WorldWideScience

Sample records for adams-stokes syndrome

  1. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System & How it Works Digestive Diseases A-Z Dumping Syndrome What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ... the colon and rectum—and anus. What causes dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome is caused by problems with ...

  2. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... two medicines that affect the body's level of serotonin are taken together at the same time. The ...

  3. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, ...

  4. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance syndrome, low HDL cholesterol, Metabolic Syndrome, overweight, syndrome x, type 2 diabetes Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, Women January 2005 Copyright © American Academy of Family PhysiciansThis ...

  5. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. Parents may not have any family history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the ...

  6. Kindler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  7. Edwards' syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Doreen; Dearmun, Annette

    2016-12-08

    Edwards' syndrome is a serious genetic condition that affects fetal cellular functions, tissue development and organogenesis. Most infants with the syndrome are female, but there is no race predominance.

  8. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  9. Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this syndrome often display hyperactivity, small head size, sleep disorders, and movement and balance disorders that can cause ... this syndrome often display hyperactivity, small head size, sleep disorders, and movement and balance disorders that can cause ...

  10. Lynch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... colon cancer may include surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Cancer screening for people with Lynch syndrome If you ... et al. Milestones of Lynch syndrome: 1895-2015. Nature Reviews Cancer. http://www.nature.com/nrc/journal/vaop/ncurrent/ ...

  11. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone ... cause your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  12. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dementia, seizures, sensory loss in the limbs, and vertigo or dizziness. Paraneoplastic syndromes include Lambert-Eaton myasthenic ... dementia, seizures, sensory loss in the limbs, and vertigo or dizziness. Paraneoplastic syndromes include Lambert-Eaton myasthenic ...

  13. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  14. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  15. Apert Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Saikat; Saha, Sandip; Kar, Arnab; Mondal, Souvonik; Basu, Syamantak

    2014-09-01

    Apert syndrome is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes which, due to its association with other skeletal anomalies, is also known as acrocephalosyndactyly. It is a rare congenital anomaly which stands out from other craniosynostosis due to its characteristic skeletal presentations.

  16. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  17. Fraser syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Kumari M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Fraser syndrome or cryptophthalmos is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by major features such as cryptophthalmos, syndactyly and abnormal genitalia. The diagnosis of this syndrome can be made on clinical examination and perinatal autopsy. We present the autopsy findings of a rare case of Fraser syndrome in a male infant.

  18. Rowell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Y Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rowell syndrome is a rare disease consisting of erythema multiforme-like lesions associated with lupus erythematosus. The syndrome occurs mostly in middle-aged women. The authors describe the syndrome in a 15-year-old boy who responded well to systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine.

  19. Refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández López, M T; López Otero, M J; Alvarez Vázquez, P; Arias Delgado, J; Varela Correa, J J

    2009-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a complex syndrome that occurs as a result of reintroducing nutrition (oral, enteral or parenteral) to patients who are starved or malnourished. Patients can develop fluid-balance abnormalities, electrolyte disorders (hypophosphataemia, hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia), abnormal glucose metabolism and certain vitamin deficiencies. Refeeding syndrome encompasses abnormalities affecting multiple organ systems, including neurological, pulmonary, cardiac, neuromuscular and haematological functions. Pathogenic mechanisms involved in the refeeding syndrome and clinical manifestations have been reviewed. We provide suggestions for the prevention and treatment of refeeding syndrome. The most important steps are to identify patients at risk, reintroduce nutrition cautiously and correct electrolyte and vitamin deficiencies properly.

  20. [Metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Masanori; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome, which is consisted of hypertension, dyslipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance, is one of the most significant lifestyle-related disorders that lead to cardiovascular diseases. Among many upstream factors that are related to metabolic syndrome, obesity, especially visceral obesity, plays an essential role in its pathogenesis. In recent studies, possible mechanisms which connect obesity to metabolic syndrome have been elucidated, such as inflammation, abnormal secretion of adipokines and mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, we focus on the relationship between obesity and metabolic syndrome; and illustrate how visceral obesity contributes to, and how the treatments for obesity act on metabolic syndrome.

  1. [Autoinflammatory syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2009-03-01

    The autoinflammatory syndromes include a group of inherited diseases that are characterized by 1) seemingly unprovoked episodes of systemic inflammations, 2) absence of high titer of autoantibody or auto-reactive T cell, and 3) inborn error of innate immunity. In this article, we will focus on the clinical features, the pathogenesis related the genetic defects, and the therapeutic strategies in the representative disorders including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), hyper-IgD with periodic fever syndrome (HIDS), syndrome of pyogenic arthritis with pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA), and Blau syndrome. Recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have proceeded our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory syndromes.

  2. Wellens' syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Lai

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of quite rare cause of thoracic pain suspected by emergency physician as Wellens’ syndrome. Wellens’ syndrome is a pattern of electrocardiographic T-wave changes associated with critical, proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD. This syndrome is about 10-15% of all unstable angina in emergency department (ED. The cardiologic consult was obtained in ED and it was not conclusive for a Wellens’ syndrome, so that the diagnostistic planning was wrong. The authors point out the importance of this syndrome in ED and the necessity of an urgent angiographic study as every acute coronary syndrome presented in ED. We remark the importance in ED to recognize these changes associated with critical LAD obstruction and the high risk for anterior wall myocardial infarction.

  3. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, P; Gross, W L

    2009-06-01

    In its strict sense, the term "autoinflammatory syndromes" comprises the hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPF), which are caused by mutations of pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) and perturbations of the cytokine balance. These include the crypyrinopathies, familial Mediterranean fever, TNF-receptor associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), hyper-IgD and periodic syndrome (HIDS), pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, NALP12-HPF, and the Blau syndrome. The diseases are characterized by spontaneous activation of cells of the innate immunity in the absence of ligands. Autoantibodies are usually not found. HPF clinically present with recurrent fever episodes and inflammation, especially of serosal and synovial interfaces and the skin. Intriguingly, PRR-mediated autoinflammtory mechanisms also play a role in a number of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  4. Metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia Atul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The Metabolic syndrome is a widely prevalent and multi-factorial disorder. The syndrome has been given several names, including- the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome, the plurimetabolic syndrome, and the deadly quartet. With the formulation of NCEP/ATP III guidelines, some uniformity and standardization has occurred in the definition of metabolic syndrome and has been very useful for epidemiological purposes. The mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome are not fully known; however resistance to insulin stimulated glucose uptake seems to modify biochemical responses in a way that predisposes to metabolic risk factors. The clinical relevance of the metabolic syndrome is related to its role in the development of cardiovascular disease. Management of the metabolic syndrome involves patient-education and intervention at various levels. Weight reduction is one of the main stays of treatment. In this article we comprehensively discuss this syndrome- the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical relevance and management. The need to do a comprehensive review of this particular syndrome has arisen in view of the ever increasing incidence of this entitiy. Soon, metabolic syndrome will overtake cigarette smoking as the number one risk factor for heart disease among the US population. Hardly any issue of any primary care medical journal can be opened without encountering an article on type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension. It is rare to see type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity or hypertension in isolation. Insulin resistance and resulting hyperinsulinemia have been implicated in the development of glucose intolerance (and progression to type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, polycystic ovary yndrome, hypercoagulability and vascular inflammation, as well as the eventual development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease manifested as myocardial infarction, stroke and myriad end organ diseases. Conversely

  5. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  6. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  7. Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanti Devi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  8. Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Basanti; Behera, Binodini; Patro, Sibasish; Pattnaik, Subhransu S; Puhan, Manas R

    2013-05-01

    Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis.

  9. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En Español Read in Chinese What causes Down syndrome? Down syndrome is caused by a duplication of all ... in persons with Down syndrome. How common is Down syndrome? The frequency of Down syndrome is approximately 1 ...

  10. Facts about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Down syndrome. View charts » What is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a condition in which a person ... in height as children and adults Types of Down Syndrome There are three types of Down syndrome. People ...

  11. Franceschetti syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrant Kasat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Franceschetti syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with variable expressivity. It is commonly known as Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS. It is named after E. Treacher Collins who described the essential components of the condition. It affects both genders equally. This article reports a case of TCS in an 18-year-old female.

  12. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akcan AB.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is an important cause of short stature in girls and primer amenorrhea in young women that is usually caused by loss of part or all of an X chromosome. This topic will review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of Turner syndrome.

  13. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Renu

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of proteus syndrome in a 20 year old male is repoted. Hemihypertrophy, asymmetric megalodactyly, linear epidermal naevus, naevus flammeus, angiokeratoma, lymphangioma circumscriptum, thickening of the palms and soles, scoliosis and varicose veins were present. There are only few reports of these cases in adults. The syndrome has not been reported from India.

  14. Poland syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra Madhur Sharma; Shrawan Kumar; Meghwani, Manoj K.; Agrawal, Ravi P.

    2014-01-01

    Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  15. Poland syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Madhur Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  16. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body, the white blood cells that fight infections, and the platelets that help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy blood cells. ... anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do ...

  17. LEOPARD syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... L, Strano S, Carbone A, Calvieri C, Giustini S. LEOPARD syndrome. Dermatol Online J . 2008;14(3):7. PMID: 18627709 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18627709 . Sarkozy A, Digilio MC, Dallapiccola B. LEOPARD syndrome. Orphanet J Rare Dis . 2008;3:13. PMID: ...

  18. Wallenberg's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... way, which makes it difficult to keep their balance when they walk. Treatment Treatment for Wallenberg's syndrome is symptomatic. A feeding ... way, which makes it difficult to keep their balance when they walk. Treatment Treatment for Wallenberg's syndrome is symptomatic. A feeding ...

  19. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder K. Gupta, Ritu Gupta, Sunil Dutt Sharma

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Turner Syndrome is one of the important chromosomal disorders characterised by loss (total or part ofsex chromosome. The manifestations being peripheral edema, short stature, extra skin fold, webbing ofneck, renal and cardiovascular anomalies, sexual infantilism, learning disability etc. We present here aone month female baby who had classical features of Turner Syndrome. The karyotape analysis wasconsistent with the diagnosis.

  20. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  1. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  2. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  3. HYDROLETHALUS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aradhana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hydrolethalus Syndrome (HLS is a rare lethal genetic syndrome, recognized as a consequence of a study on Meckle syndrome in Finland .1 HLS is characterized by multiple developmental defects of fetus which include fetal hydrocephalus, agenesis of corpus callosum, absent midline structures of brain, Cleft lip and cleft palate, defective lobulation of lungs, micrognathia and very characteristic abnormality of polydactyly. About 80% of patients have polydactyly, in hands it is postaxial and preaxial in feet with duplicated big toe. A highly characteristic hallux duplex is seen in almost no other situation .2 Club feet is also common.

  4. Hubris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, David

    2008-08-01

    Hubris syndrome is associated with power, more likely to manifest itself the longer the person exercises power and the greater the power they exercise. A syndrome not to be applied to anyone with existing mental illness or brain damage. Usually symptoms abate when the person no longer exercises power. It is less likely to develop in people who retain a personal modesty, remain open to criticism, have a degree of cynicism or well developed sense of humour. Four heads of government in the last 100 years are singled out as having developed hubris syndrome: David Lloyd George, Margaret Thatcher, George W Bush and Tony Blair.

  5. CLOVES syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jacob; Upton, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    A cohort of patients with overgrowth syndromes has been identified with congenital lipomatous overgrowth, dysregulated fat deposits, and mixed vascular malformations. The acronym CLOVES was given on a heuristic basis to stand for congenital lipomatous overgrowth (CLO), vascular malformation (V), epidermal nevi (E), and scoliosis and spinal deformities (S). These patients have upper limb anomalies with variable phenotypes. Although hand anomalies alone cannot make the diagnosis, the foot, truncal, cutaneous and spinal anomalies are particularly diagnostic. CLOVES syndrome has emerged as a distinct clinical entity diagnosed by clinical and radiographic examinations. The overgrowth pattern is now easily distinguished from other overgrowth syndromes.

  6. [Autoinflammatory syndromes/fever syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedel, J; Bach, B; Kümmerle-Deschner, J B; Kötter, I

    2011-05-01

    Hereditary periodic (fever) syndromes, also called autoinflammatory syndromes, are characterized by relapsing fever and additional manifestations such as skin rashes, mucosal manifestations, or joint symptoms. Some of these disorders present with organ involvement and serological signs of inflammation without fever. There is a strong serological inflammatory response with an elevation of serum amyloid A (SAA), resulting in an increased risk of secondary amyloidosis. There are monogenic disorders (familial mediterranean fever (FMF), hyper-IgD-syndrome (HIDS), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), "pyogenic arthritis, acne, pyoderma gangrenosum" (PAPA), and "pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA) where mutations in genes have been described, which in part by influencing the function of the inflammasome, in part by other means, lead to the induction of the production of IL-1β. In "early-onset of enterocolitis (IBD)", a functional IL-10 receptor is lacking. Therapeutically, above all, the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra is used. In case of TRAPS and PGA, TNF-antagonists (etanercept) may also be used; in FMF colchicine is first choice. As additional possible autoinflammatory syndromes, PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis), Schnitzler syndrome, Still's disease of adult and pediatric onset, Behçet disease, gout, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and Crohn's disease also are mentioned.

  7. Noonan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chest shape (most often a sunken chest called pectus excavatum) Webbed and short-appearing neck Exams and Tests ... to consider genetic counseling before having children. Images Pectus excavatum References Ali O, Donohoue PA. Noonan syndrome. In: ...

  8. Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least once every year. Alternative Names Aortic aneurysm - ... syndrome. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 702. ...

  9. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... optic nerve (arrow) looks very pale, the vessels (stars) are very thin and there is characteristic pigment, ... syndrome gene have a child together, with each birth there is a: 1-in-4 chance of ...

  10. Bart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaikwad Anil

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An infant presenting with extensive aplasia cutis on lower extremities later developed blisters on skin and mucous membrane. Clinical features and histopathological examination of skin favoured the diagnosis of Bart syndrome.

  11. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arachnoldactyly (CCA), which refers to the joint contractures (shortening) that are key features of the syndrome. How ... remain contracted for long periods of time, the muscles can become tight and short, restricting movement. When ...

  12. Isaac's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page NINDS Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page NINDS Infantile Spasms Information Page NINDS ... Support Library Clinical Research Next Steps Pre-Funding: After Review Terms of Award Pre-Award Start-up ...

  13. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page NINDS Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page NINDS Infantile Spasms Information Page NINDS ... Support Library Clinical Research Next Steps Pre-Funding: After Review Terms of Award Pre-Award Start-up ...

  14. Neurocutaneous Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect kids include: neurofibromatosis, types 1 and 2 (NF1 and NF2) Sturge-Weber syndrome tuberous sclerosis (TS) ... forms of this disorder are neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), and Schwannomatosis. NF1 is ...

  15. [Mobius syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladuţiu, Cristina; Duma, Ionela

    2012-01-01

    Mobius syndrom, an anomaly in cranial nerve developement, presents with a remarkable clinical polymorphism. The rare occurence of this pathology and the questions raised by the diagnosis and treatment determined us to make this presentation.

  16. Autoinflammatory syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M; Gasbarrini, G; Ghirardello, A; Grandemange, S; Hoffman, H M; Manna, R; Podswiadek, M; Punzi, L; Sebastiani, G D; Touitou, I; Doria, A

    2006-01-01

    The autoinflammatory disorders are a new and expanding classification of inflammatory diseases characterized by recurrent episodes of systemic inflammation in the absence of pathogens, autoantibodies or antigen specific T cells. These disorders are caused by primary dysfunction of the innate immune system, without evidence of adaptive immune dysregulation. Innate immune abnormalities include aberrant responses to pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) like lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan, prominent neutrophilia in blood and tissues, and dysregulation of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha) or their receptors. The autoinflammatory diseases comprise both hereditary (Familial Mediterranean Fever, FMF; Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency, MKD; TNF Receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome, TRAPS; Cryopyrin Associated Periodic Syndrome, CAPS; Blau syndrome; Pyogenic sterile Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum and Acne syndrome, PAPA; Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis, CRMO) and multifactorial (Crohn's and Behçet's diseases) disorders. Mutations responsible for FMF, TRAPS, CAPS, PAPA are in proteins involved in modulation of inflammation and apoptosis.

  17. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it.

  18. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart,...

  19. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne;

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties...

  20. Gardner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or central nervous system tumor less than 1% Stomach cancer 0.5% Bile duct cancer small, but increased Adrenal gland cancer small, but increased What are the screening options for Gardner syndrome? The screening options for ...

  1. Metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... obesity ). This body type may be described as "apple-shaped." Insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone produced ... Syndrome Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  2. Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnostic tests that can identify Down syndrome include: Amniocentesis. A sample of the amniotic fluid surrounding the ... somewhat higher risk of miscarriage than second trimester amniocentesis. Cordocentesis. In this test, also known as percutaneous ...

  3. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the inner layer of the aorta (aortic dissection). A defect in the valve between the heart ... Turner syndrome are at increased risk of aortic dissection during pregnancy, they should be evaluated by a ...

  4. Eagle's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves; Soares,Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira,Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo,Igor Teixeira; Nascimento, Luiz Augusto; Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is diffic...

  5. SAPHO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Sueli; Sampaio-Barros, Percival D

    2013-05-01

    SAPHO syndrome is a disorder characterized by Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, and Osteitis. As the osteoarticular and skin manifestations often do not occur simultaneously and there are no validated diagnostic criteria, the diagnosis can be difficult. Clinical and imaging investigation is necessary to establish the many differential diagnoses of SAPHO syndrome. The etiopathogenesis involves infectious (probably Propionibacterium acnes), immunologic, and genetic factors. Treatment is based on information gathered from case reports and small series, and is related to specific skin or articular symptoms.

  6. Carpenter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidestrand, Pip; Vasconez, Henry; Cottrill, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Carpenter syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that belongs to a group of rare craniosynostosis syndromes (Bull Soc Med Paris 1906;23:1310). Carpenter syndrome is the rarest, with only occasional patients seen. There are 3 common features in all of these syndromes: craniosynostosis (skull base abnormalities, with early fusion in different sutures), midface hypoplasia, and musculoskeletal abnormalities. Clinical features of Carpenter syndrome include peculiar facies, asymmetry of the skull, polydactyly, brachymesophalangy, mild soft tissue syndactyly, obesity, hypogenitalism, congenital heart disease, and mental retardation (J Pediatr 1966;69:1; Am J Roentgenol 1969;106). The brachycephaly is caused by early fusion in the coronal, sagittal, and lambdoidal sutures (Proc R Soc Med Sect Study Dis Child 1909). Most of the affected patients have a surgical procedure between 3 to 9 months of age to open the cranial vault to make space for the brain to grow (Plast Reconstr Surg 1978;62:335). We present a patient with Carpenter syndrome who is unusual in that she is an adult who has never had surgical intervention.

  7. Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of Cancer > Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome Request Permissions Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 12/2015 What is juvenile polyposis syndrome? Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a ...

  8. Cardiac Syndrome X

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kawasaki Disease Long Q-T Syndrome Marfan Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Mitral Valve Prolapse Myocardial Bridge Myocarditis Obstructive Sleep Apnea Pericarditis Peripheral Vascular Disease Rheumatic Fever Sick Sinus Syndrome Silent Ischemia Stroke Sudden ...

  9. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of ... that may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome. Outlook Metabolic syndrome is becoming more common due to a ...

  10. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is not contagious , so you can't ... have it. What's Life Like for Kids With Down Syndrome? Many kids with Down syndrome go to regular ...

  11. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Metabolic Syndrome A A A ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ...

  12. Metabolic Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Metabolic Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Metabolic Syndrome Print A A ... this is a condition called metabolic syndrome . About Metabolic Syndrome Not to be confused with metabolic disease (which ...

  13. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  14. [Serotonin syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lheureux, P; Penaloza, A; De Cottenier, V; Ullmann, U; Gris, M

    2002-10-01

    The serotonin syndrome is a hyperserotoninergic state resulting from an excess of intrasynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine, induced by multiple psychotropic agents, but also non psychiatric drugs. It is a potentially dangerous and sometimes lethal condition. The clinical manifestations usually include cognitive, neuromuscular and autonomic features and are mediated by the action of serotonin on various subtypes of receptors. The main differential diagnosis is the neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Treatment is mainly supportive. No pharmacological agent has been definitely demonstrated really effective. However, reports of cases treated with the 5-HT2 blockers, including cyproheptadine or chlorpromazine have suggested that these agents could have some efficacy. Serotonin syndrome is a toxic condition which requires heightened clinical awareness among physicians in order to prevent, recognize, and treat the condition promptly.

  15. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    necrophorum. We found a total of 137 cases of LS, of which 47 were infected with F. necrophorum and others with Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. Complications of this rare but severe disease included osteomyelitis, meningitis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mortality was extremely high in the pre....../or swelling in the throat or neck, as well as respiratory symptoms. Laboratory findings show elevated infectious parameters and radiological findings show thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and emboli in the lungs or other organs. The syndrome is often associated with an infection with Fusobacterium......This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and...

  16. Microcephaly syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, Dianne

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this article is to review microcephaly from a genetics point of view, especially with regard to the process of identification of syndromes in which small head circumference occurs. Microcephaly can be due to either genetic or environmental causes. It can be the only positive finding or may be part of a syndrome of congenital anomalies. The genetic etiology can be caused by autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked genes or various types of chromosome anomalies. Some of the gene mutations have been identified recently. Syndromic microcephaly is associated with a large number of conditions. Some can be diagnosed, or at least suspected, based on their characteristic facial dysmorphism, and others can be searched for using databases of genetic disorders.

  17. Postconcussional Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral symptoms that occurs after mild traumatic brain injury. It has been known that these symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Although its etiology is still controversial, biological, psychological and social factors may account for the development and continuation of the symptoms. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints. To find out an objective method for definite diagnosis, trials searching for both neuroimaging and specific serum biomarkers stil continue. The treatment of the syndrome is mainly of palliative nature. Information, education, reassurance and multifaceted rehabilitation programmes can be beneficial. There are promising trials reporting the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of postconcussional syndrome. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 96-109

  18. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  19. Refeeding syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathy Swagata

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a fifty-year-old male who was admitted with a three month history of increasing weakness, prostration, decreasing appetite and inability to swallow. The patient was a chronic alcoholic, unemployed, and of very poor socioeconomic background. The patient was initially investigated for upper GI malignancy, Addisons disease, bulbar palsy and other endocrinopathies. Concurrent management was started for severe electrolyte abnormalities and enteral nutritional supplementation was begun. By the fourth day of feeding patient developed severe hypophosphatemia and other life-threatening features suggesting refeeding syndrome. The patient was managed for the manifestations of refeeding syndrome. A final diagnosis of chronic alcoholic malnutrition with refeeding syndrome was made. Refeeding of previously starving patients may lead to a variety of complications including sudden death.

  20. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network...... of birth defect registries. Between January 1990 and December 2008, we identified 26 cases of Fraser syndrome in the monitored population of 12,886,464 births (minimal estimated prevalence of 0.20 per 100,000 or 1:495,633 births). Most cases (18/26; 69%) were registered in the western part of Europe, where...... was particularly high (42%). Most cases of Fraser syndrome (85%) are suspected prenatally, often due to the presence of the association of renal agenesis and cryptophthalmos. In the European population, a high proportion (82%) of pregnancies is terminated, thus reducing the live birth prevalence to a third...

  1. Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  2. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  3. [PFAPA syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Suzete Costa Anjos; Vales, Fernando; Cardoso, Eduardo; Santos, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome is characterized by periodic fever, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis and aphthous stomatitis. The bouts of fever can last for days or even weeks. Between crises, patients remain asymptomatic for variable periods. It appears before the age of five and has limited duration (4-8 years). Its aetiopathogeny is unknown. Corticoids are the treatment of choice. Tonsillectomy has been proposed as a solution but remains controversial. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl with PFAPA syndrome who underwent tonsillectomy in January, 2008, and we review the literature.

  4. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  5. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  6. Eisenmengers syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G;

    2009-01-01

    Congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt can induce proliferation, vasoconstriction and thrombosis in the pulmonary vascular bed. Eventually, the patient may develop Eisenmenger syndrome defined as pulmonary arterial hypertension caused by high pulmonary vascular resistance with right......-to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. Udgivelsesdato...

  7. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  8. [Wilkie's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognár, Gábor; Ledniczky, György; Palik, Eva; Zubek, László; Sugár, István; Ondrejka, Pál

    2008-10-01

    Loss of retroperitoneal fatty tissue as a result of a variety of debilitating conditions and noxa is believed to be the etiologic factor of superior mesenteric artery syndrome. A case of a 35 years old female patient with severe malnutrition and weight loss is presented, who developed superior mesenteric artery syndrome. Various theories of etiology, clinical course and treatment options of this uncommon disease are discussed. In our case, conservative management was inefficient, while surgical treatment aiming to bypass the obstruction by an anastomosis between the jejunum and the proximal duodenum (duodenojejunostomy) was successful. An interdisciplinary teamwork provides the most beneficial diagnostic and therapeutic result in this often underestimated disease.

  9. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  10. Gorlin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siroos Risbaf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is a dominant autosomal familial disorder. The manifestations begin at an early age and a combination of phenotypic abnormalities such special facial appearance, jaw cysts and skeletal anomalies are seen in this disease. A 22-year-old woman referred to Zahedan Dental School complaining of pain on the left cheek. During the examination, several cutaneous lesions in the neck, pits in palm and sole and multiple jaw cysts were observed. According to the clinical symptoms, lesion biopsy and reports of Gorlin syndrome radiography were presented.

  11. Morbihan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraldi, Stefano; Persico, Maria Chiara; Francia, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face) in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks).

  12. Morbihan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Veraldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of severe Morbihan syndrome (chronic erythematous edema of the upper portion of the face in a 60-year-old man. The syndrome was characterized clinically by erythematous edema involving the forehead, glabella, and both eyelids, because of which the patient was not able to open completely his eyes. Furthermore, erythema and telangiectasiae were visible on the nose and cheeks. Laboratory and instrumental examinations were within normal ranges or negative. Histopathological examination showed dermal edema, perivascular and periadnexal lympho-histiocytic infiltrate, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Oral isotretinoin was ineffective despite the relatively long duration of the therapy (26 weeks.

  13. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome. Althou

  14. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stomach move to your small intestine in an uncontrolled, abnormally fast manner. This is most often related to changes in your stomach associated with surgery. Dumping syndrome can occur after any stomach operation or removal of the esophagus (esophagectomy). Gastric bypass surgery for ...

  15. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 663-4637) Sotos Syndrome Support Association P.O. Box 4626 Wheaton IL Wheaton, IL 60189 info@sotossyndrome.org http://www.sotossyndrome.org/ Tel: 888-246-7772 The Arc of the United States 1825 K Street, NW ...

  16. Reifenstein syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgens are most important during early development in the womb. People with Reifenstein syndrome can have a normal lifespan and be totally healthy, but they may have difficulty conceiving a child. In the most severe cases, boys with outer female genitals ...

  17. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  18. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    a variety of infectious complications. Rapid diagnosis and treatment is necessary to avoid severe complications or death. Close collaboration with local microbiologist is pivotal. Treatment consists of longterm treatment with penicillin and metronidazole. This is a case report of Lemierre's syndrome....

  19. [Waardenburg's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimñenez, F; Carbonell, R; Pérez, F; Lozano, I

    1994-01-01

    Reporting one case of this condition type-2 with heterochromia iridis and cochlear deafness. The AA. review the syndrome's components and it nomenclature as well. They discuss about the convenience of including this deviation in the chapter of "diseases of the embryonic neural crest". The specific place of the gene responsibly in the chromosome-2 and the possibilities of genetic counselling are considered.

  20. Waardenburg's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesudian, D P; Jayaraman, M; Janaki, V R; Yesudian, P

    1995-01-01

    Three children in a family of five presented with heterochromia iridis, lateral displacement of inner canthi and varying degrees of sensorineural deafness. All the 3 showed iris atrophy. The father of the children had only heterochromia iridis. A diagnosis of Waardenburg's syndrome Type I was made in the children with the father probably representing a forme fruste of the condition.

  1. Klinefelter Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Peynirci

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder in males. Variation in clinical presentation and insufficient awareness of this syndrome among clinicians lead to fifty percent of patients remain undetected. Typical clinical features of Klinefelter syndrome are various degrees of hypogonadal symptoms, atrophic testes and gynaecomastia. However, these typical clinical symptoms may not be present in all patients. Even if serum testosterone levels are not markedly low, elevated serum follicle-stimulating hormone is a considerable laboratory finding. Definitive diagnosis is made by karyotype analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes. It must be kept in mind that this analysis may be normal in rare conditions. Early recognition of patients during puberty and handling them as soon as possible is important. Testosterone replacement therapy results in increased muscle mass, bone mineral density and libido. The patient’s mood and self-esteem improve significantly. In general, patients with Klinefelter syndrome are accepted as infertile, however, assisted reproductive techniques may provide fertilization. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 63-7

  2. Aicardi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as lower tone around the head and trunk, microcephaly (small head circumference), and spasticity in the limbs. Typical findings in the brain of girls with Aicardi syndrome include heterotopias , which are groups of brain cells that, during development, migrated to the wrong area ...

  3. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  4. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  5. Chylomicronemia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the blood. The disorder is passed down through families. Causes Chylomicronemia syndrome can occur due to a rare genetic disorder in which a protein (enzyme) called lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is broken or missing. LpL is normally found in fat and muscle. ...

  6. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  7. Metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Shaeffer

    2004-01-01

    @@ The emergence of cardiac disease as the number one world-wide cause of death justifies efforts to identify individuals at higher risk for preventive therapy. The metabolic syndrome, originally described by Reaven, 1 has been associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk. 2 Type Ⅱ diabetes is also a frequent sequela. 3

  8. Troyer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atrophy of the hand muscles, developmental delays, fluctuating emotions, and short stature. Onset is typically in early childhood, and symptoms gradually worsen over time. Troyer syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder (meaning that both parents must carry and pass on the defective gene ...

  9. Caplan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT scan of the chest Joint x-rays Pulmonary function tests Rheumatoid factor test and other blood tests Treatment There is no specific treatment for Caplan syndrome, other than treating any lung and joint disease. ... MD, MHS, Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, ...

  10. Brugada Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to look at your heart's electrical activity (electrophysiology study), you'll need to fast for eight to 12 hours before your test. Write down any symptoms you're experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to Brugada syndrome. Write down key personal information, especially any family ...

  11. [SAPHO syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmann, F; Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2014-10-01

    The SAPHO syndrome, an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a rare disease which affects bones, joints and the skin. The main osteoarticular features are hyperostosis and osteitis. Osteoarticular symptoms predominantly occur on the anterior chest wall but the spine and the peripheral skeleton can also be involved. The most important skin affections are palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne. The etiology of this syndrome remains unclear but infectious, immunological and genetic factors are involved. The diagnostic features of SAPHO syndrome are clinical and radiological. The most important diagnostic procedure is Tc-99 m bone scintigraphy but conventional x-rays as well as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also contribute to the final diagnosis. Bone histology and positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) may help to differentiate SAPHO syndrome from malignancies and infectious osteomyelitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of treatment. The results obtained using antibiotics and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate are inconsistent. Bisphosphonates and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have shown promising results in small studies but further research is still necessary.

  12. Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Harleen; Chacon, Anna H; Choudhary, Sonal; McLeod, Michael P; Meshkov, Lauren; Nouri, Keyvan; Izakovic, Jan

    2014-07-01

    Bloom Syndrome (BS, MIM #210900) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the BLM gene, which codes for the DNA repair enzyme RecQL3 helicase. Without proper DNA repair mechanisms, abnormal DNA exchange takes place between sister chromatids and results in genetic instability that may lead to cancer, especially lymphoma and acute myelogenous leukemia, lower and upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasias, cutaneous tumors, and neoplasias in the genitalia and urinary tract. BS patients are usually of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and exhibit narrow facial features, elongated limbs, and several dermatologic complications including photosensitivity, poikiloderma, and telangiectatic erythema. The most concerning manifestation of BS is multiple malignancies, which require frequent screenings and strict vigilance by the physician. Therefore, distinguishing between BS and other dermatologic syndromes of similar presentation such as Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome, Erythropoietic Protoporphyria, and Cockayne Syndrome is paramount to disease management and to prolonging life. BS can be diagnosed through a variety of DNA sequencing methods, and genetic testing is available for high-risk populations. This review consolidates several sources on BS sequelae and aims to suggest the importance of differentiating BS from other dermatologic conditions. This paper also elucidates the recently discovered BRAFT and FANCM protein complexes that link BS and Fanconi anemia.

  13. Compartment syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aly Saber

    2014-01-01

    Body compartments bound by fascia and limited by bony backgrounds are found in the extremities, buttocks, abdomen and thoracic cavity; conditions that cause intracompartmental swelling and hypertension can lead to ischemia and limb loss.Although compartment syndromes are described in all body regions from head to toe, the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are best characterized for three key body regions: the first is extremity, the second is abdominal, and the third is thoracic compartment syndromes.Thoracic compartment syndrome usually occurs as a result of pathological accumulation of air, fluid or blood in the mediastinum and has traditionally been described in trauma.As the intracranial contents are confined within a rigid bony cage, any increase in volume within thiscompartment as a result of brain oedema or an expanding traumatic intracranial haematoma, leads to a reciprocal decrease in the volume of cerebrospinal fluid and intracranial venous blood volume.Limb compartment syndromes may present either in acute or chronic clinical forms.Intra-abdominal pressure can be measured by direct or indirect methods.While the direct methods are quite accurate, theyare impractical and not feasible for routine practice.Indirect measurement is done through inferior vena cava, gastric, rectal and urinary bladder.Indirect measurement through urinary bladder is the simplest and is considered the method of choice for intra-abdominal pressure measurement.The management of patients with intra-abdominal hypertension is based on four important principles: the first is related to the specific procedures aiming at lowering intra-abdominal pressure and the consequences of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome; the second is for general support and medical management of the critically ill patient; while the third is surgical decompression and the fourth is optimization after surgical decompression.

  14. Short Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System & How it Works Digestive Diseases A-Z Short Bowel Syndrome What is Short Bowel Syndrome Short bowel syndrome is a group of problems ... between the stomach and large intestine. What causes Short Bowel Syndrome? The main cause of short bowel syndrome is ...

  15. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  16. Otodental syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloch-Zupan Agnès

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The otodental syndrome also named otodental dysplasia, is characterised by a striking dental phenotype known as globodontia, associated with sensorineural high frequency hearing loss and eye coloboma. Globodontia occurs in both primary and permanent dentition, affecting canine and molar teeth (i.e. enlarged bulbous malformed posterior teeth with almost no discernable cusps or grooves. The condition appears to be inherited in an autosomal dominant mode, although sporadic cases have been reported. It is a rare disease, a few families have been described in the literature. In the British family, the locus for oculo-oto-dental syndrome was mapped to 20q13.1 within a 12-cM critical chromosomal region. Dental management is complex, interdisciplinary and will include regular follow up, scheduled teeth extraction and orthodontic treatment. Hearing checks and, if necessary, hearing aids are mandatory, as well as eye examination and ad hoc treatment if necessary.

  17. Dravet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorpora Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Dravet syndrome" (DS previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized, which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+.

  18. Parinaud's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffie, D; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Stefanko, S Z

    1983-02-01

    Five cases of a tumour in the quadrigeminal area have been described, 4 of which could be verified by autopsy. In 2 cases with a metastasis in the tegmentum of the mesencephalon, a Parinaud syndrome was present. In 2 other cases, however, with extensive destruction of the quadrigeminal plate and of the posterior commissure this syndrome was not present. In the 5th case, with a big vascular tumour of the pineal area, disturbances of eye movements and pupils were also lacking. From these observations we may conclude that (1) destruction of the quadrigeminal plate has no influence upon vertical eye movements. (2) destruction of the posterior commissure, in combination with the quadrigeminal plate, is not always followed by disturbances of vertical eye movements. In man it is still not clear which structures are responsible for the performance of vertical eye movements.

  19. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  20. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and...... necrophorum. We found a total of 137 cases of LS, of which 47 were infected with F. necrophorum and others with Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. Complications of this rare but severe disease included osteomyelitis, meningitis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mortality was extremely high in the pre......-antibiotic era but has diminished with the advent of antibiotics. This review showed a mortality rate of only 2% of which none of the cases involved fusobacteria. Duration of treatment varied; a 4-6-week course of carbapenem or piperacillin/tazobactam in combination with metronidazole was optimum. Other...

  1. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  2. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharon Turban; Paul J Thuluvath; Mohamed G Atta

    2007-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a "functional" and reversible form of renal failure that occurs in patients with advanced chronic liver disease. The distinctive hallmark feature of HRS is the intense renal vasoconstriction caused by interactions between systemic and portal hemodynamics. This results in activation of vasoconstrictors and suppression of vasodilators in the renal circulation. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, as well as current and emerging therapies of HRS are discussed in this review.

  3. Postconcussional Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Necla Keskin; Lut Tamam

    2013-01-01

    Postconcussional syndrome is characterized by somatic, cognitive and psychiatric (emotional, behavioral) symptoms that occurs after mild traumatic brain injury. It has been known that these symptoms recover fully within 3-6 months almost in 90% of patients. Although its etiology is still controversial, biological, psychological and social factors may account for the development and continuation of the symptoms. Diagnosis is based on the subjective complaints. To find out an objective method f...

  4. Fraser syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay A

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Fraser Syndrome is a rare disorder with only a few cases having been described in Indian literature. We report here a case of a patient aged 16 yr present with primary amenorrhea which is a very unusual mode of presentation. Multiple associated anomalies were present including those of eyelids, eyebrow, face, fingers and genitalia. Chromosome analysis revealed a normal female karyotype. Pituitary gonadotropins were within normal range.

  5. [Fibromyalgia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo Hernández, A; Rodríguez Lozano, C; Ojeda Bruno, S

    1992-02-01

    The Fibromialgia Syndrome (FS) is a common clinical entity which may produce symtoms and signs related to multiple fields of Medicine. Typical clinical characteristics of FS include extensive pain, presence of sensitive points during exploration, morning stiffness, asthenia and non-refresing sleep. Frequently, associated rheumatologic diseases are observed, as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and vertebral disorders. In FS, complementary tests are usually normal. The most widely accepted hypothesis suggests that this is a disorder affecting modulation of pain sensitivity.

  6. Gerstmann's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Sukumar, S.; Ferguson, G C

    1996-01-01

    Although Gerstmann's syndrome has been well documented since it was characterised in the latter half of last century, there has not been much literature on it in the last few years. We present a classical case in a patient who was admitted into hospital for an unrelated problem. We conclude that clinical examination still has a valuable role in neurology, despite the availability of excellent imaging techniques.

  7. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... improves slowly after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs between days ...

  8. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... Down Syndrome Registry​ . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  9. Genetic obesity syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Anthony P; Beales, Philip L

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous reports of multi-system genetic disorders with obesity. Many have a characteristic presentation and several, an overlapping phenotype indicating the likelihood of a shared common underlying mechanism or pathway. By understanding the genetic causes and functional perturbations of such syndromes we stand to gain tremendous insight into obesogenic pathways. In this review we focus particularly on Bardet-Biedl syndrome, whose molecular genetics and cell biology has been elucidated recently, and Prader-Willi syndrome, the commonest obesity syndrome due to loss of imprinted genes on 15q11-13. We also discuss highlights of other genetic obesity syndromes including Alstrom syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (pseudohypoparathyroidism), Carpenter syndrome, MOMO syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, cases with deletions of 6q16, 1p36, 2q37 and 9q34, maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14, fragile X syndrome and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome.

  10. Blind Loop Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more commonly result from other conditions such as short bowel syndrome or chronic pancreatitis. Small intestine aspirate and fluid ... people with severe blind loop syndrome resulting in short bowel syndrome. References Townsend CM Jr, et al. Sabiston Textbook ...

  11. Asperger Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Asperger Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Asperger Syndrome Print A A ... the medical community still use the term. About Asperger Syndrome The disorder is named after Hans Asperger, a ...

  12. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Dragan M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease with recurrent thromboses and pregnancy complications (90% are female patients that can be primary and secondary (with concomitant autoimmune disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies are prothrombotic but also act directly with brain tissue. One clinical and one laboratory criterion is necessary for the diagnosis of APS. Positive serological tests have to be confirmed after at least 12 weeks. Clinical picture consists of thromboses in many organs and spontaneous miscarriages, sometimes thrombocytopaenia and haemolytic anaemia, but neurological cases are the most frequent: headaches, stroke, encephalopathy, seizures, visual disturbances, Sneddon syndrome, dementia, vertigo, chorea, balism, transitory global amnesia, psychosis, transversal myelopathy and Guillain-Barre syndrome. About 50% of strokes below 50 years of age are caused by APS. The first line of therapy in stroke is anticoagulation: intravenous heparin or low-weight heparins. In chronic treatment, oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy are used, warfarin and aspirin, mostly for life. In resistant cases, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis are necessary. Prognosis is good in most patients but some are treatment-resistant with recurrent thrombotic events and eventually death.

  13. Kartagener syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedaa Skeik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nedaa Skeik1–3, Fadi I Jabr41Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Dartmouth Medical School, Hannover, NH, USA; 3New York Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 4Horizon Medical Center, Hospital Medicine, Dickson, TN, USAAbstract: Kartagener syndrome is a rare, ciliopathic, autosomal recessive genetic disorder that causes a defect in the action of the cilia lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tube. Patients usually present with chronic recurrent rhinosinusitis, otitis media, pneumonia, and bronchiectasis caused by pseudomonal infection. Situs inversus can be seen in about 50% of cases. Diagnosis can be made by tests to prove impaired cilia function, biopsy, and genetic studies. Treatment is supportive. In severe cases, the prognosis can be fatal if bilateral lung transplantation is delayed. We present a case of a 66-year-old woman with chronic recurrent upper respiratory infections, pseudomonal pneumonia, and chronic bronchiectasis who presented with acute respiratory failure. She was diagnosed with Kartagener syndrome based on her clinical presentation and genetic studies. She expired on ventilator with refractory respiratory and multiorgan failure.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, immotile cilia syndrome, situs inversus

  14. Crush syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Lovallo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The first detailed cases of crush syndrome were described in 1941 in London after victims trapped beneath bombed buildings presented with swollen limbs, hypovolemic shock, dark urine, renal failure, and ultimately perished. The majority of the data and studies on this topic still draw from large databases of earthquake victims. However, in Africa, a continent with little seismic activity, the majority of crush syndrome cases are instead victims of severe beatings rather than earthquake casualties, and clinical suspicion by emergency personnel must be high in this patient group presenting with oliguria or pigmenturia. Damaged skeletal muscle fibres and cell membranes lead to an inflammatory cascade resulting in fluid sequestration in the injured extremity, hypotension, hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia and their complications, and renal injury from multiple sources. Elevations in the serum creatinine, creatine kinase (CK, and potassium levels are frequent findings in these patients, and can help guide critical steps in management. Fluid resuscitation should begin prior to extrication of trapped victims or as early as possible, as this basic intervention has been shown to in large part prevent progression of renal injury to requiring haemodialysis. Alkalinization of the urine and use of mannitol for forced diuresis are recommended therapies under specific circumstances and are supported by studies done in animal models, but have not been shown to change clinical outcomes in human crush victims. In the past 70 years the crush syndrome and its management have been studied more thoroughly, however clinical practice guidelines continue to evolve.

  15. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pharyngitis, Adenitis Syndrome (Juvenile) Polymyalgia Rheumatica Psoriatic Arthritis Raynaud's Phenomenon Reactive Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren's Syndrome Spinal Stenosis Spondyloarthritis Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Juvenile) Takayasu's ...

  16. Inherited ichthyosis: Syndromic forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Kozo

    2016-03-01

    Among diseases that cause ichthyosis as one of the symptoms, there are some diseases that induce abnormalities in organs other than the skin. Of these, diseases with characteristic signs are regarded as syndromes. Although these syndromes are very rare, Netherton syndrome, Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome, and Refsum syndrome have been described in texts as representative ones. It is important to know the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms in order to establish an effective therapy and beneficial genetic counseling including a prenatal diagnosis.

  17. Raynaud's syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, D G; Dathan, J R

    1985-01-01

    We report three cases of Raynaud's syndrome with digital ischaemic ulceration, in association with carpal tunnel syndrome. In all cases, the aetiology of the Raynaud's syndrome was probably unrelated to the nerve compression. However, symptoms were worse on the side of the median nerve lesion in two patients and worse on the side with the most severe nerve dysfunction in the third; symptoms were relieved by carpal tunnel decompression in two patients. We suggest that carpal tunnel syndrome ma...

  18. Morvan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  19. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Lata

    2012-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is defined as a functional renal failure in patients with liver disease with portal hypertension and it constitutes the climax of systemic circulatory changes associated with portal hypertension.This term refers to a precisely specified syndrome featuring in particular morphologically intact kidneys,where regulatory mechanisms have minimised glomerular filtration and maximised tubular resorption and urine concentration,which ultimately results in uraemia.The syndrome occurs almost exclusively in patients with ascites.Type 1 HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume due to both an extreme splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and a reduction of cardiac output.Type 2 HRS is characterised by a stable or slowly progressive renal failure so that its main clinical consequence is not acute renal failure,but refractory ascites,and its impact on prognosis is less negative.Liver transplantation is the most appropriate therapeutic method,nevertheless,only a few patients can receive it.The most suitable "bridge treatments" or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin.Terlipressin is at an initial dose of 0.5-1 mg every 4 h by intravenous bolus to 3 mg every 4 h in cases when there is no response.Renal function recovery can be achieved in less than 50% of patients and a considerable decrease in renal function may reoccur even in patients who have been responding to therapy over the short term.Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt plays only a marginal role in the treatment of HRS.

  20. OCULO-CEREBRO-RENAL SYNDROME (LOWE'S SYNDROME)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Oculo-cerebro-renal syndrome (Lowe's syndrome) is characterized by mental and motor retardation, cataract, glaucoma and renal abnormalities. It is an X-linked recessive metabolic disease. Two brothers suffering from Lowe's syndrome are reported. Their mother with lenticular opacities and peculiar facial appearance is in concordance with the obligate carrier. The ocular changes and heridity are discussed.

  1. Jacobsen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattina, Teresa; Perrotta, Concetta Simona; Grossfeld, Paul

    2009-03-07

    Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears). Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from approximately 7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia) and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be very severe

  2. HELLP syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Acar

    2014-08-01

    Suggested treatment modality consists, stabilization of blood pressure and magnesium sulfate infusion. Then evaluation of fetal status and planning delivery method and time if maternal status remains unstable. If prognosis seems favorable without urgent delivery and fetus can benefit from it, a course of betamethasone can be given to fetuses between 24 and 34 weeks of gestational age. The only and definite treatment of HELLP syndrome is delivering the baby. Suggested benefits of steroid therapy and other experimental treatments are still to be proven effective by large randomized controlled trials. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 735-760

  3. Chilaiditi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, S D; Cruikshank, J G

    1977-02-01

    The features of the Chilaiditi Syndrome are described, together with the historial background, and a brief review of the literature on the condition is given. The prevalence in our geriatric population was found to be 1% and the 13 cases seen over 22 months are reported briefly. The prevalence increases with age and may be related to the consumption of drugs by the elderly; although in the majority it is asymptomatic, it may, particularly when associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, lead to unnecessary laparotomy. In the geriatric patient, interposition of the bowel should be considered in the differential diagnosis of air under the right hemidiaphragm.

  4. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzovic, S.; Fiebach, B.J.O.; Magnus, L.; Sauerbrei, H.U.

    1982-11-01

    This article reports on 14 cases of a trichorhinophalangeal syndrome in five successive generations. Besides the well-known characteristics of the TRPS the following symptoms observed in this family are new: Teething was considerably delayed, intelligence was reduced, and there were skin manifestations resembling eczema. Besides, struma colli and colitis ulcerosa were also observed. Subsequent observations have to clarify whether these symptoms are a facultative part of the TRPS pattern. The constant appearance of carriers of these characteristics during five generation points to dominant heredity.

  5. Eagle Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beytholahi JM

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Eagle's syndrome is characterized by an elongated styloid process and (or calcification of"nstylohyoid ligament besides clinical symptoms. The symptoms are those related to pain when"nswallowing or rotating the neck, headacke, earache, dizziness, intermittent glossitis, sensation of"nforeign body in pharynx and transient syncope. The case which is presented can be considered a very"nrare form of the disease in which complete calcification of the ligament and it's thickening has"noccured. Also there is little relationship between the severity of calcification and severity of symptoms."nA careful and thorough evaluation of each panoramic radiography is emphasized.

  6. Olmsted Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  7. Refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentebella, Judy; Kerner, John A

    2009-10-01

    Refeeding syndrome (RFS) is the result of aggressive enteral or parenteral feeding in a malnourished patient, with hypophosphatemia being the hallmark of this phenomenon. Other metabolic abnormalities, such as hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia, may also occur, along with sodium and fluid retention. The metabolic changes that occur in RFS can be severe enough to cause cardiorespiratory failure and death. This article reviews the pathophysiology, the clinical manifestations, and the management of RFS. The key to prevention is identifying patients at risk and being aware of the potential complications involved in rapidly reintroducing feeds to a malnourished patient.

  8. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be

  9. Myofascial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Carli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Myofascial pain syndrome is common cause one of musculoskeletal pain and it is characterized by trigger points (TP, limited range of motion in joints and local twitch response (LTR during mechanical stimulation of the TP. Trigger point is a hyperirritable spot in skeletal muscle that is associated with a hypersensitive palpable nodule in a taut band. The spot is tender when pressed and can give rise to characteristic referred pain, motor dysfunction and autonomic phenomena. Palpation is reliable diagnostic criterion for locating TP in patients. Treatment is based on anesthetise TP, stretch and spray, local pression and physical activity.

  10. Down Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... en español El síndrome de Down About Down Syndrome Down syndrome (DS), also called Trisomy 21, is a ... rises to about 1 in 100. continue How Down Syndrome Affects Kids Kids with Down syndrome tend to ...

  11. Sheehan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicli, Fatih; Dokmetas, Hatice Sebila; Acibucu, Fettah

    2013-04-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) is characterized by various degrees of hypopituitarism, and develops as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum hemorrhage. Increased pituitary volume, small sella size, disseminated intravascular coagulation and autoimmunity are the proposed factors in the pathogenesis of SS. Hormonal insufficiencies, ranging from single pituitary hormone insufficiency to total hypopituitarism, are observed in patients. The first most important issue in the diagnosis is being aware of the syndrome. Lack of lactation and failure of menstrual resumption after delivery that complicated with severe hemorrhage are the most important clues in diagnosing SS. The most frequent endocrine disorders are the deficiencies of growth hormone and prolactin. In patients with typical obstetric history, prolactin response to TRH seems to be the most sensitive screening test in diagnosing SS. Other than typical pituitary deficiency, symptoms such as anemia, pancytopenia, osteoporosis, impairment in cognitive functions and impairment in the quality of life are also present in these patients. Treatment of SS is based on the appropriate replacement of deficient hormones. Growth hormone replacement has been found to have positive effects; however, risk to benefit ratio, side effects and cost of the treatment should be taken into account.

  12. Sotos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier-Daire Valérie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC, advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (

  13. KBG syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  14. Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, C M; Bremner, W J

    1998-06-22

    Klinefelter syndrome is the most common sex chromosome disorder. Affected males carry an additional X chromosome, which results in male hypogonadism, androgen deficiency, and impaired spermatogenesis. Some patients may exhibit all of the classic signs of this disorder, including gynecomastia, small testes, sparse body hair, tallness, and infertility, whereas others, because of the wide variability in clinical expression, lack many of these features. Treatment consists of testosterone replacement therapy to correct the androgen deficiency and to provide patients with appropriate virilization. This therapy also has positive effects on mood and self-esteem and has been shown to protect against osteoporosis, although it will not reverse infertility. Although the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome is now made definitively using chromosomal karyotyping, revealing in most instances a 47,XXY genotype, the diagnosis also can be made using a careful history and results of a physical examination, with the hallmark being small, firm testes. As it affects 1 in 500 male patients and presents with a variety of clinical features, primary care physicians should be familiar with this condition.

  15. Leopard syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallapiccola Bruno

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract LEOPARD syndrome (LS, OMIM 151100 is a rare multiple congenital anomalies condition, mainly characterized by skin, facial and cardiac anomalies. LEOPARD is an acronym for the major features of this disorder, including multiple Lentigines, ECG conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonic stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth, and sensorineural Deafness. About 200 patients have been reported worldwide but the real incidence of LS has not been assessed. Facial dysmorphism includes ocular hypertelorism, palpebral ptosis and low-set ears. Stature is usually below the 25th centile. Cardiac defects, in particular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mostly involving the left ventricle, and ECG anomalies are common. The lentigines may be congenital, although more frequently manifest by the age of 4–5 years and increase throughout puberty. Additional common features are café-au-lait spots (CLS, chest anomalies, cryptorchidism, delayed puberty, hypotonia, mild developmental delay, sensorineural deafness and learning difficulties. In about 85% of the cases, a heterozygous missense mutation is detected in exons 7, 12 or 13 of the PTPN11 gene. Recently, missense mutations in the RAF1 gene have been found in two out of six PTPN11-negative LS patients. Mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. LS is largely overlapping Noonan syndrome and, during childhood, Neurofibromatosis type 1-Noonan syndrome. Diagnostic clues of LS are multiple lentigines and CLS, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and deafness. Mutation-based differential diagnosis in patients with borderline clinical manifestations is warranted. LS is an autosomal dominant condition, with full penetrance and variable expressivity. If one parent is affected, a 50% recurrence risk is appropriate. LS should be suspected in foetuses with severe cardiac hypertrophy and prenatal DNA test may be performed. Clinical management should

  16. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy.

  17. Hypereosinophilic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Civardi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The last few years have seen a complete change in the etiopathogenetic features, classification and therapeutic approach of the hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES, a multiorgan targeted blood disease. The discovery of a genetic mutation and the occurrence of a new fusion gene, named FIP1L1-PDGFRA (FIP gene, in some patients allowed the identification of a new myeloproliferative disorder, M-HES: thereafter, the pivotal therapeutic role of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, particularly, imatinib mesylate, was clearly detected. In the same period a new pathogenetic mechanism has been detected: some authors described the presence of a CD3-CD4 +Tcell clone correlating with the overproduction of IL5, a potent eosinophilic cell line stimulating cytokine. As a consequence an international consensus committee proposed a new classification for these syndromes, in accordance with these new pathogenetic features. The disease is characterized by an extensive tissue and organ damage due to an eosinophilic cell infiltration and leading to the release of toxic cytokines and subsequent organ dysfunction. The heart, lungs, gastrointestinal apparatus, skin and central nervous system are affected. Moreover the released cytokines can induce a thrombophilic status and thromboembolic events can occur throughout the body. Aim of the study: We describe the diagnostic procedures that are necessary in order to obtain a correct diagnosis and classification of the disease and to evaluate the presence of an organ and tissue damage. In particular, bone marrow biopsy and cytogenetic examination of blood and marrow are necessary for detecting M-HES cases that are positive for the FIP gene. In these patients, imatinib mesylate has a leading role for obtaining complete remission of the disease in a high percentage of cases. We also examine the therapeutic options for the other forms of the disease: prednisone, interferon, hydroxiurea are effective therapeutic tools in

  18. ADHD and genetic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo-Castro, Adriana; D'Agati, Elisa; Curatolo, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    A high rate of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)-like characteristics has been reported in a wide variety of disorders including syndromes with known genetic causes. In this article, we review the genetic and the neurobiological links between ADHD symptoms and some genetic syndromes such as: Fragile X Syndrome, Neurofibromatosis 1, DiGeorge Syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Turner Syndrome, Williams Syndrome and Klinefelter Syndrome. Although each syndrome may arise from different genetic abnormalities with multiple molecular functions, the effects of these abnormalities may give rise to common effects downstream in the biological pathways or neural circuits, resulting in the presentation of ADHD symptoms. Early diagnosis of ADHD allows for earlier treatment, and has the potential for a better outcome in children with genetic syndromes.

  19. First Trimester Down Syndrome Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21) or Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) . The first trimester screen is one ... chromosome material that results in Down syndrome or Edwards syndrome , the levels of PAPP-A tend to be ...

  20. Prenatal Tests for Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PRENATAL TESTS FOR DOWN SYNDROME What Is Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is a common birth defect that includes mental retardation and— often— heart problems. Children with Down syndrome have round faces and almond-shaped eyes that ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Werner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for This Condition Adult premature aging syndrome Adult Progeria Werner's Syndrome Werners Syndrome WS Related Information How ... BK, Monnat RJ Jr. Werner and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes: mechanistic basis of human progeroid diseases. Nat ...

  2. Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Duane Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U D Shrestha

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome (GHS is also known as Oculo-Auriculo-Vertebral (OAV syndrome or Branchial arch syndrome. Duane retraction syndrome (DRS is a congenital disorder of ocular motility characterized by limited abduction, adduction or both. It is unilateral in 80% of cases. The important and interesting part of this eight months old child is presence of GHS with DRS. She has bilateral invol-vement, which is seen in only 5-8% of GHS, as compared to high incidence of unilateral involve-ment. This child also had refractive error of + 6.00/ - 1.5 * 180. At four year of age her vision with glass was 6/9. Children with GHS and DRS should have early eye examination done to treat the problem of refractive error. Keywords: Duane retraction syndrome; goldenhar syndrome, refractive error.

  3. Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Seth S; Sell, Gabrielle L; Zbinden, Mark A; Bird, Lynne M

    2015-07-01

    In this review we summarize the clinical and genetic aspects of Angelman syndrome (AS), its molecular and cellular underpinnings, and current treatment strategies. AS is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive disability, motor dysfunction, speech impairment, hyperactivity, and frequent seizures. AS is caused by disruption of the maternally expressed and paternally imprinted UBE3A, which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Four mechanisms that render the maternally inherited UBE3A nonfunctional are recognized, the most common of which is deletion of the maternal chromosomal region 15q11-q13. Remarkably, duplication of the same chromosomal region is one of the few characterized persistent genetic abnormalities associated with autistic spectrum disorder, occurring in >1-2% of all cases of autism spectrum disorder. While the overall morphology of the brain and connectivity of neural projections appear largely normal in AS mouse models, major functional defects are detected at the level of context-dependent learning, as well as impaired maturation of hippocampal and neocortical circuits. While these findings demonstrate a crucial role for ubiquitin protein ligase E3A in synaptic development, the mechanisms by which deficiency of ubiquitin protein ligase E3A leads to AS pathophysiology in humans remain poorly understood. However, recent efforts have shown promise in restoring functions disrupted in AS mice, renewing hope that an effective treatment strategy can be found.

  4. 先天性完全性房室传导阻滞临床特征及心脏起搏器的安置选择%Clinical features of congenital complete atrioventricular block and its indications for permanent cardiac pacing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李奋; 周爱卿; 高伟; 李筠; 黄美蓉

    2001-01-01

    Objective The data of 66 patients with congenital complete atrioventricular block (CCAVB) were analyzed retrospectively to investigate the clinical features of CCAVB and its indications for permanent cardiac pacing. Methods Between March 1974 to June 2000, 66 patients (inpatients and outpatients) were confirmed with CCAVB in our hospital, 2 of those with ventricular septal defects and 25 with onsets of Adams-Stokes syndrome. The patients without onsets of Adams-Stokes syndrome were followed up in outpatient department. The patients with onsets of Adams-Stokes syndrome were treated with medicines. If they were unresponsive, the patients underwent temporarily right ventricular pacing. The patients with frequent onsets of Adams-Stokes syndrome were candidates for permanent cardiac pacing. All patients were followed up regularly, including electrocardiography, execise-test, efficiency of cardiac pacing and function of pacemaker (those received pacemakers), etc. Results In this series, 25 patients experienced onsets of Adams-Stokes syndrome. The mean age at initial onsets was 4.5±2.6 years and the mean heart rate 41±3.5 beats per minute. During the period of onsets, electrocardiograms showed bradycardia in 10 patients, ventricular tachycardia (mainly torsades de pointes) in 13 patients and unknown in 2 patients. The factors relative to onsets of Adams-Stokes syndrome were age, heart rate, QT interval, exercise and the level of blood potassium. At the follow-up, those without onsets of Adams-Stokes syndrome lived normal lives. Majority with onsets of Adams-Stokes syndrome were controlled by infusion of isoproterenol, maintenance of potassium balance, infusion of lidocaine, etc. Minority unresponsive to medicines underwent temporarily right ventricular pacing with good results. 9 patients with frequent onsets of Adams-Stokes syndrome and 2 patients with infrequent onsets of Adams-Stokes syndrome received permanent cardiac pacemaker implantations with good results

  5. Sheehan's Syndrome (Postpartum Hypopituitarism)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan's syndrome Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Sheehan's syndrome is a condition that affects women who lose a life-threatening amount of blood in childbirth or who have severe low blood pressure ...

  6. The obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, R. H. W. M.; de Grootb, Ph. G.

    2008-01-01

    The association of persistent presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies and thromboembolic events, (recurrent) pregnancy loss or both is termed antiphospholipid syndrome. Pregnancies in women with the syndrome should be regarded as at high-risk for complications. Optimal management consist

  7. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000332.htm Milk-alkali syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Milk-alkali syndrome is a condition in which there ...

  8. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000304.htm Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) is a complication of ...

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung condition that ...

  10. Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Into Relieved Are you experiencing symptoms linked to restless legs syndrome (RLS)? Find tools and support to help get ... I couldn’t sleep. Fortunately, I found the Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation and learned what type of doctor to ...

  11. What Is Marfan Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11:11 Size: 10.5 MB November 2014 What Is Marfan Syndrome? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Being Done on Marfan Syndrome? For More Information What Is Connective Tissue? Connective tissue supports many parts ...

  12. Kleine-Levin Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  13. Locked-In Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  14. Holmes-Adie Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  15. Central Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  16. Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  17. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children who have Tourette syndrome may also have learning disabilities or obsessive-compulsive disorder (thoughts or behaviors that ... my child who has tourette syndrome, involuntary movement, learning disabilities, learning disability, movement disorders, obsessive thoughts, obsessive-compulsive ...

  18. Organic brain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... state Intoxication from drug or alcohol use Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (a long-term effect of excessive alcohol consumption ... Substance use Transient ischemic attack Vascular dementia Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome Review Date 2/27/2016 Updated by: Amit ...

  19. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001311.htm Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a rare, inherited disease. It causes ...

  20. Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome irritable bowel syndrome thyroid disease Depression and anxiety disorders are the most common conditions that overlap with PMS. About one half of women seeking treatment for PMS have one of these ...

  1. What Is Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Down syndrome are chorionic villus sampling (CVS) and amniocentesis. These procedures, which carry up to a 1% ... are nearly 100% accurate in diagnosing Down syndrome. Amniocentesis is usually performed in the second trimester between ...

  2. Barth Syndrome (BTHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be prescribed to control heart problems. The dietary supplement carnitine has aided some children with Barth syndrome but ... may be prescribed to control heart problems. The dietary supplement carnitine has aided some children with Barth syndrome but ...

  3. Hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ristiniemi, Heli; Perski, Aleksander; Lyskov, Eugene; Emtner, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress is among the most common diagnoses in Sweden, most commonly in the form of exhaustion syndrome (ICD-10 classification - F43.8). The majority of patients with this syndrome also have disturbed breathing (hyperventilation). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome. Thirty patients with exhaustion syndrome and 14 healthy subjects were evaluated with the Nijmegen Symptom Questionnaire (NQ). The participants completed ...

  4. Familial Crouzon syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Samatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Crouzon syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition of the craniosynostotic syndromes without syndactyly and with various dentofacial anomalies. Craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, shallow orbits, ocular proptosis and hypertelorism are the characteristic features of Crouzon syndrome. This report describes the variable clinical features in affected individuals over two generations of a family with dentofacial deformities and review of literature.

  5. Williams Syndrome and Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Karen; Wharton, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder with a variety of medical and developmental features, focuses on frequent outward expression of happiness. Analysis of the unique expression of happiness in individuals with Williams syndrome is followed by discussion of this happiness in the context of other dimensions of the syndrome,…

  6. Anisocoria and Horner's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anisocoria and Horner's Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is ... the affected eye. What are the signs of Horner’s syndrome? In Horner’s syndrome, the pupil in the ...

  7. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  8. Down syndrome: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Otabor Wajuihian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Optometrists as primary eye care providers examine patients from diverse populations, including those with special needs such as Down syndrome. Down syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality associated with several health conditions including vision anomalies such as refractive, accommodative and vergence anomalies, as well as ocular pathology. In this article, a narrative review of Down syndrome including the background, historical perspective, aetiology and genetic mechanisms, types, epidemiology, as well as the physical and medical profile of Down syndrome is presented.Keywords: Down syndrome review; Trisomy 21; historical perspective; etiology; types and epidemiology; features; Optometrist

  9. [Postpartum endocrine syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducarme, G; Châtel, P; Luton, D

    2008-05-01

    Postpartum endocrine syndromes occur in the year after delivery. They are due to immunologic and vascular modifications during pregnancy. The Sheehan syndrome is the first described postpartum endocrine syndrome and consists on a hypophyse necrosis in relation with a hypovolemic shock during delivery. The immunologic consequences of the pregnancy are the most frequent, sometimes discrete and transitory. The physiological evolution of the endocrine glands during pregnancy and the most frequent post-partum endocrine syndromes are discussed: postpartum lymphocytic hypophysitis, thyroiditis and Sheehan' syndrome.

  10. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Pandeshwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome—NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the PTCH (patched gene found on chromosome arm 9q. The syndrome, characterized by increased predisposition to develop basal cell carcinoma and associated multiorgan anomalies, has a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. GGS is a multidisciplinary problem, early diagnosis of which allows introduction of secondary prophylaxis and following an appropriate treatment to delay the progress of the syndrome. The following report emphasizes the need for awareness of the diagnostic criteria of this syndrome in cases with no typical skin lesions.

  11. Barth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Sarah LN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM, skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA. Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE, left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC, ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical, compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and

  12. Behcet's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Sam R; Yildirim, Resit; Yazici, Yusuf

    2012-12-03

    Behcet's syndrome (BS) is a vasculitis, seen more commonly around the Mediterranean and the Far East, and manifests with oral and genital ulcerations, skin lesions, uveitis, and vascular, central nervous system and gastrointestinal involvement. Its natural history of getting less severe over time, more severe disease in males and lack of specific diagnostic testing separates it from other commonly seen conditions in rheumatology. Most of the serious manifestations respond well to immunosuppression, and these are the mainstays of treatment for BS. BS is more prevalent in regions along the Silk Road, from the Mediterranean to the Far East. The genetic risk factor most strongly associated with BS is the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B51 allele. While genetic factors seem to play a role in the development of certain features of BS, there is general consensus that as yet unidentified environmental stimuli are necessary for initiation of disease. Proposed exogenous triggers include both bacterial and viral infections, which may then lead to dysregulation of the immune system, ultimately leading to the phenotypic expression of disease. The clinical manifestations of BS are protean in nature. While most patients develop mucocutaneous and genital ulcers along with eye disease, other patients may also present with arthritis, frank vasculitis, thrombophlebitis and CNS disease. Interestingly, the manifestations of this illness vary considerably based on gender and ethnicity. As the phenotypic expression among patients with BS is quite heterogeneous, pharmacological therapy is variable and dependent upon the severity of the disease as well as organ involvement. Treatment for BS overlaps considerably with therapies for other autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and the vasculitides. Pharmacological agents utilized for treatment of BS include corticosteroids, colchicine, azathioprine, and tumour necrosis factor (TNF).α inhibitors

  13. [Epidemiology of Asperger's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yukiko; Saito, Kazuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Only a little data is available so far on the prevalence of Asperger's syndrome. The prevalence that Fombonne (2003) estimated after considering six European research was 2/10,000. In Ishikawa's study (2006) conducted in Nagoya city, Japan, the prevalence of Asperger's syndrome was 56/10,000. Currently there are not strict diagnostic criteria of Asperger's syndrome and methods of investigation are not consistent in each study. Therefore the prevalence rate for Asperger's syndrome covered very wide range. Although we still don't have a precise prevalence data on Asperger's syndrome, the awareness of this syndrome emerged in these several decades tells us that further research and support for the children of Asperger's syndrome and their family are necessary.

  14. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sarraf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cardiac function leads to activation of the neurohumoral axis, sodium and water retention, congestion and ultimately impaired kidney function. This sequence of events has been termed the Cardiorenal Syndrome. This is different from the increase in cardiovascular complications which occur with primary kidney disease, that is, the so-called Renocardiac Syndrome. The present review discusses the pathogenesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome followed by the benefits and potential deleterious effects of pharmacological agents that have been used in this setting. The agents discussed are diuretics, aquaretics, natriuretic peptides, vasodilators, inotropes and adenosine α1 receptor antagonists. The potential role of ultrafiltration is also briefly discussed.

  15. Do you know this syndrome? Leopard syndrome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cançado, Flávio Heleno da Silva Queiroz; da Silva, Luis Candido Pinto; Taitson, Paulo Franco; de Andrade, Ana Carolina Dias Viana; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is known as Leopard syndrome, which is a mnemonic rule for multiple lentigines (L), electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities (E), ocular hypertelorism (O), pulmonary stenosis (P), abnormalities of genitalia (A), retardation of growth (R), and deafness (D). We report the case of a 12-year-old patient with some of the abovementioned characteristics: hypertelorism, macroglossia, lentigines, hypospadias, cryptorchidism, subaortic stenosis, growth retardation, and hearing impairment. Due to this set of symptoms, we diagnosed Leopard syndrome. PMID:28225973

  16. Basal cell nevus syndrome or Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalakoti, Srikanth; Geller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) or Gorlin syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome sometimes known as the fifth phacomatosis, inherited in autosomal dominant fashion with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Gorlin syndrome is characterized by development of multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), jaw cysts, palmar or plantar pits, calcification of falx cerebri, various developmental skeletal abnormalities such as bifid rib, hemi- or bifid vertebra and predisposition to the development of various tumors. BCNS is caused by a mutation in the PTCH1 gene localized to 9q22.3. Its estimated prevalence varies between 1/55600 and 1/256000 with an equal male to female ratio. The medulloblastoma variant seen in Gorlin syndrome patients is of the desmoplastic type, characteristically presenting during the first 3 years of life. Therefore, children with desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be carefully screened for other features of BCNS. Radiation therapy for desmoplastic medulloblastoma should be avoided in BCNS patients as it may induce development of invasive BCCs and other tumors in the skin area exposed to radiation. This syndrome is a multisystem disorder so involvement of multiple specialists with a multimodal approach to detect and treat various manifestations at early stages will reduce the long-term sequelae and severity of the condition. Life expectancy is not significantly altered but morbidity from complications and cosmetic scarring can be substantial.

  17. Metabolic syndrome and migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit eSachdev

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Migraine and metabolic syndrome are highly prevaleirnt and costly conditions.The two conditions coexist, but it is unclear what relationship may exist between the two processes. Metabolic syndrome involves a number of findings, including insulin resistance, systemic hypertension, obesity, a proinflammatory state, and a prothrombotic state. Only one study addresses migraine in metabolic syndrome, finding significant differences in the presentation of metabolic syndrome in migraineurs. However, controversy exists regarding the contribution of each individual risk factor to migraine pathogensis and prevalence. It is unclear what treatment implications, if any, exist as a result of the concomitant diagnosis of migraine and metabolic syndrome. The cornerstone of migraine and metabolic syndrome treatments is prevention, relying heavily on diet modification, sleep hygiene, medication use, and exercise.

  18. Gorlin-goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B V Shobha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT in the jaw, multiple basal cell carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic examination in the first decade of life, as KCOTs are usually one of the first manifestations of the NBCCS syndrome. This article reports the case of a 12-year-old girl with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, emphasizing its clinical and radiographic manifestation. This study highlights the importance of health professionals in the early diagnosis of this syndrome and a multidisciplinary approach to provide a better diagnosis and prognosis.

  19. SAPHO syndrome associated spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Masato; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Misawa, Haruo; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Takahata, Tomohiro; Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2008-10-01

    The concept of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome has been well clarified, after Chamot et al. suggested this peculiar disorder in 1987. The most commonly affected site in SAPHO syndrome is the anterior chest, followed by the spine. However, the clinical course and taxonomic concept of SAPHO spinal lesions are poorly understood. This study was performed to analyze: (1) the detailed clinical course of spinal lesions in SAPHO syndrome, and (2) the relationship between SAPHO syndrome with spinal lesions and seronegative spondyloarthropathy. Thirteen patients with spondylitis in SAPHO syndrome were analyzed. The features of spinal lesions were a chronic onset with a slight inflammatory reaction, and slowly progressing non-marginal syndesmophytes at multi spinal levels, besides the coexistence of specific skin lesions. SAPHO syndrome, especially spinal lesions related to palmoplantar pustulosis, can be recognized as a subtype of seronegative spondyloarthropathy.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Arts syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Arts syndrome Arts syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Arts syndrome is a disorder that causes serious neurological ...

  1. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Toxic Shock Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Toxic Shock Syndrome Print ... it, then take some precautions. What Is Toxic Shock Syndrome? If you're a girl who's had ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Laron syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Laron syndrome Laron syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Laron syndrome is a rare form of short stature that ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Klinefelter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Klinefelter syndrome Klinefelter syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Klinefelter syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects male physical ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Alport syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Registry: Alport syndrome, X-linked recessive Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (3 links) GeneReview: Alport Syndrome and Thin Basement Membrane Nephropathy MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Alport Syndrome MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: End-Stage ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Asperger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Asperger syndrome Asperger syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Asperger syndrome is a disorder on the autism spectrum, which ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Horner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Horner syndrome Horner syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Horner syndrome is a disorder that affects the eye ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Cockayne syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cockayne syndrome type II is also known as cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, and while some ... link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome Educational Resources (7 links) ...

  8. Down syndrome: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Otabor Wajuihian

    2016-01-01

    Optometrists as primary eye care providers examine patients from diverse populations, including those with special needs such as Down syndrome. Down syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality associated with several health conditions including vision anomalies such as refractive, accommodative and vergence anomalies, as well as ocular pathology. In this article, a narrative review of Down syndrome including the background, historical perspective, aetiology and genetic mechanisms, types, epidemiolo...

  9. Lamotrigine induced DRESS syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikkeri Narayanasetty Naveen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS syndrome is a rare and life-threatening delayed drug hypersensitivity reaction characterized by skin eruption, fever, lymphadenopathies, and visceral involvement. Here, we are presenting a 12 year old boy, who developed rare but life threatening DRESS syndrome due to Lamotrigine. Early detection and treatment led to his rapid recovery. This case is presented to highlight the importance of early detection of rare fatal syndrome.

  10. Alport's Syndrome in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Suchita Mehta; Chadi Saifan; Marie Abdellah; Rita Choueiry; Rabih Nasr; Suzanne El-Sayegh

    2013-01-01

    Background. Alport's syndrome is an X-linked hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane associated with ocular and hearing defects. In women, the disease is much less severe compared to that in men. However, women with Alport's syndrome can have an accelerated form of their disease during pregnancy with worsening of kidney function and can also develop preeclampsia. There are only four described cases of Alport's syndrome in pregnancy. Case Presentation. 20-year-old woman ...

  11. Fat embolism syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob George; Reeba George; Dixit, R; Gupta, R C; Gupta, N.

    1997-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome, an important contributor to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome, has been associated with both traumatic and nontraumatic disorders. Fat embolization after long bone trauma is probably common as a subclinical event. Fat emboli can deform and pass through the lungs, resulting in systemic embolization, most commonly to the brain and kidneys. The diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome is based on the patient’s history, supported by clinical signs of pulmonar...

  12. The carpenter syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Erkan; Oğuz, Haldun; Safak, Mustafa Asim; Samim, Erdal

    2004-03-01

    Carpenter syndrome (Acrocephalopolysyndactyly type II), first described in 1901, consists of acrocephaly, syndactyly, polydactyly, congenital heart disease, mental retardation, hypogenitalism, cryptorchidism, obesity, umbilical hernia and bony abnormalities. We report a 6 years old boy presenting as a union of these malformations and also having bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Auditory disturbances are not common among Carpenter syndrome patients. According to our knowledge, this is the first Carpenter syndrome case whose hearing loss is demonstrated by auditory brainstem response (ABR) test.

  13. Post cardiac injury syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Nielsen, F E

    1991-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome is a symptom complex which is similar in many respects to the post-myocardial infarction syndrome and these are summarized under the diagnosis of the Post Cardiac Injury Syndrome (PCIS). This condition, which is observed most frequently after open heart surgery, i...... on the coronary vessels, with cardiac tamponade and chronic pericardial exudate. In the lighter cases, PCIS may be treated with NSAID and, in the more severe cases, with systemic glucocorticoid which has a prompt effect....

  14. [Excretory azoospermia: Young's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrufat, J M; Cervelló, E; Albella, F

    1980-01-01

    The authors present a case of excretory azoospermia, whose deferentovesiculography and surgical exploration of the epididymis were normal. The patient presented bronchio-estasis and sinusitis as a result of which he was diagnosed as suffering from Young's syndrome. The authors make a review of the current state of the problem stressing the differences between Young's syndrome and immobile cilia syndrome described by Eliasson and colls.

  15. Orofacial syndromes: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Shyam Sunder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A syndrome is a set of signs and symptoms that tend to occur together and reflect the presence of a particular disease or an increased chance of developing to a particular disease. There are numerous orofacial syndromes and a thorough knowledge of their manifestations and implications is pertinent in good oral health care delivery. The aim of this review is to describe collective esoteric knowledge, about various malformations and syndromes associated with orofacial region.

  16. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana; Pasternak Janko; Milovanović Stanislav; Ivanov Dejan; Milić Saša

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella pre...

  17. Palmaris brevis spasm syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    SERRATRICE, G.; Azulay, J.P.; Serratrice, J; Pouget, J

    1995-01-01

    Palmaris brevis spasm syndrome is a rare and benign condition of localised muscular hyperactivity. In five men, the hypothenar eminence underwent spontaneous, irregular, tonic contractions of the palmaris brevis muscle. An EMG showed spontaneous high frequency discharges of normal motor units, without evidence of neuropathy or of nerve compression. This syndrome resembles other restricted muscle hyperactivity syndromes although there are some differences. Curiously, the palmaris brevis muscle...

  18. SAPHO syndrome associated spondylitis

    OpenAIRE

    Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Masato; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Misawa,Haruo; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Takahata, Tomohiro; Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2008-01-01

    The concept of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome has been well clarified, after Chamot et al. suggested this peculiar disorder in 1987. The most commonly affected site in SAPHO syndrome is the anterior chest, followed by the spine. However, the clinical course and taxonomic concept of SAPHO spinal lesions are poorly understood. This study was performed to analyze: (1) the detailed clinical course of spinal lesions in SAPHO syndrome, and (2) the relationship ...

  19. Learning about Cri du Chat Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learning About Prostate Cancer Learning About Cri du Chat Syndrome What is cri du chat syndrome? What ... cri du chat syndrome What is cri du chat syndrome? Cri du chat syndrome - also known as ...

  20. [Neurobiology of Tourette Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Dilek; Akdemir, Devrim

    2016-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by chronic motor and vocal tics. Although it is a common disorder in childhood, the etiology of Tourette Syndrome has not been fully elucidated yet. Studies, -conducted so far- have revealed differences in neurobiological structures of individuals who suffer from Tourette Syndrome. The objective of this review is to assess etiological and pathophysiological studies in the Tourette Syndrome literature. An electronical search was conducted in PubMed database using the keywords tic disorders, Tourette Syndrome, neurobiology, genetics, neuroimaging and animal models. Research and review studies published between 1985 and 2015, with a selection preference towards recent publications, were reviewed. According to the studies, genetic predisposition hypothesis is considered as a priority. However, a precise genetic disorder associated with Tourette Syndrome has not been found. The evidence from postmortem and neuroimaging studies in heterogenous patient groups and animal studies supports the pathological involvement of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuits in Tourette Syndrome. Consequently, the most emphasized hypothesis in the pathophysiology is the dopaminergic dysfunction in these circuits. Furthermore, these findings of the animal, postmortem and neuroimaging studies have confirmed the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of Tourette Syndrome. In conclusion, more studies are needed to understand the etiology of the disorder. The data obtained from neurobiological studies of the disorder will not only shed light on the way of Tourette Syndrome, but also guide studies on its treatment options.

  1. [Refeeding syndrome. A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temprano Ferreras, J L; Bretón Lesmes, I; de la Cuerda Compés, C; Camblor Alvarez, M; Zugasti Murillo, A; García Peris, P

    2005-02-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a complex clinical picture that encompass all those alterations that can occur as a consequence of the nutritional support (oral, enteral or parenteral) in malnourished patients. Refeeding syndrome is classically characterized by neurological alterations, respiratory symptoms, cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure few days after beginning of refeeding, with life-threatening outcome. Its pathogenesis includes alterations in the corporal fluids, and in some electrolytes, minerals and vitamins. In this article a review of refeeding syndrome pathogenesis and clinical manifestations is carried out, with a final series of recommendations for lowering the risk of this syndrome and for facilitate the early diagnosis and the treatment.

  2. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Ramakant S; Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S; Hosmani, Jagadish V

    2012-05-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome is a rare acquired disorder characterized by diffuse hyperpigmentation of the oral mucosa and longitudinal melanonychia in adults. They appear as macular lesions less than 5 mm in diameter. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome is considered to be a benign disease with no systemic manifestation or malignant potential. Therefore, it is important to rule out other mucocutaneous pigmentary disorders that do require medical management. Prompt clinical recognition also averts the need for excessive and invasive procedures and treatments. In India, the reported cases of this syndrome are very few. We provide a review of literature on Laugier-Hunziker syndrome with its differential diagnosis.

  3. Trauma induced eagle syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivumäki, A; Marinescu-Gava, M; Järnstedt, J; Sándor, G K; Wolff, J

    2012-03-01

    Eagle syndrome is characterized by secondary calcification and elongation of the styloid process. Eagle syndrome is often associated with sharp, intermittent pain along the path of the glossopharyngeal nerve located in the hypopharynx and at the base of the tongue. In some cases, the stylohyoid apparatus can compress the internal and/or the external carotid arteries and their perivascular sympathetic fibres, resulting in a persistent pain radiating throughout the carotid territory. The pathogenesis of the syndrome is not understood. The authors report the case of a 52-year-old woman with post traumatic Eagle syndrome-like pain and pseudoarthrosis of the stylohyoid ligament.

  4. Sjögren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pharyngitis, Adenitis Syndrome (Juvenile) Polymyalgia Rheumatica Psoriatic Arthritis Raynaud's Phenomenon Reactive Arthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren's Syndrome Spinal Stenosis Spondyloarthritis Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (Juvenile) Takayasu's ...

  5. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aus Tariq

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder, where the main clinical features include menstrual irregularities, sub-fertility, hyperandrogenism, and hirsutism. The prevalence of PCOS depends on ethnicity, environmental and genetic factors, as well as the criteria used to define it. On the other hand, metabolic syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders which include mainly abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose metabolism, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. These associated disorders directly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2), coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and endometrial cancer. Many patients with PCOS have features of metabolic syndrome such as visceral obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. These place patients with PCOS under high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), Type 2 diabetes (DMT2) and gynecological cancer, in particular, endometrial cancer. Metabolic syndrome is also increased in infertile women with PCOS. The aim of this review is to provide clear and up to date information about PCOS and its relationship with metabolic syndrome, and the possible interaction between different metabolic disorders.

  6. Epidemiology of Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Stephanie L.; Allen, Emily G.; Bean, Lora H.; Freeman, Sallie B.

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most commonly identified genetic form of mental retardation and the leading cause of specific birth defects and medical conditions. Traditional epidemiological studies to determine the prevalence, cause, and clinical significance of the syndrome have been conducted over the last 100 years. DS has been estimated to occur…

  7. Proteus syndrome in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, E; Lichtendahl, DHE; Hofer, SOP

    2002-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a very rare congenital condition comprising malformations and overgrowth of multiple sorts of tissue. It was described for the first time in 1979 and was termed Proteus syndrome in 1983. The authors describe a 37-year-old patient who was diagnosed initially as having Klippel-Tren

  8. Kleine Levin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Wahid Khan, Zia Ud Din, Abdul Salam

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available A case of Kleine Levin Syndrome is presented. Episodic course with spontaneous remission of eachepisode and characteristic features of hypersomnia, hyperphagia, disinhibited behavior. affective featureslike ilTitability and cognitive disturbance made the diagnosis of Kleine Levin syndrome 111 ourpatient.

  9. Managing Sjogren's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Sheila; Tagliavini, Lynda B

    2015-10-01

    There are approximately 4 million Americans diagnosed with Sjogren's Syndrome. This article discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostics, and implications for home care clinicians who may encounter patients with this syndrome. Chronic pain is discussed as well as interventions to manage symptoms such fatigue, dry eyes mouth and skin.

  10. Lynch Syndrome revision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sila Castellón Mortera

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The literature regarding colon`s adenocarcinoma hereditary no poliposico or Lynch Syndrome is reviewed. The clinical characteristics, genetics and histologycal of colon´s adenocarcinoma hereditary, no poliposico are pointed out, so as the updated criteria approved in Amsterdam, for the diagnostic of patients with this Syndrome. The therapeutics is updated.

  11. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A.A. Brosens; D. Langeveld; W.A. van Hattem; F.M. Giardiello; G.J.A. Offerhaus

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple distinct juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The cumulative life-time risk of colorectal cancer is 39% and the relative risk is 34. Juvenile polyps have a

  12. Turner Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Although girls with Turner syndrome may have certain learning difficulties, most can attend regular school and classes, and usually: write well learn well by hearing memorize information as well as others develop good language skills If you have Turner syndrome, you know ...

  13. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  14. The Aarskog syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryns, J P; Macken, J; Vinken, L; Igodt-Ameye, L; van den Berghe, H

    1978-06-09

    In this report a description is given of the Aarskog syndrome in six males belonging to three different families. Partial expression of the syndrome was confirmed in two of the three examined obligate female heterozygotes, who had short stature, small hands and feet, short neck, and a round face with widow's peak and, in one of them, ptosis of the eyelids.

  15. Adult onset Leigh syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandit Lekha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leigh syndrome is a rare progressive mitochondrial disorder of oxidative metabolism. Though it has been reported in infancy and childhood, it is rarely described in adults. The authors describe a patient who had clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features diagnostic of Leigh syndrome, with supportive biochemical and muscle histochemistry evidence.

  16. Central Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or hands. Central pain syndrome often begins shortly after the causative injury or damage, but may be delayed by months or even years, especially if it is related to post-stroke pain. × Definition Central pain syndrome is a neurological ...

  17. Post-Polio Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or fatigue, this may overwork already stressed-out motor neurons and increase your risk of post-polio syndrome. Generally, post-polio syndrome is rarely life-threatening, but severe muscle weakness can lead to complications: Falls. Weakness in your leg muscles makes it ...

  18. The stress ulcer syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A. van Essen

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe stress ulcer syndrome is described in this thesis. This syndrome is seen in patients admitted to intensive care departments or being treated in field hospitals, in disaster areas, or battle fields. Acute mucosal lesions associated with burns (Curling's ulcers) and central nervous sys

  19. Rothmund - Thomson Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma N. L

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is a rare geno-photodermatosis of children. Poikilodermatous cutaneous changes, growth retardation, juvenile cataract and high incidence of malignancy are its classical features. A Thomson type of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome with characteristic poikiloderma congenitale, growth retardation, absence of juvenile cataract and parental non-consanguinity is described in an 8 year old Indian girl.

  20. Trigeminalt trofisk syndrom--

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerskov, Mette Wanscher; Bygum, Anette

    2009-01-01

    Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS) is a rare but well-described syndrome consisting of the triad: paraesthesia, anaesthesia and crescent-shaped ulceration of the ala nasi. We report a case of a 62-year-old woman presenting with TTS after operative excision of an acusticus neurinoma. She attended s...

  1. MECP2 Duplication Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Signorini, Cinzia; De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia;

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) and MECP2 duplication syndrome (MDS) are neurodevelopmental disorders caused by alterations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene expression. A relationship between MECP2 loss-of-function mutations and oxidative stress has been previously documented in RTT patients ...

  2. Korsakoff's syndrome is preventable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudman, Erik; Wijnia, Jan W.

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is a life-threatening neuropsychiatric disorder caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is associated with mammillary body edema and small vessel ischemia. Many patients who develop WKS have a history of serious alcoholism and self-ne

  3. Yellow nail syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixit Ramakant

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of yellow nail syndrome is described in a forty year old male patient who presented with classical triad of this syndrome i.e. deformed yellow nails, lymph-edema and chronic recurrent pleural effusion. The practical problems in the di-agnosis are also briefly discussed with emphasis on awareness of this rare clinical entity.

  4. Plummer-Vinson syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novacek Gottfried

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plummer-Vinson or Paterson-Kelly syndrome presents as a classical triad of dysphagia, iron-deficiency anemia and esophageal webs. Exact data about epidemiology of the syndrome are not available; the syndrome is extremely rare. Most of the patients are white middle-aged women, in the fourth to seventh decade of life but the syndrome has also been described in children and adolescents. The dysphagia is usually painless and intermittent or progressive over years, limited to solids and sometimes associated with weight loss. Symptoms resulting from anemia (weakness, pallor, fatigue, tachycardia may dominate the clinical picture. Additional features are glossitis, angular cheilitis and koilonychia. Enlargement of the spleen and thyroid may also be observed. One of the most important clinical aspects of Plummer-Vinson syndrome is the association with upper alimentary tract cancers. Etiopathogenesis of Plummer-Vinson syndrome is unknown. The most important possible etiological factor is iron deficiency. Other possible factors include malnutrition, genetic predisposition or autoimmune processes. Plummer-Vinson syndrome can be treated effectively with iron supplementation and mechanical dilation. In case of significant obstruction of the esophageal lumen by esophageal web and persistent dysphagia despite iron supplementation, rupture and dilation of the web are necessary. Since Plummer-Vinson syndrome is associated with an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx and the esophagus, the patients should be followed closely.

  5. Rett Syndrome Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gradually, mental and physical symptoms appear. As the syndrome progresses, the child loses purposeful use of her hands and the ... the difficulties with symptoms, many individuals with Rett syndrome continue to live well into middle age and beyond. Because the disorder is rare, ...

  6. Androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001180.htm Androgen insensitivity syndrome To use the ... a condition in which the opening of the urethra is on the underside of the penis, instead of ... they can develop cancer, just like any undescended testicle. Estrogen replacement is ...

  7. Eisenmenger Syndrome in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    Full Text Available Abstract Eisenmenger syndrome is very rare in pregnant women. Debates remain concerning the management of Eisenmenger syndrome in this patient population and the prognosis is unclear in terms of maternal and fetoneonatal outcomes. Epidural analgesia is preferred for Cesarean section as it alleviates perioperative pain and reduces the pulmonary and systemic vascular resistances. Maternal mortality in the presence of Eisenmenger syndrome is reported as 30-50% and even up to 65% in those with Cesarean section. The major causes of death could be hypovolemia, thromboembolism and preeclampsia. Pregnancy should ideally be avoided in a woman with Eisenmenger syndrome concerning the high maternal mortality rate and probable poor prognosis of the baby. A short labour and an atraumatic delivery under epidural block are preferred in the women with a strong desire of pregnancy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the debates of Eisenmenger syndrome in pregnancy and the possible resolutions.

  8. [The refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambers, Wietske M; Kraaijenbrink, Bastiaan; Siegert, Carl E H

    2015-01-01

    The refeeding syndrome may occur during reintroduction of carbohydrates in malnourished patients. This syndrome is characterized by reduced plasma electrolyte levels, hypophosphataemia being most prevalent. The symptoms can vary from minor symptoms to severe neurological or cardiac symptoms. The pathophysiological mechanism comprises an increase in insulin levels, resulting in shifts of phosphate, potassium and magnesium into the intracellular environment, as well as fluid retention and relative deficiency of vitamin B1. There is growing interest in the screening and treatment of patients with malnutrition, due to which the incidence of refeeding syndrome is probably increasing. Currently, there is no single definition of this syndrome and therefore there is no solid scientific basis for screening and treatment. In this article we describe the rationale for screening and additional laboratory investigations. A prospective, controlled trial is important to define the clinical relevance of the refeeding syndrome and optimize its treatment.

  9. [Schizophrenia or Asperger syndrome?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Fonseca, David; Viellard, Marine; Fakra, Eric; Bastard-Rosset, Delphine; Deruelle, Christine; Poinso, François

    2008-09-01

    Patients with Asperger syndrome are often diagnosed late or are wrongly considered to have schizophrenia. Misdiagnosing Asperger syndrome creates serious problems by preventing effective therapy. Several clinical signs described in Asperger syndrome could also be considered as clinical signs of schizophrenia, including impaired social interactions, disabilities in communication, restricted interests, and delusions of persecution. A number of clinical features may facilitate the differential diagnosis: younger age at onset, family history of pervasive developmental disorder, recurring conversations on the same topic, pragmatic aspects of language use, oddities of intonation and pitch, lack of imagination, and incomprehension of social rules are more characteristic of Asperger syndrome. Accurate distinction between Asperger syndrome and schizophrenia would make it possible to offer more treatment appropriate to the patient's functioning.

  10. Familial pituitary tumor syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Marianne S; McDonald, Kerrie L; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Robinson, Bruce G

    2009-08-01

    The vast majority of pituitary tumors are benign and occur sporadically; however, they can still result in significant morbidity and even premature mortality through mass effects and hormone dysfunction. The etiology of sporadic tumors is still poorly understood; by contrast, advances have been made in our understanding of familial pituitary adenoma syndromes in the past decade. Currently, four genes are known to be associated with familial pituitary tumor syndromes: MEN1, CDKN1B, PRKAR1A and AIP. The first three genes are associated with a variety of extrapituitary pathologies, for example, primary hyperparathyroidism with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, which might aid identification of these syndromes. By contrast, AIP mutations seem to occur in the setting of isolated familial pituitary adenomas, particularly of the growth-hormone-secreting subtype. Awareness and identification of familial pituitary tumor syndromes is important because of potential associated pathologies and important implications for family members. Here, we review the current knowledge of familial pituitary tumor syndromes.

  11. Gorlin-goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Dn; Raval, N; Patadiya, H; Tarsariya, V

    2014-03-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the patched gene found on chromosome arm 9 q. It shows high penetrance and variable expressivity; is characterized by basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. Until date, very few cases of GGS have been reported in India. Early diagnosis and treatment as well as genetic counseling are essential for this syndrome. A rare case report of a patient with characteristic features of GGS diagnosed at a rural dental college of Gujarat, India is presented here. This case report draws attention of the valuable role of dentist in diagnosis and early management of this syndrome.

  12. Eagle syndrome: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludağ, İrem Fatma; Öcek, Levent; Zorlu, Yaşar; Uludağ, Burhanettin

    2013-01-01

    Eagle syndrome is an aggregate of symptoms caused by an elongated styloid process, most frequently resulting in headache, facial pain, dysphagia and sensation of foreign body in throat. The proper diagnosis is not difficult with clinical history, physical examination and radiographic assessment if there is a sufficient degree of suspicion. The treatment is very effective. We report here a typical case of Eagle syndrome which was misdiagnosed as trigeminal neuralgia for many years and was treated with carbamazepine. We aim to point the place of Eagle syndrome in the differential diagnosis of facial pain. We also re-emphasize the usefulness of the three-dimensional computed tomography in the diagnosis of Eagle syndrome. Even though Eagle syndrome is a rare condition, in cases of facial pain refractory to treatment or unexplained complaints of the head and neck region, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis as it has therapeutic consequences.

  13. [Orbitofrontal syndrome in psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, A

    1999-01-01

    Orbitofrontal syndrome is a variant of frontal lobe syndrome in which behavioural disturbances are prevailing. It results from bilateral lesions of the orbitofrontal cortex and the medial face of frontal lobe. Patients present disorganized hyperactivity. They are distractable, impulsive, euphoric and unable to abide by social rules. They often have instinctive disinhibition (hypersexuality, hyperphagia and urinary behaviour disorders). In spite of severe behavioural disturbances cognitive functions are often intact so that orbitofrontal syndrome may be confounded with two psychiatric disorders: mania (or hypomania) and antisocial personality disorder. In this article we present a case report of orbitofrontal syndrome which was initially misdiagnosed as mania. Clinical features and possible modes of presentation of this syndrome are discussed. It is suggested that serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be of some use in this disorder.

  14. [Asthenic syndrome in patients with burnout syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutko, L S; Surushkina, S Iu; Rozhkova, A V; Nikishena, I S; Iakovenko, E A

    2013-01-01

    The authors present the results of a survey of 103 patients aged 25 to 45 years with burnout syndrom. The results showed that most patients with the syndrome of burnout have clinical manifestations of asthenia, varying degrees of severity. According to psychological and psychophysiological examination in this group of patients were found attention and memory dysfunction. This study evaluated the efficacy of memoplant in the treatment of this pathology. The high efficiency of memoplant (improvement in 69.7% of cases) was detected, confirmed by the data of the clinical, psychological and neuropsychological research.

  15. Syndrome in question: Gorlin-Goltz syndrome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Pauline Lyrio; de Souza Filho, João Basílio; de Abreu, Karina Demoner; Brezinscki, Marisa Simon; Pignaton, Christine Chambo

    2016-01-01

    The Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is an uncommon disorder caused by a mutation in Patched, tumor suppressor gene. It is mainly characterized by numerous early onset basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic cysts of jaw and skeletal abnormalities. Due to the wide clinical spectrum, treatment and management of its modalities are not standardized and should be individualized and monitored by a multidisciplinary team. We report a typical case in a 30-year-old man with multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratotic pits of palmar creases and bifid ribs, with a history of several corrective surgeries for keratocystic odontogenic tumors, among other lesions characteristic of the syndrome. PMID:27579759

  16. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Toxic Shock Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Toxic Shock Syndrome Print ... en español Síndrome de shock tóxico About Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a serious ...

  17. RHEUMATIC MASKS OF PARANEOPLASTIC SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Rebrov

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary Analysis of the prevalence and clinical manifestations of paraneoplastic syndrome in 173 patients with malignant tumors admitted in departments internal medicine of Regional Clinical hospital was done. Paraneoplastic syndromes was found in 13 patients (7% and was characterized by the following rheumatic manifestations: articular syndrome, dermato- and polymyositis, lupus-like syndrome.

  18. Dysmobility syndrome: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Keith D; Farrier, Kaela; Russell, Melissa; Burton, Elissa

    2017-01-01

    Background A new term, dysmobility syndrome, has recently been described as a new approach to identify older people at risk of poor health outcomes. The aim was to undertake a systematic review of the existing research literature on dysmobility syndrome. Method All articles reporting dysmobility syndrome were identified in a systematic review of Medline (Proquest), CINAHL, PubMed, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and Scopus databases. Key characteristics of identified studies were extracted and summarized. Results The systematic review identified five papers (three cross-sectional, one case control, and one longitudinal study). No intervention studies were identified. Prevalence of dysmobility syndrome varied between studies (22%–34% in three of the studies). Dysmobility syndrome was shown to be associated with reduced function, increased falls and fractures, and a longitudinal study showed its significant association with mortality. Conclusion Early research on dysmobility syndrome indicates that it may be a useful classification approach to identify older people at risk of adverse health outcomes and to target for early interventions. Future research needs to standardize the optimal mix of measures and cut points, and investigate whether balance performance may be a more useful factor than history of falls for dysmobility syndrome. PMID:28144132

  19. Vascular compression syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czihal, Michael; Banafsche, Ramin; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Koeppel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Dealing with vascular compression syndromes is one of the most challenging tasks in Vascular Medicine practice. This heterogeneous group of disorders is characterised by external compression of primarily healthy arteries and/or veins as well as accompanying nerval structures, carrying the risk of subsequent structural vessel wall and nerve damage. Vascular compression syndromes may severely impair health-related quality of life in affected individuals who are typically young and otherwise healthy. The diagnostic approach has not been standardised for any of the vascular compression syndromes. Moreover, some degree of positional external compression of blood vessels such as the subclavian and popliteal vessels or the celiac trunk can be found in a significant proportion of healthy individuals. This implies important difficulties in differentiating physiological from pathological findings of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging with provocative manoeuvres. The level of evidence on which treatment decisions regarding surgical decompression with or without revascularisation can be relied on is generally poor, mostly coming from retrospective single centre studies. Proper patient selection is critical in order to avoid overtreatment in patients without a clear association between vascular compression and clinical symptoms. With a focus on the thoracic outlet-syndrome, the median arcuate ligament syndrome and the popliteal entrapment syndrome, the present article gives a selective literature review on compression syndromes from an interdisciplinary vascular point of view.

  20. Loin pain hematuria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taba Taba Vakili, Sahar; Alam, Tausif; Sollinger, Hans

    2014-09-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome is a rare disease with a prevalence of ∼0.012%. The most prominent clinical features include periods of severe intermittent or persistent unilateral or bilateral loin pain accompanied by either microscopic or gross hematuria. Patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome initially present with hematuria, flank pain, or most often both hematuria and flank pain. Kidney biopsies from patients with loin pain hematuria typically reveal only minor pathologic abnormalities. Further, loin pain hematuria syndrome is not associated with loss of kidney function or urinary tract infections. Loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated hematuria and pain are postulated to be linked to vascular disease of the kidney, coagulopathy, renal vasospasm with microinfarction, hypersensitivity, complement activation on arterioles, venocalyceal fistula, abnormal ureteral peristalsis, and intratubular deposition of calcium or uric acid microcrystals. Many patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome also meet criteria for a somatoform disorder, and analgesic medications, including narcotics, commonly are used to treat loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated pain. Interventional treatments include renal denervation, kidney autotransplantation, and nephrectomy; however, these methods should be used only as a last resort when less invasive measures have been tried unsuccessfully. In this review article, we discuss and critique current clinical practices related to loin pain hematuria syndrome pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  1. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella presented roughly 2-4 weeks later with a clinical syndrome highly suggestive of toxic shock syndrome. Characteristics, complications and therapy. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and rash. It can rapidly progress to severe and intractable hypotension and multisystem dysfunction. Almost every organ system can be involved. Complications of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome may include kidney failure, liver failure and even death. Crystalloids and inotropic agents are used to treat the hypovolemic shock aggressively, with close monitoring of the patient’s mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure. An immediate and aggressive management of hypovolemic shock is essential in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Targeted antibiotics are indicated; penicillin or a betalactam antibiotic is used for treating group A streptococci, and clindamycin has emerged as a key portion of the standard treatment.

  2. Eagle syndrome. A narrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Heber Arbildo; Luis Gamarra; Sandra Rojas; Edward Infantes; Hernán Vásquez

    2016-01-01

    Painful disorders in the maxillofacial region are common in dental practice. Most of these conditions are not properly diagnosed because of inadequate knowledge of craniofacial and cervico-pharyngeal syndromes such as Eagle Syndrome. The aim of this review is to describe the general aspects, diagnosis and treatment of Eagle syndrome. Eagle syndrome or stylohyoid syndrome was first described by Watt W. Eagle in 1937. It was defined as orofacial pain related to the elongation of the styloid pro...

  3. Coffin-Lowry syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, Nancy; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Orlando, Ricardo; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Muñoz, Kelly José; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2010-01-01

    The Coffin-Lowry syndrome is an X-linked genetic disease, characterized by multiple skeletal deformities, short stature, and developmental delay, neurological disorder, cardiac disorders, renal and other disturbances. If not detected and treated early the syndrome may cause neural sensory hearing loss and progressive spine deformation.We report the case of a Coffin-Lowry syndrome in a 10 year old boy with hypotonic clinical characteristics, short stature, neurological development delay and pr...

  4. Gardner′s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Panjwani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gardner′s syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease and is a subtype of familial adenomatous polyposis. It is characterized by adenomatous intestinal polyps, multiple osteomas in the skull, maxillae, mandible, and multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous masses (epidermoids and desmoid. Intestinal polyps, if not treated, have 100% chance of becoming malignant. We report a case of a 25-year-old female patient with Gardner′s syndrome, with clinical manifestations including impacted supernumerary teeth, odontomes, sebaceous cyst on the scalp, and osteomas. It is important for the general dental practitioners to be aware of the clinical and radiological characteristics of Gardner′s syndrome.

  5. Ischemic Bilateral Opercular Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysel Milanlioglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Opercular syndrome, also known as Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome, is a paralysis of the facial, pharyngeal, masticatory, tongue, laryngeal, and brachial muscles. It is a rare cortical form of pseudobulbar palsies caused by vascular insults to bilateral operculum. Its clinical presentations include anarthria, weakness of voluntary muscles involving face, tongue, pharynx, larynx, and masticatory muscles. However, autonomic reflexes and emotional activities of these structures are preserved. In the present case, an 81-year-old male presented with acute onset of anarthria with difficulties in chewing, speaking, and swallowing that was diagnosed with opercular syndrome.

  6. Ischemic bilateral opercular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanlioglu, Aysel; Aydın, Mehmet Nuri; Gökgül, Alper; Hamamcı, Mehmet; Erkuzu, Mehmet Atilla; Tombul, Temel

    2013-01-01

    Opercular syndrome, also known as Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome, is a paralysis of the facial, pharyngeal, masticatory, tongue, laryngeal, and brachial muscles. It is a rare cortical form of pseudobulbar palsies caused by vascular insults to bilateral operculum. Its clinical presentations include anarthria, weakness of voluntary muscles involving face, tongue, pharynx, larynx, and masticatory muscles. However, autonomic reflexes and emotional activities of these structures are preserved. In the present case, an 81-year-old male presented with acute onset of anarthria with difficulties in chewing, speaking, and swallowing that was diagnosed with opercular syndrome.

  7. Cantu syndrome and lymphoedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cruz, Diana; Mampel, Alejandra; Echeverria, Maria I; Vargas, Ana L; Castañeda-Cisneros, Gema; Davalos-Rodriguez, Nory; Patiño-Garcia, Brenda; Garcia-Cruz, Maria O; Castañeda, Victor; Cardona, Ernesto G; Marin-Solis, Bertha; Cantu, Jose M; Nuñez-Reveles, Nelly; Moran-Moguel, Cristina; Thavanati, Pavarthi K R; Ramirez-Garcia, Sergio; Sanchez-Corona, Jose

    2011-01-01

    Three female patients with Cantu syndrome were studied, two of whom were adults presenting with the complication of lymphoedema, as described earlier in a male patient with this syndrome. The aim of this study is to report the clinical characteristics of these three new cases and to emphasize that lymphoedema, as observed in two of the patients described here, has been observed in 11.5% of patients with Cantu syndrome and that heterochromia iridis, observed in one patient, is probably a new feature of this condition.

  8. Recurrent Miller Fisher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, S; Geetha; Bhargavan, P V

    2004-07-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) is a variant of Guillan Barre syndrome characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and areflexia. Recurrences are exceptional with Miller Fisher syndrome. We are reporting a case with two episodes of MFS within two years. Initially he presented with partial ophthalmoplegia, ataxia. Second episode was characterized by full-blown presentation characterized by ataxia, areflexia and ophthalmoplegia. CSF analysis was typical during both episodes. Nerve conduction velocity study was fairly within normal limits. MRI of brain was within normal limits. He responded to symptomatic measures initially, then to steroids in the second episode. We are reporting the case due to its rarity.

  9. Mobious syndrome: MR findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maskal Revanna Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Möbius syndrome is an extremely rare congenital disorder. We report a case of Möbius syndrome in a 2-year-old girl with bilateral convergent squint and left-sided facial weakness. The characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of Möbius syndrome, which include absent bilateral abducens nerves and absent left facial nerve, were noted. In addition, there was absence of left anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA and absence of bilateral facial colliculi. Clinical features, etiology, and imaging findings are discussed.

  10. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-07-20

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy.

  11. Hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canpolat, Nur

    2015-06-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the triad of thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Hemolytic uremic syndrome represents a heterogeneous group of disorders with variable etiologies that result in differences in presentation, management and outcome. In recent years, better understanding of the HUS, especially those due to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway have provided an update on the terminology, classification, and treatment of the disease. This review will provide the updated classification of the disease and the current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches on the complement-mediated HUS in addition to STEC-HUS which is the most common cause of the HUS in childhood.

  12. [Refeeding syndrome: practical issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzi, M; Limonta, A; Pichard, C; Stirnemann, J

    2015-10-14

    The refeeding syndrome is frequent and potentially deadly, still it is underdiagnosed. It is defined by clinical and biological manifestations that are seen upon refeeding of malnourished patients. It is the consequence of the transition from catabolism to anabolism. Ions intracellular shift caused by insulin and B1 vitamin deficiency are fundamental in the development of this syndrome. Riskconditions are well summarized by the NICE criteria. To avoid refeeding syndrome, it is fundamental to find and correct any electrolytic deficiency and to give thiamine before starting a slow and progressive oral, enteral or parenteral refeeding.

  13. [Plummer-Vinson syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyó, J C; Leborgne, F; Regules, J E

    1978-01-01

    The Plummer-Vinson syndrome is very uncommon in Latin America. Four cases showing the clinical-radiological and hematological features of this syndrome are described. Three cases were treated with esophageal dilatation and Ferro therapy. The radiological evaluation may show deformities in the faringo-esophageal lumen other than the esophageal webs, such as hypertrophy of the cricopharingeal sphincter and of the retrocricoid venous plexus as well as the demonstration of esophageal webs in the patients without symptoms or signs of the Plummer Vinson Syndrome.

  14. [Asperger's syndrome in females].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waris, Petra; Kulomäki, Tuula; Tani, Pekka

    2011-01-01

    Literature on Asperger's syndrome (AS) has mainly described symptoms that are manifested in boys. Only recently, attention has been paid on the features in AS girls that differ from the typical clinical picture and may complicate the detection of the syndrome. Because AS girls may react passively in general or compensate or hide their difficulties by other abilities, the need for support is not necessarily brought up. In that case this developmental disorder easily remains unrecognized. Recognition of the syndrome at an early stage makes early supportive actions possible.

  15. TOLOSA HUNT SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Tolosa-Hunt syndrome (THS is a painful ophthalmoplegi a caused by nonspecific inflammation of the cavernous sinus or superior orbi tal fissure. The syndrome consists of periorbital or hemicranial pain, combined with ipsilat eral ocular motor nerve palsies, oculosympathetic paralysis, and sensory loss in the distribution of the ophthalmic and occasionally the maxillary division of the trigemin al nerve. Although they have relapsing and remitting course, they respond promptly to systemic co rticosteroid therapy. The diagnostic eponym Tolosa-Hunt syndrome has been applied to these patients and it is this entity which forms the basis of this review

  16. Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, and Klinefelter syndrome: primary care throughout the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Carl; Edman, Jennifer C

    2004-09-01

    Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, and Klinefelter syndrome constitute the most common chromosomal abnormalities encountered by primary care physicians. Down syndrome typically is recognized at birth, Turner syndrome often is not recognized until adolescence,and many men with Klinefelter syndrome are never diagnosed. Although each syndrome is caused by an abnormal number of chromosomes, or aneuploidy, they are distinct syndromes with learning disabilities and a predisposition toward autoimmune diseases,endocrinologic disorders, and cancers. Optimal health care requires a thorough knowledge of the unique health risks, psychoeducational needs, functional capabilities, and phenotypic variation associated with each condition. Syndrome-specific health care should complement standard preventive health care recommendations. Checklists and syndrome-specific growth grids should be used. Ongoing communication between specialists and primary care physicians and between pediatric and adult clinicians is essential. Support groups and Internet resources can benefit affected individuals and their families immensely.

  17. Atypical charles bonnet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Priti; Jain, Rajan; Tripathi, Vaibhav

    2013-10-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is not uncommon disorder. It may not present with all typical symptoms and intact insight. Here, a case of atypical CBS is reported where antipsychotics were not effective. Patient improved completely after restoration of vision.

  18. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wiedemann syndrome References Jones KL, Jones M, Del Campo M, eds. Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation . ... Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Growth Disorders Browse ...

  19. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  20. Vogt koyanagi harada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin S

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Vogt Koyanagi Harada syndrome is reported. The depigmented macules appeared initially over eyebrows and around both eyes after an episode of fever and then rapidly involved almost the entire body within 6 months.

  1. Ehlers-Danlos' Syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leganger, Julie; Søborg, Marie-Louise Kulas; Farholt, Stense;

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a group of diseases characterized by connective tissue fragility. The clinical symptoms primarily involve the skin, joints, blood vessels and internal organs. Diagnosing EDS is complicated because of the clinical variability, imprecise diagnostic criteria...

  2. Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other conditions that may mimic Russell-Silver syndrome) Treatment Growth hormone replacement may help if this hormone is lacking. Other treatments include: Making sure the person gets enough calories, ...

  3. Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawhya R. El-Shereef

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports one case of successfully treated patients suffering from a rare entity, the catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS. Management of this patient is discussed in detail.

  4. PIRIFORMIS SYNDROME: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhasis Ranjan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Piriformis syndrome is a painful musculoskeletal condition resembling sciatica, secondary to sciatic nerve entrapment in piriformis muscle at the greater sciatic notch and responsible for 6%cases of low back pain, also called back pocket sciatica or wallet sciatica, first described in 1928 by Yeoman. It usually occurs due to abnormalities in piriformis muscle such as hypertrophy, inflammation and anatomic variations resulting in irritation and entrapment of sciatic nerve. The diagnosis of piriformis syndrome is made by clinical features, electromyography and nerve conduction velocity, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and bone scan. Management of piriformis syndrome includes nonsurgical and surgical interventions. Non-surgical management includes- nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, ultrasound, correction of biomechanical abnormality, lifestyle modifications, local anesthetic and/or steroid injection into the piriformis muscle. Surgical management includes-surgical release of piriformis muscle and decompression of the sciatic nerve. Piriformis Syndrome- a review.

  5. Learning about Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical research, the dissemination of state-of-the-art TS information, and social support services to individuals, families, physicians and the general public. The Magic Foundation: Turner Syndrome [magicfoundation.org] A national non- ...

  6. Children with Usher syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mental and behavioral disorders among adults with Usher syndrome have been discussed and reported in some case studies but no research has been reported on children with Usher syndrome. Methods: This article investigates the prevalence and characteristics of mental and behavioral...... disorders among 26 children, 3-17 years of age, with Usher syndrome. Results: Six of the 26 children were diagnosed with a mental or behavioral disorder (1 with schizophrenia and mild mental retardation, 1 with atypical autism and severe mental retardation, 1 with atypical autism and mild mental retardation......, 1 with mild mental retardation, and 2 with conduct disorder). Another 3 children had had a mental or behavioral disorder previously in their childhood. Conclusion: Even though vision impairment first manifests in late childhood, some children with Usher syndrome seem to develop mental and behavioral...

  7. Facts About Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... optic nerve (arrow) looks very pale, the vessels (stars) are very thin and there is characteristic pigment, ... type 1 Usher syndrome are profoundly deaf at birth and have severe balance problems. Many of these ...

  8. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that ... activities. The main symptom of CFS is severe fatigue that lasts for 6 months or more. You ...

  9. 47,XXY Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Link, Katarina; Giwercman, Aleksander;

    2013-01-01

    47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) is the most frequent sex chromosomal disorder and affects approximately one in 660 newborn boys. The syndrome is characterized by varying degrees of cognitive, social, behavioral, and learning difficulties and in adulthood additionally primary testicular failure...... with small testes, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, tall stature, and eunuchoid body proportions. The phenotype is variable ranging from "near-normal" to a significantly affected individual. In addition, newborns with Klinefelter syndrome generally present with a normal male phenotype and the only consistent...... clinical finding in KS is small testes, that are most often not identified until after puberty. Decreased awareness of this syndrome among health professionals and a general perception that all patients with 47,XXY exhibit the classic textbook phenotype results in a highly under-diagnosed condition with up...

  10. Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that causes your immune system to attack your peripheral nervous system ( ... over a period of weeks and then stabilize. Guillain-Barre can be hard to diagnose. Possible tests include ...

  11. Joubert Syndrome, A Ciliopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at Neurogenetics Unit, Mendel Laboratory, Rome, and University of Salerno, Italy, review the clinical features and genetic basis of Joubert syndrome, overlap with other ciliopathies, and the multifaceted roles of primary cilia in CNS development.

  12. Empty Sella Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page NINDS Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page NINDS Infantile Spasms Information Page NINDS ... Support Library Clinical Research Next Steps Pre-Funding: After Review Terms of Award Pre-Award Start-up ...

  13. Acute Radiation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS): A Fact Sheet for the Public ... is called the radiation dose. People exposed to radiation will get ARS only if: The radiation dose ...

  14. Anesthesia & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tests used to verify existence and severity of valvular heart disease. Unfortunately, not all adults with Down syndrome will ... exams without sedation or anesthesia. Suspected existence of valvular heart disease must be communicated to the anesthesiologist prior to ...

  15. Distal arthrogryposis syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5-month-old male infant presented with weak cry, decreased body movements, tightness of whole body since birth, and one episode of generalized seizure on day 4 of life. He was born at term by elective caesarian section performed for breech presentation. The child had failure to thrive, contractures at elbow and knee joints, hypertonia, microcephaly, small mouth, retrognathia, and camptodactyly. There was global developmental delay. Abdominal examination revealed umbilical and bilateral inguinal hernia. Visual evoked response and brainstem evoked response audiometry were abnormal. Nerve conduction velocity was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain revealed paucity of white matter in bilateral cerebral hemispheres with cerebellar and brain stem atrophy. The differential diagnoses considered in the index patient were distal arthrogryposis (DA syndrome, cerebroculofacioskeletal syndrome, and Pena Shokier syndrome. The index patient most likely represents a variant of DA: Sheldon Hall syndrome.

  16. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakhloo Tulika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous inherited connective tissue disorders with widespread manifestations. The prevalence of this syndrome is 1:5000 worldwide without gender, racial or ethnic associations. This syndrome is characterized by joint hypermobility, dermal hyperelasticity and tissue fragility caused by mutations in genes encoding collagen type I, III, V and enzymes involved in the posttranslational modifications of collagen. The oral manifestations include increased mucosal fragility, delayed wound healing, early onset generalized periodontitis and temporomandibular joint hypermobility. Children presenting with this syndrome are often misdiagnosed for hematological problem as they present with bruising, malignancy and/or child abuse. A thorough assessment of the patient is, therefore, essential for early diagnosis and patient referral. This paper reviews current literature, oral manifestations, diagnostic investigations and effective dental management.

  17. Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited developmental disability. A problem with a specific gene causes ... the protein. This causes the symptoms of Fragile X. People with only a small change in the ...

  18. RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Valer'evich Artem'ev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical picture, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and treatment of restless legs syndrome. Recommendations are given how to choose therapeutic modalities and drugs in relation to different factors.

  19. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staff Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine system disorder among women of reproductive age. Women with PCOS ... and symptoms and then rules out other possible disorders. During this ... An Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline. The Journal of Clinical ...

  20. Cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongFuhui

    2004-01-01

    The cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome is named that, the cutaneous nerve's functional disorder caused by some chronic entrapment, moreover appears a series of nerve's feeling obstacle,vegetative nerve function obstacle, nutrition obstacle, even motor function obstacle in various degree.

  1. Cardiorenal Syndromes and Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chelazzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiorenal syndrome is a clinical and pathophysiological entity defined as the concomitant presence of renal and cardiovascular dysfunction. In patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, acute cardiovascular, and renal derangements are common, that is, the septic cardiorenal syndrome. The aim of this paper is to describe the pathophysiology and clinical features of septic cardiorenal syndrome in light of the actual clinical and experimental evidence. In particular, the importance of systemic and intrarenal endothelial dysfunction, alterations of kidney perfusion, and myocardial function, organ “crosstalk” and ubiquitous inflammatory injury have been extensively reviewed in light of their role in cardiorenal syndrome etiology. Treatment includes early and targeted optimization of hemodynamics to reverse systemic hypotension and restore urinary output. In case of persistent renal impairment, renal replacement therapy may be used to remove cytokines and restore renal function.

  2. Dumping syndrome (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumping syndrome occurs when the contents of the stomach empty too quickly into the small intestine. The ... causing nausea, cramping, diarrhea, sweating, faintness, and palpitations. Dumping usually occurs after the consumption of too much ...

  3. Sjogren's Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and receive discounts on Sjögren's resources. Follow Us Online! Join the SSF on Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, and Linkedin! anxiety © 2016 Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation, Inc. 6707 Democracy Blvd, Ste 325, Bethesda, ...

  4. Learning about Klinefelter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscular development, grow body hair, improve mood and self esteem, increase energy and improve concentration. Most men who ... known as Klinefelter syndrome. K,S & A: Knowledge, Support & Action [genetic.org] K, S & A's mission is to help ...

  5. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome? Obesity hypoventilation (HI-po-ven-tih- ... NHLBI Research Featured in HBO Documentary Series on Obesity Hear people talk about their challenges and successes ...

  6. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials View All Content Gastritis Gastrointestinal (GI) Bleeding Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis ... diet. References [1] Hejazi, RA, McCallum RW. Review article: cyclic vomiting syndrome in adults—rediscovering and redefining ...

  7. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are common signs and symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? • What causes PCOS? • What is insulin resistance? • What can high levels of androgens lead to? • What can irregular menstrual periods lead ...

  8. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arm. Just a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ligament and ... difficult. Often, the cause is having a smaller carpal tunnel than other people do. Other causes include ...

  9. Meier-Gorlin syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnik, S.A. de; Hoefsloot, E.H.; Roukema, J.; Schoots, J.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Brunner, H.G.; Jackson, A.P.; Bongers, E.M.H.F.

    2015-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism disorder, characterized by microtia, patellar applasia/hypoplasia, and a proportionate short stature. Associated clinical features encompass feeding problems, congenital pulmonary emphysema, mammary hypoplasia in females a

  10. Blind loop syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of the stomach) and operations for extreme obesity As a complication of inflammatory bowel disease Diseases such as diabetes or scleroderma may slow down movement in a segment of the intestine, leading to blind loop syndrome.

  11. Down Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorders, breathing problems, including sleep apnea and asthma, obesity, an increased chance of infections, and a higher risk of childhood leukemia. People with Down syndrome sometimes have an unstable upper spine and should ...

  12. Prader-Willi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Willi syndrome. It can help: Build strength and agility Improve height Increase muscle mass and decrease body ... The following organizations can provide resources and support: ... www.pwsausa.org Prader Willi California Foundation: pwcf.org ...

  13. Dandy-Walker Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eyes may occur. Other symptoms include increased head circumference, bulging at the back of the skull, abnormal breathing problems, and problems with the nerves that control the eyes, face and neck. Dandy-Walker Syndrome is sometimes associated with disorders ...

  14. Ellis Von Creveld Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshar H

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available One patient with Ellis Von Creveld syndrome contains: dwarfism, congenital heart"ndisease, ectodermal dysplasia, polyductyly, an abnormally wide labial frenum and maxillary"nmolars with single root.

  15. Stuttering and Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults Teachers Speech-Language Pathologists Physicians Employers Tweet Stuttering and Tourette's Syndrome Parents of Preschoolers Parents of ... to 3 people in 1000. Just as in stuttering, TS is more common in males than females ( ...

  16. Treacher Collins Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cleft palate is a frequently associated conditions this syndrome. Cleft palate itself sometimes can cause feeding problems and increase the risk of middle ear problems. Your child’s primary care provider or cleft palate or craniofacial ...

  17. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can cause certain learning challenges, including problems learning mathematics and with memory. 7 Most girls and women ... syndrome usually require care from a variety of specialists throughout their lives. Will she be able to ...

  18. Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stomach to produce too much acid. The excess acid then leads to peptic ulcers, as well as to diarrhea and other symptoms. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is rare. The disease may occur at any time in life, but ...

  19. Parental Alienation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat Torun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Children who have been programmed by one parent to be alienated from the other parent are commonly seen in the context of child-custody disputes. Its primary manifestation is the child’s campaign of denigration against a parent, a campaign that has no justification. It is said to result from a combination of a programming (brainwashing parent’s indoctrinations and the child’s own contributions to the vilification of the targeted parent. Many evaluators use the term parental alienation syndrome to refer to the disorder engendered in such children. However, there is significant controversy going on about the validity of parental alienation syndrome. The purpose of this article has been to describe and help to differentiate parental alienation syndrome and abuse for mental health professionals working in the field, and discuss the arguments about the validity of this syndrome.

  20. Brooke-Spiegler syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szepietowski, J C; Wasik, F; Szybejko-Machaj, G; Bieniek, A; Schwartz, R A

    2001-07-01

    The Brooke-Spiegler syndrome is an autosomal dominant one characterized by cylindromas, trichoepitheliomas and occasionally spiradenomas. Within a given family, some members may have cylindromas whereas others may have trichoepitheliomas or both. We describe the coexistence of trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex (also known as epithelioma adenoides cysticum of Brooke) and cylindromas in a 30-year-old man, and discuss the relationship between these two autosomal dominant syndromes.

  1. Pellegrini-Stieda syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J C; Shapiro, M S

    1995-06-01

    The Pellegrini-Stieda "sign" is commonly seen in patients who have a history of trauma to the medial collateral ligament of the knee. Although most are asymptomatic, a few patients will develop the characteristic Pellegrini-Stieda syndrome, which can be severely limiting. When conservative measures fail, surgical treatment consisting of excision of the bony fragment with careful repair of the medial collateral ligament can eradicate the symptoms. This syndrome is reviewed in detail, and an illustrative case report is included.

  2. Celiac Artery Compression Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Muqeetadnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac artery compression syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain and weight loss. It is the result of external compression of celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament. We present a case of celiac artery compression syndrome in a 57-year-old male with severe postprandial abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. The patient eventually responded well to surgical division of the median arcuate ligament by laparoscopy.

  3. Ischemic Bilateral Opercular Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Aysel Milanlioglu; Mehmet Nuri Aydın; Alper Gökgül; Mehmet Hamamcı; Mehmet Atilla Erkuzu; Temel Tombul

    2013-01-01

    Opercular syndrome, also known as Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome, is a paralysis of the facial, pharyngeal, masticatory, tongue, laryngeal, and brachial muscles. It is a rare cortical form of pseudobulbar palsies caused by vascular insults to bilateral operculum. Its clinical presentations include anarthria, weakness of voluntary muscles involving face, tongue, pharynx, larynx, and masticatory muscles. However, autonomic reflexes and emotional activities of these structures are preserved. In the...

  4. Neurocutaneous syndromes; Neurokutane Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niederstadt, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Kurlemann, G. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Fakultaet

    2007-09-15

    Neurocutaneous Syndromes or phakomatoses are a heterogenous group of congenital diseases. They are characterized by dysplasias of tissues derived from the neuroektoderm. Skin alterations may be helpful in the interpretation of cerebral lesions. Recently, the genetic and pathophysiologic alterations of many phakomatoses have been elucidated. In this paper the radiologic findings and clinical signs of the most common neurocutaneous diseases (Neurofibromatosis 1 and 2, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex and Sturge Weber Syndrome) will be discussed. (orig.)

  5. Asperger Syndrome in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Koutelekos

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The Asperger’s Syndrome is reported in the pervasive developmental disorders and was categorized as a separate disorder, initially in the ICD -10 (World Health Organization, 1992 and afterwards in the DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Organization, 1994. The Asperger’s Syndrome is distinguished by a team of symptoms that concern the low output in the social interaction and the communication dexterities, as well as the increased stereotypical behavior in various activities and interests.The aim of this particular article that constitutes a case study is the descriptive approach of the Asperger’s Syndrome, through the study of the child behavior.The methodology that was followed in the present case-study was based on inquiring studies and reviews that were drawn from international data bases that correspond to this particular case study of syndrome Asperger in children.Results: The individuals with Asperger’ s syndrome, as well as the case study, tend to experience really big difficulties in elementary social behaviors, as failure in the development and creation of friendly relations or in the search of entertainment activities with others. Moreover, they face difficulties in the comprehension of non verbal communication (body language and the other’s expressions, the body gestures or even the eye contact.Conclusions: The precocious recognition of Asperger’s syndrome is imperative, with final objective the continuous briefing and sensitization of all health professionals, as well as the wider public, toward this syndrome. The earlier a parent foreruns for the diagnosis, the bigger probabilities they stand for a potential functional re-establishment of the syndrome.

  6. Hypokalemia syndrome in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Nicolas; Fecteau, Gilles

    2014-07-01

    This article describes hypokalemia syndrome. Lactating dairy cows seem to be at the highest risk, but younger animals may also develop the disease. At present, except for animals treated with repeated isoflupredone acetate administration, the exact determinants causing hypokalemia syndrome remain uncertain. Affected animals are anorexic, weak to recumbent, and most often show signs of gastrointestinal stasis. Treatment is directed toward supportive care and oral potassium supplementation.

  7. Nasopalpebral lipoma coloboma syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Suresh Babu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasopalpebral lipoma-coloboma syndrome is characterized by nasopalpebral lipoma and eyelid coloboma. We report a case of a 16-year-old Indian girl who reported to us with this rare syndrome. Computed tomography scan showed a significantly hypodense lesion on the right side of nose which was confirmed to be a lipoma on histopathological examination. This condition should be included in differential diagnosis of conditions with congenital eyelid coloboma.

  8. Laugier Hunziker syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Ali; Gonzalez, Mercedes E; Franks, Andrew G; Sanchez, Miguel

    2010-11-15

    Laugier Hunziker syndrome is a rare disorder that is characterized by adult-onset hyperpigmented macules of the lips, oral cavity, and fingertips. Longitudinal melanonychia is present in the majority of cases. We present a 45-year-old woman with adult-onset hyperpigmented macules of the oral cavity as well as linear melanonychia that involved multiple fingernails. The history, clinical examination, and paucity of laboratory abnormalities or systemic findings support a diagnosis of Laugier Hunziker syndrome.

  9. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawa Deepti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by the presence of multiple odontogenic keratocysts along with various cutaneous, dental, osseous, ophthalmic, neurological, and sex organ abnormalities. Early diagnosis is essential as it may progress to aggressive basal cell carcinomas and neoplasias. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has rarely been reported from India. We report here one such patient, diagnosed at a rural hospital.

  10. Asperger Syndrome in children

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannis Koutelekos; Chrysoula Valamoutopoulou

    2009-01-01

    The Asperger’s Syndrome is reported in the pervasive developmental disorders and was categorized as a separate disorder, initially in the ICD -10 (World Health Organization, 1992) and afterwards in the DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Organization, 1994). The Asperger’s Syndrome is distinguished by a team of symptoms that concern the low output in the social interaction and the communication dexterities, as well as the increased stereotypical behavior in various activities and interests.The aim o...

  11. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Leary, D P

    2010-01-01

    Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome is a rare abnormality of the anatomical relationship between the popliteal artery and adjacent muscles or fibrous bands in the popliteal fossa. The following is a case report of a 19 year old female, in whom popliteal artery entrapment syndrome was diagnosed, and successfully treated surgically. A review of literature is also presented and provides details on how PAES is classified, diagnosed both clinically and radiologically, and treated surgically.

  12. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ovchinnikov V.А.; Sokolov V.А.

    2013-01-01

    We considered one of the most complicated problems of surgery and intensive care — abdominal compartment syndrome. It is a severe, and in some cases lethal complication developing in major injuries and pathology of abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space, as well as in extra-abdominal pathology. In addition, compartment syndrome can be the complication of a number of surgical procedures accompanied primarily by laparotomy wound closure with tissue tension. We demonstrated the classificatio...

  13. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Intraabdominal hypertension and Abdominal compartment syndrome are causes of morbidity and mortality in critical care patients. Timely diagnosis and treatment may improve organ functions. Intra-abdominal pressure monitoring is vital during evaluation of the patients and in the management algorithms. The incidence, definition and risk factors, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of intraabdominal hypertension and Abdominal compartment syndrome were reviewed here.

  14. DHAT SYNDROME REVISITED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurmeet

    1985-01-01

    SUMMARY Fifty consequetive patients of male potency disorders were examined and classified as Dhat Syndrome, Impotence or Premature ejaculation depending on definition laid down for these. Dhat syndrome has been found predominantly in young adults. Thirty one patients (62%) complained of Dhat as a major symptom. Associated diagnosis was depression (48%) and anxiety neurosis (16%). No psychiatric disorder was noticed in 16 (32%) cases. The socio-demographic relationships are given and difficulty in handling such patients has been discussed. PMID:21927085

  15. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Akula Annapurna

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a condition in which a woman has an imbalance of female sex hormones. This may lead to menstrual cycle changes, cysts in the ovaries, trouble getting pregnant, and other health changes. In PCOS, mature eggs are not released from the ovaries. Instead, they can form very small cysts in the ovary. These changes can contribute to infertility. Common symptoms of PCOS include Menstrual disorders, Infertility, High levels of testosterone and Metabolic syndrome. Obesity, ...

  16. Duane's retraction syndrome associated with morning glory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, K; Fujita, S

    1981-01-01

    A 9-year-old boy with Duane's retraction syndrome and morning glory syndrome is presented. The right eye showed a grayish-pink optic disc, which had a deep excavation containing a white mass in its center and was surrounded by an annulus of pigment disturbance, i.e., consistent with the features of morning glory syndrome. The left eye had a congenital disturbance of ocular motility, which was typical of Duane's retraction syndrome. This is probably the first report of the association of Duane's retraction syndrome and morning glory syndrome. It is hypothesized that a noxious stimulus given at around two months of gestation was responsible for this rare association.

  17. Lehman syndrome: a new syndrome for pierre robin sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia-Sá, Inês; Horta, Ricardo; Neto, Tiago; Amarante, José; Marques, Marisa

    2015-05-01

    Lehman syndrome, or lateral meningocele syndrome, is characterized by facial dysmorphism, multiple lateral meningoceles, and skeletal abnormalities. Only nine cases have been described. We present a case of a 2-year-old boy presenting with micrognathia, glossoptosis, and hypertelorism as well as associated severe obstructive sleep apnea. He was submitted to bilateral mandibular distraction with external nonresorbable devices to correct Pierre Robin sequence (PRS). Later, multiple lateral meningoceles were identified, and a diagnosis of Lehman syndrome was made. Lehman syndrome must be considered in syndromic infants with PRS. Distraction osteogenesis is a safe procedure that is effective as a first choice in the treatment of patients with Lehman syndrome presenting with micrognathia.

  18. [Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisłowska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome is the most dangerous form of the antiphospholipid syndrome, which is characterized by rapid onset of thrombosis in small vessels of many organs and intravascular coagulation, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia. The syndrome develops over a short period of time with acute multi-organ failure, including kidney, respiratory, cardiovascular, central nervous system and adrenal glands, often associated with disseminated thrombotic microangiopathy. The catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome involves three or more systems, organs and/or tissues, the development of symptoms must occur within less than one week, it is necessary to confirm the histopathological vascular occlusion in at least one organ or tissue, and laboratory confirmation of the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in the serum on two occasions over an interval of 12 weeks. This syndrome is characterized by a high mortality despite the use of optimal treatment. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of patients with catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome is essential to save the life of these patients. In the last 10 years, the mortality in this disease decreased from 50% to 30% with simultaneous treatment with anticoagulants, corticosteroids, plasmapheresis and immunoglobulins.

  19. Marfan's syndrome: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    Full Text Available Marfan's syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with an estimated prevalence of one in 10,000 to 20,000 individuals. This rare hereditary connective tissue disorder affects many parts of the body. The diagnosis of Marfan's syndrome is established in accordance with a review of the diagnostic criteria, known as the Ghent nosology, through a comprehensive assessment largely based on a combination of major and minor clinical manifestations in various organ systems and the family history. Aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse are the main presentations among the cardiovascular malformations of Marfan's syndrome. The pathogenesis of Marfan's syndrome has not been fully elucidated. However, fibrillin-1 gene mutations are believed to exert a dominant negative effect. Therefore, Marfan's syndrome is termed a fibrillinopathy, along with other connective tissue disorders with subtle differences in clinical manifestations. The treatment may include prophylactic β-blockers and angiotensin II-receptor blockers in order to slow down the dilation of the ascending aorta, and prophylactic aortic surgery. Importantly, β-blocker therapy may reduce TGF-β activation, which has been recognized as a contributory factor in Marfan's syndrome. The present article aims to provide an overview of this rare hereditary disorder.

  20. Sleep overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Rezaeetalab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Overlap syndrome, which is known as the coexistence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, was first defined by Flenley. Although it can refer to concomitant occurrence of any of the pulmonary diseases and OSA, overlap syndrome is commonly considered as the coexistence of OSA and COPD. This disease has unique adverse health consequences distinct from either condition alone. Given the high prevalence of each solitary disease, overlap syndrome is also likely to be common and clinically relevant. Despite the fact that overlap syndrome has been described in the literature for nearly 30 years, paucity of evaluations and studies limited the discussion on diagnosis, prevalence, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcomes of this disease. This review article addresses these issues by reviewing several recent studies conducted in Iran or other countries. This review suggests that overlap syndrome has worse outcomes than either disease alone. Our findings accentuated the urgent need for further studies on overlap syndrome and all overlaps between OSA and chronic pulmonary disease to provide a deeper insight into diagnosis and non-invasive treatments of this disease.

  1. Epidermal nevus syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Sarah; Sugarman, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-01

    The term epidermal nevus syndrome (ENS) has been used to describe the association of epidermal hamartomas and extracutaneous abnormalities. Although many continue to use the term "ENS," it is now understood that this is not one disease, but rather a heterogeneous group with distinct genetic profiles defined by a common cutaneous phenotype: the presence of epidermal and adnexal hamartomas that are associated with other organ system involvement. One commonality is that epidermal nevi often follow the lines of Blaschko and it appears the more widespread the cutaneous manifestations, the greater the risk for extracutaneous manifestations. The majority of the extracutaneous manifestations involve the brain, eye, and skeletal systems. The CNS involvement is wide ranging and involves both clinical manifestations such as intellectual disability and seizures, as well as structural anomalies. Several subsets of ENS with characteristic features have been delineated including the nevus sebaceus syndrome, Proteus syndrome, CHILD syndrome, Becker's nevus syndrome, nevus comedonicus syndrome, and phakomatosis pigmentokeratotica. Advances in molecular biology have revealed that the manifestations of ENS are due to genomic mosaicism. It is likely that the varied clinical manifestations of ENS are due in great part to the functional effects of specific genetic defects. Optimal management of the patient with ENS involves an interdisciplinary approach given the potential for multisystem involvement. Of note, epidermal nevi have been associated with both benign and malignant neoplasms, and thus ongoing clinical follow-up is required.

  2. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: leandrocleite@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Mediciana. Departmento de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2016-07-15

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital - including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome) - compressive - including 'nutcracker' syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. (author)

  3. Takotsubo Syndrome: Insights from Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Ishihara, Masaharu

    2016-10-01

    We report the history and new insights of takotsubo syndrome based on the achievements that Japanese researchers have contributed and summarize the evidence originally presented from Japan. Takotsubo syndrome is a newly described heart failure characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction. We should be aware of this entity as a syndrome, not actual cardiomyopathy. Japanese researchers focus on the experimental approaches for clinical diagnosis and treatment of takotsubo syndrome. As representatives from a country originally naming this syndrome takotsubo, a global registry for takotsubo syndrome including Japan should be established.

  4. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biesecker Leslie G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1–9/1,000,000. The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or

  5. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesecker, Leslie G

    2008-04-24

    The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1-9/1,000,000). The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS) anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above) and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or orthopedic surgery indicated for

  6. Autoimmune Basis for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-14

    Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome; Postural Tachycardia Syndrome; Tachycardia; Arrhythmias, Cardiac; Autonomic Nervous System Diseases; Orthostatic Intolerance; Cardiovascular Diseases; Primary Dysautonomias

  7. Marfan syndrome: An eyesight of syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS, a relatively common autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue with prominent manifestations in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems, is caused by mutations in the glycoprotein gene fibrillin-1 (FBN1. Aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse are the main presentations among the cardiovascular malformations of MFS. The revised Ghent diagnostics nosology of Marfan syndrome is established in accordance with a combination of major and minor clinical manifestations in various organ systems and the family history. The pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome has not been fully elucidated. However, fibrillin-1 gene mutations are believed to exert a dominant negative effect. The treatment includes prophylactic β-blockers and angiotensin II-receptor blockers in order to slow down the dilation of the ascending aorta and prophylactic aortic surgery. Importantly, β-blocker therapy may reduce TGF-β activation, which has been recognized as a contributory factor in MFS. The identification of a mutation allows for early diagnosis, prognosis, genetic counseling, preventive management of carriers and reassurance for unaffected relatives. The importance of knowing in advance the location of the putative family mutation is highlighted by its straightforward application to prenatal and postnatal screening. The present article aims to provide an overview of this rare hereditary disorder.

  8. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lodewijk AA Brosens; Danielle Langeveld; W Arnout van Hattem; Francis M Giardiello; G Johan A Offerhaus

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple distinct juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer.The cumulative life-time risk of colorectal cancer is 39% and the relative risk is 34.Juvenile polyps have a distinctive histology characterized by an abundance of edematous lamina propria with inflammatory cells and cystically dilated glands lined by cuboidal to columnar epithelium with reactive changes.Clinically, juvenile polyposis syndrome is defined by the presence of 5 or more juvenile polyps in the colorectum,juvenile polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract or any number of juvenile polyps and a positive family history of juvenile polyposis.In about 50%-60% of patients diagnosed with juvenile polyposis syndrome a germline mutation in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A gene is found.Both genes play a role in the BMP/TGF-beta signalling pathway.It has been suggested that cancer in juvenile polyposis may develop through the so-alled "landscaper mechanism" where an abnormal stromal environment leads to neoplastic transformation of the adjacent epithelium and in the end invasive carcinoma.Recognition of this rare disorder is important for patients and their families with regard to treatment,follow-up and screening of at risk individuals.Each clinician confronted with the diagnosis of a juvenile polyp should therefore consider the possibility of juvenile polyposis syndrome.In addition, juvenile polyposis syndrome provides a unique model to study colorectal cancer pathogenesis in general and gives insight in the molecular genetic basis of cancer. This review discusses clinical manifestations, genetics, pathogenesis and management of juvenile polyposis syndrome.

  9. Dysmobility syndrome: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill KD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Keith D Hill,1 Kaela Farrier,1 Melissa Russell,2 Elissa Burton1 1School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia Background: A new term, dysmobility syndrome, has recently been described as a new approach to identify older people at risk of poor health outcomes. The aim was to undertake a systematic review of the existing research literature on dysmobility syndrome.Method: All articles reporting dysmobility syndrome were identified in a systematic review of Medline (Proquest, CINAHL, PubMed, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and Scopus databases. Key characteristics of identified studies were extracted and summarized.Results: The systematic review identified five papers (three cross-sectional, one case control, and one longitudinal study. No intervention studies were identified. Prevalence of dysmobility syndrome varied between studies (22%–34% in three of the studies. Dysmobility syndrome was shown to be associated with reduced function, increased falls and fractures, and a longitudinal study showed its significant association with mortality.Conclusion: Early research on dysmobility syndrome indicates that it may be a useful classification approach to identify older people at risk of adverse health outcomes and to target for early interventions. Future research needs to standardize the optimal mix of measures and cut points, and investigate whether balance performance may be a more useful factor than history of falls for dysmobility syndrome. Keywords: mobility, elderly, functional decline

  10. Enamel renal syndrome: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S V Kala Vani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enamel renal syndrome is a very rare disorder associating amelogenesis imperfecta with nephrocalcinosis. It is known by various synonyms such as amelogenesis imperfecta nephrocalcinosis syndrome, MacGibbon syndrome, Lubinsky syndrome, and Lubinsky-MacGibbon syndrome. It is characterized by enamel agenesis and medullary nephrocalcinosis. This paper describes enamel renal syndrome in a female patient born in a consanguineous family.

  11. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies. Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser

  12. Pre-Menstrual Syndrome in Women with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Linda; Cunningham, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) may be higher in women with Down syndrome due to syndrome specific characteristics in biochemistry, psychopathology and lifestyle. Recognition of PMS may be difficult for women with intellectual disabilities and their carers. Method: A daily diary, used to diagnose PMS with typical women, was…

  13. Hypothyroidism in metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Metabolic syndrome (MetS and hypothyroidism are well established forerunners of atherogenic cardiovascular disease. Considerable overlap occurs in the pathogenic mechanisms of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by metabolic syndrome and hypothyroidism. Insulin resistance has been studied as the basic pathogenic mechanism in metabolic syndrome. [1] This cross sectional study intended to assess thyroid function in patients with metabolic syndrome and to investigate the association between hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with metabolic syndrome who fulfilled the National Cholesterol Education Program- Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III criteria [ 3 out of 5 criteria positive namely blood pressure ≥ 130/85 mm hg or on antihypertensive medications, fasting plasma glucose > 100 mg/dl or on anti-diabetic medications, fasting triglycerides > 150 mg/dl, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C 102 cms in men and 88 cms in women] were included in the study group. [2] Fifty patients who had no features of metabolic syndrome (0 out of 5 criteria for metabolic syndrome were included in the control group. Patients with liver disorders, renal disorders, congestive cardiac failure, pregnant women, patients on oral contraceptive pills, statins and other medications that alter thyroid functions and lipid levels and those who are under treatment for any thyroid related disorder were excluded from the study. Acutely ill patients were excluded taking into account sick euthyroid syndrome. Patients were subjected to anthropometry, evaluation of vital parameters, lipid and thyroid profile along with other routine laboratory parameters. Students t-test, Chi square test and linear regression, multiple logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Of the 100 patients in study group, 55 were females (55% and 45 were males (45%. Of the 50

  14. How Is Metabolic Syndrome Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Metabolic Syndrome Treated? Heart-healthy lifestyle changes are the first line of treatment for metabolic syndrome. If heart-healthy lifestyle changes aren’t enough, ...

  15. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome? Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody ... weeks or months. This condition is called catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). People who have APS also are at ...

  16. Prognosis of Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, evaluated the clinical features, prognosis, and prophylaxis of cyclic vomiting syndrome and the relationship between the syndrome and levels of adrenocorticotropic/antidiuretic hormones (ACTH/ADH.

  17. Klinefelter Syndrome (KS): Condition Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Klinefelter Syndrome (KS): Condition Information Skip sharing on social media ... such as XXYY. This is called poly-X Klinefelter syndrome, and it causes more severe symptoms. 1 Klinefelter, ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Usher syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T, Millán JM. Targeted next generation sequencing for molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome. Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2014 ... Usher syndrome (sensorineural deafness and retinitis pigmentosa): pathogenesis, molecular diagnosis and therapeutic approaches. Curr Opin Neurol. 2012 Feb; ...

  19. Latah : An indonesian startle syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Mirte J.; van Dijk, J. Gert; Pramono, Astuti; Sutarni, Sri; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of culture-specific startles syndromes such as Latah in Indonesia and Malaysia is ill understood. Hypotheses concerning their origin include sociocultural behavior, psychiatric disorders, and neurological syndromes. The various disorders show striking similarities despite occurring in div

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Omenn syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Omenn syndrome is one of several forms of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a group of disorders that cause individuals ... Diseases Educational Resources (9 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in Children Disease InfoSearch: Omenn syndrome Great ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Bloom syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 link) BLOOM SYNDROME Sources for This Page Amor-Guéret M. Bloom syndrome, genomic instability and cancer: ... Zhang B, Zhang XD, Dou SX, Wang PY, Amor-Gueret M, Xi XG. Structural and functional analyses ...

  2. Hypertension og det metaboliske syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael Hecht; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Netherton syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Netherton syndrome Netherton syndrome Enable ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Swyer syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... raised as girls and have a female gender identity. Because they do not have functional ovaries, affected ... called isolated Swyer syndrome . However, depending on the genetic cause, Swyer syndrome may also occur along with ...

  5. Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome (KTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis Information Page Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Cushing's Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia Information ...

  6. Refeeding syndrome: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, Clare; Farrer, Kirstine; Harper, Lindsay; Lal, Simon

    2010-12-01

    Refeeding syndrome can result in a wide variety of complications and may be life threatening. Although well described in hospital practice, refeeding syndrome is often under-recognized and inadequately treated.

  7. Review of the refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Michael D; Btaiche, Imad F; Sacks, Gordon S

    2005-12-01

    Refeeding syndrome describes a constellation of metabolic disturbances that occur as a result of reinstitution of nutrition to patients who are starved or severely malnourished. Patients can develop fluid and electrolyte disorders, especially hypophosphatemia, along with neurologic, pulmonary, cardiac, neuromuscular, and hematologic complications. We reviewed literature on refeeding syndrome and the associated electrolyte abnormalities, fluid disturbances, and associated complications. In addition to assessing scientific literature, we also considered clinical experience and judgment in developing recommendations for prevention and treatment of refeeding syndrome. The most important steps are to identify patients at risk for developing refeeding syndrome, institute nutrition support cautiously, and correct and supplement electrolyte and vitamin deficiencies to avoid refeeding syndrome. We provide suggestions for the prevention of refeeding syndrome and suggestions for treatment of electrolyte disturbances and complications in patients who develop refeeding syndrome, according to evidence in the literature, the pathophysiology of refeeding syndrome, and clinical experience and judgment.

  8. McCune-Albright syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001217.htm McCune-Albright syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. McCune-Albright syndrome is a genetic disease that affects the bones ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood vessels. This clotting tendency is known as thrombophilia. In antiphospholipid syndrome , the thromboses can develop in ... Obstetrical Anti-Phospholipid Antibody Syndrome March of Dimes: Thrombophilias National Blood Clot Alliance ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ...

  10. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Symptoms On this Page Primary Symptoms Other Symptoms What's ... a doctor distinguish CFS from other illnesses. Primary Symptoms As the name chronic fatigue syndrome suggests , fatigue ...

  11. POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME IN ADOLESCENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Baptista

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: Identification of adolescents at risk for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome is critical, not only for an appropriate therapeutic approach, but also to prevent co-morbidities associated with the syndrome, including obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and infertility.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: FG syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rogers RC, Schwartz CE, Battaglia A, Lyons MJ, Stevenson RE. FG syndrome, an X-linked multiple congenital ... Simensen R, Rogers RC, Schwartz CE, Friez MJ, Stevenson RE. Behavior of 10 patients with FG syndrome ( ...

  13. Epidermal nevus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, Flores-Sarnat

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal nevus syndrome (ENS) is an inclusive term for a heterogeneous group of congenital disorders characterized by the presence of epidermal nevi associated with systemic involvement. These disorders, as are all primary neurocutaneous syndromes, are neurocristopathies. The epidermal nevi that follow the lines of Blaschko and most systemic anomalies in skeletal, ocular, cardiovascular, endocrine, and orodental tissues, as well as lipomas, are due to defective neural crest. The most important and frequent anomaly in the brain in all forms of epidermal nevus syndromes (ENSs) is hemimegalencephaly (HME). This malformation often is not recognized, despite being the principal cause of neurological manifestations in ENSs. They consist mainly of epilepsy and developmental delay or intellectual disability. The onset of epilepsy in ENS usually is in early infancy, often as infantile spasms. Several syndromic forms have been delineated. I propose the term "Heide's syndrome" for those distinctive cases with the typical triad of hemifacial epidermal nevus, ipsilateral facial lipoma, and hemimegalencephaly. Most ENSs are sporadic. The mechanism is thought to be genetic mosaicism with a lethal autosomal dominant gene. Specific genetic mutations (PTEN, FGFR3, PIK3CA, and AKT1) have been documented in some patients. The large number of contributors for over more than a century and a half to the description of these disorders precludes the use of new author eponyms.

  14. Alport's Syndrome in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchita Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alport's syndrome is an X-linked hereditary disorder affecting the glomerular basement membrane associated with ocular and hearing defects. In women, the disease is much less severe compared to that in men. However, women with Alport's syndrome can have an accelerated form of their disease during pregnancy with worsening of kidney function and can also develop preeclampsia. There are only four described cases of Alport's syndrome in pregnancy. Case Presentation. 20-year-old woman with a history of Alport's syndrome, which during pregnancy worsened resulting in hypertension, proteinuria, and acute kidney injury. Fortunately, there was complete resolution of the proteinuria and kidney injury with delivery, and the patient did not require any renal replacement therapy. Conclusion. One of the four reported cases had an accelerated form of the disease during pregnancy with rapid progression of kidney injury and end-stage renal disease. There are no definite guidelines to monitor these patients during pregnancy. Further studies are required to understand the exact pathophysiology of kidney damage that occurs in pregnant women with Alport's syndrome. This may give us some insight into the prognostic predictors, so that we can monitor these women more thoroughly and prevent adverse outcomes.

  15. QT-Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haverkamp W

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available QT-Syndrome sind durch eine im Oberflächen-EKG nachweisbare abnorme Verlängerung der QT-Intervall-Dauer und das spontane Auftreten ventrikulärer Tachyarrhythmien vom Typ der Torsade de Pointes (TdP charakterisiert. Die Rhythmusstörungen führen typischerweise zu rezidivierend auftretenden Synkopen, bei Degeneration von TdP in Kammerflimmern kann ein plötzlicher Herztod resultieren. Es ist zu unterscheiden zwischen einer kongenitalen und einer sog. erworbenen Form der Erkrankung. Während wir heute wissen, daß es sich beim kongenitalen QT-Syndrom (Romano-Ward-Syndrom, Jervell-und-Lange-Nielsen-Syndrom um eine genetisch bedingte Ionenkanalerkrankung handelt, sind die Mechanismen, die zu einer erworbenen abnormen, mit TdP einhergehenden QT-Verlängerung führen, bisher weitgehend unbekannt; nur in wenigen Fällen scheinen, wie bei den angeborenen Formen, Mutationen von Genen, die für Ionenkanäle kodieren, zugrundezuliegen. QT-Syndrome sind zwar relativ seltene Erkrankungen, im Spannungsfeld zwischen Klinik, traditioneller und molekulargenetischer Diagnostik sowie herkömmlichen Therapieverfahren und zukünftig anstehender genspezifischer Therapie kommt ihnen jedoch Modellcharakter zu.

  16. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Fanni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CNS (Congenital nephrotic syndrome is a disorder characterized by the presence of a nephrotic syndrome in the first three months of life. Different pathologies can cause this syndrome. In general, we can distinguish primary forms (sporadic and hereditary and secondary forms (acquired and associated with other syndromes. The most common form is the Finnish CNS (CNF, congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type, a hereditary form whose name derives from the fact that the highest incidence is described in that country (1.2:10,000. The pathogenesis, the clinical picture, the diagnostic criteria, the therapy and the outcome are described in details.  Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  17. Progestogens and Cushing's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harte, C

    2012-02-03

    We report 3 patients where Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (MPA = Provera) and Megestrol Acetate (Megace) in doses used for therapy of breast cancer, caused clinical hypercortisolism and Cushing\\'s syndrome. Studies of the toxicity of Medroxyprogesterone Acetate list the commonest adverse events at 500 mg\\/day as weight gain, water retention, increased blood pressure, tremor, moon face, sweating, muscle cramps, vaginal bleeding and increased appetite. Glucocorticoid-like effects are seen in up to 30% of patients treated for longer than 6 weeks with mostly large doses of the order of 1500 mg\\/day but Cushing\\'s syndrome has been reported in patients taking 400 mg\\/day. Neither the glucocorticoid-like effects or Cushing\\'s syndrome have been previously observed with Megestrol Acetate. In the elderly female population receiving progestogens for neoplastic disease the progestogen itself could be an appreciable cause of morbidity both by causing glucocorticoid-like effects and Cushing\\'s syndrome but also by lack of awareness of the danger of sudden withdrawal of these compounds when the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is suppressed. The signs and symptoms could be easily overlooked unless appropriate testing for Cushing\\'s syndrome is carried out. While the progestogen may have to be continued indefinitely a dose decrease may be feasible with reduction of morbidity.

  18. Capsule contraction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut COŞKUN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Capsule contraction syndrome occurs after fibrous metaplasia of lens proteins that leads to capsular bag contraction. Excessive front capsular wrinkling is seen in capsule contraction syndrome and there is an imbalance between powers supplying capsular integrity. This situation leads to zonular weakness. Capsule contraction syndrome is associated with pseudoexfoliation, older age, uveitis, pars planitis and myotonic muscular dystrophy. In order to decrease the risk of capsule contraction syndrome, front capsulerhexis area should be open as 5.5-6 mm diameter and a curysoft intraocular lens should be used. In order to prevent lens epithelial proliferation and metaplasia, lens epithelial cells at inferior surface of front capsule should be aspirated carefully. If postoperative capsular contraction detected, front capsulotomy should be performed by Nd-YAG laser at postoperative 2 to 3 weeks. In patients that Nd-YAG laser is unsuccessful, capsular tension should be decreased by surgical microincisions. In present study, we evaluated etiology, prevention and management of capsule contraction syndrome in the light of actual literature knowledge.

  19. [The Angelman's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurić-Nedeljković, M; Marjanović, B; Zamurović, D; Guć-Sćekić, M; Lejić, S; Zotović, M

    1994-01-01

    Distinction of patients with Angelman's syndrome in a group of mentally retarded patients is important even though the syndrome was rarely reported since the original description in 1965. Before that time these patients were thought to suffer from neurologic sequelae of perinatal asphyxia, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome or mental retardation of unknown origin. Diagnosis is based on the following criteria: developmental delay from early age, absent speech (or speech limited to less than six words), jerky movements with an ataxic gait if the patient is walking, paroxysm of inappropriate laughing, dysmorphic craniofacial features (brachycephaly, mid-facial hypoplasia, deep set eyes, macrostomia, prominent mandible). About 60% of patients have deletion of chromozome 15q11-13. Cytogenetic studies suggest that de novo deletion of chromozome 15 is connected with the low recurrence risk and that families with several members with Angelman's syndrome belong to the group without identifiable deletion on citogenetic or molecular level. The article deals with the diagnostic criteria, clinical features and electroencephalographic changes (after several years of followup) in seven children with Angelman's syndrome (four girls and three boys).

  20. The SAHA syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, C E; Adler, Y D; Zouboulis, C C

    2000-01-01

    The presence of seborrhoea, acne, hirsutism and alopecia in women has first been summarized as SAHA syndrome in 1982 and can be associated with polycystic ovary syndrome, cystic mastitis, obesity and infertility. In 1994, the association of these androgen-dependent cutaneous signs, was classified according to their etiology into four types: (1) idiopathic, (2) ovarian, (3) adrenal, and (4) hyperprolactinemic SAHA. The HAIRAN syndrome has been currently described as a fifth variant with polyendocrinopathy. The SAHA syndrome generally occurs in young to middle-aged women and involves either the presence of elevated blood levels of androgens or increased androgen-driven peripheral response with normal circulating androgen levels. Peripheral metabolism of androgens takes place in various areas within the pilosebaceous unit, as indicated by local differences in the activities of aromatase, 5alpha-reductase as well as of the presence of the androgen receptors. In cases of SAHA syndrome, careful diagnostic and clinical evaluation has to be performed in order to identify the cause for peripheral hyperandrogenism and to exclude androgen-producing tumors. Treatment will target the etiology, whereas the management in idiopathic cases will aim to improve the clinical features of SAHA.

  1. Metabolic Syndrome, Androgens, and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and met...

  2. Unusual presentation of Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Veronica PCC

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lynch Syndrome/HNPCC is a syndrome of cancer predisposition linked to inherited mutations of genes participating in post-replicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR. The spectrum of cancer associated with Lynch Syndrome includes tumours of the colorectum, endometrium, ovary, upper gastrointestinal tract and the urothelium although other cancers are rarely described. We describe a family of Lynch Syndrome with an hMLH1 mutation, that harbours an unusual tumour spectrum and its diagnostic and management challenges.

  3. Poland syndrome with absent ribs

    OpenAIRE

    Rupam Kumar Ta; Kaushik Saha; Arnab Saha; Santanu Ghosh; Mrinmoy Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Poland syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by ipsilateral absence of pectoralis major muscle. This syndrome is associated with various anomalies such as ipsilateral syndactyly, brachidactyly, dextrocardia, herniation of lung, underdevelopment of upper ribs, aplasia or hypoplasia of breast, etc. Only few cases had been reported with absent ribs in Poland syndrome. We report a rare case of Poland syndrome presented to us with mal-development of his right hemithorax and weakness...

  4. Poland syndrome with absent ribs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupam Kumar Ta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poland syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by ipsilateral absence of pectoralis major muscle. This syndrome is associated with various anomalies such as ipsilateral syndactyly, brachidactyly, dextrocardia, herniation of lung, underdevelopment of upper ribs, aplasia or hypoplasia of breast, etc. Only few cases had been reported with absent ribs in Poland syndrome. We report a rare case of Poland syndrome presented to us with mal-development of his right hemithorax and weakness of right hand.

  5. POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME IN ADOLESCENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Baptista; Maria João Vieira; Carla Meireles

    2017-01-01

    Introduction:Polycystic Ovary Syndrome is recognized as the most common endocrine disorder of reproductive-age women. The syndrome often presents during adolescence, but the diagnosis in this age group is complicated by the overlap between features of the syndrome and physiologic findings observed during the normal progression of puberty. Objective:To review the diagnosis and treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in adolescence. Development:There are no consensual diagnostic criteria o...

  6. Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pavithra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC syndrome is a condition of sporadic occurrence, with patients showing multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation and characteristic dysmorphic features. We, thus, report a rare case of this syndrome in a 1-year-old child who presented with typical features of CFC syndrome.

  7. [Antisynthetase syndrome without muscle involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júdez Navarro, Enrique; Martínez Carretero, Myriam; Martínez Jiménez, Gonzalo Fidel

    2007-11-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome is a well defined syndrome characterized by the presence of interstitial lung disease in association with arthritis, miositis, mechanic's hands and Ruynaud's phenomenon in the presence of antisynthetase antibodies, especially Ac anti-Jo1. We described the case of a 68-year-old man with this syndrome in the absence of inflammatory muscle disease.

  8. A Journey with Klinefelter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover, Virginia Isaacs

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experience having a son with Klinefelter Syndrome. Klinefelter Syndrome, also known as 47,XXY, is estimated to occur in 1 out of 600 males, making it the most common chromosomal disorder. Babies with Klinefelter Syndrome rarely have any physical differences that are detectable, which is the reason that so few…

  9. Klinefelter Syndrome With Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra G

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Leg ulcers are frequently caused by venous insufficiency, arterial insufficiency, neuropathy, or a combination of these factors. Klinefelter syndrome in association with chronic leg ulcers have been reported earlier. We report a case of Klinefelter syndrome with non- healing ulcer. The diagnosis of the Klinefelter syndrome was confirmed by karyotyping.

  10. Down Syndrome: A Cardiovascular Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vis, J. C.; Duffels, M. G. J.; Winter, M. M.; Weijerman, M. E.; Cobben, J. M.; Huisman, S. A.; Mulder, B. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the heart and vascular system in patients with Down syndrome. A clear knowledge on the wide spectrum of various abnormalities associated with this syndrome is essential for skillful management of cardiac problems in patients with Down syndrome. Epidemiology of congenital heart defects, cardiovascular aspects and…

  11. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min

    2016-05-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It leads not only to secondary distortion of skull shape but to various complications including neurologic, ophthalmic and respiratory dysfunction. Craniosynostosis is very heterogeneous in terms of its causes, presentation, and management. Both environmental factors and genetic factors are associated with development of craniosynostosis. Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis accounts for more than 70% of all cases. Syndromic craniosynostosis with a certain genetic cause is more likely to involve multiple sutures or bilateral coronal sutures. FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1 genes are major causative genes of genetic syndromes associated with craniosynostosis. Although most of syndromic craniosynostosis show autosomal dominant inheritance, approximately half of patients are de novo cases. Apert syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and Antley-Bixler syndrome are related to mutations in FGFR family (especially in FGFR2), and mutations in FGFRs can be overlapped between different syndromes. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, Muenke syndrome, and craniofrontonasal syndrome are representative disorders showing isolated coronal suture involvement. Compared to the other types of craniosynostosis, single gene mutations can be more frequently detected, in one-third of coronal synostosis patients. Molecular diagnosis can be helpful to provide adequate genetic counseling and guidance for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

  12. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  13. Down syndrome: a cardiovascular perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Vis; M.G.J. Duffels; M.M. Winter; M.E. Weijerman; J.M. Cobben; S.A. Huisman; B.J.M. Mulder

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the heart and vascular system in patients with Down syndrome. A clear knowledge on the wide spectrum of various abnormalities associated with this syndrome is essential for skilful management of cardiac problems in patients with Down syndrome. Epidemiology of congenital heart

  14. Down Syndrome Myths and Truths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome Advocacy 101 About NDSS Mission & Vision NDSS History Our Team Media Kit Financials Newsroom Shop NDSS Home » Down Syndrome » ... Syndrome Advocacy 101 About NDSS Mission & Vision NDSS History Our Team Media Kit Financials Newsroom Contact Us Helpline: 800-221- ...

  15. Hypoparathyroidism-retardation-dysmorphism syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalenahalli Jagadish Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hypoparathyroidism, growth retardation and facial dysmorphism is a rare autosomal recessive disorder seen among children born to consanguineous couple of Arab ethnicity. This syndrome is commonly known as Sanjad-Sakati or hypoparathyroidism-retardation-dysmorphism syndrome (HRD. We report 13-year-old Hindu boy with hypoparathyroidism, tetany, facial dysmorphism and developmental delay, compatible with HRD syndrome.

  16. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Valverde, E; Ferrer-Oliveras, R; Alijotas-Reig, J

    2016-04-01

    Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is associated with various obstetric complications and, in the absence of prior history of thrombosis, with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against other phospholipids, proteins called cofactors or PL-cofactor complexes. Although the obstetric complications have been related to the procoagulant properties of antiphospholipid antibodies, pathological studies of human placenta have shown the proinflammatory capacity of antiphospholipid antibodies via the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. There is no general agreement on which antiphospholipid antibodies profile (laboratory) confers the greatest obstetric risk, but the best candidates are categories I and IIa. Combined treatment with low doses of aspirin and heparin achieves good obstetric and maternal outcomes. In this study, we also review the therapeutic possibilities in refractory cases, although the likelihood of progressing to other autoimmune diseases is low. We briefly comment on incomplete obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome, also known as antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity syndrome.

  17. Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Seo, Jeong Kee; Lee, Yong Seok [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome is a rare clinical condition in which impaired intestinal peristalsis causes recurrent symptoms of bowel obstruction in the absence of a mechanical occlusion. This syndrome may involve variable segments of small or large bowel, and may be associated with urinary bladder retention. This study included 6 children(3 boys and 3 girls) of chronic intestinal obstruction. Four were symptomatic at birth and two were of the ages of one month and one year. All had abdominal distension and deflection difficulty. Five had urinary bladder distension. Despite parenteral nutrition and surgical intervention(ileostomy or colostomy), bowel obstruction persisted and four patients expired from sepses within one year. All had gaseous distension of small and large bowel on abdominal films. In small bowel series, consistent findings were variable degree of dilatation, decreased peristalsis(prolonged transit time) and microcolon or microrectum. This disease entity must be differentiated from congenital megacolon, ileal atresia and megacystis syndrome.

  18. Alagille syndrome: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Maha Saleh,1 Binita M Kamath,2 David Chitayat1,3 1Division of Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, 2Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Prenatal Diagnosis and Medical Genetics Program, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Alagille syndrome is an autosomal dominant, complex multisystem disorder characterized by the presence of three out of five major clinical criteria: cholestasis with bile duct paucity on liver biopsy, congenital cardiac defects (with particular involvement of the pulmonary arteries, posterior embryotoxon in the eye, characteristic facial features, and butterfly vertebrae. Renal and vascular abnormalities can also occur. Inter- and intrafamilial variabilities in the clinical manifestations are common. We reviewed the clinical features and management as well as the molecular basis of Alagille syndrome. Keywords: Alagille syndrome, ALGS, genetics, liver 

  19. Femoroacetabular impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Ege

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI syndrome is a recently understood hip condition that describes the pathologic contact between the femoral neck and the acetabular rim. Previously, it was also called and ldquo;acetabular rim syndrome and rdquo; or and ldquo;cervicoacetabular impingement syndrome and rdquo;. It is characterized by a developmental disorder affecting the femoral neck, acetabular rim and labrum. The chronic irritation on the hip joint causes chondral damage and mechanical changes, and these degenerative changes eventually lead to osteoarthritis. Two types of FAI have been described: Cam type and pincer type. Treatment options for FAI are conservative, open, mini open and arthroscopic surgery. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(1.000: 42-47

  20. Barn med Asperger syndrom

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlström, Hanna

    2003-01-01

    Det här examensarbetet handlar om barn med Asperger syndrom. Syftet med arbetet var att ta reda på vad Asperger syndrom är och hur man som lärare kan hjälpa dessa elever på bästa sätt. Jag är intresserad av elever som har det svårt och antar att jag någon gång under min tid som lärare kommer att stöta på dessa elever. Arbetet inleds med en teorigenomgång där jag främst går igenom de utmärkande dragen hos barn med Asperger syndrom. Där går jag också bl a igenom orsaker till Asperger och diagn...

  1. Brachman de lange syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Verma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachman de Lange syndrome or Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS is a genetic disorder which can lead to severe developmental anomalies. It affects both the physical and intellectual development of a child. It is characterized by skeletal, craniofacial deformities, gastrointestinal and cardiac malformations. This syndrome is of rare occurrence and affects between 1/10,000 and 1/60,000 neonates. Diagnosis is based on the characteristic phenotype, in particular, a striking facial appearance, prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, various skeletal abnormalities, hypertrichosis, and developmental delay. Here, we present the case of a 13-year-old patient, with micrognathia, delayed eruption, multiple carious teeth, missing teeth and periodontal problems together, which had never been reported before. The father was also found to have the same missing teeth as the girl child.

  2. Developmental Gerstmann's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PeBenito, R; Fisch, C B; Fisch, M L

    1988-09-01

    The tetrad of finger agnosia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, and right-left disorientation make up Gerstmann's syndrome. The tetrad has been infrequently described in children with learning disability and has been called developmental Gerstmann's syndrome (DGS). Developmental Gerstmann's syndrome may occur in brain-damaged and apparently normal children. Five children in whom DGS occurred in association with brain abnormalities underwent long-term observation, which indicated persistence of the deficits. The identification of these cases suggests that DGS may not be as rare as previously thought and may often be unrecognized. Testing for the Gerstmann elements in learning-disabled children may identify otherwise undiagnosed cases of DGS and should be routinely employed in the neurologic examination. Until appropriate teaching methods for DGS are found, "bypassing" the deficits and utilizing the child's strengths, plus counseling, seem to offer an effective treatment approach.

  3. Marfan syndrome: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Guglielmina; Giusti, Betti; Sticchi, Elena; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Nistri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a pleiotropic connective tissue disease inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, due to mutations in the FBN1 gene encoding fibrillin 1. It is an important protein of the extracellular matrix that contributes to the final structure of a microfibril. Few cases displaying an autosomal recessive transmission are reported in the world. The FBN1 gene, which is made of 66 exons, is located on chromosome 15q21.1. This review, after an introduction on the clinical manifestations that leads to the diagnosis of MFS, focuses on cardiovascular manifestations, pharmacological and surgical therapies of thoracic aortic aneurysm and/or dissection (TAAD), mechanisms underlying the progression of aneurysm or of acute dissection, and biomarkers associated with progression of TAADs. A Dutch group compared treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker, vs no other additional treatment (COMPARE clinical trial). They observed that losartan reduces the aortic dilatation rate in patients with Marfan syndrome. Later on, they also reported that losartan exerts a beneficial effect on patients with Marfan syndrome carrying an FBN1 mutation that causes haploinsufficiency (quantitative mutation), while it has no significant effect on patients displaying dominant negative (qualitative) mutations. Moreover, a French group in a 3-year trial compared the administration of losartan vs placebo in patients with Marfan syndrome under treatment with beta-receptor blockers. They observed that losartan decreases blood pressure but has no effect on aortic diameter progression. Thus, beta-receptor blockers remain the gold standard therapy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Three potential biochemical markers are mentioned in this review: total homocysteine, serum transforming growth factor beta, and lysyl oxidase. Moreover, markers of oxidative stress measured in plasma, previously correlated with clinical features of Marfan syndrome, may be explored as potential

  4. Genetics Home Reference: oral-facial-digital syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Registry: Oral-facial-digital syndrome Genetic Testing Registry: Orofacial-digital syndrome III Genetic Testing Registry: Orofacial-digital syndrome IV Genetic Testing Registry: Orofaciodigital syndrome ...

  5. Ulnar tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoura, Abdo; Jacoby, Sidney M

    2012-10-01

    Ulnar tunnel syndrome could be broadly defined as a compressive neuropathy of the ulnar nerve at the level of the wrist. The ulnar tunnel, or Guyon's canal, has a complex and variable anatomy. Various factors may precipitate the onset of ulnar tunnel syndrome. Patient presentation depends on the anatomic zone of ulnar nerve compression: zone I compression, motor and sensory signs and symptoms; zone II compression, isolated motor deficits; and zone III compression; purely sensory deficits. Conservative treatment such as activity modification may be helpful, but often, surgical exploration of the ulnar tunnel with subsequent ulnar nerve decompression is indicated.

  6. The alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKeon, A

    2008-08-01

    The alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a common management problem in hospital practice for neurologists, psychiatrists and general physicians alike. Although some patients have mild symptoms and may even be managed in the outpatient setting, others have more severe symptoms or a history of adverse outcomes that requires close inpatient supervision and benzodiazepine therapy. Many patients with AWS have multiple management issues (withdrawal symptoms, delirium tremens, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, seizures, depression, polysubstance abuse, electrolyte disturbances and liver disease), which requires a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach. Although AWS may be complex, careful evaluation and available treatments should ensure safe detoxification for most patients.

  7. Wolcott-Rallison Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Juneja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia with early-onset diabetes mellitus (also known as Wolcott-Rallison syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that manifests itself in early infancy with symptoms of diabetes mellitus. Short stature and walking difficulties become evident in the 2 nd year of life when the child starts to walk. These skeletal changes are progressive with age. There is usually a short trunk, excessive lordosis, a short and broad chest, and genu valgum. This report presents a case of Wolcott-Rallison syndrome in a 10 year old child.

  8. Pathogenesis of Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckman, J F; Peterson, B S; Anderson, G M; Arnsten, A F; Pauls, D L; Cohen, D J

    1997-01-01

    This review presents a models of disease pathogenesis in the context of CNS development. It begins with an exploration of the clinical features and natural history of Tourette's syndrome. This is followed by a consideration of the role of genetic and nongenetic factors. An effort is then made to review the anatomical organization of the basal ganglia and related cortical sites. These circuits are intimately involved in the normal processing of sensorimotor, cognitive, and emotionally laden information. Evidence implicating these circuits in the pathobiology of Tourette's syndrome is then considered. The review closes with the prospects for advances in interdisciplinary research and therapeutics using this model as a guide.

  9. Parry-Romberg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Hasan; Yologlu, Zeynel; Sargın, Husamettin; Metin, Melike Rusen

    2015-01-01

    Progressive hemifacial atrophy also known as Parry-Romberg syndrome is an acquired, slowly progressive disorder, occurring more in women, primarily affecting one side of the face, mainly characterized by unilateral atrophy, and loss of skin and subcutaneous tissues of face, muscles, and bones. Ocular and neurologic involvements are common. The possible etiology is unclear without any known cure. We report a rare case of Parry-Romberg syndrome with classical features. The clinical features, radiological imaging findings, differential diagnosis, and available treatment options are discussed in this report. PMID:26492117

  10. Usher syndrome in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dad, Shzeena; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Usher syndrome (USH) is a genetically heterogeneous deafness-blindness syndrome, divided into three clinical subtypes: USH1, USH2 and USH3. METHODS: Mutations in 21 out of 26 investigated Danish unrelated individuals with USH were identified, using a combination of molecular diagnostic...... methods. RESULTS: Before Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) became available mutations in nine individuals (1 USH1, 7 USH2, 1 USH3) were identified by Sanger sequencing of USH1C,USH2A or CLRN1 or by Arrayed Primer EXtension (APEX) method. Mutations in 12 individuals (7 USH1, 5 USH2) were found by targeted...

  11. quadriparesis in sjogren syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nikhil srivastva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypokalemic paralysis is a well recognised clinical presentation of Primary sjogren syndrome that occurs due to renal potassium loss caused by interstitial nephritis. However we report a case where a hypokalemic paralysis in a suspected case of sjogren syndrome was associated with high anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of a near normal Glomerular filtration rate (RTA and a failure to acidify urine pH 5.5 in the presence of systemic acidosis. [Natl J Med Res 2015; 5(2.000: 161-162

  12. [Apert's syndrome with polymetatarsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivelon, A; Nivelon, J L; Matthieu, M; Piussan, C; Maroteaux, P

    1991-01-01

    Three cases of acrocephalosyndactyly with duplication of the first toe and presence of six well-individualized metatarsals are reported. This type of polysyndactyly should suggest the diagnosis of Carpenter syndrome, which is inherited on a recessive autosomal basis. However, in the three patients reported here, the facial dysmorphism was distinct from that seen in Carpenter syndrome and the syndactyly was more marked. The correct diagnosis therefore seems to be Apert acrocephalosyndactyly, a disease with dominant transmission. A mutation seems very likely and consequently the risk of recurrence in siblings is probably minimal.

  13. Diagnosing Lynch Syndrome

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, J

    2016-11-01

    Lynch Syndrome, also known as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC), is a hereditary condition that increases an individual’s risk of developing a constellation of cancers. These most commonly arise in the colon, but also involve other solid organs such as the endometrium and ovaries in women, the stomach, brain and the skin. Ireland’s small population offers an opportunity to identify all those with Lynch Syndrome (LS) in the country, which would represent a powerful preventive opportunity to meaningfully impact on the incidence of cancer in Ireland.

  14. Lemierre's Syndrome Complicating Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thompson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre's syndrome is an anaerobic suppurative thrombophlebitis involving the internal jugular vein secondary to oropharyngeal infection. There is only one previous case report in pregnancy which was complicated by premature delivery of an infant that suffered significant neurological damage. We present an atypical case diagnosed in the second trimester with a live birth at term. By reporting this case, we hope to increase the awareness of obstetricians to the possibility of Lemierre's syndrome when patients present with signs of unabating oropharyngeal infection and pulmonary symptoms.

  15. Management of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Papa, Nicoletta; Vaso, Nikoleta

    2010-08-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder presenting with tissue injury in various organs related to large- or small-vessel thrombosis associated with antiphospholipid and antiprotein/phospholipid complex antibodies. Although the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and clinical scenario may seem clear and straightforward, a more detailed examination reveals a more complex and uncertain picture related to the management of APS. This article reviews the current situation relating to APS therapy by evaluating the different clinical features of the syndrome ranging from thrombosis to pregnancy complications together with new strategies and pharmacological approaches.

  16. Hypercoagulability and nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Antonietta; Barbano, Biagio; Sardo, Liborio; Martina, Paola; Gasperini, Maria L; Labbadia, Raffaella; Liberatori, Marta; Amoroso, Antonio; Cianci, Rosario

    2014-05-01

    Patients with nephrotic syndrome are at increased risk for thromboembolic events such as deep venous and arterial thrombosis, renal vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. This thrombophilic phenomenon has been attributed to a "hypercoagulable" state in which an imbalance between naturally occurring pro-coagulant/pro-thrombotic factors and anti-coagulant/antithrombotic factors promotes in situ thrombosis in deep veins or arteries. Management of thromboembolic events may be divided in prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. Hypoalbuminemia is the most significant independent predictor factor of thrombotic risk, especially for values thrombosis. Reviewing the recent literature, we suggest the best therapeutic management of anticoagulation for patients with nephrotic syndrome, focusing on prophylactic strategies.

  17. Asperger syndrome revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Joseph H; Sperber, Michael; Price, Bruce H

    2006-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) is a disorder on the continuum of autistic spectrum disorders characterized by a lack of social reciprocity and empathy, and severe difficulties in social integration. Controversy remains as to what constitutes AS and whether it should be declared a separate disease or higher-functioning autism. This review discusses the contributions made by Hans Asperger and Leo Kanner in first delineating the condition, and examines the syndrome's incidence, prevalence, and etiologies. Recent studies using neuroimaging are described, along with current diagnostic and treatment options.

  18. Syndrome in Question*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonolli, Vanessa Mello; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Tonello, Cláudio Sampieri; Pires, Rafaelle Batistella; Abbade, Luciana Patricia Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Hay-Wells syndrome or AEC (Ankyloblepharon, Ectodermal dysplasia and Cleft lip and palate syndrome) is a rare ectodermal disorder. The treatment is aimed to prevent clinical complications. We describe the case of a four-month old male patient with erosions on the scalp, trunk and arms, trachyonychia, deformity of the ears, micropenis, cleft palate, decreased eyebrow and eyelash hairs, in addition to antecedents of surgical correction of ankyloblepharon. The importance of the correct diagnosis is emphasized, besides the investigation of the associated diseases, treatment of complications and genetic counseling of the parents. PMID:24770526

  19. Patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Hervé; Fredericson, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) syndrome is a frequently encountered overuse disorder that involves the patellofemoral region and often presents as anterior knee pain. PFP can be difficult to diagnose. Not only do the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment remain challenging, but the terminology used to describe PFP is used inconsistently and can be confusing. Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) seems to be multifactorial, resulting from a complex interaction among intrinsic anatomic and external training factors. Although clinicians frequently make the diagnosis of PFPS, no consensus exists about its etiology or the factors most responsible for causing pain. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of PFP.

  20. KARTAGENER’S SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Kartagener syndrome (a clinical variant of primary ciliary dyskinesia is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by the triad of chronic sinusitis, bronchiectasis and situs inversus with dextrocardia. CASE CHARACTERISTICS: A 11-year-old boy presenting with chronic cough with expectoration requiring frequent nebulisations. OUTCOME: Early diagnosis of this rare congenital autosomal recessive disorder in early life is important in the overall prognosis of the syndrome, as many of the complications can be prevented if timely management is instituted, as was done in this in this case.

  1. Acquired hyperostosis syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dihlmann, W.; Hering, L.; Bargon, G.W.

    1988-10-01

    Sterno-costo-clavicular hyperostosis (SCCH) is the most common manifestation of a syndrome, consisting of increased bone metabolism, mostly new bone formation and heterotopic ossification of fibrous tissue, which we have characterised as the acquired hyperostosis syndrome. In part I we discuss the terminology, radiological appearances, scintigraphy, clinical and laboratory findings, bacteriology, histology, nosology, complications, treatment and differential diagnosis of SCCH. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is regarded as a phaenotype of SCCH, depending on the age. CRMO occurs in children, adolescents and young adults, SCCH predominantly in middleaged and elderly adults.

  2. Marfan syndrome: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepe G

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Guglielmina Pepe,1,2 Betti Giusti,1,2 Elena Sticchi,1,2 Rosanna Abbate,1,2 Gian Franco Gensini,1–3 Stefano Nistri2,4 1Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Section of Critical Medical Care and Medical Specialities, DENOTHE Center, University of Florence, 2Cardiothoracovascular Department, Marfan Syndrome and Related Disorders Regional Referral Center, Careggi Hospital, 3Santa Maria agli Ulivi, Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi, Onlus, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Florence, 4Cardiology Service, CMSR Veneto Medica, Altavilla Vicentina, Italy Abstract: Marfan syndrome (MFS is a pleiotropic connective tissue disease inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, due to mutations in the FBN1 gene encoding fibrillin 1. It is an important protein of the extracellular matrix that contributes to the final structure of a microfibril. Few cases displaying an autosomal recessive transmission are reported in the world. The FBN1 gene, which is made of 66 exons, is located on chromosome 15q21.1. This review, after an introduction on the clinical manifestations that leads to the diagnosis of MFS, focuses on cardiovascular manifestations, pharmacological and surgical therapies of thoracic aortic aneurysm and/or dissection (TAAD, mechanisms underlying the progression of aneurysm or of acute dissection, and biomarkers associated with progression of TAADs. A Dutch group compared treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker, vs no other additional treatment (COMPARE clinical trial. They observed that losartan reduces the aortic dilatation rate in patients with Marfan syndrome. Later on, they also reported that losartan exerts a beneficial effect on patients with Marfan syndrome carrying an FBN1 mutation that causes haploinsufficiency (quantitative mutation, while it has no significant effect on patients displaying dominant negative (qualitative mutations. Moreover, a French group in a 3-year trial compared the administration of

  3. Stiff person syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccoto, Giuseppe; Blaya, Maike; Kelley, Roger E

    2013-02-01

    Recognizing stiff person syndrome is clinically important. It is uncommon, characterized by body stiffness associated with painful muscle spasms, and varies in location and severity. It is subdivided into stiff trunk versus stiff limb presentation, and as a progressive encephalomyelitis. Stiff person-type syndrome also reflects a paraneoplastic picture. Most patients demonstrate exaggerated lumbar lordosis. Roughly 60% of patients have antiglutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid. The differential diagnosis includes many severe conditions. There are reports of response to muscle relaxants, immunosuppressants, intravenous gamma globulin, plasma exchange, a number of anticonvulsants, and botulinum toxin.

  4. Scintigraphy in Ochoa syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Jose Rafael; Rayo, Juan I; Serrano, Justo; Domínguez, María L; García, Lucía; Durán, Carmen

    2013-07-01

    The Ochoa or urofacial syndrome is a disease characterized by non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction and unusual facial expressions when smiling or crying. It is an extremely rare disorder with over 150 cases reported in the medical literature. This condition has been determined to be inherited by an autosomal recessive pattern. We present radionuclide renogram and renal scan of a boy with a history of incontinence, frequent infections of the urinary tract, and gene mutations consistent with this syndrome. Nuclear medicine images showed extensive bilateral renal scarring and obstructive pattern in diuretic renogram.

  5. Spontaneous Thigh Compartment Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan, Sameer K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A young man presented with a painful and swollen thigh, without any history of trauma, illness, coagulopathic medication or recent exertional exercise. Preliminary imaging delineated a haematoma in the anterior thigh, without any fractures or muscle trauma. Emergent fasciotomies were performed. No pathology could be identified intra-operatively, or on follow-up imaging. A review of thigh compartment syndromes described in literature is presented in a table. Emergency physicians and traumatologists should be cognisant of spontaneous atraumatic presentations of thigh compartment syndrome, to ensure prompt referral and definitive management of this limb-threatening condition. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1:134-138].

  6. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Banji, Muradi H.; Zahr, Doaa K.; Jan, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a severe pediatric epilepsy syndrome characterized by mixed seizures, cognitive decline, and generalized slow (rufinamide, are now available. When multiple AED trials fail, non-pharmacological treatments such as the ketogenic diet, vagus nerve stimulation, and epilepsy surgery, should be considered. The aim of this review is to present an updated outline of LGS and the available treatments. Although the prognosis for complete seizure control remains poor, the addition of newer therapies provides an improved hope for some of these patients and their families. Further long term randomized controlled trials are required to compare different therapeutic interventions in terms of efficacy and tolerability. PMID:26166587

  7. [The Patau syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misanović, Verica; Jonuzi, Fedat; Biscević, Emir; Uzicanin, Sajra; Vegar, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Known as D trisomy, Patau syndrome is the third chromosomopathy according to frequency. One of the 5000 newborn carries the trisomy 13. In over 80% cases there is fresh mutation with non separation in myeosis of older mother. The mosaic or translocation forms are not rare. The mail newborn with Patau syndrome is shown in this article. We notice: microcephalia, dolihocephalia, microphthalmia, cheilognatopalatoshisis, polydactilia, and found ultrasound changes at the brain, hearth and genitourinary system. Cytogenetic finding show: mail cariotype with aberrations 47, XY + 13, Sy Patau.

  8. West syndrome in a patient with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Fuyu; Kuroda, Yukiko; Naruto, Takuya; Ohashi, Ikuko; Takano, Kyoko; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    Schinzel-Giedion syndrome is a rare recognizable malformation syndrome defined by characteristic facial features, profound developmental delay, severe growth failure, and multiple congenital anomalies. The causative gene of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome, SETBP1, has been identified, but limited cases have been confirmed by molecular analysis. We present a 9-month-old girl affected by West syndrome with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Congenital severe hydronephrosis, typical facial features, and multiple anomalies suggested a clinical diagnosis of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Hypsarrhythmia occurred at 7 months of age and was temporarily controlled by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy during 5 weeks. SETBP1 mutational analysis showed the presence of a recurrent mutation, p.Ile871Thr. The implications in management of Schinzel-Giedion syndrome are discussed.

  9. Stress in Families of Young Children with Down Syndrome, Williams Syndrome, and Smith-Magenis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Deborah J.; Hodapp, Robert M.; Dykens, Elizabeth M.

    2000-01-01

    Compared stress levels in families of children with Down syndrome (DS), Williams syndrome (WS), or Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS). Found that DS families experienced less Pessimism than others and less Parent and Family Problems than SMS families. Strongest predictors of Parent and Family Problems were maladaptive behavior in SMS, younger age in DS,…

  10. Combined Alport syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masashi; Hashimoto, Fusako; Kaito, Hiroshi; Nozu, Kandai; Iijima, Kazumoto; Asada, Dai; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    To date, there have been a very limited number of case reports on combined Alport syndrome (AS) and Klinefelter syndrome (KS). We herein describe the case of a 9-month-old boy diagnosed with concomitant AS and KS. KS was detected on chromosomal analysis of the amniotic fluid, and hematuria/proteinuria was identified in urinary screening at 6 months of age. Renal biopsy indicated AS, with complete deficit of the α5 chain of type IV collagen in the glomerular basement membranes. On genetic analysis for AS, de novo homozygote mutation (c.3605-2a > c) was seen in the gene encoding α5 chain of type IV collagen (COL4A5) on the X chromosomes of maternal origin. This is the first case report of combined AS and KS diagnosed during infancy, and it indicates the need to consider the concurrent existence of these two disorders in infants with urine abnormalities, even in the absence of a family history.

  11. Atypical charles bonnet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Arun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS is not uncommon disorder. It may not present with all typical symptoms and intact insight. Here, a case of atypical CBS is reported where antipsychotics were not effective. Patient improved completely after restoration of vision.

  12. Hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristiniemi, Heli; Perski, Aleksander; Lyskov, Eugene; Emtner, Margareta

    2014-12-01

    Chronic stress is among the most common diagnoses in Sweden, most commonly in the form of exhaustion syndrome (ICD-10 classification - F43.8). The majority of patients with this syndrome also have disturbed breathing (hyperventilation). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome. Thirty patients with exhaustion syndrome and 14 healthy subjects were evaluated with the Nijmegen Symptom Questionnaire (NQ). The participants completed questionnaires about exhaustion, mental state, sleep disturbance, pain and quality of life. The evaluation was repeated 4 weeks later, after half of the patients and healthy subjects had engaged in a therapy method called 'Grounding', a physical exercise inspired by African dance. The patients reported significantly higher levels of hyperventilation as compared to the healthy subjects. All patients' average score on NQ was 26.57 ± 10.98, while that of the healthy subjects was 15.14 ± 7.89 (t = -3.48, df = 42, p therapy such as Grounding.

  13. Rud′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Pavani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rud′s syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder characterized by congenital ichthyosis, epilepsy, dwarfism, sexual infantilism, polyneuritis, and macrocytic anemia. We report here an interesting case of this disorder in an 18-year-old girl for its rarity and academic interest.

  14. Syndrome in question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinhua; Qiao, Jianjun; Fang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Vulvovaginal-gingival syndrome is characterized by erosions and desquamation of the vulva, vagina, and gingiva. We reported a case of a 32-year-old woman presenting with an 8-year history of damage to the vulval and perianal anatomy and limitation of mouth opening. The patient's symptoms were relieved after treatment with topical tacrolimus cream.

  15. Seminoma in Marfan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epenetos, A. A.; Collis, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    A patient with a testicular seminoma and Marfan's syndrome is described. The association is unlikely to be by chance alone, and an explanation in terms of either an associated congenital defect, or a minor chromosomal anomaly, is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:537969

  16. The nonthyroidal illness syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Suzanne Myers; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2007-09-01

    This article briefly summarizes thyroid function alterations generally seen in the euthyroid sick syndrome, provides an overview of specific thyroidal adaptations during several clinical conditions and secondary to specific pharmacologic agents, and discusses the current controversy in thyroid hormone treatment of nonthyroidal illness.

  17. Barraquer-Simons syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyhøj Heidemann, Lene; Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2016-01-01

    at the age of 8 years. Our patient did not show signs of renal impairment and this may be associated with the syndrome. Treatment of lipoatrophy in these patients is limited to cosmetic restoration, and autologous fat grafting has shown sustained positive effects with no or very little loss of volume...

  18. [Postvagotomy adaptation syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalov, V A

    1998-01-01

    It was established in experiment, that the changes of the natural resistance of organism indexes and of the peritoneal cavity cytology has compensatory-adaptational character while the denervation-adaptational syndrome occurrence and progress, which may be assessed as eustress. Vagotomy and operative trauma cause qualitatively different reactions of an organism.

  19. Cytokines in Sjogren's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Roescher; P.P. Tak; G.G. Illei

    2009-01-01

    Cytokines play a central role in the regulation of immunity and are often found to be deregulated in autoimmune diseases. Sjogren's syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation and loss of secretory function of the salivary and lachrymal glands. This review highlights the c

  20. The Syndrome of Catatonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Allen Wilcox

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome which has historically been associated with schizophrenia. Many clinicians have thought that the prevalence of this condition has been decreasing over the past few decades. This review reminds clinicians that catatonia is not exclusively associated with schizophrenia, and is still common in clinical practice. Many cases are related to affective disorders or are of an idiopathic nature. The illusion of reduced prevalence has been due to evolving diagnostic systems that failed to capture catatonic syndromes. This systemic error has remained unchallenged, and potentiated by the failure to perform adequate neurological evaluations and catatonia screening exams on psychiatric patients. We find that current data supports catatonic syndromes are still common, often severe and of modern clinical importance. Effective treatment is relatively easy and can greatly reduce organ failure associated with prolonged psychomotor symptoms. Prompt identification and treatment can produce a robust improvement in most cases. The ongoing prevalence of this syndrome requires that psychiatrists recognize catatonia and its presentations, the range of associated etiologies, and the import of timely treatment.

  1. The Syndrome of Catatonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, James Allen; Reid Duffy, Pam

    2015-12-09

    Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome which has historically been associated with schizophrenia. Many clinicians have thought that the prevalence of this condition has been decreasing over the past few decades. This review reminds clinicians that catatonia is not exclusively associated with schizophrenia, and is still common in clinical practice. Many cases are related to affective disorders or are of an idiopathic nature. The illusion of reduced prevalence has been due to evolving diagnostic systems that failed to capture catatonic syndromes. This systemic error has remained unchallenged, and potentiated by the failure to perform adequate neurological evaluations and catatonia screening exams on psychiatric patients. We find that current data supports catatonic syndromes are still common, often severe and of modern clinical importance. Effective treatment is relatively easy and can greatly reduce organ failure associated with prolonged psychomotor symptoms. Prompt identification and treatment can produce a robust improvement in most cases. The ongoing prevalence of this syndrome requires that psychiatrists recognize catatonia and its presentations, the range of associated etiologies, and the import of timely treatment.

  2. Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engenheiro, E; Møller, R S; Pinto, M;

    2008-01-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder with mental retardation and variable multiple congenital abnormalities due to mutations of the ZEB2 (ZFHX1B) gene at 2q22. MWS was first described in 1998 and the causative gene was delineated in 2001. Since then, 115 dif...

  3. Orofacial digital syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajal V Dave

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of a 10-year-old boy reported to us for delayed eruption of permanent teeth with classical features of orofacial digital syndrome (OFDS. The case of OFDS is being reported and the various clinico-radiological features of both type I and type II are compared. Chromosomal karyotyping of the case has also been performed.

  4. Learning about Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources NHGRI-Related News Journal Articles from NHGRI Social Media Careers Educational Programs Health Professional Education Intramural Training ... worsen with age. Scoliosis shortens the trunk also contributes to the arms and ... the most life threatening symptom of Marfan syndrome. They include dilated ...

  5. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Henry L.; And Others

    There is a growing body of evidence that Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) victims are not completely normal and healthy, as was once believed. A variety of new information from several disciplines strongly suggests that the infant who dies suddenly and unexpectedly may do so because of subtle developmental, neurologic, cardiorespiratory, and…

  6. Nail patela elbow syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain V

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A 15 year old male having nail-patella elbow syndrome presented with deficient nail with pterygium formation rudimentry patellae, iliac horn, increased carrying angle of elbow joints and thickened ribs. Family history was suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance.

  7. Modelling Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Animal models are extensively used in genetics, neuroscience and biomedical research. Recent studies illustrate the usefulness and the challenges of research utilising genetically engineered mice to explore the developmental biology of Down syndrome. These studies highlight many of the issues at the centre of what we understand about Down…

  8. Post-Concussion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you're having problems with memory or problem-solving. There is no specific treatment for post-concussion ... for post-concussion syndrome if you have cognitive problems, as most of them ... or other techniques to work around memory deficits and attention skills. ...

  9. Nutrition and metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albornoz López, Raúl

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The exact etiology is unclear, although it is known thatthere is a complex interaction between genetic, metabolic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, dietary habits play an important role in the treatment and prevention of this condition. General classic recommendations include control of obesity, increased physical activity, decreased intake of saturated fat and cholesterol, reduced intake of simple sugars and increased intake of fruits and vegetables. It has been studied the influence of diets low in carbohydrates, diets rich in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, fiber intake, the Mediterranean diet and the glycemic index in relation to metabolic syndrome.Other nutrients recently studied are the micronutrients (magnesium and calcium, soy and other phytochemicals. Evidence suggests that a healthy diet like the Mediterranean protects against metabolic syndrome,caracterized for a low content in saturated and trans fat, high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, balanced intake of carbohydrates and high in fiber, fruits and vegetables. There is more controversy about the type of diet of choice for the control ofmetabolic syndrome (low-carbohydrate diets or lowfat, needing more studies on the role of soy and other phytochemicals.

  10. The baboon syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Hjorth, N; Menné, T

    1984-01-01

    The catchword "baboon syndrome" is used to denote a characteristic distribution pattern of systemic allergic contact dermatitis. Diffuse erythema of the buttocks, upper inner surface of the thighs, and axillae are characteristic features. We describe 3 cases provoked by ampicillin, nickel...... and mercury. The condition may be overlooked and suspected of being a textile dermatitis or seborrhoeic dermatitis of the elderly....

  11. Boerhaave syndrome - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Radovanovic Dinic

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT: Boerhaave syndrome consists of spontaneous longitudinal transmural rupture of the esophagus, usually in its distal part. It generally develops during or after persistent vomiting as a consequence of a sudden increase in intraluminal pressure in the esophagus. It is extremely rare in clinical practice. In 50% of the cases, it is manifested by Mackler's triad: vomiting, lower thoracic pain and subcutaneous emphysema. Hematemesis is an uncommon yet challenging presentation of Boerhaave's syndrome. Compared with ruptures of other parts of the digestive tract, spontaneous rupture is characterized by a higher mortality rate. CASE REPORT: This paper presents a 64-year-old female patient whose vomit was black four days before examination and became bloody on the day of the examination. Her symptoms included epigastric pain and suffocation. Physical examination showed hypotension, tachycardia, dyspnea and a swollen and painful abdomen. Auscultation showed lateral crackling sounds on inspiration. Ultrasound examination showed a distended stomach filled with fluid. Over 1000 ml of fresh blood was extracted by means of nasogastric suction. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was discontinued immediately upon entering the proximal esophagus, where a large amount of fresh blood was observed. The patient was sent for emergency abdominal surgery, during which she died. An autopsy established a diagnosis of Boerhaave syndrome and ulceration in the duodenal bulb. CONCLUSION: Boerhaave syndrome should be considered in all cases with a combination of gastrointestinal symptoms (especially epigastric pain and vomiting and pulmonary signs and symptoms (especially suffocation.

  12. The Proteus syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alavi S

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available A race case of Proteus syndrome is presented. The main features of this hamartomatous condition are partial gigantism of hands and feet, hemihypertrophy, subcutaneous masses, epidermal nevi and bony abnormalities. The condition is extremely rare. Though the child had severe cosmetic disability, motor intellectual and language development was found to be normal.

  13. Sheldon-Hall syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamshad Michael J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sheldon-Hall syndrome (SHS is a rare multiple congenital contracture syndrome characterized by contractures of the distal joints of the limbs, triangular face, downslanting palpebral fissures, small mouth, and high arched palate. Epidemiological data for the prevalence of SHS are not available, but less than 100 cases have been reported in the literature. Other common clinical features of SHS include prominent nasolabial folds, high arched palate, attached earlobes, mild cervical webbing, short stature, severe camptodactyly, ulnar deviation, and vertical talus and/or talipes equinovarus. Typically, the contractures are most severe at birth and non-progressive. SHS is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern but about half the cases are sporadic. Mutations in either MYH3, TNNI2, or TNNT3 have been found in about 50% of cases. These genes encode proteins of the contractile apparatus of fast twitch skeletal muscle fibers. The diagnosis of SHS is based on clinical criteria. Mutation analysis is useful to distinguish SHS from arthrogryposis syndromes with similar features (e.g. distal arthrogryposis 1 and Freeman-Sheldon syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasonography is feasible at 18–24 weeks of gestation. If the family history is positive and the mutation is known in the family, prenatal molecular genetic diagnosis is possible. There is no specific therapy for SHS. However, patients benefit from early intervention with occupational and physical therapy, serial casting, and/or surgery. Life expectancy and cognitive abilities are normal.

  14. Fraser′s syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agashe A

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available A full term female baby at birth showed the features of Fraser′s syndrome viz. upper lid coloboma, cryptophthalmos, abnormal groove over temporal region, dysmorphic facies, hypospadias and bilateral syndactyly. On ultrasound examination of the abdomen and left orbit, maldeveloped kidney and eyeball were found. Other siblings were not affected. The child died at the age of 3 months.

  15. Nephrotic Syndrome in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) What Is Chronic Kidney Disease? Causes of CKD Tests & Diagnosis Managing CKD Eating Right Preventing CKD What If My Kidneys Fail? Clinical Trials Anemia High Blood Pressure Heart ... Nephropathy Kidney Disease in Children Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome Hemolytic ...

  16. Carotid Stump Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Toufic Dakhoul MD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To highlight the case of a patient with multiple transient ischemic attacks and visual disturbances diagnosed with carotid stump syndrome and managed with endovascular approach. Case Presentation. We present the case of a carotid stump syndrome in an elderly patient found to have moderate left internal carotid artery stenosis in response to an advertisement for carotid screening. After a medical therapeutic approach and a close follow-up, transient ischemic attacks recurred. Computed tomographic angiography showed an occlusion of the left internal carotid artery and the presence of moderate stenosis in the right internal carotid artery, which was treated by endovascular stenting and balloon insertion. One month later, the patient presented with visual disturbances due to the left carotid stump and severe stenosis of the left external carotid artery that was reapproached by endovascular stenting. Conclusion. Considerations should be given to the carotid stump syndrome as a source of emboli for ischemic strokes, and vascular assessment could be used to detect and treat this syndrome.

  17. [Frailty and geriatric syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaki, Koichi

    2013-06-01

    Frailty comes from decline of functions in multi-organs, not a single organ dysfunction (disease). This accounts for comorbidity in the elderly, both in the acute and chronic ill conditions. In the Kyorin University Hospital, which have a role of emergency hospitals in the western area of Tokyo, more than seventy percent of the patients admitted to the geriatric ward are emergent cases. They have multi-diseases; the most frequent one is pneumonia(from aspiration). Often, their ADL is poor and have cognitive disorders, which is why they stay in the ward long. Geriatric syndrome indicates signs and symptoms frequently observed in the elderly. Because geriatric syndromes stem from multi-system dysfunction, they cannot be treated well enough. However, if geriatric syndromes are left untreated, the ADL declines in a steady state. Usually, geriatric syndromes cannot be treated by medication, but well-planned care can prevent progression. From this sense, not a medicine but multidisciplinary approach, such as cooperation with nurse, dietitian, PT, OT, pharmacist, social worker, care programmer and others, is the key to preventing elderly people from failing to the disabled state.

  18. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sindhu Sharma, Kuldeep Singh, Sanjay Dhar*,Yudhvir Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) present at several differentiation from genetic defects to endorgan resistance thereby producing gender dilema dispelled by sex hormones signature.It is quite traumaticfor the patients and family of the affected baby. Extreme sensitivity and awareness on the part of thecaring doctor is necessary for early diagnosis of case of AIS &for successful outcome.

  19. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhu Sharma, Kuldeep Singh, Sanjay Dhar*,Yudhvir Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS present at several differentiation from genetic defects to endorgan resistance thereby producing gender dilema dispelled by sex hormones signature.It is quite traumaticfor the patients and family of the affected baby. Extreme sensitivity and awareness on the part of thecaring doctor is necessary for early diagnosis of case of AIS &for successful outcome.

  20. Revisiting plummer vinson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, D; Bansal, Dp; Malu, A

    2013-01-01

    Plummer Vinson syndrome is a rare association of postcricoid dysphagia, upper esophageal webs, and iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency state has been hypothesized to play an etiological role. While literature review elucidates the resolution of dysphagia in most cases with iron therapy, we discuss our case where the dysphagia was resistant to such therapy and necessitated a mechanical dilatation.

  1. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altintas, Ümit; Helgstrand, Ulf Johan Vilhelm; Hansen, Marc A;

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience with popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) with special emphasis on the applicability of duplex ultrasound scanning (DUS) when diagnosing PAES. In addition to examining the correlation between DUS and intraoperative findings...

  2. Anton's syndrome and eugenics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Frahm-Falkenberg, Siska

    2011-01-01

    to the clinical neurosciences, including pioneering work in neurosurgery, neuropsychology, and child psychiatry. However, it has not been recognized in the English literature that Anton was also a dedicated advocate of eugenics and racial hygiene. This paper provides a case of Anton's syndrome and puts the works...

  3. Upper airway resistance syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat, J M; Badia, J R

    1999-03-01

    This article reviews the clinical picture, diagnosis and management of the upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS). Presently, there is not enough data on key points like the frequency of UARS and the morbidity associated with this condition. Furthermore, the existence of LIARS as an independent sleep disorder and its relation with snoring and obstructive events is in debate. The diagnosis of UARS is still a controversial issue. The technical limitations of the classic approach to monitor airflow with thermistors and inductance plethysmography, as well as the lack of a precise definition of hypopnea, may have led to a misinterpretation of UARS as an independent diagnosis from the sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. The diagnosis of this syndrome can be missed using a conventional polysomnographic setting unless appropriate techniques are applied. The use of an esophageal balloon to monitor inspiratory effort is currently the gold standard. However, other sensitive methods such as the use of a pneumotachograph and, more recently, nasal cannula/pressure transducer systems or on-line monitoring of respiratory impedance with the forced oscillation technique may provide other interesting possibilities. Recognition and characterization of this subgroup of patients within sleep breathing disorders is important because they are symptomatic and may benefit from treatment. Management options to treat UARS comprise all those currently available for sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). However, the subset of patients classically identified as LIARS that exhibit skeletal craneo-facial abnormalities might possibly obtain further benefit from maxillofacial surgery.

  4. Metabolic cutis laxa syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohamed, M.; Kouwenberg, D.; Gardeitchik, T.; Kornak, U.; Wevers, R.A.; Morava, E.

    2011-01-01

    Cutis laxa is a rare skin disorder characterized by wrinkled, redundant, inelastic and sagging skin due to defective synthesis of elastic fibers and other proteins of the extracellular matrix. Wrinkled, inelastic skin occurs in many cases as an acquired condition. Syndromic forms of cutis laxa, howe

  5. Kartagener′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip V Potdar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchiectasis may have varied etiologies. In patients presenting in middle or old age with bronchiectasis, congenital and hereditary causes of bronchiectasis are not commonly encountered. In majority of adult patients, bronchiectasis follows necrotizing infection. We report a case of Kartagener′s syndrome in a female patient diagnosed in her sixties.

  6. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, A K; Garg, R; Ritch, A; Sarkar, P

    2007-07-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is an autonomic disturbance which has become better understood in recent years. It is now thought to encompass a group of disorders that have similar clinical features, such as orthostatic intolerance, but individual distinguishing parameters--for example, blood pressure and pulse rate. The clinical picture, diagnosis, and management of POTS are discussed.

  7. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-14

    Dr. Adam MacNeil, epidemiologist with Viral Special Pathogens Branch at CDC, discusses hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.  Created: 7/14/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  8. Doege-Potter Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, N; Attia, R; Green, A; Cane, P; Routledge, T

    2015-10-01

    Doege-Potter syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome presenting as a hypoinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia from the ectopic secretion of a prohormone of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) from a solitary fibrous tumour. Surgical resection is curative in the majority of cases. If, however, the diagnosis is not suspected and treatment is delayed, it can lead to hypoxic cerebral injury or death. The underlying tumour can be a benign or malignant pleural tumour but may be present in extrapleural sites. For a diagnosis of Doege-Potter syndrome, symptoms attributable to hypoglycaemia and low blood glucose levels should be present along with the secretion of prohormone IGF-II. We report a case of severe hypoglycaemia in a 76-year-old inpatient admitted for resection of a recurrent left-sided pleural tumour. Investigation revealed true hypoglycaemia and Doege-Potter syndrome was diagnosed. The tumour was completely resected and the patient made a full recovery with no further hypoglycaemic episodes.

  9. [Ovarian vein syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero Doria, R; Guzmán Valls, P; López Alba, J; Tomás Ros, M; Rico Galiano, J L; Fontana Compiano, L O

    1996-04-01

    The Ovarian Vein Syndrome has been the subject of controversy ever since first described as such by Clark in 1964. This is an uncommon entity within urologic sings and symptoms which appears as a recurrent nephritic colic coinciding with menstruation or during the immediately preceding days. The authors review a clinical case from our Urology Service, including some considerations on the case.

  10. Kraepelin-fraud syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraepelin, Emil; Freud, Sigmund; Healy, David

    2009-04-01

    Emil Kraepelin (1856-1926) and Sigmund Freud (1856-1936) here (via mysterious mediumistic mechanisms) describe a syndrome, which probably emerged in the 1950s, and can now readily be observed at medical conferences. At its core, the syndrome is comprised of extreme abilities to compartmentalise information of the type found in scientific conferences, an episodic preoccupation with the surface of a science but inability to appreciate its substance (episodic logosagnosia) and a mood state that is heavily dependent on gratification from the range of outlets available at modern conferences. Current estimates of the frequency of the condition are that there are approximately 20 full-blown psychopharmacological carriers of the syndrome per 100 million populations. This should yield a figure of 200 in Europe and North America. If a similar phenomenon applies in other branches of medicine this would yield a further 1200 affected individuals in Western medical circles. It is of pressing interest to establish whether the Kraepelin-Fraud Syndrome exists to any degree in non-medical science, and whether there are differences between those sciences with and without significant commercial applications.

  11. Tics through Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J H

    1991-06-01

    The concept of Tourette's syndrome as a bizarre and disabling disorder has changed with greater appreciation that this is a spectrum of symptoms and degrees of severity. A thorough understanding of the latest concepts regarding recognition and management is essential for the neuroscience nurse to play a meaningful role as counselor, educator and clinician in the care of these patients and families.

  12. Bladder pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, Philip; Nordling, Jørgen; Fall, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a deceptively intricate symptom complex that is diagnosed on the basis of chronic pelvic pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be related to the urinary bladder, accompanied by at least one other urinary symptom. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a patient who has...

  13. Marfan Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or she cannot compete (for example, if your child can't play in the soccer game, can he or she be the scorekeeper?). Encourage exercising. Staying active is important for everyone, including kids ... kids need to be kids! Children with Marfan syndrome need to play and laugh ...

  14. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Monica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS are a group of disorders that have in common an acute presentation with headache, reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries, with or without neurological signs and symptoms. In contrast to primary central nervous system vasculitis, they have a relatively benign course. We describe here a patient who was diagnosed with RCVS.

  15. Fatigue syndrome in sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Witold; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Most commonly it results in the formation of non-caseating granulomas in intrathoracic lymph nodes and lung parenchyma, but the clinical course and picture may be complicated by extrapulmonary involvement and many non-respiratory signs and symptoms which are directly related to the disease. In addition, sarcoidosis patients may suffer from a plethora of symptoms of uncertain or unknown origin. Fatigue is one of these symptoms, and according to some authors it is reported by the majority of patients with active sarcoidosis, but also by a smaller proportion of patients with inactive sarcoidosis, or even with complete clinical and radiological remission. Therefore the term fatigue syndrome is frequently used to name this clinical problem. The definition of fatigue syndrome in sarcoidosis is imprecise and the syndrome is usually recognized by use of validated questionnaires. In this review the uptodate knowledge in this field was presented and different challenges connected with this syndrome were described.

  16. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digestive diseases specialist (gastroenterologist). If you or your child is in the middle of a severe vomiting episode, the doctor may ... system disorders There's no cure for cyclic vomiting syndrome, so treatment ... may be prescribed: Anti-nausea drugs Sedatives Medications ...

  17. The Forgotten Syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Vita Fooken; Hansen, Michael Stormly; Møller, Martin Nue

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gradenigo's Syndrome (GS) is defined as the clinical triad of acute otitis media, ipsilateral sixth nerve palsy, and pain in the distribution of the first and the second branches of the fifth nerve. The purpose of this study is to review the literature and report 4 cases of GS. METHODS...

  18. Annotation: The Savant Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Pamela; Wallace, Gregory L.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Whilst interest has focused on the origin and nature of the savant syndrome for over a century, it is only within the past two decades that empirical group studies have been carried out. Methods: The following annotation briefly reviews relevant research and also attempts to address outstanding issues in this research area.…

  19. Subacromial impingement syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umer, M.; Qadir, I.; Azam, M.

    2012-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a matte

  20. National Down Syndrome Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DONATE HERE The ABLE Act is Now the Law of the Land! LEARN HOW TO PASS ABLE IN YOUR STATE! NDSS Your Way Join Our Independent Fundraising Program! The mission of the National Down Syndrome Society is to be the national advocate for the ...

  1. Antiphospohlipid syndrome in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Alvaro; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Khamashta, Munther

    2012-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterised by a variety of clinical and immunological manifestations. The clinical hallmarks of this syndrome are thrombosis and poor obstetric outcomes, including miscarriages, fetal loss and severe pre-eclampsia. The main antiphospholipid antibodies include lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin and anti-β2-glycoprotein I. The combination of aspirin and heparin is considered the standard of care for women with antiphospholipid syndrome and embryo-fetal losses; however, aspirin in monotherapy may have a place in women with recurrent early miscarriage. A good benefit-risk ratio of low-molecular-weight heparin in pregnancy thrombosis treatment has been reported. Warfarin must be avoided if possible throughout the first trimester of pregnancy. Adequate pregnancy management of women with antiphospholipid syndrome should include co-ordinated medical-obstetrical care, a close follow-up protocol and a good neonatal unit. Close blood pressure control and early detection of proteinuria, together with Doppler studies of the utero-placental circulation should be included in the management protocol.

  2. Trisomy 18 (Edwards Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Poureisa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Description and Definition "n"n Synonym: Edward syndrome Characterized by malformations of multiple organ systems, trisomy 18 has an incidence of 3 in 10000 live births. Abnormalities detectable by ultrasound Common findings Agenesis of the corpus callosum Choroid plexus cysts Posterior fossa abnormalities Micrognathia Low-set ears Microphthalmous Hypertelorism Short radial ray Clenched hand with overlapping index finger Clubbed foot Rocker-bottom foot Renal anomalies hydronephrosis Omphalocele Diaphragmatic hernia Cryptorchidism Heart defects Single umbilical artery Intrauterine growth restriction Polyhydramnios Nuchal lucency Occasional findings Meningomyelocele Ventriculomegaly Cleft lip and plate Major differential diagnoses Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (clenched hands and intrauterine growth restriction Pena Shokeir syndrome (pseudo-trisomy 18 Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (clenched hands and intrauterine grown restriction Triploidy (intrauterine growth restriction Trisomy 9 Other multiple malformation syndromes associated with intrauterine growth retardation, limb anomalies and/ or heart defects. Ultrasound diagnosis Prenatal; ultrasound diagnosis has been established in the first trimester, based on the finding of a nuchal lucency. Detectable features on the early second trimester include abnormal forearms, clenched hands, clubbed feet, omphalocele and a major heart defect. The features of trisomy 18 are detectable in 80% of affected fetuses in the second trimester. Sonography is often used to evaluate fetuses for the prsence of trisomy 18 when choroid plexus cysts are present, or when the triple screen results in a low level of maternal serum alpha- fetoprotein, estriol and human chorionic  gonadotropin combination. Although trisomy 18 occurs in 1 in 100 fetuses with choroid plexus cysts, if it is an isolated finding, the risk for trisomy 18 falls below 1 in 400. Documenting an open hand is very helpful as most fetuses with trisomy 18 are

  3. Childhood myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tathagata; Choudhry, V P

    2013-09-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) comprises of a heterogeneous group of bone marrow disorders resulting from a clonal stem cell defect characterised by cytopenias despite a relatively hypercellular marrow, ineffective hematopoiesis, morphological dysplasia in the marrow elements, no response to hematinics such as iron, B12 or folic acid and risk of progression to leukemia. Myelodysplastic syndrome in childhood is extremely rare and accounts for less than 5% of all hematopoietic neoplasms in children below the age of 14 y. The primary MDS in children, also known as de novo MDS differs from secondary MDS which generally follows congenital or acquired bone marrow (BM) failure syndromes as well as from therapy related MDS, commonly resulting from cytotoxic therapy. MDS associated with Down syndrome which accounts for approximately one-fourth of cases of childhood MDS is now considered a unique biologic entity synonymous with Down syndrome-related myeloid leukemia and is biologically distinct from other cases of childhood MDS. Refractory cytopenia of childhood (RCC) is the commonest type of MDS. Genetic changes predisposing to MDS in childhood remain largely obscure. Monosomy 7 is by-far the commonest cytogenetic abnormality associated with childhood MDS; however most cases of RCC show a normal karyotype. Complex cytogenetic abnormalities and trisomy 8 and trisomy 21 are also occasionally observed. The most effective and curative treatment is Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and this is particularly effective in children with the monosomy 7 genetic defect as well as those displaying complex karyotype abnormalities provided it is instituted early in the course of the disease.

  4. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiagarajan Ravi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoplastic left heart syndrome(HLHS refers to the abnormal development of the left-sided cardiac structures, resulting in obstruction to blood flow from the left ventricular outflow tract. In addition, the syndrome includes underdevelopment of the left ventricle, aorta, and aortic arch, as well as mitral atresia or stenosis. HLHS has been reported to occur in approximately 0.016 to 0.036% of all live births. Newborn infants with the condition generally are born at full term and initially appear healthy. As the arterial duct closes, the systemic perfusion becomes decreased, resulting in hypoxemia, acidosis, and shock. Usually, no heart murmur, or a non-specific heart murmur, may be detected. The second heart sound is loud and single because of aortic atresia. Often the liver is enlarged secondary to congestive heart failure. The embryologic cause of the disease, as in the case of most congenital cardiac defects, is not fully known. The most useful diagnostic modality is the echocardiogram. The syndrome can be diagnosed by fetal echocardiography between 18 and 22 weeks of gestation. Differential diagnosis includes other left-sided obstructive lesions where the systemic circulation is dependent on ductal flow (critical aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, interrupted aortic arch. Children with the syndrome require surgery as neonates, as they have duct-dependent systemic circulation. Currently, there are two major modalities, primary cardiac transplantation or a series of staged functionally univentricular palliations. The treatment chosen is dependent on the preference of the institution, its experience, and also preference. Although survival following initial surgical intervention has improved significantly over the last 20 years, significant mortality and morbidity are present for both surgical strategies. As a result pediatric cardiologists continue to be challenged by discussions with families regarding initial decision

  5. Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare and severe bowel disorder caused by mutation in SKIV2L or in TTC37, 2 genes encoding subunits of the putative human SKI complex. The estimated prevalence is 1/1,000,000 births and the transmission is autosomal recessive. The classical form is characterized by 5 clinical signs: intractable diarrhea of infancy beginning in the first month of life, usually leading to failure to thrive and requiring parenteral nutrition; facial dysmorphism characterised by prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism; hair abnormalities described as woolly and easily removable; immune disorders resulting from defective antibody production; intrauterine growth restriction. The aetiology is a defect in TTC37, a TPR containing protein, or in the RNA helicase SKIV2L, both constituting the putative human ski complex. The ski complex is a heterotetrameric cofactor of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome which ensures aberrants mRNAs decay. The diagnosis SD/THE is initially based on clinical findings and confirmed by direct sequencing of TTC37 and SKIV2L. Differential diagnosis with the other causes of intractable diarrhea is easily performed by pathologic investigations. During their clinical course, most of the children require parenteral nutrition and often immunoglobulin supplementation. With time, some of them can be weaned off parenteral nutrition and immunoglobulin supplementation. The prognosis depends on the management and is largely related to the occurrence of parenteral nutrition complications or infections. Even with optimal management, most of the children seem to experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Mild mental retardation is observed in half of the cases. Abstract in French Les diarrhées syndromiques ou syndrome tricho-hepato-enterique (SD/THE) sont un syndrome rare et sévère dont l’incidence est estimée à 1 cas pour 1 million de naissances et la transmission

  6. Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabre Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE is a rare and severe bowel disorder caused by mutation in SKIV2L or in TTC37, 2 genes encoding subunits of the putative human SKI complex. The estimated prevalence is 1/1,000,000 births and the transmission is autosomal recessive. The classical form is characterized by 5 clinical signs: intractable diarrhea of infancy beginning in the first month of life, usually leading to failure to thrive and requiring parenteral nutrition; facial dysmorphism characterised by prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism; hair abnormalities described as woolly and easily removable; immune disorders resulting from defective antibody production; intrauterine growth restriction. The aetiology is a defect in TTC37, a TPR containing protein, or in the RNA helicase SKIV2L, both constituting the putative human ski complex. The ski complex is a heterotetrameric cofactor of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome which ensures aberrants mRNAs decay. The diagnosis SD/THE is initially based on clinical findings and confirmed by direct sequencing of TTC37 and SKIV2L. Differential diagnosis with the other causes of intractable diarrhea is easily performed by pathologic investigations. During their clinical course, most of the children require parenteral nutrition and often immunoglobulin supplementation. With time, some of them can be weaned off parenteral nutrition and immunoglobulin supplementation. The prognosis depends on the management and is largely related to the occurrence of parenteral nutrition complications or infections. Even with optimal management, most of the children seem to experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Mild mental retardation is observed in half of the cases. Abstract in French Les diarrhées syndromiques ou syndrome tricho-hepato-enterique (SD/THE sont un syndrome rare et sévère dont l’incidence est estimée à 1 cas pour 1 million de naissances et la

  7. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome are cancer syndromes which affect multiple organs and lead to significant decline in quality of life in affected patients. These syndromes are rare and typically affect the adolescent and young adult population, resulting in greater cumulative years of life lost. Improved understanding of the underpinnings of the genetic pathways underlying these syndromes and the rapid evolution of targeted therapies in general have made it possible to develop therapeutic options for these patients and other genetic cancer syndromes. Targeted therapies especially antiangiogenics and inhibitors of the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway have shown activity in selected group of patients affected by these syndromes or in patients harboring specific sporadic mutations which are otherwise characteristic of these syndromes. Unfortunately due to the rare nature, patients with these syndromes are not the focus of clinical trials and unique results seen in these patients can easily go unnoticed. Most of the data suggesting benefits of targeted therapies are either case reports or small case series. Thus, a literature review was indicated. In this review we explore the use of molecularly targeted therapy options in Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

  8. Ectopic corticotroph syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penezić Zorana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a clinical state resulting from prolonged, inappropriate exposure to excessive endogenous secretion of Cortisol and hence excess circulating free cortisol, characterized by loss of the normal feedback mechanisms of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and the normal circadian rhythm of cortisol secretion [2]. The etiology of Cushing's syndrome may be excessive ACTH secretion from the pituitary gland, ectopic ACTH secretion by nonpituitary tumor, or excessive autonomous secretion of cortisol from a hyperfunctioning adrenal adenoma or carcinoma. Other than this broad ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent categories, the syndrome may be caused by ectopic CRH secretion, PPNAD, MAH, ectopic action of GIP or catecholamines, and other adrenel-dependent processes associated with adrenocortical hyperfunction. CASE REPORT A 31 year-old men with b-month history of hyperpigmentation, weight gain and proximal myopathy was refereed to Institute of Endocrinology for evaluation of hypercortisolism. At admission, patient had classic cushingoid habit with plethoric face, dermal and muscle atrophy, abdominal strie rubrae and centripetal obesity. The standard laboratory data showed hyperglycaemia and hypokaliemia with high potassium excretion level. The circadian rhythm of cortisol secretion was blunted, with moderately elevated ACTH level, and without cortisol suppression after low-dose and high-dose dexamethason suppression test. Urinary 5HIAA was elevated. Abdominal and sellar region magnetic resonance imaging was negative. CRH stimulation resulted in ACTH increase of 87% of basal, but without significant increase of cortisol level, only 7%. Thoracal CT scan revealed 14 mm mass in right apical pulmonary segment. A wedge resection of anterior segment of right upper lobe was performed. Microscopic evaluation showed tumor tissue consisting of solid areas of uniform, oval cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm and centrally

  9. Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Alexandre; Martinez-Vinson, Christine; Goulet, Olivier; Badens, Catherine

    2013-01-09

    Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare and severe bowel disorder caused by mutation in SKIV2L or in TTC37, 2 genes encoding subunits of the putative human SKI complex. The estimated prevalence is 1/1,000,000 births and the transmission is autosomal recessive. The classical form is characterized by 5 clinical signs: intractable diarrhea of infancy beginning in the first month of life, usually leading to failure to thrive and requiring parenteral nutrition; facial dysmorphism characterised by prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism; hair abnormalities described as woolly and easily removable; immune disorders resulting from defective antibody production; intrauterine growth restriction. The aetiology is a defect in TTC37, a TPR containing protein, or in the RNA helicase SKIV2L, both constituting the putative human ski complex. The ski complex is a heterotetrameric cofactor of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome which ensures aberrants mRNAs decay. The diagnosis SD/THE is initially based on clinical findings and confirmed by direct sequencing of TTC37 and SKIV2L. Differential diagnosis with the other causes of intractable diarrhea is easily performed by pathologic investigations. During their clinical course, most of the children require parenteral nutrition and often immunoglobulin supplementation. With time, some of them can be weaned off parenteral nutrition and immunoglobulin supplementation. The prognosis depends on the management and is largely related to the occurrence of parenteral nutrition complications or infections. Even with optimal management, most of the children seem to experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Mild mental retardation is observed in half of the cases.

  10. Myelodysplastic Syndrome Occurring in a Patient with Gorlin Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mull, Jamie L; Madden, Lisa M; Bayliss, Susan J

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) occurring in an African American boy with Gorlin syndrome with a novel PTCH1 mutation. Before developing MDS, the patient had been treated with chemotherapy and radiation for a medulloblastoma. He received a bone marrow transplant for the MDS and eventually died of treatment complications. Secondary hematologic malignancies are a known complication of certain chemotherapeutics, although whether a patient with Gorlin syndrome has a greater propensity for the development of such malignancies is unclear.

  11. A lethal syndrome resembling branchio-oculo-facial syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, A V; Torack, R; Dowton, S B

    1992-02-01

    Branchio-oculo-facial syndrome, a recently delineated autosomal dominant condition, is characterized by branchial cleft sinuses, ocular anomalies, and unusual facial appearance. A patient with branchial cleft fistulae, microphthalmia, nasomaxillary dysplasia, in addition to cardiac and CNS malformation (holoprosencephaly and meningo-encephalocele), is described. Although many features of this lethal malformation complex resemble those seen in the branchio-oculo-facial syndrome, the complex may represent a new multiple malformation syndrome.

  12. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic syndrome: the worrisome twosome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, D; Rasool, S

    2016-01-01

    By virtue of insulin resistance being the common etiology for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and metabolic syndrome, the cardiometabolic risks of these two syndromes are shared. The usual concerns of a PCOS patient are cosmetic or reproductive. However, there are more serious concerns past the reproductive age. Early treatment of insulin resistance, hypertension and hyperlipidemia reduces the long-term risk. This review highlights the unhealthy association of metabolic syndrome with PCOS and emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis, patient education and long-term follow-up beyond the reproductive age into menopause to prevent the long-term serious co-morbidities.

  13. Dangerous triplet: Polycystic ovary syndrome, oral contraceptives and Kounis syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nurdan; Erol; Aysu; Turkmen; Karaagac; Nicholas; G; Kounis

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is characterized by ovulatory dysfunction, androgen excess and polycystic ovaries and is associated with hypertension, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular events. Oral contraceptives constitute first-line treatment, particularly when symptomatic hyperandrogenism is present. However, these drugs are associated with cardiovascular events and hypersensitivity reactions that pose problem in differential diagnosis and therapy. We present a 14 year-old female with polycystic ovary syndrome taking oral contraceptive and suffering from recurrent coronary ischemic attacks with increased eosinophils, and troponin levels suggesting Kounis syndrome.

  14. [Recovery of Cushing syndrome revealing McCune-Albright syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halioui-Louhaichi, S; Dridi, Y; Azzabi, O; Selmi, I; Fetni, I; Siala, N; Maherzi, A

    2016-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) is a rare feature of McCune-Albright syndrome. Treatments consist of bilateral adrenalectomy followed by lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid treatment. However, cases of spontaneous remission of CS have been reported in the literature. We report a case of McCune-Albright syndrome with CS treated with metyrapone for 30 months with prolonged remission after a 12-year follow-up. Adrenalectomy may be avoided in some cases of CS caused by McCune-Albright syndrome. Metyrapone could be a good alternative to surgical treatment.

  15. Neurofibromatosis type 1 with overlap Turner syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Nihal; Kurtoglu, Selim; Kendirci, Mustafa; Keskin, Mehmet; Per, Hüseyin

    2010-02-01

    Turner's syndrome is a sex chromosome disorder. Klinefelter's syndrome is one of the most severe genetic diseases. Neurofibromatosis is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by cafe-au-lait spots and fibromatous tumors of the skin. In this article, we report the overlap of neurofibromatosis-1 with Turner and Klinefelter syndromes. Thus, these disorders might overlap within the same patient. Due to these cases, we suggest that each patient with Turner-like symptoms or Klinefelter's-like syndrome, be carefully examined for café au lait macules before the initiation of hormone replacement treatment.

  16. Metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome: an intriguing overlapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, Donatella; Adducchio, Gloria; Picchia, Simona; Ralli, Eleonora; Matteucci, Eleonora; Moscarini, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is an increasing pathology in adults and in children, due to a parallel rise of obesity. Sedentary lifestyle, food habits, cultural influences and also a genetic predisposition can cause dyslipidemia, hypertension, abdominal obesity and insulin resistance which are the two main features of metabolic syndrome. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition directly associated with obesity, insulin resistance (HOMA index) and metabolic syndrome, and it is very interesting for its relationship and overlap with the metabolic syndrome. The relationship between the two syndromes is mutual: PCOS women have a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome and also women with metabolic syndrome commonly present the reproductive/endocrine trait of PCOS. Prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome and PCOS are similar for various aspects. It is necessary to treat excess adiposity and insulin resistance, with the overall goals of preventing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes and improving reproductive failure in young women with PCOS. First of all, lifestyle changes, then pharmacological therapy, bariatric surgery and laparoscopic ovarian surgery represent the pillars for PCOS treatment.

  17. [Neurocutaneous syndrome with hair alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Martínez, F

    1997-09-01

    There are multiple neurocutaneous syndromes that may show hair alterations such as the interglabellar peak or 'widow's peak', which is an alteration of the hair implantation, in addition to the genohypotrichosis, hypertrichosis and hair shaft dysplasias. In this chapter we will focus on the latter. Out of the unspecific hair shaft dysplasias the only ones showing neurological alterations are trichorrhexis invaginata, observed in the syndrome of Netherton. Among the specific dysplasias we would like to point out monilethrix, and very especially the moniliform hair syndrome, the trichorrhexis nodosa, the pili torti and trichotiodystrophy. The latter is actually a group of syndromes which associates a series of diverse symptoms that have in common hair brittleness, fertility problems and physical and mental retardation, and they constitute the basic syndrome know as 'BIDS syndrome.

  18. Waardenburg Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayrullah Alp

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Auditory-pigmentary syndromes are a group of diseases that effect the skin, hair, eyes and the cochlea. Waardenburg syndrome is one of the members of these autosomal dominantly inherited diseases. Waardenburg syndrome is characterized by white forelock, congenital sensorineural hearing loss, hypopigmented skin and anomalies of the intraocular tissues. How ever all these diagnostic features may not be seen in all patient. In addition, there are four subtypes of the syndrome in each of which the genetic and clinical findings are different. Case Report: In this article, a-3-year old boy with Waardenburg syndrome Type 1 was described. Also, in some of the family members the same disease was diagnosed. Conclusion: Waardenburg syndrome should be evaluated in the patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss accompanied with the clinical findings. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 123-6

  19. Metabolic syndrome, androgens, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2011-04-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with increases in androgen levels. In men, reductions in androgen levels are associated with inflammation, and androgen supplements reduce inflammation. In women, increases in androgens are associated with increases in inflammatory cytokines, and reducing androgens reduces inflammation. This review discusses the possibility that the effects of androgens on metabolic syndrome and its sequelae may differ between males and females.

  20. Johanson-Blizzard syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nabeel Almashraki; Mukarram Zainuddin Abdulnabee; Maja Sukalo; Abdullah Alrajoudi; Iman Sharafadeen; Martin Zenker

    2011-01-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, hypoplastic or aplastic nasal alae, cutis aplasia on the scalp, and other features including developmental delay, failure to thrive, hearing loss, mental retardation, hypothyroidism, dental abnormalities, and anomalies in cardiac and genitourinary systems. More than 60 cases of this syndrome have been reported to date. We describe the case of a male infant with typical symptoms of JBS. In addition, a new clinical feature which has not previously been documented, that is anemia requiring frequent blood transfusions and mild to moderate thrombocytopenia was observed. A molecular study was performed which revealed a novel homozygous UBR1 mutation. Possible explanations for this new association are discussed.