The studied soils differed sharply in the microbial biomass and in the numbers of metabolically active cells of archaea and bacteria. The number of active bacterial cells was 3.5-7.0 times greater than that of archaea. In the arable chernozem, the numbers of active cells of archaea and bacteria were 2.6 and 1.5 times, respectively, lower than those in the chernozem under the shelterbelt. The agricultural use of the brown semidesert soil had little effect on the abundances of bacteria and archaea. The soil organic carbon content was the major factor controlling the numbers of metabolically active cells of both domains. However, the dependence of the abundance of bacteria on the organic matter content was more pronounced. The decrease in the organic carbon and total nitrogen contents down the soil profiles was accompanied by the decrease in the bacteria: archaea ratio attesting to a better adaptation of archaea to the permanent deficiency of carbon and nitrogen. The bacteria: archaea ratio can serve as an ecotrophic indicator of the state of soil microbial communities.

  8. Obese Patients With a Binge Eating Disorder Have an Unfavorable Metabolic and Inflammatory Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succurro, Elena; Segura-Garcia, Cristina; Ruffo, Mariafrancesca; Caroleo, Mariarita; Rania, Marianna; Aloi, Matteo; De Fazio, Pasquale; Sesti, Giorgio; Arturi, Franco

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate whether obese patients with a binge eating disorder (BED) have an altered metabolic and inflammatory profile related to their eating behaviors compared with non-BED obese.A total of 115 White obese patients consecutively recruited underwent biochemical, anthropometrical evaluation, and a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Patients answered the Binge Eating Scale and were interviewed by a psychiatrist. The patients were subsequently divided into 2 groups according to diagnosis: non-BED obese (n = 85) and BED obese (n = 30). Structural equation modeling analysis was performed to elucidate the relation between eating behaviors and metabolic and inflammatory profile.BED obese exhibited significantly higher percentages of altered eating behaviors, body mass index (P eating disorder obese also had a worse metabolic and inflammatory profile, exhibiting significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (P eating behaviors of BED and the metabolic and inflammatory profile.Binge eating disorder obese exhibited an unfavorable metabolic and inflammatory profile, which is related to their characteristic eating habits.

  9. Adaptative diversity of calcium metabolism in gammarus fossarum populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyran, J.C. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1994-11-01

    Analysis of Gammarus fossarum populations from mountain torrents in the Grenoble region reveals some morphological and eco physiological diversity which appears to be related to the calcium concentration of the water after both field and laboratory experimentation. Animals from waters with a high calcium concentration (located in Chartreuse and Vercors) show larger size and a longer molt cycle than those from low calcium concentrated waters (located in Belledonne); their calcium balance during the molt cycle is different. Translocation experiments confirm these differences: a significant increase of the duration of the molt cycle is observed in animals translocated to lower calcium concentrated waters and vice-versa whereas no significant difference is observed between controls and animals translocated within comparably calcium concentrated waters. The causes of such an adaptative diversity between Gammarus fossarum populations will be researched at the genetic level, namely through mitochondrial DNA investigations. (author). 25 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  10. Adaptative diversity of calcium metabolism in gammarus fossarum populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of Gammarus fossarum populations from mountain torrents in the Grenoble region reveals some morphological and eco physiological diversity which appears to be related to the calcium concentration of the water after both field and laboratory experimentation. Animals from waters with a high calcium concentration (located in Chartreuse and Vercors) show larger size and a longer molt cycle than those from low calcium concentrated waters (located in Belledonne); their calcium balance during the molt cycle is different. Translocation experiments confirm these differences: a significant increase of the duration of the molt cycle is observed in animals translocated to lower calcium concentrated waters and vice-versa whereas no significant difference is observed between controls and animals translocated within comparably calcium concentrated waters. The causes of such an adaptative diversity between Gammarus fossarum populations will be researched at the genetic level, namely through mitochondrial DNA investigations. (author). 25 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  11. Metabolic profile in growing buffalo heifers fed diet with different energy content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gasparrini

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to verify the relation among the mediators and indicators of nutritional status like insulin, glucagon, urea, cholesterol, triglycerides and total proteins in growing buffalo heifers, fed diets with different energy density. 12 Murrah heifers were randomly allocated into two dietary treatments (High, Group H; Low, Group L that differed in energetic levels (Group H: 5.8 UFL/d; Group L: 3.6 UFL/d. Every 30 days, for a total of five times, blood samples were collected at 08.00 h, before feeding, from the jugular vein in vacutainer tubes and analysed to determine metabolic profile. Data on haematic constants were analysed by ANOVA for repeated measures with treatment as the main factor. Low energy availability and low NSC reduced the glucose and insulin and increased glucagone and urea blood levels. The increase of NSC in the diet of group H during the experiment may caused a reduction of the fibre digestibility after the period of adaptation of the rumen microflora and, as a paradox effect, suffered for an energetic lack with a subsequent activation of lipolysis and mobilization of their body reserves. Liver and muscular synthesis increase in group with a high energy availability.

  12. Metabolic Profiling of Human Benign and Malignant Pulmonary Nodules Using Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Nam Ong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN or coin lesion is a mass in the lung and can be commonly found in chest X-rays or computerized tomography (CT scans. However, despite the advancement of imaging technologies, it is still difficult to distinguish malignant cancer from benign SPNs. Here we investigated the metabolic profiling of patients with benign and malignant pulmonary nodules. A combination of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS was used to profile the plasma metabolites in 17 patients with malignant SPNs, 15 patients with benign SPNs and 20 healthy controls. The metabolic profiles were assayed using OPLS-DA, and further analyzed to identify marker metabolites related to diseases. Both GC/MS- and LC/MS-derived models showed clear discriminations in metabolic profiles among three groups. It was found that 63 metabolites (12 from GC/MS, 51 from LC/MS contributed to the differences. Of these, 48 metabolites showed same change trend in both malignant and benign SPNs as compared with healthy controls, indicating some common pathways including inflammation and oxidative injury shared by two diseases. In contrast, 14 metabolites constituted distinct profiles that differentiated malignant from benign SPNs, which might be a unique biochemical feature associated with lung cancer. Overall, our data suggested that integration of two highly sensitive and complementary metabolomics platforms could enable a comprehensive metabolic profiling and assist in discrimination malignant from benign SPNs.

  13. Associations between ionomic profile and metabolic abnormalities in human population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few studies assessed effects of individual and multiple ions simultaneously on metabolic outcomes, due to methodological limitation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By combining advanced ionomics and mutual information, a quantifying measurement for mutual dependence between two random variables, we investigated associations of ion modules/networks with overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS and type 2 diabetes (T2DM in 976 middle-aged Chinese men and women. Fasting plasma ions were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Significant ion modules were selected by mutual information to construct disease related ion networks. Plasma copper and phosphorus always ranked the first two among three specific ion networks associated with overweight/obesity, MetS and T2DM. Comparing the ranking of ion individually and in networks, three patterns were observed (1 "Individual ion," such as potassium and chrome, which tends to work alone; (2 "Module ion," such as iron in T2DM, which tends to act in modules/network; and (3 "Module-individual ion," such as copper in overweight/obesity, which seems to work equivalently in either way. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, by using the novel approach of the ionomics strategy and the information theory, we observed potential associations of ions individually or as modules/networks with metabolic disorders. Certainly, these findings need to be confirmed in future biological studies.

  14. Genome-Wide Fitness and Expression Profiling Implicate Mga2 in Adaptation to Hydrogen Peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan Kelley; Trey Ideker

    2009-01-01

    Caloric restriction extends lifespan, an effect once thought to involve attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by aerobic metabolism. However, recent evidence suggests that caloric restriction may in fact raise ROS levels, which in turn provides protection from acute doses of oxidant through a process called adaptation. To shed light on the molecular mechanisms of adaptation, we designed a series of genome-wide deletion fitness and mRNA expression screens to identify genes inv...

  15. Metabolic adaptation in transplastomic plants massively accumulating recombinant proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Bally

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant chloroplasts are endowed with an astonishing capacity to accumulate foreign proteins. However, knowledge about the impact on resident proteins of such high levels of recombinant protein accumulation is lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we used proteomics to characterize tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum plastid transformants massively accumulating a p-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD or a green fluorescent protein (GFP. While under the conditions used no obvious modifications in plant phenotype could be observed, these proteins accumulated to even higher levels than ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, the most abundant protein on the planet. This accumulation occurred at the expense of a limited number of leaf proteins including Rubisco. In particular, enzymes involved in CO(2 metabolism such as nuclear-encoded plastidial Calvin cycle enzymes and mitochondrial glycine decarboxylase were found to adjust their accumulation level to these novel physiological conditions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results document how protein synthetic capacity is limited in plant cells. They may provide new avenues to evaluate possible bottlenecks in recombinant protein technology and to maintain plant fitness in future studies aiming at producing recombinant proteins of interest through chloroplast transformation.

  16. Metabolic Disorders in the Transition Period Indicate that the Dairy Cows’ Ability to Adapt is Overstressed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundrum, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Metabolic disorders are a key problem in the transition period of dairy cows and often appear before the onset of further health problems. Problems derive from difficulties animals have to adapt to large variations and disturbances occurring both outside and inside the organism. A lack of success in solving these issues may be due to predominant approaches in farm management and agricultural science, dealing with such disorders as merely negative side effects. Instead, a successful adaptation of animals to their living conditions should be seen as an important end in itself. Both farm management and agricultural sciences should support animals in their ability to cope with nutritional and metabolic challenges by employing a functional and result-driven approach. Abstract Metabolic disorders are a key problem in the transition period of dairy cows and often appear before the onset of further health problems. They mainly derive from difficulties the animals have in adapting to changes and disturbances occurring both outside and inside the organisms and due to varying gaps between nutrient supply and demand. Adaptation is a functional and target-oriented process involving the whole organism and thus cannot be narrowed down to single factors. Most problems which challenge the organisms can be solved in a number of different ways. To understand the mechanisms of adaptation, the interconnectedness of variables and the nutrient flow within a metabolic network need to be considered. Metabolic disorders indicate an overstressed ability to balance input, partitioning and output variables. Dairy cows will more easily succeed in adapting and in avoiding dysfunctional processes in the transition period when the gap between nutrient and energy demands and their supply is restricted. Dairy farms vary widely in relation to the living conditions of the animals. The complexity of nutritional and metabolic processes and their large variations on various scales

  17. Profile-based adaptive anomaly detection for network security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengchu C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Durgin, Nancy Ann

    2005-11-01

    As information systems become increasingly complex and pervasive, they become inextricably intertwined with the critical infrastructure of national, public, and private organizations. The problem of recognizing and evaluating threats against these complex, heterogeneous networks of cyber and physical components is a difficult one, yet a solution is vital to ensuring security. In this paper we investigate profile-based anomaly detection techniques that can be used to address this problem. We focus primarily on the area of network anomaly detection, but the approach could be extended to other problem domains. We investigate using several data analysis techniques to create profiles of network hosts and perform anomaly detection using those profiles. The ''profiles'' reduce multi-dimensional vectors representing ''normal behavior'' into fewer dimensions, thus allowing pattern and cluster discovery. New events are compared against the profiles, producing a quantitative measure of how ''anomalous'' the event is. Most network intrusion detection systems (IDSs) detect malicious behavior by searching for known patterns in the network traffic. This approach suffers from several weaknesses, including a lack of generalizability, an inability to detect stealthy or novel attacks, and lack of flexibility regarding alarm thresholds. Our research focuses on enhancing current IDS capabilities by addressing some of these shortcomings. We identify and evaluate promising techniques for data mining and machine-learning. The algorithms are ''trained'' by providing them with a series of data-points from ''normal'' network traffic. A successful algorithm can be trained automatically and efficiently, will have a low error rate (low false alarm and miss rates), and will be able to identify anomalies in ''pseudo real-time'' (i.e., while the intrusion is still in progress

  18. Metabolic disturbances, side effect profile and effectiveness of clozapine in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Data on effect of clozapine on metabolic syndrome in adolescent patients with psychosis are limited. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and incidence of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents with psychotic disorders prior to clozapine and while receiving clozapine. Secondary aims were to study the effectiveness and side effect profile of clozapine. Materials and Methods: Thirteen child and adolescent patients were evaluated at baseline, 3 months, and a follow-up beyond 6 months. Assessments were made for metabolic profile, effectiveness by positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS, and side effects. Results: Prior to starting of clozapine, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 23%. After 3 months on clozapine, 38.5% (5/13 patients fulfilled criteria of metabolic syndrome and further on follow-up beyond 6 months (with last observation carried forward 46.2% (6/13 had developed metabolic syndrome. There was a significant reduction in PANSS scores at 3 months and follow-up more so in those who developed metabolic syndrome at 3 months. Among the other side effects, hypersalivation was the most common side effect (100% followed by sedation (69%. Conclusion: Half the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in adolescents on clozapine can be attributed to other factors prior to starting of clozapine, and another half can be attributed to clozapine. Clozapine is effective in an adolescent population.

  19. Altered circadian rhythm and metabolic gene profile in rats subjected to advanced light phase shifts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Herrero

    Full Text Available The circadian clock regulates metabolic homeostasis and its disruption predisposes to obesity and other metabolic diseases. However, the effect of phase shifts on metabolism is not completely understood. We examined whether alterations in the circadian rhythm caused by phase shifts induce metabolic changes in crucial genes that would predispose to obesity. Three-month-old rats were maintained on a standard diet under lighting conditions with chronic phase shifts consisting of advances, delays or advances plus delays. Serum leptin, insulin and glucose levels decreased only in rats subjected to advances. The expression of the clock gene Bmal 1 increased in the hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT, brown adipose tissue (BAT and liver of the advanced group compared to control rats. The advanced group showed an increase in hypothalamic AgRP and NPY mRNA, and their lipid metabolism gene profile was altered in liver, WAT and BAT. WAT showed an increase in inflammation and ER stress and brown adipocytes suffered a brown-to-white transformation and decreased UCP-1 expression. Our results indicate that chronic phase advances lead to significant changes in neuropeptides, lipid metabolism, inflammation and ER stress gene profile in metabolically relevant tissues such as the hypothalamus, liver, WAT and BAT. This highlights a link between alteration of the circadian rhythm and metabolism at the transcriptional level.

  20. Adaptive super-twisting observer for estimation of random road excitation profile in automotive suspension systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, J J; Veluvolu, K C; Defoort, M

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of road excitation profile is important for evaluation of vehicle stability and vehicle suspension performance for autonomous vehicle control systems. In this work, the nonlinear dynamics of the active automotive system that is excited by the unknown road excitation profile are considered for modeling. To address the issue of estimation of road profile, we develop an adaptive supertwisting observer for state and unknown road profile estimation. Under Lipschitz conditions for the nonlinear functions, the convergence of the estimation error is proven. Simulation results with Ford Fiesta MK2 demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer for state and unknown input estimation for nonlinear active suspension system.

  1. Adaptive Super-Twisting Observer for Estimation of Random Road Excitation Profile in Automotive Suspension Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Rath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of road excitation profile is important for evaluation of vehicle stability and vehicle suspension performance for autonomous vehicle control systems. In this work, the nonlinear dynamics of the active automotive system that is excited by the unknown road excitation profile are considered for modeling. To address the issue of estimation of road profile, we develop an adaptive supertwisting observer for state and unknown road profile estimation. Under Lipschitz conditions for the nonlinear functions, the convergence of the estimation error is proven. Simulation results with Ford Fiesta MK2 demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer for state and unknown input estimation for nonlinear active suspension system.

  2. Metabolite profiling identifies candidate markers reflecting the clinical adaptations associated with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Mutch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB surgery is associated with weight loss, improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis, and a reduction in co-morbidities such as diabetes and coronary heart disease. To generate further insight into the numerous metabolic adaptations associated with RYGB surgery, we profiled serum metabolites before and after gastric bypass surgery and integrated metabolite changes with clinical data. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Serum metabolites were detected by gas and liquid chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry before, and 3 and 6 months after RYGB in morbidly obese female subjects (n = 14; BMI = 46.2+/-1.7. Subjects showed decreases in weight-related parameters and improvements in insulin sensitivity post surgery. The abundance of 48% (83 of 172 of the measured metabolites changed significantly within the first 3 months post RYGB (p<0.05, including sphingosines, unsaturated fatty acids, and branched chain amino acids. Dividing subjects into obese (n = 9 and obese/diabetic (n = 5 groups identified 8 metabolites that differed consistently at all time points and whose serum levels changed following RYGB: asparagine, lysophosphatidylcholine (C18:2, nervonic (C24:1 acid, p-Cresol sulfate, lactate, lycopene, glucose, and mannose. Changes in the aforementioned metabolites were integrated with clinical data for body mass index (BMI and estimates for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. Of these, nervonic acid was significantly and negatively correlated with HOMA-IR (p = 0.001, R = -0.55. CONCLUSIONS: Global metabolite profiling in morbidly obese subjects after RYGB has provided new information regarding the considerable metabolic alterations associated with this surgical procedure. Integrating clinical measurements with metabolomics data is capable of identifying markers that reflect the metabolic adaptations following RYGB.

  3. Metabolic Disorders in the Transition Period Indicate that the Dairy Cows’ Ability to Adapt is Overstressed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Sundrum

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders are a key problem in the transition period of dairy cows and often appear before the onset of further health problems. They mainly derive from difficulties the animals have in adapting to changes and disturbances occurring both outside and inside the organisms and due to varying gaps between nutrient supply and demand. Adaptation is a functional and target-oriented process involving the whole organism and thus cannot be narrowed down to single factors. Most problems which challenge the organisms can be solved in a number of different ways. To understand the mechanisms of adaptation, the interconnectedness of variables and the nutrient flow within a metabolic network need to be considered. Metabolic disorders indicate an overstressed ability to balance input, partitioning and output variables. Dairy cows will more easily succeed in adapting and in avoiding dysfunctional processes in the transition period when the gap between nutrient and energy demands and their supply is restricted. Dairy farms vary widely in relation to the living conditions of the animals. The complexity of nutritional and metabolic processes Animals 2015, 5 979 and their large variations on various scales contradict any attempts to predict the outcome of animals’ adaptation in a farm specific situation. Any attempts to reduce the prevalence of metabolic disorders and associated production diseases should rely on continuous and comprehensive monitoring with appropriate indicators on the farm level. Furthermore, low levels of disorders and diseases should be seen as a further significant goal which carries weight in addition to productivity goals. In the long run, low disease levels can only be expected when farmers realize that they can gain a competitive advantage over competitors with higher levels of disease.

  4. Elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress impairs metabolic adaptations to exercise in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D Crane

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a complex phenomenon that is inherently tied to energy provision and is implicated in many metabolic disorders. Exercise training increases mitochondrial oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle yet it remains unclear if oxidative stress plays a role in regulating these adaptations. We demonstrate that the chronic elevation in mitochondrial oxidative stress present in Sod2 (+/- mice impairs the functional and biochemical mitochondrial adaptations to exercise. Following exercise training Sod2 (+/- mice fail to increase maximal work capacity, mitochondrial enzyme activity and mtDNA copy number, despite a normal augmentation of mitochondrial proteins. Additionally, exercised Sod2 (+/- mice cannot compensate for their higher amount of basal mitochondrial oxidative damage and exhibit poor electron transport chain complex assembly that accounts for their compromised adaptation. Overall, these results demonstrate that chronic skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative stress does not impact exercise induced mitochondrial biogenesis, but impairs the resulting mitochondrial protein function and can limit metabolic plasticity.

  5. A non-traditional model of the metabolic syndrome: the adaptive significance of insulin resistance in fasting-adapted seals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorian S Houser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance in modern society is perceived as a pathological consequence of excess energy consumption and reduced physical activity. Its presence in relation to the development of cardiovascular risk factors has been termed the metabolic syndrome, which produces increased mortality and morbidity and which is rapidly increasing in human populations. Ironically, insulin resistance likely evolved to assist animals during food shortages by increasing the availability of endogenous lipid for catabolism while protecting protein from use in gluconeogenesis and eventual oxidation. Some species that incorporate fasting as a predictable component of their life history demonstrate physiological traits similar to the metabolic syndrome during prolonged fasts. One such species is the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris, which fasts from food and water for periods of up to three months. During this time, ~90% of the seals metabolic demands are met through fat oxidation and circulating non-esterified fatty acids are high (0.7-3.2 mM. All life history stages of elephant seal studied to date demonstrate insulin resistance and fasting hyperglycemia as well as variations in hormones and adipocytokines that reflect the metabolic syndrome to some degree. Elephant seals demonstrate some intriguing adaptations with the potential for medical advancement; for example, ketosis is negligible despite significant and prolonged fatty acid oxidation and investigation of this feature might provide insight into the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. The parallels to the metabolic syndrome are likely reflected to varying degrees in other marine mammals, most of which evolved on diets high in lipid and protein content but essentially devoid of carbohydrate. Utilization of these natural models of insulin resistance may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome in humans and better assist the development of preventative measures

  6. Effects of Cadmium Exposure on Growth and Metabolic Profile of Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Xie; Longxing Hu; Zhimin Du; Xiaoyan Sun; Erick Amombo; Jibiao Fan; Jinmin Fu

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic responses to cadmium (Cd) may be associated with variations in Cd tolerance in plants. The objectives of this study were to examine changes in metabolic profiles in bermudagrass in response to Cd stress and to identify predominant metabolites associated with differential Cd tolerance using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Two genotypes of bermudagrass with contrasting Cd tolerance were exposed to 0 and 1.5 mM CdSO4 for 14 days in hydroponics. Physiological responses to Cd were ...

  7. Metabolic profiling as a tool for prioritizing antimicrobial compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Changsheng; Choi, Young Hae; van Wezel, Gilles P.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is an analytical technique that allows scientists to globally profile low molecular weight metabolites between samples in a medium- or high-throughput environment. Different biological samples are statistically analyzed and correlated to a bioactivity of interest, highlighting differentially produced compounds as potential biomarkers. Here, we review NMR- and MS-based metabolomics as technologies to facilitate the identification of novel antimicrobial natural products from microb...

  8. Review: Microfluidic Applications in Metabolomics and Metabolic Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Kraly, James R.; Holcomb, Ryan E.; Guan, Qian; Charles S. Henry

    2009-01-01

    Metabolomics is an emerging area of research focused on measuring small molecules in biological samples. There are a number of different types of metabolomics, ranging from global profiling of all metabolites in a single sample to measurement of a selected group of analytes. Microfluidics and related technologies have been used in this research area with good success. The aim of this review article is to summarize the use of microfluidics in metabolomics. Direct application of microfluidics t...

  9. Metabolic model-based integration of microbiome taxonomic and metabolomic profiles elucidates mechanistic links between ecological and metabolic variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noecker, Cecilia; Eng, Alexander; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Theriot , Casey M.; Young, VIncent B.; Jansson, Janet K.; Fredricks, David N.; Borenstein, Elhanan A.

    2016-01-19

    Multiple molecular assays now enable high-throughput profiling of the ecology, metabolic capacity, and activity of the human microbiome. However, to date analyses of such multi-meta-omic data typically focus on statistical associations, often ignoring extensive prior knowledge of the mechanisms linking these various facets of the microbiome. Here we introduce a comprehensive framework to systematically link variation in metabolomic data with community composition by utilizing taxonomic, genomic, and metabolic information. Specifically, we integrate available and inferred genomic data, metabolic network modeling, and a method for predicting community-wide metabolite turnover to estimate the biosynthetic and degradation potential of a given community. Our framework then compares variation in predicted metabolic potential with variation in measured metabolites' abundances to evaluate whether community composition can explain observed shifts in the community metabolome, and to identify key taxa and genes contributors. Focusing on two independent vaginal microbiome datasets, each pairing 16S community profiling with large-scale metabolomics, we demonstrate that our framework successfully recapitulates observed variation in 37% of metabolites. Well-predicted metabolite variation tends to result from disease-associated metabolism. We further identify several disease-enriched species that significantly contribute to these predictions. Interestingly, our analysis also detects metabolites for which predicted variation negatively correlates with measured variation, suggesting environmental control points of community metabolism. Applying this framework to gut microbiome datasets reveals similar trends,including prediction of bile acid metabolite shifts. This framework is an important first step towards a system-level multi-omic integration and an improved mechanistic understanding of the microbiome activity and dynamics in health and disease.

  10. Metabolic profiles of dystrophin and utrophin expression in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, J L; Sang, E; Evens, T; Davies, K; Clarke, K

    2002-10-23

    Metabolic profiles from (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been used to describe both one and two protein systems in four mouse models related to Duchenne muscular dystrophy using the pattern recognition technique partial least squares. Robust statistical models were built for extracts and intact cardiac tissue, distinguishing mice according to expression of dystrophin. Using metabolic profiles of diaphragm, models were built describing dystrophin and utrophin, a dystrophin related protein, expression. Increased utrophin expression counteracted some of the deficits associated with dystrophic tissue. This suggests the method may be ideal for following treatment regimes such as gene therapy. PMID:12387876

  11. Biochemical association of metabolic profile and microbiome in chronic pressure ulcer wounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Cloud B Ammons

    Full Text Available Chronic, non-healing wounds contribute significantly to the suffering of patients with co-morbidities in the clinical population with mild to severely compromised immune systems. Normal wound healing proceeds through a well-described process. However, in chronic wounds this process seems to become dysregulated at the transition between resolution of inflammation and re-epithelialization. Bioburden in the form of colonizing bacteria is a major contributor to the delayed headlining in chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers. However how the microbiome influences the wound metabolic landscape is unknown. Here, we have used a Systems Biology approach to determine the biochemical associations between the taxonomic and metabolomic profiles of wounds colonized by bacteria. Pressure ulcer biopsies were harvested from primary chronic wounds and bisected into top and bottom sections prior to analysis of microbiome by pyrosequencing and analysis of metabolome using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Bacterial taxonomy revealed that wounds were colonized predominantly by three main phyla, but differed significantly at the genus level. While taxonomic profiles demonstrated significant variability between wounds, metabolic profiles shared significant similarity based on the depth of the wound biopsy. Biochemical association between taxonomy and metabolic landscape indicated significant wound-to-wound similarity in metabolite enrichment sets and metabolic pathway impacts, especially with regard to amino acid metabolism. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a statistically robust correlation between bacterial colonization and metabolic landscape within the chronic wound environment.

  12. Radiation Changes the Metabolic Profiling of Melanoma Cell Line B16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yating; Liang, Wei; Zheng, Qinghui; Huang, Xianing; Huang, Yong; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy can be an effective way to kill cancer cells using ionizing radiation, but some tumors are resistant to radiation therapy and the underlying mechanism still remains elusive. It is therefore necessary to establish an appropriate working model to study and monitor radiation-mediated cancer therapy. In response to cellular stress, the metabolome is the integrated profiling of changes in all metabolites in cells, which can be used to investigate radiation tolerance mechanisms and identify targets for cancer radiation sensibilization. In this study, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance for untargeted metabolic profiling in radiation-tolerant mouse melanoma cell line B16, we comprehensively investigated changes in metabolites and metabolic network in B16 cells in response to radiation. Principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis indicated the difference in cellular metabolites between the untreated cells and X-ray radiated cells. In radiated cells, the content of alanine, glutamate, glycine and choline was increased, while the content of leucine, lactate, creatine and creatine phosphate was decreased. Enrichment analysis of metabolic pathway showed that the changes in metabolites were related to multiple metabolic pathways including the metabolism of glycine, arginine, taurine, glycolysis, and gluconeogenesis. Taken together, with cellular metabolome study followed by bioinformatic analysis to profile specific metabolic pathways in response to radiation, we deepened our understanding of radiation-resistant mechanisms and radiation sensibilization in cancer, which may further provide a theoretical and practical basis for personalized cancer therapy. PMID:27631970

  13. Volatile profiling reveals intracellular metabolic changes in Aspergillus parasiticus: veA regulates branched chain amino acid and ethanol metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roze Ludmila V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous fungi in the genus Aspergillus produce a variety of natural products, including aflatoxin, the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen known. Aflatoxin biosynthesis, one of the most highly characterized secondary metabolic pathways, offers a model system to study secondary metabolism in eukaryotes. To control or customize biosynthesis of natural products we must understand how secondary metabolism integrates into the overall cellular metabolic network. By applying a metabolomics approach we analyzed volatile compounds synthesized by Aspergillus parasiticus in an attempt to define the association of secondary metabolism with other metabolic and cellular processes. Results Volatile compounds were examined using solid phase microextraction - gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In the wild type strain Aspergillus parasiticus SU-1, the largest group of volatiles included compounds derived from catabolism of branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, and valine; we also identified alcohols, esters, aldehydes, and lipid-derived volatiles. The number and quantity of the volatiles produced depended on media composition, time of incubation, and light-dark status. A block in aflatoxin biosynthesis or disruption of the global regulator veA affected the volatile profile. In addition to its multiple functions in secondary metabolism and development, VeA negatively regulated catabolism of branched chain amino acids and synthesis of ethanol at the transcriptional level thus playing a role in controlling carbon flow within the cell. Finally, we demonstrated that volatiles generated by a veA disruption mutant are part of the complex regulatory machinery that mediates the effects of VeA on asexual conidiation and sclerotia formation. Conclusions 1 Volatile profiling provides a rapid, effective, and powerful approach to identify changes in intracellular metabolic networks in filamentous fungi. 2 VeA coordinates the

  14. Volatile profiling reveals intracellular metabolic changes in Aspergillus parasiticus: veA regulates branched chain amino acid and ethanol metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Filamentous fungi in the genus Aspergillus produce a variety of natural products, including aflatoxin, the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen known. Aflatoxin biosynthesis, one of the most highly characterized secondary metabolic pathways, offers a model system to study secondary metabolism in eukaryotes. To control or customize biosynthesis of natural products we must understand how secondary metabolism integrates into the overall cellular metabolic network. By applying a metabolomics approach we analyzed volatile compounds synthesized by Aspergillus parasiticus in an attempt to define the association of secondary metabolism with other metabolic and cellular processes. Results Volatile compounds were examined using solid phase microextraction - gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In the wild type strain Aspergillus parasiticus SU-1, the largest group of volatiles included compounds derived from catabolism of branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, and valine); we also identified alcohols, esters, aldehydes, and lipid-derived volatiles. The number and quantity of the volatiles produced depended on media composition, time of incubation, and light-dark status. A block in aflatoxin biosynthesis or disruption of the global regulator veA affected the volatile profile. In addition to its multiple functions in secondary metabolism and development, VeA negatively regulated catabolism of branched chain amino acids and synthesis of ethanol at the transcriptional level thus playing a role in controlling carbon flow within the cell. Finally, we demonstrated that volatiles generated by a veA disruption mutant are part of the complex regulatory machinery that mediates the effects of VeA on asexual conidiation and sclerotia formation. Conclusions 1) Volatile profiling provides a rapid, effective, and powerful approach to identify changes in intracellular metabolic networks in filamentous fungi. 2) VeA coordinates the biosynthesis of secondary

  15. Validation Through Simulations of a Cn2 Profiler for the ESO/VLT Adaptive Optics Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Rissmann, A; Kolb, J; Louarn, M Le; Madec, P -Y; Neichel, B

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) project envisages transforming one of the VLT units into an adaptive telescope and providing its ESO (European Southern Observatory) second generation instruments with turbulence corrected wavefronts. For MUSE and HAWK-I this correction will be achieved through the GALACSI and GRAAL AO modules working in conjunction with a 1170 actuators Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF). Multiple wavefront sensors will enable GLAO and LTAO capabilities, whose performance can greatly benefit from a knowledge about the stratification of the turbulence in the atmosphere. This work, totally based on end-to-end simulations, describes the validation tests conducted on a Cn2 profiler adapted for the AOF specifications. Because an absolute profile calibration is strongly dependent on a reliable knowledge of turbulence parameters r0 and L0, the tests presented here refer only to normalized output profiles. Uncertainties in the input parameters inherent t...

  16. In Vivo NMR Metabolic Profiling of Fabrea salina Reveals Sequential Defense Mechanisms against Ultraviolet Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Marangoni, Roberto; Paris, Debora; Melck, Dominique; Fulgentini, Lorenzo; Colombetti, Giuliano; Motta, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Fabrea salina is a hypersaline ciliate that is known to be among the strongest ultraviolet (UV)-resistant microorganisms; however, the molecular mechanisms of this resistance are almost unknown. By means of in vivo NMR spectroscopy, we determined the metabolic profile of living F. salina cells exposed to visible light and to polychromatic UV-B + UV-A + Vis radiation for several different exposure times. We used unsupervised pattern-recognition analysis to compare these profiles and discovered...

  17. Rural and urban differences in metabolic profiles in a Cameroonian population

    OpenAIRE

    Clarisse Noel Ayina Ayina Lissock; Eugene Sobngwi; Eliane Ngassam; Laurent Serge Etoundi Ngoa

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The difference between modern lifestyle in urban areas and the traditional way of life in rural areas may affect the population's health in developing countries proportionally. In this study, we sought to describe and compare the metabolic (fasting blood sugar and lipid profile) profile in an urban and rural sample of a Cameroonian population, and study the association to anthropometric risk factors of obesity. Methods 332 urban and 120 rural men and women originating from the Sa...

  18. Metabolic Dysfunction in Heart Failure: Diagnostic, Prognostic, and Pathophysiologic Insights From Metabolomic Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Wynn G; Kelly, Jacob P; McGarrah, Robert W; Kraus, William E; Shah, Svati H

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic impairment is an intrinsic component of heart failure (HF) pathophysiology. Although initially conceived as a myocardial defect, metabolic dysfunction is now recognized as a systemic process with complex interplay between the myocardium and peripheral tissues and organs. Specifically, HF-associated metabolic dysfunction includes alterations in substrate utilization, insulin resistance, defects in energy production, and imbalanced anabolic-catabolic signaling leading to cachexia. Each of these metabolic abnormalities is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in patients with HF; however, their detection and therapeutic management remains challenging. Given the difficulty in obtaining human cardiac tissue for research purposes, peripheral blood metabolomic profiling, a well-established approach for characterizing small-molecule metabolite intermediates from canonical biochemical pathways, may be a useful technology for dissecting biomarkers and mechanisms of metabolic impairment in HF. In this review, metabolic abnormalities in HF will be discussed with particular emphasis on the application of metabolomic profiling to detecting, risk stratifying, and identifying novel targets for metabolic therapy in this heterogeneous population. PMID:27216948

  19. p300 is not required for metabolic adaptation to endurance exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBarge, Samuel A; Migdal, Christopher W; Buckner, Elisa H; Okuno, Hiroshi; Gertsman, Ilya; Stocks, Ben; Barshop, Bruce A; Nalbandian, Sarah R; Philp, Andrew; McCurdy, Carrie E; Schenk, Simon

    2016-04-01

    The acetyltransferase, E1a-binding protein (p300), is proposed to regulate various aspects of skeletal muscle development, metabolism, and mitochondrial function,viaits interaction with numerous transcriptional regulators and other proteins. Remarkably, however, the contribution of p300 to skeletal muscle function and metabolism,in vivo, is poorly understood. To address this, we used Cre-LoxP methodology to generate mice with skeletal muscle-specific knockout of E1a-binding protein (mKO). mKO mice were indistinguishable from their wild-type/floxed littermates, with no differences in lean mass, skeletal muscle structure, fiber type, respirometry flux, or metabolites of fatty acid and amino acid metabolism.Ex vivomuscle function in extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles, including peak stress and time to fatigue, as well asin vivorunning capacity were also comparable. Moreover, expected adaptations to a 20 d voluntary wheel running regime were not compromised in mKO mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that p300 is not required for the normal development or functioning of adult skeletal muscle, nor is it required for endurance exercise-mediated mitochondrial adaptations.-LaBarge, S. A., Migdal, C. W., Buckner, E. H., Okuno, H., Gertsman, I., Stocks, B., Barshop, B. A., Nalbandian, S. R., Philp, A., McCurdy, C. E., Schenk, S. p300 is not required for metabolic adaptation to endurance exercise training.

  20. Understanding developmental and adaptive cues in pine through metabolite profiling and co-expression network analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cañas, Rafael A.; Canales, Javier; Muñoz-Hernández, Carmen; Granados, Jose M.; Ávila, Concepción; García-Martín, María L.; Cánovas, Francisco M.

    2015-01-01

    Conifers include long-lived evergreen trees of great economic and ecological importance, including pines and spruces. During their long lives conifers must respond to seasonal environmental changes, adapt to unpredictable environmental stresses, and co-ordinate their adaptive adjustments with internal developmental programmes. To gain insights into these responses, we examined metabolite and transcriptomic profiles of needles from naturally growing 25-year-old maritime pine (Pinus pinaster L....

  1. The evolution of control and distribution of adaptive mutations in a metabolic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kevin M; Rausher, Mark D

    2010-02-01

    In an attempt to understand whether it should be expected that some genes tend to be used disproportionately often by natural selection, we investigated two related phenomena: the evolution of flux control among enzymes in a metabolic pathway and properties of adaptive substitutions in pathway enzymes. These two phenomena are related by the principle that adaptive substitutions should occur more frequently in enzymes with greater flux control. Predicting which enzymes will be preferentially involved in adaptive evolution thus requires an evolutionary theory of flux control. We investigated the evolution of enzyme control in metabolic pathways with two models of enzyme kinetics: metabolic control theory (MCT) and Michaelis-Menten saturation kinetics (SK). Our models generate two main predictions for pathways in which reactions are moderately to highly irreversible: (1) flux control will evolve to be highly unequal among enzymes in a pathway and (2) upstream enzymes evolve a greater control coefficient then those downstream. This results in upstream enzymes fixing the majority of beneficial mutations during adaptive evolution. Once the population has reached high fitness, the trend is reversed, with the majority of neutral/slightly deleterious mutations occurring in downstream enzymes. These patterns are the result of three factors (the first of these is unique to the MCT simulations while the other two seem to be general properties of the metabolic pathways): (1) the majority of randomly selected, starting combinations of enzyme kinetic rates generate pathways that possess greater control for the upstream enzymes compared to downstream enzymes; (2) selection against large pools of intermediate substrates tends to prevent majority control by downstream enzymes; and (3) equivalent mutations in enzyme kinetic rates have the greatest effect on flux for enzymes with high levels of flux control, and these enzymes will accumulate adaptive substitutions, strengthening their

  2. Coregulation of host-adapted metabolism and virulence by pathogenic yersiniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Kathrin eHeroven

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Deciphering the principles how pathogenic bacteria adapt their metabolism to a specific host microenvironment is critical for understanding bacterial pathogenesis. The enteric pathogenic Yersinia species Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica and the causative agent of plague, Y. pestis, are able to survive in a large variety of environmental reservoirs (e.g. soil, plants, insects as well as warm-blooded animals (e.g. rodents, pigs, humans with a particular preference for lymphatic tissues. In order to manage rapidly changing environmental conditions and inter-bacterial competition, Yersinia senses the nutritional composition during the course of an infection by special molecular devices, integrates this information and adapts its metabolism accordingly. In addition, nutrient availability has an impact on expression of virulence genes in response to C-sources, demonstrating a tight link between the pathogenicity of yersiniae and utilization of nutrients. Recent studies revealed that global regulatory factors such as the cAMP receptor protein (Crp and the carbon storage regulator (Csr system are part of a large network of transcriptional and posttranscriptional control strategies adjusting metabolic changes and virulence in response to temperature, ion and nutrient availability. Gained knowledge about the specific metabolic requirements and the correlation between metabolic and virulence gene expression that enable efficient host colonization led to the identification of new potential antimicrobial targets.

  3. Coregulation of host-adapted metabolism and virulence by pathogenic yersiniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Dersch, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the principles how pathogenic bacteria adapt their metabolism to a specific host microenvironment is critical for understanding bacterial pathogenesis. The enteric pathogenic Yersinia species Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica and the causative agent of plague, Yersinia pestis, are able to survive in a large variety of environmental reservoirs (e.g., soil, plants, insects) as well as warm-blooded animals (e.g., rodents, pigs, humans) with a particular preference for lymphatic tissues. In order to manage rapidly changing environmental conditions and interbacterial competition, Yersinia senses the nutritional composition during the course of an infection by special molecular devices, integrates this information and adapts its metabolism accordingly. In addition, nutrient availability has an impact on expression of virulence genes in response to C-sources, demonstrating a tight link between the pathogenicity of yersiniae and utilization of nutrients. Recent studies revealed that global regulatory factors such as the cAMP receptor protein (Crp) and the carbon storage regulator (Csr) system are part of a large network of transcriptional and posttranscriptional control strategies adjusting metabolic changes and virulence in response to temperature, ion and nutrient availability. Gained knowledge about the specific metabolic requirements and the correlation between metabolic and virulence gene expression that enable efficient host colonization led to the identification of new potential antimicrobial targets. PMID:25368845

  4. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoti Verma-Gaur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory changes that drive biofilm maturation remains to be fully understood. We show here that the RNA binding protein Puf3 regulates a posttranscriptional mRNA network in C. albicans that impacts on mitochondrial biogenesis, and provide the first functional data suggesting evolutionary rewiring of posttranscriptional gene regulation between the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans. A proportion of the Puf3 mRNA network is differentially expressed in biofilms, and by using a mutant in the mRNA deadenylase CCR4 (the enzyme recruited to mRNAs by Puf3 to control transcript stability we show that posttranscriptional regulation is important for mitochondrial regulation in biofilms. Inactivation of CCR4 or dis-regulation of mitochondrial activity led to altered biofilm structure and over-production of extracellular matrix material. The extracellular matrix is critical for antifungal resistance and immune evasion, and yet of all biofilm maturation pathways extracellular matrix biogenesis is the least understood. We propose a model in which the hypoxic biofilm environment is sensed by regulators such as Ccr4 to orchestrate metabolic adaptation, as well as the regulation of extracellular matrix production by impacting on the expression of matrix-related cell wall genes. Therefore metabolic changes in biofilms might be intimately linked to a key biofilm maturation mechanism that ultimately results in untreatable fungal disease.

  5. Metabolic Analysis of Adaptation to Short-Term Changes in Culture Conditions of the Marine Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    OpenAIRE

    Bromke, Mariusz A; Patrick Giavalisco; Lothar Willmitzer; Holger Hesse

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the metabolic and lipidomic profiling of 97 low-molecular weight compounds from the primary metabolism and 124 lipid compounds of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. The metabolic profiles were created for diatoms perturbed for 24 hours with four different treatments: (I) removal of nitrogen, (II) lower iron concentration, (III) addition of sea salt, (IV) addition of carbonate to their growth media. Our results show that as early as 24 hours after nitrogen depletion sig...

  6. Metabolic profiling as a tool for prioritizing antimicrobial compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changsheng; Choi, Young Hae; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-03-01

    Metabolomics is an analytical technique that allows scientists to globally profile low molecular weight metabolites between samples in a medium- or high-throughput environment. Different biological samples are statistically analyzed and correlated to a bioactivity of interest, highlighting differentially produced compounds as potential biomarkers. Here, we review NMR- and MS-based metabolomics as technologies to facilitate the identification of novel antimicrobial natural products from microbial sources. Approaches to elicit the production of poorly expressed (cryptic) molecules are thereby a key to allow statistical analysis of samples to identify bioactive markers, while connection of compounds to their biosynthetic gene cluster is a determining step in elucidating the biosynthetic pathway and allows downstream process optimization and upscaling. The review focuses on approaches built around NMR-based metabolomics, which enables efficient dereplication and guided fractionation of (antimicrobial) compounds. PMID:26335567

  7. Adaptation of the Biolog Phenotype MicroArrayTM Technology to Profile the Obligate Anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyner, Dominique; Fortney, Julian; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry

    2010-05-17

    The Biolog OmniLog? Phenotype MicroArray (PM) plate technology was successfully adapted to generate a select phenotypic profile of the strict anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens (G.m.). The profile generated for G.m. provides insight into the chemical sensitivity of the organism as well as some of its metabolic capabilities when grown with a basal medium containing acetate and Fe(III). The PM technology was developed for aerobic organisms. The reduction of a tetrazolium dye by the test organism represents metabolic activity on the array which is detected and measured by the OmniLog(R) system. We have previously adapted the technology for the anaerobic sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris. In this work, we have taken the technology a step further by adapting it for the iron reducing obligate anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens. In an osmotic stress microarray it was determined that the organism has higher sensitivity to impermeable solutes 3-6percent KCl and 2-5percent NaNO3 that result in osmotic stress by osmosis to the cell than to permeable non-ionic solutes represented by 5-20percent ethylene glycol and 2-3percent urea. The osmotic stress microarray also includes an array of osmoprotectants and precursor molecules that were screened to identify substrates that would provide osmotic protection to NaCl stress. None of the substrates tested conferred resistance to elevated concentrations of salt. Verification studies in which G.m. was grown in defined medium amended with 100mM NaCl (MIC) and the common osmoprotectants betaine, glycine and proline supported the PM findings. Further verification was done by analysis of transcriptomic profiles of G.m. grown under 100mM NaCl stress that revealed up-regulation of genes related to degradation rather than accumulation of the above-mentioned osmoprotectants. The phenotypic profile, supported by additional analysis indicates that the accumulation of these osmoprotectants as a response to salt stress does not

  8. Estimation of dynamic flux profiles from metabolic time series data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou I-Chun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in modern high-throughput techniques of molecular biology have enabled top-down approaches for the estimation of parameter values in metabolic systems, based on time series data. Special among them is the recent method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE, which uses such data not only for parameter estimation but also for the identification of functional forms of the processes governing a metabolic system. DFE furthermore provides diagnostic tools for the evaluation of model validity and of the quality of a model fit beyond residual errors. Unfortunately, DFE works only when the data are more or less complete and the system contains as many independent fluxes as metabolites. These drawbacks may be ameliorated with other types of estimation and information. However, such supplementations incur their own limitations. In particular, assumptions must be made regarding the functional forms of some processes and detailed kinetic information must be available, in addition to the time series data. Results The authors propose here a systematic approach that supplements DFE and overcomes some of its shortcomings. Like DFE, the approach is model-free and requires only minimal assumptions. If sufficient time series data are available, the approach allows the determination of a subset of fluxes that enables the subsequent applicability of DFE to the rest of the flux system. The authors demonstrate the procedure with three artificial pathway systems exhibiting distinct characteristics and with actual data of the trehalose pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the proposed method successfully complements DFE under various situations and without a priori assumptions regarding the model representation. The proposed method also permits an examination of whether at all, to what degree, or within what range the available time series data can be validly represented in a particular functional format of

  9. Metabolic Plasticity of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells: Adaptation to Changes in the Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui V. Simões

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells adapt their metabolism during tumorigenesis. We studied two isogenic breast cancer cells lines (highly metastatic 4T1; nonmetastatic 67NR to identify differences in their glucose and glutamine metabolism in response to metabolic and environmental stress. Dynamic magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 13C-isotopomers showed that 4T1 cells have higher glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle flux than 67NR cells and readily switch between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS in response to different extracellular environments. OXPHOS activity increased with metastatic potential in isogenic cell lines derived from the same primary breast cancer: 4T1 > 4T07 and 168FARN (local micrometastasis only > 67NR. We observed a restricted TCA cycle flux at the succinate dehydrogenase step in 67NR cells (but not in 4T1 cells, leading to succinate accumulation and hindering OXPHOS. In the four isogenic cell lines, environmental stresses modulated succinate dehydrogenase subunit A expression according to metastatic potential. Moreover, glucose-derived lactate production was more glutamine dependent in cell lines with higher metastatic potential. These studies show clear differences in TCA cycle metabolism between 4T1 and 67NR breast cancer cells. They indicate that metastases-forming 4T1 cells are more adept at adjusting their metabolism in response to environmental stress than isogenic, nonmetastatic 67NR cells. We suggest that the metabolic plasticity and adaptability are more important to the metastatic breast cancer phenotype than rapid cell proliferation alone, which could 1 provide a new biomarker for early detection of this phenotype, possibly at the time of diagnosis, and 2 lead to new treatment strategies of metastatic breast cancer by targeting mitochondrial metabolism.

  10. Multi-omic profiles of hepatic metabolism in TPN-fed preterm pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    New generation lipid emulsions comprised of fish oil or blends of soybean/fish/medium chain triglyceride/olive oil are emerging that result in favorable clinical metabolic outcomes in pediatric populations. Our aim was to characterize the lipidodomic, metabolomic, and transcriptomic profiles these ...

  11. Abdominal obesity has the highest impact on metabolic profile in an overweight African population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handlos, L. N.; Witte, D. R.; Mwaniki, D. L.;

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the association between different anthropometric parameters and metabolic profile in an overweight, adult, black Kenyan population. Methods: An opportunity sample of 245 overweight adult Kenyans (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2) was analysed. A score o...

  12. Yogurt consumption is associated with better diet quality and metabolic profile in American men and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-fat dairy products may be beneficial for health, but few studies have specifically focused on yogurt. We examined whether yogurt consumption was associated with better dietary patterns, diet quality, and metabolic profile. This cross-sectional study included the adults (n=6526) participating in ...

  13. Effect of opium on glucose metabolism and lipid profiles in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeghian, Saeed; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Sotoudeh-Anvari, Maryam; Rahbani, Shahram; Sheikhfathollahi, Mahmood; Abbasi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Background: This experimental study was performed to determine the impact of opium use on serum lipid profile and glucose metabolism in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Material and methods: To determine the effect of opium, 20 male rats were divided into control (n = 10) and opium-treated

  14. Metabolomic profiles of lipid metabolism, arterial stiffness and hemodynamics in male coronary artery disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaido Paapstel

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: We demonstrated an independent association between the serum medium- and long-chain acylcarnitine profile and aortic stiffness for the CAD patients. In addition to the lipid-related classical CVD risk markers, the intermediates of lipid metabolism may serve as novel indicators for altered vascular function.

  15. African American parents' racial and emotion socialization profiles and young adults' emotional adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Angel S; Perry, Nicole B; Cavanaugh, Alyson M; Leerkes, Esther M

    2015-07-01

    The current study aimed to identify parents' profiles of racial and emotion socialization practices, to determine if these profiles vary as a function of family income and young adult child gender, and to examine their links with young adults' emotional adaptation. Participants included 192 African American young adults (70% women) who ranged in age from 18 to 24 years (M = 19.44 years). Four maternal profiles emerged: cultural-supportive (high cultural socialization and supportive responses to children's negative emotions), moderate bias preparation (moderate preparation for bias, promotion of mistrust, and nonsupportive responses to negative emotions), high bias preparation (high preparation for bias, promotion of mistrust, and nonsupportive responses), and low engaged (low across racial and socialization constructs). Three paternal profiles emerged: multifaceted (moderate across racial and emotion socialization constructs), high bias preparation, and low engaged. Men were more likely to have mothers in the high bias preparation and to have fathers in the multifaceted or high bias preparation profiles. Individuals with higher income were more likely to have mothers in the cultural-supportive profile and to have fathers in the multifaceted profile. Young adults whose mothers fit the cultural-supportive profile or the moderate bias preparation profile had lower levels of depressive symptoms than young adults whose mothers fit the high bias preparation profile. PMID:25090149

  16. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system for temperature and humidity profile retrieval from microwave radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, K.; Kesarkar, A. P.; Bhate, J.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Jayaraman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The retrieval of accurate profiles of temperature and water vapour is important for the study of atmospheric convection. Recent development in computational techniques motivated us to use adaptive techniques in the retrieval algorithms. In this work, we have used an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to retrieve profiles of temperature and humidity up to 10 km over the tropical station Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), India. ANFIS is trained by using observations of temperature and humidity measurements by co-located Meisei GPS radiosonde (henceforth referred to as radiosonde) and microwave brightness temperatures observed by radiometrics multichannel microwave radiometer MP3000 (MWR). ANFIS is trained by considering these observations during rainy and non-rainy days (ANFIS(RD + NRD)) and during non-rainy days only (ANFIS(NRD)). The comparison of ANFIS(RD + NRD) and ANFIS(NRD) profiles with independent radiosonde observations and profiles retrieved using multivariate linear regression (MVLR: RD + NRD and NRD) and artificial neural network (ANN) indicated that the errors in the ANFIS(RD + NRD) are less compared to other retrieval methods. The Pearson product movement correlation coefficient (r) between retrieved and observed profiles is more than 92% for temperature profiles for all techniques and more than 99% for the ANFIS(RD + NRD) technique Therefore this new techniques is relatively better for the retrieval of temperature profiles. The comparison of bias, mean absolute error (MAE), RMSE and symmetric mean absolute percentage error (SMAPE) of retrieved temperature and relative humidity (RH) profiles using ANN and ANFIS also indicated that profiles retrieved using ANFIS(RD + NRD) are significantly better compared to the ANN technique. The analysis of profiles concludes that retrieved profiles using ANFIS techniques have improved the temperature retrievals substantially; however, the retrieval of RH by all techniques considered in this paper (ANN, MVLR and

  17. Reproductive activity in cows following parturition against values of certain parameters of metabolic profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otava Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from literature indicate that there is a correlation between the values of reproductive parameters and the values of parameters of the metabolic profile, even though this cannot be confirmed in many cases. The objective of this work was to examine the connection between certain parameters of the metabolic profile and the restoration of reproductive activity in the postpartal period. Blood samples were taken from the cows involved in the experiment and values of parameters of the metabolic state were determined in 27 cows, of which 14 were primiparous and 13 multiparous. In the blood serum samples, we determined the concentration of glucose, total proteins, albumin, urea, and the activities of certain enzymes (alkaline phosphatase, ASAT and ALAT. It was established on the grounds of the obtained results that the delay in the establishment of reproductive activity in the postpartal period was in correlation with the blood concentrations of urea and albumin. .

  18. Metabolic Profiles in Ovine Carotid Arteries with Developmental Maturation and Long-Term Hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Goyal

    Full Text Available Long-term hypoxia (LTH is an important stressor related to health and disease during development. At different time points from fetus to adult, we are exposed to hypoxic stress because of placental insufficiency, high-altitude residence, smoking, chronic anemia, pulmonary, and heart disorders, as well as cancers. Intrauterine hypoxia can lead to fetal growth restriction and long-term sequelae such as cognitive impairments, hypertension, cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, and schizophrenia. Similarly, prolonged hypoxic exposure during adult life can lead to acute mountain sickness, chronic fatigue, chronic headache, cognitive impairment, acute cerebral and/or pulmonary edema, and death.LTH also can lead to alteration in metabolites such as fumarate, 2-oxoglutarate, malate, and lactate, which are linked to epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Importantly, during the intrauterine life, a fetus is under a relative hypoxic environment, as compared to newborn or adult. Thus, the changes in gene expression with development from fetus to newborn to adult may be as a consequence of underlying changes in the metabolic profile because of the hypoxic environment along with developmental maturation. To examine this possibility, we examined the metabolic profile in carotid arteries from near-term fetus, newborn, and adult sheep in both normoxic and long-term hypoxic acclimatized groups.Our results demonstrate that LTH differentially regulated glucose metabolism, mitochondrial metabolism, nicotinamide cofactor metabolism, oxidative stress and antioxidants, membrane lipid hydrolysis, and free fatty acid metabolism, each of which may play a role in genetic-epigenetic regulation.

  19. Metabolic profiling of alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in mouse tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Mori

    Full Text Available NAD plays essential redox and non-redox roles in cell biology. In mammals, its de novo and recycling biosynthetic pathways encompass two independent branches, the "amidated" and "deamidated" routes. Here we focused on the indispensable enzymes gating these two routes, i.e. nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT, which in mammals comprises three distinct isozymes, and NAD synthetase (NADS. First, we measured the in vitro activity of the enzymes, and the levels of all their substrates and products in a number of tissues from the C57BL/6 mouse. Second, from these data, we derived in vivo estimates of enzymes'rates and quantitative contributions to NAD homeostasis. The NMNAT activity, mainly represented by nuclear NMNAT1, appears to be high and nonrate-limiting in all examined tissues, except in blood. The NADS activity, however, appears rate-limiting in lung and skeletal muscle, where its undetectable levels parallel a relative accumulation of the enzyme's substrate NaAD (nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide. In all tissues, the amidated NAD route was predominant, displaying highest rates in liver and kidney, and lowest in blood. In contrast, the minor deamidated route showed higher relative proportions in blood and small intestine, and higher absolute values in liver and small intestine. Such results provide the first comprehensive picture of the balance of the two alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in different mammalian tissues under physiological conditions. This fills a gap in the current knowledge of NAD biosynthesis, and provides a crucial information for the study of NAD metabolism and its role in disease.

  20. A comprehensive metabolic profile of cultured astrocytes using isotopic transient metabolic flux analysis and 13C-labeled glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I Amaral

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic models have been used to elucidate important aspects of brain metabolism in recent years. This work applies for the first time the concept of isotopic transient 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA to estimate intracellular fluxes of cultured astrocytes. This methodology comprehensively explores the information provided by 13C labeling time-courses of intracellular metabolites after administration of a 13C labeled substrate. Cells were incubated with medium containing [1-13C]glucose for 24 h and samples of cell supernatant and extracts collected at different time-points were then analyzed by mass spectrometry and/or HPLC. Metabolic fluxes were estimated by fitting a carbon labeling network model to isotopomer profiles experimentally determined. Both the fast isotopic equilibrium of glycolytic metabolite pools and the slow labeling dynamics of TCA cycle intermediates are described well by the model. The large pools of glutamate and aspartate which are linked to the TCA cycle via reversible aminotransferase reactions are likely to be responsible for the observed delay in equilibration of TCA cycle intermediates. Furthermore, it was estimated that 11% of the glucose taken up by astrocytes was diverted to the pentose phosphate pathway. In addition, considerable fluxes through pyruvate carboxylase (PC (PC/pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH ratio = 0.5, malic enzyme (5% of the total pyruvate production and catabolism of branched-chained amino acids (contributing with ~40% to total acetyl-CoA produced confirmed the significance of these pathways to astrocytic metabolism. Consistent with the need of maintaining cytosolic redox potential, the fluxes through the malate-aspartate shuttle and the PDH pathway were comparable. Finally, the estimated glutamate/α-ketoglutarate exchange rate (~0.7 µmol.mg prot-1.h-1 was similar to the TCA cycle flux. In conclusion, this work demonstrates the potential of isotopic transient MFA for a comprehensive analysis of

  1. Monitoring and robust adaptive control of fed-batch cultures of microorganisms exhibiting overflow metabolism [abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vande Wouwer, A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Overflow metabolism characterizes cells strains that are likely to produce inhibiting by-products resulting from an excess of substrate feeding and a saturated respiratory capacity. The critical substrate level separating the two different metabolic pathways is generally not well defined. Monitoring of this kind of cultures, going from model identification to state estimation, is first discussed. Then, a review of control techniques which all aim at maximizing the cell productivity of fed-batch fermentations is presented. Two main adaptive control strategies, one using an estimation of the critical substrate level as set-point and another regulating the by-product concentration, are proposed. Finally, experimental investigations of an adaptive RST control scheme using the observer polynomial for the regulation of the ethanol concentration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae fed-batch cultures ranging from laboratory to industrial scales, are also presented.

  2. Metabolic profiling of biofilm bacteria known to cause microbial influenced corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, D J; Morrison, P D; Key, C; Palombo, E A

    2014-01-01

    This study builds upon previous research that demonstrated the simplicity of obtaining metabolite profiles of bacteria in urban water networks, by using the metabolic profile of bacteria extracted from a reticulation pipe biofilm, which is known to cause microbial influenced corrosion (MIC). The extracellular metabolites of the isolated bacteria, and those bacteria in consortium, were analysed in isolation, and after exposure to low levels of copper. Applying chemometric analytical methodologies to the metabolomic data, we were able to better understand the profile of the isolated biofilm bacteria, which were differentiated according to their activity and copper exposure. It was found that the metabolic activity of the isolated bacteria and the bacteria in consortium varied according to the bacterium's ability to metabolise copper. This demonstrates the power of metabolomic techniques for the discrimination of water reticulation biofilms comprising similar bacteria in consortium, but undergoing different physico-chemical activities, such as corrosion and corrosion inhibition. PMID:24434961

  3. Adaptive Control Model Reveals Systematic Feedback and Key Molecules in Metabolic Pathway Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Quo, Chang F.; Moffitt, Richard A; Merrill, Alfred H.; Wang, May D.

    2011-01-01

    Robust behavior in metabolic pathways resembles stabilized performance in systems under autonomous control. This suggests we can apply control theory to study existing regulation in these cellular networks. Here, we use model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) to investigate the dynamics of de novo sphingolipid synthesis regulation in a combined theoretical and experimental case study. The effects of serine palmitoyltransferase over-expression on this pathway are studied in vitro using human e...

  4. Coregulation of host-adapted metabolism and virulence by pathogenic yersiniae

    OpenAIRE

    Ann Kathrin eHeroven; Petra eDersch

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the principles how pathogenic bacteria adapt their metabolism to a specific host microenvironment is critical for understanding bacterial pathogenesis. The enteric pathogenic Yersinia species Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica and the causative agent of plague, Y. pestis, are able to survive in a large variety of environmental reservoirs (e.g. soil, plants, insects) as well as warm-blooded animals (e.g. rodents, pigs, humans) with a particular preference for lymphatic tis...

  5. Altered myocardial metabolic adaptation to increased fatty acid availability in cardiomyocyte-specific CLOCK mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo A; Goel, Mehak; Aristorenas, Jonathan A; Shah, Krishna; He, Lan; Yang, Qinglin; Shalev, Anath; Bailey, Shannon M; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Chatham, John C; Gamble, Karen L; Young, Martin E

    2016-10-01

    A mismatch between fatty acid availability and utilization leads to cellular/organ dysfunction during cardiometabolic disease states (e.g., obesity, diabetes mellitus). This can precipitate cardiac dysfunction. The heart adapts to increased fatty acid availability at transcriptional, translational, post-translational and metabolic levels, thereby attenuating cardiomyopathy development. We have previously reported that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock regulates transcriptional responsiveness of the heart to acute increases in fatty acid availability (e.g., short-term fasting). The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the cardiomyocyte circadian clock plays a role in adaptation of the heart to chronic elevations in fatty acid availability. Fatty acid availability was increased in cardiomyocyte-specific CLOCK mutant (CCM) and wild-type (WT) littermate mice for 9weeks in time-of-day-independent (streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes) and dependent (high fat diet meal feeding) manners. Indices of myocardial metabolic adaptation (e.g., substrate reliance perturbations) to STZ-induced diabetes and high fat meal feeding were found to be dependent on genotype. Various transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms were investigated, revealing that Cte1 mRNA induction in the heart during STZ-induced diabetes is attenuated in CCM hearts. At the functional level, time-of-day-dependent high fat meal feeding tended to influence cardiac function to a greater extent in WT versus CCM mice. Collectively, these data suggest that CLOCK (a circadian clock component) is important for metabolic adaption of the heart to prolonged elevations in fatty acid availability. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:26721420

  6. The colitis-associated transcriptional profile of commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron enhances adaptive immune responses to a bacterial antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Hansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD may be caused in part by aberrant immune responses to commensal intestinal microbes including the well-characterized anaerobic gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta. Healthy, germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (Tg rats develop chronic colitis when colonized with complex gut commensal bacteria whereas non-transgenic (nTg rats remain disease-free. However, the role of B. theta in causing disease in Tg rats is unknown nor is much known about how gut microbes respond to host inflammation. METHODS: Tg and nTg rats were monoassociated with a human isolate of B. theta. Colonic inflammation was assessed by histologic scoring and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokine measurement. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of B. theta recovered from ceca was performed using custom GeneChips and data analyzed using dChip, Significance Analysis of Microarrays, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA software. Western Blots were used to determine adaptive immune responses to a differentially expressed B. theta gene. RESULTS: B. theta monoassociated Tg rats, but not nTg or germ-free controls, developed chronic colitis. Transcriptional profiles of cecal B. theta were significantly different in Tg vs. nTg rats. GSEA revealed that genes in KEGG canonical pathways involved in bacterial growth and metabolism were downregulated in B. theta from Tg rats with colitis though luminal bacterial concentrations were unaffected. Bacterial genes in the Gene Ontology molecular function "receptor activity", most of which encode nutrient binding proteins, were significantly upregulated in B. theta from Tg rats and include a SusC homolog that induces adaptive immune responses in Tg rats. CONCLUSIONS: B. theta induces colitis in HLA-B27 Tg rats, which is associated with regulation of bacterial genes in metabolic and nutrient binding pathways that may affect host immune responses. These studies of the host-microbial dialogue may lead to

  7. Adaptive changes in basal metabolic rate and thermogenesis in chronic undernutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic adaptation during chronic undernutrition represents a complex integration of several processes which affect the total energy expenditure of the individual. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is reduced; reductions in BMR per unit fat free mass (FFM) is difficult to demonstrate. BMR changes in undernutrition reflect the low body weight as well as alterations in the composition of the FFM; more specifically changes in the ratio of viscera to muscle compartments of the FFM. Thermogenic responses to norepinephrine are transiently suppressed but recover rapidly on repeated stimulation. Dietary thermogenesis is enhanced possible the result of increases in tissue synthesis within the body. Changes in BMR and thermogenesis suggestive of an increase in metabolic efficiency is thus difficult to demonstrate in chronic undernutrition. (author). 15 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  8. Diversity of metabolic profiles of cystic fibrosis Pseudomonas aeruginosa during the early stages of lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karin Meinike; Wassermann, Tina; Johansen, Helle Krogh;

    2015-01-01

    and mutations in the global regulator genes mucA, lasR and rpoN. Our aim was to understand the metabolic changes occurring over time and between niches of the CF airways. By applying Phenotype MicroArrays, we investigated changes in the carbon and nitrogen catabolism of subsequently clonally related mucoid...... and non-mucoid (NM) lung and sinus P. aeruginosa isolates from 10 CF patients (five intermittently colonized/five chronically infected). We found the most pronounced catabolic changes for the early/late NM isolate comparisons, with respiratory reduction seen for all chronically infecting isolates and two...... of metabolic pathways via the KEGG database showed a prevalence of substrates involved in the metabolism of Ala, Asp and Glu, d-Ala, and Arg and Pro. In conclusion, extensive heterogeneity in the metabolic profiles of the P. aeruginosa isolates was observed from the initial stages of the infection, showing...

  9. Adaptation of manipulation skills in physical contact with the environment to reference force profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Dakka, Fares J.; Nemec, Bojan; Jørgensen, Jimmy A.;

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new methodology for learning and adaption of manipulation skills that involve physical contact with the environment. Pure position control is unsuitable for such tasks because even small errors in the desired trajectory can cause significant deviations from the desired forces...... and torques. The proposed algorithm takes a reference Cartesian trajectory and force/torque profile as input and adapts the movement so that the resulting forces and torques match the reference profiles. The learning algorithm is based on dynamic movement primitives and quaternion representation...... of orientation, which provide a mathematical machinery for efficient and stable adaptation. Experimentally we show that the robot’s performance can be significantly improved within a few iteration steps, compensating for vision and other errors that might arise during the execution of the task. We also show...

  10. Metabolic cold adaptation of polar fish based on measurements of aerobic oxygen consumption: fact or artefact? Artefact!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2002-01-01

    a considerably elevated resting oxygen consumption, or standard metabolic rate, compared with oxygen consumption values of tropical or temperate fish extrapolated to similar low polar temperatures. Recent experiments on arctic and Antarctic fish, however, do not show elevated resting aerobic oxygen consumption......Whether metabolic cold adaptation in polar fish, based on measurements of aerobic standard metabolic rate, is a fact or an artefact has been a dispute since Holeton asked the question in 1974. So far polar fish had been considered to be metabolically cold adapted because they were reported to have...

  11. Metabolic Profiling of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Influence of Vitamin D Status and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Stepien

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC could serve as a less invasive and more direct alternative to tissue biopsies or serum in metabolomic research. We conducted two exploratory independent studies in order to characterise PBMC’s metabolomic profile following short-term vitamin D3 supplementation and to determine gender effects. In the first study, eight healthy males and females aged 40–65 y were randomly selected for profiling of PBMCs after receiving either 15 µg of vitamin D3 or placebo for four weeks. In the second study, twenty younger healthy males and females were studied. Cell metabolites were extracted and deproteinised using methanol/chloroform/water method and analysed by GC-MS. Higher vitamin D status had no effect on the fatty acid profile of PBMCs, but inflammatory biomarkers and adipokines correlated positively with stearic acid levels. In the second study, no gender-specific metabolites were identified. Valine, leucine and aspartic acid were identified as potential BMI-sensitive amino acids. Larger studies are needed to confirm the influence of BMI on these parameters. This work clearly demonstrates the utility of metabolomics profiling of PBMCs and paves the way for future applications of metabolomics in identifying metabolic profiles of blood cells as a measure for dietary intakes or physiological status.

  12. Multi-Organ Contribution to the Metabolic Plasma Profile Using Hierarchical Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torell, Frida; Bennett, Kate; Cereghini, Silvia; Rännar, Stefan; Lundstedt-Enkel, Katrin; Moritz, Thomas; Haumaitre, Cecile; Trygg, Johan; Lundstedt, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical modelling was applied in order to identify the organs that contribute to the levels of metabolites in plasma. Plasma and organ samples from gut, kidney, liver, muscle and pancreas were obtained from mice. The samples were analysed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC TOF-MS) at the Swedish Metabolomics centre, Umeå University, Sweden. The multivariate analysis was performed by means of principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS). The main goal of this study was to investigate how each organ contributes to the metabolic plasma profile. This was performed using hierarchical modelling. Each organ was found to have a unique metabolic profile. The hierarchical modelling showed that the gut, kidney and liver demonstrated the greatest contribution to the metabolic pattern of plasma. For example, we found that metabolites were absorbed in the gut and transported to the plasma. The kidneys excrete branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) and fatty acids are transported in the plasma to the muscles and liver. Lactic acid was also found to be transported from the pancreas to plasma. The results indicated that hierarchical modelling can be utilized to identify the organ contribution of unknown metabolites to the metabolic profile of plasma. PMID:26086868

  13. Multi-Organ Contribution to the Metabolic Plasma Profile Using Hierarchical Modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Torell

    Full Text Available Hierarchical modelling was applied in order to identify the organs that contribute to the levels of metabolites in plasma. Plasma and organ samples from gut, kidney, liver, muscle and pancreas were obtained from mice. The samples were analysed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC TOF-MS at the Swedish Metabolomics centre, Umeå University, Sweden. The multivariate analysis was performed by means of principal component analysis (PCA and orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS. The main goal of this study was to investigate how each organ contributes to the metabolic plasma profile. This was performed using hierarchical modelling. Each organ was found to have a unique metabolic profile. The hierarchical modelling showed that the gut, kidney and liver demonstrated the greatest contribution to the metabolic pattern of plasma. For example, we found that metabolites were absorbed in the gut and transported to the plasma. The kidneys excrete branched chain amino acids (BCAAs and fatty acids are transported in the plasma to the muscles and liver. Lactic acid was also found to be transported from the pancreas to plasma. The results indicated that hierarchical modelling can be utilized to identify the organ contribution of unknown metabolites to the metabolic profile of plasma.

  14. Alzheimer's disease and natural cognitive aging may represent adaptive metabolism reduction programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reser Jared

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present article examines several lines of converging evidence suggesting that the slow and insidious brain changes that accumulate over the lifespan, resulting in both natural cognitive aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD, represent a metabolism reduction program. A number of such adaptive programs are known to accompany aging and are thought to have decreased energy requirements for ancestral hunter-gatherers in their 30s, 40s and 50s. Foraging ability in modern hunter-gatherers declines rapidly, more than a decade before the average terminal age of 55 years. Given this, the human brain would have been a tremendous metabolic liability that must have been advantageously tempered by the early cellular and molecular changes of AD which begin to accumulate in all humans during early adulthood. Before the recent lengthening of life span, individuals in the ancestral environment died well before this metabolism reduction program resulted in clinical AD, thus there was never any selective pressure to keep adaptive changes from progressing to a maladaptive extent. Aging foragers may not have needed the same cognitive capacities as their younger counterparts because of the benefits of accumulated learning and life experience. It is known that during both childhood and adulthood metabolic rate in the brain decreases linearly with age. This trend is thought to reflect the fact that children have more to learn. AD "pathology" may be a natural continuation of this trend. It is characterized by decreasing cerebral metabolism, selective elimination of synapses and reliance on accumulating knowledge (especially implicit and procedural over raw brain power (working memory. Over decades of subsistence, the behaviors of aging foragers became routinized, their motor movements automated and their expertise ingrained to a point where they no longer necessitated the first-rate working memory they possessed when younger and learning actively. Alzheimer

  15. Metabolic Profiling of Somatic Tissues from Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae Reveals Effects of Irradiation on Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangjian Qu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A high-level of sexual sterility is of importance for the sterile insect technique (SIT. However, the use of high-dose-intensity gamma radiation to induce sterility has negative impacts not only on reproductive cells but also on somatic cells. In this study, we investigated the metabolite differences in somatic tissues between non-irradiated, 20-Gy-irradiated, and 40-Gy-irradiated male Monochamus alternatus, an important vector of the pathogenic nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, which kills Asian pines. The results showed that metabolite levels changed moderately in the 20-Gy samples but were markedly altered in the 40-Gy samples compared with the non-irradiated samples. Twenty-six and 53 metabolites were disturbed by 20-Gy and 40-Gy radiation, respectively. Thirty-six metabolites were found to be markedly altered in the 40-Gy samples but were not changed significantly in the 20-Gy samples. The comprehensive metabolomic disorders induced by 40-Gy radiation dysregulated six metabolic pathways involved in the life process. The findings presented in this manuscript will contribute to our knowledge of the characteristic metabolic changes associated with gamma-radiation-induced damage to somatic cells and will allow for better exploration of the SIT for the control of this target pest.

  16. Adaptable beam profiles from a dual-cavity Nd:YAG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D J; Mackenzie, J I; Kim, J W

    2016-04-15

    We report a technique to tailor a laser beam profile from a donut to quasi-top-hat intensity distribution, directly from the laser, simply achieved by simultaneous excitation and control of the relative contributions of the fundamental (TEM00) and first-order Laguerre-Gaussian (LG01) transverse modes. Exploiting a dual-cavity configuration with a single Nd:YAG gain element, adaptable continuous-wave laser beam profiles from the primary cavity could be obtained by varying the diffraction loss of an acousto-optic modulator in the secondary cavity. We investigate the resultant beam profiles as a function of pump power and the AOM diffraction loss, and discuss the prospects for tunable laser beams profiles.

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy For Metabolic Profiling of Medicinal Plants and Their Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy has multidisciplinary applications, including excellent impact in metabolomics. The analytical capacity of NMR spectroscopy provides information for easy qualitative and quantitative assessment of both endogenous and exogenous metabolites present in biological samples. The complexity of a particular metabolite and its contribution in a biological system are critically important for understanding the functional state that governs the organism's phenotypes. This review covers historical aspects of developments in the NMR field, its applications in chemical profiling, metabolomics, and quality control of plants and their derived medicines, foods, and other products. The bottlenecks of NMR in metabolic profiling are also discussed, keeping in view the future scope and further technological interventions. PMID:26575437

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy For Metabolic Profiling of Medicinal Plants and Their Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy has multidisciplinary applications, including excellent impact in metabolomics. The analytical capacity of NMR spectroscopy provides information for easy qualitative and quantitative assessment of both endogenous and exogenous metabolites present in biological samples. The complexity of a particular metabolite and its contribution in a biological system are critically important for understanding the functional state that governs the organism's phenotypes. This review covers historical aspects of developments in the NMR field, its applications in chemical profiling, metabolomics, and quality control of plants and their derived medicines, foods, and other products. The bottlenecks of NMR in metabolic profiling are also discussed, keeping in view the future scope and further technological interventions.

  19. Metabolic Profile Changes of CCl₄-Liver Fibrosis and Inhibitory Effects of Jiaqi Ganxian Granule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Li, Zehao; Li, Hao; Li, Lidan; Li, Jian; Yu, Changyuan

    2016-01-01

    Jiaqi Ganxian Granule (JGG) is a famous traditional Chinese medicine, which has been long used in clinical practice for treating liver fibrosis. However, the mechanism underlying its anti-hepatic fibrosis is still not clear. In this study, an Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-TOF-MS)-based metabolomics strategy was used to profile the metabolic characteristic of serum obtained from a carbon tetrachloride (CCl₄)-induced hepatic fibrosis model in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with JGG treatment. Through Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA), it was shown that metabolic perturbations induced by CCl₄ were inhibited after treatment of JGG, for 17 different metabolites related to CCl₄. Among these compounds, the change tendency of eight potential drug targets was restored after the intervention with JGG. The current study indicates that JGG has a significant anti-fibrosis effect on CCl₄-induced liver fibrosis in rats, which might be by regulating the dysfunction of sphingolipid metabolism, glycerophospholipid metabolism, N-acylethanolamine biosynthesis, fat digestion and absorption, while glycerophospholipid metabolism played vital roles in the inhibitory effects of JGG on hepatic fibrosis according to Metabolic Pathway Analysis (MetPA). Our findings indicated that the metabolomics approach may provide a useful tool for exploring potential biomarkers involved in hepatic fibrosis and elucidate the mechanisms underlying the action of therapies used in traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:27248993

  20. Metabolic profiling and outer pericarp water state in Zespri, CI.GI, and Hayward kiwifruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitani, Donatella; Mannina, Luisa; Proietti, Noemi; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Tomassini, Alberta; Miccheli, Alfredo; Di Cocco, Maria E; Capuani, Giorgio; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Delfini, Maurizio

    2013-02-27

    The metabolic profiling of aqueous extracts of Zespri Gold ( Actinidia chinensis ) and CI.GI (a controlled crossbreed from different species of Actinidia deliciosa ) kiwifruits and the water state of the outer pericarp of entire fruits were monitored over the season by means of high-field NMR spectroscopy and T(2) relaxation time measurements, respectively, and compared with the corresponding ones of Hayward kiwifruits previously investigated. A more complete assignment of the (1)H spectrum with respect to that obtained previously was reported: histidine, phenylalanine, quercetin 3-rhamnoside, and epicatechin were identified. Metabolic profiling confirmed Zespri's earlier maturation compared with the two other varieties. The water state of entire kiwifruits was measured nondestructively on fruits attached to the plants or detached from the plants. T(2) relaxation times were found to be sensitive to the kiwifruit developmental stage.

  1. A comparative study on lifestyle and metabolic profile in normal and obese individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Revathi R, Swetha S, MeghalathaTS, Arunakumari R

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the lifestyle and metabolic profiles in normal and obese. Material and Methods: A cross sectional study design was employed. Information on body weight, height, body fat, food choices, diet and physical activity behavior were collected by a questionnaire among 100 obese adults aged 18-35 years and compared with healthy individuals as controls. Blood samples were collected to analyze blood glucose, heamoglobin and total cholesterol....

  2. Transcriptome profiling of bovine milk oligosaccharide metabolism genes using RNA-sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Wickramasinghe

    Full Text Available This study examines the genes coding for enzymes involved in bovine milk oligosaccharide metabolism by comparing the oligosaccharide profiles with the expressions of glycosylation-related genes. Fresh milk samples (n = 32 were collected from four Holstein and Jersey cows at days 1, 15, 90 and 250 of lactation and free milk oligosaccharide profiles were analyzed. RNA was extracted from milk somatic cells at days 15 and 250 of lactation (n = 12 and gene expression analysis was conducted by RNA-Sequencing. A list was created of 121 glycosylation-related genes involved in oligosaccharide metabolism pathways in bovine by analyzing the oligosaccharide profiles and performing an extensive literature search. No significant differences were observed in either oligosaccharide profiles or expressions of glycosylation-related genes between Holstein and Jersey cows. The highest concentrations of free oligosaccharides were observed in the colostrum samples and a sharp decrease was observed in the concentration of free oligosaccharides on day 15, followed by progressive decrease on days 90 and 250. Ninety-two glycosylation-related genes were expressed in milk somatic cells. Most of these genes exhibited higher expression in day 250 samples indicating increases in net glycosylation-related metabolism in spite of decreases in free milk oligosaccharides in late lactation milk. Even though fucosylated free oligosaccharides were not identified, gene expression indicated the likely presence of fucosylated oligosaccharides in bovine milk. Fucosidase genes were expressed in milk and a possible explanation for not detecting fucosylated free oligosaccharides is the degradation of large fucosylated free oligosaccharides by the fucosidases. Detailed characterization of enzymes encoded by the 92 glycosylation-related genes identified in this study will provide the basic knowledge for metabolic network analysis of oligosaccharides in mammalian milk. These candidate

  3. Perturbation in kidney lipid metabolic profiles in diabetic rats with reference to alcoholic oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    K. R. Shanmugam; Ramakrishna, C. H.; K Mallikarjuna; Reddy, K. Sathyavelu

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes is a major threat to global public health, and the number of diabetic patients is rapidly increasing worldwide. Evidence suggests that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic complications and alcoholic diseases. The aim of this study is to find out the impact of alcohol on lipid metabolic profiles in kidney tissue under streptozotocin induced diabetic condition. No study has been reported so far on the effect of alcohol on diabetic condition and also with ref...

  4. Metabolic profiling of muscle contraction in lean compared with obese rodents

    OpenAIRE

    John P. Thyfault; Cree, Melanie G.; Tapscott, Edward B.; Bell, Jill A.; Koves, Timothy R.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Wolfe, Robert R.; Dohm, G. Lynis; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2010-01-01

    Interest in the pathophysiological relevance of intramuscular triacylglycerol (IMTG) accumulation has grown from numerous studies reporting that abnormally high glycerolipid levels in tissues of obese and diabetic subjects correlate negatively with glucose tolerance. Here, we used a hindlimb perfusion model to examine the impact of obesity and elevated IMTG levels on contraction-induced changes in skeletal muscle fuel metabolism. Comprehensive lipid profiling was performed on gastrocnemius mu...

  5. Racial Disparities between the Sex Steroid Milieu and the Metabolic Risk Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Loreto Jackson; Ronald Goldberg; Robert Ross; Arlette Perry; Xuewen Wang

    2010-01-01

    Aims and Method. The present study examined the relationship between the metabolic risk profile (MRP) and total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone using the free androgen index (FAI) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in 36 Caucasian American (CA) and 30 African-American (AA) women volunteering for a weight loss study. Results. After controlling for age, significant relationships were found between TT and diastolic blood pressure (P = .004 and P = .015 in CA and AA women, resp.). Ad...

  6. 1H NMR-based serum metabolic profiling in compensated and decompensated cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Wen Qi; Zhi-Guang Tu; Wu-Jian Peng; Lin-Xian Wang; Xin Ou-Yang; An-Ji Cai; Yong Dai

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study the metabolic profiling of serum samples from compensated and decompensated cirrhosis patients.METHODS: A pilot metabolic profiling study was conducted using three groups: compensated cirrhosis patients (n = 30), decompensated cirrhosis patients (n = 30) and healthy controls (n = 30). A 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics approach was used to obtain the serum metabolic profiles of the samples. The acquired data were processed by multivariate principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). RESULTS: The OPLS-DA model was capable of distinguishing between decompensated and compensated cirrhosis patients, with an R2Y of 0.784 and a Q2Y of 0.598. Twelve metabolites, such as pyruvate, phenylalanine and succinate, were identified as the most influential factors for the difference between the two groups. The validation of the diagnosis prediction showed that the accuracy of the OPLSDA model was 85% (17/20). CONCLUSION: 1H NMR spectra combined with pattern recognition analysis techniques offer a new way to diagnose compensated and decompensated cirrhosis in the future.

  7. Follicular adenomas exhibit a unique metabolic profile. ¹H NMR studies of thyroid lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Deja

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. However, more than 90% of thyroid nodules are benign. It remains unclear whether thyroid carcinoma arises from preexisting benign nodules. Metabolomics can provide valuable and comprehensive information about low molecular weight compounds present in living systems and further our understanding of the biology regulating pathological processes. Herein, we applied ¹H NMR-based metabolic profiling to identify the metabolites present in aqueous tissue extracts of healthy thyroid tissue (H, non-neoplastic nodules (NN, follicular adenomas (FA and malignant thyroid cancer (TC as an alternative way of investigating cancer lesions. Multivariate statistical methods provided clear discrimination not only between healthy thyroid tissue and pathological thyroid tissue but also between different types of thyroid lesions. Potential biomarkers common to all thyroid lesions were identified, namely, alanine, methionine, acetone, glutamate, glycine, lactate, tyrosine, phenylalanine and hypoxanthine. Metabolic changes in thyroid cancer were mainly related to osmotic regulators (taurine and scyllo- and myo-inositol, citrate, and amino acids supplying the TCA cycle. Thyroid follicular adenomas were found to display metabolic features of benign non-neoplastic nodules and simultaneously displayed a partial metabolic profile associated with malignancy. This finding allows the discrimination of follicular adenomas from benign non-neoplastic nodules and thyroid cancer with similar accuracy. Moreover, the presented data indicate that follicular adenoma could be an individual stage of thyroid cancer development.

  8. A Pilot Metabolic Profiling Study of Patients With Neonatal Jaundice and Response to Phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, A; Qi, S; Su, Z; Shen, H; Yang, Y; Cai, W; Dai, Y

    2016-08-01

    Phototherapy has been widely used in treating neonatal jaundice, but detailed metabonomic profiles of neonatal jaundice patients and response to phototherapy have not been characterized. Our aim was to depict the serum metabolic characteristics of neonatal jaundice patients relative to controls and changes in response to phototherapy. A (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomic approach was employed to study the metabolic profiling of serum from healthy infants (n = 25) and from infants with neonatal jaundice (n = 30) pre- and postphototherapy. The acquired data were processed by multivariate principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The PLS-DA and OPLS-DA model identified nine metabolites capable of distinguishing patients from controls. In addition, 28 metabolites such as β-glucose, α-glucose, valine, and pyruvate changed in response to phototherapy. This study offers useful information on metabolic disorders in neonatal jaundice patients and the effects of phototherapy on lipids, amino acid, and energy metabolism. PMID:27306191

  9. Gene Transcriptional and Metabolic Profile Changes in Mimetic Aging Mice Induced by D-Galactose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Yue Zhou

    Full Text Available D-galactose injection has been shown to induce many changes in mice that represent accelerated aging. This mouse model has been widely used for pharmacological studies of anti-aging agents. The underlying mechanism of D-galactose induced aging remains unclear, however, it appears to relate to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders. Currently, there has yet to be a study that focuses on investigating gene expression changes in D-galactose aging mice. In this study, integrated analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomics and gene expression profiles was used to investigate the changes in transcriptional and metabolic profiles in mimetic aging mice injected with D-galactose. Our findings demonstrated that 48 mRNAs were differentially expressed between control and D-galactose mice, and 51 potential biomarkers were identified at the metabolic level. The effects of D-galactose on aging could be attributed to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders, oxidative damage, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs, reduction in abnormal substance elimination, cell apoptosis, and insulin resistance.

  10. Metagenomic and metabolic profiling of nonlithifying and lithifying stromatolitic mats of Highborne Cay, The Bahamas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L M Khodadad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stromatolites are laminated carbonate build-ups formed by the metabolic activity of microbial mats and represent one of the oldest known ecosystems on Earth. In this study, we examined a living stromatolite located within the Exuma Sound, The Bahamas and profiled the metagenome and metabolic potential underlying these complex microbial communities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The metagenomes of the two dominant stromatolitic mat types, a nonlithifying (Type 1 and lithifying (Type 3 microbial mat, were partially sequenced and compared. This deep-sequencing approach was complemented by profiling the substrate utilization patterns of the mats using metabolic microarrays. Taxonomic assessment of the protein-encoding genes confirmed previous SSU rRNA analyses that bacteria dominate the metagenome of both mat types. Eukaryotes comprised less than 13% of the metagenomes and were rich in sequences associated with nematodes and heterotrophic protists. Comparative genomic analyses of the functional genes revealed extensive similarities in most of the subsystems between the nonlithifying and lithifying mat types. The one exception was an increase in the relative abundance of certain genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism in the lithifying Type 3 mats. Specifically, genes associated with the degradation of carbohydrates commonly found in exopolymeric substances, such as hexoses, deoxy- and acidic sugars were found. The genetic differences in carbohydrate metabolisms between the two mat types were confirmed using metabolic microarrays. Lithifying mats had a significant increase in diversity and utilization of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur substrates. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The two stromatolitic mat types retained similar microbial communities, functional diversity and many genetic components within their metagenomes. However, there were major differences detected in the activity and genetic pathways of organic carbon

  11. Serum metabolic profiling of human gastric cancer based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis plays an important role in diagnosing and treating gastric cancer. Metabolic profiling may offer the opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis and help to non-invasively identify the potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of human gastric cancer. The aims of this study were to explore the underlying metabolic mechanisms of gastric cancer and to identify biomarkers associated with morbidity. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to analyze the serum metabolites of 30 Chinese gastric cancer patients and 30 healthy controls. Diagnostic models for gastric cancer were constructed using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). Acquired metabolomic data were analyzed by the nonparametric Wilcoxon test to find serum metabolic biomarkers for gastric cancer. The OPLS-DA model showed adequate discrimination between cancer and non-cancer cohorts while the model failed to discriminate different pathological stages (I-IV) of gastric cancer patients. A total of 44 endogenous metabolites such as amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids, and steroids were detected, of which 18 differential metabolites were identified with significant differences. A total of 13 variables were obtained for their greatest contribution in the discriminating OPLS-DA model [variable importance in the projection (VIP) value >1.0], among which 11 metabolites were identified using both VIP values (VIP >1) and the Wilcoxon test. These metabolites potentially revealed perturbations of glycolysis and of amino acid, fatty acid, cholesterol, and nucleotide metabolism of gastric cancer patients. These results suggest that gastric cancer serum metabolic profiling has great potential in detecting this disease and helping to understand its metabolic mechanisms

  12. Change in Metabolic Profile after 1-Year Nutritional-Behavioral Intervention in Obese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Verduci

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Research findings are inconsistent about improvement of specific cardio-metabolic variables after lifestyle intervention in obese children. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effect of a 1-year intervention, based on normocaloric diet and physical activity, on body mass index (BMI, blood lipid profile, glucose metabolism and metabolic syndrome. Eighty-five obese children aged ≥6 years were analyzed. The BMI z-score was calculated. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for lipids, insulin and glucose. The homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was calculated and insulin resistance was defined as HOMA-IR >3.16. HOMA-β%, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index and triglyceride glucose index were calculated. The metabolic syndrome was defined in accordance with the International Diabetes Federation criteria. At the end of intervention children showed a reduction (mean (95% CI in BMI z-score (−0.58 (−0.66; −0.50, triglycerides (−0.35 (−0.45; −0.25 mmol/L and triglyceride glucose index (−0.29 (−0.37; −0.21, and an increase in HDL cholesterol (0.06 (0.01; 0.11 mmol/L. Prevalence of insulin resistance declined from 51.8% to 36.5% and prevalence of metabolic syndrome from 17.1% to 4.9%. Nutritional-behavioral interventions can improve the blood lipid profile and insulin sensitivity in obese children, and possibly provide benefits in terms of metabolic syndrome.

  13. Lipid mobilisation and oxidative stress as metabolic adaptation processes in dairy heifers during transition period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, R; Podpečan, O; Mrkun, J; Kosec, M; Flegar-Meštrić, Z; Perkov, S; Starič, J; Robić, M; Belić, M; Zrimšek, P

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate metabolic disorders and oxidative stress in dairy heifers during the transition period. Possible relationships between lipid mobilisation indicators and oxidative stress markers were investigated as well. Nineteen dairy heifers were included in the study. Blood samples were collected at the time of estrus synchronisation in heifers, at insemination, three weeks after insemination, one week before calving, at calving and 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks postpartum. Common metabolic parameters, beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), free fatty acids (FFA), paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity and total antioxidative status (TAS) were analysed. Around insemination, no significant difference was observed in the majority of tested parameters (P>0.05). However, the transition period markedly affected the concentration of triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-C, BHB, FFA, TAS and PON1activity. Positive correlations between PON1 activity and total cholesterol, HDL-C and triglycerides were noted but inverse correlations with FFA, BHB and bilirubin were found indicating that PON1 activity changed with lipid metabolism and was influenced by negative energy balance. These findings suggest that lipid mobilisation and oxidative stress are part of a complex metabolic adaptation to low energy balance which reaches equilibrium later in advanced lactation.

  14. Elucidation of xenobiotic metabolism pathways in human skin and human skin models by proteomic profiling.

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    Sven van Eijl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human skin has the capacity to metabolise foreign chemicals (xenobiotics, but knowledge of the various enzymes involved is incomplete. A broad-based unbiased proteomics approach was used to describe the profile of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes present in human skin and hence indicate principal routes of metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. Several in vitro models of human skin have been developed for the purpose of safety assessment of chemicals. The suitability of these epidermal models for studies involving biotransformation was assessed by comparing their profiles of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes with those of human skin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Label-free proteomic analysis of whole human skin (10 donors was applied and analysed using custom-built PROTSIFT software. The results showed the presence of enzymes with a capacity for the metabolism of alcohols through dehydrogenation, aldehydes through dehydrogenation and oxidation, amines through oxidation, carbonyls through reduction, epoxides and carboxylesters through hydrolysis and, of many compounds, by conjugation to glutathione. Whereas protein levels of these enzymes in skin were mostly just 4-10 fold lower than those in liver and sufficient to support metabolism, the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes were at least 300-fold lower indicating they play no significant role. Four epidermal models of human skin had profiles very similar to one another and these overlapped substantially with that of whole skin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proteomics profiling approach was successful in producing a comprehensive analysis of the biotransformation characteristics of whole human skin and various in vitro skin models. The results show that skin contains a range of defined enzymes capable of metabolising different classes of chemicals. The degree of similarity of the profiles of the in vitro models indicates their suitability for epidermal toxicity testing. Overall, these

  15. Carotenoid metabolic profiling and transcriptome-genome mining reveal functional equivalence among blue-pigmented copepods and appendicularia

    KAUST Repository

    Mojib, Nazia

    2014-06-01

    The tropical oligotrophic oceanic areas are characterized by high water transparency and annual solar radiation. Under these conditions, a large number of phylogenetically diverse mesozooplankton species living in the surface waters (neuston) are found to be blue pigmented. In the present study, we focused on understanding the metabolic and genetic basis of the observed blue phenotype functional equivalence between the blue-pigmented organisms from the phylum Arthropoda, subclass Copepoda (Acartia fossae) and the phylum Chordata, class Appendicularia (Oikopleura dioica) in the Red Sea. Previous studies have shown that carotenoid–protein complexes are responsible for blue coloration in crustaceans. Therefore, we performed carotenoid metabolic profiling using both targeted and nontargeted (high-resolution mass spectrometry) approaches in four different blue-pigmented genera of copepods and one blue-pigmented species of appendicularia. Astaxanthin was found to be the principal carotenoid in all the species. The pathway analysis showed that all the species can synthesize astaxanthin from β-carotene, ingested from dietary sources, via 3-hydroxyechinenone, canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin, adonirubin or adonixanthin. Further, using de novo assembled transcriptome of blue A. fossae (subclass Copepoda), we identified highly expressed homologous β-carotene hydroxylase enzymes and putative carotenoid-binding proteins responsible for astaxanthin formation and the blue phenotype. In blue O. dioica (class Appendicularia), corresponding putative genes were identified from the reference genome. Collectively, our data provide molecular evidences for the bioconversion and accumulation of blue astaxanthin–protein complexes underpinning the observed ecological functional equivalence and adaptive convergence among neustonic mesozooplankton.

  16. Co-evolution of Hormone Metabolism and Signaling Networks Expands Plant Adaptive Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Ye, Mingli; Li, Bin; Noel, Joseph P

    2016-08-11

    Classically, hormones elicit specific cellular responses by activating dedicated receptors. Nevertheless, the biosynthesis and turnover of many of these hormone molecules also produce chemically related metabolites. These molecules may also possess hormonal activities; therefore, one or more may contribute to the adaptive plasticity of signaling outcomes in host organisms. Here, we show that a catabolite of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA), namely phaseic acid (PA), likely emerged in seed plants as a signaling molecule that fine-tunes plant physiology, environmental adaptation, and development. This trait was facilitated by both the emergence-selection of a PA reductase that modulates PA concentrations and by the functional diversification of the ABA receptor family to perceive and respond to PA. Our results suggest that PA serves as a hormone in seed plants through activation of a subset of ABA receptors. This study demonstrates that the co-evolution of hormone metabolism and signaling networks can expand organismal resilience. PMID:27518563

  17. Plasma proteome profiles associated with diet-induced metabolic syndrome and the early onset of metabolic syndrome in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Pas, Marinus F W; Koopmans, Sietse-Jan; Kruijt, Leo; Calus, Mario P L; Smits, Mari A

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and related diabetes are important health threatening multifactorial metabolic diseases and it has been suggested that 25% of all diabetic patients are unaware of their patho-physiological condition. Biomarkers for monitoring and control are available, but early stage predictive biomarkers enabling prevention of these diseases are still lacking. We used the pig as a model to study metabolic disease because humans and pigs share a multitude of metabolic similarities. Diabetes was chemically induced and control and diabetic pigs were either fed a high unsaturated fat (Mediterranean) diet or a high saturated fat/cholesterol/sugar (cafeteria) diet. Physiological parameters related to fat metabolism and diabetes were measured. Diabetic pigs' plasma proteome profiles differed more between the two diets than control pigs plasma proteome profiles. The expression levels of several proteins correlated well with (patho)physiological parameters related to the fat metabolism (cholesterol, VLDL, LDL, NEFA) and diabetes (Glucose) and to the diet fed to the animals. Studying only the control pigs as a model for metabolic syndrome when fed the two diets showed correlations to the same parameters but now more focused on insulin, glucose and abdominal fat depot parameters. We conclude that proteomic profiles can be used as a biomarker to identify pigs with developing metabolic syndrome (prediabetes) and diabetes when fed a cafeteria diet. It could be developed into a potential biomarkers for the early recognition of metabolic diseases.

  18. Plasma proteome profiles associated with diet-induced metabolic syndrome and the early onset of metabolic syndrome in a pig model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinus F W te Pas

    Full Text Available Obesity and related diabetes are important health threatening multifactorial metabolic diseases and it has been suggested that 25% of all diabetic patients are unaware of their patho-physiological condition. Biomarkers for monitoring and control are available, but early stage predictive biomarkers enabling prevention of these diseases are still lacking. We used the pig as a model to study metabolic disease because humans and pigs share a multitude of metabolic similarities. Diabetes was chemically induced and control and diabetic pigs were either fed a high unsaturated fat (Mediterranean diet or a high saturated fat/cholesterol/sugar (cafeteria diet. Physiological parameters related to fat metabolism and diabetes were measured. Diabetic pigs' plasma proteome profiles differed more between the two diets than control pigs plasma proteome profiles. The expression levels of several proteins correlated well with (pathophysiological parameters related to the fat metabolism (cholesterol, VLDL, LDL, NEFA and diabetes (Glucose and to the diet fed to the animals. Studying only the control pigs as a model for metabolic syndrome when fed the two diets showed correlations to the same parameters but now more focused on insulin, glucose and abdominal fat depot parameters. We conclude that proteomic profiles can be used as a biomarker to identify pigs with developing metabolic syndrome (prediabetes and diabetes when fed a cafeteria diet. It could be developed into a potential biomarkers for the early recognition of metabolic diseases.

  19. Adapting to aging out: profiles of risk and resilience among emancipated foster youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Tuppett M; Grey, Izabela K

    2012-05-01

    This investigation employed latent profile analysis to identify distinct patterns of multiform competence among 164 emancipated foster youth (Mage = 19.67 years, SD = 1.12; 64% female). Fit indices and conceptual interpretation converged on a four-profile solution. A subset of emancipated youth evidenced a maladaptive profile (16.5%; n = 27), which was characterized by low educational competence, low occupational competence, low civic engagement, problematic interpersonal relationships, low self-esteem, and high depressive symptoms. However, the largest group of emancipated youth exhibited a resilient profile in which they were faring reasonably well in all domains despite marked adversity (47%; n = 77). Two additional groups evidenced discordant adjustment patterns wherein they exhibited high levels of psychological competence despite behavioral difficulties (i.e., internally resilient; 30%; n = 49) or significant emotional difficulties despite manifest competence (i.e., externally resilient; 6.5%; n = 11). The obtained profiles were validated against independent measures of behavioral and socioemotional adjustment. Exploratory analyses examined etiological differences across profiles with respect to child welfare variables, such as age at entry into care, placement disruption, reason for placement, and severity of child maltreatment. The findings highlight the need for multidimensional models of risk and resilience and illustrate the importance of heretofore underappreciated heterogeneity in the adaptive outcomes of emancipated foster youth. PMID:22559125

  20. Impact of a synbiotic food on the gut microbial ecology and metabolic profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candela Marco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human gut harbors a diverse community of microorganisms which serve numerous important functions for the host wellbeing. Functional foods are commonly used to modulate the composition of the gut microbiota contributing to the maintenance of the host health or prevention of disease. In the present study, we characterized the impact of one month intake of a synbiotic food, containing fructooligosaccharides and the probiotic strains Lactobacillus helveticus Bar13 and Bifidobacterium longum Bar33, on the gut microbiota composition and metabolic profiles of 20 healthy subjects. Results The synbiotic food did not modify the overall structure of the gut microbiome, as indicated by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE. The ability of the probiotic L. helveticus and B. longum strains to pass through the gastrointestinal tract was hypothesized on the basis of real-time PCR data. In spite of a stable microbiota, the intake of the synbiotic food resulted in a shift of the fecal metabolic profiles, highlighted by the Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (GC-MS/SPME analysis. The extent of short chain fatty acids (SCFA, ketones, carbon disulfide and methyl acetate was significantly affected by the synbiotic food consumption. Furthermore, the Canonical discriminant Analysis of Principal coordinates (CAP of GC-MS/SPME profiles allowed a separation of the stool samples recovered before and after the consumption of the functional food. Conclusion In this study we investigated the global impact of a dietary intervention on the gut ecology and metabolism in healthy humans. We demonstrated that the intake of a synbiotic food leads to a modulation of the gut metabolic activities with a maintenance of the gut biostructure. In particular, the significant increase of SCFA, ketones, carbon disulfide and methyl acetate following the feeding period suggests potential health

  1. Transcriptional profiling of rats subjected to gestational undernourishment: implications for the developmental variations in metabolic traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany J Morris

    Full Text Available A link has been established between prenatal nutrition and the development of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases later in life, a process referred to as developmental programming. It has been suggested that the trajectory of development is shifted by alterations in the maternal nutritional state leading to changes in developmental plasticity, in part underpinned by epigenetic changes in gene regulation. However, to date, only candidate gene approaches have been used to assess expression and molecular changes in the offspring of maternally undernourished animals. Furthermore, most work has focused on animals at an age where the programmed phenotype is already manifest and little is known about changes in gene expression in the offspring prior to development of obesity and related metabolic disorders. Gene expression profiles of liver, retroperitoneal white adipose fat, and biceps femoris skeletal muscle tissue from young adult male rats (55 days old in which nutritional status had been manipulated in utero by maternal undernutrition (UN were compared to the profiles of offspring of ad libitum fed mothers serving as the control group (AD (8 offspring/group. The expression profiles were determined using the Illumina RatRef-12 BeadChip. No significant changes in expression were identified for skeletal muscle or white adipose tissue. However, studies of liver tissue showed 249 differentially expressed genes (143 up regulated, 106 down regulated. Although the animals at day 55 have yet to develop obesity they already show biochemical abnormalities and by day 110 express a phenotype characterized by increased adiposity and altered insulin sensitivity. An analysis of pathways affected suggests that intrauterine programming of UN animals to favor fat as an energy source results in mitochondrial dysfunction which initially affects the postnatal hepatic function and subsequently, via the resultant metabolic changes in other organs leads to the evolution

  2. Transcriptional profiling of rats subjected to gestational undernourishment: implications for the developmental variations in metabolic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Tiffany J; Vickers, Mark; Gluckman, Peter; Gilmour, Stewart; Affara, Nabeel

    2009-09-29

    A link has been established between prenatal nutrition and the development of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases later in life, a process referred to as developmental programming. It has been suggested that the trajectory of development is shifted by alterations in the maternal nutritional state leading to changes in developmental plasticity, in part underpinned by epigenetic changes in gene regulation. However, to date, only candidate gene approaches have been used to assess expression and molecular changes in the offspring of maternally undernourished animals. Furthermore, most work has focused on animals at an age where the programmed phenotype is already manifest and little is known about changes in gene expression in the offspring prior to development of obesity and related metabolic disorders. Gene expression profiles of liver, retroperitoneal white adipose fat, and biceps femoris skeletal muscle tissue from young adult male rats (55 days old) in which nutritional status had been manipulated in utero by maternal undernutrition (UN) were compared to the profiles of offspring of ad libitum fed mothers serving as the control group (AD) (8 offspring/group). The expression profiles were determined using the Illumina RatRef-12 BeadChip. No significant changes in expression were identified for skeletal muscle or white adipose tissue. However, studies of liver tissue showed 249 differentially expressed genes (143 up regulated, 106 down regulated). Although the animals at day 55 have yet to develop obesity they already show biochemical abnormalities and by day 110 express a phenotype characterized by increased adiposity and altered insulin sensitivity. An analysis of pathways affected suggests that intrauterine programming of UN animals to favor fat as an energy source results in mitochondrial dysfunction which initially affects the postnatal hepatic function and subsequently, via the resultant metabolic changes in other organs leads to the evolution of a phenotype

  3. Unsupervised principal component analysis of NMR metabolic profiles for the assessment of substantial equivalence of transgenic grapes (Vitis vinifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, Gianfranco; Mezzetti, Bruno; Babini, Elena; Capocasa, Franco; Placucci, Giuseppe; Capozzi, Francesco

    2011-09-14

    Substantial equivalence is a key concept in the evaluation of unintended and potentially harmful metabolic impact consequent to a genetic modification of food. The application of unsupervised multivariate data analysis to the metabolic profiles is expected to improve the effectiveness of such evaluation. The present study uses NMR spectra of hydroalcoholic extracts, as holistic representations of the metabolic profiles of grapes, to evaluate the effect of the insertion of one or three copies of the DefH9-iaaM construct in plants of Silcora and Thompson Seedless cultivars. The comparison of the metabolic profiles of transgenic derivatives with respect to their corresponding natural lines pointed out that the overall metabolic changes occur in the same direction, independent of the host genotype, although the two cultivars are modified to different extents. A higher number of copies not only produces a larger effect but also modifies the whole pattern of perturbed metabolites. PMID:21806070

  4. Effects of sildenafil on lipid profile and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haedar Abdulhafith Al-biati

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: We have provided the first evidence that sildenafil therapy improve glycemic control, lipid profile and body mass index in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(6.000: 1048-1051

  5. Metabolic profiling of a range of peach fruit varieties reveals high metabolic diversity and commonalities and differences during ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Laura L; Bustamante, Claudia A; Osorio, Sonia; Gabilondo, Julieta; Borsani, Julia; Lauxmann, Martin A; Maulión, Evangelina; Valentini, Gabriel; Budde, Claudio O; Fernie, Alisdair R; Lara, María V; Drincovich, María F

    2016-01-01

    Peach (Prunus persica) fruits from different varieties display differential organoleptic and nutritional properties, characteristics related to their chemical composition. Here, chemical biodiversity of peach fruits from fifteen varieties, at harvest and after post-harvest ripening, was explored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Metabolic profiling revealed that metabolites involved in organoleptic properties (sugars, organic and amino acids), stress tolerance (raffinose, galactinol, maltitol), and with nutritional properties (amino, caffeoylquinic and dehydroascorbic acids) displayed variety-dependent levels. Peach varieties clustered into four groups: two groups of early-harvest varieties with higher amino acid levels; two groups of mid- and late-harvest varieties with higher maltose levels. Further separation was mostly dependent on organic acids/raffinose levels. Variety-dependent and independent metabolic changes associated with ripening were detected; which contribute to chemical diversity or can be used as ripening markers, respectively. The great variety-dependent diversity in the content of metabolites that define fruit quality reinforces metabolomics usage as a tool to assist fruit quality improvement in peach.

  6. Evaluation and characterization of bacterial metabolic dynamics with a novel profiling technique, real-time metabolotyping.

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    Shinji Fukuda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental processes in ecosystems are dynamically altered by several metabolic responses in microorganisms, including intracellular sensing and pumping, battle for survival, and supply of or competition for nutrients. Notably, intestinal bacteria maintain homeostatic balance in mammals via multiple dynamic biochemical reactions to produce several metabolites from undigested food, and those metabolites exert various effects on mammalian cells in a time-dependent manner. We have established a method for the analysis of bacterial metabolic dynamics in real time and used it in combination with statistical NMR procedures. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a novel method called real-time metabolotyping (RT-MT, which performs sequential (1H-NMR profiling and two-dimensional (2D (1H, (13C-HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum coherence profiling during bacterial growth in an NMR tube. The profiles were evaluated with such statistical methods as Z-score analysis, principal components analysis, and time series of statistical TOtal Correlation SpectroScopY (TOCSY. In addition, using 2D (1H, (13C-HSQC with the stable isotope labeling technique, we observed the metabolic kinetics of specific biochemical reactions based on time-dependent 2D kinetic profiles. Using these methods, we clarified the pathway for linolenic acid hydrogenation by a gastrointestinal bacterium, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens. We identified trans11, cis13 conjugated linoleic acid as the intermediate of linolenic acid hydrogenation by B. fibrisolvens, based on the results of (13C-labeling RT-MT experiments. In addition, we showed that the biohydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids serves as a defense mechanism against their toxic effects. CONCLUSIONS: RT-MT is useful for the characterization of beneficial bacterium that shows potential for use as probiotic by producing bioactive compounds.

  7. Influence of the RelA activity on E. coli metabolism by metabolite profiling of glucose-limited chemostat cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Sónia Carneiro; Villas-Bôas, Silas G.; Ferreira, Eugénio C.; Isabel Rocha

    2012-01-01

    Metabolite profiling of E. coli W3110 and the isogenic DrelA mutant cells was used to characterize the RelA-dependent stringent control of metabolism under different growth conditions. Metabolic profiles were obtained by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis and revealed significant differences between E. coli strains grown at different conditions. Major differences between the two strains were assessed in the levels of amino acids and fatty acids and their precursor metabolit...

  8. Metabolic modelling reveals the specialization of secondary replicons for niche adaptation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    diCenzo, George C; Checcucci, Alice; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio; Viti, Carlo; Dziewit, Lukasz; Finan, Turlough M; Galardini, Marco; Fondi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The genome of about 10% of bacterial species is divided among two or more large chromosome-sized replicons. The contribution of each replicon to the microbial life cycle (for example, environmental adaptations and/or niche switching) remains unclear. Here we report a genome-scale metabolic model of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti that is integrated with carbon utilization data for 1,500 genes with 192 carbon substrates. Growth of S. meliloti is modelled in three ecological niches (bulk soil, rhizosphere and nodule) with a focus on the role of each of its three replicons. We observe clear metabolic differences during growth in the tested ecological niches and an overall reprogramming following niche switching. In silico examination of the inferred fitness of gene deletion mutants suggests that secondary replicons evolved to fulfil a specialized function, particularly host-associated niche adaptation. Thus, genes on secondary replicons might potentially be manipulated to promote or suppress host interactions for biotechnological purposes. PMID:27447951

  9. IKKβ promotes metabolic adaptation to glutamine deprivation via phosphorylation and inhibition of PFKFB3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Michael A; Lowman, Xazmin H; Pan, Min; Tran, Thai Q; Warmoes, Marc O; Ishak Gabra, Mari B; Yang, Ying; Locasale, Jason W; Kong, Mei

    2016-08-15

    Glutamine is an essential nutrient for cancer cell survival and proliferation. Enhanced utilization of glutamine often depletes its local supply, yet how cancer cells adapt to low glutamine conditions is largely unknown. Here, we report that IκB kinase β (IKKβ) is activated upon glutamine deprivation and is required for cell survival independently of NF-κB transcription. We demonstrate that IKKβ directly interacts with and phosphorylates 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase isoform 3 (PFKFB3), a major driver of aerobic glycolysis, at Ser269 upon glutamine deprivation to inhibit its activity, thereby down-regulating aerobic glycolysis when glutamine levels are low. Thus, due to lack of inhibition of PFKFB3, IKKβ-deficient cells exhibit elevated aerobic glycolysis and lactate production, leading to less glucose carbons contributing to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and the pentose phosphate pathway, which results in increased glutamine dependence for both TCA cycle intermediates and reactive oxygen species suppression. Therefore, coinhibition of IKKβ and glutamine metabolism results in dramatic synergistic killing of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. In all, our results uncover a previously unidentified role of IKKβ in regulating glycolysis, sensing low-glutamine-induced metabolic stress, and promoting cellular adaptation to nutrient availability. PMID:27585591

  10. Similar metabolic adaptations during exercise after low volume sprint interval and traditional endurance training in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgomaster, Kirsten A; Howarth, Krista R; Phillips, Stuart M; Rakobowchuk, Mark; Macdonald, Maureen J; McGee, Sean L; Gibala, Martin J

    2008-01-01

    Low-volume 'sprint' interval training (SIT) stimulates rapid improvements in muscle oxidative capacity that are comparable to levels reached following traditional endurance training (ET) but no study has examined metabolic adaptations during exercise after these different training strategies. We hypothesized that SIT and ET would induce similar adaptations in markers of skeletal muscle carbohydrate (CHO) and lipid metabolism and metabolic control during exercise despite large differences in training volume and time commitment. Active but untrained subjects (23 +/- 1 years) performed a constant-load cycling challenge (1 h at 65% of peak oxygen uptake (.VO(2peak)) before and after 6 weeks of either SIT or ET (n = 5 men and 5 women per group). SIT consisted of four to six repeats of a 30 s 'all out' Wingate Test (mean power output approximately 500 W) with 4.5 min recovery between repeats, 3 days per week. ET consisted of 40-60 min of continuous cycling at a workload that elicited approximately 65% (mean power output approximately 150 W) per day, 5 days per week. Weekly time commitment (approximately 1.5 versus approximately 4.5 h) and total training volume (approximately 225 versus approximately 2250 kJ week(-1)) were substantially lower in SIT versus ET. Despite these differences, both protocols induced similar increases (P < 0.05) in mitochondrial markers for skeletal muscle CHO (pyruvate dehydrogenase E1alpha protein content) and lipid oxidation (3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase maximal activity) and protein content of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha. Glycogen and phosphocreatine utilization during exercise were reduced after training, and calculated rates of whole-body CHO and lipid oxidation were decreased and increased, respectively, with no differences between groups (all main effects, P < 0.05). Given the markedly lower training volume in the SIT group, these data suggest that high-intensity interval training is a time

  11. Similar metabolic adaptations during exercise after low volume sprint interval and traditional endurance training in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgomaster, Kirsten A; Howarth, Krista R; Phillips, Stuart M; Rakobowchuk, Mark; MacDonald, Maureen J; McGee, Sean L; Gibala, Martin J

    2008-01-01

    Low-volume ‘sprint’ interval training (SIT) stimulates rapid improvements in muscle oxidative capacity that are comparable to levels reached following traditional endurance training (ET) but no study has examined metabolic adaptations during exercise after these different training strategies. We hypothesized that SIT and ET would induce similar adaptations in markers of skeletal muscle carbohydrate (CHO) and lipid metabolism and metabolic control during exercise despite large differences in training volume and time commitment. Active but untrained subjects (23 ± 1 years) performed a constant-load cycling challenge (1 h at 65% of peak oxygen uptake before and after 6 weeks of either SIT or ET (n = 5 men and 5 women per group). SIT consisted of four to six repeats of a 30 s ‘all out’ Wingate Test (mean power output ∼500 W) with 4.5 min recovery between repeats, 3 days per week. ET consisted of 40–60 min of continuous cycling at a workload that elicited ∼65% (mean power output ∼150 W) per day, 5 days per week. Weekly time commitment (∼1.5 versus∼4.5 h) and total training volume (∼225 versus∼2250 kJ week−1) were substantially lower in SIT versus ET. Despite these differences, both protocols induced similar increases (P < 0.05) in mitochondrial markers for skeletal muscle CHO (pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α protein content) and lipid oxidation (3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase maximal activity) and protein content of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α. Glycogen and phosphocreatine utilization during exercise were reduced after training, and calculated rates of whole-body CHO and lipid oxidation were decreased and increased, respectively, with no differences between groups (all main effects, P < 0.05). Given the markedly lower training volume in the SIT group, these data suggest that high-intensity interval training is a time-efficient strategy to increase skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and induce specific metabolic

  12. Inner workings of thrombolites: spatial gradients of metabolic activity as revealed by metatranscriptome profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobberley, J. M.; Khodadad, C. L. M.; Visscher, P. T.; Reid, R. P.; Hagan, P.; Foster, J. S.

    2015-07-01

    Microbialites are sedimentary deposits formed by the metabolic interactions of microbes and their environment. These lithifying microbial communities represent one of the oldest ecosystems on Earth, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying the function of these communities are poorly understood. In this study, we used comparative metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses to characterize the spatial organization of the thrombolites of Highborne Cay, The Bahamas, an actively forming microbialite system. At midday, there were differences in gene expression throughout the spatial profile of the thrombolitic mat with a high abundance of transcripts encoding genes required for photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and exopolymeric substance production in the upper three mm of the mat. Transcripts associated with denitrification and sulfate reduction were in low abundance throughout the depth profile, suggesting these metabolisms were less active during midday. Comparative metagenomics of the Bahamian thrombolites with other known microbialite ecosystems from across the globe revealed that, despite many shared core pathways, the thrombolites represented genetically distinct communities. This study represents the first time the metatranscriptome of living microbialite has been characterized and offers a new molecular perspective on those microbial metabolisms, and their underlying genetic pathways, that influence the mechanisms of carbonate precipitation in lithifying microbial mat ecosystems.

  13. Metabolic profiles and free radical scavenging activity of Cordyceps bassiana fruiting bodies according to developmental stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Hee Hyun

    Full Text Available The metabolic profiles of Cordyceps bassiana according to fruiting body developmental stage were investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We were able to detect 62 metabolites, including 48 metabolites from 70% methanol extracts and 14 metabolites from 100% n-hexane extracts. These metabolites were classified as alcohols, amino acids, organic acids, phosphoric acids, purine nucleosides and bases, sugars, saturated fatty acids, unsaturated fatty acids, or fatty amides. Significant changes in metabolite levels were found according to developmental stage. Relative levels of amino acids, purine nucleosides, and sugars were higher in development stage 3 than in the other stages. Among the amino acids, valine, isoleucine, lysine, histidine, glutamine, and aspartic acid, which are associated with ABC transporters and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, also showed higher levels in stage 3 samples. The free radical scavenging activities, which were significantly higher in stage 3 than in the other stages, showed a positive correlation with purine nucleoside metabolites such as adenosine, guanosine, and inosine. These results not only show metabolic profiles, but also suggest the metabolic pathways associated with fruiting body development stages in cultivated C. bassiana.

  14. Adenovirus-36 Seropositivity and Its Relation with Obesity and Metabolic Profile in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isela Parra-Rojas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The human adenovirus 36 (Ad-36 is causally and correlatively associated in animals and humans, respectively, with increased adiposity and altered metabolic profile. In previous studies, the relationship between Ad-36 seropositivity with obesity was established in adults and children. We evaluated the association of positive antibodies to Ad-36 with obesity and metabolic profile in Mexican children. Seventy-five children with normal-weight and 82 with obesity were studied in this research. All children had a clinic assessment which included weight, height, body circumferences, and skinfold thickness. Laboratory analyzes included triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and glucose and insulin levels. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to determine the antibodies to Ad-36 in the serum samples. The overall Ad-36 seroprevalence was 73.9%. Ad-36 seropositivity had a higher prevalence in obese children than in normal weight group (58.6 versus 41.4%, P=0.007. Ad-36 seropositivity was associated with obesity (OR=2.66, P=0.01 and high-density lipoprotein <40 mg/dL (OR=2.85, P=0.03. The Ad-36 seropositive group had greater risk of 4 metabolic abnormalities compared with those children without none alteration. In summary, Ad-36 seropositivity was associated with obesity and low HDL-c levels in the sample of children studied.

  15. Metabolic Profiles of Obesity in American Indians: The Strong Heart Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Lyle G.; Umans, Jason G.; Uppal, Karan; Tran, ViLinh T.; Jones, Dean P.; Lee, Elisa T.; Howard, Barbara V.; Zhao, Jinying

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a typical metabolic disorder resulting from the imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. American Indians suffer disproportionately high rates of obesity and diabetes. The goal of this study is to identify metabolic profiles of obesity in 431 normoglycemic American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Family Study. Using an untargeted liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, we detected 1,364 distinct m/z features matched to known compounds in the current metabolomics databases. We conducted multivariate analysis to identify metabolic profiles for obesity, adjusting for standard obesity indicators. After adjusting for covariates and multiple testing, five metabolites were associated with body mass index and seven were associated with waist circumference. Of them, three were associated with both. Majority of the obesity-related metabolites belongs to lipids, e.g., fatty amides, sphingolipids, prenol lipids, and steroid derivatives. Other identified metabolites are amino acids or peptides. Of the nine identified metabolites, five metabolites (oleoylethanolamide, mannosyl-diinositol-phosphorylceramide, pristanic acid, glutamate, and kynurenine) have been previously implicated in obesity or its related pathways. Future studies are warranted to replicate these findings in larger populations or other ethnic groups. PMID:27434237

  16. Effects of potato spindle tuber viroid infection on tomato metabolic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherian, Seyed Ali Akbar; Hamzehzarghani, Habiballah; Izadpanah, Keramatollah; Djavaheri, Mohammad

    2016-08-20

    Viroids are the smallest plant pathogens consisting of a single stranded circular RNA molecule with a strong secondary structure, lacking a coat protein or any other proteins. The mechanism of viroid pathogenicity has remained unclear. Recent advances in instrumentation and data mining have made it possible to study the effects of various stresses on primary and secondary metabolisms. Here, we have utilized metabolic profiling approach to show how PSTVd infection alters tomato metabolic profile and the related pathways. Three terminal leaflets of third true leaf of 20-day-old tolerant tomato cultivar 'Moneymaker' were mechanically inoculated by PSTVd intermediate variant cDNAs and samples were taken from eighth leaf, 19days post-inoculation. Metabolites were extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and subjected to statistical data analysis. Affected pathways were identified by Pathway Tools program and were compared with microarray data previously reported. The study showed that 79 metabolites changed significantly and 23 pathways were identified in relation to these metabolites. Fourteen of these pathways were similar to those reported in other works. The altered pathways in PSTVd infected tomato leaves included, eight cutin and wax biosynthesis, seven pathways that produce defense related compounds, two energy generator pathways, three hormone biosynthesis pathways, two signal transduction pathways, and one nucleotide biosynthesis pathway. Our data on up/down-regulation of pathways supported the data produced on their corresponding gene(s) up/down-regulation. PMID:27393919

  17. Effects of cadmium exposure on growth and metabolic profile of bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yan; Hu, Longxing; Du, Zhimin; Sun, Xiaoyan; Amombo, Erick; Fan, Jibiao; Fu, Jinmin

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic responses to cadmium (Cd) may be associated with variations in Cd tolerance in plants. The objectives of this study were to examine changes in metabolic profiles in bermudagrass in response to Cd stress and to identify predominant metabolites associated with differential Cd tolerance using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Two genotypes of bermudagrass with contrasting Cd tolerance were exposed to 0 and 1.5 mM CdSO4 for 14 days in hydroponics. Physiological responses to Cd were evaluated by determining turf quality, growth rate, chlorophyll content and normalized relative transpiration. All these parameters exhibited higher tolerance in WB242 than in WB144. Cd treated WB144 transported more Cd to the shoot than in WB242. The metabolite analysis of leaf polar extracts revealed 39 Cd responsive metabolites in both genotypes, mainly consisting of amino acids, organic acids, sugars, fatty acids and others. A difference in the metabolic profiles was observed between the two bermudagrass genotypes exposed to Cd stress. Seven amino acids (norvaline, glycine, proline, serine, threonine, glutamic acid and gulonic acid), four organic acids (glyceric acid, oxoglutaric acid, citric acid and malic acid,) and three sugars (xylulose, galactose and talose) accumulated more in WB242 than WB144. However, compared to the control, WB144 accumulated higher quantities of sugars than WB242 in the Cd regime. The differential accumulation of these metabolites could be associated with the differential Cd tolerance in bermudagrass. PMID:25545719

  18. Effects of cadmium exposure on growth and metabolic profile of bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L. Pers].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xie

    Full Text Available Metabolic responses to cadmium (Cd may be associated with variations in Cd tolerance in plants. The objectives of this study were to examine changes in metabolic profiles in bermudagrass in response to Cd stress and to identify predominant metabolites associated with differential Cd tolerance using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Two genotypes of bermudagrass with contrasting Cd tolerance were exposed to 0 and 1.5 mM CdSO4 for 14 days in hydroponics. Physiological responses to Cd were evaluated by determining turf quality, growth rate, chlorophyll content and normalized relative transpiration. All these parameters exhibited higher tolerance in WB242 than in WB144. Cd treated WB144 transported more Cd to the shoot than in WB242. The metabolite analysis of leaf polar extracts revealed 39 Cd responsive metabolites in both genotypes, mainly consisting of amino acids, organic acids, sugars, fatty acids and others. A difference in the metabolic profiles was observed between the two bermudagrass genotypes exposed to Cd stress. Seven amino acids (norvaline, glycine, proline, serine, threonine, glutamic acid and gulonic acid, four organic acids (glyceric acid, oxoglutaric acid, citric acid and malic acid, and three sugars (xylulose, galactose and talose accumulated more in WB242 than WB144. However, compared to the control, WB144 accumulated higher quantities of sugars than WB242 in the Cd regime. The differential accumulation of these metabolites could be associated with the differential Cd tolerance in bermudagrass.

  19. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography-mass spectrometry for anionic metabolic profiling of urine from antibiotic-treated rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Miranda G M; Swann, Jonathan R; Wilson, Ian D; Somsen, Govert W; de Jong, Gerhardus J

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography-mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS) was used for anionic metabolic profiling of urine from antibiotic-treated rats to study microbial-host co-metabolism. Rats were treated with the antibiotics penicillin G and streptomycin sulfate for four or eight days and compared t

  20. SEVERE OBESITY SHIFTS METABOLIC THRESHOLDS BUT DOES NOT ATTENUATE AEROBIC TRAINING ADAPTATIONS IN ZUCKER RATS

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    Thiago Santos Rosa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe obesity affects metabolism with potential to influence the lactate and glycemic response to different exercise intensities in untrained and trained rats. Here we evaluated metabolic thresholds and maximal aerobic capacity in rats with severe obesity and lean counterparts at pre- and post-training. Zucker rats (obese: n = 10, lean: n = 10 were submitted to constant treadmill bouts, to determine the maximal lactate steady state, and an incremental treadmill test, to determine the lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal velocity at pre and post 8 weeks of treadmill training. Velocities of the lactate threshold and glycemic threshold agreed with the maximal lactate steady state velocity on most comparisons. The maximal lactate steady state velocity occurred at higher percentage of the maximal velocity in Zucker rats at pre-training than the percentage commonly reported and used for training prescription for other rat strains (i.e., 60% (obese = 78±9% and lean = 68±5%, P 0.05, whereas increase in maximal velocity was greater in the obese group (P <0.05 vs. lean. In conclusion, lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal lactate steady state occurred at similar exercise intensity in Zucker rats at pre- and post-training. Severe obesity shifted metabolic thresholds to higher exercise intensity at pre-training, but did not attenuate submaximal and maximal aerobic training adaptations.

  1. Severe Obesity Shifts Metabolic Thresholds but Does Not Attenuate Aerobic Training Adaptations in Zucker Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Thiago S.; Simões, Herbert G.; Rogero, Marcelo M.; Moraes, Milton R.; Denadai, Benedito S.; Arida, Ricardo M.; Andrade, Marília S.; Silva, Bruno M.

    2016-01-01

    Severe obesity affects metabolism with potential to influence the lactate and glycemic response to different exercise intensities in untrained and trained rats. Here we evaluated metabolic thresholds and maximal aerobic capacity in rats with severe obesity and lean counterparts at pre- and post-training. Zucker rats (obese: n = 10, lean: n = 10) were submitted to constant treadmill bouts, to determine the maximal lactate steady state, and an incremental treadmill test, to determine the lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal velocity at pre and post 8 weeks of treadmill training. Velocities of the lactate threshold and glycemic threshold agreed with the maximal lactate steady state velocity on most comparisons. The maximal lactate steady state velocity occurred at higher percentage of the maximal velocity in Zucker rats at pre-training than the percentage commonly reported and used for training prescription for other rat strains (i.e., 60%) (obese = 78 ± 9% and lean = 68 ± 5%, P 0.05), whereas increase in maximal velocity was greater in the obese group (P < 0.05 vs. lean). In conclusion, lactate threshold, glycemic threshold and maximal lactate steady state occurred at similar exercise intensity in Zucker rats at pre- and post-training. Severe obesity shifted metabolic thresholds to higher exercise intensity at pre-training, but did not attenuate submaximal and maximal aerobic training adaptations. PMID:27148063

  2. Chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism as adaptive strategies during citrus canker induction by Xanthomonas citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Leandro Marcio; Facincani, Agda Paula; Ferreira, Cristiano Barbalho; Ferreira, Rafael Marine; Ferro, Maria Inês Tiraboshi; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; de Oliveira, Julio Cezar Franco; Ferro, Jesus Aparecido; Soares, Márcia Regina

    2015-03-01

    The genome of Xanthomonas citri subsp. Citri strain 306 pathotype A (Xac) was completely sequenced more than 10 years; to date, few studies involving functional genomics Xac and its host compatible have been developed, specially related to adaptive events that allow the survival of Xac within the plant. Proteomic analysis of Xac showed that the processes of chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism are key adaptive strategies during the interaction of a pathogenic bacterium with its plant host. The results also indicate the importance of a group of proteins that may not be directly related to the classical virulence factors, but that are likely fundamental to the success of the initial stages of the infection, such as methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (Mcp) and phosphate specific transport (Pst). Furthermore, the analysis of the mutant of the gene pstB which codifies to an ABC phosphate transporter subunit revealed a complete absence of citrus canker symptoms when inoculated in compatible hosts. We also conducted an in silico analysis which established the possible network of genes regulated by two-component systems PhoPQ and PhoBR (related to phosphate metabolism), and possible transcriptional factor binding site (TFBS) motifs of regulatory proteins PhoB and PhoP, detaching high degree of conservation of PhoB TFBS in 84 genes of Xac genome. This is the first time that chemotaxis signal transduction and phosphate metabolism were therefore indicated to be fundamental to the process of colonization of plant tissue during the induction of disease associated with Xanthomonas genus bacteria. PMID:25403594

  3. Chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism as adaptive strategies during citrus canker induction by Xanthomonas citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Leandro Marcio; Facincani, Agda Paula; Ferreira, Cristiano Barbalho; Ferreira, Rafael Marine; Ferro, Maria Inês Tiraboshi; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; de Oliveira, Julio Cezar Franco; Ferro, Jesus Aparecido; Soares, Márcia Regina

    2015-03-01

    The genome of Xanthomonas citri subsp. Citri strain 306 pathotype A (Xac) was completely sequenced more than 10 years; to date, few studies involving functional genomics Xac and its host compatible have been developed, specially related to adaptive events that allow the survival of Xac within the plant. Proteomic analysis of Xac showed that the processes of chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism are key adaptive strategies during the interaction of a pathogenic bacterium with its plant host. The results also indicate the importance of a group of proteins that may not be directly related to the classical virulence factors, but that are likely fundamental to the success of the initial stages of the infection, such as methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (Mcp) and phosphate specific transport (Pst). Furthermore, the analysis of the mutant of the gene pstB which codifies to an ABC phosphate transporter subunit revealed a complete absence of citrus canker symptoms when inoculated in compatible hosts. We also conducted an in silico analysis which established the possible network of genes regulated by two-component systems PhoPQ and PhoBR (related to phosphate metabolism), and possible transcriptional factor binding site (TFBS) motifs of regulatory proteins PhoB and PhoP, detaching high degree of conservation of PhoB TFBS in 84 genes of Xac genome. This is the first time that chemotaxis signal transduction and phosphate metabolism were therefore indicated to be fundamental to the process of colonization of plant tissue during the induction of disease associated with Xanthomonas genus bacteria.

  4. Raman-based noninvasive metabolic profile evaluation of in vitro bovine embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Érika Cristina; Martinho, Herculano; Annes, Kelly; da Silva, Thais; Soares, Carlos Alexandre; Leite, Roberta Ferreira; Milazzotto, Marcella Pecora

    2016-07-01

    The timing of the first embryonic cell divisions may predict the ability of an embryo to establish pregnancy. Similarly, metabolic profiles may be markers of embryonic viability. However, in bovine, data about the metabolomics profile of these embryos are still not available. In the present work, we describe Raman-based metabolomic profiles of culture media of bovine embryos with different developmental kinetics (fast x slow) throughout the in vitro culture. The principal component analysis enabled us to classify embryos with different developmental kinetics since they presented specific spectroscopic profiles for each evaluated time point. We noticed that bands at 1076 cm-1 (lipids), 1300 cm-1 (Amide III), and 2719 cm-1 (DNA nitrogen bases) gave the most relevant spectral features, enabling the separation between fast and slow groups. Bands at 1001 cm-1 (phenylalanine) and 2892 cm-1 (methylene group of the polymethylene chain) presented specific patterns related to embryonic stage and can be considered as biomarkers of embryonic development by Raman spectroscopy. The culture media analysis by Raman spectroscopy proved to be a simple and sensitive technique that can be applied with high efficiency to characterize the profiles of in vitro produced bovine embryos with different development kinetics and different stages of development.

  5. Taxonomic and predicted metabolic profiles of the human gut microbiome in pre-Columbian mummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Fornaciari, Gino; Luciani, Stefania; Dowd, Scot E; Toranzos, Gary A; Marota, Isolina; Cano, Raul J

    2016-11-01

    Characterization of naturally mummified human gut remains could potentially provide insights into the preservation and evolution of commensal and pathogenic microorganisms, and metabolic profiles. We characterized the gut microbiome of two pre-Columbian Andean mummies dating to the 10-15th centuries using 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics, and compared them to a previously characterized gut microbiome of an 11th century AD pre-Columbian Andean mummy. Our previous study showed that the Clostridiales represented the majority of the bacterial communities in the mummified gut remains, but that other microbial communities were also preserved during the process of natural mummification, as shown with the metagenomics analyses. The gut microbiome of the other two mummies were mainly comprised by Clostridiales or Bacillales, as demonstrated with 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, many of which are facultative anaerobes, possibly consistent with the process of natural mummification requiring low oxygen levels. Metagenome analyses showed the presence of other microbial groups that were positively or negatively correlated with specific metabolic profiles. The presence of sequences similar to both Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania donovani could suggest that these pathogens were prevalent in pre-Columbian individuals. Taxonomic and functional profiling of mummified human gut remains will aid in the understanding of the microbial ecology of the process of natural mummification. PMID:27559027

  6. Development of a Pipeline for Exploratory Metabolic Profiling of Infant Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Frances; Georgakopoulou, Nancy; Kaluarachchi, Manuja; Kyriakides, Michael; Andreas, Nicholas; Przysiezna, Natalia; Hyde, Matthew J; Modi, Neena; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Holmes, Elaine

    2016-09-01

    Numerous metabolic profiling pipelines have been developed to characterize the composition of human biofluids and tissues, the vast majority of these being for studies in adults. To accommodate limited sample volume and to take into account the compositional differences between adult and infant biofluids, we developed and optimized sample handling and analytical procedures for studying urine from newborns. A robust pipeline for metabolic profiling using NMR spectroscopy was established, encompassing sample collection, preparation, spectroscopic measurement, and computational analysis. Longitudinal samples were collected from five infants from birth until 14 months of age. Methods of extraction and effects of freezing and sample dilution were assessed, and urinary contaminants from breakdown of polymers in a range of diapers and cotton wool balls were identified and compared, including propylene glycol, acrylic acid, and tert-butanol. Finally, assessment of urinary profiles obtained over the first few weeks of life revealed a dramatic change in composition, with concentrations of phenols, amino acids, and betaine altering systematically over the first few months of life. Therefore, neonatal samples require more stringent standardization of experimental design, sample handling, and analysis compared to that of adult samples to accommodate the variability and limited sample volume. PMID:27476583

  7. Development of a Pipeline for Exploratory Metabolic Profiling of Infant Urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Frances; Georgakopoulou, Nancy; Kaluarachchi, Manuja; Kyriakides, Michael; Andreas, Nicholas; Przysiezna, Natalia; Hyde, Matthew J; Modi, Neena; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Holmes, Elaine

    2016-09-01

    Numerous metabolic profiling pipelines have been developed to characterize the composition of human biofluids and tissues, the vast majority of these being for studies in adults. To accommodate limited sample volume and to take into account the compositional differences between adult and infant biofluids, we developed and optimized sample handling and analytical procedures for studying urine from newborns. A robust pipeline for metabolic profiling using NMR spectroscopy was established, encompassing sample collection, preparation, spectroscopic measurement, and computational analysis. Longitudinal samples were collected from five infants from birth until 14 months of age. Methods of extraction and effects of freezing and sample dilution were assessed, and urinary contaminants from breakdown of polymers in a range of diapers and cotton wool balls were identified and compared, including propylene glycol, acrylic acid, and tert-butanol. Finally, assessment of urinary profiles obtained over the first few weeks of life revealed a dramatic change in composition, with concentrations of phenols, amino acids, and betaine altering systematically over the first few months of life. Therefore, neonatal samples require more stringent standardization of experimental design, sample handling, and analysis compared to that of adult samples to accommodate the variability and limited sample volume.

  8. Proteomic analysis of the metabolic adaptation of the biocontrol agent Pseudozyma flocculosa leading to glycolipid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bélanger Richard R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The yeast-like epiphytic fungus Pseudozyma flocculosa is known to antagonize powdery mildew fungi through proliferation on colonies presumably preceded by the release of an antifungal glycolipid (flocculosin. In culture conditions, P. flocculosa can be induced to produce or not flocculosin through manipulation of the culture medium nutrients. In order to characterize and understand the metabolic changes in P. flocculosa linked to glycolipid production, we conducted a 2-DE proteomic analysis and compared the proteomic profile of P. flocculosa growing under conditions favoring the development of the fungus (control or conducive to flocculosin synthesis (stress. A large number of protein spots (771 were detected in protein extracts of the control treatment compared to only 435 matched protein spots in extracts of the stress cultures, which clearly suggests an important metabolic reorganization in slow-growing cells producing flocculosin. From the latter treatment, we were able to identify 21 protein spots that were either specific to the treatment or up-regulated significantly (2-fold increase. All of them were identified based on similarity between predicted ORF of the newly sequenced genome of P. flocculosa with Ustilago maydis' available annotated sequences. These proteins were associated with the carbon and fatty acid metabolism, and also with the filamentous change of the fungus leading to flocculosin production. This first look into the proteome of P. flocculosa suggests that flocculosin synthesis is elicited in response to specific stress or limiting conditions.

  9. Metabolic profiling reveals growth related FAME productivity and quality of Chlorella sorokiniana with different inoculum sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shuhuan; Wang, Jiangxin; Niu, Yanhong; Yang, Jie; Zhou, Jian; Yuan, Yingjin

    2012-07-01

    Inoculum size strongly affects cell growth and lipid accumulation of microalgae, one of the most potential biodiesel feedstock, however, the metabolic mechanism(s) of the lipid biosynthesis upon inoculum size has not been fully explored yet. The effects of inoculum size on cell growth, lipid accumulation, and metabolic changes of a green microalga Chlorella sorokiniana were investigated. In our experimental range of inoculum size, the productivity and the cetane number (CN) of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) increased with increasing initial cell density, and the inoculum of 1 × 10(7) cells mL(-1) processed much higher productivity (up to 2.02-fold) and CN (up to 1.19-fold) of the FAME than the others. A significant correlation between the metabolic profile and quantity and quality of lipid production was revealed by partial least-squares to latent structures (PLS) analysis, and 15 key metabolites were identified. Most of those metabolites were involved in the photosynthetically fixed carbon metabolism. Furthermore, light intensity as one of the vital limitation factors for the high inoculum size cultivation was evaluated by illumination assay and the results revealed that increasing light intensity could improve the polyunsaturated fatty acids composition and lipid accumulation of C. sorokiniana. The lipid productivity of the culture was improved by 71.21% with the light intensity of 110 µmol m(-2) s(-1), compared to that under the irradiance of 65 µmol m(-2) s(-1). PMID:22252441

  10. A metabolic profiling strategy for the dissection of plant defense against fungal pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos A Aliferis

    Full Text Available Here we present a metabolic profiling strategy employing direct infusion Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS for the monitoring of soybean's (Glycine max L. global metabolism regulation in response to Rhizoctonia solani infection in a time-course. Key elements in the approach are the construction of a comprehensive metabolite library for soybean, which accelerates the steps of metabolite identification and biological interpretation of results, and bioinformatics tools for the visualization and analysis of its metabolome. The study of metabolic networks revealed that infection results in the mobilization of carbohydrates, disturbance of the amino acid pool, and activation of isoflavonoid, α-linolenate, and phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathways of the plant. Components of these pathways include phytoalexins, coumarins, flavonoids, signaling molecules, and hormones, many of which exhibit antioxidant properties and bioactivity helping the plant to counterattack the pathogen's invasion. Unraveling the biochemical mechanism operating during soybean-Rhizoctonia interaction, in addition to its significance towards the understanding of the plant's metabolism regulation under biotic stress, provides valuable insights with potential for applications in biotechnology, crop breeding, and agrochemical and food industries.

  11. Thermal and metabolic adaptation to first cold-water immersion in juvenile penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, H; Roussel, B

    1986-09-01

    Juvenile king and macaroni penguins are terrestrial seabirds and must face an intensive and prolonged energetic demand during their passage from shore to marine life in cold subantarctic seawater. Evidence for progressive thermal adaptation was sought by measurement of metabolic rate (MR) and body (Tb) and skin (Tsk) temperatures in unrestrained, fully immersed penguins. Steady-state responses obtained after the 3rd h of immersion in never-immersed (NI) penguins were compared with those of penguins acclimatized to seawater temperature (A). NI macaroni penguins, unlike NI king penguins, showed a fall in Tb on their first immersion but, once acclimatized, were able to maintain their homeothermy due to an increase (greater than 3.2 W/kg) in regulatory thermogenesis. In NI king penguins, during a simulation of seawater adaptation by 10 successive immersions, MR at 7 degrees C water temperature (Tw) rose from 6.0 to 9.4 W/kg (becoming 3-5 times higher than in air), whereas Tb rose from 37.6 to 38.4 degrees C. In both species occurrence of peak MR at much lower Tw, progressive increase in thermogenesis capacity, and lower conductance in water after adaptation to marine life (28 and 36% less in A king and macaroni penguins, respectively) showed that the passage from shore to marine life consisted of a true cold acclimatization. PMID:3752279

  12. Metabolic profile of different Italian cultivars of hazelnut (Corylus avellana) by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciubba, Fabio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Gianferri, Raffaella; Impellizzeri, Danilo; Mannina, Luisa; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Venditti, Alessandro; Delfini, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution proton NMR spectroscopy was performed on three Italian hazelnut cultivars, Tonda di Giffoni, Mortarella and Tonda Gentile Romana, and it allowed to define their metabolic profile. The hazelnuts were grown in the same pedoclimatic conditions in the Monti Cimini (Latium) area. The samples were obtained by using a modified Bligh-Dyer extraction protocol which did not give rise to artefacts arising from the demolition of macromolecular structures such as proteins and polysaccharides. Metabolites belonging to different chemical classes (amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, lipids and miscellaneous compounds) were identified and quantified. The three cultivars were discriminated by means of univariate (ANOVA) and multivariate (PCA) statistical analysis.

  13. Metabolic profiling of a mapping population exposes new insights in the regulation of seed metabolism and seed, fruit, and plant relations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Toubiana

    Full Text Available To investigate the regulation of seed metabolism and to estimate the degree of metabolic natural variability, metabolite profiling and network analysis were applied to a collection of 76 different homozygous tomato introgression lines (ILs grown in the field in two consecutive harvest seasons. Factorial ANOVA confirmed the presence of 30 metabolite quantitative trait loci (mQTL. Amino acid contents displayed a high degree of variability across the population, with similar patterns across the two seasons, while sugars exhibited significant seasonal fluctuations. Upon integration of data for tomato pericarp metabolite profiling, factorial ANOVA identified the main factor for metabolic polymorphism to be the genotypic background rather than the environment or the tissue. Analysis of the coefficient of variance indicated greater phenotypic plasticity in the ILs than in the M82 tomato cultivar. Broad-sense estimate of heritability suggested that the mode of inheritance of metabolite traits in the seed differed from that in the fruit. Correlation-based metabolic network analysis comparing metabolite data for the seed with that for the pericarp showed that the seed network displayed tighter interdependence of metabolic processes than the fruit. Amino acids in the seed metabolic network were shown to play a central hub-like role in the topology of the network, maintaining high interactions with other metabolite categories, i.e., sugars and organic acids. Network analysis identified six exceptionally highly co-regulated amino acids, Gly, Ser, Thr, Ile, Val, and Pro. The strong interdependence of this group was confirmed by the mQTL mapping. Taken together these results (i reflect the extensive redundancy of the regulation underlying seed metabolism, (ii demonstrate the tight co-ordination of seed metabolism with respect to fruit metabolism, and (iii emphasize the centrality of the amino acid module in the seed metabolic network. Finally, the study

  14. Adaptive Hybrid Control of Vehicle Semiactive Suspension Based on Road Profile Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yechen Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new road estimation based suspension hybrid control strategy is proposed. Its aim is to adaptively change control gains to improve both ride comfort and road handling with the constraint of rattle space. To achieve this, analytical expressions for ride comfort, road handling, and rattle space with respect to road input are derived based on the hybrid control, and the problem is transformed into a MOOP (Multiobjective Optimization Problem and has been solved by NSGA-II (Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II. A new road estimation and classification method, which is based on ANFIS (Adaptive Neurofuzzy Inference System and wavelet transforms, is then presented as a means of detecting the road profile level, and a Kalman filter is designed for observing unknown states. The results of simulations conducted with random road excitation show that the efficiency of the proposed control strategy compares favourably to that of a passive system.

  15. A Robust Adaptive Sliding Mode Control for PMLSM with Variable Velocity Profile Over Wide Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Ghaebi Panah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive robust variable structure speed controller is designed for wide range of desired velocity control of a Permanent Magnet Linear Synchronous Motor (PMLSM. This is performed for comprehensive nonlinear model of PMLSM including non-idealities such as detent force, parameter uncertainty, unpredicted disturbance and nonlinear friction. The proposed method is based on the robust Sliding Mode Control (SMC in combination with an adaptive strategy for a wide range of velocity. The simulation results are provided for the above mentioned comprehensive model of PMLSM with a variable velocity profile. Moreover, as an evaluation criterion, a Proportional-Integral (PI controller is designed whose parameters are optimally tuned by the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO algorithm for better comparison.

  16. Metabolic profiling of plasma amino acids shows that histidine increases following the consumption of pork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samman S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Samir Samman,1 Ben Crossett,2 Miles Somers,1 Kirstine J Bell,1 Nicole T Lai,1,3 David R Sullivan,3 Peter Petocz4 1Discipline of Nutrition and Metabolism, 2Discipline of Proteomics and Biotechnology, School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4Department of Statistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Amino acid (AA status is determined by factors including nutrition, metabolic rate, and interactions between the metabolism of AA, carbohydrates, and lipids. Analysis of the plasma AA profile, together with markers of glucose and lipid metabolism, will shed light on metabolic regulation. The objectives of this study were to investigate the acute responses to the consumption of meals containing either pork (PM or chicken (CM, and to identify relationships between plasma AA and markers of glycemic and lipemic control. A secondary aim was to explore AA predictors of plasma zinc concentrations. Ten healthy adults participated in a postprandial study on two separate occasions. In a randomized cross-over design, participants consumed PM or CM. The concentrations of 21 AA, glucose, insulin, triglycerides, nonesterified fatty acids, and zinc were determined over 5 hours postprandially. The meal composition did not influence glucose, insulin, triglyceride, nonesterified fatty acid, or zinc concentrations. Plasma histidine was higher following the consumption of PM (P=0.014, with consistently higher changes observed after 60 minutes (P<0.001. Greater percentage increases were noted at limited time points for valine and leucine + isoleucine in those who consumed CM compared to PM. In linear regression, some AAs emerged as predictors of the metabolic responses, irrespective of the meal that was consumed. The present study demonstrates that a single meal of PM or CM produces a differential profile of AA in the

  17. Vitamin C improves basal metabolic rate and lipid profile in alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus in rats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D U Owu; A B Antai; K H Udofia; A O Obembe; K O Obasi; M U Eteng

    2006-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multi-factorial disease which is characterized by hyperglycaemia, lipoprotein abnormalities and oxidative stress. This study evaluated effect of oral vitamin C administration on basal metabolic rate and lipid profile of alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Vitamin C was administered at 200 mg/kg body wt. by gavage for four weeks to diabetic rats after which the resting metabolic rate and plasma lipid profile was determined. The results showed that vitamin C administration significantly ( < 0.01) reduced the resting metabolic rate in diabetic rats; and also lowered plasma triglyceride, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. These results suggest that the administration of vitamin C in this model of established diabetes mellitus might be beneficial for the restoration of basal metabolic rate and improvement of lipid profile. This may at least in part reduce the risk of cardiovascular events seen in diabetes mellitus.

  18. User Profile-Driven Data Warehouse Summary for Adaptive OLAP Queries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rym Khemiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Data warehousing is an essential element of decision support systems. It aims at enabling the userknowledge to make better and faster daily business decisions. To improve this decision support system andto give more and more relevant information to the user, the need to integrate user's profiles into the datawarehouse process becomes crucial. In this paper, we propose to exploit users' preferences as a basis foradapting OLAP (On-Line Analytical Processing queries to the user. For this, we present a user profiledrivendata warehouse approach that allows dening user's profile composed by his/her identifier and a setof his/her preferences. Our approach is based on a general data warehouse architecture and an adaptiveOLAP analysis system. Our main idea consists in creating a data warehouse materialized view for eachuser with respect to his/her profile. This task is performed off-line when the user defines his/her profile forthe first time. Then, when a user query is submitted to the data warehouse, the system deals with his/herdata warehouse materialized view instead of the whole data warehouse. In other words, the datawarehouse view summaries the data warehouse content for the user by taking into account his/herpreferences. Moreover, we are implementing our data warehouse personalization approach under the SQLServer 2005 DBMS (DataBase Management System.

  19. Urinary Metabolomic Approach Provides New Insights into Distinct Metabolic Profiles of Glutamine and N-Carbamylglutamate Supplementation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangmang; Cao, Wei; Fang, Tingting; Jia, Gang; Zhao, Hua; Chen, Xiaoling; Wu, Caimei; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine and N-carbamylglutamate can enhance growth performance and health in animals, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the effect of glutamine and N-carbamylglutamate supplementation in rat metabolism. Thirty rats were fed a control, glutamine, or N-carbamylglutamate diet for four weeks. Urine samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics, specifically high-resolution ¹H NMR metabolic profiling combined with multivariate data analysis. Glutamine significantly increased the urine levels of acetamide, acetate, citrulline, creatinine, and methymalonate, and decreased the urine levels of ethanol and formate (p glutamine and N-carbamylglutamate could modify urinary metabolome related to nitrogen metabolism and gut microbiota metabolism. Moreover, N-carbamylglutamate could alter energy and lipid metabolism. These findings indicate that different arginine precursors may lead to differences in the biofluid profile in rats. PMID:27527211

  20. CS-16THE eEF2 KINASE IS CRITICAL FOR BRAIN TUMOURS ADAPTATION TO METABOLIC STRESS

    OpenAIRE

    Leprivier, Gabriel; Remke, Marc; Rotblat, Barak; Agnihotri, Sameer; Kool, Marcel; Derry, Brent; Pfister, Stefan; Taylor, Michael D.; Sorensen, Poul H.

    2014-01-01

    During tumour progression, brain tumour cells are exposed to metabolic stress, such as nutrient deprivation, due to abnormal tumour vasculature. The ability of tumour cells to respond and manage reduced nutrient availability has a strong impact on tumour outcome. The molecular pathways supporting metabolic adaptation of brain tumour cells to nutrient stress represent potential therapeutic targets which are still not well defined. We report that the translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2) kinas...

  1. The New Weather Radar for America's Space Program in Florida: A Temperature Profile Adaptive Scan Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, L. D.; Petersen, W. A.; Deierling, W.; Roeder, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    A new weather radar is being acquired for use in support of America s space program at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, NASA Kennedy Space Center, and Patrick AFB on the east coast of central Florida. This new radar replaces the modified WSR-74C at Patrick AFB that has been in use since 1984. The new radar is a Radtec TDR 43-250, which has Doppler and dual polarization capability. A new fixed scan strategy was designed to best support the space program. The fixed scan strategy represents a complex compromise between many competing factors and relies on climatological heights of various temperatures that are important for improved lightning forecasting and evaluation of Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), which are the weather rules to avoid lightning strikes to in-flight rockets. The 0 C to -20 C layer is vital since most generation of electric charge occurs within it and so it is critical in evaluating Lightning LCC and in forecasting lightning. These are two of the most important duties of 45 WS. While the fixed scan strategy that covers most of the climatological variation of the 0 C to -20 C levels with high resolution ensures that these critical temperatures are well covered most of the time, it also means that on any particular day the radar is spending precious time scanning at angles covering less important heights. The goal of this project is to develop a user-friendly, Interactive Data Language (IDL) computer program that will automatically generate optimized radar scan strategies that adapt to user input of the temperature profile and other important parameters. By using only the required scan angles output by the temperature profile adaptive scan strategy program, faster update times for volume scans and/or collection of more samples per gate for better data quality is possible, while maintaining high resolution at the critical temperature levels. The temperature profile adaptive technique will also take into account earth curvature and refraction

  2. Adaptive mutations in sugar metabolism restore growth on glucose in a pyruvate decarboxylase negative yeast strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yiming; Liu, Guodong; Engqvist, Martin K. M.;

    2015-01-01

    Background: A Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying deletions in all three pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) genes (also called Pdc negative yeast) represents a non-ethanol producing platform strain for the production of pyruvate derived biochemicals. However, it cannot grow on glucose as the sole...... carbon source, and requires supplementation of C2 compounds to the medium in order to meet the requirement for cytosolic acetyl-CoA for biosynthesis of fatty acids and ergosterol. Results: In this study, a Pdc negative strain was adaptively evolved for improved growth in glucose medium via serial...... expression of several hexose transporter genes. The non-synonymous mutations in HXT2 and CIT1 may function in the presence of mutated MTH1 alleles and could be related to an altered central carbon metabolism in order to ensure production of cytosolic acetyl-CoA in the Pdc negative strain....

  3. The globally widespread genus Sulfurimonas: versatile energy metabolisms and adaptations to redox clines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuchen; Perner, Mirjam

    2015-01-01

    Sulfurimonas species are commonly isolated from sulfidic habitats and numerous 16S rRNA sequences related to Sulfurimonas species have been identified in chemically distinct environments, such as hydrothermal deep-sea vents, marine sediments, the ocean's water column, and terrestrial habitats. In some of these habitats, Sulfurimonas have been demonstrated to play an important role in chemoautotrophic processes. Sulfurimonas species can grow with a variety of electron donors and acceptors, which may contribute to their widespread distribution. Multiple copies of one type of enzyme (e.g., sulfide:quinone reductases and hydrogenases) may play a pivotal role in Sulfurimonas' flexibility to colonize disparate environments. Many of these genes appear to have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer which has promoted adaptations to the distinct habitats. Here we summarize Sulfurimonas' versatile energy metabolisms and link their physiological properties to their global distribution.

  4. Analysis of anoxybacillus genomes from the aspects of lifestyle adaptations, prophage diversity, and carbohydrate metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kian Mau Goh

    Full Text Available Species of Anoxybacillus are widespread in geothermal springs, manure, and milk-processing plants. The genus is composed of 22 species and two subspecies, but the relationship between its lifestyle and genome is little understood. In this study, two high-quality draft genomes were generated from Anoxybacillus spp. SK3-4 and DT3-1, isolated from Malaysian hot springs. De novo assembly and annotation were performed, followed by comparative genome analysis with the complete genome of Anoxybacillus flavithermus WK1 and two additional draft genomes, of A. flavithermus TNO-09.006 and A. kamchatkensis G10. The genomes of Anoxybacillus spp. are among the smaller of the family Bacillaceae. Despite having smaller genomes, their essential genes related to lifestyle adaptations at elevated temperature, extreme pH, and protection against ultraviolet are complete. Due to the presence of various competence proteins, Anoxybacillus spp. SK3-4 and DT3-1 are able to take up foreign DNA fragments, and some of these transferred genes are important for the survival of the cells. The analysis of intact putative prophage genomes shows that they are highly diversified. Based on the genome analysis using SEED, many of the annotated sequences are involved in carbohydrate metabolism. The presence of glycosyl hydrolases among the Anoxybacillus spp. was compared, and the potential applications of these unexplored enzymes are suggested here. This is the first study that compares Anoxybacillus genomes from the aspect of lifestyle adaptations, the capacity for horizontal gene transfer, and carbohydrate metabolism.

  5. Metabolic profiling of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba invadens revealed activation of unpredicted pathway during encystation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeelani, Ghulam; Sato, Dan; Husain, Afzal; Escueta-de Cadiz, Aleyla; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Suematsu, Makoto; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Encystation, which is cellular differentiation from the motile, proliferative, labile trophozoite form to the dormant, resistant cyst form, is a crucial process found in parasitic and free-living protozoa such as Entamoeba, Giardia, Acanthamoeba, and Balamuthia. Since encystation is an essential process to deal with the adverse external environmental changes during the life cycle, and often integral to the transmission of the diseases, biochemical understanding of the process potentially provides useful measures against the infections caused by this group of protozoa. In this study, we investigated metabolic and transcriptomic changes that occur during encystation in Entamoeba invadens, the reptilian sibling of mammal-infecting E. histolytica, using capillary electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling and DNA microarray-based expression profiling. As the encystation progressed, the levels of majority of metabolites involved in glycolysis and nucleotides drastically decreased, indicating energy generation is ceased. Furthermore, the flux of glycolysis was redirected toward chitin wall biosynthesis. We found remarkable temporal increases in biogenic amines such as isoamylamine, isobutylamine, and cadaverine, during the early period of encystation, when the trophozoites form large multicellular aggregates (precyst). We also found remarkable induction of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during encystation. This study has unveiled for the first time the dynamics of the transcriptional and metabolic regulatory networks during encystation, and should help in better understanding of the process in pathogenic eukaryotes, and further development of measures controlling infections they cause.

  6. Cytokine profile and clinical metabolic alterations in HIV-1 infected individuals with and without lipodistrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. R. Pontes-Cardoso

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The extensive use of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART has transformed HIV infection into a chronic condition. Thus, metabolic alterations including lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia have been associated with the use of such medications. The objective of the present study was to analyze clinical metabolic alterations and the profile of TNF-alpha, IFN-Y, IL-2, IL-10, and TNF-alpha type II soluble receptor in serum of HIV-1 individuals with and without lipodystrophy. Eighty-four adults were evaluated, 42 males and 42 females, mean age 37 years, and HAART time of at least 15 months. Two groups were formed, G1: 42 individuals with lipodystrophy, and G2: 42 without lipodistropy. From the HAART used, stavudine was more associated with the lipodystrophy group and zidovudine with the non-lipodystrophy group. CD4 and CD8 values, viral load, glucose, albumin, and lipids were not different between groups, except for triglycerides, which were high in the lipodystrophy group, and HDL, whose concentration was reduced in G1. TNF-alpha, TNF-RII, and IL-10 profiles were high and had positive correlation; IL-2 and IFN-gamma had reduced levels in the lipodystrophy group. High TNF-alpha and its receptor levels seem to be associated with lipodystrophy development in individuals under HAART therapy.

  7. Metabolic profiling of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba invadens revealed activation of unpredicted pathway during encystation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Jeelani

    Full Text Available Encystation, which is cellular differentiation from the motile, proliferative, labile trophozoite form to the dormant, resistant cyst form, is a crucial process found in parasitic and free-living protozoa such as Entamoeba, Giardia, Acanthamoeba, and Balamuthia. Since encystation is an essential process to deal with the adverse external environmental changes during the life cycle, and often integral to the transmission of the diseases, biochemical understanding of the process potentially provides useful measures against the infections caused by this group of protozoa. In this study, we investigated metabolic and transcriptomic changes that occur during encystation in Entamoeba invadens, the reptilian sibling of mammal-infecting E. histolytica, using capillary electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling and DNA microarray-based expression profiling. As the encystation progressed, the levels of majority of metabolites involved in glycolysis and nucleotides drastically decreased, indicating energy generation is ceased. Furthermore, the flux of glycolysis was redirected toward chitin wall biosynthesis. We found remarkable temporal increases in biogenic amines such as isoamylamine, isobutylamine, and cadaverine, during the early period of encystation, when the trophozoites form large multicellular aggregates (precyst. We also found remarkable induction of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA during encystation. This study has unveiled for the first time the dynamics of the transcriptional and metabolic regulatory networks during encystation, and should help in better understanding of the process in pathogenic eukaryotes, and further development of measures controlling infections they cause.

  8. Effects of α-Tocopherol on Oxidative Status and Metabolic Profile in Overweight Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ble-Castillo, J. L.; Cleva-Villanueva, G.; Díaz-Zagoya, J. C.; Medina-Santillán, R.; Rubio-Arias, H. O.; Méndez, J. D.

    2007-01-01

    Despite extensive research, the effects of α-tocopherol supplementation remain controversial. Few studies have been focused on obese and overweight people. We examined the effects of α-tocopherol (AT) on the oxidative status and metabolic profile in overweight women. Sixteen overweight women between the ages of 40–60 years old, received AT, 800 IU/day during 12 weeks, followed by a 6-week washout period. Blood samples were taken at the beginning and then every 6 weeks until the end of the study. AT, retinol, malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant status (TAS), selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) were quantified to evaluate the oxidative stress. The metabolic profile was estimated by measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in erythrocytes and glucose, phosphate, magnesium, lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in serum. Under AT administration HbA1c, serum-MDA levels and erythrocyte GPx activity were markedly reduced. TAS, AT and Mg2+ concentrations in serum and SOD activity in erythrocytes were higher after AT treatment. Body weight; glucose, lipid and retinol concentrations, or blood cells count were unchanged. Lipid peroxidation was considerably reduced in AT treated women and also improved serum antioxidant status was observed, but the imbalanced response between erythrocyte SOD and GPx activities could affect normal response to oxidative stress. PMID:18180536

  9. Constrained Total Energy Expenditure and Metabolic Adaptation to Physical Activity in Adult Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontzer, Herman; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Dugas, Lara R; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Bovet, Pascal; Forrester, Terrence E; Lambert, Estelle V; Cooper, Richard S; Schoeller, Dale A; Luke, Amy

    2016-02-01

    Current obesity prevention strategies recommend increasing daily physical activity, assuming that increased activity will lead to corresponding increases in total energy expenditure and prevent or reverse energy imbalance and weight gain [1-3]. Such Additive total energy expenditure models are supported by exercise intervention and accelerometry studies reporting positive correlations between physical activity and total energy expenditure [4] but are challenged by ecological studies in humans and other species showing that more active populations do not have higher total energy expenditure [5-8]. Here we tested a Constrained total energy expenditure model, in which total energy expenditure increases with physical activity at low activity levels but plateaus at higher activity levels as the body adapts to maintain total energy expenditure within a narrow range. We compared total energy expenditure, measured using doubly labeled water, against physical activity, measured using accelerometry, for a large (n = 332) sample of adults living in five populations [9]. After adjusting for body size and composition, total energy expenditure was positively correlated with physical activity, but the relationship was markedly stronger over the lower range of physical activity. For subjects in the upper range of physical activity, total energy expenditure plateaued, supporting a Constrained total energy expenditure model. Body fat percentage and activity intensity appear to modulate the metabolic response to physical activity. Models of energy balance employed in public health [1-3] should be revised to better reflect the constrained nature of total energy expenditure and the complex effects of physical activity on metabolic physiology.

  10. Metabolic profiles show specific mitochondrial toxicities in vitro in myotube cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Qiuwei, E-mail: qiuwei_xu@merck.com; Vu, Heather; Liu Liping; Wang, Ting-Chuan; Schaefer, William H. [Merck Research Laboratories (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Mitochondrial toxicity has been a serious concern, not only in preclinical drug development but also in clinical trials. In mitochondria, there are several distinct metabolic processes including fatty acid {beta}-oxidation, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and each process contains discrete but often intimately linked steps. Interruption in any one of those steps can cause mitochondrial dysfunction. Detection of inhibition to OXPHOS can be complicated in vivo because intermediate endogenous metabolites can be recycled in situ or circulated systemically for metabolism in other organs or tissues. Commonly used assays for evaluating mitochondrial function are often applied to ex vivo or in vitro samples; they include various enzymatic or protein assays, as well as functional assays such as measurement of oxygen consumption rate, membrane potential, or acidification rates. Metabolomics provides quantitative profiles of overall metabolic changes that can aid in the unraveling of explicit biochemical details of mitochondrial inhibition while providing a holistic view and heuristic understanding of cellular bioenergetics. In this paper, we showed the application of quantitative NMR metabolomics to in vitro myotube cells treated with mitochondrial toxicants, rotenone and antimycin A. The close coupling of the TCA cycle to the electron transfer chain (ETC) in OXPHOS enables specific diagnoses of inhibition to ETC complexes by discrete biochemical changes in the TCA cycle.

  11. Metabolic parameters and blood leukocyte profiles in cows from herds with high or low mastitis incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtenius, K; Persson Waller, K; Essén-Gustavsson, B; Holtenius, P; Hallén Sandgren, C

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether there were differences in metabolic parameters and blood leukocyte profiles between cows in herds with high or low yearly mastitis incidence. In this study, 271 cows from 20 high yielding dairy herds were examined. According to the selection criteria, all herds had low somatic cell counts. Ten of the selected herds represented low mastitis treatment incidence (LMI) and ten herds had high mastitis treatment incidence (HMI). The farms were visited once and blood samples were taken from each cow that was in the interval from three weeks before to 15 weeks after parturition. The eosinophil count was significantly lower among cows from the HMI herds in the period from four weeks to 15 weeks after parturition. The plasma concentrations of beta-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, insulin and urea did not differ between groups, but the concentration of nonesterified fatty acids was significantly higher among HMI cows during the period three weeks after parturition. The concentration of the amino acid tryptophan in plasma was significantly lower among the HMI cows prior to parturition. Glutamine was significantly lower in cows from HMI herds during the first three weeks after parturition. Arginine was consistently lower in HMI cows, although the decrease was only significant during the period from four to fifteen weeks after parturition. The results suggest that there were differences in the metabolism and immune status between herds with high or low yearly mastitis treatment incidence indicating an increased metabolic stress in HMI cows.

  12. Association between sedentary behavior and anthropometric and metabolic profiles among adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseane de Fátima Guimarães

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to establish the association between sedentary behavior and the anthropometric and metabolic profiles within a sample group of 572 adolescents from public schools in the city of Curitiba, State of Paraná, Brazil. Approximately 8 ml of blood was drawn to measure total cholesterol (TC, LDL-c, HDL-c, triglycerides, and glucose. Stature and body mass were measured to calculate the body mass index. Information about the subjects' socioeconomic status, physical activity level, sedentary behavior, eating frequency, as well as personal information was obtained through questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency and percentage score, and Binary Logistic Regression were used to obtain the odds ratio with a CI of 95% and p<0.05. Half of the girls had TC levels classified as borderline or altered, and total screen time presented a significant association between the metabolic variables analyzed in the study. We conclude that girls had TC levels less favorable than that of the boys and that screen time is associated with some metabolic variables.

  13. Liver metabolic and histopathological profile in finishing lambs fed licuri (Syagrus coronata(Mart.)Becc.) cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jonival Barreto; Oliveira, Ronaldo Lopes; Silva, Thadeu Mariniello; Ayres, Maria Consuêlo Caribé; Estrela-Lima, Alessandra; Carvalho, Silvana Texeira; Ribeiro, Rebeca Dantas Xavier; de Cruz, Géssica Ariane Melo

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of including licuri cake in the diet of Santa Inês crossbred finishing lambs by examining their liver metabolic and histopathological profile. Forty-four uncastrated lambs with an average age of 6 months and an average weight of 21.2 kg ± 2.7 kg. The animals were fed diets with 40 % Tifton 85 hay and 60 % of a mixture consisting of corn and soybean meal, 1 % urea, a mineral-vitamin premix, and an inclusion of licuri cake at a level of 0, 8, 16, and 24 % of the dietary dry matter (DM), which composed the treatments. The experimental design was completely randomized, and the data were analyzed by variance and regression analyses. The animals were confined in individual stalls for 70 days. Blood was collected on the last day of the experimental period, and metabolite, protein, energy, and enzyme profiles of the liver were determined for these samples. Histopathological evaluations of the liver parenchyma were also undertaken. The increase in the level of the licuri cake in the diet caused a linear increase (P cake inclusion levels in the diet. Regarding energy metabolism, a linear increase (P cake had no effect on the enzymatic activities, except on gamma-glutamyltransferase, which decreased linearly (P cake. The use of the licuri cake in composing up to 24 % of the diet did not cause metabolic or liver disorders in the lambs.

  14. Effects of black raspberry on lipid profiles and vascular endothelial function in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Han Saem; Hong, Soon Jun; Lee, Tae-Bum; Kwon, Ji-Wung; Jeong, Jong Tae; Joo, Hyung Joon; Park, Jae Hyoung; Ahn, Chul-Min; Yu, Cheol Woong; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-10-01

    Black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) has been known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. However, short-term effects of black raspberry on lipid profiles and vascular endothelial function have not been investigated in patients with metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome (n = 77) were prospectively randomized into a group with black raspberry (n = 39, 750 mg/day) and a placebo group (n = 38) during a 12-week follow-up. Lipid profiles, brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (baFMD), and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α, C-reactive protein, adiponectin, sICAM-1, and sVCAM-1 were measured at the baseline and at the 12-week follow-up. Decreases from the baseline in the total cholesterol level (-22.8 ± 30.4 mg/dL vs. -1.9 ± 31.8 mg/dL, p raspberry than in the placebo group. Increases in baFMD at the 12-week follow-up were significantly greater in the group with black raspberry than in the placebo group (0.33 ± 0.44 mm vs. 0.10 ± 0.35 mm, p raspberry. The use of black raspberry significantly decreased serum total cholesterol level and inflammatory cytokines, thereby improving vascular endothelial function in patients with metabolic syndrome during the 12-week follow-up.

  15. Effective long term adaptation and metabolic state regulation of ski-racers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhareva A.S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to scientifically substantiate effective mechanisms of organism’s bio-chemical adaptation of ski-racers in competition period with the help of lipid peroxidation indicators, oxidative modification of proteins and activity of hypothalamus pituitary adrenocortical system. Material: in the research 14 sportsmen of 18-25 years’ age (combined team of university with different level of sportsmanship participated. Assessment of free radical oxidation, anti-oxidant system, cortisol level was fulfilled with the help of indicators’ quantitative analysis by bio-chemical methods applied to blood serum samples. Results: it was found that in the basis of bio-chemical changes under intensive physical loads is increase of catabolic processes’ speed. Change of organism’s metabolic orientation of ski racers at optimal level results in working muscles’ energy supply improvement, increase of energy systems’ power and sports efficiency. Conclusions: Application of interval trainings at stages of preparation to special significant competitions results in expected adaptation and increase of sports efficiency. We also showed their effective role in ensuring long term reactions, conditioning high sports efficiency.

  16. Site and strain-specific variation in gut microbiota profiles and metabolism in experimental mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa K Friswell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gastrointestinal tract microbiota (GTM of mammals is a complex microbial consortium, the composition and activities of which influences mucosal development, immunity, nutrition and drug metabolism. It remains unclear whether the composition of the dominant GTM is conserved within animals of the same strain and whether stable GTMs are selected for by host-specific factors or dictated by environmental variables. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The GTM composition of six highly inbred, genetically distinct strains of mouse (C3H, C57, GFEC, CD1, CBA nu/nu and SCID was profiled using eubacterial -specific PCR-DGGE and quantitative PCR of feces. Animals exhibited strain-specific fecal eubacterial profiles that were highly stable (c. >95% concordance over 26 months for C57. Analyses of mice that had been relocated before and after maturity indicated marked, reproducible changes in fecal consortia and that occurred only in young animals. Implantation of a female BDF1 mouse with genetically distinct (C57 and Agoutie embryos produced highly similar GTM profiles (c. 95% concordance between mother and offspring, regardless of offspring strain, which was also reflected in urinary metabolite profiles. Marked institution-specific GTM profiles were apparent in C3H mice raised in two different research institutions. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Strain-specific data were suggestive of genetic determination of the composition and activities of intestinal symbiotic consortia. However, relocation studies and uterine implantation demonstrated the dominance of environmental influences on the GTM. This was manifested in large variations between isogenic adult mice reared in different research institutions.

  17. Magnetic resonance metabolic profiling of breast cancer tissue obtained with core needle biopsy for predicting pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Soo Choi

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether metabolic profiling of core needle biopsy (CNB samples using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS could be used for predicting pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. After institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained, CNB tissue samples were collected from 37 malignant lesions in 37 patients before NAC treatment. The metabolic profiling of CNB samples were performed by HR-MAS MRS. Metabolic profiles were compared according to pathologic response to NAC using the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal projections to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA. Various metabolites including choline-containing compounds were identified and quantified by HR-MAS MRS in all 37 breast cancer tissue samples obtained by CNB. In univariate analysis, the metabolite concentrations and metabolic ratios of CNB samples obtained with HR-MAS MRS were not significantly different between different pathologic response groups. However, there was a trend of lower levels of phosphocholine/creatine ratio and choline-containing metabolite concentrations in the pathologic complete response group compared to the non-pathologic complete response group. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MR metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between the pathologic response groups. This study showed OPLS-DA multivariate analysis using metabolic profiles of pretreatment CNB samples assessed by HR- MAS MRS may be used to predict pathologic response before NAC, although we did not identify the metabolite showing statistical significance in univariate analysis. Therefore, our preliminary results raise the necessity of further study on HR-MAS MR metabolic profiling of CNB samples for a large number of cancers.

  18. Metabolic profiling for detection of Staphylococcus aureus infection and antibiotic resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Antti

    Full Text Available Due to slow diagnostics, physicians must optimize antibiotic therapies based on clinical evaluation of patients without specific information on causative bacteria. We have investigated metabolomic analysis of blood for the detection of acute bacterial infection and early differentiation between ineffective and effective antibiotic treatment. A vital and timely therapeutic difficulty was thereby addressed: the ability to rapidly detect treatment failures because of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA were used in vitro and for infecting mice, while natural MSSA infection was studied in humans. Samples of bacterial growth media, the blood of infected mice and of humans were analyzed with combined Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. Multivariate data analysis was used to reveal the metabolic profiles of infection and the responses to different antibiotic treatments. In vitro experiments resulted in the detection of 256 putative metabolites and mice infection experiments resulted in the detection of 474 putative metabolites. Importantly, ineffective and effective antibiotic treatments were differentiated already two hours after treatment start in both experimental systems. That is, the ineffective treatment of MRSA using cloxacillin and untreated controls produced one metabolic profile while all effective treatment combinations using cloxacillin or vancomycin for MSSA or MRSA produced another profile. For further evaluation of the concept, blood samples of humans admitted to intensive care with severe sepsis were analyzed. One hundred thirty-three putative metabolites differentiated severe MSSA sepsis (n = 6 from severe Escherichia coli sepsis (n = 10 and identified treatment responses over time. Combined analysis of human, in vitro, and mice samples identified 25 metabolites indicative of effective treatment of S. aureus sepsis. Taken together, this

  19. Fluorescent profiling of modular biosynthetic enzymes by complementary metabolic and activity based probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Jordan L; Mercer, Andrew C; Burkart, Michael D

    2008-04-23

    The study of the enzymes responsible for natural product biosynthesis has proven a valuable source of new enzymatic activities and been applied to a number of biotechnology applications. Protein profiling could prove highly complementary to genetics based approaches by allowing us to understand the activity, transcriptional control, and post-translational modification of these enzymes in their native and dynamic proteomic environments. Here we present a method for the fluorescent profiling of PKS, NRPS, and FAS multidomain modular synthases in their whole proteomes using complementary metabolic and activity based probes. After first examining the reactivity of these activity based probes with a variety of purified recombinant PKS, NRPS, and FAS enzymes in vitro, we apply this duel labeling strategy to the analysis of modular synthases in a human breast cancer cell line and two strains of the natural product producer Bacillus subtilis. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that complementary protein profiling approaches can prove highly useful in the identification and assignment of inhibitor specificity and domain structure of these modular biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:18376827

  20. LOSS OF CARDIAC METABOLIC ADAPTATION AND DYSFUNCTION OF THE HEART WITH WESTERN DIET IN THE OBESE ZUCKER RAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The normal heart sustains its work output through changing the proportion of substrates it oxidizes depending on fuel supply. This metabolic adaptation is thought to be regulated at a transcriptional level by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-alpha). We proposed that obesity...

  1. Metabolic Profile and Inflammatory Responses in Dairy Cows with Left Displaced Abomasum Kept under Small-Scaled Farm Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenja Klevenhusen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Left displaced abomasum (LDA is a severe metabolic disease of cattle with a strong negative impact on production efficiency of dairy farms. Metabolic and inflammatory alterations associated with this disease have been reported in earlier studies, conducted mostly in large dairy farms. This research aimed to: (1 evaluate metabolic and inflammatory responses in dairy cows affected by LDA in small-scaled dairy farms; and (2 establish an Animals 2015, 5 1022 association between lactation number and milk production with the outcome of metabolic variables. The cows with LDA had lower serum calcium (Ca, but greater concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA and beta-hydroxy-butyrate (BHBA, in particular when lactation number was >2. Cows with LDA showed elevated levels of aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and serum amyloid A (SAA, regardless of lactation number. In addition, this study revealed strong associations between milk yield and the alteration of metabolic profile but not with inflammation in the sick cows. Results indicate metabolic alterations, liver damage, and inflammation in LDA cows kept under small-scale farm conditions. Furthermore, the data suggest exacerbation of metabolic profile and Ca metabolism but not of inflammation and liver health with increasing lactation number and milk yield in cows affected by LDA.

  2. Metabolic Profile and Inflammatory Responses in Dairy Cows with Left Displaced Abomasum Kept under Small-Scaled Farm Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klevenhusen, Fenja; Humer, Elke; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara; Podstatzky-Lichtenstein, Leopold; Wittek, Thomas; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2015-01-01

    Left displaced abomasum (LDA) is a severe metabolic disease of cattle with a strong negative impact on production efficiency of dairy farms. Metabolic and inflammatory alterations associated with this disease have been reported in earlier studies, conducted mostly in large dairy farms. This research aimed to: (1) evaluate metabolic and inflammatory responses in dairy cows affected by LDA in small-scaled dairy farms; and (2) establish an Animals 2015, 5 1022 association between lactation number and milk production with the outcome of metabolic variables. The cows with LDA had lower serum calcium (Ca), but greater concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and beta-hydroxy-butyrate (BHBA), in particular when lactation number was >2. Cows with LDA showed elevated levels of aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and serum amyloid A (SAA), regardless of lactation number. In addition, this study revealed strong associations between milk yield and the alteration of metabolic profile but not with inflammation in the sick cows. Results indicate metabolic alterations, liver damage, and inflammation in LDA cows kept under small-scale farm conditions. Furthermore, the data suggest exacerbation of metabolic profile and Ca metabolism but not of inflammation and liver health with increasing lactation number and milk yield in cows affected by LDA. PMID:26479481

  3. Metabolic Profiling of Dividing Cells in Live Rodent Brain by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1HMRS) and LCModel Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, June-Hee; Lee, Hedok; Makaryus, Rany;

    2014-01-01

    shock in the live rodent brain via spectral signatures representing mobile lipids resonating at ∼1.30 ppm. In addition, we also apply the same 1HMRS methodology to metabolically profile glioblastomas with actively dividing cells growing in RCAS-PDGF mice. METHODS: 1HMRS metabolic profiles were acquired...... on a 9.4T MRI instrument in combination with LCModel spectral analysis of: 1) rat brains before and after ECS or sham treatments and 2) RCAS-PDGF mice with glioblastomas and wild-type controls. Quantified 1HMRS data were compared to post-mortem histology. RESULTS: Dividing cells in the rat hippocampus......-PDGF mice, when compared to normal brain tissue in the control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Metabolic profiling using 1HMRS in combination with LCModel analysis did not reveal correlation between Lip13a+Lip13b spectral signatures and an increase in neurogenesis in adult rat hippocampus after ECS. However, increases...

  4. Metabolic Profiling of Chicken Embryos Exposed to Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) and Agonists to Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Anna; Kärrman, Anna; Pinto, Rui; Brunström, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Untargeted metabolic profiling of body fluids in experimental animals and humans exposed to chemicals may reveal early signs of toxicity and indicate toxicity pathways. Avian embryos develop separately from their mothers, which gives unique possibilities to study effects of chemicals during embryo development with minimal confounding factors from the mother. In this study we explored blood plasma and allantoic fluid from chicken embryos as matrices for revealing metabolic changes caused by exposure to chemicals during embryonic development. Embryos were exposed via egg injection on day 7 to the environmental pollutant perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and effects on the metabolic profile on day 12 were compared with those caused by GW7647 and rosiglitazone, which are selective agonists to peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPARγ, respectively. Analysis of the metabolite concentrations from allantoic fluid by Orthogonal Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA) showed clear separation between the embryos exposed to GW7647, rosiglitazone, and vehicle control, respectively. In blood plasma only GW7647 caused a significant effect on the metabolic profile. PFOA induced embryo mortality and increased relative liver weight at the highest dose. Sublethal doses of PFOA did not significantly affect the metabolic profile in either matrix, although single metabolites appeared to be altered. Neonatal mortality by PFOA in the mouse has been suggested to be mediated via activation of PPARα. However, we found no similarity in the metabolite profile of chicken embryos exposed to PFOA with those of embryos exposed to PPAR agonists. This indicates that PFOA does not activate PPAR pathways in our model at concentrations in eggs and embryos well above those found in wild birds. The present study suggests that allantoic fluid and plasma from chicken embryos are useful and complementary matrices for exploring effects on the metabolic profile resulting

  5. Metabolic Profiling of Chicken Embryos Exposed to Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA and Agonists to Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mattsson

    Full Text Available Untargeted metabolic profiling of body fluids in experimental animals and humans exposed to chemicals may reveal early signs of toxicity and indicate toxicity pathways. Avian embryos develop separately from their mothers, which gives unique possibilities to study effects of chemicals during embryo development with minimal confounding factors from the mother. In this study we explored blood plasma and allantoic fluid from chicken embryos as matrices for revealing metabolic changes caused by exposure to chemicals during embryonic development. Embryos were exposed via egg injection on day 7 to the environmental pollutant perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, and effects on the metabolic profile on day 12 were compared with those caused by GW7647 and rosiglitazone, which are selective agonists to peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα and PPARγ, respectively. Analysis of the metabolite concentrations from allantoic fluid by Orthogonal Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA showed clear separation between the embryos exposed to GW7647, rosiglitazone, and vehicle control, respectively. In blood plasma only GW7647 caused a significant effect on the metabolic profile. PFOA induced embryo mortality and increased relative liver weight at the highest dose. Sublethal doses of PFOA did not significantly affect the metabolic profile in either matrix, although single metabolites appeared to be altered. Neonatal mortality by PFOA in the mouse has been suggested to be mediated via activation of PPARα. However, we found no similarity in the metabolite profile of chicken embryos exposed to PFOA with those of embryos exposed to PPAR agonists. This indicates that PFOA does not activate PPAR pathways in our model at concentrations in eggs and embryos well above those found in wild birds. The present study suggests that allantoic fluid and plasma from chicken embryos are useful and complementary matrices for exploring effects on the metabolic

  6. Metabolic and endocrine profiles and reproductive parameters in dairy cows under grazing conditions: effect of polymorphisms in somatotropic axis genes

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira Isabel; Ramos Juan; Carriquiry Mariana; Ruprechter Gretel; Ana Meikle

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The present study hypothesized that GH-AluI and IGF-I-SnabI polymorphisms do change the metabolic/endocrine profiles in Holstein cows during the transition period, which in turn are associated with productive and reproductive parameters. Methods Holstein cows (Farm 1, primiparous cows, n = 110, and Farm 2, multiparous cows, n = 76) under grazing conditions were selected and GH and IGF-I genotypes were determined. Blood samples for metabolic/endocrine determinations were ta...

  7. Effect of age on 6-mercaptopurine metabolic profile during the maintenance phase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DZHANGt; AGILBER; KYAKOUBEN; YMEDARD; EVILMER; EJACQZ-AIGRAIN

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) is a thiopurine analogue administered for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). It is an inactive pro-drug that undergoes extensive metabolism resulting in the formation of active metabolites 6-thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGN) and inactive 6-mercaptopurine methylated metabolites (6-MMP) under the genetic control of the enzyme thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT). 6-MP metabolic profile (6-MMP/6-TGN) was proposed as a tool to

  8. Metabolic profiling of plasma from cardiac surgical patients concurrently administered with tranexamic acid:DI-SPME-LC-MS analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Bojko; Marcin Wąsowicz; Janusz Pawliszyn

    2014-01-01

    A metabolic profile of plasma samples from patients undergoing heart surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and concurrent administration of tranexamic acid was determined. Direct immersion solid phase microextraction (DI-SPME), a new sampling and sample preparation tool for metabolomics, was used in this study for the first time to investigate clinical samples. The results showed alteration of diverse compounds involved in different biochemical pathways. The most significant contribution in changes induced by surgery and applied pharmacotherapy was noticed in metabolic profile of lysophospholipids, triacylglycerols, mediators of platelet aggregation, and linoleic acid metabolites. Two cases of individual response to treatment were also reported.

  9. A unique in vivo experimental approach reveals metabolic adaptation of the probiotic Propionibacterium freudenreichii to the colon environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Propionibacterium freudenreichii is a food grade bacterium consumed both in cheeses and in probiotic preparations. Its promising probiotic potential, relying largely on the active release of beneficial metabolites within the gut as well as the expression of key surface proteins involved in immunomodulation, deserves to be explored more deeply. Adaptation to the colon environment is requisite for the active release of propionibacterial beneficial metabolites and constitutes a bottleneck for metabolic activity in vivo. Mechanisms allowing P. freudenreichii to adapt to digestive stresses have been only studied in vitro so far. Our aim was therefore to study P. freudenreichii metabolic adaptation to intra-colonic conditions in situ. Results We maintained a pure culture of the type strain P. freudenreichii CIRM BIA 1, contained in a dialysis bag, within the colon of vigilant piglets during 24 hours. A transcriptomic analysis compared gene expression to identify the metabolic pathways induced by this environment, versus control cultures maintained in spent culture medium. We observed drastic changes in the catabolism of sugars and amino-acids. Glycolysis, the Wood-Werkman cycle and the oxidative phosphorylation pathways were down-regulated but induction of specific carbohydrate catabolisms and alternative pathways were induced to produce NADH, NADPH, ATP and precursors (utilizing of propanediol, gluconate, lactate, purine and pyrimidine and amino-acids). Genes involved in stress response were down-regulated and genes specifically expressed during cell division were induced, suggesting that P. freudenreichii adapted its metabolism to the conditions encountered in the colon. Conclusions This study constitutes the first molecular demonstration of P. freudenreichii activity and physiological adaptation in vivo within the colon. Our data are likely specific to our pig microbiota composition but opens an avenue towards understanding probiotic action within the gut

  10. Metabolic profile of the bioactive compounds of burdock (Arctium lappa) seeds, roots and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracane, Rosalia; Graziani, Giulia; Gallo, Monica; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Ritieni, Alberto

    2010-01-20

    In this work the bioactive metabolic profile, the antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of burdock (Arctium lappa) seeds, leaves and roots were obtained. TEAC values and total phenolic content for hydro-alcoholic extracts of burdock ranged from 67.39 to 1.63 micromol Trolox equivalent/100g dry weight (DW), and from 2.87 to 45 g of gallic acid equivalent/100g DW, respectively. Phytochemical compounds were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) in negative mode. The main compounds of burdock extracts were caffeoylquinic acid derivatives, lignans (mainly arctiin) and various flavonoids. The occurrence of some phenolic acids (caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid and cynarin) in burdock seeds; arctiin, luteolin and quercetin rhamnoside in burdock roots; phenolic acids, quercetin, quercitrin and luteolin in burdock leaves was reported for the first time.

  11. Characterisation of metabolic profile of banana genotypes, aiming at biofortified Musa spp. cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Cristine Vanz; Amorim, Vanusia Batista de Oliveira; Ramlov, Fernanda; Ledo, Carlos Alberto da Silva; Donato, Marcela; Maraschin, Marcelo; Amorim, Edson Perito

    2014-02-15

    The banana is an important, widely consumed fruit, especially in areas of rampant undernutrition. Twenty-nine samples were analysed, including 9 diploids, 13 triploids and 7 tetraploids, in the Active Germplasm Bank, at Embrapa Cassava & Fruits, to evaluate the bioactive compounds. The results of this study reveal the presence of a diversity of bioactive compounds, e.g., catechins; they are phenolic compounds with high antioxidant potential and antitumour activity. In addition, accessions with appreciable amounts of pVACs were identified, especially compared with the main cultivars that are currently marketed. The ATR-FTIR, combined with principal components analysis, identified accessions with distinct metabolic profiles in the fingerprint regions of compounds important for human health. Likewise, starch fraction characterisation allowed discrimination of accessions according to their physical, chemical, and functional properties. The results of this study demonstrate that the banana has functional characteristics endowing it with the potential to promote human health.

  12. The mRNA expression profile of metabolic genes relative to MHC isoform pattern in human skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plomgaard, Peter; Penkowa, Milena; Leick, Lotte;

    2006-01-01

    The metabolic profile of rodent muscle is generally reflected in the myosin heavy chain (MHC) fiber-type composition. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that metabolic gene expression is not tightly coupled with MHC fiber-type composition for all genes in human skeletal muscle...... activator receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha, forkhead box O1, or peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-alpha. Thus the mRNA expression of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins and transcriptional regulators does not seem to be fiber type specific as the genes encoding glycolytic and lipid metabolism...

  13. Evaluation of hyperandrogenemia and metabolic risk profile in women with postadolescent acne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Baykal Selçuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Postadolescent acne is a disease with relapses frequently seen in women. Treatment is difficult. In our study, we aimed to investigate the clinical and biochemical characteristics of hyperandrogenism and the prevalence of metabolic disorders, such as metabolic syndrome (MS and dyslipidemia in women with postadolescent acne. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 50 women who attended our department with the complaint of postadolescent acne between July 2014 and December 2014. The presence of androgenetic alopecia (AGA, hirsutism, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, MS, dyslipidemia, and obesity was evaluated. Results: Seborrhea was present in 56%, hirsutism in 40%, AGA in 26%, and PCOS in 24% of women with postadolescent acne. The prevalence of MS and dyslipidemia was 24% and 44%, respectively. The prevalence of MS was significantly higher in patients with AGA and hirsutism. There was no association of MS with menstrual irregularity and PCOS. There was no significant association of dyslipidemia with AGA, hirsutism, PCOS, and menstrual irregularity. Conclusion: Clinical symptoms of hyperandrogenism, such as hirsutism, AGA, and PCOS were more common in women with postadolescent acne but androgenic hormone profile abnormalities were minimal. As a result, postadolescent acne resistant to treatment may be considered as an early marker in the early diagnosis of PCOS in women to prevent the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, MS and hypercholesterolemia.

  14. Transcriptome profiling of brown adipose tissue during cold exposure reveals extensive regulation of glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qin; Yadav, Rachita; Basse, Astrid L; Petersen, Sidsel; Sonne, Si B; Rasmussen, Simon; Zhu, Qianhua; Lu, Zhike; Wang, Jun; Audouze, Karine; Gupta, Ramneek; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Hansen, Jacob B

    2015-03-01

    We applied digital gene expression profiling to determine the transcriptome of brown and white adipose tissues (BAT and WAT, respectively) during cold exposure. Male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to cold for 2 or 4 days. A notable induction of genes related to glucose uptake, glycolysis, glycogen metabolism, and the pentose phosphate pathway was observed in BAT from cold-exposed animals. In addition, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 expression was induced in BAT from cold-challenged mice, suggesting increased synthesis of glycerol from glucose. Similarly, expression of lactate dehydrogenases was induced by cold in BAT. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (Pdk2) and Pdk4 were expressed at significantly higher levels in BAT than in WAT, and Pdk2 was induced in BAT by cold. Of notice, only a subset of the changes detected in BAT was observed in WAT. Based on changes in gene expression during cold exposure, we propose a model for the intermediary glucose metabolism in activated BAT: 1) fluxes through glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway are induced, the latter providing reducing equivalents for de novo fatty acid synthesis; 2) glycerol synthesis from glucose is increased, facilitating triacylglycerol synthesis/fatty acid re-esterification; 3) glycogen turnover and lactate production are increased; and 4) entry of glucose carbon into the tricarboxylic acid cycle is restricted by PDK2 and PDK4. In summary, our results demonstrate extensive and diverse gene expression changes related to glucose handling in activated BAT. PMID:25516548

  15. Complete genome sequence and comparative metabolic profiling of the prototypical enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strain 042.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy R Chaudhuri

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli can experience a multifaceted life, in some cases acting as a commensal while in other cases causing intestinal and/or extraintestinal disease. Several studies suggest enteroaggregative E. coli are the predominant cause of E. coli-mediated diarrhea in the developed world and are second only to Campylobacter sp. as a cause of bacterial-mediated diarrhea. Furthermore, enteroaggregative E. coli are a predominant cause of persistent diarrhea in the developing world where infection has been associated with malnourishment and growth retardation.In this study we determined the complete genomic sequence of E. coli 042, the prototypical member of the enteroaggregative E. coli, which has been shown to cause disease in volunteer studies. We performed genomic and phylogenetic comparisons with other E. coli strains revealing previously uncharacterised virulence factors including a variety of secreted proteins and a capsular polysaccharide biosynthetic locus. In addition, by using Biolog Phenotype Microarrays we have provided a full metabolic profiling of E. coli 042 and the non-pathogenic lab strain E. coli K-12. We have highlighted the genetic basis for many of the metabolic differences between E. coli 042 and E. coli K-12.This study provides a genetic context for the vast amount of experimental and epidemiological data published thus far and provides a template for future diagnostic and intervention strategies.

  16. Metabolic profile of dystrophic mdx mouse muscles analyzed with in vitro magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Bach, Aurea B; Bloise, Antonio C; Vainzof, Mariz; Rahnamaye Rabbani, Said

    2012-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked form of muscular dystrophy characterized by progressive and irreversible degeneration of the muscles. The mdx mouse is the classical animal model for DMD, showing similar molecular and protein defects. The mdx mouse, however, does not show significant muscle weakness, and the diaphragm muscle is significantly more degenerated than skeletal muscles. In this work, (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to study the metabolic profile of quadriceps and diaphragm muscles from mdx and control mice. Using principal components analysis (PCA), the animals were separated into groups according to age and lineages. The classification was compared to histopathological analysis. Among the 24 metabolites identified from the nuclear MR spectra, only 19 were used by the PCA program for classification purposes. These can be important key biomarkers associated with the progression of degeneration in mdx muscles and with natural aging in control mice. Glutamate, glutamine, succinate, isoleucine, acetate, alanine and glycerol were increased in mdx samples as compared to control mice, in contrast to carnosine, taurine, glycine, methionine and creatine that were decreased. These results suggest that MRS associated with pattern recognition analysis can be a reliable tool to assess the degree of pathological and metabolic alterations in the dystrophic tissue, thereby affording the possibility of evaluation of beneficial effects of putative therapies. PMID:22673895

  17. Metabolomics-proteomics profiles delineate metabolic changes in kidney fibrosis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongxin; Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Zhou, Xiaohang; Guan, Yu; Liu, Qi; Kong, Ling; Wang, Xijun

    2015-11-01

    Kidney fibrosis (KF) is a common process that leads to the progression of various types of kidney disease including kidney-yang deficiency syndrome, however, little is known regarding the underlying biology of this disorder. Fortunately, integrated omics approaches provide the molecule fingerprints related to the disease. In an attempt to address this issue, we integrated metabolomics-proteomics profiles analyzed pathogenic mechanisms of KF based on rat model. A total 37 serum differential metabolites were contributed to KF progress, involved several important metabolic pathways. Using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis, 126 differential serum proteins were identified and provide valuable insight into the underlying mechanisms of KF. These proteins appear to be involved in complement and coagulation cascades, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, MAPK signaling pathway, RNA transport, etc. Interestingly, pathway/network analysis of integrated proteomics and metabolomics data firstly reveals that these signaling pathways were closely related with KF. It further indicated that most of these proteins play a pivotal role in the regulation of metabolism pathways.

  18. Profile and prevalence of aspirin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoping Liu; Yang Yu; Yuanjie Mao; Xinhua Wang; Jianzhong Wang; Yong Huo

    2008-01-01

    Objective Aspirin has been used extensively in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease,particularly for subjects at high risk such as metabolic syndrome.However,the responsiveness to aspirin treatment may vary among individuals.The present study was conducted to investigate the profile and prevalence of aspirin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome.Methods In 221 consecutive patients,platelet aggregation induced by arachidonic acid (0.5mg/ml) was assessed after 10 days of aspirin treatment (200mg/d).Aspirin resistance was defined as mean optical platelet aggregation =20%.Results Aspirin resistance occurred in 39 patients (17.6%).Serum fibrinogen level was higher in patients with than in those without aspirin resistance (2.6_+0.4g/l vs 2.4±0.4g/L,P=0.017).The 2 groups,aspirin resistance group and no aspirin resistance group,did not differ significantly,with regard to gender,age,body mass index,waist-hip ratio,blood pressure level,serum cholesterol level and history of myocardial or cerebral infarction.Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only serum fibrinogen level entered the model (odds ratio 2.973,p=0.023).Subgroup analysis further showed that aspirin resistance occurred more in male patients with myocardial infarction (50% vs14.5%,P=0.02) and in female patients with diastolic blood pressure=85mmHg (34% vs 15.5%,P=0.043).But after multifactor logistic regression,in women blood pressure=85mmHg was not a predictor any more.Conclusions In patients with metabolic syndrome,aspirin resistance is not uncommon,especially for men with history of myocardial infarction.Patients with aspirin resistance have an increased serum fibrinogen level.(J Geriatr Cardio12008;5:7-10)

  19. Residual feed intake and hematological and metabolic blood profiles of lle de France lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Ferraz Evaristo de Paula

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to estimate the phenotypic correlations of residual feed intake (RFI and gross feed efficiency (GFE with hematological and metabolic blood profiles of lambs and to determine the differences for these traits in animals of different RFI classes. Twenty Ile de France male lambs, 115±8 days of age and 31.3±4.1 kg of body weight (means ± SD, were individually housed and their dry matter intake was measured over 65 days. They were weighed every 13 days to determine the average daily weight gain and two blood samples were collected at the last two weighings (at 07h30 for analysis of blood variables. The animals were divided into two classes: negative RFI (most efficient: 0.5 SD above the mean; n=8. There were associations among RFI and the serum metabolic variables for albumin (rRFI = 0.74 and creatinine (rRFI = -0.45 and between GFE and serum albumin (rGFE = -0.70. Less efficient animals as measured by RFI had higher serum albumin and lower creatinine levels and showed a tendency to have a greater concentration of total plasma protein. Other serum biochemical parameters were not correlated with GFE and RFI, and no differences between RFI classes were found. There was a correlation between the percentage of eosinophils and RFI (rRFI = -0.65, and such more efficient animals had a higher proportion of these cells and a trend to have a lower percentage of monocytes. This study provided evidence indicating associations between RFI and protein metabolism, as reflected by the serum albumin and creatinine. The hematological findings suggest that RFI is related to susceptibility of lambs to stressand should provide a basis for further research in this regard.

  20. Expression Profile of Genes Related to Drug Metabolism in Human Brain Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelis Stavrinou

    Full Text Available Endogenous and exogenous compounds as well as carcinogens are metabolized and detoxified by phase I and II enzymes, the activity of which could be crucial to the inactivation and hence susceptibility to carcinogenic factors. The expression of these enzymes in human brain tumor tissue has not been investigated sufficiently. We studied the association between tumor pathology and the expression profile of seven phase I and II drug metabolizing genes (CYP1A1, CYP1B1, ALDH3A1, AOX1, GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM3 and some of their proteins.Using qRT-PCR and western blotting analysis the gene and protein expression in a cohort of 77 tumors were investigated. The major tumor subtypes were meningioma, astrocytoma and brain metastases, -the later all adenocarcinomas from a lung primary.Meningeal tumors showed higher expression levels for AOX1, CYP1B1, GSTM3 and GSTP1. For AOX1, GSTM and GSTP1 this could be verified on a protein level as well. A negative correlation between the WHO degree of malignancy and the strength of expression was identified on both transcriptional and translational level for AOX1, GSTM3 and GSTP1, although the results could have been biased by the prevalence of meningiomas and glioblastomas in the inevitably bipolar distribution of the WHO grades. A correlation between the gene expression and the protein product was observed for AOX1, GSTP1 and GSTM3 in astrocytomas.The various CNS tumors show different patterns of drug metabolizing gene expression. Our results suggest that the most important factor governing the expression of these enzymes is the histological subtype and to a far lesser extent the degree of malignancy itself.

  1. EnzDP: improved enzyme annotation for metabolic network reconstruction based on domain composition profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nam-Ninh; Srihari, Sriganesh; Leong, Hon Wai; Chong, Ket-Fah

    2015-10-01

    Determining the entire complement of enzymes and their enzymatic functions is a fundamental step for reconstructing the metabolic network of cells. High quality enzyme annotation helps in enhancing metabolic networks reconstructed from the genome, especially by reducing gaps and increasing the enzyme coverage. Currently, structure-based and network-based approaches can only cover a limited number of enzyme families, and the accuracy of homology-based approaches can be further improved. Bottom-up homology-based approach improves the coverage by rebuilding Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profiles for all known enzymes. However, its clustering procedure relies firmly on BLAST similarity score, ignoring protein domains/patterns, and is sensitive to changes in cut-off thresholds. Here, we use functional domain architecture to score the association between domain families and enzyme families (Domain-Enzyme Association Scoring, DEAS). The DEAS score is used to calculate the similarity between proteins, which is then used in clustering procedure, instead of using sequence similarity score. We improve the enzyme annotation protocol using a stringent classification procedure, and by choosing optimal threshold settings and checking for active sites. Our analysis shows that our stringent protocol EnzDP can cover up to 90% of enzyme families available in Swiss-Prot. It achieves a high accuracy of 94.5% based on five-fold cross-validation. EnzDP outperforms existing methods across several testing scenarios. Thus, EnzDP serves as a reliable automated tool for enzyme annotation and metabolic network reconstruction. Available at: www.comp.nus.edu.sg/~nguyennn/EnzDP . PMID:26542446

  2. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data.

  3. Interactive effects of age and multi-gene profile on motor learning and sensorimotor adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Boyden, Nate B; Kwak, Youngbin; Humfleet, Jennifer; Müller, Martijn L T M; Bohnen, Nicolaas I; Seidler, Rachael D

    2016-04-01

    The interactive association of age and dopaminergic polymorphisms on cognitive function has been studied extensively. However, there is limited research on whether age interacts with the association between genetic polymorphisms and motor learning. We examined a group of young and older adults' performance in three motor tasks: explicit sequence learning, visuomotor adaptation, and grooved pegboard. We assessed whether individuals' motor learning and performance were associated with their age and genotypes. We selected three genetic polymorphisms: Catechol-O-Methyl Transferase (COMT val158met) and Dopamine D2 Receptor (DRD2 G>T), which are involved with dopaminergic regulation, and Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF val66met) that modulates neuroplasticity and has been shown to interact with dopaminergic genes. Although the underlying mechanisms of the function of these three genotypes are different, the high performance alleles of each have been linked to better learning and performance. We created a composite polygene score based on the Number of High Performance Alleles (NHPA) that each individual carried. We found several associations between genetic profile, motor performance, and sensorimotor adaptation. More importantly, we found that this association varies with age, task type, and engagement of implicit versus explicit learning processes. PMID:26926580

  4. In vivo NMR metabolic profiling of Fabrea salina reveals sequential defense mechanisms against ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangoni, Roberto; Paris, Debora; Melck, Dominique; Fulgentini, Lorenzo; Colombetti, Giuliano; Motta, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Fabrea salina is a hypersaline ciliate that is known to be among the strongest ultraviolet (UV)-resistant microorganisms; however, the molecular mechanisms of this resistance are almost unknown. By means of in vivo NMR spectroscopy, we determined the metabolic profile of living F. salina cells exposed to visible light and to polychromatic UV-B + UV-A + Vis radiation for several different exposure times. We used unsupervised pattern-recognition analysis to compare these profiles and discovered some metabolites whose concentration changed specifically upon UV exposure and in a dose-dependent manner. This variation was interpreted in terms of a two-phase cell reaction involving at least two different pathways: an early response consisting of degradation processes, followed by a late response activating osmoprotection mechanisms. The first step alters the concentration of formate, acetate, and saturated fatty-acid metabolites, whereas the osmoprotection modifies the activity of betaine moieties and other functionally related metabolites. In the latter pathway, alanine, proline, and sugars suggest a possible incipient protein synthesis as defense and/or degeneration mechanisms. We conclude that NMR spectroscopy on in vivo cells is an optimal approach for investigating the effect of UV-induced stress on the whole metabolome of F. salina because it minimizes the invasiveness of the measurement. PMID:21190674

  5. Soy Germ Protein With or Without-Zn Improve Plasma Lipid Profile in Metabolic Syndrome Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIWI PRAMATAMA MARS WIJAYANTI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the effect of soy germ protein on lipid profile of metabolic syndrome (MetS patients. Respondents were 30 women with criteria, i.e. blood glucose level > normal, body mass index > 25 kg/m2, hypertriglyceridemia, low cholesterol-HDL level, 40-65 years old, living in Purwokerto, and signed the informed consent. The project was approved by the ethics committee of the Medical Faculty from Gadjah Mada University-Yogyakarta. Respondents were divided into three randomly chosen groups consisting of ten women each. The first, second, and third groups were treated, respectively, with milk enriched soy germ protein plus Zn, milk enriched soy germ protein (without Zn, and placebo for two months. Blood samples were taken at baseline, one and two months after observation. Two months after observation the groups consuming milk enriched with soy germ protein, both with or without Zn, had their level of cholesterol-total decrease from 215.8 to 180.2 mg/dl (P = 0.03, triglyceride from 240.2 to 162.5 mg/dl (P = 0.02, and LDL from 154.01 to 93.85 mg/dl (P = 0.03. In contrast, HDL increased from 38.91 to 49.49 mg/dl (P = 0.0008. In conclusion, soy germ protein can improve lipid profile, thus it can inhibit atherosclerosis incident.

  6. Metabolic syndrome prevalence in different affective temperament profiles in bipolar-I disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kursat Altinbas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Temperament originates in the brain structure, and individual differences are attributable to neural and physiological function differences. It has been suggested that temperament is associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS markers, which may be partly mediated by lifestyle and socioeconomic status. Therefore, we aim to compare MetS prevalence between different affective temperamental profiles for each season in bipolar patients. Methods: Twenty-six bipolar type-I patients of a specialized outpatient mood disorder unit were evaluated for MetS according to new definition proposed by the International Diabetes Federation in the four seasons of a year. Temperament was assessed using the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego - autoquestionnaire version (TEMPS-A. Results: The proportions of MetS were 19.2, 23.1, 34.6, and 38.5% in the summer, fall, spring, and winter, respectively. Only depressive temperament scores were higher (p = 0.002 during the winter in patients with MetS. Conclusion: These data suggest that depressive temperament profiles may predispose an individual to the development of MetS in the winter.

  7. High-Throughput Metabolic Profiling of Soybean Leaves by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ali; Rudolph, Heather L; Hurst, Jerod J; Wood, Troy D

    2016-01-19

    As a relatively recent research field, plant metabolomics has gained increasing interest in the past few years and has been applied to answer biological questions through large-scale qualitative and quantitative analyses of the plant metabolome. The combination of sensitivity and selectivity offered by mass spectrometry (MS) for measurement of many metabolites in a single shot makes it an indispensable platform in metabolomics. In this regard, Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) has the unique advantage of delivering high mass resolving power and mass accuracy simultaneously, making it ideal for the study of complex mixtures such as plant extracts. Here we optimize soybean leaf extraction methods compatible with high-throughput reproducible MS-based metabolomics. In addition, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and direct LDI of soybean leaves are compared for metabolite profiling. The extraction method combined with electrospray (ESI)-FTICR is supported by the significant reduction of chlorophyll and its related metabolites as the growing season moves from midsummer to the autumn harvest day. To our knowledge for the first time, the use of ESI-FTICR MS and MALDI-FTICR MS is described in a complementary manner with the aim of metabolic profiling of plant leaves that have been collected at different time points during the growing season. PMID:26651857

  8. Metabolic profile of normal glucose-tolerant subjects with elevated 1-h plasma glucose values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramodkumar, Thyparambil Aravindakshan; Priya, Miranda; Jebarani, Saravanan; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan; Pradeepa, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the metabolic profiles of subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) with and without elevated 1-h postglucose (1HrPG) values during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Methodology: The study group comprised 996 subjects without known diabetes seen at tertiary diabetes center between 2010 and 2014. NGT was defined as fasting plasma glucose <100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L) and 2-h plasma glucose <140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L) after an 82.5 g oral glucose (equivalent to 75 g of anhydrous glucose) OGTT. Anthropometric measurements and biochemical investigations were done using standardized methods. The prevalence rate of generalized and central obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome (MS) was determined among the NGT subjects stratified based on their 1HrPG values as <143 mg/dl, ≥143–<155 mg/dl, and ≥155 mg/dl, after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, alcohol consumption, smoking, and family history of diabetes. Results: The mean age of the 996 NGT subjects was 48 ± 12 years and 53.5% were male. The mean glycated hemoglobin for subjects with 1HrPG <143 mg/dl was 5.5%, for those with 1HrPG ≥143–<155 mg/dl, 5.6% and for those with 1HrPG ≥155 mg/dl, 5.7%. NGT subjects with 1HrPG ≥143–<155 mg/dl and ≥155 mg/dl had significantly higher BMI, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio, triglyceride/HDL ratio, leukocyte count, and gamma glutamyl aminotransferase (P < 0.05) compared to subjects with 1HrPG <143 mg/dl. The odds ratio for MS for subjects with 1HrPG ≥143 mg/dl was 1.84 times higher compared to subjects with 1HrPG <143 mg/dl taken as the reference. Conclusion: NGT subjects with elevated 1HrPG values have a worse metabolic profile than those with normal 1HrPG during an OGTT. PMID:27730069

  9. Metabolic Profile as a Potential Modifier of Long-Term Radiation Effects on Peripheral Lymphocyte Subsets in Atomic Bomb Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakashima, Eiji; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Hakoda, Masayuki; Hayashi, Tomonori; Hida, Ayumi; Ohishi, Waka; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2016-09-01

    Immune system impairments reflected by the composition and function of circulating lymphocytes are still observed in atomic bomb survivors, and metabolic abnormalities including altered blood triglyceride and cholesterol levels have also been detected in such survivors. Based on closely related features of immune and metabolic profiles of individuals, we investigated the hypothesis that long-term effects of radiation exposure on lymphocyte subsets might be modified by metabolic profiles in 3,113 atomic bomb survivors who participated in health examinations at the Radiation Effect Research Foundation, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in 2000-2002. The lymphocyte subsets analyzed involved T-, B- and NK-cell subsets, and their percentages in the lymphocyte fraction were assessed using flow cytometry. Health examinations included metabolic indicators, body mass index, serum levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein and hemoglobin A1c, as well as diabetes and fatty liver diagnoses. Standard regression analyses indicated that several metabolic indicators of obesity/related disease, particularly high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, were positively associated with type-1 helper T- and B-cell percentages but were inversely associated with naïve CD4 T and NK cells. A regression analysis adjusted for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol revealed a radiation dose relationship with increasing NK-cell percentage. Additionally, an interaction effect was suggested between radiation dose and C-reactive protein on B-cell percentage with a negative coefficient of the interaction term. Collectively, these findings suggest that radiation exposure and subsequent metabolic profile changes, potentially in relationship to obesity-related inflammation, lead to such long-term alterations in lymphocyte subset composition. Because this study is based on cross-sectional and exploratory analyses, the implications regarding radiation exposure, metabolic

  10. Integrative Phosphoproteomics Links IL-23R Signaling with Metabolic Adaptation in Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochmatter, Corinne; Fischer, Roman; Charles, Philip D; Yu, Zhanru; Powrie, Fiona; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-23 mediated signal transduction represents a major molecular mechanism underlying the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition, emerging evidence supports the role of IL-23-driven Th17 cells in inflammation. Components of the IL-23 signaling pathway, such as IL-23R, JAK2 and STAT3, have been characterized, but elements unique to this network as compared to other interleukins have not been readily explored. In this study, we have undertaken an integrative phosphoproteomics approach to better characterise downstream signaling events. To this end, we performed and compared phosphopeptide and phosphoprotein enrichment methodologies after activation of T lymphocytes by IL-23. We demonstrate the complementary nature of the two phosphoenrichment approaches by maximizing the capture of phosphorylation events. A total of 8202 unique phosphopeptides, and 4317 unique proteins were identified, amongst which STAT3, PKM2, CDK6 and LASP-1 showed induction of specific phosphorylation not readily observed after IL-2 stimulation. Interestingly, quantitative analysis revealed predominant phosphorylation of pre-existing STAT3 nuclear subsets in addition to translocation of phosphorylated STAT3 within 30 min after IL-23 stimulation. After IL-23R activation, a small subset of PKM2 also translocates to the nucleus and may contribute to STAT3 phosphorylation, suggesting multiple cellular responses including metabolic adaptation. PMID:27080861

  11. Noninvasive Monitoring of Training Induced Muscle Adaptation with -MRS: Fibre Type Shifts Correlate with Metabolic Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike Hoff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate training induced metabolic changes noninvasively with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (-MRS for measuring muscle fibre type adaptation. Methods. Eleven volunteers underwent a 24-week training, consisting of speed-strength, endurance, and detraining (each 8 weeks. Prior to and following each training period, needle biopsies and -MRS of the resting gastrocnemius muscle were performed. Fibre type distribution was analyzed histologically and tested for correlation with the ratios of high energy phosphates ([PCr]/[], [PCr]/[βATP] and [PCr + ]/[βATP]. The correlation between the changes of the -MRS parameters during training and the resulting changes in fibre composition were also analysed. Results. We observed an increased type-II-fibre proportion after speed-strength and detraining. After endurance training the percentage of fast-twitch fibres was reduced. The progression of the [PCr]/[]-ratio was similar to that of the fast-twitch fibres during the training. We found a correlation between the type-II-fibre proportion and [PCr]/[] (, or [PCr]/[βATP] (, ; the correlations between its changes (delta and the fibre-shift were significant as well (delta[PCr]/[] , delta[PCr]/[βATP] , . Conclusion. Shifts in fibre type composition and high energy phosphate metabolite content covary in human gastrocnemius muscle. Therefore -MRS might be a feasible method for noninvasive monitoring of exercise-induced fibre type transformation.

  12. Plasma proteome profiles predict diet-induced metabolic syndrome and the early onset of metabolic syndrome in a pig model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, te M.F.W.; Koopmans, S.J.; Kruijt, L.; Smits, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and related diabetes are important health threatening multifactorial metabolic diseases and it has been suggested that 25 % of all diabetic patients are unaware of their patho-physiological condition. Feeding behavior is often associated with the onset of the metabolic syndrome. We have deve

  13. A recycling pathway for cyanogenic glycosides evidenced by the comparative metabolic profiling in three cyanogenic plant species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pičmanová, Martina; Neilson, Elizabeth H.; Motawia, Mohammed S.;

    2015-01-01

    nitrogen at specific developmental stages. To investigate the presence of putative turnover products of cyanogenic glycosides, comparative metabolic profiling using LC-MS/MS and HR-MS complemented by ion-mobility mass spectrometry was carried out in three cyanogenic plant species: cassava, almond...

  14. Metabolic Adaptation of the Small Intestine to Short- and Medium-Term High-Fat Diet Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clara, Rosmarie; Schumacher, Manuel; Ramachandran, Deepti; Fedele, Shahana; Krieger, Jean-Philippe; Langhans, Wolfgang; Mansouri, Abdelhak

    2017-01-01

    The small intestine is the main organ involved in the digestion and absorption of nutrients. It is in an ideal position to sense the availability of energy in the lumen in addition to its absorptive function. Consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) influences the metabolic characteristics of the small intestine. Therefore, to better understand the metabolic features of the small intestine and their changes in response to dietary fat, we characterized the metabolism of duodenal, jejunal, and hepatic cell lines and assessed the metabolic changes in the enterocytes and the liver after short-term (3 days) or medium-term (14 days) HFD feeding in mice. Experiments with immortalized enterocytes indicated a higher glycolytic capacity in the duodenal cell line compared to the other two cell lines, whereas the jejunal cell line exhibited a high oxidative metabolism. Short-term HFD feeding induced changes in the expression of glucose and lipid metabolism-related genes in the duodenum and the jejunum of mice, but not in the liver. When focusing on fatty acid oxidation both, short- and medium-term HFD feeding induced an upregulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A, the key enzyme of ketogenesis, at the protein level in the intestinal epithelial cells, but not in the liver. These results suggest that HFD feeding induces an early adaptation of the small intestine rather than the liver in response to a substantial fat load. This highlights the importance of the small intestine in the adaptation of the body to the metabolic changes induced by HFD exposure. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 167-175, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolic profiling reveals inherent biological variation in yeast and nematode model systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeto, Samuel S. W.; Reinke, Stacey N.; Lemire, Bernard D., E-mail: bernard.lemire@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry, School of Molecular and Systems Medicine (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    The application of metabolomics to human and animal model systems is poised to provide great insight into our understanding of disease etiology and the metabolic changes that are associated with these conditions. However, metabolomic studies have also revealed that there is significant, inherent biological variation in human samples and even in samples from animal model systems where the animals are housed under carefully controlled conditions. This inherent biological variability is an important consideration for all metabolomics analyses. In this study, we examined the biological variation in {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolic profiling of two model systems, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Using relative standard deviations (RSD) as a measure of variability, our results reveal that both model systems have significant amounts of biological variation. The C. elegans metabolome possesses greater metabolic variance with average RSD values of 29 and 39%, depending on the food source that was used. The S. cerevisiae exometabolome RSD values ranged from 8% to 12% for the four strains examined. We also determined whether biological variation occurs between pairs of phenotypically identical yeast strains. Multivariate statistical analysis allowed us to discriminate between pair members based on their metabolic phenotypes. Our results highlight the variability of the metabolome that exists even for less complex model systems cultured under defined conditions. We also highlight the efficacy of metabolic profiling for defining these subtle metabolic alterations.

  16. Adaptation of chondrocytes to low oxygen tension: relationship between hypoxia and cellular metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpurohit, R; Koch, C J; Tao, Z; Teixeira, C M; Shapiro, I M

    1996-08-01

    In endochondral bone, the growth cartilage is the site of rapid growth. Since the vascular supply to the cartilage is limited, it is widely assumed that cells of the cartilage are hypoxic and that limitations in the oxygen supply regulate the energetic state of the maturing cells. In this report, we evaluate the effects of oxygen tension on chondrocyte energy metabolism, thiol status, and expression of transcription elements, HIF and AP-1. Imposition of an hypoxic environment on cultured chondrocytes caused a proportional increase in glucose utilization and elevated levels of lactate synthesis. Although we observed a statistical increase in the activities of phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase after exposure to lowered oxygen concentrations, the effect was small. The cultured cells exhibited a decreased utilization of glutamine, possibly due to down regulation of mitochondrial function and inhibition of oxidative deamination. With respect to total energy generation, we noted that these cells are quite capable of maintaining the energy charge of the cell at low oxygen tensions. Indeed, no changes in the absolute quantity of adenine nucleotides or the energy charge ratio was observed. Hypoxia caused a decrease in the glutathione content of cultured chondrocytes and a concomitant rise in cell and medium cysteine levels. It is likely that the fall in cell glutathione level is due to decreased synthesis of the tripeptide under reduced oxygen stress and the limited supply of glutamate. The observed rise in cellular and medium cysteine levels probably reflects an increase in the rate of degradation of glutathione and a decrease in synthesis of the peptide. To explore how cells transduce these metabolic effects, gel retardation assays were used to study chondrocyte HIF and AP-1 binding activities. Chondrocyte nuclear preparations bound an HIF-oligonucleotide; however, at low oxygen tensions, no increase in HIF binding was

  17. Global metabolic profiling and its role in systems biology to advance personalized medicine in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnackenberg, Laura K

    2007-05-01

    Systems biology attempts to elucidate the complex interaction between genes, proteins and metabolites to provide a mechanistic understanding of cellular function and how this function is affected by disease processes, drug toxicity or drug efficacy effects. Global metabolic profiling is an important component of systems biology that can be applied in both preclinical and clinical settings for drug discovery and development, and to study disease mechanisms. The metabolic profile encodes the phenotype, which is composed of the genotype and environmental factors. The phenotypic profile can be used to make decisions about the best course of treatment for an individual patient. Understanding the combined effects of genetics and environment through a systems biology framework will enable the advancement of personalized medicine.

  18. The correlation of sodium and potassium metabolism with the level of energy consumption in man during adaptation to heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasyev, B. G.; Zhestovskiy, V. A.

    1978-01-01

    The sodium and potassium metabolism was studied in a thermal chamber at 35 deg and 80 percent relative humidity in 8 men for a period of 6 days. The control group (3 subjects) were outside of the chamber at a comfortable ambient temperature. The intracellular sodium and potassium metabolism were assessed based on their content in the erythrocytes. The finding was that during adaptation to heat, a considerable amount of sodium was excreted by the body in the sweat and urine (about 1/3 of the sodium content of the human body) as compared with its intake and the amount of potassium retained in the body. Changes in the concentration of sodium and potassium may serve as indexes of the state of adaptation processes during constant exposure to heat.

  19. Insights into the iron and sulfur energetic metabolism of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans by microarray transcriptome profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Quatrini; C. Appia-Ayme; Y. Denis; J. Ratouchniak; F. Veloso; J. Valdes; C. Lefimil; S. Silver; F. Roberto; O. Orellana; F. Denizot; E. Jedlicki; D. Holmes; V. Bonnefoy

    2006-09-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a well known acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic, Gram negative, bacterium involved in bioleaching and acid mine drainage. In aerobic conditions, it gains energy mainly from the oxidation of ferrous iron and/or reduced sulfur compounds present in ores. After initial oxidation of the substrate, electrons from ferrous iron or sulfur enter respiratory chains and are transported through several redox proteins to oxygen. However, the oxidation of ferrous iron and reduced sulfur compounds has also to provide electrons for the reduction of NAD(P) that is subsequently required for many metabolic processes including CO2 fixation. To help to unravel the enzymatic pathways and the electron transfer chains involved in these processes, a genome-wide microarray transcript profiling analysis was carried out. Oligonucleotides corresponding to approximately 3000 genes of the A. ferrooxidans type strain ATCC23270 were spotted onto glass-slides and hybridized with cDNA retrotranscribed from RNA extracted from ferrous iron and sulfur grown cells. The genes which are preferentially transcribed in ferrous iron conditions and those preferentially transcribed in sulfur conditions were analyzed. The expression of a substantial number of these genes has been validated by real-time PCR, Northern blot hybridization and/or immunodetection analysis. Our results support and extend certain models of iron and sulfur oxidation and highlight previous observations regarding the possible presence of alternate electron pathways. Our findings also suggest ways in which iron and sulfur oxidation may be co-ordinately regulated. An accompanying paper (Appia-Ayme et al.) describes results pertaining to other metabolic functions.

  20. Use of metabolic profiles in dairy cattle in tropical and subtropical countries on smallholder dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, D A; Goodger, W J; Garcia, M; Perera, B M; Wittwer, F

    1999-01-27

    Metabolic profile testing has generally been used as part of a multidisciplinary approach for dairy herds in temperate climates. Our goal was to evaluate the effectiveness of the technique for identifying constraints on productivity in small herds in environments less favorable for milk production. Metabolites tested were chosen for stability in the sample after collection of blood, ease of analysis and practical knowledge of the meaning of the results. Blood levels of five different metabolites in low-producing dairy cows belonging to smallholders in tropical and subtropical environments were measured. The study involved 13 projects with 80 cows in each, carried out in six Latin American, six Asian, and one southern European countries. Data were also collected on feeding, body condition score (BCS) and weight change, parasitism, and reproduction. In Chile, Mexico, Paraguay, Philippines, Uruguay, and Venezuela, globulin levels were high in > 17% of cows sampled on each occasion. Globulin levels were also high in Turkey and Vietnam on one or more occasions. In Paraguay, 49% of cows had high globulin levels at two to three months after calving. These results suggest that inflammatory disease was present to a potentially important degree, although this was not always investigated and not always taken into account. In all countries except Mexico and Venezuela, high beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) levels before calving in many cows highlighted the presence of condition loss in late pregnancy, an important potential constraint on productivity and fertility. Fewer cows showed high BHB levels in lactation, whereas change in BCS and weight was more sensitive for measuring negative energy balance. Urea concentrations were low in only small numbers of cows suggesting that dietary protein shortages were not common. Albumin values were low mainly in cows where globulin values were high and, hence, did not generally provide additional information. The exception was in China where

  1. Use of metabolic profiles in dairy cattle in tropical and subtropical countries on smallholder dairy farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic profile testing has generally been used as part of a multi-disciplinary approach for dairy herds in temperate climates. Our goal was to evaluate the effectiveness of the technique for identifying constraints on productivity in small herds in environments less favourable for milk production. Metabolites tested were chosen for stability in the sample after collection of blood, ease of analysis and practical knowledge of the meaning of the results. Blood levels of five different metabolites in low producing dairy cows belonging to smallholders in tropical and subtropical environments were measured. The study involved 13 projects with 80 cows in each, carried out in six Latin American, six Asian and one southern European country. Data was also collected on feeding, body condition (BCS) and weight change, parasitism and reproduction. In Chile, Mexico, Paraguay, Philippines, Uruguay and Venezuela globulin levels were high in more than 17% of cows sampled on each occasion. Globulin levels were also high in Turkey and Viet Nam on one or more occasions. In Paraguay 49% of cows had high globulin levels at 2-3 months after calving. These results suggest that inflammatory disease was present to a potentially important degree, although this was not always investigated and not always taken into account. In all countries except Mexico and Venezuela high β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) levels before calving in many cows highlighted the presence of condition loss in late pregnancy, an important potential constraint on productivity and fertility. Fewer cows showed high BHB levels in lactation where change in BCS and weight was more sensitive for measuring negative energy balance. Urea concentrations were only found to be low in small numbers of cows suggesting that dietary protein shortages were not common. Albumin values were low mainly in cows where globulin values were high and so did not generally provide additional information. The exception was in China where pregnant yaks

  2. Gender effect on the metabolic profile of ostriches (Struthio camelus domesticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Di Meo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to better define the effect of the sex on the metabolic profile of young ostriches (Struthio camelus domesticus, forty birds were divided into two groups by sex (20 males vs20 females. The animals were fed ad libitumnatural pasture and corn silage. The daily ration was completed by administering 1200 g/head of a commercial concentrate with the following chemical composition expressed as a percentage of dry mat- ter: crude protein 18.8, crude fibre 8.4, ether extract 3.6, ash 7.5. After about 12 h of fasting, in the mor- ning the blood was collected from the wing vein. The following biochemical parameters were determined: glu- cose, cholesterol, triglycerides, lactate (LAC, total protein (TP, uric acid, total bilirubin (Tbil, creatinine (CREA, calcium (Ca, magnesium (Mg, phosphorus (P, natrium (Na, potassium (K, chloride (Cl, iron (Fe, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (AP, choline- sterase (ChE; α-amylase (Amyl, lipase (LIPA; γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT. Sex significantly affected only some haematic parameters: in the females total protein and calcium were higher than in the males (TP, 43.3 vs38.9 g/l, respectively for females and males, P< 0.05; Ca, 2.99 vs2.59 mmol/l, respectively for females and males, P< 0.01. The other haematic parameters did not show signifi- cant differences by sex, and the average values were: glucose (9.87 mmol/l, cholesterol (1.96 mmol/l, triglycerides (1.56 mmol/l, LAC (6.60 mmol/l, uric acid (361 mmol/l, CREA (31.95 µmol/l, Na (144.8 mmol/l, K (3.27 mmol/l, Cl (109.7 mmol/l, P (1.47 mmol/l, Mg (1.10 mmol/l, Fe (9.22 µmol/l, Tbil (9.28 µmol/l, AST (341.3 U/l, ALT (11.42 U/l, AP (75.8 U/l, GGT (10.07 U/l, Amyl (6.97 U/l, LIPA (241.2 U/l, ChE (385.1 U/l. The results of our study, in agreement with previous findings, contribute to enhance the knowledge on the metabolic profile of ostriches in function of the sex.

  3. RNA profiles of porcine embryos during genome activation reveal complex metabolic switch sensitive to in vitro conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østrup, Olga; Olbricht, Gayla; Østrup, Esben;

    2013-01-01

    stage) EGA and determine major metabolic changes that regulate totipotency. The period before EGA was dominated by transcripts responsible for cell cycle regulation, mitosis, RNA translation and processing (including ribosomal machinery), protein catabolism, and chromatin remodelling. Following EGA...... an increase in the abundance of transcripts involved in transcription, translation, DNA metabolism, histone and chromatin modification, as well as protein catabolism was detected. The further analysis of members of overlapping GO terms revealed that despite that comparable cellular processes are taking place...... before and after EGA (RNA splicing, protein catabolism), different metabolic pathways are involved. This strongly suggests that a complex metabolic switch accompanies EGA. In vitro conditions significantly altered RNA profiles before EGA, and the character of these changes indicates that they originate...

  4. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also influenced by body composition — people with more muscle and less fat generally have higher BMRs. previous continue Things That Can Go Wrong With Metabolism Most of the time your metabolism works effectively ...

  5. Exploring the molecular and metabolic factors contributing to the adaptation of maize seedlings to nitrate limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf eEl-Kereamy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Crop production on soils containing sub-optimal levels of nitrogen (N severely compromises yield potential. The development of plant varieties displaying high N use efficiency (NUE will optimize N fertilizer use and reduce the environmental damage caused by excess N application. Maize is one of the most important crops cultivated worldwide. Identification of the genotypes with an enhanced NUE in the field is both time and resource consuming and sometime is difficult due to the regulation in the biotechnology programs. Identification of traits associated with adaptation to N limitation at an early vegetative stage which could reflect NUE at maturity is in need. We developed a hydroponic growth system and used it to test two genotypes that were different in their NUE at maturity under N limitation. One genotype SRG-200 showed a higher NUE than the other genotype SRG-100 and we used its hybrid SRG-150 as a reference for NUE. A number of phenotypic, molecular and metabolic factors were tested using these three genetic lines at an early vegetative stage to determine which of these could be more indicative of predicting improved NUE at an early seedling stage. These include a transcriptional analysis which showed that the higher NUE in SRG-200 genotype is associated with higher transcript levels for the genes involved in nitrate transport, N assimilation and GS and that the SRG-200 genotype maintained higher sugar content in leaves. Those identified in this study could be useful indicators for selecting promising maize lines at early stages to help develop elite varieties showing an enhanced NUE.

  6. Comparative genome analysis reveals metabolic versatility and environmental adaptations of Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans strain ST.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Guo

    Full Text Available The genus Sulfobacillus is a cohort of mildly thermophilic or thermotolerant acidophiles within the phylum Firmicutes and requires extremely acidic environments and hypersalinity for optimal growth. However, our understanding of them is still preliminary partly because few genome sequences are available. Here, the draft genome of Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans strain ST was deciphered to obtain a comprehensive insight into the genetic content and to understand the cellular mechanisms necessary for its survival. Furthermore, the expressions of key genes related with iron and sulfur oxidation were verified by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. The draft genome sequence of Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans strain ST, which encodes 3225 predicted coding genes on a total length of 3,333,554 bp and a 48.35% G+C, revealed the high degree of heterogeneity with other Sulfobacillus species. The presence of numerous transposases, genomic islands and complete CRISPR/Cas defence systems testifies to its dynamic evolution consistent with the genome heterogeneity. As expected, S. thermosulfidooxidans encodes a suit of conserved enzymes required for the oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds (ISCs. The model of sulfur oxidation in S. thermosulfidooxidans was proposed, which showed some different characteristics from the sulfur oxidation of Gram-negative A. ferrooxidans. Sulfur oxygenase reductase and heterodisulfide reductase were suggested to play important roles in the sulfur oxidation. Although the iron oxidation ability was observed, some key proteins cannot be identified in S. thermosulfidooxidans. Unexpectedly, a predicted sulfocyanin is proposed to transfer electrons in the iron oxidation. Furthermore, its carbon metabolism is rather flexible, can perform the transformation of pentose through the oxidative and non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathways and has the ability to take up small organic compounds. It encodes a multitude of heavy metal

  7. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  8. A proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics study of metabolic profiling in immunoglobulin a nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Weiguo; Che, Wenti; Guimai, Zuo; Chen, Jiejing [181st Hospital Guangxi, Central Laboratory, Laboratory of Metabolic Diseases Research, Guangxi Province (China); Li, Liping [Guangxi Normal University, The Life Science College, Guangxi Province (China); Li, Wuxian [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education Ministry, Chongqiong Medical University, Chongqing (China); Dai, Yong [Clinical Medical Research Center, the Second Clinical Medical College of Jinan University (Shenzhen People' s Hospital), Shenzhen, Guangdong Province (China)

    2012-07-01

    Objectives: Immunoglobulin A nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic renal failure among primary glomerulonephritis patients. The ability to diagnose immunoglobulin A nephropathy remains poor. However, renal biopsy is an inconvenient, invasive, and painful examination, and no reliable biomarkers have been developed for use in routine patient evaluations. The aims of the present study were to identify immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients, to identify useful biomarkers of immunoglobulin A nephropathy and to establish a human immunoglobulin A nephropathy metabolic profile. Methods: Serum samples were collected from immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients who were not using immunosuppressants. A pilot study was undertaken to determine disease-specific metabolite biomarker profiles in three groups: healthy controls (N = 23), low-risk patients in whom immunoglobulin A nephropathy was confirmed as grades I-II by renal biopsy (N = 23), and high-risk patients with nephropathies of grades IV-V (N = 12). Serum samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by applying multivariate pattern recognition analysis for disease classification. Results: Compared with the healthy controls, both the low-risk and high-risk patients had higher levels of phenylalanine, myo-inositol, lactate, L6 lipids ( CH-CH{sub 2}-CH = O), L5 lipids (-CH{sub 2}-C = O), and L3 lipids (-CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-C = O) as well as lower levels of {beta}-glucose, {alpha}-glucose, valine, tyrosine, phosphocholine, lysine, isoleucine, glycerolphosphocholine, glycine, glutamine, glutamate, alanine, acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, and 1-methylhistidine. Conclusions: These metabolites investigated in this study may serve as potential biomarkers of immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Point scoring of pattern recognition analysis was able to distinguish immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients from healthy controls. However, there were no obvious differences between the low-risk and high

  9. A proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics study of metabolic profiling in immunoglobulin a nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Sui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Immunoglobulin A nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic renal failure among primary glomerulonephritis patients. The ability to diagnose immunoglobulin A nephropathy remains poor. However, renal biopsy is an inconvenient, invasive, and painful examination, and no reliable biomarkers have been developed for use in routine patient evaluations. The aims of the present study were to identify immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients, to identify useful biomarkers of immunoglobulin A nephropathy and to establish a human immunoglobulin A nephropathy metabolic profile. METHODS: Serum samples were collected from immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients who were not using immunosuppressants. A pilot study was undertaken to determine disease-specific metabolite biomarker profiles in three groups: healthy controls (N = 23, low-risk patients in whom immunoglobulin A nephropathy was confirmed as grades I-II by renal biopsy (N = 23, and high-risk patients with nephropathies of grades IV-V (N = 12. Serum samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by applying multivariate pattern recognition analysis for disease classification. RESULTS: Compared with the healthy controls, both the low-risk and high-risk patients had higher levels of phenylalanine, myo-Inositol, lactate, L6 lipids ( = CH-CH2-CH = O, L5 lipids (-CH2-C = O, and L3 lipids (-CH2-CH2-C = O as well as lower levels of β -glucose, α-glucose, valine, tyrosine, phosphocholine, lysine, isoleucine, glycerolphosphocholine, glycine, glutamine, glutamate, alanine, acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, and 1-methylhistidine. CONCLUSIONS: These metabolites investigated in this study may serve as potential biomarkers of immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Point scoring of pattern recognition analysis was able to distinguish immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients from healthy controls. However, there were no obvious differences between the low-risk and high-risk groups in our

  10. Translational Targeted Proteomics Profiling of Mitochondrial Energy Metabolic Pathways in Mouse and Human Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Justina C; Ciapaite, Jolita; van Eunen, Karen; Niezen-Koning, Klary E; Matton, Alix; Porte, Robert J; Horvatovich, Peter; Bakker, Barbara M; Bischoff, Rainer; Permentier, Hjalmar P

    2016-09-01

    Absolute measurements of protein abundance are important in the understanding of biological processes and the precise computational modeling of biological pathways. We developed targeted LC-MS/MS assays in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode to quantify over 50 mitochondrial proteins in a single run. The targeted proteins cover the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid β-oxidation, oxidative phosphorylation, and the detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Assays used isotopically labeled concatemers as internal standards designed to target murine mitochondrial proteins and their human orthologues. Most assays were also suitable to quantify the corresponding protein orthologues in rats. After exclusion of peptides that did not pass the selection criteria, we arrived at SRM assays for 55 mouse, 52 human, and 51 rat proteins. These assays were optimized in isolated mitochondrial fractions from mouse and rat liver and cultured human fibroblasts and in total liver extracts from mouse, rat, and human. The developed proteomics approach is suitable for the quantification of proteins in the mitochondrial energy metabolic pathways in mice, rats, and humans as a basis for translational research. Initial data show that the assays have great potential for elucidating the adaptive response of human patients to mutations in mitochondrial proteins in a clinical setting.

  11. Gene expression profiling in Entamoeba histolytica identifies key components in iron uptake and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cuevas, Nora Adriana; Weber, Christian; Hon, Chung-Chau; Guillen, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an ameboid parasite that causes colonic dysentery and liver abscesses in humans. The parasite encounters dramatic changes in iron concentration during its invasion of the host, with relatively low levels in the intestinal lumen and then relatively high levels in the blood and liver. The liver notably contains sources of iron; therefore, the parasite's ability to use these sources might be relevant to its survival in the liver and thus the pathogenesis of liver abscesses. The objective of the present study was to identify factors involved in iron uptake, use and storage in E. histolytica. We compared the respective transcriptomes of E. histolytica trophozoites grown in normal medium (containing around 169 µM iron), low-iron medium (around 123 µM iron), iron-deficient medium (around 91 µM iron), and iron-deficient medium replenished with hemoglobin. The differentially expressed genes included those coding for the ATP-binding cassette transporters and major facilitator transporters (which share homology with bacterial siderophores and heme transporters) and genes involved in heme biosynthesis and degradation. Iron deficiency was associated with increased transcription of genes encoding a subset of cell signaling molecules, some of which have previously been linked to adaptation to the intestinal environment and virulence. The present study is the first to have assessed the transcriptome of E. histolytica grown under various iron concentrations. Our results provide insights into the pathways involved in iron uptake and metabolism in this parasite.

  12. Gene expression profiling in Entamoeba histolytica identifies key components in iron uptake and metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Adriana Hernández-Cuevas

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is an ameboid parasite that causes colonic dysentery and liver abscesses in humans. The parasite encounters dramatic changes in iron concentration during its invasion of the host, with relatively low levels in the intestinal lumen and then relatively high levels in the blood and liver. The liver notably contains sources of iron; therefore, the parasite's ability to use these sources might be relevant to its survival in the liver and thus the pathogenesis of liver abscesses. The objective of the present study was to identify factors involved in iron uptake, use and storage in E. histolytica. We compared the respective transcriptomes of E. histolytica trophozoites grown in normal medium (containing around 169 µM iron, low-iron medium (around 123 µM iron, iron-deficient medium (around 91 µM iron, and iron-deficient medium replenished with hemoglobin. The differentially expressed genes included those coding for the ATP-binding cassette transporters and major facilitator transporters (which share homology with bacterial siderophores and heme transporters and genes involved in heme biosynthesis and degradation. Iron deficiency was associated with increased transcription of genes encoding a subset of cell signaling molecules, some of which have previously been linked to adaptation to the intestinal environment and virulence. The present study is the first to have assessed the transcriptome of E. histolytica grown under various iron concentrations. Our results provide insights into the pathways involved in iron uptake and metabolism in this parasite.

  13. Perilipin 5 is dispensable for normal substrate metabolism and in the adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohktar, Ruzaidi A M; Montgomery, Magda K; Murphy, Robyn M; Watt, Matthew J

    2016-07-01

    Cytoplasmic lipid droplets provide a reservoir for triglyceride storage and are a central hub for fatty acid trafficking in cells. The protein perilipin 5 (PLIN5) is highly expressed in oxidative tissues such as skeletal muscle and regulates lipid metabolism by coordinating the trafficking and the reversible interactions of effector proteins at the lipid droplet. PLIN5 may also regulate mitochondrial function, although this remains unsubstantiated. Hence, the aims of this study were to examine the role of PLIN5 in the regulation of skeletal muscle substrate metabolism during acute exercise and to determine whether PLIN5 is required for the metabolic adaptations and enhancement in exercise tolerance following endurance exercise training. Using muscle-specific Plin5 knockout mice (Plin5(MKO)), we show that PLIN5 is dispensable for normal substrate metabolism during exercise, as reflected by levels of blood metabolites and rates of glycogen and triglyceride depletion that were indistinguishable from control (lox/lox) mice. Plin5(MKO) mice exhibited a functional impairment in their response to endurance exercise training, as reflected by reduced maximal running capacity (20%) and reduced time to fatigue during prolonged submaximal exercise (15%). The reduction in exercise performance was not accompanied by alterations in carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during submaximal exercise. Similarly, mitochondrial capacity (mtDNA, respiratory complex proteins, citrate synthase activity) and mitochondrial function (oxygen consumption rate in muscle fiber bundles) were not different between lox/lox and Plin5(MKO) mice. Thus, PLIN5 is dispensable for normal substrate metabolism during exercise and is not required to promote mitochondrial biogenesis or enhance the cellular adaptations to endurance exercise training.

  14. Perilipin 5 is dispensable for normal substrate metabolism and in the adaptation of skeletal muscle to exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohktar, Ruzaidi A M; Montgomery, Magda K; Murphy, Robyn M; Watt, Matthew J

    2016-07-01

    Cytoplasmic lipid droplets provide a reservoir for triglyceride storage and are a central hub for fatty acid trafficking in cells. The protein perilipin 5 (PLIN5) is highly expressed in oxidative tissues such as skeletal muscle and regulates lipid metabolism by coordinating the trafficking and the reversible interactions of effector proteins at the lipid droplet. PLIN5 may also regulate mitochondrial function, although this remains unsubstantiated. Hence, the aims of this study were to examine the role of PLIN5 in the regulation of skeletal muscle substrate metabolism during acute exercise and to determine whether PLIN5 is required for the metabolic adaptations and enhancement in exercise tolerance following endurance exercise training. Using muscle-specific Plin5 knockout mice (Plin5(MKO)), we show that PLIN5 is dispensable for normal substrate metabolism during exercise, as reflected by levels of blood metabolites and rates of glycogen and triglyceride depletion that were indistinguishable from control (lox/lox) mice. Plin5(MKO) mice exhibited a functional impairment in their response to endurance exercise training, as reflected by reduced maximal running capacity (20%) and reduced time to fatigue during prolonged submaximal exercise (15%). The reduction in exercise performance was not accompanied by alterations in carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during submaximal exercise. Similarly, mitochondrial capacity (mtDNA, respiratory complex proteins, citrate synthase activity) and mitochondrial function (oxygen consumption rate in muscle fiber bundles) were not different between lox/lox and Plin5(MKO) mice. Thus, PLIN5 is dispensable for normal substrate metabolism during exercise and is not required to promote mitochondrial biogenesis or enhance the cellular adaptations to endurance exercise training. PMID:27189934

  15. Dose-dependent effects of dietary zinc oxide on bacterial communities and metabolic profiles in the ileum of weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, R; Vahjen, W; Neumann, K; Van Kessel, A G; Zentek, J

    2012-10-01

    Pharmacological levels of zinc oxide (ZnO) can improve the health of weaning piglets and influence the intestinal microbiota. This experiment aimed at studying the dose-response effect of five dietary concentrations of ZnO on small intestinal bacteria and metabolite profiles. Fifteen piglets, weaned at 25 ± 1 days of age, were allocated into five groups according to body weight and litter. Diets were formulated to contain 50 (basal diet), 150, 250, 1000 and 2500 mg zinc/kg by adding analytical-grade (>98% purity) ZnO to the basal diet and fed ad libitum for 14 days after a 7-day adaptation period on the basal diet. Ileal bacterial community profiles were analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and selected bacterial groups quantified by real-time PCR. Concentrations of ileal volatile fatty acids (VFA), D- and L-lactate and ammonia were determined. Species richness, Shannon diversity and evenness were significantly higher at high ZnO levels. Quantitative PCR revealed lowest total bacterial counts in the 50 mg/kg group. Increasing ZnO levels led to an increase (p = 0.017) in enterobacteria from log 4.0 cfu/g digesta (50 mg/kg) to log 6.7 cfu/g digesta (2500 mg/kg). Lactic acid bacteria were not influenced (p = 0.687) and clostridial cluster XIVa declined (p = 0.035) at highest ZnO level. Concentration of total, D- and L-lactate and propionate was not affected (p = 0.736, p = 0.290 and p = 0.630), but concentrations of ileal total VFA, acetate and butyrate increased markedly from 50 to 150 mg/kg and decreased with further increasing zinc levels and reached low levels again at 2500 mg/kg (p = 0.048, p = 0.048 and p = 0.097). Ammonia decreased (p < 0.006) with increasing dietary ZnO level. In conclusion, increasing levels of dietary ZnO had strong and dose-dependent effects on ileal bacterial community composition and activity, suggesting taxonomic variation in metabolic response to ZnO. PMID:21929727

  16. Adaptation and failure of pancreatic β cells in murine models with different degrees of metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Gomez, Gema; Yetukuri, Laxman; Velagapudi, Vidya; Campbell, Mark; Blount, Margaret; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Ros, Manuel; Orešič, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The events that contribute to the expansion of β-cell mass and enhanced β-cell function in insulin-resistant states have not been elucidated fully. Recently, we showed that β-cell adaptation failed dramatically in adult, insulin-resistant POKO mice, which contrasts with the appropriate expansion of β cells in their ob/ob littermates. Thus, we hypothesised that characterisation of the islets in these mouse models at an early age should provide a unique opportunity to: (1) identify mechanisms involved in sensing insulin resistance at the level of the β cells, (2) identify molecular effectors that contribute to increasing β-cell mass and function, and (3) distinguish primary events from secondary events that are more likely to be present at more advanced stages of diabetes. Our results define the POKO mouse as a model of early lipotoxicity. At 4 weeks of age, it manifests with inappropriate β-cell function and defects in proliferation markers. Other well-recognised pathogenic effectors that were observed previously in 16-week-old mice, such as increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), macrophage infiltration and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, are also present in both young POKO and young ob/ob mice, indicating the lack of predictive power with regards to the severity of β-cell failure. Of interest, the relatively preserved lipidomic profile in islets from young POKO mice contrasted with the large changes in lipid composition and the differences in the chain length of triacylglycerols in the serum, liver, muscle and adipose tissue in adult POKO mice. Later lipotoxic insults in adult β cells contribute to the failure of the POKO β cell. Our results indicate that the rapid development of insulin resistance and β-cell failure in POKO mice makes this model a useful tool to study early molecular events leading to insulin resistance and β-cell failure. Furthermore, comparisons with ob/ob mice might reveal important adaptive mechanisms in β cells with

  17. Metabolic profiling of cholesterol and sex steroid hormones to monitor urological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ju-Yeun; Choi, Man Ho; Kim, Jayoung

    2016-10-01

    Cholesterol and sex steroid hormones including androgens and estrogens play a critical role in the development and progression of urological diseases such as prostate cancer. This disease remains the most commonly diagnosed malignant tumor in men and is the leading cause of death from different cancers. Attempts to understand the role of cholesterol and steroid metabolism in urological diseases have been ongoing for many years, but despite this, our mechanistic and translational understanding remains elusive. In order to further evaluate the problem, we have taken an interest in metabolomics; a discipline dedicated to the systematic study of biologically active metabolites in cells, tissues, hair and biofluids. Recently, we provided evidence that a quantitative measurement of cholesterol and sex steroid metabolites can be successfully achieved using hair of human and mouse models. The overall goal of this short review article is to introduce current metabolomic technologies for the quantitative biomarker assay development and also to provide new insight into understanding the underlying mechanisms that trigger the pathological condition. Furthermore, this review will place a particular emphasis on how to prepare biospecimens (e.g., hair fiber), quantify molecular profiles and assess their clinical significance in various urological diseases. PMID:27580660

  18. Metabolic profiling uncovers a phenotypic signature of small for gestational age in early pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horgan, Richard P

    2012-01-31

    Being born small for gestational age (SGA) confers increased risks of perinatal morbidity and mortality and increases the risk of cardiovascular complications and diabetes in later life. Accumulating evidence suggests that the etiology of SGA is usually associated with poor placental vascular development in early pregnancy. We examined metabolomic profiles using ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) in three independent studies: (a) venous cord plasma from normal and SGA babies, (b) plasma from a rat model of placental insufficiency and controls, and (c) early pregnancy peripheral plasma samples from women who subsequently delivered a SGA baby and controls. Multivariate analysis by cross-validated Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) of all 3 studies showed a comprehensive and similar disruption of plasma metabolism. A multivariate predictive model combining 19 metabolites produced by a Genetic Algorithm-based search program gave an Odds Ratio for developing SGA of 44, with an area under the Receiver Operator Characteristic curve of 0.9. Sphingolipids, phospholipids, carnitines, and fatty acids were among this panel of metabolites. The finding of a consistent discriminatory metabolite signature in early pregnancy plasma preceding the onset of SGA offers insight into disease pathogenesis and offers the promise of a robust presymptomatic screening test.

  19. Leaf Metabolic, Genetic, and Morphophysiological Profiles of Cultivated and Wild Rocket Salad (Eruca and Diplotaxis Spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranto, Francesca; Francese, Gianluca; Di Dato, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Antonietta; Greco, Barbara; Onofaro Sanajà, Vincenzo; Pentangelo, Alfonso; Mennella, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Pasquale

    2016-07-27

    Rocket salad (Diplotaxis spp., Eruca spp.) is a leafy vegetable rich in health-promoting compounds and widely consumed. In the present study, metabolic profiles of 40 rocket accessions mainly retrieved from gene banks were assessed. Seven glucosinolates (GLSs) and 15 flavonol compounds were detected across genotypes. Dimeric 4-mercaptobutyl-GLS and 4-(β-d-glucopyranosyldisulfanyl)butyl-GLS were the major components of the total glucosinolate content. Flavonols were different between genera, with the exception of isorhamnetin 3,4'-diglucoside. Morphoagronomic traits and color coordinates were also scored. Results showed a negative correlation between color and GLSs, indicating these last as responsible for the increase of the intensity of green and yellow pigments as well as for the darkness of the leaf, whereas agronomic traits showed positive correlation with GLSs. Genetic diversity was assessed using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers, allowing separation of the accessions on the basis of the species and elucidating the observations made by means of phenotypic data. PMID:27357913

  20. Leaf Metabolic, Genetic, and Morphophysiological Profiles of Cultivated and Wild Rocket Salad (Eruca and Diplotaxis Spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranto, Francesca; Francese, Gianluca; Di Dato, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Antonietta; Greco, Barbara; Onofaro Sanajà, Vincenzo; Pentangelo, Alfonso; Mennella, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Pasquale

    2016-07-27

    Rocket salad (Diplotaxis spp., Eruca spp.) is a leafy vegetable rich in health-promoting compounds and widely consumed. In the present study, metabolic profiles of 40 rocket accessions mainly retrieved from gene banks were assessed. Seven glucosinolates (GLSs) and 15 flavonol compounds were detected across genotypes. Dimeric 4-mercaptobutyl-GLS and 4-(β-d-glucopyranosyldisulfanyl)butyl-GLS were the major components of the total glucosinolate content. Flavonols were different between genera, with the exception of isorhamnetin 3,4'-diglucoside. Morphoagronomic traits and color coordinates were also scored. Results showed a negative correlation between color and GLSs, indicating these last as responsible for the increase of the intensity of green and yellow pigments as well as for the darkness of the leaf, whereas agronomic traits showed positive correlation with GLSs. Genetic diversity was assessed using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers, allowing separation of the accessions on the basis of the species and elucidating the observations made by means of phenotypic data.

  1. Metabolic profiling directly from the Petri dish using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrous, Jeramie; Roach, Patrick; Heath, Brandi; Alexandrov, Theodore; Laskin, Julia; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2013-11-01

    Understanding molecular interaction pathways in complex biological systems constitutes a treasure trove of knowledge that might facilitate the specific, chemical manipulation of the countless microbiological systems that occur throughout our world. However, there is a lack of methodologies that allow the direct investigation of chemical gradients and interactions in living biological systems, in real time. Here, we report the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) imaging mass spectrometry for in vivo metabolic profiling of living bacterial colonies directly from the Petri dish with absolutely no sample preparation needed. Using this technique, we investigated single colonies of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Bacillus subtilis 3610, and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as well as a mixed biofilm of S. oneidensis MR-1 and B. subtilis 3610. Data from B. subtilis 3610 and S. coelicolor A3(2) provided a means of validation for the method while data from S. oneidensis MR-1 and the mixed biofilm showed a wide range of compounds that this bacterium uses for the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular metal oxides, including riboflavin, iron-bound heme and heme biosynthetic intermediates, and the siderophore putrebactin. PMID:24047514

  2. Metabolic Profiles Reveal Changes in Wild and Cultivated Soybean Seedling Leaves under Salt Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yang, Dongshuang; Li, Mingxia; Shi, Lianxuan

    2016-01-01

    Clarification of the metabolic mechanisms underlying salt stress responses in plants will allow further optimization of crop breeding and cultivation to obtain high yields in saline-alkali land. Here, we characterized 68 differential metabolites of cultivated soybean (Glycine max) and wild soybean (Glycine soja) under neutral-salt and alkali-salt stresses using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics, to reveal the physiological and molecular differences in salt tolerance. According to comparisons of growth parameters under the two kinds of salt stresses, the level of inhibition in wild soybean was lower than in cultivated soybean, especially under alkali-salt stress. Moreover, wild soybean contained significantly higher amounts of phenylalanine, asparagine, citraconic acid, citramalic acid, citric acid and α-ketoglutaric acid under neutral-salt stress, and higher amounts of palmitic acid, lignoceric acid, glucose, citric acid and α-ketoglutaric acid under alkali-salt stress, than cultivated soybean. Further investigations demonstrated that the ability of wild soybean to salt tolerance was mainly based on the synthesis of organic and amino acids, and the more active tricarboxylic acid cycle under neutral-salt stress. In addition, the metabolite profiling analysis suggested that the energy generation from β-oxidation, glycolysis and the citric acid cycle plays important roles under alkali-salt stress. Our results extend the understanding of mechanisms involved in wild soybean salt tolerance and provide an important reference for increasing yields and developing salt-tolerant soybean cultivars.

  3. Metabolic Profiles Reveal Changes in Wild and Cultivated Soybean Seedling Leaves under Salt Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    Full Text Available Clarification of the metabolic mechanisms underlying salt stress responses in plants will allow further optimization of crop breeding and cultivation to obtain high yields in saline-alkali land. Here, we characterized 68 differential metabolites of cultivated soybean (Glycine max and wild soybean (Glycine soja under neutral-salt and alkali-salt stresses using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS-based metabolomics, to reveal the physiological and molecular differences in salt tolerance. According to comparisons of growth parameters under the two kinds of salt stresses, the level of inhibition in wild soybean was lower than in cultivated soybean, especially under alkali-salt stress. Moreover, wild soybean contained significantly higher amounts of phenylalanine, asparagine, citraconic acid, citramalic acid, citric acid and α-ketoglutaric acid under neutral-salt stress, and higher amounts of palmitic acid, lignoceric acid, glucose, citric acid and α-ketoglutaric acid under alkali-salt stress, than cultivated soybean. Further investigations demonstrated that the ability of wild soybean to salt tolerance was mainly based on the synthesis of organic and amino acids, and the more active tricarboxylic acid cycle under neutral-salt stress. In addition, the metabolite profiling analysis suggested that the energy generation from β-oxidation, glycolysis and the citric acid cycle plays important roles under alkali-salt stress. Our results extend the understanding of mechanisms involved in wild soybean salt tolerance and provide an important reference for increasing yields and developing salt-tolerant soybean cultivars.

  4. Microbial community structures and metabolic profiles response differently to physiochemical properties between three landfill cover soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xi-En; Wang, Juan; Huang, Ying; Yao, Huaiying

    2016-08-01

    Landfills are always the most important part of solid waste management and bear diverse metabolic activities involved in element biogeochemical cycling. There is an increasing interest in understanding the microbial community and activities in landfill cover soils. To improve our knowledge of landfill ecosystems, we determined the microbial physiological profiles and communities in three landfill cover soils (Ninghai: NH, Xiangshan: XS, and Fenghua: FH) of different ages using the MicroResp(TM), phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and high-throughput sequencing techniques. Both total PLFAs and glucose-induced respiration suggested more active microorganisms occurred in intermediate cover soils. Microorganisms in all landfill cover soils favored L-malic acid, ketoglutarate, and citric acid. Gram-negative bacterial PLFAs predominated in all samples with the representation of 16:1ω7, 18:1ω7, and cy19:0 in XS and NH sites. Proteobacteria dominated soil microbial phyla across different sites, soil layers, and season samples. Canonical correspondence analysis showed soil pH, dissolved organic C (DOC), As, and total nitrogen (TN) contents significantly influenced the microbial community but TN affected the microbial physiological activities in both summer and winter landfill cover soils. PMID:27117156

  5. Metabolic profiling of vitamin C deficiency in Gulo-/- mice using proton NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggan, Gavin E. [University of Calgary, Biochemistry Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences (Canada); Joan Miller, B.; Jirik, Frank R. [University of Calgary, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health (Canada); Vogel, Hans J., E-mail: vogel@ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, Biochemistry Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    Nutrient deficiencies are an ongoing problem in many populations and ascorbic acid is a key vitamin whose mild or acute absence leads to a number of conditions including the famously debilitating scurvy. As such, the biochemical effects of ascorbate deficiency merit ongoing scrutiny, and the Gulo knockout mouse provides a useful model for the metabolomic examination of vitamin C deficiency. Like humans, these animals are incapable of synthesizing ascorbic acid but with dietary supplements are otherwise healthy and grow normally. In this study, all vitamin C sources were removed after weaning from the diet of Gulo-/- mice (n = 7) and wild type controls (n = 7) for 12 weeks before collection of serum. A replicate study was performed with similar parameters but animals were harvested pre-symptomatically after 2-3 weeks. The serum concentration of 50 metabolites was determined by quantitative profiling of 1D proton NMR spectra. Multivariate statistical models were used to describe metabolic changes as compared to control animals; replicate study animals were used for external validation of the resulting models. The results of the study highlight the metabolites and pathways known to require ascorbate for proper flux.

  6. Metabolic profiling of vitamin C deficiency in Gulo−/− mice using proton NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutrient deficiencies are an ongoing problem in many populations and ascorbic acid is a key vitamin whose mild or acute absence leads to a number of conditions including the famously debilitating scurvy. As such, the biochemical effects of ascorbate deficiency merit ongoing scrutiny, and the Gulo knockout mouse provides a useful model for the metabolomic examination of vitamin C deficiency. Like humans, these animals are incapable of synthesizing ascorbic acid but with dietary supplements are otherwise healthy and grow normally. In this study, all vitamin C sources were removed after weaning from the diet of Gulo−/− mice (n = 7) and wild type controls (n = 7) for 12 weeks before collection of serum. A replicate study was performed with similar parameters but animals were harvested pre-symptomatically after 2–3 weeks. The serum concentration of 50 metabolites was determined by quantitative profiling of 1D proton NMR spectra. Multivariate statistical models were used to describe metabolic changes as compared to control animals; replicate study animals were used for external validation of the resulting models. The results of the study highlight the metabolites and pathways known to require ascorbate for proper flux.

  7. Genetic variation near IRS1 associates with reduced adiposity and an impaired metabolic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Zillikens, M Carola; Stančákova, Alena; Finucane, Francis M; Ried, Janina S; Langenberg, Claudia; Zhang, Weihua; Beckmann, Jacques S; Luan, Jian'an; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Zhou, Yanhua; Smith, Albert Vernon; Zhao, Jing-Hua; Amin, Najaf; Vedantam, Sailaja; Shin, So-Youn; Haritunians, Talin; Fu, Mao; Feitosa, Mary F; Kumari, Meena; Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Tikkanen, Emmi; Mangino, Massimo; Hayward, Caroline; Song, Ci; Arnold, Alice M; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Oostra, Ben A; Campbell, Harry; Cupples, L Adrienne; Davis, Kathryn E; Döring, Angela; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Estrada, Karol; Fernández-Real, José Manuel; Garcia, Melissa; Gieger, Christian; Glazer, Nicole L; Guiducci, Candace; Hofman, Albert; Humphries, Steve E; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Leonie C; Jula, Antti; Karasik, David; Karlsson, Magnus K; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Lauren J; Kivimäki, Mika; Klopp, Norman; Kühnel, Brigitte; Kuusisto, Johanna; Liu, Yongmei; Ljunggren, Osten; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N; McKnight, Barbara; Mellström, Dan; Mitchell, Braxton D; Mooser, Vincent; Moreno, José Maria; Männistö, Satu; O'Connell, Jeffery R; Pascoe, Laura; Peltonen, Leena; Peral, Belén; Perola, Markus; Psaty, Bruce M; Salomaa, Veikko; Savage, David B; Semple, Robert K; Skaric-Juric, Tatjana; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Song, Kijoung S; Spector, Timothy D; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Talmud, Philippa J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Clegg, Deborah J; Schadt, Eric; Wilson, James F; Rudan, Igor; Ripatti, Samuli; Borecki, Ingrid B; Shuldiner, Alan R; Ingelsson, Erik; Jansson, John-Olov; Kaplan, Robert C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Groop, Leif; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Walker, Mark; Barroso, Inês; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Chambers, John C; Kooner, Jaspal S; Soranzo, Nicole; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Stefansson, Kari; Wichmann, H-Erich; Ohlsson, Claes; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Wareham, Nicholas J; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Fox, Caroline S; Laakso, Markku; Loos, Ruth J F

    2011-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 32 loci influencing body mass index, but this measure does not distinguish lean from fat mass. To identify adiposity loci, we meta-analyzed associations between ∼2.5 million SNPs and body fat percentage from 36,626 individuals and followed up the 14 most significant (P < 10(-6)) independent loci in 39,576 individuals. We confirmed a previously established adiposity locus in FTO (P = 3 × 10(-26)) and identified two new loci associated with body fat percentage, one near IRS1 (P = 4 × 10(-11)) and one near SPRY2 (P = 3 × 10(-8)). Both loci contain genes with potential links to adipocyte physiology. Notably, the body-fat-decreasing allele near IRS1 is associated with decreased IRS1 expression and with an impaired metabolic profile, including an increased visceral to subcutaneous fat ratio, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, risk of diabetes and coronary artery disease and decreased adiponectin levels. Our findings provide new insights into adiposity and insulin resistance. PMID:21706003

  8. Metabolic Profiling Directly from the Petri Dish Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watrous, Jeramie D.; Roach, Patrick J.; Heath, Brandi S.; Alexandrov, Theodore; Laskin, Julia; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2013-11-05

    Understanding molecular interaction pathways in complex biological systems constitutes a treasure trove of knowledge that might facilitate the specific, chemical manipulation of the countless microbiological systems that occur throughout our world. However, there is a lack of methodologies that allow the direct investigation of chemical gradients and interactions in living biological systems, in real time. Here, we report the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) imaging mass spectrometry for in vivo metabolic profiling of living bacterial colonies directly from the Petri dish with absolutely no sample preparation needed. Using this technique, we investigated single colonies of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Bacillus subtilis 3610, and Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as well as a mixed biofilm of S. oneidensis MR-1 and B. subtilis 3610. Data from B. subtilis 3610 and S. coelicolor A3(2) provided a means of validation for the method while data from S. oneidensis MR-1 and the mixed biofilm showed a wide range of compounds that this bacterium uses for the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular metal oxides, including riboflavin, iron-bound heme and heme biosynthetic intermediates, and the siderophore putrebactin.

  9. Phylogeography, Salinity Adaptations and Metabolic Potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria Based on a Partial Single Cell Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Lisa M; Hyde, Andrew S; MacGregor, Barbara J; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that have been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis - previously developed based on (14)C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines - that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source. PMID:27597842

  10. RNA profiles of porcine embryos during genome activation reveal complex metabolic switch sensitive to in vitro conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Østrup

    Full Text Available Fertilization is followed by complex changes in cytoplasmic composition and extensive chromatin reprogramming which results in the abundant activation of totipotent embryonic genome at embryonic genome activation (EGA. While chromatin reprogramming has been widely studied in several species, only a handful of reports characterize changing transcriptome profiles and resulting metabolic changes in cleavage stage embryos. The aims of the current study were to investigate RNA profiles of in vivo developed (ivv and in vitro produced (ivt porcine embryos before (2-cell stage and after (late 4-cell stage EGA and determine major metabolic changes that regulate totipotency. The period before EGA was dominated by transcripts responsible for cell cycle regulation, mitosis, RNA translation and processing (including ribosomal machinery, protein catabolism, and chromatin remodelling. Following EGA an increase in the abundance of transcripts involved in transcription, translation, DNA metabolism, histone and chromatin modification, as well as protein catabolism was detected. The further analysis of members of overlapping GO terms revealed that despite that comparable cellular processes are taking place before and after EGA (RNA splicing, protein catabolism, different metabolic pathways are involved. This strongly suggests that a complex metabolic switch accompanies EGA. In vitro conditions significantly altered RNA profiles before EGA, and the character of these changes indicates that they originate from oocyte and are imposed either before oocyte aspiration or during in vitro maturation. IVT embryos have altered content of apoptotic factors, cell cycle regulation factors and spindle components, and transcription factors, which all may contribute to reduced developmental competence of embryos produced in vitro. Overall, our data are in good accordance with previously published, genome-wide profiling data in other species. Moreover, comparison with mouse and

  11. Effects of Regular Physical Exercises in the Water on the Metabolic Profile of Women with Abdominal Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasprzak Zbigniew

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recreational physical exercise in the water is predominantly based on aerobic metabolism. Since it involves both carbohydrate and lipid sources of energy, aqua aerobics has a beneficial effect on metabolism of these substrates. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of a 3 month aqua aerobics training program on the metabolic profile of women with abdominal obesity. The study sample comprised 32 women aged 41-72 years. Somatic characteristics and variables characterizing carbohydrate and lipid metabolism were measured before the commencement and after the completion of the training program. During the 2nd measurement all mean anthropometric variables were found to be significantly lower (p<0.01. In the blood lipid profile, the concentrations of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and HOMAIR were significantly lower (p<0.01. Furthermore, the levels of fasting triglycerides, glucose and insulin were reduced significantly (p<0.05 after the training program. The aqua aerobics program contributed to positive changes in lipid metabolism, anthropometric variables, as well as the fasting insulin, glucose levels and insulin resistance index in women with abdominal obesity.

  12. Comparison of Metabolic and Hormonal Profiles of Women With and Without Premenstrual Syndrome: A Community Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Somayeh; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Mohammadi, Nader; Rostami Dovom, Marzieh; Torkestani, Farahnaz; Simbar, Masumeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-01-01

    Background Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is reported by up to 85% of women of reproductive age. Although several studies have focused on the hormone and lipid profiles of females with PMS, the results are controversial. Objectives This study was designed to investigate the association of hormonal and metabolic factors with PMS among Iranian women of reproductive age. Materials and Methods This study was a community based cross-sectional study. Anthropometric measurements, biochemical parameters, and metabolic disorders were compared between 354 women with PMS and 302 healthy controls selected from among 1126 women of reproductive age who participated in the Iranian PCOS prevalence study. P values age and body mass index (BMI), linear regression analysis demonstrated that for every one unit increase in PMS score there was 12% rise in the probability of having metabolic syndrome (P = 0.033). Conclusions There was a significant association between PMS scores and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Further studies are needed to confirm and validate the relationships between lipid profile abnormalities and metabolic disorders with PMS.

  13. Cross-sectional and longitudinal comparisons of metabolic profiles between vegetarian and non-vegetarian subjects: a matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yen-Feng; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Chiu, Tina H T; Lee, Chun-Yi; Liu, Ting-Ting; Tsao, Chwen Keng; Chuang, Su-Chun; Hsiung, Chao A

    2015-10-28

    Several previous cross-sectional studies have shown that vegetarians have a better metabolic profile than non-vegetarians, suggesting that a vegetarian dietary pattern may help prevent chronic degenerative diseases. However, longitudinal studies on the impact of vegetarian diets on metabolic traits are scarce. We studied how several sub-types of vegetarian diets affect metabolic traits, including waist circumference, BMI, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol (TC), HDL, LDL, TAG and TC:HDL ratio, through both cross-sectional and longitudinal study designs. The study used the MJ Health Screening database, with data collected from 1994 to 2008 in Taiwan, which included 4415 lacto-ovo-vegetarians, 1855 lacto-vegetarians and 1913 vegans; each vegetarian was matched with five non-vegetarians based on age, sex and study site. In the longitudinal follow-up, each additional year of vegan diet lowered the risk of obesity by 7 % (95 % CI 0·88, 0·99), whereas each additional year of lacto-vegetarian diet lowered the risk of elevated SBP by 8 % (95 % CI 0·85, 0·99) and elevated glucose by 7 % (95 % CI 0·87, 0·99), and each additional year of ovo-lacto-vegetarian diet increased abnormal HDL by 7 % (95 % CI 1·03, 1·12), compared with non-vegetarians. In the cross-sectional comparisons, all sub-types of vegetarians had lower likelihoods of abnormalities compared with non-vegetarians on all metabolic traits (P<0·001 for all comparisons), except for HDL and TAG. The better metabolic profile in vegetarians is partially attributable to lower BMI. With proper management of TAG and HDL, along with caution about the intake of refined carbohydrates and fructose, a plant-based diet may benefit all aspects of the metabolic profile. PMID:26355190

  14. Effects of herbage allowance of native grasslands in purebred and crossbred beef cows: metabolic, endocrine and hepatic gene expression profiles through the gestation-lactation cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, J; Astessiano, A L; López-Mazz, C; Soca, P; Espasandin, A C; Carriquiry, M

    2014-07-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the metabolic, endocrine and hepatic mRNA profiles through the gestation-lactation cycle in purebred (PU: Angus and Hereford) and crossbred (CR: reciprocal F1 crosses) mutliparous beef cows (n=32), grazing on two herbage allowances of native pastures (2.5 v. 4 kg dry matter/kg BW; LO v. HI) and their associations with cow's productive performance (calf birth weight, milk production and commencement of luteal activity). Cow BW, body condition score (BCS) and blood samples were collected monthly, starting at -165 days relative to calving (days), and every 2 weeks after calving until +60 days of lactation. Liver biopsies were collected at -165, -75, -45, -15±10, and +15 and +60±3 days. Metabolic, endocrine and hepatic gene expression profiles, and calf birth weight, milk yield and postpartum commencement of luteal activity were evaluated. Overall, the most pronounced changes in metabolic, endocrine and hepatic gene expression occurred during winter gestation (-165 to -45 days), when all cows experienced the onset of a negative energy balance (decreased BCS, glucose and insulin, and increased non-esterified fatty acid concentrations, Pcattle (reduced hepatic GHR1A and IGF-I mRNA) was not observed in this study. The hepatic mRNA expression of key transcripts involved in gluconeogenesis and fatty-acid oxidation were upregulated (PBCS, estimated energy intake, increased milk yield and shorter commencement of luteal activity in HI than in LO, and in CR than in PU cows (P<0.018), would indicate that HI and CR cows were able to adapt more efficiently to changes in nutrient and energy supply through the gestation-lactation cycle.

  15. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists. PMID:26407887

  16. Metabolic adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to oxygen stress by cell-to-cell clumping and flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-12-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.

  17. Calorie Restriction-like Effects of 30 Days of Resveratrol Supplementation on Energy Metabolism and Metabolic Profile in Obese Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, S.; Konings, E.; Bilet, L.; Houtkooper, R.H.; Weijer, van de T.; Goossens, G.H.; Hoeks, J.; Krieken, van der S.; Ryu, D.; Kersten, A.H.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Hesselink, M.K.C.; Kunz, I.; Schrauwen-Hinderling, V.B.; Blaak, E.E.; Auwerx, J.; Schrauwen, P.

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural compound that affects energy metabolism and mitochondrial function and serves as a calorie restriction mimetic, at least in animal models of obesity. Here, we treated 11 healthy, obese men with placebo and 150 mg/day resveratrol (resVida) in a randomized double-blind crossov

  18. EXTREME METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS AND METABOLIC PROFILE IN HIGH YIELDING HOLSTEINFRIESIAN DAIRY COWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. GERGÁCZ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The impact of two years (2002 and 2003 with different summer temperature extremes on variation in metabolic profile was analyzed in blood and urine samples taken from healthy, primiparous (n = 371 and multiparous (n = 795 high yielding Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. In this study main focus was lead on three most critical physiological phases, thus cows were assigned into three groups as follows: (1 dry cows for 10 days prior to calving; (2 cows 1-30 days after delivery, and (3 cows with more than 31 days post partum. Findings reveal clear response of the cows to heat in selected blood (hemoglobin, plasma aceto-acetic-acid, FFA, AST, glucose, urea and urine (pH, NABE and urea parameters. In the majority of cows, glucose and hemoglobin level, one of the most significant blood parameters, indicated symptoms of insufficient energy supply. Further metabolic indicators differed more or less from reference values depending on actual condition. Due to heat load dry matter intake has been decreased even by 10-15 per cent in primiparous cows. They were expected to increase body weight and size and simultaneously produce attain at large milk yields. In doing so that cows would have require large amount of nutrients. Out of parameters such as hemoglobin, glucose, FFA, AST and blood-urea differed from the reference values in most cases; however, this phenomenon seemed to be present in almost every case for hemoglobin and glucose. The lack of energy caused by heat stress can be contributed to the decrease of dry matter intake which has been indicated by the urea levels and pH both in blood and urine prevailing unfavorable and insufficient feeding practice. The results reconfirm the need to reconsider both the actual feeding practice (e.g. to increase of nutrient content in rations, reduce the intake of soluble proteins in rumen, pay attention of crude fiber in Total Mixed Rations (TMR, NDF and ADF, avoid overfeeding of inorganic buffers, to control moisture

  19. (1)H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Plasma Metabolic Profiling of Dairy Cows with Fatty Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chuang; Sun, Ling-Wei; Xia, Cheng; Zhang, Hong-You; Zheng, Jia-San; Wang, Jun-Song

    2016-02-01

    Fatty liver is a common metabolic disorder of dairy cows during the transition period. Historically, the diagnosis of fatty liver has involved liver biopsy, biochemical or histological examination of liver specimens, and ultrasonographic imaging of the liver. However, more convenient and noninvasive methods would be beneficial for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows. The plasma metabolic profiles of dairy cows with fatty liver and normal (control) cows were investigated to identify new biomarkers using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance. Compared with the control group, the primary differences in the fatty liver group included increases in β-hydroxybutyric acid, acetone, glycine, valine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, citrulline, and isobutyrate, and decreases in alanine, asparagine, glucose, γ-aminobutyric acid glycerol, and creatinine. This analysis revealed a global profile of endogenous metabolites, which may present potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows. PMID:26732447

  20. (1)H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Plasma Metabolic Profiling of Dairy Cows with Fatty Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chuang; Sun, Ling-Wei; Xia, Cheng; Zhang, Hong-You; Zheng, Jia-San; Wang, Jun-Song

    2016-02-01

    Fatty liver is a common metabolic disorder of dairy cows during the transition period. Historically, the diagnosis of fatty liver has involved liver biopsy, biochemical or histological examination of liver specimens, and ultrasonographic imaging of the liver. However, more convenient and noninvasive methods would be beneficial for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows. The plasma metabolic profiles of dairy cows with fatty liver and normal (control) cows were investigated to identify new biomarkers using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance. Compared with the control group, the primary differences in the fatty liver group included increases in β-hydroxybutyric acid, acetone, glycine, valine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, citrulline, and isobutyrate, and decreases in alanine, asparagine, glucose, γ-aminobutyric acid glycerol, and creatinine. This analysis revealed a global profile of endogenous metabolites, which may present potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows.

  1. Transfer of Assembly Operations to New Workpiece Poses by Adaptation to the Desired Force Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemec, Bojan; Abu-Dakka, Fares; Rytz, Jimmy Alison;

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new algorithm that can be used for adaptation of robot trajectories in automated assembly tasks. Initial trajectories and forces are obtained by demonstration and iteratively adapted to the specific environment configuration. The algorithm adapts Cartesian space trajector...

  2. Metabolic heat production and thermal conductance are mass-independent adaptations to thermal environment in birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fristoe, Trevor S; Burger, Joseph R; Balk, Meghan A; Khaliq, Imran; Hof, Christian; Brown, James H

    2015-12-29

    The extent to which different kinds of organisms have adapted to environmental temperature regimes is central to understanding how they respond to climate change. The Scholander-Irving (S-I) model of heat transfer lays the foundation for explaining how endothermic birds and mammals maintain their high, relatively constant body temperatures in the face of wide variation in environmental temperature. The S-I model shows how body temperature is regulated by balancing the rates of heat production and heat loss. Both rates scale with body size, suggesting that larger animals should be better adapted to cold environments than smaller animals, and vice versa. However, the global distributions of ∼9,000 species of terrestrial birds and mammals show that the entire range of body sizes occurs in nearly all climatic regimes. Using physiological and environmental temperature data for 211 bird and 178 mammal species, we test for mass-independent adaptive changes in two key parameters of the S-I model: basal metabolic rate (BMR) and thermal conductance. We derive an axis of thermal adaptation that is independent of body size, extends the S-I model, and highlights interactions among physiological and morphological traits that allow endotherms to persist in a wide range of temperatures. Our macrophysiological and macroecological analyses support our predictions that shifts in BMR and thermal conductance confer important adaptations to environmental temperature in both birds and mammals.

  3. Use of metabolic profiles and body condition scoring for the assessment of energy status of dairy cows

    OpenAIRE

    Prodanović R.; Sladojević Ž.; Kirovski D.; Vujanac I.; Ivetić V.; Savić B.; Kureljušić B.; Stevančević M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the significance of body condition scoring and metabolic profile test for estimation of energy status of healthy high-yielding dairy cows. Twenty one healthy cows (primiparous and secundiparous) were divided into three groups: dry cows, early puerperal cows and early lactating cows. Cow’s energy status was estimated by the analysis of blood samples for beta-hydroxybutirate (BHBA) and glucose. Additionally, urea, total bil...

  4. Metabolic Profiling-based Data-mining for an Effective Chemical Combination to Induce Apoptosis of Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Motofumi Kumazoe; Yoshinori Fujimura; Shiori Hidaka; Yoonhee Kim; Kanako Murayama; Mika Takai; Yuhui Huang; Shuya Yamashita; Motoki Murata; Daisuke Miura; Hiroyuki Wariishi; Mari Maeda-Yamamoto; Hirofumi Tachibana

    2015-01-01

    Green tea extract (GTE) induces apoptosis of cancer cells without adversely affecting normal cells. Several clinical trials reported that GTE was well tolerated and had potential anti-cancer efficacy. Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) is the primary compound responsible for the anti-cancer effect of GTE; however, the effect of EGCG alone is limited. To identify GTE compounds capable of potentiating EGCG bioactivity, we performed metabolic profiling of 43 green tea cultivar panels by liquid ...

  5. Avocado Oil Supplementation Modifies Cardiovascular Risk Profile Markers in a Rat Model of Sucrose-Induced Metabolic Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Octavio Carvajal-Zarrabal; Cirilo Nolasco-Hipolito; M. Guadalupe Aguilar-Uscanga; Guadalupe Melo-Santiesteban; Patricia M. Hayward-Jones; Barradas-Dermitz, Dulce M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of avocado oil administration on biochemical markers of cardiovascular risk profile in rats with metabolic changes induced by sucrose ingestion. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: a control group (CG; basic diet), a sick group (MC; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution), and three other groups (MCao, MCac, and MCas; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution plus olive oil and avocado oil extracted by centrifugation or using solvent,...

  6. Tumour xenograft detection through quantitative analysis of the metabolic profile of urine in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroz, Jennifer [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11322-89 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Turner, Joan [Department of Experimental Oncology, University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Slupsky, Carolyn [Department of Nutrition, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-8598 (United States); Fallone, Gino; Syme, Alasdair, E-mail: alasdair.syme@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2011-02-07

    The metabolic content of urine from NIH III nude mice (n = 22) was analysed before and after inoculation with human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer cells. An age- and gender-matched control population (n = 14) was also studied to identify non-tumour-related changes. Urine samples were collected daily for 6 weeks, beginning 1 week before cell injection. Metabolite concentrations were obtained via targeted profiling with Chenomx Suite 5.1, based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra acquired on an Oxford 800 MHz cold probe NMR spectrometer. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to evaluate the significance of the change in metabolite concentration between the two time points. Both the metabolite concentrations and the ratios of pairs of metabolites were studied. The complicated inter-relationships between metabolites were assessed through partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for all variables and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated. The data indicate that the number of statistically significant changes in metabolite concentrations was more pronounced in the tumour-bearing population than in the control animals. This was also true of the ratios of pairs of metabolites. ROC analysis suggests that the ratios were better able to differentiate between the pre- and post-injection samples compared to the metabolite concentrations. PLS-DA models produced good separation between the populations and had the best AUC results (all models exceeded 0.937). These results demonstrate that metabolomics may be used as a screening tool for GBM cells grown in xenograft models in mice.

  7. Tumour xenograft detection through quantitative analysis of the metabolic profile of urine in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Jennifer; Turner, Joan; Slupsky, Carolyn; Fallone, Gino; Syme, Alasdair

    2011-02-01

    The metabolic content of urine from NIH III nude mice (n = 22) was analysed before and after inoculation with human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer cells. An age- and gender-matched control population (n = 14) was also studied to identify non-tumour-related changes. Urine samples were collected daily for 6 weeks, beginning 1 week before cell injection. Metabolite concentrations were obtained via targeted profiling with Chenomx Suite 5.1, based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra acquired on an Oxford 800 MHz cold probe NMR spectrometer. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to evaluate the significance of the change in metabolite concentration between the two time points. Both the metabolite concentrations and the ratios of pairs of metabolites were studied. The complicated inter-relationships between metabolites were assessed through partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for all variables and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated. The data indicate that the number of statistically significant changes in metabolite concentrations was more pronounced in the tumour-bearing population than in the control animals. This was also true of the ratios of pairs of metabolites. ROC analysis suggests that the ratios were better able to differentiate between the pre- and post-injection samples compared to the metabolite concentrations. PLS-DA models produced good separation between the populations and had the best AUC results (all models exceeded 0.937). These results demonstrate that metabolomics may be used as a screening tool for GBM cells grown in xenograft models in mice.

  8. Metabolic profiling of human brain metastases using in vivo proton MR spectroscopy at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastases to the central nervous system from different primary cancers are an oncologic challenge as the overall prognosis for these patients is generally poor. The incidence of brain metastases varies with type of primary cancer and is probably increasing due to improved therapies of extracranial metastases prolonging patient's overall survival and thereby time for brain metastases to develop. In addition, the greater access to improved neuroimaging techniques can provide earlier diagnosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and multivariate analyses to characterize brain metastases originating from different primary cancers, to assess changes in spectra during radiation treatment and to correlate the spectra to clinical outcome after treatment. Patients (n = 26) with brain metastases were examined using single voxel MRS at a 3T clinical MR system. Five patients were excluded due to poor spectral quality. The spectra were obtained before start (n = 21 patients), immediately after (n = 6 patients) and two months after end of treatment (n = 4 patients). Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square regression analysis (PLS) were applied in order to identify clustering of spectra due to origin of metastases and to relate clinical outcome (survival) of the patients to spectral data from the first MR examination. The PCA results indicated that brain metastases from primary lung and breast cancer were separated into two clusters, while the metastases from malignant melanomas showed no uniformity. The PLS analysis showed a significant correlation between MR spectral data and survival five months after MRS before start of treatment. MRS determined metabolic profiles analysed by PCA and PLS might give valuable clinical information when planning and evaluating the treatment of brain metastases, and also when deciding to terminate further therapies

  9. Pseudo-transition Analysis Identifies the Key Regulators of Dynamic Metabolic Adaptations from Steady-State Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerosa, Luca; Haverkorn van Rijsewijk, Bart R B; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Kochanowski, Karl; Schmidt, Thomas S B; Noor, Elad; Sauer, Uwe

    2015-10-28

    Hundreds of molecular-level changes within central metabolism allow a cell to adapt to the changing environment. A primary challenge in cell physiology is to identify which of these molecular-level changes are active regulatory events. Here, we introduce pseudo-transition analysis, an approach that uses multiple steady-state observations of (13)C-resolved fluxes, metabolites, and transcripts to infer which regulatory events drive metabolic adaptations following environmental transitions. Pseudo-transition analysis recapitulates known biology and identifies an unexpectedly sparse, transition-dependent regulatory landscape: typically a handful of regulatory events drive adaptation between carbon sources, with transcription mainly regulating TCA cycle flux and reactants regulating EMP pathway flux. We verify these observations using time-resolved measurements of the diauxic shift, demonstrating that some dynamic transitions can be approximated as monotonic shifts between steady-state extremes. Overall, we show that pseudo-transition analysis can explore the vast regulatory landscape of dynamic transitions using relatively few steady-state data, thereby guiding time-consuming, hypothesis-driven molecular validations. PMID:27136056

  10. Profiling the Metabolism of Astragaloside IV by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Quadrupole/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Dong Cheng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Astragaloside IV is a compound isolated from the Traditional Chinese Medicine Astragalus membranaceus, that has been reported to have bioactivities against cardiovascular disease and kidney disease. There is limited information on the metabolism of astragaloside IV, which impedes comprehension of its biological actions and pharmacology. In the present study, an ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS-based approach was developed to profile the metabolites of astragaloside IV in rat plasma, bile, urine and feces samples. Twenty-two major metabolites were detected. The major components found in plasma, bile, urine and feces included the parent chemical and phases I and II metabolites. The major metabolic reactions of astragaloside IV were hydrolysis, glucuronidation, sulfation and dehydrogenation. These results will help to improve understanding the metabolism and reveal the biotransformation profiling of astragaloside IV in vivo. The metabolic information obtained from our study will guide studies into the pharmacological activity and clinical safety of astragaloside IV.

  11. Metabolic profiles in five high-producing Swedish dairy herds with a history of abomasal displacement and ketosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stengärde Lena

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body condition score and blood profiles have been used to monitor management and herd health in dairy cows. The aim of this study was to examine BCS and extended metabolic profiles, reflecting both energy metabolism and liver status around calving in high-producing herds with a high incidence of abomasal displacement and ketosis and to evaluate if such profiles can be used at herd level to pinpoint specific herd problems. Methods Body condition score and metabolic profiles around calving in five high-producing herds with high incidences of abomasal displacement and ketosis were assessed using linear mixed models (94 cows, 326 examinations. Cows were examined and blood sampled every three weeks from four weeks ante partum (ap to nine weeks postpartum (pp. Blood parameters studied were glucose, fructosamine, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA, insulin, β-hydroxybutyrate, aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase, haptoglobin and cholesterol. Results All herds had overconditioned dry cows that lost body condition substantially the first 4–6 weeks pp. Two herds had elevated levels of NEFA ap and three herds had elevated levels pp. One herd had low levels of insulin ap and low levels of cholesterol pp. Haptoglobin was detected pp in all herds and its usefulness is discussed. Conclusion NEFA was the parameter that most closely reflected the body condition losses while these losses were not seen in glucose and fructosamine levels. Insulin and cholesterol were potentially useful in herd profiles but need further investigation. Increased glutamate dehydrogenase suggested liver cell damage in all herds.

  12. FGF21 as a Stress Hormone: The Roles of FGF21 in Stress Adaptation and the Treatment of Metabolic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kook Hwan Kim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is an endocrine hormone that is primarily expressed in the liver and exerts beneficial effects on obesity and related metabolic diseases. In addition to its remarkable pharmacologic actions, the physiological roles of FGF21 include the maintenance of energy homeostasis in the body in conditions of metabolic or environmental stress. The expression of FGF21 is induced in multiple organs in response to diverse physiological or pathological stressors, such as starvation, nutrient excess, autophagy deficiency, mitochondrial stress, exercise, and cold exposure. Thus, the FGF21 induction caused by stress plays an important role in adaptive response to these stimuli. Here, we highlight our current understanding of the functional importance of the induction of FGF21 by diverse stressors as a feedback mechanism that prevents excessive stress.

  13. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    OpenAIRE

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Gregory B Hurst; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clum...

  14. Web Log Pre-processing and Analysis for Generation of Learning Profiles in Adaptive E-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika M. Pai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive E-learning Systems (AESs enhance the efficiency of online courses in education by providing personalized contents and user interfaces that changes according to learner’s requirements and usage patterns. This paper presents the approach to generate learning profile of each learner which helps to identify the learning styles and provide Adaptive User Interface which includes adaptive learning components and learning material. The proposed method analyzes the captured web usage data to identify the learning profile of the learners. The learning profiles are identified by an algorithmic approach that is based on the frequency of accessing the materials and the time spent on the various learning components on the portal. The captured log data is pre-processed and converted into standard XML format to generate learners sequence data corresponding to the different sessions and time spent. The learning style model adopted in this approach is Felder-Silverman Learning Style Model (FSLSM. This paper also presents the analysis of learner’s activities, preprocessed XML files and generated sequences.

  15. Web Log Pre-processing and Analysis for Generation of Learning Profiles in Adaptive E-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika M. Pai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive E-learning Systems (AESs enhance the efficiency of online courses in education by providing personalized contents and user interfaces that changes according to learner’s requirements and usage patterns. This paper presents the approach to generate learning profile of each learner which helps to identify the learning styles and provide Adaptive User Interface which includes adaptive learning components and learning material. The proposed method analyzes the captured web usage data to identify the learning profile of the learners. The learning profiles are identified by an algorithmic approach that is based on the frequency of accessing the materials and the time spent on the various learning components on the portal. The captured log data is pre-processed and converted into standard XML format to generate learners sequence data corresponding to the different sessions and time spent. The learning style model adopted in this approach is Felder-Silverman Learning Style Model (FSLSM. This paper also presents the analysis of learner’s activities, preprocessed XML files and generated sequences.

  16. Ectopic lipid deposition and the metabolic profile of skeletal muscle in ovariectomized mice

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Kathryn C.; Wohlers, Lindsay M.; Richard M. Lovering; Schuh, Rosemary A.; Maher, Amy C.; Bonen, Arend; Koves, Timothy R.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Thomson, David M.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Spangenburg, Espen E.

    2012-01-01

    Disruptions of ovarian function in women are associated with increased risk of metabolic disease due to dysregulation of peripheral glucose homeostasis in skeletal muscle. Our previous evidence suggests that alterations in skeletal muscle lipid metabolism coupled with altered mitochondrial function may also develop. The objective of this study was to use an integrative metabolic approach to identify potential areas of dysfunction that develop in skeletal muscle from ovariectomized (OVX) femal...

  17. Adaptation of the symbiotic Mesorhizobium-chickpea relationship to phosphate deficiency relies on reprogramming of whole-plant metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr Esfahani, Maryam; Kusano, Miyako; Nguyen, Kien Huu; Watanabe, Yasuko; Ha, Chien Van; Saito, Kazuki; Sulieman, Saad; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Tran, L S

    2016-08-01

    Low inorganic phosphate (Pi) availability is a major constraint for efficient nitrogen fixation in legumes, including chickpea. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in nodule acclimation to low Pi availability, two Mesorhizobium-chickpea associations exhibiting differential symbiotic performances, Mesorhizobium ciceri CP-31 (McCP-31)-chickpea and Mesorhizobium mediterranum SWRI9 (MmSWRI9)-chickpea, were comprehensively studied under both control and low Pi conditions. MmSWRI9-chickpea showed a lower symbiotic efficiency under low Pi availability than McCP-31-chickpea as evidenced by reduced growth parameters and down-regulation of nifD and nifK These differences can be attributed to decline in Pi level in MmSWRI9-induced nodules under low Pi stress, which coincided with up-regulation of several key Pi starvation-responsive genes, and accumulation of asparagine in nodules and the levels of identified amino acids in Pi-deficient leaves of MmSWRI9-inoculated plants exceeding the shoot nitrogen requirement during Pi starvation, indicative of nitrogen feedback inhibition. Conversely, Pi levels increased in nodules of Pi-stressed McCP-31-inoculated plants, because these plants evolved various metabolic and biochemical strategies to maintain nodular Pi homeostasis under Pi deficiency. These adaptations involve the activation of alternative pathways of carbon metabolism, enhanced production and exudation of organic acids from roots into the rhizosphere, and the ability to protect nodule metabolism against Pi deficiency-induced oxidative stress. Collectively, the adaptation of symbiotic efficiency under Pi deficiency resulted from highly coordinated processes with an extensive reprogramming of whole-plant metabolism. The findings of this study will enable us to design effective breeding and genetic engineering strategies to enhance symbiotic efficiency in legume crops. PMID:27450089

  18. Disruption of the acyl-coa binding protein gene delays hepatic adaptation to metabolic changes at weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neess, Ditte; Bloksgaard, Maria; Sørensen, Signe Bek;

    2011-01-01

    , little is known about the in vivo function in mammalian cells. We have generated mice with targeted disruption of ACBP (ACBP-/-). These mice are viable and fertile and develop normally. However, around weaning the ACBP-/- mice go through a crisis with overall weakness, and a slightly decreased growth...... rate. Using microarray analysis we show that the liver of ACBP-/- mice display a significantly delayed adaptation to weaning with late induction of target genes of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) family. As a result, hepatic de novo cholesterogenesis is decreased at weaning....... The delayed induction of SREBP target genes around weaning is caused by a compromised processing and decreased expression of SREBP precursors leading to reduced binding of SREBP to target sites in chromatin. In conclusion, lack of ACBP interferes with the normal metabolic adaptation to weaning and leads...

  19. Noninvasive analysis of metabolic changes following nutrient input into diverse fish species, as investigated by metabolic and microbial profiling approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiga Asakura

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An NMR-based metabolomic approach in aquatic ecosystems is valuable for studying the environmental effects of pharmaceuticals and other chemicals on fish. This technique has also contributed to new information in numerous research areas, such as basic physiology and development, disease, and water pollution. We evaluated the microbial diversity in various fish species collected from Japan’s coastal waters using next-generation sequencing, followed by evaluation of the effects of feed type on co-metabolic modulations in fish-microbial symbiotic ecosystems in laboratory-scale experiments. Intestinal bacteria of fish in their natural environment were characterized (using 16S rRNA genes for trophic level using pyrosequencing and noninvasive sampling procedures developed to study the metabolism of intestinal symbiotic ecosystems in fish reared in their environment. Metabolites in feces were compared, and intestinal contents and feed were annotated based on HSQC and TOCSY using SpinAssign and network analysis. Feces were characterized by species and varied greatly depending on the feeding types. In addition, feces samples demonstrated a response to changes in the time series of feeding. The potential of this approach as a non-invasive inspection technique in aquaculture is suggested.

  20. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood ...

  1. Adverse Metabolic Risk Profiles in Greenlandic Inuit Children Compared to Danish Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, T.; Sorensen, K.; Andersen, L. B.;

    2013-01-01

    Objective During recent decades, the prevalence of metabolic morbidity has increased rapidly in adult Greenlandic Inuit. To what extent this is also reflected in the juvenile Inuit population is unknown. The objective was, therefore, in the comparison with Danish children, to evaluate metabolic p...

  2. Association between metabolic syndrome and depressive symptom profiles-Sex-specific?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, Radboud M; Smits, Johanna E M P; Schoevers, Robert A; van den Brink, Rob H S; Holewijn, Suzanne; Franke, Barbara; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Oude Voshaar, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    Background: The association between depression and metabolic syndrome is becoming more obvious. Waist circumference (WC) might be the most important metabolic syndrome (MetS) feature in relation to late-life depression, with a possible mediating role for adiponectin. Methods: Cross-sectional populat

  3. Association between metabolic syndrome and depressive symptom profiles--sex-specific?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, R.M.; Smits, J.E.; Schoevers, R.A.; Brink, R.H. van den; Holewijn, S.; Franke, B.; Graaf, J. de; Voshaar, R.C. Oude

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association between depression and metabolic syndrome is becoming more obvious. Waist circumference (WC) might be the most important metabolic syndrome (MetS) feature in relation to late-life depression, with a possible mediating role for adiponectin. METHODS: Cross-sectional populat

  4. Transcriptome analysis of Salicornia europaea under saline conditions revealed the adaptive primary metabolic pathways as early events to facilitate salt adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengxiang Fan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Halophytes such as Salicornia europaea have evolved to exhibit unique mechanisms controlled by complex networks and regulated by numerous genes and interactions to adapt to habitats with high salinity. However, these mechanisms remain unknown. METHODS: To investigate the mechanism by which halophytes tolerate salt based on changes in the whole transcriptome, we performed transcriptome sequencing and functional annotation by database search. Using the unigene database, we conducted digital gene expression analysis of S. europaea at various time points after these materials were treated with NaCl. We also quantified ion uptakes. Gene functional enrichment analysis was performed to determine the important pathways involved in this process. RESULTS: A total of 57,151 unigenes with lengths of >300 bp were assembled, in which 57.5% of these unigenes were functionally annotated. Differentially expressed genes indicated that cell wall metabolism and lignin biosynthetic pathways were significantly enriched in S. europaea to promote the development of the xylem under saline conditions. This result is consistent with the increase in sodium uptake as ions pass through the xylem. Given that PSII efficiency remained unaltered, salt treatment activated the expression of electron transfer-related genes encoded by the chloroplast chromosome. Chlorophyll biosynthesis was also inhibited, indicating the energy-efficient state of the electron transfer system of S. europaea. CONCLUSIONS: The key function of adjusting important primary metabolic pathways in salt adaption was identified by analyzing the changes in the transcriptome of S. europaea. These pathways could involve unique salt tolerance mechanisms in halophytes. This study also provided information as the basis of future investigations on salt response genes in S. europaea. Ample gene resources were also provided to improve the genes responsible for the salt tolerance ability of crops.

  5. Adapt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  6. Metabolic profiling reveals altered nitrogen nutrient regimes have diverse effects on the metabolism of hydroponically-grown tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2005-01-01

    The role of inorganic nitrogen assimilation in the production of amino acids is one of the most important biochemical processes in plants. For this reason, a detailed broad-range characterization of the metabolic response of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves to the alteration of nitrate level was performed. Tomato plants were grown hydroponically in liquid culture under three different nitrate regimes: saturated (8 mM NO3-), replete (4 mM NO3-) and deficient (0.4 mM NO3-). All treatments were performed under varied light intensity, with leaf samples being collected after 7, 14, and 21 d. In addition, the short-term response (after 1, 24, 48, and 94 h) to varying nutrient status was evaluated at the higher light intensity. GC-MS analysis of the levels of amino acids, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, sugars, sugar alcohols, and representative compounds of secondary metabolism revealed substantial changes under the various growth regimes applied. The data presented here suggest that nitrate nutrition has wide-ranging effects on plant leaf metabolism with nitrate deficiency resulting in decreases in many amino and organic acids and increases in the level of several carbohydrates and phosphoesters, as well as a handful of secondary metabolites. These results are compared with previously reported transcript profiles of altered nitrogen regimes and discussed within the context of current models of carbon nitrogen interaction. PMID:15596475

  7. Relationship between habitat, densities and metabolic profile in brown hares (Lepus europaeus Pallas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bagliacca

    2010-01-01

    and best body conditions can be found in highlands, open fields with low tree presence and wooded borders, medium mixture soils, scarce predator presence and limited anthropogenic presence and with abundant water availability and shrubbiness. The study of the absolute values of metabolic profile, indicator of the physiological and nutritional condition of the reared animals, did not show any nutritional winter deficiency in wild hares and, as census data, should be repeated for several years since, probably, only their variations can be used as indicators of preliminary problems.

  8. Polymorphism profiling of nine high altitude relevant candidate gene loci in acclimatized sojourners and adapted natives

    OpenAIRE

    Tomar, Arvind; Malhotra, Seema; Sarkar, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Background Sea level sojourners, on ascent to high altitude, undergo acclimatization through integrated physiological processes for defending the body against oxygen deprivation while the high altitude natives (resident population) are adapted to the prevailing hypobaric hypoxic condition through natural selection. Separating the acclimatization processes from adaptive changes and identifying genetic markers in lowlanders that may be beneficial for offsetting the high altitude hypoxic stress,...

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid metabolic profiles in multiple sclerosis and degenerative dementias obtained by high resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 19 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), 12 patients with degenerative dementia and 17 control patients using in vitro high resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 400 MHz. The CSF metabolic profile is slightly modified in MS patients (increased lactate and fructose concentrations, decreased creatinine and phenylalanine concentrations) and is not correlated with the intensity of the intrathecal inflammation. Proton MRS of CSF does not differentiate relapsing-remitting MS and primary progressive MS. We have not detected any specific abnormal resonance in native or lyophilized CSF. The CSF metabolic profile of demented patients is much more altered (increased concentration of lactate, pyruvate, alanine, lysine, valine, leucine-isoleucine, tyrosine, glutamine) and is in agreement with a brain oxidative metabolism impairment as already described in Alzheimer's disease. Unassigned abnormal but non specific or constant resonances have been detected on MR spectra of demented patients. CSF inositol concentration is also increased in the CSF of patients with Alzheimer's disease. In vitro high resolution proton MRS of the CSF constitutes a new and original way to explore CSF for the differential and/or early diagnosis of dementias, as a complement to in vivo proton cerebral MRS. (authors). 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Metabolic and phylogenetic profile of bacterial community in Guishan coastal water (Pearl River Estuary), South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaojuan; Liu, Qing; Li, Zhuojia; He, Zhili; Gong, Yingxue; Cao, Yucheng; Yang, Yufeng

    2014-10-01

    Characteristics of a microbial community are important as they indicate the status of aquatic ecosystems. In the present study, the metabolic and phylogenetic profile of the bacterioplankton community in Guishan coastal water (Pearl River Estuary), South China Sea, at 12 sites (S1-S12) were explored by community-level physiological profiling (CLPP) with BIOLOG Eco-plate and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Our results showed that the core mariculture area (S6, S7 and S8) and the sites associating with human activity and sewage discharge (S11 and S12) had higher microbial metabolic capability and bacterial community diversity than others (S1-5, S9-10). Especially, the diversity index of S11 and S12 calculated from both CLPP and DGGE data ( H>3.2) was higher than that of others as sewage discharge may increase water nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient. The bacterial community structure of S6, S8, S11 and S12 was greatly influenced by total phosphorous, salinity and total nitrogen. Based on DGGE fingerprinting, proteobacteria, especially γ- and α-proteobacteria, were found dominant at all sites. In conclusion, the aquaculture area and wharf had high microbial metabolic capability. The structure and composition of bacterial community were closely related to the level of phosphorus, salinity and nitrogen.

  11. Two-Level Automatic Adaptation of a Distributed User Profile for Personalized News Content Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Papadogiorgaki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a distributed client-server architecture for the personalized delivery of textual news content to mobile users. The user profile consists of two separate models, that is, the long-term interests are stored in a skeleton profile on the server and the short-term interests in a detailed profile in the handset. The user profile enables a high-level filtering of available news content on the server, followed by matching of detailed user preferences in the handset. The highest rated items are recommended to the user, by employing an efficient ranking process. The paper focuses on a two-level learning process, which is employed on the client side in order to automatically update both user profile models. It involves the use of machine learning algorithms applied to the implicit and explicit user feedback. The system's learning performance has been systematically evaluated based on data collected from regular system users.

  12. Expression profiling reveals differences in metabolic gene expression between exercise-induced cardiac effects and maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Claes C; Aplin, Mark; Ploug, Thorkil;

    2005-01-01

    by quantitative PCR. The exercise program resulted in cardiac hypertrophy without impaired cardiac function. Principal component analysis identified an exercise-induced change in gene expression that was distinct from the program observed in maladaptive hypertrophy. Statistical analysis identified 267 upregulated...... genes and 62 downregulated genes in response to exercise. Expression changes in genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins, cytoskeletal elements, signalling factors and ribosomal proteins mimicked changes previously described in maladaptive hypertrophy. Our most striking observation...... was that expression changes of genes involved in beta-oxidation of fatty acids and glucose metabolism differentiate adaptive from maladaptive hypertrophy. Direct comparison to maladaptive hypertrophy was enabled by quantitative PCR of key metabolic enzymes including uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) and fatty acid...

  13. Tumour-specific metabolic adaptation to acidosis is coupled to epigenetic stability in osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chano, Tokuhiro; Avnet, Sofia; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Sonveaux, Pierre; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic-based metabolism of cancers promotes an acidic microenvironment that is responsible for increased aggressiveness. However, the effects of acidosis on tumour metabolism have been almost unexplored. By using capillary electrophoresis with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we observed a significant metabolic difference associated with glycolysis repression (dihydroxyacetone phosphate), increase of amino acid catabolism (phosphocreatine and glutamate) and urea cycle enhancement (arginino succinic acid) in osteosarcoma (OS) cells compared with normal fibroblasts. Noteworthy, metabolites associated with chromatin modification, like UDP-glucose and N(8)-acetylspermidine, decreased more in OS cells than in fibroblasts. COBRA assay and acetyl-H3 immunoblotting indicated an epigenetic stability in OS cells than in normal cells, and OS cells were more sensitive to an HDAC inhibitor under acidosis than under neutral pH. Since our data suggest that acidosis promotes a metabolic reprogramming that can contribute to the epigenetic maintenance under acidosis only in tumour cells, the acidic microenvironment should be considered for future therapies. PMID:27186436

  14. A PPAR gamma-FGF1 axis is required for adaptive adipose remodelling and metabolic homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Johan W.; Suh, Jae Myoung; Atkins, Annette R.; Ahmadian, Maryam; Li, Pingping; Whyte, Jamie; He, Mingxiao; Juguilon, Henry; Yin, Yun-Qiang; Phillips, Colin T.; Yu, Ruth T.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Henry, Robert R.; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    Although feast and famine cycles illustrate that remodelling of adipose tissue in response to fluctuations in nutrient availability is essential for maintaining metabolic homeostasis, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood(1,2). Here we identify fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) as a cri

  15. A transcription factor links growth rate and metabolism in the hypersaline adapted archaeon Halobacterium salinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Horia; Dulmage, Keely; Gillum, Nicholas; Bain, James R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Schmid, Amy K

    2014-09-01

    Co-ordinating metabolism and growth is a key challenge for all organisms. Despite fluctuating environments, cells must produce the same metabolic outputs to thrive. The mechanisms underlying this 'growth homeostasis' are known in bacteria and eukaryotes, but remain unexplored in archaea. In the model archaeon Halobacterium salinarum, the transcription factor TrmB regulates enzyme-coding genes in diverse metabolic pathways in response to glucose. However, H. salinarum is thought not to catabolize glucose. To resolve this discrepancy, we demonstrate that TrmB regulates the gluconeogenic production of sugars incorporated into the cell surface S-layer glycoprotein. Additionally, we show that TrmB-DNA binding correlates with instantaneous growth rate, likely because S-layer glycosylation is proportional to growth. This suggests that TrmB transduces a growth rate signal to co-regulated metabolic pathways including amino acid, purine, and cobalamin biosynthesis. Remarkably, the topology and function of this growth homeostatic network appear conserved across domains despite extensive alterations in protein components.

  16. Metabolic and endocrine adaptations to fasting in lean and obese individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, Marjolein A.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we examined several effects of fasting in lean and obese individuals. As expected, both the hormonal response as well as the metabolic shift from glucose towards lipid oxidation was impaired in obese individuals. At baseline, mitochondrial protein content in skeletal muscle of obese s

  17. Tumour-specific metabolic adaptation to acidosis is coupled to epigenetic stability in osteosarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chano, Tokuhiro; Avnet, Sofia; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Sonveaux, Pierre; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic-based metabolism of cancers promotes an acidic microenvironment that is responsible for increased aggressiveness. However, the effects of acidosis on tumour metabolism have been almost unexplored. By using capillary electrophoresis with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we observed a significant metabolic difference associated with glycolysis repression (dihydroxyacetone phosphate), increase of amino acid catabolism (phosphocreatine and glutamate) and urea cycle enhancement (arginino succinic acid) in osteosarcoma (OS) cells compared with normal fibroblasts. Noteworthy, metabolites associated with chromatin modification, like UDP-glucose and N8-acetylspermidine, decreased more in OS cells than in fibroblasts. COBRA assay and acetyl-H3 immunoblotting indicated an epigenetic stability in OS cells than in normal cells, and OS cells were more sensitive to an HDAC inhibitor under acidosis than under neutral pH. Since our data suggest that acidosis promotes a metabolic reprogramming that can contribute to the epigenetic maintenance under acidosis only in tumour cells, the acidic microenvironment should be considered for future therapies. PMID:27186436

  18. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  19. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoacetica metabolic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrei V; Sears, Jesse A; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R; Ahring, Birgitte K; Majors, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    An in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600-MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol, and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process, enabling identification of intermediate and endpoint metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  20. Dynamic Metabolic Profiles and Tissue-Specific Source Effects on the Metabolome of Developing Seeds of Brassica napus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helin Tan

    Full Text Available Canola (Brassica napus is one of several important oil-producing crops, and the physiological processes, enzymes, and genes involved in oil synthesis in canola seeds have been well characterized. However, relatively little is known about the dynamic metabolic changes that occur during oil accumulation in seeds, as well as the mechanistic origins of metabolic changes. To explore the metabolic changes that occur during oil accumulation, we isolated metabolites from both seed and silique wall and identified and characterized them by using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The results showed that a total of 443 metabolites were identified from four developmental stages. Dozens of these metabolites were differentially expressed during seed ripening, including 20 known to be involved in seed development. To investigate the contribution of tissue-specific carbon sources to the biosynthesis of these metabolites, we examined the metabolic changes of silique walls and seeds under three treatments: leaf-detachment (Ld, phloem-peeling (Pe, and selective silique darkening (Sd. Our study demonstrated that the oil content was independent of leaf photosynthesis and phloem transport during oil accumulation, but required the metabolic influx from the silique wall. Notably, Sd treatment resulted in seed senescence, which eventually led to a severe reduction of the oil content. Sd treatment also caused a significant accumulation of fatty acids (FA, organic acids and amino acids. Furthermore, an unexpected accumulation of sugar derivatives and organic acid was observed in the Pe- and Sd-treated seeds. Consistent with this, the expression of a subset of genes involved in FA metabolism, sugar and oil storage was significantly altered in Pe and Sd treated seeds. Taken together, our studies suggest the metabolite profiles of canola seeds dynamically varied during the course of oil accumulation, which may provide a new insight into the mechanisms

  1. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoacetica metabolic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrei V; Sears, Jesse A; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R; Ahring, Birgitte K; Majors, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    An in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600-MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol, and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process, enabling identification of intermediate and endpoint metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts. PMID:24946863

  2. Adaptation of energy metabolism to undernutrition in ewes. Contribution of portal-drained viscera, liver and hindquarters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigues, I; Durand, D

    1995-02-01

    Adaptation of energy metabolism to undernutrition and to the duration of undernutrition was studied in adult, non-pregnant, non-lactating ewes at the whole-animal, portal-drained viscera, liver and hindquarters levels. Arterio-venous and indirect calorimetry techniques were used. Animals were successively fed at 1 times (3 weeks) and at 0.5 times (7 weeks) their metabolizable energy requirements for maintenance (MEm). Portal, hepatic and hindquarters blood flows in quietly standing ewes decreased by 22, 19 and 11% respectively within the first week of undernutrition and remained at that level thereafter. Standardizing hindquarters blood flow to that in a given posture (quietly standing) reduced blood flow by 9.8%. In the portal-drained viscera and liver, O2 extraction rates decreased, leading to 34 and 38% drops in O2 consumption with underfeeding respectively. In the hindquarters, O2 extraction rate increased, partly counterbalancing the drop in blood flow. Thus O2 consumption of hindquarters tended to decrease but the effect was not significant. All changes appeared to be completed from day 5 of underfeeding. Consequently, the portal-drained viscera, liver and carcass were responsible for 39, 32 and 5% respectively of the drop in whole-animal O2 consumption with underfeeding. At the end of the 0.5 x MEm period, in vivo metabolic rates averaged 1.65, 4.89 and 0.38 mmol O2 consumed/d per g fresh weight of adipose-tissue-free portal-drained viscera, liver and boneless hindquarters respectively. Undernutrition imposed a much greater nutritional challenge to splanchnic tissues than to hindquarters. The former reduced their energy expenditure whereas hindquarters metabolism adapted by counteracting the slight drop in nutrient supply.

  3. Untargeted Metabolic Profiling of Winery-Derived Biomass Waste Degradation by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpe, Avinash V; Beale, David J; Godhani, Nainesh B; Morrison, Paul D; Harding, Ian H; Palombo, Enzo A

    2015-12-16

    Winery-derived biomass waste was degraded by Penicillium chrysogenum under solid state fermentation over 8 days in a (2)H2O-supplemented medium. Multivariate statistical analysis of the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data resulted in the identification of 94 significant metabolites, within 28 different metabolic pathways. The majority of biomass sugars were utilized by day 4 to yield products such as sugars, fatty acids, isoprenoids, and amino acids. The fungus was observed to metabolize xylose to xylitol, an intermediate of ethanol production. However, enzyme inhibition and autolysis were observed from day 6, indicating 5 days as the optimal time for fermentation. P. chrysogenum displayed metabolism of pentoses (to alcohols) and degraded tannins and lignins, properties that are lacking in other biomass-degrading ascomycetes. Rapid fermentation (3-5 days) may not only increase the pentose metabolizing efficiency but also increase the yield of medicinally important metabolites, such as syringate. PMID:26611372

  4. ¹H NMR spectroscopy profiling of metabolic reprogramming of Chinese hamster ovary cells upon a temperature shift during culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane L Wagstaff

    Full Text Available We report an NMR based approach to determine the metabolic reprogramming of Chinese hamster ovary cells upon a temperature shift during culture by investigating the extracellular cell culture media and intracellular metabolome of CHOK1 and CHO-S cells during culture and in response to cold-shock and subsequent recovery from hypothermic culturing. A total of 24 components were identified for CHOK1 and 29 components identified for CHO-S cell systems including the observation that CHO-S media contains 5.6 times the level of glucose of CHOK1 media at time zero. We confirm that an NMR metabolic approach provides quantitative analysis of components such as glucose and alanine with both cell lines responding in a similar manner and comparable to previously reported data. However, analysis of lactate confirms a differentiation between CHOK1 and CHO-S and that reprogramming of metabolism in response to temperature was cell line specific. The significance of our results is presented using principal component analysis (PCA that confirms changes in metabolite profile in response to temperature and recovery. Ultimately, our approach demonstrates the capability of NMR providing real-time analysis to detect reprogramming of metabolism upon cellular perception of cold-shock/sub-physiological temperatures. This has the potential to allow manipulation of metabolites in culture supernatant to improve growth or productivity.

  5. ROLE OF PHYSICAL EXERCISE, FITNESS AND AEROBIC TRAINING IN TYPE 1 DIABETIC AND HEALTHY MEN IN RELATION TO THE LIPID PROFILE, LIPID PEROXIDATION AND THE METABOLIC SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Laaksonen

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia and possibly lipid peroxidation play important roles in the development of macro- and microvascular disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Little is known, however, of the role of aerobic exercise in dyslipidemia and resting and exercise-induced lipid peroxidation in type 1 diabetes. Despite the well-known effect of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA on components of the metabolic syndrome, little is known of the association of LTPA and cardiorespiratory fitness (maximal oxygen consumption, VO2max with development of the metabolic syndrome itself. A randomized controlled trial assessing the effect of a 12-16 week aerobic exercise program on VO2max and the lipid profile was carried out in otherwise healthy young men with type 1 diabetes. The effect of acute physical exercise on oxidative stress and antioxidant defenses and the relation to VO2max in men with type 1 diabetes was also evaluated. To test four recently proposed definitions by the World Health Organization (WHO and National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP of the metabolic syndrome, the sensitivity and specificity of the definitions for prevalent and incident diabetes were assessed in a population-based cohort of middle-aged men. We also studied the associations of LTPA and cardiorespiratory fitness with prevalent and incident cases of the metabolic syndrome. A 12-16 week endurance exercise program produced antiatherogenic changes in lipid, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein levels in 20 type 1 diabetic men who for the most part were already physically active at baseline. The most favorable training-induced changes in the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL and apolipoprotein A-I/apolipoprotein B ratios were in patients with low baseline HDL/LDL levels, likely the group with the most benefit to be gained by such changes. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, a measure of lipid peroxidation, was higher in nine

  6. Evaluation of hyperandrogenemia and metabolic risk profile in women with postadolescent acne

    OpenAIRE

    Leyla Baykal Selçuk; Deniz Aksu Arıca; Savaş Yaylı

    2016-01-01

    Background and Design: Postadolescent acne is a disease with relapses frequently seen in women. Treatment is difficult. In our study, we aimed to investigate the clinical and biochemical characteristics of hyperandrogenism and the prevalence of metabolic disorders, such as metabolic syndrome (MS) and dyslipidemia in women with postadolescent acne. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 50 women who attended our department with the complaint of postadolescent acne between July 2014...

  7. Metabolic profiles of biological aging in American Indians: The strong heart family study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jinying; Zhu, Yun; Uppal, Karan; ViLinh T Tran; Yu, Tianwei; Lin, Jue; Matsuguchi, Tet; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Jones, Dean; Lee, Elisa T.; Howard, Barbara V.

    2014-01-01

    Short telomere length, a marker of biological aging, has been associated with age-related metabolic disorders. Telomere attrition induces profound metabolic dysfunction in animal models, but no study has examined the metabolome of telomeric aging in human. Here we studied 423 apparently healthy American Indians participating in the Strong Family Heart Study. Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) was measured by qPCR. Metabolites in fasting plasma were detected by untargeted LC/MS. Associations of L...

  8. Nut consumption has favorable effects on lipid profiles of Korean women with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Joo; Nam, Ga Eun; Seo, Ji A; Yoon, Taehyung; Seo, Ilwon; Lee, Jin Hee; Im, Donggil; Bahn, Kyeong-Nyeo; Jeong, Si An; Kang, Tae Seok; Ahn, Jae Hee; Kim, Do Hoon; Kim, Nan Hee

    2014-09-01

    Nut consumption has been studied for its cardioprotective effects. However, the findings of clinical intervention studies are inconsistent; and no intervention studies have been conducted in the Korean population. We hypothesized that nut supplementation may have favorable influence on metabolic markers. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of nut consumption on metabolic parameters and biomarkers related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial function in Korean adults with metabolic syndrome. To this end, we designed a randomized, parallel, controlled dietary intervention study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02023749). Subjects with metabolic syndrome and a body mass index of at least 23 kg/m(2) were randomized to the Control group and the Nut group, which received supplementation with 30 g/d of mixed nuts (walnuts, peanuts, and pine nuts) for 6 weeks. Sixty volunteers were included in the final analysis. Metabolic markers were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the study. Total cholesterol and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels significantly improved in the Nut group compared to those in the Control group (P = .023 and P = .016, respectively) in women. Biomarkers related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial function did not significantly change from baseline in either group. Thus, supplementing a usual diet with mixed nuts for 6 weeks had favorable effects on several lipid parameters in Korean women with metabolic syndrome. These findings present a possible mechanism for the cardioprotective effects of nut consumption.

  9. Metabolic profiling of the tissue-specific responses in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis towards Vibrio harveyi challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Ji, Chenglong; Zhao, Jianmin; Wang, Qing; Li, Fei; Wu, Huifeng

    2014-08-01

    Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is a marine aquaculture shellfish distributing widely along the coast in north China. In this work, we studied the differential metabolic responses induced by Vibrio harveyi in digestive gland and gill tissues from M. galloprovincialis using NMR-based metabolomics. The differential metabolic responses in the two tissue types were detected, except the similarly altered taurine and betaine. These metabolic responses suggested that V. harveyi mainly induced osmotic disruption and reduced energy demand via the metabolic pathways of glucose synthesis and ATP/AMP conversion in mussel digestive gland. In mussel gill tissues, V. harveyi basically caused osmotic stress and possible reduced energy demand as shown by the elevated phosphocholine that is involved in one of the metabolic pathways of ATP synthesis from ADP and phosphocholine. The altered mRNA expression levels of related genes (superoxide dismutase with copper and zinc, heat shock protein 90, defensin and lysozyme) suggested that V. harveyi induced clear oxidative and immune stresses in both digestive gland and gill tissues. However, the mRNA expression levels of both lysozyme and defensin in digestive gland were more significantly up-regulated than those in gill from V. harveyi-challenged mussel M. galloprovincialis, meaning that the immune organ, digestive gland, was more sensitive than gill. Overall, our results indicated that V. harveyi could induce tissue-specific metabolic responses in mussel M. galloprovincialis.

  10. Systems-level metabolic flux profiling elucidates a complete, bifurcated tricarboxylic acid cycle in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Fan, Jing; Roquet, Nathaniel; Rabitz, Herschel; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2010-09-01

    Obligatory anaerobic bacteria are major contributors to the overall metabolism of soil and the human gut. The metabolic pathways of these bacteria remain, however, poorly understood. Using isotope tracers, mass spectrometry, and quantitative flux modeling, here we directly map the metabolic pathways of Clostridium acetobutylicum, a soil bacterium whose major fermentation products include the biofuels butanol and hydrogen. While genome annotation suggests the absence of most tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes, our results demonstrate that this bacterium has a complete, albeit bifurcated, TCA cycle; oxaloacetate flows to succinate both through citrate/alpha-ketoglutarate and via malate/fumarate. Our investigations also yielded insights into the pathways utilized for glucose catabolism and amino acid biosynthesis and revealed that the organism's one-carbon metabolism is distinct from that of model microbes, involving reversible pyruvate decarboxylation and the use of pyruvate as the one-carbon donor for biosynthetic reactions. This study represents the first in vivo characterization of the TCA cycle and central metabolism of C. acetobutylicum. Our results establish a role for the full TCA cycle in an obligatory anaerobic organism and demonstrate the importance of complementing genome annotation with isotope tracer studies for determining the metabolic pathways of diverse microbes.

  11. Phylogeography, salinity adaptations and metabolic potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria based on a partial single cell genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Nigro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that has been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome (SAG of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis – previously developed based on 14C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines - that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source.

  12. Transcriptome analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 grown in vitro in the sterile-filtrated cecal content of human gut microbiota associated rats reveals an adaptive expression of metabolic and virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Guillaume; Jubelin, Grégory; Garneau, Philippe; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick; Martin, Christine; Beaudry, Francis; Harel, Josée

    2015-01-01

    In developed countries, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a leading cause of bloody diarrhea and renal failures in human. Understanding strategies employed by EHEC to colonize the intestine is of major importance since to date no cure exists to eradicate the pathogen. In this study, the adaptive response of EHEC to the intestinal milieu conditioned by a human microbiota was examined. A transcriptomic analysis was performed on the EHEC strain EDL933 incubated in vitro in the sterile-filtrated cecal content of human microbiota-associated rats (HMC) compared with EDL933 incubated in the sterile-filtrated cecal content of germ-free rat (GFC). EDL933 switches from a glycolytic metabolic profile in the GFC to an anaplerotic metabolic profile in HMC. The expression of several catabolism genes was strongly affected such as those involved in the utilization of sugars, glycerol, N-acetylneuraminic acid, amino acids and secondary metabolites. Interestingly, expression level of critical EHEC O157:H7 virulence genes including genes from the locus of enterocyte effacement was reduced in HMC. Altogether, these results contribute to the understanding of EHEC adaptive response to a digestive content and highlight the ability of the microbiota to repress EHEC virulence gene expression. PMID:25290220

  13. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire [EA4483, Université de Lille 2, Faculté de Médecine de Lille, Pôle Recherche, 59045 Lille (France); Buob, David [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie Pathologie Génétique, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien [Institut de Pathologie, Centre de Biologie Pathologie Génétique, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR837, Centre de Recherche Jean-Pierre Aubert, Equipe 5, 59045 Lille (France); Flamand, Vincent [Service d' Urologie, Hôpital Huriez, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Hennino, Marie-Flore [EA4483, Université de Lille 2, Faculté de Médecine de Lille, Pôle Recherche, 59045 Lille (France); Service de Néphrologie, Hôpital Huriez, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille (France); Perrais, Michaël [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, UMR837, Centre de Recherche Jean-Pierre Aubert, Equipe 5, 59045 Lille (France); and others

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies. - Highlights: • Renal proximal tubular (PT) cells are highly sensitive to xenobiotics. • Expression of genes involved in xenobiotic disposition was measured. • PT cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue.

  14. Metabolic Profiling of Intact Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves during Circadian Cycle Using 1H High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schadewijk, R.; de Groot, H. J. M.; Alia, A.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the most widely used model organism for research in plant biology. While significant advances in understanding plant growth and development have been made by focusing on the molecular genetics of Arabidopsis, extracting and understanding the functional framework of metabolism is challenging, both from a technical perspective due to losses and modification during extraction of metabolites from the leaves, and from the biological perspective, due to random variation obscuring how well the function is performed. The purpose of this work is to establish the in vivo metabolic profile directly from the Arabidopsis thaliana leaves without metabolite extraction, to reduce the complexity of the results by multivariate analysis, and to unravel the mitigation of cellular complexity by predominant functional periodicity. To achieve this, we use the circadian cycle that strongly influences metabolic and physiological processes and exerts control over the photosynthetic machinery. High resolution-magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) was applied to obtain the metabolic profile directly from intact Arabidopsis leaves. Combining one- and two-dimensional 1H HR-MAS NMR allowed the identification of several metabolites including sugars and amino acids in intact leaves. Multivariate analysis on HR-MAS NMR spectra of leaves throughout the circadian cycle revealed modules of primary metabolites with significant and consistent variations of their molecular components at different time points of the circadian cycle. Since robust photosynthetic performance in plants relies on the functional periodicity of the circadian rhythm, our results show that HR-MAS NMR promises to be an important non-invasive method that can be used for metabolomics of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered physiology and photosynthetic efficiency. PMID:27662620

  15. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies. - Highlights: • Renal proximal tubular (PT) cells are highly sensitive to xenobiotics. • Expression of genes involved in xenobiotic disposition was measured. • PT cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue

  16. Responses of mouse skeletal muscle to endurance exercise. Functional, metabolic, and genomic adaptations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Snoo, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    Endurance exercise is commonly known to improve skeletal muscle performance with respect to fatigue resistance. The exact mechanisms, however, as to how skeletal muscle adapts to increased physical demand are still largely unknown, despite extensive research. These processes were originally studied

  17. Metabolic adaptations of skeletal muscle to voluntary wheel running exercise in hypertensive heart failure rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, R L; Kullman, E L; Waters, Ryan;

    2013-01-01

    The Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rat mimics the human progression of hypertension from hypertrophy to heart failure. However, it is unknown whether SHHF animals can exercise at sufficient levels to observe beneficial biochemical adaptations in skeletal muscle. Thirty-seven fema...

  18. Effect of probiotics on metabolic profiles in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caifeng; Li, Xin; Han, Hongqiu; Cui, Hailong; Peng, Min; Wang, Guolin; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a prevalent metabolic disease which is imposing heavy burden on global health and economy. Recent studies indicate gut microbiota play important role on the pathogenesis and metabolic disturbance of T2DM. As an effective mean of regulating gut microbiota, probiotics are live micro-organisms that are believed to provide a specific health benefit on the host. Whether probiotic supplementation could improve metabolic profiles by modifying gut microbiota in T2DM or not is still in controversy.The aim of the study is to assess the effect of probiotic supplementation on metabolic profiles in T2DM.We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library up to 12 April 2016. Two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data, and evaluated risk of bias of included studies. Data were pooled by using the random-effect model and expressed as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Heterogeneity was assessed and quantified (I).A total of 12 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Lipid profiles (n = 508) and fasting blood glucose (FBG) (n = 520) were reported in 9 trials; the homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) (n = 368) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (n = 380) were reported in 6 trials. Probiotics could alleviate FBG (SMD -0.61 mmol/L, 95% CI [-0.92, -0.30], P = 0.0001). Probiotics could increase high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) (SMD 0.42 mmol/L, 95% CI [0.08, 0.76], P = 0.01). There were no significant differences in low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), HbA1c and HOMA-IR between the treatment group and the control group.Probiotics may improve glycemic control and lipid metabolism in T2DM. Application of probiotic agents might become a new method for glucose management in T2DM. PMID:27368052

  19. Exercise-Induced Skeletal Muscle Remodeling and Metabolic Adaptation: Redox Signaling and Role of Autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraro, Elisabetta; Giammarioli, Anna Maria; Chiandotto, Sergio; Spoletini, Ilaria; Rosano, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Skeletal muscle is a highly plastic tissue. Exercise evokes signaling pathways that strongly modify myofiber metabolism and physiological and contractile properties of skeletal muscle. Regular physical activity is beneficial for health and is highly recommended for the prevention of several chronic conditions. In this review, we have focused our attention on the pathways that are known to mediate physical training-induced plasticity. Recent Advances: An important role for redox ...

  20. Long-Term Impacts of Foetal Malnutrition Followed by Early Postnatal Obesity on Fat Distribution Pattern and Metabolic Adaptability in Adult Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Prabhat; Johnsen, Lærke; Axel, Anne Marie Dixen; Hansen, Pernille Willert; Kongsted, Anna Hauntoft; Lyckegaard, Nette Brinch; Nielsen, Mette Olaf

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether over- versus undernutrition in late foetal life combined with obesity development in early postnatal life have differential implications for fat distribution and metabolic adaptability in adulthood. Twin-pregnant ewes were fed NORM (100% of daily energy and protein requirements), LOW (50% of NORM) or HIGH (150%/110% of energy/protein requirements) diets during the last trimester. Postnatally, twin-lambs received obesogenic (HCHF) or moderate (CONV) diets until 6 months of age, and a moderate (obesity correcting) diet thereafter. At 2½ years of age (adulthood), plasma metabolite profiles during fasting, glucose, insulin and propionate (in fed and fasted states) tolerance tests were examined. Organ weights were determined at autopsy. Early obesity development was associated with lack of expansion of perirenal, but not other adipose tissues from adolescence to adulthood, resulting in 10% unit increased proportion of mesenteric of intra-abdominal fat. Prenatal undernutrition had a similar but much less pronounced effect. Across tolerance tests, LOW-HCHF sheep had highest plasma levels of cholesterol, urea-nitrogen, creatinine, and lactate. Sex specific differences were observed, particularly with respect to fat deposition, but direction of responses to early nutrition impacts were similar. However, prenatal undernutrition induced greater metabolic alterations in adult females than males. Foetal undernutrition, but not overnutrition, predisposed for adult hypercholesterolaemia, hyperureaemia, hypercreatinaemia and hyperlactataemia, which became manifested only in combination with early obesity development. Perirenal expandability may play a special role in this context. Differential nutrition recommendations may be advisable for individuals with low versus high birth weights. PMID:27257993

  1. Long-Term Impacts of Foetal Malnutrition Followed by Early Postnatal Obesity on Fat Distribution Pattern and Metabolic Adaptability in Adult Sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat Khanal

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate whether over- versus undernutrition in late foetal life combined with obesity development in early postnatal life have differential implications for fat distribution and metabolic adaptability in adulthood. Twin-pregnant ewes were fed NORM (100% of daily energy and protein requirements, LOW (50% of NORM or HIGH (150%/110% of energy/protein requirements diets during the last trimester. Postnatally, twin-lambs received obesogenic (HCHF or moderate (CONV diets until 6 months of age, and a moderate (obesity correcting diet thereafter. At 2½ years of age (adulthood, plasma metabolite profiles during fasting, glucose, insulin and propionate (in fed and fasted states tolerance tests were examined. Organ weights were determined at autopsy. Early obesity development was associated with lack of expansion of perirenal, but not other adipose tissues from adolescence to adulthood, resulting in 10% unit increased proportion of mesenteric of intra-abdominal fat. Prenatal undernutrition had a similar but much less pronounced effect. Across tolerance tests, LOW-HCHF sheep had highest plasma levels of cholesterol, urea-nitrogen, creatinine, and lactate. Sex specific differences were observed, particularly with respect to fat deposition, but direction of responses to early nutrition impacts were similar. However, prenatal undernutrition induced greater metabolic alterations in adult females than males. Foetal undernutrition, but not overnutrition, predisposed for adult hypercholesterolaemia, hyperureaemia, hypercreatinaemia and hyperlactataemia, which became manifested only in combination with early obesity development. Perirenal expandability may play a special role in this context. Differential nutrition recommendations may be advisable for individuals with low versus high birth weights.

  2. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina C Oliveira

    Full Text Available Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA. Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines. Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids, adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines.

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  4. Uniform longitudinal beam profiles in the Fermilab Recycler using adaptive rf correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Martin; Broemmelsiek, Daniel Robert; Chase, Brian; Crisp, James L.; Eddy, Nathan; Joireman, Paul W.; Ng, King Yuen; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring is a permanent magnet based 8 GeV anti-proton storage ring. A wideband RF system, driven with ARB's (ARBitrary waveform generators), allows the system to produce programmable barrier waveforms. Beam current profile distortion was observed, its origin verified both experimentally and theoretically, and an FPGA-based correction system was designed, tested and implemented to level the bunch profile.

  5. Predicting chronic copper and nickel reproductive toxicity to Daphnia pulex-pulicaria from whole-animal metabolic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nadine S; Kirwan, Jennifer A; Johnson, Craig; Yan, Norman D; Viant, Mark R; Gunn, John M; McGeer, James C

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of omics approaches in environmental research has enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying toxicity; however, extrapolation from molecular effects to whole-organism and population level outcomes remains a considerable challenge. Using environmentally relevant, sublethal, concentrations of two metals (Cu and Ni), both singly and in binary mixtures, we integrated data from traditional chronic, partial life-cycle toxicity testing and metabolomics to generate a statistical model that was predictive of reproductive impairment in a Daphnia pulex-pulicaria hybrid that was isolated from an historically metal-stressed lake. Furthermore, we determined that the metabolic profiles of organisms exposed in a separate acute assay were also predictive of impaired reproduction following metal exposure. Thus we were able to directly associate molecular profiles to a key population response - reproduction, a key step towards improving environmental risk assessment and management.

  6. Leukemic Stem Cells Evade Chemotherapy by Metabolic Adaptation to an Adipose Tissue Niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Haobin; Adane, Biniam; Khan, Nabilah; Sullivan, Timothy; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Gasparetto, Maura; Stevens, Brett; Pei, Shanshan; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M; Klemm, Dwight J; Woolthuis, Carolien M; Stranahan, Alec W; Park, Christopher Y; Jordan, Craig T

    2016-07-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) has previously been identified as an extra-medullary reservoir for normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and may promote tumor development. Here, we show that a subpopulation of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) can utilize gonadal adipose tissue (GAT) as a niche to support their metabolism and evade chemotherapy. In a mouse model of blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), adipose-resident LSCs exhibit a pro-inflammatory phenotype and induce lipolysis in GAT. GAT lipolysis fuels fatty acid oxidation in LSCs, especially within a subpopulation expressing the fatty acid transporter CD36. CD36(+) LSCs have unique metabolic properties, are strikingly enriched in AT, and are protected from chemotherapy by the GAT microenvironment. CD36 also marks a fraction of human blast crisis CML and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells with similar biological properties. These findings suggest striking interplay between leukemic cells and AT to create a unique microenvironment that supports the metabolic demands and survival of a distinct LSC subpopulation. PMID:27374788

  7. 1H NMR Metabolic Profiling of Biofluids from Rats with Gastric Mucosal Lesion and Electroacupuncture Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric mucosal lesion (GML is a common gastrointestinal disorder with multiple pathogenic mechanisms in clinical practice. In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, electroacupuncture (EA treatment has been proven as an effective therapy for GML, although the underlying healing mechanism is not yet clear. Here, we used proton nuclear magnetic resonance- (1H NMR- based metabolomic method to investigate the metabolic perturbation induced by GML and the therapeutic effect of EA treatment on stomach meridian (SM acupoints. Clear metabolic differences were observed between GML and control groups, and related metabolic pathways were discussed by means of online metabolic network analysis toolbox. By comparing the endogenous metabolites from GML and GML-SM groups, the disturbed pathways were partly recovered towards healthy state via EA treated on SM acupoints. Further comparison of the metabolic variations induced by EA stimulated on SM and the control gallbladder meridian (GM acupoints showed a quite similar metabolite composition except for increased phenylacetylglycine, 3,4-dihydroxymandelate, and meta-hydroxyphenylacetate and decreased N-methylnicotinamide in urine from rats with EA treated on SM acupoints. The current study showed the potential application of metabolomics in providing further insight into the molecular mechanism of acupuncture.

  8. Xylem transcription profiles indicate potential metabolic responses for economically relevant characteristics of Eucalyptus species

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar, Marcela Mendes; Nascimento, Leandro Costa; Camargo, Eduardo Leal Oliveira; Gonçalves, Danieli Cristina; Neto, Jorge Lepikson; Marques, Wesley Leoricy; Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Mondego, Jorge Maurício Costa; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Deckmann, Ana Carolina; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2013-01-01

    Background Eucalyptus is one of the most important sources of industrial cellulose. Three species of this botanical group are intensively used in breeding programs: E. globulus, E. grandis and E. urophylla. E. globulus is adapted to subtropical/temperate areas and is considered a source of high-quality cellulose; E. grandis grows rapidly and is adapted to tropical/subtropical climates; and E. urophylla, though less productive, is considered a source of genes related to robustness. Wood, or se...

  9. Effects of herbage allowance of native grasslands in purebred and crossbred beef cows: metabolic, endocrine and hepatic gene expression profiles through the gestation-lactation cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, J; Astessiano, A L; López-Mazz, C; Soca, P; Espasandin, A C; Carriquiry, M

    2014-07-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the metabolic, endocrine and hepatic mRNA profiles through the gestation-lactation cycle in purebred (PU: Angus and Hereford) and crossbred (CR: reciprocal F1 crosses) mutliparous beef cows (n=32), grazing on two herbage allowances of native pastures (2.5 v. 4 kg dry matter/kg BW; LO v. HI) and their associations with cow's productive performance (calf birth weight, milk production and commencement of luteal activity). Cow BW, body condition score (BCS) and blood samples were collected monthly, starting at -165 days relative to calving (days), and every 2 weeks after calving until +60 days of lactation. Liver biopsies were collected at -165, -75, -45, -15±10, and +15 and +60±3 days. Metabolic, endocrine and hepatic gene expression profiles, and calf birth weight, milk yield and postpartum commencement of luteal activity were evaluated. Overall, the most pronounced changes in metabolic, endocrine and hepatic gene expression occurred during winter gestation (-165 to -45 days), when all cows experienced the onset of a negative energy balance (decreased BCS, glucose and insulin, and increased non-esterified fatty acid concentrations, Pcows. However, serum IGF-I concentrations and hepatic growth hormone receptor (GHR) and IGF1 mRNA decreased (Pcows. Although IGF-I concentrations decreased (Pcows, the typical molecular mechanism that control the uncoupling of the growth hormone-IGF1 axis during the transition period of the dairy cattle (reduced hepatic GHR1A and IGF-I mRNA) was not observed in this study. The hepatic mRNA expression of key transcripts involved in gluconeogenesis and fatty-acid oxidation were upregulated (Pcow groups). Particularly, acyl-CoA oxidase-1 mRNA was greater for CR than for PU cows during winter gestation (-75 and -45 days), and fibroblast growth factor-21 mRNA was downregulated (Pcows during the transition (-15 v. 15 days) and lactation period (+15 to +60 days, Pmilk yield and shorter commencement of luteal

  10. Partial restoration of dietary fat induced metabolic adaptations to training by 7 days of carbohydrate diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Watt, Peter W; Richter, Erik A;

    2002-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a shift to carbohydrate diet after prolonged adaptation to fat diet would lead to decreased glucose uptake and impaired muscle glycogen breakdown during exercise compared with ingestion of a carbohydrate diet all along. We studied 13 untrained men; 7 consumed a high......-fat (Fat-CHO; 62% fat, 21% carbohydrate) and 6 a high-carbohydrate diet (CHO; 20% fat, 65% carbohydrate) for 7 wk, and thereafter both groups consumed the carbohydrate diet for an eighth week. Training was performed throughout. After 8 wk, during 60 min of exercise (71 +/- 1% pretraining maximal oxygen...... +/- 59 vs. 688 +/- 43 mmol/kg dry wt) in Fat-CHO than in CHO. In conclusion, shift to carbohydrate diet after prolonged adaptation to fat diet and training causes increased resting muscle glycogen levels but impaired leg glucose uptake and similar muscle glycogen breakdown, despite higher resting levels...

  11. Effective long term adaptation and metabolic state regulation of ski-racers

    OpenAIRE

    Bakhareva A.S.; Isaev A.P.; Erlikh V.V.; Aminov A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: to scientifically substantiate effective mechanisms of organism’s bio-chemical adaptation of ski-racers in competition period with the help of lipid peroxidation indicators, oxidative modification of proteins and activity of hypothalamus pituitary adrenocortical system. Material: in the research 14 sportsmen of 18-25 years’ age (combined team of university) with different level of sportsmanship participated. Assessment of free radical oxidation, anti-oxidant system, cortisol level wa...

  12. Metabolic and proteomic profiling of diapause in the aphid parasitoid Praon volucre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Colinet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diapause, a condition of developmental arrest and metabolic depression exhibited by a wide range of animals is accompanied by complex physiological and biochemical changes that generally enhance environmental stress tolerance and synchronize reproduction. Even though some aspects of diapause have been well characterized, very little is known about the full range of molecular and biochemical modifications underlying diapause in non-model organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we focused on the parasitic wasp, Praon volucre that exhibits a pupal diapause in response to environmental signals. System-wide metabolic changes occurring during diapause were investigated using GC-MS metabolic fingerprinting. Moreover, proteomic changes were studied in diapausing versus non-diapausing phenotypes using a combination of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry. We found a reduction of Krebs cycle intermediates which most likely resulted from the metabolic depression. Glycolysis was galvanized, probably to favor polyols biosynthesis. Diapausing parasitoids accumulated high levels of cryoprotective polyols, especially sorbitol. A large set of proteins were modulated during diapause and these were involved in various functions such as remodeling of cytoskeleton and cuticle, stress tolerance, protein turnover, lipid metabolism and various metabolic enzymes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results presented here provide some first clues about the molecular and biochemical events that characterize the diapause syndrome in aphid parasitoids. These data are useful for probing potential commonality of parasitoids diapause with other taxa and they will help creating a general understanding of diapause underpinnings and a background for future interpretations.

  13. Metabolic profiling provides a system understanding of hypothyroidism in rats and its application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism is a chronic condition of endocrine disorder and its precise molecular mechanism remains obscure. In spite of certain efficacy of thyroid hormone replacement therapy in treating hypothyroidism, it often results in other side effects because of its over-replacement, so it is still urgent to discover new modes of treatment for hypothyroidism. Sini decoction (SND is a well-known formula of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and is considered as efficient agents against hypothyroidism. However, its holistic effect assessment and mechanistic understanding are still lacking due to its complex components. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A urinary metabonomic method based on ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was employed to explore global metabolic characters of hypothyroidism. Three typical hypothyroidism models (methimazole-, propylthiouracil- and thyroidectomy-induced hypothyroidism were applied to elucidate the molecular mechanism of hypothyroidism. 17, 21, 19 potential biomarkers were identified with these three hypothyroidism models respectively, primarily involved in energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, sphingolipid metabolism and purine metabolism. In order to avert the interference of drug interaction between the antithyroid drugs and SND, the thyroidectomy-induced hypothyroidism model was further used to systematically assess the therapeutic efficacy of SND on hypothyroidism. A time-dependent recovery tendency was observed in SND-treated group from the beginning of model to the end of treatment, suggesting that SND exerted a recovery effect on hypothyroidism in a time-dependent manner through partially regulating the perturbed metabolic pathways. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that the metabonomic approach is instrumental to understand the pathophysiology of hypothyroidism and offers a valuable tool for systematically studying the therapeutic effects of SND on

  14. Metabolic effects of influenza virus infection in cultured animal cells: Intra- and extracellular metabolite profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genzel Yvonne

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many details in cell culture-derived influenza vaccine production are still poorly understood and approaches for process optimization mainly remain empirical. More insights on mammalian cell metabolism after a viral infection could give hints on limitations and cell-specific virus production capacities. A detailed metabolic characterization of an influenza infected adherent cell line (MDCK was carried out based on extracellular and intracellular measurements of metabolite concentrations. Results For most metabolites the comparison of infected (human influenza A/PR/8/34 and mock-infected cells showed a very similar behavior during the first 10-12 h post infection (pi. Significant changes were observed after about 12 h pi: (1 uptake of extracellular glucose and lactate release into the cell culture supernatant were clearly increased in infected cells compared to mock-infected cells. At the same time (12 h pi intracellular metabolite concentrations of the upper part of glycolysis were significantly increased. On the contrary, nucleoside triphosphate concentrations of infected cells dropped clearly after 12 h pi. This behaviour was observed for two different human influenza A/PR/8/34 strains at slightly different time points. Conclusions Comparing these results with literature values for the time course of infection with same influenza strains, underline the hypothesis that influenza infection only represents a minor additional burden for host cell metabolism. The metabolic changes observed after12 h pi are most probably caused by the onset of apoptosis in infected cells. The comparison of experimental data from two variants of the A/PR/8/34 virus strain (RKI versus NIBSC with different productivities and infection dynamics showed comparable metabolic patterns but a clearly different timely behavior. Thus, infection dynamics are obviously reflected in host cell metabolism.

  15. Effect of silver nanoparticles on growth performance, metabolism and microbial profile of broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pineda, Lane Manalili; Chwalibog, André; Sawosz, Ewa;

    2012-01-01

    and intestinal content were collected to evaluate the effects of AgNano on plasma concentration of immunoglobulins and the intestinal microflora, respectively. The provision of water solutions containing different concentrations of AgNano had no effect on postnatal growth performance and the energy metabolism...... (IgG) in the blood plasma of broilers supplemented with AgNano decreased at day 36 (p = 0.012). The results demonstrated that AgNano affects N utilisation and plasma IgG concentration; however, it does not influence the microbial populations in the digestive tract, the energy metabolism and growth...

  16. Tissue-Specific Metabolic Profile Study of Moringa oleifera L. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmud, Iqbal; Chowdhury, Kamal; Boroujerdi, Arezue

    2014-01-01

    Moringa oleifera, an important multipurpose crop, is rich in various phytochemicals: flavonoids, antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and carotenes. The purpose of this study was to profile the groups of metabolites in leaf and stem tissues of M. oleifera. Various sugars, amino acids, and organic acid derivatives were found in all of the M. oleifera tissues with different profiles/peak intensities depending on the tissue. 1D proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was applied for collecting metab...

  17. Disruption of the Acyl-CoA binding protein gene delays hepatic adaptation to metabolic changes at weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neess, Ditte; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Bloksgaard, Maria;

    -CoA esters between different enzymatic systems. However, little is known about the in vivo function in mammalian cells. We have generated mice with targeted disruption of ACBP (ACBP-/-). These mice are viable and fertile and develop normally. However, around weaning the ACBP-/- mice show decreased growth......) family, around the weaning period. As a result, the hepatic de novo cholesterogenesis is significantly decreased at weaning. The delayed induction of SREBP target genes around weaning is caused by a compromised processing and decreased expression of SREBP precursors leading to reduced binding of SREBP...... to target sites in chromatin. In conclusion, lack of ACBP causes elevated levels of plasma and hepatic lipids during weaning, which interferes with the normal metabolic adaptation to weaning by delaying induction of the lipogenic gene programs in the liver....

  18. Association between muscle mass and adipo-metabolic profile: a cross-sectional study in older subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perna S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Simone Perna,1,* Davide Guido,2,* Mario Grassi,2 Mariangela Rondanelli1 1Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, School of Medicine, Endocrinology and Nutrition Unit, University of Pavia, Azienda di Servizi alla Persona di Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 2Medical and Genomic Statistics Unit, Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Sarcopenia, the decrease in muscle mass and function, may lead to various negative health outcomes in elderly. The association among sarcopenia with adiposity and metabolic markers has rarely been studied in the elderly population, with controversial results. The aim of this study is to evaluate this relationship in older subjects.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 290 elderly patients, focusing on the possible association between muscle mass loss, assessed by relative skeletal muscle mass (RSMM, and an adipo-metabolic profile (AMP defined by adiposity and metabolic biochemical markers. Measurements of body composition were assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Biochemical parameters, such as albumin, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, and homocysteine and its related markers (folate and vitamin B12 were measured. Using canonical correlation analysis and structural equation modeling, an individual score of AMP was created and correlated with RSMM.Results: The AMP–RSMM correlation was equal to +0.642 (95% confidence interval, +0.512 to +0.773; P<0.001. Hence, a negative association between sarcopenia severity and adiposity/metabolic biochemical markers was highlighted.Conclusion: This study contained a novel way to examine the relationship between the variables of interest based on a composite index of adiposity and metabolic conditions. Results shed light on the orientation and magnitude of

  19. Effects of α-Tocopherol on Oxidative Status and Metabolic Profile in Overweight Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Méndez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive research, the effects of α-tocopherol supplementation remain controversial. Few studies have been focused on obese and overweight people. We examined the effects of α-tocopherol (AT on the oxidative status and metabolic profile in overweight women. Sixteen overweight women between the ages of 40-60 years old, received AT, 800 IU/day during 12 weeks, followed by a 6-week washout period. Blood samples were taken at the beginning and then every 6 weeks until the end of the study. AT, retinol, malondialdehyde (MDA, total antioxidant status (TAS, selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPx and CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD were quantified to evaluate the oxidative stress. The metabolic profile was estimated by measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c in erythrocytes and glucose, phosphate, magnesium, lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in serum. Under AT administration HbA1c, serum- MDA levels and erythrocyte GPx activity were markedly reduced. TAS, AT and Mg2+ concentrations in serum and SOD activity in erythrocytes were higher after AT treatment. Body weight; glucose, lipid and retinol concentrations, or blood cells count were unchanged. Lipid peroxidation was considerably reduced in AT treated women and also improved serum antioxidant status was observed, but the imbalanced response between erythrocyte SOD and GPx activities could affect normal response to oxidative stress.

  20. Metabolic profiling reveals distinct variations linked to nicotine consumption in humans--first results from the KORA study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wang-Sattler

    Full Text Available Exposure to nicotine during smoking causes a multitude of metabolic changes that are poorly understood. We quantified and analyzed 198 metabolites in 283 serum samples from the human cohort KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg. Multivariate analysis of metabolic profiles revealed that the group of smokers could be clearly differentiated from the groups of former smokers and non-smokers. Moreover, 23 lipid metabolites were identified as nicotine-dependent biomarkers. The levels of these biomarkers are all up-regulated in smokers compared to those in former and non-smokers, except for three acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines (e.g. plasmalogens. Consistently significant results were further found for the ratios of plasmalogens to diacyl-phosphatidylcolines, which are reduced in smokers and regulated by the enzyme alkylglycerone phosphate synthase (alkyl-DHAP in both ether lipid and glycerophospholipid pathways. Notably, our metabolite profiles are consistent with the strong down-regulation of the gene for alkyl-DHAP (AGPS in smokers that has been found in a study analyzing gene expression in human lung tissues. Our data suggest that smoking is associated with plasmalogen-deficiency disorders, caused by reduced or lack of activity of the peroxisomal enzyme alkyl-DHAP. Our findings provide new insight into the pathophysiology of smoking addiction. Activation of the enzyme alkyl-DHAP by small molecules may provide novel routes for therapy.

  1. Gut microbiota can transfer fiber characteristics and lipid metabolic profiles of skeletal muscle from pigs to germ-free mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Honglin; Diao, Hui; Xiao, Yi; Li, Wenxia; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping; Mao, Xiangbing; Luo, Yuheng; Zeng, Benhua; Wei, Hong; Chen, Daiwen

    2016-01-01

    Obesity causes changes in microbiota composition, and an altered gut microbiota can transfer obesity-associated phenotypes from donors to recipients. Obese Rongchang pigs (RP) exhibited distinct fiber characteristics and lipid metabolic profiles in their muscle compared with lean Yorkshire pigs (YP). However, whether RP have a different gut microbiota than YP and whether there is a relationship between the microbiota and muscle properties are poorly understood. The present study was conducted to test whether the muscle properties can be transferred from pigs to germ-free (GF) mice. High-throughput pyrosequencing confirms the presence of distinct core microbiota between pig breeds, with alterations in taxonomic distribution and modulations in β diversity. RP displayed a significant higher Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and apparent genera differences compared with YP. Transplanting the porcine microbiota into GF mice replicated the phenotypes of the donors. RP and their GF mouse recipients exhibited a higher body fat mass, a higher slow-contracting fiber proportion, a decreased fiber size and fast IIb fiber percentage, and enhanced lipogenesis in the gastrocnemius muscle. Furthermore, the gut microbiota composition of colonized mice shared high similarity with their donor pigs. Taken together, the gut microbiota of obese pigs intrinsically influences skeletal muscle development and the lipid metabolic profiles. PMID:27545196

  2. Changes in C-N metabolism under elevated CO2 and temperature in Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.): an adaptation strategy under climate change scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Chandra Shekhar; Misra, Virendra

    2014-11-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the possible role of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism in adaptation of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.) growing under ambient (370 ± 15 ppm) and elevated CO2 (700 ± 15 ppm), and jointly in elevated CO2 and temperature (30/22 °C for day/night). The key enzymes responsible for C-N metabolism were studied in different samples of Brassica juncea L. collected from ambient (AMB), elevated (ELE) and ELExT growth conditions. Total percent amount of C and N in leaves were particularly estimated to establish a clear understanding of aforesaid metabolism in plant adaptation. Furthermore, key morphological and physiological parameters such as plant height, leaf area index, dry biomass, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration, total protein and chlorophyll contents were also studied in relation to C/N metabolism. The results indicated that the C-metabolizing enzymes, such as (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, malate dehydrogenase, NAD-malic enzyme, NADP-malic enzyme and citrate synthase) and the N-metabolizing enzymes, such as (aspartate amino transferase, glutamine synthetase, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase) showed significantly (P ELExT > AMB growth conditions. This is also evident by significant (P adaptation in Brassica juncea L. against elevated CO2 and temperature prevailing in climate change scenarios.

  3. Educational Multimedia Profiling Recommendations for Device-Aware Adaptive Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Arghir-Nicolae; Ghergulescu, Ioana; Muntean, Cristina Hava

    2014-01-01

    Mobile learning is seeing a fast adoption with the increasing availability and affordability of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. As the creation and consumption of educational multimedia content on mobile devices is also increasing fast, educators and mobile learning providers are faced with the challenge to adapt multimedia type…

  4. Inflammatory Cytokine Profile Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Ferreira-Hermosillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-10, TNF, IL-8, resistin, and adiponectin in type 1 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and to determine the cut-off point of the estimated glucose disposal rate that accurately differentiated these groups. Design. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of all patients in our type 1 diabetes clinic from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were considered to have metabolic syndrome when they fulfilled the joint statement criteria and were evaluated for clinical, biochemical, and immunological features. Methods. We determined serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF with flow cytometry and adiponectin and resistin concentrations with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. We also compared estimated glucose disposal rate between groups. Results. We tested 140 patients. Forty-four percent fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria (n=61, 54% had central obesity, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia, 29% had hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and 19% had hypertension. We observed that resistin concentrations were higher in patients with MS. Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of MS in Mexican patients with T1D. The increased level of resistin may be related to the increased fat mass and could be involved in the development of insulin resistance.

  5. Inflammatory Cytokine Profile Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario; Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Vargas, Guadalupe; Gonzalez, Baldomero; Isibasi, Armando; Archundia-Riveros, Irma; Mendoza, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-10, TNF, IL-8, resistin, and adiponectin in type 1 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and to determine the cut-off point of the estimated glucose disposal rate that accurately differentiated these groups. Design. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of all patients in our type 1 diabetes clinic from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were considered to have metabolic syndrome when they fulfilled the joint statement criteria and were evaluated for clinical, biochemical, and immunological features. Methods. We determined serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF with flow cytometry and adiponectin and resistin concentrations with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. We also compared estimated glucose disposal rate between groups. Results. We tested 140 patients. Forty-four percent fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria (n = 61), 54% had central obesity, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia, 29% had hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and 19% had hypertension. We observed that resistin concentrations were higher in patients with MS. Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of MS in Mexican patients with T1D. The increased level of resistin may be related to the increased fat mass and could be involved in the development of insulin resistance. PMID:26273680

  6. Metabolic profile of long-distance migratory flight and stopover in a shorebird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landys, MM; Piersma, T; Guglielmo, CG; Jukema, J; Ramenofsky, M; Wingfield, JC; Guglielmo, Christopher G.; Wingfield, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Migrating birds often complete long non-stop flights during which body energy stores exclusively support energetic demands. The metabolic correlates of such long-distance travel in free-living migrants are as yet poorly studied. Bar-tailed godwits, Limosa lapponica taymyrensis, undertake a 4500 km f

  7. The Mediator subunit MDT-15 confers metabolic adaptation to ingested material.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Taubert

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase II (Pol(II dependent gene expression requires accessory factors termed transcriptional coregulators. One coregulator that universally contributes to Pol(II-dependent transcription is the Mediator, a multisubunit complex that is targeted by many transcriptional regulatory factors. For example, the Caenorhabditis elegans Mediator subunit MDT-15 confers the regulatory actions of the sterol response element binding protein SBP-1 and the nuclear hormone receptor NHR-49 on fatty acid metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that MDT-15 displays a broader spectrum of activities, and that it integrates metabolic responses to materials ingested by C. elegans. Depletion of MDT-15 protein or mutation of the mdt-15 gene abrogated induction of specific detoxification genes in response to certain xenobiotics or heavy metals, rendering these animals hypersensitive to toxin exposure. Intriguingly, MDT-15 appeared to selectively affect stress responses related to ingestion, as MDT-15 functional defects did not abrogate other stress responses, e.g., thermotolerance. Together with our previous finding that MDT-15:NHR-49 regulatory complexes coordinate a sector of the fasting response, we propose a model whereby MDT-15 integrates several transcriptional regulatory pathways to monitor both the availability and quality of ingested materials, including nutrients and xenobiotic compounds.

  8. Effects of sodium benzoate, a widely used food preservative, on glucose homeostasis and metabolic profiles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennerz, Belinda S; Vafai, Scott B; Delaney, Nigel F; Clish, Clary B; Deik, Amy A; Pierce, Kerry A; Ludwig, David S; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2015-01-01

    Sodium benzoate is a widely used preservative found in many foods and soft drinks. It is metabolized within mitochondria to produce hippurate, which is then cleared by the kidneys. We previously reported that ingestion of sodium benzoate at the generally regarded as safe (GRAS) dose leads to a robust excursion in the plasma hippurate level [1]. Since previous reports demonstrated adverse effects of benzoate and hippurate on glucose homeostasis in cells and in animal models, we hypothesized that benzoate might represent a widespread and underappreciated diabetogenic dietary exposure in humans. Here, we evaluated whether acute exposure to GRAS levels of sodium benzoate alters insulin and glucose homeostasis through a randomized, controlled, cross-over study of 14 overweight subjects. Serial blood samples were collected following an oral glucose challenge, in the presence or absence of sodium benzoate. Outcome measurements included glucose, insulin, glucagon, as well as temporal mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiles. We did not find a statistically significant effect of an acute oral exposure to sodium benzoate on glucose homeostasis. Of the 146 metabolites targeted, four changed significantly in response to benzoate, including the expected rise in benzoate and hippurate. In addition, anthranilic acid, a tryptophan metabolite, exhibited a robust rise, while acetylglycine dropped. Although our study shows that GRAS doses of benzoate do not have an acute, adverse effect on glucose homeostasis, future studies will be necessary to explore the metabolic impact of chronic benzoate exposure.

  9. Glutamine supplementation alleviates vasculopathy and corrects metabolic profile in an in vivo model of endothelial cell dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Addabbo

    Full Text Available Endothelial Cell Dysfunction (ECD is a recognized harbinger of a host of chronic cardiovascular diseases. Using a mouse model of ECD triggered by treatment with L-Nω-methylarginine (L-NMMA, we previously demonstrated that renal microvasculature displays a perturbed protein profile, including diminished expression of two key enzymes of the Krebs cycle associated with a Warburg-type suppression of mitochondrial metabolism. We hypothesized that supplementation with L-glutamine (GLN, that can enter the Krebs cycle downstream this enzymatic bottleneck, would normalize vascular function and alleviate mitochondrial dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, mice with chronic L-NMMA-induced ECD were co-treated with GLN at different concentrations for 2 months. Results confirmed that L-NMMA led to a defect in acetylcholine-induced relaxation of aortic rings that was dose-dependently prevented by GLN. In caveolin-1 transgenic mice characterized by eNOS inactivation, L-NMMA further impaired vasorelaxation which was partially rescued by GLN co-treatment. Pro-inflammatory profile induced by L-NMMA was blunted in mice co-treated with GLN. Using an LC/MS platform for metabolite profiling, we sought to identify metabolic perturbations associated with ECD and offset by GLN supplementation. 3453 plasma molecules could be detected with 100% frequency in mice from at least one treatment group. Among these, 37 were found to be differentially expressed in a 4-way comparison of control vs. LNMMA both with and without GLN. One of such molecules, hippuric acid, an "uremic toxin" was found to be elevated in our non-uremic mice receiving L-NMMA, but normalized by treatment with GLN. Ex vivo analysis of hippuric acid effects on vasomotion demonstrated that it significantly reduced acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation of vascular rings. In conclusion, functional and metabolic profiling of animals with early ECD revealed macrovasculopathy and that supplementation GLN is capable

  10. Association between polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes and urinary arsenic methylation profiles in girls and boys chronically exposed to arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio-Vega, Rogelio; González-Cortes, Tania; Olivas-Calderón, Edgar; Clark Lantz, R; Jay Gandolfi, A; Michel-Ramirez, Gladis

    2016-08-01

    Disease manifestations or susceptibilities often differ among individuals exposed to the same concentrations of arsenic (As). These differences have been associated with several factors including As metabolism, sex, age, genetic variants, nutritional status, smoking, and others. This study evaluated the associations between four As metabolism-related gene polymorphisms/null genotypes with urinary As methylation profiles in girls and boys chronically exposed to As. In a total of 332 children aged 6-12 years, the frequency of AS3MT, GSTO1, GSTT1, and GSTM1 polymorphisms/null genotypes and As urinary metabolites were measured. The results revealed that total As and monomethyl metabolites of As (MMA) levels were higher in boys than in girls. No differences in the frequency of the evaluated polymorphisms were found between girls and boys. In AS3MT-Met287Thr carriers, %MMA levels were higher and second methylation levels (defined as dimethylarsinic acid divided by MMA) were lower. In children with the GSTM1 null genotype, second methylation levels were higher. In boys, a positive association between the AS3MT-Met287Thr polymorphism with %MMA and between the GSTO1-Glu155del and As(v) was found; whereas, a negative relationship was identified between AS3MT-Met287Thr and second methylation profiles. In girls, a positive association was found between the GSTO1-Ala140Asp polymorphism with second methylation levels. In conclusion, our data indicate that gender, high As exposure levels, and polymorphisms in the evaluated genes negatively influenced As metabolism. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:516-525, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Transcript profiling of Paoenia ostii during artificial chilling induced dormancy release identifies activation of GA pathway and carbohydrate metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shupeng Gai

    Full Text Available Endo-dormant flower buds must pass through a period of chilling to reinitiate growth and subsequent flowering, which is a major obstacle to the forcing culture of tree peony in winter. Customized cDNA microarray (8×15 K element was used to investigate gene expression profiling in tree peony 'Feng Dan Bai' buds during 24 d chilling treatment at 0-4°C. According to the morphological changes after the whole plants were transferred to green house, endo-dormancy was released after 18 d chilling treatment, and prolonged chilling treatment increased bud break rate. Pearson correlation hierarchical clustering of sample groups was highly consistent with the dormancy transitions revealed by morphological changes. Totally 3,174 significantly differentially-expressed genes (P<0.05 were observed through endo-dormancy release process, of which the number of up-regulated (1,611 and that of down-regulated (1,563 was almost the same. Functional annotation of differentially-expressed genes revealed that cellular process, metabolic process, response to stimulus, regulation of biological process and development process were well-represented. Hierarchical clustering indicated that activation of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism (Glycolysis, Citrate cycle and Pentose phosphate pathway, energy metabolism and cell growth. Based on the results of GO analysis, totally 51 probes presented in the microarray were associated with GA response and GA signaling pathway, and 22 of them were differently expressed. The expression profiles also revealed that the genes of GA biosynthesis, signaling and response involved in endo-dormancy release. We hypothesized that activation of GA pathway played a central role in the regulation of dormancy release in tree peony.

  12. Metabolomic and Gene Expression Profiles Exhibit Modular Genetic and Dietary Structure Linking Metabolic Syndrome Phenotypes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephanie; Dew-Budd, Kelly; Davis, Kristen; Anderson, Julie; Bishop, Ruth; Freeman, Kenda; Davis, Dana; Bray, Katherine; Perkins, Lauren; Hubickey, Joana; Reed, Laura K

    2015-12-01

    Genetic and environmental factors influence complex disease in humans, such as metabolic syndrome, and Drosophila melanogaster serves as an excellent model in which to test these factors experimentally. Here we explore the modularity of endophenotypes with an in-depth reanalysis of a previous study by Reed et al. (2014), where we raised 20 wild-type genetic lines of Drosophila larvae on four diets and measured gross phenotypes of body weight, total sugar, and total triglycerides, as well as the endophenotypes of metabolomic and whole-genome expression profiles. We then perform new gene expression experiments to test for conservation of phenotype-expression correlations across different diets and populations. We find that transcript levels correlated with gross phenotypes were enriched for puparial adhesion, metamorphosis, and central energy metabolism functions. The specific metabolites L-DOPA and N-arachidonoyl dopamine make physiological links between the gross phenotypes across diets, whereas leucine and isoleucine thus exhibit genotype-by-diet interactions. Between diets, we find low conservation of the endophenotypes that correlate with the gross phenotypes. Through the follow-up expression study, we found that transcript-trait correlations are well conserved across populations raised on a familiar diet, but on a novel diet, the transcript-trait correlations are no longer conserved. Thus, physiological canalization of metabolic phenotypes breaks down in a novel environment exposing cryptic variation. We cannot predict the physiological basis of disease in a perturbing environment from profiles observed in the ancestral environment. This study demonstrates that variation for disease traits within a population is acquired through a multitude of physiological mechanisms, some of which transcend genetic and environmental influences, and others that are specific to an individual's genetic and environmental context. PMID:26530416

  13. The adaptive metabolic response involves specific protein glutathionylation during the filamentation process in the pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergondey, R; Garcia, C; Serre, V; Camadro, J M; Auchère, F

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunist pathogen responsible for a large spectrum of infections, from superficial mycosis to the systemic disease candidiasis. Its ability to adopt various morphological forms, such as unicellular yeasts, filamentous pseudohyphae and hyphae, contributes to its ability to survive within the host. It has been suggested that the antioxidant glutathione is involved in the filamentation process. We investigated S-glutathionylation, the reversible binding of glutathione to proteins, and the functional consequences on C. albicans metabolic remodeling during the yeast-to-hyphae transition. Our work provided evidence for the specific glutathionylation of mitochondrial proteins involved in bioenergetics pathways in filamentous forms and a regulation of the main enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, isocitrate lyase, by glutathionylation. Isocitrate lyase inactivation in the hyphal forms was reversed by glutaredoxin treatment, in agreement with a glutathionylation process, which was confirmed by proteomic data showing the binding of one glutathione molecule to the enzyme (data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003685). We also assessed the effect of alternative carbon sources on glutathione levels and isocitrate lyase activity. Changes in nutrient availability led to morphological flexibility and were related to perturbations in glutathione levels and isocitrate lyase activity, confirming the key role of the maintenance of intracellular redox status in the adaptive metabolic strategy of the pathogen. PMID:27083931

  14. A comparative study of the metabolic profile, insulin sensitivity and inflammatory response between organically and conventionally managed dairy cattle during the periparturient period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, A; Hernández, J; Benedito, J L; Castillo, C

    2014-09-01

    The number of organically managed cattle (OMC) within the European Union has increased tremendously in the last decade. However, there are still some concerns about animals under this farming system meeting their dietary requirements for milk production. The aim of this study was to compare the metabolic adaptations to the onset of lactation in three different herds, one conventional and two organic ones. Twenty-two conventionally managed cattle (CMC) and 20 from each organic farm were sampled throughout the periparturient period. These samplings were grouped into four different stages: (i) far-off dry, (ii) close-up dry, (iii) fresh and (iv) peak of lactation and compared among them. In addition, the results of periparturient animals were also compared within each management type with a control group (animals between the 4th and 5th months of pregnancy). Metabolic profiles were used to assess the health status of the herds, along with the quantification of the acute phase proteins haptoglobin and serum amyloid A, insulin and the calculation of different surrogate indices of insulin sensitivity. Generalised linear mixed models with repeated measurements were used to study the effect of the stage, management type or their interaction on the serum variables studied. The prevalence of subclinical ketosis was higher in OMC, although they showed better insulin sensitivity, a lower degree of inflammation and less liver injury, without a higher risk of macromineral deficiencies. Therefore, attention should be paid on organic farms to the nutritional management of cows around the time of calving in order to prevent the harmful consequences of excessive negative energy balance. Moreover, it must be taken into account that most of the common practices used to treat this condition in CMC are not allowed on a systematic basis in OMC. PMID:24916777

  15. A comparative study of the metabolic profile, insulin sensitivity and inflammatory response between organically and conventionally managed dairy cattle during the periparturient period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, A; Hernández, J; Benedito, J L; Castillo, C

    2014-09-01

    The number of organically managed cattle (OMC) within the European Union has increased tremendously in the last decade. However, there are still some concerns about animals under this farming system meeting their dietary requirements for milk production. The aim of this study was to compare the metabolic adaptations to the onset of lactation in three different herds, one conventional and two organic ones. Twenty-two conventionally managed cattle (CMC) and 20 from each organic farm were sampled throughout the periparturient period. These samplings were grouped into four different stages: (i) far-off dry, (ii) close-up dry, (iii) fresh and (iv) peak of lactation and compared among them. In addition, the results of periparturient animals were also compared within each management type with a control group (animals between the 4th and 5th months of pregnancy). Metabolic profiles were used to assess the health status of the herds, along with the quantification of the acute phase proteins haptoglobin and serum amyloid A, insulin and the calculation of different surrogate indices of insulin sensitivity. Generalised linear mixed models with repeated measurements were used to study the effect of the stage, management type or their interaction on the serum variables studied. The prevalence of subclinical ketosis was higher in OMC, although they showed better insulin sensitivity, a lower degree of inflammation and less liver injury, without a higher risk of macromineral deficiencies. Therefore, attention should be paid on organic farms to the nutritional management of cows around the time of calving in order to prevent the harmful consequences of excessive negative energy balance. Moreover, it must be taken into account that most of the common practices used to treat this condition in CMC are not allowed on a systematic basis in OMC.

  16. Coordinate changes in histone modifications, mRNA levels, and metabolite profiles in clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells accompany functional adaptations to lipotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmgren, Siri; Spégel, Peter; Danielsson, Anders P H; Nagorny, Cecilia L; Andersson, Lotta E; Nitert, Marloes Dekker; Ridderstråle, Martin; Mulder, Hindrik; Ling, Charlotte

    2013-04-26

    Lipotoxicity is a presumed pathogenetic process whereby elevated circulating and stored lipids in type 2 diabetes cause pancreatic β-cell failure. To resolve the underlying molecular mechanisms, we exposed clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells to palmitate for 48 h. We observed elevated basal insulin secretion but impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in palmitate-exposed cells. Glucose utilization was unchanged, palmitate oxidation was increased, and oxygen consumption was impaired. Halting exposure of the clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells to palmitate largely recovered all of the lipid-induced functional changes. Metabolite profiling revealed profound but reversible increases in cellular lipids. Glucose-induced increases in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates were attenuated by exposure to palmitate. Analysis of gene expression by microarray showed increased expression of 982 genes and decreased expression of 1032 genes after exposure to palmitate. Increases were seen in pathways for steroid biosynthesis, cell cycle, fatty acid metabolism, DNA replication, and biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids; decreases occurred in the aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis pathway. The activity of histone-modifying enzymes and histone modifications of differentially expressed genes were reversibly altered upon exposure to palmitate. Thus, Insig1, Lss, Peci, Idi1, Hmgcs1, and Casr were subject to epigenetic regulation. Our analyses demonstrate that coordinate changes in histone modifications, mRNA levels, and metabolite profiles accompanied functional adaptations of clonal β-cells to lipotoxicity. It is highly likely that these changes are pathogenetic, accounting for loss of glucose responsiveness and perturbed insulin secretion. PMID:23476019

  17. Coordinate Changes in Histone Modifications, mRNA Levels, and Metabolite Profiles in Clonal INS-1 832/13 β-Cells Accompany Functional Adaptations to Lipotoxicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmgren, Siri; Spégel, Peter; Danielsson, Anders P.H.; Nagorny, Cecilia L.; Andersson, Lotta E.; Nitert, Marloes Dekker; Ridderstråle, Martin; Mulder, Hindrik; Ling, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Lipotoxicity is a presumed pathogenetic process whereby elevated circulating and stored lipids in type 2 diabetes cause pancreatic β-cell failure. To resolve the underlying molecular mechanisms, we exposed clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells to palmitate for 48 h. We observed elevated basal insulin secretion but impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in palmitate-exposed cells. Glucose utilization was unchanged, palmitate oxidation was increased, and oxygen consumption was impaired. Halting exposure of the clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells to palmitate largely recovered all of the lipid-induced functional changes. Metabolite profiling revealed profound but reversible increases in cellular lipids. Glucose-induced increases in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates were attenuated by exposure to palmitate. Analysis of gene expression by microarray showed increased expression of 982 genes and decreased expression of 1032 genes after exposure to palmitate. Increases were seen in pathways for steroid biosynthesis, cell cycle, fatty acid metabolism, DNA replication, and biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids; decreases occurred in the aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis pathway. The activity of histone-modifying enzymes and histone modifications of differentially expressed genes were reversibly altered upon exposure to palmitate. Thus, Insig1, Lss, Peci, Idi1, Hmgcs1, and Casr were subject to epigenetic regulation. Our analyses demonstrate that coordinate changes in histone modifications, mRNA levels, and metabolite profiles accompanied functional adaptations of clonal β-cells to lipotoxicity. It is highly likely that these changes are pathogenetic, accounting for loss of glucose responsiveness and perturbed insulin secretion. PMID:23476019

  18. Profiling and Metabolism of Sterols in the Weaver Ant Genus Oecophylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidkjær, Nanna H; Jensen, Karl-Martin V; Gislum, René; Fomsgaard, Inge S

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential to insects because they are vital for many biochemical processes, nevertheless insects cannot synthesize sterols but have to acquire them through their diet. Studies of sterols in ants are sparse and here the sterols of the weaver ant genus Oecophylla are identified for the first time. The sterol profile and the dietary sterols provided to a laboratory Oecophylla longinoda colony were analyzed. Most sterols originated from the diet, except one, which was probably formed via dealkylation in the ants and two sterols of fungal origin, which likely originate from hitherto unidentified endosymbionts responsible for supplying these two compounds. The sterol profile of a wild Oecophylla smaragdina colony was also investigated. Remarkable qualitative similarities were established between the two species despite the differences in diet, species, and origin. This may reflect a common sterol need/aversion in the weaver ants. Additionally, each individual caste of both species displayed unique sterol profiles. PMID:26996016

  19. Profiling and Metabolism of Sterols in the Weaver Ant Genus Oecophylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidkjær, Nanna H; Jensen, Karl-Martin V; Gislum, René; Fomsgaard, Inge S

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential to insects because they are vital for many biochemical processes, nevertheless insects cannot synthesize sterols but have to acquire them through their diet. Studies of sterols in ants are sparse and here the sterols of the weaver ant genus Oecophylla are identified for the first time. The sterol profile and the dietary sterols provided to a laboratory Oecophylla longinoda colony were analyzed. Most sterols originated from the diet, except one, which was probably formed via dealkylation in the ants and two sterols of fungal origin, which likely originate from hitherto unidentified endosymbionts responsible for supplying these two compounds. The sterol profile of a wild Oecophylla smaragdina colony was also investigated. Remarkable qualitative similarities were established between the two species despite the differences in diet, species, and origin. This may reflect a common sterol need/aversion in the weaver ants. Additionally, each individual caste of both species displayed unique sterol profiles.

  20. Changes in chloroplast ultrastructure in some high-alpine plants: adaptation to metabolic demands and climate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütz, C; Engel, L

    2007-01-01

    The cytology of leaf cells from five different high-alpine plants was studied and compared with structures in chloroplasts from the typical high-alpine plant Ranunculus glacialis previously described as having frequent envelope plus stroma protrusions. The plants under investigation ranged from subalpine/alpine Geum montanum through alpine Geum reptans, Poa alpina var. vivipara, and Oxyria digyna to nival Cerastium uniflorum and R. glacialis. The general leaf structure (by light microscopy) and leaf mesophyll cell ultrastructure (by transmission electron microscopy [TEM]) did not show any specialized structures unique to these mountain species. However, chloroplast protrusion formation could be found in G. reptans and, to a greater extent, in O. digyna. The other species exhibited only a low percentage of such chloroplast structural changes. Occurrence of protrusions in samples of G. montanum and O. digyna growing in a mild climate at about 50 m above sea level was drastically reduced. Serial TEM sections of O. digyna cells showed that the protrusions can appear as rather broad and long appendices of plastids, often forming pocketlike structures where mitochondria and microbodies are in close vicinity to the plastid and to each other. It is suggested that some high-alpine plants may form such protrusions to facilitate fast exchange of molecules between cytoplasm and plastid as an adaptation to the short, often unfavorable vegetation period in the Alps, while other species may have developed different types of adaptation that are not expressed in ultrastructural changes of the plastids.

  1. Involvement of anti-oxidative enzymes, photosynthetic pigments and flavonoid metabolism in the adaptation of Reaumuria soongorica to salt stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuBing Liu; Bo Cao; MeiLing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Reaumuria soongorica is a short woody shrub widely found in semi-arid areas of China. It can survive severe environ-mental stress including high salinity in its natural habitat. Thus, we investigated the involvement of anti-oxidative enzymes, photosynthetic pigments and flavonoid metabolism in the adaptation of R. soongorica to saline environments. R. soon-gorica was treated with 0, 100, 200 and 400 mM NaCl solutions for 14 days. Soil salt content increased significantly by watering with high content of NaCl solution, and no variation between 8 and 14 days during treatment. The levels of pe-roxidation of lipid membranes (measured by malondialdehyde content) and the activities of three antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX)) increased under salt stress. Chlorophyll and carotenoid content decreased with increasing salt content. The ratio of Chl a/Chl b and carotenoid/Chl exhibited sig-nificant increase under 400 mM NaCl. However, total flavonoid and anthocyanin contents and key enzyme activities in the flavonoid pathway including phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL) and Chalcone isomerase (CHI) decreased under salt stress. These findings possibly suggest that R. soongorica has an adaptation protection mechanism against salt-induced oxidative damage by inducing the activity of antioxidant enzymes and maintaining a steady level of carotenoid/Chl.

  2. PGC-1alpha in exercise- and exercise training-induced metabolic adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm

    of gluconeogenesis, requires PGC-1α, while fasting-induced regulation of gluconeogenic capacity does not require PGC-1α. Study III demonstrates the time course of an exercise-induced uncoupling protein (UCP)1 mRNA response in WT mouse epididymal (eWAT) and inguinal (iWAT) white adipose tissue...... (PGC)-1α is required for exercise-, exercise training- and fasting-induced mRNA and protein responses, respectively, of metabolic, angiogenic and gluconeogenic proteins in liver and adipose tissue in mice, 3) PGC-1α is required for both exercise training and resveratrol mediated prevention of age...... in oxidative and/or angiogenic proteins in mouse liver and adipose tissue, while fasting-induced regulation of gluconeogenic capacity does not. In addition, resveratrol supplementation seems to have minor effects on the content of oxidative and angiogenic proteins in mouse skeletal muscle compared...

  3. Maternal Diabetes Leads to Adaptation in Embryonic Amino Acid Metabolism during Early Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürke, Jacqueline; Hirche, Frank; Thieme, René; Haucke, Elisa; Schindler, Maria; Stangl, Gabriele I; Fischer, Bernd; Navarrete Santos, Anne

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy an adequate amino acid supply is essential for embryo development and fetal growth. We have studied amino acid composition and branched chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism at day 6 p.c. in diabetic rabbits and blastocysts. In the plasma of diabetic rabbits the concentrations of 12 amino acids were altered in comparison to the controls. Notably, the concentrations of the BCAA leucine, isoleucine and valine were approximately three-fold higher in diabetic rabbits than in the control. In the cavity fluid of blastocysts from diabetic rabbits BCAA concentrations were twice as high as those from controls, indicating a close link between maternal diabetes and embryonic BCAA metabolism. The expression of BCAA oxidizing enzymes and BCAA transporter was analysed in maternal tissues and in blastocysts. The RNA amounts of three oxidizing enzymes, i.e. branched chain aminotransferase 2 (Bcat2), branched chain ketoacid dehydrogenase (Bckdha) and dehydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld), were markedly increased in maternal adipose tissue and decreased in liver and skeletal muscle of diabetic rabbits than in those of controls. Blastocysts of diabetic rabbits revealed a higher Bcat2 mRNA and protein abundance in comparison to control blastocysts. The expression of BCAA transporter LAT1 and LAT2 were unaltered in endometrium of diabetic and healthy rabbits, whereas LAT2 transcripts were increased in blastocysts of diabetic rabbits. In correlation to high embryonic BCAA levels the phosphorylation amount of the nutrient sensor mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was enhanced in blastocysts caused by maternal diabetes. These results demonstrate a direct impact of maternal diabetes on BCAA concentrations and degradation in mammalian blastocysts with influence on embryonic mTOR signalling. PMID:26020623

  4. Identifying the preferred subset of enzymatic profiles in nonlinear kinetic metabolic models via multiobjective global optimization and Pareto filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Carlos; Guillén-Gosálbez, Gonzalo; Sorribas, Albert; Jiménez, Laureano

    2012-01-01

    Optimization models in metabolic engineering and systems biology focus typically on optimizing a unique criterion, usually the synthesis rate of a metabolite of interest or the rate of growth. Connectivity and non-linear regulatory effects, however, make it necessary to consider multiple objectives in order to identify useful strategies that balance out different metabolic issues. This is a fundamental aspect, as optimization of maximum yield in a given condition may involve unrealistic values in other key processes. Due to the difficulties associated with detailed non-linear models, analysis using stoichiometric descriptions and linear optimization methods have become rather popular in systems biology. However, despite being useful, these approaches fail in capturing the intrinsic nonlinear nature of the underlying metabolic systems and the regulatory signals involved. Targeting more complex biological systems requires the application of global optimization methods to non-linear representations. In this work we address the multi-objective global optimization of metabolic networks that are described by a special class of models based on the power-law formalism: the generalized mass action (GMA) representation. Our goal is to develop global optimization methods capable of efficiently dealing with several biological criteria simultaneously. In order to overcome the numerical difficulties of dealing with multiple criteria in the optimization, we propose a heuristic approach based on the epsilon constraint method that reduces the computational burden of generating a set of Pareto optimal alternatives, each achieving a unique combination of objectives values. To facilitate the post-optimal analysis of these solutions and narrow down their number prior to being tested in the laboratory, we explore the use of Pareto filters that identify the preferred subset of enzymatic profiles. We demonstrate the usefulness of our approach by means of a case study that optimizes the

  5. Identifying the preferred subset of enzymatic profiles in nonlinear kinetic metabolic models via multiobjective global optimization and Pareto filters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Pozo

    Full Text Available Optimization models in metabolic engineering and systems biology focus typically on optimizing a unique criterion, usually the synthesis rate of a metabolite of interest or the rate of growth. Connectivity and non-linear regulatory effects, however, make it necessary to consider multiple objectives in order to identify useful strategies that balance out different metabolic issues. This is a fundamental aspect, as optimization of maximum yield in a given condition may involve unrealistic values in other key processes. Due to the difficulties associated with detailed non-linear models, analysis using stoichiometric descriptions and linear optimization methods have become rather popular in systems biology. However, despite being useful, these approaches fail in capturing the intrinsic nonlinear nature of the underlying metabolic systems and the regulatory signals involved. Targeting more complex biological systems requires the application of global optimization methods to non-linear representations. In this work we address the multi-objective global optimization of metabolic networks that are described by a special class of models based on the power-law formalism: the generalized mass action (GMA representation. Our goal is to develop global optimization methods capable of efficiently dealing with several biological criteria simultaneously. In order to overcome the numerical difficulties of dealing with multiple criteria in the optimization, we propose a heuristic approach based on the epsilon constraint method that reduces the computational burden of generating a set of Pareto optimal alternatives, each achieving a unique combination of objectives values. To facilitate the post-optimal analysis of these solutions and narrow down their number prior to being tested in the laboratory, we explore the use of Pareto filters that identify the preferred subset of enzymatic profiles. We demonstrate the usefulness of our approach by means of a case study

  6. Comprehensive Analysis of PPARα-Dependent Regulation of Hepatic Lipid Metabolism by Expression Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rakhshandehroo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available PPARα is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of nutrient metabolism and inflammation. Although much is already known about the function of PPARα in hepatic lipid metabolism, many PPARα-dependent pathways and genes have yet to be discovered. In order to obtain an overview of PPARα-regulated genes relevant to lipid metabolism, and to probe for novel candidate PPARα target genes, livers from several animal studies in which PPARα was activated and/or disabled were analyzed by Affymetrix GeneChips. Numerous novel PPARα-regulated genes relevant to lipid metabolism were identified. Out of this set of genes, eight genes were singled out for study of PPARα-dependent regulation in mouse liver and in mouse, rat, and human primary hepatocytes, including thioredoxin interacting protein (Txnip, electron-transferring-flavoprotein β polypeptide (Etfb, electron-transferring-flavoprotein dehydrogenase (Etfdh, phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (Pctp, endothelial lipase (EL, Lipg, adipose triglyceride lipase (Pnpla2, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, Lipe, and monoglyceride lipase (Mgll. Using an in silico screening approach, one or more PPAR response elements (PPREs were identified in each of these genes. Regulation of Pnpla2, Lipe, and Mgll, which are involved in triglyceride hydrolysis, was studied under conditions of elevated hepatic lipids. In wild-type mice fed a high fat diet, the decrease in hepatic lipids following treatment with the PPARα agonist Wy14643 was paralleled by significant up-regulation of Pnpla2, Lipe, and Mgll, suggesting that induction of triglyceride hydrolysis may contribute to the anti-steatotic role of PPARα. Our study illustrates the power of transcriptional profiling to uncover novel PPARα-regulated genes and pathways in liver.

  7. Metabolism and fatty acid profile in fat and lean rainbow trout lines fed with vegetable oil: effect of carbohydrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Sam Kamalam

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effect of dietary carbohydrates on metabolism, with special focus on fatty acid bioconversion and flesh lipid composition in two rainbow trout lines divergently selected for muscle lipid content and fed with vegetable oils. These lines were chosen based on previously demonstrated potential differences in LC-PUFA synthesis and carbohydrate utilization. Applying a factorial study design, juvenile trout from the lean (L and the fat (F line were fed vegetable oil based diets with or without gelatinised starch (17.1% for 12 weeks. Blood, liver, muscle, intestine and adipose tissue were sampled after the last meal. Feed intake and growth was higher in the L line than the F line, irrespective of the diet. Moderate postprandial hyperglycemia, strong induction of hepatic glucokinase and repressed glucose-6-phosphatase transcripts confirmed the metabolic response of both lines to carbohydrate intake. Further at the transcriptional level, dietary carbohydrate in the presence of n-3 LC-PUFA deficient vegetable oils enhanced intestinal chylomicron assembly, disturbed hepatic lipid metabolism and importantly elicited a higher response of key desaturase and elongase enzymes in the liver and intestine that endorsed our hypothesis. PPARγ was identified as the factor mediating this dietary regulation of fatty acid bioconversion enzymes in the liver. However, these molecular changes were not sufficient to modify the fatty acid composition of muscle or liver. Concerning the genotype effect, there was no evidence of substantial genotypic difference in lipid metabolism, LC-PUFA synthesis and flesh fatty acid profile when fed with vegetable oils. The minor reduction in plasma glucose and triglyceride levels in the F line was linked to potentially higher glucose and lipid uptake in the muscle. Overall, these data emphasize the importance of dietary macro-nutrient interface in evolving fish nutrition strategies.

  8. Microbial metabolic profiles in Australian soils with varying crop management strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldorri, Sind; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily

    2015-04-01

    Cotton production belt in Australia is covering vast areas from subtropical to temperate and grassland. Soil types are mostly different variations of clay with mainly black, grey and red clay soil containing variable proportions of sand in it. Growers often grow cotton in rotation with other crops, such as wheat, beans and corn, and soil fertilization vary with a number of growers using organic amendments as a main or supplementary source of nutrients. We have collected soil samples from farms in different regions and with different crop management strategies and studied the metabolic signature of microbial communities using the Biolog Ecoplate system. The metabolic patterns, supplemented with molecular analysis of the community will further the understanding of the influence of crop and soil management on soil functions carried out by microbes.

  9. Physical activity, heart rate, metabolic profile, and estradiol in premenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emaus, Aina; Veierød, Marit B; Furberg, Anne-Sofie;

    2008-01-01

    syndrome (zMS); total cholesterol-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio, insulin resistance, total fat tissue, BP, and triglycerides] was defined. Linear regression and linear mixed models were used, and confounding factors were tested. RESULTS: Physically active women had lower fat percentage...... were also found for fat tissue, total cholesterol-HDL-C ratio, insulin resistance, and triglycerides. A dose-response relationship was observed among the three levels of LPA and HR and zMS (Ptrend = 0.03 for LPA; Ptrend = 0.004 for HR). Women in the highest tertile of the clustered metabolic risk score......PURPOSE: To study whether physical inactive women with a tendency to develop metabolic syndrome have high levels of 17beta-estradiol (E2) of importance for breast cancer risk. METHODS: Two hundred and four healthy women of reproductive age were assessed for self-reported leisure-time physical...

  10. Development of a UHPLC method for the assessment of the metabolic profile of cinitapride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Helena; Albertí, Joan; Salvà, Miquel; Saurina, Javier; Sentellas, Sonia

    2011-12-01

    An ultra high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed to study the cinitapride metabolism. Metabolites were generated from the incubation of cinitapride with human liver microsomes. Cinitapride and its metabolites were separated by reversed-phase mode using a formate aqueous solution (pH 6.5) and acetonitrile as the components of the mobile phase. Chromatographic conditions, including the establishment of an elution gradient, were optimized for obtaining the maximum number of resolved components in the minimum analysis time. Experimental design and multicriteria decision-making strategies were utilized to facilitate the optimization of chromatographic conditions. Figures of merit were evaluated with cinitapride standards and incubated samples. Limits of detection are about 0.03 μmol/L, and repeatabilities are better than 0.06% for retention times and better than 3.5% for concentrations. The method was applied to characterize the in vitro cinitapride metabolism with human liver microsomes. PMID:21695682

  11. Nutrition, metabolic profiles and puberty in Brahman (Bos indicus) beef heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, F; Blache, D; Martin, G B; D'Occhio, M J

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to gain an improved understanding of the relationships between body weight (BW), body condition (BCS), and metabolic homeostasis, and the attainment of puberty in Brahman heifers in a subtropical environment. Brahman heifers (200±3kg BW; 2.00±0.0 BCS) were assigned to a moderate nutrition (MN, n=11) or improved nutrition (IN, n=11) treatment from 11 to 23 months-of-age. The heifers were monitored at regular intervals for circulating concentrations of GH, IGF-1, insulin, glucose and leptin, and ovarian follicular activity was recorded until the first ovulation. From approximately 16 months of age, heifers on IN had a greater (PBrahman heifers on IN had a metabolic homeostasis that was supportive of reproductive maturation and puberty. PMID:24725537

  12. Profiling the control of hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism for evaluating novel strategies of insulin delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Ana Francisca Leal Silva

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder that results from a dysfunction of insulin secretion (type 1) and/or sensitivity (type 2). Type 1 and in many cases type 2 diabetic patients require daily insulin injections to control blood glucose levels and retard the appearance of diabetes-related complications. The liver plays a central role in the context of whole-body glucose homoeostasis and fuel management in general. Under physiological conditions, insulin is released by the pancr...

  13. Metabolic and Endocrine Profiles in Response to Systemic Infusion of Fructose and Glucose in Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Sean H.; Stanhope, Kimber L.; Grant, Ryan W.; Cummings, Bethany P.; Havel, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Diurnal patterns of circulating leptin concentrations are attenuated after consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages compared with glucose-sweetened beverages, likely a result of limited postprandial glucose and insulin excursions after fructose. Differences in postprandial exposure of adipose tissue to peripheral circulating fructose and glucose or in adipocyte metabolism of the two sugars may also be involved. Thus, we compared plasma leptin concentrations after 6-h iv infusions of saline...

  14. Untargeted metabolic profiling identifies interactions between Huntington’s disease and neuronal manganese status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kevin K.; Goodwin, Cody R.; Uhouse, Michael A.; Bornhorst, Julia; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Aschner, Michael; McLean, John A.; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient for development and function of the nervous system. Deficiencies in Mn transport have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease (HD), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of medium spiny neurons of the striatum. Brain Mn levels are highest in striatum and other basal ganglia structures, the most sensitive brain regions to Mn neurotoxicity. Mouse models of HD exhibit decreased striatal Mn accumulation and HD striatal neuron models are resistant to Mn cytotoxicity. We hypothesized that the observed modulation of Mn cellular transport is associated with compensatory metabolic responses to HD pathology. Here we use an untargeted metabolomics approach by performing ultraperformance liquid chromatography-ion mobility-mass spectrometry (UPLC-IM-MS) on control and HD immortalized mouse striatal neurons to identify metabolic disruptions under three Mn exposure conditions, low (vehicle), moderate (non-cytotoxic) and high (cytotoxic). Our analysis revealed lower metabolite levels of pantothenic acid, and glutathione (GSH) in HD striatal cells relative to control cells. HD striatal cells also exhibited lower abundance and impaired induction of isobutyryl carnitine in response to increasing Mn exposure. In addition, we observed induction of metabolites in the pentose shunt pathway in HD striatal cells after high Mn exposure. These findings provide metabolic evidence of an interaction between the HD genotype and biologically relevant levels of Mn in a striatal cell model with known HD by Mn exposure interactions. The metabolic phenotypes detected support existing hypotheses that changes in energetic processes underlie the pathobiology of both HD and Mn neurotoxicity. PMID:25599126

  15. Morphometric Variables Related to Metabolic Profile in Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Marcia CR; Higgins, Paul B.; Mattern, Vicki L; Garza, Melissa A De La; Brasky, Kathleen M.; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Comuzzie, Anthony G.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for several diseases including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to compare the relationships of waist circumference and body weight with circulating markers of metabolic, cardiovascular, and hepatic function in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). After a 12-h fast, blood was collected from 39 adult captive chimpanzees for measurement of serum glucose, BUN, creatinine, albumin, cholesterol, ALT, AST, ALP, total and direct bilirubin, trig...

  16. Optimization and evaluation of metabolite extraction protocols for untargeted metabolic profiling of liver samples by UPLC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Perrine; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Want, Elizabeth J

    2010-09-15

    A series of six protocols were evaluated for UPLC-MS based untargeted metabolic profiling of liver extracts in terms of reproducibility and number of metabolite features obtained. These protocols, designed to extract both polar and nonpolar metabolites, were based on (i) a two stage extraction approach or (ii) a simultaneous extraction in a biphasic mixture, employing different volumes and combinations of extraction and resuspension solvents. A multivariate statistical strategy was developed to allow comparison of the multidimensional variation between the methods. The optimal protocol for profiling both polar and nonpolar metabolites was found to be an aqueous extraction with methanol/water followed by an organic extraction with dichloromethane/methanol, with resuspension of the dried extracts in methanol/water before UPLC-MS analysis. This protocol resulted in a median CV of feature intensities among experimental replicates of data demonstrate the robustness of the proposed protocol for extracting metabolites from liver samples and make it well suited for untargeted liver profiling in studies exploring xenobiotic hepatotoxicity and clinical investigations of liver disease. The generic nature of this protocol facilitates its application to other tissues, for example, brain or lung, enhancing its utility in clinical and toxicological studies. PMID:20715759

  17. Expression profiles of the genes associated with metabolism and transport of amino acids and their derivatives in rat liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C S; Chang, C F

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids (AA) are components of protein and precursors of many important biological molecules. To address effects of the genes associated with metabolism and transport of AA and their derivatives during rat liver regeneration (LR), we firstly obtained the above genes by collecting databases data and retrieving related thesis, and then analyzed their expression profiles during LR using Rat Genome 230 2.0 array. The LR-associated genes were identified by comparing the gene expression difference between partial hepatectomy (PH) and sham-operation (SO) rat livers. It was approved that 134 genes associated with metabolism of AA and their derivatives and 26 genes involved in transport of them were LR-associated. The initially and totally expressing number of these genes occurring in initial phase of LR (0.5-4 h after PH), G0/G1 (4-6 h after PH), cell proliferation (6-66 h after PH), cell differentiation and structure-function reconstruction of liver tissue (72-168 h after PH) were respectively 76, 17, 79, 5 and 162, 89, 564, 195, illustrating that these LR-associated genes were initially expressed mainly in initial stage, and functioned in different phases. Frequencies of up-regulation and down-regulation of them being separately 564 and 357 demonstrated that genes up-regulated outnumbered those down-regulated. Categorization of their expression patterns into 22 types implied the diversity of cell physiological and biochemical activities. According to expression changes and patterns of the above-mentioned genes in LR, it was presumed that histidine biosynthesis in the metaphase and anaphase, valine metabolism in the anaphase, and metabolism of glutamate, glutamine, asparate, asparagine, methionine, alanine, leucine and aromatic amino acid almost were enhanced in the whole LR; as for amino acid derivatives, transport of neutral amino acids, urea, gamma-aminobutyric acid, betaine and taurine, metabolism of dopamine, heme, S-adenosylmethionine, thyroxine, and

  18. Transcriptome profiling of brown adipose tissue during cold exposure reveals extensive regulation of glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Qin; Yadav, Rachita; Basse, Astrid L.;

    2015-01-01

    We applied digital gene expression profiling to determine the transcriptome of brown and white adipose tissues (BAT and WAT, respectively) during cold exposure. Male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to cold for 2 or 4 days. A notable induction of genes related to glucose uptake, glycolysis, glycogen...

  19. Cerebral Metabolic Profiling of Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest with and Without Antegrade Selective Cerebral Perfusion: Evidence from Nontargeted Tissue Metabolomics in a Rabbit Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Hua Zou; Jin-Ping Liu; Hao Zhang; Shu-Bin Wu; Bing-Yang Ji

    2016-01-01

    Background:Antegrade selective cerebral perfusion (ASCP) is regarded to perform cerebral protection during the thoracic aorta surgery as an adjunctive technique to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA).However,brain metabolism profile after ASCP has not been systematically investigated by metabolomics technology.Methods:To clarify the metabolomics profiling of ASCP,12 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned into 60 min DHCA with (DHCA+ASCP [DA] group,n =6) and without (DHCA [D] group,n =6) ASCP according to the random number table.ASCP was conducted by cannulation on the right subclavian artery and cross-clamping of the innominate artery.Rabbits were sacrificed 60 min after weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass.The metabolic features of the cerebral cortex were analyzed by a nontargeted metabolic profiling strategy based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.Variable importance projection values exceeding 1.0 were selected as potentially changed metabolites,and then Student's t-test was applied to test for statistical significance between the two groups.Results:Metabolic profiling of brain was distinctive significantly between the two groups (Q2y =0.88 for partial least squares-DA model).In comparing to group D,62 definable metabolites were varied significantly after ASCP,which were mainly related to amino acid metabolism,carbohydrate metabolism,and lipid metabolism.Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis revealed that metabolic pathways after DHCA with ASCP were mainly involved in the activated glycolytic pathway,subdued anaerobic metabolism,and oxidative stress.In addition,L-kynurenine (P =0.0019),5-methoxyindole-3-acetic acid (P =0.0499),and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (P =0.0495) in tryptophan metabolism pathways were decreased,and citrulline (P =0.0158) in urea cycle was increased in group DA comparing to group D.Conclusions:The present study applied metabolomics analysis to identify the cerebral metabolic profiling in rabbits with ASCP

  20. Towards real-time metabolic profiling of a biopsy specimen during a surgical operation by 1H high resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotto Martial

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Providing information on cancerous tissue samples during a surgical operation can help surgeons delineate the limits of a tumoral invasion more reliably. Here, we describe the use of metabolic profiling of a colon biopsy specimen by high resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to evaluate tumoral invasion during a simulated surgical operation. Case presentation Biopsy specimens (n = 9 originating from the excised right colon of a 66-year-old Caucasian women with an adenocarcinoma were automatically analyzed using a previously built statistical model. Conclusions Metabolic profiling results were in full agreement with those of a histopathological analysis. The time-response of the technique is sufficiently fast for it to be used effectively during a real operation (17 min/sample. Metabolic profiling has the potential to become a method to rapidly characterize cancerous biopsies in the operation theater.

  1. Effect of different dietary levels of mangrove (Laguncularia racemosa) leaves and spice supplementation on productive performance, egg quality, lipid metabolism and metabolic profiles in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harthi, M A; El-Deek, A A; Attia, Y A; Bovera, F; Qota, E M

    2009-11-01

    In order to study the influence of white mangrove (Laguncularia racemosa) leaves on productive performance, egg quality, lipids metabolism and metabolic profiles, 180 Hy-line laying hens were randomly distributed to 6 dietary treatments each contained 6 replicates of 5 individually caged hens during the period from 50 to 60 weeks of age. 2. Three isoenergetic and isonitrogenous diets were formulated to contain 0, 50 and 100 g/kg of sun-dried mangrove leaves. Each diet was fed with or without supplementation of 2 g of cardamom, cumin, hot and black pepper mixture (1:1:1:1)/kg diet. 3. Mangrove leaves at either 50 or 100 g/kg adversely affect laying rate, egg mass and FCR, whilst increasing water intake and water to feed ratio. Mangrove leaves had no significant effect on dry matter, protein, lipid, cholesterol and ash content of liver, or on dry matter, protein and ash of yolk. 4. Plasma total protein, total lipids; liver enzymes AST and ALT and mortality rate were not significantly affected by mangrove leaves. On the other hand, yolk lipid, yolk cholesterol and plasma cholesterol significantly decreased, while yolk colour significantly increased with inclusion of 50 or 100 g/kg mangrove leaves, and Haugh unit score significantly increased with 100 g/kg mangrove leaves. 5. Spice mixture significantly increased egg weight by 2.2%. Yolk lipid content significantly decreased by 2.6%, while yolk colour and Haugh unit significantly increased with inclusion of spice mixtures. 6. In conclusion, mangrove leaves at 50 g/kg may be included in the laying hen diets as a means of decreasing lipid and cholesterol in yolk and plasma cholesterol and increasing yolk colour. Spice mixture at 2 g of cardamom, cumin, hot and black pepper mixture (1:1:1:1)/kg diet increased laying rate, egg mass, Haugh unit score and yolk colour while decreasing yolk lipids.

  2. An efficient xylose-fermenting recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain obtained through adaptive evolution and its global transcription profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yu; Chen, Xiao; Peng, Bingyin; Chen, Liyuan; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China). State Key Lab. of Microbial Technology

    2012-11-15

    Factors related to ethanol production from xylose in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae that contain an exogenous initial metabolic pathway are still to be elucidated. In the present study, a strain that expresses the xylose isomerase gene of Piromyces sp. Pi-xylA and overexpresses XKS1, RPE1, RKI1, TAL1, and TKL1, with deleted GRE3 and COX4 genes was constructed. The xylose utilization capacity of the respiratory deficiency strain was poor but improved via adaptive evolution in xylose. The {mu}{sub max} of the evolved strain in 20 gl{sup -1} xylose is 0.11 {+-} 0.00 h{sup -1}, and the evolved strain consumed 17.83 gl{sup -1} xylose within 72 h, with an ethanol yield of 0.43 gg{sup -1} total consumed sugars during glucose-xylose cofermentation. Global transcriptional changes and effect of several specific genes were studied. The result revealed that the increased xylose isomerase activity, the upregulation of enzymes involved in glycolysis and glutamate synthesis, and the downregulation of trehalose and glycogen synthesis, may have contributed to the improved xylose utilization of the strain. Furthermore, the deletion of PHO13 decreased the xylose growth in the respiration deficiency strain although deleting PHO13 can improve the xylose metabolism in other strains. (orig.)

  3. Metabolic Responses of Poplar to Apripona germari (Hope) as Revealed by Metabolite Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Lijuan Wang; Liangjian Qu; Liwei Zhang; Jianjun Hu; Fang Tang; Mengzhu Lu

    2016-01-01

    Plants have developed biochemical responses to adapt to biotic stress. To characterize the resistance mechanisms in poplar tree against Apripona germari, comprehensive metabolomic changes of poplar bark and xylem in response to A. germari infection were examined by gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC–TOF/MS). It was found that, four days after feeding (stage I), A. germari infection brought about changes in various metabolites, such as phenolics, amino acids and sugars in ...

  4. Staphylococcus epidermidis: metabolic adaptation and biofilm formation in response to different oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe-Alvarez, Cristina; Chiquete-Félix, Natalia; Contreras-Zentella, Martha; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Peña, Antonio; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis has become a major health hazard. It is necessary to study its metabolism and hopefully uncover therapeutic targets. Cultivating S. epidermidis at increasing oxygen concentration [O2] enhanced growth, while inhibiting biofilm formation. Respiratory oxidoreductases were differentially expressed, probably to prevent reactive oxygen species formation. Under aerobiosis, S. epidermidis expressed high oxidoreductase activities, including glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, ethanol dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase, as well as cytochromes bo and aa3; while little tendency to form biofilms was observed. Under microaerobiosis, pyruvate dehydrogenase and ethanol dehydrogenase decreased while glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase nearly disappeared; cytochrome bo was present; anaerobic nitrate reductase activity was observed; biofilm formation increased slightly. Under anaerobiosis, biofilms grew; low ethanol dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and cytochrome bo were still present; nitrate dehydrogenase was the main terminal electron acceptor. KCN inhibited the aerobic respiratory chain and increased biofilm formation. In contrast, methylamine inhibited both nitrate reductase and biofilm formation. The correlation between the expression and/or activity or redox enzymes and biofilm-formation activities suggests that these are possible therapeutic targets to erradicate S. epidermidis.

  5. Differential remodelling of peroxisome function underpins the environmental and metabolic adaptability of diplonemids and kinetoplastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Jorge; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Williams, Tom A; Hirawake-Mogi, Hiroko; Makiuchi, Takashi; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Kaga, Naoko; Taka, Hikari; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Koike, Masato; Mita, Toshihiro; Bringaud, Frédéric; Concepción, Juan L; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Embley, T Martin; Nara, Takeshi

    2016-05-11

    The remodelling of organelle function is increasingly appreciated as a central driver of eukaryotic biodiversity and evolution. Kinetoplastids including Trypanosoma and Leishmania have evolved specialized peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Glycosomes uniquely contain a glycolytic pathway as well as other enzymes, which underpin the physiological flexibility of these major human pathogens. The sister group of kinetoplastids are the diplonemids, which are among the most abundant eukaryotes in marine plankton. Here we demonstrate the compartmentalization of gluconeogenesis, or glycolysis in reverse, in the peroxisomes of the free-living marine diplonemid, Diplonema papillatum Our results suggest that peroxisome modification was already under way in the common ancestor of kinetoplastids and diplonemids, and raise the possibility that the central importance of gluconeogenesis to carbon metabolism in the heterotrophic free-living ancestor may have been an important selective driver. Our data indicate that peroxisome modification is not confined to the kinetoplastid lineage, but has also been a factor in the success of their free-living euglenozoan relatives. PMID:27170716

  6. Rapid temperature adaptation in trout: Alterations in membrane molecular species metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, E.E.; Hazel, J.R. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The ability of poikilotherms to change their membrane phospholipid composition in response to long term temperature change is well documented. Less understood are the changes which occur when rapid temperature fluctuations are encountered. The authors have followed the fate of 16:0/18:1 phosphatidylcholine (PC), radiocarbon labeled at the 18:1 acyl chain, in the plasma membranes of trout hepatocytes. After isolation by PC, 5%-10% of which was taken up into the plasma membranes. The cells were then divided into two groups and either held at acclimation temperature or transferred to 5C. After 1 hour at 20C or 5 hours at 5C the plasma membranes were isolated, the lipids extracted, and the PC fraction was resolved into its molecular species. The distribution of radiolabel between the warm and cold exposed cells was then determined. In both groups radioactivity was found in molecular species other than 16:0/18:1, however no radioactivity was found in lipids other than PC. Cold exposed cells contained less radioactivity in 18:2/18:2, 20:1/22:6, 16:0/18:2 and 18:0/18:1 PC than the warm cells, but contained more in 18:1/18:1 PC. These results indicate that the environmental temperature influences the rates of in situ desaturation, chain elongation, and intermolecular acyl chain regroupings. Subtle changes in molecular species metabolism might be important early steps in temperature acclimation.

  7. Role of Hypothalamic VGF in Energy Balance and Metabolic Adaption to Environmental Enrichment in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglesong, Grant D; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xianglan; Slater, Andrew M; Siu, Jason; Yildiz, Vedat; Salton, Stephen R J; Cao, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE), a housing condition providing complex physical, social, and cognitive stimulation, leads to improved metabolic health and resistance to diet-induced obesity and cancer. One underlying mechanism is the activation of the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis with hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as the key mediator. VGF, a peptide precursor particularly abundant in the hypothalamus, was up-regulated by EE. Overexpressing BDNF or acute injection of BDNF protein to the hypothalamus up-regulated VGF, whereas suppressing BDNF signaling down-regulated VGF expression. Moreover, hypothalamic VGF expression was regulated by leptin, melanocortin receptor agonist, and food deprivation mostly paralleled to BDNF expression. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer of Cre recombinase to floxed VGF mice specifically decreased VGF expression in the hypothalamus. In contrast to the lean and hypermetabolic phenotype of homozygous germline VGF knockout mice, specific knockdown of hypothalamic VGF in male adult mice led to increased adiposity, decreased core body temperature, reduced energy expenditure, and impaired glucose tolerance, as well as disturbance of molecular features of brown and white adipose tissues without effects on food intake. However, VGF knockdown failed to block the EE-induced BDNF up-regulation or decrease of adiposity indicating a minor role of VGF in the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis. Taken together, our results suggest hypothalamic VGF responds to environmental demands and plays an important role in energy balance and glycemic control likely acting in the melanocortin pathway downstream of BDNF. PMID:26730934

  8. Acylcarnitine Profiles in Acetaminophen Toxicity in the Mouse: Comparison to Toxicity, Metabolism and Hepatocyte Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Hinson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available High doses of acetaminophen (APAP result in hepatotoxicity that involves metabolic activation of the parent compound, covalent binding of the reactive intermediate N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI to liver proteins, and depletion of hepatic glutathione. Impaired fatty acid β-oxidation has been implicated in previous studies of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. To better understand relationships between toxicity and fatty acid β-oxidation in the liver in APAP toxicity, metabolomic assays for long chain acylcarnitines were examined in relationship to established markers of liver toxicity, oxidative metabolism, and liver regeneration in a time course study in mice. Male B6C3F1 mice were treated with APAP (200 mg/kg IP or saline and sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24 or 48 h after APAP. At 1 h, hepatic glutathione was depleted and APAP protein adducts were markedly increased. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels were elevated at 4 and 8 h, while proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA expression, indicative of hepatocyte regeneration, was apparent at 24 h and 48 h. Elevations of palmitoyl, oleoyl and myristoyl carnitine were apparent by 2–4 h, concurrent with the onset of Oil Red O staining in liver sections. By 8 h, acylcarnitine levels were below baseline levels and remained low at 24 and 48 h. A partial least squares (PLS model suggested a direct association of acylcarnitine accumulation in serum to APAP protein adduct and hepatic glutathione levels in mice. Overall, the kinetics of serum acylcarnitines in APAP toxicity in mice followed a biphasic pattern involving early elevation after the metabolism phases of toxicity and later depletion of acylcarnitines.

  9. Mineral and metabolic profiles in tea leaves and flowers during flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Sisi; Wang, Yu; Hu, Jianhui; Ding, Zhaotang; Liang, Qing; Zhang, Yinfei; Wang, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverage crops in the world, and the physiological processes and gene regulations involved in development in tea plants have been well characterized. However, relatively little is known about the metabolic changes combined with mineral distributions that occur during flower development. Here we detected the contents of 11 elements in tea leaves and flowers and found that, some of them, especially phosphorus, sulfur and copper, showed significant changes during tea flowering. We also detected 122 metabolites in tea leaves and flowers and found that, 72 of them showed significant differences between flowers and leaves, of which sugars, organic acids, and flavonoids dominated. The sugars, such as trehalose and galactose, all accumulated in tea flowers, and the organic acids, such as malic acid, citric acid and fumaric acid involved in TCA cycle. The flavonoids, like epicatechin, catechin gallate and epigallocatechin, were more abundant in leaves. Furthermore, we found that the contents of 33 metabolites changed during the development of flowers. Especially, citric acid, phenylalanine and most flavonoids decreased while fructose and galactose increased during flowering stages in flowers. We also analyzed the correlations between the ions and metabolites and found that, some mineral nutrients including phosphorus, sulfur, manganese and zinc had close relations to organic acids, flavonoids, sugars and several amino acids during flowering. We mapped the metabolic pathway according to the KEGG database. This work will serve as the foundation for a systems biology approach to the understanding of mineral metabolism. PMID:27372442

  10. The Effects of Sprint Interval vs. Continuous Endurance Training on Physiological And Metabolic Adaptations in Young Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalcakan, Gulbin Rudarli

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of sprint interval training (SIT) and continuous endurance training (CET) on selected anthropometric, aerobic, and anaerobic performance indices as well as the blood lipid profile, inflammatory and muscle damage markers in healthy young males. Fifteen recreationally active male volunteers (age: 21.7 ±2.2 years, body mass: 83.0 ±8.0 kg, body height: 1.82 ±0.05 m) were divided into two groups according to their initial VO2max levels. Training programs were conducted 3 times per week for 7 weeks. The SIT program consisted of 4-6 Wingate anaerobic sprints with a 4.5 min recovery, while CET consisted of 30-50 min cycling at 60% VO2max. Biochemical, anthropometric and fitness assessments were performed both pre and post-intervention. Significant improvements in VO2max, anaerobic power and capacity, and VO2 utilization during the submaximal workout and significant decreases in body fat and in waist circumference after the intervention occurred in both SIT and CET groups. Significantly greater gross efficiency was measured in the CET group. No differences in the lipid profile or serum levels of inflammatory, myocardial and skeletal muscle damage markers were observed after the training period. The study results agree with the effectiveness of a 30 s all-out training program with a reduced time commitment for anthropometric, aerobic and anaerobic adaptation and eliminate doubts about its safety as a model. PMID:25713670

  11. Metabolic Profile of Offspring from Diabetic Wistar Rats Treated with Mentha piperita (Peppermint)

    OpenAIRE

    Barbalho, Sandra M.; Damasceno, Débora C; Ana Paula Machado Spada; Vanessa Sellis da Silva; Karla Aparecida Martuchi; Marie Oshiiwa; Flávia M. V. Farinazzi Machado; Claudemir Gregório Mendes

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating glycemia and lipid profile of offspring from diabetic Wistar rats treated with Mentha piperita (peppermint) juice. Male offspring from nondiabetic dams (control group: 10 animals treated with water and 10 treated with peppermint juice) and from dams with streptozotocin-induced severe diabetes (diabetic group: 10 animals treated with water and 10 treated with peppermint juice) were used. They were treated during 30 days, and, after the treatment period, levels of...

  12. Differential effect of ultraviolet-B radiation on certain metabolic processes in a chromatically adapting Nostoc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of UV-B radiation on growth, pigmentation and certain physiological processes was studied in a N2-fixing chromatically adapting cyanobacterium, Nostoc spongiaeforme. A brownish form (phycoerythrin rich) was found to be more tolerant to UV-B than the blue-green (phycocyanin rich) form of N. spongiaeforme. Continuous exposure to UV-B (5.5 W m-2) for 90 min caused complete killing of the blue-green strain whereas the brown strain showed complete loss of survival after 180 min. Pigment content was more strongly inhibited in the blue-green strain than in the brown. Nitrogenase activity was completely abolished in both strains within 35 min of UV-B treatment. Restoration of nitrogenase occurred upon transfer to fluorescent or incandescent light after a lag of 5-6 h, suggesting fresh synthesis of nitrogenase. In vivo nitrate reductase activity was stimulated by UV-B treatment, the degree of enhancement being significantly higher in the blue-green strain. 14CO2 uptake was also completely abolished by UV-B treatment in both strains. (author)

  13. Synergy and antagonism of active constituents of ADAPT-232 on transcriptional level of metabolic regulation of isolated neuroglial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander George Panossian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling was performed on the human neuroglial cell line T98G after treatment with adaptogen ADAPT-232 and its constituents – extracts of Eleutherococcus senticosus root, Schisandra chinensis berry, and Rhodiola rosea root as well as several constituents individually, namely, eleutheroside E, schizandrin B, salidroside, triandrin, and tyrosol. A common feature for all tested adaptogens was their effect on G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling pathways, i.e. cAMP, phospholipase C and phosphatidylinositol signal transduction pathways. Adaptogens may reduce the cAMP level in brain cells by downregulation of adenylate cyclase gene ADC2Y and upregulation of phosphodiestherase gene PDE4D that is essential for energy homeostasis as well as for switching from catabolic to anabolic states and vice versa. All tested adaptogens up-regulated the PLCB1 gene, which encodes phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks, key players for the regulation of NF-B-mediated defense responses. Other common targets of adaptogens included genes encoding ERα estrogen receptor(2.9-22.6 fold down-regulation, cholesterol ester transfer protein (5.1-10.6 fold down-regulation, heat shock protein Hsp70 (3.0-45.0 fold up-regulation, serpin peptidase inhibitor (neuroserpin, and 5-HT3 receptor of serotonin (2.2-6.6 fold down-regulation. These findings can be reconciled with the observed beneficial effects of adaptogens in behavioral, mental and aging-associated disorders. Combining two or more active substances in one mixture significantly changes deregulated genes profiles: synergetic interactions result in activation of genes that none of the individual substances affected, while antagonistic interactions result in suppression some genes activated by individual substances. Merging of deregulated genes array profiles and intracellular networks is specific to the new substance with unique pharmacological

  14. Expression profiling of skeletal muscle following acute and chronic β2-adrenergic stimulation: implications for hypertrophy, metabolism and circadian rhythm

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    Lynch Gordon S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR agonists has been found to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and significant metabolic changes. In the context of energy homeostasis, the importance of β-AR signaling has been highlighted by the inability of β1-3-AR-deficient mice to regulate energy expenditure and susceptibility to diet induced obesity. However, the molecular pathways and gene expression changes that initiate and maintain these phenotypic modulations are poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify differential changes in gene expression in murine skeletal muscle associated with systemic (acute and chronic administration of the β2-AR agonist formoterol. Results Skeletal muscle gene expression (from murine tibialis anterior was profiled at both 1 and 4 hours following systemic administration of the β2-AR agonist formoterol, using Illumina 46K mouse BeadArrays. Illumina expression profiling revealed significant expression changes in genes associated with skeletal muscle hypertrophy, myoblast differentiation, metabolism, circadian rhythm, transcription, histones, and oxidative stress. Differentially expressed genes relevant to the regulation of muscle mass and metabolism (in the context of the hypertrophic phenotype were further validated by quantitative RT-PCR to examine gene expression in response to both acute (1-24 h and chronic administration (1-28 days of formoterol at multiple timepoints. In terms of skeletal muscle hypertrophy, attenuation of myostatin signaling (including differential expression of myostatin, activin receptor IIB, phospho-Smad3 etc was observed following acute and chronic administration of formoterol. Acute (but not chronic administration of formoterol also significantly induced the expression of genes involved in oxidative metabolism, including hexokinase 2, sorbin and SH3 domain containing 1, and uncoupling protein 3. Interestingly, formoterol

  15. A multivariate statistical analysis coming from the NMR metabolic profile of cherry tomatoes (The Sicilian Pachino case)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, Domenico; Corsaro, Carmelo; Salvo, Andrea; Cicero, Nicola; Macaluso, Andrea; Giangrosso, Giuseppe; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Dugo, Giacomo

    2014-05-01

    We have studied by means of High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance the metabolic profile of the famous Sicilian cherry tomato of Pachino. Thanks to its organoleptic and healthy properties, this particular foodstuff was the first tomato accredited by the European PGI (Protected Geographical Indication) certification of quality. Due to the relatively high price of the final product commercial frauds originated in the Italian and international markets. Hence, there is a growing interest to develop analytical techniques able to predict the origin of a tomato sample, indicating whether or not it originates from the area of Pachino, Sicily (Italy). In this paper we have determined the molar concentration of the metabolites constituent the PGI cherry tomato of Pachino. Furthermore, by means of a multivariate statistical analysis we have identified which metabolites are relevant for sample differentiation.

  16. Metabolic Profiling and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Mouse Brain by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Christian; Hiller, Karsten; Buttini, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites are key mediators of cellular functions, and have emerged as important modulators in a variety of diseases. Recent developments in translational biomedicine have highlighted the importance of not looking at just one disease marker or disease inducing molecule, but at populations thereof to gain a global understanding of cellular function in health and disease. The goal of metabolomics is the systematic identification and quantification of metabolite populations. One of the most pressing issues of our times is the understanding of normal and diseased nervous tissue functions. To ensure high quality data, proper sample processing is crucial. Here, we present a method for the extraction of metabolites from brain tissue, their subsequent preparation for non-targeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) measurement, as well as giving some guidelines for processing of raw data. In addition, we present a sensitive screening method for neurotransmitters based on GC-MS in selected ion monitoring mode. The precise multi-analyte detection and quantification of amino acid and monoamine neurotransmitters can be used for further studies such as metabolic modeling. Our protocol can be applied to shed light on nervous tissue function in health, as well as neurodegenerative disease mechanisms and the effect of experimental therapeutics at the metabolic level. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584556

  17. Transcriptional Profiling of Hydrogen Production Metabolism of Rhodobacter capsulatus under Temperature Stress by Microarray Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muazzez Gürgan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biohydrogen is a clean and renewable form of hydrogen, which can be produced by photosynthetic bacteria in outdoor large-scale photobioreactors using sunlight. In this study, the transcriptional response of Rhodobacter capsulatus to cold (4 °C and heat (42 °C stress was studied using microarrays. Bacteria were grown in 30/2 acetate/glutamate medium at 30 °C for 48 h under continuous illumination. Then, cold and heat stresses were applied for two and six hours. Growth and hydrogen production were impaired under both stress conditions. Microarray chips for R. capsulatus were custom designed by Affymetrix (GeneChip®. TR_RCH2a520699F. The numbers of significantly changed genes were 328 and 293 out of 3685 genes under cold and heat stress, respectively. Our results indicate that temperature stress greatly affects the hydrogen production metabolisms of R. capsulatus. Specifically, the expression of genes that participate in nitrogen metabolism, photosynthesis and the electron transport system were induced by cold stress, while decreased by heat stress. Heat stress also resulted in down regulation of genes related to cell envelope, transporter and binding proteins. Transcriptome analysis and physiological results were consistent with each other. The results presented here may aid clarification of the genetic mechanisms for hydrogen production in purple non-sulfur (PNS bacteria under temperature stress.

  18. Development of a Rapid Microbore Metabolic Profiling Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Approach for High-Throughput Phenotyping Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Nicola; Adesina-Georgiadis, Kyrillos; Chekmeneva, Elena; Plumb, Robert S; Wilson, Ian D; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2016-06-01

    A rapid gradient microbore ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) method has been developed to provide a high-throughput analytical platform for the metabolic phenotyping of urine from large sample cohorts. The rapid microbore metabolic profiling (RAMMP) approach was based on scaling a conventional reversed-phase UPLC-MS method for urinary profiling from 2.1 mm × 100 mm columns to 1 mm × 50 mm columns, increasing the linear velocity of the solvent, and decreasing the gradient time to provide an analysis time of 2.5 min/sample. Comparison showed that conventional UPLC-MS and rapid gradient approaches provided peak capacities of 150 and 50, respectively, with the conventional method detecting approximately 19 000 features compared to the ∼6 000 found using the rapid gradient method. Similar levels of repeatability were seen for both methods. Despite the reduced peak capacity and the reduction in ions detected, the RAMMP method was able to achieve similar levels of group discrimination as conventional UPLC-MS when applied to rat urine samples obtained from investigative studies on the effects of acute 2-bromophenol and chronic acetaminophen administration. When compared to a direct infusion MS method of similar analysis time the RAMMP method provided superior selectivity. The RAMMP approach provides a robust and sensitive method that is well suited to high-throughput metabonomic analysis of complex mixtures such as urine combined with a 5-fold reduction in analysis time compared with the conventional UPLC-MS method. PMID:27116471

  19. Dynamics of bacterial metabolic profile and community structure during the mineralization of organic carbon in intensive swine farm wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Ma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Land application of intensive swine farm wastewater has raised serious environmental concerns due to the accumulation and microbially mediated transformation of large amounts of swine wastewater organic C (SWOC. Therefore, the study of SWOC mineralization and dynamics of wastewater microorganisms is essential to understand the environmental impacts of swine wastewater application. We measured the C mineralization of incubated swine wastewaters with high (wastewater H and low (wastewater L organic C concentrations. The dynamics of bacteria metabolic profile and community structure were also investigated. The results showed that SWOC mineralization was properly fitted by the two-simultaneous reactions model. The initial potential rate of labile C mineralization of wastewater H was 46% higher than that of wastewater L, whereas the initial potential rates of recalcitrant C mineralization of wastewaters H and L were both around 23 mg L-1 d-1. The bacterial functional and structural diversities significantly decreased for both the wastewaters during SWOC mineralization, and were all negatively correlated to specific UV absorbance (SUVA254; P < 0.01. The bacteria in the raw wastewaters exhibited functional similarity, and both metabolic profile and community structure changed with the mineralization of SWOC, mainly under the influence of SUVA254 (P < 0.001. These results suggested that SWOC mineralization was characterized by rapid mineralization of labile C and subsequent slow decomposition of recalcitrant C pool, and the quality of SWOC varied between the wastewaters with different amounts of organic C. The decreased bio-availability of dissolved organic matter affected the dynamics of wastewater bacteria during SWOC mineralization.

  20. The Variable Regions of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Genomes Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Metabolic and Host-Adaptation Repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceapa, Corina; Davids, Mark; Ritari, Jarmo; Lambert, Jolanda; Wels, Michiel; Douillard, François P; Smokvina, Tamara; de Vos, Willem M; Knol, Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a diverse Gram-positive species with strains isolated from different ecological niches. Here, we report the genome sequence analysis of 40 diverse strains of L. rhamnosus and their genomic comparison, with a focus on the variable genome. Genomic comparison of 40 L. rhamnosus strains discriminated the conserved genes (core genome) and regions of plasticity involving frequent rearrangements and horizontal transfer (variome). The L. rhamnosus core genome encompasses 2,164 genes, out of 4,711 genes in total (the pan-genome). The accessory genome is dominated by genes encoding carbohydrate transport and metabolism, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) biosynthesis, bacteriocin production, pili production, the cas system, and the associated clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci, and more than 100 transporter functions and mobile genetic elements like phages, plasmid genes, and transposons. A clade distribution based on amino acid differences between core (shared) proteins matched with the clade distribution obtained from the presence-absence of variable genes. The phylogenetic and variome tree overlap indicated that frequent events of gene acquisition and loss dominated the evolutionary segregation of the strains within this species, which is paralleled by evolutionary diversification of core gene functions. The CRISPR-Cas system could have contributed to this evolutionary segregation. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains contain the genetic and metabolic machinery with strain-specific gene functions required to adapt to a large range of environments. A remarkable congruency of the evolutionary relatedness of the strains' core and variome functions, possibly favoring interspecies genetic exchanges, underlines the importance of gene-acquisition and loss within the L. rhamnosus strain diversification. PMID:27358423

  1. Effect of the environment on the secondary metabolic profile of Tithonia diversifolia: a model for environmental metabolomics of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Bruno Leite; Edrada-Ebel, Ruangelie; da Costa, Fernando Batista

    2016-07-01

    Tithonia diversifolia is an invasive weed commonly found in tropical ecosystems. In this work, we investigate the influence of different abiotic environmental factors on the plant’s metabolite profile by multivariate statistical analyses of spectral data deduced by UHPLC-DAD-ESI-HRMS and NMR methods. Different plant part samples of T. diversifolia which included leaves, stems, roots, and inflorescences were collected from two Brazilian states throughout a 24-month period, along with the corresponding monthly environmental data. A metabolomic approach employing concatenated LC-MS and NMR data was utilised for the first time to study the relationships between environment and plant metabolism. A seasonal pattern was observed for the occurrence of metabolites that included sugars, sesquiterpenes lactones and phenolics in the leaf and stem parts, which can be correlated to the amount of rainfall and changes in temperature. The distribution of the metabolites in the inflorescence and root parts were mainly affected by variation of some soil nutrients such as Ca, Mg, P, K and Cu. We highlight the environment-metabolism relationship for T. diversifolia and the combined analytical approach to obtain reliable data that contributed to a holistic understanding of the influence of abiotic environmental factors on the production of metabolites in various plant parts.

  2. Scent emission profiles from Darwin's orchid--Angraecum sesquipedale: Investigation of the aldoxime metabolism using clustering analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lasse Janniche; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2015-12-01

    The display of scent is crucial for plants in attracting pollinating insects to flowers and ensuring successful pollination and reproduction. The large number of aldoxime volatile species present in the scent of the Madagascan orchid Angraecum sesquipedale has been suggested to play a primary role in attracting the sphingid moth Xanthopan morgani praedicta. By solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we monitored the scent release from different flowers of a single orchid, day and night throughout the entire flowering period. In separate experiments, the diurnal release was monitored in 3h intervals and the tissue specific release from the different floral parts was tracked. Numerous novel compounds related to the aldoxime metabolism not previously detected in A. sesquipedale were identified and positioned into a proposed pathway for aldoxime metabolism. From the results, we hypothesize that (E/Z)-phenylacetaldoxime and its derivatives could be important attractants for the pollinating moth X. morgani praedicta. By applying an untargeted Partitioning Around Medoids (PAM) cluster analysis to the metabolite profiles in the scent, the proposed pathways for the formation of aldoximes were substantiated. With this study, we demonstrate the powerful utility of a bioinformatics tool to aid in the elucidation of the routes of formation for volatiles and provide a benchmark and guidelines for future detailed observations of hawkmoth pollination of Angraecum species, and in particular A. sesquipedale, in the wild. PMID:26603277

  3. Avocado Oil Supplementation Modifies Cardiovascular Risk Profile Markers in a Rat Model of Sucrose-Induced Metabolic Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Carvajal-Zarrabal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of avocado oil administration on biochemical markers of cardiovascular risk profile in rats with metabolic changes induced by sucrose ingestion. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: a control group (CG; basic diet, a sick group (MC; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution, and three other groups (MCao, MCac, and MCas; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution plus olive oil and avocado oil extracted by centrifugation or using solvent, resp.. Glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, low- and high-density lipoproteins (LDL, HDL, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL, lactic dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration were analyzed. Avocado oil reduces TG, VLDL, and LDL levels, in the LDL case significantly so, without affecting HDL levels. An effect was exhibited by avocado oil similar to olive oil, with no significant difference between avocado oil extracted either by centrifugation or solvent in myocardial injury biochemical indicators. Avocado oil decreased hs-CRP levels, indicating that inflammatory processes were partially reversed. These findings suggested that avocado oil supplementation has a positive health outcome because it reduces inflammatory events and produces positive changes in the biochemical indicators studied, related to the development of metabolic syndrome.

  4. Avocado oil supplementation modifies cardiovascular risk profile markers in a rat model of sucrose-induced metabolic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Zarrabal, Octavio; Nolasco-Hipolito, Cirilo; Aguilar-Uscanga, M Guadalupe; Melo-Santiesteban, Guadalupe; Hayward-Jones, Patricia M; Barradas-Dermitz, Dulce M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of avocado oil administration on biochemical markers of cardiovascular risk profile in rats with metabolic changes induced by sucrose ingestion. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: a control group (CG; basic diet), a sick group (MC; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution), and three other groups (MCao, MCac, and MCas; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution plus olive oil and avocado oil extracted by centrifugation or using solvent, resp.). Glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, low- and high-density lipoproteins (LDL, HDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), lactic dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration were analyzed. Avocado oil reduces TG, VLDL, and LDL levels, in the LDL case significantly so, without affecting HDL levels. An effect was exhibited by avocado oil similar to olive oil, with no significant difference between avocado oil extracted either by centrifugation or solvent in myocardial injury biochemical indicators. Avocado oil decreased hs-CRP levels, indicating that inflammatory processes were partially reversed. These findings suggested that avocado oil supplementation has a positive health outcome because it reduces inflammatory events and produces positive changes in the biochemical indicators studied, related to the development of metabolic syndrome.

  5. Temporal proteome and lipidome profiles reveal hepatitis C virus-associated reprogramming of hepatocellular metabolism and bioenergetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah L Diamond

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomic and lipidomic profiling was performed over a time course of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in cultured Huh-7.5 cells to gain new insights into the intracellular processes influenced by this virus. Our proteomic data suggest that HCV induces early perturbations in glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the citric acid cycle, which favor host biosynthetic activities supporting viral replication and propagation. This is followed by a compensatory shift in metabolism aimed at maintaining energy homeostasis and cell viability during elevated viral replication and increasing cellular stress. Complementary lipidomic analyses identified numerous temporal perturbations in select lipid species (e.g. phospholipids and sphingomyelins predicted to play important roles in viral replication and downstream assembly and secretion events. The elevation of lipotoxic ceramide species suggests a potential link between HCV-associated biochemical alterations and the direct cytopathic effect observed in this in vitro system. Using innovative computational modeling approaches, we further identified mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzymes, which are comparably regulated during in vitro infection and in patients with histological evidence of fibrosis, as possible targets through which HCV regulates temporal alterations in cellular metabolic homeostasis.

  6. Effect of the environment on the secondary metabolic profile of Tithonia diversifolia: a model for environmental metabolomics of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Bruno Leite; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Da Costa, Fernando Batista

    2016-01-01

    Tithonia diversifolia is an invasive weed commonly found in tropical ecosystems. In this work, we investigate the influence of different abiotic environmental factors on the plant’s metabolite profile by multivariate statistical analyses of spectral data deduced by UHPLC-DAD-ESI-HRMS and NMR methods. Different plant part samples of T. diversifolia which included leaves, stems, roots, and inflorescences were collected from two Brazilian states throughout a 24-month period, along with the corresponding monthly environmental data. A metabolomic approach employing concatenated LC-MS and NMR data was utilised for the first time to study the relationships between environment and plant metabolism. A seasonal pattern was observed for the occurrence of metabolites that included sugars, sesquiterpenes lactones and phenolics in the leaf and stem parts, which can be correlated to the amount of rainfall and changes in temperature. The distribution of the metabolites in the inflorescence and root parts were mainly affected by variation of some soil nutrients such as Ca, Mg, P, K and Cu. We highlight the environment-metabolism relationship for T. diversifolia and the combined analytical approach to obtain reliable data that contributed to a holistic understanding of the influence of abiotic environmental factors on the production of metabolites in various plant parts. PMID:27383265

  7. Metabolic and Dynamic Profiling for Risk Assessment of Fluopyram, a Typical Phenylamide Fungicide Widely Applied in Vegetable Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Liu, Yanan; Li, Wenzhuo; Qian, Yuan; Nie, Yanxia; Kim, Dongyeop; Wang, Mengcen

    2016-09-01

    Fluopyram, a typical phenylamide fungicide, was widely applied to protect fruit vegetables from fungal pathogens-responsible yield loss. Highly linked to the ecological and dietary risks, its residual and metabolic profiles in the fruit vegetable ecosystem still remained obscure. Here, an approach using modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) extraction combined with GC-MS/MS analysis was developed to investigate fluopyram fate in the typical fruit vegetables including tomato, cucumber, pepper under the greenhouse environment. Fluopyram dissipated in accordance with the first-order rate dynamics equation with the maximum half-life of 5.7 d. Cleveage of fluopyram into 2-trifluoromethyl benzamide and subsequent formation of 3-chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl) pyridine-2-acetic acid and 3-chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl) picolinic acid was elucidated to be its ubiquitous metabolic pathway. Moreover, the incurrence of fluopyram at the pre-harvest interval (PHI) of 7–21 d was between 0.0108 and 0.1603 mg/kg, and the Hazard Quotients (HQs) were calculated to be less than 1, indicating temporary safety on consumption of the fruit vegetables incurred with fluopyram, irrespective of the uncertain toxicity of the metabolites. Taken together, our findings reveal the residual essential of fluopyram in the typical agricultural ecosystem, and would advance the further insight into ecological risk posed by this fungicide associated with its metabolites.

  8. Serum Leptin Levels in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Its Relationship with Metabolic and Hormonal Profile in Pakistani Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhtiar Baig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to investigate the levels of serum leptin in PCOS females and to correlate it with metabolic and hormonal parameters. Sixty-two PCOS and ninety normal cycling (NC females with matched age and body mass index (BMI were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Serum leptin, FSH, LH, E2, free testosterone, progesterone, thyroid profile, and FBG levels were measured. The mean leptin levels in PCOS and NC were not significantly different (45.56 ng/mL ± 1.49 vs 41.78 ± 1.31 ng/mL, P>0.05; however, leptin levels showed a strong correlation with BMI in PCOS and NC group (r=0.77, P<0.0001; r=0.82, P<0.0001, resp.. High E2 levels in NC had a significant correlation with leptin whereas FBG correlated with leptin in PCOS (r=0.51, P=0.005. TSH had a substantial correlation (r=0.49, P<0.005; r=0.69, P<0.005 in PCOS and NC, respectively. There was no significant difference found in circulating leptin concentration between PCOS and NC subjects. Leptin levels in PCOS were related with metabolic impairments manifested by disturbance in FBG levels and impairment of reproductive functions in terms of reduced E2 secretion.

  9. Metabolic profiling for studying chemotype variations in Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal fruits using GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anil; Bharti, Santosh K; Tewari, Shri K; Sidhu, Om P; Roy, Raja

    2013-09-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal (Solanaceae), commonly known as Ashwagandha, is one of the most valued Indian medicinal plant with several pharmaceutical and nutraceutical applications. Metabolic profiling was performed by GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy on the fruits obtained from four chemotypes of W. somnifera. A combination of (1)H NMR spectroscopy and GC-MS identified 82 chemically diverse metabolites consisting of organic acids, fatty acids, aliphatic and aromatic amino acids, polyols, sugars, sterols, tocopherols, phenolic acids and withanamides in the fruits of W. somnifera. The range of metabolites identified by GC-MS and NMR of W. somnifera fruits showed various known and unknown metabolites. The primary and secondary metabolites observed in this study represent MVA, DOXP, shikimic acid and phenylpropanoid biosynthetic metabolic pathways. Squalene and tocopherol have been rated as the most potent naturally occurring compounds with antioxidant properties. These compounds have been identified by us for the first time in the fruits of W. somnifera. Multivariate principal component analysis (PCA) on GC-MS and NMR data revealed clear distinctions in the primary and secondary metabolites among the chemotypes. The variation in the metabolite concentration among different chemotypes of the fruits of W. somnifera suggest that specific chemovars can be used to obtain substantial amounts of bioactive ingredients for use as potential pharmacological and nutraceuticals agents.

  10. Effects of acute changes in neonatal leptin levels on food intake and long-term metabolic profiles in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado, Miriam; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Díaz, Francisca; Mela, Virginia; Viveros, Maria-Paz; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2011-11-01

    In rodents there is a rise in serum leptin levels between postnatal days (PND) 5 and 14, with this neonatal leptin surge reported to modulate the maturation of hypothalamic circuits involved in appetite regulation. We hypothesized that acute changes in neonatal leptin levels have different long-term metabolic effects depending on how and when this surge is modified. To advance the timing of the normal leptin peak, male Wistar rats were injected with leptin (sc, 3 μg/g) on PND 2. To ablate the leptin peak on PND 10, a pegylated leptin antagonist (sc, 9 μg/g) was injected. Controls received vehicle. All rats were allowed to eat ad libitum until PND 150. Increased leptin on PND 2 reduced food intake (P<0.01) after 3 months of age with no effect on body weight. Levels of total ghrelin were reduced (P<0.001) and acylated ghrelin increased (P<0.05), with no other modifications in metabolic hormones. In contrast, treatment with the leptin antagonist on PND 9 did not affect food intake but reduced body weight beginning around PND 60 (P<0.02). This was associated with a reduction in fat mass, insulin (P<0.01), and leptin (P<0.007) levels and an increase in testosterone levels (P<0.01). Hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (P<0.05) and leptin receptor (P<0.005) mRNA levels were reduced, whereas mRNA levels for uncoupling protein 2 (P<0.005) were increased in visceral fat, which may indicate an increase in energy expenditure. In conclusion, acute changes in neonatal leptin levels induce different metabolic profiles depending on how and when leptin levels are modified.

  11. Microbial and metabolic profiling reveal strong influence of water table and land-use patterns on classification of degraded tropical peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S.; Lee, W. A.; Hooijer, A.; Reuben, S.; Sudiana, I. M.; Idris, A.; Swarup, S.

    2014-04-01

    Tropical peatlands from southeast Asia are undergoing extensive drainage, deforestation and degradation for agriculture and human settlement purposes. This is resulting in biomass loss and subsidence of peat from its oxidation. Molecular profiling approaches were used to understand the relative influences of different land-use patterns, hydrological and physicochemical parameters on the state of degraded tropical peatlands. As microbial communities play a critical role in biogeochemical cascades in the functioning of peatlands, we used microbial and metabolic profiles as surrogates of community structure and functions, respectively. Profiles were generated from 230 bacterial 16 S rDNA fragments and 145 metabolic markers of 46 samples from 10 sites, including those from above and below water table in a contiguous area of 48 km2 covering five land-use types. These were degraded forest, degraded land, oil palm plantation, mixed crop plantation and settlements. Bacterial profiles were most influenced by variations in water table and land-use patterns, followed by age of drainage and peat thickness in that order. Bacterial profiling revealed differences in sites, based on the duration and frequency of water table fluctuations and on oxygen availability. Mixed crop plantations had the most diverse bacterial and metabolic profiles. Metabolic profiling, being closely associated with biogeochemical functions, could distinguish communities not only based on land-use types but also their geographic locations, thus providing a finer resolution than bacterial profiles. Agricultural inputs, such as nitrates, were highly associated with bacterial community structure of oil palm plantations, whereas phosphates and dissolved organic carbon influenced those from mixed crop plantations and settlements. Our results provide a basis for adopting molecular marker-based approaches to classify peatlands and determine relative importance of factors that influence peat functioning. Our

  12. NAD(PH-hydrate dehydratase- a metabolic repair enzyme and its role in Bacillus subtilis stress adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Petrovova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the strategies for survival stress conditions in bacteria is a regulatory adaptive system called general stress response (GSR, which is dependent on the SigB transcription factor in Bacillus sp. The GSR is one of the largest regulon in Bacillus sp., including about 100 genes; however, most of the genes that show changes in expression during various stresses have not yet been characterized or assigned a biochemical function for the encoded proteins. Previously, we characterized the Bacillus subtilis168 osmosensitive mutant, defective in the yxkO gene (encoding a putative ribokinase, which was recently assigned in vitro as an ADP/ATP-dependent NAD(PH-hydrate dehydratase and was demonstrated to belong to the SigB operon. METHODS AND RESULTS: We show the impact of YxkO on the activity of SigB-dependent Pctc promoter and adaptation to osmotic and ethanol stress and potassium limitation respectively. Using a 2DE approach, we compare the proteomes of WT and mutant strains grown under conditions of osmotic and ethanol stress. Both stresses led to changes in the protein level of enzymes that are involved in motility (flagellin, citrate cycle (isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, glycolysis (phosphoglycerate kinase, and decomposition of Amadori products (fructosamine-6-phosphate deglycase. Glutamine synthetase revealed a different pattern after osmotic stress. The patterns of enzymes for branched amino acid metabolism and cell wall synthesis (L-alanine dehydrogenase, aspartate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, ketol-acid reductoisomerase were altered after ethanol stress. CONCLUSION: We performed the first characterization of a Bacillus subtilis168 knock-out mutant in the yxkO gene that encodes a metabolite repair enzyme. We show that such enzymes could play a significant role in the survival of stressed cells.

  13. Developing an Adaptive Exposure Model to Support the Generation of Country Disaster Risk Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, Rashmin; Ishizawa, Oscar; Aubrecht, Christoph; Pita, Gonzalo; Pomonis, Antonios; Fane, Kayoum; Murray, Siobhan; Blankespoor, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Probabilistic disaster risk profiles provide estimates of potential damage to property and life caused by adverse natural hazards. A Country Disaster Risk Profile (CDRP), which is a coarse level analysis, presents an estimate of risk at the national level. We define the exposure model in that context as a geo-referenced database of assets at risk at a 1-km grid level, capturing important attributes such as geographical location, urban/rural classification, type of occupancy (e.g. residential and non-residential), building typology (e.g. wood, steel, masonry), and aggregated asset value. We present here a sensitivity analysis of key parameters of the exposure model developed in relation to CDRPs. Specifically, we analyse the sensitivity in characterisation of built up areas, and associated disaggregation of assets. We evaluate this by comparing datasets such as Modis 500m (2010), Landscan (2012), BuREF (2012), and GUF (2013). We also present a method to integrate exterior wall and roof type typologies to assess vulnerability of buildings to both earthquakes and hurricanes. Finally, developments in determining replacement value of buildings from national and sub national datasets are presented. Integration of all these developments together produces an exposure model. The sensitivity of such a model output is even more crucial in risk analysis of Small Island States (SIS), and we highlight this with case studies from the Caribbean region. This resultant gridded exposure database could be convolved with hazard and vulnerability components to create CDRPs for multiple hazards that include earthquake, flood and windstorms. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this paper are entirely those of the authors. They do not necessarily represent the views of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/World Bank and its affiliated organizations, or those of the Executive Directors of the World Bank or the governments they represent.

  14. Metabolic Profiling of Food Protective Cultures by in vitro NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebrahimi, Parvaneh

    and other health problems. Physical treatments of the products, on the other hand, can deteriorate the sensory properties of the products, and may even destroy some of the nutrients and vitamins. In this context, biopreservation, which is defined as the use of safe antibacterial/antifungal microorganism (so......-called protective cultures) has unexploited potential to inhibit the growth of pathogenic microorganisms and enhance the shelf life of the final food product. In order to apply biopreservation in food products effectively, detailed knowledge on the metabolism of protective cultures is required. The present Ph...... and in the second case PCLUSTER served as an efficient tool for quantifying inhibition assays, and finding antifungal metabolites and metabolites that correlated positively/negatively with the inhibition. The developed analytical tools are expected to be very beneficial in the studies related to the biopreservation...

  15. Offspring body size and metabolic profile - effects of lifestyle intervention in obese pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanvig, Mette; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, the prevalence of obesity has reached epidemic proportions. In Denmark one third of all pregnant women are overweight and 12 % are obese. Perhaps even more concerning, a dramatic rise in the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity has also been evident over recent decades...... disturbances in the offspring. Pregnancy offers the opportunity to modify the intrauterine environment, and maternal lifestyle changes during gestation may confer health benefits to the child. The overall aim with this PhD thesis was to study the effects of maternal obesity on offspring body size and metabolic...... outcomes, with special emphasis on the effects of lifestyle intervention during pregnancy. The thesis is based on a literature review, description of own studies and three original papers/manuscripts (I, II and III). In paper I, we used data from the Danish Medical Birth Registry. The aim of this paper...

  16. Transcript profiles uncover temporal and stress-induced changes of metabolic pathways in germinating sugar beet seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windhövel Andrea

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With a cultivation area of 1.75 Mio ha and sugar yield of 16.7 Mio tons in 2006, sugar beet is a crop of great economic importance in Europe. The productivity of sugar beet is determined significantly by seed vigour and field emergence potential; however, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these traits. Both traits exhibit large variations within sugar beet germplasm that have been difficult to ascribe to either environmental or genetic causes. Among potential targets for trait improvement, an enhancement of stress tolerance is considered because of the high negative influence of environmental stresses on trait parameters. Extending our knowledge of genetic and molecular determinants of sugar beet germination, stress response and adaptation mechanisms would facilitate the detection of new targets for breeding crop with an enhanced field emergence potential. Results To gain insight into the sugar beet germination we initiated an analysis of gene expression in a well emerging sugar beet hybrid showing high germination potential under various environmental conditions. A total of 2,784 ESTs representing 2,251 'unigenes' was generated from dry mature and germinating seeds. Analysis of the temporal expression of these genes during germination under non-stress conditions uncovered drastic transcriptional changes accompanying a shift from quiescent to metabolically active stages of the plant life cycle. Assay of germination under stressful conditions revealed 157 genes showing significantly different expression patterns in response to stress. As deduced from transcriptome data, stress adaptation mechanisms included an alteration in reserve mobilization pathways, an accumulation of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine, late embryogenesis abundant proteins and detoxification enzymes. The observed transcriptional changes are supposed to be regulated by ABA-dependent signal transduction pathway. Conclusion This study

  17. Metabolic profiling studies on the toxicological effects of realgar in rats by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxicological effects of realgar after intragastrical administration (1 g/kg body weight) were investigated over a 21 day period in male Wistar rats using metabonomic analysis of 1H NMR spectra of urine, serum and liver tissue aqueous extracts. Liver and kidney histopathology examination and serum clinical chemistry analyses were also performed. 1H NMR spectra and pattern recognition analyses from realgar treated animals showed increased excretion of urinary Kreb's cycle intermediates, increased levels of ketone bodies in urine and serum, and decreased levels of hepatic glucose and glycogen, as well as hypoglycemia and hyperlipoidemia, suggesting the perturbation of energy metabolism. Elevated levels of choline containing metabolites and betaine in serum and liver tissue aqueous extracts and increased serum creatine indicated altered transmethylation. Decreased urinary levels of trimethylamine-N-oxide, phenylacetylglycine and hippurate suggested the effects on the gut microflora environment by realgar. Signs of impairment of amino acid metabolism were supported by increased hepatic glutamate levels, increased methionine and decreased alanine levels in serum, and hypertaurinuria. The observed increase in glutathione in liver tissue aqueous extracts could be a biomarker of realgar induced oxidative injury. Serum clinical chemistry analyses showed increased levels of lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase as well as increased levels of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, indicating slight liver and kidney injury. The time-dependent biochemical variations induced by realgar were achieved using pattern recognition methods. This work illustrated the high reliability of NMR-based metabonomic approach on the study of the biochemical effects induced by traditional Chinese medicine

  18. Quantitatively metabolic profiles of salvianolic acids in rats after gastric-administration of Salvia miltiorrhiza extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanli; Zheng, Xunyang; Guo, Yanlei; Qin, Weihan; Hua, Lei; Yang, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Salvianolic acids, the well-known active components in Salvia miltiorrhiza, have been shown to possess markedly pharmacological activities. However, due to the complex in vivo course after administration, the pharmacologically active forms are still poorly understood. In present study, we evaluated the stability of eight major salvianolic acids from Danshen extract under different chemical and physiological conditions. We also quantitatively explained the absorption, metabolism and excretion of these salvianolic acids in rats after gastric-administration, which was carried out by simultaneously determining the amounts of salvianolic acids and their metabolites in the rat gastrointestinal contents, gastrointestinal mucosa, plasma, bile and urine. We found that: 1) protocatechuic aldehyde (PAL) was much stable whether in acidic environment (pH4.0) or in alkaline environment (pH8.0), while other salvianolic acids were stable in acidic environment and instable in alkaline environment; 2) PAL, salvianoli acid A (SAA) and salvianolic acid B (SAB) were instable whether in rat stomach or in small intestine, while other salvianolic acids were stable in rat stomach and instable in small intestine; 3) after gastric-administration, except PAL and Danshensu (DSS), other phenolic acids would be metabolized into DSS and caffeic acid (CA) in the rat gastrointestinal tract before absorption, and only free and glucuronidated PAL, CA and DSS were detected in rat plasma, bile and urine. In conclusion, it was the free and glucuronidated PAL, CA and DSS rather than the prototypes of other salvianolic acids that were present in plasma with considerable concentrations after gastric-administration. PMID:27370098

  19. Combining Mass Spectrometric Metabolic Profiling with Genomic Analysis: A Powerful Approach for Discovering Natural Products from Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleigrewe, Karin; Almaliti, Jehad; Tian, Isaac Yuheng; Kinnel, Robin B; Korobeynikov, Anton; Monroe, Emily A; Duggan, Brendan M; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Sherman, David H; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H

    2015-07-24

    An innovative approach was developed for the discovery of new natural products by combining mass spectrometric metabolic profiling with genomic analysis and resulted in the discovery of the columbamides, a new class of di- and trichlorinated acyl amides with cannabinomimetic activity. Three species of cultured marine cyanobacteria, Moorea producens 3L, Moorea producens JHB, and Moorea bouillonii PNG, were subjected to genome sequencing and analysis for their recognizable biosynthetic pathways, and this information was then compared with their respective metabolomes as detected by MS profiling. By genome analysis, a presumed regulatory domain was identified upstream of several previously described biosynthetic gene clusters in two of these cyanobacteria, M. producens 3L and M. producens JHB. A similar regulatory domain was identified in the M. bouillonii PNG genome, and a corresponding downstream biosynthetic gene cluster was located and carefully analyzed. Subsequently, MS-based molecular networking identified a series of candidate products, and these were isolated and their structures rigorously established. On the basis of their distinctive acyl amide structure, the most prevalent metabolite was evaluated for cannabinomimetic properties and found to be moderate affinity ligands for CB1.

  20. Comparative Effect of Insulin Sensitizers and Statin on Metabolic Profile and Ultrasonographical Score in Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Suraj Singh; Reddy, Himanshu D.; Singhal, Shubham; Singh, Dinesh Kumar; Usman, Kauser

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is a metabolic disorder involving fat accumulation in the liver. The initial management for patients with NAFLD includes lifestyle modification and weight loss in overweight or obese patients. Aim The present study was conducted to compare the efficacy of insulin sensitizers and statin in the patients of NAFLD. Materials and Methods The study included 98 patients diagnosed with NAFLD on USG (Ultrasonography) abdomen, divided into three Groups randomly and administered Metformin (Group I), Rosuvastatin (Group II) or Pioglitazone (Group III) along with dietary intervention and lifestyle modification. Their Body Mass