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Sample records for adaptation growth arrest

  1. Growth arrest specific protein (GAS) 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, T N; Rasmussen, Morten; Jaksch, C A M;

    2013-01-01

    using RNA microarray and quantitative PCR. The role of a differentially expressed gene, growth arrest specific protein 6 (GAS6), was evaluated in vitro using neonatal rat islets. Results The mRNA level of Gas6, known to be mitogenic in other tissues, was reduced in LP offspring. The mRNA content of Mafa...

  2. MRI in the assessment of growth arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohman, Martina; Kivisaari, Arto; Kivisaari, Leena [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Vehmas, Tapio [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland); Kallio, Pentti; Puntila, Juha [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare MRI with X-ray tomography in the assessment of bone bridges across the growth plate. Materials and methods: The investigation consisted of two parts. (1) Eleven children with 13 epiphyses suspected of physeal growth arrests were examined with conventional X-ray tomography and MRI. The bar was post-traumatic in eight children, postinfectious in two and due to a congenital, operated pes equinovarus in one. Three blinded radiologists separately evaluated the examinations retrospectively. (2) The images of four children with known physeal bars in the ankle were mixed with 36 normal examinations obtained 1-year after trauma and evaluated blindly by three radiologists. Results: In 5 of 13 epiphysis, the bony bridge was considered smaller on MRI than on X-ray tomography, in 7 of 13 it was considered equal, while it was larger only in one. The interobserver agreement (weighted kappa) was 0.8 (very good) for MRI, 0.76 (good) for X-ray tomography and 0.60 (moderate) for radiographs. The four bony bridges were easily detected on MRI. Conclusions: Compared to MRI, the size of bridges was estimated larger by tomography in about half of the patients. (orig.)

  3. Paclitaxel Arrests Growth of Intracellular Toxoplasma gondii

    OpenAIRE

    Estes, Randee; Vogel, Nicolas; Mack, Douglas; McLeod, Rima

    1998-01-01

    Addition of paclitaxel (Taxol) at a concentration of 1 μM to Toxoplasma gondii-infected human foreskin fibroblasts arrested parasite multiplication. Division of the T. gondii tachyzoite nucleus was inhibited, leading to syncytium-like parasite structures within the fibroblasts by 24 h after infection and treatment of the cultures. By 4 days after infection and treatment of the cultures with paclitaxel, this inhibition was irreversible, since the arrested intracellular form was incapable of le...

  4. Cell cycle control after DNA damage: arrest, recovery and adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA damage triggers surveillance mechanisms, the DNA checkpoints, that control the genome integrity. The DNA checkpoints induce several responses, either cellular or transcriptional, that favor DNA repair. In particular, activation of the DNA checkpoints inhibits cell cycle progression in all phases, depending on the stage when lesions occur. These arrests are generally transient and cells ultimately reenter the cell division cycle whether lesions have been repaired (this process is termed 'recovery') or have proved un-repairable (this option is called 'adaptation'). The mechanisms controlling cell cycle arrests, recovery and adaptation are largely conserved among eukaryotes, and much information is now available for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that is used as a model organism in these studies. (author)

  5. Cortical bone tissue resists fatigue fracture by deceleration and arrest of microcrack growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkus, O; Rimnac, C M

    2001-06-01

    Knowledge of kinetics of fatigue crack growth of microcracks is important so as to understand the dynamics of bone adaptation, remodeling, and the etiology of fatigue-based failures of cortical bone tissue. In this respect, theoretical models (Taylor, J. Biomech., 31 (1998) 587-592; Taylor and Prendergast, Proc. Instn. Mech. Engrs. Part H 211 (1997) 369-375) of microcrack growth in cortical bone have predicted a decreasing microcrack growth rate with increasing microcrack length. However, these predictions have not been observed directly. This study investigated microcrack growth and arrest through observations of surface microcracks during cyclic loading (R=0.1, 50-80MPa) of human femoral cortical bone (male, n=4, age range: 37-40yr) utilizing a video microscopy system. The change in crack length and orientation of eight surface microcracks were measured with the number of fatigue cycles from four specimens. At the applied cyclic stresses, the microcracks propagated and arrested in generally less than 10,000 cycles. The fatigue crack growth rate of all microcracks decreased with increasing crack length following initial identification, consistent with theoretical predictions. The growth rate of the microcracks was observed to be in the range of 5x10(-5) to 5x10(-7)mmcycle(-1). In addition, many of the microcracks were observed not to grow beyond 150 microm and a cyclic stress intensity factor of 0.5MNm(-3/2). The results of this study suggest that cortical bone tissue may resist fracture at the microscale by deceleration of fatigue crack growth and arrest of microcracks.

  6. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer.

  7. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:26489631

  8. The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling gene AtCHR12 mediates temporary growth arrest in Arabidopsis thaliana upon perceiving environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynárová, Ludmila; Nap, Jan-Peter; Bisseling, Ton

    2007-09-01

    One of the earliest responses of plants to environmental stress is establishing a temporary growth arrest that allows adaptation to adverse conditions. The response to abiotic stress requires the modulation of gene expression, which may be mediated by the alteration of chromatin structures. This alteration can be accomplished with the help of chromatin-remodeling enzymes, such as the various SWI/SNF classes of ATPases. Here, we investigate the role of the Arabidopsis SNF2/Brahma-type AtCHR12 chromatin-remodeling gene in plant growth and development in reaction to adverse environmental conditions. We show that the AtCHR12 chromatin-remodeling gene plays a vital role in mediating the temporary growth arrest of Arabidopsis that is induced upon perception of stress. Exposing an AtCHR12 overexpressing mutant to stress conditions leads to growth arrest of normally active primary buds, as well as to reduced growth of the primary stem. In contrast, the AtCHR12 knockout mutant shows less growth arrest than the wild-type when exposed to moderate stress. Without stress, mutant plants are indistinguishable from the wild-type, and the growth arrest response seems to depend on the severity of the stress applied. Modulation of AtCHR12 expression correlates with changes in expression of dormancy-associated genes. This is in agreement with the concept of AtCHR12 participation in priming the plants for the growth arrest response. Our data indicate that AtCHR12-associated growth arrest differs from DELLA-mediated growth restraint. This establishes AtCHR12 as a novel gene involved in the response repertoire of plants that permits flexible modulation of growth in adverse and/or otherwise limiting environments. PMID:17605754

  9. Gene expression signature in organized and growth arrested mammaryacini predicts good outcome in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Marcia V.; Martin, Katherine J.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Xhaja, Kris; Bosch, Irene; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-02-08

    To understand how non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) transit from a disorganized proliferating to an organized growth arrested state, and to relate this process to the changes that occur in breast cancer, we studied gene expression changes in non-malignant HMEC grown in three-dimensional cultures, and in a previously published panel of microarray data for 295 breast cancer samples. We hypothesized that the gene expression pattern of organized and growth arrested mammary acini would share similarities with breast tumors with good prognoses. Using Affymetrix HG-U133A microarrays, we analyzed the expression of 22,283 gene transcripts in two HMEC cell lines, 184 (finite life span) and HMT3522 S1 (immortal non-malignant), on successive days post-seeding in a laminin-rich extracellular matrix assay. Both HMECs underwent growth arrest in G0/G1 and differentiated into polarized acini between days 5 and 7. We identified gene expression changes with the same temporal pattern in both lines. We show that genes that are significantly lower in the organized, growth arrested HMEC than in their proliferating counterparts can be used to classify breast cancer patients into poor and good prognosis groups with high accuracy. This study represents a novel unsupervised approach to identifying breast cancer markers that may be of use clinically.

  10. The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suzuki, Harukazu; Forrest, Alistair R R; van Nimwegen, Erik;

    2009-01-01

    Using deep sequencing (deepCAGE), the FANTOM4 study measured the genome-wide dynamics of transcription-start-site usage in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 throughout a time course of growth arrest and differentiation. Modeling the expression dynamics in terms of predicted cis-regulatory sites...

  11. Withaferin-A induces mitotic catastrophe and growth arrest in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Ram V; Suman, Suman; Das, Trinath P; Luevano, Joe; Damodaran, Chendil

    2013-01-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is strongly associated with the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (CaP). Clinical trials of cell cycle regulators that target either the G0/G1 or G2/M phase to inhibit the growth of cancers including CaP are increasing. In this study, we determined the cell-cycle regulatory potential of the herbal molecule Withaferin-A (WA) on CaP cells. WA induced irreversible G2/M arrest in both CaP cell lines (PC3 and DU145) for 48 h. The G2/M arrest was accompanied by upregulation of...

  12. p53-Induced Growth Arrest Is Regulated by the Mitochondrial SirT3 Deacetylase

    OpenAIRE

    SiDe Li; Michaela Banck; Shiraz Mujtaba; Ming-Ming Zhou; Mary M Sugrue; Walsh, Martin J

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of p53 function is to regulate a transcriptional program in response to extracellular and intracellular stress that directs cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Independent of the role of p53 in the nucleus, some of the anti-proliferative functions of p53 reside within the mitochondria [1]. p53 can arrest cell growth in response to mitochondrial p53 in an EJ bladder carcinoma cell environment that is naïve of p53 function until induced to express p53 [2]. TP53 can...

  13. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kanayo [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Minoru, E-mail: sakaguti@gly.oups.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Tanaka, Satoshi [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Tadashi [Department of Life Science, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508 (Japan); Takaoka, Masanori [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Osaka University of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 4-20-1 Nasahara, Takatsuki, Osaka 569-1094 (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  14. Physeal growth arrest after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Sang-Heon; Agashe, Mandar Vikas; Huh, Young-Jae; Hwang, Soon-Young; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Bilateral tibial lengthening has become one of the standard treatments for upper segment-lower segment disproportion and to improve quality of life in achondroplasia. We determined the effect of tibial lengthening on the tibial physis and compared tibial growth that occurred at the physis with that in non-operated patients with acondroplasia. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of serial radiographs until skeletal maturity in 23 achondroplasia patients who und...

  15. Somatostatin receptor-1 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E

    2008-11-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:18823376

  16. Somatostatin receptor-1 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E

    2008-11-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

  17. Physeal growth arrest after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Bilateral tibial lengthening has become one of the standard treatments for upper segment-lower segment disproportion and to improve quality of life in achondroplasia. We determined the effect of tibial lengthening on the tibial physis and compared tibial growth that occurred at the physis with that in non-operated patients with acondroplasia. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of serial radiographs until skeletal maturity in 23 achondroplasia patients who underwent bilateral tibial lengthening before skeletal maturity (lengthening group L) and 12 achondroplasia patients of similar height and age who did not undergo tibial lengthening (control group C). The mean amount of lengthening of tibia in group L was 9.2 cm (lengthening percentage: 60%) and the mean age at the time of lengthening was 8.2 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 9.8 years. Results Skeletal maturity (fusion of physis) occurred at 15.2 years in group L and at 16.0 years in group C. The actual length of tibia (without distraction) at skeletal maturity was 238 mm in group L and 277 mm in group C (p = 0.03). The mean growth rates showed a decrease in group L relative to group C from about 2 years after surgery. Physeal closure was most pronounced on the anterolateral proximal tibial physis, with relative preservation of the distal physis. Interpretation Our findings indicate that physeal growth rate can be disturbed after tibial lengthening in achondroplasia, and a close watch should be kept for such an occurrence—especially when lengthening of more than 50% is attempted. PMID:22489887

  18. Growth-arrest-specific protein 2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growth-arrest-specific 2 gene was originally identified in murine fibroblasts under growth arrest conditions. Furthermore, serum stimulation of quiescent, non-dividing cells leads to the down-regulation of gas2 and results in re-entry into the cell cycle. Cytoskeleton rearrangements are critical for cell cycle progression and cell division and the Gas2 protein has been shown to co-localize with actin and microtubules in interphase mammalian cells. Despite these findings, direct evidence supporting a role for Gas2 in the mechanism of cell division has not been reported. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine whether the Gas2 protein plays a role in cell division, we over-expressed the full-length Gas2 protein and Gas2 truncations containing either the actin-binding CH domain or the tubulin-binding Gas2 domain in Xenopus laevis embryos. We found that both the full-length Gas2 protein and the Gas2 domain, but not the CH domain, inhibited cell division and resulted in multinucleated cells. The observation that Gas2 domain alone can arrest cell division suggests that Gas2 function is mediated by microtubule binding. Gas2 co-localized with microtubules at the cell cortex of Gas2-injected Xenopus embryos using cryo-confocal microscopy and co-sedimented with microtubules in cytoskeleton co-sedimentation assays. To investigate the mechanism of Gas2-induced cell division arrest, we showed, using a wound-induced contractile array assay, that Gas2 stabilized microtubules. Finally, electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Gas2 bundled microtubules into higher-order structures. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our experiments show that Gas2 inhibits cell division in Xenopus embryos. We propose that Gas2 function is mediated by binding and bundling microtubules, leading to cell division arrest.

  19. Growth arrest-specific protein 6 plasma concentrations during septic shock

    OpenAIRE

    Gibot, Sébastien; Massin, Frédéric; Cravoisy, Aurélie; Dupays, Rachel; Barraud, Damien; Nace, Lionel; Bollaert, Pierre-Edouard

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The product of growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) is a vitamin K dependent protein that is secreted by leucocytes and endothelial cells in response to injury and participates in cell survival, proliferation, migration and adhesion. Our purpose was to investigate plasma Gas6 concentration and its relation to organ dysfunction in patients with septic shock. Methods Forty-five patients with septic shock admitted to a medical adult intensive care unit were enrolled. Plasma Gas6 con...

  20. MR imaging of pituitary hyperplasia in a child with growth arrest and primary hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging of pituitary hyperplasia has been rarely described in children with primary hypothyroidism. We report a case of pituitary hyperplasia in a child presented with significant growth arrest and laboratory evidence of hypothyroidism. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed symmetrical pituitary enlargement simulating macroadenoma. After thyroid hormone replacement therapy, the child's height increased and pituitary enlargement regressed to normal. Awareness of MRI appearance of pituitary hyperplasia in children with laboratory evidence of hypothyroidism might avoid misdiagnosis for pituitary tumor, which may also manifest as growth disorder, obviating unnecessary surgery. (orig.)

  1. Protandry, sexual size dimorphism, and adaptive growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbey, Yolanda E

    2013-12-21

    Adaptive growth refers to the strategic adjustment of growth rate by individuals to maximize some component of fitness. The concept of adaptive growth proliferated in the 1990s, in part due to an influential theoretical paper by Peter Abrams and colleagues. In their 1996 paper, Abrams et al. explored the effects of time stress on optimal growth rate, development time, and adult size in seasonal organisms. In this review, I explore how the concept of adaptive growth informs our understanding of protandry (the earlier arrival of males to sites of reproduction than females) and sexual size dimorphism in seasonal organisms. I conclude that growth rate variation is an important mechanism that helps to conserve optimal levels of protandry and sexual size dimorphism in changing environments.

  2. Modulation of medium pH by Caulobacter crescentus facilitates recovery from uranium-induced growth arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dan M; Jiao, Yongqin

    2014-09-01

    The oxidized form of uranium [U(VI)] predominates in oxic environments and poses a major threat to ecosystems. Due to its ability to mineralize U(VI), the oligotroph Caulobacter crescentus is an attractive candidate for U(VI) bioremediation. However, the physiological basis for U(VI) tolerance is unclear. Here we demonstrated that U(VI) caused a temporary growth arrest in C. crescentus and three other bacterial species, although the duration of growth arrest was significantly shorter for C. crescentus. During the majority of the growth arrest period, cell morphology was unaltered and DNA replication initiation was inhibited. However, during the transition from growth arrest to exponential phase, cells with shorter stalks were observed, suggesting a decoupling between stalk development and the cell cycle. Upon recovery from growth arrest, C. crescentus proliferated with a growth rate comparable to that of a control without U(VI), although a fraction of these cells appeared filamentous with multiple replication start sites. Normal cell morphology was restored by the end of exponential phase. Cells did not accumulate U(VI) resistance mutations during the prolonged growth arrest, but rather, a reduction in U(VI) toxicity occurred concomitantly with an increase in medium pH. Together, these data suggest that C. crescentus recovers from U(VI)-induced growth arrest by reducing U(VI) toxicity through pH modulation. Our finding represents a unique U(VI) detoxification strategy and provides insight into how microbes cope with U(VI) under nongrowing conditions, a metabolic state that is prevalent in natural environments.

  3. Placental Adaptations in Growth Restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The placenta is the primary interface between the fetus and mother and plays an important role in maintaining fetal development and growth by facilitating the transfer of substrates and participating in modulating the maternal immune response to prevent immunological rejection of the conceptus. The major substrates required for fetal growth include oxygen, glucose, amino acids and fatty acids, and their transport processes depend on morphological characteristics of the placenta, such as placental size, morphology, blood flow and vascularity. Other factors including insulin-like growth factors, apoptosis, autophagy and glucocorticoid exposure also affect placental growth and substrate transport capacity. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR is often a consequence of insufficiency, and is associated with a high incidence of perinatal morbidity and mortality, as well as increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in later life. Several different experimental methods have been used to induce placental insufficiency and IUGR in animal models and a range of factors that regulate placental growth and substrate transport capacity have been demonstrated. While no model system completely recapitulates human IUGR, these animal models allow us to carefully dissect cellular and molecular mechanisms to improve our understanding and facilitate development of therapeutic interventions.

  4. Adapting RRT growth for heterogeneous environments

    KAUST Repository

    Denny, Jory

    2013-11-01

    Rapidly-exploring Random Trees (RRTs) are effective for a wide range of applications ranging from kinodynamic planning to motion planning under uncertainty. However, RRTs are not as efficient when exploring heterogeneous environments and do not adapt to the space. For example, in difficult areas an expensive RRT growth method might be appropriate, while in open areas inexpensive growth methods should be chosen. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm, Adaptive RRT, that adapts RRT growth to the current exploration area using a two level growth selection mechanism. At the first level, we select groups of expansion methods according to the visibility of the node being expanded. Second, we use a cost-sensitive learning approach to select a sampler from the group of expansion methods chosen. Also, we propose a novel definition of visibility for RRT nodes which can be computed in an online manner and used by Adaptive RRT to select an appropriate expansion method. We present the algorithm and experimental analysis on a broad range of problems showing not only its adaptability, but efficiency gains achieved by adapting exploration methods appropriately. © 2013 IEEE.

  5. Growth inhibitory effect of 4-phenyl butyric acid on human gastric cancer cells is associated with cell cycle arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long-Zhu Li; Hong-Xia Deng; Wen-Zhu Lou; Xue-Yan Sun; Meng-Wan Song; Jing Tao; Bing-Xiu Xiao; Jun-Ming Guo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the growth effects of 4-phenyl butyric acid (PBA) on human gastric carcinoma cells and their mechanisms. METHODS: Moderately-differentiated human gastric carcinoma SGC-7901 and lowly-differentiated MGC-803 cells were treated with 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60 μmol/L PBA for 1-4 d. Cell proliferation was detected using the MTT colorimetric assay. Cell cycle distributions were examined using flow cytometry. RESULTS: The proliferation of gastric carcinoma cells was inhibited by PBA in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Flow cytometry showed that SGC-7901 cells treated with low concentrations of PBA were arrested at the G0/G1 phase, whereas cells treated with high concentrations of PBA were arrested at the G2/M phase. Although MGC-803 cells treated with low concentrations of PBA were also arrested at the G0/G1 phase, cells treated with high concentrations of PBA were arrested at the S phase. CONCLUSION: The growth inhibitory effect of PBA on gastric cancer cells is associated with alteration of the cell cycle. For moderately-differentiated gastric cancer cells, the cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 and G2/M phases. For lowly-differentiated gastric cancer cells, the cell cycle was arrested at the G0/G1 and S phases.

  6. Arrested chain growth during magnetic directed particle assembly in yield stress matrix fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Jason P; McKinley, Gareth H; Doyle, Patrick S

    2012-02-28

    The process of assembling particles into organized functional structures is influenced by the rheological properties of the matrix fluid in which the assembly takes place. Therefore, tuning these properties represents a viable and as yet unexplored approach for controlling particle assembly. In this Letter, we examine the effect of the matrix fluid yield stress on the directed assembly of polarizable particles into linear chains under a uniform external magnetic field. Using particle-level simulations with a simple yield stress model, we find that chain growth follows the same trajectory as in Newtonian matrix fluids up to a critical time that depends on the balance between the yield stress and the strength of magnetic interactions between particles; subsequently, the system undergoes structural arrest. Appropriate dimensionless groups for characterizing the arresting behavior are determined and relationships between these groups and the resulting structural properties are presented. Since field-induced structures can be indefinitely stabilized by the matrix fluid yield stress and "frozen" into place as desired, this approach may facilitate the assembly of more complex and sophisticated structures. PMID:22335399

  7. Withaferin-A induces mitotic catastrophe and growth arrest in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ram V; Suman, Suman; Das, Trinath P.; Luevano, Joe; Damodaran, Chendil

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is strongly associated with the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (CaP). Clinical trials of cell cycle regulators that target either the G0/G1 or G2/M phase to inhibit the growth of cancers including CaP are increasing. In this study, we determined the cell-cycle regulatory potential of the herbal molecule Withaferin-A (WA) on CaP cells. WA induced irreversible G2/M arrest in both CaP cell lines (PC3 and DU145) for 48 h. The G2/M arrest was accompanied by upregulation of phosphorylated Wee1, phophorylated histone H3, p21 and Aurora-B. On the other hand, downregulation of cyclins (E2, A, and B1) and phorphorylated Cdc2 (Tyr15) was observed in WA-treated CaP cells. In addition, decreased levels of phosphorylated Chk1 (Ser345) and Chk2 (Thr68) were evident in WA-treated CaP cells. Our results suggest that activation of Cdc2 leads to accumulation in M-phase, with abnormal duplication, and initiation of mitotic catastrophe that results in cell death. In conclusion, these results clearly highlight the potential of WA as a regulator of the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and as a therapeutic agent for CaP. PMID:24079846

  8. Type-1-cytokines synergize with oncogene inhibition to induce tumor growth arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquavella, Nicolas; Clever, David; Yu, Zhiya; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Palmer, Douglas C.; Xi, Liqiang; Pflicke, Holger; Ji, Yun; Gros, Alena; Hanada, Ken-ichi; Goldlust, Ian S.; Mehta, Gautam U.; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Crompton, Joseph G.; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Morrow, James J.; Franco, Zulmarie; Gattinoni, Luca; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Stroncek, David F.; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Raffeld, Mark; Bosenberg, Marcus W.; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Both targeted inhibition of oncogenic driver mutations and immune-based therapies show efficacy in treatment of patients with metastatic cancer but responses can be either short-lived or incompletely effective. Oncogene inhibition can augment the efficacy of immune-based therapy but mechanisms by which these two interventions might cooperate are incompletely resolved. Using a novel transplantable BRAFV600E-mutant murine melanoma model (SB-3123), we explore potential mechanisms of synergy between the selective BRAFV600E inhibitor vemurafenib and adoptive cell transfer (ACT)-based immunotherapy. We found that vemurafenib cooperated with ACT to delay melanoma progression without significantly affecting tumor infiltration or effector function of endogenous or adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells as previously observed. Instead, we found that the T-cell cytokines IFNγ and TNFα synergized with vemurafenib to induce cell-cycle arrest of tumor cells in vitro. This combinatorial effect was recapitulated in human melanoma-derived cell lines and was restricted to cancers bearing a BRAFV600E-mutation. Molecular profiling of treated SB-3123 indicated that the provision of vemurafenib promoted the sensitization of SB-3123 to the anti-proliferative effects of T-cell effector cytokines. The unexpected finding that immune cytokines synergize with oncogene inhibitors to induce growth arrest have major implications for understanding cancer biology at the intersection of oncogenic and immune signaling and provides a basis for design of combinatorial therapeutic approaches for patients with metastatic cancer. PMID:25358764

  9. The Role of Telomere Maintenance in the Spontaneous Growth Arrest of Pediatric Low-Grade Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uri Tabori

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous tumor regression is a unique feature of pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGG. We speculated that lack of telomere maintenance is responsible for this behavior. We first looked for evidence of telomerase activity and alternative-lengthening telomeres (ALT in 56 PLGG. Telomerase activity was observed in 0 of 11 PLGG in contrast to 10 of 13 high-grade pediatric brain tumors. There was no ALT in 45 of 45 samples. We applied Q-FISH to eight patients whose indolent PLGG underwent two metachronous biopsies over a lag of several years. Telomere shortening was observed in the second biopsy in all tumors but not in a normal brain control (P 8.0 conferred a high likelihood of late recurrences in PLGG. Our findings provide a plausible biological mechanism to explain the tendency of PLGG to exhibit growth arrest and spontaneous regression. Telomere maintenance may therefore represent the first known biologic prognostic marker in PLGG.

  10. Silencing NOTCH signaling causes growth arrest in both breast cancer stem cells and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, S; Das, T P; Damodaran, C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are characterized by high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzyme activity and are refractory to current treatment modalities, show a higher risk for metastasis, and influence the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), leading to a shorter time to recurrence and death. In this study, we focused on examination of the mechanism of action of a small herbal molecule, psoralidin (Pso) that has been shown to effectively suppress the growth of BSCSs and breast cancer cells (BCCs), in breast cancer (BC) models. Methods: ALDH− and ALDH+ BCCs were isolated from MDA-MB-231 cells, and the anticancer effects of Pso were measured using cell viability, apoptosis, colony formation, invasion, migration, mammosphere formation, immunofluorescence, and western blot analysis. Results: Psoralidin significantly downregulated NOTCH1 signaling, and this downregulation resulted in growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis in both ALDH− and ALDH+ cells. Molecularly, Pso inhibited NOTCH1 signaling, which facilitated inhibition of EMT markers (β-catenin and vimentin) and upregulated E-cadherin expression, resulting in reduced migration and invasion of both ALDH− and ALDH+ cells. Conclusion: Together, our results suggest that inhibition of NOTCH1 by Pso resulted in growth arrest and inhibition of EMT in BCSCs and BCCs. Psoralidin appears to be a novel agent that targets both BCSCs and BCCs. PMID:24129237

  11. Understanding the functional difference between growth arrest-specific protein 6 and protein S : an evolutionary approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Studer, Romain A.; Opperdoes, Fred R.; Nicolaes, Gerry A. F.; Mulder, Andre B.; Mulder, Rene

    2014-01-01

    Although protein S (PROS1) and growth arrest-specific protein 6 (GAS6) proteins are homologous with a high degree of structural similarity, they are functionally different. The objectives of this study were to identify the evolutionary origins from which these functional differences arose. Bioinform

  12. Analysis of HIV-1 Vpr determinants responsible for cell growth arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Xiao-Jian

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 genome encodes a well-conserved accessory gene product, Vpr, that serves multiple functions in the retroviral life cycle, including the enhancement of viral replication in nondividing macrophages, the induction of G2 cell-cycle arrest, and the modulation of HIV-1-induced apoptosis. We previously reported the genetic selection of a panel of di-tryptophan (W-containing peptides capable of interacting with HIV-1 Vpr and inhibiting its cytostatic activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Yao, X.-J., J. Lemay, N. Rougeau, M. Clément, S. Kurtz, P. Belhumeur, and E. A. Cohen, J. Biol. Chem. v. 277, p. 48816–48826, 2002. In this study, we performed a mutagenic analysis of Vpr to identify sequence and/or structural determinants implicated in the interaction with di-W-containing peptides and assessed the effect of mutations on Vpr-induced cytostatic activity in S. cerevisiae. Results Our data clearly shows that integrity of N-terminal α-helix I (17–33 and α-helix III (53–83 is crucial for Vpr interaction with di-W-containing peptides as well as for the protein-induced cytostatic effect in budding yeast. Interestingly, several Vpr mutants, mainly in the N- and C-terminal domains, which were previously reported to be defective for cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis in human cells, still displayed a cytostatic activity in S. cerevisiae and remained sensitive to the inhibitory effect of di-W-containing peptides. Conclusions Vpr-induced growth arrest in budding yeast can be effectively inhibited by GST-fused di-W peptide through a specific interaction of di-W peptide with Vpr functional domain, which includes α-helix I (17–33 and α-helix III (53–83. Furthermore, the mechanism(s underlying Vpr-induced cytostatic effect in budding yeast are likely to be distinct from those implicated in cell-cycle alteration and apoptosis in human cells.

  13. Glycogen synthesis correlates with androgen-dependent growth arrest in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorin Frederic A

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen withdrawal in normal prostate or androgen-dependent prostate cancer is associated with the downregulation of several glycolytic enzymes and with reduced glucose uptake. Although glycogen metabolism is known to regulate the intracellular glucose level its involvement in androgen response has not been studied. Methods We investigated the effects of androgen on glycogen phosphorylase (GP, glycogen synthase (GS and on glycogen accumulation in the androgen-receptor (AR reconstituted PC3 cell line containing either an empty vector (PC3-AR-V or vector with HPV-E7 (PC3-AR-E7 and the LNCaP cell line. Results Androgen addition in PC3 cells expressing the AR mimics androgen ablation in androgen-dependent prostate cells. Incubation of PC3-AR-V or PC3-AR-E7 cells with the androgen R1881 induced G1 cell cycle arrest within 24 hours and resulted in a gradual cell number reduction over 5 days thereafter, which was accompanied by a 2 to 5 fold increase in glycogen content. 24 hours after androgen-treatment the level of Glucose-6-P (G-6-P had increased threefold and after 48 hours the GS and GP activities increased twofold. Under this condition inhibition of glycogenolysis with the selective GP inhibitor CP-91149 enhanced the increase in glycogen content and further reduced the cell number. The androgen-dependent LNCaP cells that endogenously express AR responded to androgen withdrawal with growth arrest and increased glycogen content. CP-91149 further increased glycogen content and caused a reduction of cell number. Conclusion Increased glycogenesis is part of the androgen receptor-mediated cellular response and blockage of glycogenolysis by the GP inhibitor CP-91149 further increased glycogenesis. The combined use of a GP inhibitor with hormone therapy may increase the efficacy of hormone treatment by decreasing the survival of prostate cancer cells and thereby reducing the chance of cancer recurrence.

  14. Three-dimensional MR imaging in the assessment of physeal growth arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailhan, Frederic; Chotel, Franck; Gollogly, Sohrab; Adam, Philippe; Berard, Jerome [Department of Orthopaedics, Hopital Bebrousse, 29 rue Soeur Bouvier, 69005, Lyon (France); Guibal, Anne-Laure; Guibaud, Laurent [Department of Radiology, Hopital Bebrousse, 29 rue Soeur Bouvier, 69005, Lyon (France)

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe an imaging method for identifying and characterising physeal growth arrest following physeal plate aggression. The authors describe the use of three-dimensional MRI performed with fat-suppressed three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled echo sequences followed by manual image reconstruction to create a 3D model of the physeal plate. This retrospective series reports the analysis of 33 bony physeal bridges in 28 children (mean age 10.5 years) with the use of fat-suppressed three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled echo imaging and 3D reconstructions from the source images. 3D reconstructions were obtained after the outlining was done manually on each source image. Files of all patients were reviewed for clinical data at the time of MRI, type of injury, age at MRI and bone bridge characteristics on reconstructions. Twenty-one (63%) of the 33 bridges were post-traumatic and were mostly situated in the lower extremities (19/21). The distal tibia was involved in 66% (14/21) of the cases. Bridges due to causes other than trauma were located in the lower extremities in 10/12 cases, and the distal femur represented 60% of these cases. Of the 28 patients, five presented with two bridges involving two different growth plates making a total of 33 physeal bone bars. The location and shape of each bridge was accurately identified in each patient, and in post-traumatic cases, 89% of bone bars were of Ogden type III (central) or I (peripheral). Reconstructions were obtained in 15 min and are easy to interpret. Volumes of the physeal bone bridge(s) and of the remaining normal physis were calculated. The bone bridging represented less than 1% to 47% of the total physeal plate volume. The precise shape and location of the bridge can be visualised on the 3D reconstructions. This information is useful in the surgical management of these deformities; as for the eight patients who underwent bone bar resection, an excellent correspondence was

  15. The lag-phase during diauxic growth is a trade-off between fast adaptation and high growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Dominique; Barnes, David J.

    2016-04-01

    Bi-phasic or diauxic growth is often observed when microbes are grown in a chemically defined medium containing two sugars (for example glucose and lactose). Typically, the two growth stages are separated by an often lengthy phase of arrested growth, the so-called lag-phase. Diauxic growth is usually interpreted as an adaptation to maximise population growth in multi-nutrient environments. However, the lag-phase implies a substantial loss of growth during the switch-over. It therefore remains unexplained why the lag-phase is adaptive. Here we show by means of a stochastic simulation model based on the bacterial PTS system that it is not possible to shorten the lag-phase without incurring a permanent growth-penalty. Mechanistically, this is due to the inherent and well established limitations of biological sensors to operate efficiently at a given resource cost. Hence, there is a trade-off between lost growth during the diauxic switch and the long-term growth potential of the cell. Using simulated evolution we predict that the lag-phase will evolve depending on the distribution of conditions experienced during adaptation. In environments where switching is less frequently required, the lag-phase will evolve to be longer whereas, in frequently changing environments, the lag-phase will evolve to be shorter.

  16. Interaction of influenza virus NS1 protein with growth arrest-specific protein 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mengbin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract NS1 protein is the only non-structural protein encoded by the influenza A virus, and it contributes significantly to disease pathogenesis by modulating many virus and host cell processes. A two-hybrid screen for proteins that interact with NS1 from influenza A yielded growth arrest-specific protein 8. Gas8 associated with NS1 in vitro and in vivo. Deletion analysis revealed that the N-terminal 260 amino acids of Gas8 were able to interact with NS1, and neither the RNA-binding domain nor the effector domain of NS1 was sufficient for the NS1 interaction. We also found that actin, myosin, and drebrin interact with Gas8. NS1 and β-actin proteins could be co-immunoprecipitated from extracts of transfected cells. Furthermore, actin and Gas8 co-localized at the plasma membrane. These results are discussed in relation to the possible functions of Gas8 protein and their relevance in influenza virus release.

  17. Indole-3-carbinol inhibits nasopharyngeal carcinoma growth through cell cycle arrest in vivo and in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Chen

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a common malignant tumor in the head and neck. Because of frequent recurrence and distant metastasis which are the main causes of death, better treatment is needed. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C, a natural phytochemical found in the vegetables of the cruciferous family, shows anticancer effect through various signal pathways. I3C induces G1 arrest in NPC cell line with downregulation of cell cycle-related proteins, such as CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1 and pRb. In vivo, nude mice receiving I3C protectively or therapeutically exhibited smaller tumors than control group after they were inoculated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. The expression of CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1 and pRb in preventive treatment group and drug treatment group both decreased compared with the control group. We conclude that I3C can inhibit the growth of NPC in vitro and in vivo by suppressing the expression of CDK and cyclin families. The drug was safe and had no toxic effects on normal tissues and organs.

  18. Postmortem serum protein growth arrest-specific 6 levels in sepsis-related deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmiere, Cristian; Augsburger, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Growth arrest-specific 6 (Gas6) is widely expressed in leukocytes, platelets, endothelial cells, and monocytes. It regulates various processes including granulocyte adhesion to the endothelium, cell migration, thrombus stabilization, and cytokine release. In humans, increased plasma Gas6 levels have been described in patients with sepsis and septic shock. In this study, Gas6 concentrations were measured in postmortem serum from femoral blood in a series of sepsis-related fatalities and control cases. The aims were twofold: first, to determine whether Gas6 can be reliably determined in postmortem serum; and second, to assess its diagnostic potential in identifying sepsis-related deaths. Two study groups were prospectively formed, a sepsis-related fatalities group (24 cases) and a control group (24 cases) including cases of deep vein thrombosis and fatal pulmonary embolism, cases of systemic inflammatory response syndrome in severe trauma, cases of end-stage renal failure, and cases of hanging (non-septic, non-SIRS, non-end stage renal failure cases). The preliminary results of this study seem to indicate that Gas6 can be effectively measured in postmortem serum. However, Gas6 levels in sepsis-related fatalities do not appear to be clearly distinguishable from concentrations in pulmonary embolism, severe trauma, and end-stage renal failure cases. These findings tend to support previous reports that indicated that Gas6 behaves as an acute phase reactant and can be considered a general marker of inflammation rather than a specific biomarker of sepsis. PMID:26233610

  19. A novel peptide sansalvamide analogue inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth through G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have little hope for cure because no effective therapies are available. Sansalvamide A is a cyclic depsipeptide produced by a marine fungus. We investigated the effect of a novel sansalvamide A analogue on growth, cell-cycle phases, and induction of apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The sansalvamide analogue caused marked time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis and cell proliferation of two human pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1 and S2-013). The analogue induced G0/G1 phase cell-cycle arrest and morphological changes suggesting induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was confirmed by annexin V binding. This novel sansalvamide analogue inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer cells through G0/G1 arrest and induces apoptosis. Sansalvamide analogues may be valuable for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

  20. Fibroblasts from long-lived Snell dwarf mice are resistant to oxygen-induced in vitro growth arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott P; Miller, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Snell dwarf mice live longer than controls, and show lower age-adjusted rates of lethal neoplastic diseases. Fibroblast cells from adult dwarf mice are resistant to the lethal effects of oxidative and nonoxidative stresses, including the carcinogen methyl methanesulfonate. We now report that dwarf...... in skin fibroblasts by the hormonal milieu of the Snell dwarf lead to resistance to multiple forms of injury, including the oxidative damage that contributes to growth arrest in vitro and neoplasia in intact mice....

  1. Mutation of Growth Arrest Specific 8 Reveals a Role in Motile Cilia Function and Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Wesley R; Malarkey, Erik B; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Pasek, Raymond C; Porath, Jonathan D; Birket, Susan E; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Knowles, Michael R; Leigh, Margaret W; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Challa, Anil K; Kesterson, Robert A; Rowe, Steven M; Drummond, Iain A; Parant, John M; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Porter, Mary E; Yoder, Bradley K; Berbari, Nicolas F

    2016-07-01

    Ciliopathies are genetic disorders arising from dysfunction of microtubule-based cellular appendages called cilia. Different cilia types possess distinct stereotypic microtubule doublet arrangements with non-motile or 'primary' cilia having a 9+0 and motile cilia have a 9+2 array of microtubule doublets. Primary cilia are critical sensory and signaling centers needed for normal mammalian development. Defects in their structure/function result in a spectrum of clinical and developmental pathologies including abnormal neural tube and limb patterning. Altered patterning phenotypes in the limb and neural tube are due to perturbations in the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Motile cilia are important in fluid movement and defects in motility result in chronic respiratory infections, altered left-right asymmetry, and infertility. These features are the hallmarks of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, OMIM 244400). While mutations in several genes are associated with PCD in patients and animal models, the genetic lesion in many cases is unknown. We assessed the in vivo functions of Growth Arrest Specific 8 (GAS8). GAS8 shares strong sequence similarity with the Chlamydomonas Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (NDRC) protein 4 (DRC4) where it is needed for proper flagella motility. In mammalian cells, the GAS8 protein localizes not only to the microtubule axoneme of motile cilia, but also to the base of non-motile cilia. Gas8 was recently implicated in the Hh signaling pathway as a regulator of Smoothened trafficking into the cilium. Here, we generate the first mouse with a Gas8 mutation and show that it causes severe PCD phenotypes; however, there were no overt Hh pathway phenotypes. In addition, we identified two human patients with missense variants in Gas8. Rescue experiments in Chlamydomonas revealed a subtle defect in swim velocity compared to controls. Further experiments using CRISPR/Cas9 homology driven repair (HDR) to generate one of these human missense variants in

  2. Lifespan extension in a semelparous chordate occurs via developmental growth arrest just prior to meiotic entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunasekaran Subramaniam

    Full Text Available It is proposed that the ageing process is linked to signaling from the germline such that the rate of ageing can be adjusted to the state of the reproductive system, allowing these two processes to co-evolve. Mechanistic insight into this link has been primarily derived from iteroparous reproductive models, the nematode C. elegans, and the arthropod Drosophila. Here, we examined to what extent these mechanisms are evolutionarily conserved in a semelparous chordate, Oikopleura dioica, where we identify a developmental growth arrest (GA in response to crowded, diet-restricted conditions, which can extend its lifespan at least three-fold. Under nutritional stress, the iteroparative models sacrifice germ cells that have entered meiosis, while maintaining a reduced pool of active germline stem cells (GSCs. In contrast, O. dioica only entered GA prior to meiotic entry. Stress conditions encountered after this point led to maturation in a normal time frame but with reduced reproductive output. During GA, TOR signaling was inhibited, whereas MAPK, ERK1/2 and p38 pathways were activated, and under such conditions, activation of these pathways was shown to be critical for survival. Direct inhibition of TOR signaling alone was sufficient to prevent meiotic entry and germline differentiation. This inhibition activated the p38 pathway, but did not activate the ERK1/2 pathway. Thus, the link between reproductive status and lifespan extension in response to nutrient-limited conditions is interpreted in a significantly different manner in these iteroparative versus semelparous models. In the latter case, meiotic entry is a definitive signal that lifespan extension can no longer occur, whereas in the former, meiotic entry is not a unique chronological event, and can be largely erased during lifespan extension in response to nutrient stress, and reactivated from a pool of maintained GSCs when conditions improve.

  3. Overexpression of a novel gene, Cms1, can rescue the growth arrest of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mcm10 suppressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    MCM10 protein is an essential replication factor involved in the initiation of DNA replication. A mcm10 mutant (mcm10-1) of budding yeast shows a growth arrest at 37℃. In the present work, we have isolated a mcm10-1 suppressor strain, which grows at 37℃. Interestingly, this mcm10-1 suppressor undergoes cell cycle arrest at 14℃. A novel gene, YLR003c, is identified by high-copy complementation of this suppressor. We called it as Cmsl (Complementation of Mcm 10 Suppressor). Furthermore, the experiments of transformation show that cells of mcm10-1 suppressor with high-copy plasmid but not low-copy plasmid grow at 14℃, indicating that overexpression of Cmsl can rescue the growth arrest of this mcm10 suppressor at non-permissive temperature. These results suggest that CMS1 protein may functionally interact with MCM10 protein and play a role in the regulation of DNA replication and cell cycle control.

  4. Methyl Sartortuoate Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Inducing Apoptosis and G2/M-Phase Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiusheng Lan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The potential anti-neoplastic activity of terpenoids is of continued interest. In this study, we investigate whether methyl sartortuoate, a terpenoid isolated from soft coral, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a human colon cancer cell line. Culture studies found that methyl sartortuoate inhibited colon cancer cell (LoVo and RKO growth and caused apoptotic death in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, by activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, p53 and Bax, and inactivation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 apoptosis regulating proteins. Methyl sartortuoate treatment led to reduced expression of cdc2 and up-regulated p21 and p53, suggesting that Methyl sartortuoate induced G2-M arrest through modulation of p53/p21/cdc2 pathways. Methyl sartortuoate also up-regulated phospho-JNK and phospho-p38 expression levels. This resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2-M phase and apoptosis in LoVo and RKO cells. Treatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 prevented methyl sartortuoate-induced apoptosis in LoVo cells. Moreover, methyl sartortuoate also prevented neoplasm growth in NOD-SCID nude mice inoculated with LoVo cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that methyl sartortuoate is capable of leading to activation of caspase-8, -9, -3, increasing p53 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio apoptosis through MAPK-dependent apoptosis and results in G2-M phase arrest in LoVo and RKO cells. Thus, methyl sartortuoate may be a promising anticancer candidate.

  5. Airway Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevents Arrested Alveolar Growth in Neonatal Lung Injury in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    van Haaften, Timothy; Byrne, Roisin; Bonnet, Sebastien; Rochefort, Gael Y.; Akabutu, John; Bouchentouf, Manaf; Rey-Parra, Gloria J.; Galipeau, Jacques; Haromy, Alois; Eaton, Farah; Chen, Ming; Hashimoto, Kyoko; Abley, Doris; Korbutt, Greg; Archer, Stephen L.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and emphysema are characterized by arrested alveolar development or loss of alveoli; both are significant global health problems and currently lack effective therapy. Bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) prevent adult lung injury, but their therapeutic potential in neonatal lung disease is unknown.

  6. Sequential signaling cascade of IL-6 and PGC-1α is involved in high glucose-induced podocyte loss and growth arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Il; Park, Soo Hyun, E-mail: parksh@chonnam.ac.kr

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •The pathophysiological role of IL-6 in high glucose-induced podocyte loss. •The novel role of PGC-1α in the development of diabetic nephropathy. •Signaling of IL-6 and PGC-1α in high glucose-induced dysfunction of podocyte. -- Abstract: Podocyte loss, which is mediated by podocyte apoptosis, is implicated in the onset of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we investigated the involvement of interleukin (IL)-6 in high glucose-induced apoptosis of rat podocytes. We also examined the pathophysiological role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) in this system. High glucose treatment induced not only podocyte apoptosis but also podocyte growth arrest. High glucose treatment also increased IL-6 secretion and activated IL-6 signaling. The high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis was blocked by IL-6 neutralizing antibody. IL-6 treatment or overexpression induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest, and IL-6 siRNA transfection blocked high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest. Furthermore, high glucose or IL-6 treatment increased PGC-1α expression, and PGC-1α overexpression also induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest. PGC-1α siRNA transfection blocked high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest. Collectively, these findings showed that high glucose promoted apoptosis and cell growth arrest in podocytes via IL-6 signaling. In addition, PGC-1α is involved in podocyte apoptosis and cell growth arrest. Therefore, blocking IL-6 and its downstream mediators such as IL6Rα, gp130 and PGC-1α may attenuate the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  7. HipA-triggered growth arrest and β-lactam tolerance in Escherichia coli are mediated by RelA-dependent ppGpp synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokinsky, Gregory; Baidoo, Edward E K; Akella, Swetha; Burd, Helcio; Weaver, Daniel; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; García-Martín, Héctor; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-07-01

    Persistence is a phenomenon whereby a subpopulation of bacterial cells enters a transient growth-arrested state that confers antibiotic tolerance. While entrance into persistence has been linked to the activities of toxin proteins, the molecular mechanisms by which toxins induce growth arrest and the persistent state remain unclear. Here, we show that overexpression of the protein kinase HipA in Escherichia coli triggers growth arrest by activating synthesis of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) by the enzyme RelA, a signal typically associated with amino acid starvation. We further demonstrate that chemically suppressing ppGpp synthesis with chloramphenicol relieves inhibition of DNA replication initiation and RNA synthesis in HipA-arrested cells and restores vulnerability to β-lactam antibiotics. HipA-arrested cells maintain glucose uptake and oxygen consumption and accumulate amino acids as a consequence of translational inhibition. We harness the active metabolism of HipA-arrested cells to provide a bacteriophage-resistant platform for the production of biotechnologically relevant compounds, which may represent an innovative solution to the costly problem of phage contamination in industrial fermentations.

  8. Interaction of E-cadherin and PTEN regulates morphogenesis and growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Marcia V.; Fata, Jimmie E.; Martin, Katherine J.; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-06-03

    PTEN is a dual function phosphatase with tumor suppressor function compromised in a wide spectrum of cancers. Because tissue polarity and architecture are crucial modulators of normal and malignant behavior, we postulated that PTEN may play a role in maintenance of tissue integrity. We used two non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMECs) that form polarized, growth-arrested structures (acini) when cultured in 3-dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix gels (3D lrECM). As acini begin to form, PTEN accumulates in both the cytoplasm, and at cell-cell contacts where it colocalizes with E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex. Reduction of PTEN levels by shRNA in lrECM prevents formation of organized breast acini and disrupts growth arrest. Importantly, disruption of acinar polarity and cell-cell contact by E-cadherin function-blocking antibodies reduces endogenous PTEN protein levels and inhibits its accumulation at cell-cell contacts. Conversely, in SKBR3 breast cancer cells lacking endogenous E-cadherin expression, exogenous introduction of E-cadherin gene causes induction of PTEN expression and its accumulation at sites of cell interactions. These studies provide evidence that E-cadherin regulates both the PTEN protein levels and its recruitment to cell-cell junctions in 3D lrECM indicating a dynamic reciprocity between architectural integrity and the levels and localization of PTEN. This interaction thus appears to be a critical integrator of proliferative and morphogenetic signaling in breast epithelial cells.

  9. Pharmacologic inhibition of cdk4/6 arrests the growth of glioblastoma multiforme intracranial xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Michaud, Karine; Solomon, David A.; Oermann, Eric; Kim, Jung-Sik; Zhong, Wei-Zhu; Prados, Michael D.; Ozawa, Tomoko; James, C. David; Waldman, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Activation of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (cdk4/6) occurs in the majority of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors, and represents a promising molecular target for the development of small molecule inhibitors. In the current study we investigated the molecular determinants and in vivo response of diverse GBM cell lines and xenografts to PD-0332991, a cdk4/6 specific inhibitor. In vitro testing of PD-0332991 against a panel of GBM cell lines revealed a potent G1 cell cycle arrest and induc...

  10. Using growth and arrest of Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities and Lagrangian simulations to study high-rate material strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments applying a supported shock through mating surfaces (Atwood number = 1) with geometrical perturbations have been proposed for studying strength at strain rates up to 107/s using Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. Buttler et al. recently reported experimental results for RM instability growth in copper but with an unsupported shock applied by high explosives and the geometrical perturbations on the opposite free surface (Atwood number = −1). This novel configuration allowed detailed experimental observation of the instability growth and arrest. We present results and interpretation from numerical simulations of the Buttler RM instability experiments. Highly-resolved, two-dimensional simulations were performed using a Lagrangian hydrocode and the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) strength model. The model predictions show good agreement with the data. The numerical simulations are used to examine various assumptions previously made in an analytical model and to estimate the sensitivity of such experiments to material strength.

  11. Berberine inhibits growth and induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in human cholangiocarcinoma QBC939 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Wang, Bin; Zhuang, Yun; Shao, Dong; Sun, Kewen; Chen, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic approach using non-toxic natural products may be one of the strategies for the management of the cholangiocarcinoma. Here we report that in vitro treatment of human cholangiocarcinoma QBC939 cells with berberine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid, decreased cell viability and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, which was associated with an increase in G1 arrest. Our western blot analysis showed that berberine-induced G1 cell cycle arrest was mediated through the increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (Cdki) proteins (Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27); a simultaneous decrease in Cdk2 and Cdk4 and cyclins D1, and reduced activity of the Cyclins-Cdk complex. In additional studies, treatment of QBC939 cells with different concentrations (10, 40, 80 μM) of berberine for 48 h resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase in apoptosis compared to the non-berberine-treated control, which was associated with an increased expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Together, this study for the first time identified berberine as a chemotherapeutic agent against human cholangiocarcinoma cells QBC939 cells in vitro. Further in vivo studies are required to determine whether berberine could be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the management of cholangiocarcinoma.

  12. Bypass of hexavalent chromium-induced growth arrest by a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor: Enhanced survival and mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the consequences of genotoxic injury include cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, cell survival responses after genotoxic injury can produce intrinsic death-resistance and contribute to the development of a transformed phenotype. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are integral components of key survival pathways, and are responsible for their inactivation, while PTP inhibition is often associated with enhanced cell proliferation. Our aim was to elucidate signaling events that modulate cell survival after genotoxin exposure. Diploid human lung fibroblasts (HLF) were treated with Cr(VI) (as Na2CrO4), the soluble oxyanionic dissolution product of certain particulate chromates, which are well-documented human respiratory carcinogens. In vitro soluble Cr(VI) induces a wide spectrum of DNA damage, in both the presence and absence of a broad-range PTP inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate (SOV). Notably, SOV abrogated Cr(VI)-induced clonogenic lethality. The enhanced survival of Cr(VI)-exposed cells after SOV treatment was predominantly due to a bypass of cell cycle arrest, as there was no effect of the PTP inhibitor on Cr-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the SOV effect was not due to decreased Cr uptake as evidenced by unchanged Cr-DNA adduct burden. Additionally, the bypass of Cr-induced growth arrest by SOV was accompanied by a decrease in Cr(VI)-induced expression of cell cycle inhibiting genes, and an increase in Cr(VI)-induced expression of cell cycle promoting genes. Importantly, SOV resulted in an increase in forward mutations at the HPRT locus, supporting the hypothesis that PTP inhibition in the presence of certain types of DNA damage may lead to increased genomic instability, via bypass of cell cycle checkpoints

  13. Platycodin D Induces Tumor Growth Arrest by Activating FOXO3a Expression in Prostate Cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rui; Lu, Zongliang; Liu, Kai; Guo, Jing; Liu, Jie; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Jian; Mi, Mantian; Xu, Hongxia

    2014-01-01

    Platycodin D (PD), a major saponin derived from Platycodin grandiflorum, exerted cytotoxicity against prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145 and LNCaP cells) with IC50 values in the range of 11.17 to 26.13μmol/L, whereas RWPE-1cells (a non-malignant human prostate epithelial cell line) were not significantly affected. A further study in these cell lines showed that PD could potently affect cell proliferation (indicated by the bromodeoxyuridine assay), induce cell apoptosis (determined by Annexin V-FITC flow cytometry) and cause cell cycle arrest (indicated by PI staining). After being treated with PD for 48 hours, DU145 and LNCaP cells were arrested in the G0 /G1 phase, and PC3 cells were arrested in the G2/M phase. A Western blotting analysis indicated that PD increased the expression of the FOXO3a transcription factor, decreased the expression of p-FOXO3a and MDM2 and increased the expression of FOXO-responsive genes, p21 and p27. MDM2 silencing (transiently by siRNA-MDM2) increased the PD-induced FOXO3a protein expression, while MDM2 overexpression (in cells transiently transfected with a pcDNA3-MDM2 plasmid) decreased the PD-induced expression of the FOXO3a protein. Moreover, PD dose-dependently inhibited the growth of PC3 xenograft tumors in BALB/c nude mice. A Western blotting analysis of the excised xenograft tumors indicated that similar changes in protein expression also occurred in vivo. These results suggest that PD exhibits significant activity against prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. The FOXO3a transcription factor appears to be involved in the activity of PD. Together, all of these findings provide a basis for the future development of this agent for human prostate cancer therapy. PMID:25431082

  14. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  15. Betulinic Acid Inhibits Growth of Cultured Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells In Vitro by Inducing G1 Arrest and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Kumar Vadivelu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Betulinic acid is a widely available plant-derived triterpene which is reported to possess selective cytotoxic activity against cancer cells of neuroectodermal origin and leukemia. However, the potential of betulinic acid as an antiproliferative and cytotoxic agent on vascular smooth muscle (VSMC is still unclear. This study was carried out to demonstrate the antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid on VSMCs using 3-[4,5-dimethylthizol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay, flow cytometry cell cycle assay, BrdU proliferation assay, acridine orange/propidium iodide staining, and comet assay. Result from MTT and BrdU assays indicated that betulinic acid was able to inhibit the growth and proliferation of VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 of 3.8 μg/mL significantly (P<0.05. Nevertheless, betulinic acid exhibited G1 cell cycle arrest in flow cytometry cell cycle profiling and low level of DNA damage against VSMC in acridine orange/propidium iodide and comet assay after 24 h of treatment. In conclusion, betulinic acid induced G1 cell cycle arrest and dose-dependent DNA damage on VSMC.

  16. A generic mechanism for adaptive growth rate regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikara Furusawa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available How can a microorganism adapt to a variety of environmental conditions despite the existence of a limited number of signal transduction mechanisms? We show that for any growing cells whose gene expression fluctuate stochastically, the adaptive cellular state is inevitably selected by noise, even without a specific signal transduction network for it. In general, changes in protein concentration in a cell are given by its synthesis minus dilution and degradation, both of which are proportional to the rate of cell growth. In an adaptive state with a higher growth speed, both terms are large and balanced. Under the presence of noise in gene expression, the adaptive state is less affected by stochasticity since both the synthesis and dilution terms are large, while for a nonadaptive state both the terms are smaller so that cells are easily kicked out of the original state by noise. Hence, escape time from a cellular state and the cellular growth rate are negatively correlated. This leads to a selection of adaptive states with higher growth rates, and model simulations confirm this selection to take place in general. The results suggest a general form of adaptation that has never been brought to light--a process that requires no specific mechanisms for sensory adaptation. The present scheme may help explain a wide range of cellular adaptive responses including the metabolic flux optimization for maximal cell growth.

  17. A generic mechanism for adaptive growth rate regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2008-01-01

    How can a microorganism adapt to a variety of environmental conditions despite the existence of a limited number of signal transduction mechanisms? We show that for any growing cells whose gene expression fluctuate stochastically, the adaptive cellular state is inevitably selected by noise, even without a specific signal transduction network for it. In general, changes in protein concentration in a cell are given by its synthesis minus dilution and degradation, both of which are proportional to the rate of cell growth. In an adaptive state with a higher growth speed, both terms are large and balanced. Under the presence of noise in gene expression, the adaptive state is less affected by stochasticity since both the synthesis and dilution terms are large, while for a nonadaptive state both the terms are smaller so that cells are easily kicked out of the original state by noise. Hence, escape time from a cellular state and the cellular growth rate are negatively correlated. This leads to a selection of adaptive states with higher growth rates, and model simulations confirm this selection to take place in general. The results suggest a general form of adaptation that has never been brought to light--a process that requires no specific mechanisms for sensory adaptation. The present scheme may help explain a wide range of cellular adaptive responses including the metabolic flux optimization for maximal cell growth.

  18. Differential regulation of vitamin D receptor expression in distinct leukemic cell lines upon phorbol ester-induced growth arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folgueira M.A.A.K.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A close correlation between vitamin D receptor (VDR abundance and cell proliferation rate has been shown in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, MCF-7 breast cancer and in HL-60 myeloblastic cells. We have now determined if this association occurs in other leukemic cell lines, U937 and K562, and if VDR content is related to c-myc expression, which is also linked to cell growth state. Upon phorbol myristate acetate (PMA treatment, cells from the three lineages (HL-60, U937 and K562 differentiated and expressed specific surface antigens. All cell lines analyzed were growth inhibited by PMA and the doubling time was increased, mainly due to an increased fraction of cells in the G0/G1 phase, as determined by flow cytometry measurements of incorporated bromodeoxyuridine and cell DNA content. C-myc mRNA expression was down-regulated and closely correlated to cell growth arrest. However, VDR expression in leukemic cell lines, as determined by immunofluorescence and Northern blot assays, was not consistently changed upon inhibition of cell proliferation since VDR levels were down-regulated only in HL-60 cells. Our data suggest that VDR expression cannot be explained simply as a reflection of the leukemic cell growth state.

  19. NBM-T-BBX-OS01, Semisynthesized from Osthole, Induced G1 Growth Arrest through HDAC6 Inhibition in Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Jih-Tung; Hsu, Chia-Yun; Hua, Kuo-Tai; Yu, Sheng-Yung; Huang, Chung-Yang; Chen, Chia-Nan; Liao, Chiung-Ho; Weng, Meng-Shih

    2015-01-01

    Disrupting lung tumor growth via histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibition is a strategy for cancer therapy or prevention. Targeting HDAC6 may disturb the maturation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) mediated cell cycle regulation. In this study, we demonstrated the effects of semisynthesized NBM-T-BBX-OS01 (TBBX) from osthole on HDAC6-mediated growth arrest in lung cancer cells. The results exhibited that the anti-proliferative activity of TBBX in numerous lung cancer cells was more potent than suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a clinically approved pan-HDAC inhibitor, and the growth inhibitory effect has been mediated through G1 growth arrest. Furthermore, the protein levels of cyclin D1, CDK2 and CDK4 were reduced while cyclin E and CDK inhibitor, p21Waf1/Cip1, were up-regulated in TBBX-treated H1299 cells. The results also displayed that TBBX inhibited HDAC6 activity via down-regulation HDAC6 protein expression. TBBX induced Hsp90 hyper-acetylation and led to the disruption of cyclin D1/Hsp90 and CDK4/Hsp90 association following the degradation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 proteins through proteasome. Ectopic expression of HDAC6 rescued TBBX-induced G1 arrest in H1299 cells. Conclusively, the data suggested that TBBX induced G1 growth arrest may mediate HDAC6-caused Hsp90 hyper-acetylation and consequently increased the degradation of cyclin D1 and CDK4. PMID:25946558

  20. Shocks and growth: adaptation, precaution and compensation.

    OpenAIRE

    Collier, Paul; Goderis, Benedikt; Hoeffler, Anke

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we investigate how a wide array of types of shock arising from world prices, natural events, and political violence affect growth. Our results suggest that the impact from political shocks are far greater than from natural shocks. However, our preliminary cointegration results suggest that the cost from primary commodity exporting are very large. Potentially shocks can affect growth either due to their impact, or due to the volatility that repeated shocks generate. In our empiri...

  1. Natural variation in small molecule-induced TIR-NB-LRR signaling induces root growth arrest via EDS1- and PAD4-complexed R protein VICTR in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Hauser, Felix; Park, Jiyoung; Engineer, Cawas; Liu, Amy; Ha, Tracy; Parker, Jane E; Gassmann, Walter; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-12-01

    In a chemical genetics screen we identified the small-molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that triggers rapid inhibition of early abscisic acid signal transduction via PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4)- and ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1)-dependent immune signaling mechanisms. However, mechanisms upstream of EDS1 and PAD4 in DFPM-mediated signaling remain unknown. Here, we report that DFPM generates an Arabidopsis thaliana accession-specific root growth arrest in Columbia-0 (Col-0) plants. The genetic locus responsible for this natural variant, VICTR (VARIATION IN COMPOUND TRIGGERED ROOT growth response), encodes a TIR-NB-LRR (for Toll-Interleukin1 Receptor-nucleotide binding-Leucine-rich repeat) protein. Analyses of T-DNA insertion victr alleles showed that VICTR is necessary for DFPM-induced root growth arrest and inhibition of abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing. Transgenic expression of the Col-0 VICTR allele in DFPM-insensitive Arabidopsis accessions recapitulated the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. EDS1 and PAD4, both central regulators of basal resistance and effector-triggered immunity, as well as HSP90 chaperones and their cochaperones RAR1 and SGT1B, are required for the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. Salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling pathway components are dispensable. We further demonstrate that VICTR associates with EDS1 and PAD4 in a nuclear protein complex. These findings show a previously unexplored association between a TIR-NB-LRR protein and PAD4 and identify functions of plant immune signaling components in the regulation of root meristematic zone-targeted growth arrest. PMID:23275581

  2. Natural variation in small molecule-induced TIR-NB-LRR signaling induces root growth arrest via EDS1- and PAD4-complexed R protein VICTR in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Hauser, Felix; Park, Jiyoung; Engineer, Cawas; Liu, Amy; Ha, Tracy; Parker, Jane E; Gassmann, Walter; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-12-01

    In a chemical genetics screen we identified the small-molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that triggers rapid inhibition of early abscisic acid signal transduction via PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4)- and ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1)-dependent immune signaling mechanisms. However, mechanisms upstream of EDS1 and PAD4 in DFPM-mediated signaling remain unknown. Here, we report that DFPM generates an Arabidopsis thaliana accession-specific root growth arrest in Columbia-0 (Col-0) plants. The genetic locus responsible for this natural variant, VICTR (VARIATION IN COMPOUND TRIGGERED ROOT growth response), encodes a TIR-NB-LRR (for Toll-Interleukin1 Receptor-nucleotide binding-Leucine-rich repeat) protein. Analyses of T-DNA insertion victr alleles showed that VICTR is necessary for DFPM-induced root growth arrest and inhibition of abscisic acid-induced stomatal closing. Transgenic expression of the Col-0 VICTR allele in DFPM-insensitive Arabidopsis accessions recapitulated the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. EDS1 and PAD4, both central regulators of basal resistance and effector-triggered immunity, as well as HSP90 chaperones and their cochaperones RAR1 and SGT1B, are required for the DFPM-induced root growth arrest. Salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling pathway components are dispensable. We further demonstrate that VICTR associates with EDS1 and PAD4 in a nuclear protein complex. These findings show a previously unexplored association between a TIR-NB-LRR protein and PAD4 and identify functions of plant immune signaling components in the regulation of root meristematic zone-targeted growth arrest.

  3. Involvement of MINK, a Ste20 Family Kinase, in Ras Oncogene-Induced Growth Arrest in Human Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicke, B.; Bastien, J.; Khanna, S.J.; Warne, P.H.; Cowling, V.; Cook, S.J.; Peters, G.; Delpuech, O.; Schulze, A.; Berns, K.; Mullenders, J.; Beijersbergen, R.L.; Bernards, R.A.; Ganesan, T.S.; Downward, J.; Hancock, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of activated Ras to induce growth arrest of human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells via induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 has been used to screen for Ras pathway signaling components using a library of RNA interference (RNAi) vectors targeting the kino

  4. Novel protein kinase D inhibitors cause potent arrest in prostate cancer cell growth and motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazo John S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinase D (PKD has been implicated in a wide range of cellular processes and pathological conditions including cancer. However, targeting PKD therapeutically and dissecting PKD-mediated cellular responses remains difficult due to lack of a potent and selective inhibitor. Previously, we identified a novel pan-PKD inhibitor, CID755673, with potency in the upper nanomolar range and high selectivity for PKD. In an effort to further enhance its selectivity and potency for potential in vivo application, small molecule analogs of CID755673 were generated by modifying both the core structure and side-chains. Results After initial activity screening, five analogs with equal or greater potencies as CID755673 were chosen for further analysis: kb-NB142-70, kb-NB165-09, kb-NB165-31, kb-NB165-92, and kb-NB184-02. Our data showed that modifications to the aromatic core structure in particular significantly increased potency while retaining high specificity for PKD. When tested in prostate cancer cells, all compounds inhibited PMA-induced autophosphorylation of PKD1, with kb-NB142-70 being most active. Importantly, these analogs caused a dramatic arrest in cell proliferation accompanying elevated cytotoxicity when applied to prostate cancer cells. Cell migration and invasion were also inhibited by these analogs with varying potencies that correlated to their cellular activity. Conclusions Throughout the battery of experiments, the compounds kb-NB142-70 and kb-NB165-09 emerged as the most potent and specific analogs in vitro and in cells. These compounds are undergoing further testing for their effectiveness as pharmacological tools for dissecting PKD function and as potential anti-cancer agents in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  5. Growth arrest and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells induced by hexamethylene bisacetamide

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang, Gao-Liang; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Min LIU; Chen, Rui-Chuan; Huang, Zhi; Jiang, Rui-Sheng; Chen, Fu; Hong, Shui-Gen; Bao, Shi-Deng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the cellular effects of hybrid polar compound hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) on the growth and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and to provide the molecular mechanism for potential application of HMBA in the treatment of liver cancer.

  6. Inhibition of lung cancer cell growth by quercetin glucuronides via G2/M arrest and induction of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jen-Hung; Hsia, Te-Chun; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee; Chou, Chi-Chung; Wei, Yau-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2006-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in many developed countries, including Taiwan. Quercetin, a widely distributed bioflavonoid, is well known to induce growth inhibition in a variety of human cancer cells. Quercetin glucuronides are the main circulating metabolites after dietary supplements with quercetin in humans. However, there is little information available as to how quercetin glucuronides affect human cancer cells. We investigated the effects of quercetin glucuronides in a human lung cancer cell line NCI-H209. We checked the cell viability, cell cycle checkpoint proteins, pro- and antiapoptotic proteins, caspase-3 activity, and gene expression by flow cytometry and Western blot. The viability of cells decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed a significant increase of the proportion of cells in G2/M phase and subG0/G1 phase (corresponding to apoptotic cells). Moreover, quercetin glucuronides increased the expressions of cyclin B, Cdc25c-ser-216-p, and Wee1 proteins, indicating the G2/M arrest. We also demonstrated a concurrent decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, up-regulation of Bax, down-regulation of Bcl-2, and activation of caspase-3, and subsequently, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. In addition, quercetin glucuronide-induced apoptosis was totally blocked by the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp fluoromethylketone. Taken together, we demonstrated that quercetin glucuronides inhibited proliferation through G2/M arrest of the cell cycle and induced apoptosis via caspase-3 cascade in the human lung cancer cell line NCI-H209. Delineation of the biological effects of specific major quercetin metabolites on chemotherapeutic potential or chemoprevention of human cancers warrants further investigation. PMID:16280456

  7. Non-homologous end joining dependency of {gamma}-irradiation-induced adaptive frameshift mutation formation in cell cycle-arrested yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, Erich [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Molecular Genetics, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: erich.heidenreich@meduniwien.ac.at; Eisler, Herfried [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Molecular Genetics, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2004-11-22

    There is a strong selective pressure favoring adaptive mutations which relieve proliferation-limiting adverse living conditions. Due to their importance for evolution and pathogenesis, we are interested in the mechanisms responsible for the formation of such adaptive, gain-of-fitness mutations in stationary-phase cells. During previous studies on the occurrence of spontaneous reversions of an auxotrophy-causing frameshift allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we noticed that about 50% of the adaptive reversions depended on a functional non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here, we show that the occasional NHEJ component Pol4, which is the yeast ortholog of mammalian DNA polymerase lambda, is not required for adaptive mutagenesis. An artificially imposed excess of DSBs by {gamma}-irradiation resulted in a dramatic increase in the incidence of adaptive, cell cycle arrest-releasing frameshift reversions. By the use of DNA ligase IV-deficient strains we detected that the majority of the {gamma}-induced adaptive mutations were also dependent on a functional NHEJ pathway. This suggests that the same mutagenic NHEJ mechanism acts on spontaneously arising as well as on ionizing radiation-induced DSBs. Inaccuracy of the NHEJ repair pathway may extensively contribute to the incidence of frameshift mutations in resting (non-dividing) eukaryotic cells, and thus act as a driving force in tumor development.

  8. H4 histamine receptors mediate cell cycle arrest in growth factor-induced murine and human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-France Petit-Bertron

    Full Text Available The most recently characterized H4 histamine receptor (H4R is expressed preferentially in the bone marrow, raising the question of its role during hematopoiesis. Here we show that both murine and human progenitor cell populations express this receptor subtype on transcriptional and protein levels and respond to its agonists by reduced growth factor-induced cell cycle progression that leads to decreased myeloid, erythroid and lymphoid colony formation. H4R activation prevents the induction of cell cycle genes through a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway that is not associated with apoptosis. It is mediated specifically through H4R signaling since gene silencing or treatment with selective antagonists restores normal cell cycle progression. The arrest of growth factor-induced G1/S transition protects murine and human progenitor cells from the toxicity of the cell cycle-dependent anticancer drug Ara-C in vitro and reduces aplasia in a murine model of chemotherapy. This first evidence for functional H4R expression in hematopoietic progenitors opens new therapeutic perspectives for alleviating hematotoxic side effects of antineoplastic drugs.

  9. CSBF/C10orf99, a novel potential cytokine, inhibits colon cancer cell growth through inducing G1 arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wen; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Heyu; Liu, Baocai; Mo, Xiaoning; Li, Ting; Li, Lin; Cheng, Xiaojing; Zhang, Lianhai; Ji, Jiafu; Wang, Pingzhang; Han, Wenling

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are soluble proteins that exert their functions by binding specific receptors. Many cytokines play essential roles in carcinogenesis and have been developed for the treatment of cancer. In this study, we identified a novel potential cytokine using immunogenomics designated colon-derived SUSD2 binding factor (CSBF), also known as chromosome 10 open reading frame 99 (C10orf99). CSBF/C10orf99 is a classical secreted protein with predicted molecular mass of 6.5 kDa, and a functional ligand of Sushi Domain Containing 2 (SUSD2). CSBF/C10orf99 has the highest expression level in colon tissue. Both CSBF/C10orf99 and SUSD2 are down-regulated in colon cancer tissues and cell lines with different regulation mechanisms. CSBF/C10orf99 interacts with SUSD2 to inhibit colon cancer cell growth and induce G1 cell cycle arrest by down-regulating cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6). CSBF/C10orf99 displays a bell-shaped activity curve with the optimal effect at ~10 ng/ml. Its growth inhibitory effects can be blocked by sSUSD2-Fc soluble protein. Our results suggest that CSBF/C10orf99 is a novel potential cytokine with tumor suppressor functions. PMID:25351403

  10. Higher order nuclear organization in growth arrest of humanmammary epithelial cells: A novel role for telomere-associated proteinTIN2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminker, Patrick; Plachot, Cedric; Kim, Sahn-Ho; Chung, Peter; Crippen, Danielle; Petersen, Ole W.; Bissell, Mina J.; Campisi, Judith; Lelievre, Sophie A.

    2004-12-15

    Nuclear organization, such as the formation of specific nuclear subdomains, is generally thought to be involved in the control of cellular phenotype; however, there are relatively few specific examples of how mammalian nuclei organize during radical changes in phenotype, such as those which occur during differentiation and growth arrest. Using human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) in which growth arrest is essential for morphological differentiation, we show that the arrest of cell proliferation is accompanied by a reorganization of the telomere-associated protein, TIN2, into one to three large nuclear subdomains. The large TIN2 domains do not contain telomeres and occur concomitant with the continued presence of TIN2 at telomeres. The TIN2 domains were sensitive to DNAse, but not RNAse, occurred frequently, but not exclusively near nucleoli, and overlapped often with dense domains containing heterochromatin protein l{gamma}. Expression of truncated forms of TIN2 simultaneously prevented the formation of TIN2 domains and relaxed the stringent morphogenesis-induced growth arrest in HMECs. Our findings reveal a novel extra-telomeric organization of TIN2 associated with the control of cell proliferation and identify TIN2 as an important regulator of mammary epithelial differentiation.

  11. Metformin inhibits salivary adenocarcinoma growth through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yuqi; Yu, Tao; Yang, Jian; Zhang, Tianqing; Zhou, Yang; He, Fan; Kurago, Zoya; Myssiorek, David; Wu, Yingjie; Lee, Peng; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of metformin have been observed in many types of cancer. However, its effect on human salivary gland carcinoma is unknown. The effect of metformin alone or in combination with pp242 (an mTOR inhibitor) on salivary adenocarcinoma cells growth were determined in vitro and in vivo. We found that metformin suppressed HSY cell growth in vitro in a time and dose dependent manner associated with a reduced expression of MYC onco-protein, and the same inhibitory effect of metfor...

  12. Identification and characterization of CCAAT/Enhancer Binding proteindelta (C/EBPdelta target genes in G0 growth arrested mammary epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Tim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Proteinδ (C/EBPδ is a member of the highly conserved C/EBP family of leucine zipper (bZIP proteins. C/EBPδ is highly expressed in G0 growth arrested mammary epithelial cells (MECs and "loss of function" alterations in C/EBPδ have been associated with impaired contact inhibition, increased genomic instability and increased cell migration. Reduced C/EBPδ expression has also been reported in breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia (AML. C/EBPδ functions as a transcriptional activator, however, only a limited number of C/EBPδ target genes have been reported. As a result, the role of C/EBPδ in growth control and the potential mechanisms by which "loss of function" alterations in C/EBPδ contribute to tumorigenesis are poorly understood. The goals of the present study were to identify C/EBPδ target genes using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation coupled with a CpG Island (HCG12K Array gene chip ("ChIP-chip" assay and to assess the expression and potential functional roles of C/EBPδ target genes in growth control. Results ChIP-chip assays identified ~100 C/EBPδ target gene loci which were classified by gene ontology (GO into cell adhesion, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, signal transduction, intermediary metabolism, gene transcription, DNA repair and solute transport categories. Conventional ChIP assays validated the ChIP-chip results and demonstrated that 14/14 C/EBPδ target loci were bound by C/EBPδ in G0 growth arrested MCF-12A MECs. Gene-specific RT-PCR analysis also demonstrated C/EBPδ-inducible expression of 14/14 C/EBPδ target genes in G0 growth arrested MCF-12A MECs. Finally, expression of endogenous C/EBPδ and selected C/EBPδ target genes was also demonstrated in contact-inhibited G0 growth arrested nontransformed human MCF-10A MECs and in mouse HC11 MECs. The results demonstrate consistent activation and downstream function of C/EBPδ in growth arrested human and murine MECs. Conclusion

  13. Live-Cell Imaging Visualizes Frequent Mitotic Skipping During Senescence-Like Growth Arrest in Mammary Carcinoma Cells Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masatoshi, E-mail: msuzuki@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki (Japan); Yamauchi, Motohiro; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi [Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Senescence-like growth arrest in human solid carcinomas is now recognized as the major outcome of radiotherapy. This study was designed to analyze cell cycle during the process of senescence-like growth arrest in mammary carcinoma cells exposed to X-rays. Methods and Materials: Fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicators were introduced into the human mammary carcinoma cell line MCF-7. Cell cycle was sequentially monitored by live-cell imaging for up to 5 days after exposure to 10 Gy of X-rays. Results: Live-cell imaging revealed that cell cycle transition from G2 to G1 phase without mitosis, so-called mitotic skipping, was observed in 17.1% and 69.8% of G1- and G2-irradiated cells, respectively. Entry to G1 phase was confirmed by the nuclear accumulation of mKO{sub 2}-hCdt1 as well as cyclin E, which was inversely correlated to the accumulation of G2-specific markers such as mAG-hGeminin and CENP-F. More than 90% of cells skipping mitosis were persistently arrested in G1 phase and showed positive staining for the senescent biochemical marker, which is senescence-associated ss-galactosidase, indicating induction of senescence-like growth arrest accompanied by mitotic skipping. While G2 irradiation with higher doses of X-rays induced mitotic skipping in approximately 80% of cells, transduction of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for p53 significantly suppressed mitotic skipping, suggesting that ionizing radiation-induced mitotic skipping is associated with p53 function. Conclusions: The present study found the pathway of senescence-like growth arrest in G1 phase without mitotic entry following G2-irradiation.

  14. Arrest of Myelination and Reduced Axon Growth when Schwann Cells Lack mTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, Diane L.; Krols, Michiel; Wu, Lai-Man N.; Grove, Matthew; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Brophy, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    In developing peripheral nerves differentiating Schwann cells sort individual axons from bundles and ensheath them to generate multiple layers of myelin. In recent years there has been an increasing understanding of the extracellular and intracellular factors that initiate and stimulate Schwann cell myelination together with a growing appreciation of some of the signalling pathways involved. However, our knowledge of how Schwann cell growth is regulated during myelination is still incomplete....

  15. Acetate supplementation as a means of inducing glioblastoma stem-like cell growth arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Patrick M; Tighe, Scott W; Driscoll, Heather E; Fortner, Karen A; Viapiano, Mariano S; Jaworski, Diane M

    2015-08-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most common primary adult malignant brain tumor, is associated with a poor prognosis due, in part, to tumor recurrence mediated by chemotherapy and radiation resistant glioma stem-like cells (GSCs). The metabolic and epigenetic state of GSCs differs from their non-GSC counterparts, with GSCs exhibiting greater glycolytic metabolism and global hypoacetylation. However, little attention has been focused on the potential use of acetate supplementation as a therapeutic approach. N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA), the primary storage form of brain acetate, and aspartoacylase (ASPA), the enzyme responsible for NAA catalysis, are significantly reduced in GBM tumors. We recently demonstrated that NAA supplementation is not an appropriate therapeutic approach since it increases GSC proliferation and pursued an alternative acetate source. The FDA approved food additive Triacetin (glyceryl triacetate, GTA) has been safely used for acetate supplementation therapy in Canavan disease, a leukodystrophy due to ASPA mutation. This study characterized the effects of GTA on the proliferation and differentiation of six primary GBM-derived GSCs relative to established U87 and U251 GBM cell lines, normal human cerebral cortical astrocytes, and murine neural stem cells. GTA reduced proliferation of GSCs greater than established GBM lines. Moreover, GTA reduced growth of the more aggressive mesenchymal GSCs greater than proneural GSCs. Although sodium acetate induced a dose-dependent reduction of GSC growth, it also reduced cell viability. GTA-mediated growth inhibition was not associated with differentiation, but increased protein acetylation. These data suggest that GTA-mediated acetate supplementation is a novel therapeutic strategy to inhibit GSC growth.

  16. Resistance to ultraviolet-induced apoptosis in DNA repair deficient growth arrested human fibroblasts is not related to recovery from RNA transcription blockage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of ultraviolet (UV-C) photoproducts on apoptosis induction was investigated in growth arrested (confluent) and proliferating human primary fibroblasts. Confluent fibroblasts were more resistant to UV-C-induced apoptosis than proliferating cells, and this was observed for normal human cells and for cells from patients with Cockayne and trichothiodystrophy syndromes, deficient in transcription coupled repair. This resistance was sustained for at least seven days and was not due to DNA repair efficiency, as the removal of CPDs in the genome was similar under both growth conditions. There was no correlation between reduced apoptosis and RNA synthesis recovery. Following UV-C treatment, proliferating and confluent fibroblasts showed a similar level of RNA synthesis inhibition and recovery from transcription blockage. These results support the hypothesis that the decrease of DNA replication, in growth arrested cells, protects cell from UV-C-induced apoptosis, even in the presence of DNA lesions

  17. Interleukin-1beta can mediate growth arrest and differentiation via the leukemia inhibitory factor/JAK/STAT pathway in medullary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-In; Strock, Christopher J; Ball, Douglas W; Nelkin, Barry D

    2005-02-01

    Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) is a pleiotropic cytokine that can induce several cellular signal transduction pathways. Here, we show that IL-1beta can induce cell cycle arrest and differentiation in the human medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cell line, TT. IL-1beta induces cell cycle arrest accompanied by morphological changes and expression of the neuroendocrine marker calcitonin. These changes are blocked by the MEK1/2 specific inhibitor U0126, indicating that MEK1/2 is essential for IL-1beta signaling in TT cells. IL-1beta induces expression of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and activation of STAT3 via the MEK/ERK pathway. This activation of STAT3 could be abrogated by treatment with anti-LIF neutralizing antibody or anti-gp130 blocking antibody, indicating that induction of LIF expression is sufficient and essential for STAT3 activation by IL-1beta. In addition to activation of the LIF/JAK/STAT pathway, IL-1beta also induced an MEK/ERK-mediated intracellular cell-autonomous signaling pathway that is independently sufficient for growth arrest and differentiation. Thus, IL-1beta activates the MEK/ERK pathway to induce growth arrest and differentiation in MTC cells via dual independent signaling mechanisms, the cell-extrinsic LIF/JAK/STAT pathway, and the cell-intrinsic autonomous signaling pathway.

  18. Linear Growth Arrest Without Weight Gain Due to Overuse of Topical Clobetasol

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Razavi; Milad Sanginabadi

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged potent topical glucocorticoid therapy in infants can cause iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. This case highlights the rarity of poor weight gain in iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. A 17-month-old boy was referred to outpatients pediatric endocrine clinic for evaluation of growth failure. On presentation his weight was 9.7kg (5th percentile) and height was 72cm (-3.6 SD below mean for age and sex). Systemic examination revealed grossly moon-like face, hypertrichosis and thin skin in the g...

  19. Linear growth arrest without weight gain due to overuse of topical clobetasol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Zahra; Sanginabadi, Milad

    2014-11-01

    Prolonged potent topical glucocorticoid therapy in infants can cause iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome. This case highlights the rarity of poor weight gain in iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome. A 17-month-old boy was referred to outpatients pediatric endocrine clinic for evaluation of growth failure. On presentation his weight was 9.7kg (5th percentile) and height was 72cm (-3.6 SD below mean for age and sex). Systemic examination revealed grossly moon-like face, hypertrichosis and thin skin in the genital area. His mother reported using local clobetasol for the previous seven months for his diaper dermatitis. Baseline plasma cortisol was low (0.3ng/ml, normal range: 60 to 280ng/ml). During standard dose of synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone test, the peak cortisol level was 0.4ng/ml (N>180ng/ml) and was consistent with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression. The patient's clinical presentation and laboratory investigations confirmed the diagnosis of secondary adrenal insufficiency and iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome. He was treated successfully by discontinuing use of clobetasol. His appearance and growth returned to normal within two months. Morning cortisol was 101.2ng/ml after stopping the oral physiologic dose of hydrocortisone. Our case differed from other reports of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome by presenting in poor weight gain rather than obesity. PMID:25584165

  20. Linear Growth Arrest Without Weight Gain Due to Overuse of Topical Clobetasol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Razavi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged potent topical glucocorticoid therapy in infants can cause iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. This case highlights the rarity of poor weight gain in iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. A 17-month-old boy was referred to outpatients pediatric endocrine clinic for evaluation of growth failure. On presentation his weight was 9.7kg (5th percentile and height was 72cm (-3.6 SD below mean for age and sex. Systemic examination revealed grossly moon-like face, hypertrichosis and thin skin in the genital area. His mother reported using local clobetasol for the previous seven months for his diaper dermatitis. Baseline plasma cortisol was low (0.3ng/ml, normal range: 60 to 280ng/ml. During standard dose of synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone test, the peak cortisol level was 0.4ng/ml (N>180ng/ml and was consistent with hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis suppression. The patient’s clinical presentation and laboratory investigations confirmed the diagnosis of secondary adrenal insufficiency and iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. He was treated successfully by discontinuing use of clobetasol. His appearance and growth returned to normal within two months. Morning cortisol was 101.2ng/ml after stopping the oral physiologic dose of hydrocortisone. Our case differed from other reports of iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome by presenting in poor weight gain rather than obesity.

  1. Inhibitor of growth 4 suppresses colorectal cancer growth and invasion by inducing G1 arrest, inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hui; Yin, Hong; Yan, Su; Tao, Min; Xie, Yufeng; Chen, Weichang

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have found that inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4), a tumor suppressor, is reduced in human colorectal cancer (CRC), and is inversely correlated with clinical Dukes' stage, histological grade, lymph node metastasis and microvessel density (MVD). However, its underlying mechanism remains undetermined. In the present study, we analyzed ING4 expression in a panel of human CRC cells using low (LS174T and SW480) and high (LoVo and SW620) metastatic cell lines. We demonstrated that both the low and high metastatic CRC cells exhibited a lower level of ING4 compared to the level in normal human colorectal mucous epithelial FHC cells. Furthermore, ING4 expression in high metastatic CRC cells was less than that in low metastatic CRC cells. We then generated a lentivirus construct expressing ING4 and green fluorescent protein (GFP), established a ING4-stably transgenic LoVo CRC cell line, and investigated the effect of lentiviral-mediated ING4 expression on high metastatic LoVo CRC cells. Gain-of-function studies revealed that ING4 significantly inhibited LoVo CRC cell growth and invasion in vitro and induced cell cycle G1 phase arrest. Moreover, ING4 obviously suppressed LoVo CRC subcutaneously xenografted tumor growth and reduced tumor MVD in vivo in athymic BALB/c nude mice. Mechanistically, ING4 markedly upregulated P21 and E-cadherin but downregulated cyclin E, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Snail1, N-cadherin and vimentin in the LoVo CRC cells. Our data provide compelling evidence that i) ING4 suppresses CRC growth possibly via induction of G1 phase arrest through upregulation of P21 cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor and downregulation of cyclin E as well as inhibition of tumor angiogenesis through reduction of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF proangiogenic factors; ii) ING4 inhibits CRC invasion and metastasis probably via a switch from mesenchymal marker N-cadherin to epithelial marker E-cadherin through downregulation of

  2. Resveratrol oligomers isolated from Carex species inhibit growth of human colon tumorigenic cells mediated by cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Gromek, Samantha; Niesen, Daniel; Seeram, Navindra P; Henry, Geneive E

    2011-08-24

    Research has shown that members of the Carex genus produce biologically active stilbenoids including resveratrol oligomers. This is of great interest to the nutraceutical industry given that resveratrol, a constituent of grape and red wine, has attracted immense research attention due to its potential human health benefits. In the current study, five resveratrol oligomers (isolated from Carex folliculata and Carex gynandra ), along with resveratrol, were evaluated for antiproliferative effects against human colon cancer (HCT-116, HT-29, Caco-2) and normal human colon (CCD-18Co) cells. The resveratrol oligomers included one dimer, two trimers, and two tetramers: pallidol (1); α-viniferin (2) and trans-miyabenol C (3); and kobophenols A (4) and B (5), respectively. Although not cytotoxic, the resveratrol oligomers (1-5), as well as resveratrol, inhibited growth of the human colon cancer cells. Among the six stilbenoids, α-viniferin (2) was most active against the colon cancer cells with IC(50) values of 6-32 μM (>2-fold compared to normal colon cells). Moreover, α-viniferin (at 20 μM) did not induce apoptosis but arrested cell cycle (in the S-phase) for the colon cancer but not the normal colon cells. This study adds to the growing body of knowledge supporting the anticancer effects of resveratrol and its oligomers. Furthermore, Carex species should be investigated for their nutraceutical potential given that they produce biologically active stilbenoids such as α-viniferin. PMID:21761862

  3. Silica Nanoparticles Sensitize Human Multiple Myeloma Cells to Snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia Venom-Induced Apoptosis and Growth Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douaa Sayed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Multiple myeloma (MM, an almost incurable disease, is the second most common blood cancer. Initial chemotherapeutic treatment could be successful; however, resistance development urges the use of higher toxic doses accompanied by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The establishment of more effective treatments that can overcome or circumvent chemoresistance has become a priority. We recently demonstrated that venom extracted from Walterinnesia aegyptia (WEV either alone or in combination with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NPs mediated the growth arrest and apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of WEV alone and WEV+NP on proliferation and apoptosis of MM cells. Methods. The impacts of WEV alone and WEV+NP were monitored in MM cells from 70 diagnosed patients. The influences of WEV and WEV+NP were assessed with flow cytometry analysis. Results. WEV alone and WEV+NP decreased the viability of MM cells. Using a CFSE proliferation assay, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited MM cell proliferation. Furthermore, analysis of the cell cycle using the propidium iodide (PI staining method indicated that WEV+NP strongly altered the cell cycle of MM cells and enhanced the induction of apoptosis. Conclusions. Our data reveal the biological effects of WEV and WEV+NP on MM cells that enable these compounds to function as effective treatments for MM.

  4. Antisense oligonucleotide targeting at the initiator of hTERT arrests growth of hepatoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Xia Liu; Wen-Sheng Sun; Ying-Lin Cao; Chun-Hong Ma; Li-Hui Han; Li-Ning Zhang; Zhen-Guang Wang; Fa-Liang Zhu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inhibitory effect of antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotide (asON) complementary to the initiator of human telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT)on the growth of hepatoma cells.METHODS: The as-hTERT was synthesized by using a DNA synthesizer. HepG2.2.15 cells were treated with ashTERT at the concentration of 10 μmol/L. After 72 h, these cells were obtained for detecting growth inhibition,telomerase activity using the methods of MTT, TRAP-PCR-ELISA, respectively. BALB/c(nu/nu) mice were injected HepG2.2.15 cells and a human-nude mice model was obtained. There were three groups for anti-tumor activity study. Once tumors were established, these animals in the first group were administered as-hTERT and saline.Apoptosis of tumor cells was detected by FCM. In the 2nd group, the animals were injected HepG2.2.15 cells together with as-hTERT. In the third group, the animals were given as-hTERT 24 hours postinjection of HepG2.2.15 cells. The anti-HBV effects were assayed with ELISA ih vitro and in vivo.RESULTS: Growth inhibition was observed in cells treated with as-hTERT ih vitro. A significant different in the value of A570-A630 was found between cells treated with as-hTERT and control (P<0.01) by MTT method. The telomerase activity of tumor cells treated with as-hTERT was reduced,the value of A450 nm was 0.42 compared to control (1,49)with TRAP-PCR-ELISA. The peak of apoptosis in tumor cells given as-hTERT was 21. 12%, but not seen in saline-treated control. A prolonged period of carcinogenesis was observed in the second and third group animals. There was inhibitory effect on the expression of HBsAg and HBeAg ih vivo and in vitro.CONCLUSION: As-hTERT has an anti-tumor activity, which may be useful for gene therapy of tumors.

  5. Overexpression of the promyelocytic leukemia gene suppresses growth of human bladder cancer cells by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Dalin 贺大林; NAN Xunyi 南勋义; Chang Kun-Song; WANG Yafeng 王亚峰; Chung Leland W.K.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To examine the anti-oncogenic effects of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) on bladder cancer and to explore its molecular mechanisms of growth suppression.Methods Wild-type PML was transfected into bladder cancer cells (5637 cell) and expressed in a replication-deficient adenovirus-mediated gene delivery system and introduced into human bladder cancer cells (5637 cell) in vitro and in vivo. The effect and mechanisms of the PML gene in cell growth, clonogenicity, and tumorigenicity of bladder cancer cells were studied using in vitro and in vivo growth assays, soft agar colony-forming assay, cell cycle analysis, apoptosis assay and in vivo tumorigenicity assay.Results Overexpression of PML in 5637 cells significantly reduced their growth rate and clonogenicity on soft agar. PML suppressed bladder cancer cell growth by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Adenovirus-mediated PML (Ad-PML) significantly suppressed the tumorigenicity and growth of bladder cancer cells. Intratumoral injection of Ad-PML into tumors induced by 5637 cells dramatically suppressed their growth. Conclusions The results indicated that overexpression of PML protein may promote efficient growth inhibition of human bladder cancer cells by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and adenovirus-mediated PML (Ad-PML) expression efficiently suppresses human bladder cancer growth.

  6. Growth arrest line mimicking lymphoma involvement: The findings of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone SPECT/CT and serial bone scan in a child with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Woo; Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Yun Young; Lee, Seung Hun; Lee, Young Ho [Hanyang University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Growth arrest lines appear as dense sclerotic lines parallel to the growth plate of long bones on radiography. We describe the case of a 9-year-old female with growth arrest lines initially masquerading as lymphoma involvement on {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy who had been treated with chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma about 3 years previously. Subsequent regional bone SPECT/CT clearly diagnosed the growth arrest lines, and retrograde review of previous bone scintigraphy demonstrated line migration in this patient. Growth arrest lines should be considered a possible diagnosis on bone scintigraphy, especially in the surveillance of children who have experienced severe childhood infections, malnutrition, immobilization, or treatment with immunosuppressive or chemotherapeutic drugs that may inhibit bone growth.

  7. RRR-α-tocopheryl succinate inhibits human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell growth by inducing apoptosis and DNA synthesis arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Wu; Yan Zhao; Bai-He Liu; Yao Li; Fang Liu; Jian Guo; Wei-Ping Yu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of growth inhibition ofhuman gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell with RRR-α-tocopherylsuccinate (VES), a derivative of natural Vitamin E, viainducing apoptosis and DNA synthesis arrest.METHODS: Human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells wereregularly incubated in the presence of VES at 5, 10 and20mg@ L 1(VES was dissolved in absolute ethanol anddiluted in RPMI 1640 complete condition mediacorrespondingly to a final concentration of VES and 1mL@L-1 ethanol), succinic acid and ethanol equivalents asvehicle (VEH) control andcondition media only asuntreated (UT) control. Trypan blue dye exclusionanalysis and MTT assay were applied to detect the cellproliferation. 37kBq of tritiated thymidine was added tocells and [3H] TdR uptake was measured to observe DNAsynthesis. Apoptotic morphology was observed byelectron microscopy and DAPI staining. Flow cytometryand terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTPnick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detectVES-triggered apoptosis.RESULTS: VES inhibited SGC-7901 cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. The growth curve showed suppressionby 24.7%, 49.2% and 68.7% following 24h of VEStreatment at 5, 10 and 20 mg@L 1, respectively, similar tothe findings from MTT assay. DNA synthesis wasevidently reduced by 35%, 45% and 98% after 24h VEStreatment at 20 mg@ L-1 and 48h at 10 and 20 mg@ L 1,respectively. VES induced SGC-7901 cells to undergoapoptosis with typically apoptotic characteristics,including morphological changes of chromatincondensation, chromatin crescent formation/margination,nucleus fragmentation and apoptotic body formation,typical apoptotic sub-G1 peak by flow cytometry andincrease of apoptotic cells by TUNEL assay in which 90%of cells underwent apoptosis after 48h of VES treatment at20 mcg@L-1.CONCLUSION: VES can inhibit human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell growth by inducing apoptosis and DNA synthesisarrest. Inhibition of SGC-7901 cell growth by VES is dose-and time

  8. Growth arrest of lung carcinoma cells (A549) by polyacrylate-anchored peroxovanadate by activating Rac1-NADPH oxidase signalling axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nirupama; Anwar, Tarique; Islam, Nashreen S; Ramasarma, T; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is often required in sublethal, millimolar concentrations to show its oxidant effects on cells in culture as it is easily destroyed by cellular catalase. Previously, we had shown that diperoxovanadate, a physiologically stable peroxovanadium compound, can substitute H2O2 effectively in peroxidation reactions. We report here that peroxovanadate when anchored to polyacrylic acid (PAPV) becomes a highly potent inhibitor of growth of lung carcinoma cells (A549). The early events associated with PAPV treatment included cytoskeletal modifications, increase in GTPase activity of Rac1, accumulation of the reactive oxygen species, and also increase in phosphorylation of H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA damage. These effects persisted even at 24 h after removal of the compound and culminated in increased levels of p53 and p21 together with growth arrest. The PAPV-mediated growth arrest was significantly abrogated in cells pre-treated with the N-acetylcysteine, Rac1 knocked down by siRNA and DPI an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. In conclusion, our results show that polyacrylate derivative of peroxovanadate efficiently arrests growth of A549 cancerous cells by activating the axis of Rac1-NADPH oxidase leading to oxidative stress and DNA damage. PMID:27435854

  9. Daily Arrests

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset provides the public with arrest information from the Montgomery County Central Processing Unit (CPU) systems. The data presented is derived from every...

  10. Peptide nucleic acids arrest the growth of gastric cancer cells SGC7901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宽; 张岂凡; 王锡山; 薛英威; 庞达; 傅松滨

    2004-01-01

    Background Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has many characteristics useful in molecular biology. This paper described an effective way to raise the cell ingestion rate of PNA so as to kill gastric cancer cells.Methods Heteroduplexes of PNAs and oligonucleotides, wrapped by Lipofectamine 2000, were used to infect SGC7901 cells. The inhibitive effect of heteroduplexes was evaluated by analyzing cell clone forming and cell growth rate. Telomerase activity of SGC7901 cells was detected by polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA) and silver staining assay.Results PNAs showed a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. The percentage of proliferation inhibition was 99.4% after 7 days; the rate of cloning inhibition was 98.2% after 8 days;whereas for oligonucleotide groups, at the same concentration, the percentages were 50. 1% and 67. 5% respectively. Antisense PNA-DNA-Lipofectamine 2000 group (AP-D-L group) exhibited significantly different percentages from the control groups (P<0.05). The test result indicated that telomerase activity of the AP-D-L group was inhibited (P<0.05). At the same time, the impact on cell morphology was observed.Conclusions The results showed that PNAs are potent antisense reagents. The telomeraseassociated therapies are very promising for the treatment of malignant tumours.

  11. Proximate causes of adaptive growth rates: growth efficiency variation among latitudinal populations of Rana temporaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, B; Laurila, A

    2005-07-01

    In ectothermic organisms, declining season length and lower temperature towards higher latitudes often select for latitudinal variation in growth and development. However, the energetic mechanisms underlying this adaptive variation are largely unknown. We investigated growth, food intake and growth efficiency of Rana temporaria tadpoles from eight populations along a 1500 km latitudinal gradient across Sweden. To gain an insight into the mechanisms of adaptation at organ level, we also examined variation in tadpole gut length. The tadpoles were raised at two temperatures (16 and 20 degrees C) in a laboratory common garden experiment. We found increased growth rate towards higher latitudes, regardless of temperature treatment. This increase in growth was not because of a higher food intake rate, but populations from higher latitudes had higher growth efficiency, i.e. they were more efficient at converting ingested food into body mass. Low temperature reduced growth efficiency most strongly in southern populations. Relative gut length increased with latitude, and tadpoles at low temperature tended to have longer guts. However, variation in gut length was not the sole adaptive explanation for increased growth efficiency as latitude and body length still explained significant amounts of variation in growth efficiency. Hence, additional energetic adaptations are probably involved in growth efficiency variation along the latitudinal gradient.

  12. Induced growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CD133+/CD44+ prostate cancer stem cells by flavopiridol

    Science.gov (United States)

    SONER, BURAK CEM; AKTUG, HUSEYIN; ACIKGOZ, EDA; DUZAGAC, FAHRIYE; GUVEN, UMMU; AYLA, SULE; CAL, CAG; OKTEM, GULPERI

    2014-01-01

    Flavopiridol is a flavone that inhibits several cyclin-dependent kinases and exhibits potent growth-inhibitory activity, apoptosis and G1-phase arrest in a number of human tumor cell lines. Flavopiridol is currently undergoing investigation in human clinical trials. The present study focused on the effect of flavopiridol in cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs). Therefore, cluster of differentiation 133 (CD133)+high/CD44+high prostate CSCs were isolated from the DU145 human prostate cancer cell line. The cells were treated with flavopiridol in a dose- and time-dependent manner to determine the inhibitory effect. Cell viability and proliferation were analyzed and the efficiency of flavopiridol was assessed using the sphere-forming assay. Flavopiridol was applied to monolayer cultures of CD133high/CD44high human prostate CSCs at the following final concentrations: 100, 300, 500 and 1000 nM. The cultures were incubated for 24, 48 and 72 h. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of the drug was determined as 500 nM for monolayer cells. Dead cells were analyzed prior and subsequent to exposure to increasing flavopiridol doses. Annexin-V and immunofluorescence analyses were performed for the evaluation of apoptotic pathways. According to the results, flavopiridol treatment caused significant growth inhibition at 500 and 1000 nM when compared to the control at 24 h. G0/G1 analysis showed a statistically significant difference between 100 and 500 nM (P<0.005), 100 and 1000 nM (P<0.001), 300 and 1000 nM (P<0.001), and 500 and 1000 nM (P<0.001). Flavopiridol also significantly influenced the cells in the G2/M phase, particularly at high-dose treatments. Flavopiridol induced growth inhibition and apoptosis at the IC50 dose (500 nM), resulting in a significant increase in immunofluorescence staining of caspase-3, caspase-8 and p53. In conclusion, the present results indicated that flavopiridol could be a

  13. Resveratrol induces growth arrest and apoptosis through activation of FOXO transcription factors in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghe Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resveratrol, a naturally occurring phytopolyphenol compound, has attracted extensive interest in recent years because of its diverse pharmacological characteristics. Although resveratrol possesses chemopreventive properties against several cancers, the molecular mechanisms by which it inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis have not been clearly understood. The present study was carried out to examine whether PI3K/AKT/FOXO pathway mediates the biological effects of resveratrol. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Resveratrol inhibited the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and mTOR. Resveratrol, PI3K inhibitors (LY294002 and Wortmannin and AKT inhibitor alone slightly induced apoptosis in LNCaP cells. These inhibitors further enhanced the apoptosis-inducing potential of resveratrol. Overexpression of wild-type PTEN slightly induced apoptosis. Wild type PTEN and PTEN-G129E enhanced resveratrol-induced apoptosis, whereas PTEN-G129R had no effect on proapoptotic effects of resveratrol. Furthermore, apoptosis-inducing potential of resveratrol was enhanced by dominant negative AKT, and inhibited by wild-type AKT and constitutively active AKT. Resveratrol has no effect on the expression of FKHR, FKHRL1 and AFX genes. The inhibition of FOXO phosphorylation by resveratrol resulted in its nuclear translocation, DNA binding and transcriptional activity. The inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway induced FOXO transcriptional activity resulting in induction of Bim, TRAIL, p27/KIP1, DR4 and DR5, and inhibition of cyclin D1. Similarly, resveratrol-induced FOXO transcriptional activity was further enhanced when activation of PI3K/AKT pathway was blocked. Over-expression of phosphorylation deficient mutants of FOXO proteins (FOXO1-TM, FOXO3A-TM and FOXO4-TM induced FOXO transcriptional activity, which was further enhanced by resveratrol. Inhibition of FOXO transcription factors by shRNA blocked resveratrol-induced upregulation of Bim, TRAIL, DR4, DR5, p27/KIP1 and

  14. Inhibitory effect of isoamericanol A from Jatropha curcas seeds on the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line by G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagi, Ayako; Sui, Li; Kamitori, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Toshisada; Katayama, Takeshi; Hossain, Akram; Noguchi, Chisato; Dong, Youyi; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tokuda, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Although various parts of J. curcas (Jatropha curcas L., Euphorbiaceae) have long been used as traditional folk medicines for their antiviral, analgesic, and/or antidotal efficacies, we are the first to investigate the role of anti-carcinogenicity of isoamericanol A (IAA) from the seed extract. Our results showed that IAA is capable of inhibiting cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner on the human cancer cell lines of MCF-7, MDA-MB231, HuH-7, and HeLa. Flow cytometry analysis showed IAA significantly induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M on MCF-7 cells. At both protein and mRNA levels examined by western blot and real-time PCR, the results revealed increased expression of BTG2 (B-cell translocation gene 2), p21 (p21(WAF1/CIPI) ), and GADD45A (growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible, alpha) after IAA treatment, but inversed expression in CDK1 (cyclin-dependent kinase 1) and cyclins B1 and B2. All these effects contribute to G2/M cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, these results coincide with the changes in molecular expressions determined by DNA-microarray analysis. Our findings indicate that IAA has an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation of MCF-7 through cell cycle arrest, giving it great potential as a future therapeutic reagent for cancers. PMID:27441238

  15. Adaptive evolution of synthetic cooperating communities improves growth performance.

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    Xiaolin Zhang

    Full Text Available Symbiotic interactions between organisms are important for human health and biotechnological applications. Microbial mutualism is a widespread phenomenon and is important in maintaining natural microbial communities. Although cooperative interactions are prevalent in nature, little is known about the processes that allow their initial establishment, govern population dynamics and affect evolutionary processes. To investigate cooperative interactions between bacteria, we constructed, characterized, and adaptively evolved a synthetic community comprised of leucine and lysine Escherichia coli auxotrophs. The co-culture can grow in glucose minimal medium only if the two auxotrophs exchange essential metabolites - lysine and leucine (or its precursors. Our experiments showed that a viable co-culture using these two auxotrophs could be established and adaptively evolved to increase growth rates (by ∼3 fold and optical densities. While independently evolved co-cultures achieved similar improvements in growth, they took different evolutionary trajectories leading to different community compositions. Experiments with individual isolates from these evolved co-cultures showed that changes in both the leucine and lysine auxotrophs improved growth of the co-culture. Interestingly, while evolved isolates increased growth of co-cultures, they exhibited decreased growth in mono-culture (in the presence of leucine or lysine. A genome-scale metabolic model of the co-culture was also constructed and used to investigate the effects of amino acid (leucine or lysine release and uptake rates on growth and composition of the co-culture. When the metabolic model was constrained by the estimated leucine and lysine release rates, the model predictions agreed well with experimental growth rates and composition measurements. While this study and others have focused on cooperative interactions amongst community members, the adaptive evolution of communities with other

  16. Hepatocyte proliferation/growth arrest balance in the liver of mice during E. multilocularis infection: a coordinated 3-stage course.

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    Chuanshan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alveolar echinococcosis (AE is characterized by the tumor-like growth of Echinococcus (E. multilocularis. Very little is known on the influence of helminth parasites which develop in the liver on the proliferation/growth arrest metabolic pathways in the hepatocytes of the infected liver over the various stages of infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Western blot analysis, qPCR and immunohistochemistry, we measured the levels of MAPKs activation, Cyclins, PCNA, Gadd45β, Gadd45γ, p53 and p21 expression in the murine AE model, from day 2 to 360 post-infection. Within the early (day 2-60 and middle (day60-180 stages, CyclinB1 and CyclinD1 gene expression increased up to day30 and then returned to control level after day60; Gadd45β, CyclinA and PCNA increased all over the period; ERK1/2 was permanently activated. Meanwhile, p53, p21 and Gadd45γ gene expression, and caspase 3 activation, gradually increased in a time-dependent manner. In the late stage (day180-360, p53, p21 and Gadd45γ gene expression were significantly higher in infected mice; JNK and caspase 3 were activated. TUNEL analysis showed apoptosis of hepatocytes. No significant change in CyclinE, p53 mRNA and p-p38 expression were observed at any time. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the concept of a sequential activation of metabolic pathways which 1 would first favor parasitic, liver and immune cell proliferation and survival, and thus promote metacestode fertility and tolerance by the host, and 2 would then favor liver damage/apoptosis, impairment in protein synthesis and xenobiotic metabolism, as well as promote immune deficiency, and thus contribute to the dissemination of the protoscoleces after metacestode fertility has been acquired. These findings give a rational explanation to the clinical observations of hepatomegaly and of unexpected survival of AE patients after major hepatic resections, and of chronic liver injury, necrosis and of hepatic failure at

  17. Effects of gamma-radiation on cell growth, cycle arrest, death, and superoxide dismutase expression by DU 145 human prostate cancer cells

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    Vucic V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-irradiation (gamma-IR is extensively used in the treatment of hormone-resistant prostate carcinoma. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of 60Co gamma-IR on the growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death of the human prostate cancer cell line DU 145. The viability of DU 145 cells was measured by the Trypan blue exclusion assay and the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5,diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was used for the determination of cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest and cell death were analyzed by flow cytometry. Superoxide dismutase (SOD, specifically CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression, after 10 Gy gamma-IR, was determined by Western immunoblotting analysis. gamma-IR treatment had a significant (P < 0.001 antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect on DU 145 cells. Both effects were time and dose dependent. Also, the dose of gamma-IR which inhibited DNA synthesis and cell proliferation by 50% was 9.7 Gy. Furthermore, gamma-IR induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was increased from 15% (control to 49% (IR cells, with a nonsignificant induction of apoptosis. Treatment with 10 Gy gamma-IR for 24, 48, and 72 h stimulated CuZnSOD and MnSOD protein expression in a time-dependent manner, approximately by 3- to 3.5-fold. These data suggest that CuZnSOD and MnSOD enzymes may play an important role in the gamma-IR-induced changes in DU 145 cell growth, cell cycle arrest and cell death.

  18. Epigenetic transcriptional regulation of the growth arrest-specific gene 1 (Gas1 in hepatic cell proliferation at mononucleosomal resolution.

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    Natalia Sacilotto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gas1 (growth arrest-specific 1 gene is known to inhibit cell proliferation in a variety of models, but its possible implication in regulating quiescence in adult tissues has not been examined to date. The knowledge of how Gas1 is regulated in quiescence may contribute to understand the deregulation occurring in neoplastic diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gas1 expression has been studied in quiescent murine liver and during the naturally synchronized cell proliferation after partial hepatectomy. Chromatin immunoprecipitation at nucleosomal resolution (Nuc-ChIP has been used to carry out the study preserving the in vivo conditions. Transcription has been assessed at real time by quantifying the presence of RNA polymerase II in coding regions (RNApol-ChIP. It has been found that Gas1 is expressed not only in quiescent liver but also at the cell cycle G(1/S transition. The latter expression peak had not been previously reported. Two nucleosomes, flanking a nucleosome-free region, are positioned close to the transcription start site. Both nucleosomes slide in going from the active to the inactive state and vice versa. Nuc-ChIP analysis of the acquisition of histone epigenetic marks show distinctive features in both active states: H3K9ac and H3K4me2 are characteristic of transcription in G(0 and H4R3me2 in G(1/S transition. Sequential-ChIP analysis revealed that the "repressing" mark H3K9me2 colocalize with several "activating" marks at nucleosome N-1 when Gas1 is actively transcribed suggesting a greater plasticity of epigenetic marks than proposed until now. The recruitment of chromatin-remodeling or modifying complexes also displayed distinct characteristics in quiescence and the G(1/S transition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The finding that Gas1 is transcribed at the G(1/S transition suggests that the gene may exert a novel function during cell proliferation. Transcription of this gene is modulated by specific "activating" and

  19. Curcumin induces growth-arrest and apoptosis in association with the inhibition of constitutively active JAK-STAT pathway in T cell leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult T cell leukemia is an aggressive and frequently fatal malignancy that expressess constitutively activated growth-signaling pathways in association with deregulated growth and resistance to apoptosis. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a naturally occurring yellow pigment, isolated from the rhizomes of the plant Curcuma longa that has traditionally been used in the treatment of injury and inflammation. But the effect and mechanism of action of curcumin on T cell leukemia is not known. To investigate the antitumor activity of curcumin in T cell leukemia, we examined its effect on constitutive phosphorylation of JAK and STAT proteins, proliferation, and apoptosis in HTLV-I-transformed T cell lines. HTLV-I-transformed T cell leukemia lines, MT-2, HuT-102, and SLB-1, express constitutively phosphorylated JAK3, TYK2, STAT3, and STAT5 signaling proteins. In vitro treatment with curcumin induced a dose-dependent decrease in JAK and STAT phosphorylation resulting in the induction of growth-arrest and apoptosis in T cell leukemia. The induction of growth-arrest and apoptosis in association with the blockade of constitutively active JAK-STAT pathway suggests this be a mechanism by which curcumin induces antitumor activity in T cell leukemia

  20. A role for transcriptional repression of p21CIP1 by c-Myc in overcoming transforming growth factor β-induced cell-cycle arrest

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    Claassen, Gisela F.; Hann, Stephen R.

    2000-01-01

    c-Myc plays a vital role in cell-cycle progression. Deregulated expression of c-Myc can overcome cell-cycle arrest in order to promote cellular proliferation. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) treatment of immortalized human keratinocyte cells inhibits cell-cycle progression and is characterized by down-regulation of c-Myc followed by up-regulation of p21CIP1. A direct role of c-Myc in this pathway was demonstrated by the observation that ectopic expression of c-Myc overcame the cell-cycle ...

  1. Platelet-derived growth factor stimulation of [3H]-glucosamine incorporation in density-arrested BALB/c-3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G0/G1 traverse in density-arrested BALB/c-3T3 cells is controlled by multiple serum-derived growth factors. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) initiates a proliferative response, whereas factors present in plasma facilitate progression through G0/G1. In the absence of competence formation, progression factors are unable to stimulate cell cycle traverse. The authors have identified the stimulation of a biochemical process specific to competence formation in BALB/c-3T3 cells. PDGF treated BALB/c-3T3 cells incorporated 5-10 fold more [3H]-glucosamine (GlcN) into acid-insoluble material as compared to platelet-poor plasma (PPP) treated cultures. Increased GlcN incorporation occurred in density-arrested BALB/c-3T3 cells in response to treatment with other competence factors, fibroblast growth factor, and Ca3 (PO4)2 and was not due to cell-cycle traverse. Stimulation of [3H]-GlcN incorporation by PDGF was time dependent, and increased incorporation of [3H]-GlcN into protein required de novo protein synthesis. Several mechanisms through which PDGF could increase GlcN incorporation into cellular material were examined. Results of these studies suggest an increase in the cellular capacity to glycosylate proteins is a response to or a part of competence formation

  2. Resistance to ursodeoxycholic acid-induced growth arrest can also result in resistance to deoxycholic acid-induced apoptosis and increased tumorgenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a large body of evidence which suggests that bile acids increase the risk of colon cancer and act as tumor promoters, however, the mechanism(s) of bile acids mediated tumorigenesis is not clear. Previously we showed that deoxycholic acid (DCA), a tumorogenic bile acid, and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a putative chemopreventive agent, exhibited distinct biological effects, yet appeared to act on some of the same signaling molecules. The present study was carried out to determine whether there is overlap in signaling pathways activated by tumorogenic bile acid DCA and chemopreventive bile acid UDCA. To determine whether there was an overlap in activation of signaling pathways by DCA and UDCA, we mutagenized HCT116 cells and then isolated cell lines resistant to UDCA induced growth arrest. These lines were then tested for their response to DCA induced apoptosis. We found that a majority of the cell lines resistant to UDCA-induced growth arrest were also resistant to DCA-induced apoptosis, implying an overlap in DCA and UDCA mediated signaling. Moreover, the cell lines which were the most resistant to DCA-induced apoptosis also exhibited a greater capacity for anchorage independent growth. We conclude that UDCA and DCA have overlapping signaling activities and that disregulation of these pathways can lead to a more advanced neoplastic phenotype

  3. Metformin Induced AMPK Activation, G0/G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest and the Inhibition of Growth of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinomas In Vitro and In Vivo.

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    Cai, Xianbin; Hu, Xi; Tan, Xiaojun; Cheng, Weijie; Wang, Qinjia; Chen, Xiaofeng; Guan, Yinghong; Chen, Chong; Jing, Xubin

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) have become a severe threat to health and the current treatments for ESCC are frequently not effective. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that the anti-hyperglycemic agent metformin may reduce the risk of developing cancer, including ESCC, among diabetic patients. However, the antitumor effects of metformin on ESCC and the mechanisms underlying its cell cycle regulation remain elusive. The findings reported herein show that the anti-proliferative action of metformin on ESCC cell lines is partially mediated by AMPK. Moreover, we observed that metformin induced G0/G1 phase arrest accompanied by the up-regulation of p21CIP1 and p27KIP1. In vivo experiments further showed that metformin inhibited tumor growth in a ESCC xenograft model. Most importantly, the up-regulation of AMPK, p53, p21CIP1, p27KIP1 and the down-regulation of cyclinD1 are involved in the anti-tumor action of metformin in vivo. In conclusion, metformin inhibits the growth of ESCC cells both in cell cultures and in an animal model. AMPK, p53, p21CIP1, p27KIP1 and cyclinD1 are involved in the inhibition of tumor growth that is induced by metformin and cell cycle arrest in ESCC. These findings indicate that metformin has the potential for use in the treatment of ESCC.

  4. An Eden model for the growth of adaptive networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meakin, Paul

    1991-12-01

    An adaptive growth model based on the Eden model has been investigated using computer simulations. In this model a “score” associated with all the sites along the shortest path from the newly added site to the initial seed or growth site is incremented by an amount δ 1 ( δ1=1/( l+1) η where l is the path length) and the score associated with all the sites in the cluster is decreased by a fixed amount δ2 ( δ2=1/ Nm) after each growth event. If the score associated with a site falls below zero it is removed from the cluster. In the asymptotic limit ( t→∞ where t is the number of growth events) the cluster size fluctuates about a constant value proportional to N vm where the exponent v is given by the empirical relationship v=2/(2+ η), which is supported by simple theoretical considerations. The growth of the number of occupied sites, s( t), can be represented by the scaling form s( t) = N vm ƒ(t/N vm) .

  5. Adapting to Population Growth: The Evolutionary Alternative to Malthus

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    Axel Kristinsson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A long-standing debate on the dynamics of population growth in human history has become polarized between a Malthusian stance and a Boserupian one. The former tends to view population growth as limited by carrying capacity, dependent on environment and technology, whereas the latter sees population growth itself as a major inducement to social, economic and technological developments. In this paper the authors experiment with approaching this debate by using recent developments in evolutionary theory. According to these, evolutionary principles, as expounded by Charles Darwin and subsequent evolutionary scientists, apply not only to biological evolution but also to social or cultural evolution. Here, the role of genes is taken over by culture and, since culture is much more pliable than our DNA, evolution speeds up. As the only organisms on Earth whose evolution relies as heavily on culture as on genes, humans have become extremely adaptable. Their hyper-adaptability suggest that humans, through their cultural evolution, have managed increasingly to adapt to their own growing population, thus succeeding in accommodating ever-growing numbers. This hypothesis fits the Boserupian approach to population very well but less so the Malthusian one, perhaps indicating a gradual shift from a Malthusian regime to a Boserupian one in human history. The hypothesis is discussed and examined through four case studies: The beginning of farming around Göbekli Tepe in southeast Turkey, the productive farming systems of Tiwanaku in South America, the population crisis of late medieval and early modern Iceland, and the ‘collapse’ of Rapa Nui (Easter Island.

  6. The MicroRNA 424/503 Cluster Reduces CDC25A Expression during Cell Cycle Arrest Imposed by Transforming Growth Factor β in Mammary Epithelial Cells

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    Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Olivan, Mireia; Castro, Veronica; Saucedo-Cuevas, Laura; Marshall, Netonia; Putcha, Preeti; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bardot, Evan; Ezhkova, Elena; Iavarone, Antonio; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the microRNA 424(322)/503 [miR-424(322)/503] cluster is transcriptionally controlled by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in the mammary epithelium. Induction of this microRNA cluster impacts mammary epithelium fate by regulating apoptosis and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling. Here, we expanded our finding to demonstrate that miR-424(322)/503 is an integral component of the cell cycle arrest mediated by TGF-β. Mechanistically, we showed that after TGF-β exposure, increased levels of miR-424(322)/503 reduce the expression of the cell cycle regulator CDC25A. miR-424(322)/503-dependent posttranscriptional downregulation of CDC25A cooperates with previously described transcriptional repression of the CDC25A promoter and proteasome-mediated degradation to reduce the levels of CDC25A expression and to induce cell cycle arrest. We also provide evidence that the TGF-β/miR-424(322)/503 axis is part of the mechanism that regulates the proliferation of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) mammary epithelial cells in vivo. PMID:25266660

  7. The Mobile bypass Signal Arrests Shoot Growth by Disrupting Shoot Apical Meristem Maintenance, Cytokinin Signaling, and WUS Transcription Factor Expression1[OPEN

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    Parrott, David L.; Adhikari, Emma; Fraser, Nisa

    2016-01-01

    The bypass1 (bps1) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) produces a root-sourced compound (the bps signal) that moves to the shoot and is sufficient to arrest growth of a wild-type shoot; however, the mechanism of growth arrest is not understood. Here, we show that the earliest shoot defect arises during germination and is a failure of bps1 mutants to maintain their shoot apical meristem (SAM). This finding suggested that the bps signal might affect expression or function of SAM regulatory genes, and we found WUSCHEL (WUS) expression to be repressed in bps1 mutants. Repression appears to arise from the mobile bps signal, as the bps1 root was sufficient to rapidly down-regulate WUS expression in wild-type shoots. Normally, WUS is regulated by a balance between positive regulation by cytokinin (CK) and negative regulation by CLAVATA (CLV). In bps1, repression of WUS was independent of CLV, and, instead, the bps signal down-regulates CK responses. Cytokinin treatment of bps1 mutants restored both WUS expression and activity, but only in the rib meristem. How the bps signal down-regulates CK remains unknown, though the bps signal was sufficient to repress expression of one CK receptor (AHK4) and one response regulator (AHP6). Together, these data suggest that the bps signal pathway has the potential for long-distance regulation through modification of CK signaling and altering gene expression. PMID:27208247

  8. 2-(3,5-Dihydroxyphenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole arrests cell growth and cell cycle and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Mehdi

    2012-03-01

    2-Arylbenzothiazoles are an important class of bicyclic privileged substructures present in various natural or synthetic compounds that have been shown to possess anticancer, antifungal, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiallergic activities. This study examined the antiproliferative properties of 2-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole (DH) and its molecular mechanism of action in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. DH inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-231 cells with an IC(50) value of 25 μM in a dose/time-dependent manner as measured by the microculture tetrazolium method. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry showed that DH-induced growth arrest could be associated to apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. PMID:21838530

  9. [Heart arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarella, F; Giovannini, E; Bozzano, A; Caristo, G; Delise, P; Fedele, F; Fera, M S; Lavalle, C; Roghi, A; Valagussa, F

    2001-03-01

    Cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of mortality in industrialized countries and is mainly due to ischemic heart disease. According to ISTAT estimates, approximately 45,000 sudden deaths occur annually in Italy whereas according to the World Health Organization, its incidence is 1 per 1000 persons. The most common cause of cardiac arrest is ventricular fibrillation due to an acute ischemic episode. During acute ischemia the onset of a ventricular tachyarrhythmia is sudden, unpredictable and often irreversible and lethal. Each minute that passes, the probability that the patient survives decreases by 10%. For this reason, the first 10 min are considered to be priceless for an efficacious first aid. The possibility of survival depends on the presence of witnesses, on the heart rhythm and on the resolution of the arrhythmia. In the majority of cases, the latter is possible by means of electrical defibrillation followed by the reestablishment of systolic function. An increase in equipment alone does not suffice for efficacious handling of cardiac arrest occurring outside the hospital premises. Above all, an adequate intervention strategy is required. Ambulance personnel must be well trained and capable of intervening rapidly, possibly within the first 5 min. The key to success lies in the diffusion and proper use of defibrillators. The availability of new generation instruments, the external automatic defibrillators, encourages their widespread use. On the territory, these emergencies are the responsibility of the 118 organization based, according to the characteristics specific to each country, on the regulated coordination between the operative command, the crews and the first-aid means. Strategies for the handling of these emergencies within hospitals have been proposed by the Conference of Bethesda and tend to guarantee an efficacious resuscitation with a maximum latency of 2 min between cardiac arrest and the first electric shock. The diffusion of external

  10. Piperine, an alkaloid from black pepper, inhibits growth of human colon cancer cells via G1 arrest and apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Paul B; Power Coombs, Melanie R; Doucette, Carolyn D; Walsh, Mark; Hoskin, David W

    2015-10-01

    Piperine, a piperidine alkaloid present in black pepper, inhibits the growth of cancer cells, although the mechanism of action is not well understood. In this study, we show that piperine (75-150 µM) inhibited the growth of several colon cancer cell lines but had little effect on the growth of normal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Piperine inhibited HT-29 colon carcinoma cell proliferation by causing G1 phase cell cycle arrest that was associated with decreased expression of cyclins D1 and D3 and their activating partner cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, as well as reduced phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein and up-regulation of p21/WAF1 and p27/KIP1 expression. In addition, piperine caused hydroxyl radical production and apoptosis that was partially dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species. Piperine-treated HT-29 cells showed loss of mitochondrial membrane integrity and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, as well as caspase activation and reduced apoptosis in the presence of the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-FMK. Increased expression of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins inositol-requiring 1α protein, C/EBP homologous protein, and binding immunoglobulin protein, and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as decreased phosphorylation of Akt and reduced survivin expression were also observed in piperine-treated HT-29 cells. Furthermore, piperine inhibited colony formation by HT-29 cells, as well as the growth of HT-29 spheroids. Cell cycle arrest and endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated apoptosis following piperine treatment of HT-29 cells provides the first evidence that piperine may be useful in the treatment of colon cancer.

  11. Tanshinone IIA Inhibits Growth of Keratinocytes through Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis: Underlying Treatment Mechanism of Psoriasis

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    Fu-Lun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation was to elucidate the cellular mechanisms whereby Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA leads to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro in keratinocytes, the target cells in psoriasis. Tan IIA inhibited proliferation of mouse keratinocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis, resulting in S phase arrest accompanied by down-regulation of pCdk2 and cyclin A protein expression. Furthermore, Tan IIA-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential changes were also further demonstrated by DNA fragmentation, single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (SCGE, and flow cytometry methods. Apoptosis was partially blocked by the caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO. Mitochondrial regulation of apoptosis further downstream was investigated, showing changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release into the cytoplasm, and enhanced activation of cleaved caspase-3 and Poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. There was also no translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF from mitochondria to the nucleus in apoptotic keratinocytes, indicating Tan IIA-induced apoptosis occurs mainly through the caspase pathway. Our findings provide the molecular mechanisms by which Tan IIA can be used to treat psoriasis and support the traditional use of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bungee (Labiatae for psoriasis and related skin diseases.

  12. Identification of MicroRNAs Involved in Growth Arrest and Apoptosis in Hydrogen Peroxide-Treated Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line HepG2

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    Yuan Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although both oxidative stress and microRNAs (miRNAs play vital roles in physiological and pathological processes, little is known about the interactions between them. In this study, we first described the regulation of H2O2 in cell viability, proliferation, cycle, and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. Then, miRNAs expression was profiled after H2O2 treatment. The results showed that high concentration of H2O2 (600 μM could decrease cell viability, inhibit cell proliferation, induce cell cycle arrest, and finally promote cell apoptosis. Conversely, no significant effects could be found under treatment with low concentration (30 μM. miRNAs array analysis identified 131 differentially expressed miRNAs (125 were upregulated and 6 were downregulated and predicted 13504 putative target genes of the deregulated miRNAs. Gene ontology (GO analysis revealed that the putative target genes were associated with H2O2-induced cell growth arrest and apoptosis. The subsequent bioinformatics analysis indicated that H2O2-response pathways, including MAPK signaling pathway, apoptosis, and pathways in cancer and cell cycle, were significantly affected. Overall, these results provided comprehensive information on the biological function of H2O2 treatment in HepG2 cells. The identification of miRNAs and their putative targets may offer new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for liver cancer.

  13. Ling Zhi-8 mediates p53-dependent growth arrest of lung cancer cells proliferation via the ribosomal protein S7-MDM2-p53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chien-Ting; Lin, Tung-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Sheu, Fuu; Ho, Chau-Mei; Chen, Edmund I-T

    2011-12-01

    Ling Zhi-8 (LZ-8), an immunomodulatory protein, is derived from and has been cloned from the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi or Ling Zhi); this protein exhibits immunomodulating and antitumor properties. We investigated the effects of recombinant LZ-8 protein (rLZ-8) on the proliferation of A549 human lung cancer cells. Here, we showed that rLZ-8 inhibits cell growth and that this is correlated with increased G(1) arrest. The treatment of A549 cells with rLZ-8 activated p53 and p21 expression, and both the G(1) arrest and the antigrowth effect were found to be p53 dependent. It was further demonstrated that rLZ-8 inhibited tumor growth in mice transplanted with Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Interestingly, rLZ-8 treatment was found to lead to nucleolar stress (or ribosomal stress) as evidenced by inhibition of precursor ribosomal RNA synthesis and reduced polysome formation in A549 cells. These changes resulted in an increasing binding of ribosomal protein S7 to MDM2 and a decreased interaction between MDM2 and p53. Taking these results together, we have identified a novel rLZ-8 antitumor function that positively modulates p53 via ribosomal stress and inhibits lung cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our current results suggest that rLZ-8 may have potential as a therapeutic intervention for the treatment of cancers that contain wild-type p53 and high expression of MDM2.

  14. Taxol-induced growth arrest and apoptosis is associated with the upregulation of the Cdk inhibitor, p21WAF1/CIP1, in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yung Hyun; Yoo, Young Hyun

    2012-12-01

    The anticancer agent, taxol, stabilizes tubulin polymerization, resulting in arrest at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and apoptotic cell death. However, the molecular mechanism of this growth inhibition and apoptosis is poorly understood. In this study, we used MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells which have different estrogen receptor (ER) and tumor suppressor p53 statuses to examine the mechanisms of taxol-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. Treatment of the cells with taxol resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of cell viability, which was accompanied by an accumulation of cells at G2/M and the sub-G1 apoptotic region, determined by flow cytometric analysis. Furthermore, chromatin condensation, DNA ladder formation and proteolytic cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in both cell lines were observed following treatment with taxol, indicating the occurrence of apoptotic cell death. Western blot analysis using whole cell lysates from MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells treated with taxol demonstrated that taxol treatment inhibited expression of cyclin A and cyclin B1 proteins in a time-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of taxol on cell growth and apoptosis induced by taxol were also associated with the downregulation of Wee1 kinase expression and a marked induction in the activity of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21WAF/CIP1. Furthermore, taxol elevated p21 promoter activity in both cell lines. These findings suggest that taxol-induced G2/M arrest and apoptosis in human breast carcinoma cells is mediated through the ER- and p53-independent upregulation of p21. PMID:23023313

  15. 6-Gingerol Inhibits Growth of Colon Cancer Cell LoVo via Induction of G2/M Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Bin; Lin, Chun-Che; Tsay, Gregory J

    2012-01-01

    6-Gingerol, a natural component of ginger, has been widely reported to possess antiinflammatory and antitumorigenic activities. Despite its potential efficacy against cancer, the anti-tumor mechanisms of 6-gingerol are complicated and remain sketchy. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anti-tumor effects of 6-gingerol on colon cancer cells. Our results revealed that 6-gingerol treatment significantly reduced the cell viability of human colon cancer cell, LoVo, in a dose-dependent manner. Further flow cytometric analysis showed that 6-gingerol induced significant G2/M phase arrest and had slight influence on sub-G1 phase in LoVo cells. Therefore, levels of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and their regulatory proteins involved in S-G2/M transition were investigated. Our findings revealed that levels of cyclin A, cyclin B1, and CDK1 were diminished; in contrast, levels of the negative cell cycle regulators p27(Kip1) and p21(Cip1) were increased in response to 6-gingerol treatment. In addition, 6-gingerol treatment elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and phosphorylation level of p53. These findings indicate that exposure of 6-gingerol may induce intracellular ROS and upregulate p53, p27(Kip1), and p21(Cip1) levels leading to consequent decrease of CDK1, cyclin A, and cyclin B1 as result of cell cycle arrest in LoVo cells. It would be suggested that 6-gingerol should be beneficial to treatment of colon cancer.

  16. 6-Gingerol Inhibits Growth of Colon Cancer Cell LoVo via Induction of G2/M Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Bin Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 6-Gingerol, a natural component of ginger, has been widely reported to possess antiinflammatory and antitumorigenic activities. Despite its potential efficacy against cancer, the anti-tumor mechanisms of 6-gingerol are complicated and remain sketchy. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anti-tumor effects of 6-gingerol on colon cancer cells. Our results revealed that 6-gingerol treatment significantly reduced the cell viability of human colon cancer cell, LoVo, in a dose-dependent manner. Further flow cytometric analysis showed that 6-gingerol induced significant G2/M phase arrest and had slight influence on sub-G1 phase in LoVo cells. Therefore, levels of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs, and their regulatory proteins involved in S-G2/M transition were investigated. Our findings revealed that levels of cyclin A, cyclin B1, and CDK1 were diminished; in contrast, levels of the negative cell cycle regulators p27Kip1 and p21Cip1 were increased in response to 6-gingerol treatment. In addition, 6-gingerol treatment elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and phosphorylation level of p53. These findings indicate that exposure of 6-gingerol may induce intracellular ROS and upregulate p53, p27Kip1, and p21Cip1 levels leading to consequent decrease of CDK1, cyclin A, and cyclin B1 as result of cell cycle arrest in LoVo cells. It would be suggested that 6-gingerol should be beneficial to treatment of colon cancer.

  17. UV-B inhibition of hypocotyl growth in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings is a consequence of cell cycle arrest initiated by photodimer accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biever, Jessica J; Brinkman, Doug; Gardner, Gary

    2014-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an important constituent of sunlight that determines plant morphology and growth. It induces photomorphogenic responses but also causes damage to DNA. Arabidopsis mutants of the endonucleases that function in nucleotide excision repair, xpf-3 and uvr1-1, showed hypersensitivity to UV-B (280-320nm) in terms of inhibition of hypocotyl growth. SOG1 is a transcription factor that functions in the DNA damage signalling response after γ-irradiation. xpf mutants that carry the sog1-1 mutation showed hypocotyl growth inhibition after UV-B irradiation similar to the wild type. A DNA replication inhibitor, hydroxyurea (HU), also inhibited hypocotyl growth in etiolated seedlings, but xpf-3 was not hypersensitive to HU. UV-B irradiation induced accumulation of the G2/M-specific cell cycle reporter construct CYCB1;1-GUS in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings that was consistent with the expected accumulation of photodimers and coincided with the time course of hypocotyl growth inhibition after UV-B treatment. Etiolated mutants of UVR8, a recently described UV-B photoreceptor gene, irradiated with UV-B showed inhibition of hypocotyl growth that was not different from that of the wild type, but they lacked UV-B-specific expression of chalcone synthase (CHS), as expected from previous reports. CHS expression after UV-B irradiation was not different in xpf-3 compared with the wild type, nor was it altered after HU treatment. These results suggest that hypocotyl growth inhibition by UV-B light in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings, a photomorphogenic response, is dictated by signals originating from UV-B absorption by DNA that lead to cell cycle arrest. This process occurs distinct from UVR8 and its signalling pathway responsible for CHS induction.

  18. A novel muscarinic antagonist R2HBJJ inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Hua

    Full Text Available Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs. In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ presented a strong anticholinergic activity on carbachol-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea. R2HBJJ markedly suppressed the growth of NSCLC cells, such as H1299, H460 and H157. In H1299 cells, both R2HBJJ and its leading compound R2-PHC displayed significant anti-proliferative activity as M3 receptor antagonist darifenacin. Exogenous replenish of ACh could attenuate R2HBJJ-induced growth inhibition. Silencing M3 receptor or ChAT by specific-siRNAs resulted in a growth inhibition of 55.5% and 37.9% on H1299 cells 96 h post transfection, respectively. Further studies revealed that treatment with R2HBJJ arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1 by down-regulation of cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb. Therefore, the current study reveals that NSCLC cells express an autocrine and paracrine cholinergic system which stimulates the growth of NSCLC cells. R2HBJJ, as a novel mAChRs antagonist, can block the local cholinergic loop by antagonizing predominantly M3 receptors and inhibit NSCLC cell growth, which suggest that M3 receptor antagonist might be a potential chemotherapeutic regimen for NSCLC.

  19. A novel muscarinic antagonist R2HBJJ inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Nan; Wei, Xiaoli; Liu, Xiaoyan; Ma, Xiaoyun; He, Xinhua; Zhuo, Rengong; Zhao, Zhe; Wang, Liyun; Yan, Haitao; Zhong, Bohua; Zheng, Jianquan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs). In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ presented a strong anticholinergic activity on carbachol-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea. R2HBJJ markedly suppressed the growth of NSCLC cells, such as H1299, H460 and H157. In H1299 cells, both R2HBJJ and its leading compound R2-PHC displayed significant anti-proliferative activity as M3 receptor antagonist darifenacin. Exogenous replenish of ACh could attenuate R2HBJJ-induced growth inhibition. Silencing M3 receptor or ChAT by specific-siRNAs resulted in a growth inhibition of 55.5% and 37.9% on H1299 cells 96 h post transfection, respectively. Further studies revealed that treatment with R2HBJJ arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1 by down-regulation of cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb. Therefore, the current study reveals that NSCLC cells express an autocrine and paracrine cholinergic system which stimulates the growth of NSCLC cells. R2HBJJ, as a novel mAChRs antagonist, can block the local cholinergic loop by antagonizing predominantly M3 receptors and inhibit NSCLC cell growth, which suggest that M3 receptor antagonist might be a potential chemotherapeutic regimen for NSCLC. PMID:23285263

  20. Curcumin-treated cancer cells show mitotic disturbances leading to growth arrest and induction of senescence phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosieniak, Grażyna; Sliwinska, Małgorzata A; Przybylska, Dorota; Grabowska, Wioleta; Sunderland, Piotr; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Sikora, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Cellular senescence is recognized as a potent anticancer mechanism that inhibits carcinogenesis. Cancer cells can also undergo senescence upon chemo- or radiotherapy. Curcumin, a natural polyphenol derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, shows anticancer properties both in vitro and in vivo. Previously, we have shown that treatment with curcumin leads to senescence of human cancer cells. Now we identified the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon. We observed a time-dependent accumulation of mitotic cells upon curcumin treatment. The time-lapse analysis proved that those cells progressed through mitosis for a significantly longer period of time. A fraction of cells managed to divide or undergo mitotic slippage and then enter the next phase of the cell cycle. Cells arrested in mitosis had an improperly formed mitotic spindle and were positive for γH2AX, which shows that they acquired DNA damage during prolonged mitosis. Moreover, the DNA damage response pathway was activated upon curcumin treatment and the components of this pathway remained upregulated while cells were undergoing senescence. Inhibition of the DNA damage response decreased the number of senescent cells. Thus, our studies revealed that the induction of cell senescence upon curcumin treatment resulted from aberrant progression through the cell cycle. Moreover, the DNA damage acquired by cancer cells, due to mitotic disturbances, activates an important molecular mechanism that determines the potential anticancer activity of curcumin. PMID:26916504

  1. Neferine, an alkaloid from lotus seed embryo, inhibits human lung cancer cell growth by MAPK activation and cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poornima, Paramasivan; Weng, Ching Feng; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya

    2014-01-01

    Neferine is the major bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the seed embryo of a traditional medicinal plant Nelumbo nucifera (Lotus). Epidemiological studies have revealed the therapeutic potential of lotus seed embryo. Although several mechanisms have been proposed, a clear anticancer action mechanism of neferine on lung cancer cells is still not known. Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in the world, and the patients with advanced stage of nonsmall lung cancer require adjunct chemotherapy after surgical resection for the eradication of cancer cells. In this study, the effects of neferine were evaluated and characterized in A549 cells. Neferine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner with the hypergeneration of reactive oxygen species, activation of MAPKs, lipid peroxidation, depletion of cellular antioxidant pool, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and intracellular calcium accumulation. Furthermore, neferine treatment leads to the inhibition of nuclear factor kappaB and Bcl2, upregulation of Bax and Bad, release of cytochrome C, activation of caspase cascade, and DNA fragmentation. In addition, neferine could induce p53 and its effector protein p21 and downregulation of cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 thereby inducing G1 cell cycle arrest. These results suggest a novel function of neferine as an apoptosis inducer in lung cancer cells.

  2. Notch Signaling Activation in Cervical Cancer Cells Induces Cell Growth Arrest with the Involvement of the Nuclear Receptor NR4A2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lichun; Liu, Mingqiu; Sun, Guang-Chun; Yang, Xu; Qian, Qingqing; Feng, Shuyu; Mackey, L. Vienna; Coy, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a second leading cancer death in women world-wide, with most cases in less developed countries. Notch signaling is highly conserved with its involvement in many cancers. In the present study, we established stable cervical cell lines with Notch activation and inactivation and found that Notch activation played a suppressive role in cervical cancer cells. Meanwhile, the transient overexpression of the active intracellular domain of all four Notch receptors (ICN1, 2, 3, and 4) also induced the suppression of cervical cancer Hela cell growth. ICN1 also induced cell cycle arrest at phase G1. Notch1 signaling activation affected the expression of serial genes, especially the genes associated with cAMP signaling, with an increase of genes like THBS1, VCL, p63, c-Myc and SCG2, a decrease of genes like NR4A2, PCK2 and BCL-2. Particularly, The nuclear receptor NR4A2 was observed to induce cell proliferation via MTT assay and reduce cell apoptosis via FACS assay. Furthermore, NR4A2's activation could reverse ICN1-induced suppression of cell growth while erasing ICN1-induced increase of tumor suppressor p63. These findings support that Notch signaling mediates cervical cancer cell growth suppression with the involvement of nuclear receptor NR4A2. Notably, Notch/NR4A2/p63 signaling cascade possibly is a new signling pathway undisclosed. PMID:27471554

  3. Growth arrest in the ribosomopathy, Bowen-Conradi syndrome, is due to dramatically reduced cell proliferation and a defect in mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armistead, Joy; Patel, Nehal; Wu, Xiaoli; Hemming, Richard; Chowdhury, Biswajit; Basra, Gagandeep Singh; Del Bigio, Marc R; Ding, Hao; Triggs-Raine, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Bowen-Conradi syndrome (BCS) is a ribosomopathy characterized by severe developmental delay and growth failure that typically leads to death by one year of age. It is caused by a c.257A>G, p.D86G substitution in the ribosomal biogenesis protein, Essential for Mitotic Growth 1 (EMG1). We generated a knock-in of the D86G substitution in mice to characterize the effects of EMG1 deficiency, particularly in the brain, where EMG1 expression is high. Embryos homozygous for the mutation in Emg1 were small for gestational age with neural tube defects, and died between embryonic days 8.5 and 12.5. These embryos exhibited dramatically reduced cell proliferation, which we also detected in autopsy brain tissue and bone marrow of BCS patients, consistent with a requirement for high levels of EMG1 in tissues with rapid cell proliferation. In fibroblasts derived from the BCS mouse embryos, we detected a high proportion of binucleated cells, indicating that a mitotic defect underlies the growth arrest in BCS. These studies add to growing evidence of a link between ribosome biogenesis, mitotic progression, and brain development that is currently unexplored.

  4. Using quantitative PCR to Identify Kinesin-3 Genes that are Upregulated During Growth Arrest in MouseNIH3T3 Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Rikke; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Pedersen, Lotte Bang

    2009-01-01

    Most cells in our body form a single primary cilium when entering growth arrest. During the past decade, a number of studies have revealed a key role for primary cilia in coordinating a variety of signaling pathways that control important cellular and developmental processes. Consequently, signif...

  5. Generation of growth arrested Leishmania amastigotes: a tool to develop live attenuated vaccine candidates against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Dey, Ranadhir; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Solanki, Sumit; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2014-06-30

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is fatal if not treated and is prevalent widely in the tropical and sub-tropical regions of world. VL is caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani or Leishmania infantum. Although several second generation vaccines have been licensed to protect dogs against VL, there are no effective vaccines against human VL [1]. Since people cured of leishmaniasis develop lifelong protection, development of live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccines, which can have controlled infection, may be a close surrogate to leishmanization. This can be achieved by deletion of genes involved in the regulation of growth and/or virulence of the parasite. Such mutant parasites generally do not revert to virulence in animal models even under conditions of induced immune suppression due to complete deletion of the essential gene(s). In the Leishmania life cycle, the intracellular amastigote form is the virulent form and causes disease in the mammalian hosts. We developed centrin gene deleted L. donovani parasites that displayed attenuated growth only in the amastigote stage and were found safe and efficacious against virulent challenge in the experimental animal models. Thus, targeting genes differentially expressed in the amastigote stage would potentially attenuate only the amastigote stage and hence controlled infectivity may be effective in developing immunity. This review lays out the strategies for attenuation of the growth of the amastigote form of Leishmania for use as live vaccine against leishmaniasis, with a focus on visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:24837513

  6. Generation of growth arrested Leishmania amastigotes: a tool to develop live attenuated vaccine candidates against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Dey, Ranadhir; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Solanki, Sumit; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2014-06-30

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is fatal if not treated and is prevalent widely in the tropical and sub-tropical regions of world. VL is caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani or Leishmania infantum. Although several second generation vaccines have been licensed to protect dogs against VL, there are no effective vaccines against human VL [1]. Since people cured of leishmaniasis develop lifelong protection, development of live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccines, which can have controlled infection, may be a close surrogate to leishmanization. This can be achieved by deletion of genes involved in the regulation of growth and/or virulence of the parasite. Such mutant parasites generally do not revert to virulence in animal models even under conditions of induced immune suppression due to complete deletion of the essential gene(s). In the Leishmania life cycle, the intracellular amastigote form is the virulent form and causes disease in the mammalian hosts. We developed centrin gene deleted L. donovani parasites that displayed attenuated growth only in the amastigote stage and were found safe and efficacious against virulent challenge in the experimental animal models. Thus, targeting genes differentially expressed in the amastigote stage would potentially attenuate only the amastigote stage and hence controlled infectivity may be effective in developing immunity. This review lays out the strategies for attenuation of the growth of the amastigote form of Leishmania for use as live vaccine against leishmaniasis, with a focus on visceral leishmaniasis.

  7. Induction of reactive oxygen species generation inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and promotes growth arrest in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Trinath P; Suman, Suman; Damodaran, Chendil

    2014-07-01

    Oxidative stress is one causative factor of the pathogenesis and aggressiveness of most of the cancer types, including prostate cancer (CaP). A moderate increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) induces cell proliferation whereas excessive amounts of ROS promote apoptosis. In this study, we explored the pro-oxidant property of 3,9-dihydroxy-2-prenylcoumestan (psoralidin [pso]), a dietary agent, on CaP (PC-3 and C4-2B) cells. Pso greatly induced ROS generation (more than 20-fold) that resulted in the growth inhibition of CaP cells. Overexpression of anti-oxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), SOD2, and catalase, or pretreatment with the pharmacological inhibitor N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly attenuated both pso-mediated ROS generation and pso-mediated growth inhibition in CaP cells. Furthermore, pso administration significantly inhibited the migratory and invasive property of CaP cells by decreasing the transcription of β-catenin, and slug, which promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and by concurrently inducing E-cadherin expression in CaP cells. Pso-induced ROS generation in CaP cells resulted in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome-c release, and activation of caspase-3 and -9 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), which led to apoptosis. On the other hand, overexpression of anti-oxidants rescued pso-mediated effects on CaP cells. These findings suggest that increasing the threshold of intracellular ROS could prevent or treat CaP growth and metastasis. PMID:23475579

  8. Intestinal growth adaptation and glucagon-like peptide 2 in rats with ileal-jejunal transposition or small bowel resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, Jesper; Hartmann, B.; Kissow, H.;

    2001-01-01

    Anatomy, glucagon-like peptide 2, small intestine, short bowel, intestinal adaptation, growth factors, rat......Anatomy, glucagon-like peptide 2, small intestine, short bowel, intestinal adaptation, growth factors, rat...

  9. Influence of edaravone on growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34 expression following focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wang; Xiao-Mei Wu; Bo Jiang; Chun-Yu Wang; Hai-Nan Zhang; Xiang-Min Shen

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the influence of edaravone on the expression of growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34 (GADD34). Methods: A total of 108 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham operation group, model group and edaravone group (36 cases for each group). Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 h followed by reperfusion in Sprague-Dawley rats. Then, GADD34 expression was measured with immunohistochemistry at different time-points after reperfusion in the peri-infarct regions of all rats. Results: The GADD34 expression was detected in the peri-infarct regions of rats 1 h after reperfusion, which reached its peak 24 h after reperfusion. And edaravone could significantly down-regulate the GADD34 expression. Conclusions:Edaravon could down-regulate GADD34 expression, which suggests that edaravone may exert an important function in inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by scavenging free radicals in the upper stream.

  10. Influence of edaravone on growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34 expression following focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei; Wang; Xiao-Mei; Wu; Bo; Jiang; Chun-Yu; Wang; Hai-Nan; Zhang; Xiang-Min; Shen

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the influence of edaravone on the expression of growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 34(GADD34).Methods:A total of 108 healthy male Sprague-Dawlcy rats were randomly divided into sham operation group,model group and edaravone.group(36 cases for each group).Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 h followed by reperfusion in Sprague-Dawlev rats.Then.GAOD34 expression was measured with immunohistochemistry at different time-points after reperfusion in the peri-infarct regions of all rats.Results:The GADD34 expression was detected in the peri-infaret regions of rats 1 h after reperfusion,which reached its peak 24 h after reperfusion.And edaravone could significantly down-regulate the GAOD34 expression.Conclusions:Edaravon could down-regulate GADD34 expression,which suggests that edaravone may exert an important function in inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by scavenging free radicals in the upper stream.

  11. Myeloblastic leukemia cells conditionally blocked by myc-estrogen receptor chimeric transgenes for terminal differentiation coupled to growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumaran, M; Liebermann, D; Hoffman-Liebermann, B

    1993-05-01

    Conditional mutants of the myeloblastic leukemic M1 cell line, expressing the chimeric mycer transgene, have been established. It is shown that M1 mycer cells, like M1, undergo terminal differentiation coupled to growth arrest and programmed cell death (apoptosis) after treatment with the physiologic differentiation inducer interleukin-6. However, when beta-estradiol is included in the culture medium, M1 mycer cells respond to differentiation inducers like M1 myc cell lines, where the differentiation program is blocked at an intermediate stage. By manipulating the function of the mycer transgene product, it is shown that there is a 10-hour window during myeloid differentiation, from 30 to 40 hours after the addition of the differentiation inducer, when the terminal differentiation program switches from being dependent on c-myc suppression to becoming c-myc suppression independent, where activation of c-myc has no apparent effect on mature macrophages. M1 mycer cell lines provide a powerful tool to increase our understanding of the role of c-myc in normal myelopoiesis and in leukemogenesis, also providing a strategy to clone c-myc target genes.

  12. Ability of Group IVB metallocene polyethers containing dienestrol to arrest the growth of selected cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monomeric Group IVB (Ti, Zr and Hf) metallocenes represent a new class of antitumor compounds. There is literature on the general biological activities of some organotin compounds. Unfortunately, there is little information with respect to the molecular level activity of these organotin compounds. We recently started focusing on the anti-cancer activity of organotin polymers that we had made for other purposes and as part of our platinum anti-cancer effort. For this study, we synthesized a new series of metallocene-containing compounds coupling the metallocene unit with dienestrol, a synthetic, nonsteroidal estrogen. This is part of our effort to couple known moieties that offer antitumor activity with biologically active units hoping to increase the biological activity of the combination. The materials were confirmed to be polymeric using light scattering photometry and the structural repeat unit was verified employing matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy results. The polymers demonstrated the ability to suppress the growth of a series of tumor cell lines originating from breast, colon, prostrate, and lung cancers at concentrations generally lower than those required for inhibition of cell growth by the commonly used antitumor drug cisplatin. These drugs show great promise in vitro against a number of cancer cell lines and due to their polymeric nature will most likely be less toxic than currently used metal-containing drugs such as cisplatin. These drugs also offer several addition positive aspects. First, the reactants are commercially available so that additional synthetic steps are not needed. Second, synthesis of the polymer is rapid, occurring within about 15 seconds. Third, the interfacial synthetic system is already industrially employed in the synthesis of aromatic nylons and polycarbonates. Thus, the ability to synthesize large amounts of the drugs is straight forward

  13. Treatment of mouse melanoma cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate counteracts mannosylerythritol lipid-induced growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X; Geltinger, C; Kishikawa, S; Ohshima, K; Murata, T; Nomura, N; Nakahara, T; Yokoyama, K K

    2000-07-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipid (MEL), an extracellularglycolipid from yeast, induces the differentiation ofHL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells towardsgranulocytes. We show here that MEL is also a potentinhibitor of the proliferation of mouse melanoma B16cells. Flow-cytometric analysis of the cell cycle ofMEL-treated B16 cells revealed the accumulation ofcells in the sub-G(0)/G(1) phase, which is a hallmark ofcells undergoing apoptosis. Treatment of B16 cellsfor 24 h with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA),an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), did notinterfere with the growth and survival of the cells,but it effectively counteracted the MEL-induced growtharrest and apoptosis. The activity of PKC was reducedin B16 cells treated with MEL at a concentration atwhich MEL induced apoptosis. However, incubation withPMA in addition to MEL reversed this reduction in theactivity of PKC. These results suggest thatconverging signaling pathways are triggeredindependently by MEL and PMA and that the signalsmight both be mediated by PKC. PMID:19002819

  14. Dehydroleucodine inhibits tumor growth in a preclinical melanoma model by inducing cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Valeria V; Lobos-Gonzalez, Lorena; Ibañez, Jorge; Fernandez, Dario; Cuello-Carrión, F Darío; Valenzuela, Manuel A; Barbieri, Manuel A; Semino, Silvana N; Jahn, Graciela A; Quest, Andrew F G; Lopez, Luis A

    2016-03-01

    Malignant melanoma represents the fastest growing public health risk of all cancer types worldwide. Several strategies and anti-cancer drugs have been used in an effort to improve treatments, but the development of resistance to anti-neoplastic drugs remains the major cause of chemotherapy failure in melanomas. Previously, we showed that the sesquiterpene lactone, dehydroleucodine (DhL), promotes the accumulation of DNA damage markers, such as H2AX and 53BP1, in human tumor cells. Also DhL was shown to trigger either cell senescence or apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner in HeLa and MCF7 cells. Here, we evaluated the effects of DhL on B16F0 mouse melanoma cells in vitro and in a pre-clinical melanoma model. DhL inhibited the proliferation of B16F0 cells by inducing senescence or apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Also, DhL reduced the expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1 and B1 and the inhibitor of apoptosis protein, survivin. In melanomas generated by subcutaneous injection of B16F0 cells into C57/BL6 mice, the treatment with 20 mg DhL /Kg/day in preventive, simultaneous and therapeutic protocols reduced tumor volumes by 70%, 60% and 50%, respectively. DhL treatments reduced the number of proliferating, while increasing the number of senescent and apoptotic tumor cells. To estimate the long-term effects of DhL, a mathematical model was applied to fit experimental data. Extrapolation beyond experimental time points revealed that DhL administration following preventive and therapeutic protocols is predicted to be more effective than simultaneous treatments with DhL in restricting tumor growth. PMID:26718258

  15. Dual involvement of growth arrest-specific gene 6 in the early phase of human IgA nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojiro Nagai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gas6 is a growth factor that causes proliferation of mesangial cells in the development of glomerulonephritis. Gas6 can bind to three kinds of receptors; Axl, Dtk, and Mer. However, their expression and functions are not entirely clear in the different glomerular cell types. Meanwhile, representative cell cycle regulatory protein p27 has been reported to be expressed in podocytes in normal glomeruli with decreased expression in proliferating glomeruli, which inversely correlated with mesangial proliferation in human IgA nephropathy (IgAN. METHODS: The aim of this study is to clarify Gas6 involvement in the progression of IgAN. Expression of Gas6/Axl/Dtk was examined in 31 biopsy proven IgAN cases. We compared the expression levels with histological severity or clinical data. Moreover, we investigated the expression of Gas6 and its receptors in cultured podocytes. RESULTS: In 28 of 31 cases, Gas6 was upregulated mainly in podocytes. In the other 3 cases, Gas6 expression was induced in endothelial and mesangial cells, which was similar to animal nephritis models. Among 28 podocyte type cases, the expression level of Gas6 correlated with the mesangial hypercellularity score of IgAN Oxford classification and urine protein excretion. It also inversely correlated with p27 expression in glomeruli. As for the receptors, Axl was mainly expressed in endothelial and mesangial cells, while Dtk was expressed in podocytes. In vitro, Dtk was expressed in cultured murine podocytes, and the expression of p27 was decreased by Gas6 stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: Gas6 was uniquely upregulated in either endothelial/mesangial cells or podocytes in IgAN. The expression pattern can be used as a marker to classify IgAN. Gas6 has a possibility to be involved in not only mesangial proliferation via Axl, but also podocyte injury via Dtk in IgAN.

  16. Hedging Medical Spending Growth: An Adaptive Expectations Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberthal, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term health insurance provides consumers with protection against persistent, negative health shocks. While the stochastic rise in medical spending growth may make some health risks harder to insure, financial assets could act as a hedge for medical spending growth risk. The purpose of this research was to determine whether such hedges exist. The results of this study were two-fold. First, the asset classes with the strongest statistical evidence as hedges were bonds, not stocks. Second, any strategy to hedge medical spending growth involved shorting assets i.e. betting against the bond or stock market. Health insurers writing long-term contracts should combine the use of hedges in the bond market with of portfolio diversification, and may benefit from health policies to moderate the uncertainty of medical spending growth. PMID:27635415

  17. Growth and adaptation of microorganisms on the cheese surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnet, Christophe; Landaud, Sophie; Bonnarme, Pascal; Swennen, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities living on cheese surfaces are composed of various bacteria, yeasts and molds that interact together, thus generating the typical sensory properties of a cheese. Physiological and genomic investigations have revealed important functions involved in the ability of microorganisms to establish themselves at the cheese surface. These functions include the ability to use the cheese's main energy sources, to acquire iron, to tolerate low pH at the beginning of ripening and to adapt to high salt concentrations and moisture levels. Horizontal gene transfer events involved in the adaptation to the cheese habitat have been described, both for bacteria and fungi. In the future, in situ microbial gene expression profiling and identification of genes that contribute to strain fitness by massive sequencing of transposon libraries will help us to better understand how cheese surface communities function.

  18. Landsliding as the progressive growth of a slipping region: Initiating dynamic rupture propagation by local pore-pressure increase and its potential for arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viesca-Falguières, R. C.; Rice, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Given the low angles of continental slopes, sedimentation alone may not be sufficient to initiate failure, in which case a source of locally elevated pore pressure p is a likely candidate. Heterogeneities in p may arise from spatially variable sources of gas (e.g., Fleischer et al., Geo-Mar. Lett. 2001), variations in permeability, and channelized seepage, and are expected in regions affected by methane hydrates and their dissociation (e.g., Xu & Germanovich, JGR 2006). Additionally, while marine sediments are ideally considered as normally consolidated sediments (for which shear strength is expected to increase with deformation), given typical sedimentation rates on these slopes (~mm/yr or less) strength may develop due to the long lifetime of interparticle contacts. Such behavior is indicated by increased sample stiffness following long periods of fixed loads in consolidation tests (e.g., Karig & Ask, JGR 2003); as well as by the development of increasingly peaked stress-strain profiles under triaxial loading conditions for normally consolidated samples previously held under loads for increasingly long times (e.g., Bjerrum & Lo, Geotechniqué 1963). Such strength would be lost upon sufficient disruption of contacts (i.e., the sediments are considered sensitive), and if weakening is sufficiently strong, localized deformation may be expected as traditionally is for overconsolidated sediments. Consequently, we apply a fracture-mechanics model of the quasistatic growth of a thin zone of localized shear (represented as a slipping crack surface) due to a locally peaked and increasing p profile of a generic nature. Strength on the slip surface weakens with slip and we find that the ruptured region may reach a limit at which the quasistatically calculated crack growth rates become unbounded, corresponding to initiation of dynamic rupture and landsliding. In some cases rupture propagation may not be indefinite, because another equilibrium crack length and slip

  19. Growth arrest-specific transcript 5 associated snoRNA levels are related to p53 expression and DNA damage in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Krell

    Full Text Available The growth arrest-specific transcript 5 gene (GAS5 encodes a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA and hosts a number of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs that have recently been implicated in multiple cellular processes and cancer. Here, we investigate the relationship between DNA damage, p53, and the GAS5 snoRNAs to gain further insight into the potential role of this locus in cell survival and oncogenesis both in vivo and in vitro.We used quantitative techniques to analyse the effect of DNA damage on GAS5 snoRNA expression and to assess the relationship between p53 and the GAS5 snoRNAs in cancer cell lines and in normal, pre-malignant, and malignant human colorectal tissue and used biological techniques to suggest potential roles for these snoRNAs in the DNA damage response.GAS5-derived snoRNA expression was induced by DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner in colorectal cancer cell lines and their levels were not affected by DICER. Furthermore, p53 levels strongly correlated with GAS5-derived snoRNA expression in colorectal tissue.In aggregate, these data suggest that the GAS5-derived snoRNAs are under control of p53 and that they have an important role in mediating the p53 response to DNA damage, which may not relate to their function in the ribosome. We suggest that these snoRNAs are not processed by DICER to form smaller snoRNA-derived RNAs with microRNA (miRNA-like functions, but their precise role requires further evaluation. Furthermore, since GAS5 host snoRNAs are often used as endogenous controls in qPCR quantifications we show that their use as housekeeping genes in DNA damage experiments can lead to inaccurate results.

  20. Hwanggeumchal sorghum Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, and Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metastasis through Jak2/STAT Pathways in Breast Cancer Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun Joung; Joung, Youn Hee; Hong, Dae Young; Park, Eui U.; Park, Seung Hwa; Choi, Soo Keun; Moon, Eon-Soo; Cho, Byung Wook; Park, Kyung Do; Lee, Hak Kyo; Kim, Myong-Jo; Park, Dong-Sik; Yang, Young Mok

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. Conclusions/Significance Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer. PMID:22792362

  1. Growth Arrest-Specific 6 Protein in Patients with Sjogren Syndrome: Determination of the Plasma Level and Expression in the Labial Salivary Gland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Hung Chen

    Full Text Available Growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6 is a vitamin K-dependent protein expressed by endothelial cells and leukocytes that are involved in cell survival, migration, and proliferation in response to inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to assess the implications of Gas6 in Sjögren syndrome (SS and its expression in the labial salivary gland.A total of 254 adults, including 159 with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS, 34 with secondary Sjögren syndrome (sSS, and 61 normal controls, were recruited. Plasma Gas6 concentrations were determined, and Gas6 expressions in labial salivary gland (LSG tissues from controls and pSS and sSS patients were also evaluated. Plasma Gas6 concentrations were significantly lower among patients with pSS than normal controls (13.5 ± 8.6 vs. 19.9 ± 13.4 ng/ml, p < 0.001. There were, however, no significant differences in plasma Gas6 levels between pSS and sSS patients (13.5 ± 8.6 vs. 16.9 ± 11.2 ng/ml, p = 0.068. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, after adjustment for white blood cell count, hemoglobin level, platelet count, lymphocyte count, and C3 and C4 levels, lower plasma Gas6 concentrations were significantly associated with an increased risk of SS. Moreover, by using a semi-quantitative scale to evaluate Gas6 expression in LSG tissues, Gas6 expression was found to be markedly lower in LSG tissues from pSS patients than in tissues from normal controls.Decreased plasma Gas6 concentration and LSG expression were associated with pSS. As such, Gas6 may represent a novel independent risk factor for pSS, with a potential role in salivary gland inflammation and dysfunction.

  2. Hwanggeumchal sorghum induces cell cycle arrest, and suppresses tumor growth and metastasis through Jak2/STAT pathways in breast cancer xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hee Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer.

  3. Growth arrest by the antitumor steroidal lactone withaferin A in human breast cancer cells is associated with down-regulation and covalent binding at cysteine 303 of β-tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Marie L; Lee, Joomin; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Kim, Su-Hyeong; Marcus, Adam I; Kumari, Vandana; Ji, Xinhua; Yang, Zhen; Vowell, Courtney L; Wipf, Peter; Uechi, Guy T; Yates, Nathan A; Romero, Guillermo; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Singh, Shivendra V

    2014-01-17

    Withaferin A (WA), a C5,C6-epoxy steroidal lactone derived from a medicinal plant (Withania somnifera), inhibits growth of human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and prevents mammary cancer development in a transgenic mouse model. However, the mechanisms underlying the anticancer effect of WA are not fully understood. Herein, we report that tubulin is a novel target of WA-mediated growth arrest in human breast cancer cells. The G2 and mitotic arrest resulting from WA exposure in MCF-7, SUM159, and SK-BR-3 cells was associated with a marked decrease in protein levels of β-tubulin. These effects were not observed with the naturally occurring C6,C7-epoxy analogs of WA (withanone and withanolide A). A non-tumorigenic normal mammary epithelial cell line (MCF-10A) was markedly more resistant to mitotic arrest by WA compared with breast cancer cells. Vehicle-treated control cells exhibited a normal bipolar spindle with chromosomes aligned along the metaphase plate. In contrast, WA treatment led to a severe disruption of normal spindle morphology. NMR analyses revealed that the A-ring enone in WA, but not in withanone or withanolide A, was highly reactive with cysteamine and rapidly succumbed to irreversible nucleophilic addition. Mass spectrometry demonstrated direct covalent binding of WA to Cys(303) of β-tubulin in MCF-7 cells. Molecular docking indicated that the WA-binding pocket is located on the surface of β-tubulin and characterized by a hydrophobic floor, a hydrophobic wall, and a charge-balanced hydrophilic entrance. These results provide novel insights into the mechanism of growth arrest by WA in breast cancer cells. PMID:24297176

  4. Vagal afferents are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth in orally fed rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, David W; Liu, Xiaowen; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2006-01-01

    Small bowel resection stimulates intestinal adaptive growth by a neuroendocrine process thought to involve both sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation and enterotrophic hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2). We investigated whether capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent neurons...... of bioactive GLP-2 resulting from resection in orally fed rats. Ablation of spinal/splanchnic innervation by ganglionectomy failed to attenuate resection-induced adaptive growth. In TPN rats, capsaicin did not attenuate resection-induced mucosal growth. We conclude that vagal afferents are not essential...

  5. ERK activation is required for CCK-mediated pancreatic adaptive growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Bryan J; Lodewyk, Kevin B; Sebolt-Leopold, Judith S; Ernst, Stephen A; Williams, John A

    2014-10-01

    High levels of cholecystokinin (CCK) can stimulate pancreatic adaptive growth in which mature acinar cells divide, leading to enhanced pancreatic mass with parallel increases in protein, DNA, RNA, and digestive enzyme content. Prolonged release of CCK can be induced by feeding trypsin inhibitor (TI) to disrupt normal feedback control. This leads to exocrine growth in a CCK-dependent manner. The extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) pathway regulates many proliferative processes in various tissues and disease models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ERK signaling in pancreatic adaptive growth using the MEK inhibitors PD-0325901 and trametinib (GSK-1120212). It was determined that PD-0325901 given two times daily by gavage or mixed into powdered chow was an effective and specific inhibitor of ERK signaling in vivo. TI-containing chow led to a robust increase in pancreatic mass, protein, DNA, and RNA content. This pancreatic adaptive growth was blocked in mice fed chow containing the MEK inhibitors. PD-0325901 blocked TI-induced ERK-regulated early response genes, cell-cycle proteins, and mitogenesis by acinar cells. It was determined that ERK signaling is necessary for the initiation of pancreatic adaptive growth but not necessary to maintain it. PD-0325901 blocked adaptive growth when given before cell-cycle initiation but not after mitogenesis had been established. Furthermore, GSK-1120212, a chemically distinct inhibitor of the ERK pathway that is now approved for clinical use, inhibited growth similar to PD-0325901. These data demonstrate that the ERK pathway is required for CCK-stimulated pancreatic adaptive growth.

  6. Sonic Hedgehog Opposes Epithelial Cell Cycle Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Hongran; Khavari, Paul A

    1999-01-01

    Stratified epithelium displays an equilibrium between proliferation and cell cycle arrest, a balance that is disrupted in basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway activation appears sufficient to induce BCC, however, the way it does so is unknown. Shh-induced epidermal hyperplasia is accompanied by continued cell proliferation in normally growth arrested suprabasal cells in vivo. Shh-expressing cells fail to exit S and G2/M phases in response to calcium-induced differentiation...

  7. Adaptive growth responses of Listeria monocytogenes to acid and osmotic shifts above and across the growth boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belessi, C-I A; Le Marc, Y; Merkouri, S I; Gounadaki, A S; Schvartzman, S; Jordan, K; Drosinos, E H; Skandamis, P N

    2011-01-01

    The effect of acid and osmotic shifts on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated at 10°C. Two types of shifts were tested: (i) within the range of pH and water activity (a(w)) levels that allow growth of L. monocytogenes and (ii) after habituation at no-growth conditions back to growth-permitting conditions. A L. monocytogenes cheese isolate, with high survival capacity during cheesemaking, was inoculated (10(2) CFU/ml) in tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract at six pH levels (5.1 to 7.2; adjusted with lactic acid) and 0.5% NaCl (a(w) 0.995), or four a(w) levels (0.995 to 0.93, adjusted with 0.5 to 10.5% NaCl) at pH 7.2 and grown to early stationary phase. L. monocytogenes was then shifted (at 10(2) CFU/ml) to each of the aforementioned growth-permitting pH and a(w) levels and incubated at 10°C. Shifts from no-growth to growth-permitting conditions were carried out by transferring L. monocytogenes habituated at pH 4.9 or a(w) 0.90 (12.5% NaCl) for 1, 5, and 10 days to all pH and a(w) levels permitting growth. Reducing a(w) or pH at different levels in the range of 0.995 to 0.93 and 7.2 to 5.1, respectively, decreased the maximum specific growth rate of L. monocytogenes. The lag time of the organism increased with all osmotic downshifts, as well as by the reduction of pH to 5.1. Conversely, any type of shift within pH 5.5 to 7.2 did not markedly affect the lag times of L. monocytogenes. The longer the cells were incubated at no-growth a(w) (0.90), the faster they initiated growth subsequently, suggesting adaptation to osmotic stress. Conversely, extended habituation at pH 4.9 had the opposite effect on subsequent growth of L. monocytogenes, possibly due to cell injury. These results suggest that there is an adaptation or injury rate induced at conditions inhibiting the growth of the pathogen. Thus, quantifying adaptation phenomena under growth-limiting environments, such as in fermented dairy and meat products or products preserved in

  8. OXIDATIVE STRESS IN MUSCLE GROWTH AND ADAPTATION TO PHYSICAL EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihor Yurkevych

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In a few last decades oxidative stress detected in a variety of physiological processes where reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS play a central role. They are directly involved in oxidation of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. In certain concentrations they are necessary for cell division, proliferation and apoptosis. Contractile muscle tissue at aerobic conditions form high ROS flow that may modulate a variety of cell functions, for example proliferation. However, slight increase in ROS level provide hormetic effect which may participate in adaptation to heavy weight training resulted in hypertrophy and proliferation of skeletal muscle fibers. This review will discuss ROS types, sites of generation, strategies to increase force production and achieve skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  9. A novel site contributing to growth-arrest-specific gene 6 binding to its receptors as revealed by a human monoclonal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Gas6 (growth-arrest-specific gene 6) is a vitamin K-dependent protein known to activate the Axl family of receptor tyrosine kinases. It is an important regulator of thrombosis and many other biological functions. The C-terminus of Gas6 binds to receptors and consists of two laminin-like globular domains LG1 and LG2. It has been reported that a Ca2+-binding site at the junction of LG1 and LG2 domains and a hydrophobic patch at the LG2 domain are important for receptor binding [Sasaki, Knyazev, Cheburkin, Gohring, Tisi, Ullrich, Timpl and Hohenester (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 44164–44170]. In the present study, we developed a neutralizing human monoclonal antibody, named CNTO300, for Gas6. The antibody was generated by immunization of human IgG-expressing transgenic mice with recombinant human Gas6 protein and the anti-Gas6 IgG sequences were rescued from an unstable hybridoma clone. Binding of Gas6 to its receptors was partially inhibited by the CNTO300 antibody in a dose-dependent manner. To characterize further the interaction between Gas6 and this antibody, the binding kinetics of CNTO300 for recombinant Gas6 were compared with independently expressed LG1 and LG2. The CNTO300 antibody showed comparable binding affinity, yet different dependence on Ca2+, to Gas6 and LG1. No binding to LG2 was detected. In the presence of EDTA, binding of the antibody to Gas6 was disrupted, but no significant effect of EDTA on LG1 binding was evident. Further epitope mapping identified a Gas6 peptide sequence recognized by the CNTO300 antibody. This peptide sequence was found to be located at the LG1 domain distant from the Ca2+-binding site and the hydrophobic patch. Co-interaction of Gas6 with its receptor and CNTO300 antibody was detected by BIAcore analysis, suggesting a second receptor-binding site on the LG1 domain. This hypothesis was further supported by direct binding of Gas6 receptors to an independently expressed LG1 domain. Our results revealed, for the first time, a

  10. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces cell cycle arrest by activating atypical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 through up-regulation of Smad3-dependent p35 expression in human MCF10A mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong Ji; Yang, Sun Woo; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2016-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) play important roles in control of cell division. Cdk5 is an atypical member of Cdk family with non-cyclin-like regulatory subunit, p35, but its role in cell cycle progression is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of Cdk5/p35 on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced cell cycle arrest. In human MCF10A mammary epithelial cells, TGF-β1 induced cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and increased p27KIP1 expression. Interestingly, pretreatment with roscovitine, an inhibitor of Cdk5, or transfection with small interfering (si) RNAs specific to Cdk5 and p35 significantly attenuated the TGF-β1-induced p27KIP1 expression and cell cycle arrest. TGF-β1 increased Cdk5 activity via up-regulation of p35 gene at transcriptional level, and these effects were abolished by transfection with Smad3 siRNA or infection of adenovirus carrying Smad3 mutant at the C-tail (3SA). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay further revealed that wild type Smad3, but not mutant Smad3 (3SA), binds to the region of the p35 promoter region (-1000--755) in a TGF-β1-dependent manner. These results for the first time demonstrate a role of Cdk5/p35 in the regulation of cell cycle progression modulated by TGF-β1.

  11. Serum Removal from Culture Induces Growth Arrest, Ploidy Alteration, Decrease in Infectivity and Differential Expression of Crucial Genes in Leishmania infantum Promastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; Moreno-Izquierdo, Miguel A; Degayón, María A; Moreno, Inmaculada; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is one of the species responsible for visceral leishmaniasis. This species is distributed basically in the Mediterranean basin. A recent outbreak in humans has been reported in Spain. Axenic cultures are performed for most procedures with Leishmania spp. promastigotes. This model is stable and reproducible and mimics the conditions of the gut of the sand fly host, which is the natural environment of promastigote development. Culture media are undefined because they contain mammalian serum, which is a rich source of complex lipids and proteins. Serum deprivation slows down the growth kinetics and therefore, yield in biomass. In fact, we have confirmed that the growth rate decreases, as well as infectivity. Ploidy is also affected. Regarding the transcriptome, a high-throughput approach has revealed a low differential expression rate but important differentially regulated genes. The most remarkable profiles are: up-regulation of the GINS Psf3, the fatty acyl-CoA synthase (FAS1), the glyoxylase I (GLO1), the hydrophilic surface protein B (HASPB), the methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase (MMCE) and an amastin gene; and down-regulation of the gPEPCK and the arginase. Implications for metabolic adaptations, differentiation and infectivity are discussed herein. PMID:26959417

  12. Fetal hemodynamic adaptive changes related to intrauterine growth the generation R study

    OpenAIRE

    Verburg, Bero Olof; JADDOE, Vincent; Wladimiroff, Juriy; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline; Steegers-Theunissen, Régine

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground-It has been suggested that an adverse fetal environment increases susceptibility to hypertension and cardiovascular disease in adult life. This increased risk may result from suboptimal development of the heart and main arteries in utero and from adaptive cardiovascular changes in conditions of reduced fetal growth. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether reduced fetal growth is associated with fetal circulatory changes and cardiac dysfunction. Methods and ...

  13. Climate Change Adaptation. Challenges and Opportunities for a Smart Urban Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Galderisi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is one of the main environmental issues challenging cities in the 21th century. At present, more than half of the world population lives in cities and the latter are responsible for 60% to 80% of global energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions, which are the main causes of the change in climate conditions. In the meantime, they are seriously threatened by the heterogeneous climate-related phenomena, very often exacerbated by the features of the cities themselves. In the last decade, international and European efforts have been mainly focused on mitigation rather than on adaptation strategies. Europe is one of the world leaders in global mitigation policies, while the issue of adaptation has gained growing importance in the last years. As underlined by the EU Strategy on adaptation to climate change, even though climate change mitigation still remains a priority for the global community, large room has to be devoted to adaptation measures, in order to effectively face the unavoidable impacts and related economic, environmental and social costs of climate change (EC, 2013. Thus, measures for adaptation to climate change are receiving an increasing financial support and a growing number of European countries are implementing national and urban adaptation strategies to deal with the actual and potential climate change impacts. According to the above considerations, this paper explores strengths and weaknesses of current adaptation strategies in European cities. First the main suggestions of the European Community to improve urban adaptation to climate change are examined; then, some recent Adaptation Plans are analyzed, in order to highlight challenges and opportunities arising from the adaptation processes at urban level and to explore the potential of Adaptation Plans to promote a smart growth in the European cities.

  14. Growth arrest- and DNA-damage-inducible 45beta gene inhibits c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and decreases IL-1beta-induced apoptosis in insulin-producing INS-1E cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Claus Morten; Døssing, M G; Papa, S;

    2006-01-01

    IL-1beta is a candidate mediator of apoptotic beta cell destruction, a process that leads to type 1 diabetes and progression of type 2 diabetes. IL-1beta activates beta cell c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38, all of which are members of the mitogen......-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family. Inhibition of JNK prevents IL-1beta-mediated beta cell destruction. In mouse embryo fibroblasts and 3DO T cells, overexpression of the gene encoding growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45beta (Gadd45b) downregulates pro-apoptotic JNK signalling. The aim of this study...

  15. High-density growth arrest in Ras-transformed cells: low Cdk kinase activities in spite of absence of p27Kip Cdk-complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Willumsen, Berthe Marie

    2005-01-01

    The ras oncogene transforms immortalized, contact-inhibited non-malignant murine fibroblasts into cells that are focus forming, exhibit increased saturation density, and are malignant in suitable hosts. Here, we examined changes in cell cycle control complexes as normal and Ras-transformed cells...... ceased to grow exponentially, to reveal the molecular basis for Ras-dependent focus formation. As normal cells entered density-dependent arrest, cyclin D1 decreased while cyclin D2 was induced and replaced D1 in Cdk4 complexes. Concomitantly, p27Kip1 levels rose and the inhibitor accumulated in both Cdk4......-like state with low Cdk4 and Cdk2 activity. Surprisingly, this delayed arrest was molecularly distinct from contact inhibition of normal cells, as it occurred in the absence of p27Kip1 induction and cyclin D1 levels remained high. This demonstrates that although oncogenic Ras efficiently disabled the normal...

  16. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Risk Factors & Prevention Heart Diseases & Disorders Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) SCA: Who's At Risk? Prevention of SCA What Causes SCA? SCA Awareness Atrial Flutter Heart Block Heart Failure Sick Sinus Syndrome Substances & Heart Rhythm Disorders Symptoms & ...

  17. Pittsburgh Police Arrest Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Arrest data contains information on people taken into custody by City of Pittsburgh police officers. More serious crimes such as felony offenses are more likely to...

  18. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  19. Plasma membrane proteomics in the maize primary root growth zone: novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voothuluru, Priyamvada; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Robert E; Peck, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    Previous work on maize (Zea mays L.) primary root growth under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. These responses involve spatially differential and coordinated regulation of osmotic adjustment, modification of cell wall extensibility, and other cellular growth processes that are required for root growth under water-stressed conditions. As the interface between the cytoplasm and the apoplast (including the cell wall), the plasma membrane likely plays critical roles in these responses. Using a simplified method for enrichment of plasma membrane proteins, the developmental distribution of plasma membrane proteins was analysed in the growth zone of well-watered and water-stressed maize primary roots. The results identified 432 proteins with differential abundances in well-watered and water-stressed roots. The majority of changes involved region-specific patterns of response, and the identities of the water stress-responsive proteins suggest involvement in diverse biological processes including modification of sugar and nutrient transport, ion homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and cell wall composition. Integration of the distinct, region-specific plasma membrane protein abundance patterns with results from previous physiological, transcriptomic and cell wall proteomic studies reveals novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

  20. Plasma membrane proteomics in the maize primary root growth zone: novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voothuluru, Priyamvada; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Robert E; Peck, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    Previous work on maize (Zea mays L.) primary root growth under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. These responses involve spatially differential and coordinated regulation of osmotic adjustment, modification of cell wall extensibility, and other cellular growth processes that are required for root growth under water-stressed conditions. As the interface between the cytoplasm and the apoplast (including the cell wall), the plasma membrane likely plays critical roles in these responses. Using a simplified method for enrichment of plasma membrane proteins, the developmental distribution of plasma membrane proteins was analysed in the growth zone of well-watered and water-stressed maize primary roots. The results identified 432 proteins with differential abundances in well-watered and water-stressed roots. The majority of changes involved region-specific patterns of response, and the identities of the water stress-responsive proteins suggest involvement in diverse biological processes including modification of sugar and nutrient transport, ion homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and cell wall composition. Integration of the distinct, region-specific plasma membrane protein abundance patterns with results from previous physiological, transcriptomic and cell wall proteomic studies reveals novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress. PMID:27341663

  1. Key techniques and applications of adaptive growth method for stiffener layout design of plates and shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaohong; Ji, Xuerong; Ma, Man; Hou, Jianyun

    2013-11-01

    The application of the adaptive growth method is limited because several key techniques during the design process need manual intervention of designers. Key techniques of the method including the ground structure construction and seed selection are studied, so as to make it possible to improve the effectiveness and applicability of the adaptive growth method in stiffener layout design optimization of plates and shells. Three schemes of ground structures, which are comprised by different shell elements and beam elements, are proposed. It is found that the main stiffener layouts resulted from different ground structures are almost the same, but the ground structure comprised by 8-nodes shell elements and both 3-nodes and 2-nodes beam elements can result in clearest stiffener layout, and has good adaptability and low computational cost. An automatic seed selection approach is proposed, which is based on such selection rules that the seeds should be positioned on where the structural strain energy is great for the minimum compliance problem, and satisfy the dispersancy requirement. The adaptive growth method with the suggested key techniques is integrated into an ANSYS-based program, which provides a design tool for the stiffener layout design optimization of plates and shells. Typical design examples, including plate and shell structures to achieve minimum compliance and maximum bulking stability are illustrated. In addition, as a practical mechanical structural design example, the stiffener layout of an inlet structure for a large-scale electrostatic precipitator is also demonstrated. The design results show that the adaptive growth method integrated with the suggested key techniques can effectively and flexibly deal with stiffener layout design problem for plates and shells with complex geometrical shape and loading conditions to achieve various design objectives, thus it provides a new solution method for engineering structural topology design optimization.

  2. Defining Old Growth for Fire-adapted Forests of the Western United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott L. Stephens

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available There are varying definitions of old-growth forests because of differences in environment and differing fire influence across the Intermountain West. Two general types of forests reflect the role of fire: 1 forests shaped by natural changes in structure and species makeup—plant succession—that are driven by competitive differences among species and individual trees and by small-scale disturbances, and 2 forests where plant succession processes are disrupted by major biological disturbances (fire, insects, wind, or drought extending across larger areas. Some case examples of old-growth forests where fire was historically frequent are used. The examples sketch out the typical biophysical settings, fire regime, natural disturbance factors, spatial features of patches, and the processes and conditions that produce spatial changes of the landscape over time. These examples confirm the complexity of describing or defining old growth in frequent-fire forests. We define fire-adapted forests at three spatial scales, whereas the standard definition of old growth refers to a patch or stand condition. Our definition is based on ecological principles rather than on the cultural aspects of old growth. It focuses on central tendencies, given all the possible combinations of conditions and processes, that move forests toward old growth in the fire-adapted forests of the Intermountain West.

  3. Effect of a Previous Acid Adaptation of Zygosaccharomyces bailii on its Growth Kinetic in Acidic Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Tchuenchieu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The growth response of Zygosaccharomyces bailii acid adapted cells was assessed in acidified media. Yeast cells were first pre-cultured in nutrient broth adjusted with hydrochloric, citric and malic acid to pH 4; 4.5; 5; 5.5; 6 and 6.5. Moreover, they were also grown in two controls consisting of nutrient broth and nutrient broth supplemented with 1% of glucose both adjusted at pH 7. The variation of pH before and after the growth along with yeast concentration was measured. The cells pre-cultured in controls conditions and in the three conditions at pH 5 were then each inoculated in six BHI medium consisting of BHI adjusted with hydrochloric, citric and malic acid at pH 5.5 and 3.5. The growth was monitored by spectrophotometry and the yeast concentration after incubation was obtained by microscopy using a Thoma cell chamber. DMFit 2.1 was used to plot the growth curves and to estimate the growth parameters. All the pre-cultures and cultures were made at 37°C during 24 hours. During the pre-cultures, an important decrease of pH was noted in nutrient broth supplemented with glucose, moving from 7 to 3.81. In all the other pre-cultures, just a little variation was observed ranging from -0.57 to 0.50. Growth was observed in all the conditions, except at pH4. By growing the cells coming from the selected pre-cultures conditions in the different acidic BHI media, it appears that acid adaptation enhance the growth at pH 5.5 no matter the acid contains in the medium and the acid to which the cells were adapted. However, this acid adaptation was not sufficient to initiate growth at pH 3.5 after 24 hours of incubation at 37°C. Growth rate was significantly affected by the pH of the pre-culture medium and the acid present in the culture medium. Pre-culture with glucose supplementation was the only parameter studied affecting the latency.

  4. Adaptation of the European crop growth monitoring system to the Belgian conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Buffet, D.; Dehem, Didier; Wouters, K.; Tychon, Bernard; Oger, Robert; Veroustraete, F.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the Belgian Crop Growth Monitoring System (B-CGMS) is the elaboration of an integrated information system predicting reliable, timely and objective estimates of crop yields and monitoring calamity sites at regional scales. Seven major crops are concerned by the project : winter wheat, winter barley, fodder maize, winter rape seed, potatoes, sugar beet and permanent meadow. The main tasks in the adaptation of the European model come down to the completion and the improvement of the ...

  5. Vagal afferents are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth in orally fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David W; Liu, Xiaowen; Holst, Jens J; Raybould, Helen E; Ney, Denise M

    2006-11-01

    Small bowel resection stimulates intestinal adaptive growth by a neuroendocrine process thought to involve both sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation and enterotrophic hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2). We investigated whether capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent neurons are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal growth. Rats received systemic or perivagal capsaicin or ganglionectomy before 70% midjejunoileal resection or transection and were fed orally or by total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for 7 days after surgery. Growth of residual bowel was assessed by changes in mucosal mass, protein, DNA, and histology. Both systemic and perivagal capsaicin significantly attenuated by 48-100% resection-induced increases in ileal mucosal mass, protein, and DNA in rats fed orally. Villus height was significantly reduced in resected rats given capsaicin compared with vehicle. Sucrase specific activity in jejunal mucosa was not significantly different; ileal mucosal sucrase specific activity was significantly increased by resection in capsaicin-treated rats. Capsaicin did not alter the 57% increase in ileal proglucagon mRNA or the 150% increase in plasma concentration of bioactive GLP-2 resulting from resection in orally fed rats. Ablation of spinal/splanchnic innervation by ganglionectomy failed to attenuate resection-induced adaptive growth. In TPN rats, capsaicin did not attenuate resection-induced mucosal growth. We conclude that vagal afferents are not essential for GLP-2 secretion when the ileum has direct contact with luminal nutrients after resection. In summary, vagal afferent neurons are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal adaptation through a mechanism that appears to involve stimulation by luminal nutrients.

  6. GH3-mediated auxin homeostasis links growth regulation with stress adaptation response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Eun; Park, Ju-Young; Kim, Youn-Sung; Staswick, Paul E; Jeon, Jin; Yun, Ju; Kim, Sun-Young; Kim, Jungmook; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Park, Chung-Mo

    2007-03-30

    Plants constantly monitor environmental fluctuations to optimize their growth and metabolism. One example is adaptive growth occurring in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we demonstrate that GH3-mediated auxin homeostasis is an essential constituent of the complex network of auxin actions that regulates stress adaptation responses in Arabidopsis. Endogenous auxin pool is regulated, at least in part, through negative feedback by a group of auxin-inducible GH3 genes encoding auxin-conjugating enzymes. An Arabidopsis mutant, wes1-D, in which a GH3 gene WES1 is activated by nearby insertion of the (35)S enhancer, exhibited auxin-deficient traits, including reduced growth and altered leaf shape. Interestingly, WES1 is also induced by various stress conditions as well as by salicylic acid and abscisic acid. Accordingly, wes1-D was resistant to both biotic and abiotic stresses, and stress-responsive genes, such as pathogenesis-related genes and CBF genes, were upregulated in this mutant. In contrast, a T-DNA insertional mutant showed reduced stress resistance. We therefore propose that GH3-mediated growth suppression directs reallocation of metabolic resources to resistance establishment and represents the fitness costs of induced resistance.

  7. 4β-Hydroxywithanolide E from Physalis peruviana (golden berry inhibits growth of human lung cancer cells through DNA damage, apoptosis and G2/M arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Zong-Lun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The crude extract of the fruit bearing plant, Physalis peruviana (golden berry, demonstrated anti-hepatoma and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the cellular mechanism involved in this process is still unknown. Methods Herein, we isolated the main pure compound, 4β-Hydroxywithanolide (4βHWE derived from golden berries, and investigated its antiproliferative effect on a human lung cancer cell line (H1299 using survival, cell cycle, and apoptosis analyses. An alkaline comet-nuclear extract (NE assay was used to evaluate the DNA damage due to the drug. Results It was shown that DNA damage was significantly induced by 1, 5, and 10 μg/mL 4βHWE for 2 h in a dose-dependent manner (p p 50 of 4βHWE in H1299 cells for 24 and 48 h were 0.6 and 0.71 μg/mL, respectively, suggesting it could be a potential therapeutic agent against lung cancer. In a flow cytometric analysis, 4βHWE produced cell cycle perturbation in the form of sub-G1 accumulation and slight arrest at the G2/M phase with 1 μg/mL for 12 and 24 h, respectively. Using flow cytometric and annexin V/propidium iodide immunofluorescence double-staining techniques, these phenomena were proven to be apoptosis and complete G2/M arrest for H1299 cells treated with 5 μg/mL for 24 h. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that golden berry-derived 4βHWE is a potential DNA-damaging and chemotherapeutic agent against lung cancer.

  8. Adaptive growth factor delivery from a polyelectrolyte coating promotes synergistic bone tissue repair and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nisarg J; Hyder, Md Nasim; Quadir, Mohiuddin A; Dorval Courchesne, Noémie-Manuelle; Seeherman, Howard J; Nevins, Myron; Spector, Myron; Hammond, Paula T

    2014-09-01

    Traumatic wounds and congenital defects that require large-scale bone tissue repair have few successful clinical therapies, particularly for craniomaxillofacial defects. Although bioactive materials have demonstrated alternative approaches to tissue repair, an optimized materials system for reproducible, safe, and targeted repair remains elusive. We hypothesized that controlled, rapid bone formation in large, critical-size defects could be induced by simultaneously delivering multiple biological growth factors to the site of the wound. Here, we report an approach for bone repair using a polyelectrolye multilayer coating carrying as little as 200 ng of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and platelet-derived growth factor-BB that were eluted over readily adapted time scales to induce rapid bone repair. Based on electrostatic interactions between the polymer multilayers and growth factors alone, we sustained mitogenic and osteogenic signals with these growth factors in an easily tunable and controlled manner to direct endogenous cell function. To prove the role of this adaptive release system, we applied the polyelectrolyte coating on a well-studied biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) support membrane. The released growth factors directed cellular processes to induce bone repair in a critical-size rat calvaria model. The released growth factors promoted local bone formation that bridged a critical-size defect in the calvaria as early as 2 wk after implantation. Mature, mechanically competent bone regenerated the native calvaria form. Such an approach could be clinically useful and has significant benefits as a synthetic, off-the-shelf, cell-free option for bone tissue repair and restoration.

  9. Resveratrol analogue 3,4,4′,5-tetramethoxystilbene inhibits growth, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in ovarian SKOV‐3 and A-2780 cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotrowska, Hanna; Myszkowski, Krzysztof; Ziółkowska, Alicja [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kulcenty, Katarzyna [Chair of Medical Biotechnology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Wierzchowski, Marcin [Department of Chemical Technology of Drugs, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kaczmarek, Mariusz [Department of Clinical Immunology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Murias, Marek [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Kwiatkowska-Borowczyk, Eliza [Chair of Medical Biotechnology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland); Department of Cancer Diagnostics and Immunology, Greater Poland Cancer Centre, Poznan (Poland); Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga, E-mail: liebert@ump.edu.pl [Department of Toxicology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan (Poland)

    2012-08-15

    In the screening studies, cytotoxicity of 12 methylated resveratrol analogues on 11 human cancer cell lines was examined. The most active compound 3,4,4′5-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) and two ovarian cancer cell lines A-2780 (IC{sub 50} = 0.71 μM) and SKOV-3 (IC{sub 50} = 11.51 μM) were selected for further investigation. To determine the mechanism of DMU-212 cytotoxicity, its ability to induce apoptosis was examined. DMU-212 arrested cell cycle in the G2/M or G0/G1 phase which resulted in apoptosis of both cell lines. The expression level of 84 apoptosis-related genes was investigated. In SKOV-3 cells DMU-212 caused up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax, Apaf-1 and p53 genes, specific to intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, and a decrease in Bcl-2 and Bcl 2110 mRNA expressions. Conversely, in A-2780 cells an increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes Fas, FasL, TNF, TNFRSF10A, TNFRSF21, TNFRSF16 specific to extracellular mechanism of apoptosis was observed. There are no data published so far regarding the receptor mediated apoptosis induced by DMU-212. The activation of caspase-3/7 was correlated with decreased TRAF-1 and BIRC-2 expression level in A-2780 cells exposed to DMU-212. DMU-212 caused a decrease in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA levels in A-2780 by 50% and 75%, and in SKOV-3 cells by 15% and 45%, respectively. The protein expression was also reduced in both cell lines. It is noteworthy that the expression of CYP1B1 protein was entirely inhibited in A-2780 cells treated with DMU-212. It can be suggested that different CYP1B1 expression patterns in either ovarian cell line may affect their sensitivity to cytotoxic activity of DMU-212. -- Highlights: ► DMU-212 was the most cytotoxic among 12 O-methylated resveratrol analogues. ► DMU-212 arrested cell cycle at G2/M and G0/G1phase ► DMU-212 triggered mitochondria- and receptor‐mediated apoptosis. ► DMU-212 entirely inhibited CYP1B1 protein expression in A-2780 cells.

  10. Evolution of the dragonfly head-arresting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorb, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    The arrester or fixation system of the head in adult Odonata is unique among arthropods. This system involves the organs of two body segments: the head and the neck. It consists of a skeleton–muscle apparatus that sets the arrester parts in motion. The parts comprise formations covered with complicated microstructures: fields of microtrichia on the rear surface of the head and post-cervical sclerites of the neck. The arrester immobilizes the head during feeding or when the dragonfly is in tandem flight. Thus, it may serve as an adaptation to save the head from violent mechanical disturbance and to stabilize gaze in a variety of behavioural situations. This study shows the evolutionary trend of the arrester in the order Odonata by using scanning electron microscopy and measurements of arrester structures in 227 species from 26 odonate families. The arrester design occurring in the Epiophlebiidae, Gomphidae, Neopetaliidae, Petaluridae and Chlorogomphinae is suggested to be the basic one. Two convergent pathways of head-arrester evolution among Zygoptera and Anisoptera are proposed. The possible functional significance of the arrester system is discussed.

  11. Adaptive algorithms for estimation of multiple biomass growth rates and biomass concentration in a class of bioprocesses

    OpenAIRE

    Lubenova, V.; Ferreira, E.C.

    2000-01-01

    An approach for multiple biomass growth rates and biomass concentration estimation is proposed for a class of bioprocesses characterizing by on-line measurements of dissolved oxygen concentration and off-line measurements of biomass concentration. The approach is based on adaptive observer theory and includes two steps. In the first one, an adaptive estimator of two biomass growth rates is designed using on-line measurements of dissolved oxygen concentration. In the second step...

  12. Rice LTG1 is involved in adaptive growth and fitness under low ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guangwen; Wu, Fu-Qing; Wu, Weixun; Wang, Hong-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Yunhui; Chen, Xiuling; Zhou, Kunneng; Jin, Mingna; Cheng, Zhijun; Li, Xueyong; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Haiyang; Wan, Jianmin

    2014-05-01

    Low temperature (LT) is one of the most prevalent factors limiting the productivity and geographical distribution of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Although significant progress has been made in elucidating the effect of LT on seed germination and reproductive development in rice, the genetic component affecting vegetative growth under LT remains poorly understood. Here, we report that rice cultivars harboring the dominant LTG1 (Low Temperature Growth 1) allele are more tolerant to LT (15-25°C, a temperature range prevalent in high-altitude, temperate zones and high-latitude areas), than those with the ltg1 allele. Using a map-based cloning strategy, we show that LTG1 encodes a casein kinase I. A functional nucleotide polymorphism was identified in the coding region of LTG1, causing a single amino acid substitution (I357K) that is associated with the growth rate, heading date and yield of rice plants grown at LT. We present evidence that LTG1 affects rice growth at LT via an auxin-dependent process(es). Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of this locus suggests that the ltg1 haplotype arose before the domestication of rice in tropical climates. Together, our data demonstrate that LTG1 plays an important role in the adaptive growth and fitness of rice cultivars under conditions of low ambient temperature.

  13. Relation of spontaneous transformation in cell culture to adaptive growth and clonal heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, A L; Yao, A; Rubin, H

    1990-01-01

    Cell transformation in culture is marked by the appearance of morphologically altered cells that continue to multiply to form discrete foci in confluent sheets when the surrounding cells are inhibited. These foci occur spontaneously in early-passage NIH 3T3 cells grown to confluency in 10% calf serum (CS) but are not seen in cultures grown to confluency in 2% CS. However, repeated passage of the cells at low density in 2% CS gives rise to an adapted population that grows to increasingly higher saturation densities and produces large numbers of foci in 2% CS. The increased saturation density of the adapted population in 2% CS is retained upon repeated passage in 10% CS, but the number and size of the foci produced in 2% CS gradually decrease under this regime. Clonal analysis confirms that the focus-forming potential of most if not all of the cells in a population increases in response to a continuously applied growth constraint, although only a small fraction of the population may actually form foci in a given assay. The acquired capacity for focus formation varies widely in clones derived from the adapted population and changes in diverse ways upon further passage of the clones. We propose that the adaptive changes result from progressive selection of successive phenotypic variations in growth capacity that occur spontaneously. The process designated progressive state selection resolves the apparent dichotomy between spontaneous mutation with selection on the one hand and induction on the other, by introducing selection among fluctuating states or metabolic patterns rather than among genetically altered cells.

  14. Understanding the adaptive growth strategy of Lactobacillus plantarum by in silico optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusink, Bas; Wiersma, Anne; Jacobs, Leo; Notebaart, Richard A; Smid, Eddy J

    2009-06-01

    In the study of metabolic networks, optimization techniques are often used to predict flux distributions, and hence, metabolic phenotype. Flux balance analysis in particular has been successful in predicting metabolic phenotypes. However, an inherent limitation of a stoichiometric approach such as flux balance analysis is that it can predict only flux distributions that result in maximal yields. Hence, previous attempts to use FBA to predict metabolic fluxes in Lactobacillus plantarum failed, as this lactic acid bacterium produces lactate, even under glucose-limited chemostat conditions, where FBA predicted mixed acid fermentation as an alternative pathway leading to a higher yield. In this study we tested, however, whether long-term adaptation on an unusual and poor carbon source (for this bacterium) would select for mutants with optimal biomass yields. We have therefore adapted Lactobacillus plantarum to grow well on glycerol as its main growth substrate. After prolonged serial dilutions, the growth yield and corresponding fluxes were compared to in silico predictions. Surprisingly, the organism still produced mainly lactate, which was corroborated by FBA to indeed be optimal. To understand these results, constraint-based elementary flux mode analysis was developed that predicted 3 out of 2669 possible flux modes to be optimal under the experimental conditions. These optimal pathways corresponded very closely to the experimentally observed fluxes and explained lactate formation as the result of competition for oxygen by the other flux modes. Hence, these results provide thorough understanding of adaptive evolution, allowing in silico predictions of the resulting flux states, provided that the selective growth conditions favor yield optimization as the winning strategy.

  15. Understanding the adaptive growth strategy of Lactobacillus plantarum by in silico optimisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas Teusink

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the study of metabolic networks, optimization techniques are often used to predict flux distributions, and hence, metabolic phenotype. Flux balance analysis in particular has been successful in predicting metabolic phenotypes. However, an inherent limitation of a stoichiometric approach such as flux balance analysis is that it can predict only flux distributions that result in maximal yields. Hence, previous attempts to use FBA to predict metabolic fluxes in Lactobacillus plantarum failed, as this lactic acid bacterium produces lactate, even under glucose-limited chemostat conditions, where FBA predicted mixed acid fermentation as an alternative pathway leading to a higher yield. In this study we tested, however, whether long-term adaptation on an unusual and poor carbon source (for this bacterium would select for mutants with optimal biomass yields. We have therefore adapted Lactobacillus plantarum to grow well on glycerol as its main growth substrate. After prolonged serial dilutions, the growth yield and corresponding fluxes were compared to in silico predictions. Surprisingly, the organism still produced mainly lactate, which was corroborated by FBA to indeed be optimal. To understand these results, constraint-based elementary flux mode analysis was developed that predicted 3 out of 2669 possible flux modes to be optimal under the experimental conditions. These optimal pathways corresponded very closely to the experimentally observed fluxes and explained lactate formation as the result of competition for oxygen by the other flux modes. Hence, these results provide thorough understanding of adaptive evolution, allowing in silico predictions of the resulting flux states, provided that the selective growth conditions favor yield optimization as the winning strategy.

  16. CARI III Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Melanoma-Bearing Mouse Model through Induction of G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jin Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mushroom-derived natural products have been used to prevent or treat cancer for millennia. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of CARI (Cell Activation Research Institute III, which consists of a blend of mushroom mycelia from Phellinus linteus grown on germinated brown rice, Inonotus obliquus grown on germinated brown rice, Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice and Ganoderma lucidum. Here, we showed that CARI III exerted anti-cancer activity, which is comparable to Dox against melanoma in vivo. B16F10 cells were intraperitoneally injected into C57BL6 mice to develop solid intra-abdominal tumors. Three hundred milligrams of the CARI III/kg/day p.o. regimen reduced tumor weight, comparable to the doxorubicin (Dox-treated group. An increase in life span (ILS% = 50.88% was observed in the CARI III-administered group, compared to the tumor control group. CARI III demonstrates anti-proliferative activity against B16F10 melanoma cells through inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. CARI III inhibits the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK2 and induces p21. Therefore, CARI III could be a potential chemopreventive supplement to melanoma patients.

  17. CARI III inhibits tumor growth in a melanoma-bearing mouse model through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Mushroom-derived natural products have been used to prevent or treat cancer for millennia. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of CARI (Cell Activation Research Institute) III, which consists of a blend of mushroom mycelia from Phellinus linteus grown on germinated brown rice, Inonotus obliquus grown on germinated brown rice, Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice and Ganoderma lucidum. Here, we showed that CARI III exerted anti-cancer activity, which is comparable to Dox against melanoma in vivo. B16F10 cells were intraperitoneally injected into C57BL6 mice to develop solid intra-abdominal tumors. Three hundred milligrams of the CARI III/kg/day p.o. regimen reduced tumor weight, comparable to the doxorubicin (Dox)-treated group. An increase in life span (ILS% = 50.88%) was observed in the CARI III-administered group, compared to the tumor control group. CARI III demonstrates anti-proliferative activity against B16F10 melanoma cells through inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. CARI III inhibits the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK2 and induces p21. Therefore, CARI III could be a potential chemopreventive supplement to melanoma patients. PMID:25221864

  18. Dactylone inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced transformation and phenotype expression of human cancer cells and induces G1-S arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Sergey N; Shubina, Larisa K; Bode, Ann M; Stonik, Valentin A; Dong, Zigang

    2007-06-15

    The marine natural chamigrane-type sesquiterpenoid, dactylone, is closely related to secondary metabolites of some edible species of red algae. In the present study, the effect of dactylone was tested on the mouse skin epidermal JB6 P+ Cl41 cell line and its stable transfectants as well as on several human tumor cell lines, including lung (H460), colon (HCT-116), and skin melanomas (SK-MEL-5 and SK-MEL-28). This natural product was effective at nontoxic doses as a cancer-preventive agent, which exerted its actions, at least in part, through the inhibition of cyclin D3 and Cdk4 expression and retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) phosphorylation. The inhibition of these cell cycle components was followed by cell cycle arrest at the G1-S transition with subsequent p53-independent apoptosis. Therefore, these data showed that application of dactylone and related compounds may lead to decreased malignant cell transformation and/or decreased tumor cell proliferation. PMID:17575161

  19. Alpinia pricei Rhizome Extracts Induce Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Squamous Carcinoma KB Cells and Suppress Tumor Growth in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Cheng Hseu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpinia pricei has been shown to induce apoptosis in human squamous carcinoma (KB cells. In this study, we report the effectiveness of the ethanol (70% extracts of A. pricei rhizome (AP extracts in terms of tumor regression as determined using both in vitro cell culture and in vivo athymic nude mice models of KB cells. We found that the AP extract (25–200 μg/mL treatment decreased the proliferation of KB cells by arresting progression through the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. This cell cycle blockade was associated with reductions in cyclin A and B1, Cdc2, and Cdc25C, and increased p21/WAF1, Wee1, p53 and phospho-p53 (p-p53 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that AP extract treatment decreased metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 and urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA expression, while expression of their endogenous inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of MMP-1 (TIMP-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, were increased in KB cells. Furthermore, AP extract treatment effectively delayed tumor incidence in nude mice inoculated with KB cells and reduced the tumor burden. AP extract treatment also induced apoptotic DNA fragmentation, as detected by in situ TUNEL staining. Thus, A. pricei may possess antitumor activity in human squamous carcinoma (KB cells.

  20. Adapt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  1. Brain serotonergic activation in growth-stunted farmed salmon: adaption versus pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vindas, Marco A.; Johansen, Ida B.; Folkedal, Ole;

    2016-01-01

    ) in aquaculture as a model to explore this stance of evolutionary-based medicine, for which empirical evidence has been lacking. Growth-stunted (GS) farmed fish were characterized by elevated brain serotonergic activation, increased cortisol production and behavioural inhibition. We make the novel observation......Signalling systems activated under stress are highly conserved, suggesting adaptive effects of their function. Pathologies arising from continued activation of such systems may represent a mismatch between evolutionary programming and current environments. Here, we use Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar....... Hence, we propose that serotonin-mediated behavioural inhibition may have evolved in vertebrates to minimize stress exposure in vulnerable individuals....

  2. NF-kappa B signaling pathway is involved in growth inhibition, G2/M arrest and apoptosis induced by Trichostatin A in human tongue carcinoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Jun; Duan, Li; Fan, Mingwen; Wu, Xinxing

    2006-01-01

    The HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) exhibits antiturnour activity in various tumour cells. However, little is known about the effect of TSA on growth of human tongue carcinoma cells. In this study, we observed that TSA concentration-dependently inhibited growth of human tongue carcinoma Tca8113

  3. Intestinal adaptation after extensive small bowel resection: differential changes in growth and insulin-like growth factor system messenger ribonucleic acids in jejunum and ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, T R; Mantell, M P; Chow, J C; Rombeau, J L; Smith, R J

    1998-07-01

    The distal small bowel exhibits greater adaptive growth than proximal segments after partial small intestine resection. To explore this process, we evaluated adaptive cellularity, intestinal insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts, and effects of recombinant IGF-I treatment in jejunum and ileum of adult rats. Gastrostomy-fed animals underwent 80% jejuno-ileal resection or intestinal transection and reanastomosis without resection, followed by infusion of human recombinant IGF-I (2.4 mg/kgXday) or vehicle. After 7 days, resected rats demonstrated modest adaptive growth in jejunum and marked cell proliferation in ileum. Resection increased IGF-I mRNA in both jejunum (183%) and ileum (249%) and up-regulated IGFBP-4 mRNA levels in both tissues. IGFBP-3 mRNA fell significantly in ileum after resection. IGF-I infusion modestly increased ileal cellularity after resection, but had no effect in jejunum. IGF-I markedly increased IGFBP-3 mRNA levels in jejunum after both transection and resection. These data confirm that bowel resection induces greater adaptive growth in ileum than jejunum. IGF-I administration modestly increases ileal, but not jejunal, growth after resection. Increased levels of intestinal IGF-I and IGFBP-4 mRNA suggest roles for IGF-I and IGFBP-4 in mediating small bowel adaptation. Higher levels of jejunal IGFBP-3 mRNA may be related to limited jejunal vs. ileal growth after extensive jejuno-ileal resection.

  4. Arrest Decisions as Precludes To? An Evaluation of Policy Related Research. Volume I: Administrative Summary and Training Script.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neithercutt, M. G.; And Others

    The document is the first part of a study conducted to evaluate policy-related research on police arrest discretion as an alternative solution to arrest. It presents the administrative summary of the Arrest Decisions as Preludes To? (ADAPT) project and contains scripts intended for use by police departments as a staff training device. The…

  5. Quantitative analysis of population heterogeneity of the adaptive salt stress response and growth capacity of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besten, den H.M.W.; Ingham, C.J.; Hylckama Vlieg, van J.E.T.; Beerthuyzen, M.M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Abee, T.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial populations can display heterogeneity with respect to both the adaptive stress response and growth capacity of individual cells. The growth dynamics of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 during mild and severe salt stress exposure were investigated for the population as a whole in liquid culture.

  6. Physiological and cell morphology adaptation of Bacillus subtilis at near-zero specific growth rates: a transcriptome analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overkamp, W.; Ercan, O.; Herber, M.; Maris, van A.J.; Kleerebezem, M.; Kuipers, O.P.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient scarcity is a common condition in nature, but the resulting extremely low growth rates (below 0.025 h-1) are an unexplored research area in B. subtilis. To understand microbial life in natural environments, studying the adaptation of B. subtilis to near-zero growth conditions is relevant. T

  7. A Novel Muscarinic Antagonist R2HBJJ Inhibits Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Growth and Arrests the Cell Cycle in G0/G1

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Nan; Wei, Xiaoli; Liu, Xiaoyan; Ma, Xiaoyun; He, Xinhua; Zhuo, Rengong; Zhao, Zhe; Wang, Liyun; Yan, Haitao; Zhong, Bohua; Zheng, Jianquan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs). In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ pre...

  8. Transcriptome adaptation of group B Streptococcus to growth in human amniotic fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Sitkiewicz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus is a bacterial pathogen that causes severe intrauterine infections leading to fetal morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of GBS infection in this environment is poorly understood, in part because we lack a detailed understanding of the adaptation of this pathogen to growth in amniotic fluid. To address this knowledge deficit, we characterized the transcriptome of GBS grown in human amniotic fluid (AF and compared it with the transcriptome in rich laboratory medium. METHODS: GBS was grown in Todd Hewitt-yeast extract medium and human AF. Bacteria were collected at mid-logarithmic, late-logarithmic and stationary growth phase. We performed global expression microarray analysis using a custom-made Affymetrix GeneChip. The normalized hybridization values derived from three biological replicates at each growth point were obtained. AF/THY transcript ratios representing greater than a 2-fold change and P-value exceeding 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have discovered that GBS significantly remodels its transcriptome in response to exposure to human amniotic fluid. GBS grew rapidly in human AF and did not exhibit a global stress response. The majority of changes in GBS transcripts in AF compared to THY medium were related to genes mediating metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, and nucleotides. The majority of the observed changes in transcripts affects genes involved in basic bacterial metabolism and is connected to AF composition and nutritional requirements of the bacterium. Importantly, the response to growth in human AF included significant changes in transcripts of multiple virulence genes such as adhesins, capsule, and hemolysin and IL-8 proteinase what might have consequences for the outcome of host-pathogen interactions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our work provides extensive new information about how the transcriptome of GBS responds

  9. E. coli 6S RNA: a universal transcriptional regulator within the centre of growth adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissen, René; Steuten, Benedikt; Polen, Tino; Wagner, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial 6S RNA has been shown to bind with high affinity to σ(70)-containing RNA polymerase, suppressing σ(70)-dependent transcription during stationary phase, when 6S RNA concentrations are highest. We recently reported a genome-wide transcriptional comparison of wild-type and 6S RNA deficient E. coli strains. Contrary to the expected σ(70)- and stationary phase-specific regulatory effect of 6S RNA it turned out that mRNA levels derived from many alternative sigma factors, including σ(38) or σ(32), were affected during exponential and stationary growth. Among the most noticeably down-regulated genes at stationary growth are ribosomal proteins and factors involved in translation. In addition, a striking number of mRNA levels coding for enzymes involved in the purine metabolism, for transporters and stress regulators are altered both during log- and stationary phase. During the study we discovered a link between 6S RNA and the general stress alarmone ppGpp, which has a higher basal level in cells deficient in 6S RNA. This finding points to a functional interrelation of 6S RNA and the global network of stress and growth adaptation. PMID:20930516

  10. Key physiological properties contributing to rhizosphere adaptation and plant growth promotion abilities of Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibach-Paldi, Sharon; Burdman, Saul; Okon, Yaacov

    2012-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that is being increasingly used in agriculture in a commercial scale. Recent research has elucidated key properties of A. brasilense that contribute to its ability to adapt to the rhizosphere habitat and to promote plant growth. They include synthesis of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid, nitric oxide, carotenoids, and a range of cell surface components as well as the ability to undergo phenotypic variation. Storage and utilization of polybetahydroxyalkanoate polymers are important for the shelf life of the bacteria in production of inoculants, products containing bacterial cells in a suitable carrier for agricultural use. Azospirillum brasilense is able to fix nitrogen, but despite some controversy, as judging from most systems evaluated so far, contribution of fixed nitrogen by this bacterium does not seem to play a major role in plant growth promotion. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the understanding of physiological properties of A. brasilense that are important for rhizosphere performance and successful interactions with plant roots.

  11. Redox state, reactive oxygen species and adaptive growth in colonial hydroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, N W

    2001-06-01

    Colonial metazoans often encrust surfaces over which the food supply varies in time or space. In such an environment, adaptive colony development entails adjusting the timing and spacing of feeding structures and gastrovascular connections to correspond to this variable food supply. To investigate the possibility of such adaptive growth, within-colony differential feeding experiments were carried out using the hydroid Podocoryna carnea. Indeed, such colonies strongly exhibited adaptive growth, developing dense arrays of polyps (feeding structures) and gastrovascular connections in areas that were fed relative to areas that were starved, and this effect became more consistent over time. To investigate mechanisms of signaling between the food supply and colony development, measurements were taken of metabolic parameters that have been implicated in signal transduction in other systems, particularly redox state and levels of reactive oxygen species. Utilizing fluorescence microscopy of P. carnea cells in vivo, simultaneous measurements of redox state [using NAD(P)H] and hydrogen peroxide (using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate) were taken. Both measures focused on polyp epitheliomuscular cells, since these exhibit the greatest metabolic activity. Colonies 3-5h after feeding were relatively oxidized, with low levels of peroxide, while colonies 24h after feeding were relatively reduced, with high levels of peroxide. The functional role of polyps in feeding and generating gastrovascular flow probably produced this dichotomy. Polyps 3-5h after feeding contract maximally, and this metabolic demand probably shifts the redox state in the direction of oxidation and diminishes levels of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, 24h after feeding, polyps are quiescent, and this lack of metabolic demand probably shifts the redox state in the direction of reduction and increases levels of reactive oxygen species. Within-colony differential feeding experiments were carried out on

  12. WIF1, a Wnt pathway inhibitor, regulates SKP2 and c-myc expression leading to G1 arrest and growth inhibition ofhuman invasive urinary bladder cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yaxiong; Simoneau, Anne R; Liao, Wu-Xiang; Yi, Guo; Hope, Christopher; Liu, Feng; Li, Shunqiang; Xie, Jun; Holcombe, Randall F; Jurnak, Frances A.; Mercola, Dan; Hoang, Bang H.; Zi, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of secreted wingless-type (Wnt) antagonists through hypermethylation is associated with tobacco smoking and with invasive bladder cancer. The secreted Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF1) has shown consistent growth-inhibitory effect on various cancer cell lines. Therefore,we assessed the mechanisms of action of WIF1 by either restoring WIF1 expression in invasive bladder cancer cell lines (T24 and TSU-PR1) or using a recombinant protein containing functional WIF1 domain. Both ...

  13. Antibodies to Placental Immunoregulatory Ferritin with Transfer of Polyclonal Lymphocytes Arrest MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Growth in a Nude Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Halpern

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The recently cloned human gene named “placental immunoregulatory ferritin” (PLIF is a pregnancyrelated immunomodulator. Recombinant PLIF and its bioactive domain C48 are immune-suppressive and induce pronounced IL-10 production by immune cells. PLIF is expressed in the placenta and breast cancer cells. Blocking PLIF in pregnant mice by anti-C48 antibodies inhibited placental and fetal growth and modulated the cytokine network. It has been revealed that anti-C48 treatment inhibited MCF-7 tumor growth in nude mice. However, this significant effect was observed only in those transfused with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Blocking PLIF in tumor-engrafted human immune cell transfused mice resulted in massive infiltration of human CD45+ cells (mainly CD8+ T cells, both intratumorally and in the tumor periphery, and a significant number of caspase-3+ cells. In vitro, antiC48 treatment of MCF-7 tumor cells cocultured with human lymphocytes induced a significant increase in interferon-γ secretion. We conclude that blocking PLIF inhibits breast cancer growth, possibly by an effect on the cytokine network in immune cells and on breakdown of immunosuppression.

  14. Adaptive mutations in sugar metabolism restore growth on glucose in a pyruvate decarboxylase negative yeast strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yiming; Liu, Guodong; Engqvist, Martin K. M.;

    2015-01-01

    Background: A Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying deletions in all three pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) genes (also called Pdc negative yeast) represents a non-ethanol producing platform strain for the production of pyruvate derived biochemicals. However, it cannot grow on glucose as the sole...... carbon source, and requires supplementation of C2 compounds to the medium in order to meet the requirement for cytosolic acetyl-CoA for biosynthesis of fatty acids and ergosterol. Results: In this study, a Pdc negative strain was adaptively evolved for improved growth in glucose medium via serial...... expression of several hexose transporter genes. The non-synonymous mutations in HXT2 and CIT1 may function in the presence of mutated MTH1 alleles and could be related to an altered central carbon metabolism in order to ensure production of cytosolic acetyl-CoA in the Pdc negative strain....

  15. Adaptive strategies for graph state growth in the presence of monitored errors

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, E T; Benjamin, S C; Kok, P; Campbell, Earl T.; Fitzsimons, Joseph; Benjamin, Simon C.; Kok, Pieter

    2006-01-01

    Graph states, also known as cluster states, are the entanglement resource that enables one-way quantum computing. They can be grown by a series of projective measurements on the component qubits. Such measurements typically carry a significant failure probability. Moreover, even upon success they may generate imperfect entanglement. Here we describe strategies to adapt growth operations in order to cancel incurred errors. Nascent states that initially deviate from the ideal graph states evolve toward the desired high fidelity resource without incurring an impractical overhead. Our analysis extends the diagrammatic language of graph states to include characteristics such as tilted vertices, weighted edges, and partial fusion, which may arise due to experimental imperfections. The strategies we present are relevant to parity projection schemes such as optical `path erasure' with distributed matter qubits.

  16. EGFR-targeted plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles suppress lung tumor growth by abrogating G2/M cell-cycle arrest and inducing DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shinji Kuroda,1 Justina Tam,2 Jack A Roth,1 Konstantin Sokolov,2 Rajagopal Ramesh3–5 1Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 2Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Pathology, 4Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, 5Stephenson Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA Background: We have previously demonstrated the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeted hybrid plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles (225-NP produce a therapeutic effect in human lung cancer cell lines in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of 225-NP-mediated antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo using the EGFR-mutant HCC827 cell line. Methods: The growth inhibitory effect of 225-NP on lung tumor cells was determined by cell viability and cell-cycle analysis. Protein expression related to autophagy, apoptosis, and DNA-damage were determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. An in vivo efficacy study was conducted using a human lung tumor xenograft mouse model. Results: The 225-NP treatment markedly reduced tumor cell viability at 72 hours compared with the cell viability in control treatment groups. Cell-cycle analysis showed the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase was reduced when treated with 225-NP, with a concomitant increase in the number of cells in Sub-G1 phase, indicative of cell death. Western blotting showed LC3B and PARP cleavage, indicating 225-NP-treatment activated both autophagy- and apoptosis-mediated cell death. The 225-NP strongly induced γH2AX and phosphorylated histone H3, markers indicative of DNA damage and mitosis, respectively. Additionally, significant γH2AX foci formation was observed in 225-NP-treated cells compared with control treatment groups, suggesting 225-NP induced cell death by triggering DNA damage. The 225-NP-mediated DNA damage involved abrogation of the

  17. Adaptive growth of tree root systems in response to wind action and site conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Bruce C.; Ray, Duncan

    1996-01-01

    Soil-root plate dimensions and structural root architecture were examined on 46-year-old Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) trees that had been mechanically uprooted. Rooting depth was restricted by a water table, and root system morphology had adapted to resist the wind movement associated with shallow rooting. The spread of the root system and the ratio of root mass to shoot mass (root/shoot ratio) were both negatively related to soil-root plate depth. Root systems had more structural root mass on the leeward side than the windward side of the tree relative to the prevailing wind direction. Cross sections of structural roots were obtained at distances of 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, and 1.25 m from the tree center. Buttressed parts of roots had greater lateral and vertical secondary thickening above rather than below the biological center. This uneven growth, which produced a shape similar in cross section to a T-beam, was greater on the leeward side of the tree, and was greatest at 0.5 m from the tree center of shallow rooted trees. Further from the tree, particularly on the windward side, many roots developed eccentric cross-sectional shapes comparable to I-beams, which would efficiently resist vertical flexing. Roots became more ovoid in shape with increasing distance from the tree, especially on deep rooted trees where lateral roots tapered rapidly to a small diameter. We conclude that these forms of adaptive growth in response to wind movement improve the rigidity of the soil-root plate and counteract the increasing vulnerability to windthrow as the tree grows.

  18. Universal approximation of extreme learning machine with adaptive growth of hidden nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Lan, Yuan; Huang, Guang-Bin; Xu, Zong-Ben

    2012-02-01

    Extreme learning machines (ELMs) have been proposed for generalized single-hidden-layer feedforward networks which need not be neuron-like and perform well in both regression and classification applications. In this brief, we propose an ELM with adaptive growth of hidden nodes (AG-ELM), which provides a new approach for the automated design of networks. Different from other incremental ELMs (I-ELMs) whose existing hidden nodes are frozen when the new hidden nodes are added one by one, in AG-ELM the number of hidden nodes is determined in an adaptive way in the sense that the existing networks may be replaced by newly generated networks which have fewer hidden nodes and better generalization performance. We then prove that such an AG-ELM using Lebesgue p-integrable hidden activation functions can approximate any Lebesgue p-integrable function on a compact input set. Simulation results demonstrate and verify that this new approach can achieve a more compact network architecture than the I-ELM. PMID:24808516

  19. Universal approximation of extreme learning machine with adaptive growth of hidden nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Lan, Yuan; Huang, Guang-Bin; Xu, Zong-Ben

    2012-02-01

    Extreme learning machines (ELMs) have been proposed for generalized single-hidden-layer feedforward networks which need not be neuron-like and perform well in both regression and classification applications. In this brief, we propose an ELM with adaptive growth of hidden nodes (AG-ELM), which provides a new approach for the automated design of networks. Different from other incremental ELMs (I-ELMs) whose existing hidden nodes are frozen when the new hidden nodes are added one by one, in AG-ELM the number of hidden nodes is determined in an adaptive way in the sense that the existing networks may be replaced by newly generated networks which have fewer hidden nodes and better generalization performance. We then prove that such an AG-ELM using Lebesgue p-integrable hidden activation functions can approximate any Lebesgue p-integrable function on a compact input set. Simulation results demonstrate and verify that this new approach can achieve a more compact network architecture than the I-ELM.

  20. Cause–effect relationship among morphological adaptations, growth, and gas exchange response of pedunculate oak seedlings to waterlogging

    OpenAIRE

    Tatin Froux, Fabienne; Capelli, Nicolas; Parelle, Julien

    2014-01-01

    & Context In response to waterlogging, pedunculate oak is known to develop adventitious roots and hypertrophied lenti-cels. However, to date, a link between these adaptations and the ability to maintain net CO 2 assimilation rates and growth has not been demonstrated. & Aims The aim of this study was to explore the cause–effect relationship between the ability to form morphological adap-tations (hypertrophied lenticels and adventitious roots) and the capacity to maintain high assimilation rat...

  1. ADAPTATION TO UNFAVORABLE CONDITIONS OF GROWTH: PATHOGENICITY OF ACHOLEPLASMA LAIDLAWII PG8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim V. Trushin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:As a result of cultivation of A. laidlawii PG8 cells on the deficient medium during 480 days, the mycoplasma culture adapted in vitro to unfavorable growth conditions was obtained. The culture consisted of cells with sizes less than 0.2 µm and features of A. laidlawii PG8 ultramicroforms, nanocells. A. laidlawii PG8 culture adapted in vitro to unfavorable growth conditions shows more evident phytopathogenicity than the unadapted one. Infecting plants V. minor L. by A. laidlawii PG8 culture adapted in vitro to UGC resulted in the appearance of chloroses in 75%, necrosis – 50%, leaves marcescence – 50% and abnormalities of bine development in 30% of plants through 12 days, while infecting plants by A. laidlawii PG8 culture unadapted to UGC led to respective signs in 40%, 25%, 25% and 0% of samples, respectively, through 30 days. The ability of A. laidlawii PG8 to form UMF resistant to stress factors in UGC with high phytopathogenic potential seems to demand a new approach to investigate the precise mechanisms of interacting the mycoplasma with host organisms.RESUMENComo resultado del cultivo de células de A. laidlawii PG8 en medio deficiente durante 480 días, fue obtenido un cultivo de mycoplasma adaptado in vitro a las condiciones desfavorables del crecimiento. El cultivo consistió en células con tamaño menor de 0.2 µm y características PG8 ultramicroformas de A. laidlawii nanocélulas. El cultivo de A. laidlawii PG8 adaptado in vitro a condiciones desfavorables del crecimiento muestra más evidente fitopatogenicidad que el inadaptado. Plantas infectadas V. minor L. por el cultivo del A. laidlawii PG8 adaptado in vitro a UGC dio como resultado la aparición de clorosis en el 75%, necrosis en el 50%, marcescencia de las hojas en el 50% y anormalidades del desarrollo del bine en el 30% de plantas a los 12 días, mientras que las plantas infectadas por el cultivo del A. laidlawii PG8 inadaptado a UGC, condujo a dichos signos en

  2. Posttraumatic growth measures: translation and adaptation of three self-report instruments to Brazilian Portuguese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Loreto Garcia da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Posttraumatic growth is one of the most commonly used concepts to evaluate positive changes after trauma. The principal scales used internationally to evaluate this phenomenon have not yet a Brazilian Portuguese version. Objectives This study aimed to translate and adapt to the Brazilian context the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI, the Core Beliefs Inventory (CBI, and the Event Related Rumination Inventory (ERRI. Methods The procedures included translation, back translation, expert committee’s evaluation, and pilot testing in the target population. Results All items of all three instruments had a good content validity index after evaluation by four experts and three reformulations. The back translation of the final version also demonstrated that all Brazilian Portuguese versions convey the same meaning as the original English version. The final version was pilot tested with 30 undergraduate students, and all the items were above the cut-off point. Discussion This study was able to produce Brazilian versions of the PTGI, CBI, and ERRI. Further studies are underway to determine the reliability, factorial validity, and convergent validity of the subscales of the instruments.

  3. Adaptation of Lactococcus lactis to high growth temperature leads to a dramatic increase in acidification rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jing; Ingvar Hellgren, Lars; Ruhdal Jensen, Peter; Solem, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is essential for most cheese making, and this mesophilic bacterium has its growth optimum around 30 °C. We have, through adaptive evolution, isolated a mutant TM29 that grows well up to 39 °C, and continuous growth at 40 °C is possible if pre-incubated at a slightly lower temperature. At the maximal permissive temperature for the wild-type, 38 °C, TM29 grows 33% faster and has a 12% higher specific lactate production rate than its parent MG1363, which results in fast lactate accumulation. Genome sequencing was used to reveal the mutations accumulated, most of which were shown to affect thermal tolerance. Of the mutations with more pronounced effects, two affected expression of single proteins (chaperone; riboflavin transporter), two had pleiotropic effects (RNA polymerase) which changed the gene expression profile, and one resulted in a change in the coding sequence of CDP-diglyceride synthase. A large deletion containing 10 genes was also found to affect thermal tolerance significantly. With this study we demonstrate a simple approach to obtain non-GMO derivatives of the important L. lactis that possess properties desirable by the industry, e.g. thermal robustness and increased rate of acidification. The mutations we have identified provide a genetic basis for further investigation of thermal tolerance. PMID:26388459

  4. Adaptive Use of Information during Growth Can Explain Long-Term Effects of Early Life Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Sinead; Fawcett, Tim W; Higginson, Andrew D; Trimmer, Pete C; Uller, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    Development is a continuous process during which individuals gain information about their environment and adjust their phenotype accordingly. In many natural systems, individuals are particularly sensitive to early life experiences, even in the absence of later constraints on plasticity. Recent models have highlighted how the adaptive use of information can explain age-dependent plasticity. These models assume that information gain and phenotypic adjustments either cannot occur simultaneously or are completely independent. This assumption is not valid in the context of growth, where finding food results both in a size increase and learning about food availability. Here, we describe a simple model of growth to provide proof of principle that long-term effects of early life experiences can arise through the coupled dynamics of information acquisition and phenotypic change in the absence of direct constraints on plasticity. The increase in reproductive value from gaining information and sensitivity of behavior to experiences declines across development. Early life experiences have long-term impacts on age of maturity, yet-due to compensatory changes in behavior-our model predicts no substantial effects on reproductive success. We discuss how the evolution of sensitive windows can be explained by experiences having short-term effects on informational and phenotypic states, which generate long-term effects on life-history decisions. PMID:27104994

  5. Repair of U/G and U/A in DNA by UNG2-associated repair complexes takes place predominantly by short-patch repair both in proliferating and growth-arrested cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Otterlei, Marit; Pena Diaz, Javier;

    2004-01-01

    , PCNA and DNA ligase, the latter detected as activity. Short-patch repair was the predominant mechanism both in extracts and UNG2-ARC from proliferating and less BER-proficient growth-arrested cells. Repair of U/G mispairs and U/A pairs was completely inhibited by neutralizing UNG......-antibodies, but whereas added recombinant SMUG1 could partially restore repair of U/G mispairs, it was unable to restore repair of U/A pairs in UNG2-ARC. Neutralizing antibodies to APE1 and POLbeta, and depletion of XRCC1 strongly reduced short-patch BER, and a fraction of long-patch repair was POLbeta dependent......Nuclear uracil-DNA glycosylase UNG2 has an established role in repair of U/A pairs resulting from misincorporation of dUMP during replication. In antigen-stimulated B-lymphocytes UNG2 removes uracil from U/G mispairs as part of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination processes. Using...

  6. RhoA/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling after growth arrest-specific protein 6/mer receptor tyrosine kinase engagement promotes epithelial cell growth and wound repair via upregulation of hepatocyte growth factor in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ye-Ji; Park, Hyun-Jung; Woo, So-Youn; Park, Eun-Mi; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2014-09-01

    Growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6)/Mer receptor tyrosine kinase (Mer) signaling modulates cytokine secretion and helps to regulate the immune response and apoptotic cell clearance. Signaling pathways that activate an epithelial growth program in macrophages are still poorly defined. We report that Gas6/Mer/RhoA signaling can induce the production of epithelial growth factor hepatic growth factor (HGF) in macrophages, which ultimately promotes epithelial cell proliferation and wound repair. The RhoA/protein kinase B (Akt)/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, including p38 MAP kinase, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase, and Jun NH2-terminal kinase axis in RAW 264.7 cells, was identified as Gas6/Mer downstream signaling pathway for the upregulation of HGF mRNA and protein. Conditioned medium from RAW 264.7 cells that had been exposed to Gas6 or apoptotic cells enhanced epithelial cell proliferation of the epithelial cell line LA-4 and wound closure. Cotreatment with an HGF receptor-blocking antibody or c-Met antagonist downregulated this enhancement. Inhibition of Mer with small interfering RNA (siRNA) or the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway by RhoA siRNA or Rho kinase pharmacologic inhibitor suppressed Gas6-induced HGF mRNA and protein expression in macrophages and blocked epithelial cell proliferation and wound closure induced by the conditioned medium. Our data provide evidence that macrophages can be reprogrammed by Gas6 to promote epithelial proliferation and wound repair via HGF, which is induced by the Mer/RhoA/Akt/MAP kinase pathway. Thus, defects in Gas6/Mer/RhoA signaling in macrophages may delay tissue repair after injury to the alveolar epithelium.

  7. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  8. High-Dose Estrogen and Clinical Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators Induce Growth Arrest, p21, and p53 in Primate Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Jay W.; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2005-06-09

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological cancer affecting women. Hormone-based therapies are variably successful in treating ovarian cancer, but the reasoning behind these therapies is paradoxical. Clinical reagents such as tamoxifen are considered to inhibit or reverse tumor growth by competitive inhibition of the estrogen receptor (ER); however high dose estrogen is as clinically effective as tamoxifen, and it is unlikely that estrogen is acting by blocking ER activity; however, it may be activating a unique function of the ER that is nonmitogenic. For poorly defined reasons, 90% of varian cancers derive from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). In vivo the ER-positive OSE is exposed to high estrogen levels, reaching micromolar concentrations in dominant ovarian follicles. Using cultured OSE cells in vitro, we show that these levels of estradiol (1 ug/ml; {approx}3um) block the actions of serum growth factors, activate the G1 phase retinoblastoma AQ:A checkpoint, and induce p21, an inhibitor of kinases that normally inactivate the retinoblastoma checkpoint. We also show that estradiol increases p53 levels, which may contribute to p21 induction. Supporting the hypothesis that clinical selective ER modulators activate this novel ER function, we find that micromolar doses of tamoxifen and the ''pure antiestrogen'' ICI 182,780 elicit the same effects as estradiol. We propose that, in the context of proliferation, these data clarify some paradoxical aspects of hormone-based therapy and suggest that fuller understanding of normal ER function is necessary to improve therapeutic strategies that target the ER. (J Clin Endocrinol Metab 90: 0000-0000, 2005)

  9. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits transforming growth factor-β1-induced cell cycle arrest by promoting Smad3 linker phosphorylation through activation of Akt-ERK1/2-linked signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Park, Seong Ji; Jo, Eun Ji [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hui-Young [Department of Internal Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Suntaek [Laboratory of Cancer Cell Biology, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong-Jin [CHA Cancer Institute, CHA University of Medicine and Science, Seoul 135-081 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Chul, E-mail: bckim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell cycle arrest. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces Smad3 linker phosphorylation through Akt-ERK1/2 pathway. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated suppression of TGF-β signal requires Smad3 linker phosphorylation. •This is a first report about interplay between H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and growth inhibition pathway. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) functions as a second messenger in growth factor receptor-mediated intracellular signaling cascade and is tumorigenic by virtue of its ability to promote cell proliferation; however, the mechanisms underlying the growth stimulatory action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are less understood. Here we report an important mechanism for antagonistic effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on growth inhibitory response to transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In Mv1Lu and HepG2 cells, pretreatment of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (0.05–0.2 mM) completely blocked TGF-β1-mediated induction of p15{sup INK4B} expression and increase of its promoter activity. Interestingly, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} selectively suppressed the transcriptional activation potential of Smad3, not Smad2, in the absence of effects on TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of the COOH-tail SSXS motif of Smad3 and its nuclear translocation. Mechanism studies showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increases the phosphorylation of Smad3 at the middle linker region in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and this effect is mediated by activation of extracellular signal-activated kinase 1/2 through Akt. Furthermore, expression of a mutant Smad3 in which linker phosphorylation sites were ablated significantly abrogated the inhibitory effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on TGF-β1-induced increase of p15{sup INK4B}-Luc reporter activity and blockade of cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. These findings for the first time define H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as a signaling molecule that modulate Smad3 linker phosphorylation and its transcriptional activity, thus providing

  10. Proteasomal degradation of sphingosine kinase 1 and inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase by the sphingosine kinase inhibitors, SKi or ABC294640, induces growth arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Melissa; Pitman, Melissa; Pitson, Stuart M; Pyne, Nigel J; Pyne, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Sphingosine kinases (two isoforms termed SK1 and SK2) catalyse the formation of the bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate. We demonstrate here that the SK2 inhibitor, ABC294640 (3-(4-chlorophenyl)-adamantane-1-carboxylic acid (pyridin-4-ylmethyl)amide) or the SK1/SK2 inhibitor, SKi (2-(p-hydroxyanilino)-4-(p-chlorophenyl)thiazole)) induce the proteasomal degradation of SK1a (Mr = 42 kDa) and inhibit DNA synthesis in androgen-independent LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells. These effects are recapitulated by the dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1) inhibitor, fenretinide. Moreover, SKi or ABC294640 reduce Des1 activity in Jurkat cells and ABC294640 induces the proteasomal degradation of Des1 (Mr = 38 kDa) in LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, SKi or ABC294640 or fenretinide increase the expression of the senescence markers, p53 and p21 in LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells. The siRNA knockdown of SK1 or SK2 failed to increase p53 and p21 expression, but the former did reduce DNA synthesis in LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells. Moreover, N-acetylcysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger) blocked the SK inhibitor-induced increase in p21 and p53 expression but had no effect on the proteasomal degradation of SK1a. In addition, siRNA knockdown of Des1 increased p53 expression while a combination of Des1/SK1 siRNA increased the expression of p21. Therefore, Des1 and SK1 participate in regulating LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cell growth and this involves p53/p21-dependent and -independent pathways. Therefore, we propose targeting androgen-independent prostate cancer cells with compounds that affect Des1/SK1 to modulate both de novo and sphingolipid rheostat pathways in order to induce growth arrest.

  11. Proteasomal degradation of sphingosine kinase 1 and inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase by the sphingosine kinase inhibitors, SKi or ABC294640, induces growth arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Melissa; Pitman, Melissa; Pitson, Stuart M.; Pyne, Nigel J.; Pyne, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine kinases (two isoforms termed SK1 and SK2) catalyse the formation of the bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate. We demonstrate here that the SK2 inhibitor, ABC294640 (3-(4-chlorophenyl)-adamantane-1-carboxylic acid (pyridin-4-ylmethyl)amide) or the SK1/SK2 inhibitor, SKi (2-(p-hydroxyanilino)-4-(p-chlorophenyl)thiazole)) induce the proteasomal degradation of SK1a (Mr = 42 kDa) and inhibit DNA synthesis in androgen-independent LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells. These effects are recapitulated by the dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1) inhibitor, fenretinide. Moreover, SKi or ABC294640 reduce Des1 activity in Jurkat cells and ABC294640 induces the proteasomal degradation of Des1 (Mr = 38 kDa) in LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, SKi or ABC294640 or fenretinide increase the expression of the senescence markers, p53 and p21 in LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells. The siRNA knockdown of SK1 or SK2 failed to increase p53 and p21 expression, but the former did reduce DNA synthesis in LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cells. Moreover, N-acetylcysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger) blocked the SK inhibitor-induced increase in p21 and p53 expression but had no effect on the proteasomal degradation of SK1a. In addition, siRNA knockdown of Des1 increased p53 expression while a combination of Des1/SK1 siRNA increased the expression of p21. Therefore, Des1 and SK1 participate in regulating LNCaP-AI prostate cancer cell growth and this involves p53/p21-dependent and -independent pathways. Therefore, we propose targeting androgen-independent prostate cancer cells with compounds that affect Des1/SK1 to modulate both de novo and sphingolipid rheostat pathways in order to induce growth arrest. PMID:26934645

  12. Inhibition of in vitro growth and arrest in the G0/G1 phase of HCT8 line human colon cancer cells by kaempferide triglycoside from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineti, Valentina; Tognarini, Isabella; Azzari, Chiara; Carbonell Sala, Silvia; Clematis, Francesca; Dolci, Marcello; Lanzotti, Virginia; Tonelli, Francesco; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Curir, Paolo

    2010-09-01

    The effects of phytoestrogens have been studied in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and in various non-gonadal targets. Epidemiologic and experimental evidence indicates a protective effect of phytoestrogens also in colorectal cancer. The mechanism through which estrogenic molecules control colorectal cancer tumorigenesis could possibly involve estrogen receptor beta, the predominantly expressed estrogen receptor subtype in colon mucosa.To validate this hypothesis, we therefore used an engineered human colon cancer cell line induced to overexpress estrogen receptor beta, beside its native cell line, expressing very low levels of ERbeta and not expressing ERalpha; as a phytoestrogenic molecule, we used kaempferide triglycoside, a glycosylated flavonol from a Dianthus caryophyllus cultivar. The inhibitory properties of this molecule toward vegetal cell growth have been previously demonstrated: however, no data on its activity on animal cell or information about the mechanism of this activity are available. Kaempferide triglycoside proved to inhibit the proliferation of native and estrogen receptor beta overexpressing colon cancer cells through a mechanism not mediated by ligand binding dependent estrogen receptor activation. It affected HCT8 cell cycle progression by increasing the G(0)/G(1) cell fraction and in estrogen receptor beta overexpressing cells increased two antioxidant enzymes. Interestingly, the biological effects of this kaempferide triglycoside were strengthened by the presence of high levels of estrogen receptor beta.Pleiotropic molecular effects of phytoestrogens may explain their protective activity against colorectal cancer and may represent an interesting area for future investigation with potential clinical applications.

  13. Mangrove dolabrane-type of diterpenes tagalsins suppresses tumor growth via ROS-mediated apoptosis and ATM/ATR-Chk1/Chk2-regulated cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Jennifer; Yang, Yi; Köhler, Rebecca; Giaisi, Marco; Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Liu, Dong; Krammer, Peter H; Lin, Wenhan; Li-Weber, Min

    2015-12-01

    Natural compounds are an important source for drug development. With an increasing cancer rate worldwide there is an urgent quest for new anti-cancer drugs. In this study, we show that a group of dolabrane-type of diterpenes, collectively named tagalsins, isolated from the Chinese mangrove genus Ceriops has potent cytotoxicity on a panel of hematologic cancer cells. Investigation of the molecular mechanisms by which tagalsins kill malignant cells revealed that it induces a ROS-mediated damage of DNA. This event leads to apoptosis induction and blockage of cell cycle progression at S-G2 phase via activation of the ATM/ATR-Chk1/Chk2 check point pathway. We further show that tagalsins suppress growth of human T-cell leukemia xenografts in vivo. Tagalsins show only minor toxicity on healthy cells and are well tolerated by mice. Our study shows a therapeutic potential of tagalsins for the treatment of hematologic malignancies and a new source of anticancer drugs. PMID:26061604

  14. Inhibition of in vitro growth and arrest in the G0/G1 phase of HCT8 line human colon cancer cells by kaempferide triglycoside from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineti, Valentina; Tognarini, Isabella; Azzari, Chiara; Carbonell Sala, Silvia; Clematis, Francesca; Dolci, Marcello; Lanzotti, Virginia; Tonelli, Francesco; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Curir, Paolo

    2010-09-01

    The effects of phytoestrogens have been studied in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and in various non-gonadal targets. Epidemiologic and experimental evidence indicates a protective effect of phytoestrogens also in colorectal cancer. The mechanism through which estrogenic molecules control colorectal cancer tumorigenesis could possibly involve estrogen receptor beta, the predominantly expressed estrogen receptor subtype in colon mucosa.To validate this hypothesis, we therefore used an engineered human colon cancer cell line induced to overexpress estrogen receptor beta, beside its native cell line, expressing very low levels of ERbeta and not expressing ERalpha; as a phytoestrogenic molecule, we used kaempferide triglycoside, a glycosylated flavonol from a Dianthus caryophyllus cultivar. The inhibitory properties of this molecule toward vegetal cell growth have been previously demonstrated: however, no data on its activity on animal cell or information about the mechanism of this activity are available. Kaempferide triglycoside proved to inhibit the proliferation of native and estrogen receptor beta overexpressing colon cancer cells through a mechanism not mediated by ligand binding dependent estrogen receptor activation. It affected HCT8 cell cycle progression by increasing the G(0)/G(1) cell fraction and in estrogen receptor beta overexpressing cells increased two antioxidant enzymes. Interestingly, the biological effects of this kaempferide triglycoside were strengthened by the presence of high levels of estrogen receptor beta.Pleiotropic molecular effects of phytoestrogens may explain their protective activity against colorectal cancer and may represent an interesting area for future investigation with potential clinical applications. PMID:20104502

  15. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  16. Seedling growth dynamic of Haloxylon ammodendron and its adaptation strategy to habitat condition in hinterland of desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Jiang; ZHANG XiMing; SHAN LiShan; YAN HaiLong; LIANG ShaoMing

    2007-01-01

    Through measuring the above/below-ground growth data of Haloxylon ammodendron seedlings at different stages in hinterland of the desert the results show that the H. ammodendron seedling growth has demonstrated different adaptation characteristics in the continued arid environment with time and space. In May, July, September and October, the growth speed of vertical root is 0.607 cm/d, 0.809 cm/d, 0.155 cm/d and 0.394 cm/d, respectively; the growth speed of height is 0.093 cm/d, 0.076 cm/d,0.408 cm/d and 136 cm/d, respectively. It is explained that seedlings root system has the growth superiority in space. The maximum growth speed of below-ground (vertical root and horizontal root) of seedling is earlier than that of above-ground (height and horizontal of shoot). In the different periods,the vertical growth speed and the horizontal growth speed of below-ground is 2-10 times and 3-5 times than the height increase speed and the shoot growth speed, respectively. In the whole season,the growth speed of above/below-ground of seedlings shows the alternation growth tendency. At the different periods, the root/shoot ratio of H. ammodendron seedlings is 0.41, 0.3, 0.39 and 0.88. All these characteristics are the comprehensive performance of seedlings' strategy selection to adapt to the continued arid environment.

  17. Control of growth and adaptation to nutritional shifts for bacteria exposed to amino acid-limiting environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateescu, Eduard M.; Hwa, Terence

    2007-03-01

    In order to grow at the highest rate sustainable by the environment, bacteria turn on different metabolic pathways and utilize a myriad of adaptive strategies. The macromolecular composition (RNA, DNA, protein) and overall cell size (mass) can be very different in different environments. Surprisingly however, these differences appear to depend only on the growth rate and not on the growth medium itself. As the nutritional environment changes in time, the cells quickly adapt their composition to the one corresponding to the new conditions. Here, we propose a phenomenological model of growth and adaptation control for the bacterial cell, based on a simplified formulation of the central dogma and a simplified implementation of the stringent response. The core model contains no free parameters and provides a simple intuitive understanding of cell growth control. The results generated by the model, physiological state of the cell as well as the characteristics of the transition between optimized states of growth, are in qualitative and semi-quantitative agreement (i.e. within a factor of 2) with the experimental observations.

  18. Cis and trans RET signaling control the survival and central projection growth of rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Michael S; Vysochan, Anna; Paixão, Sόnia; Niu, Jingwen; Klein, Rüdiger; Savitt, Joseph M; Luo, Wenqin

    2015-04-02

    RET can be activated in cis or trans by its co-receptors and ligands in vitro, but the physiological roles of trans signaling are unclear. Rapidly adapting (RA) mechanoreceptors in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) express Ret and the co-receptor Gfrα2 and depend on Ret for survival and central projection growth. Here, we show that Ret and Gfrα2 null mice display comparable early central projection deficits, but Gfrα2 null RA mechanoreceptors recover later. Loss of Gfrα1, the co-receptor implicated in activating RET in trans, causes no significant central projection or cell survival deficit, but Gfrα1;Gfrα2 double nulls phenocopy Ret nulls. Finally, we demonstrate that GFRα1 produced by neighboring DRG neurons activates RET in RA mechanoreceptors. Taken together, our results suggest that trans and cis RET signaling could function in the same developmental process and that the availability of both forms of activation likely enhances but not diversifies outcomes of RET signaling.

  19. ADAPTATION OF CRACK GROWTH DETECTION TECHNIQUES TO US MATERIAL TEST REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Joseph Palmer; Sebastien P. Teysseyre; Kurt L. Davis; Gordon Kohse; Yakov Ostrovsky; David M. Carpenter; Joy L. Rempe

    2015-04-01

    A key component in evaluating the ability of Light Water Reactors to operate beyond 60 years is characterizing the degradation of materials exposed to radiation and various water chemistries. Of particular concern is the response of reactor materials to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Some test reactors outside the United States, such as the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), have developed techniques to measure crack growth propagation during irradiation. The basic approach is to use a custom-designed compact loading mechanism to stress the specimen during irradiation, while the crack in the specimen is monitored in-situ using the Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method. In 2012 the US Department of Energy commissioned the Idaho National Laboratory and the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (MIT NRL) to take the basic concepts developed at the HBWR and adapt them to a test rig capable of conducting in-pile IASCC tests in US Material Test Reactors. The first two and half years of the project consisted of designing and testing the loader mechanism, testing individual components of the in-pile rig and electronic support equipment, and autoclave testing of the rig design prior to insertion in the MIT Reactor. The load was applied to the specimen by means of a scissor like mechanism, actuated by a miniature metal bellows driven by pneumatic pressure and sized to fit within the small in-core irradiation volume. In addition to the loader design, technical challenges included developing robust connections to the specimen for the applied current and voltage measurements, appropriate ceramic insulating materials that can endure the LWR environment, dealing with the high electromagnetic noise environment of a reactor core at full power, and accommodating material property changes in the specimen, due primarily to fast neutron damage, which change the specimen resistance without additional crack growth. The project culminated with an in

  20. Ethyl-2-amino-pyrrole-3-carboxylates are novel potent anticancer agents that affect tubulin polymerization, induce G2/M cell-cycle arrest, and effectively inhibit soft tissue cancer cell growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boichuk, Sergei; Galembikova, Aigul; Zykova, Svetlana; Ramazanov, Bulat; Khusnutdinov, Ramil; Dunaev, Pavel; Khaibullina, Svetlana; Lombardi, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Microtubules are known to be one of the most attractive and validated targets in cancer therapy. However, the clinical use of drugs that affect the dynamic state of microtubules has been hindered by chemoresistance and toxicity issues. Accordingly, the development of novel agents that target microtubules is needed. Here, we report the identification of novel compounds with pirrole and carboxylate structures: ethyl-2-amino-pyrrole-3-carboxylates (EAPCs) that provide potent cytotoxic activities against multiple soft tissue cancer cell lines in vitro. Using the MTS cell proliferation assay, we assessed the activity of EAPCs on various cancer cell lines including leiomyosarcoma SK-LMS-1, rhabdomyosarcoma RD, gastrointestinal stromal tumor GIST-T1, A-673 Ewing's sarcoma, and U-2 OS osteosarcoma. We found that in the majority of cases, two EAPC compounds (EAPC-20 and EAPC-24) considerably inhibited cancer cell proliferation in vitro. The growth-inhibitory effects of EAPC-20 and EAPC-24 were time and dose dependent. The molecular mechanisms of action of these compounds were because of the inhibition of tubulin polymerization and induction of a robust G2/M cell-cycle arrest, leading to considerable accumulation of tumor cells in the M-phase. Finally, EAPCs induced tumor cell death by apoptotic pathways. The above-mentioned effects were also observed in most soft tissue tumor cell lines and the gastrointestinal stromal tumor cell line investigated. Taken together, our data identify potent antitumor activity of EAPCs in vitro, thus providing a novel scaffold with which to develop potent chemotherapeutic agents for cancer therapy. PMID:27129079

  1. Effects of ecological differentiation on Lotka-Volterra systems for species with behavioral adaptation and variable growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacitignola, D; Tebaldi, C

    2005-03-01

    We study the properties of a n2-dimensional Lotka-Volterra system describing competing species that include behaviorally adaptive abilities. We indicate as behavioral adaptation a mechanism, based on a kind of learning, which is not viewed in the evolutionary sense but is intended to occur over shorter time scales. We consider a competitive adaptive n species Lotka-Volterra system, n > or = 3, in which one species is made ecologically differentiated with respect to the others by carrying capacity and intrinsic growth rate. The symmetry properties of the system and the existence of a certain class of invariant subspaces allow the introduction of a 7-dimensional reduced model, where n appears as a parameter, which gives full account of existence and stability of equilibria in the complete system. The reduced model is effective also in describing the time-dependent regimes for a large range of parameter values. The case in which one species has a strong ecological advantage (i.e. with a carrying capacity higher than the others), but with a varying growth rate, has been analyzed in detail, and time-dependent behaviors have been investigated in the case of adaptive competition among four species. Relevant questions, as species survival/exclusion, are addressed focusing on the role of adaptation. Interesting forms of species coexistence are found (i.e. competitive stable equilibria, periodic oscillations, strange attractors).

  2. Fatigue crack arrest in a self-healing polymer composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, E. N. (Eric N.); White, S. R. (Scott R.); Sottos, Nancy R.

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental program is performed to assess the in situ fatigue behavior of a self-healing polymer. A fatigue-life-extension protocol is established for characterizing healing efficiency of the self-healing epoxy under cyclic loading. At moderate {Delta}K{sub I} and at high {Delta}K{sub I}, when a rest period is employed, in situ healing extends fatigue life though temporary crack arrest and retardation. In situ self-healing permanently arrests crack growth at low {delta}K{sub I} and at moderate {Delta}K{sub I}, when a rest period is employed. Fatigue crack retardation and arrest result from two primary crack-tip shielding mechanisms: hydrodynamic pressure in the viscous healing agent and artificial crack closure. Application of self-healing functionality to fatigue slows the crack growth rate and increases the fatigue threshold.

  3. Intestinal growth adaptation and glucagon-like peptide 2 in rats with ileal--jejunal transposition or small bowel resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Hartmann, B; Kissow, Hannelouise;

    2001-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), produced by enteroendocrine L-cells, regulates intestinal growth. This study investigates circulating and intestinal GLP-2 levels in conditions with altered L-cell exposure to nutrients. Rats were allocated to the following experimental groups: ileal-jejunal trans......Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), produced by enteroendocrine L-cells, regulates intestinal growth. This study investigates circulating and intestinal GLP-2 levels in conditions with altered L-cell exposure to nutrients. Rats were allocated to the following experimental groups: ileal......, and twofold in the distally resected group. Tissue GLP-2 levels were unchanged in resected rats. The data indicate that transposition of a distal part of the small intestine, and thereby exposure of L cells to a more nutrient-rich chyme, leads to intestinal growth. The adaptive intestinal growth is associated...

  4. Chondroitinase ABC promotes recovery of adaptive limb movements and enhances axonal growth caudal to a spinal hemisection

    OpenAIRE

    Jefferson, Stephanie C.; Tester, Nicole J.; Howland, Dena R.

    2011-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that Chondroitinase ABC (Ch’ase ABC) digestion of inhibitory chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans significantly enhances axonal growth and recovery in rodents following spinal cord injury (SCI). Further, our group has shown improved recovery following SCI in the larger cat model. The purpose of the current study was to determine if intraspinal delivery of Ch’ase ABC, following T10 hemisections in adult cats, enhances adaptive movement features during a skilled...

  5. The influence of the social thermoregulation on the cold-adaptive growth of BAT in hairless and furred mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmaier, G

    1975-03-26

    When mice were living in groups they developed less brown adipose tissue (BAT) during cold adaptation as compared with single mice. This effect of social aggregation was more pronounced in genetically hairless mice than in furred mice. In both races of mice the most significant difference in BAT growth was found between single mice and pairs of mice, indicating that the formation of pairs causes the relatively most effective improvement of thermal balance.

  6. Sculpting Pickering Emulsion Droplets by Arrest and Jamming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Christopher; Wei, Zengyi; Caggioni, Marco; Spicer, Patrick; Atherton, Tim

    Pickering emulsion droplets can be arrested into non-spherical shapes--useful for applications such as active delivery--through a general mechanism of deformation followed by absorption of additional colloidal particles onto the interface, relaxation of the droplet caused by surface tension and arrest at some point due to crowding of the particles. We perform simulations of the arrest process to clarify the relative importance of diffusive rearrangement of particles and collective forcing due to surface evolution. Experiment and theory are compared, giving insight into the stability of the resulting capsules and the robustness of the production process for higher-throughput production in, for example, microfluidic systems. We adapt theoretical tools from the jamming literature to better understand the arrested configurations and long timescale evolution of the system: using linear programming and a penalty function approach, we identify unjamming motions in kinetically arrested states. We propose a paradigm of ``metric jamming'' to describe the limiting behavior of this class of system: a structure is metric-jammed if it is stable with respect to collective motion of the particles as well as evolution of the hypersurface on which the packing is embedded. Supported by a Cottrell Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  7. Growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum adapted to lowland Lombok Island as an alternative food crop for dryland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zubaidi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wheat is not currently grown as a commercial crop in Indonesia, however since the consumption of wheat in Indonesia is steadily increasing and alternative of dry season crops are required for farming system diversification, wheat becomes an important crop to be adapted in dry land areas of Indonesia, one of them is dry land area of Lombok Island. The aims of this experiment is to adapt and screen wheat varieties including national and introduced Australian varieties in lowland Lombok Island. In future, wheat is expected to be an alternative crop for degraded lands. The experimental method used to evaluate growth and yield of 10 wheat varieties to look at the adaptability on the lowland of 200 m asl (Pringgarata and on higher land of 400 m asl (Aik Bukak. The results showed that at a lower altitude (Pringgarata, wheat growth is slower than in Aik Bukak, which can be caused by the temperature at 200 m asl has exceeded the tolerance limit for grain growth (supra optimal temperature. Wheat can give good yields on 400 m asl, but the yield is decreased at 200 m asl (average 1.68 t/ha vs 0.82 t/ha. This low yield is mainly due to sterility indicated by the low number of grain/spikelet ( 2 t/ha , higher than other varieties

  8. Adaptation to low pH and lignocellulosic inhibitors resulting in ethanolic fermentation and growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Venkatachalam; Sànchez I Nogué, Violeta; van Niel, Ed W J; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F

    2016-12-01

    Lignocellulosic bioethanol from renewable feedstocks using Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a promising alternative to fossil fuels owing to environmental challenges. S. cerevisiae is frequently challenged by bacterial contamination and a combination of lignocellulosic inhibitors formed during the pre-treatment, in terms of growth, ethanol yield and productivity. We investigated the phenotypic robustness of a brewing yeast strain TMB3500 and its ability to adapt to low pH thereby preventing bacterial contamination along with lignocellulosic inhibitors by short-term adaptation and adaptive lab evolution (ALE). The short-term adaptation strategy was used to investigate the inherent ability of strain TMB3500 to activate a robust phenotype involving pre-culturing yeast cells in defined medium with lignocellulosic inhibitors at pH 5.0 until late exponential phase prior to inoculating them in defined media with the same inhibitor cocktail at pH 3.7. Adapted cells were able to grow aerobically, ferment anaerobically (glucose exhaustion by 19 ± 5 h to yield 0.45 ± 0.01 g ethanol g glucose(-1)) and portray significant detoxification of inhibitors at pH 3.7, when compared to non-adapted cells. ALE was performed to investigate whether a stable strain could be developed to grow and ferment at low pH with lignocellulosic inhibitors in a continuous suspension culture. Though a robust population was obtained after 3600 h with an ability to grow and ferment at pH 3.7 with inhibitors, inhibitor robustness was not stable as indicated by the characterisation of the evolved culture possibly due to phenotypic plasticity. With further research, this short-term adaptation and low pH strategy could be successfully applied in lignocellulosic ethanol plants to prevent bacterial contamination. PMID:27566648

  9. Features of Localization of ARG-X Protease-processing in the Suprastructures of Interphase Chromatin under Conditions of Cell Cycle Arrest by Sodium Butyrate, upon Induction of Growth Morphogenesis of Mature Embryos of Winter and Spring Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov R.S.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental property of many organisms is the ability to feel, to assess direction of the signal action and respond to the environmental conditions. It is known that chromatin plays a major role in organizing the regulation of gene activity. However, our understanding of how state of the suprastructure organization of chromatin and its proteins reacts not only to changes in the environment, but also on the development of specific signals remains largely unclear. In the course of this work, we have analyzed the result of the various ways of chromatin modifications: the regulatory Arg-X protease-processing and inhibition of protein deacetylation with sodium butyrate. Sodium butyrate causes cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase, and promotes of duration of the transcriptional activity of chromatin. Experiments on molecular-genetic state of the chromatin matrix were carried out at the induction of growth morphogenesis in the physiological period of active water absorption of mature seeds and wheat germs, which were purposefully transformed and formed in different environmental conditions. During focused, long-term transforming of spring wheat Artemovka into winter wheat Mironovskaya 808 and the last of them again into Mironovskaya Spring wheat while stopping of the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase, mainly occurs the active Arg-X protease-processing at the level of non-histone proteins, and linker histones of suprastructures chromatin. We assume that the regulatory proteolytic processing and prolongation of acetylation of proteins can be interconnected in the regulation of conformational transitions of chromatin at the different levels of its organization: both suprastructures and at the more profound proteomic level of non-histone and histone blocks, and have its peculiarities during the period of transcriptional activation. We hope that the study peculiarities of locations of regulatory proteolysis in the conditions of inhibition of deacetylation in

  10. Diabetic intestinal growth adaptation and glucagon-like peptide 2 in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Hartmann, B; Nielsen, C;

    1999-01-01

    Dietary fibre influence growth and function of the upper gastrointestinal tract. This study investigates the importance of dietary fibre in intestinal growth in experimental diabetes, and correlates intestinal growth with plasma levels of the intestinotrophic factor, glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2)....

  11. COMBINED DELAUNAY TRIANGULATION AND ADAPTIVE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR CRACK GROWTH ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pramote DECHAUMPHAI; Sutthisak PHONGTHANAPANICH; Thanawat SRICHAROENCHAI

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the utilization of the adaptive Delaunay triangulation in the finite element modeling of two dimensional crack propagation problems, including detailed description of the proposed procedure which consists of the Delaunay triangulation algorithm and an adaptive remeshing technique. The adaptive remeshing technique generates small elements around crack tips and large elements in the other regions. The resulting stress intensity factors and simulated crack propagation behavior are used to evaluate the effectiveness of the procedure. Three sample problems of a center cracked plate, a single edge cracked plate and a compact tension specimen, are simulated and their results assessed.

  12. MULTIPASS, a rice R2R3-type MYB transcription factor, regulates adaptive growth by integrating multiple hormonal pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Romy; Schippers, Jos H M; Mieulet, Delphine; Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Growth regulation is an important aspect of plant adaptation during environmental perturbations. Here, the role of MULTIPASS (OsMPS), an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor of rice, was explored. OsMPS is induced by salt stress and expressed in vegetative and reproductive tissues. Over-expression of OsMPS reduces growth under non-stress conditions, while knockdown plants display increased biomass. OsMPS expression is induced by abscisic acid and cytokinin, but is repressed by auxin, gibberellin and brassinolide. Growth retardation caused by OsMPS over-expression is partially restored by auxin application. Expression profiling revealed that OsMPS negatively regulates the expression of EXPANSIN (EXP) and cell-wall biosynthesis as well as phytohormone signaling genes. Furthermore, the expression of OsMPS-dependent genes is regulated by auxin, cytokinin and abscisic acid. Moreover, we show that OsMPS is a direct upstream regulator of OsEXPA4, OsEXPA8, OsEXPB2, OsEXPB3, OsEXPB6 and the endoglucanase genes OsGLU5 and OsGLU14. The multiple responses of OsMPS and its target genes to various hormones suggest an integrative function of OsMPS in the cross-talk between phytohormones and the environment to regulate adaptive growth.

  13. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway induces a senescence-like arrest mediated by p27Kip1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collado, M.; Medema, R.H.; Garcia-Cao, I.; Dubuisson, M.L.N.; Barradas, M.; Glassford, J.; Rivas, C.; Burgering, B.M.T.; Serrano, M.; Lam, E.W.-F.

    2000-01-01

    A senescence-like growth arrest is induced in mouse primary embryo fibroblasts by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). We observed that senescence-like growth arrest is correlated with an increase in p27Kip1 but that down-regulation of other cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, inclu

  14. The stringent response and cell cycle arrest in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Ferullo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial stringent response, triggered by nutritional deprivation, causes an accumulation of the signaling nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp. We characterize the replication arrest that occurs during the stringent response in Escherichia coli. Wild type cells undergo a RelA-dependent arrest after treatment with serine hydroxamate to contain an integer number of chromosomes and a replication origin-to-terminus ratio of 1. The growth rate prior to starvation determines the number of chromosomes upon arrest. Nucleoids of these cells are decondensed; in the absence of the ability to synthesize ppGpp, nucleoids become highly condensed, similar to that seen after treatment with the translational inhibitor chloramphenicol. After induction of the stringent response, while regions corresponding to the origins of replication segregate, the termini remain colocalized in wild-type cells. In contrast, cells arrested by rifampicin and cephalexin do not show colocalized termini, suggesting that the stringent response arrests chromosome segregation at a specific point. Release from starvation causes rapid nucleoid reorganization, chromosome segregation, and resumption of replication. Arrest of replication and inhibition of colony formation by ppGpp accumulation is relieved in seqA and dam mutants, although other aspects of the stringent response appear to be intact. We propose that DNA methylation and SeqA binding to non-origin loci is necessary to enforce a full stringent arrest, affecting both initiation of replication and chromosome segregation. This is the first indication that bacterial chromosome segregation, whose mechanism is not understood, is a step that may be regulated in response to environmental conditions.

  15. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  16. Crack propagation and arrest in CFRP materials with strain softening regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilligan, Matthew Anthony

    Understanding the growth and arrest of cracks in composite materials is critical for their effective utilization in fatigue-sensitive and damage susceptible applications such as primary aircraft structures. Local tailoring of the laminate stack to provide crack arrest capacity intermediate to major structural components has been investigated and demonstrated since some of the earliest efforts in composite aerostructural design, but to date no rigorous model of the crack arrest mechanism has been developed to allow effective sizing of these features. To address this shortcoming, the previous work in the field is reviewed, with particular attention to the analysis methodologies proposed for similar arrest features. The damage and arrest processes active in such features are investigated, and various models of these processes are discussed and evaluated. Governing equations are derived based on a proposed mechanistic model of the crack arrest process. The derived governing equations are implemented in a numerical model, and a series of simulations are performed to ascertain the general characteristics of the proposed model and allow qualitative comparison to existing experimental results. The sensitivity of the model and the arrest process to various parameters is investigated, and preliminary conclusions regarding the optimal feature configuration are developed. To address deficiencies in the available material and experimental data, a series of coupon tests are developed and conducted covering a range of arrest zone configurations. Test results are discussed and analyzed, with a particular focus on identification of the proposed failure and arrest mechanisms. Utilizing the experimentally derived material properties, the tests are reproduced with both the developed numerical tool as well as a FEA-based implementation of the arrest model. Correlation between the simulated and experimental results is analyzed, and future avenues of investigation are identified

  17. Different Transcriptional Responses from Slow and Fast Growth Rate Strains of Listeria monocytogenes Adapted to Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Ninoska; Maza, Felipe; Navea-Perez, Helen; Aravena, Andrés; Marquez-Fontt, Bárbara; Navarrete, Paola; Figueroa, Guillermo; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio; Reyes-Jara, Angélica

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8°C of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8°C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature. PMID:26973610

  18. Optimal regeneration planning for old-growth forest: addressing scientific uncertainty in endangered species recovery through adaptive management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C.T.; Conroy, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic and structural uncertainties about forest dynamics present challenges in the management of ephemeral habitat conditions for endangered forest species. Maintaining critical foraging and breeding habitat for the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) requires an uninterrupted supply of old-growth forest. We constructed and optimized a dynamic forest growth model for the Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge (Georgia, USA) with the objective of perpetuating a maximum stream of old-growth forest habitat. Our model accommodates stochastic disturbances and hardwood succession rates, and uncertainty about model structure. We produced a regeneration policy that was indexed by current forest state and by current weight of evidence among alternative model forms. We used adaptive stochastic dynamic programming, which anticipates that model probabilities, as well as forest states, may change through time, with consequent evolution of the optimal decision for any given forest state. In light of considerable uncertainty about forest dynamics, we analyzed a set of competing models incorporating extreme, but plausible, parameter values. Under any of these models, forest silviculture practices currently recommended for the creation of woodpecker habitat are suboptimal. We endorse fully adaptive approaches to the management of endangered species habitats in which predictive modeling, monitoring, and assessment are tightly linked.

  19. Different transcriptional responses from slow and fast growth rate strains of Listeria monocytogenes adapted to low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninoska eCordero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8 ºC of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8 °C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature.

  20. 33 CFR 154.822 - Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. 154.822 Section 154.822 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.822 Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. (a)...

  1. Interindividual Variation in Functionally Adapted Trait Sets Is Established During Postnatal Growth and Predictable Based on Bone Robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Nirnimesh; Bhola, Siddharth; Goldstone, Andrew; Chen, Fred; Chrzanowski, Jessica; Terranova, Carl J.; Ghillani, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Adults acquire unique sets of morphological and tissue-quality bone traits that are predictable based on robustness and deterministic of strength and fragility. How and when individual trait sets arise during growth has not been established. Longitudinal structural changes of the metacarpal diaphysis were measured for boys and girls from 3 mo to 8 yr of age using hand radiographs obtained from the Bolton-Brush collection. Robustness varied ∼2-fold among boys and girls, and individual values were established by 2 yr of age, indicating that genetic and environmental factors controlling the relationship between growth in width and growth in length were established early during postnatal growth. Significant negative correlations between robustness and relative cortical area and a significant positive correlation between robustness and a novel measure capturing the efficiency of growth indicated that coordination of the subperiosteal and endocortical surfaces was responsible for this population acquiring a narrow range of trait sets that was predictable based on robustness. Boys and girls with robust diaphyses had proportionally thinner cortices to minimize mass, whereas children with slender diaphyses had proportionally thicker cortices to maximize stiffness. Girls had more slender metacarpals with proportionally thicker cortices compared with boys at all prepubertal ages. Although postnatal growth patterns varied in fundamentally different ways with sex and robustness, the dependence of trait sets on robustness indicated that children sustained variants affecting subperiosteal growth because they shared a common biological factor regulating functional adaptation. Considering the natural variation in acquired trait sets may help identify determinants of fracture risk, because age-related bone loss and gain will affect slender and robust structures differently. PMID:20001599

  2. Adaptation of model genetically engineered microorganisms to lake water: growth rate enhancements and plasmid loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Sobecky, P A; Schell, M A; Moran, M. A.; Hodson, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    When a genetically engineered microorganism (GEM) is released into a natural ecosystem, its survival, and hence its potential environmental impact, depends on its genetic stability and potential for growth under highly oligotrophic conditions. In this study, we compared plasmid stability and potential for growth on low concentrations of organic nutrients of strains of Pseudomonas putida serving as model GEMs. Plasmid-free and plasmid-bearing (NAH7) prototrophic isogenic strains and two amino-...

  3. A transcription factor links growth rate and metabolism in the hypersaline adapted archaeon Halobacterium salinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Horia; Dulmage, Keely; Gillum, Nicholas; Bain, James R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Schmid, Amy K

    2014-09-01

    Co-ordinating metabolism and growth is a key challenge for all organisms. Despite fluctuating environments, cells must produce the same metabolic outputs to thrive. The mechanisms underlying this 'growth homeostasis' are known in bacteria and eukaryotes, but remain unexplored in archaea. In the model archaeon Halobacterium salinarum, the transcription factor TrmB regulates enzyme-coding genes in diverse metabolic pathways in response to glucose. However, H. salinarum is thought not to catabolize glucose. To resolve this discrepancy, we demonstrate that TrmB regulates the gluconeogenic production of sugars incorporated into the cell surface S-layer glycoprotein. Additionally, we show that TrmB-DNA binding correlates with instantaneous growth rate, likely because S-layer glycosylation is proportional to growth. This suggests that TrmB transduces a growth rate signal to co-regulated metabolic pathways including amino acid, purine, and cobalamin biosynthesis. Remarkably, the topology and function of this growth homeostatic network appear conserved across domains despite extensive alterations in protein components.

  4. Geography, environmental efficiency and Italian economic growth: a spatially-adapted Environmental Kuznets Curve

    OpenAIRE

    Ciriaci, Daria; Palma, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    The present paper tests the hypothesis that environmental degradation and per capita income follow an inverted-U-shaped relationship (the so-called Environmental Kuznets Curve) at the Italian Nut3 level over the period 1990-2005. We adopt a spatial econometric approach to account for the localised nature of environmental damage. In this spatially-adapted EKC, we explicitly introduced the role of energy intensive sectors to control for local industrial structure. The experiment brought to ligh...

  5. Effect of a biofield treatment on plant growth and adaptation (Benth.)

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics was developed when human energies of consciousness were found to influence observations at the scale of elementary particles, here referred as non-contact biofield treatment or biofield energies . Quantum mechanics has also proved efficacious in biological processes. The present experiments found an enhanced and significant impact of the biofield treatment on adaptive micropropagation response and callus induction of two plant species, Withania somnifera and Amaranthus dubiu...

  6. Role of insulin-like growth factor-I in the regulation of skeletal muscle adaptation to increased loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, G. R.

    1998-01-01

    Adaptations in muscle mass stimulated by changes in muscle loading state entail alternations in the synthesis and degradation of myofiber proteins and the modulation of myonuclear number such that the ratio between the number of myonuclei and the size of the myofibers remains relatively constant. As depicted schematically in Figure 2.6, the literature regarding the role of IGF-in mediating muscle adaptation to alterations in loading state suggests the following conclusions: During periods of increased loading, myofibers upregulate the expression and secretion of IGF-I. Acting as an autocrine and/or paracrine growth factor, IGF-I stimulates myofiber anabolic processes. Acting as a paracrine growth factor, IGF-I also stimulates adjacent satellite cells to enter the cell cycle and proliferate. Continued myofiber production of IGF-I stimulates some satellite cells to differentiate and then fuse with myofibers, thus providing additional myonuclei in order to maintain or reestablish the myonucleus to myofiber size ratios of the enlarged myofibers.

  7. Lysine63-linked ubiquitylation of PIN2 auxin carrier protein governs hormonally controlled adaptation of Arabidopsis root growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Johannes; Petrášek, Jan; Tomanov, Konstantin; Retzer, Katarzyna; Pařezová, Markéta; Korbei, Barbara; Bachmair, Andreas; Zažímalová, Eva; Luschnig, Christian

    2012-05-22

    Cross-talk between plant cells and their surroundings requires tight regulation of information exchange at the plasma membrane (PM), which involves dynamic adjustments of PM protein localization and turnover to modulate signal perception and solute transport at the interface between cells and their surroundings. In animals and fungi, turnover of PM proteins is controlled by reversible ubiquitylation, which signals endocytosis and delivery to the cell's lytic compartment, and there is emerging evidence for related mechanisms in plants. Here, we describe the fate of Arabidopsis PIN2 protein, required for directional cellular efflux of the phytohormone auxin, and identify cis- and trans-acting mediators of PIN2 ubiquitylation. We demonstrate that ubiquitin acts as a principal signal for PM protein endocytosis in plants and reveal dynamic adjustments in PIN2 ubiquitylation coinciding with variations in vacuolar targeting and proteolytic turnover. We show that control of PIN2 proteolytic turnover via its ubiquitylation status is of significant importance for auxin distribution in root meristems and for environmentally controlled adaptations of root growth. Moreover, we provide experimental evidence indicating that PIN2 vacuolar sorting depends on modification specifically by lysine(63)-linked ubiquitin chains. Collectively, our results establish lysine(63)-linked PM cargo ubiquitylation as a regulator of polar auxin transport and adaptive growth responses in higher plants.

  8. Adaptation of the QoL-AGHDA scale for adults with growth hormone deficiency in four Slavic languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenna Stephen P

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The Quality of Life in Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency Assessment (QoL-AGHDA is a disease-specific quality of life measure specific to individuals who are growth hormone deficient. The present study describes the adaptation of the QoL-AGHDA for use in the following four Slavic languages; Czech, Polish, Serbian and Slovakian. Methods The study involved three stages in each language; translation, cognitive debriefing and validation. The validation stage assessed internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha, reproducibility (test-retest reliability using Spearman's rank correlations, convergent and divergent validity (Correlations with the NHP and known group validity. Results The QoL-AGHDA was successfully translated into the target languages with minimal problems. Cognitive debriefing interviewees (n = 15-18 found the measures easy to complete and identified few problems with the content. Internal consistency (Czech Republic = 0.91, Poland = 0.91, Serbia = 0.91 and Slovakia = 0.89 and reproducibility (Czech Republic = 0.91, Poland = 0.91, Serbia = 0.88 and Slovakia = 0.93 were good in all adaptations. Convergent and divergent validity and known group validity data were not available for Slovakia. The QoL-AGHDA correlated as expected with the NHP scales most relevant to GHD. The QoL-AGHDA was able to distinguish between participants based on a range of variables. Conclusions The QoL-AGHDA was successfully adapted for use in the Czech Republic, Poland, Serbia and Slovakia. Further validation of the Slovakian version would be beneficial. The addition of these new lanaguage versions will prove valuable to multinational clinical trials and to clinical practice in the respective countries.

  9. Long-term warming of a subarctic heath decreases soil bacterial community growth but has no effects on its temperature adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Bååth, E

    2011-01-01

    , respectively. The decrease was most likely due to decreased availability of labile substrate under warming. However, we found no evidence for temperature adaptation of soil bacterial communities. The optimum temperature for bacterial growth was on average 25 °C, and the apparent minimum temperature for growth......We tested whether bacterial communities of subarctic heath soil are adapted to elevated temperature after experimental warming by open-top greenhouses for 7 or 17 years. The long-term warming by 1–2 °C significantly decreased bacterial community growth, by 28% and 73% after 7 and 17 years...

  10. Programmed cell cycle arrest is required for infection of corn plants by the fungus Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanheira, Sónia; Mielnichuk, Natalia; Pérez-Martín, José

    2014-12-01

    Ustilago maydis is a plant pathogen that requires a specific structure called infective filament to penetrate the plant tissue. Although able to grow, this filament is cell cycle arrested on the plant surface. This cell cycle arrest is released once the filament penetrates the plant tissue. The reasons and mechanisms for this cell cycle arrest are unknown. Here, we have tried to address these questions. We reached three conclusions from our studies. First, the observed cell cycle arrest is the result of the cooperation of at least two distinct mechanisms: one involving the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) cascade; and the other relying on the transcriptional downregulation of Hsl1, a kinase that modulates the G2/M transition. Second, a sustained cell cycle arrest during the infective filament step is necessary for the virulence in U. maydis, as a strain unable to arrest the cell cycle was severely impaired in its ability to infect corn plants. Third, production of the appressorium, a structure required for plant penetration, is incompatible with an active cell cycle. The inability to infect plants by strains defective in cell cycle arrest seems to be caused by their failure to induce the appressorium formation process. In summary, our findings uncover genetic circuits to arrest the cell cycle during the growth of this fungus on the plant surface, thus allowing the penetration into plant tissue.

  11. Adaptation and growth of Serratia marcescens in contact lens disinfectant solutions containing chlorhexidine gluconate.

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhi, P A; Sawant, A D; Wilson, L.A.; Ahearn, D G

    1993-01-01

    Serratia marcescens (11 of 12 strains) demonstrated an ability to grow in certain chlorhexidine-based disinfecting solutions recommended for rigid gas-permeable contact lenses. For a representative strain, cells that were grown in nutrient-rich medium, washed, and inoculated into disinfecting solution went into a nonrecoverable phase within 24 h. However, after 4 days, cells that had the ability to grow in the disinfectant (doubling time, g = 5.7 h) emerged. Solutions supporting growth of S. ...

  12. Adaptation to metal-contaminated soils in populations of the moss, Ceratodon purpureus: Vegetative growth and reproductive expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jules, E.S.; Shaw, A.J. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Many observations suggest that morphological evolution occurs slowly in bryophytes, and this has been suggested to reflect low genetic diversity within species. Isozyme studies, however, stand in apparent contrast and have shown that bryophytes can contain high levels of genetic variability within and among populations. In light of this conflict, we tested the potential of the moss, Ceratodon purpureus, to undergo adaptive change (i.e., ecotypic differentiation) in response to soils that have been contaminated with high levels of metals for 90 years by measuring gametophytic growth and reproductive expression under experimental conditions. Variation in protonemal growth in sterile culture indicates that plants from one population growing on contaminated soil near a smelter are significantly more tolerant of zinc, cadmium, and lead than plants from uncontaminated sites. Results from a common garden experiment, in which plants were grown on soil from the smelter site, indicate that plants from near the smelter are significantly more tolerant of contaminated soils than plants from uncontaminated sites for vegetative growth. The same experiment suggests that plants from the smelter site are also more tolerant in terms of gametangial production (although we could not test this statistically). Our results demonstrate that C. purpureus has been able to undergo relatively rapid evolution in response to strong selective pressures. 29 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Adaptation of high-growth influenza H5N1 vaccine virus in Vero cells: implications for pandemic preparedness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fen Tseng

    Full Text Available Current egg-based influenza vaccine production technology can't promptly meet the global demand during an influenza pandemic as shown in the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Moreover, its manufacturing capacity would be vulnerable during pandemics caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. Therefore, vaccine production using mammalian cell technology is becoming attractive. Current influenza H5N1 vaccine strain (NIBRG-14, a reassortant virus between A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (H5N1 virus and egg-adapted high-growth A/PR/8/1934 virus, could grow efficiently in eggs and MDCK cells but not Vero cells which is the most popular cell line for manufacturing human vaccines. After serial passages and plaque purifications of the NIBRG-14 vaccine virus in Vero cells, one high-growth virus strain (Vero-15 was generated and can grow over 10(8 TCID(50/ml. In conclusion, one high-growth H5N1 vaccine virus was generated in Vero cells, which can be used to manufacture influenza H5N1 vaccines and prepare reassortant vaccine viruses for other influenza A subtypes.

  14. Evaluation of Spring Wheat (20 Varieties Adaptation to Soil Drought during Seedlings Growth Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Biesaga-Kościelniak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of soil drought (10 days on the growth of plants, the accumulation of water and leakage of electrolytes, gas exchange, the contents of chl a + b and carotenoids in leaves and photochemical activity of photosystem II was studied at the seedling stage by transient fluorescent analysis in 20 of the popular varieties of polish spring wheat. Drought caused a particularly strong reduction in vigor of growth of seedlings, net photosynthesis rate and triggered an increase in electrolyte leakage from the leaves. Certain varieties during the drought demonstrated relatively intense CO2 assimilation at low water loss through transpiration. The varieties tested were significantly different in terms of tolerance to drought of the processes of gas exchange and seedlings development. Photochemical processes in PSII showed high tolerance to drought and at the same time low differentiation among varieties. The results obtained suggested that tolerance of growth parameters to drought and CO2 assimilation at the seedling stage may alleviate consequent depression of final yield of the grain.

  15. Cyclooxygenase 2,pS2,inducible nitric oxide synthase and transforming growth factor alpha in gastric adaptation to stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Nan Nie; Hai-Chen Sun; Xue-Hao Wu; Xiao-Ming Qian

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the role of mucosal gene expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), pS2 (belongs to trefoil peptides),inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) in gastric adaptation to water immersion and restraint stress (WRS) in rats.METHODS: Wistar rats were exposed to single or repeated WRS for 4 h every other day for up to 6 d. Gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF) was measured by laser Doppler fiowmeter3. The extent of gastric mucosal lesions were evaluated grossly and histologically and expressions of COX-2, pS2,iNOS and TGFα were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot.RESULTS: The damage to the surface of gastric epithelium with focal areas of deep haemorrhagic necrosis was induced by repeated WRS.The adaptative cytoprotection against stress was developed with activation of cell proliferation in the neck regions of gastric glands. The ulcer index (UI) in groups Ⅱ, Ⅲ and Ⅳ was markedly reduced as compared with group Ⅰ (Ⅰ: 47.23±1.20; Ⅳ: 10.39±1.18,P<0.01). GMBF significantly decreased after first exposure to WRS with an adaptive increasement of GMBF in experimental groups after repetitive challenges with WRS. After the 4th WRS,the value of GMBF almost restored to normal level (Ⅰ:321.87±8.85; Ⅳ: 455.95±11.81,P<0.01). First WRS significantly decreased the expression of pS2 and significantly increased the expressions of COX-2, iNOS and TGFα. After repeated WRS, pS2 and TGFα expressions gradually increased (pS2: Ⅰ: 0.37±0.02; Ⅳ: 0.77±0.01; TGFα: Ⅰ:0.86±0.01; Ⅳ: 0.93±0.03, P<0.05) with a decrease in the expressions of COX-2 and iNOS (COX-2: Ⅰ: 0.45±0.02; Ⅳ:0.22±0.01; iNOS: Ⅰ: 0.93±0.01; Ⅳ: 0.56±0.01, P<0.01).Expressions of pS2, COX-2, iNOS and TGFα showed regular changes with a good relationship among them.CONCLUSION: Gastric adaptation to WRS injury involves enhanced cell proliferation, increased expression of pS2 and

  16. An Adaptive Multigrid Algorithm for Simulating Solid Tumor Growth Using Mixture Models

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, S.M.; Lowengrub, J.S.; Cristini, V

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we give the details of the numerical solution of a three-dimensional multispecies diffuse interface model of tumor growth, which was derived in (Wise et al., J. Theor. Biol. 253 (2008)) and used to study the development of glioma in (Frieboes et al., NeuroImage 37 (2007) and tumor invasion in (Bearer et al., Cancer Research, 69 (2009)) and (Frieboes et al., J. Theor. Biol. 264 (2010)). The model has a thermodynamic basis, is related to recently developed mixture models, and is c...

  17. Cognitive and Functional Consequence of Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Claudia A; Samudra, Niyatee; Aiyagari, Venkatesh

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Better-quality bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation training, cardiocerebral resuscitation principles, and intensive post-resuscitation hospital care have improved survival. However, cognitive and functional impairment after cardiac arrest remain areas of concern. Research focus has shifted beyond prognostication in the immediate post-arrest period to identification of mechanisms for long-term brain injury and implementation of promising protocols to reduce neuronal injury. These include therapeutic temperature management (TTM), as well as pharmacologic and psychological interventions which also improve overall neurological function. Comprehensive assessment of cognitive function post-arrest is hampered by heterogeneous measures among studies. However, the domains of attention, long-term memory, spatial memory, and executive function appear to be affected. As more patients survive cardiac arrest for longer periods of time, there needs to be a greater focus on interventions that can enhance cognitive and psychosocial function post-arrest. PMID:27311306

  18. Effects of submergence on growth and survival of saplings of three wetland trees differing in adaptive mechanisms for flood tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiko Iwanaga

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Withstanding total submergence and reaeration following submergence is essential for the survival and establishment of wetland species. We focused on “LOES–low oxygen escape syndrome” and “LOQS–low oxygen quiescence syndrome” and compared tolerances to total submergence among wetland woody species differing in morphological adaptation to soil flooding. Area of study, materials and methods: This study examined the survival of 2-year-old saplings of Taxodium distichum and Metasequioia glyptostroboides (LOQS species, and Alnus japonica (LOES species, during and after total submergence. Saplings were completely submerged, then de-submerged to determine trends in survival and growth Main results: The M. glyptostroboides and A. japonica saplings could not survive prolonged submergence for more than 8 weeks, whereas saplings of T. distichum survived for over 2 years. Submerged saplings of all species showed no significant growth or modifications in morphology and anatomy under water, such as shoot elongation, adventitious root formation, and/or aerenchyma development. All T. distichum saplings that were de-submerged in the second year had the same pattern of shoot growth regardless of differences in timing and seasonality of de-submergence. Wood formation in T. distichum saplings ceased during submergence and resumed after de-submergence in spring and summer, but not in autumn. Research highlights: T. distichum saplings, which survived longer submergence periods than A. japonica and M. glyptostroboides, had physiological characteristics, such as suspension of growth and metabolism, which allowed survival of protracted total submergence (at least 2 years when saplings were immersed during the dormant stage before leaf flushing.

  19. Natural variation in Arabidopsis adaptation to growth at low nitrogen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Kathryn Anne; Ehlting, Barbara; Koprivova, Anna; Rennenberg, Heinz; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2009-10-01

    Improving nutrient use efficiency of crop plants, especially at low input, is essential to ensure sustainable food production in the future. In order to address the genetic basis of nutrient use efficiency in a model system, growth of Arabidopsis ecotypes at normal and low nitrogen (N) supply was compared. The ecotypes differed significantly in the extent of growth reduction in limiting conditions. The fresh weight of Shahdara and Ws grown at 1mM nitrate was reduced by 30% compared to control, whereas Col-0 and Ga-0 were almost unaffected. Total N content was reduced in all ecotypes by 10-30%. The capacity to store nitrate correlated with the tolerance to low N; in Shahdara and Ws, but not in Col-0 and Ga-0, nitrate content on low N was significantly reduced compared to control nutrition. The mRNA levels for genes of nitrate uptake and assimilation were only moderately affected by the treatment. The transcript levels of nitrate reductase NIA1 and nitrite reductase were higher in the ecotypes tolerant to low N (Col-0 and Ga-0) with normal N nutrition but on low N they were reduced to a much higher extent than the sensitive ecotypes (Shahdara and Ws). It seems that a higher capacity to keep nitrate reserves at low N, perhaps due to the ability to turn down nitrate reduction rate, is responsible for a better tolerance of Col-0 and Ga-0 to low N supply.

  20. Survival and growth patterns of white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) rangewide provenances and their implications for climate change adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Pengxin; Parker, William H; Cherry, Marilyn; Colombo, Steve; Parker, William C; Man, Rongzhou; Roubal, Ngaire

    2014-06-01

    Intraspecific assisted migration (ISAM) through seed transfer during artificial forest regeneration has been suggested as an adaptation strategy to enhance forest resilience and productivity under future climate. In this study, we assessed the risks and benefits of ISAM in white spruce based on long-term and multilocation, rangewide provenance test data. Our results indicate that the adaptive capacity and growth potential of white spruce varied considerably among 245 range-wide provenances sampled across North America; however, the results revealed that local populations could be outperformed by nonlocal ones. Provenances originating from south-central Ontario and southwestern Québec, Canada, close to the southern edge of the species' natural distribution, demonstrated superior growth in more northerly environments compared with local populations and performed much better than populations from western Canada and Alaska, United States. During the 19-28 years between planting and measurement, the southern provenances have not been more susceptible to freezing damage compared with local populations, indicating they have the potential to be used now for the reforestation of more northerly planting sites; based on changing temperature, these seed sources potentially could maintain or increase white spruce productivity at or above historical levels at northern sites. A universal response function (URF), which uses climatic variables to predict provenance performance across field trials, indicated a relatively weak relationship between provenance performance and the climate at provenance origin. Consequently, the URF from this study did not provide information useful to ISAM. The ecological and economic importance of conserving white spruce genetic resources in south-central Ontario and southwestern Québec for use in ISAM is discussed.

  1. Food viscosity as determinant for adaptive growth responses in rat intestine: long-term feeding of different hydroxyethyl celluloses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenhans, B; Caspary, W F

    2000-07-01

    Carbohydrate gelling agents can be regarded as being representative for the soluble and viscous fractions of dietary fibre. Their dietary concentration affects the consistency of the ingested food as well as the dilution of nutrients and energy. By feeding hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) differing in molecular mass, and thus in its viscosity properties, only the consistency of the diet was modified. Three HEC (of low (LV), medium (MV) and high viscosity (HV)) were employed in a 6-week feeding study with female rats to evaluate the effect of the viscosity on adaptive responses of intestinal growth variables. Each of the HEC was added in three increasing concentrations (8, 16, and 32%, w/w) to a fibre-free control diet to yield nine test groups besides a fibre-free and an additional, fibre-rich, cereal-based control group. Except for the highest concentration of the high viscosity product (32% HV-HEC), the dilution of the energy density of the diet was almost completely compensated by an increased food intake. With the same exception, energy utilisation was not impaired and, therefore, body-weight gains in the test groups were not significantly different from that in the control. Most other changes, e.g. increases in small intestinal length, mucosal DNA content, caecal and colonic weight, not only depended on the dietary concentration but also on the viscosity of HEC in a manner that either increasing the viscosity at a given dietary concentration or increasing the dietary concentration at a given viscosity led to the same results. These findings clearly prove the important role of the viscosity of the lumen content, as a mere physico-chemical factor, in determining adaptative growth responses in the intestinal tract of rats.

  2. Simulated Cardiopulmonary Arrests in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Barbara H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simulated interdisciplinary role rehearsal for cardiopulmonary arrest to prepare nurses to function effectively. Includes needs analysis, program components, and responses of program participants. (Author)

  3. [Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkkunen, Ilkka; Hoppu, Sanna; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac arrest as the first symptom of coronary artery disease is not uncommon. Some of previously healthy people with sudden cardiac arrest may be saved by effective resuscitation and post-resuscitative therapy. The majority of cardiac arrest patients experience the cardiac arrest outside of the hospital, in which case early recognition of lifelessness, commencement of basic life support and entry to professional care without delay are the prerequisites for recovery. After the heart has started beating again, the clinical picture of post-resuscitation syndrome must be recognized and appropriate treatment utilized. PMID:22204143

  4. Global optimization, local adaptation and the role of growth in distribution networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Highly-optimized complex transport networks serve crucial functions in many man-made and natural systems such as power grids and plant or animal vasculature. Often, the relevant optimization functional is non-convex and characterized by many local extrema. In general, finding the global, or nearly global optimum is difficult. In biological systems, it is believed that natural selection slowly guides the network towards an optimized state. However, general coarse grained models for flow networks with local positive feedback rules for the vessel conductivity typically get trapped in low efficiency, local minima. In this work we show how the growth of the underlying tissue, coupled to the dynamical equations for network development, can drive the system to a dramatically improved optimal state. This general model provides a surprisingly simple explanation for the appearance of highly optimized transport networks in biology such as leaf and animal vasculature.

  5. Global Optimization, Local Adaptation, and the Role of Growth in Distribution Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Katifori, Eleni

    2016-09-01

    Highly optimized complex transport networks serve crucial functions in many man-made and natural systems such as power grids and plant or animal vasculature. Often, the relevant optimization functional is nonconvex and characterized by many local extrema. In general, finding the global, or nearly global optimum is difficult. In biological systems, it is believed that such an optimal state is slowly achieved through natural selection. However, general coarse grained models for flow networks with local positive feedback rules for the vessel conductivity typically get trapped in low efficiency, local minima. In this work we show how the growth of the underlying tissue, coupled to the dynamical equations for network development, can drive the system to a dramatically improved optimal state. This general model provides a surprisingly simple explanation for the appearance of highly optimized transport networks in biology such as leaf and animal vasculature.

  6. The beneficial role of proteolysis in skeletal muscle growth and stress adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Ryan A V; Al-Khalaf, Mohammad; Megeney, Lynn A

    2016-01-01

    Muscle atrophy derived from excessive proteolysis is a hallmark of numerous disease conditions. Accordingly, the negative consequences of skeletal muscle protein breakdown often overshadow the critical nature of proteolytic systems in maintaining normal cellular function. Here, we discuss the major cellular proteolysis machinery-the ubiquitin/proteosome system, the autophagy/lysosomal system, and caspase-mediated protein cleavage-and the critical role of these protein machines in establishing and preserving muscle health. We examine how ordered degradation modifies (1) the spatiotemporal expression of myogenic regulatory factors during myoblast differentiation, (2) membrane fusion during myotube formation, (3) sarcomere remodeling and muscle growth following physical stress, and (4) energy homeostasis during nutrient deprivation. Finally, we review the origin and etiology of a number of myopathies and how these devastating conditions arise from inborn errors in proteolysis.

  7. Growth curve of locally adapted pantaneiro cows raised under natural conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Araújo Barbosa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to use morphometric and ultrasound evaluations to estimate the growth curve of the Pantaneiro cattle breed, raised in its natural habitat, aiming at the re-insertion of this breed in production systems. One hundred and three females, aging from months to 11 years, and raised on native pastures, were evaluated. The animals belonged to the Conservation Nucleus of Embrapa Pantanal, located in the Pantanal of Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil. Weight, thoracic perimeter (TP, body length (BL, rump height (RH, height at withers (HW, hip height (HH, depth (DP, distance between the ilia (DI (cm and rib-eye area (REA were measured. To relate the measurements with the age of the animals, the univariate regression model was used, assigning the variable response to gamma distribution. The Pearson correlation between variables was also estimated. The inflection point of the growth curve was 37 months for HH; between 38 and 39 months for TP and HW; between 40 and 41 months for DI, HH and DP; and 45 months for BL. The REA results could not fit in a statistical model. The majority of the variables presented a correlation above 60% among themselves, except for REA × Age, of 15.81%; REA × HW, of 34.44%; HH × Age, of 46.19; HH × DI, of 58.07%; REA × HH, of 24.57%; and REA × TP, of 39.9%. The cows showed maturity age at 40 months, which may have occurred because they were raised in natural farming conditions. In Pantaneiro cows reared in extensive systems only on natural pastures, the use of ultrasound is not effective to estimate the curve of muscular development, perhaps because this breed was not selected for weight gain.

  8. Ent-11α-Hydroxy-15-oxo-kaur-16-en-19-oic-acid Inhibits Growth of Human Lung Cancer A549 Cells by Arresting Cell Cycle and Triggering Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; George G Chen; Ying-nian Lu; Yi Liu; Ke-feng Wu; Xian-ling Gong; Zhan-ping Gou; Ming-yue Li; Nian-ci Liang

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To examine the apoptotic effect of ent-11α-hydroxy-15-oxo-kaur-16-en-19-oic-acid (5F),a compound isolated from Pteris semipinnata L(PsL),in human lung cancer A549 cells.Methods:A549 cells were treated with 5F (0-80 μg/ml) for different time periods.Cytotoxicity was examined using a MTT method.Cell cycle was examined using propidium iodide staining.Apoptosis was examined using Hoechst 33258 staining,enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and caspase-3 activity analysis.Expression of representative apoptosis-related proteins was evaluated by Western blot analysis.Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was measured using standard protocols.Potential interaction of 5F with cisplatin was also examined.Results:5F inhibited the proliferation of A549 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner.5F increased the accumulation of cells in sub-G1 phase and arrested the cells in the G2 phase.Exposure to 5F induced morphological changes and DNA fragmentation that are characteristic of apoptosis.The expression of p21 was increased.5F exposure also increased Bax expression,release of cytochrome c and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF),and activation of caspase-3.5F significantly sensitized the cells to cisplatin toxicity Interestingly,treatment with 5F did not increase ROS,but reduced ROS production induced by cisplatin.Conclusion:SF could inhibit the proliferation of A549 cells by arresting the cells in G2 phase and by inducing mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis.

  9. Arabidopsis COPPER MODIFIED RESISTANCE1/PATRONUS1 is essential for growth adaptation to stress and required for mitotic onset control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraniec, Michal; Heyman, Jefri; Schubert, Veit; Salis, Pietrino; De Veylder, Lieven; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint (MC) guards faithful sister chromatid segregation by monitoring the attachment of spindle microtubules to the kinetochores. When chromosome attachment errors are detected, MC delays the metaphase-to-anaphase transition through the inhibition of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase. In contrast to yeast and mammals, our knowledge on the proteins involved in MC in plants is scarce. Transient synchronization of root tips as well as promoter-reporter gene fusions were performed to analyze temporal and spatial expression of COPPER MODIFIED RESISTANCE1/PATRONUS1 (CMR1/PANS1) in developing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Functional analysis of the gene was carried out, including CYCB1;2 stability in CMR1/PANS1 knockout and overexpressor background as well as metaphase-anaphase chromosome status. CMR1/PANS1 is transcriptionally active during M phase. Its deficiency provokes premature cell cycle exit and in consequence a rapid consumption of the number of meristematic cells in particular under stress conditions that are known to affect spindle microtubules. Root growth impairment is correlated with a failure to delay the onset of anaphase, resulting in anaphase bridges and chromosome missegregation. CMR1/PANS1 overexpression stabilizes the mitotic CYCB1;2 protein. Likely, CMR1/PANS1 coordinates mitotic cell cycle progression by acting as an APC/C inhibitor and plays a key role in growth adaptation to stress.

  10. Adaptation of Trichoderma Species to Pesticide Confidor and Evaluation of their Growth Ability in the Media Containing Confidor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Ershadfath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contamination caused by pesticides is considered as one of the environmental problems. Bioremediation is exploiting the ability of microorganisms to remove pollutants. Trichoderma species are free-living fungi that exist naturally in the environment. These fungi have the ability to uptake some contaminants biologically. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Confidor, as an environmental contaminant, on the growth ability of Trichoderma sp. as a contaminant absorber. Materials and methods: Five species of Trichoderma fungi were cultured in PDA media. Then the fungi were adapted with 3 different concentrations of Confidor gradually (5, 10 and 20 mg/l. The diameter of the fungal colonies growing in different concentrations of the toxin, were measured after 24 hr and were compared with the control samples (medium without toxin. Results: Results showed that in all species of fungi the colony diameters increased significantly with increasing toxin concentrations. The largest colony diameter was related to T.tomentosum, T.asperellum and T.harzianum (88.88, 87.5 and 86.95%, respectively at the concentration of 20 mg of toxic. Also, in all studied fungal species, in the medium containing 20 (mg/ l of toxic, the aerial hyphae expanded much thicker and faster than other concentrations. Discussion and conclusion: The results indicate a significant increase in the growth ability of Trichoderma strains with increasing Confidor concentration. Therefore it could be concluded that Trichoderma fungi have a high potentiality for biodegradation of Confidor.

  11. A novel parameter estimation method for metal oxide surge arrester models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehdi Nafar; Gevork B Gharehpetian; Taher Niknam

    2011-12-01

    Accurate modelling and exact determination of Metal Oxide (MO) surge arrester parameters are very important for arrester allocation, insulation coordination studies and systems reliability calculations. In this paper, a new technique, which is the combination of Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization (APSO) and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) algorithms and linking the MATLAB and EMTP, is proposed to estimate the parameters of MO surge arrester models. The proposed algorithm is named Modified Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization (MAPSO). In the proposed algorithm, to overcome the drawback of the PSO algorithm (convergence to local optima), the inertia weight is tuned by using fuzzy rules and the cognitive and the social parameters are self-adaptively adjusted. Also, to improve the global search capability and prevent the convergence to local minima, ACO algorithm is combined to the proposed APSO algorithm. The transient models of MO surge arrester have been simulated by using ATP-EMTP. The results of simulations have been applied to the program, which is based on MAPSO algorithm and can determine the fitness and parameters of different models. The validity and the accuracy of estimated parameters of surge arrester models are assessed by comparing the predicted residual voltage with experimental results.

  12. Why Be a Shrub? A Basic Model and Hypotheses for the Adaptive Values of a Common Growth Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götmark, Frank; Götmark, Elin; Jensen, Anna M

    2016-01-01

    Shrubs are multi-stemmed short woody plants, more widespread than trees, important in many ecosystems, neglected in ecology compared to herbs and trees, but currently in focus due to their global expansion. We present a novel model based on scaling relationships and four hypotheses to explain the adaptive significance of shrubs, including a review of the literature with a test of one hypothesis. Our model describes advantages for a small shrub compared to a small tree with the same above-ground woody volume, based on larger cross-sectional stem area, larger area of photosynthetic tissue in bark and stem, larger vascular cambium area, larger epidermis (bark) area, and larger area for sprouting, and faster production of twigs and canopy. These components form our Hypothesis 1 that predicts higher growth rate for a small shrub than a small tree. This prediction was supported by available relevant empirical studies (14 publications). Further, a shrub will produce seeds faster than a tree (Hypothesis 2), multiple stems in shrubs insure future survival and growth if one or more stems die (Hypothesis 3), and three structural traits of short shrub stems improve survival compared to tall tree stems (Hypothesis 4)-all hypotheses have some empirical support. Multi-stemmed trees may be distinguished from shrubs by more upright stems, reducing bending moment. Improved understanding of shrubs can clarify their recent expansion on savannas, grasslands, and alpine heaths. More experiments and other empirical studies, followed by more elaborate models, are needed to understand why the shrub growth form is successful in many habitats. PMID:27507981

  13. Why Be a Shrub? A Basic Model and Hypotheses for the Adaptive Values of a Common Growth Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götmark, Frank; Götmark, Elin; Jensen, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    Shrubs are multi-stemmed short woody plants, more widespread than trees, important in many ecosystems, neglected in ecology compared to herbs and trees, but currently in focus due to their global expansion. We present a novel model based on scaling relationships and four hypotheses to explain the adaptive significance of shrubs, including a review of the literature with a test of one hypothesis. Our model describes advantages for a small shrub compared to a small tree with the same above-ground woody volume, based on larger cross-sectional stem area, larger area of photosynthetic tissue in bark and stem, larger vascular cambium area, larger epidermis (bark) area, and larger area for sprouting, and faster production of twigs and canopy. These components form our Hypothesis 1 that predicts higher growth rate for a small shrub than a small tree. This prediction was supported by available relevant empirical studies (14 publications). Further, a shrub will produce seeds faster than a tree (Hypothesis 2), multiple stems in shrubs insure future survival and growth if one or more stems die (Hypothesis 3), and three structural traits of short shrub stems improve survival compared to tall tree stems (Hypothesis 4)—all hypotheses have some empirical support. Multi-stemmed trees may be distinguished from shrubs by more upright stems, reducing bending moment. Improved understanding of shrubs can clarify their recent expansion on savannas, grasslands, and alpine heaths. More experiments and other empirical studies, followed by more elaborate models, are needed to understand why the shrub growth form is successful in many habitats. PMID:27507981

  14. The course of circulatory and cerebral recovery after circulatory arrest: influence of pre-arrest, arrest and post-arrest factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, E O; Holm, S

    1999-11-01

    We evaluated the influence of pre-arrest, arrest and post-arrest factors on circulatory and neurological recovery for up to 1 year following circulatory arrest of cardio-pulmonary aetiology in 231 patients. Initially, all patients were unconscious and 106 had some cortical activity recorded in the immediate post-resuscitation EEG (Group I), while 125 had no such activity initially (Group II). The following variables were explored: age, sex, medical history, cause and location of arrest, initial cardiac dysrhythmia, duration of life support, metabolic acidosis, pulse-pressure product and heart pump function capacity early after resuscitation. Outcome measures were duration and quality of circulatory survival, cause of death, neurological recovery and ultimate outcome. First year survival was 33% in Group I and 16% in Group II. Severe heart failure and brain death occurred mainly in Group II. Circulatory recovery was negatively influenced by out-of-hospital arrest, metabolic acidosis and pulse-pressure products below 150. Neurological recovery was negatively influenced by initial dysrhythmias other than ventricular fibrillation, pulse-pressure products below 150, post-arrest heart failure and/or pulmonary complications. It seems that circulatory and cerebral outcomes are mainly determined by the global ischaemic insults sustained during the circulatory arrest period. PMID:10625157

  15. Carnosol, a dietary diterpene, displays growth inhibitory effects in human prostate cancer PC3 cells leading to G2-phase cell cycle arrest and targets the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremy J.; Syed, Deeba N.; Heren, Chenelle R.; Suh, Yewseok; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The anti-cancer effect of carnosol was investigated in human prostate cancer PC3 cells. Methods Biochemical analysis and protein array data of carnosol treated PC3 cells were analyzed. Results We evaluated carnosol for its potential anti-cancer properties in the PC3 cells. Using an MTT assay we found that carnosol (10 – 70 µM) decreases cell viability in a time and dose dependent manner. Next, we evaluated the effect of carnosol (20–60 uM) effect using flow cytometry as well as biochemical analysis and found induction of G2-phase cell cycle arrest. To establish a more precise mechanism, we performed a protein array that evaluated 638 proteins involved in cell signaling pathways. The protein array identified 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a serine/threonine protein kinase involved in the regulation of cellular energy balance as a potential target. Further downstream effects consistent with cancer inhibition included the modulation of the mTOR/HSP70S6k/4E-BP1 pathway. Additionally, we found that carnosol targeted the PI3K/Akt pathway in a dose dependent manner. Conclusions These results suggest that carnosol targets multiple signaling pathways that include the AMPK pathway. The ability of carnosol to inhibit prostate cancer in vitro suggests carnosol may be a novel agent for the management of PCa. PMID:18286356

  16. 2-D gel electrophoresis-based proteomic analysis reveals that ormeloxifen induces G0-G1 growth arrest and ERK-mediated apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia cells K562.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Pooja; Kanaujiya, Jitendra K; Lochab, Savita; Tripathi, Shashi B; Bhatt, Madan L B; Singh, Pradhyumna K; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Trivedi, Arun K

    2011-04-01

    Ormeloxifen is a nonsteroidal selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) and has been shown to possess anticancer activities in breast and uterine cancer. Here, we show that ormeloxifen induces apoptosis in dose-dependent manner in a variety of leukemia cells, more strikingly in K562. 2-DE-gel electrophoresis of K562 cells induced with ormeloxifen showed that 57 and 30% of proteins belong to apoptosis and cell-cycle pathways, respectively. Our data demonstrate that ormeloxifen-induced apoptosis in K562 cells involves activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and subsequent cytochrome c release, leading to mitochondria-mediated caspase-3 activation. Ormeloxifen-induced apoptosis via ERK activation was drastically inhibited by prior treatment of K562 cells with ERK inhibitor PD98059. Ormeloxifen also inhibits proliferation of K562 cells by blocking them in G0-G1 phase by inhibiting c-myc promoter via ormeloxifen-induced MBP-1 (c-myc promoter-binding protein) and upregulation of p21 expression. We further show that ormeloxifen-induced apoptosis in K562 is translatable to mononuclear cells isolated from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients. Thus, ormeloxifen induces apoptosis in K562 cells via phosphorylation of ERK and arrests them in G0-G1 phase by reciprocal regulation of p21 and c-myc. Therefore, inclusion of ormeloxifen in the therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia can be of potential utility. PMID:21360677

  17. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, C.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2016-08-01

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich panels. A finite element (FE) model of the experimental setup was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE simulation was based on the adoption of linear fracture mechanics and a fatigue propagation law (i.e. Paris law) to predict the residual fatigue life-time and behaviour of the test specimens. Finally, a comparison between the experimental results and the numerical simulations was made to validate the numerical predictions as well as the overall performance of the crack arresters.

  18. Extracellular enzymatic activities of cold-adapted bacteria from polar oceans and effect of temperature and salinity on cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Yinxin; Yu Yong; Chen Bo; Li Huirong

    2004-01-01

    The potential of 324 bacteria isolated from different habitats in polar oceans to produce a variety of extracellular enzymatic activities at low temperature was investigated. By plate assay, lipase, protease, amylase, gelatinase, agarase, chitinase or cellulase were detected. Lipases were generally present by bacteria living in polar oceans. Protease-producing bacteria held the second highest proportion in culturable isolates. Strains producing amylase kept a relative stable proportion of around 30% in different polar marine habitats. All 50 Arctic sea-ice bacteria producing proteases were cold-adapted strains, however, only 20% were psychrophilic. 98% of them could grow at 3% NaCl, and 56% could grow without NaCl. On the other hand, 98% of these sea-ice bacteria produced extracellular proteases with optimum temperature at or higher than 35℃, well above the upper temperature limit of cell growth. Extracellular enzymes including amylase, agarase, cellulase and lipase released by bacteria from seawater or sediment in polar oceans, most expressed maximum activities between 25 and 35℃. Among extracellular enzymes released by bacterial strain BSw20308, protease expressed maximum activity at 40℃, higher than 35℃ of polysaccharide hydrolases and 25℃ of lipase.

  19. A Computational Approach to Model Vascular Adaptation During Chronic Hemodialysis: Shape Optimization as a Substitute for Growth Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh Akherat, S. M. Javid; Boghosian, Michael; Cassel, Kevin; Hammes, Mary

    2015-11-01

    End-stage-renal disease patients depend on successful long-term hemodialysis via vascular access, commonly facilitated via a Brachiocephalic Fistula (BCF). The primary cause of BCF failure is Cephalic Arch Stenosis (CAS). It is believed that low Wall Shear Stress (WSS) regions, which occur because of the high flow rates through the natural bend in the cephalic vein, create hemodynamic circumstances that trigger the onset and development of Intimal Hyperplasia (IH) and subsequent CAS. IH is hypothesized to be a natural effort to reshape the vessel, aiming to bring the WSS values back to a physiologically acceptable range. We seek to explore the correlation between regions of low WSS and subsequent IH and CAS in patient-specific geometries. By utilizing a shape optimization framework, a method is proposed to predict cardiovascular adaptation that could potentially be an alternative to vascular growth and remodeling. Based on an objective functional that seeks to alter the vessel shape in such a way as to readjust the WSS to be within the normal physiological range, CFD and shape optimization are then coupled to investigate whether the optimal shape evolution is correlated with actual patient-specific geometries thereafter. Supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (R01 DK90769).

  20. Analysis of different strategies adapted by two cassava cultivars in response to drought stress: ensuring survival or continuing growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pingjuan; Liu, Pei; Shao, Jiaofang; Li, Chunqiang; Wang, Bin; Guo, Xin; Yan, Bin; Xia, Yiji; Peng, Ming

    2015-03-01

    Cassava is one of the most drought-tolerant crops, however, the underlying mechanism for its ability to survive and produce under drought remains obscure. In this study, two cassava cultivars, SC124 and Arg7, were treated by gradually reducing the soil water content. Their responses to the drought stress were examined through their morphological and physiological traits and isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis. SC124 plants adapted a 'survival' mode under mild drought stress as evidenced by early stomatal closure and a reduction in the levels of various photosynthetic proteins and photosynthetic capacity, resulting in early growth quiescence. In contrast, Arg7 plants underwent senescence of older leaves but continued to grow, although at a reduced rate, under mild drought. SC124 plants were more capable of surviving prolonged severe drought than Arg7. The iTRAQ analysis identified over 5000 cassava proteins. Among the drought-responsive proteins identified in the study were an aquaporin, myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthases, and a number of proteins involved in the antioxidant systems and secondary metabolism. Many proteins that might play a role in signalling or gene regulation were also identified as drought-responsive proteins, which included several protein kinases, two 14-3-3 proteins, several RNA-binding proteins and transcription factors, and two histone deacetylases. Our study also supports the notion that linamarin might play a role in nitrogen reallocation in cassava under drought.

  1. Chromosomal Aneuploidies and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Maurer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selecting the best embryo for transfer, with the highest chance of achieving a vital pregnancy, is a major goal in current in vitro fertilization (IVF technology. The high rate of embryonic developmental arrest during IVF treatment is one of the limitations in achieving this goal. Chromosomal abnormalities are possibly linked with chromosomal arrest and selection against abnormal fertilization products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos with developmental arrest. Materials and Methods: This cohort study included blastomeres of embryos with early developmental arrest that were biopsied and analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH with probes for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21 and 22. Forty-five couples undergoing IVF treatment were included, and 119 arrested embryos were biopsied. All probes were obtained from the Kinderwunsch Zentrum, Linz, Austria, between August 2009 and August 2011. Results: Of these embryos, 31.6% were normal for all chromosomes tested, and 68.4% were abnormal. Eleven embryos were uniformly aneuploid, 20 were polyploid, 3 were haploid, 11 displayed mosaicism and 22 embryos exhibited chaotic chromosomal complement. Conclusion: Nearly 70% of arrested embryos exhibit chromosomal errors, making chromosomal abnormalities a major cause of embryonic arrest and may be a further explanation for the high developmental failure rates during culture of the embryos in the IVF setting.

  2. Berberine inhibits growth, induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells by regulating Cdki-Cdk-cyclin cascade, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantena, Sudheer K; Sharma, Som D; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2006-10-01

    Chemotherapeutic approach using non-toxic botanicals may be one of the strategies for the management of the skin cancers. Here we report that in vitro treatment of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells with berberine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid, decreased cell viability (3-77%, P berberine-induced G(1) cell cycle arrest was mediated through the increased expression of Cdki proteins (Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27), a simultaneous decrease in Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6 and cyclins D1, D2 and E and enhanced binding of Cdki-Cdk. In additional studies, treatment of A431 cells with berberine (15-75 microM) for 72 h resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase in apoptosis (31-60%, P berberine-treated control (11.7%), which was associated with an increased expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax, decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, and activation of caspases 9, 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) significantly blocked the berberine-induced apoptosis in A431 cells confirmed that berberine-induced apoptosis is mediated through activation of caspase 3-dependent pathway. Together, this study for the first time identified berberine as a chemotherapeutic agent against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells in vitro, further in vivo studies are required to determine whether berberine could be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the management of non-melanoma skin cancers.

  3. Aqueous Extracts of the Edible Gracilaria tenuistipitata are Protective Against H2O2-Induced DNA Damage, Growth Inhibition, and Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chen Yeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Potential antioxidant properties of an aqueous extract of the edible red seaweed Gracilaria tenuistipitata (AEGT against oxidative DNA damage were evaluated. The AEGT revealed several antioxidant molecules, including phenolics, flavonoids and ascorbic acid. In a cell-free assay, the extract exhibited 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity that significantly reduced H2O2-induced plasmid DNA breaks in a dose-response manner (P < 0.001. The AEGT also suppressed H2O2-induced oxidative DNA damage in H1299 cells by reducing the percentage of damaged DNA in a dose-response manner (P < 0.001 as measured by a modified alkaline comet-nuclear extract (comet-NE assay. The MTT assay results showed that AEGT confers significant protection against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity and that AEGT itself is not cytotoxic (P < 0.001. Moreover, H2O2-induced cell cycle G2/M arrest was significantly released when cells were co-treated with different concentrations of AEGT (P < 0.001. Taken together, these findings suggest that edible red algae Gracilaria water extract can prevent H2O2-induced oxidative DNA damage and its related cellular responses.

  4. Crack arrest saturation model under combined electrical and mechanical loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Bhargava

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The investigation aims at proposing a model for cracked piezoelectric strip which is capable to arrest the crack.Design/methodology/approach: Under the combined effect of electrical and mechanical loadings applied at the edges of the strip, the developed saturation zone is produced at each tip of the crack. To arrest further opening of the crack, the rims of the developed saturation zones are subjected to in-plane cohesive, normal uniform constant saturation point electrical displacement. The problem is solved using Fourier integral transform method which reduces the problem to the solution of Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. This integral equation in turn is solved numerically.Findings: The expressions are derived for different intensity factors and energy release rate. A qualitative analysis of the parameters affecting the arrest of opening of the crack and fatigue crack growth with respect to strip thickness and material constants are presented graphically.Research limitations/implications: The investigations are carried out by considering the material electrical brittle. Consequently, the zones protrude along the straight lines ahead of the crack tips. And further, the small scale electrical yielding conditions are used.Practical implications: Piezoelectric materials are widely getting used nowadays, even in day to day life like piezoelectric cigarette lighter, children toys etc. And, its advance used in technology like transducers, actuators has been already in progress. So, the aspect of cracking of piezoelectric materials are of great practical importance.Originality/value: The piezoelectric material under the combined effect of electrical and mechanical loadings gives the assessment of electrical displacement which is required to arrest the crack. The various useful interpretations are also drawn from the graphs.

  5. Genotypic Variation in Growth and Physiological Response to Drought Stress and Re-Watering Reveals the Critical Role of Recovery in Drought Adaptation in Maize Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daoqian; Wang, Shiwen; Cao, Beibei; Cao, Dan; Leng, Guohui; Li, Hongbing; Yin, Lina; Shan, Lun; Deng, Xiping

    2015-01-01

    Non-irrigated crops in temperate climates and irrigated crops in arid climates are subjected to continuous cycles of water stress and re-watering. Thus, fast and efficient recovery from water stress may be among the key determinants of plant drought adaptation. The present study was designed to comparatively analyze the roles of drought resistance and drought recovery in drought adaptation and to investigate the physiological basis of genotypic variation in drought adaptation in maize (Zea mays) seedlings. As the seedlings behavior in growth associate with yield under drought, it could partly reflect the potential of drought adaptability. Growth and physiological responses to progressive drought stress and recovery were observed in seedlings of 10 maize lines. The results showed that drought adaptability is closely related to drought recovery (r = 0.714(**)), but not to drought resistance (r = 0.332). Drought induced decreases in leaf water content, water potential, osmotic potential, gas exchange parameters, chlorophyll content, Fv/Fm and nitrogen content, and increased H2O2 accumulation and lipid peroxidation. After recovery, most of these physiological parameters rapidly returned to normal levels. The physiological responses varied between lines. Further correlation analysis indicated that the physiological bases of drought resistance and drought recovery are definitely different, and that maintaining higher chlorophyll content (r = 0.874(***)) and Fv/Fm (r = 0.626(*)) under drought stress contributes to drought recovery. Our results suggest that both drought resistance and recovery are key determinants of plant drought adaptation, and that drought recovery may play a more important role than previously thought. In addition, leaf water potential, chlorophyll content and Fv/Fm could be used as efficient reference indicators in the selection of drought-adaptive genotypes. PMID:26793218

  6. Genotypic variation in growth and physiological response to drought stress and re-watering reveals the critical role of recovery in drought adaptation in maize seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoqian eChen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-irrigated crops in temperate climates and irrigated crops in arid climates are subjected to continuous cycles of water stress and re-watering. Thus, fast and efficient recovery from water stress may be among the key determinants of plant drought adaptation. The present study was designed to comparatively analyze the roles of drought resistance and drought recovery in drought adaptation and to investigate the physiological basis of genotypic variation in drought adaptation in maize (Zea mays seedlings. As the seedlings behavior in growth associate with yield under drought, it could partly reflect the potential of drought adaptability. Growth and physiological responses to progressive drought stress and recovery were observed in seedlings of ten maize lines. The results showed that drought adaptability is closely related to drought recovery (r = 0.714**, but not to drought resistance (r = 0.332. Drought induced decreases in leaf water content, water potential, osmotic potential, gas exchange parameters, chlorophyll content, Fv/Fm and nitrogen content, and increased H2O2 accumulation and lipid peroxidation. After recovery, most of these physiological parameters rapidly returned to normal levels. The physiological responses varied between lines. Further correlation analysis indicated that the physiological bases of drought resistance and drought recovery are definitely different, and that maintaining higher chlorophyll content (r = 0.874*** and Fv/Fm (r = 0.626* under drought stress contributes to drought recovery. Our results suggest that both drought resistance and recovery are key determinants of plant drought adaptation, and that drought recovery may play a more important role than previously thought. In addition, leaf water potential, chlorophyll content and Fv/Fm could be used as efficient reference indicators in the selection of drought-adaptive genotypes.

  7. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  8. Surface Electrocardiogram Predictors of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghani, Samy A.; Rosenthal, Todd M.; Morin, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is a major cause of death in industrialized nations, with approximately 50% of these deaths attributable to sudden cardiac arrest. If patients at high risk for sudden cardiac arrest can be identified, their odds of surviving fatal arrhythmias can be significantly improved through prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator placement. This review summarizes the current knowledge pertaining to surface electrocardiogram (ECG) predictors of sudden cardiac arrest. Methods: We conducted a literature review focused on methods of predicting sudden cardiac arrest through noninvasive electrocardiographic testing. Results: Several electrocardiographic-based methods of risk stratification of sudden cardiac arrest have been studied, including QT prolongation, QRS duration, fragmented QRS complexes, early repolarization, Holter monitoring, heart rate variability, heart rate turbulence, signal-averaged ECG, T wave alternans, and T-peak to T-end. These ECG findings have shown variable effectiveness as screening tools. Conclusion: At this time, no individual ECG finding has been found to be able to adequately stratify patients with regard to risk for sudden cardiac arrest. However, one or more of these candidate surface ECG parameters may become useful components of future multifactorial risk stratification calculators. PMID:27660578

  9. Sex Disparities in Arrest Outcomes for Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Melissa; Worthen, Meredith G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence arrests have been historically focused on protecting women and children from abusive men. Arrest patterns continue to reflect this bias with more men arrested for domestic violence compared to women. Such potential gender variations in arrest patterns pave the way to the investigation of disparities by sex of the offender in…

  10. High Nutrient Levels and TORC1 Activity Reduce Cell Viability following Prolonged Telomere Dysfunction and Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Klermund

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells challenged with DNA damage activate checkpoints to arrest the cell cycle and allow time for repair. Successful repair coupled to subsequent checkpoint inactivation is referred to as recovery. When DNA damage cannot be repaired, a choice between permanent arrest and cycling in the presence of damage (checkpoint adaptation must be made. While permanent arrest jeopardizes future lineages, continued proliferation is associated with the risk of genome instability. We demonstrate that nutritional signaling through target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1 influences the outcome of this decision. Rapamycin-mediated TORC1 inhibition prevents checkpoint adaptation via both Cdc5 inactivation and autophagy induction. Preventing adaptation results in increased cell viability and hence proliferative potential. In accordance, the ability of rapamycin to increase longevity is dependent upon the DNA damage checkpoint. The crosstalk between TORC1 and the DNA damage checkpoint may have important implications in terms of therapeutic alternatives for diseases associated with genome instability.

  11. Contributions of Two-Component Regulatory Systems, Alternative σ Factors, and Negative Regulators to Listeria monocytogenes Cold Adaptation and Cold Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yvonne C.; Hu, Yuewei; Chaturongakul, Soraya; Files, Kali D.; Bowen, Barbara M.; Boor, Kathryn J.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to grow at refrigeration temperatures is critical for transmission of this foodborne pathogen. We evaluated the contributions of different transcriptional regulators and two-component regulatory systems to L. monocytogenes cold adaptation and cold growth. L. monocytogenes parent strain 10403S and selected isogenic null mutants in genes encoding four alternative σ factors (sigB, sigH, sigC, and sigL), two regulators of σB (rsbT and rsbV), two negative regulators (ctsR and hrcA), and 15 two-component response regulators were grown in brain heart infusion broth at 4°C with (i) a high-concentration starting inoculum (108 CFU/ml), (ii) a low-concentration starting inoculum (102 CFU/ml), and (iii) a high-concentration starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells. With a starting inoculum of 108 CFU/ml, null mutants in genes encoding selected alternative σ factors (ΔsigH, ΔsigC, and ΔsigL), a negative regulator (ΔctsR), regulators of σB (ΔrsbT and ΔrsbV), and selected two-component response regulators (ΔlisR, Δlmo1172, and Δlmo1060) had significantly reduced growth (P < 0.05) compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4°C. The growth defect for ΔsigL was limited and was not confirmed by optical density (OD600) measurement data. With a starting inoculum of 102 CFU/ml and after monitoring growth at 4°C over 84 days, only the ΔctsR strain had a consistent but limited growth defect; the other mutant strains had either no growth defects or limited growth defects apparent at only one or two of the nine sampling points evaluated during the 84-day growth period (ΔsigB, ΔsigC, and Δlmo1172). With a 108 CFU/ml starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells, none of the mutant strains that had a growth defect when inoculation was performed with cells pregrown at 37°C had reduced growth as compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4°C, suggesting a specific defect in the ability of these mutant strains to adapt to 4

  12. A Multi-Moment Bulkwater Ice Microphysics Scheme with Consideration of the Adaptive Growth Habit and Apparent Density for Pristine Ice in the WRF Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, T. C.; Chen, J. P.; Dearden, C.

    2014-12-01

    The wide variety of ice crystal shapes and growth habits makes it a complicated issue in cloud models. This study developed the bulk ice adaptive habit parameterization based on the theoretical approach of Chen and Lamb (1994) and introduced a 6-class hydrometeors double-moment (mass and number) bulk microphysics scheme with gamma-type size distribution function. Both the proposed schemes have been implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) model forming a new multi-moment bulk microphysics scheme. Two new moments of ice crystal shape and volume are included for tracking pristine ice's adaptive habit and apparent density. A closure technique is developed to solve the time evolution of the bulk moments. For the verification of the bulk ice habit parameterization, some parcel-type (zero-dimension) calculations were conducted and compared with binned numerical calculations. The results showed that: a flexible size spectrum is important in numerical accuracy, the ice shape can significantly enhance the diffusional growth, and it is important to consider the memory of growth habit (adaptive growth) under varying environmental conditions. Also, the derived results with the 3-moment method were much closer to the binned calculations. A field campaign of DIAMET was selected to simulate in the WRF model for real-case studies. The simulations were performed with the traditional spherical ice and the new adaptive shape schemes to evaluate the effect of crystal habits. Some main features of narrow rain band, as well as the embedded precipitation cells, in the cold front case were well captured by the model. Furthermore, the simulations produced a good agreement in the microphysics against the aircraft observations in ice particle number concentration, ice crystal aspect ratio, and deposition heating rate especially within the temperature region of ice secondary multiplication production.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits transforming growth factor-β1-induced cell cycle arrest by promoting Smad3 linker phosphorylation through activation of Akt-ERK1/2-linked signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Park, Seong Ji; Jo, Eun Ji; Lee, Hui-Young; Hong, Suntaek; Kim, Seong-Jin; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2013-06-14

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) functions as a second messenger in growth factor receptor-mediated intracellular signaling cascade and is tumorigenic by virtue of its ability to promote cell proliferation; however, the mechanisms underlying the growth stimulatory action of H2O2 are less understood. Here we report an important mechanism for antagonistic effects of H2O2 on growth inhibitory response to transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In Mv1Lu and HepG2 cells, pretreatment of H2O2 (0.05-0.2 mM) completely blocked TGF-β1-mediated induction of p15(INK4B) expression and increase of its promoter activity. Interestingly, H2O2 selectively suppressed the transcriptional activation potential of Smad3, not Smad2, in the absence of effects on TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of the COOH-tail SSXS motif of Smad3 and its nuclear translocation. Mechanism studies showed that H2O2 increases the phosphorylation of Smad3 at the middle linker region in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and this effect is mediated by activation of extracellular signal-activated kinase 1/2 through Akt. Furthermore, expression of a mutant Smad3 in which linker phosphorylation sites were ablated significantly abrogated the inhibitory effects of H2O2 on TGF-β1-induced increase of p15(INK4B)-Luc reporter activity and blockade of cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. These findings for the first time define H2O2 as a signaling molecule that modulate Smad3 linker phosphorylation and its transcriptional activity, thus providing a potential mechanism whereby H2O2 antagonizes the cytostatic function of TGF-β1.

  14. 科技型中小企业适应性成长路径研究%Towards an adaptive growth path of medium and small technological enterprises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄春萍; 刘奎颖; 曾珍香

    2011-01-01

    Medium and small technological enterprises are the main force of national economic development. Their healthy growth is the common concern of both the business and academic circles. The adaptation of these enterprises and their adaptive growth stages are analyzed and a model for their adaptive growth path is established. Finally, cluster analysis is applied in an empirical study.%科技型中小企业是国民经济发展的主力军,其健康成长是企业界和学术界共同关心的热点问题.本文首先分析了科技型中小企业的适应性及其适应性成长阶段,分别是创业阶段、发展阶段、成熟阶段和蜕变阶段;进而基于企业适应性这一视角,提出了科技型中小企业适应性成长路径为自主发展型、动态模仿型和创新涌现型,并构建了其适应性成长路径模型,最后应用聚类分析进行了实证研究.

  15. Reversible cryo-arrest for imaging molecules in living cells at high spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masip, Martin E; Huebinger, Jan; Christmann, Jens; Sabet, Ola; Wehner, Frank; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Fuhr, Günther R; Bastiaens, Philippe I H

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of molecules in living cells hampers precise imaging of molecular patterns by functional and super-resolution microscopy. We developed a method that circumvents lethal chemical fixation and allows on-stage cryo-arrest for consecutive imaging of molecular patterns within the same living, but arrested, cells. The reversibility of consecutive cryo-arrests was demonstrated by the high survival rate of different cell lines and by intact growth factor signaling that was not perturbed by stress response. Reversible cryo-arrest was applied to study the evolution of ligand-induced receptor tyrosine kinase activation at different scales. The nanoscale clustering of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the plasma membrane was assessed by single-molecule localization microscopy, and endosomal microscale activity patterns of ephrin receptor A2 (EphA2) were assessed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Reversible cryo-arrest allows the precise determination of molecular patterns while conserving the dynamic capabilities of living cells. PMID:27400419

  16. Burkholderia pseudomallei transcriptional adaptation in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieng Sylvia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen of phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. How the bacterium interacts with host macrophage cells is still not well understood and is critical to appreciate the strategies used by this bacterium to survive and how intracellular survival leads to disease manifestation. Results Here we report the expression profile of intracellular B. pseudomallei following infection of human macrophage-like U937 cells. During intracellular growth over the 6 h infection period, approximately 22 % of the B. pseudomallei genome showed significant transcriptional adaptation. B. pseudomallei adapted rapidly to the intracellular environment by down-regulating numerous genes involved in metabolism, cell envelope, motility, replication, amino acid and ion transport system and regulatory function pathways. Reduced expression in catabolic and housekeeping genes suggested lower energy requirement and growth arrest during macrophage infection, while expression of genes encoding anaerobic metabolism functions were up regulated. However, whilst the type VI secretion system was up regulated, expression of many known virulence factors was not significantly modulated over the 6hours of infection. Conclusions The transcriptome profile described here provides the first comprehensive view of how B. pseudomallei survives within host cells and will help identify potential virulence factors and proteins that are important for the survival and growth of B. pseudomallei within human cells.

  17. Seasonal and altitudinal variations on adaptation, growth and testicular activity of Baladi goats with vertical transhumance in Eastern Mediterranean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of transhumance on body growth and adaptation parameters in theBaladi goat, and testicular activity in bucks were studied over a period of one year. Thirty two animals were allocated to 4 similar groups according to age (100 days for 8 male and 8 female kids, and 3-4 years for 8 bucks and 8 does) and sex. Goats were raised in a coastal pasture area for the winter period (WP), then transhumed towards a mountainous area in May for the summer period (SP). Every 21 days, animals were weighed and monitored for a whole day to estimate the distance travelled; four does and four bucks were followed for two successive days to evaluate the nature of the plants grazed by direct observation. Four summer and two winter collections of these plants were subjected to proximate analysis; Respiration and heart rates were recorded every two hours between 6:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.; Testicular volume and semen quality were also measured. Animals traveled 1 km/h in summer period and 0.8 km/h in winter. Herbaceous plants formed 95% of the plants grazed in SP and ligneous plants formed the majority of the plants ingested (80 to 95%) in WP. Protein percentages decreased from 15.2 to 8.6% between the beginning and the middle of the SP whereas it was around 11% in WP. Weight gain was greater during SP in comparison to WP except for bucks (12, 7.6, 4.2 and -3.3 kg vs. 3.4,1.8, -7.5 and 3.3 kg for male and female goat kids, does and bucks, respectively). Respiration and heart rates showed adaptation of animals to walking long distances in both zones, stabilizing respectively at 47-50 breaths/min and 83-90 beats/min after a 6 km walk. Decrease in semen concentration was observed at the end of the animal's stay in each zone, with values between 3.1 and 3.7 spermatozoa x 109/ml vs. 1.7and 2.7 spermatozoa x 109/ml in SP and WP, respectively. The volume varied between 1.0 ±0.2 and 1.6 ± 0.4 ml in SP, and decreased to 0.6 ± 0.3 ml in WP. Transhumance is thus beneficial for only two

  18. Industrial Growth and the Theory of Retardation. Precursors of an Adaptive Evolutionary Theory of EconomicChange

    OpenAIRE

    John Stanley Metcalfe

    2003-01-01

    In the 1930s the idea of industrial growth was explored extensively by many economists in particular by Simon Kuznets and Arthur Burns. In their detailed empirical studies they identified diversity of industry growth rates and retardation of industry growth rates as a central feature of capitalist economic development. Yet the theory of growth rate diversity and retardation has only recently begun to be explored in detail by evolutionary economists. This paper is written in recognition of the...

  19. 4-Formylaminooxyvinylglycine, an Herbicidal Germination-Arrest Factor (GAF) from Pseudomonas Rhizosphere Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new oxyvinylglycine has been identified as a naturally occurring herbicide that irreversibly arrests germination of the seeds of grassy weeds; such as annual bluegrass (Poa annua), without significantly affecting the growth of established grass seedlings and mature plants, or germination of the se...

  20. Up-regulation of stathmin induces growth arrest of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma EC9706 cell%上调stathmin基因表达对食管鳞癌EC9706细胞的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王峰; 王留兴; 何炜; 李克; 王瑞林; 赵培荣; 樊青霞

    2010-01-01

    proliferation of transfected cells was measured by cell counting, MTT and in vitro formation assay of flat Flow cytometry was used to detect the cell cycle. Nude mice were adopted to investigate the in vivo tumorigenic characteristics of the transfected cells. Results A 450 bp coding sequence of stathmin cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR and then cloned into pcDNA3. 1 ( + ) plasmid to harvest the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3. 1-stathmin. The recombinant plasmid pcDNA3. 1-stathmin and blank vector were transfected respectively into EC9706 cells. The up-regulated expression of stathmin protein was validated by Western blot ( P < 0. 01 ) . Compared with control, EC9706 cells transfected with pcDNA3. 1-stathmin appeared swollen and multi-nuclear with a cell mitotic arrest; doubling generation time of pcDNA3. 1stathmin transfectants was prolonged(25 -28 h); The in vitro cell proliferation ability and clone formation rate (34.5% +-6.9%) decreased, cell cleavage was blocked at G2/M phase (21. 7% +- 3. 4% ) and the oncogenicity of inoculated cells in nude mice decreased ( all P < 0. 01). Conclusions The up-regulated expression of stathmin protein triggered by the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3. 1-stathmin can inhibit the proliferation and oncogenicity of ESCC EC9706 cells. TTiis molecule may be a promising therapeutic target in ESCC patients.

  1. Microanatomical and histological features in the long bones of Mosasaurine mosasaurs (Reptilia, Squamata--implications for aquatic adaptation and growth rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Houssaye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During their evolution in the Late Cretaceous, mosasauroids attained a worldwide distribution, accompanied by a marked increase in body size and open ocean adaptations. This transition from land-dwellers to highly marine-adapted forms is readily apparent not only at the gross anatomic level but also in their inner bone architecture, which underwent profound modifications. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present contribution describes, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the internal organization (microanatomy and tissue types and characteristics (histology of propodial and epipodial bones in one lineage of mosasauroids; i.e., the subfamily Mosasaurinae. By using microanatomical and histological data from limb bones in combination with recently acquired knowledge on the inner structure of ribs and vertebrae, and through comparisons with extant squamates and semi-aquatic to fully marine amniotes, we infer possible implications on mosasaurine evolution, aquatic adaptation, growth rates, and basal metabolic rates. Notably, we observe the occurrence of an unusual type of parallel-fibered bone, with large and randomly shaped osteocyte lacunae (otherwise typical of fibrous bone and particular microanatomical features in Dallasaurus, which displays, rather than a spongious inner organization, bone mass increase in its humeri and a tubular organization in its femora and ribs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The dominance of an unusual type of parallel-fibered bone suggests growth rates and, by extension, basal metabolic rates intermediate between that of the extant leatherback turtle, Dermochelys, and those suggested for plesiosaur and ichthyosaur reptiles. Moreover, the microanatomical features of the relatively primitive genus Dallasaurus differ from those of more derived mosasaurines, indicating an intermediate stage of adaptation for a marine existence. The more complete image of the various microanatomical trends observed in mosasaurine

  2. Altered brain energetics induces mitochondrial fission arrest in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Trushin, Sergey; Christensen, Trace A; Bachmeier, Benjamin V; Gateno, Benjamin; Schroeder, Andreas; Yao, Jia; Itoh, Kie; Sesaki, Hiromi; Poon, Wayne W; Gylys, Karen H; Patterson, Emily R; Parisi, Joseph E; Diaz Brinton, Roberta; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Trushina, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Altered brain metabolism is associated with progression of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Mitochondria respond to bioenergetic changes by continuous fission and fusion. To account for three dimensional architecture of the brain tissue and organelles, we applied 3-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) reconstruction to visualize mitochondrial structure in the brain tissue from patients and mouse models of AD. We identified a previously unknown mitochondrial fission arrest phenotype that results in elongated interconnected organelles, "mitochondria-on-a-string" (MOAS). Our data suggest that MOAS formation may occur at the final stages of fission process and was not associated with altered translocation of activated dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria but with reduced GTPase activity. Since MOAS formation was also observed in the brain tissue of wild-type mice in response to hypoxia or during chronological aging, fission arrest may represent fundamental compensatory adaptation to bioenergetic stress providing protection against mitophagy that may preserve residual mitochondrial function. The discovery of novel mitochondrial phenotype that occurs in the brain tissue in response to energetic stress accurately detected only using 3D EM reconstruction argues for a major role of mitochondrial dynamics in regulating neuronal survival. PMID:26729583

  3. Cell cycle arrest and cell survival induce reverse trends of cardiolipin remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Chao

    Full Text Available Cell survival from the arrested state can be a cause of the cancer recurrence. Transition from the arrest state to the growth state is highly regulated by mitochondrial activity, which is related to the lipid compositions of the mitochondrial membrane. Cardiolipin is a critical phospholipid for the mitochondrial integrity and functions. We examined the changes of cardiolipin species by LC-MS in the transition between cell cycle arrest and cell reviving in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. We have identified 41 cardiolipin species by MS/MS and semi-quantitated them to analyze the detailed changes of cardiolipin species. The mass spectra of cardiolipin with the same carbon number form an envelope, and the C64, C66, C68, C70 C72 and C74 envelopes in HT1080 cells show a normal distribution in the full scan mass spectrum. The cardiolipin quantity in a cell decreases while entering the cell cycle arrest, but maintains at a similar level through cell survival. While cells awakening from the arrested state and preparing itself for replication, the groups with short acyl chains, such as C64, C66 and C68 show a decrease of cardiolipin percentage, but the groups with long acyl chains, such as C70 and C72 display an increase of cardiolipin percentage. Interestingly, the trends of the cardiolipin species changes during the arresting state are completely opposite to cell growing state. Our results indicate that the cardiolipin species shift from the short chain to long chain cardiolipin during the transition from cell cycle arrest to cell progression.

  4. A synthetic circuit for selectively arresting daughter cells to create aging populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Bruno; Silver, Pamela A; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M

    2010-05-01

    The ability to engineer genetic programs governing cell fate will permit new safeguards for engineered organisms and will further the biological understanding of differentiation and aging. Here, we have designed, built and implemented a genetic device in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that controls cell-cycle progression selectively in daughter cells. The synthetic device was built in a modular fashion by combining timing elements that are coupled to the cell cycle, i.e. cell-cycle specific promoters and protein degradation domains, and an enzymatic domain which conditionally confers cell arrest. Thus, in the presence of a drug, the device is designed to arrest growth of only newly-divided daughter cells in the population. Indeed, while the engineered cells grow normally in the absence of drug, with the drug the engineered cells display reduced, linear growth on the population level. Fluorescence microscopy of single cells shows that the device induces cell arrest exclusively in daughter cells and radically shifts the age distribution of the resulting population towards older cells. This device, termed the 'daughter arrester', provides a blueprint for more advanced devices that mimic developmental processes by having control over cell growth and death.

  5. Cell cycle arrest by a gradient of Dpp signaling during Drosophila eye development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Abhishek

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secreted morphogen Dpp plays important roles in spatial regulation of gene expression and cell cycle progression in the developing Drosophila eye. Dpp signaling is required for timely cell cycle arrest ahead of the morphogenetic furrow as a prelude to differentiation, and is also important for eye disc growth. The dpp gene is expressed at multiple locations in the eye imaginal disc, including the morphogenetic furrow that sweeps across the eye disc as differentiation initiates. Results Studies of Brinker and Dad expression, and of Mad phosphorylation, establish that there is a gradient of Dpp signaling in the eye imaginal disc anterior to the morphogenetic furrow, predominantly in the anterior-posterior axis, and also Dpp signaling at the margins of the disc epithelium and in the dorsal peripodial membrane. Almost all signaling activity seems to spread through the plane of the epithelia, although peripodial epithelium cells can also respond to underlying disc cells. There is a graded requirement for Dpp signaling components for G1 arrest in the eye disc, with more stringent requirements further anteriorly where signaling is lower. The signaling level defines the cell cycle response, because elevated signaling through expression of an activated Thickveins receptor molecule arrested cells at more anterior locations. Very anterior regions of the eye disc were not arrested in response to activated receptor, however, and evidence is presented that expression of the Homothorax protein may contribute to this protection. By contrast to activated Thickveins, ectopic expression of processed Dpp leads to very high levels of Mad phosphorylation which appear to have non-physiological consequences. Conclusions G1 arrest occurs at a threshold level of Dpp signaling within a morphogen gradient in the anterior eye. G1 arrest is specific for one competent domain in the eye disc, allowing Dpp signaling to promote growth at earlier

  6. The Organizational Determinants of Police Arrest Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Allison T.; MacDonald, John M.; Manz, Patrick W.

    2006-01-01

    A limited amount of research has examined the relationship between characteristics of police organizations and policing styles. In particular, few studies have examined the link between organizational structures and police officer arrest decisions. Wilson's (1968) pioneering case study of police organizations suggested that individual police…

  7. Predictors for outcome among cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibrandt-Johansen, Ida Maria; Norsted, Kristine; Schmidt, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundIn the past decade, early treatment of cardiac arrest (CA) victims has been improved in several ways, leading to more optimistic over all prognoses. However, the global survival rate after out-of-hospital CA (OHCA) is still not more than 5-10%. With a better knowledge of the predictors...

  8. Juvenile Arrests, 2007. Juvenile Justice Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzanchera, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This Bulletin summarizes 2007 juvenile crime and arrest data reported by local law enforcement agencies across the country and cited in the FBI report, "Crime in the United States 2007." The Bulletin describes the extent and nature of juvenile crime that comes to the attention of the justice system. It serves as a baseline for comparison for…

  9. Maternal Cardiac Arrest: A Practical and Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida M. Jeejeebhoy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest during pregnancy is a dedicated chapter in the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care; however, a robust maternal cardiac arrest knowledge translation strategy and emergency response plan is not usually the focus of institutional emergency preparedness programs. Although maternal cardiac arrest is rare, the emergency department is a high-risk area for receiving pregnant women in either prearrest or full cardiac arrest. It is imperative that institutions review and update emergency response plans for a maternal arrest. This review highlights the most recent science, guidelines, and recommended implementation strategies related to a maternal arrest. The aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the important physiological differences of, and management strategies for, a maternal cardiac arrest, as well as provide institutions with the most up-to-date literature on which they can build emergency preparedness programs for a maternal arrest.

  10. Growth Habit and Mechanical Architecture of the Sand Dune‐adapted Climber Clematis flammula var. maritima L.

    OpenAIRE

    Isnard, Sandrine; Rowe, Nick; Speck, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Clematis flammula var. maritima is a woody lianoid plant that grows on coastal sand dunes in the Mediterranean region. Older perennial stems are present as extensive underground axes. These generate surface growth of shorter‐lived stems producing monospecific trellises above the surface of the sand. Despite its sand dune habitat and shortage of host support plants, this variety of Clematis shows mechanical characteristics during growth that are closely comparable with those of scandent woody ...

  11. 基于自适应成长法的散热通道构建技术%Construction Technology of Cooling Channel Based on Adaptive Growth Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨东升; 丁晓红; 季学荣; 刘炜

    2012-01-01

    应用自然界生物分枝网形态成长机理的自适应成长法对体-点问题进行求解,以每一单元的材料热导率作为设计变量,以设计区域的最高温度最低为设计目标,根据设计领域的温度梯度,逐步将高导热材料填充到设计区域,实现自适应成长。以若干典型体-点问题为算例,通过与现有设计方法的结果进行比较,说明提出的自适应成长技术可有效地应用于散热通道的构建。%The adaptive growth method based on the growth mechanism of branch systems mor- phologies in nature was applied to solve volume--point problem. The thermal conductivity of each ele ment was selected to be as design variable and minimization of the maximum temperature in the de- sign area was the objective. The material with high thermal conductivity was distributed gradually to the design area and the adaptive growth of cooling channel was realized. Several typical volume--point problems were analyzed and compared with the results of current methods. It is found that the adap- tive growth method can be used to construct cooling channel effectively.

  12. 生长停滞特异性基因产物6的2个单核苷酸多态性与缺血性脑卒中的相关性%Relation between two single nucleotide polymorphisms of growth arrest-specific gene 6 and ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高永俊; 李晓峰; 杨旭; 李新毅

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨生长停滞特异性基因产物6(growth arrest-specific gene 6,Gas 6)单核苷酸多态性(single nucleotide polymorphisms,SNP)与缺血性脑卒中(ischemic stroke,IS)及其亚型发生的相关性.方法 选择IS患者119例作为病例组,同期随机抽取无心、脑及周围动脉粥样硬化史的健康体检者217例作为对照组.根据既往研究的阳性结果及HapMap数据库,选择Gas6 rs8191974及rs7400722位点分析.采用PCR-RFLP技术进行2个SNP基因分型.采用logistic多元回归分析IS及其亚型的危险因素.结果 2组2个SNP基因型(P=0.80、0.79)、等位基因频率(P=0.57、0.50)及不同模型基因频率(显性:P=0.93、0.58;隐性:P=0.51、0.58)比较,差异均无统计学意义;以连锁不平衡系数>0.5为判断标准,共构建4个单体型(G-C,G-T,A-C,A-T),2组4个单体型分布频率差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05);校正相关危险因素后,差异仍无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 Gas6 rs8191974及rs7400722位点基因型、等位基因频率及单体型与IS无明显相关性.%Objective To study the relation of single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNP) of growth arrest-specific gene 6(Gas6) with ischemic stroke (IS) and its subtypes. Methods One hundred and nineteen IS patients served as a patient group and 217 subjects with no history of cardiac,cerebral and peripheral athrosclerosis served as a control group in this study. The rs8191974 and rs7400722 polymorphisms of Gas6, selected according to the positive findings in previous studies and in HapMap database,were detected by PCR-RFLP. Risk factors for IS and its subtypes were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results No significant difference was found in the 2 ingle nucleotide SNP,frequency of allele and Gas6 gene in different models,and in the 4 haplotypes(G-C, G-T, A-C, AT) we established with the chain-imbalance factor >0. 05 as a judge criterion between the two groups, even after the related risk factors were

  13. Adaptation of BHK-21 cells to growth in shaker culture and subsequent challenge by Japanese encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guskey, L E; Jenkin, H M

    1975-09-01

    Baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells were adapted to grow in shaker culture using Waymouth medium 752/1 containing 20 mM N-2-hydroxyethyl-piperazine-N'-2'-ethanesulfonic acid buffer and supplemented with 2.5% (vol/vol) calf serum, 0.002% (wt/vol) sodium oleate, and 0.2% fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin (WO2.5). Infectivity of Japanese encephalitis virus grown in the cells adapted to WO2.5 approached 2 x 10(8) plaque-forming units per ml. The culture volume of infected cells was reduced fivefold 12 h after infection. This step resulted in a 10-fold increase in infectivity over that obtained from infected cultures not subjected to volume reduction. PMID:1237269

  14. Adaptation to flooding during emergence and seedling growth in rice and weeds, and implications for crop establishment

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Abdelbagi M.; Johnson, David E.; Ella, Evangelina S.; Vergara, Georgina V.; Baltazar, Aurora M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Direct seeding of rice is being adopted in rainfed and irrigated lowland ecosystems because it reduces labour costs in addition to other benefits. However, early flooding due to uneven fields or rainfall slows down seed germination and hinders crop establishment. Conversely, early flooding helps suppress weeds and reduces the costs of manual weeding and/or dependence on herbicides; however, numerous weed species are adapted to lowlands and present challenges for the use of...

  15. First permanent molar root development arrest associated with compound odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunda, Sachin A; Patil, Anil; Varekar, Aniruddha

    2013-07-04

    Trauma or infection to the primary tooth may have deleterious effects on the underlying developing tooth buds. Anatomically the root apices of primary teeth are in close proximity to the developing permanent tooth buds; hence spread of infection originating from pulp necrosis of primary tooth may not only affect the underlying tooth bud but may also affect the adjacent tooth buds. The extent of malformation depends on the developmental stage of tooth or the age of patient. Presented here is a rare case of complete arrest of maxillary first permanent molar root growth due to spread of periapical infection originating from second primary molar leading to failure of its eruption and finally extraction. Histopathlogical analysis revealed compound odontoma associated with maxillary first permanent molar.

  16. Root proteome response to growth on tannery waste in three different poplar species with various adaptation abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemleduch-Barylska A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In our study we compared growth of three poplar clones (Populus tremula ×alba, P. alba ‘Villafranca” and P. nigra on chromium-containing solid tannery waste. Tolerance index of saplings ranged from only 25% for P. nigra up to 80% for P. tremula x alba. Standard morphological, chemical and biochemical analyses also confirmed significant differences in reaction of all tested clones to such growth conditions. Preliminary proteomic study showed an unequal level of changes in protein profiles from roots in different poplars.

  17. Bud phenology and growth are subject to divergent selection across a latitudinal gradient in Populus angustifolia and impact adaptation across the distributional range and associated arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Luke M; Kaluthota, Sobadini; Pearce, David W; Allan, Gerard J; Floate, Kevin; Rood, Stewart B; Whitham, Thomas G

    2016-07-01

    Temperate forest tree species that span large geographical areas and climatic gradients often have high levels of genetic variation. Such species are ideal for testing how neutral demographic factors and climate-driven selection structure genetic variation within species, and how this genetic variation can affect ecological communities. Here, we quantified genetic variation in vegetative phenology and growth traits in narrowleaf cottonwood, Populus angustifolia, using three common gardens planted with genotypes originating from source populations spanning the species' range along the Rocky Mountains of North America (ca. 1700 km). We present three main findings. First, we found strong evidence of divergent selection (Q ST > F ST) on fall phenology (bud set) with adaptive consequences for frost avoidance. We also found evidence for selection on bud flush duration, tree height, and basal diameter, resulting in population differentiation. Second, we found strong associations with climate variables that were strongly correlated with latitude of origin. More strongly differentiated traits also showed stronger climate correlations, which emphasizes the role that climate has played in divergent selection throughout the range. We found population × garden interaction effects; for some traits, this accounted for more of the variance than either factor alone. Tree height was influenced by the difference in climate of the source and garden locations and declined with increasing transfer distance. Third, growth traits were correlated with dependent arthropod community diversity metrics. Synthesis. Overall, we conclude that climate has influenced genetic variation and structure in phenology and growth traits and leads to local adaptation in P. angustifolia, which can then impact dependent arthropod species. Importantly, relocation of genotypes far northward or southward often resulted in poor growth, likely due to a phenological mismatch with photoperiod, the proximate

  18. Glucose restriction induces transient G2 cell cycle arrest extending cellular chronological lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Fumie; Ishii, Mahiro; Mori, Ayaka; Uehara, Lisa; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Kojiro; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2016-01-01

    While glucose is the fundamental source of energy in most eukaryotes, it is not always abundantly available in natural environments, including within the human body. Eukaryotic cells are therefore thought to possess adaptive mechanisms to survive glucose-limited conditions, which remain unclear. Here, we report a novel mechanism regulating cell cycle progression in response to abrupt changes in extracellular glucose concentration. Upon reduction of glucose in the medium, wild-type fission yeast cells undergo transient arrest specifically at G2 phase. This cell cycle arrest is dependent on the Wee1 tyrosine kinase inhibiting the key cell cycle regulator, CDK1/Cdc2. Mutant cells lacking Wee1 are not arrested at G2 upon glucose limitation and lose viability faster than the wild-type cells under glucose-depleted quiescent conditions, suggesting that this cell cycle arrest is required for extension of chronological lifespan. Our findings indicate the presence of a novel cell cycle checkpoint monitoring glucose availability, which may be a good molecular target for cancer therapy. PMID:26804466

  19. Piperine causes G1 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in melanoma cells through checkpoint kinase-1 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neel M Fofaria

    Full Text Available In this study, we determined the cytotoxic effects of piperine, a major constituent of black and long pepper in melanoma cells. Piperine treatment inhibited the growth of SK MEL 28 and B16 F0 cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. The growth inhibitory effects of piperine were mediated by cell cycle arrest of both the cell lines in G1 phase. The G1 arrest by piperine correlated with the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and induction of p21. Furthermore, this growth arrest by piperine treatment was associated with DNA damage as indicated by phosphorylation of H2AX at Ser139, activation of ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related protein (ATR and checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1. Pretreatment with AZD 7762, a Chk1 inhibitor not only abrogated the activation of Chk1 but also piperine mediated G1 arrest. Similarly, transfection of cells with Chk1 siRNA completely protected the cells from G1 arrest induced by piperine. Piperine treatment caused down-regulation of E2F1 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb. Apoptosis induced by piperine was associated with down-regulation of XIAP, Bid (full length and cleavage of Caspase-3 and PARP. Furthermore, our results showed that piperine treatment generated ROS in melanoma cells. Blocking ROS by tiron protected the cells from piperine mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These results suggest that piperine mediated ROS played a critical role in inducing DNA damage and activation of Chk1 leading to G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  20. Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  1. Growth and Collapse of a Resource System: an Adaptive Cycle of Change in Public Lands Governance and Forest Management in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Lauren. Lovecraft

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale government efforts to develop resources for societal benefit have often experienced cycles of growth and decline that leave behind difficult social and ecological legacies. To understand the origins and outcomes of these failures of resource governance, scholars have applied the framework of the adaptive cycle. In this study, we used the adaptive cycle as a diagnostic approach to trace the drivers and dynamics of forest governance surrounding a boom–bust sequence of industrial forest management in one of the largest-scale resource systems in U.S. history: the Tongass National Forest in southeastern Alaska. Our application of the adaptive cycle combined a historical narrative tracing dynamics in political, institutional, and economic subsystems and a longitudinal analysis of an indicator of overall system behavior (timber harvests. We found that federal policies in concert with global market changes drove transformative change in both forest governance (policy making and forest management (practices, through creation and dissolution of subsidized long-term lease contracts. Evidence of the systemic resilience provided by these leases was found in the analysis of industry responses to market volatility before and after Tongass-specific federal reforms. Although the lease contracts stabilized the Tongass system for a period of time, they fostered a growing degree of rigidity that contributed to a severe industrial collapse and the subsequent emergence of complex social traps. Broader lessons from the Tongass suggest that large-scale changes occurred only when the nested economic and policy cycles were in coherence, and a systemic effort to minimize social and ecological variability ultimately resulted in catastrophic collapse of governance. This collapse resulted in a pervasive and challenging legacy that prevents Tongass reorganization and limits the adaptive capacity of the larger social–ecological system of southeastern Alaska

  2. Sequence adaptations during growth of rescued classical swine fever viruses in cell culture and within infected pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadsbjerg, Johanne; Friis, Martin B; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Nielsen, Jens; Belsham, Graham J; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2016-08-30

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes an economically important disease of swine. Four different viruses were rescued from full-length cloned cDNAs derived from the Paderborn strain of CSFV. Three of these viruses had been modified by mutagenesis (with 7 or 8 nt changes) within stem 2 of the subdomain IIIf of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that directs the initiation of protein synthesis. Rescued viruses were inoculated into pigs. The rescued vPader10 virus, without modifications in the IRES, induced clinical disease in pigs that was very similar to that observed previously with the parental field strain and transmission to in-contact pigs occurred. Two sequence reversions, in the NS2 and NS5B coding regions, became dominant within the virus populations in these infected pigs. Rescued viruses, with mutant IRES elements, did not induce disease and only very limited circulation of viral RNA could be detected. However, the animals inoculated with these mutant viruses seroconverted against CSFV. Thus, these mutant viruses were highly attenuated in vivo. All 4 rescued viruses were also passaged up to 20 times in cell culture. Using full genome sequencing, the same two adaptations within each of four independent virus populations were observed that restored the coding sequence to that of the parental field strain. These adaptations occurred with different kinetics. The combination of reverse genetics and in depth, full genome sequencing provides a powerful approach to analyse virus adaptation and to identify key determinants of viral replication efficiency in cells and within host animals. PMID:27527774

  3. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  4. Nuclear reactor melt arrest and coolability device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, Theo G.; Dinh, Nam Truc; Wachowiak, Richard M.

    2016-06-14

    Example embodiments provide a Basemat-Internal Melt Arrest and Coolability device (BiMAC) that offers improved spatial and mechanical characteristics for use in damage prevention and risk mitigation in accident scenarios. Example embodiments may include a BiMAC having an inclination of less than 10-degrees from the basemat floor and/or coolant channels of less than 4 inches in diameter, while maintaining minimum safety margins required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  5. Mind your errors: evidence for a neural mechanism linking growth mind-set to adaptive posterror adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Jason S; Schroder, Hans S; Heeter, Carrie; Moran, Tim P; Lee, Yu-Hao

    2011-12-01

    How well people bounce back from mistakes depends on their beliefs about learning and intelligence. For individuals with a growth mind-set, who believe intelligence develops through effort, mistakes are seen as opportunities to learn and improve. For individuals with a fixed mind-set, who believe intelligence is a stable characteristic, mistakes indicate lack of ability. We examined performance-monitoring event-related potentials (ERPs) to probe the neural mechanisms underlying these different reactions to mistakes. Findings revealed that a growth mind-set was associated with enhancement of the error positivity component (Pe), which reflects awareness of and allocation of attention to mistakes. More growth-minded individuals also showed superior accuracy after mistakes compared with individuals endorsing a more fixed mind-set. It is critical to note that Pe amplitude mediated the relationship between mind-set and posterror accuracy. These results suggest that neural mechanisms indexing on-line awareness of and attention to mistakes are intimately involved in growth-minded individuals' ability to rebound from mistakes.

  6. Adaptation of the CROPGRO growth model to velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens) : II Cultivar evaluation and model testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartkamp, A.D.; Hoogenboom, G.; Gilbert, R.; Benson, T.; Tarawali, S.A.; Gijsman, A.; Bowen, W.; White, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    Velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens (L.) DC. cv.-group utilis) is widely promoted in tropical and sub-tropical regions as a green manure cover crop that can reduce weed growth and soil erosion and enhance soil fertility. To provide these benefits, the crop must attain rapid ground cover and develop substan

  7. Aerodynamically generated noise by lightning arrester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Váchová J.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the general solution of aerodynamically generated noise by lightning arrester. Governing equations are presented in form of Lighthill acoustic analogy, as embodied in the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H equation. This equation is based on conservation laws of fluid mechanics rather than on the wave equation. Thus, the FW-H equation is valid even if the integration surface is in nonlinear region. That’s why the FWH method is superior in aeroacoustics. The FW-H method is implemented in program Fluent and the numerical solution is acquired by Fluent code.The general solution of acoustic signal generated by lightning arrester is shown and the results in form of acoustic pressure and frequency spectrum are presented. The verification of accuracy was made by evaluation of Strouhal number. A comparison of Strouhal number for circumfluence of a cylinder and the lightning arrester was done, because the experimental data for cylinder case are known and these solids are supposed to be respectively in shape relation.

  8. Temperature-dependent growth and emergence of functional leaves: an adaptive mechanism in the seedlings of the western Himalayan plant Podophyllum hexandrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Pandey, Subedar; Chanda, Sanjoy; Bhattacharya, Amita; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh

    2008-05-01

    As an adaptive mechanism, hypocotyl dormancy delays emergence of functional leaf until favorable season of growth in Podophyllum hexandrum, an endangered medicinal plant of the western Himalayas. However, upon exposure of the freshly germinated seedlings to favorable temperature (25 degrees C), functional leaves emerged within 20 days. Therefore, we examined regulation mechanisms of growth and development of this alpine plant by temperature under laboratory conditions. The seedlings were exposed to (1) 25 degrees C (temperature prevailing at the time of maximum vegetative growth), (2) 4 degrees C (mean temperature at the onset of winter in its natural habitat), and (3) 10 degrees C (an intermediate temperature). Slackened growth at 4 degrees C was followed by senescence of aerial parts and quiescence of roots and predetermined leaf primordia. Rapid development of leaf primordia at 25 degrees C was associated with increased starch hydrolysis. This was evident from higher alpha-amylase activity and reducing sugars. These parameters decreased on sudden exposure to 4 degrees C. In contrast, the roots (perennating organs) showed a slight increase (1.36-fold) in alpha-amylase activity. Growth and development in seedlings growing at 10 degrees C (temperature less adverse than 4 degrees C) were comparatively faster. The content of reducing sugars and alpha-amylase activity were also higher in all the seedling parts at 10 degrees C as compared to 4 degrees C. This indicated larger requirements for sugar by the seedlings at 10 degrees C. Irrespective of temperature, maximum changes in nitrate and nitrate reductase occurred during the initial 10 days, i.e., when the readily available form of sugars (reducing sugar) was highest. This indicated that a temperature-dependent availability of carbon, but not temperature itself, was an important regulator of uptake and reduction of nitrogen.

  9. Arrest scenarios in concentrated protein solutions - from hard sphere glasses to arrested spinodal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stradner, Anna; Bucciarelli, Saskia; Casal, Lucia; Foffi, Giuseppe; Thurston, George; Farago, Bela; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2014-03-01

    The occurrence of an arrest transition in concentrated colloid suspensions and its dependence on the interaction potential is a hot topic in soft matter. Such arrest transitions can also occur in concentrated protein solutions, as they exist e.g. in biological cells or are increasingly used in pharmaceutical formulations. Here we demonstrate the applicability of concepts from colloid science to understand the dynamics of concentrated protein solutions. In this presentation we report a combination of 3D light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering and neutron spin echo measurements to study the structural properties as well as the collective and self diffusion of proteins in highly concentrated solutions on the relevant length and time scales. We demonstrate that various arrest scenarios indeed exist for different globular proteins. The proteins chosen are different bovine lens crystallins. We report examples of hard and attractive glass transitions and arrested spinodal decomposition directly linked to the effective pair potentials determined in static scattering experiments for the different proteins. We discuss these different arrest scenarios in view of possible applications of dense protein solutions as well as in view of their possible relevance for living systems.

  10. Hypothermia improves outcome from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, S A

    2005-12-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is common and patients who are initially resuscitated by ambulance officers and transported to hospital are usually admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In the past, the treatment in the ICU consisted of supportive care only, and most patients remained unconscious due to the severe anoxic neurological injury. It was this neurological injury rather than cardiac complications that caused the high rate of morbidity and mortality. However, in the early 1990's, a series of animal experiments demonstrated convincingly that mild hypothermia induced after return of spontaneous circulation and maintained for several hours dramatically reduced the severity of the anoxic neurological injury. In the mid-1990's, preliminary human studies suggested that mild hypothermia could be induced and maintained in post-cardiac arrest patients without an increase in the rate of cardiac or other complications. In the late 1990's, two prospective, randomised, controlled trials were conducted and the results confirmed the animal data that mild hypothermia induced after resuscitation and maintained for 12 - 24 hours dramatically improved neurological and overall outcomes. On the basis of these studies, mild hypothermia was endorsed in 2003 by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation as a recommended treatment for comatose patients with an initial cardiac rhythm of ventricular fibrillation. However, the application of this therapy into routine clinical critical care practice has been slow. The reasons for this are uncertain, but may relate to the relative complexity of the treatment, unfamiliarity with the pathophysiology of hypothermia, lack of clear protocols and/or uncertainty of benefit in particular patients. Therefore, recent research in this area has focused on the development of feasible, inexpensive techniques for the early, rapid induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Currently, the most promising strategy is a rapid

  11. Berberine induces p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cells by inflicting DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zhaojian; Liu Qiao; Xu Bing; Wu Jingjing [Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Guo Chun; Zhu Faliang [Institute of Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Yang Qiaozi [Department of Genetics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Gao Guimin [Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Gong Yaoqin [Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)], E-mail: yxg8@sdu.edu.cn; Shao Changshun [Key Laboratory of Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education and Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Department of Genetics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: shao@biology.rutgers.edu

    2009-03-09

    Alkaloid berberine is widely used for the treatment of diarrhea and other diseases. Many laboratory studies showed that it exhibits anti-proliferative activity against a wide spectrum of cancer cells in culture. In this report we studied the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of berberine on human osteosarcoma cells and on normal osteoblasts. The inhibition was largely attributed to cell cycle arrest at G1 and G2/M, and to a less extent, to apoptosis. The G1 arrest was dependent on p53, as G1 arrest was abolished in p53-deficient osteosarcoma cells. The induction of G1 arrest and apoptosis was accompanied by a p53-dependent up-regulation of p21 and pro-apoptotic genes. However, the G2/M arrest could be induced by berberine regardless of the status of p53. Interestingly, DNA double-strand breaks, as measured by the phosphorylation of H2AX, were remarkably accumulated in berberine-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, one major mechanism by which berberine exerts its growth-inhibitory effect is to inflict genomic lesions on cells, which in turn trigger the activation of p53 and the p53-dependent cellular responses including cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  12. Developing European operational oceanography for Blue Growth, climate change adaptation and mitigation and ecosystem-based management

    OpenAIRE

    She, J; Allen, I.; Buch, E.; A. Crise; J. A. Johannessen; Traon, P. Y.; Lips, U.; Nolan, G.; Pinardi, N.; Reißmann, J. H.; J. Siddorn; Stanev, E.; H. Wehde

    2016-01-01

    “Operational Approaches” have been more and more widely developed and used for providing marine data and information service for different socio-economic sectors of the Blue Growth and to advance knowledge about the marine environment. The objective of operational oceanographic research is to develop and improve the efficiency, timeliness, robustness and product quality of this approach. This white paper aims to address key scientific challenges and research priorities for the ...

  13. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Adaptation of Listeria monocytogenes to Growth on Vacuum-Packed Cold Smoked Salmon

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Silin; Orsi, Renato H; den Bakker, Henk C.; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J.; Bergholz, Teresa M.

    2015-01-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is able to survive and grow in ready-to-eat foods, in which it is likely to experience a number of environmental stresses due to refrigerated storage and the physicochemical properties of the food. Little is known about the specific molecular mechanisms underlying survival and growth of L. monocytogenes under different complex conditions on/in specific food matrices. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) was used to understand the transcriptional lan...

  14. Interindividual Variation in Functionally Adapted Trait Sets Is Established During Postnatal Growth and Predictable Based on Bone Robustness

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Nirnimesh; Bhola, Siddharth; Goldstone, Andrew; Chen, Fred; Chrzanowski, Jessica; Terranova, Carl J.; Ghillani, Richard; Jepsen, Karl J.

    2009-01-01

    Adults acquire unique sets of morphological and tissue-quality bone traits that are predictable based on robustness and deterministic of strength and fragility. How and when individual trait sets arise during growth has not been established. Longitudinal structural changes of the metacarpal diaphysis were measured for boys and girls from 3 mo to 8 yr of age using hand radiographs obtained from the Bolton-Brush collection. Robustness varied ∼2-fold among boys and girls, and individual values w...

  15. Adaptation of Trichoderma Species to Pesticide Confidor and Evaluation of their Growth Ability in the Media Containing Confidor

    OpenAIRE

    Farnaz Ershadfath; Hossein Banejad; Fariba Mohsenzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Contamination caused by pesticides is considered as one of the environmental problems. Bioremediation is exploiting the ability of microorganisms to remove pollutants. Trichoderma species are free-living fungi that exist naturally in the environment. These fungi have the ability to uptake some contaminants biologically. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Confidor, as an environmental contaminant, on the growth ability of Trichoderma sp. as a contaminant absorber....

  16. Adaptability comparison of E. fetida in vermicomposting against sludge from livestock wastewater treatment plant based on their several growth stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaoxia; Hu, Hongwen; Li, Xuewei; Jiang, Dongmei; Zhu, Li; Bai, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Vermicomposting is a low-cost, eco-efficient process to deal with organic wastes. Mixtures of swine manure (SM), cow dung (CD), and animal wastewater treatment plant sludge (S) were applied as feeds, and Eisenia fetida was employed in this study to investigate the vermicomposting efficiency based on their several growth stages. The hatching test resulted in a 100 % hatching rate in S60SM40 (60 % S + 40 % SM) mixture, while 4.40 hatchlings per cocoon were observed. The growth of infancy performed best in 0-20 % CD mixtures (0.05 ± 0.002 g), followed by in SM + CD (0.04 ± 0.003 g). The highest growth rate of young and adult E. fetida was noticed in CD + S mixtures (11.14 ± 0.01 and 6.00 ± 0.02 mg/d/worm, respectively), while the higher cocoon production of adults was noticed in S + SM mixtures especially in S40SM60 (537 ± 5 worms). Moreover, the conversion of solids; the modified pH value; the reduction in total organic carbon (TOC); total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), NH4-N, NO3-N, and C:N ratio; and the rich in total available phosphorus (TAP) and total potassium (TK) content by young and adult E. fetida were related to the growth of worms. Such work would benefit understanding and to increase the efficiency of vermicompost processing of different wastes. PMID:27117153

  17. Adaptability comparison of E. fetida in vermicomposting against sludge from livestock wastewater treatment plant based on their several growth stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaoxia; Hu, Hongwen; Li, Xuewei; Jiang, Dongmei; Zhu, Li; Bai, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Vermicomposting is a low-cost, eco-efficient process to deal with organic wastes. Mixtures of swine manure (SM), cow dung (CD), and animal wastewater treatment plant sludge (S) were applied as feeds, and Eisenia fetida was employed in this study to investigate the vermicomposting efficiency based on their several growth stages. The hatching test resulted in a 100 % hatching rate in S60SM40 (60 % S + 40 % SM) mixture, while 4.40 hatchlings per cocoon were observed. The growth of infancy performed best in 0-20 % CD mixtures (0.05 ± 0.002 g), followed by in SM + CD (0.04 ± 0.003 g). The highest growth rate of young and adult E. fetida was noticed in CD + S mixtures (11.14 ± 0.01 and 6.00 ± 0.02 mg/d/worm, respectively), while the higher cocoon production of adults was noticed in S + SM mixtures especially in S40SM60 (537 ± 5 worms). Moreover, the conversion of solids; the modified pH value; the reduction in total organic carbon (TOC); total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), NH4-N, NO3-N, and C:N ratio; and the rich in total available phosphorus (TAP) and total potassium (TK) content by young and adult E. fetida were related to the growth of worms. Such work would benefit understanding and to increase the efficiency of vermicompost processing of different wastes.

  18. Verification at the protein level of the PIF4-mediated external coincidence model for the temperature-adaptive photoperiodic control of plant growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashino, Takafumi; Nomoto, Yuji; Lorrain, Séverine; Miyachi, Miki; Ito, Shogo; Nakamichi, Norihito; Fankhauser, Christian; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2013-03-01

    Plant circadian clock controls a wide variety of physiological and developmental events, which include the short-days (SDs)-specific promotion of the elongation of hypocotyls during de-etiolation and also the elongation of petioles during vegetative growth. In A. thaliana, the PIF4 gene encoding a phytochrome-interacting basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor plays crucial roles in this photoperiodic control of plant growth. According to the proposed external coincidence model, the PIF4 gene is transcribed precociously at the end of night specifically in SDs, under which conditions the protein product is stably accumulated, while PIF4 is expressed exclusively during the daytime in long days (LDs), under which conditions the protein product is degraded by the light-activated phyB and also the residual proteins are inactivated by the DELLA family of proteins. A number of previous reports provided solid evidence to support this coincidence model mainly at the transcriptional level of the PIF 4 and PIF4-traget genes. Nevertheless, the diurnal oscillation profiles of PIF4 proteins, which were postulated to be dependent on photoperiod and ambient temperature, have not yet been demonstrated. Here we present such crucial evidence on PIF4 protein level to further support the external coincidence model underlying the temperature-adaptive photoperiodic control of plant growth in A. thaliana.

  19. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Adaptation of Listeria monocytogenes to Growth on Vacuum-Packed Cold Smoked Salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Silin; Orsi, Renato H; den Bakker, Henk C; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J; Bergholz, Teresa M

    2015-10-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is able to survive and grow in ready-to-eat foods, in which it is likely to experience a number of environmental stresses due to refrigerated storage and the physicochemical properties of the food. Little is known about the specific molecular mechanisms underlying survival and growth of L. monocytogenes under different complex conditions on/in specific food matrices. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) was used to understand the transcriptional landscape of L. monocytogenes strain H7858 grown on cold smoked salmon (CSS; water phase salt, 4.65%; pH 6.1) relative to that in modified brain heart infusion broth (MBHIB; water phase salt, 4.65%; pH 6.1) at 7°C. Significant differential transcription of 149 genes was observed (false-discovery rate [FDR], monocytogenes were not significantly different between CSS and MBHIB, indicating that the transcriptomic differences reflect how L. monocytogenes is able to facilitate growth under these different conditions. Differential expression analysis and Gene Ontology enrichment analysis indicated that genes encoding proteins involved in cobalamin biosynthesis as well as ethanolamine and 1,2-propanediol utilization have significantly higher transcript levels in H7858 grown on CSS than in that grown in MBHIB. Our data identify specific transcriptional profiles of L. monocytogenes growing on vacuum-packaged CSS, which may provide targets for the development of novel and improved strategies to control L. monocytogenes growth on this ready-to-eat food. PMID:26209664

  20. Adaptation of seedling growth to the altitude: a case of the Norway spruce from the polish Sudety mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robakowski, Piotr

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Seedlings of five Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.] populations originating from different altitudes in the massif of Snieznik Klodzki in the Sudety Mountains (Poland were grown in the greenhouse. Height, root length, and weight of root, shoot, needles and bud, as well as biomass allocation were studied. A good correlation of seedling traits and the altitude of mother stands was found. This indicates a rather good ecological adaptation of these, probably introduced populations. Some ecological and silvicultural aspects of the results are discussed.

    [fr] Les plantes de cinq populations de l'épicéa commun [Picea abies (L. Karst.] provenant des différentes altitudes du massif de Snieznik Klodzki dans les Sudètes (une chaîne des montagnes en Pologne ont été cultivées dans la serre. Leurs paramètres suivants ont été analysés: la hauteur, la longueur des racines, le poids frais et le poids sec des racines, des tiges, des aiguilles, des bourgeons et l'allocation de la biomasse. La haute corrélation a été notée entre les paramètres des plantes et l'altitude des stations des arbres ayant été les semenciers des graines. Ce résultat montre une plutôt bonne adaptation écologique de ces populations, probablement introduites dans le massif de Snieznik Klodzki. Les aspects écologiques et les conséquences de l'adaptation de l'épicéa commun aux conditions montagneuses pour la sylviculture sont discutés.
    [es] Plántulas de cinco poblaciones de abeto rojo [Picea abies (L. Karst.] procedentes de diferente altitud en el macizo de Snieznik Klodzki, en los Montes Sudetes, (Polonia se cultivaron en invernadero. Se han analizado los parámetros siguientes: altura y longitud de las raíces, pesos fresco y seco de raíces, tallos, hojas y yemas, así como la distribución de la biomasa. Como resultado se obtuvo una correlación alta entre los parámetros de las plántidas y la altitud de las estaciones donde se colectaron las

  1. Sequence adaptations during growth of rescued classical swine fever viruses in cell culture and within infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadsbjerg, Johanne; Friis, Martin Barfred; Fahnøe, Ulrik;

    2016-01-01

    of the subdomain IIIf of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that directs the initiation of protein synthesis. Rescued viruses were inoculated into pigs. The rescued vPader10 virus, without modifications in the IRES, induced clinical disease in pigs that was very similar to that observed previously...... RNA could be detected. However, the animals inoculated with these mutant viruses seroconverted against CSFV. Thus, these mutant viruses were highly attenuated in vivo. All 4 rescued viruses were also passaged up to 20 times in cell culture. Using full genome sequencing, the same two adaptations within......Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes an economically important disease of swine. Four different viruses were rescued from full-length cloned cDNAs derived from the Paderborn strain of CSFV. Three of these viruses had been modified by mutagenesis (with 7 or 8 nt changes) within stem 2...

  2. Apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human and murine tumor cells are initiated by isoprenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, H; Elson, C E

    1999-04-01

    Diverse classes of phytochemicals initiate biological responses that effectively lower cancer risk. One class of phytochemicals, broadly defined as pure and mixed isoprenoids, encompasses an estimated 22,000 individual components. A representative mixed isoprenoid, gamma-tocotrienol, suppresses the growth of murine B16(F10) melanoma cells, and with greater potency, the growth of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human leukemic (HL-60) cells. beta-Ionone, a pure isoprenoid, suppresses the growth of B16 cells and with greater potency, the growth of MCF-7, HL-60 and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Results obtained with diverse cell lines differing in ras and p53 status showed that the isoprenoid-mediated suppression of growth is independent of mutated ras and p53 functions. beta-Ionone suppressed the growth of human colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) but only when present at three-fold the concentration required to suppress the growth of Caco-2 cells. The isoprenoids initiated apoptosis and, concomitantly arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Both suppress 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase activity. beta-Ionone and lovastatin interfered with the posttranslational processing of lamin B, an activity essential to assembly of daughter nuclei. This interference, we postulate, renders neosynthesized DNA available to the endonuclease activities leading to apoptotic cell death. Lovastatin-imposed mevalonate starvation suppressed the glycosylation and translocation of growth factor receptors to the cell surface. As a consequence, cells were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This rationale may apply to the isoprenoid-mediated G1-phase arrest of tumor cells. The additive and potentially synergistic actions of these isoprenoids in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis coupled with the mass action of the diverse isoprenoid constituents of plant products may explain, in part, the impact of fruit, vegetable

  3. Sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation attributed to anabolic steroid use in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenfeld, Jana; Deal, Barbara J; Crawford, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone that promote the growth of skeletal muscles and have many recognised cardiovascular effects. We report the clinical presentation and pathological findings of an adolescent male whose sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation was attributed to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The age of our patient reflects the usage of anabolic androgenic steroids among younger athletes and highlights the need for increased awareness among practitioners.

  4. Sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation attributed to anabolic steroid use in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenfeld, Jana; Deal, Barbara J; Crawford, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are synthetic derivatives of testosterone that promote the growth of skeletal muscles and have many recognised cardiovascular effects. We report the clinical presentation and pathological findings of an adolescent male whose sudden cardiac arrest following ventricular fibrillation was attributed to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The age of our patient reflects the usage of anabolic androgenic steroids among younger athletes and highlights the need for increased awareness among practitioners. PMID:26980272

  5. Genetic changes during a laboratory adaptive evolution process that allowed fast growth in glucose to an Escherichia coli strain lacking the major glucose transport system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar César

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli strains lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS, which is the major bacterial component involved in glucose transport and its phosphorylation, accumulate high amounts of phosphoenolpyruvate that can be diverted to the synthesis of commercially relevant products. However, these strains grow slowly in glucose as sole carbon source due to its inefficient transport and metabolism. Strain PB12, with 400% increased growth rate, was isolated after a 120 hours adaptive laboratory evolution process for the selection of faster growing derivatives in glucose. Analysis of the genetic changes that occurred in the PB12 strain that lacks PTS will allow a better understanding of the basis of its growth adaptation and, therefore, in the design of improved metabolic engineering strategies for enhancing carbon diversion into the aromatic pathways. Results Whole genome analyses using two different sequencing methodologies: the Roche NimbleGen Inc. comparative genome sequencing technique, and high throughput sequencing with Illumina Inc. GAIIx, allowed the identification of the genetic changes that occurred in the PB12 strain. Both methods detected 23 non-synonymous and 22 synonymous point mutations. Several non-synonymous mutations mapped in regulatory genes (arcB, barA, rpoD, rna and in other putative regulatory loci (yjjU, rssA and ypdA. In addition, a chromosomal deletion of 10,328 bp was detected that removed 12 genes, among them, the rppH, mutH and galR genes. Characterization of some of these mutated and deleted genes with their functions and possible functions, are presented. Conclusions The deletion of the contiguous rppH, mutH and galR genes that occurred simultaneously, is apparently the main reason for the faster growth of the evolved PB12 strain. In support of this interpretation is the fact that inactivation of the rppH gene in the parental PB11 strain substantially increased

  6. Feedback (F) Fueling Adaptation (A) Network Growth (N) and Self-Organization (S): A Complex Systems Design and Evaluation Approach to Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Susan A.; Klopfer, Eric

    2006-12-01

    This paper reports on the efficacy of a professional development framework premised on four complex systems design principles: Feedback, Adaptation, Network Growth and Self-organization (FANS). The framework is applied to the design and delivery of the first 2 years of a 3-year study aimed at improving teacher and student understanding of computational modeling tools. We demonstrate that structuring a professional development program around the FANS framework facilitates the development of important strategies and processes for program organizers such as the identification of salient system variables, effectively distributing expertise, adaptation and improvement of professional development resources and activities and building technological, human and social capital. For participants, there is evidence to show that the FANS framework encourages: professional goal setting, engagement in a strong professional community and personal autonomy by enabling individualized purpose—all fundamental components in promoting self-organization. We discuss three meta-level themes that may account for the success of the FANS framework: structure versus agency, exploration versus exploitation and short-term versus long-term goals. Each illustrates the tension that exists between competing variables that need to be considered in order to work effectively in real world complex educational systems.

  7. Global arrest of translation during invertebrate quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, G E; Hand, S C

    1994-08-30

    Comparing the translational capacities of cell-free systems from aerobically developing embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana vs. quiescent embryos has revealed a global arrest of protein synthesis. Incorporation rates of [3H]leucine by lysates from 4-h anoxic embryos were 8% of those from aerobic (control) embryos, when assayed at the respective pH values measured for each treatment in vivo. Exposure of embryos to 4 h of aerobic acidosis (elevated CO2 in the presence of oxygen) suppressed protein synthesis to 3% of control values. These latter two experimental treatments promote developmental arrest of Artemia embryos and, concomitantly, cause acute declines in intracellular pH. When lysates from each treatment were assayed over a range of physiologically relevant pH values (pH 6.4-8.0), amino acid incorporation rates in lysates from quiescent embryos were consistently lower than values for the aerobic controls. Acute reversal of pH to alkaline values during the 6-min assays was not sufficient to return the incorporation rates of quiescent lysates to control values. Thus, a stable alteration in translational capacity of quiescent lysates is indicated. Addition of exogenous mRNA did not rescue the suppressed protein synthesis in quiescent lysates, which suggests that the acute blockage of amino acid incorporation is apparently not due to limitation in message. Thus, the results support a role for intracellular pH as an initial signaling event in translational control during quiescence yet, at the same time, indicate that a direct proton effect on the translational machinery is not the sole proximal agent for biosynthetic arrest in this primitive crustacean. PMID:8078909

  8. Hydroxylated PBDEs induce developmental arrest in zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usenko, Crystal Y., E-mail: Crystal_usenko@baylor.edu; Hopkins, David C.; Trumble, Stephen J., E-mail: Stephen_trumble@baylor.edu; Bruce, Erica D., E-mail: Erica_bruce@baylor.edu

    2012-07-01

    The ubiquitous spread of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) has led to concerns regarding the metabolites of these congeners, in particular hydroxylated PBDEs. There are limited studies regarding the biological interactions of these chemicals, yet there is some concern they may be more toxic than their parent compounds. In this study three hydroxylated PBDEs were assessed for toxicity in embryonic zebrafish: 3-OH-BDE 47, 5-OH-BDE 47, and 6-OH-BDE 47. All three congeners induced developmental arrest in a concentration-dependent manner; however, 6-OH-BDE 47 induced adverse effects at lower concentrations than the other congeners. Furthermore, all three induced cell death; however apoptosis was not observed. In short-term exposures (24–28 hours post fertilization), all hydroxylated PBDEs generated oxidative stress in the region corresponding to the cell death at 5 and 10 ppm. To further investigate the short-term effects that may be responsible for the developmental arrest observed in this study, gene regulation was assessed for embryos exposed to 0.625 ppm 6-OH-BDE 47 from 24 to 28 hpf. Genes involved in stress response, thyroid hormone regulation, and neurodevelopment were significantly upregulated compared to controls; however, genes related to oxidative stress were either unaffected or downregulated. This study suggests that hydroxylated PBDEs disrupt development, and may induce oxidative stress and potentially disrupt the cholinergic system and thyroid hormone homeostasis. -- Highlights: ► OH-PBDEs induce developmental arrest in a concentration-dependent manner. ► Hydroxyl group location influences biological interaction. ► OH-PBDEs induce oxidative stress. ► Thyroid hormone gene regulation was disrupted following exposure. ► To our knowledge, this is the first whole organism study of OH-PBDE toxicity.

  9. Possible role of growth regulators in adaptation to heat stress affecting partitioning of photosynthates in tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Starck

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tomato plants of two cultivars: Roma - sensitive and Robin - tolerant to heat stress were grown in greenhouse up to the flowering stage and then under controlled environmen­tal conditions. The partitioning of recently fixed 14CO2 by mature tomato leaves was examined as a posteffect of 24-h heat stress (38/25°C day/night with the interaction of growth regulators (GR sprayed on the flowers with solution of β-naphthoxyacetic (NOA and gibberellic (GA3 acid (denoted as NG, or Zeatin + NOA + GA3 (denoted as ZNG. In both cuitivars GR strongly stimulated fruit growth and transport of 14C-photosynthates to the clusters at the expense of vegetative organs. Heat stress decreased export of 14C-phoiosynthates from the blades in plants not treated with GR, but even more in cv. Roma. In Roma plants not treated with GR (with very small fruitlets and fruits the heat stress retarded 14C-transport just in the petioles, diminishing the 14C-supply to the fruits. Reduction of the current photosynthate supplied to the fruits seems to be causally connected with inhibition of the specific activity of acid invertase in that organ. Growth regulators reduced the negative effect of high temperature - they alleviated depression of 14C-export from the blades and increased invertase activity. 14C-photosynthate transport to the fruits, presumably owing to their higher sink strength, was less affected by heat stress. In Robin plants (which had bigger fruits during the experiment high temperature depressed 14C-fruit supply only in the NG-series, in contrast to enhacement of 14C-Movement to that sink in the control and ZNG-series. In spite of these facts, after heat stress, the specific activity of acid invertase decreased in all the experimental series, but much less in the GR-treated series. Therefore, in the Robin cv. there was no relation between invertase activity and 14C-mobilization by fruits, as was observed in Roma plants. The possible explanation of the different

  10. Abulia following an episode of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Vismay Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    The word 'abulia' means a lack of will, initiative or drive. The symptoms of abulia include lack of spontaneous action and speech, reduced emotional responsiveness and social interaction, poor attention and easy distractibility. These symptoms are independent of reduced levels of consciousness or cognitive impairment. We describe a case of a socially active 72-year-old female patient who presented with symptoms of abulia which may have occurred due to damage of the frontosubcortical circuits following an episode of cardiac arrest. The patient's symptoms improved dramatically following treatment with bromocriptine. PMID:26135487

  11. Global arrest of translation during invertebrate quiescence.

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, G E; Hand, S C

    1994-01-01

    Comparing the translational capacities of cell-free systems from aerobically developing embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana vs. quiescent embryos has revealed a global arrest of protein synthesis. Incorporation rates of [3H]leucine by lysates from 4-h anoxic embryos were 8% of those from aerobic (control) embryos, when assayed at the respective pH values measured for each treatment in vivo. Exposure of embryos to 4 h of aerobic acidosis (elevated CO2 in the presence of oxygen) sup...

  12. A case of thyroid storm with cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakashima Y

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Yutaka Nakashima,1 Tsuneaki Kenzaka,2 Masanobu Okayama,3 Eiji Kajii31Department for Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, 2Division of General Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, Japan; 3Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, JapanAbstract: A 23-year-old man became unconscious while jogging. He immediately received basic life support from a bystander and was transported to our hospital. On arrival, his spontaneous circulation had returned from a state of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity. Following admission, hyperthyroidism led to a suspicion of thyroid storm, which was then diagnosed as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest. Although hyperthyroidism-induced cardiac arrest including ventricular fibrillation is rare, it should be considered when diagnosing the cause of treatable cardiac arrest.Keywords: hyperthyroidism, ventricular fibrillation, treatable cardiac arrest, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary arrest

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Alters Growth Activity, Autolysis, and Antibiotic Tolerance in a Human Host-Adapted Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lineage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Christensen, Anne-Mette; Bojer, Martin Saxtorph;

    2014-01-01

    Interactions among members of polymicrobial infections or between pathogens and the commensal flora may determine disease outcomes. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are important opportunistic human pathogens and are both part of the polymicrobial infection communities in human....... aeruginosa DK2 strains outcompeted S. aureus during coculture on agar plates, we found that later P. aeruginosa DK2 strains showed a commensal-like interaction, where S. aureus was not inhibited by P. aeruginosa and the growth activity of P. aeruginosa was enhanced in the presence of S. aureus. This effect...... is mediated by one or more extracellular S. aureus proteins greater than 10 kDa, which also suppressed P. aeruginosa autolysis and prevented killing by clinically relevant antibiotics through promoting small-colony variant (SCV) formation. The commensal interaction was abolished with S. aureus strains mutated...

  14. Developing European operational oceanography for Blue Growth, climate change adaptation and mitigation, and ecosystem-based management

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Jun; Allen, Icarus; Buch, Erik; Crise, Alessandro; Johannessen, Johnny A.; Le Traon, Pierre-Yves; Lips, Urmas; Nolan, Glenn; Pinardi, Nadia; Reißmann, Jan H.; Siddorn, John; Stanev, Emil; Wehde, Henning

    2016-07-01

    Operational approaches have been more and more widely developed and used for providing marine data and information services for different socio-economic sectors of the Blue Growth and to advance knowledge about the marine environment. The objective of operational oceanographic research is to develop and improve the efficiency, timeliness, robustness and product quality of this approach. This white paper aims to address key scientific challenges and research priorities for the development of operational oceanography in Europe for the next 5-10 years. Knowledge gaps and deficiencies are identified in relation to common scientific challenges in four EuroGOOS knowledge areas: European Ocean Observations, Modelling and Forecasting Technology, Coastal Operational Oceanography and Operational Ecology. The areas "European Ocean Observations" and "Modelling and Forecasting Technology" focus on the further advancement of the basic instruments and capacities for European operational oceanography, while "Coastal Operational Oceanography" and "Operational Ecology" aim at developing new operational approaches for the corresponding knowledge areas.

  15. Bile acids are "homeotrophic" sensors of the functional hepatic capacity and regulate adaptive growth during liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Andreas; Trautwein, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Liver mass depends on one or more unidentified humoral signals that drive regeneration when liver functional capacity is diminished. Bile acids are important liver products, and their levels are tightly regulated. Here, we identify a role for nuclear receptor-dependent bile acid signaling in normal liver regeneration. Elevated bile acid levels accelerate regeneration, and decreased levels inhibit liver regrowth, as does the absence of the primary nuclear bile acid receptor FXR. We propose that FXR activation by increased bile acid flux is a signal of decreased functional capacity of the liver. FXR, and possibly other nuclear receptors, may promote homeostasis not only by regulating expression of appropriate metabolic target genes but also by driving homeotrophic liver growth.

  16. Identification and modulation of a growth hormone-binding protein in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) plasma during seawater adaptation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sohm, F.; Manfroid, Isabelle; Pezet, A.; Rentier-Delrue, Françoise; Rand-Weaver, M; Kelly, P A; Boeuf, G.; Postel-Vinay, M C; de Luze, A; Edery, M.

    1998-01-01

    A soluble protein that specifically bound 125I-human growth hormone (hGH) was identified in rainbow trout plasma, using HPLC-gel filtration. The binding affinity of the protein for hGH was 1.2 x 10(9)M-1. 125I-rainbow trout GH (tGH) was also able to bind to the protein albeit with a lower affinity (6.6 x 10(7)M-1) than hGH. Crosslinking experiments using 125I-hGH revealed two specific bands of 150 and 130 kDa. The complex 125I-hGH-BP could be precipitated by a monoclonal anti-GH receptor anti...

  17. Electrothermal model for complete metal-oxide surge arresters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, E. Guedes da; Naidu, S.R. [UFPB, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Lima, A. Guedes de [CEFET-PB, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2001-01-01

    A computational, electrothermal model for a complete metal-oxide surge arrester based on the implicit form of the finite-differences method is presented. The model is used to calculate the cooling curve after the application of overvoltages and the temperature variations during standard test. The model has been checked against experiments carried out on a test section and a complete surge arrester and the behaviour of a hypothetical surge arrester during standard tests simulated. (Author)

  18. Effect of tropically adapted sire breeds on preweaning growth of F1 Angus calves and reproductive performance of their Angus dams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, C C; Hammond, A C; Olson, T A

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of tropically adapted sire breeds on preweaning growth performance of F1 calves and on reproductive performance of their Angus dams. Angus (A) cows were bred in two consecutive years (1992 and 1993) by AI using semen from Brahman (B; Bos indicus; n = 10), Senepol (S; Bos taurus; n = 10), and Tuli (T; Sanga; n = 9) bulls. A total of 82 B x A, 85 S x A, and 91 T x A calves were born. The statistical model included the fixed effects of year, sire breed, calf sex, sire breed x calf sex, and cow parity and the random effect of sire within sire breed. Birth weight, weaning weight, 205-d adjusted weaning weight, ADG from birth to weaning, and hip height at weaning were greater (P .10) length of gestation, and sire breed did not affect the interval from calving to first observed estrus or pregnancy in Angus dams. These results demonstrate that preweaning growth performance of B x A calves was greater than that of either S x A or T x A calves. However, use of Brahman sires on Angus dams led to calving problems and tended to reduce the percentage of calves that survived until weaning. Thus, heavier weaning weights of B x A calves would be an advantage for cow-calf producers marketing calves, but heavier birth weights and calving difficulty attributed to Brahman sires would be a disadvantage. PMID:10834561

  19. Differentiated dynamics of bud dormancy and growth in temperate fruit trees relating to bud phenology adaptation, the case of apple and almond trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Yaacoubi, Adnane; Malagi, Gustavo; Oukabli, Ahmed; Citadin, Idemir; Hafidi, Majida; Bonhomme, Marc; Legave, Jean-Michel

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have focused on the characterization of bud dormancy and growth dynamics for temperate fruit species in temperate and mild cropping areas, although this is an appropriate framework to anticipate phenology adaptation facing future warming contexts which would potentially combine chill declines and heat increases. To examine this issue, two experimental approaches and field observations were used for high- and low-chill apple cultivars in temperate climate of southern France and in mild climates of northern Morocco and southern Brazil. Low-chill almond cultivars offered an additional relevant plant material for comparison with apple in northern Morocco. Divergent patterns of dormancy and growth dynamics were clearly found in apple tree between southern France and southern Brazil. Divergences were less pronounced between France and Morocco. A global view outlined main differences in the dormancy chronology and intensity, the transition between endordormancy and ecodormancy and the duration of ecodormancy. A key role of bud rehydration in the transition period was shown. High-chill cultivars would be submitted in mild conditions to heterogeneous rehydration capacities linked to insufficient chill fulfillment and excessive forcing linked to high temperatures. This would favor bud competitions and consequently excessive flowering durations and weak flowering. Low chilling requirements in apple and almond would conversely confer biological capacities to tolerate superficial dormancy and abrupt transition from endordormancy to ecodormancy without important heterogeneous rehydration states within buds. It may also assume that low-chill cultivars can also tolerate high temperatures during ecodormancy as well as extended flowering durations.

  20. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetty, Chandramu [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Dontula, Ranadheer [Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, 840 South Wood Street, Suite 820-E, Chicago, IL-60612 (United States); Ganji, Purnachandra Nagaraju [Department of Cancer Biology and Pharmacology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Gujrati, Meena [Department of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, One Illini Drive, Peoria, IL-61605 (United States); Lakka, Sajani S., E-mail: slakka@uic.edu [Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago, 840 South Wood Street, Suite 820-E, Chicago, IL-60612 (United States)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  1. Altered Cell Cycle Arrest by Multifunctional Drug-Loaded Enzymatically-Triggered Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Can; Sun, Ying; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiangyu; Gao, Pei; Duan, Yourong

    2016-01-20

    cRGD-targeting matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-sensitive nanoparticles [PLGA-PEG1K-cRGD/PLGA-peptide-PEG5K (NPs-cRGD)] were successfully developed. Au-Pt(IV) nanoparticles, PTX, and ADR were encapsulated into NPs-RGD separately. The effects of the drug-loaded nanoparticles on the cell cycle were investigated. Here, we showed that higher cytotoxicity of drug-loaded nanoparticles was related to the cell cycle arrest, compared to that of free drugs. The NPs-cRGD studied here did not disrupt cell cycle progression. The cell cycle of Au-Pt(IV)@NPs-cRGD showed a main S phase arrest in all phases of the cell cycle phase, especially in G0/G1 phase. PTX@NPs-cRGD and ADR@NPs-cRGD showed a higher ratio of G2/M and S phase arrest than the free drugs, respectively. Cells in G0/G1 and S phases of the cell cycle had a higher uptake ratio of NPs-cRGD. A nutrient deprivation or an increase in the requirement of nutrients in tumor cells could promote the uptake of nanoparticles from the microenvironments. In vivo, NPs-cRGD could efficiently accumulate at tumor sites. The inhibition of tumor growth coupled with cell cycle arrest is in line with that in vitro. On the basis of our results, we propose that future studies on nanoparticle action mechanism should consider the cell cycle, which could be different from free drugs. Understanding the actions of cell cycle arrest could affect the application of nanomedicine in the clinic.

  2. Aspartate Rescues S-phase Arrest Caused by Suppression of Glutamine Utilization in KRas-driven Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Deven; Menon, Deepak; Bernfeld, Elyssa; Mroz, Victoria; Kalan, Sampada; Loayza, Diego; Foster, David A

    2016-04-22

    During G1-phase of the cell cycle, normal cells respond first to growth factors that indicate that it is appropriate to divide and then later in G1 to the presence of nutrients that indicate sufficient raw material to generate two daughter cells. Dividing cells rely on the "conditionally essential" amino acid glutamine (Q) as an anaplerotic carbon source for TCA cycle intermediates and as a nitrogen source for nucleotide biosynthesis. We previously reported that while non-transformed cells arrest in the latter portion of G1 upon Q deprivation, mutant KRas-driven cancer cells bypass the G1 checkpoint, and instead, arrest in S-phase. In this study, we report that the arrest of KRas-driven cancer cells in S-phase upon Q deprivation is due to the lack of deoxynucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. The lack of deoxynucleotides causes replicative stress leading to activation of the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR)-mediated DNA damage pathway, which arrests cells in S-phase. The key metabolite generated from Q utilization was aspartate, which is generated from a transaminase reaction whereby Q-derived glutamate is converted to α-ketoglutarate with the concomitant conversion of oxaloacetate to aspartate. Aspartate is a critical metabolite for both purine and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis. This study identifies the molecular basis for the S-phase arrest caused by Q deprivation in KRas-driven cancer cells that arrest in S-phase in response to Q deprivation. Given that arresting cells in S-phase sensitizes cells to apoptotic insult, this study suggests novel therapeutic approaches to KRas-driven cancers.

  3. Adaptive strategies against drought stress of six plant species with different growth forms from karst habitats of southwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Guo, K.; Liu, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Frequent temporary drought in the rain season, as well as long-term drought in the dry season, is one of the most important factors limiting the survival and growth of plants in the harsh karst habitats of southwestern China. The morphological and physiological responses to drought stress of six native woody plant species were investigated under both temporary and prolonged drought stress. The six plant species included Pyracantha fortuneana (evergreen shrub), Rosa cymosa (deciduous shrub), Cinnamomum bodinieri (evergreen tree), and other three deciduous trees, Broussonetia papyrifera, Platycarya longipes and Pteroceltis tatarinowii. Under severe drought stress, the two shrubs with low leaf area ratio (LAR) maintained higher water status, higher photosynthetic capacity and larger percent biomass increase than the most of the trees, owing to their lower specific leaf area, higher intrinsic water use efficiency and thermal dissipation, and higher capacities of osmotic adjustment and antioxidant protection. The evergreen tree, C. bodinieri, exhibited small decrease of water potential and maintained higher leaf mass ratio (LMR) and LAR than the deciduous species under moderate drought stress, due to the high proline accumulation and high activities of antioxidant enzymes. However, it showed high levels of cellular damages, very low photosynthetic capacity, and sharp decreases of water potential and biomass under severe drought stress. After rewatering, C. bodinieri showed a lower ability to recover from severe drought with the successive repeats of severe drought event. The three deciduous trees developed high root mass ratio for maximizing water uptake, and showed higher LAR and biomass than the two shrubs under well-watered condition. However, drought stress resulted in sharp decreases of biomass in the three deciduous trees, which were attributed to the large drought-induced decreases of LMR, LAR and gas exchange. Under drought conditions, the deciduous trees

  4. Resuscitation, prolonged cardiac arrest, and an automated chest compression device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Martin; Jørgensen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Lars S;

    2010-01-01

    The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest.......The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest....

  5. Thermodynamic coarsening arrested by viscous fingering in partially miscible binary mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-09-01

    We study the evolution of binary mixtures far from equilibrium, and show that the interplay between phase separation and hydrodynamic instability can arrest the Ostwald ripening process characteristic of nonflowing mixtures. We describe a model binary system in a Hele-Shaw cell using a phase-field approach with explicit dependence of both phase fraction and mass concentration. When the viscosity contrast between phases is large (as is the case for gas and liquid phases), an imposed background flow leads to viscous fingering, phase branching, and pinch off. This dynamic flow disorder limits phase growth and arrests thermodynamic coarsening. As a result, the system reaches a regime of statistical steady state in which the binary mixture is permanently driven away from equilibrium.

  6. Prediction of the potential clinical outcomes for post-resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungmin; Kwon, Bojun; Yun, Il Dong; Lee, Sang Uk; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Joonghee

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral injuries after cardiac arrest are serious causes for morbidity. Many previous researches in the medical society have been proposed to prognosticate the functional recoveries of post-resuscitated patients after cardiac arrest, but the validity of suggested features and the automation of prognostication have not been made yet. This paper presents the automatic classification method which predicts the potential clinical outcomes of post-resuscitated patients who suffered from cardiac arrest. The global features and the local features are adapted from the researches from the medical society. The global features, which are consisted of the percentage of the partial volume under the uniformly increasing thresholds, represent the global tendency of apparent diffusion coefficient value in a DWI. The local features are localized and measured on the refined local apparent diffusion coefficient minimal points. The local features represent the ischemic change of small areas in a brain. The features are trained and classified by the random forest method, which have been widely used in the machine learning society for classification. The validity of features is automatically evaluated during the classification process. The proposed method achieved the 0.129 false-positive rate while maintaining the perfect true-positive rate. The area-under-curve of the proposed method was 0.9516, which showed the feasibility and the robustness of the proposed method.

  7. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg Jørgensen, Mads

    challenges, due to the victim’s physical location, which brings an inherent risk of delay (or altogether absence) of recognition and treatment of cardiac arrest. A low frequency of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and low 30-day survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were identified nearly ten......BACK COVER TEXT Cardiac arrest is an emergency medical condition characterized by the cessation of cardiac mechanical activity; without immediate and decisive treatment, a victim’s chances of survival are minimal. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a particular arrest subgroup that poses additional...... years ago in Denmark. These findings led to several national initiatives to strengthen bystander resuscitation attempts and advance care. Despite these nationwide efforts, it was unknown prior to this project whether these efforts resulted in changes in resuscitation attempts by bystanders and changes...

  8. Sublingual Microcirculation is Impaired in Post-cardiac Arrest Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Omar, Yasser; Massey, Michael; Wiuff Andersen, Lars;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: We hypothesized that microcirculatory dysfunction, similar to that seen in sepsis, occurs in post-cardiac arrest patients and that better microcirculatory flow will be associated with improved outcome. We also assessed the association between microcirculatory dysfunction and inflammatory...... markers in the post-cardiac arrest state. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated the sublingual microcirculation in post-cardiac arrest patients, severe sepsis/septic shock patients, and healthy control patients using Sidestream Darkfield microscopy. Microcirculatory flow was assessed using...... the microcirculation flow index (MFI) at 6 and 24h in the cardiac arrest patients, and within 6h of emergency department admission in the sepsis and control patients. RESULTS: We evaluated 30 post-cardiac arrest patients, 16 severe sepsis/septic shock patients, and 9 healthy control patients. Sublingual...

  9. Witnessed arrest, but not delayed bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves prehospital cardiac arrest survivial

    OpenAIRE

    Vukmir, R

    2004-01-01

    Methods: This prospective, randomised, double blinded clinical intervention trial enrolled 874 prehospital cardiopulmonary arrest patients encountered in a prehospital urban, suburban, and rural regional emergency medical service (EMS) area. This group underwent conventional advanced cardiac life support intervention followed by empiric early administration of sodium bicarbonate (1 mEq/l), monitoring conventional resuscitation parameters. Survival was measured as presence of vital signs on em...

  10. Performance of metal oxide gapless surge arresters for HVDC systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diseko, N.L.

    1990-09-01

    An examination of the electrical stresses which may be imposed upon metal oxide surge arresters in a dc converter station is undertaken by means of simulation of the dc system and associated ac systems in the time domain using a digital computer program. Detailed models of a dc link are developed for temporary overvoltage stresses and steep front stresses. The most critical stresses for each type of dc station arrester due to converter faults and converter malfunctions are identified. The energy stresses were generally determined to be dependent on the converter control and protection strategies adopted during the faults. The arrester energy stresses for faults on both the line side and valve side busses of the converter transformer were determined to be sensitive to the instant of fault application and the duration of the fault. The arrester stresses for ac bus faults were analyzed in detail to determine their statistical distribution relative to the point on wave at which the fault occurred in each affected phase, and to the instant of fault clearance in each phase. Generally, the highest stresses occur for sequential fault occurrence in the phases compared with simultaneous faults. The studies indicate that the stresses in the arresters in a dc pile experiencing the worst duty depend on the number of arresters represented. Modelling only one arrester of a series-connected group does not provide correct results when the fault condition imposes duty on more than one of the arresters in the group. The study also indicates that the highest stresses do not necessarily occur in the single arrester connected across the valve with the highest prospective overvoltage. Hence the capability to represent all valve arresters within one pole is necessary when determining the most onerous stresses. 11 refs., 79 figs., 28 tabs.

  11. Expression of Growth Arrest and DNA Damage-Inducible45 a Gene in Different Types of Human Oral Salivary Gland Tumors%生长抑制和DNA损伤基因45 a在人不同组织类型涎腺肿瘤中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭淑荣; 董刚; 李涛; 郑建金; 齐方梅; 徐燕; 卢恕东

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨生长抑制和DNA损伤基因45a (Gadd45a) mRNA在涎腺正常组织及其良、恶性肿瘤组织中的表达情况及其临床病理意义。方法应用逆转录聚合酶链反应( RT-PCR)和实时荧光定量PCR (real-time PCR)方法检测30例正常涎腺组织和涎腺良、恶性肿瘤中Gadd45a mRNA的表达量。结果与瘤旁正常腮腺组织相比, Gadd45a mRNA在恶性肿瘤中的表达量降低; Gadd45a mRNA在多形性腺瘤中的表达量,在基底细胞腺瘤中的表达量亦降低, Gadd45a mRNA在腺淋巴瘤中的表达量未见明显变化。 Gadd45a mRNA在恶性肿瘤中表达较良性肿瘤(多形性腺瘤和基底细胞腺瘤)降低( P <0.05)。结论提示Gadd45a基因可能在涎腺肿瘤的发生发展中具有重要作用, Gadd45a mRNA在恶性涎腺肿瘤中低表达可能诱导了肿瘤细胞的恶性增殖。%Objective To investigate the expression of Growth arrest and DNA damage-induc-ible 45a ( Gadd45a ) mRNA in normal, benign, and malignant tissues of salivary gland and its pathological significance. Methods 30 cases of salivary gland tumors from human and the same number of salivary gland tissues adjacent to the tumors were used in this study. The changes of Gadd45 a mRNA expression level were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction ( RT-PCR) followed by Real-time PCR. Results Compared to adjacent salivary gland tissues, the Gadd45a mRNA expression in malignant tumors were decreased significantly, the Gadd45a mRNA expression in pleomorphic adenoma and basal cell adenoma were decreased too; But the Gadd45 a mRNA expression in warthin tumors were no significant changes. The Gadd45 a mRNA expression were lower in malignant salivary gland tumors than that in benign ( pleomorphic adenoma and basal cell adenoma) salivary gland tumors (P<0. 05). Conclusions Gadd45a mRNA expression level is decreased in salivary gland tumors, which may play an important role in the tumorigenesis of sali

  12. Allometric growth in the extant coelacanth lung during ontogenetic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupello, Camila; Brito, Paulo M; Herbin, Marc; Meunier, François J; Janvier, Philippe; Dutel, Hugo; Clément, Gaël

    2015-09-15

    Coelacanths are lobe-finned fishes known from the Devonian to Recent that were long considered extinct, until the discovery of two living species in deep marine waters of the Mozambique Channel and Sulawesi. Despite extensive studies, the pulmonary system of extant coelacanths has not been fully investigated. Here we confirm the presence of a lung and discuss its allometric growth in Latimeria chalumnae, based on a unique ontogenetic series. Our results demonstrate the presence of a potentially functional, well-developed lung in the earliest known coelacanth embryo, and its arrested growth at later ontogenetic stages, when the lung is clearly vestigial. The parallel development of a fatty organ for buoyancy control suggests a unique adaptation to deep-water environments. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for the presence of small, hard, flexible plates around the lung in L. chalumnae, and consider them homologous to the plates of the 'calcified lung' of fossil coelacanths.

  13. Dealing with moral dilemma raised by adaptive preferences in health technology assessment: the example of growth hormones and bilateral cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébaut, Clémence

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this article is to assess dilemma raised by adaptive preferences in the economic evaluation of growth hormone (GH) treatment for non-GH-deficient short children, and of bilateral cochlear implants for deaf children. Early implementation of both technologies and their irreversible consequences increase the potential conflicts faced by the assessors of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) states (on behalf of patients) who could be interviewed (parents, individuals with an experience of the same disability, or representative samples of the general public). Indeed, assessors' preferences may be influenced by their own situation and they are likely to vary according to age and the experience of disability. Three options are put forward which aim to resolve these moral dilemma and help economists make methodological choices that cannot be avoided in order to carry out this assessment. They are grounded on three specific egalitarian theories of social justice. The main contribution of this article is to show that a dialogue between ethics and economics, prior to an assessment, makes it possible to redefine the choice of effectiveness criteria (subjective well-being, capabilities or social outcomes), the choice of perspective (patients or the able-bodied), as well as the scope of assessment (medical and non-medical care). PMID:24355476

  14. 云杉在保定市区内生长适应性调查研究%Investigation of spruce growth adaptability to Baoding urban district surroundings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯云华; 卢艳; 崔叶红

    2012-01-01

    In order to enrich the Baoding City landscape construction and provide theoretical basis for its landscape design, a long-term investigation on the spruce growth adaptability to the plantation in Baoding urban district park, roads, and courtyard has been conducted. The results show that spruce is growing well in the surroundings in hills, flat land, fertile soil with well aeration and drainage of Baoding City, with beautiful shape and good leafiness, which can be well used for city beautification by urban landscape construction and garden greening.%为了丰富保定市区园林绿化建设、给保定市园林绿化设计提供依据,对市区内公园、道路、庭院等地方栽植的云杉进行了生长适应性调查研究.结果表明,云杉在高坡、平地、土壤肥沃、通透、排水好等的环境条件下,长势好,树形美观,枝叶茂盛,有着较好的园林造景、绿化和美化功能.

  15. High efficiency light harvesting by carotenoids in the LH2 complex from photosynthetic bacteria: unique adaptation to growth under low-light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdaong, Nikki M; LaFountain, Amy M; Greco, Jordan A; Gardiner, Alastair T; Carey, Anne-Marie; Cogdell, Richard J; Gibson, George N; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2014-09-25

    Rhodopin, rhodopinal, and their glucoside derivatives are carotenoids that accumulate in different amounts in the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodoblastus (Rbl.) acidophilus strain 7050, depending on the intensity of the light under which the organism is grown. The different growth conditions also have a profound effect on the spectra of the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) pigments that assemble in the major LH2 light-harvesting pigment-protein complex. Under high-light conditions the well-characterized B800-850 LH2 complex is formed and accumulates rhodopin and rhodopin glucoside as the primary carotenoids. Under low-light conditions, a variant LH2, denoted B800-820, is formed, and rhodopinal and rhodopinal glucoside are the most abundant carotenoids. The present investigation compares and contrasts the spectral properties and dynamics of the excited states of rhodopin and rhodopinal in solution. In addition, the systematic differences in pigment composition and structure of the chromophores in the LH2 complexes provide an opportunity to explore the effect of these factors on the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer. It is found that the enzymatic conversion of rhodopin to rhodopinal by Rbl. acidophilus 7050 grown under low-light conditions results in nearly 100% carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer efficiency in the LH2 complex. This comparative analysis provides insight into how photosynthetic systems are able to adapt and survive under challenging environmental conditions.

  16. A mutation-promotive role of nucleotide excision repair in cell cycle-arrested cell populations following UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Erich; Eisler, Herfried; Lengheimer, Theresia; Dorninger, Petra; Steinboeck, Ferdinand

    2010-01-01

    Growing attention is paid to the concept that mutations arising in stationary, non-proliferating cell populations considerably contribute to evolution, aging, and pathogenesis. If such mutations are beneficial to the affected cell, in the sense of allowing a restart of proliferation, they are called adaptive mutations. In order to identify cellular processes responsible for adaptive mutagenesis in eukaryotes, we study frameshift mutations occurring during auxotrophy-caused cell cycle arrest in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previous work has shown that an exposure of cells to UV irradiation during prolonged cell cycle arrest resulted in an increased incidence of mutations. In the present work, we determined the influence of defects in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway on the incidence of UV-induced adaptive mutations in stationary cells. The mutation frequency was decreased in Rad16-deficient cells and further decreased in Rad16/Rad26 double-deficient cells. A knockout of the RAD14 gene, the ortholog of the human XPA gene, even resulted in a nearly complete abolishment of UV-induced mutagenesis in cell cycle-arrested cells. Thus, the NER pathway, responsible for a normally accurate repair of UV-induced DNA damage, paradoxically is required for the generation and/or fixation of UV-induced frameshift mutations specifically in non-replicating cells.

  17. Relationship between Intrauterine Bacterial Infection and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Fei Yan; Xin-Yan Liu; Yun-Fei Cheng; Zhi-Yi Li; Jie Ou; Wei Wang; Feng-Qin Li

    2016-01-01

    Background:Early embryonic developmental arrest is the most commonly understudied adverse outcome of pregnancy.The relevance of intrauterine infection to spontaneous embryonic death is rarely studied and remains unclear.This study aimed to investigate the relationship between intrauterine bacterial infection and early embryonic developmental arrest.Methods:Embryonic chorion tissue and uterine swabs for bacterial detection were obtained from 33 patients who underwent artificial abortion (control group) and from 45 patients who displayed early embryonic developmental arrest (trial group).Results:Intrauterine bacterial infection was discovered in both groups.The infection rate was 24.44% (11/45) in the early embryonic developmental arrest group and 9.09% (3/33) in the artificial abortion group.Classification analysis revealed that the highest detection rate for Micrococcus luteus in the early embryonic developmental arrest group was 13.33% (6/45),and none was detected in the artificial abortion group.M.luteus infection was significantly different between the groups (P < 0.05 as shown by Fisher's exact test).In addition,no correlation was found between intrauterine bacterial infection and history of early embryonic developmental arrest.Conclusions:M.luteus infection is related to early embryonic developmental arrest and might be one of its causative factors.

  18. Sulforaphane induces cell cycle arrest by protecting RB-E2F-1 complex in epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Robert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate phytochemical present predominantly in cruciferous vegetables such as brussels sprout and broccoli, is considered a promising chemo-preventive agent against cancer. In-vitro exposure to SFN appears to result in the induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in a variety of tumor types. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the inhibition of cell cycle progression by SFN are poorly understood in epithelial ovarian cancer cells (EOC. The aim of this study is to understand the signaling mechanisms through which SFN influences the cell growth and proliferation in EOC. Results SFN at concentrations of 5 - 20 μM induced a dose-dependent suppression of growth in cell lines MDAH 2774 and SkOV-3 with an IC50 of ~8 μM after a 3 day exposure. Combination treatment with chemotherapeutic agent, paclitaxel, resulted in additive growth suppression. SFN at ~8 μM decreased growth by 40% and 20% on day 1 in MDAH 2774 and SkOV-3, respectively. Cells treated with cytotoxic concentrations of SFN have reduced cell migration and increased apoptotic cell death via an increase in Bak/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of procaspase-9 and poly (ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP. Gene expression profile analysis of cell cycle regulated proteins demonstrated increased levels of tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein (RB and decreased levels of E2F-1 transcription factor. SFN treatment resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest through down modulation of RB phosphorylation and by protecting the RB-E2F-1 complex. Conclusions SFN induces growth arrest and apoptosis in EOC cells. Inhibition of retinoblastoma (RB phosphorylation and reduction in levels of free E2F-1 appear to play an important role in EOC growth arrest.

  19. Pollution performance of 110 kV metal oxide arresters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzan, K.; Pohl, Z. [Technical Univ. of Wroclaw (Poland). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Grzybowski, S. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Koehler, W. [Univ. of Stuttgart (Germany). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1997-04-01

    Pollution test results of single unit 110 kV metal oxide surge arresters with porcelain housing according to the solid layer and salt fog methods are presented. During 6 hours of testing, the internal and external charge and maximum temperature along the varistor column were measured. The formation of single stable dry bands on the housing was often observed, especially during salt fog tests. In such cases, the varistor temperature can reach about 70 C. The simple electrical model of the arrester enabling calculations of voltages and currents as a function of arrester and pollution parameters is shown.

  20. Resuscitation of a Pediatric Drowning in Hypothermic Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragann, Brendan N; Melnychuk, Eric M; Wilson, Christopher J; Lambert, Richard L; Maffei, Frank A

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of pediatric patients who require prolonged resuscitation after ice water drowning and hypothermic cardiac arrest remains guarded. We report a case of successful prolonged resuscitation of a pediatric patient in hypothermic cardiac arrest who showed severe metabolic derangements and went on to make a rapid and full neurologic recovery without the use of extracoproreal rewarming or mechanical cardiac support. Many ground and air medical emergency medical service programs have policies against interfacility transfer of patients in hypothermic cardiac arrest, calling into question the need to revise current protocols. PMID:27021675

  1. Electronic registration of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Dahl, Michael; Gade, John;

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The reported incidences of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) in western countries vary considerably. According to the latest report from Danish Cardiac Arrest Database (DCAD) the incidence rate in Denmark in 2004 was 51/100,000/year. The report states however that this number...... of cardiac arrest. 83 of those (28 %) received first aid. The first aid was provided by layman (68 %), physicians (11 %), nurses (11 %) and first-aiders (4 %). In 6 % the identity of the first aid provider was unknown. The majority of the patients (n = 177 (58 %)) had asystole upon ambulance arrival. 37 (12...

  2. Evolution of the dragonfly head-arresting system

    OpenAIRE

    Gorb, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    The arrester or fixation system of the head in adult Odonata is unique among arthropods. This system involves the organs of two body segments: the head and the neck. It consists of a skeleton–muscle apparatus that sets the arrester parts in motion. The parts comprise formations covered with complicated microstructures: fields of microtrichia on the rear surface of the head and post-cervical sclerites of the neck. The arrester immobilizes the head during feeding or when the dragonfly is in tan...

  3. Cross-talk between the fat body and brain regulates insect developmental arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Hua; Lu, Yu-Xuan; Denlinger, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Developmental arrest, a critical component of the life cycle in animals as diverse as nematodes (dauer state), insects (diapause), and vertebrates (hibernation), results in dramatic depression of the metabolic rate and a profound extension in longevity. Although many details of the hormonal systems controlling developmental arrest are well-known, we know little about the interactions between metabolic events and the hormones controlling the arrested state. Here, we show that diapause is regulated by an interplay between blood-borne metabolites and regulatory centers within the brain. Gene expression in the fat body, the insect equivalent of the liver, is strongly suppressed during diapause, resulting in low levels of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) intermediates circulating within the blood, and at diapause termination, the fat body becomes activated, releasing an abundance of TCA intermediates that act on the brain to stimulate synthesis of regulatory peptides that prompt production of the insect growth hormone ecdysone. This model is supported by our success in breaking diapause by injecting a mixture of TCA intermediates and upstream metabolites. The results underscore the importance of cross-talk between the brain and fat body as a regulator of diapause and suggest that the TCA cycle may be a checkpoint for regulating different forms of animal dormancy. PMID:22912402

  4. Induction and mechanism of growth arrest DNA damage-inducible gene 45 β in human hepatoma HepG2 cells by Triapine%Triapine对肝癌细胞株HepG2中GADD45β表达影响及其可能机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王佳玉; 彭承宏; 邱伟华; 杨卫平; 林大伟; 衣琳; 李军; 汪洋; 覃胜灵; 施敏敏; 沈柏用

    2011-01-01

    目的:DNA损伤修复相关基因 GADD45β的特异性表达缺失与肝癌的恶性程度密切相关,本研究初步明确肝癌细胞中GADD45β近端启动子序列,探索3-氨基吡啶-2-甲醛硫代缩氨基脲(Triapine)对人肝癌细胞株HepG2的GADD45β表达影响及其可能机制.方法:体外合成GADD45β近端启动子序列(-618至-314),构建荧光素表达质粒,转染HepG2,根据启动子活性强度结合数据库分析存在的转录调节因子结合位点;以实时荧光定量PCR比较Triapine作用前后HepG2细胞GADD45β表达;进一步比较Triapine对GADD45β启动子活性的调控作用,分析Triapine对HepG2的抑制效应;并通过Caspase-8、Caspase-9和Caspase-3的表达变化测定凋亡的发生和发展.结果:GADD45β近端启动子中含有3个NF-κB (-602/-593、-581/-572、-537/-528)和1个E2F-1 (-470/-436)转录调节因子与启动子结合位点;2.5μmol/L和5μmol/L的Triapine作用后,GA DD45β/GA PDH分别为0.029 3和0.073 9,呈现剂量-诱导效应正相关,同时NF-KB和E2F-1启动子活性分别增强了1.5和0.8倍;高剂量Triapine对HepG2的DNA合成能力和细胞克隆形成能力的抑制率分别为75.25%和60.54%,呈现剂量-抑制效应正相关;Triapine作用后6h即出现HepG2凋亡高峰.结论:Triapine能通过增强转录调节因子的活性,诱导肝癌细胞中特异性缺失的GA DD45β基因表达;进而抑制肝癌细胞的增殖并启动凋亡途径.%Objective To identify the proximal promoter of down-expression of growth arrest DNA damage-inducible gene 45 B (GA DD45f$) and to evaluate the influence of Triapine to HCC cell lines. Methods The proximal promoter fragments (-618/-314) were synthesized in vitro and cloned into pGL3 basic luciferase expression plasmid, then transfected into the HepG2 cell line by electroporation. The promoter regions were identified in reference to TRANSFAC database. Following Triapine administration, quantitative real-time PC Ft was employed to

  5. Solanine inhibits prostate cancer Du145 xenograft growth in nude mice by inducing cell cycle arrest in G1/S phase%龙葵素通过诱导细胞周期G1/S阻滞抑制裸鼠前列腺癌细胞Du145移植瘤生长

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟伟枫; 刘思平; 潘斌; 唐兆烽; 钟锦光; 周芳坚

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of solanine on the growth of human prostate cancer cell xenograft in nude mice. Methods Human prostate cancer Du145 cells were injected into the subcutaneous layers on the back of nude mice. After a week, the mice bearing subcutaneous tumor graft were randomly divided into solanine treatment group and saline control group for treatment for 3 weeks. The tumor grafts were then harvested to evaluate the inhibition rate. The mRNA and protein expressions of cell cycle-related genes in the tumors were detected by qRT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively, and tumor cell apoptosis was detected using TUNEL method. Results The tumor growth rate in solanine-treated group was significantly slower than that in the control group (P<0.01). The mRNA and protein expressions of C-myc, cyclin D1, cyclin E1, CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6 were significantly inhibited by solanine. Solanine significantly up-regulated p21 mRNA and protein expression in the tumors and induced a higher apoptosis rate of the tumor cells than saline (P<0.01). Conclusion The tumor-inhibition effect of solanine is probably mediated by regulating the expressions of genes related with G1/S cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis.%目的:探讨龙葵素对前列腺癌细胞Du145裸鼠移植瘤生长的影响及分子机制。方法采用高度恶性的转移前列腺癌细胞株Du145作为动物体内实验的模型,裸鼠皮下接种Du145细胞建立裸鼠皮下瘤模型。1周后将接种的裸鼠随机分为2组:龙葵素实验组和生理盐水空白对照组,每3 d分别向实体瘤中间部位注射0.2 mL龙葵素(50μg/mL)和生理盐水,观察裸鼠体内肿瘤生长,3周后颈椎脱臼处死裸鼠,剥离肿瘤组织,测量肿瘤的重量并根据肿瘤重量计算抑瘤率。实时荧光定量PCR和Western blotting技术检测各组裸鼠瘤体细胞周期相关基因mRNA和蛋白表达。Tunel原位检测各组裸鼠瘤体组织凋亡情况。结果龙葵素

  6. Induction of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by berberine in bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Keqiang; Zhang, Cheng; Feng, Jinbo; Hou, Lifang; Yan, Lei; Zhou, Zunlin; Liu, Zhaoxu; Liu, Cheng; Fan, Yidon; Zheng, Baozhong; Xu, Zhonghua

    2011-07-01

    Bladder cancer is the ninth most common type of cancer, and its surgery is always followed by chemotherapy to prevent recurrence. Berberine is non-toxic to normal cells but has anti-cancer effects in many cancer cell lines. This study was aimed to determine whether berberine inhibits the cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in BIU-87 and T24 bladder cancer cell line. The superficial bladder cancer cell line BIU-87 and invasive T24 bladder cancer cells were treated with different concentrations of berberine. MTT assay was used to determine the effects of berberine on the viability of these cells. The cell cycle arrest was detected through propidium iodide (PI) staining. The induction of apoptosis was determined through Annexin V-conjugated Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa488) staining. Berberine inhibited the viability of BIU-87 and T24 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also promoted cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in a dose-dependent manner and induced apoptosis. We observed that H-Ras and c-fos mRNA and protein expressionswere dose-dependently and time-dependently decreased by berberine treatment. Also, we investigated the cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9 protein expressions increased in a dose-dependent manner. Berberine inhibits the cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in BIU-87, bladder cancer cell line and T24, invasive bladder cancer cell line. Berberine can inhibit the oncogentic H-Ras and c-fos in T24 cells, and can induce the activation of the caspase-3 and caspase-9 apoptosis. Therefore, berberine has the potential to be a novel chemotherapy drug to treat the bladder cancer by suppressing tumor growth.

  7. Crack-arrest behavior in SEN wide plates of low-upper-shelf base metal tested under nonisothermal conditions: WP-2 series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Keeney-Walker, J.; Bass, B.R.; Robinson, G.C. Jr.; Iskander, S.K.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Fields, R.J.; deWit, R.; Low, S.R. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Schwartz, C.W. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Johansson, I.B. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1990-08-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting analytical and experimental studies aimed at understanding the circumstances that would initiate the growth of an existing crack in a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and the conditions leading to arrest of a propagating crack. Objectives of these studies are to determine (1) if the material will exhibit crack-arrest behavior when the driving force on a crack exceeds the ASME limit, (2) the relationship between K{sub Ia} and temperature, and (3) the interaction of fracture modes (arrest, stable crack growth, unstable crack growth, and tensile instability) when arrest occurs at high temperatures. In meeting these objectives, crack-arrest data are being developed over an expanded temperature range through tests involving large thermally shocked cylinders, pressurized thermally shocked vessels, and wide-plate specimens. The wide-plate specimens provide the opportunity for a significant number of data points to be obtained at relatively affordable costs. These tests are designed to provide fracture-toughness measurements approaching or above the onset of the Charpy upper-shelf regime in a rising toughness region and with an increasing driving force. This document discusses test methodology and results. 23 refs., 92 figs., 25 tabs.

  8. In silico Analysis of HIV-1 Env-gp120 Reveals Structural Bases for Viral Adaptation in Growth-Restrictive Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Masaru; Nomaguchi, Masako; Doi, Naoya; Kanda, Tadahito; Adachi, Akio; Sato, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    Variable V1/V2 and V3 loops on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope-gp120 core play key roles in modulating viral competence to recognize two infection receptors, CD4 and chemokine-receptors. However, molecular bases for the modulation largely remain unclear. To address these issues, we constructed structural models for a full-length gp120 in CD4-free and -bound states. The models showed topologies of gp120 surface loop that agree with those in reported structural data. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that in the unliganded state, V1/V2 loop settled into a thermodynamically stable arrangement near V3 loop for conformational masking of V3 tip, a potent neutralization epitope. In the CD4-bound state, however, V1/V2 loop was rearranged near the bound CD4 to support CD4 binding. In parallel, cell-based adaptation in the absence of anti-viral antibody pressures led to the identification of amino acid substitutions that individually enhance viral entry and growth efficiencies in association with reduced sensitivity to CCR5 antagonist TAK-779. Notably, all these substitutions were positioned on the receptors binding surfaces in V1/V2 or V3 loop. In silico structural studies predicted some physical changes of gp120 by substitutions with alterations in viral replication phenotypes. These data suggest that V1/V2 loop is critical for creating a gp120 structure that masks co-receptor binding site compatible with maintenance of viral infectivity, and for tuning a functional balance of gp120 between immune escape ability and infectivity to optimize HIV-1 replication fitness. PMID:26903989

  9. Radiation-induced apoptosis, necrosis and G2 arrest in Fadu and Hep2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation damage is produced and viable cell number is reduced. We need to know the type of cell death by the ionizing radiation and the amount and duration of cell cycle arrest. In this study, we want to identified the main cause of the cellular damage in the oral cancer cells and normal keratinocytes with clinical useful radiation dosage. Human gingival tissue specimens obtained from healthy volunteers were used for primary culture of the normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK). Primary NHOK were prepared from separated epithelial tissue and maintained in keratinocyte growth medium containing 0.15 mM calcium and a supplementary growth factor bullet kit as described previously. Fadu and Hep-2 cell lines were obtained from KCLB. Cells were irradiated in a (137) Cs gamma-irradiator at the dose of 10 Gy. The dose rate was 5.38 Gy/min. The necrotic cell death was examined with Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the culture medium. Every 4 day after irradiation, LDH activities were read and compared control group. Cell cycle phase distribution and preG1-incidence after radiation was analyzed by flow cytometry using Propidium Iodine (PI) staining. Cell cycle analysis were carried out with a FAC Star plus flowcytometry (FACS, Becton Dickinson, USA) and DNA histograms were processed with CELLFIT software (Becton Dickinson, USA). LDH activity increased in all of the experimental cells by the times. This pattern could be seen in the non-irradiated cells, and there was no difference between the non-irradiated cells and irradiated cells. We detected an induction of apoptosis after irradiation with a single dose of 10 Gy. The maximal rate of apoptosis ranged from 4.0% to 8.0% 4 days after irradiation. In all experimental cells, we detected G2/M arrest after irradiation with a single dose of 10 Gy. Yet there were differences in the number of G2/M arrested cells. The maximal rate of the G2/M ranges from 60.0% to 80.0% 24h after irradiation. There is no significant changes on

  10. Genotypic Variation in Growth and Physiological Response to Drought Stress and Re-Watering Reveals the Critical Role of Recovery in Drought Adaptation in Maize Seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Daoqian; Wang, Shiwen; Cao, Beibei; Cao, Dan; Leng, Guohui; Li, Hongbing; Yin, Lina; Shan, Lun; Deng, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Non-irrigated crops in temperate climates and irrigated crops in arid climates are subjected to continuous cycles of water stress and re-watering. Thus, fast and efficient recovery from water stress may be among the key determinants of plant drought adaptation. The present study was designed to comparatively analyze the roles of drought resistance and drought recovery in drought adaptation and to investigate the physiological basis of genotypic variation in drought adaptation in maize (Zea ma...

  11. Genotypic variation in growth and physiological response to drought stress and re-watering reveals the critical role of recovery in drought adaptation in maize seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Daoqian eChen; Shiwen eWang; Beibei eCao; Dan eCao; Guohui eLeng; Hongbing eLi; Lina eYin; Lun eShan; Xiping eDeng

    2016-01-01

    Non-irrigated crops in temperate climates and irrigated crops in arid climates are subjected to continuous cycles of water stress and re-watering. Thus, fast and efficient recovery from water stress may be among the key determinants of plant drought adaptation. The present study was designed to comparatively analyze the roles of drought resistance and drought recovery in drought adaptation and to investigate the physiological basis of genotypic variation in drought adaptation in maize (Zea ma...

  12. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Resuscitation Following Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenberger, Jon C; Friess, Stuart; Polderman, Kees H

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac arrest is the most common cause of death in North America. Neurocritical care interventions, including targeted temperature management (TTM), have significantly improved neurological outcomes in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Therefore, resuscitation following cardiac arrest was chosen as an emergency neurological life support protocol. Patients remaining comatose following resuscitation from cardiac arrest should be considered for TTM. This protocol will review induction, maintenance, and re-warming phases of TTM, along with management of TTM side effects. Aggressive shivering suppression is necessary with this treatment to ensure the maintenance of a target temperature. Ancillary testing, including electrocardiography, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, continuous electroencephalography monitoring, and correction of electrolyte, blood gas, and hematocrit changes, are also necessary to optimize outcomes. PMID:26438463

  13. [Effect of phenibut on the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakanov, I A; Tarasova, N N; Belova, E A; Safonov, V A

    2006-01-01

    The role of the GABAergic system in mechanisms of the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin administration was studied in anaesthetized rats. Under normal conditions, the systemic administration of serotonin (20-60 mg/kg, i.v.) resulted in drastic changes of the respiratory pattern, whereby the initial phase of increased respiratory rate was followed by the respiratory arrest. The preliminary injection of phenibut (400 mg/kg, i.p.) abolished or sharply reduced the duration of the respiratory arrest phase induced by serotonin. Bilateral vagotomy following the phenibut injection potentiated the anti-apnoesic effect of phenibut, which was evidence of the additive action of vagotomy and phenibut administration. The mechanism of apnea caused by serotonin administration is suggested to include a central GABAergic element, which is activated by phenibut so as to counteract the respiratory arrest. PMID:16579056

  14. Hybrid simulation of metal oxide surge-arrester thermal behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, L.; Raghuveer, M.R. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1996-01-01

    A finite-difference-based technique for simulating the thermal behaviour of a metal oxide surge arrester (MOSA) was described. The improved hybrid thermal modelling technique was claimed to accurately represent heat-transfer modes. Fin theory was used to represent arrester sheds. The proposed model, which relies on simple measurements at the arrester terminals, yields the temporal variation of temperature in a MOSA in both the axial and radial direction. The thermal behaviour of a MOSA under steady-state and transient conditions can be simulated using such a model under different environmental conditions. The accuracy of the modelling technique was demonstrated experimentally by measurements conducted on an arrester. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Human papillomavirus 16E6 and NFX1-123 potentiate notch signaling and differentiation without activating cellular arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vliet-Gregg, Portia A.; Hamilton, Jennifer R. [Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children' s Research Institute, 1900 Ninth Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (United States); Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A., E-mail: rkatzen@uw.edu [Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children' s Research Institute, 1900 Ninth Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle WA (United States)

    2015-04-15

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) oncoproteins bind host cell proteins to dysregulate and uncouple apoptosis, senescence, differentiation, and growth. These pathways are important for both the viral life cycle and cancer development. HR HPV16 E6 (16E6) interacts with the cellular protein NFX1-123, and they collaboratively increase the growth and differentiation master regulator, Notch1. In 16E6 expressing keratinocytes (16E6 HFKs), the Notch canonical pathway genes Hes1 and Hes5 were increased with overexpression of NFX1-123, and their expression was directly linked to the activation or blockade of the Notch1 receptor. Keratinocyte differentiation genes Keratin 1 and Keratin 10 were also increased, but in contrast their upregulation was only indirectly associated with Notch1 receptor stimulation and was fully unlinked to growth arrest, increased p21{sup Waf1/CIP1}, or decreased proliferative factor Ki67. This leads to a model of 16E6, NFX1-123, and Notch1 differently regulating canonical and differentiation pathways and entirely uncoupling cellular arrest from increased differentiation. - Highlights: • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the Notch canonical pathway through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the differentiation pathway indirectly through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased differentiation gene expression without growth arrest. • Increased NFX1-123 with 16E6 may create an ideal cellular phenotype for HPV.

  16. The psychosocial outcome of anoxic brain injury following cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The psychosocial outcome of anoxic brain injury following cardiac arrest is a relatively under researched, but clinically important area. The aim of the current study was to add to the limited existing literature exploring the psychosocial outcome for cardiac arrest survivors, but specifically explore if there is a greater impact on psychosocial outcome in individuals experiencing anoxic brain injury as a result. Methods A range of self report measures were used to c...

  17. Usage of Lightning Arrester Line to Feed Light Electrical Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani B. Odeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In remote areas, light loads (tens of kilowatts are scattered and situated in the field of high voltage lines (66KV and above. These loads are very far from the main feeders/sub-stations (33KV-0.380KV. Feeding such loads in the traditional ways like provision of Diesel-Powered Stations, installation of new distribution lines from the Feeding Centers, or building new Sub-Stations are not practical ways from the economical point of view, because it requires huge additional expenses and will increase electrical power losses. These expenses are not worthy for such loads and therefore, it is necessary to search for other methods to supply them. One of these methods is to use the lightning arrester line as capacitive divider to supply the light loads. In this research, the induced voltage of the lightning arrester line was calculated when it is isolated from the earth. We found the capacitance between lightning arrester line versus the phases and lightning arrester. It was also found the selective power out of the lightning arrester line and the required length which is to be isolated from the earth keeping the main function of the lightning arrester line. When economically comparing between supplying the light electrical loads by traditional ways and the method of lightning arrester, it was found the advantage of using lightning arresters to supply such loads. Also, by using the traditional methods, it was noted that there is a power loss in the power transmission lines by a percentage of 1.8%.

  18. Crack arrest saturation model under combined electrical and mechanical loadings

    OpenAIRE

    R.R. Bhargava; A. Setia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The investigation aims at proposing a model for cracked piezoelectric strip which is capable to arrest the crack.Design/methodology/approach: Under the combined effect of electrical and mechanical loadings applied at the edges of the strip, the developed saturation zone is produced at each tip of the crack. To arrest further opening of the crack, the rims of the developed saturation zones are subjected to in-plane cohesive, normal uniform constant saturation point electrical displace...

  19. Al-Qaeda arrest casts shadow over the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Dacey, James

    2010-01-01

    "Cern remains on course for the imminent switch-on of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) despite the media frenzy following the recent arrest of a physicist who had been working at the facility. The researcher in question is a 32-year-old man of Algerian descent who is expected to face trail in France - the country in which he was arrested" (0.5 page)

  20. Chinese medicinal herb, Acanthopanax gracilistylus, extract induces cell cycle arrest of human tumor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, B E; Zeki, K; Sugiura, T; Yoshida, Y; Yamashita, U

    2000-04-01

    We investigated the effect of a Chinese medicinal herb, Acanthopanax gracilistylus (AG), extract (E) on the growth of human tumor cell lines in vitro. AGE markedly inhibited the proliferation of several tumor cell lines such as MT-2, Raji, HL-60, TMK-1 and HSC-2. The activity was associated with a protein of 60 kDa, which was purified by gel-filtration chromatography. Cell viability analyses indicated that the treatment with AGE inhibits cell proliferation, but does not induce cell death. The mechanism of AGE-induced inhibition of tumor cell growth involves arrest of the cell cycle at the G(0) / G(1) stage without a direct cytotoxic effect. The cell cycle arrest induced by AGE was accompanied by a decrease of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Furthermore, cyclin-dependent kinases 2 and 4 (Cdk2 and Cdk4), which are involved in the phosphorylation of Rb, were also decreased. These results suggest that AGE inhibits tumor cell growth by affecting phosphorylated Rb proteins and Cdks. PMID:10804285

  1. TRICHOSTATIN A INHIBITS PROLIFERATION, INDUCES APOPTOSIS AND CELL CYCLE ARREST IN HELA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhou-min; WANG Yi-qun; MEI Qi; CHEN Jian; DU Jia; WEI Yan; XU Ying-chun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIS) have been shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation, stimulate apoptosis, an induce cell cycle arrest. Our purpose was to investigate the antiproliferative effects of a HDACI, trichostatin A (TSA), against human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). Methods: HeLa cells were treated in vitro with various concentrations of TSA. The inhibitory effect of TSA on the growth of HeLa cells was measured by MTT assay. To detect the characteristic of apoptosis chromatin condensation, HeLa cells were stained with Hoechst 33258 in the presence of TSA. Induction of cell cycle arrest was studied by flow cytometry. Changes in gene expression of p53, p21Waf1 and p27Kip1 were studied by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results: TSA inhibited cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Hoechst 33258 staining assay showed that TSA induced apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis indicated that treatment with TSA decreased the proportion of cells in S phase and increased the proportion of cells in G0/G1 and/or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. This was concomitant with overexpression of genes related to malignant phenotype, including an increase in p53, p21Waf1 and p27Kip1. Conclusion: These results suggest that TSA is effective in inhibiting growth of HeLa cells in vitro. The findings raise the possibility that TSA may prove particularly effective in treatment of cervical cancers.

  2. c-Myc plays a key role in TADs-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dongdong; QI, JUNPENG; Liu, Rui; Dai, Bingling; Ma, Weina; Zhan, Yingzhuan; Zhang, Yanmin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell growth is complicated progression which is regulated and controlled by multiple factors including cell cycle, migration and apoptosis. In present study, we report that TADs, a novel derivative of taspine, has an essential role in resisting hepatocellular carcinoma growth (including arrest cell cycle) and migration, and inducing cell apoptosis. Our findings demonstrated that the TADs showed good inhibition on the hepatoma cell growth and migration, and good action on apoptosis indu...

  3. Requirement of MgtC for Brucella suis Intramacrophage Growth: a Potential Mechanism Shared by Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis for Adaptation to a Low-Mg2+ Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; O'Callaghan, David; Blanc-Potard, Anne-Béatrice

    2005-01-01

    A Brucella suis mgtC mutant is defective for growth within macrophages and in low-Mg2+ medium. These phenotypes are strikingly similar to those observed with mgtC mutants from Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, two other pathogens that proliferate within phagosomes. MgtC appears as a remarkable virulence factor that would have been acquired by distantly related intracellular pathogens to contribute to the adaptation to a low-Mg2+ environment in the phagosome. PMID:15845525

  4. Situational ambiguity and gendered patterns of arrest for intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durfee, Alesha

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the 2005 National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS), this analysis focuses on the impacts that domestic violence mandatory arrest policies have on arrest outcomes in "situationally ambiguous" cases: cases where both the female and male partners have been identified by police as both a victim and an offender. Results indicate that although officers arrest male partners more frequently than female partners, after controlling for incident and individual factors, mandatory arrest policies disproportionately affect women. Furthermore, correlates of arrest differ for male-only arrests versus female-only arrests. These findings are discussed in the context of changing legal responses to domestic violence. PMID:22411299

  5. Galiellalactone induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through the ATM/ATR pathway in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Víctor; Lara-Chica, Maribel; Cantarero, Irene; Sterner, Olov; Calzado, Marco A; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2016-01-26

    Galiellalactone (GL) is a fungal metabolite that presents antitumor activities on prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. In this study we show that GL induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, caspase-dependent apoptosis and also affected the microtubule organization and migration ability in DU145 cells. GL did not induce double strand DNA break but activated the ATR and ATM-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) inducing CHK1, H2AX phosphorylation (fH2AX) and CDC25C downregulation. Inhibition of the ATM/ATR activation with caffeine reverted GL-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA damage measured by fH2AX. In contrast, UCN-01, a CHK1 inhibitor, prevented GL-induced cell cycle arrest but enhanced apoptosis in DU145 cells. Furthermore, we found that GL did not increase the levels of intracellular ROS, but the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely prevented the effects of GL on fH2AX, G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In contrast to NAC, other antioxidants such as ambroxol and EGCG did not interfere with the activity of GL on cell cycle. GL significantly suppressed DU145 xenograft growth in vivo and induced the expression of fH2AX in the tumors. These findings identify for the first time that GL activates DDR in prostate cancer.

  6. Role of the retinoblastoma protein in cell cycle arrest mediated by a novel cell surface proliferation inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enebo, D. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Moos, P. J.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A novel cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS-18), purified from the cell surface of bovine cerebral cortex cells has been shown to be a potent and reversible inhibitor of proliferation of a wide array of fibroblasts as well as epithelial-like cells and nontransformed and transformed cells. To investigate the possible mechanisms by which CeReS-18 exerts its inhibitory action, the effect of the inhibitor on the posttranslational regulation of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (RB), a tumor suppressor gene, has been examined. It is shown that CeReS-18 mediated cell cycle arrest of both human diploid fibroblasts (HSBP) and mouse fibroblasts (Swiss 3T3) results in the maintenance of the RB protein in the hypophosphorylated state, consistent with a late G1 arrest site. Although their normal nontransformed counterparts are sensitive to cell cycle arrest mediated by CeReS-18, cell lines lacking a functional RB protein, through either genetic mutation or DNA tumor virus oncoprotein interaction, are less sensitive. The refractory nature of these cells is shown to be independent of specific surface receptors for the inhibitor, and another tumor suppressor gene (p53) does not appear to be involved in the CeReS-18 inhibition of cell proliferation. The requirement for a functional RB protein product, in order for CeReS-18 to mediate cell cycle arrest, is discussed in light of regulatory events associated with density-dependent growth inhibition.

  7. Changing the guard: Polymer replaces porcelain for surge arresters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, T.; Gleimar, H. E. G.

    2002-07-01

    Surge arresters are safety devices which quickly and effectively limit the over voltages that can arise in transmission networks following lightning, switching and other transient events. The earliest forms of overvoltage protection, a simple air gap between electrodes, have long since been replaced by a new generation of gapless arresters with series-connected, non-linear zinc oxide varistors contained in a porcelain housing. Now these porcelain type surge arresters are being replaced by a new type, called PEXLIM (Polymeric EXcellent LIMiter), which uses the same block of zinc oxide as the porcelain type, but its housing is made of silicon rubber, a polymer. The new lightweight insulation material shows a number of properties superior to the porcelain, such as enhanced product safety and ease of handling. It is also more durable, resilient, yet solid and compact, water-repellent, lightweight, resistant to aging or light or ultra-violet radiation, as well as fire, has good electrical properties, and is environmentally friendly since it does not contain any substances harmful to the environment. These properties make this new type of surge arrester highly suitable for use in earthquake-prone areas; it can also replace more expensive and maintenance-intensive equipment. Having successfully broken into the lower voltage systems, these new type of surge arresters are now rapidly gaining ground at the higher voltage levels. ABB, the developer of PEXLIM, has already supplied these arresters to North America for use in an 800-kV grid. As further proof of its growing popularity, last year PEXLIM made up over half of the surge arrester production for applications up to and including 245 kV. 1 tab., 6 figs.

  8. Nursing students’ knowledge about arrest rhythms and their treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Kyrgianidou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Knowledge of health professionals for the arrest rhythms, is considered particularly important for the early recognition and proper treatment. Aim: The purpose of the present study was to assess the knowledge of nursing students on arrest rhythms and how to treat them. Material and Methods: The sample studied included 151 students from the Department of Nursing A' (n = 60, 40% and B' (n = 91, 60%, TEI of Athens, of whom 83% (n=125 were women and 17% (n=26 were men with a mean age of 23 years. Data collection was performed with specially designed questionnaire, that apart from demographics and students’ education level, it included ten questions about arrest rhythms’ knowledge and also self-assessment questions of their level of knowledge. The data were analyzed with the SPSS package v.19, using the criteria t-Test and χ2. Results: Of all the participants in the research, 95% (n = 144 did not answer correctly more than 6 questions from a total of 10. The students of the Department of Nursing A’ recognized with greater accuracy the arrest rhythms (p = 0.003. Those studying in lower semester acknowledged best the arrest rhythms (p = 0.002. Students who had recently attended course in basic or advanced resuscitation recognized best the arrest rhythms (p = 0.006. Older students knew better right treatment of the arrest rhythms (p = 0.037. Also, students who had attended the course of cardiac nursing in the last year, knew better the right treatment (p <0.001. Finally, the level of self-assessment was in line with the actual level of knowledge of students (p = 0.05. Conclusions: Continuous attendance of courses, education on certified programs and refresh courses help to maintain a good level of knowledge for longer periods.

  9. Adaptive Lighting

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive LightingAdaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled i...

  10. Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates erythropoiesis in hypophysectomized rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, A.; Zapf, J.; Eckardt, K.U.; Clemons, G.; Froesch, E.R.; Bauer, C. (Universitaet Zurich (Switzerland))

    1988-10-01

    Stimulation of erythropoiesis during growth is necessary to ensure proportionality between erythrocyte mass and body mass. However, the way by which erythrocyte formation is adapted to body growth is still unknown. Growth arrest in hypophysectomized rats is accompanied by decreased erythropoiesis. The authors have, therefore, examined whether insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), the mediator of growth hormone effects on body growth, is able to restore erythropoiesis in these animals. Subcutaneous infusions of 120 {mu}g of recombinant human IGF-I per day in hypophysectomized rats led to increases in body weight, {sup 59}Fe incorporation into erythrocytes, and the number of reticulocytes that were similar to increases caused by infusions of 28 milliunits of human growth hormone per day. Body weight gain and {sup 59}Fe incorporation were linearly correlated. Like growth hormone, IGF-I also caused a significant rise in serum erythropoietin concentrations. However, the stimulatory effect on erythropoiesis occurred before serum erythropoietin levels had risen. These results demonstrate that IGF-I mediates the stimulatory effect of growth hormone on erythropoiesis in vivo and thus further support the somatomedin concept. They also show that IGF-I can stimulate erythropoiesis in an endocrine manner, and they suggest two possible routes of action: a direct one and an indirect one by means of enhanced erythropoietin production.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates erythropoiesis in hypophysectomized rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stimulation of erythropoiesis during growth is necessary to ensure proportionality between erythrocyte mass and body mass. However, the way by which erythrocyte formation is adapted to body growth is still unknown. Growth arrest in hypophysectomized rats is accompanied by decreased erythropoiesis. The authors have, therefore, examined whether insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), the mediator of growth hormone effects on body growth, is able to restore erythropoiesis in these animals. Subcutaneous infusions of 120 μg of recombinant human IGF-I per day in hypophysectomized rats led to increases in body weight, 59Fe incorporation into erythrocytes, and the number of reticulocytes that were similar to increases caused by infusions of 28 milliunits of human growth hormone per day. Body weight gain and 59Fe incorporation were linearly correlated. Like growth hormone, IGF-I also caused a significant rise in serum erythropoietin concentrations. However, the stimulatory effect on erythropoiesis occurred before serum erythropoietin levels had risen. These results demonstrate that IGF-I mediates the stimulatory effect of growth hormone on erythropoiesis in vivo and thus further support the somatomedin concept. They also show that IGF-I can stimulate erythropoiesis in an endocrine manner, and they suggest two possible routes of action: a direct one and an indirect one by means of enhanced erythropoietin production

  12. Microanatomical and Histological Features in the Long Bones of Mosasaurine Mosasaurs (Reptilia, Squamata) – Implications for Aquatic Adaptation and Growth Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Houssaye; Johan Lindgren; Rodrigo Pellegrini; Lee, Andrew H.; Damien Germain; Polcyn, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During their evolution in the Late Cretaceous, mosasauroids attained a worldwide distribution, accompanied by a marked increase in body size and open ocean adaptations. This transition from land-dwellers to highly marine-adapted forms is readily apparent not only at the gross anatomic level but also in their inner bone architecture, which underwent profound modifications. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present contribution describes, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the...

  13. Visualizing Vpr-induced G2 arrest and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Murakami

    Full Text Available Vpr is an accessory protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 with multiple functions. The induction of G2 arrest by Vpr plays a particularly important role in efficient viral replication because the transcriptional activity of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat is most active in G2 phase. The regulation of apoptosis by Vpr is also important for immune suppression and pathogenesis during HIV infection. However, it is not known whether Vpr-induced apoptosis depends on the ability of Vpr to induce G2 arrest, and the dynamics of Vpr-induced G2 arrest and apoptosis have not been visualized. We performed time-lapse imaging to examine the temporal relationship between Vpr-induced G2 arrest and apoptosis using HeLa cells containing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator2 (Fucci2. The dynamics of G2 arrest and subsequent long-term mitotic cell rounding in cells transfected with the Vpr-expression vector were visualized. These cells underwent nuclear mis-segregation after prolonged mitotic processes and then entered G1 phase. Some cells subsequently displayed evidence of apoptosis after prolonged mitotic processes and nuclear mis-segregation. Interestingly, Vpr-induced apoptosis was seldom observed in S or G2 phase. Likewise, visualization of synchronized HeLa/Fucci2 cells infected with an adenoviral vector expressing Vpr clearly showed that Vpr arrests the cell cycle at G2 phase, but does not induce apoptosis at S or G2 phase. Furthermore, time-lapse imaging of HeLa/Fucci2 cells expressing SCAT3.1, a caspase-3-sensitive fusion protein, clearly demonstrated that Vpr induces caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Finally, to examine whether the effects of Vpr on G2 arrest and apoptosis were reversible, we performed live-cell imaging of a destabilizing domain fusion Vpr, which enabled rapid stabilization and destabilization by Shield1. The effects of Vpr on G2 arrest and subsequent apoptosis were reversible. This study is the first to

  14. Nucleation and Arrest of Dynamic Fault Rupture on a Pressurized Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garagash, D.; Germanovich, L. N.

    2010-12-01

    Locally elevated pore pressure is a viable mechanism for reduction of fault strength and earthquake triggering. Possible sources of elevated pressure near faults that are associated with induced or triggered seismicity include (1) deep fluid injection into the crust (e.g., Healy et al, Science 1968); (2) fault-valve systems (inter-seismically impermeable fault transecting the suprahydrostatic pressure gradient, Sibson, Tectonophysics 1992); (3) metamorphic dehydration in thrust and normal fault systems. Although the mechanics of fault reactivation due to the pore pressure perturbation is generally well understood, there is a considerable lack of understanding of (1) the condition(s) under which the reactivation of fault slip leads to the nucleation of dynamic (earthquake) rupture; and (2) what is the extent of the dynamic rupture propagation before it is arrested (what separates micro-seismic events from earthquakes)? We address these questions by analyzing nucleation and possible arrest of the dynamic slip on a pressurized fault in the otherwise uniform background stress field. Evolving, locally-peaked pore pressure profile is generated by along-the-fault diffusion from a fluid source characterized by either a constant overpressure or constant flow rate. As a result, frictional strength of the fault, given by the product of the local normal effective stress and slip-weakening friction coefficient, reduces below the background stress within the pressurized region, which is expanding with time. This causes a shear crack, which growth is initially moderated by the pressure diffusion and, thus, quasi-static. The slip-weakening nature of friction suggests that the quasi-static growth may become eventually unstable, for example, leading to the nucleation of dynamic rupture. We extend the approach of Uenishi and Rice (JGR, 2003) to develop a solution for the extent of the nucleation patch and the time to the nucleation. A similar approach has been independently used by

  15. Current Pharmacological Advances in the Treatment of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andry Papastylianou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest is defined as the sudden cessation of spontaneous ventilation and circulation. Within 15 seconds of cardiac arrest, the patient loses consciousness, electroencephalogram becomes flat after 30 seconds, pupils dilate fully after 60 seconds, and cerebral damage takes place within 90–300 seconds. It is essential to act immediately as irreversible damage can occur in a short time. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through a broad range of interventions which are early defibrillation, high-quality and uninterrupted chest compressions, advanced airway interventions, and pharmacological interventions. Drugs should be considered only after initial shocks have been delivered (when indicated and chest compressions and ventilation have been started. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, no specific drug therapy has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge after cardiac arrest, and only few drugs have a proven benefit for short-term survival. This paper reviews current pharmacological treatment of cardiac arrest. There are three groups of drugs relevant to the management of cardiac arrest: vasopressors, antiarrhythmics, and other drugs such as sodium bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, atropine, fibrinolytic drugs, and corticosteroids.

  16. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiaolan, E-mail: huxiaolan1998@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Xianqi [The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Qiu, Shuifeng [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin [Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  17. Alphaherpesvirus Subversion of Stress-Induced Translational Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée L. Finnen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we provide an overview of translational arrest in eukaryotic cells in response to stress and the tactics used specifically by alphaherpesviruses to overcome translational arrest. One consequence of translational arrest is the formation of cytoplasmic compartments called stress granules (SGs. Many viruses target SGs for disruption and/or modification, including the alphaherpesvirus herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2. Recently, it was discovered that HSV-2 disrupts SG formation early after infection via virion host shutoff protein (vhs, an endoribonuclease that is packaged within the HSV-2 virion. We review this discovery and discuss the insights it has provided into SG biology as well as its potential significance in HSV-2 infection. A model for vhs-mediated disruption of SG formation is presented.

  18. Alphaherpesvirus Subversion of Stress-Induced Translational Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnen, Renée L.; Banfield, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of translational arrest in eukaryotic cells in response to stress and the tactics used specifically by alphaherpesviruses to overcome translational arrest. One consequence of translational arrest is the formation of cytoplasmic compartments called stress granules (SGs). Many viruses target SGs for disruption and/or modification, including the alphaherpesvirus herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Recently, it was discovered that HSV-2 disrupts SG formation early after infection via virion host shutoff protein (vhs), an endoribonuclease that is packaged within the HSV-2 virion. We review this discovery and discuss the insights it has provided into SG biology as well as its potential significance in HSV-2 infection. A model for vhs-mediated disruption of SG formation is presented. PMID:26999187

  19. Investigating Different ZnO Arresters Models against Transient Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Babaee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide surge arresters have dynamic characteristics that are significant for over voltage coordination studies involving fast front surges. Several models with acceptable accuracy have been proposed to simulate this frequency-dependent behavior. In this paper, various electrical models are presented for surge arrester performance simulation against lightning impulse. The desirable model is obtained by using simulation results of the existing models and experimental tests. The IEEE proposed model is a proportional model can give satisfactory results for discharge currents within a range of time to crest for 0.5 to 45 :s but due to no existing residual voltage resulting switching current on the manufacture's datasheets decrease its performance generally. In this study the maximum residual voltage due to current impulse is analyzed too. In additional, the amount of discharged energy by surge arrester is focused.

  20. Effect of early experience and adaptation period on voluntary intake, digestion, and growth in Barbarine lambs given tannin-containing (Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. foliage) or tannin-free (oaten hay) diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to determine whether experience early in life and adaptation time (up to 72 days) to tannin-rich diets affect feed intake, digestion, nitrogen balance, and growth in Barbarine lambs given tannin-containing (Acacia cyanophylla Lindl., acacia) or tannin-free (oaten hay) diets later in life. Twelve experienced lambs (live-weight, LW: 13.2 ± 2.0 kg) were divided into two equal groups. Each group received air-dried acacia (tannin-containing diet) or oaten hay (hay, tannin free-diet) ad libitum. Twelve other inexperienced lambs (LW 12.3 ± 2.5 kg) were also divided into two equal groups. Each group received one of the above two diets. All animals were 4 months old at the start of this experiment and were supplemented with 300 g concentrate. To investigate the carry-over effect of tannins, the acacia-diet was removed on day 73, thus all lambs received thereafter the hay-diet for a further 24 days before starting a 6-day faecal collection period. Irrespective to early experience and adaptation time, the nutritive value of hay-diet was higher than that of acacia-diet and consequently lambs given hay performed better than those receiving acacia (P = 0.0001). Animals exposed to tannins early in life exhibited higher digestible crude protein intake (P = 0.0389), retained more N (P = 0.0963) and excreted more allantoin in urine (P = 0.0248) than the inexperienced lambs. Except plasma urea (P = 0.2923), the adaptation period to experimental diets affected significantly all measured parameters (P 0.0001). Animals adapted to diets for only 6 days exhibited the lowest acacia or hay intake and the highest diet digestibility compared to those adapted to these diets for 24, 48 or 72 days. Weight losses of inexperienced lambs adapted to acacia-diet for 6 days were associated with negative nitrogen balance. Sheep which received the acacia-diet, followed by the hay diet, had similar hay intake, diet digestibility, N balance and growth rate as compared to those offered

  1. Effect of early experience and adaptation period on voluntary intake, digestion, and growth in Barbarine lambs given tannin-containing (Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. foliage) or tannin-free (oaten hay) diets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salem, H. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia)]. E-mail: bensalem.hichem@iresa.agrinet.tn; Nefzaouia, A.; Ben Salem, I. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia); Makkar, H.P.S. [Animal Production and Health Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Hochlef, H. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia); Ecole Superieure d' Agriculture de Mateur, Mateur (Tunisia); Ben Salem, L. [Office de l' Elevage et des Paturages, Tunis (Tunisia)

    2005-08-19

    Our objective was to determine whether experience early in life and adaptation time (up to 72 days) to tannin-rich diets affect feed intake, digestion, nitrogen balance, and growth in Barbarine lambs given tannin-containing (Acacia cyanophylla Lindl., acacia) or tannin-free (oaten hay) diets later in life. Twelve experienced lambs (live-weight, LW: 13.2 {+-} 2.0 kg) were divided into two equal groups. Each group received air-dried acacia (tannin-containing diet) or oaten hay (hay, tannin free-diet) ad libitum. Twelve other inexperienced lambs (LW 12.3 {+-} 2.5 kg) were also divided into two equal groups. Each group received one of the above two diets. All animals were 4 months old at the start of this experiment and were supplemented with 300 g concentrate. To investigate the carry-over effect of tannins, the acacia-diet was removed on day 73, thus all lambs received thereafter the hay-diet for a further 24 days before starting a 6-day faecal collection period. Irrespective to early experience and adaptation time, the nutritive value of hay-diet was higher than that of acacia-diet and consequently lambs given hay performed better than those receiving acacia (P = 0.0001). Animals exposed to tannins early in life exhibited higher digestible crude protein intake (P = 0.0389), retained more N (P = 0.0963) and excreted more allantoin in urine (P = 0.0248) than the inexperienced lambs. Except plasma urea (P = 0.2923), the adaptation period to experimental diets affected significantly all measured parameters (P 0.0001). Animals adapted to diets for only 6 days exhibited the lowest acacia or hay intake and the highest diet digestibility compared to those adapted to these diets for 24, 48 or 72 days. Weight losses of inexperienced lambs adapted to acacia-diet for 6 days were associated with negative nitrogen balance. Sheep which received the acacia-diet, followed by the hay diet, had similar hay intake, diet digestibility, N balance and growth rate as compared to those

  2. Oridonin induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of gallbladder cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallbladder cancer is the most frequent malignancy of the bile duct with high aggressive and extremely poor prognosis. The main objective of the paper was to investigate the inhibitory effects of oridonin, a diterpenoid isolated from Rabdosia rubescens, on gallbladder cancer both in vitro and in vivo and to explore the mechanisms underlying oridonin-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. The anti-tumor activity of oridonin on SGC996 and NOZ cells was assessed by the MTT and colony forming assays. Cell cycle changes were detected by flow cytometric analysis. Apoptosis was detected by annexin V/PI double-staining and Hoechst 33342 staining assays. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was observed by Rhodamine 123 staining. The in vivo efficacy of oridonin was evaluated using a NOZ xenograft model in athymic nude mice. The expression of cell cycle- and apoptosis-related proteins in vitro and in vivo was analyzed by western blot analysis. Activation of caspases (caspase-3, -8 and -9) was measured by caspases activity assay. Oridonin induced potent growth inhibition, S-phase arrest, apoptosis, and colony-forming inhibition in SGC996 and NOZ cells in a dose-dependent manner. Intraperitoneal injection of oridonin (5, 10, or 15 mg/kg) for 3 weeks significantly inhibited the growth of NOZ xenografts in athymic nude mice. We demonstrated that oridonin regulated cell cycle-related proteins in response to S-phase arrest by western blot analysis. In contrast, we observed inhibition of NF-κB nuclear translocation and an increase Bax/Bcl-2 ratio accompanied by activated caspase-3, caspase-9 and PARP-1 cleavage after treatment with oridonin, which indicate that the mitochondrial pathway is involved in oridonin-mediated apoptosis. Oridonin possesses potent anti-gallbladder cancer activities that correlate with regulation of the mitochondrial pathway, which is critical for apoptosis and S-phase arrest. Therefore, oridonin has potential as a novel anti-tumor therapy for the

  3. Checkpoint adaptation and recovery: back with Polo after the break

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, M.A.T.M. van; Medema, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    S. cerevisiae cells that are unable to repair a double strand break ultimately escape the DNA damage checkpoint arrest and enter mitosis. This process called 'adaptation' depends on functional Cdc5, a Polo-like kinase, and was long thought to be limited to single-cell organisms. However, the recent

  4. Checkpoint adaptation and recovery : back with Polo after the break

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, Marcel A T M; Medema, René H

    2004-01-01

    S. cerevisiae cells that are unable to repair a double strand break ultimately escape the DNA damage checkpoint arrest and enter mitosis. This process called 'adaptation' depends on functional Cdc5, a Polo-like kinase, and was long thought to be limited to single-cell organisms. However, the recent

  5. Inhibition of ileal and colonic ornithine decarboxylase activity by alpha-difluoromethylornithine in rats: transient atrophic changes and loss of postresectional adaptive growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsnorth, A N; Abu-Khalaf, M; LaMuraglia, G M; McCann, P P; Diekema, K A; Ross, J S; Malt, R A

    1986-06-01

    To determine the role of putrescine synthesis in adaptive hyperplasia of the ileum and colon, DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an enzyme-activated, irreversible inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the enzyme controlling putrescine biosynthesis, was fed to rats after excision of the proximal half of the small bowel. A rise in ODC activity (280% in the proximal ileum, 62% in the proximal colon) and a rise in putrescine content (220% in the proximal ileum, 250% in the proximal colon) normally accompanied characteristic cytochemical adaptive increases in the ileum and colon at day 6. Inclusion of 1% DFMO (2.1 gm/kg/day) in drinking water for 12 hours before operation and for 14 days thereafter decreased ODC activity by 85% to 96%, reduced levels of putrescine and spermidine and measurements of the adaptive response by 50% in the ileum, and abolished the adaptive response in the colon. During the first 10 days of DFMO feeding, villous atrophy and other hypoplastic changes occurred in control rats, but by 14 days of DFMO feeding atrophy and hypoplasia were no longer present. Although DFMO inhibits adaptive hyperplasia occurring in the ileum and colon of rats after resection of the proximal half of the small bowel, spontaneous recovery of villous atrophy occurs during further DFMO feeding and may protect the host during chemotherapy.

  6. Piperlongumine Suppresses Proliferation of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma through Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, San-Yuan; Liu, Geng-Hung; Chao, Wen-Ying; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yen; Lim, Yun-Ping; Lu, Chieh-Hsiang; Lai, Peng-Yeh; Chen, Hau-Ren; Lee, Ying-Ray

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), an aggressive cancer originating in the oral cavity, is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in males worldwide. This study investigated the antitumor activity and mechanisms of piperlongumine (PL), a natural compound isolated from Piper longum L., in human OSCC cells. The effects of PL on cell proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in human OSCC cells were investigated. PL effectively inhibited cell growth, caused cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis and senescence in OSCC cells. Moreover, PL-mediated anti-human OSCC behavior was inhibited by an ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment, suggesting that regulation of ROS was involved in the mechanism of the anticancer activity of PL. These findings suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth by regulating the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis and senescence and is a potential chemotherapy agent for human OSCC cells. PMID:27120594

  7. Piperlongumine Suppresses Proliferation of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma through Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Yuan Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, an aggressive cancer originating in the oral cavity, is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in males worldwide. This study investigated the antitumor activity and mechanisms of piperlongumine (PL, a natural compound isolated from Piper longum L., in human OSCC cells. The effects of PL on cell proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels in human OSCC cells were investigated. PL effectively inhibited cell growth, caused cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis and senescence in OSCC cells. Moreover, PL-mediated anti-human OSCC behavior was inhibited by an ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC treatment, suggesting that regulation of ROS was involved in the mechanism of the anticancer activity of PL. These findings suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth by regulating the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis and senescence and is a potential chemotherapy agent for human OSCC cells.

  8. Drug therapy in cardiac arrest: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Andreas; Djärv, Therese; Engdahl, Johan; Hollenberg, Jacob; Nordberg, Per; Ravn-Fischer, Annika; Ringh, Mattias; Rysz, Susanne; Svensson, Leif; Herlitz, Johan; Lundgren, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature on human studies of drug therapy in cardiac arrest during the last 25 years. In May 2015, a systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and CRD databases. Prospective interventional and observational studies evaluating a specified drug therapy in human cardiac arrest reporting a clinical endpoint [i.e. return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or survival] and published in English 1990 or later were included, whereas animal studies, case series and reports, studies of drug administration, drug pharmacology, non-specified drug therapies, preventive drug therapy, drug administration after ROSC, studies with primarily physiological endpoints, and studies of traumatic cardiac arrest were excluded. The literature search identified a total of 8936 articles. Eighty-eight articles met our inclusion criteria and were included in the review. We identified no human study in which drug therapy, compared with placebo, improved long-term survival. Regarding adrenaline and amiodarone, the drugs currently recommended in cardiac arrest, two prospective randomized placebo-controlled trials, were identified for adrenaline, and one for amiodarone, but they were all underpowered to detect differences in survival to hospital discharge. Of all reviewed studies, only one recent prospective study demonstrated improved neurological outcome with one therapy over another using a combination of vasopressin, steroids, and adrenaline as the intervention compared with standard adrenaline administration. The evidence base for drug therapy in cardiac arrest is scarce. However, many human studies on drug therapy in cardiac arrest have not been powered to identify differences in important clinical outcomes such as survival to hospital discharge and favourable neurological outcome. Efforts are needed to initiate large multicentre prospective randomized clinical trials to evaluate both currently recommended and

  9. Hypernegative Supercoiling Inhibits Growth by Causing RNA Degradation▿

    OpenAIRE

    Baaklini, Imad; Usongo, Valentine; Nolent, Flora; Sanscartier, Patrick; Hraiky, Chadi; Drlica, Karl; Drolet, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Transcription-induced hypernegative supercoiling is a hallmark of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (topA) mutants. However, its physiological significance has remained unclear. Temperature downshift of a mutant yielded transient growth arrest and a parallel increase in hypernegative supercoiling that was more severe with lower temperature. Both properties were alleviated by overexpression of RNase HI. While ribosomes in extracts showed normal activity when obtained during growth arrest, mRNA ...

  10. Increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest in obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam Jacoba; Blom, Marieke Tabo; Bardai, Abdennasser;

    2013-01-01

    . METHODS: A community-based case-control study was performed, with 1310 cases of SCA of the ARREST study and 5793 age, sex and SCA-date matched non-SCA controls from the PHARMO database. Only incident SCA cases, age older than 40 years, that resulted from unequivocal cardiac causes......BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine whether (1) patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (OPD) have an increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT/VF), and (2) the SCA risk is mediated by cardiovascular risk-profile and/or respiratory drug use...

  11. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westhall, Erik; Rossetti, Andrea O; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. METHODS: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists...... patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present...

  12. Cdc20 control of cell fate during prolonged mitotic arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The fate of cells arrested in mitosis by antimitotic compounds is complex but is influenced by competition between pathways promoting cell death and pathways promoting mitotic exit. As components of both of these pathways are regulated by Cdc20-dependent degradation, I hypothesize that variations...... in Cdc20 protein levels, rather than mutations in checkpoint genes, could affect cell fate during prolonged mitotic arrest. This hypothesis is supported by experiments where manipulation of Cdc20 levels affects the response to antimitotic compounds. The observed differences in Cdc20 levels between cell...

  13. Induction of G2/M arrest by pseudolaric acid B is mediated by activation of the ATM signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-guo MENG; Ling-lingJIANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of pseudolaric acid B (PLAB)-induced cell cycle arrest in human melanoma SK-28 cells. Methods: Cell growth inhibition was detected by MTT assay, the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry, and protein expression was examined by Western blot analysis.Results: PLAB inhibited the growth of human melanoma ceils and induced G2/M arrest in SK-28 cells, accompanied by an up-regulation of Cdc2 phosphorylation and a subsequent down-regulation of Cdc2 expression. Furthermore, PLAB decreased the expression of Cdc25C phosphatase and increased the expression of Wee1 kinase. Meanwhile, a reduction in Cdc2 activity was party due to induction of the expression of p21wsaf1/cip1 in a p53-dependent manner. In addition, PLAB activated the checkpoint kinase, Chk2, and increased the expression of p53, two major targets of ATM kinase. These effects were inhibited by caffeine, an ATM kinase inhibitor. We also found that PLAB significantly enhanced ATM kinase activity. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that PLAB induced G2/M arrest in human melanoma cells via a mechanism involving the activation of ATM, and the effect of PLAB on Cdc2 activity was mediated via interactions with the Chk2-Cdc25C and p53 signalling pathways, two distinct downstream pathways of ATM. PLAB may be a promising chemopreventive agent for treating human melanoma.

  14. Lysophosphatidate induces chemo-resistance by releasing breast cancer cells from taxol-induced mitotic arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Samadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Taxol is a microtubule stabilizing agent that arrests cells in mitosis leading to cell death. Taxol is widely used to treat breast cancer, but resistance occurs in 25-69% of patients and it is vital to understand how Taxol resistance develops to improve chemotherapy. The effects of chemotherapeutic agents are overcome by survival signals that cancer cells receive. We focused our studies on autotaxin, which is a secreted protein that increases tumor growth, aggressiveness, angiogenesis and metastasis. We discovered that autotaxin strongly antagonizes the Taxol-induced killing of breast cancer and melanoma cells by converting the abundant extra-cellular lipid, lysophosphatidylcholine, into lysophosphatidate. This lipid stimulates specific G-protein coupled receptors that activate survival signals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we determined the basis of these antagonistic actions of lysophosphatidate towards Taxol-induced G2/M arrest and cell death using cultured breast cancer cells. Lysophosphatidate does not antagonize Taxol action in MCF-7 cells by increasing Taxol metabolism or its expulsion through multi-drug resistance transporters. Lysophosphatidate does not lower the percentage of cells accumulating in G2/M by decreasing exit from S-phase or selective stimulation of cell death in G2/M. Instead, LPA had an unexpected and remarkable action in enabling MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 cells, which had been arrested in G2/M by Taxol, to normalize spindle structure and divide, thus avoiding cell death. This action involves displacement of Taxol from the tubulin polymer fraction, which based on inhibitor studies, depends on activation of LPA receptors and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work demonstrates a previously unknown consequence of lysophosphatidate action that explains why autotaxin and lysophosphatidate protect against Taxol-induced cell death and promote resistance to the action of this

  15. Crack arrest model for a piezoelectric strip subjected to Model loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Bhargava

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present paper aims at proposing a crack arrest model for an infinitely long narrow, poled ceramic strip weakened by a finite hairline straight crack when the edges of the strip are subjected to combined mechanical and electrical loads.Design/methodology/approach: (Model As a consequence of loads the rims of crack open forming a yield zone ahead of each tip of the crack. To arrest the crack from further opening the rims of the yield zones are subjected to normal cohesive quadratically varying yield point stress. Two cases are presented when edges of the strip are subjected to: Case-I~in-plane stresses and electrical displacement or Case-II~in-plane stresses and in-plane electric field. Problems are solved using Fourier integral transform method.Findings: The stress intensity factor, yield zone length, crack opening displacement, crack growth rate have been calculated. Their variation with respect to affecting parameters viz. yield zone length, width of the strip, material constant, electrical and mechanical loads has been depicted graphically.Research limitations/implications: The material of the strip is assumed mechanically brittle and electrically ductile consequently mechanically singularity is encountered first. The investigations in this paper are carried at this level. Also the crack yielding under the loads is considered small scale hence the yield zone is assumed to be lying on the line segment ahead of the crack.Practical implications: Piezoelectric ceramics are widely used as sensors and actuators, this necessity prompts the fracture study on such ceramics under different loading conditions.Originality/value: The paper gives an assessment of the quadratically varying load required to be prescribed on yield zones so as to arrest the opening of the crack. The investigations are useful to smart material design technology where sensors and actuators are manufactured.

  16. Crack arrest model for a piezoelectric strip subjected to Mode-I loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Bhargava

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present paper aims at proposing a crack arrest model for an infinitely long narrow, poledceramic strip weakened by a finite hairline straight crack when the edges of the strip are subjected to combinedmechanical and electrical loads.Design/methodology/approach: (Model As a consequence of loads the rims of crack open forming a yieldzone ahead of each tip of the crack. To arrest the crack from further opening the rims of the yield zones aresubjected to normal cohesive quadratically varying yield point stress. Two cases are presented when edges ofthe strip are subjected to: Case-I~in-plane stresses and electrical displacement or Case-II~in-plane stresses andin-plane electric field. Problems are solved using Fourier integral transform method.Findings: The stress intensity factor, yield zone length, crack opening displacement, crack growth rate havebeen calculated. Their variation with respect to affecting parameters viz. yield zone length, width of the strip,material constant, electrical and mechanical loads has been depicted graphically.Research limitations/implications: The material of the strip is assumed mechanically brittle and electricallyductile consequently mechanically singularity is encountered first. The investigations in this paper are carried atthis level. Also the crack yielding under the loads is considered small scale hence the yield zone is assumed tobe lying on the line segment ahead of the crack.Practical implications: Piezoelectric ceramics are widely used as sensors and actuators, this necessity promptsthe fracture study on such ceramics under different loading conditions.Originality/value: The paper gives an assessment of the quadratically varying load required to be prescribedon yield zones so as to arrest the opening of the crack. The investigations are useful to smart material designtechnology where sensors and actuators are manufactured.

  17. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy

  18. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer [Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Knox, Susan J., E-mail: sknox@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy.

  19. 多重外部因素下珠三角外贸企业适应性成长机制%Adaptive Growth Mechanism of Foreign Trade Enterprises in the Pearl River Delta with Multiple External Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁裕辉

    2012-01-01

    Multiple factors such as global social responsibility campaign, financial crisis, digital manufacturing, and virtual communities will change the ecological environment of the foreign trade enterprises in the Pearl River Delta. Through the a-nalysis on growth factors of foreign trade enterprises in the Pearl River Delta, its adaptive growth mechanism model has been constructed from the perspective of complex adaptive theory. Studies show that adaptive growth enterprises must be able to respond quickly to external environment' s change and reconstruct "internal model". Finally, in view of the multiple external factor, the paper puts forward the corresponding rapid response mechanisms consisting of technology innovation, system innovation, marketing innovation, and consciousness innovation.%全球社会责任运动、金融危机、制造业数字化、虚拟社区等多重因素将改变珠三角外贸企业的生态环境.基于复杂自适应理论的视角分析了影响珠三角外贸企业成长的因素,并构建了其适应性成长机制模型.研究结果表明:企业只有快速响应外部生态环境变化而重构“内部模型”,才能适应性成长.最后,针对目前多重外部因素的影响,提出了由技术创新、制度创新、营销创新、意识创新等构建的快速响应机制.

  20. Proteotoxic stress induces a cell-cycle arrest by stimulating Lon to degrade the replication initiator DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kristina; Liu, Jing; Chien, Peter; Laub, Michael T

    2013-08-01

    The decision to initiate DNA replication is a critical step in the cell cycle of all organisms. Cells often delay replication in the face of stressful conditions, but the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate in Caulobacter crescentus that proteotoxic stress induces a cell-cycle arrest by triggering the degradation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator. A depletion of available Hsp70 chaperone, DnaK, either through genetic manipulation or heat shock, induces synthesis of the Lon protease, which can directly degrade DnaA. Unexpectedly, we find that unfolded proteins, which accumulate following a loss of DnaK, also allosterically activate Lon to degrade DnaA, thereby ensuring a cell-cycle arrest. Our work reveals a mechanism for regulating DNA replication under adverse growth conditions. Additionally, our data indicate that unfolded proteins can actively and directly alter substrate recognition by cellular proteases. PMID:23911325

  1. Selection of Variants Utilizing Heparin Sulphate For Cell Entry When South African Territories Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus is Adapted for Growth on Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) attains entry to epithelial cells by affinity for at least four members of the integrin family of receptors. Adaptation of field isolates to grow in cultured cells is an essential step towards development of vaccines against new outbreak strains. This is made poss...

  2. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  3. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald;

    2013-01-01

    intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations. He was discharged in good health after 14 days. This case report emphasises both the importance...

  4. Design of Lightning Arresters for Electrical Power Systems Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehab Abdulwadood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of how the lightning strikes and their effects on power distribution systems can be modeled, where the results give a clear picture of how to eliminate the devastating impact, caused by lightning, by using lightning arresters. The program ATP-Draw (Alternative Transient Program was used to simulate the problem and was applied on a part of a power network.The simulation was done once when the lightning strikes a transmission line and a substation with no lightning arresters in use and once more with their use. The source of the lightning was represented by the ATP models (Type-15 surge function and Type-13 ramp function and the surge arrester was represented by the MOV-Type 92 component. The voltage was recorded at the substation 110/22 kV and at all loads in the electric network, and was drawn by the PlotXWin program. The results obtained indicate that the voltages induced by the lightning can reach values of the order of millions over insulation flashover levels for 22 kV equipment, where is clearly seen in Fig. 12 to 16 and Tab.10, which requires the installation of lightning arresters.

  5. Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Heart360 Cardiovascular Conditions • Conditions Home • Arrhythmia and Atrial Fibrillation • Cardiac Arrest • Cardiac Rehab • Cardiomyopathy • Cardiovascular Conditions of Childhood • Cholesterol • Congenital Heart Defects • Diabetes • Heart Attack • Heart Failure (HF) • Heart Valve Problems and Disease • High Blood ...

  6. Ventilation and gas exchange management after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherasan, Yuda; Raimondo, Pasquale; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    For several decades, physicians had integrated several interventions aiming to improve the outcomes in post-cardiac arrest patients. However, the mortality rate after cardiac arrest is still as high as 50%. Post-cardiac arrest syndrome is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to not only poor neurological outcome and cardiovascular failure but also respiratory dysfunction. To minimize ventilator-associated lung injury, protective mechanical ventilation by using low tidal volume ventilation and driving pressure may decrease pulmonary complications and improve survival. Low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can be initiated and titrated with careful cardiac output and respiratory mechanics monitoring. Furthermore, optimizing gas exchange by avoiding hypoxia and hyperoxia as well as maintaining normocarbia may improve neurological and survival outcome. Early multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation intervention is recommended. Minimally invasive monitoring techniques, that is, echocardiography, transpulmonary thermodilution method measuring extravascular lung water, as well as transcranial Doppler ultrasound, might be useful to improve appropriate management of post-cardiac arrest patients. PMID:26670813

  7. Bad Behavior : Delinquency, Arrest and Early School Leaving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ward, Shannon; Williams, J.; van Ours, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of delinquency and arrest on school leaving using information on males from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. We use a multivariate mixed proportional hazard framework in order to account for common unobserved confounders and reverse causality.

  8. Collapse arresting in an inhomogeneous quintic nonlinear Schrodinger model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Schjødt-Eriksen, Jens; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1999-01-01

    Collapse of (1 + 1)-dimensional beams in the inhomogeneous one-dimensional quintic nonlinear Schrodinger equation is analyzed both numerically and analytically. It is shown that in the vicinity of a narrow attractive inhomogeneity, the collapse of beams in which the homogeneous medium would blow ...... may be delayed and even arrested. [S1063-651X(99)03610-7]....

  9. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is insufficient knowledge of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the very young. OBJECTIVES: This nationwide study sought to examine age-stratified OHCA characteristics and the role of parental socioeconomic differences and its contribution to mortality in the young...

  10. Chemical Society Reinstates Iranian Chemists; Iranian-American Scholar Arrested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollag, Burton

    2007-01-01

    The frosty relationship between the United States and Iran has created a chill in many areas of scholarly endeavor. One resulting battle, over whether Iranian scholars can belong to the American Chemical Society, has been largely resolved. But a new imbroglio looms with the arrest of a prominent U.S.-Iranian scholar who was visiting Tehran. The…

  11. Parenting and Women Arrested for Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Catherine A.; Lehmann, Peter; Dia, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the relationship between parenting and women's use of violence the current study surveyed 106 mothers arrested for intimate partner violence (IPV) related crimes on parenting styles and attitudes toward when using violence against their partner is justified. Findings indicate parenting styles indicative of low belief in using physical…

  12. Mechanisms of immunosuppression by organotins : apoptosis vs. proliferative arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gennari, Alessandra

    2001-01-01

    Mechanisms of immunosuppression by organotins-apoptosis vs. proliferative arrest. The organotin compounds di-n-butyltin dichloride (DBTC) and trin-butyltin chloride (TBTC), used as stabilizers and biocides respectively, induce thymus atrophy inhibiting immature thymocyte proliferation. The aim of

  13. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... distributed differently into an architectural body. We also examine what might occur when light is dynamic and able to change colour, intensity and direction, and when it is adaptive and can be brought into interaction with its surroundings. In short, what happens to an architectural space when artificial...

  14. Mechanisms involved in ceramide-induced cell cycle arrest in human hepatocarcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Xiao-Wen Lv; Jie-Ping Shi; Xiao-Song Hu

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effect of ceramide on the cell cycle in human hepatocarcinoma Bel7402 cells.Possible molecular mechanisms were explored.METHODS:[3-(4,5)-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(MTT)assay,plasmid transfection,reporter assay,FACS and Western blotting analyses were employed to investigate the effect and the related molecular mechanisms of C2-ceramide on the cell cycle of Bel7402 cells.RESULTS:C2-ceramide was found to inhibit the growth of Bel7402 cells by inducing cell cycle arrest.During the process,the expression of p21 protein increased,while that of cyclinD1,phospho-ERK1/2 and c-myc decreased.Furthermore,the level of CDK7 was downregulated,while the transcriptional activity of PPARγ was upregulated.Addition of GW9662,which is a PPARγ specific antagonist,could reserve the modulation action on CDK7.CONCLUSION:Our results support the hypothesis that cell cycle arrest induced by C2-ceramide may be mediated via accumulation of p21 and reduction of cyclinD1 and CDK7,at least partly,through PPARγ activation.The ERK signaling pathway was involved in this process.

  15. Tea pigments induce cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Dong Jia; Chi Han; Jun-Shi Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the molecular mechanisms by which tea pigments exert preventive effects on liver carcinogenesis.METHODS: HepG2 cells were seeded at a density of 5×105/well in six-well culture dishes and incubated overnight. The cells then were treated with various concentrations of tea pigments over 3 d, harvested by trypsinization, and counted using a hemocytometer. Flow cytometric analysis was performed by a flow cytometer after propidium iodide labeling. Bcl-2 and p21WAF1 proteins were determined by Western blotting. In addition, DNA laddering assay was performed on treated and untreated cultured HepG2 cells.RESULTS: Tea pigments inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis showed that tea pigments arrested cell cycle progression at G1 phase. DNA laddering was used to investigate apoptotic cell death, and the result showed that 100 mg/L of tea pigments caused typical DNA laddering. Our study also showed that tea pigments induced upregulation of p21WAF1 protein and downregulation of Bcl-2 protein.CONCLUSION: Tea pigments induce cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Tea pigments may be used as an ideal chemopreventive agent.

  16. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Induces DU145 Cell Cycle Arrest through Cdk5 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Lin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, the active form of vitamin A, plays an important role in the growth arrest of numerous types of cancer cells. It has been indicated that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 activity can be affected by ATRA treatment. Our previous results demonstrate the involvement of Cdk5 in the fate of prostate cancer cells. The purpose of this study is to examine whether Cdk5 is involved in ATRA-induced growth arrest of the castration-resistant cancer cell line DU145 through up-regulating Cdk inhibitor protein, p27. Methods: DU145 cells were treated with ATRA, and cell proliferation, protein expression, and protein localization of Cdk5/p27 were examined. Cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution were also determined under Cdk5 inhibition induced by inhibitor or knockdown. Results: ATRA treatment inhibited DU145 cell proliferation and significantly increased p27 expression through Cdk5 up-regulation. Immunocytochemical data showed that a Cdk5 inhibitor reduced ATRA-triggered nuclear distribution of p27 in DU145 cells. The proliferation inhibition and G1 phase accumulation of DU145 cells were significantly increased by ATRA treatment, whereas Cdk5 inhibitor and siRNA could reverse these effects. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that ATRA induced growth inhibition in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells through activating Cdk5 and p27. We hope this finding will increase the knowledge of prostate cancer treatment and can be applied in patients' nutritional control in the future.

  17. U.S. Juvenile Arrests: Gang Membership, Social Class, and Labeling Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the link between gang membership and arrest frequency, exploring the Gang x Socioeconomic status interaction on those arrests. Notoriously poor, delinquent, and often well-known to police, America's gang youth should have very high odds of arrest. Yet it is unclear whether mere membership in a gang increases the risk of arrest…

  18. 8 CFR 287.3 - Disposition of cases of aliens arrested without warrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... satisfied that there is prima facie evidence that the arrested alien was entering, attempting to enter, or... REGULATIONS FIELD OFFICERS; POWERS AND DUTIES § 287.3 Disposition of cases of aliens arrested without warrant... unnecessary delay, the arresting officer, if the conduct of such examination is a part of the duties...

  19. Mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation in in-hospital cardiac arrest : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lameijer, Heleen; Immink, Rosa S.; Broekema, Josien J.; Ter Maaten, Jan C.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing rates of in-hospital cardiac arrest, improving resuscitation outcomes is essential. Mechanical chest compressors seem to be related to improved outcome in out-of hospital cardiac arrest; however, the literature on its use in in-hospital cardiac arrest is scarce. We used the Medline p

  20. Gender and Relational-Distance Effects in Arrests for Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, William; DeMaris, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    This study tests two hypotheses regarding factors affecting arrest of the perpetrator in domestic violence incidents. Black's relational-distance thesis is that the probability of arrest increases with increasing relational distance between perpetrator and victim. Klinger's leniency principle suggests that the probability of arrest is lower for…

  1. 30 CFR 77.508-1 - Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508-1 Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings. Lightning arresters protecting exposed telephone wires entering buildings shall be provided...

  2. 30 CFR 75.521 - Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.521 Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed power conductors and... leads underground shall be equipped with suitable lightning arresters of approved type within 100...

  3. 30 CFR 77.508 - Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed... arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires. All ungrounded, exposed power conductors and telephone wires shall be equipped with suitable lightning arresters which are...

  4. 10 CFR 1049.6 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force. 1049... OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.6 Exercise of arrest authority—Use of non-deadly force. (a) When a Protective Force Officer is authorized to make an arrest...

  5. 10 CFR 1049.7 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force. 1049.7 Section 1049.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.7 Exercise of arrest...

  6. Survival of Phenotypic Information during Cellular Growth Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J Christian J

    2016-08-19

    Phenotypic memory can predispose cells to physiological outcomes, contribute to heterogeneity in cellular populations, and allow computation of environmental features, such as nutrient gradients. In bacteria and synthetic circuits in general, memory can often be set by protein concentrations: because of the relative stability of proteins, the degradation rate is often dominated by the growth rate, and inheritance is a significant factor. Cells can then be primed to respond to events that recur with frequencies faster than the time to eliminate proteins. Protein memory can be extended if cells reach extremely low growth rates or no growth. Here we characterize the necessary time scales for different quantities of protein memory, measured as relative entropy (Kullback-Leibler divergence), for a variety of cellular growth arrest transition dynamics. We identify a critical manifold in relative protein degradation/growth arrest time scales where information is, in principle, preserved indefinitely because proteins are trapped at a concentration determined by the competing time scales as long as nongrowth-mediated protein degradation is negligible. We next asked what characteristics of growth arrest dynamics and initial protein distributions best preserve or eliminate information about previous environments. We identified that sharp growth arrest transitions with skewed initial protein distributions optimize flexibility, with information preservation and minimal cost of residual protein. As a result, a nearly memoryless regime, corresponding to a form of bet-hedging, may be an optimal strategy for storage of information by protein concentrations in growth-arrested cells. PMID:26910476

  7. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... the investigations of lighting scenarios carried out in two test installations: White Cube and White Box. The test installations are discussed as large-scale experiential instruments. In these test installations we examine what could potentially occur when light using LED technology is integrated and...

  8. Association of national initiatives to improve cardiac arrest management with rates of bystander intervention and patient survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Lippert, Freddy K.; Folke, Fredrik;

    2013-01-01

    resuscitation was attempted were identified between 2001 and 2010 in the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Of 29 111 patients with cardiac arrest, we excluded those with presumed noncardiac cause of arrest (n = 7390) and those with cardiac arrests witnessed by emergency medical services personnel (n......IMPORTANCE Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a major health problem associated with poor outcomes. Early recognition and intervention are critical for patient survival. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is one factor among many associated with improved survival. OBJECTIVE To examine...... temporal changes in bystander resuscitation attempts and survival during a 10-year period in which several national initiatives were taken to increase rates of bystander resuscitation and improve advanced care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for which...

  9. Adaptive Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Provides information on various adaptive technology resources available to people with disabilities. (Contains 19 references, an annotated list of 129 websites, and 12 additional print resources.) (JOW)

  10. ADAPT Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT) Project Lead: Scott Poll Subject Fault diagnosis in electrical power systems Description The Advanced...

  11. Resource allocation among sexual, clonal reproduction and vegetative growth of two Potamogeton species and their hybrid:Adaptability of the hybrid in relation to its parents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan LIU; Xiao-Lin ZHANG; Qing-Feng WANG; Hui LIU; Guang-Xi WANG; Wei LI

    2013-01-01

    Resource allocation,as well as the tradeoffs among different reproductive components,plays an important role in the adaptability of plants to different environments.The hybrid may exhibit a higher adaptability in life history in heterogeneous environments because of the genetic variation derived from its parents.In this study,we exploited three levels of water depths and two types of sediments to investigate the resource allocation pattern of the first generation of the natural hybrid Potamogeton × intortifolius compared to its parents P.wrightii and P.perfoliatus.We also measured the ramet survivorship and the seed set of the hybrid P.× intortifolius.Our results showed that P.×intortifolius had higher ramet survival than its parents at 1.5-m water depth on clay sediment.The possible tradeoffs showed that in P.×intortifolius the tradeoff pattern between sexual and clonal reproduction was more pronounced in limiting environments.The individuals allocated more resources to sexual reproduction when the environment was limiting,which might confer a higher ability to utilize resources,to produce offspring and to found new populations.Although the seed set of P.×intortifolius was lower than its parents,it had a higher ability to increase its seed set when the environment was limiting (sandy sediment) than its parents,which might benefit its future survival.These results indicated that the F1 hybrid P.×intortifolius was more able to adapt to limiting environments than one or both of its two parental taxa.

  12. Use of Adaptive Laboratory Evolution To Discover Key Mutations Enabling Rapid Growth of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 on Glucose Minimal Medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaCroix, Ryan A.; Sandberg, Troy E.; O'Brien, Edward J.;

    2015-01-01

    using a gene classification system alone. The methods described here represent a powerful combination of technologies to increase the speed and efficiency of ALE studies. The identified mutations can be examined as genetic parts for increasing growth rate in a desired strain and for understanding rapid...

  13. Isocorydine inhibits cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines by inducing G2/m cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hefen Sun

    Full Text Available The treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cell lines with (+-isocorydine, which was isolated and purified from Papaveraceae sp. plants, resulted in a growth inhibitory effect caused by the induction of G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We report that isocorydine induces G2/M phase arrest by increasing cyclin B1 and p-CDK1 expression levels, which was caused by decreasing the expression and inhibiting the activation of Cdc25C. The phosphorylation levels of Chk1 and Chk2 were increased after ICD treatment. Furthermore, G2/M arrest induced by ICD can be disrupted by Chk1 siRNA but not by Chk2 siRNA. In addition, isocorydine treatment led to a decrease in the percentage of CD133(+ PLC/PRF/5 cells. Interestingly, isocorydine treatment dramatically decreased the tumorigenicity of SMMC-7721 and Huh7 cells. These findings indicate that isocorydine might be a potential therapeutic drug for the chemotherapeutic treatment of HCC.

  14. PLK1 blockade enhances therapeutic effects of radiation by inducing cell cycle arrest at the mitotic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Minoru; Yoshimura, Michio; Kobayashi, Minoru; Morinibu, Akiyo; Itasaka, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Harada, Hiroshi

    2015-10-27

    The cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation depends on the cell cycle phase; therefore, its pharmacological manipulation, especially the induction of cell cycle arrest at the radiosensitive mitotic-phase (M-phase), has been attempted for effective radiation therapy. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine/threonine kinase that functions in mitotic progression, and is now recognized as a potential target for radiosensitization. We herein investigated whether PLK1 blockade enhanced the cytotoxic effects of radiation by modulating cell cycle phases of cancer cells using the novel small molecule inhibitor of PLK1, TAK-960. The TAK-960 treatment exhibited radiosensitizing effects in vitro, especially when it increased the proportion of M-phase cells. TAK-960 did not sensitize cancer cells to radiation when an insufficient amount of time was provided to induce mitotic arrest. The overexpression of a PLK1 mutant, PLK1-R136G&T210D, which was confirmed to cancel the TAK-960-mediated increase in the proportion of mitotic cells, abrogated the radiosensitizing effects of TAK-960. A tumor growth delay assay also demonstrated that the radiosensitizing effects of TAK-960 depended on an increase in the proportion of M-phase cells. These results provide a rational basis for targeting PLK1 for radiosensitization when considering the therapeutic time window for M-phase arrest as the best timing for radiation treatments.

  15. Induction of Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Colorectal Carcinoma by Litchi Seed Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Hsu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Litchi (Litchi chinensis fruit products possess rich amounts of flavanoids and proanthocyanidins. Its pericarp has been shown to inhibit breast and liver cancer cell growth. However, the anticolorectal cancer effect of Litchi seed extract has not yet been reported. In this study, the effects of polyphenol-rich Litchi seed ethanol extract (LCSP on the proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis of two colorectal cancer cell lines Colo320DM and SW480 were examined. The results demonstrated that LCSP significantly induced apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner and arrested cell cycle in G2/M in colorectal carcinoma cells. LCSP also suppressed cyclins and elevated the Bax : Bcl-2 ratio and caspase 3 activity. This study provides in vitro evidence that LCSP serves as a potential chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer.

  16. The use of COD and plastic instability in crack propagation and arrest in shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, F.; Ratwani, M.

    1974-01-01

    The initiation, growth, and possible arrest of fracture in cylindrical shells containing initial defects are dealt with. For those defects which may be approximated by a part-through semi-elliptic surface crack which is sufficiently shallow so that part of the net ligament in the plane of the crack is still elastic, the existing flat plate solution is modified to take into account the shell curvature effect as well as the effect of the thickness and the small scale plastic deformations. The problem of large defects is then considered under the assumptions that the defect may be approximated by a relatively deep meridional part-through surface crack and the net ligament through the shell wall is fully yielded. The results given are based on an 8th order bending theory of shallow shells using a conventional plastic strip model to account for the plastic deformations around the crack border.

  17. Thermal Arrest Memory Effect in Ni-Mn-Ga Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rudajevova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilatation characteristics were measured to investigate the thermal arrest memory effect in Ni53.6Mn27.1Ga19.3 and Ni54.2Mn29.4Ga16.4 alloys. Interruption of the martensite-austenite phase transformation is connected with the reduction of the sample length after thermal cycle. If a total phase transformation took place in the complete thermal cycle following the interruption, then the sample length would return to its original length. Analysis of these results has shown that the thermal arrest memory effect is a consequence of a stress-focusing effect and shape memory effect. The stress-focusing effect occurs when the phase transformation propagates radially in a cylindrical sample from the surface, inward to the center. Evolution and release of the thermoelastic deformations in both alloys during heating and cooling are analyzed.

  18. Arrest of rapid crack propagation in polymer pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flueler, P.; Farshad, M. [EMPA, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    1995-12-31

    The design of rapid crack arresters for polymer pipes was studied. Mechanisms that would inhibit a running crack and strengthen existing pipes against dynamic fracture and to enhance their degree of safety were examined. The crack arresters examined were based on the principle that rapid crack propagation (RCP) could not occur in pipe walls that were less than a `critical thickness`. Sections of pipe whose walls were thinned were reinforced with a reinforcing ring. Another variation was to produce a pipe with partially adhered multilayer walls. A third variation tried was a multi-layer pipe segment with a damping element and reinforcing rings. Experiments were successful in reducing RCP, but these preliminary results were considered exploratory and would require further confirmation. 2 figs., 8 refs.

  19. The pRB-related protein p107 contains two growth suppression domains : independent interactions with E2F and cyclin/cdk complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, L.; Enders, G.; Lees, J.A.; Beijersbergen, R.L.; Bernards, R.A.; Harlow, E.

    1995-01-01

    Unregulated expression of either the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) or the related protein p107 can cause growth arrest of sensitive cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. However, growth arrests mediated by p107 and pRB are not identical. Through structure-function and co-expression analyses we hav

  20. Arresting Strategy Based on Dynamic Criminal Networks Changing over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqing Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a sequence of dynamic criminal networks on a time series based on the dynamic network analysis (DNA. According to the change of networks’ structure, networks’ variation trend is analyzed to forecast its future structure. Finally, an optimal arresting time and priority list are designed based on our analysis. Better results can be expected than that based on social network analysis (SNA.

  1. Comments on metal oxide surge arresters surges energy absorption capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.L.B. [Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Zanetta, L.C. Jr. [E. Politecnica Univ. de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents an approach to determine the energy absorption capacity of metal oxide surge arrester resistors. The proposed approach deals with the discharge current peak versus discharge current time relation. A testing method and a statistical evaluation are proposed. After determining the discharge current withstanding limit of the tested metal oxide resistors, the prospective energy absorption capacity limit is computed. Finally, comments on the obtained results are presented.

  2. Hyperoxia toxicity after cardiac arrest: What is the evidence?

    OpenAIRE

    Llitjos, Jean-François; Mira, Jean-Paul; Duranteau, Jacques; Cariou, Alain

    2016-01-01

    This review gives an overview of current knowledge on hyperoxia pathophysiology and examines experimental and human evidence of hyperoxia effects after cardiac arrest. Oxygen plays a pivotal role in critical care management as a lifesaving therapy through the compensation of the imbalance between oxygen requirements and supply. However, growing evidence sustains the hypothesis of reactive oxygen species overproduction-mediated toxicity during hyperoxia, thus exacerbating organ failure by vari...

  3. Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome have successful embryo arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Baoli; Hao, Haoying; Wei, Duo; Song, Xiaobing; Xie, Juanke; Zhang, Cuilian

    2015-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we investigate the relationship between embryo arrest and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) during in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET). In this study, 667 subjects were enrolled, including 330 patients with PCOS and 337 subjects without PCOS. The subjects underwent in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection and embryo transfer (IVF/ICSI-ET) cycles at the Reproductive Medical Centre of Henan Provincial Hospital from January 2009 to December ...

  4. ADULTHOOD ANIMAL ABUSE AMONG MEN ARRESTED FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Febres, Jeniimarie; Brasfield, Hope; Shorey, Ryan C.; Elmquist, Joanna; Ninnemann, Andrew; Schonbrun, Yael C.; Temple, Jeff R.; Recupero, Patricia R.; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Learning more about intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators could aid the development of more effective treatments. The prevalence of adulthood animal abuse (AAA) perpetration and its association with IPV perpetration, antisociality, and alcohol use in 307 men arrested for domestic violence was examined. 41% (n = 125) of the men committed at least one act of animal abuse since the age of 18, in contrast to the 3.0% prevalence rate reported by men in the general population. Controlling fo...

  5. Nontrapping arrest of Langmuir wave damping near the threshold amplitude

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, A.V.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2005-01-01

    Evolution of a Langmuir wave is studied numerically for finite amplitudes slightly above the threshold which separates damping from nondamping cases. Arrest of linear damping is found to be a second-order effect due to ballistic evolution of perturbations, resonant power transfer between field and particles, and organization of phase space into a positive slope for the average distribution function $f_{av}$ around the resonant wave phase speed $v_\\phi$. Near the threshold trapping in the wave...

  6. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion

    OpenAIRE

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald; Jensen, Svend Eggert

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral thiamine has a very high safety profile. The most common adverse effect is local irritation; however, anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions may occur, mostly related to intravenous administration. We describe a 44-year-old man, a chronic alcoholic, who was admitted with alcohol intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations....

  7. Luminescence from Tube-Arrest Bubbles in Pure Glycerin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈岐岱; 王龙

    2004-01-01

    Single transient cavitation bubble with luminescence has been generated in pure glycerin by using the ‘tube arrest'method. The analyses of high-speed photograph and light emission data suggest that the light emission would be a single bubble sonoluminescence. The luminescence pulse width is observed to wry from sub-nanosecond to about 30 ns. The width and intensity of luminescence pulses increases with the height of the liquid column height and decreases with the liquid temperature.

  8. Characteristics of in-hospital cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Ivić

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim We have studied epidemiology of in-hospital cardiac arrest, characteristics of organizing a reanimationand its,procedures as well as its documenting.Methods We analyzed all resuscitation procedure data where anesthesiology reanimation teams (RT providedcardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR during one-year period. We included resuscitation attemptsthat were initiated outside the Department of Anesthesiology, excluding incidents in operation rooms andIntensive Care Unit (ICU. Data on every cardiac arrest and CPR were entered in a special form.Results During one-year period 87 CPR were performed. Victims of cardiac arrest were principallyelderly patients (age 60 – 80, mostly male (60%. Most frequent victims were neurological patients(42%, surgical patients (21% and neurosurgical patients (10%. The leading cause of cardiac arrestwas primary heart disease, following neurological diseases and respiration disorders of severe etiology.In over 90% cases CPR was initiated by medical personnel in their respective departments, RT arrivedwithin 5 minutes in 73,56% cases. Initially survival was 32%, but full recovery was accomplished in 4patients out of 87 (4,6%.Conclusion Victims of cardiac arrest are patients whose primary disease contributes to occurrence ofcardiorespiratory complications. High mortality and low percentage of full recovery can be explainedby characteristics of patients (old age, nature and seriousness of primary disease which significantly affectthe outcome of CPR. In some cases a question is raised whether to initiate the CPR at all. We wouldlike to point out that continous monitoring of potentially critical patients may prevent cardiorespiratoryincidents whereas the quality and success of CPR may be improved by training of staff and better technicalequipment on the relevant locations in the in the hospital where such incidents usually occur.

  9. Advances in crack-arrest technology for reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is continuing to improve the understanding of conditions that govern the initiation, rapid propagation, arrest, and ductile tearing of cracks in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This paper describes recent advances in a coordinated effort being conducted under the HSST Program by ORNL and several subcontracting groups to develop the crack-arrest data base and the analytical tools required to construct inelastic dynamic fracture models for RPV steels. Large-scale tests are being carried out to generate crack-arrest toughness data at temperatures approaching and above the onset of Charpy upper-shelf behavior. Small- and intermediate-size specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading are being developed and tested to provide additional fracture data for RPV steels. Viscoplastic effects are being included in dynamic fracture models and computer programs and their utility validated through analyses of data from carefully controlled experiments. Recent studies are described that examine convergence problems associated with energy-based fracture parameters in viscoplastic-dynamic fracture applications. Alternative techniques that have potential for achieving convergent solutions for fracture parameters in the context of viscoplastic-dynamic models are discussed. 46 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Hyperoxia toxicity after cardiac arrest: What is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llitjos, Jean-François; Mira, Jean-Paul; Duranteau, Jacques; Cariou, Alain

    2016-12-01

    This review gives an overview of current knowledge on hyperoxia pathophysiology and examines experimental and human evidence of hyperoxia effects after cardiac arrest. Oxygen plays a pivotal role in critical care management as a lifesaving therapy through the compensation of the imbalance between oxygen requirements and supply. However, growing evidence sustains the hypothesis of reactive oxygen species overproduction-mediated toxicity during hyperoxia, thus exacerbating organ failure by various oxidative cellular injuries. In the cardiac arrest context, evidence of hyperoxia effects on outcome is fairly conflicting. Although prospective data are lacking, retrospective studies and meta-analysis suggest that hyperoxia could be associated with an increased mortality. However, data originate from retrospective, heterogeneous and inconsistent studies presenting various biases that are detailed in this review. Therefore, after an original and detailed analysis of all experimental and clinical studies, we herein provide new ideas and concepts that could participate to improve knowledge on oxygen toxicity and help in developing further prospective controlled randomized trials on this topic. Up to now, the strategy recommended by international guidelines on cardiac arrest (i.e., targeting an oxyhemoglobin saturation of 94-98 %) should be applied in order to avoid deleterious hypoxia and potent hyperoxia. PMID:27003426

  11. Isolation Syndrome after Cardiac Arrest and Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgacs, Peter B; Fridman, Esteban A; Goldfine, Andrew M; Schiff, Nicholas D

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the first description of an isolation syndrome in a patient who suffered prolonged cardiac arrest and underwent a standard therapeutic hypothermia protocol. Two years after the arrest, the patient demonstrated no motor responses to commands, communication capabilities, or visual tracking at the bedside. However, resting neuronal metabolism and electrical activity across the entire anterior forebrain was found to be normal despite severe structural injuries to primary motor, parietal, and occipital cortices. In addition, using quantitative electroencephalography, the patient showed evidence for willful modulation of brain activity in response to auditory commands revealing covert conscious awareness. A possible explanation for this striking dissociation in this patient is that altered neuronal recovery patterns following therapeutic hypothermia may lead to a disproportionate preservation of anterior forebrain cortico-thalamic circuits even in the setting of severe hypoxic injury to other brain areas. Compared to recent reports of other severely brain-injured subjects with such dissociation of clinically observable (overt) and covert behaviors, we propose that this case represents a potentially generalizable mechanism producing an isolation syndrome of blindness, motor paralysis, and retained cognition as a sequela of cardiac arrest and therapeutic hypothermia. Our findings further support that highly-preserved anterior cortico-thalamic integrity is associated with the presence of conscious awareness independent from the degree of injury to other brain areas. PMID:27375420

  12. Effect of walking stress on growth, physiological adaptability and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes in a semi-arid tropical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Maurya, Vijai P.; Naqvi, Syed M. K.

    2012-03-01

    Sheep in hot semi-arid environments are mostly reared using extensive systems. In addition to thermal stress and feed scarcity, the animals need to walk long distances for grazing in this ecological zone. A study was conducted to assess the effect of long-distance walking on adaptive capability in terms of physiological, biochemical and endocrine responses in Malpura ewes. Fourteen adult Malpura non-pregnant ewes weighing between 33 and 35 kg were used in the study. The ewes were randomly allocated into two groups of seven animals each: GI ( n = 7; Control), and GII ( n = 7; walking stress). The animals were stall-fed with a diet consisting of 70% roughage and 30% concentrate. Both GI and GII ewes had uniform access to feed and water. The walking stress group (GII) ewes were made to walk 14 km in two spans between 0900 and 1500 hours with 1 h 30 min for each span (7 km) of walking. The ewes subjected to walking stress (GII) were prevented from grazing by applying a face mask made of cotton thread. The study was conducted for a period of two estrous cycles (35 days) during the autumn season (October-November). Physiological responses were recorded twice daily at 0800 and 1400 hours at weekly intervals. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein at weekly intervals to study the effects of walking stress on blood biochemical and endocrine parameters. The results indicate that walking stress had significant ( P < 0.05) influence on body weight, average daily gain, respiration rate (RR), rectal temperature (RT), haemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), plasma glucose, calcium, phosphorus, aspartate amino transferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT), tri-iodo-thyronine (T3), thyroxin (T4), and cortisol. However, walking stress did not influence the reproductive hormone levels. The significant changes in RR, RT, plasma cortisol, T3 and T4 show that Malpura ewes have the capability to adapt to long-distance walking, and that adrenal and thyroid gland

  13. Molecular interplay between cdk4 and p21 dictates G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gulappa, Thippeswamy; Reddy, Ramadevi Subramani; Suman, Suman; Nyakeriga, Alice M; Damodaran, Chendil

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of 3, 9-dihydroxy-2-prenylcoumestan (pso), a furanocoumarin, on PC-3 and C4-2B castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cell lines. Pso caused significant G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibition of cell growth. Molecular analysis of cyclin (D1, D2, D3, and E), cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) (cdks 2, 4, and 6), and cdk inhibitor (p21 and p27) expression suggested transcriptional regulation of the cdk inhibitors and more significant downregulation of cdk4 than of...

  14. Descriptive Analysis of Medication Administration During Inpatient Cardiopulmonary Arrest Resuscitation (from the Mayo Registry for Telemetry Efficacy in Arrest Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipelisky, David; Ray, Jordan; Matcha, Gautam; Roy, Archana; Dumitrascu, Adrian; Harris, Dana; Bosworth, Veronica; Clark, Brooke; Thomas, Colleen S; Heckman, Michael G; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Kusumoto, Fred; Burton, M Caroline

    2016-05-15

    Advanced cardiovascular life support guidelines exist, yet there are variations in clinical practice. Our study aims to describe the utilization of medications during resuscitation from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. A retrospective review of patients who suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest from May 2008 to June 2014 was performed. Clinical and resuscitation data, including timing and dose of medications used, were extracted from the electronic medical record and comparisons made. A total of 94 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into different groups based on the medication combination used during resuscitation: (1) epinephrine; (2) epinephrine and bicarbonate; (3) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and calcium; (4) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and epinephrine drip; and (5) epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, and epinephrine drip. No difference in baseline demographics or clinical data was present, apart from history of dementia and the use of calcium channel blockers. The number of medications given was correlated with resuscitation duration (Spearman's rank correlation = 0.50, p <0.001). The proportion of patients who died during the arrest was 12.5% in those who received epinephrine alone, 30.0% in those who received only epinephrine and bicarbonate, and 46.7% to 57.9% in the remaining groups. Patients receiving only epinephrine had shorter resuscitation durations compared to that of the other groups (p <0.001) and improved survival (p = 0.003). In conclusion, providers frequently use nonguideline medications in resuscitation efforts for in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests. Increased duration and mortality rates were found in those resuscitations compared with epinephrine alone, likely due to the longer resuscitation duration in the former groups. PMID:27015887

  15. Joints and Mineral Veins in Limestone-Marl Alternations: Arrest and Fracture Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, S. L.; Reyer, D.

    2009-05-01

    materials science. Some fractures may also be arrested by slip at contacts. For fractures to propagate, the stress field along their potential pathways must be favorable and essentially homogeneous so that the probability of fracture arrest is minimized. The field observations show that most joints, and many mineral veins, become arrested, primarily at layer contacts. Fractures that are restricted to single layers are referred to as stratabound, whereas for non- stratabound fractures, layering does not affect fracture growth. Different types of fractures react differently to host-rock layering. Fractures formed at great depths are generally less likely to become stratabound, but different fractures also seem to "feel" the rock layers and contacts differently. For example, mineral veins are much more often non-stratabound than joints. In our study areas there is also a clear inverse correlation between layer thicknesses and joint frequencies, particularly for layering on a decimeter-scale. The calcite veins, however, are not related to layer thickness. The results have important implications for the permeability of fluid reservoirs, such as for petroleum, gas, geothermal or ground water. Whereas correlations with layer thicknesses may be used for joint frequencies in the subsurface and thus reservoir permeabilities, it is more difficult to predict how many reservoir fractures are likely to be stratabound. A reservoir where most fractures are stratabound is less likely to develop interconnected fracture systems than a reservoir with non-stratabound fractures. Thus, a reservoir with mostly stratabound fractures may not reach the percolation threshold needed for significant permeability.

  16. Arrest of Avalanche Propagation by Discontinuities on Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigo, B.; Chiaia, B.

    2009-04-01

    Considering the spatial variability of the snow cover, the paper analyses, in the framework of Fracture Mechanics, the Mode II fracture propagation on snow cover that leads to large dry slab avalanches. Under the hypothesis of a perfectly brittle phenomenon, avalanche triggering is usually investigated numerically by means of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (McClung, 1979; Chiaia et al., 2008). Since, however, the real phenomenon is intrinsically dynamical, another aspect to investigate is represented by dynamic fracture propagation. In this paper, we model dynamic crack propagation into a dry snow slab, to assess the possibility of crack arrest due to the presence of weak zones distributed along the snow slope. As a consequence of the first triggering mechanism (the Mode II fracture propagation on the weak plane), the secondary Mode I crack propagation in the crown is studied by means of numerical simulations based on Dynamic Elastic Fracture Mechanics and on the theory of crack arresters. By taking into account kinetic energy and using the FEM software FRANC 2D (Wawrzynek and Ingraffea, 1993), several paths of crown fracture propagation and their stability have been investigated. The snowpack is considered as a linear-elastic plate (2D problem), whose physical and mechanical parameters are chosen according to classical literature values. To investigate the possible arrest of crown fracture, we apply the theory of crack arresters, usually adopted for pipelines and perforated steel sheets fracture problems. To study crack arrest, different crack paths are simulated, in discontinuous (equipped with different shapes and geometries of artificial voids) snowpacks. The simulations show the effectiveness of these weak zones, to reduce substantially the crack driving force of the propagating fracture. This means that, increasing spatial variability tends to stabilize the snow slope, eventually splitting a major avalanche event into smaller, independent avalanches. Our

  17. The cancer-germline antigen SSX2 causes cell cycle arrest and DNA damage in cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Katrine Buch Vidén; Lindgreen, Jonas; Terp, Mikkel Green;

    2011-01-01

    increase in the number of gamma-H2AX ‘DNA damage foci’, indicating replicative stress, which may lead to genomic instability. As the p53 tumor suppressor is an inducer of G1 arrest after DNA damage and often deregulated in cancer cells, we investigated if the growth reduction due to SSX2 expression was p53...... dependent. The growth reduction was similar in isogenic colon cancer cells with and without p53, indicating that SSX2 is able to inhibit the growth of cancer cells, even in absence of functional p53. Our results show that SSX2 acts as an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation, possibly through replicative......The SSX family of cancer and germline antigens is mainly expressed in the germ cells of healthy individuals as well as wide range of cancers and is therefore potential targets for immunotherapy. However, little is known about the role of SSX proteins in tumorigenesis and normal cell function. Here...

  18. Analyses of Adaptation, Growth and Ornamental Value of 9 Eucalyptus Species%9种观赏性桉树引种试验分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王楚彪; 刘丽婷; 武海霞; 莫晓勇

    2013-01-01

    Seedlings from 20 families representing 9 species of ornamental Eucalyptus were established at 3 experimental field sites .At age two -year these trials were analyzed for growth and survival - including caus-es of mortality -and this provided the basis for evaluating families and species on their ornamental value . The species with acceptable survival and growth were then further investigated in a second assessment , with traits being analyzed , in order to provide a scientific basis for introduction of ornamental Eucalyptus in future .%  通过育苗与栽种,对9种20个家系的观赏性桉树在3个试验地进行引种试验,经过调查,分析栽种2年来的生长情况,总结引种桉树成活率不高的原因,初步筛选出具观赏价值的树种,进行第2次调查,分析其性状,为今后观赏桉树的继续引种提供依据。

  19. Is adaptation. Truly an adaptation? Is adaptation. Truly an adaptation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Flores Nogueira Diniz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The article begins by historicizing film adaptation from the arrival of cinema, pointing out the many theoretical approaches under which the process has been seen: from the concept of “the same story told in a different medium” to a comprehensible definition such as “the process through which works can be transformed, forming an intersection of textual surfaces, quotations, conflations and inversions of other texts”. To illustrate this new concept, the article discusses Spike Jonze’s film Adaptation. according to James Naremore’s proposal which considers the study of adaptation as part of a general theory of repetition, joined with the study of recycling, remaking, and every form of retelling. The film deals with the attempt by the scriptwriter Charles Kaufman, cast by Nicholas Cage, to adapt/translate a non-fictional book to the cinema, but ends up with a kind of film which is by no means what it intended to be: a film of action in the model of Hollywood productions. During the process of creation, Charles and his twin brother, Donald, undergo a series of adventures involving some real persons from the world of film, the author and the protagonist of the book, all of them turning into fictional characters in the film. In the film, adaptation then signifies something different from itstraditional meaning. The article begins by historicizing film adaptation from the arrival of cinema, pointing out the many theoretical approaches under which the process has been seen: from the concept of “the same story told in a different medium” to a comprehensible definition such as “the process through which works can be transformed, forming an intersection of textual surfaces, quotations, conflations and inversions of other texts”. To illustrate this new concept, the article discusses Spike Jonze’s film Adaptation. according to James Naremore’s proposal which considers the study of adaptation as part of a general theory of repetition

  20. Sulforaphane, a Dietary Isothiocyanate, Induces G2/M Arrest in Cervical Cancer Cells through CyclinB1 Downregulation and GADD45β/CDC2 Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ya-Min; Tsai, Ching-Chou; Hsu, Yi-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Globally, cervical cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women. The main treatment methods for this type of cancer include conization or hysterectomy procedures. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a natural, compound-based drug derived from dietary isothiocyanates which has previously been shown to possess potent anti-tumor and chemopreventive effects against several types of cancer. The present study investigated the effects of SFN on anti-proliferation and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cell lines (Cx, CxWJ, and HeLa). We found that cytotoxicity is associated with an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phases of the cell-cycle. Treatment with SFN led to cell cycle arrest as well as the down-regulation of Cyclin B1 expression, but not of CDC2 expression. In addition, the effects of GADD45β gene activation in cell cycle arrest increase proportionally with the dose of SFN; however, mitotic delay and the inhibition of proliferation both depend on the dosage of SFN used to treat cancer cells. These results indicate that SFN may delay the development of cancer by arresting cell growth in the G2/M phase via down-regulation of Cyclin B1 gene expression, dissociation of the cyclin B1/CDC2 complex, and up-regulation of GADD45β proteins. PMID:27626412