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Sample records for acyl-coa metabolism induces

  1. Disruption of the acyl-coa binding protein gene delays hepatic adaptation to metabolic changes at weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neess, Ditte; Bloksgaard, Maria; Sørensen, Signe Bek;

    2011-01-01

    , little is known about the in vivo function in mammalian cells. We have generated mice with targeted disruption of ACBP (ACBP-/-). These mice are viable and fertile and develop normally. However, around weaning the ACBP-/- mice go through a crisis with overall weakness, and a slightly decreased growth...... rate. Using microarray analysis we show that the liver of ACBP-/- mice display a significantly delayed adaptation to weaning with late induction of target genes of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) family. As a result, hepatic de novo cholesterogenesis is decreased at weaning....... The delayed induction of SREBP target genes around weaning is caused by a compromised processing and decreased expression of SREBP precursors leading to reduced binding of SREBP to target sites in chromatin. In conclusion, lack of ACBP interferes with the normal metabolic adaptation to weaning and leads...

  2. EFFECT OF FREE FATTY ACIDS ON LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE 1 EXPRESSION LEVEL AND LIPID METABOLISM IN LIVER CELLS%游离脂肪酸对肝细胞ACSL1表达及相关脂代谢的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳; 施文荣; 洪振丰; 郑海音; 李颖

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究游离脂肪酸(FFA)的诱导对L02肝细胞长链脂酰CoA合成酶1(ACSL1)的表达及相关代谢的影响.方法 用含不同浓度(0.2、0.4、0.8 mmol/L) FFA的培养液诱导L02细胞48 h,Western blot检测ACSL1蛋白水平,荧光定量PCR检测ACSL1 mRNA水平,比色法测定甘油三酯(TG)含量、ATP水平和培养上清FFA浓度变化,生化法测定酮体含量和培养上清葡萄糖浓度变化.结果 FFA的诱导可显著提高ACSL1蛋白表达水平(P<0.01),但对ACSL1 mRNA水平无明显影响(P>0.05),细胞内TG含量显著升高(P<0.01或P<0.05),酮体含量显著升高(P<0.05),培养上清葡萄糖消耗显著增加(P<0.01),胞内ATP水平无明显变化(P>0.05),与0.2 mmol/L、0.4 mmol/L FFA组相比,0.8 mmol/L FFA组培养上清FFA消耗显著增加(P<0.01或P<0.05).结论 FFA通过上调ACSL1蛋白表达水平致肝细胞TG蓄积.%Objective To investigate the effect of free fatty acids (FFA) on long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase l(ACSL1) expression level and lipid metabolism in L02 cells.Methods The cells were treated by FFA (0.2,0.4,0.8 mmol/L) for 48 h.ACSL1 mRNA level was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and protein level by Western blotting.Cellular triglyceride (TG),ketone bodies (Ket),ATP and consumption of FFA and glucose in culture supernatant were measured.Results Compared with normal control group,treatment of L02 cells with FFA did not affect ACSL1 mRNA expression level but significantly increased ACSL1 protein expression level.TG content,Ket level and consumption of glucose in culture supernatant were significantly higher and ATP level was not affected.Compared with 0.2 and 0.4 mmol/L FFA group,the consumption of FFA in culture supernatant was significantly higher in treatment with 0.8 mmol/L FFA.Conclusion FFA induced intracellular TG accumulation by up-regulating ACSL1 protein level in L02 cells.

  3. Arabidopsis CER8 encodes LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE 1 (LACS1) that has overlapping functions with LACS2 in plant wax and cutin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Shiyou; Song, Tao; Kosma, Dylan K; Parsons, Eugene P; Rowland, Owen; Jenks, Matthew A

    2009-08-01

    Plant cuticle is an extracellular lipid-based matrix of cutin and waxes, which covers aerial organs and protects them from many forms of environmental stress. We report here the characterization of CER8/LACS1, one of nine Arabidopsis long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases thought to activate acyl chains. Mutations in LACS1 reduced the amount of wax in all chemical classes on the stem and leaf, except in the very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) class wherein acids longer than 24 carbons (C(24)) were elevated more than 155%. The C(16) cutin monomers on lacs1 were reduced by 37% and 22%, whereas the C(18) monomers were increased by 28% and 20% on stem and leaf, respectively. Amounts of wax and cutin on a lacs1-1 lacs2-3 double mutant were much lower than on either parent, and lacs1-1 lacs2-3 had much higher cuticular permeability than either parent. These additive effects indicate that LACS1 and LACS2 have overlapping functions in both wax and cutin synthesis. We demonstrated that LACS1 has synthetase activity for VLCFAs C(20)-C(30), with highest activity for C(30) acids. LACS1 thus appears to function as a very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase in wax metabolism. Since C(16) but not C(18) cutin monomers are reduced in lacs1, and C(16) acids are the next most preferred acid (behind C(30)) by LACS1 in our assays, LACS1 also appears to be important for the incorporation of C(16) monomers into cutin polyester. As such, LACS1 defines a functionally novel acyl-CoA synthetase that preferentially modifies both VLCFAs for wax synthesis and long-chain (C(16)) fatty acids for cutin synthesis.

  4. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marken Lichtenbelt, W.D.; Daanen, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cold-induced metabolism. van Marken Lichtenbelt WD, Daanen HA. Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesi

  5. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic respon

  6. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs' characteristics.

  7. Cerebral energy metabolism during induced mitochondrial dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Bindslev, TT; Pedersen, S M

    2013-01-01

    In patients with traumatic brain injury as well as stroke, impaired cerebral oxidative energy metabolism may be an important factor contributing to the ultimate degree of tissue damage. We hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction can be diagnosed bedside by comparing the simultaneous changes in...... in brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) and cerebral cytoplasmatic redox state. The study describes cerebral energy metabolism during mitochondrial dysfunction induced by sevoflurane in piglets....

  8. Pharmacologically-induced metabolic acidosis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamis, George; Milionis, Haralampos J; Elisaf, Moses

    2010-05-01

    Metabolic acidosis may occasionally develop in the course of treatment with drugs used in everyday clinical practice, as well as with the exposure to certain chemicals. Drug-induced metabolic acidosis, although usually mild, may well be life-threatening, as in cases of lactic acidosis complicating antiretroviral therapy or treatment with biguanides. Therefore, a detailed medical history, with special attention to the recent use of culprit medications, is essential in patients with acid-base derangements. Effective clinical management can be handled through awareness of the adverse effect of certain pharmaceutical compounds on the acid-base status. In this review, we evaluate relevant literature with regard to metabolic acidosis associated with specific drug treatment, and discuss the clinical setting and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. These mechanisms involve renal inability to excrete the dietary H+ load (including types I and IV renal tubular acidoses), metabolic acidosis owing to increased H+ load (including lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis, ingestion of various substances, administration of hyperalimentation solutions and massive rhabdomyolysis) and metabolic acidosis due to HCO3- loss (including gastrointestinal loss and type II renal tubular acidosis). Determinations of arterial blood gases, the serum anion gap and, in some circumstances, the serum osmolar gap are helpful in delineating the pathogenesis of the acid-base disorder. In all cases of drug-related metabolic acidosis, discontinuation of the culprit medications and avoidance of readministration is advised.

  9. Bactericidal antibiotics induce programmed metabolic toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aislinn D. Rowan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The misuse of antibiotics has led to the development and spread of antibiotic resistance in clinically important pathogens. These resistant infections are having a significant impact on treatment outcomes and contribute to approximately 25,000 deaths in the U.S. annually. If additional therapeutic options are not identified, the number of annual deaths is predicted to rise to 317,000 in North America and 10,000,000 worldwide by 2050. Identifying therapeutic methodologies that utilize our antibiotic arsenal more effectively is one potential way to extend the useful lifespan of our current antibiotics. Recent studies have indicated that modulating metabolic activity is one possible strategy that can impact the efficacy of antibiotic therapy. In this review, we will address recent advances in our knowledge about the impacts of bacterial metabolism on antibiotic effectiveness and the impacts of antibiotics on bacterial metabolism. We will particularly focus on two studies, Lobritz, et al. (PNAS, 112(27: 8173-8180 and Belenky et al. (Cell Reports, 13(5: 968–980 that together demonstrate that bactericidal antibiotics induce metabolic perturbations that are linked to and required for bactericidal antibiotic toxicity.

  10. Gene expression in plant lipid metabolism in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Shan Hsiao

    Full Text Available Events in plant lipid metabolism are important during seedling establishment. As it has not been experimentally verified whether lipid metabolism in 2- and 5-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings is diurnally-controlled, quantitative real-time PCR analysis was used to investigate the expression of target genes in acyl-lipid transfer, β-oxidation and triacylglycerol (TAG synthesis and hydrolysis in wild-type Arabidopsis WS and Col-0. In both WS and Col-0, ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN3 (ACBP3, DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE1 (DGAT1 and DGAT3 showed diurnal control in 2- and 5-day-old seedlings. Also, COMATOSE (CTS was diurnally regulated in 2-day-old seedlings and LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE6 (LACS6 in 5-day-old seedlings in both WS and Col-0. Subsequently, the effect of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1 and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY from the core clock system was examined using the cca1lhy mutant and CCA1-overexpressing (CCA1-OX lines versus wild-type WS and Col-0, respectively. Results revealed differential gene expression in lipid metabolism between 2- and 5-day-old mutant and wild-type WS seedlings, as well as between CCA1-OX and wild-type Col-0. Of the ACBPs, ACBP3 displayed the most significant changes between cca1lhy and WS and between CCA1-OX and Col-0, consistent with previous reports that ACBP3 is greatly affected by light/dark cycling. Evidence of oil body retention in 4- and 5-day-old seedlings of the cca1lhy mutant in comparison to WS indicated the effect of cca1lhy on storage lipid reserve mobilization. Lipid profiling revealed differences in primary lipid metabolism, namely in TAG, fatty acid methyl ester and acyl-CoA contents amongst cca1lhy, CCA1-OX, and wild-type seedlings. Taken together, this study demonstrates that lipid metabolism is subject to diurnal regulation in the early stages of seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  11. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Quynh Trang Pham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs’ characteristics.

  12. Fuel utilization in patients with very long-chain acyl-coa dehydrogenase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ØRngreen, Mette C; Nørgaard, Mette; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    Fuel utilization in two adult patients with the myopathic form of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency and five healthy subjects was investigated with stable isotopes during exercise at 50% of VO2max. The findings indicate that residual VLCAD activity in the patients...

  13. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  14. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome : Improving outcome with lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, M. D. N. L.; Nuver, J.; Lefrandt, J. D.; Vrieling, A. H.; Gietema, J. A.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of long-term cancer survivors face important treatment related adverse effects. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome (CTIMetS) is an especially prevalent and harmful condition. The aetiology of CTIMetS likely differs from metabolic syndrome in the general population, but ef

  15. Magnesium Oxide Induced Metabolic Alkalosis in Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvie, T H; Butler, D G; Gartley, C J; Dohoo, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    A study was designed to compare the metabolic alkalosis produced in cattle from the use of an antacid (magnesium oxide) and a saline cathartic (magnesium sulphate). Six, mature, normal cattle were treated orally with a magnesium oxide (MgO) product and one week later given a comparable cathartic dose of magnesium sulphate (MgSO4).

  16. Metabolic acidosis-induced insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Gema; Donapetry, Cristóbal; Calviño, Jesús; Adeva, Maria M

    2011-08-01

    Microalbuminuria has been conclusively established as an independent cardiovascular risk factor, and there is evidence of an association between insulin resistance and microalbuminuria, the former preceding the latter in prospective studies. It has been demonstrated that even the slightest degree of metabolic acidosis produces insulin resistance in healthy humans. Many recent epidemiological studies link metabolic acidosis indicators with insulin resistance and systemic hypertension. The strongly acidogenic diet consumed in developed countries produces a lifetime acidotic state, exacerbated by excess body weight and aging, which may result in insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes, contributing to cardiovascular risk, along with genetic causes, lack of physical exercise, and other factors. Elevated fruits and vegetables consumption has been associated with lower diabetes incidence. Diseases featuring severe atheromatosis and elevated cardiovascular risk, such as diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney failure, are typically characterized by a chronic state of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic patients consume particularly acidogenic diets, and deficiency of insulin action generates ketone bodies, creating a baseline state of metabolic acidosis worsened by inadequate metabolic control, which creates a vicious circle by inducing insulin resistance. Even very slight levels of chronic kidney insufficiency are associated with increased cardiovascular risk, which may be explained at least in part by deficient acid excretory capacity of the kidney and consequent metabolic acidosis-induced insulin resistance.

  17. Secondary psychosis induced by metabolic disorders

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    Olivier eBonnot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders are not well recognized by psychiatrists as a possible source of secondary psychoses. Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs are not frequent. Although, their prompt diagnosis may lead to suitable treatments. IEMs are well known to paediatricians, in particular for their most serious forms, having an early expression most of the time. Recent years discoveries have unveiled later expression forms, and sometimes, very discreet first physical signs. There is a growing body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that IEMs can manifest as atypical psychiatric symptoms, even in the absence of clear neurological symptoms. In the present review, we propose a detailed overview at schizophrenia-like and autism-like symptoms that can lead practitioners to bear in mind an IEM. Other psychiatric manifestations are also found, as behavioral., cognitive, learning and mood disorders. However, they are less frequent. Ensuring an accurate IEM diagnosis, in front of these psychiatric symptoms should be a priority, in order to grant suitable and valuable treatment for these pathologies.

  18. Implication of snail in metabolic stress-induced necrosis.

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    Cho Hee Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Necrosis, a type of cell death accompanied by the rupture of the plasma membrane, promotes tumor progression and aggressiveness by releasing the pro-inflammatory and angiogenic cytokine high mobility group box 1. It is commonly found in the core region of solid tumors due to hypoxia and glucose depletion (GD resulting from insufficient vascularization. Thus, metabolic stress-induced necrosis has important clinical implications for tumor development; however, its regulatory mechanisms have been poorly investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that the transcription factor Snail, a key regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is induced in a reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent manner in both two-dimensional culture of cancer cells, including A549, HepG2, and MDA-MB-231, in response to GD and the inner regions of a multicellular tumor spheroid system, an in vitro model of solid tumors and of human tumors. Snail short hairpin (sh RNA inhibited metabolic stress-induced necrosis in two-dimensional cell culture and in multicellular tumor spheroid system. Snail shRNA-mediated necrosis inhibition appeared to be linked to its ability to suppress metabolic stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition, which are the primary events that trigger necrosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Snail is implicated in metabolic stress-induced necrosis, providing a new function for Snail in tumor progression.

  19. Perinatal programming of metabolic dysfunction and obesity-induced inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Camilla; Hellgren, Lars; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    The number of obese women in the childbearing age is drastically increasing globally. As a consequence, more children are born by obese mothers. Unfortunately, maternal obesity and/ or high fat intake during pregnancy increase the risk of developing obesity, type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease...... and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in the children, which passes obesity and metabolic dysfunction on from generation to generation. Several studies try to elucidate causative effects of maternal metabolic markers on the metabolic imprinting in the children; however diet induced obesity is also......, we suggest that an early elevated lipid exposure caused by a maternal high fat feeding might be more important for long term metabolic imprinting in the offspring. Therefore, we study the effect of maternal high fat/high sucrose diet during gestation, lactation or both to elucidate if perinatal...

  20. AMPKα in Exercise-Induced Substrate Metabolism and Exercise Training-Induced Metabolic and Mitochondrial Adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz, Joachim

    A bout of exercise potently stimulates skeletal muscle energy metabolism. The ATP turnover may rise up to0 ~100 fold compared to the resting state and this presents a substantial stress on skeletal muscle ATP regeneration. To prepare for future events of metabolic stress, the muscle increases its...

  1. Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina

    2015-09-03

    Background Protein aggregation and its pathological effects are the major cause of several neurodegenerative diseases. In Huntington’s disease an elongated stretch of polyglutamines within the protein Huntingtin leads to increased aggregation propensity. This induces cellular defects, culminating in neuronal loss, but the connection between aggregation and toxicity remains to be established. Results To uncover cellular pathways relevant for intoxication we used genome-wide analyses in a yeast model system and identify fourteen genes that, if deleted, result in higher polyglutamine toxicity. Several of these genes, like UGO1, ATP15 and NFU1 encode mitochondrial proteins, implying that a challenged mitochondrial system may become dysfunctional during polyglutamine intoxication. We further employed microarrays to decipher the transcriptional response upon polyglutamine intoxication, which exposes an upregulation of genes involved in sulfur and iron metabolism and mitochondrial Fe-S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth is impossible after intoxication with the polyglutamine protein. NMR-based metabolic analyses reveal that mitochondrial metabolism is reduced, leading to accumulation of metabolic intermediates in polyglutamine-intoxicated cells. Conclusion These data show that damages to the mitochondrial system occur in polyglutamine intoxicated yeast cells and suggest an intricate connection between polyglutamine-induced toxicity, mitochondrial functionality and iron homeostasis in this model system.

  2. Metabolic reprogramming induced by ketone bodies diminishes pancreatic cancer cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Aberrant energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. To fulfill the increased energy requirements, tumor cells secrete cytokines/factors inducing muscle and fat degradation in cancer patients, a condition known as cancer cachexia. It accounts for nearly 20% of all cancer-related deaths. However, the mechanistic basis of cancer cachexia and therapies targeting cancer cachexia thus far remain elusive. A ketogenic diet, a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet that elevates circulating lev...

  3. Stereoselective propranolol metabolism in two drug induced rat hepatic microsomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Li; Su Zeng

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the influence of inducers BNF and PB on the stereoselective metabolism of propranolol in rat hepatic microsomes.METHODS Phase Ⅰ metabolism of propranolol was studied by using the microsomes induced by BNF and PB and the non-induced microsome as the control. The enzymatic kinetic parameters of propranolol enantiomers were calculated by regression analysis of Lineweaver-Burk plots.Propranolol concentrations were assayed by HPLC.RESULTS A RP-HPLC method was developed to determine propranolol concentration in rat hepatic microsomes. The linearity equations for R( + )-propranolol and S ( - )-propranolol were A=705.7C+ 311.2C (R =0.9987) and A=697.2C +311.4C (R = 0.9970) respectively. Recoveries of each enantiomer were 98.9%, 99.5%, 101.0% at 60 μmol/L, 120 μmol/L, 240 μmol/L respectively. At the concentration level of 120 μmol/L, propranolol enantiomers were metabolized at different rates in different microsomes. The concentration ratio R (+)/S (-) of control and PB induced microsomes increased with time, whereas that of microsome induced by BNF decreased. The assayed enzyme parameters were: 1. Km. Control group: R( + )30±8, S( - )18 ± 5; BNF group: R( + )34 ± 3, S (-)39±7; PB group: R(+)38±17, S(-)36± 10.2. Vmax. Control group: R(+ )1.5 ±0.2, S( - )2.9±0.3; BNF group: R(+)3.8±0.3, S(-)3.3±0.5; PB group: R( + )0.07±0.03, S( - )1.94±0.07.3.Clint. Control group: R( + )60±3, S(- )170±30; BNF group: R( + )111.0 ±1, S(- ) 84±5; PB group: R(+)2.0 ± 2, S(- )56.0 ± 1. The enzyme parameters compared with unpaired t tests showed that no stereoselectivity was observed in enzymatic affinity of three microsomes to enantiomers and their catalytic abilitieswere quite different and had stereoselectivities. Compared with the control,microsome induced by BNF enhanced enzyme activity to propranolol R ( + )-enantiomer, and microsome induced by PB showed less enzyme activity to propranolol S(- )-enantiomer which remains the same stereoselectivities as

  4. Elicitor-induced transcription factors for metabolic reprogramming of secondary metabolism in Medicago truncatula

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    Dixon Richard A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure of Medicago truncatula cell suspension cultures to pathogen or wound signals leads to accumulation of various classes of flavonoid and/or triterpene defense molecules, orchestrated via a complex signalling network in which transcription factors (TFs are essential components. Results In this study, we analyzed TFs responding to yeast elicitor (YE or methyl jasmonate (MJ. From 502 differentially expressed TFs, WRKY and AP2/EREBP gene families were over-represented among YE-induced genes whereas Basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH family members were more over-represented among the MJ-induced genes. Jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ transcriptional regulators were highly induced by MJ treatment. To investigate potential involvement of WRKY TFs in signalling, we expressed four Medicago WRKY genes in tobacco. Levels of soluble and wall bound phenolic compounds and lignin were increased in all cases. WRKY W109669 also induced tobacco endo-1,3-β-glucanase (NtPR2 and enhanced the systemic defense response to tobacco mosaic virus in transgenic tobacco plants. Conclusion These results confirm that Medicago WRKY TFs have broad roles in orchestrating metabolic responses to biotic stress, and that they also represent potentially valuable reagents for engineering metabolic changes that impact pathogen resistance.

  5. Artificial sweeteners produce the counterintuitive effect of inducing metabolic derangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swithers, Susan E

    2013-09-01

    The negative impact of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages on weight and other health outcomes has been increasingly recognized; therefore, many people have turned to high-intensity sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, and saccharin as a way to reduce the risk of these consequences. However, accumulating evidence suggests that frequent consumers of these sugar substitutes may also be at increased risk of excessive weight gain, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. This paper discusses these findings and considers the hypothesis that consuming sweet-tasting but noncaloric or reduced-calorie food and beverages interferes with learned responses that normally contribute to glucose and energy homeostasis. Because of this interference, frequent consumption of high-intensity sweeteners may have the counterintuitive effect of inducing metabolic derangements.

  6. Tidal switch on metabolic activity: Salinity induced responses on bacterioplankton metabolic capabilities in a tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thottathil, S.D.; Balachandran, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Gupta, G.V.M.; Nair, S.

    for the present study, as it receives 35% of the total freshwater discharge through the River Periyar (Srinivas et al., 2003). Moreover, a fertilizer factory situated in the upstream north forms a major source of ammonia in the study region (Joy et al., 1990... mouth of the estuary. On the other hand, PCA indicates that amino/carboxylic acids are support- ing community metabolism at high salinity (Table 2). This shift can be due to the availability of substrates which induce bacterial cells to synthesize ecto...

  7. POTENTIAL OF INDUCED METABOLIC BIOLUMINESCENCE IMAGING TO UNCOVER METABOLIC EFFECTS OF ANTI-ANGIOGENIC THERAPY IN TUMORS

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    Stefano eIndraccolo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity at the genetic level has been illustrated by a multitude of studies on the genomics of cancer, but whether tumors can be heterogeneous at the metabolic level is an issue which has been less systematically investigated so far. A burning related question is whether the metabolic features of tumors can change either following natural tumor progression (i.e. in primary tumors versus metastasis or therapeutic interventions. In this regard, recent findings by independent teams indicate that anti-angiogenic drugs cause metabolic perturbations in tumors as well as metabolic adaptations associated with increased malignancy. Induced metabolic bioluminescence imaging (imBI is an imaging technique which enables detection of key metabolites associated with glycolysis, including lactate, glucose, pyruvate and ATP in tumor sections. Signals captured by imBI can be used to visualize the topographic distribution of these metabolites and quantify their absolute amount. ImBI can be very useful for metabolic classification of tumors as well as to track metabolic changes in the glycolytic pathway associated with certain therapies. Imaging of the metabolic changes induced by anti-angiogenic drugs in tumors by imBI or other emerging technologies is a valuable tool to uncover molecular sensors engaged by metabolic stress and offers an opportunity to understand how metabolism-based approaches could improve cancer therapy.

  8. Copper and zinc metabolism in aminonucleoside-induced nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza-Chaverrí, J; Torres-Rodríguez, G A; Cruz, C; Mainero, A; Tapia, E; Ibarra-Rubio, M E; Silencio, J L

    1994-01-01

    Copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) were measured in urine, serum and tissues from rats with nephrotic syndrome (NS) induced with a single subcutaneous dose of puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN; 15 mg/100 g BW). Control animals were pair-fed. Urine was collected daily, and the rats were sacrificed on day 10. PAN-nephrotic rats had proteinuria (days 3-10), high urinary Cu (days 1, 2, 4-10) and Zn (days 3-10) excretion. On day 10, nephrotic rats had: (a) albuminuria, hypoalbuminemia, hypoproteinemia, high urine and low serum levels of ceruloplasmin; (b) low Cu and Zn serum levels; (c) high clearance and fractional excretion of Cu and Zn, and (d) low kidney and liver Cu content and essentially normal tissue Zn levels. The alterations in Cu metabolism were more intense than those in Zn metabolism. Urine Cu and Zn showed a positive correlation with urine total protein on days 3-10 which suggests that high urinary excretion of Cu and Zn may be due to the excretion of its carrier proteins. In conclusion, these rats did not show a typical Zn deficiency but a clear decrease in Cu in the liver and kidney.

  9. REPEATED ACUTE STRESS INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM IN RAT

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    Nirupama R.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute stress induced alterations in the activity levels of rate limiting enzymes and concentration of intermediates of different pathways of carbohydrate metabolism have been studied. Adult male Wistar rats were restrained (RS for 1 h and after an interval of 4 h they were subjected to forced swimming (FS exercise and appropriate controls were maintained. Five rats were killed before the commencement of the experiment (initial controls, 5 control and equal number of stressed rats were killed 2 h after RS and remaining 5 rats in each group were killed 4 h after FS. There was a significant increase in the adrenal 3β- hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase activity following RS, which showed further increase after FS compared to controls and thereby indicated stress response of rats. There was a significant increase in the blood glucose levels following RS which showed further increase and reached hyperglycemic condition after FS. The hyperglycemic condition due to stress was accompanied by significant increases in the activities of glutamate- pyruvate transaminase, glutamate- oxaloacetate transaminase, glucose -6- phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase and significant decrease in the glucose -6- phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities, whereas pyruvate kinase activity did not show any alteration compared to controls. Further, the glycogen and total protein contents of the liver were decreased whereas those of pyruvate and lactate showed significant increase compared to controls after RS as well as FS.The results put together indicate that acute stress induced hyperglycemia results due to increased gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis without alteration in glycolysis. The study first time reveals that after first acute stress exposure, the subsequent stressful experience augments metabolic stress response leading to hyperglycemia. The results have relevance to human health as human beings are exposed to several stressors in a day and

  10. Intermittent hypoxia exacerbates metabolic effects of diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drager, Luciano F; Li, Jianguo; Reinke, Christian; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Jun, Jonathan C; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2011-11-01

    Obesity causes insulin resistance (IR) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but the relative contribution of sleep apnea is debatable. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a hallmark of sleep apnea, on IR and NAFLD in lean mice and mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO). Mice (C57BL/6J), 6-8 weeks of age were fed a high fat (n = 18) or regular (n = 16) diet for 12 weeks and then exposed to CIH or control conditions (room air) for 4 weeks. At the end of the exposure, fasting (5 h) blood glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index, liver enzymes, and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (1 g/kg) were measured. In DIO mice, body weight remained stable during CIH and did not differ from control conditions. Lean mice under CIH were significantly lighter than control mice by day 28 (P = 0.002). Compared to lean mice, DIO mice had higher fasting levels of blood glucose, plasma insulin, the HOMA index, and had glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis at baseline. In lean mice, CIH slightly increased HOMA index (from 1.79 ± 0.13 in control to 2.41 ± 0.26 in CIH; P = 0.05), whereas glucose tolerance was not affected. In contrast, in DIO mice, CIH doubled HOMA index (from 10.1 ± 2.1 in control to 22.5 ± 3.6 in CIH; P < 0.01), and induced severe glucose intolerance. In DIO mice, CIH induced NAFLD, inflammation, and oxidative stress, which was not observed in lean mice. In conclusion, CIH exacerbates IR and induces steatohepatitis in DIO mice, suggesting that CIH may account for metabolic dysfunction in obesity.

  11. Exercise-induced albuminuria is related to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Sharon; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Rogowski, Ori; Shapira, Itzhak; Zeltser, David; Weinstein, Talia; Lahav, Dror; Vered, Jaffa; Tovia-Brodie, Oholi; Arbel, Yaron; Berliner, Shlomo; Milwidsky, Assi

    2016-06-01

    Microalbuminuria (MA) is a known marker for endothelial dysfunction and future cardiovascular events. Exercise-induced albuminuria (EiA) may precede the appearance of MA. Associations between EiA and metabolic syndrome (MS) have not been assessed so far. Our aim was to investigate this association in a large sample of apparently healthy individuals with no baseline albuminuria. This was a cross-sectional study of 2,027 adults with no overt cardiovascular diseases who took part in a health survey program and had no baseline MA. Diagnosis of MS was based on harmonized criteria. All patients underwent an exercise test (Bruce protocol), and urinary albumin was measured before and after the examination. Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) values before and after exercise were 0.40 (0.21-0.89) and 1.06 (0.43-2.69) mg/g for median (interquartile range) respectively. A total of 394 (20%) subjects had EiA; ACR rose from normal rest values (0.79 mg/g) to 52.28 mg/g after exercise (P metabolic equivalents (P < 0.001), higher baseline blood pressure (P < 0.001), and higher levels of fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, and body mass index (P < 0.001). Multivariate binary logistic regression model showed that subjects with MS were 98% more likely to have EiA (95% confidence interval: 1.13-3.46, P = 0.016). In conclusion, EiA in the absence of baseline MA is independently related to MS.

  12. Colonization-Induced Host-Gut Microbial Metabolic Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claus, S.P.; Ellero, S.L.; Berger, B.; Krause, L.; Bruttin, A.; Molina, J.; Paris, A.; Want, E.J.; Waziers, de I.; Cloarec, O.; Richards, S.E.; Wang, Y.; Dumas, M.E.; Ross, A.; Rezzi, S.; Kochhar, S.; Bladeren, van P.J.; LindOn, J.C.; Holmes, E.; Nicholson, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    The gut microbiota enhances the host’s metabolic capacity for processing nutrients and drugs and modulate the activities of multiple pathways in a variety of organ systems. We have probed the systemic metabolic adaptation to gut colonization for 20 days following exposure of axenic mice (n = 35) to

  13. Fatty acid-inducible ANGPTL4 governs lipid metabolic response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catoire, Milène; Alex, Sheril; Paraskevopulos, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity increases energy metabolism in exercising muscle. Whether acute exercise elicits metabolic changes in nonexercising muscles remains unclear. We show that one of the few genes that is more highly induced in nonexercising muscle than in exercising human muscle during acute exercis...

  14. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Activity: Endocrine System Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine ...

  15. Hydroxytyrosol ameliorates metabolic, cardiovascular and liver changes in a rat model of diet-induced metabolic syndrome: Pharmacological and metabolism-based investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudyal, Hemant; Lemonakis, Nikolaos; Efentakis, Panagiotis; Gikas, Evangelos; Halabalaki, Maria; Andreadou, Ioanna; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Brown, Lindsay

    2017-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a clustering of interrelated risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The Mediterranean diet has been proposed as an important dietary pattern to confer cardioprotection by attenuating risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Hydroxytyrosol (HT) is present in olive fruit and oil, which are basic constituents of the Mediterranean diet. In this study, we have shown that treatment with HT (20mg/kg/d for 8 weeks) decreased adiposity, improved impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, improved endothelial function with lower systolic blood pressure, decreased left ventricular fibrosis and resultant diastolic stiffness and reduced markers of liver damage in a diet-induced rat model of metabolic syndrome. These results were accompanied by reduced infiltration of monocytes/macrophages into the heart with reduced biomarkers of oxidative stress. Furthermore, in an HRMS-based metabolism study of HT, we have identified 24 HT phase I and II metabolites, six of them being over-produced in high-starch, low-fat diet fed rats treated with HT compared to obese rats on high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet. These results provide direct evidence for cardioprotective effects of hydroxytyrosol by attenuation of metabolic risk factors. The implications of altered metabolism of HT in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet fed obese rats warrant further investigation.

  16. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  17. Bactericidal Antibiotics Induce Toxic Metabolic Perturbations that Lead to Cellular Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenky, Peter; Ye, Jonathan D; Porter, Caroline B M; Cohen, Nadia R; Lobritz, Michael A; Ferrante, Thomas; Jain, Saloni; Korry, Benjamin J; Schwarz, Eric G; Walker, Graham C; Collins, James J

    2015-11-03

    Understanding how antibiotics impact bacterial metabolism may provide insight into their mechanisms of action and could lead to enhanced therapeutic methodologies. Here, we profiled the metabolome of Escherichia coli after treatment with three different classes of bactericidal antibiotics (?-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones). These treatments induced a similar set of metabolic changes after 30 min that then diverged into more distinct profiles at later time points. The most striking changes corresponded to elevated concentrations of central carbon metabolites, active breakdown of the nucleotide pool, reduced lipid levels, and evidence of an elevated redox state. We examined potential end-target consequences of these metabolic perturbations and found that antibiotic-treated cells exhibited cytotoxic changes indicative of oxidative stress, including higher levels of protein carbonylation, malondialdehyde adducts, nucleotide oxidation, and double-strand DNA breaks. This work shows that bactericidal antibiotics induce a complex set of metabolic changes that are correlated with the buildup of toxic metabolic by-products.

  18. Homeobox gene Dlx-2 is implicated in metabolic stress-induced necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Sung-Chul

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to tumor-suppressive apoptosis and autophagic cell death, necrosis promotes tumor progression by releasing the pro-inflammatory and tumor-promoting cytokine high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, and its presence in tumor patients is associated with poor prognosis. Thus, necrosis has important clinical implications in tumor development; however, its molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. Results In the present study, we show that Distal-less 2 (Dlx-2, a homeobox gene of the Dlx family that is involved in embryonic development, is induced in cancer cell lines dependently of reactive oxygen species (ROS in response to glucose deprivation (GD, one of the metabolic stresses occurring in solid tumors. Increased Dlx-2 expression was also detected in the inner regions, which experience metabolic stress, of human tumors and of a multicellular tumor spheroid, an in vitro model of solid tumors. Dlx-2 short hairpin RNA (shRNA inhibited metabolic stress-induced increase in propidium iodide-positive cell population and HMGB1 and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, indicating the important role(s of Dlx-2 in metabolic stress-induced necrosis. Dlx-2 shRNA appeared to exert its anti-necrotic effects by preventing metabolic stress-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS, which are responsible for triggering necrosis. Conclusions These results suggest that Dlx-2 may be involved in tumor progression via the regulation of metabolic stress-induced necrosis.

  19. High-fat diet induces significant metabolic disorders in a mouse model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hao; Jia, Xiao; Yu, Qiuxiao; Zhang, Chenglu; Qiao, Jie; Guan, Youfei; Kang, Jihong

    2014-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common female endocrinopathy associated with both reproductive and metabolic disorders. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is currently used to induce a PCOS mouse model. High-fat diet (HFD) has been shown to cause obesity and infertility in female mice. The possible effect of an HFD on the phenotype of DHEA-induced PCOS mice is unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate both reproductive and metabolic features of DHEA-induced PCOS mice fed a normal chow or a 60% HFD. Prepubertal C57BL/6 mice (age 25 days) on the normal chow or an HFD were injected (s.c.) daily with the vehicle sesame oil or DHEA for 20 consecutive days. At the end of the experiment, both reproductive and metabolic characteristics were assessed. Our data show that an HFD did not affect the reproductive phenotype of DHEA-treated mice. The treatment of HFD, however, caused significant metabolic alterations in DHEA-treated mice, including obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and pronounced liver steatosis. These findings suggest that HFD induces distinct metabolic features in DHEA-induced PCOS mice. The combined DHEA and HFD treatment may thus serve as a means of studying the mechanisms involved in metabolic derangements of this syndrome, particularly in the high prevalence of hepatic steatosis in women with PCOS.

  20. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Post-Translational Mechanisms for Cold-Induced Metabolic Changes in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Li; Alma L.Burlingame; Zhi-Ping Deng; Zhi Yong Wang; Shou-Ling Xu; Juan A.Oses-Prieto; Sunita Putil; Peng Xu; Rui-Ju Wang; Kathy H.Li; David A.Malty; Liz-He An

    2011-01-01

    Cold-induced changes of gene expression and metabolism are critical for plants to survive freezing. Largely by changing gene expression, exposure to a period of non-freezing low temperatures increases plant tolerance to freezing-a phenomenon known as cold acclimation. Cold also induces rapid metabolic changes, which provide instant protection before temperature drops below freezing point. The molecular mechanisms for such rapid metabolic responses to cold remain largely unknown. Here, we use two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) analysis of sub-cellular fractions of Arabidopsis thaliana proteome coupled with spot identification by tandem mass spectrometry to identify early cold-responsive proteins in Arabidopsis. These proteins include four enzymes involved in starch degradation, three HSP100 proteins, several proteins in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and sucrose metabolism. Upon cold treatment, the Disproportionating Enzyme 2 (DPE2), a cytosolic transglucosidase metabolizing maltose to glucose, increased rapidly in the centrifugation pellet fraction and decreased in the soluble fraction. Consistent with cold-induced inactivation of DPE2 enzymatic activity, the dpe2 mutant showed increased freezing tolerance without affecting the C-repeat binding transcription factor (CBF) transcriptional pathway. These results support a model that cold-induced inactivation of DPE2 leads to rapid accumulation of maltose, which is a cold-induced compatible solute that protects cells from freezing damage. This study provides evidence for a key role of rapid post-translational regulation of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in plant protection against sudden temperature drop.

  1. Thiazide diuretics exacerbate fructose-induced metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reungjui, Sirirat; Roncal, Carlos A; Mu, Wei; Srinivas, Titte R; Sirivongs, Dhavee; Johnson, Richard J; Nakagawa, Takahiko

    2007-10-01

    Fructose is a commonly used sweetener associated with diets that increase the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Thiazide diuretics are frequently used in these patients for treatment of hypertension, but they also exacerbate metabolic syndrome. Rats on high-fructose diets that are given thiazides exhibit potassium depletion and hyperuricemia. Potassium supplementation improves their insulin resistance and hypertension, whereas allopurinol reduces serum levels of uric acid and ameliorates hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance. Both potassium supplementation and treatment with allopurinol also increase urinary nitric oxide excretion. We suggest that potassium depletion and hyperuricemia in rats exacerbates endothelial dysfunction and lowers the bioavailability of nitric oxide, which blocks insulin activity and causes insulin resistance during thiazide usage. Addition of potassium supplements and allopurinol with thiazides might be helpful in the management of metabolic syndrome.

  2. Metabolic mechanisms of cancer-induced inhibition of immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Antonella; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2007-08-01

    During progression, tumors become refractory to the offensive weapons of the immune system. It has been known for a long time that the tumor microenvironment presents a profound modification in the metabolism of arachidonic acid and amino acids such as l-triptophan and l-arginine. However, only in the last decade we have started to appreciate how these changes might cause dysfunctions in cells of both adaptive and innate immune system. The knowledge of these complex and partially interconnected metabolic pathways is offering new targets for an integrated pharmacological approach aiming at freeing tumor-specific T lymphocytes from the latches of cancer influence.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of respiration induced metabolic oscillations in erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn; Madsen, Mads F; Danø, Sune;

    2009-01-01

    The changes in the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide (P(O(2)) and P(CO(2))) during blood circulation alter erythrocyte metabolism, hereby causing flux changes between oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. In the study we have modeled this effect by extending the comprehensive kinetic mo...

  4. MPH-Induced Changes in Right Frontal Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The effects of methylphenidate (MPH), a drug that increases dopamine, on brain glucose metabolism in 20 cocaine abusers was studied using PET scans and measurements of D2 receptors at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and New York University, NY.

  5. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan L. Iovanna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis.

  6. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasseur, Sophie, E-mail: sophie.vasseur@inserm.fr; Tomasini, Richard; Tournaire, Roselyne; Iovanna, Juan L. [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, BP 915,13288 Marseille cedex 9 (France)

    2010-12-16

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis.

  7. Mitochondrial translocation of Nur77 induced by ROS contributed to cardiomyocyte apoptosis in metabolic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Aibin; Liu, Jingyi [Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an (China); Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, General Hospital of Beijing Command, PLA, Beijing (China); Liu, Peilin; Jia, Min; Wang, Han [Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an (China); Tao, Ling, E-mail: lingtao2006@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Metabolic syndrome exacerbated MI/R induced injury accompanied by decreased Nur77. • ROS led to Nur77 translocation in metabolic syndrome. • Inhibiting relocation of Nur77 to mitochondria reduced ROS-induced cardiomyocyte injury in metabolic syndrome. - Abstract: Metabolic syndrome is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis which contributes to cardiac dysfunction after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Nur77, a nuclear orphan receptor, is involved in such various cellular events as apoptosis, proliferation, and glucose and lipid metabolism in several cell types. Apoptosis is positively correlated with mitochondrial translocation of Nur77 in the cancer cells. However, the roles of Nur77 on cardiac myocytes in patients with metabolic syndrome remain unclear. The objective of this study was to determine whether Nur77 may contribute to cardiac apoptosis in patients with metabolic syndrome after I/R injury, and, if so, to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible. We used leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice to make metabolic syndrome models. In this report, we observed that, accompanied by the substantial decline in apoptosis inducer Nur77, MI/R induced cardiac dysfunction was manifested as cardiomyopathy and increased ROS. Using the neonatal rat cardiac myocytes cultured in a high-glucose and high-fat medium, we found that excessive H{sub 2}O{sub 2} led to the significant alteration in mitochondrial membrane potential and translocation of Nur77 from the nucleus to the mitochondria. However, inhibition of the relocation of Nur77 to mitochondria via Cyclosporin A reversed the changes in membrane potential mediated by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and reduced myocardial cell injury. Therefore, these data provide a potential underlying mechanism for cardiac dysfunction in metabolic syndrome and the suppression of Nur77 translocation may provide an effective approach to reduce cardiac injury in the

  8. Role of Metabolism by Intestinal Bacteria in Arbutin-Induced Suppression of Lymphoproliferative Response in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi Jeong; Ha, Hyun Woo; Kim, Ghee Hwan; Lee, Sang Kyu; Ahn, Young Tae; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2012-01-01

    Role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in arbutin-induced immunotoxicity was investigated in splenocyte cultures. Following an incubation of arbutin with 5 different intestinal bacteria for 24 hr, its aglycone hydroquinone could be produced and detected in the bacterial culture media with different amounts. Toxic effects of activated arbutin by intestinal bacteria on lymphoproliferative response were tested in splenocyte cultures from normal mice. Lipopolysaccharide and concanavalin A were used as mitogens for B- and T-cells, respectively. When bacteria cultured medium with arbutin was treated into the splenocytes for 3 days, the medium cultured with bacteria producing large amounts of hydroquinone induced suppression of lymphoproliferative responses, indicating that metabolic activation by intestinal bacteria might be required in arbutin-induced toxicity. The results indicated that the present testing system might be applied for determining the possible role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in certain chemical-induced immunotoxicity in animal cell cultures. PMID:24116295

  9. Artificial sweeteners produce the counterintuitive effect of inducing metabolic derangements

    OpenAIRE

    Swithers, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    The negative impact of consuming sugar-sweetened beverages on weight and other health outcomes has been increasingly recognized; therefore, many people have turned to high-intensity sweeteners like aspartame, sucralose, and saccharin as a way to reduce the risk of these consequences. However, accumulating evidence suggests that frequent consumers of these sugar substitutes may also be at increased risk of excessive weight gain, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. ...

  10. Aerobic exercise training induces metabolic benefits in rats with metabolic syndrome independent of dietary changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Wesendonck Caponi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the effects of aerobic exercise training without dietary changes on cardiovascular and metabolic variables and on the expression of glucose transporter Type 4 in rats with metabolic syndrome. METHODS: Twenty male spontaneously hypertensive rats received monosodium glutamate during the neonatal period. The animals were allocated to the following groups: MS (sedentary metabolic syndrome, MS-T (trained on a treadmill for 1 hour/day, 5 days/week for 10 weeks, H (sedentary spontaneously hypertensive rats and H-T (trained spontaneously hypertensive rats. The Lee index, blood pressure (tail-cuff system, insulin sensitivity (insulin tolerance test and functional capacity were evaluated before and after 10 weeks of training. Glucose transporter Type 4 expression was analyzed using Western blotting. The data were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA (p<0.05. RESULTS: At baseline, the MS rats exhibited lower insulin sensitivity and increased Lee index compared with the H rats. Training decreased the body weight and Lee index of the MS rats (MS-T vs. MS, but not of the H rats (H-T vs. H. There were no differences in food intake between the groups. At the end of the experiments, the systolic blood pressure was lower in the two trained groups than in their sedentary controls. Whole-body insulin sensitivity increased in the trained groups. Glucose transporter Type 4 content increased in the heart, white adipose tissue and gastrocnemius muscle of the trained groups relative to their respective untrained groups. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the present study shows that an isolated aerobic exercise training intervention is an efficient means of improving several components of metabolic syndrome, that is, training reduces obesity and hypertension and increases insulin sensitivity.

  11. Strategies for reversing the effects of metabolic disorders induced as a consequence of developmental programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H Vickers

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and the metabolic syndrome have reached epidemic proportions worldwide with far-reaching health care and economic implications. The rapid increase in the prevalence of these disorders suggests that environmental and behavioural influences, rather than genetic causes, are fuelling the epidemic. The developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis has highlighted the link between the periconceptual, fetal and early infant phases of life and the subsequent development of metabolic disorders in later life. In particular, the impact of poor maternal nutrition on susceptibility to later life metabolic disease in offspring is now well documented. Several studies have now shown, at least in experimental animal models, that some components of the metabolic syndrome, induced as a consequence of developmental programming, are potentially reversible by nutritional or targeted therapeutic interventions during windows of developmental plasticity. This review will focus on critical windows of development and possible therapeutic avenues that may reduce metabolic and obesogenic risk following an adverse early life environment.

  12. An integrated metabonomics and transcriptomics approach to understanding metabolic pathway disturbance induced by perfluorooctanoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Siyuan; Yan, Lijuan; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Zhanlin; Tian, Meiping; Shen, Heqing

    2013-12-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is one of the most representative perfluorinated compounds and liver is the major organ where PFOA is accumulated. Although the multiple toxicities had been reported, its toxicological profile remained unclear. In this study, a systems toxicology strategy integrating liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomics and transcriptomics analyses was applied for the first time to investigate the effects of PFOA on a representative Chinese normal human liver cell line L-02, with focusing on the metabolic disturbance. Fifteen potential biomarkers were identified on metabolic level and most observations were consistent with the altered levels of gene expression. Our results showed that PFOA induced the perturbations in various metabolic processes in L-02 cells, especially lipid metabolism-related pathways. The up-stream mitochondrial carnitine metabolism was proved to be influenced by PFOA treatment. The specific transformation from carnitine to acylcarnitines, which showed a dose-dependent effect, and the expression level of key genes involved in this pathway were observed to be altered correspondingly. Furthermore, the down-stream cholesterol biosynthesis was directly confirmed to be up-regulated by both increased cholesterol content and elevated expression level of key genes. The PFOA-induced lipid metabolism-related effects in L-02 cells started from the fatty acid catabolism in cytosol, fluctuated to the processes in mitochondria, extended to the cholesterol biosynthesis. Many other metabolic pathways like amino acid metabolism and tricarboxylic acid cycle might also be disturbed. The findings obtained from the systems biological research provide more details about metabolic disorders induced by PFOA in human liver.

  13. Prenatal caffeine ingestion induces transgenerational neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in second generation rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Hanwen [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Deng, Zixin; Liu, Lian; Shen, Lang; Kou, Hao; He, Zheng [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Ping, Jie; Xu, Dan [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Ma, Lu [Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Public Health School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Chen, Liaobin, E-mail: lbchen@whu.edu.cn [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-02-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that prenatal caffeine ingestion induces an increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome with alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic phenotypes in adult first generation (F1) of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rats, and the underlying mechanism is originated from a hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in utero. This study aims to investigate the transgenerational effects of this programming alteration in adult second generation (F2). Pregnant Wistar rats were administered with caffeine (120 mg/kg·d) from gestational day 11 until delivery. Four groups in F2 were set according to the cross-mating between control and caffeine-induced IUGR rats. F2 were subjected to a fortnight ice water swimming stimulus on postnatal month 4, and blood samples were collected before and after stress. Results showed that the majority of the activities of HPA axis and phenotypes of glucose and lipid metabolism were altered in F2. Particularly, comparing with the control group, caffeine groups had an enhanced corticosterone levels after chronic stress. Compared with before stress, the serum glucose levels were increased in some groups whereas the triglyceride levels were decreased. Furthermore, total cholesterol gain rates were enhanced but the high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol gain rates were decreased in most caffeine groups after stress. These transgenerational effects were characterized partially with gender and parental differences. Taken together, these results indicate that the reproductive and developmental toxicities and the neuroendocrine metabolic programming mechanism by prenatal caffeine ingestion have transgenerational effects in rats, which may help to explain the susceptibility to metabolic syndrome and associated diseases in F2. - Highlights: • Caffeine-induced neuroendocrine metabolic programming of HPA has hereditary effect. • Caffeine-induced

  14. CTRP9 transgenic mice are protected from diet-induced obesity and metabolic dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jonathan M.; Wei, Zhikui; Seldin, Marcus M.; Byerly, Mardi S.; Aja, Susan

    2013-01-01

    CTRP9 is a secreted multimeric protein of the C1q family and the closest paralog of the insulin-sensitizing adipokine, adiponectin. The metabolic function of this adipose tissue-derived plasma protein remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the circulating levels of CTRP9 are downregulated in diet-induced obese mice and upregulated upon refeeding. Overexpressing CTRP9 resulted in lean mice that dramatically resisted weight gain induced by a high-fat diet, largely through decreased food intake and increased basal metabolism. Enhanced fat oxidation in CTRP9 transgenic mice resulted from increases in skeletal muscle mitochondrial content, expression of enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation (LCAD and MCAD), and chronic AMPK activation. Hepatic and skeletal muscle triglyceride levels were substantially decreased in transgenic mice. Consequently, CTRP9 transgenic mice had a greatly improved metabolic profile with markedly reduced fasting insulin and glucose levels. The high-fat diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis observed in wild-type mice were prevented in transgenic mice. Consistent with the in vivo data, recombinant protein significantly enhanced fat oxidation in L6 myotubes via AMPK activation and reduced lipid accumulation in H4IIE hepatocytes. Collectively, these data establish CTRP9 as a novel metabolic regulator and a new component of the metabolic network that links adipose tissue to lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle and liver. PMID:23842676

  15. Blackcurrant Suppresses Metabolic Syndrome Induced by High-Fructose Diet in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hun Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased fructose ingestion has been linked to obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and hypertension associated with metabolic syndrome. Blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum; BC is a horticultural crop in Europe. To induce metabolic syndrome, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed 60% high-fructose diet. Treatment with BC (100 or 300 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks significantly suppressed increased liver weight, epididymal fat weight, C-reactive protein (CRP, total bilirubin, leptin, and insulin in rats with induced metabolic syndrome. BC markedly prevented increased adipocyte size and hepatic triglyceride accumulation in rats with induced metabolic syndrome. BC suppressed oral glucose tolerance and protein expression of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 and phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK in muscle. BC significantly suppressed plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride, and LDL content. BC suppressed endothelial dysfunction by inducing downregulation of endothelin-1 and adhesion molecules in the aorta. Vascular relaxation of thoracic aortic rings by sodium nitroprusside and acetylcholine was improved by BC. The present study provides evidence of the potential protective effect of BC against metabolic syndrome by demonstrating improvements in dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and obesity in vivo.

  16. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Depressive-Like Behaviors and Metabolic Abnormalities Induced by Chronic Corticosterone Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cheng Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic glucocorticoid exposure is known to cause depression and metabolic disorders. It is critical to improve abnormal metabolic status as well as depressive-like behaviors in patients with long-term glucocorticoid therapy. This study aimed to investigate the effects of resveratrol on the depressive-like behaviors and metabolic abnormalities induced by chronic corticosterone injection. Male ICR mice were administrated corticosterone (40 mg/kg by subcutaneous injection for three weeks. Resveratrol (50 and 100 mg/kg, fluoxetine (20 mg/kg and pioglitazone (10 mg/kg were given by oral gavage 30 min prior to corticosterone administration. The behavioral tests showed that resveratrol significantly reversed the depressive-like behaviors induced by corticosterone, including the reduced sucrose preference and increased immobility time in the forced swimming test. Moreover, resveratrol also increased the secretion of insulin, reduced serum level of glucose and improved blood lipid profiles in corticosterone-treated mice without affecting normal mice. However, fluoxetine only reverse depressive-like behaviors, and pioglitazone only prevent the dyslipidemia induced by corticosterone. Furthermore, resveratrol and pioglitazone decreased serum level of glucagon and corticosterone. The present results indicated that resveratrol can ameliorate depressive-like behaviors and metabolic abnormalities induced by corticosterone, which suggested that the multiple effects of resveratrol could be beneficial for patients with depression and/or metabolic syndrome associated with long-term glucocorticoid therapy.

  17. Exercise Induced Adipokine Changes and the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Golbidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lack of adequate physical activity and obesity created a worldwide pandemic. Obesity is characterized by the deposition of adipose tissue in various parts of the body; it is now evident that adipose tissue also acts as an endocrine organ capable of secreting many cytokines that are though to be involved in the pathophysiology of obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome. Adipokines, or adipose tissue-derived proteins, play a pivotal role in this scenario. Increased secretion of proinflammatory adipokines leads to a chronic inflammatory state that is accompanied by insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Lifestyle change in terms of increased physical activity and exercise is the best nonpharmacological treatment for obesity since these can reduce insulin resistance, counteract the inflammatory state, and improve the lipid profile. There is growing evidence that exercise exerts its beneficial effects partly through alterations in the adipokine profile; that is, exercise increases secretion of anti-inflammatory adipokines and reduces proinflammatory cytokines. In this paper we briefly describe the pathophysiologic role of four important adipokines (adiponectin, leptin, TNF-α, and IL-6 in the metabolic syndrome and review some of the clinical trials that monitored these adipokines as a clinical outcome before and after exercise.

  18. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... acid phenylalanine, needed for normal growth and protein production). Inborn errors of metabolism can sometimes lead to ...

  19. Oxidative metabolism drives inflammation-induced platinum resistance in human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matassa, D S; Amoroso, M R; Lu, H; Avolio, R; Arzeni, D; Procaccini, C; Faicchia, D; Maddalena, F; Simeon, V; Agliarulo, I; Zanini, E; Mazzoccoli, C; Recchi, C; Stronach, E; Marone, G; Gabra, H; Matarese, G; Landriscina, M; Esposito, F

    2016-09-01

    Tumour cells have long been considered defective in mitochondrial respiration and mostly dependent on glycolytic metabolism. However, this assumption is currently challenged by several lines of evidence in a growing number of tumours. Ovarian cancer (OC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide, but it continues to be a poorly understood disease and its metabolic features are far to be elucidated. In this context, we investigated the role of tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1), which is found upregulated in several cancer types and is a key modulator of tumour cell metabolism. Surprisingly, we found that TRAP1 expression inversely correlated with grade, stage and lower survival in a large cohort of OC patients. Accordingly, TRAP1 silencing induced resistance to cisplatin, resistant cells showed increased oxidative metabolism compared with their sensitive counterpart, and the bioenergetics cellular index of higher grade tumours indicated increased mitochondrial respiration. Strikingly, cisplatin resistance was reversible upon pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by metformin/oligomycin. At molecular level, increased oxidative metabolism in low TRAP1-expressing OC cells and tissues enhanced production of inflammatory mediators such as interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Mechanistically, we identified members of the multidrug resistance complex (MDR) as key mediators of such metabolism-driven, inflammation-induced process. Indeed, treatment of OC cell lines with TNFα and IL6 induced a selective increase in the expression of TAP1 and multidrug resistance protein 1, whereas TAP1 silencing sensitized cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Our results unveil a novel role for TRAP1 and oxidative metabolism in cancer progression and suggest the targeting of mitochondrial bioenergetics to increase cisplatin efficacy in human OC.

  20. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, A; Leang, C; Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2014-03-25

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis.

  1. Quercetin ameliorates cardiovascular, hepatic, and metabolic changes in diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Sunil K; Poudyal, Hemant; Brown, Lindsay

    2012-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We investigated the responses to the flavonol, quercetin, in male Wistar rats (8-9 wk old) divided into 4 groups. Two groups were given either a corn starch-rich (C) or high-carbohydrate, high-fat (H) diet for 16 wk; the remaining 2 groups were given either a C or H diet for 8 wk followed by supplementation with 0.8 g/kg quercetin in the food for the following 8 wk (CQ and HQ, respectively). The H diet contained ~68% carbohydrates, mainly as fructose and sucrose, and ~24% fat from beef tallow; the C diet contained ~68% carbohydrates as polysaccharides and ~0.7% fat. Compared with the C rats, the H rats had greater body weight and abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, higher systolic blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, cardiovascular remodeling, and NAFLD. The H rats had lower protein expressions of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor-2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) with greater expression of NF-κB in both the heart and the liver and less expression of caspase-3 in the liver than in C rats. HQ rats had higher expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and CPT1 and lower expression of NF-κB than H rats in both the heart and the liver. HQ rats had less abdominal fat and lower systolic blood pressure along with attenuation of changes in structure and function of the heart and the liver compared with H rats, although body weight and dyslipidemia did not differ between the H and HQ rats. Thus, quercetin treatment attenuated most of the symptoms of metabolic syndrome, including abdominal obesity, cardiovascular remodeling, and NAFLD, with the most likely mechanisms being decreases in oxidative stress and inflammation.

  2. Ammonia-induced energy disorders interfere with bilirubin metabolism in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiongye; Wang, Yanfang; Yu, Zujiang; Li, Duolu; Jia, Bin; Li, Jingjing; Guan, Kelei; Zhou, Yubing; Chen, Yanling; Kan, Quancheng

    2014-08-01

    Hyperammonemia and jaundice are the most common clinical symptoms of hepatic failure. Decreasing the level of ammonia in the blood is often accompanied by a reduction in bilirubin in patients with hepatic failure. Previous studies have shown that hyperammonemia can cause bilirubin metabolism disorders, however it is unclear exactly how hyperammonemia interferes with bilirubin metabolism in hepatocytes. The purpose of the current study was to determine the mechanism or mechanisms by which hyperammonemia interferes with bilirubin metabolism in hepatocytes. Cell viability and apoptosis were analyzed in primary hepatocytes that had been exposed to ammonium chloride. Mitochondrial morphology and permeability were observed and analyzed, intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were determined and changes in the expression of enzymes related to bilirubin metabolism were analyzed after ammonia exposure. Hyperammonemia inhibited cell growth, induced apoptosis, damaged the mitochondria and hindered the TCA cycle in hepatocytes. This led to a reduction in energy synthesis, eventually affecting the expression of enzymes related to bilirubin metabolism, which then caused further problems with bilirubin metabolism. These effects were significant, but could be reversed with the addition of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This study demonstrates that ammonia can cause problems with bilirubin metabolism by interfering with energy synthesis.

  3. Calcium and mitochondrial metabolism in ceramide-induced cardiomyocyte death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Valentina; Moraga, Francisco; Kuzmicic, Jovan; López-Crisosto, Camila; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Torrealba, Natalia; Criollo, Alfredo; Díaz-Elizondo, Jessica; Rothermel, Beverly A; Quest, Andrew F G; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-08-01

    Ceramides are important intermediates in the biosynthesis and degradation of sphingolipids that regulate numerous cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, cell growth, differentiation and death. In cardiomyocytes, ceramides induce apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential and promoting cytochrome-c release. Ca(2+) overload is a common feature of all types of cell death. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ceramides on cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels, mitochondrial function and cardiomyocyte death. Our data show that C2-ceramide induces apoptosis and necrosis in cultured cardiomyocytes by a mechanism involving increased Ca(2+) influx, mitochondrial network fragmentation and loss of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffer capacity. These biochemical events increase cytosolic Ca(2+) levels and trigger cardiomyocyte death via the activation of calpains.

  4. Effect of opium on glucose metabolism and lipid profiles in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeghian, Saeed; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Sotoudeh-Anvari, Maryam; Rahbani, Shahram; Sheikhfathollahi, Mahmood; Abbasi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Background: This experimental study was performed to determine the impact of opium use on serum lipid profile and glucose metabolism in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Material and methods: To determine the effect of opium, 20 male rats were divided into control (n = 10) and opium-treated

  5. Modulation of antioxidant status, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by melatonin on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirunalini Sankaran*

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Melatonin, “synchronizer of the biological clock” is major hormones secreted from the pineal gland have various therapeutic effects. The present study was designed to explore the modulatory effect of melatonin on antioxidant status, glucose and lipid metabolism in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats weighing 180-200 g were made diabetic by administration of streptozotocin (STZ (40 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally. Melatonin was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 2 mg/kg body weight to STZ-induced diabetic rats for 30 days. Body weight, blood glucose, carbohydrate metabolic enzyme, lipid profile, antioxidant and lipid peroxidation status were assessed. The level of the blood glucose, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and lipid peroxidative marker (TBARS were increased in STZ induced diabetic rats while the melatonin treatment revert back to the near normal condition. In contrast, administered melatonin resulted in an increased in body weight and insulin secretion in diabetic rats. The enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, CAT and GPX and non-enzymatic antioxidants (GSH, vitamin C and vitamin E were also increased by melatonin treatment. The cholesterol and phospholipids which were elevated in diabetic rats were normalized by the melatonin administration. Hence these findings indicate that melatonin protects against STZ induced oxidative stress and thus explain its use in treatment of diabetes by modulating lipid and glucose metabolism.

  6. Loxapine for Reversal of Antipsychotic-Induced Metabolic Disturbances: A Chart Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Seema; Andridge, Rebecca; Hellings, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Loxapine substitution is a promising option for patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who develop antipsychotic-induced metabolic illness. We performed a chart review of 15 adolescents and adults meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for ASD, all with antipsychotic-associated weight gain, who received low dose loxapine in an attempt to taper or…

  7. The unfolded protein response mediates reversible tau phosphorylation induced by metabolic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harg, J. M.; Nolle, A.; Zwart, R.; Boerema, A. S.; van Haastert, E. S.; Strijkstra, A. M.; Hoozemans, J. J. M.; Scheper, W.

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in neurodegenerative tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) in close connection with early stages of tau pathology. Metabolic disturbances are strongly associated with increased risk for AD and are a potent inducer of the UPR. Here, we demonstra

  8. METABOLISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To determine the allele frequencies of genetic variants 373 Ala→Pro and 451 Arg→Gln of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and to explore their potential impacts on serum lipid metabolism. Methods: The genotypes in CETP codon 373 and 451 in 91 German healthy students and 409 an-

  9. Diabetes and hyperlipidemia induce dysfunction of VSMCs: contribution of the metabolic inflammation/miRNA pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Yang, Guang-ming; Zhu, Yu; Wu, Yue; Chen, Xiang-yun; Lan, Dan; Tian, Kun-lun; Liu, Liang-ming

    2015-02-15

    Vascular endothelial cell injury is considered to be the major factor inducing vascular complications in metabolic diseases and plays an important role in other organ damage. With diabetic and hyperlipidemic rats and cultured VSMCs, the present study was aimed at investigating whether the early damage of VSMCs during metabolic diseases plays a critical role in vascular dysfunction and the underlying mechanisms and would be a promising treatment target. With diabetic and hyperlipidemic rats and cultured VSMCs, the changes and relationships of vascular relaxation and contractile function to the vital organ damage and the underlying mechanisms were investigated; meanwhile, the protective and preventive effects of lowering blood lipid and glucose and inhibition of diabetes and hyperlipidemia-induced vascular hyperreactivity were observed. Diabetic and hyperlipidemic rats presented hyperreactivity in vascular contractile response in the early stages. Hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia directly affected the contractile function of VSMCs. Early application of fasudil, a specific antagonist of Rho kinase, significantly alleviated diabetes and hyperlipidemia-induced organ damage by inhibiting vascular hyperreactivity. Diabetes and hyperlipidemia-induced inflammatory response could upregulate the expression of connexins and Rho kinase by selective downregulation of the expression of miR-10a, miR-139b, miR-206, and miR-222. These findings suggest that hyperglucose and lipid may directly impair VSMCs and induce vascular hyperreactivity in the early stages. Metabolic inflammation-induced changes in the miRNA-connexin/Rho kinase regulatory pathway are the main mechanism for vascular hyperreactivity and organ damage. Measures inhibiting vascular hyperreactivity are promising for the prevention of organ damage induced by metabolic diseases.

  10. Bactericidal Antibiotics Induce Toxic Metabolic Perturbations that Lead to Cellular Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Belenky

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how antibiotics impact bacterial metabolism may provide insight into their mechanisms of action and could lead to enhanced therapeutic methodologies. Here, we profiled the metabolome of Escherichia coli after treatment with three different classes of bactericidal antibiotics (β-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones. These treatments induced a similar set of metabolic changes after 30 min that then diverged into more distinct profiles at later time points. The most striking changes corresponded to elevated concentrations of central carbon metabolites, active breakdown of the nucleotide pool, reduced lipid levels, and evidence of an elevated redox state. We examined potential end-target consequences of these metabolic perturbations and found that antibiotic-treated cells exhibited cytotoxic changes indicative of oxidative stress, including higher levels of protein carbonylation, malondialdehyde adducts, nucleotide oxidation, and double-strand DNA breaks. This work shows that bactericidal antibiotics induce a complex set of metabolic changes that are correlated with the buildup of toxic metabolic by-products.

  11. Pharmacological inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase ameliorates diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Abishek; Kauter, Kathleen; Alam, Md Ashraful; Hwang, Sung Hee; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D; Brown, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    The signs of metabolic syndrome following chronic excessive macronutrient intake include body weight gain, excess visceral adipose deposition, hyperglycaemia, glucose and insulin intolerances, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, endothelial damage, cardiovascular hypertrophy, inflammation, ventricular contractile dysfunction, fibrosis, and fatty liver disease. Recent studies show increased activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) during obesity and metabolic dysfunction. We have tested whether sEH inhibition has therapeutic potential in a rat model of diet-induced metabolic syndrome. In these high-carbohydrate, high-fat-fed rats, chronic oral treatment with trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-ylureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid (t-AUCB), a potent sEH inhibitor, alleviated the signs of metabolic syndrome in vivo including glucose, insulin, and lipid abnormalities, changes in pancreatic structure, increased systolic blood pressure, cardiovascular structural and functional abnormalities, and structural and functional changes in the liver. The present study describes the pharmacological responses to this selective sEH inhibitor in rats with the signs of diet-induced metabolic syndrome.

  12. Regulation of exercise-induced lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordy, Andreas Børsting; Kiens, Bente

    2014-01-01

    mice. In skeletal muscle, 98% of the lipase activity is accounted for by adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase. Give that inhibition or knockout of hormone-sensitive lipase does not impair lipolysis in muscle during contraction, the data point to an important role of adipose......Exercise increases the utilization of lipids in muscle. The sources of lipids are long-chain fatty acids taken up from the plasma and fatty acids released from stores of intramuscular triacylglycerol by the action of intramuscular lipases. In the present review, we focus on the role of fatty acid...... binding proteins, particularly fatty acid translocase/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36), in the exercise- and contraction-induced increase in uptake of long-chain fatty acids in muscle. The FAT/CD36 translocates from intracellular depots to the surface membrane upon initiation of exercise/muscle...

  13. Exercise training prevents diastolic dysfunction induced by metabolic syndrome in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Mostarda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: High fructose consumption contributes to the incidence of metabolic syndrome and, consequently, to cardiovascular outcomes. We investigated whether exercise training prevents high fructose diet-induced metabolic and cardiac morphofunctional alterations. METHODS: Wistar rats receiving fructose overload (F in drinking water (100 g/l were concomitantly trained on a treadmill (FT for 10 weeks or kept sedentary. These rats were compared with a control group (C. Obesity was evaluated by the Lee index, and glycemia and insulin tolerance tests constituted the metabolic evaluation. Blood pressure was measured directly (Windaq, 2 kHz, and echocardiography was performed to determine left ventricular morphology and function. Statistical significance was determined by one-way ANOVA, with significance set at p<0.05. RESULTS: Fructose overload induced a metabolic syndrome state, as confirmed by insulin resistance (F: 3.6 ± 0.2 vs. C: 4.5 ± 0.2 mg/dl/min, hypertension (mean blood pressure, F: 118 ± 3 vs. C: 104 ± 4 mmHg and obesity (F: 0.31±0.001 vs. C: 0.29 ± 0.001 g/mm. Interestingly, fructose overload rats also exhibited diastolic dysfunction. Exercise training performed during the period of high fructose intake eliminated all of these derangements. The improvements in metabolic parameters were correlated with the maintenance of diastolic function. CONCLUSION: The role of exercise training in the prevention of metabolic and hemodynamic parameter alterations is of great importance in decreasing the cardiac morbidity and mortality related to metabolic syndrome.

  14. Superovulation Induced Changes of Lipid Metabolism in Ovaries and Embryos and Its Probable Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ya Wang

    Full Text Available This research was intended to investigate the fetal origins of changed birth weight of the offspring born through assisted reproductive technology (ART. The association between hormone and lipid metabolism or body weight has been generally accepted, and as the basic and specific treatment in ART procedure, gonadotropin stimulation might have potential effects on intrauterine lipid metabolism. In our studies, the mice were superovulated with two doses of gonadotropin. The cholesterol metabolism in ovaries and the triglyceride metabolism in embryos were analyzed. The results showed gonadotropin probably accelerated luteinization and induced a longer time follicle development and ovulation, which resulted in histological and morphological alteration of ovary, and increased the cholesterol content and the expressions of steroidogenesis-related genes. In embryos, gonadotropin increased lipid accumulation and decreased fatty acid synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the changes of fatty acid composition were also shown in superovulation groups. Our studies firstly provided the evidence that the superovulation might affect the maternal and fetal lipid metabolism. These variations of lipid metabolism in our results may be associated with birth weight of ART infants.

  15. Silibinin-mediated metabolic reprogramming attenuates pancreatic cancer-induced cachexia and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Surendra K; Dasgupta, Aneesha; Mehla, Kamiya; Gunda, Venugopal; Vernucci, Enza; Souchek, Joshua; Goode, Gennifer; King, Ryan; Mishra, Anusha; Rai, Ibha; Nagarajan, Sangeetha; Chaika, Nina V; Yu, Fang; Singh, Pankaj K

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the US. Cancer-associated cachexia is present in up to 80% of PDAC patients and is associated with aggressive disease and poor prognosis. In the present studies we evaluated an anti-cancer natural product silibinin for its effectiveness in targeting pancreatic cancer aggressiveness and the cachectic properties of pancreatic cancer cells and tumors. Our results demonstrate that silibinin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner and reduces glycolytic activity of cancer cells. Our LC-MS/MS based metabolomics data demonstrates that silibinin treatment induces global metabolic reprogramming in pancreatic cancer cells. Silibinin treatment diminishes c-MYC expression, a key regulator of cancer metabolism. Furthermore, we observed reduced STAT3 signaling in silibinin-treated cancer cells. Overexpression of constitutively active STAT3 was sufficient to substantially revert the silibinin-induced downregulation of c-MYC and the metabolic phenotype. Our in vivo investigations demonstrate that silibinin reduces tumor growth and proliferation in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer and prevents the loss of body weight and muscle. It also improves physical activity including grip strength and latency to fall in tumor-bearing mice. In conclusion, silibinin-induced metabolic reprogramming diminishes cell growth and cachectic properties of pancreatic cancer cells and animal models.

  16. Neurodegeneration Alters Metabolic Profile and Sirt 1 Signaling in High-Fat-Induced Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Leandro Ceotto Freitas; Saliba, Soraya Wilke; Andrade, João Marcus Oliveira; Cunha, Maria Luisa; Cassini-Vieira, Puebla; Feltenberger, John David; Barcelos, Lucíola Silva; Guimarães, André Luiz Sena; de-Paula, Alfredo Mauricio Batista; de Oliveira, Antônio Carlos Pinheiro; Santos, Sérgio Henrique Sousa

    2016-05-16

    Different factors may contribute to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Among them, metabolic syndrome (MS), which has reached epidemic proportions, has emerged as a potential element that may be involved in neurodegeneration. Furthermore, studies have shown the importance of the sirtuin family in neuronal survival and MS, which opens the possibility of new pharmacological targets. This study investigates the influence of sirtuin metabolic pathways by examining the functional capacities of glucose-induced obesity in an excitotoxic state induced by a quinolinic acid (QA) animal model. Mice were divided into two groups that received different diets for 8 weeks: one group received a regular diet, and the other group received a high-fat diet (HF) to induce MS. The animals were submitted to a stereotaxic surgery and subdivided into four groups: Standard (ST), Standard-QA (ST-QA), HF and HF-QA. The QA groups were given a 250 nL quinolinic acid injection in the right striatum and PBS was injected in the other groups. Obese mice presented with a weight gain of 40 % more than the ST group beyond acquiring an insulin resistance. QA induced motor impairment and neurodegeneration in both ST-QA and HF-QA, although no difference was observed between these groups. The HF-QA group showed a reduction in adiposity when compared with the groups that received PBS. Therefore, the HF-QA group demonstrated a commitment-dependent metabolic pathway. The results suggest that an obesogenic diet does not aggravate the neurodegeneration induced by QA. However, the excitotoxicity induced by QA promotes a sirtuin pathway impairment that contributes to metabolic changes.

  17. Permethrin-induced oxidative stress and toxicity and metabolism. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Martínez, María-Aránzazu; Dai, Menghong; Chen, Dongmei; Ares, Irma; Romero, Alejandro; Castellano, Victor; Martínez, Marta; Rodríguez, José Luis; Martínez-Larrañaga, María-Rosa; Anadón, Arturo; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-08-01

    Permethrin (PER), the most frequently used synthetic Type I pyrethroid insecticide, is widely used in the world because of its high activity as an insecticide and its low mammalian toxicity. It was originally believed that PER exhibited low toxicity on untargeted animals. However, as its use became more extensive worldwide, increasing evidence suggested that PER might have a variety of toxic effects on animals and humans alike, such as neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, reproductive, genotoxic, and haematotoxic effects, digestive system toxicity, and cytotoxicity. A growing number of studies indicate that oxidative stress played critical roles in the various toxicities associated with PER. To date, almost no review has addressed the toxicity of PER correlated with oxidative stress. The focus of this article is primarily to summarise advances in the research associated with oxidative stress as a potential mechanism for PER-induced toxicity as well as its metabolism. This review summarises the research conducted over the past decade into the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and oxidative stress as a consequence of PER treatments, and ultimately their correlation with the toxicity and the metabolism of PER. The metabolism of PER involves various CYP450 enzymes, alcohol or aldehyde dehydrogenases for oxidation and the carboxylesterases for hydrolysis, through which oxidative stress might occur, and such metabolic factors are also reviewed. The protection of a variety of antioxidants against PER-induced toxicity is also discussed, in order to further understand the role of oxidative stress in PER-induced toxicity. This review will throw new light on the critical roles of oxidative stress in PER-induced toxicity, as well as on the blind spots that still exist in the understanding of PER metabolism, the cellular effects in terms of apoptosis and cell signaling pathways, and finally strategies to help to protect against its oxidative

  18. Influence of high carbohydrate versus high fat diet in ozone induced pulmonary injury and systemic metabolic impairment in a Brown Norway (BN) rat model of healthy aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Air pollution has been recently linked to the increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome. It has been postulated that dietary risk factors might exacerbate air pollution-induced metabolic impairment. We have recently reported that ozone exposure induces acute systemic ...

  19. Metformin improves metabolic memory in high fat diet (HFD)-induced renal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Sharma, Ekta; Amara, Venkateswara Rao; Pamulapati, Himani; Dhawale, Vaibhav Shrirang

    2016-08-22

    Recently, we have shown that high fat diet (HFD) in vivo and in vitro generates metabolic memory by altering H3K36me2 and H3K27me3 on the promoter of FOXO1 (transcription factor of gluconeogenic genes) (Kumar et al., 2015). Here we checked the hypothesis, whether concomitant diet reversal and metformin could overcome HFD-induced metabolic memory and renal damage. Male adult Sprague Dawley rats were rendered insulin resistant by feeding high fat diet for 16 weeks. Then the rats were subjected to diet reversal (REV) alone and along with metformin (REV+MET) for 8 weeks. Biochemical and histological markers of insulin resistance and kidney function were measured. Blood pressure and in vivo vascular reactivity to Angiotensin II (200 mgkg-1) were also checked. Diet reversal could improve lipid profile but could not prevent renal complications induced by HFD. Interestingly, metformin along with diet reversal restored the levels of blood glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. In kidney, metformin increased the activation of AMPK, decreased inflammatory markers-COX-2, IL-1β and apoptotic markers-PARP, Caspase3. Metformin was effective in lowering the elevated basal blood pressure, acute change in mean arterial pressure (ΔMAP) in response to Ang II. It also attenuated the tubulointerstitial fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis induced by HFD-feeding in kidney. Here we report for the first time, that metformin treatment overcomes metabolic memory and prevents HFD-induced renal damage.

  20. Kalpaamruthaa ameliorates mitochondrial and metabolic alterations in diabetes mellitus induced cardiovascular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latha, Raja; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanadham

    2014-12-01

    Efficacy of Kalpaamruthaa on the activities of lipid and carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, electron transport chain complexes and mitochondrial ATPases were studied in heart and liver of experimental rats. Cardiovascular damage (CVD) was developed in 8 weeks after type 2 diabetes mellitus induction with high fat diet (2 weeks) and low dose of streptozotocin (2 × 35 mg/kg b.w. i.p. in 24 hr interval). In CVD-induced rats, the activities of total lipase, cholesterol ester hydrolase and cholesterol ester synthetase were increased, while lipoprotein lipase and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activities were decreased. The activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes were altered by Kalpaamruthaa in CVD-induced rats towards normal. Kalpaamruthaa modulated the activities of glycolytic enzymes (hexokinase, phosphogluco-isomerase, aldolase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), gluconeogenic enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase) and glycogenolytic enzyme (glycogen phosphorylase) along with increased glycogen content in the liver of CVD-induced rats. The activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, Complexes and ATPases (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase) were decreased in CVD-induced rats, which were ameliorated by the treatment with Kalpaamruthaa. This study ascertained the efficacy of Kalpaamruthaa for the treatment of CVD in diabetes through the modulation of metabolizing enzymes and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  1. Protective effects of berberine against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in rats by inhibiting metabolism of doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Gang; Yu, Yunli; Gu, Bingren; Xing, Yiwen; Xue, Man

    2015-01-01

    1. The clinical use of doxorubicin, an effective anticancer drug, is severely hampered by its cardiotoxicity. Berberine, a botanical alkaloid, has been reported to possess cardioprotective and antitumor effects. In this study, we investigated the cardioprotective effect of berberine on doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity and the effect of berberine on the metabolism of doxorubicin. 2. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered doxorubicin in the presence or absence of berberine for 2 weeks. Administration of berberine effectively prevented doxorubicin-induced body weight reduction and mortality in rats. 3. Berberine reduced the activity of myocardial enzymes, including aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine kinase (CK), CK isoenzyme (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Echocardiographic examination further demonstrated that berberine effectively ameliorated cardiac dysfunction induced by doxorubicin. 4. Berberine inhibited the metabolism of doxorubicin in the cytoplasm of rat heart and reduced the accumulation of doxorubicinol (a secondary alcohol metabolite of doxorubicin) in heart. 5. These data showed that berberine alleviated the doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in rats via inhibition of the metabolism of doxorubicin and reduced accumulation of doxorubicinol selectively in hearts.

  2. Cerebral energy metabolism during mitochondrial dysfunction induced by cyanide in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Olsen, N.V.; Toft, P;

    2013-01-01

    variables related to energy metabolism. METHODS: Mitochondrial dysfunction was induced in piglets and evaluated by monitoring brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2 ) and cerebral levels of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, and glycerol bilaterally. The biochemical variables were obtained by microdialysis...... metabolism and degradation of cellular membranes, respectively. CONCLUSION: Mitochondrial dysfunction is characterised by an increased LP ratio signifying a shift in cytoplasmatic redox state at normal or elevated PbtO2 . The condition is biochemically characterised by a marked increase in cerebral lactate...... with a normal or elevated pyruvate level. The metabolic pattern is different from cerebral ischemia, which is characterised by simultaneous decreases in intracerebral pyruvate and PbtO2 . The study supports the hypothesis that cerebral ischemia and mitochondrial dysfunction may be identified and separated...

  3. Heat stress induced changes in metabolic regulators of donkeys from arid tracts in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataria N.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available To find out heat stress induced changes in metabolic regulators of donkeys from arid tracts in India, blood samples were collected to harvest the serum during moderate and extreme hot ambiences. The metabolic enzymes determined were sorbitol dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, ornithine carbamoyl transferase, gammaglutamayl transferase, 5’nucleotidase, glucose-6-phosphatase, arginase, and aldolase. The mean values of all the serum enzymes increased significantly (p≤0.05 during hot ambience as compared to respective values during moderate ambience. It was concluded that increased activity of all the enzymes in the serum was due to modulation of metabolic reactions to combat the effect of hot ambience on the animals. Activation of gluconeogenesis along with hexose monophosphate shunt and urea cycle probably helped the animals to combat the heat stress.

  4. Radiation-induced vasculopathy implicated by depressed blood flow and metabolism in a pineal glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineura, K.; Sasajima, T.; Kowada, M. (Akita University Hospital (Japan). Neurosurgical Service); Saitoh, H. (Oodate Municipal Hospital (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery); Shishido, F. (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    A case of radiation-induced vasculopathy of a pineal glioma was presented with haemodynamic and metabolic changes before and after radiotherapy. After radiation of 60 Gy with conventional fractionation (1.8-2.0 Gy daily, 5 days per week), regional blood flow, oxygen extraction fraction, metabolic rate of oxygen, kinetic metabolic rate of glucose and the rate constants (K2, K3) were markedly depressed (20% or greater) compared with the pre-irradiated study. 7 months after radiotherapy, the patient developed transient episodes of both right and left upper limb convulsion, terminating in generalized convulsion. When she developed status epilepticus, computed tomography showed extensive low density areas in the territory supplied by the right middle cerebral and the right posterior cerebral arteries. (author).

  5. Pioglitazone in adult rats reverses immediate postnatal overfeeding-induced metabolic, hormonal, and inflammatory alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullu-Ciocca, S; Tassistro, V; Dutour, A; Grino, M

    2015-12-01

    Immediate postnatal overfeeding in rats, obtained by reducing the litter size, results in early-onset obesity. Such experimental paradigm programs overweight, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, increased adipose glucocorticoid metabolism [up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1)], and overexpression of proinflammatory cytokines in mesenteric adipose tissue (MAT) in adulthood. We studied the effects of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, treatment on the above-mentioned overfeeding-induced alterations. Nine-month-old rats normofed or overfed during the immediate postnatal period were given pioglitazone (3 mg/kg/day) for 6 weeks. Pioglitazone stimulated weight gain and induced a redistribution of adipose tissue toward epididymal location with enhanced plasma adiponectin. Treatment normalized postnatal overfeeding-induced metabolic alterations (increased fasting insulinemia and free fatty acids) and mesenteric overexpression of GR, 11β-HSD11, CD 68, and proinflammatory cytokines mRNAs, including plasminogen-activator inhibitor type 1. Mesenteric GR mRNA levels correlated positively with mesenteric proinflammatory cytokines mRNA concentrations. In vitro incubation of MAT obtained from overfed rats demonstrated that pioglitazone induced a down-regulation of GR gene expression and normalized glucocorticoid-induced stimulation of 11β-HSD1 and plasminogen-activator inhibitor type 1 mRNAs. Our data show for the first time that the metabolic, endocrine, and inflammatory alterations induced by early-onset postnatal obesity can be reversed by pioglitazone at the adulthood. They demonstrate that pioglitazone, in addition to its well-established effect on adipose tissue redistribution and adiponectin secretion, reverses programing-induced adipose GR, 11β-HSD1, and proinflammatory cytokines overexpression, possibly through a GR-dependent mechanism.

  6. Green and Black Cardamom in a Diet-Induced Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maharshi Bhaswant

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Both black (B and green (G cardamom are used as flavours during food preparation. This study investigated the responses to B and G in a diet-induced rat model of human metabolic syndrome. Male Wistar rats were fed either a corn starch-rich diet (C or a high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet with increased simple sugars along with saturated and trans fats (H for 16 weeks. H rats showed signs of metabolic syndrome leading to visceral obesity with hypertension, glucose intolerance, cardiovascular remodelling and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Food was supplemented with 3% dried B or G for the final eight weeks only. The major volatile components were the closely related terpenes, 1,8-cineole in B and α-terpinyl acetate in G. HB (high-carbohydrate, high-fat + black cardamom rats showed marked reversal of diet-induced changes, with decreased visceral adiposity, total body fat mass, systolic blood pressure and plasma triglycerides, and structure and function of the heart and liver. In contrast, HG (high-carbohydrate, high-fat + green cardamom rats increased visceral adiposity and total body fat mass, and increased heart and liver damage, without consistent improvement in the signs of metabolic syndrome. These results suggest that black cardamom is more effective in reversing the signs of metabolic syndrome than green cardamom.

  7. Green and Black Cardamom in a Diet-Induced Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaswant, Maharshi; Poudyal, Hemant; Mathai, Michael L; Ward, Leigh C; Mouatt, Peter; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-09-11

    Both black (B) and green (G) cardamom are used as flavours during food preparation. This study investigated the responses to B and G in a diet-induced rat model of human metabolic syndrome. Male Wistar rats were fed either a corn starch-rich diet (C) or a high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet with increased simple sugars along with saturated and trans fats (H) for 16 weeks. H rats showed signs of metabolic syndrome leading to visceral obesity with hypertension, glucose intolerance, cardiovascular remodelling and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Food was supplemented with 3% dried B or G for the final eight weeks only. The major volatile components were the closely related terpenes, 1,8-cineole in B and α-terpinyl acetate in G. HB (high-carbohydrate, high-fat + black cardamom) rats showed marked reversal of diet-induced changes, with decreased visceral adiposity, total body fat mass, systolic blood pressure and plasma triglycerides, and structure and function of the heart and liver. In contrast, HG (high-carbohydrate, high-fat + green cardamom) rats increased visceral adiposity and total body fat mass, and increased heart and liver damage, without consistent improvement in the signs of metabolic syndrome. These results suggest that black cardamom is more effective in reversing the signs of metabolic syndrome than green cardamom.

  8. Gene Transcriptional and Metabolic Profile Changes in Mimetic Aging Mice Induced by D-Galactose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Yue Zhou

    Full Text Available D-galactose injection has been shown to induce many changes in mice that represent accelerated aging. This mouse model has been widely used for pharmacological studies of anti-aging agents. The underlying mechanism of D-galactose induced aging remains unclear, however, it appears to relate to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders. Currently, there has yet to be a study that focuses on investigating gene expression changes in D-galactose aging mice. In this study, integrated analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomics and gene expression profiles was used to investigate the changes in transcriptional and metabolic profiles in mimetic aging mice injected with D-galactose. Our findings demonstrated that 48 mRNAs were differentially expressed between control and D-galactose mice, and 51 potential biomarkers were identified at the metabolic level. The effects of D-galactose on aging could be attributed to glucose and 1ipid metabolic disorders, oxidative damage, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs, reduction in abnormal substance elimination, cell apoptosis, and insulin resistance.

  9. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects Are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Desinia B; Snow, Samantha J; Schladweiler, Mette C; Richards, Judy E; Ghio, Andrew J; Ledbetter, Allen D; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2016-04-01

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces metabolic alterations in animals. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for both ozone-induced metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats underwent bilateral adrenal demedullation (DEMED), total bilateral adrenalectomy (ADREX), or sham surgery (SHAM). After a 4 day recovery, rats were exposed to air or ozone (1 ppm), 4 h/day for 1 or 2 days and responses assessed immediately postexposure. Circulating adrenaline levels dropped to nearly zero in DEMED and ADREX rats relative to SHAM. Corticosterone tended to be low in DEMED rats and dropped to nearly zero in ADREX rats. Adrenalectomy in air-exposed rats caused modest changes in metabolites and lung toxicity parameters. Ozone-induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance were markedly attenuated in DEMED rats with nearly complete reversal in ADREX rats. Ozone increased circulating epinephrine and corticosterone in SHAM but not in DEMED or ADREX rats. Free fatty acids (P = .15) and branched-chain amino acids increased after ozone exposure in SHAM but not in DEMED or ADREX rats. Lung minute volume was not affected by surgery or ozone but ozone-induced labored breathing was less pronounced in ADREX rats. Ozone-induced increases in lung protein leakage and neutrophilic inflammation were markedly reduced in DEMED and ADREX rats (ADREX > DEMED). Ozone-mediated decreases in circulating white blood cells in SHAM were not observed in DEMED and ADREX rats. We demonstrate that ozone-induced peripheral metabolic effects and lung injury/inflammation are mediated through adrenal-derived stress hormones likely via the activation of stress response pathway.

  10. Gender differences in ozone-induced pulmonary and metabolic health effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOT 2015 abstractGender differences in ozone-induced pulmonary and metabolic health effectsU.P. Kodavanti1, V.L. Bass2, M.C. Schladweiler1, C.J. Gordon3, K.A. Jarema3, P. Phillips3, A.D. Ledbetter1, D.B. Miller4, S. Snow5, J.E. Richards1. 1 EPHD, NHEERL, USEPA, Research Triangle ...

  11. Sex differences in diet and inhaled ozone (O3) induced metabolic impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    APS 2015 abstract Sex differences in diet and inhaled ozone (O3) induced metabolic impairment U.P. Kodavanti1, V.L. Bass2, M.C. Schladweiler1, C.J. Gordon3, K.A. Jarema1, P. Phillips1, A.D. Ledbetter1, D.B. Miller4, S. Snow5, J.E. Richards1. 1 EPHD, NHEERL, USEPA, Research Triang...

  12. Cold- and exercise-induced peak metabolic rates in tropical birds

    OpenAIRE

    Wiersma, Popko; Chappell, Mark A; Williams, Joseph B.

    2007-01-01

    Compared with temperate birds, tropical birds have low reproductive rates, slow development as nestlings, and long lifespans. These “slow” life history traits are thought to be associated with reduced energy expenditure, or a slow “pace of life.” To test predictions from this hypothesis, we measured exercise-induced peak metabolic rates (PMRE) in 45 species of tropical lowland forest birds and compared these data with PMRE for three temperate species. We also compared cold-induced PMR (PMRC) ...

  13. CTRP3 attenuates diet-induced hepatic steatosis by regulating triglyceride metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jonathan M.; Seldin, Marcus M.; Wei, Zhikui; Aja, Susan

    2013-01-01

    CTRP3 is a secreted plasma protein of the C1q family that helps regulate hepatic gluconeogenesis and is downregulated in a diet-induced obese state. However, the role of CTRP3 in regulating lipid metabolism has not been established. Here, we used a transgenic mouse model to address the potential function of CTRP3 in ameliorating high-fat diet-induced metabolic stress. Both transgenic and wild-type mice fed a high-fat diet showed similar body weight gain, food intake, and energy expenditure. Despite similar adiposity to wild-type mice upon diet-induced obesity (DIO), CTRP3 transgenic mice were strikingly resistant to the development of hepatic steatosis, had reduced serum TNF-α levels, and demonstrated a modest improvement in systemic insulin sensitivity. Additionally, reduced hepatic triglyceride levels were due to decreased expression of enzymes (GPAT, AGPAT, and DGAT) involved in triglyceride synthesis. Importantly, short-term daily administration of recombinant CTRP3 to DIO mice for 5 days was sufficient to improve the fatty liver phenotype, evident as reduced hepatic triglyceride content and expression of triglyceride synthesis genes. Consistent with a direct effect on liver cells, recombinant CTRP3 treatment reduced fatty acid synthesis and neutral lipid accumulation in cultured rat H4IIE hepatocytes. Together, these results establish a novel role for CTRP3 hormone in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism and highlight its protective function and therapeutic potential in attenuating hepatic steatosis. PMID:23744740

  14. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, V. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Cascio, W.E. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Phillips, P.M. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Andrews, D. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Miller, D. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Doerfler, D.L. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kodavanti, U.P., E-mail: kodavanti.urmila@epa.gov [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone

  15. Biphenyl metabolism by rat liver microsomes. Regioselective effects of inducers, inhibitors, and solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugen, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the inducers phenobarbital and 3-methylcholanthrene, the inhibitors 7,8-benzoflavone and 1-benzyl-imidazole, and the solvents methanol, acetone, and dimethyl sulfoxide on the 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxylation of biphenyl and the O-de-ethylation of 7-ethoxycoumarin by rat liver microsomes were examined. Phenobarbital pretreatment primarily induced 2- and 3-hydroxylation, the latter most dramatically. 3-Methylcholanthrene pretreatment induced 2- and 3-hydroxylation to similar extents. The inhibitors and solvents had regioselective effects on biphenyl metabolism that were characteristic of the uninduced, phenobarbital-induced, and 3-methylcholanthrene-induced microsomes. The presence of multiple forms of cytochrome P-450 in uninduced microsomes is indicated by the regioselective effects of the solvents and the inhibitors. The 3-methylcholanthrene-dependent increases in 2- and 3-hydroxylation appear due to induction of a single form of cytochrome P-450, as indicated by similar dose-response relationships and similar changes in sensitivitty to the inhibitors. The phenobarbital-dependent increases in 2- and 3-hydroxylation appear due to the induction of two forms of cytochrome P-450, as indicated by different changes in sensitivity to the effects of dimethyl sulfoxide and 7,8-benzoflavone. The results indicate that examination of the regioselectivity of biphenyl metabolism is a useful approach for characterizing microsomal mono-oxygenases, and they suggest that the approach may also be useful in the characterization of purified mono-oxygenase systems. (JMT)

  16. Dioscin relieves endotoxemia induced acute neuro-inflammation and protect neurogenesis via improving 5-HT metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Chen, Wei; Lu, Ye; Li, Yingke; Du, Hongli; Gao, Songyan; Dong, Xin; Yuan, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis, in addition to causing fatality, is an independent risk factor for cognitive impairment among sepsis survivors. The pathologic mechanism of endotoxemia induced acute neuro-inflammation still has not been fully understood. For the first time, we found the disruption of neurotransmitters 5-HT, impaired neurogenesis and activation of astrocytes coupled with concomitant neuro-inflammation were the potential pathogenesis of endotoxemia induced acute neuro-inflammation in sepsis survivors. In addition, dioscin a natural steroidal saponin isolated from Chinese medicinal herbs, enhanced the serotonergic system and produced anti-depressant effect by enhancing 5-HT levels in hippocampus. What is more, this finding was verified by metabolic analyses of hippocampus, indicating 5-HT related metabolic pathway was involved in the pathogenesis of endotoxemia induced acute neuro-inflammation. Moreover, neuro-inflammation and neurogenesis within hippocampus were indexed using quantitative immunofluorescence analysis of GFAP DCX and Ki67, as well as real-time RT-PCR analysis of some gene expression levels in hippocampus. Our in vivo and in vitro studies show dioscin protects hippocampus from endotoxemia induced cascade neuro-inflammation through neurotransmitter 5-HT and HMGB-1/TLR4 signaling pathway, which accounts for the dioscin therapeutic effect in behavioral tests. Therefore, the current findings suggest that dioscin could be a potential approach for the therapy of endotoxemia induced acute neuro-inflammation. PMID:28059131

  17. Role of metabolism in 1-bromopropane-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Kyu; Kang, Mi Jeong; Jeon, Tae Won; Ha, Hyun Woo; Yoo, Jin Woo; Ko, Gyu Sub; Kang, Wonku; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Lyoo, Won Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2010-01-01

    A possible role of metabolism in 1-bromopropane (1-BP)-induced hepatotoxicity was investigated in male ICR mice. The depletion of glutathione (GSH) by formation of GSH conjugates was associated with increased hepatotoxicity in 1-BP-treated mice. The formation of S-propyl and 2-hydroxypropyl GSH conjugates were identified in the liver following 1-BP treatment. In addition, the formation of reactive metabolites of 1-BP by certain cytochrome P-450 (CYP) may be involved in 1-BP-induced hepatotoxicity. The decreased content of hepatic GSH produced by 1-BP was associated not only with increased activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) but also with elevated levels of hepatic thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) in mice where metabolic enzymes were induced by pretreatment with phenobarbital. In addition, the hepatotoxicity induced by 1-BP was prevented by pretreatment with SKF-525A. Taken together, the formation of reactive metabolites by CYP and depletion of GSH may play important roles in hepatotoxicity induced by 1-BP.

  18. Plasma proteome profiles associated with diet-induced metabolic syndrome and the early onset of metabolic syndrome in a pig model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinus F W te Pas

    Full Text Available Obesity and related diabetes are important health threatening multifactorial metabolic diseases and it has been suggested that 25% of all diabetic patients are unaware of their patho-physiological condition. Biomarkers for monitoring and control are available, but early stage predictive biomarkers enabling prevention of these diseases are still lacking. We used the pig as a model to study metabolic disease because humans and pigs share a multitude of metabolic similarities. Diabetes was chemically induced and control and diabetic pigs were either fed a high unsaturated fat (Mediterranean diet or a high saturated fat/cholesterol/sugar (cafeteria diet. Physiological parameters related to fat metabolism and diabetes were measured. Diabetic pigs' plasma proteome profiles differed more between the two diets than control pigs plasma proteome profiles. The expression levels of several proteins correlated well with (pathophysiological parameters related to the fat metabolism (cholesterol, VLDL, LDL, NEFA and diabetes (Glucose and to the diet fed to the animals. Studying only the control pigs as a model for metabolic syndrome when fed the two diets showed correlations to the same parameters but now more focused on insulin, glucose and abdominal fat depot parameters. We conclude that proteomic profiles can be used as a biomarker to identify pigs with developing metabolic syndrome (prediabetes and diabetes when fed a cafeteria diet. It could be developed into a potential biomarkers for the early recognition of metabolic diseases.

  19. Plasma proteome profiles associated with diet-induced metabolic syndrome and the early onset of metabolic syndrome in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Pas, Marinus F W; Koopmans, Sietse-Jan; Kruijt, Leo; Calus, Mario P L; Smits, Mari A

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and related diabetes are important health threatening multifactorial metabolic diseases and it has been suggested that 25% of all diabetic patients are unaware of their patho-physiological condition. Biomarkers for monitoring and control are available, but early stage predictive biomarkers enabling prevention of these diseases are still lacking. We used the pig as a model to study metabolic disease because humans and pigs share a multitude of metabolic similarities. Diabetes was chemically induced and control and diabetic pigs were either fed a high unsaturated fat (Mediterranean) diet or a high saturated fat/cholesterol/sugar (cafeteria) diet. Physiological parameters related to fat metabolism and diabetes were measured. Diabetic pigs' plasma proteome profiles differed more between the two diets than control pigs plasma proteome profiles. The expression levels of several proteins correlated well with (patho)physiological parameters related to the fat metabolism (cholesterol, VLDL, LDL, NEFA) and diabetes (Glucose) and to the diet fed to the animals. Studying only the control pigs as a model for metabolic syndrome when fed the two diets showed correlations to the same parameters but now more focused on insulin, glucose and abdominal fat depot parameters. We conclude that proteomic profiles can be used as a biomarker to identify pigs with developing metabolic syndrome (prediabetes) and diabetes when fed a cafeteria diet. It could be developed into a potential biomarkers for the early recognition of metabolic diseases.

  20. Metabolic flux ratio analysis and multi-objective optimization revealed a globally conserved and coordinated metabolic response of E. coli to paraquat-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tie; Rui, Bin; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Ximing; Yi, Yin; Wen, Han; Zheng, Haoran; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2013-01-27

    The ability of a microorganism to adapt to changes in the environment, such as in nutrient or oxygen availability, is essential for its competitive fitness and survival. The cellular objective and the strategy of the metabolic response to an extreme environment are therefore of tremendous interest and, thus, have been increasingly explored. However, the cellular objective of the complex regulatory structure of the metabolic changes has not yet been fully elucidated and more details regarding the quantitative behaviour of the metabolic flux redistribution are required to understand the systems-wide biological significance of this response. In this study, the intracellular metabolic flux ratios involved in the central carbon metabolism were determined by fractional (13)C-labeling and metabolic flux ratio analysis (MetaFoR) of the wild-type E. coli strain JM101 at an oxidative environment in a chemostat. We observed a significant increase in the flux through phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malic enzyme (MEZ) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT). We applied an ε-constraint based multi-objective optimization to investigate the trade-off relationships between the biomass yield and the generation of reductive power using the in silico iJR904 genome-scale model of E. coli K-12. The theoretical metabolic redistribution supports that the trans-hydrogenase pathway should not play a direct role in the defence mounted by E. coli against oxidative stress. The agreement between the measured ratio and the theoretical redistribution established the significance of NADPH synthesis as the goal of the metabolic reprogramming that occurs in response to oxidative stress. Our work presents a framework that combines metabolic flux ratio analysis and multi-objective optimization to investigate the metabolic trade-offs that occur under varied environmental conditions. Our results led to the proposal that the metabolic response of E

  1. Human brain dopamine metabolism in levodopa-induced dyskinesia and wearing-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Ali H; Fenton, Mark E; Di Paolo, Thérèse; Sitte, Harold; Pifl, Christian; Hornykiewicz, Oleh

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this study was to identify dopamine (DA) metabolism pattern in Lewy body Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with dyskinesia (Dysk) only, with wearing-off (WO) only, or no motor complications (NMC) induced by levodopa (LD). DA, homovanillic acid (HVA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) were measured individual basal ganglia nuclei of nine PD patients who received LD for 6-18 years. Three patients had only Dysk, three only WO, and three had neither Dysk nor WO. Biochemical measurements in PD brains were compared with four non-neurological control brains from individuals matched for age and post-mortem retrieval time. DA levels in the PD were reduced in the caudate by 87% and putamen by 99%. In the caudates, the HVA/DA molar ratio as an index of DA metabolism was similar in the WO and the Dysk patients. However, in the putamen, the ratio of HVA/DA was significantly higher in the WO compared with the Dysk (p = 0.03)and the NMC (p = 0.04) groups of patients. In the putamen, the DOPAC levels were higher in the WO cases while in the Dysk cases, 3-MT levels were higher. The results suggest that in the WO only cases, the putaminal DA was in large measure metabolized intraneuronally while the DA metabolism in our Dysk only patients was mainly extraneuronal. We conclude that the magnitude and the site (intra vs. extraneuronal) of the synaptic DA metabolism in the putamen plays a significant role in LD-induced Dysk and WO.

  2. Metabolic and adaptive immune responses induced in mice infected with tissue-dwelling nematode Trichinella zimbabwensis

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    Onkoba, N.; Chimbari, M.J.; Kamau, J.M.; Mukaratirwa, S.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-dwelling helminths are known to induce intestinal and systemic inflammation accompanied with host compensatory mechanisms to counter balance nutritional and metabolic deficiencies. The metabolic and immune responses of the host depend on parasite species and tissues affected by the parasite. This study investigated metabolic and immuno-inflammatory responses of mice infected with tissue-dwelling larvae of Trichinella zimbabwensis and explored the relationship between infection, metabolic parameters and Th1/Th17 immune responses. Sixty (60) female BALB/c mice aged between 6 to 8 weeks old were randomly assigned into T. zimbabwensis-infected and control groups. Levels of Th1 (interferon-γ) and Th17 (interleukin-17) cytokines, insulin and blood glucose were determined as well as measurements of body weight, food and water intake. Results showed that during the enteric phase of infection, insulin and IFN-γ levels were significantly higher in the Trichinella infected group accompanied with a reduction in the trends of food intake and weight loss compared with the control group. During systemic larval migration, trends in food and water intake were significantly altered and this was attributed to compensatory feeding resulting in weight gain, reduced insulin levels and increased IL-17 levels. Larval migration also induced a Th1/Th17 derived inflammatory response. It was concluded that T. zimbabwensis alters metabolic parameters by instigating host compensatory feeding. Furthermore, we showed for the first time that non-encapsulated T. zimbabwensis parasite plays a role in immunomodulating host Th1/Th17 type responses during chronic infection. PMID:27882304

  3. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism

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    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how alcohol consumption promotes the onset of human breast cancer(s). One hypothesis is that ethanol induces metabolic changes in the tumor microenvironment, which then enhances epithelial tumor growth. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we used a co-culture system consisting of human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation. Oxidative stress in stromal fibroblasts also results in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, driving the induction of ketone body production in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, ethanol has just the opposite effect in epithelial cancer cells, where it confers autophagy resistance, elevates mitochondrial biogenesis and induces key enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1/OXCT1). During co-culture, ethanol treatment also converts MCF7 cells from an ER(+) to an ER(-) status, which is thought to be associated with “stemness,” more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Thus, ethanol treatment induces ketone production in cancer-associated fibroblasts and ketone re-utilization in epithelial cancer cells, fueling tumor cell growth via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). This “two-compartment” metabolic model is consistent with previous historical observations that ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde (which induces oxidative stress) and then ultimately to acetyl-CoA (a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), or can be used to synthesize ketone bodies. As such, our results provide a novel mechanism by which alcohol consumption could metabolically convert “low-risk” breast cancer patients to “high-risk” status, explaining tumor recurrence or disease progression. Hence, our findings have clear implications for both breast cancer prevention and therapy. Remarkably, our results

  4. SOCS3 deficiency in leptin receptor-expressing cells mitigates the development of pregnancy-induced metabolic changes

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    Thais T. Zampieri

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Our study identified the increased hypothalamic expression of SOCS3 as a key mechanism responsible for triggering pregnancy-induced leptin resistance and metabolic adaptations. These findings not only help to explain a common phenomenon of the mammalian physiology, but it may also aid in the development of approaches to prevent and treat gestational metabolic imbalances.

  5. High Glucose-Induced PC12 Cell Death by Increasing Glutamate Production and Decreasing Methyl Group Metabolism

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    Minjiang Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. High glucose- (HG- induced neuronal cell death is responsible for the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the effect of HG on metabolism in neuronal cells is still unclear. Materials and Methods. The neural-crest derived PC12 cells were cultured for 72 h in the HG (75 mM or control (25 mM groups. We used NMR-based metabolomics to examine both intracellular and extracellular metabolic changes in HG-treated PC12 cells. Results. We found that the reduction in intracellular lactate may be due to excreting more lactate into the extracellular medium under HG condition. HG also induced the changes of other energy-related metabolites, such as an increased succinate and creatine phosphate. Our results also reveal that the synthesis of glutamate from the branched-chain amino acids (isoleucine and valine may be enhanced under HG. Increased levels of intracellular alanine, phenylalanine, myoinositol, and choline were observed in HG-treated PC12 cells. In addition, HG-induced decreases in intracellular dimethylamine, dimethylglycine, and 3-methylhistidine may indicate a downregulation of methyl group metabolism. Conclusions. Our metabolomic results suggest that HG-induced neuronal cell death may be attributed to a series of metabolic changes, involving energy metabolism, amino acids metabolism, osmoregulation and membrane metabolism, and methyl group metabolism.

  6. Halofuginone reduces the inflammatory responses of DSS-induced colitis through metabolic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Mu, Huai-Xue; Zhao, Ling; Du, Jun; Yang, Depo; Wang, Dongmei; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Lin, Shu-Hai

    2016-06-21

    Hypoxia and inflammation have been identified as the hallmarks of colitis, intertwined with metabolism. Here, we report that halofuginone (HF), an antiparasitic drug, attenuates dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, as represented by attenuating the disease activity index, inhibiting colonic shortening, ameliorating colonic lesions and histological signs of damage, reducing colonic myeloperoxidase activity, and suppressing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in colon tissue. Intriguingly, the hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1α) and tumor necrosis factor alpha were also suppressed by HF treatment in colon tissues, exhibiting a tissue-specific effect. To further reveal the metabolic signatures upon HF treatment, mass spectrometry-based metabolomic analysis of the small molecular metabolites in liver, spleen and colon tissues was performed. As a result, we found that HF treatment counteracted the levels of acylcarnitines, including palmitoyl-l-carnitine, isobutyrylcarnitine, vaccenylcarnitine, and myristoylcarnitine, in colon tissues with DSS induction, but no significant change in the levels of acylcarnitines was observed in liver or spleen tissues. The metabolic signatures may indicate that incomplete fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in the colon could be restored upon HF treatment as the tissue-specific metabolic characterization. Taken together, our findings uncovered that the HF potentiated anti-inflammatory effect in DSS-induced colitis in mice and its underlying mechanisms could be associated with the inhibition of HIF-1α and reduced levels of acylcarnitines, suggesting that both the inhibition of HIF-1α and the counteraction of incomplete FAO might be useful in the prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  7. Hydroxytyrosol prevents diet-induced metabolic syndrome and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ke; Xu, Jie; Zou, Xuan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Cong; Zheng, Adi; Li, Hao; Li, Hua; Szeto, Ignatius Man-Yau; Shi, Yujie; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang; Feng, Zhihui

    2014-02-01

    A Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil has profound influence on health outcomes including metabolic syndrome. However, the active compound and detailed mechanisms still remain unclear. Hydroxytyrosol (HT), a major polyphenolic compound in virgin olive oil, has received increased attention for its antioxidative activity and regulation of mitochondrial function. Here, we investigated whether HT is the active compound in olive oil exerting a protective effect against metabolic syndrome. In this study, we show that HT could prevent high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance in C57BL/6J mice after 17 weeks supplementation. Within liver and skeletal muscle tissues, HT could decrease HFD-induced lipid deposits through inhibition of the SREBP-1c/FAS pathway, ameliorate HFD-induced oxidative stress by enhancing antioxidant enzyme activities, normalize expression of mitochondrial complex subunits and mitochondrial fission marker Drp1, and eventually inhibit apoptosis activation. Moreover, in muscle tissue, the levels of mitochondrial carbonyl protein were decreased and mitochondrial complex activities were significantly improved by HT supplementation. In db/db mice, HT significantly decreased fasting glucose, similar to metformin. Notably, HT decreased serum lipid, at which metformin failed. Also, HT was more effective at decreasing the oxidation levels of lipids and proteins in both liver and muscle tissue. Similar to the results in the HFD model, HT decreased muscle mitochondrial carbonyl protein levels and improved mitochondrial complex activities in db/db mice. Our study links the olive oil component HT to diabetes and metabolic disease through changes that are not limited to decreases in oxidative stress, suggesting a potential pharmaceutical or clinical use of HT in metabolic syndrome treatment.

  8. Amino acid metabolism inhibits antibody-driven kidney injury by inducing autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Kapil; Shinde, Rahul; Liu, Haiyun; Gnana-Prakasam, Jaya P; Veeranan-Karmegam, Rajalakshmi; Huang, Lei; Ravishankar, Buvana; Bradley, Jillian; Kvirkvelia, Nino; McMenamin, Malgorzata; Xiao, Wei; Kleven, Daniel; Mellor, Andrew L; Madaio, Michael P; McGaha, Tracy L

    2015-06-15

    Inflammatory kidney disease is a major clinical problem that can result in end-stage renal failure. In this article, we show that Ab-mediated inflammatory kidney injury and renal disease in a mouse nephrotoxic serum nephritis model was inhibited by amino acid metabolism and a protective autophagic response. The metabolic signal was driven by IFN-γ-mediated induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) enzyme activity with subsequent activation of a stress response dependent on the eIF2α kinase general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2). Activation of GCN2 suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production in glomeruli and reduced macrophage recruitment to the kidney during the incipient stage of Ab-induced glomerular inflammation. Further, inhibition of autophagy or genetic ablation of Ido1 or Gcn2 converted Ab-induced, self-limiting nephritis to fatal end-stage renal disease. Conversely, increasing kidney IDO1 activity or treating mice with a GCN2 agonist induced autophagy and protected mice from nephritic kidney damage. Finally, kidney tissue from patients with Ab-driven nephropathy showed increased IDO1 abundance and stress gene expression. Thus, these findings support the hypothesis that the IDO-GCN2 pathway in glomerular stromal cells is a critical negative feedback mechanism that limits inflammatory renal pathologic changes by inducing autophagy.

  9. Palmitic acid induces central leptin resistance and impairs hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Licai; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wu, Yizhen; Wang, Hongqin; Camer, Danielle; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-05-01

    The consumption of diets rich in saturated fat largely contributes to the development of obesity in modern societies. A diet high in saturated fats can induce inflammation and impair leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. However, the role of saturated fatty acids on hypothalamic leptin signaling, and hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism remains largely undiscovered. In this study, we investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of a saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid (PA, C16:0), on central leptin sensitivity, hypothalamic leptin signaling, inflammatory molecules and hepatic energy metabolism in C57BL/6J male mice. We found that the icv administration of PA led to central leptin resistance, evidenced by the inhibition of central leptin's suppression of food intake. Central leptin resistance was concomitant with impaired hypothalamic leptin signaling (JAK2-STAT3, PKB/Akt-FOXO1) and a pro-inflammatory response (TNF-α, IL1-β, IL-6 and pIκBa) in the mediobasal hypothalamus and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei. Furthermore, the pre-administration of icv PA blunted the effect of leptin-induced decreases in mRNA expression related to gluconeogenesis (G6Pase and PEPCK), glucose transportation (GLUT2) and lipogenesis (FAS and SCD1) in the liver of mice. Therefore, elevated central PA concentrations can induce pro-inflammatory responses and leptin resistance, which are associated with disorders of energy homeostasis in the liver as a result of diet-induced obesity.

  10. Diet-induced metabolic hamster model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

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    Bhathena J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jasmine Bhathena, Arun Kulamarva, Christopher Martoni, Aleksandra Malgorzata Urbanska, Meenakshi Malhotra, Arghya Paul, Satya PrakashBiomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Artificial Cells and Organs Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, CanadaBackground: Obesity, hypercholesterolemia, elevated triglycerides, and type 2 diabetes are major risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Hamsters, unlike rats or mice, respond well to diet-induced obesity, increase body mass and adiposity on group housing, and increase food intake due to social confrontation-induced stress. They have a cardiovascular and hepatic system similar to that of humans, and can thus be a useful model for human pathophysiology.Methods: Experiments were planned to develop a diet-induced Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamster model of dyslipidemia and associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the metabolic syndrome. Hamsters were fed a normal control diet, a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, a high-fat/high-cholesterol/methionine-deficient/choline-devoid diet, and a high-fat/high-cholesterol/choline-deficient diet. Serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, atherogenic index, and body weight were quantified biweekly. Fat deposition in the liver was observed and assessed following lipid staining with hematoxylin and eosin and with oil red O.Results: In this study, we established a diet-induced Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamster model for studying dyslipidemia and associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the metabolic syndrome. Hyperlipidemia and elevated serum glucose concentrations were induced using this diet. Atherogenic index was elevated, increasing the risk for a cardiovascular event. Histological analysis of liver specimens at the end of four weeks showed increased fat deposition in the liver of animals fed

  11. Host Genotype and Gut Microbiome Modulate Insulin Secretion and Diet-Induced Metabolic Phenotypes

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    Julia H. Kreznar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation drives phenotypic diversity and influences the predisposition to metabolic disease. Here, we characterize the metabolic phenotypes of eight genetically distinct inbred mouse strains in response to a high-fat/high-sucrose diet. We found significant variation in diabetes-related phenotypes and gut microbiota composition among the different mouse strains in response to the dietary challenge and identified taxa associated with these traits. Follow-up microbiota transplant experiments showed that altering the composition of the gut microbiota modifies strain-specific susceptibility to diet-induced metabolic disease. Animals harboring microbial communities with enhanced capacity for processing dietary sugars and for generating hydrophobic bile acids showed increased susceptibility to metabolic disease. Notably, differences in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion between different mouse strains were partially recapitulated via gut microbiota transfer. Our results suggest that the gut microbiome contributes to the genetic and phenotypic diversity observed among mouse strains and provide a link between the gut microbiome and insulin secretion.

  12. Bezafibrate Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Metabolic Flexibility in STZ-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Andras; Huypens, Peter; Neschen, Susanne; Irmler, Martin; Rozman, Jan; Rathkolb, Birgit; Neff, Frauke; Prehn, Cornelia; Dubois, Guillaume; Baumann, Martina; Massinger, Rebecca; Gradinger, Daniel; Przemeck, Gerhard K H; Repp, Birgit; Aichler, Michaela; Feuchtinger, Annette; Schommers, Philipp; Stöhr, Oliver; Sanchez-Lasheras, Carmen; Adamski, Jerzy; Peter, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger; Beckers, Johannes; Walch, Axel K; Fuchs, Helmut; Wolf, Eckhard; Schubert, Markus; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Bezafibrate (BEZ), a pan activator of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), has been generally used to treat hyperlipidemia for decades. Clinical trials with type 2 diabetes patients indicated that BEZ also has beneficial effects on glucose metabolism, although the underlying mechanisms of these effects remain elusive. Even less is known about a potential role for BEZ in treating type 1 diabetes. Here we show that BEZ markedly improves hyperglycemia and glucose and insulin tolerance in mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, an insulin-deficient mouse model of type 1 diabetes. BEZ treatment of STZ mice significantly suppressed the hepatic expression of genes that are annotated in inflammatory processes, whereas the expression of PPAR and insulin target gene transcripts was increased. Furthermore, BEZ-treated mice also exhibited improved metabolic flexibility as well as an enhanced mitochondrial mass and function in the liver. Finally, we show that the number of pancreatic islets and the area of insulin-positive cells tended to be higher in BEZ-treated mice. Our data suggest that BEZ may improve impaired glucose metabolism by augmenting hepatic mitochondrial performance, suppressing hepatic inflammatory pathways, and improving insulin sensitivity and metabolic flexibility. Thus, BEZ treatment might also be useful for patients with impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes.

  13. Red-Koji Fermented Red Ginseng Ameliorates High Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Disorders in Mice

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    Il Je Cho

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation of medicinal herbs improves their pharmacological efficacy. In this study, we investigated the effects of red-koji fermented red ginseng (fRG on high-fat diet (HFD-mediated metabolic disorders, and those effects were compared to those of non-fermented red ginseng (RG. fRG (500, 250 or 125 mg/kg, RG (250 mg/kg, simvastatin (10 mg/kg, silymarin (100 mg/kg and metformin (250 mg/kg were orally administered from 1 week after initiation of HFD supply for 84 days. The diameter of adipocytes in periovarian and abdominal fat pads and the thickness of the abdominal fat were significantly decreased by fRG treatment, while HFD-mediated weight gain was partly alleviated by fRG in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, biochemical and histomorphometrical analyses clearly indicated that fRG significantly inhibited HFD-induced metabolic disorders such as hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, hepatopathy and nephropathy in a dose-dependent manner. More favorable pharmacological effects on HFD-mediated metabolic disorders were also observed with fRG compared to an equal dose of RG. This finding provides direct evidence that the pharmacological activities of RG were enhanced by red-koji fermentation, and fRG could be a neutraceutical resource for the alleviation of obesity-mediated metabolic disorders.

  14. Discovering the role of mitochondria in the iron deficiency-induced metabolic responses of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigani, Gianpiero

    2012-01-01

    In plants, iron (Fe) deficiency-induced chlorosis is a major problem, affecting both yield and quality of crops. Plants have evolved multifaceted strategies, such as reductase activity, proton extrusion, and specialised storage proteins, to mobilise Fe from the environment and distribute it within the plant. Because of its fundamental role in plant productivity, several issues concerning Fe homeostasis in plants are currently intensively studied. The activation of Fe uptake reactions requires an overall adaptation of the primary metabolism because these activities need the constant supply of energetic substrates (i.e., NADPH and ATP). Several studies concerning the metabolism of Fe-deficient plants have been conducted, but research focused on mitochondrial implications in adaptive responses to nutritional stress has only begun in recent years. Mitochondria are the energetic centre of the root cell, and they are strongly affected by Fe deficiency. Nevertheless, they display a high level of functional flexibility, which allows them to maintain the viability of the cell. Mitochondria represent a crucial target of studies on plant homeostasis, and it might be of interest to concentrate future research on understanding how mitochondria orchestrate the reprogramming of root cell metabolism under Fe deficiency. In this review, I summarise what it is known about the effect of Fe deficiency on mitochondrial metabolism and morphology. Moreover, I present a detailed view of the possible roles of mitochondria in the development of plant responses to Fe deficiency, integrating old findings with new and discussing new hypotheses for future investigations.

  15. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Department of Plastic Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sang Ho [Department of Dermatology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sil [College of Pharmacy & Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewah Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun-Jung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaeho, E-mail: jjhmd@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-08

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. - Highlights: • The effects of radiation on skin thickness in mice. • Next generation sequencing revealed that radiation inhibited pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression. • PDK2 inhibited irradiation-induced cytokine gene expression. • Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness.

  16. Insights into pH-induced metabolic switch by flux balance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, Marija; Noh, Heeju; Morbidelli, Massimo; Soos, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Lactate accumulation in mammalian cell culture is known to impede cellular growth and productivity. The control of lactate formation and consumption in a hybridoma cell line was achieved by pH alteration during the early exponential growth phase. In particular, lactate consumption was induced even at high glucose concentrations at pH 6.8, whereas highly increased production of lactate was obtained at pH 7.8. Consequently, constraint-based metabolic flux analysis was used to examine pH-induced metabolic states in the same growth state. We demonstrated that lactate influx at pH 6.8 led cells to maintain high fluxes in the TCA cycle and malate-aspartate shuttle resulting in a high ATP production rate. In contrast, under increased pH conditions, less ATP was generated and different ATP sources were utilized. Gene expression analysis led to the conclusion that lactate formation at high pH was enabled by gluconeogenic pathways in addition to facilitated glucose uptake. The obtained results provide new insights into the influence of pH on cellular metabolism, and are of importance when considering pH heterogeneities typically present in large scale industrial bioreactors.

  17. Olanzapine-induced changes in glucose metabolism are independent of the melanin-concentrating hormone system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Elodie M; Toonen, Pim W; Eggels, Leslie; Foppen, Ewout; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; la Fleur, Susanne E; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2013-11-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs such as Olanzapine (Ola) induce weight gain and metabolic changes associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms underlying these undesired side-effects are currently unknown. Chagnon et al. showed that the common allele rs7973796 of the prepro-melanin-concentrating hormone (PMCH) gene is associated with a greater body mass index in Ola-treated schizophrenic patients. As PMCH encodes for the orexigenic neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), it was hypothesized that MCH is involved in Ola-induced metabolic changes. We have recently reported that the intragastric infusion of Ola results in hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance in male rats. In order to test in vivo the possible involvement of the PMCH gene in the pathogenesis of Ola side-effects, we administered Ola intragastrically in wild-type (WT) and PMCH knock-out (KO) rats. Our results show that glucose and corticosterone levels, as well as endogenous glucose production, are elevated by the infusion of Ola in both WT and KO animals. Thus, the lack of MCH does not seem to affect the acute effects of Ola on glucose metabolism. On the other hand, these effects might be obliterated by compensatory changes in other hypothalamic systems. In addition, possible modulatory effects of the MCH KO on the long term effects of Ola, i.e. increased adiposity, body weight gain, have not been investigated yet.

  18. Quantitative optical imaging of paracetamol-induced metabolism changes in the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaowen; Wang, Haolu; Liu, Xin; Roberts, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Paracetamol is the most readily available and widely used painkiller. However, its toxicity remains the most common cause of liver injury. The toxicity of paracetamol has been attributing to its toxic metabolite, which depletes cellular glutathione (GSH) stores and reacts within cells to increase oxidative stress, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell necrosis. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) can provide quantitative imaging of biological tissues and organs in vivo and allow direct visualization of cellular events, which were used to monitor cellular metabolism in paracetamol-induced toxicity in this study. To better understand mechanisms of paracetamol induced liver injury, the redox ratio of NADH/FAD in liver cells were detected and quantified by MPM imaging to represent the relative rates of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation within cells. Compared to normal liver, average fluorescence lifetime of NADH and redox ratio of NADH/FAD in hepatocytes was significantly decreased after paracetamol overdose for 12 and 24 hrs, reflecting impaired metabolic activity. GSH levels of treatment groups were significantly lower than those of normal livers, with gradually decreasing from periportal to centrilobular zonation. This imaging technique has significant implications for investigating metabolic mechanisms of paracetamol toxicity.

  19. Salmonella Modulates Metabolism During Growth under Conditions that Induce Expression of Virulence Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Mo; Schmidt, Brian; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Ansong, Charles; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-04-05

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a facultative pathogen that uses complex mechanisms to invade and proliferate within mammalian host cells. To investigate possible contributions of metabolic processes in S. Typhimurium grown under conditions known to induce expression of virulence genes, we used a metabolomics-driven systems biology approach coupled with genome scale modeling. First, we identified distinct metabolite profiles associated with bacteria grown in either rich or virulence-inducing media and report the most comprehensive coverage of the S. Typhimurium metabolome to date. Second, we applied an omics-informed genome scale modeling analysis of the functional consequences of adaptive alterations in S. Typhimurium metabolism during growth under our conditions. Excitingly, we observed possible sequestration of metabolites recently suggested to have immune modulating roles. Modeling efforts highlighted a decreased cellular capability to both produce and utilize intracellular amino acids during stationary phase culture in virulence conditions, despite significant abundance increases for these molecules as observed by our metabolomics measurements. Model-guided analysis suggested that alterations in metabolism prioritized other activities necessary for pathogenesis instead, such as lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

  20. Irradiation induced injury reduces energy metabolism in small intestine of Tibet minipigs.

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    Yu-Jue Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The radiation-induced energy metabolism dysfunction related to injury and radiation doses is largely elusive. The purpose of this study is to investigate the early response of energy metabolism in small intestinal tissue and its correlation with pathologic lesion after total body X-ray irradiation (TBI in Tibet minipigs. METHODS AND RESULTS: 30 Tibet minipigs were assigned into 6 groups including 5 experimental groups and one control group with 6 animals each group. The minipigs in these experimental groups were subjected to a TBI of 2, 5, 8, 11, and 14 Gy, respectively. Small intestine tissues were collected at 24 h following X-ray exposure and analyzed by histology and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. DNA contents in this tissue were also examined. Irradiation causes pathologic lesions and mitochondrial abnormalities. The Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA content-corrected and uncorrected adenosine-triphosphate (ATP and total adenine nucleotides (TAN were significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by 2-8 Gy exposure, and no further reduction was observed over 8 Gy. CONCLUSION: TBI induced injury is highly dependent on the irradiation dosage in small intestine and inversely correlates with the energy metabolism, with its reduction potentially indicating the severity of injury.

  1. Psychosocial stress induces hyperphagia and exacerbates diet-induced insulin resistance and the manifestations of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghez, Valentina; Razzoli, Maria; Carobbio, Stefania; Campbell, Mark; McCallum, Jacob; Cero, Cheryl; Ceresini, Graziano; Cabassi, Aderville; Govoni, Paolo; Franceschini, Paolo; de Santis, Valentina; Gurney, Allison; Ninkovic, Ivana; Parmigiani, Stefano; Palanza, Paola; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Bartolomucci, Alessandro

    2013-12-01

    Stress and hypercaloric food are recognized risk factors for obesity, Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). Given the complexity of these metabolic processes and the unavailability of animal models, there is poor understanding of their underlying mechanisms. We established a model of chronic psychosocial stress in which subordinate mice are vulnerable to weight gain while dominant mice are resilient. Subordinate mice fed a standard diet showed marked hyperphagia, high leptin, low adiponectin, and dyslipidemia. Despite these molecular signatures of MetS and T2D, subordinate mice fed a standard diet were still euglycemic. We hypothesized that stress predisposes subordinate mice to develop T2D when synergizing with other risk factors. High fat diet aggravated dyslipidemia and the MetS thus causing a pre-diabetes-like state in subordinate mice. Contrary to subordinates, dominant mice were fully protected from stress-induced metabolic disorders when fed both a standard- and a high fat-diet. Dominant mice showed a hyperphagic response that was similar to subordinate but, unlike subordinates, showed a significant increase in VO2, VCO2, and respiratory exchange ratio when compared to control mice. Overall, we demonstrated a robust stress- and social status-dependent effect on the development of MetS and T2D and provided insights on the physiological mechanisms. Our results are reminiscent of the effect of the individual socioeconomic status on human health and provide an animal model to study the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  2. Chiral metabolism of propafenone in rat hepatic microsomes treated with two inducers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan Zhou; Tong-Wei Yao; Su Zeng

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the influence of inducers of drug metabolism enzyme, β-naphthoflavone (BNF) and dexamethasone (DEX), on the stereoselective metabolism of propafenone in the rat hepatic microsomes. METHODS: Phase I metabolism of propafenone was studied using the microsomes induced by BNF and DEX and the non-induced microsome was used as the control. The enzymatic kinetics parameters of propafenone enantiomers were calculated by regress analysis of Eadie-Hofstee Plots.Propafenone enantiomer concentrations were assayed by a chiral HPLC. RESULTS: The metabolite of propafenone, N-desalkylpropafenone, was found after incubstion of propafenone with the rat hepatic microsomes induced by BNF and DEX. In these two groups, the stereoselectivity favoring R ( - ) isomer was observed in metabolism st Iow substrate concentrations of racemic propafenone, but lost the stereoselectivity st high substrate concentrations.However; in control group, no stereeselectivity was observed. The enzyme kinetic parameters were: ① Km.Control group: R( - ) 83 ± 6, S( + ) 94 ± 7; BNF group: R (-)105 ± 6, S( + )128 ± 14; DEX group: R( - ) 86± 11, S( + ) 118 ± 16; ② vmax. Control group: R( - ) 0.75 ± 0.16, S( + ) 0.72±0.07; BNF group: R( - )1.04± 0.15, S( + )1.07±14; DEX group: R( - ) 0.93 ± 0.06, S( + ) 1.04 ± 0.09; (③)Clint. Control group: R( - ) 8.9± 1.1, S( + ) 7.6±0.7; BNFgroup: R( - )9.9±0.9, S( + )8.3±0.7; DEX group: R( - )10.9± 0.8, S( + ) 8.9 ± 0.9. The enantiomeric differences in Km and Clint were both significant, but not in Vmax, in BNF and DEX group. Whereas enantiomeric differences in three parameters were all insignificant in control group.Furthermore, Km and Umax were both significantly less than those in BNF or DEX group. In the rat liver microsorne induced by DEX, nimodipine (NDP) decreased the stereoselectivity in propafenone metabolism at Iow substrate concentration. The inhibition of NDP on the metabolism of propafenone was stereo.selective with R

  3. Self-induced metabolic state switching by a tunable cell density sensor for microbial isopropanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Yuki; Hanai, Taizo

    2015-07-01

    Chemicals production by engineered microorganisms often requires induction of target gene expression at an appropriate cell density to reduce conflict with cell growth. The lux system in Vibrio fischeri is a well-characterized model for cell density-dependent regulation of gene expression termed quorum sensing (QS). However, there are currently no reports for application of the lux system to microbial chemical production. Here, we constructed a synthetic lux system as a tunable cell density sensor-regulator using a synthetic lux promoter and a positive feedback loop in Escherichia coli. In this system, self-induction of a target gene expression is driven by QS-signal, and its threshold cell density can be changed depending on the concentration of a chemical inducer. We demonstrate auto-redirection of metabolic flux from central metabolic pathways toward a synthetic isopropanol pathway at a desired cell density resulting in a significant increase in isopropanol production.

  4. Arsenic induces structural and compositional colonic microbiome change and promotes host nitrogen and amino acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheer, Rishu; Patterson, Jena; Dudash, Mark; Stachler, Elyse N; Bibby, Kyle J; Stolz, Donna B; Shiva, Sruti; Wang, Zeneng; Hazen, Stanley L; Barchowsky, Aaron; Stolz, John F

    2015-12-15

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water causes cancer and non-cancer diseases. However, mechanisms for chronic arsenic-induced pathogenesis, especially in response to lower exposure levels, are unclear. In addition, the importance of health impacts from xeniobiotic-promoted microbiome changes is just being realized and effects of arsenic on the microbiome with relation to disease promotion are unknown. To investigate impact of arsenic exposure on both microbiome and host metabolism, the stucture and composition of colonic microbiota, their metabolic phenotype, and host tissue and plasma metabolite levels were compared in mice exposed for 2, 5, or 10weeks to 0, 10 (low) or 250 (high) ppb arsenite (As(III)). Genotyping of colonic bacteria revealed time and arsenic concentration dependent shifts in community composition, particularly the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, relative to those seen in the time-matched controls. Arsenic-induced erosion of bacterial biofilms adjacent to the mucosal lining and changes in the diversity and abundance of morphologically distinct species indicated changes in microbial community structure. Bacterical spores increased in abundance and intracellular inclusions decreased with high dose arsenic. Interestingly, expression of arsenate reductase (arsA) and the As(III) exporter arsB, remained unchanged, while the dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nrfA) gene expression increased. In keeping with the change in nitrogen metabolism, colonic and liver nitrite and nitrate levels and ratios changed with time. In addition, there was a concomitant increase in pathogenic arginine metabolites in the mouse circulation. These data suggest that arsenic exposure impacts the microbiome and microbiome/host nitrogen metabolism to support disease enhancing pathogenic phenotypes.

  5. Arsenic induces structural and compositional colonic microbiome change and promotes host nitrogen and amino acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheer, Rishu; Patterson, Jena; Dudash, Mark; Stachler, Elyse N.; Bibby, Kyle J.; Stolz, Donna B.; Shiva, Sruti; Wang, Zeneng; Hazen, Stanley L.; Barchowsky, Aaron; Stolz, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water causes cancer and non-cancer diseases. However, mechanisms for chronic arsenic-induced pathogeneis, especially in response to lower exposure levels, are unclear. In addition, the importance of health impacts from xeniobiotic-promoted microbiome changes is just being realized and effects of arsenic on the microbiome with relation to disease promotion are unknown. To investigate impact of arsenic exposure on both microbiome and host metabolism, the stucture and composition of colonic microbiota, their metabolic phenotype, and host tissue and plasma metabolite levels were compared in mice exposed for 2, 5, or 10 weeks to 0, 10 (low) or 250 (high) ppb arsenite (As(III)). Genotyping of colonic bacteria revealed time and arsenic concentration dependent shifts in community composition, particularly the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, relative to those seen in the time-matched controls. Arsenic-induced erosion of bacterial biofilms adjacent to the mucosal lining and changes in the diversity and abundance of morphologically distinct species indicated changes in microbial community structure. Bacterical spores increased in abundance and intracellular inclusions decreased with high dose arsenic. Interestingly, expression of arsenate reductase (arsA) and the As(III) exporter arsB, remained unchanged, while the dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nrfA) gene expression increased. In keeping with the change in nitrogen metabolism, colonic and liver nitrite and nitrate levels and ratios changed with time. In addition, there was a concomitant increase in pathogenic arginine metabolites in the mouse circulation. These data suggest that arsenic exposure impacts the microbiome and microbiome/host nitrogen metabolism to support disease enhancing pathogenic phenotypes. PMID:26529668

  6. Ozone autohemotherapy induces long-term cerebral metabolic changes in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, F; Simonetti, V; Franzini, M; Pandolfi, S; Vaiano, F; Valdenassi, L; Liboni, W

    2014-01-01

    Ozone autohemotherapy is an emerging therapeutic technique that is gaining increasing importance in treating neurological disorders. A validated and standard methodology to assess the effect of such therapy on brain metabolism and circulation is however still lacking. We used a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system to monitor the cerebral metabolism and a transcranial Doppler (TCD) to monitor the blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries. Fifty-four subjects (32 neurological patients and 22 controls) were tested before, during, and after ozone autohemotherapy. We monitored the concentration changes in the level of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin, and in the level of the Cytochrome-c-oxidase (CYT-c). As a primary endpoint of the work, we showed the changes in the brain metabolism and circulation of the entire population. The concentration of oxygenated haemoglobin increased after the reinjection of the ozoned blood and remained higher than the beginning for another 1.5 hours. The concentration of the deoxygenated haemoglobin decreased during the therapy and the CYT-c concentration markedly increased about 1 hour after the reinjection. No significant changes were observed on the blood flow velocity. As secondary endpoint, we compared the NIRS metabolic pattern of 20 remitting-relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) patients against 20 controls. We showed that by using only 7 NIRS variables it was possible to characterize the metabolic brain pattern of the two groups of subjects. The MS subjects showed a marked increase of the CYT-c activity and concentration about 40 minutes after the end of the autohemotherapy, possibly revealing a reduction of the chronic oxidative stress level typical of MS sufferers. From a technical point of view, this preliminary study showed that NIRS could be useful to show the effects of ozone autohemotherapy at cerebral level, in a long-term monitoring. The clinical result of this study is the quantitative measurement of the

  7. Lifestyle-induced metabolic inflexibility and accelerated ageing syndrome: insulin resistance, friend or foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Jimmy D

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The metabolic syndrome may have its origins in thriftiness, insulin resistance and one of the most ancient of all signalling systems, redox. Thriftiness results from an evolutionarily-driven propensity to minimise energy expenditure. This has to be balanced with the need to resist the oxidative stress from cellular signalling and pathogen resistance, giving rise to something we call 'redox-thriftiness'. This is based on the notion that mitochondria may be able to both amplify membrane-derived redox growth signals as well as negatively regulate them, resulting in an increased ATP/ROS ratio. We suggest that 'redox-thriftiness' leads to insulin resistance, which has the effect of both protecting the individual cell from excessive growth/inflammatory stress, while ensuring energy is channelled to the brain, the immune system, and for storage. We also suggest that fine tuning of redox-thriftiness is achieved by hormetic (mild stress signals that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and resistance to oxidative stress, which improves metabolic flexibility. However, in a non-hormetic environment with excessive calories, the protective nature of this system may lead to escalating insulin resistance and rising oxidative stress due to metabolic inflexibility and mitochondrial overload. Thus, the mitochondrially-associated resistance to oxidative stress (and metabolic flexibility may determine insulin resistance. Genetically and environmentally determined mitochondrial function may define a 'tipping point' where protective insulin resistance tips over to inflammatory insulin resistance. Many hormetic factors may induce mild mitochondrial stress and biogenesis, including exercise, fasting, temperature extremes, unsaturated fats, polyphenols, alcohol, and even metformin and statins. Without hormesis, a proposed redox-thriftiness tipping point might lead to a feed forward insulin resistance cycle in the presence of excess calories. We therefore suggest

  8. Alcohol Decreases Baseline Brain Glucose Metabolism More in Heavy Drinkers Than Controls But Has No Effect on Stimulation-Induced Metabolic Increases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Shokri Kojori, Ehsan; Fowler, Joanna S.; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-01-01

    During alcohol intoxication, the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75 g/kg alcohol vs placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video stimulation (VS) versus when given with no stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HDs) and 23 healthy controls, each of whom underwent four PET-18FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p = 0.04); that alcohol (compared with placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20 ± 13%) than controls (9 ± 11%, p = 0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r = 0.36, p = 0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10 ± 12%) compared with NS in both groups (15 ± 13%, p = 0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e., acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in HDs, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal. PMID:25698759

  9. Effects of Silybum marianum Extract on High-Fat Diet Induced Metabolic Disorders in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayin Fatma Kubra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Silybum marianum extract (SME has been used for centuries as a natural remedy for diseases of liver and biliary tract. Lately, it has been promoted as a nutritional supplement for beneficial effects on some risk factors of diabetes and hyperlipidemia. In this study we aimed to determine the effects of SME on high-fat diet (HFD induced metabolic disorders. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed HFD for 11 weeks to induce obesity. SME was given to animals for two different durations, for 11 weeks or for 7 weeks. The results showed significant increase in plasma transaminases, total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, leptin, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP, glucose and insulin along with significant increase in body mass index (BMI and liver weights in rats fed the HFD diet compared to rats fed with standard rat diet. SME supplementation for different durations raised improvement in the HFD-induced metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia and hepatopathy at different degrees. Our study concludes that SME can be well considered as an effective supplement to improve insulin and leptin sensitivity and hyperlipidemia and to suppress body weight gain.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Fenofibrate-Induced Metabolic Catastrophe and Glioblastoma Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Anna; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Zapata, Adriana; Dean, Matthew; Mullinax, Jennifer; Marrero, Luis; Parsons, Christopher; Peruzzi, Francesca; Culicchia, Frank; Ochoa, Augusto; Grabacka, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Fenofibrate (FF) is a common lipid-lowering drug and a potent agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). FF and several other agonists of PPARα have interesting anticancer properties, and our recent studies demonstrate that FF is very effective against tumor cells of neuroectodermal origin. In spite of these promising anticancer effects, the molecular mechanism(s) of FF-induced tumor cell toxicity remains to be elucidated. Here we report a novel PPARα-independent mechanism explaining FF's cytotoxicity in vitro and in an intracranial mouse model of glioblastoma. The mechanism involves accumulation of FF in the mitochondrial fraction, followed by immediate impairment of mitochondrial respiration at the level of complex I of the electron transport chain. This mitochondrial action sensitizes tested glioblastoma cells to the PPARα-dependent metabolic switch from glycolysis to fatty acid β-oxidation. As a consequence, prolonged exposure to FF depletes intracellular ATP, activates the AMP-activated protein kinase–mammalian target of rapamycin–autophagy pathway, and results in extensive tumor cell death. Interestingly, autophagy activators attenuate and autophagy inhibitors enhance FF-induced glioblastoma cytotoxicity. Our results explain the molecular basis of FF-induced glioblastoma cytotoxicity and reveal a new supplemental therapeutic approach in which intracranial infusion of FF could selectively trigger metabolic catastrophe in glioblastoma cells. PMID:25332241

  11. Asparagine deprivation mediated by Salmonella asparaginase causes suppression of activation-induced T cell metabolic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, AnnMarie; Luke, Joanna D; Kullas, Amy L; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Botbol, Yair; Koller, Antonius; Tonge, Peter J; Chen, Emily I; Macian, Fernando; van der Velden, Adrianus W M

    2016-02-01

    Salmonellae are pathogenic bacteria that induce immunosuppression by mechanisms that remain largely unknown. Previously, we showed that a putative type II l-asparaginase produced by Salmonella Typhimurium inhibits T cell responses and mediates virulence in a murine model of infection. Here, we report that this putative L-asparaginase exhibits L-asparagine hydrolase activity required for Salmonella Typhimurium to inhibit T cells. We show that L-asparagine is a nutrient important for T cell activation and that L-asparagine deprivation, such as that mediated by the Salmonella Typhimurium L-asparaginase, causes suppression of activation-induced mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, autophagy, Myc expression, and L-lactate secretion. We also show that L-asparagine deprivation mediated by the Salmonella Typhimurium L-asparaginase causes suppression of cellular processes and pathways involved in protein synthesis, metabolism, and immune response. Our results advance knowledge of a mechanism used by Salmonella Typhimurium to inhibit T cell responses and mediate virulence, and provide new insights into the prerequisites of T cell activation. We propose a model in which l-asparagine deprivation inhibits T cell exit from quiescence by causing suppression of activation-induced metabolic reprogramming.

  12. Soybean Aphid Infestation Induces Changes in Fatty Acid Metabolism in Soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Kanobe

    Full Text Available The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura is one of the most important insect pests of soybeans in the North-central region of the US. It has been hypothesized that aphids avoid effective defenses by inhibition of jasmonate-regulated plant responses. Given the role fatty acids play in jasmonate-induced plant defenses, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of soybean leaves and seeds from aphid-infested plants. Aphid infestation reduced levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in leaves with a concomitant increase in palmitic acid. In seeds, a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with an increase in stearic acid and oleic acid. Soybean plants challenged with the brown stem rot fungus or with soybean cyst nematodes did not present changes in fatty acid levels in leaves or seeds, indicating that the changes induced by aphids are not a general response to pests. One of the polyunsaturated fatty acids, linolenic acid, is the precursor of jasmonate; thus, these changes in fatty acid metabolism may be examples of "metabolic hijacking" by the aphid to avoid the induction of effective defenses. Based on the changes in fatty acid levels observed in seeds and leaves, we hypothesize that aphids potentially induce interference in the fatty acid desaturation pathway, likely reducing FAD2 and FAD6 activity that leads to a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our data support the idea that aphids block jasmonate-dependent defenses by reduction of the hormone precursor.

  13. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism during isoflurane-induced hypotension in patients subjected to surgery for cerebral aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J B; Cold, G E; Hansen, E S;

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen were measured during isoflurane-induced hypotension in 10 patients subjected to craniotomy for clipping of a cerebral aneurysm. Flow and metabolism were measured 5-13 days after the subarachnoid haemorrhage by a modification of the classi......Cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen were measured during isoflurane-induced hypotension in 10 patients subjected to craniotomy for clipping of a cerebral aneurysm. Flow and metabolism were measured 5-13 days after the subarachnoid haemorrhage by a modification......). Controlled hypotension to an average MAP of 50-55 mm Hg was induced by increasing the dose of isoflurane, and maintained at an inspired concentration of 2.2 +/- 0.2%. This resulted in a significant decrease in CMRO2 (to 1.73 +/- 0.16 ml/100 g min-1), while CBF was unchanged. After the clipping...

  14. Plasma proteome profiles predict diet-induced metabolic syndrome and the early onset of metabolic syndrome in a pig model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, te M.F.W.; Koopmans, S.J.; Kruijt, L.; Smits, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and related diabetes are important health threatening multifactorial metabolic diseases and it has been suggested that 25 % of all diabetic patients are unaware of their patho-physiological condition. Feeding behavior is often associated with the onset of the metabolic syndrome. We have deve

  15. New opportunities: harnessing induced pluripotency for discovery in diabetes and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Adrian Kee Keong; Wagers, Amy J; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2013-12-03

    The landmark discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by Shinya Yamanaka has transformed regenerative biology. Previously, insights into the pathogenesis of chronic human diseases have been hindered by the inaccessibility of patient samples. However, scientists are now able to convert patient fibroblasts into iPSCs and differentiate them into disease-relevant cell types. This ability opens new avenues for investigating disease pathogenesis and designing novel treatments. In this review, we highlight the uses of human iPSCs to uncover the underlying causes and pathological consequences of diabetes and metabolic syndromes, multifactorial diseases whose etiologies have been difficult to unravel using traditional methodologies.

  16. Hydroxyl Radical Induced Apoptosis Is Closely Related to Changes in Cellular Energy/Redox Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺雨虹; 陈晶; 任建国; 隋森芳; 蔡国平

    2003-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the hydroxyl radical (·OH), are known to be potential modulators of apoptosis.However, the biochemical mechanisms underlying apoptosis induced by·OH, namely how the radical induces a cell to die, are poorly understood.The present work highlights the changes of the energy/redox status during apoptosis by exogenous· OH-treatment.HeLa cells were induced to undergo typical apoptosis by·OH generated directly via the Fe2+-mediated Fenton reaction.The thermodynamics study indicated that the· OH-treatment increased the cellular heat output in the first hours, and then the cellular thermodynamics shifted to endothermic.The data demonstrates that the mitochondria are actively involved in· OH-treatment induced apoptosis, with the cellular oxygen consumption rapidly decreasing after the·OH-treatment for only 0.5 h.But DNA fragmentation, which is the major characteristic of apoptosis, took place 16 h after · OH-treatment.The results suggest that alteration of the energy/redox metabolism and the energy/redox status may be the primary causes among the early events of· OH-induced apoptosis.

  17. Rescue of Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome by Antibiotics or Faecal Transplantation in a Rat Model of Obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanda Di Luccia

    Full Text Available A fructose-rich diet can induce metabolic syndrome, a combination of health disorders that increases the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Diet is also known to alter the microbial composition of the gut, although it is not clear whether such alteration contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome. The aim of this work was to assess the possible link between the gut microbiota and the development of diet-induced metabolic syndrome in a rat model of obesity. Rats were fed either a standard or high-fructose diet. Groups of fructose-fed rats were treated with either antibiotics or faecal samples from control rats by oral gavage. Body composition, plasma metabolic parameters and markers of tissue oxidative stress were measured in all groups. A 16S DNA-sequencing approach was used to evaluate the bacterial composition of the gut of animals under different diets. The fructose-rich diet induced markers of metabolic syndrome, inflammation and oxidative stress, that were all significantly reduced when the animals were treated with antibiotic or faecal samples. The number of members of two bacterial genera, Coprococcus and Ruminococcus, was increased by the fructose-rich diet and reduced by both antibiotic and faecal treatments, pointing to a correlation between their abundance and the development of the metabolic syndrome. Our data indicate that in rats fed a fructose-rich diet the development of metabolic syndrome is directly correlated with variations of the gut content of specific bacterial taxa.

  18. Icariin Is A PPARα Activator Inducing Lipid Metabolic Gene Expression in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Fu Lu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Icariin is effective in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. To understand the effect of icariin on lipid metabolism, effects of icariin on PPARα and its target genes were investigated. Mice were treated orally with icariin at doses of 0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, or clofibrate (500 mg/kg for five days. Liver total RNA was isolated and the expressions of PPARα and lipid metabolism genes were examined. PPARα and its marker genes Cyp4a10 and Cyp4a14 were induced 2-4 fold by icariin, and 4-8 fold by clofibrate. The fatty acid (FA binding and co-activator proteins Fabp1, Fabp4 and Acsl1 were increased 2-fold. The mRNAs of mitochondrial FA β-oxidation enzymes (Cpt1a, Acat1, Acad1 and Hmgcs2 were increased 2-3 fold. The mRNAs of proximal β-oxidation enzymes (Acox1, Ech1, and Ehhadh were also increased by icariin and clofibrate. The expression of mRNAs for sterol regulatory element-binding factor-1 (Srebf1 and FA synthetase (Fasn were unaltered by icariin. The lipid lysis genes Lipe and Pnpla2 were increased by icariin and clofibrate. These results indicate that icariin is a novel PPARα agonist, activates lipid metabolism gene expressions in liver, which could be a basis for its lipid-lowering effects and its beneficial effects against diabetes.

  19. 3-Bromopyruvate treatment induces alterations of metabolic and stress-related pathways in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasserini, Davide; Davidescu, Magdalena; Orvietani, Pier Luigi; Susta, Federica; Macchioni, Lara; Petricciuolo, Maya; Castigli, Emilia; Roberti, Rita; Binaglia, Luciano; Corazzi, Lanfranco

    2017-01-30

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumour of adults. The metabolic phenotype of GBM cells is highly dependent on glycolysis; therefore, therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with glycolytic pathways are under consideration. 3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) is a potent antiglycolytic agent, with a variety of targets and possible effects on global cell metabolism. Here we analyzed the changes in protein expression on a GBM cell line (GL15 cells) caused by 3BP treatment using a global proteomic approach. Validation of differential protein expression was performed with immunoblotting and enzyme activity assays in GL15 and U251 cell lines. The results show that treatment of GL15 cells with 3BP leads to extensive changes in the expression of glycolytic enzymes and stress related proteins. Importantly, other metabolisms were also affected, including pentose phosphate pathway, aminoacid synthesis, and glucose derivatives production. 3BP elicited the activation of stress response proteins, as shown by the phosphorylation of HSPB1 at serine 82, caused by the concomitant activation of the p38 pathway. Our results show that inhibition of glycolysis in GL15 cells by 3BP influences different but interconnected pathways. Proteome analysis may help in the molecular characterization of the glioblastoma response induced by pharmacological treatment with antiglycolytic agents.

  20. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhong, Wei; Li, Houkai; Li, Qiong; Qiu, Yunping; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Huiyuan; Zhao, Xueqing; Zhang, Shucha; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zeisel, Steven H.; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the bile acid metabolism is limited by the fact that previous analyses have primarily focused on a selected few circulating bile acids; the bile acid profiles of the liver and gastrointestinal tract pools are rarely investigated. Here, we determined how chronic ethanol consumption altered the bile acids in multiple body compartments (liver, gastrointestinal tract, and serum) of rats. Rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with 38% of calories as ethanol (the amount equivalent of 4–5 drinks in humans). While conjugated bile acids predominated in the liver (98.3%), duodenum (97.8%), and ileum (89.7%), unconjugated bile acids comprised the largest proportion of measured bile acids in serum (81.2%), the cecum (97.7%), and the rectum (97.5%). In particular, taurine-conjugated bile acids were significantly decreased in the liver and gastrointestinal tract of ethanol-treated rats, while unconjugated and glycine-conjugated species increased. Ethanol consumption caused increased expression of genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis, efflux transport, and reduced expression of genes regulating bile acid influx transport in the liver. These results provide an improved understanding of the systemic modulations of bile acid metabolism in mammals through the gut-liver axis.—Xie, G., Zhong, W., Li, H., Li, Q., Qiu, Y., Zheng, X., Chen, H., Zhao, X., Zhang, S., Zhou, Z., Zeisel, S. H., Jia, W. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:23709616

  1. Role of protein farnesylation in burn-induced metabolic derangements and insulin resistance in mouse skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harumasa Nakazawa

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Metabolic derangements, including insulin resistance and hyperlactatemia, are a major complication of major trauma (e.g., burn injury and affect the prognosis of burn patients. Protein farnesylation, a posttranslational lipid modification of cysteine residues, has been emerging as a potential component of inflammatory response in sepsis. However, farnesylation has not yet been studied in major trauma. To study a role of farnesylation in burn-induced metabolic aberration, we examined the effects of farnesyltransferase (FTase inhibitor, FTI-277, on burn-induced insulin resistance and metabolic alterations in mouse skeletal muscle. METHODS: A full thickness burn (30% total body surface area was produced under anesthesia in male C57BL/6 mice at 8 weeks of age. After the mice were treated with FTI-277 (5 mg/kg/day, IP or vehicle for 3 days, muscle insulin signaling, metabolic alterations and inflammatory gene expression were evaluated. RESULTS: Burn increased FTase expression and farnesylated proteins in mouse muscle compared with sham-burn at 3 days after burn. Simultaneously, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR, insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1, Akt and GSK-3β was decreased. Protein expression of PTP-1B (a negative regulator of IR-IRS-1 signaling, PTEN (a negative regulator of Akt-mediated signaling, protein degradation and lactate release by muscle, and plasma lactate levels were increased by burn. Burn-induced impaired insulin signaling and metabolic dysfunction were associated with increased inflammatory gene expression. These burn-induced alterations were reversed or ameliorated by FTI-277. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that burn increased FTase expression and protein farnesylation along with insulin resistance, metabolic alterations and inflammatory response in mouse skeletal muscle, all of which were prevented by FTI-277 treatment. These results indicate that increased protein farnesylation plays a

  2. Inhibition of murine splenic T lymphocyte proliferation by 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced metabolic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. S.; Klinger, J. C.; Akin, C.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1994-01-01

    Female Swiss-Webster mice were injected with the glucose analogue 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), which when administered to rodents induces acute periods of metabolic stress. A single or multiple injections of 2-DG invoked a stress response, as evidenced by increases in serum corticosterone levels. The influence of this metabolic stressor on the blastogenic potential of splenic T lymphocytes was then examined. It was found that one, two, or three injections of 2-DG resulted in depressed T cell proliferative responses, with an attenuation of the effect occurring by the fifth injection. The 2-DG-induced inhibition of T cell proliferation was not attributable to 2-DG-induced cytolysis, as in vitro incubation of naive T cells with varying concentrations of 2-DG did not result in a reduction in cell number or viability, and flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that percentages of CD3, CD4, and CD8 splenic T cells were not altered as a result of 2-DG-induced stress. Incubating naive T cells in varying concentrations of 2-DG resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of T cell blastogenic potential. Following in vivo exposure to 2-DG, T cell proliferation did not return to normal levels until 3 days after the cessation of 2-DG injections. Administering the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol did not reverse the inhibited lymphoproliferation in 2-DG-treated mice. The inhibition in T cell proliferation was not observed, however, in mice that had been adrenalectomized or hypophysectomized and injected with 2-DG.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  3. β-Cell adaptation in a mouse model of glucocorticoid-induced metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Liselotte; Franzén, Stephanie; Rosengren, Victoria; Wolbert, Petra; Sjöholm, Åke; Ortsäter, Henrik

    2013-12-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are stress hormones primarily responsible for mobilizing glucose to the circulation. Due to this effect, insulin resistance and glucose intolerance are concerns in patients with endogenous overproduction of GCs and in patients prescribed GC-based therapy. In addition, hypercortisolemic conditions share many characteristics with the metabolic syndrome. This study reports on a thorough characterization, in terms of glucose control and lipid handling, of a mouse model where corticosterone is given via the drinking water. C57BL/6J mice were treated with corticosterone (100 or 25 μg/ml) or vehicle in their drinking water for 5 weeks after which they were subjected to insulin or glucose tolerance tests. GC-treated mice displayed increased food intake, body weight gain, and central fat deposit accumulations. In addition, the GC treatment led to dyslipidemia as well as accumulation of ectopic fat in the liver and skeletal muscle, having a substantial negative effect on insulin sensitivity. Also glucose intolerance and hypertension, both part of the metabolic syndrome, were evident in the GC-treated mice. However, the observed effects of corticosterone were reversed after drug removal. Furthermore, this study reveals insights into β-cell adaptation to the GC-induced insulin resistance. Increased pancreatic islet volume due to cell proliferation, increased insulin secretion capacity, and increased islet chaperone expression were found in GC-treated animals. This model mimics the human metabolic syndrome. It could be a valuable model for studying the complex mechanisms behind the development of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, as well as the multifaceted relations between GC excess and disease.

  4. Mangiferin stimulates carbohydrate oxidation and protects against metabolic disorders induced by high-fat diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apontes, Pasha; Liu, Zhongbo; Su, Kai; Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Youn, Dou Y; Li, Xisong; Li, Wei; Mirza, Raihan H; Bastie, Claire C; Jelicks, Linda A; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Muzumdar, Radhika H; Sauve, Anthony A; Chi, Yuling

    2014-11-01

    Excessive dietary fat intake causes systemic metabolic toxicity, manifested in weight gain, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance. In addition, carbohydrate utilization as a fuel is substantially inhibited. Correction or reversal of these effects during high-fat diet (HFD) intake is of exceptional interest in light of widespread occurrence of diet-associated metabolic disorders in global human populations. Here we report that mangiferin (MGF), a natural compound (the predominant constituent of Mangifera indica extract from the plant that produces mango), protected against HFD-induced weight gain, increased aerobic mitochondrial capacity and thermogenesis, and improved glucose and insulin profiles. To obtain mechanistic insight into the basis for these effects, we determined that mice exposed to an HFD combined with MGF exhibited a substantial shift in respiratory quotient from fatty acid toward carbohydrate utilization. MGF treatment significantly increased glucose oxidation in muscle of HFD-fed mice without changing fatty acid oxidation. These results indicate that MGF redirects fuel utilization toward carbohydrates. In cultured C2C12 myotubes, MGF increased glucose and pyruvate oxidation and ATP production without affecting fatty acid oxidation, confirming in vivo and ex vivo effects. Furthermore, MGF inhibited anaerobic metabolism of pyruvate to lactate but enhanced pyruvate oxidation. A key target of MGF appears to be pyruvate dehydrogenase, determined to be activated by MGF in a variety of assays. These findings underscore the therapeutic potential of activation of carbohydrate utilization in correction of metabolic syndrome and highlight the potential of MGF to serve as a model compound that can elicit fuel-switching effects.

  5. Respiratory metabolism and calorie restriction relieve persistent endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by calcium shortage in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busti, Stefano; Mapelli, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida; Sanvito, Rossella; Magni, Fulvio; Coccetti, Paola; Rocchetti, Marcella; Nielsen, Jens; Alberghina, Lilia; Vanoni, Marco

    2016-06-16

    Calcium homeostasis is crucial to eukaryotic cell survival. By acting as an enzyme cofactor and a second messenger in several signal transduction pathways, the calcium ion controls many essential biological processes. Inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium concentration is carefully regulated to safeguard the correct folding and processing of secretory proteins. By using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that calcium shortage leads to a slowdown of cell growth and metabolism. Accumulation of unfolded proteins within the calcium-depleted lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress) triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) and generates a state of oxidative stress that decreases cell viability. These effects are severe during growth on rapidly fermentable carbon sources and can be mitigated by decreasing the protein synthesis rate or by inducing cellular respiration. Calcium homeostasis, protein biosynthesis and the unfolded protein response are tightly intertwined and the consequences of facing calcium starvation are determined by whether cellular energy production is balanced with demands for anabolic functions. Our findings confirm that the connections linking disturbance of ER calcium equilibrium to ER stress and UPR signaling are evolutionary conserved and highlight the crucial role of metabolism in modulating the effects induced by calcium shortage.

  6. The metabolome of induced pluripotent stem cells reveals metabolic changes occurring in somatic cell reprogramming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Athanasia D Panopoulos; Margaret Lutz; W Travis Berggren; Kun Zhang; Ronald M Evans; Gary Siuzdak; Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte; Oscar Yanes; SergioRuiz; Yasuyuki S Kida; Dinh Diep; Ralf Tautenhahn; Aida Herrerias; Erika M Batchelder; Nongluk Plongthongkum

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism is vital to every aspect of cell function,yet the metabolome of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)remains largely unexplored.Here we report,using an untargeted metabolomics approach,that human iPSCs share a pluripotent metabolomic signature with embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that is distinct from their parental cells,and that is characterized by changes in metabolites involved in cellular respiration.Examination of cellular bioenergetics corroborated with our metabolomic analysis,and demonstrated that somatic cells convert from an oxidative state to a glycolytic state in pluripotency.Interestingly,the bioenergetics of various somatic cells correlated with their reprogramming efficiencies.We further identified metabolites that differ between iPSCs and ESCs,which revealed novel metabolic pathways that play a critical role in regulating somatic cell reprogramming.Our findings are the first to globally analyze the metabolome of iPSCs,and provide mechanistic insight into a new layer of regulation involved in inducing pluripotency,and in evaluating iPSC and ESC equivalence.

  7. NRF2 Orchestrates the Metabolic Shift during Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate E. Hawkins

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The potential of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs in disease modeling and regenerative medicine is vast, but current methodologies remain inefficient. Understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying iPSC reprogramming, such as the metabolic shift from oxidative to glycolytic energy production, is key to improving its efficiency. We have developed a lentiviral reporter system to assay longitudinal changes in cell signaling and transcription factor activity in living cells throughout iPSC reprogramming of human dermal fibroblasts. We reveal early NF-κB, AP-1, and NRF2 transcription factor activation prior to a temporal peak in hypoxia inducible factor α (HIFα activity. Mechanistically, we show that an early burst in oxidative phosphorylation and elevated reactive oxygen species generation mediates increased NRF2 activity, which in turn initiates the HIFα-mediated glycolytic shift and may modulate glucose redistribution to the pentose phosphate pathway. Critically, inhibition of NRF2 by KEAP1 overexpression compromises metabolic reprogramming and results in reduced efficiency of iPSC colony formation.

  8. Alleviation of metabolic abnormalities induced by excessive fructose administration in Wistar rats by Spirulina maxima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarouliya, Urmila; Anish, Zacharia J.; Kumar, Pravin; Bisen, P.S.; Prasad, G.B.K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycaemia. Several natural products have been isolated and identified to restore the complications of diabetes. Spirulina maxima is naturally occurring fresh water cyanobacterium, enriched with proteins and essential nutrients. The aim of the study was to determine whether S. maxima could serve as a therapeutic agent to correct metabolic abnormalities induced by excessive fructose administration in Wistar rats. Methods: Oral administration of 10 per cent fructose solution to Wistar rats (n=5 in each group) for 30 days resulted in hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia. Aqueous suspension of S. maxima (5 or 10%) was also administered orally once daily for 30 days. The therapeutic potential of the preparation with reference to metformin (500 mg/kg) was assessed by monitoring various biochemical parameters at 10 day intervals during the course of therapy and at the end of 30 days S. maxima administration. Results: Significant (P<0.001) reductions in blood glucose, lipid profile (triglycerides, cholesterol and LDL, VLDL) and liver function markers (SGPT and SGOT) were recorded along with elevated level of HDL-C at the end of 30 days therapy of 5 or 10 per cent S. maxima aquous extract. Co-administration of S. maxima extract (5 or 10% aqueous) with 10 per cent fructose solution offered a significant protection against fructose induced metabolic abnormalities in Wistar rats. Interpretation & Conclusions: The present findings showed that S. maxima exhibited anti-hyperglycaemic, anti-hyperlipidaemic and hepatoprotective activity in rats fed with fructose. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms. PMID:22561632

  9. Cold- and exercise-induced peak metabolic rates in tropical birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Popko; Chappell, Mark A; Williams, Joseph B

    2007-12-26

    Compared with temperate birds, tropical birds have low reproductive rates, slow development as nestlings, and long lifespans. These "slow" life history traits are thought to be associated with reduced energy expenditure, or a slow "pace of life." To test predictions from this hypothesis, we measured exercise-induced peak metabolic rates (PMR(E)) in 45 species of tropical lowland forest birds and compared these data with PMR(E) for three temperate species. We also compared cold-induced PMR (PMR(C)) with PMR(E) in the same individuals of 19 tropical species. Tropical birds had a 39% lower PMR(E) than did the temperate species. In tropical birds, PMR(C) and PMR(E) scaled similarly with body mass (M(b)), but PMR(E) was 47% higher than PMR(C). PMR(E) averaged 6.44 x basal metabolic rate (BMR) and PMR(C) averaged 4.52 x BMR. The slope of the equation relating PMR(E) to M(b) exceeded the slope for the equation for BMR vs. M(b), whereas slopes for the equations of PMR(C) and BMR vs. M(b) did not differ. M(b)-adjusted residuals of PMR(E) were positively correlated with residual BMR, whereas residual PMR(C) and residual BMR were not correlated. PMR(E) and PMR(C) were not correlated after we corrected for M(b). Temperate birds maintained their body temperature at an 8.6 degrees C lower average air temperature than did tropical species. The lower PMR(E) values in tropical species suggest that their suite of life history traits on the slow end of the life history continuum are associated with reduced metabolic rates.

  10. Determination of aluminium induced metabolic changes in mice liver: a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, S; Sivasubramanian, J; Khatiwada, Chandra Prasad; Manivannan, J; Raja, B

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we made a new approach to evaluate aluminium induced metabolic changes in liver tissue of mice using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis taking one step further in correlation with strong biochemical evidence. This finding reveals the alterations on the major biochemical constituents, such as lipids, proteins, nucleic acids and glycogen of the liver tissues of mice. The peak area value of amide A significantly decrease from 288.278±3.121 to 189.872±2.012 between control and aluminium treated liver tissue respectively. Amide I and amide II peak area value also decrease from 40.749±2.052 to 21.170±1.311 and 13.167±1.441 to 8.953±0.548 in aluminium treated liver tissue respectively. This result suggests an alteration in the protein profile. The absence of olefinicCH stretching band and CO stretching of triglycerides in aluminium treated liver suggests an altered lipid levels due to aluminium exposure. Significant shift in the peak position of glycogen may be the interruption of aluminium in the calcium metabolism and the reduced level of calcium. The overall findings exhibit that the liver metabolic program is altered through increasing the structural modification in proteins, triglycerides and quantitative alteration in proteins, lipids, and glycogen. All the above mentioned modifications were protected in desferrioxamine treated mice. Histopathological results also revealed impairment of aluminium induced alterations in liver tissue. The results of the FTIR study were found to be in agreement with biochemical studies and which demonstrate FTIR can be used successfully to indicate the molecular level changes.

  11. Intrinsic vs. extrinsic influences on life history expression: metabolism and parentally induced temperature influences on embryo development rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas E.; Ton, Riccardo; Nikilson, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic processes are assumed to underlie life history expression and trade-offs, but extrinsic inputs are theorised to shift trait expression and mask trade-offs within species. Here, we explore application of this theory across species. We do this based on parentally induced embryo temperature as an extrinsic input, and mass-specific embryo metabolism as an intrinsic process, underlying embryonic development rate. We found that embryonic metabolism followed intrinsic allometry rules among 49 songbird species from temperate and tropical sites. Extrinsic inputs via parentally induced temperatures explained the majority of variation in development rates and masked a relationship with metabolism; metabolism explained a minor proportion of the variation in development rates among species, and only after accounting for temperature effects. We discuss evidence that temperature further obscures the expected interspecific trade-off between development rate and offspring quality. These results demonstrate the importance of considering extrinsic inputs to trait expression and trade-offs across species.

  12. Roles of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction Induced by Lipotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Véret

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in order to maintain glucose homeostasis. However, various environmental stresses such as obesity have been shown to induce loss of secretory responsiveness in pancreatic β cells and pancreatic β cell apoptosis which can favor the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Indeed, elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs have been shown to induce β cell apoptosis. Importantly, the chronic adverse effects of FFAs on β cell function and viability are potentiated in the presence of hyperglycaemia, a phenomenon that has been termed gluco-lipotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of gluco-lipotoxicity in pancreatic β cells are not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that sphingolipid metabolism plays a key role in gluco-lipotoxicity induced apoptosis and loss of function of pancreatic β cells. The present review focuses on how the two main sphingolipid mediators, ceramides and sphingoid base-1-phosphates, regulate the deleterious effects of gluco-lipotoxicity on pancreatic β cells. The review highlights the role of a sphingolipid biostat on the dysregulation of β cell fate and function induced by gluco-lipotoxicity, offering the possibility of new therapeutic targets to prevent the onset of T2D.

  13. Chronic endocannabinoid system stimulation induces muscle macrophage and lipid accumulation in type 2 diabetic mice independently of metabolic endotoxaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Geurts

    Full Text Available AIMS: Obesity and type 2 diabetes are characterised by low-grade inflammation, metabolic endotoxaemia (i.e., increased plasma lipopolysaccharides [LPS] levels and altered endocannabinoid (eCB-system tone. The aim of this study was to decipher the specific role of eCB-system stimulation or metabolic endotoxaemia in the onset of glucose intolerance, metabolic inflammation and altered lipid metabolism. METHODS: Mice were treated with either a cannabinoid (CB receptor agonist (HU210 or low-dose LPS using subcutaneous mini-pumps for 6 weeks. After 3 weeks of the treatment under control (CT diet, one-half of each group of mice were challenged with a high fat (HF diet for the following 3-week period. RESULTS: Under basal conditions (control diet, chronic CB receptor agonist treatment (i.e., 6 weeks induced glucose intolerance, stimulated metabolic endotoxaemia, and increased macrophage infiltration (CD11c and F4/80 expression in the muscles; this phenomenon was associated with an altered lipid metabolism (increased PGC-1α expression and decreased CPT-1b expression in this tissue. Chronic LPS treatment tended to increase the body weight and fat mass, with minor effects on the other metabolic parameters. Challenging mice with an HF diet following pre-treatment with the CB agonist exacerbated the HF diet-induced glucose intolerance, the muscle macrophage infiltration and the muscle's lipid content without affecting the body weight or the fat mass. CONCLUSION: Chronic CB receptor stimulation under basal conditions induces glucose intolerance, stimulates metabolic inflammation and alters lipid metabolism in the muscles. These effects worsen following the concomitant ingestion of an HF diet. Here, we highlight the central roles played by the eCB system and LPS in the pathophysiology of several hallmarks of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  14. Prenatal Hyperandrogenization Induces Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations Which Depend on the Levels of Testosterone Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalfi, Sabrina; Velez, Leandro Martín; Heber, María Florencia; Vighi, Susana; Ferreira, Silvana Rocío; Orozco, Adriana Vega; Pignataro, Omar; Motta, Alicia Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal hyperandrogenism is able to induce polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in rats. The aim of the present study was to establish if the levels of prenatal testosterone may determine the extent of metabolic and endocrine alterations during the adult life. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were prenatally injected with either 2 or 5 mg free testosterone (groups T2 and T5 respectively) from day 16 to day 19 day of gestation. Female offspring from T2 and T5 displayed different phenotype of PCOS during adult life. Offspring from T2 showed hyperandrogenism, ovarian cysts and ovulatory cycles whereas those from T5 displayed hyperandrogenism, ovarian cysts and anovulatory cycles. Both group showed increased circulating glucose levels after the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT; an evaluation of insulin resistance). IPGTT was higher in T5 rats and directly correlated with body weight at prepubertal age. However, the decrease in the body weight at prepubertal age was compensated during adult life. Although both groups showed enhanced ovarian steroidogenesis, it appears that the molecular mechanisms involved were different. The higher dose of testosterone enhanced the expression of both the protein that regulates cholesterol availability (the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)) and the protein expression of the transcriptional factor: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma). Prenatal hyperandrogenization induced an anti-oxidant response that prevented a possible pro-oxidant status. The higher dose of testosterone induced a pro-inflammatory state in ovarian tissue mediated by increased levels of prostaglandin E (PG) and the protein expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2, the limiting enzyme of PGs synthesis). In summary, our data show that the levels of testosterone prenatally injected modulate the uterine environment and that this, in turn, would be responsible for the endocrine and metabolic abnormalities and the phenotype of PCOS

  15. Pseudomonas fluorescens induces strain-dependent and strain-independent host plant responses in defense networks, primary metabolism and photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL; Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan S [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Colonization of plants by nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains can confer enhanced defense capacity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Few studies, however, have linked defense pathway regulation to primary metabolism and physiology. In this study, physiological data, metabolites, and transcript profiles are integrated to elucidate how molecular networks initiated at the root-microbe interface influence shoot metabolism and whole-plant performance. Experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana were performed using the newly identified P. fluorescens GM30 or P. fluorescens Pf-5 strains. Co-expression networks indicated that Pf-5 and GM30 induced a subnetwork specific to roots enriched for genes participating in RNA regulation, protein degradation, and hormonal metabolism. In contrast, only GM30 induced a subnetwork enriched for calcium signaling, sugar and nutrient signaling, and auxin metabolism, suggesting strain dependence in network architecture. In addition, one subnetwork present in shoots was enriched for genes in secondary metabolism, photosynthetic light reactions, and hormone metabolism. Metabolite analysis indicated that this network initiated changes in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Consistent with this, we observed strain-specific responses in tryptophan and phenylalanine abundance. Both strains reduced host plant carbon gain and fitness, yet provided a clear fitness benefit when plants were challenged with the pathogen P. syringae DC3000.

  16. Interleukin-17A Differentially Induces Inflammatory and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Adipose Tissues of Lean and Obese Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yine Qu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The functions of interleukin-17A (IL-17A in adipose tissues and adipocytes have not been well understood. In the present study, male mice were fed with a regular diet (n = 6, lean mice or a high-fat diet (n = 6, obese mice for 30 weeks. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT and visceral adipose tissue (VAT were analyzed for IL-17A levels. SAT and VAT were treated with IL-17A and analyzed for inflammatory and metabolic gene expression. Mouse 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes were differentiated into adipocytes, followed with IL-17A treatment and analysis for inflammatory and metabolic gene expression. We found that IL-17A levels were higher in obese SAT than lean SAT; the basal expression of inflammatory and metabolic genes was different between SAT and VAT and between lean and obese adipose tissues. IL-17A differentially induced expression of inflammatory and metabolic genes, such as tumor necrosis factor α, Il-6, Il-1β, leptin, and glucose transporter 4, in adipose tissues of lean and obese mice. IL-17A also differentially induced expression of inflammatory and metabolic genes in pre-adipocytes and adipocytes, and IL-17A selectively activated signaling pathways in adipose tissues and adipocytes. These findings suggest that IL-17A differentially induces inflammatory and metabolic gene expression in the adipose tissues of lean and obese mice.

  17. Interleukin-17A Differentially Induces Inflammatory and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Adipose Tissues of Lean and Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yine; Zhang, Qiuyang; Ma, Siqi; Liu, Sen; Chen, Zhiquan; Mo, Zhongfu; You, Zongbing

    2016-04-07

    The functions of interleukin-17A (IL-17A) in adipose tissues and adipocytes have not been well understood. In the present study, male mice were fed with a regular diet (n = 6, lean mice) or a high-fat diet (n = 6, obese mice) for 30 weeks. Subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) were analyzed for IL-17A levels. SAT and VAT were treated with IL-17A and analyzed for inflammatory and metabolic gene expression. Mouse 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes were differentiated into adipocytes, followed with IL-17A treatment and analysis for inflammatory and metabolic gene expression. We found that IL-17A levels were higher in obese SAT than lean SAT; the basal expression of inflammatory and metabolic genes was different between SAT and VAT and between lean and obese adipose tissues. IL-17A differentially induced expression of inflammatory and metabolic genes, such as tumor necrosis factor α, Il-6, Il-1β, leptin, and glucose transporter 4, in adipose tissues of lean and obese mice. IL-17A also differentially induced expression of inflammatory and metabolic genes in pre-adipocytes and adipocytes, and IL-17A selectively activated signaling pathways in adipose tissues and adipocytes. These findings suggest that IL-17A differentially induces inflammatory and metabolic gene expression in the adipose tissues of lean and obese mice.

  18. Endothelial dysfunction and metabolic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Mañas, L; Angulo, J; Peiró, C; Llergo, J L; Sánchez-Ferrer, A; López-Dóriga, P; Sánchez-Ferrer, C F

    1998-04-01

    1. The aim of this work was to study the influence of the metabolic control, estimated by the levels of glycosylated haemoglobin in total blood samples (HbA1c), in developing vascular endothelial dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Four groups of animals with different levels of insulin treatment were established, by determining HbA1c values in 5.5 to 7.4%, 7.5 to 9.4%, 9.5 to 12% and > 12%, respectively. 2. The parameters analysed were: (1) the endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh) in isolated aorta and mesenteric microvessels; (2) the vasodilator responses to exogenous nitric oxide (NO) in aorta: and (3) the existence of oxidative stress by studying the influence of the free radical scavenger superoxide dismutase (SOD) on the vasodilator responses to both ACh and NO. 3. In both isolated aortic segments and mesenteric microvessels, the endothelium-mediated concentration-dependent relaxant responses elicited by ACh were significantly decreased when the vessels were obtained from diabetic animals but only with HbA1c values higher than 7.5%. There was a high correlation between HbA1c levels and the impairment of ACh-induced relaxations, measured by pD2 values. 4. The concentration-dependent vasorelaxant responses to NO in endothelium-denuded aortic segments were significantly reduced only in vessels from diabetic animals with HbA1c values higher than 7.5%. Again, a very high correlation was found between the HbA1c values and pD2 for NO-evoked responses. 5. In the presence of SOD, the responses to ACh or NO were only increased in the segments from diabetic rats with HbA1c levels higher than 7.5%, but not in those from non-diabetic or diabetic rats with a good metabolic control (HbA1c levels metabolic control of diabetes, estimated by the levels of HbA1c; and (2) an increased production of superoxide anions in the vascular wall of the diabetic rats, which is also related to the metabolic control of the disease.

  19. Dietary carbohydrate restriction induces a unique metabolic state positively affecting atherogenic dyslipidemia, fatty acid partitioning, and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volek, Jeff S; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Feinman, Richard D; Phinney, Stephen D

    2008-09-01

    Abnormal fatty acid metabolism and dyslipidemia play an intimate role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. The availability of glucose and insulin predominate as upstream regulatory elements that operate through a collection of transcription factors to partition lipids toward anabolic pathways. The unraveling of the details of these cellular events has proceeded rapidly, but their physiologic relevance to lifestyle modification has been largely ignored. Here we highlight the role of dietary input, specifically carbohydrate intake, in the mechanism of metabolic regulation germane to metabolic syndrome. The key principle is that carbohydrate, directly or indirectly through the effect of insulin, controls the disposition of excess dietary nutrients. Dietary carbohydrate modulates lipolysis, lipoprotein assembly and processing and affects the relation between dietary intake of saturated fat intake and circulating levels. Several of these processes are the subject of intense investigation at the cellular level. We see the need to integrate these cellular mechanisms with results from low-carbohydrate diet trials that have shown reduced cardiovascular risk through improvement in hepatic, intravascular, and peripheral processing of lipoproteins, alterations in fatty acid composition, and reductions in other cardiovascular risk factors, notably inflammation. From the current state of the literature, however, low-carbohydrate diets are grounded in basic metabolic principles and the data suggest that some form of carbohydrate restriction is a candidate to be the preferred dietary strategy for cardiovascular health beyond weight regulation.

  20. Fatty acid synthesis and pyruvate metabolism pathways remain active in dihydroartemisinin-induced dormant ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nanhua; LaCrue, Alexis N; Teuscher, Franka; Waters, Norman C; Gatton, Michelle L; Kyle, Dennis E; Cheng, Qin

    2014-08-01

    Artemisinin (ART)-based combination therapy (ACT) is used as the first-line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria worldwide. However, despite high potency and rapid action, there is a high rate of recrudescence associated with ART monotherapy or ACT long before the recent emergence of ART resistance. ART-induced ring-stage dormancy and recovery have been implicated as possible causes of recrudescence; however, little is known about the characteristics of dormant parasites, including whether dormant parasites are metabolically active. We investigated the transcription of 12 genes encoding key enzymes in various metabolic pathways in P. falciparum during dihydroartemisinin (DHA)-induced dormancy and recovery. Transcription analysis showed an immediate downregulation for 10 genes following exposure to DHA but continued transcription of 2 genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins. Transcription of several additional genes encoding apicoplast and mitochondrial proteins, particularly of genes encoding enzymes in pyruvate metabolism and fatty acid synthesis pathways, was also maintained. Additions of inhibitors for biotin acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase and enoyl-acyl carrier reductase of the fatty acid synthesis pathways delayed the recovery of dormant parasites by 6 and 4 days, respectively, following DHA treatment. Our results demonstrate that most metabolic pathways are downregulated in DHA-induced dormant parasites. In contrast, fatty acid and pyruvate metabolic pathways remain active. These findings highlight new targets to interrupt recovery of parasites from ART-induced dormancy and to reduce the rate of recrudescence following ART treatment.

  1. Shemamruthaa, herbal formulation modulates xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and energy metabolism in 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced breast cancer in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purushothaman Ayyakkannu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing interest in identifying naturally occurring potent preventive and therapeutic agents for cancer. Shemamruthaa, a phytochemical formulation was evaluated for the first time with a view to potentiate more intense anticancer property. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (8-week-old were used for the study and were divided into 4 Groups. Group I control animals received standard pellet diet and water ad libitum. Group II animals were induced for mammary carcinoma with a single oral dose of 25 mg of DMBA, whereas another set of DMBA-induced rats were treated with SM (400 mg/kg body weight/day orally by gastric intubation for 14 days after 3 months of induction period (Group III. Group IV animals served as SM-control. The status xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzymes were analysed in control and experimental rats. Our findings revealed that the SM formulation has potential to induce Phase-II enzyme activities, associated mainly with carcinogen detoxification and inhibit the Phase I enzyme activities. The activities of glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzymes were significantly brought back to near normal levels in SM treated animals. The results demonstrated unequivocally the effect of SM on inhibition of tumor progression by altering xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and restoring energy metabolism

  2. Asiatic Acid Alleviates Hemodynamic and Metabolic Alterations via Restoring eNOS/iNOS Expression, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poungrat Pakdeechote

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asiatic acid is a triterpenoid isolated from Centella asiatica. The present study aimed to investigate whether asiatic acid could lessen the metabolic, cardiovascular complications in rats with metabolic syndrome (MS induced by a high-carbohydrate, high-fat (HCHF diet. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with HCHF diet with 15% fructose in drinking water for 12 weeks to induce MS. MS rats were treated with asiatic acid (10 or 20 mg/kg/day or vehicle for a further three weeks. MS rats had an impairment of oral glucose tolerance, increases in fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and hindlimb vascular resistance; these were related to the augmentation of vascular superoxide anion production, plasma malondialdehyde and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α levels (p < 0.05. Plasma nitrate and nitrite (NOx were markedly high with upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression, but dowregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression (p < 0.05. Asiatic acid significantly improved insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, hemodynamic parameters, oxidative stress markers, plasma TNF-α, NOx, and recovered abnormality of eNOS/iNOS expressions in MS rats (p < 0.05. In conclusion, asiatic acid improved metabolic, hemodynamic abnormalities in MS rats that could be associated with its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory effects and recovering regulation of eNOS/iNOS expression.

  3. Kinetic studies on toluene metabolism in ethanol- and phenobarbital-induced rat liver microsomes in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ruisheng; Nakajima, Tamie (Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto (Japan). Dept. of Hygiene)

    1991-01-01

    In vitro metabolism of toluene was investigated at substrate concentrations of 0.03-6.25 mM in liver microsomes from control and ethanol- and phenobarbital (PB)-treated rats. Three metabolites, benzylalcohol (BA), o-and p-cresol, were measured by high-performance liquid chromatograph. BA was the main metabolite of toluene, whereas o- and p-creasol contributed only 1.1-1.5% and 1.7-2.8% of total metabolites, respectively, in microsomes from control rats. Ethanol treatment showed little effect on the percentages of three metabolites, but PB increased the percentages of o- and p-cresol to as high as 5.5% and 8.0%, respectively, following the increase in toluene concentration. There were two different isozymes with different K{sub m} involved in the side-chain hydroxylation of toluene in microsomes from control and ethanol-treated rats. One had a low K{sub m} value (0.13-0.17 mM) and could be greatly induced with ethanol treatment. The other was a high K{sub m} isozyme (0.60-0.87 mM). PB-induced isozyme showed a similar K{sub m} value to that of the high K{sub m} isozyme existing in microsomes from control and ethanol-treated rats. Two isozymes were involved in the formation of p-cresol in microsomes of control rats; the low-K{sub m} type had a similar value (0.15 mM) to the low isozyme of BA formation, but the high K{sub m} isozyme had a larger value (2.04 mM) than the high isozyme of BA. Only one enzyme responsible for o-cresol formation was detected in microsomes of control rats, and had a similar K{sub m} (2.11 mM) to that of the high K{sub m} isozyme of p-cresol. The high K{sub m} and low V{sub max} values of isozymes of aromatic hydroxylation account for the minor proportion of cresols. Ethanol and PB treatments enhanced the metabolism of toluene, but they differ in that the ethanol-inducible isozyme metabolized toluene at a faster rate at low substrate concentrations, whereas PB did so at high toluene concentrations. (orig./MG).

  4. pH gradients induced by urea metabolism in 'artificial mouth' microcosm plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissons, C H; Wong, L; Hancock, E M; Cutress, T W

    1994-06-01

    Evidence was sought for urea-induced pH gradients in dental plaque microcosm biofilms cultured from the mixed salivary bacteria in a multi plaque 'artificial mouth'. Application of 500 mmol/l urea for short periods (6 min) to 5-8 mm maximum-thickness plaques induced intraplaque pH gradients of up to 0.7 pH units with the surface alkaline relative to the inner plaque. These pH gradients persisted for more than 5 h in the absence of a flow of fluid. With 30-min urea applications and a flow of a basal medium containing mucin (BMM, pH 7.0), the pH of the inner (deeper) plaque regions also increased. Although the pH gradient initially formed was alkaline at the plaque surface, the BMM flow lowered the surface pH to neutrality whilst the inner layers were still alkaline, thereby reversing the pH gradient. In thick microcosm dental plaques, urea-induced pH gradients can therefore form and last many hours. They probably result from the significant time taken for urea to penetrate to the inner layers of plaque, its rapid metabolism by the outer plaque layers, and a rate-limiting clearance of ammonia. Even a slow BMM flow over the plaque greatly increased the rate of return to the resting pH, causing the gradients to change polarity.

  5. Nano-Cesium for Anti-Cancer Properties: An Investigation into Cesium Induced Metabolic Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Enrique A; Misra, Santosh K; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S; Ohoka, Ayako; Miller, Callie; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-10-03

    The use of cesium chloride (CsCl) for cancer therapy ("high pH therapy") has been theorized to produce anticancer properties by raising intracellular pH to induce apoptosis. Although considered as "alternative medicine", little scientific evidence supports this theory. Alternatively, cells have no cesium ion (Cs(+)) mediated channels for clearance. Thus, such unstable electrochemical distributions have the severe potential to disrupt electrochemical dependent cellular processes, such as glucose cotransporters. Hence, a detailed investigation of pH changing effects and glucose uptake inhibition are warranted as a possible cesium-induced anticancer therapy. We developed and characterized cesium nanoparticles (38 ± 6 nm), termed NanoCs, for nanoparticle-mediated internalization of the ion, and compared its treatment to free CsCl. Our investigations suggest that neither NanoCs nor CsCl drastically changed the intracellular pH, negating the theory. Alternatively, NanoCs lead to a significant decrease in glucose uptake when compared to free CsCl, suggesting cesium inhibited glucose uptake. An apoptosis assay of observed cell death affirms that NanoCs leads tumor cells to initiate apoptosis rather than follow necrotic behavior. Furthermore, NanoCs lead to in vivo tumor regression, where H&E analysis confirmed apoptotic cell populations. Thus, NanoCs performed pH-independent anticancer therapy by inducing metabolic stasis.

  6. Type 1 Interferons Induce Changes in Core Metabolism that Are Critical for Immune Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Duojiao; Sanin, David E; Everts, Bart; Chen, Qiongyu; Qiu, Jing; Buck, Michael D; Patterson, Annette; Smith, Amber M; Chang, Chih-Hao; Liu, Zhiping; Artyomov, Maxim N; Pearce, Erika L; Cella, Marina; Pearce, Edward J

    2016-06-21

    Greater understanding of the complex host responses induced by type 1 interferon (IFN) cytokines could allow new therapeutic approaches for diseases in which these cytokines are implicated. We found that in response to the Toll-like receptor-9 agonist CpGA, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) produced type 1 IFNs, which, through an autocrine type 1 IFN receptor-dependent pathway, induced changes in cellular metabolism characterized by increased fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Direct inhibition of FAO and of pathways that support this process, such as fatty acid synthesis, prevented full pDC activation. Type 1 IFNs also induced increased FAO and OXPHOS in non-hematopoietic cells and were found to be responsible for increased FAO and OXPHOS in virus-infected cells. Increased FAO and OXPHOS in response to type 1 IFNs was regulated by PPARα. Our findings reveal FAO, OXPHOS and PPARα as potential targets to therapeutically modulate downstream effects of type 1 IFNs.

  7. Global metabolic profiling for the study of Rhizoma Paridis saponins-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Shuli; Qiu, Peiyu; Li, Jing; Zhang, Liming; Gao, Wenyuan

    2017-01-01

    Rhizoma Paridis saponins (RPS) is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) from the plant Paris polyphylla var. yunnanensis (Fr.) Hand.-Mazz. Despite its potentially clinical utility such as anticancer and anti-inflammation, it has slight side effects and toxicity as previous report. In this work, 90-day administration of RPS induced liver injury. (1) H-NMR- and GC/MS-based metabonomic analyses in conjunction with histopathological examinations, blood biochemistry and hepatic phase I and II enzymes assays were performed to evaluate the toxic mechanisms of RPS induced in rats. As a result, oral administration of RPS possessed certain liver toxicity in SD rats. (1) H-NMR and GC/MS data indicated that RPS inhibited the oxidation of fatty acids, glycolysis, and TCA cycle pathway, and disturbed glycine, serine, and threonine metabolism. Low expression of TG, T-CHO, and LDL-C and high levels of ALT and AST indicated that chronic exposure to RPS caused hepatocyte damage, synthesis dysfunction, and transportation failure of lipoproteins. In addition, RPS downregulated the mRNA levels of CYP1A2, CYP2E1, and UGTs. In conclusion, we used metabonomics approach to study the toxicity of RPS for the first time. This research demonstrated that metabonomics method was a promising tool to study and diagnose TCM-induced toxicity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 99-108, 2017.

  8. Oxidative stress disturbs energy metabolism of mitochondria in ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Shui Pan; Shao-Zhen He; Hong-Zhi Xu; Xiao-Juan Zhan; Xiao-Ning Yang; Hong-Min Xiao; Hua-Xiu Shi; Jian-Lin Ren

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of mitochondrial energy disorder in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury.METHODS: Wistar rats were used in this study. A gastric mucosal injury model was established by giving the rats alcohol. Gross and microscopic appearance of gastric mucosa and ultrastructure of mitochondria were evaluated. Malondiadehyde (MDA) in gastric mucosa was measured with thiobarbituric acid. Expression of ATP synthase (ATPase) subunits 6 and 8 in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).RESULTS: The gastric mucosal lesion index was correlated with the MDA content in gastric mucosa. As the concentration of ethanol was elevated and the exposure time to ethanol was extended, the content of MDA in gastric mucosa increased and the extent of damage aggravated. The ultrastructure of mitochondria was positively related to the ethanol concentration and exposure time. The expression of mtDNA ATPase subunits 6 and 8 mRNA declined with the increasing MDA content in gastric mucosa after gavage with ethanol.CONCLUSION: Ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury is related to oxidative stress, which disturbs energy metabolism of mitochondria and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury.

  9. Oxidative stress disturbs energy metabolism of mitochondria in ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jin-Shui; He, Shao-Zhen; Xu, Hong-Zhi; Zhan, Xiao-Juan; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Xiao, Hong-Min; Shi, Hua-Xiu; Ren, Jian-Lin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of mitochondrial energy disorder in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury. METHODS: Wistar rats were used in this study. A gastric mucosal injury model was established by giving the rats alcohol. Gross and microscopic appearance of gastric mucosa and ultrastructure of mitochondria were evaluated. Malondiadehyde (MDA) in gastric mucosa was measured with thiobarbituric acid. Expression of ATP synthase (ATPase) subunits 6 and 8 in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: The gastric mucosal lesion index was correlated with the MDA content in gastric mucosa. As the concentration of ethanol was elevated and the exposure time to ethanol was extended, the content of MDA in gastric mucosa increased and the extent of damage aggravated. The ultrastructure of mitochondria was positively related to the ethanol concentration and exposure time. The expression of mtDNA ATPase subunits 6 and 8 mRNA declined with the increasing MDA content in gastric mucosa after gavage with ethanol. CONCLUSION: Ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury is related to oxidative stress, which disturbs energy metabolism of mitochondria and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury. PMID:18855985

  10. Melatonin as a Potent and Inducible Endogenous Antioxidant: Synthesis and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dun-Xian Tan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a tryptophan-derived molecule with pleiotropic activities. It is present in almost all or all organisms. Its synthetic pathway depends on the species in which it is measured. For example, the tryptophan to melatonin pathway differs in plants and animals. It is speculated that the melatonin synthetic machinery in eukaryotes was inherited from bacteria as a result of endosymbiosis. However, melatonin’s synthetic mechanisms in microorganisms are currently unknown. Melatonin metabolism is highly complex with these enzymatic processes having evolved from cytochrome C. In addition to its enzymatic degradation, melatonin is metabolized via pseudoenzymatic and free radical interactive processes. The metabolic products of these processes overlap and it is often difficult to determine which process is dominant. However, under oxidative stress, the free radical interactive pathway may be featured over the others. Because of the complexity of the melatonin degradative processes, it is expected that additional novel melatonin metabolites will be identified in future investigations. The original and primary function of melatonin in early life forms such as in unicellular organisms was as a free radical scavenger and antioxidant. During evolution, melatonin was selected as a signaling molecule to transduce the environmental photoperiodic information into an endocrine message in multicellular organisms and for other purposes as well. As an antioxidant, melatonin exhibits several unique features which differ from the classic antioxidants. These include its cascade reaction with free radicals and its capacity to be induced under moderate oxidative stress. These features make melatonin a potent endogenously-occurring antioxidant that protects organisms from catastrophic oxidative stress.

  11. Mechanism of Cisplatin-Induced Cytotoxicity Is Correlated to Impaired Metabolism Due to Mitochondrial ROS Generation.

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    Yong-Min Choi

    Full Text Available The chemotherapeutic use of cisplatin is limited by its severe side effects. In this study, by conducting different omics data analyses, we demonstrated that cisplatin induces cell death in a proximal tubular cell line by suppressing glycolysis- and tricarboxylic acid (TCA/mitochondria-related genes. Furthermore, analysis of the urine from cisplatin-treated rats revealed the lower expression levels of enzymes involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, and genes related to mitochondrial stability and confirmed the cisplatin-related metabolic abnormalities. Additionally, an increase in the level of p53, which directly inhibits glycolysis, has been observed. Inhibition of p53 restored glycolysis and significantly reduced the rate of cell death at 24 h and 48 h due to p53 inhibition. The foremost reason of cisplatin-related cytotoxicity has been correlated to the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS that influence multiple pathways. Abnormalities in these pathways resulted in the collapse of mitochondrial energy production, which in turn sensitized the cells to death. The quenching of ROS led to the amelioration of the affected pathways. Considering these observations, it can be concluded that there is a significant correlation between cisplatin and metabolic dysfunctions involving mROS as the major player.

  12. Nitazoxanide induces in vitro metabolic acidosis in Taenia crassiceps cysticerci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isac, Eliana; de A Picanço, Guaraciara; da Costa, Tatiane L; de Lima, Nayana F; de S M M Alves, Daniella; Fraga, Carolina M; de S Lino Junior, Ruy; Vinaud, Marina C

    2016-12-01

    Nitazoxanide (NTZ) is a broad-spectrum anti-parasitic drug used against a wide variety of protozoans and helminthes. Albendazole, its active metabolite albendazole sulfoxide (ABZSO), is one of the drugs of choice to treat both intestinal and tissue helminth and protozoan infections. However little is known regarding their impact on the metabolism of parasites. The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro effect of NTZ and ABZSO in the glycolysis of Taenia crassiceps cysticerci. The cysticerci were treated with 1.2; 0.6; 0.3 or 0.15 μg/mL of NTZ or ABZSO. Chromatographic and spectrophotometric analyses were performed in the culture medium and in the cysticerci extract. Regarding the glucose concentrations was possible to observe two responses: impair of the uptake and gluconeogenesis. The pyruvate concentrations were increased in the ABZSO treated group. Lactate concentrations were increased in the culture medium of NTZ treated groups. Therefore it was possible to infer that the metabolic acidosis was greater in the group treated with NTZ than in the ABZSO treated group indicating that this is one of the modes of action used by this drug to induce the parasite death.

  13. Similar degrees of obesity induced by diet or aging cause strikingly different immunologic and metabolic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Kanthi B; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Dedousis, Nikolaos; Sipula, Ian; O'Doherty, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    In obesity, adipose tissue (AT) and liver are infiltrated with Th-1 polarized immune cells, which are proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic abnormalities of obesity. Aging is also associated with increased adiposity, but the effects of this increase on inflammation and associated metabolic dysfunction are poorly understood. To address this issue, we assessed insulin resistance (IR) andATand liver immunophenotype in aged, lean (AL) and aged, obese (AO) mice, all of whom were maintained on a standard chow diet (11% fat diet) throughout their lives. For comparison, these variables were also assessed in young, lean (YL) and young diet-induced obese mice (41% fat diet,YO). Despite similar body weight and fat accumulation,YOmice were substantially moreIRand had greater liver steatosis compared toAOmice.YOalso had elevated infiltration of macrophages/dendritic cells inATand liver, but these increases were absent inAO Furthermore, liver immune cells ofYOwere more Th-1 polarized thenAO Notably, aging was associated with accumulation of T cells, but this occurred independent of obesity. Together, the data suggest that reduced inflammation inAOunderlies the improved insulin sensitivity and lowered steatosis compared toYO.

  14. Molecular mechanism of hepatitis C virus-induced glucose metabolic disorders

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    Ikuo eShoji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection causes not only intrahepatic diseases but also extrahepatic manifestations, including metabolic disorders. Chronic HCV infection is often associated with type 2 diabetes. However, the precise mechanism underlying this association is still unclear. Glucose is transported into hepatocytes via glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2. Hepatocytes play a crucial role in maintaining plasma glucose homeostasis via the gluconeogenic and glycolytic pathways. We have been investigating the molecular mechanism of HCV-related type 2 diabetes using HCV RNA replicon cells and HCV J6/JFH1 system. We found that HCV replication down-regulates cell surface expression of GLUT2 at the transcriptional level. We also found that HCV infection promotes hepatic gluconeogenesis in HCV J6/JFH1-infected Huh-7.5 cells. HCV infection transcriptionally up-regulated the genes for PEPCK and G6Pase, the rate-limiting enzymes for hepatic gluconeogenesis. Gene expression of PEPCK and G6Pase was regulated by the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1 in HCV-infected cells. Phosphorylation of FoxO1 at Ser319 was markedly diminished in HCV-infected cells, resulting in increased nuclear accumulation of FoxO1. HCV NS5A protein was directly linked with the FoxO1-dependent increased gluconeogenesis. This paper will discuss the current model of HCV-induced glucose metabolic disorders.

  15. Melatonin May Curtail the Metabolic Syndrome: Studies on Initial and Fully Established Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome in Rats

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    Pablo Scacchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To examine the effect of melatonin given to rats simultaneously with fructose on initial and fully developed metabolic syndrome, male Wistar rats had free access to chow and 5% or 10% fructose drinking solution for 8 weeks. As compared to controls, systolic blood pressure augmented significantly under both treatments whereas excessive body weight was seen in rats receiving the 10% fructose only. Rats drinking 5% fructose showed a greater tolerance to a glucose load while rats having access to a 10% fructose drinking solution exhibited the expected impaired glucose tolerance found in the metabolic syndrome. Circulating triglyceride and low density lipoproteins-cholesterol (LDL-c concentration augmented significantly in rats showing a fully developed metabolic syndrome only, while high blood cholesterol levels were found at both stages examined. Melatonin (25 μg/mL drinking solution counteracted the changes in body weight and systolic blood pressure found in rats administered with fructose. Melatonin decreased the abnormal hyperglycemia seen after a glucose load in 10% fructose-treated rats but it did not modify the greater tolerance to glucose observed in animals drinking 5% fructose. Melatonin also counteracted the changes in plasma LDL-c, triglyceride and cholesterol levels and decreased plasma uric acid levels. The results underline a possible therapeutical role of melatonin in the metabolic syndrome, both at initial and established phases.

  16. α-Amyrin attenuates high fructose diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Pankaj; Reeta, K H; Maulik, Subir Kumar; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of α-amyrin (a pentacyclic triterpene) on high-fructose diet (HFD)-induced metabolic syndrome in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into different groups. The control group was fed normal rat chow diet. The HFD group was fed HFD (60%; w/w) for 42 days. Pioglitazone (10 mg/kg, orally, once daily) was used as a standard drug. α-Amyrin was administered in 3 doses (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, orally, once daily along with HFD). Plasma glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were estimated. Changes in blood pressure, oral glucose tolerance, and insulin tolerance were measured. Hepatic oxidative stress as well as messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) were analyzed. A significant increase in systolic blood pressure, plasma glucose, total cholesterol, and plasma triglycerides and a significant decrease in HDL-C were observed in HFD rats as compared with control rats. Glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance were also significantly impaired with HFD. α-Amyrin prevented these changes in a dose-dependent manner. Hepatic oxidative stress as well as micro- and macrovesicular fatty changes in hepatocytes caused by HFD were also attenuated by α-amyrin. α-Amyrin preserved the hepatic mRNA and protein levels of PPAR-α, which was reduced in HFD group. This study thus demonstrates that α-amyrin attenuates HFD-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

  17. Rhinacanthus nasutus leaf improves metabolic abnormalities in high-fat diet-induced obese mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Supaporn Wannasiri; Pritsana Piyabhan; Jarinyaporn Naowaboot

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of Rhinacanthus nasutus(R.nasutus) leaf extract on impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in obese ICR mice.Methods:Obesity was induced in the male ICR mice by feeding them a high-fat diet(60 kcal%fat) for 12 weeks.After the first six weeks of the diet,the obese mice were administered with the water extract of R.nasutus leaves at 250 and 500 mg/kg per day for the next six weeks.Subsequently,the blood glucose,lipid profiles,insulin,leptin,and adiponectin levels were measured.The liver and adipose tissues were excised for histopathological examination and protein expression study.Results:After six weeks of the treatment,R.nasutus extract(at 250 and 500 mg/kg per day) was found to reduce the elevated blood glucose level,improve the insulin sensitivity,decrease the serum leptin,and increase the serum adiponectin levels.The obese mice treated with R.nasutus were found to have a reduction in the increased lipid concentrations in their serum and liver tissues.Moreover,treatment with R.nasutus reduced the fat accumulation in the liver and the large adipocyte size in the fat tissues.Interestingly,the administration with R.nasutus extract was marked by an increase in the hepatic peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor alpha,fat cell adiponectin,and glucose transporter 4 proteins.Conclusions:To the best of our knowledge,the present study is the first report on the impact of R.nasutus extract in improving the impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice via stimulating the insulin sensitivity in the liver and adipose tissues.

  18. Rhinacanthus nasutus leaf improves metabolic abnormalities in high-fat diet-induced obese mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Supaporn Wannasiri; Pritsana Piyabhan; Jarinyaporn Naowaboot

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Rhinacanthus nasutus (R. nasutus) leaf extract on impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in obese ICR mice. Methods: Obesity was induced in the male ICR mice by feeding them a high-fat diet (60 kcal% fat) for 12 weeks. After the first six weeks of the diet, the obese mice were administered with the water extract of R. nasutus leaves at 250 and 500 mg/kg per day for the next six weeks. Subsequently, the blood glucose, lipid profiles, insulin, leptin, and adiponectin levels were measured. The liver and adipose tissues were excised for his-topathological examination and protein expression study. Results: After six weeks of the treatment, R. nasutus extract (at 250 and 500 mg/kg per day) was found to reduce the elevated blood glucose level, improve the insulin sensitivity, decrease the serum leptin, and increase the serum adiponectin levels. The obese mice treated with R. nasutus were found to have a reduction in the increased lipid concen-trations in their serum and liver tissues. Moreover, treatment with R. nasutus reduced the fat accumulation in the liver and the large adipocyte size in the fat tissues. Interestingly, the administration with R. nasutus extract was marked by an increase in the hepatic peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor alpha, fat cell adiponectin, and glucose transporter 4 proteins. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first report on the impact of R. nasutus extract in improving the impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice via stimulating the insulin sensitivity in the liver and adipose tissues.

  19. Melatonin improves metabolic syndrome induced by high fructose intake in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Akira; Ohta, Yoshiji; Ohashi, Koji

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we examined whether melatonin improves metabolic syndrome induced by high fructose intake in male Wistar rats. Feeding of a diet containing 60% fructose (HFD) for 4 or 6 wk caused increased serum insulin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, free fatty acids, uric acid, leptin, and lipid peroxide concentrations as well as hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations, and relative intra-abdominal fat and liver weights. The 4- or 6-wk HFD feeding reduced serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and adiponectin concentrations. The 6-wk HFD feeding increased serum tumor necrosis factor-α concentration and hepatic lipid peroxide concentration and lowered hepatic reduced glutathione concentration. Daily intraperitoneal administration of melatonin (1 or 10mg/kg body weight), starting at 4-wk HFD feeding, attenuated these changes at 6-wk HFD feeding more effectively at its higher dose than at its lower dose. In an oral glucose tolerance test, rats with 4- or 6-wk HFD feeding showed higher serum insulin response curve and normal serum glucose response curve when compared with the corresponding animals that received the control diet. The 4- or 6-wk HFD feeding caused insulin resistance, judging from the scores of HOMR-IR and QUICKI, which are indices of insulin resistance. The daily administered melatonin (1 or 10mg/kg body weight) ameliorated the higher serum insulin response curve in the oral glucose tolerance test and insulin resistance at 6-wk HFD feeding more effectively at its higher dose than at its lower dose. These results indicate that melatonin improves metabolic syndrome induced by high fructose intake in rats.

  20. Increases in myocardial workload induced by rapid atrial pacing trigger alterations in global metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslan T Turer

    Full Text Available To determine whether increases in cardiac work lead to alterations in the plasma metabolome and whether such changes arise from the heart or peripheral organs.There is growing evidence that the heart influences systemic metabolism through endocrine effects and affecting pathways involved in energy homeostasis.Nineteen patients referred for cardiac catheterization were enrolled. Peripheral and selective coronary sinus (CS blood sampling was performed at serial timepoints following the initiation of pacing, and metabolite profiling was performed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS.Pacing-stress resulted in a 225% increase in the median rate·pressure product from baseline. Increased myocardial work induced significant changes in the peripheral concentration of 43 of 125 metabolites assayed, including large changes in purine [adenosine (+99%, p = 0.006, ADP (+42%, p = 0.01, AMP (+79%, p = 0.004, GDP (+69%, p = 0.003, GMP (+58%, p = 0.01, IMP (+50%, p = 0.03, xanthine (+61%, p = 0.0006], and several bile acid metabolites. The CS changes in metabolites qualitatively mirrored those in the peripheral blood in both timing and magnitude, suggesting the heart was not the major source of the metabolite release.Isolated increases in myocardial work can induce changes in the plasma metabolome, but these changes do not appear to be directly cardiac in origin. A number of these dynamic metabolites have known signaling functions. Our study provides additional evidence to a growing body of literature on metabolic 'cross-talk' between the heart and other organs.

  1. Ozone-induced augmentation of eicosanoid metabolism in epithelial cells from bovine trachea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leikauf, G.D.; Driscoll, K.E.; Wey, H.E.

    1988-02-01

    Epithelial injury and inflammation have been implicated in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. Because ozone is relatively insoluble and highly reactive, toxicologic effects of this compound may be limited to the plasma membranes of airway epithelium. We hypothesize that oxidant damage to epithelium may result in elaboration of various eicosanoids, which are known to alter airway smooth muscle responsiveness and epithelial cell functions (including ion transport). To examine eicosanoid metabolism after exposure to 0.1 to 10.0 ppm ozone, epithelial cells derived from bovine trachea were isolated and grown to confluency. Bovine tracheal cells in culture expressed differentiated features characteristic of epithelial cells, including a plasma membrane with a specialized polar morphology, an extensive network of filaments that were connected through intercellular junctional complexes, and keratin-containing monofilaments as determined by indirect immunofluorescent localization. Monolayers were alternately exposed to ozone and culture medium for 2 h in a specially designed in vitro chamber using a rotating inclined platform. Eicosanoid products were measured by the release of (/sup 3/H)-labeled products from cells incubated with (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid for 24 h before exposure and by the release of immunoreactive products into the cell supernatant. Both methods revealed ozone-induced increases in cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase product formation with significant increases in prostaglandins E2, F2 alpha, 6-keto F1 alpha, and leukotriene B4. Release rates of immunoreactive products were dose-dependent, and ozone concentrations as low as 0.1 ppm produced an increase in prostaglandin F2 alpha. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that ozone can augment eicosanoid metabolism in airway epithelial cells.

  2. INITIAL METABOLIC STATE AND EXERCISE-INDUCED ENDOTOXAEMIA ARE UNRELATED TO GASTROINTESTINAL SYMPTOMS DURING EXERCISE

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    José Moncada-Jiménez

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the association between the initial metabolic state and exercise-induced endotoxaemia on the appearance of gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS during exercise. Eleven males (36.6 ± 4.9 yrs, 1.7 ± 0.1 m, 74.5 ± 7.7 kg, DEXA body fat % 17.2 ± 6.6, VO2max 57.4 ± 7.4 ml·kg-1·min-1 underwent two isoenergetic diets designed to change their initial metabolic status by either depleting or maintaining their hepatic and muscular glycogen content. These diets and accompanying exercise sessions were performed by each participant in the days before completing a laboratory-based duathlon (5-km run, 30-km cycling, 10-km run. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately and 1- and 2-h following the duathlon for determination of insulin (IN, glucagon (GL, endotoxin, aspartic aminotransferase (AST, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT markers. GIS were assessed by survey before and after exercise. Diet content produced a different energy status as determined by macronutrient content and the IN/GL ratio (p < 0.05, and mild exercise-induced endotoxaemia was observed in both experimental duathlons. Regardless of the diet, the AST/ALT ratio following exercise and in the recovery phase indicated hepatocyte and liver parenchyma structural damage. In spite of GIS, no significant correlations between endotoxin levels and GIS were found. In conclusion, increased markers of endotoxaemia observed with the high-intensity exercise were unrelated to hepatic function and/or GIS before and after exercise

  3. Local Muscle Metabolic Demand Induced by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Voluntary Contractions at Different Force Levels: A NIRS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthalib, Makii; Kerr, Graham; Nosaka, Kazunori; Perrey, Stephane

    2016-06-13

    Functional Muscle metabolic demand during contractions evoked by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been consistently documented to be greater than voluntary contractions (VOL) at the same force level (10-50% maximal voluntary contraction-MVC). However, we have shown using a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique that local muscle metabolic demand is similar between NMES and VOL performed at MVC levels, thus controversy exists. This study therefore compared biceps brachii muscle metabolic demand (tissue oxygenation index-TOI and total hemoglobin volume-tHb) during a 10s isometric contraction of the elbow flexors between NMES (stimulation frequency of 30Hz and current level to evoke 30% MVC) and VOL at 30% MVC (VOL-30%MVC) and MVC (VOL-MVC) level in 8 healthy men (23-33-y). Greater changes in TOI and tHb induced by NMES than VOL-30%MVC confirm previous studies of a greater local metabolic demand for NMES than VOL at the same force level. The same TOI and tHb changes for NMES and VOL-MVC suggest that local muscle metabolic demand and intramuscular pressure were similar between conditions. In conclusion, these findings indicate that NMES induce a similar local muscle metabolic demand as that of maximal VOL.

  4. Oxidative Inactivation of Liver Mitochondria in High Fructose Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome in Rats: Effect of Glycyrrhizin Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Rajarshi; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a serious health problem in the present world. Glycyrrhizin, a triterpenoid saponin of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root, has been reported to ameliorate the primary complications and hepatocellular damage in rats with the syndrome. In this study, we have explored metabolic syndrome-induced changes in liver mitochondrial function and effect of glycyrrhizin against the changes. Metabolic syndrome was induced in rats by high fructose (60%) diet for 6 weeks. The rats were then treated with glycyrrhizin (50 mg/kg body weight) by single intra-peritoneal injection. After 2 weeks of the treatment, the rats were sacrificed to collect liver tissue. Elevated mitochondrial ROS, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl, and decreased reduced glutathione content indicated oxidative stress in metabolic syndrome. Loss of mitochondrial inner membrane cardiolipin was observed. Mitochondrial complex I activity did not change but complex IV activity decreased significantly. Mitochondrial MTT reduction ability, membrane potential, phosphate utilisation and oxygen consumption decreased in metabolic syndrome. Reduced mitochondrial aconitase activity and increased aconitase carbonyl content suggested oxidative damage of the enzyme. Elevated Fe(2+) ion level in mitochondria might be associated with increased ROS generation in metabolic syndrome. Glycyrrhizin effectively attenuated mitochondrial oxidative stress and aconitase degradation, and improved electron transport chain activity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Modulation of tissue fatty acids by L-carnitine attenuates metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Sunil K; Poudyal, Hemant; Ward, Leigh C; Waanders, Jennifer; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and dyslipidaemia are metabolic defects resulting from impaired lipid metabolism. These impairments are associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Correcting the defects in lipid metabolism may attenuate obesity and dyslipidaemia, and reduce cardiovascular risk and liver damage. L-Carnitine supplementation was used in this study to enhance fatty acid oxidation so as to ameliorate diet-induced disturbances in lipid metabolism. Male Wistar rats (8-9 weeks old) were fed with either corn starch or high-carbohydrate, high-fat diets for 16 weeks. Separate groups were supplemented with L-carnitine (1.2% in food) on either diet for the last 8 weeks of the protocol. High-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats showed central obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinaemia, cardiovascular remodelling and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. L-Carnitine supplementation attenuated these high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced changes, together with modifications in lipid metabolism including the inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 activity, reduced storage of short-chain monounsaturated fatty acids in the tissues with decreased linoleic acid content and trans fatty acids stored in retroperitoneal fat. Thus, L-carnitine supplementation attenuated the signs of metabolic syndrome through inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 activity, preferential β-oxidation of some fatty acids and increased storage of saturated fatty acids and relatively inert oleic acid in the tissues.

  6. Effects of proportions of dietary macronutrients on glucocorticoid metabolism in diet-induced obesity in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland H Stimson

    Full Text Available Tissue glucocorticoid levels in the liver and adipose tissue are regulated by regeneration of inactive glucocorticoid by 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1 and inactivation by 5alpha- and 5beta-reductases. A low carbohydrate diet increases hepatic 11beta-HSD1 and reduces glucocorticoid metabolism during weight loss in obese humans. We hypothesized that similar variations in macronutrient proportions regulate glucocorticoid metabolism in obese rats. Male Lister Hooded rats were fed an obesity-inducing ad libitum 'Western' diet (37% fat, n = 36 for 22 weeks, then randomised to continue this diet (n = 12 or to switch to either a low carbohydrate (n = 12 or a moderate carbohydrate (n = 12 diet for the final 8 weeks. A parallel lean control group were fed an ad libitum control diet (10% fat, n = 12 throughout. The low and moderate carbohydrate diets decreased hepatic 11beta-HSD1 mRNA compared with the Western diet (both 0.7+/-0.0 vs 0.9+/-0.1 AU; p<0.01, but did not alter 11beta-HSD1 in adipose tissue. 5Alpha-reductase mRNA was increased on the low carbohydrate compared with the moderate carbohydrate diet. Compared with lean controls, the Western diet decreased 11beta-HSD1 activity (1.6+/-0.1 vs 2.8+/-0.1 nmol/mcg protein/hr; p<0.001 and increased 5alpha-reductase and 5beta-reductase mRNAs (1.9+/-0.3 vs 1.0+/-0.2 and 1.6+/-0.1 vs 1.0+/-0.1 AU respectively; p<0.01 in the liver, and reduced 11beta-HSD1 mRNA and activity (both p<0.01 in adipose tissue. Although an obesity-inducing high fat diet in rats recapitulates the abnormal glucocorticoid metabolism associated with human obesity in liver (but not in adipose tissue, a low carbohydrate diet does not increase hepatic 11beta-HSD1 in obese rats as occurs in humans.

  7. Pleiotropic protective effects of Vitamin D against high fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats: One for all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Dalia K; Nasra, Rasha A; Zahran, Noha; Ghoneim, Mohammed T

    2016-12-05

    Several lines of evidence point to the association of vitamin D deficiency with the different components of metabolic syndrome. Yet, the effect of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic syndrome is not clearly elucidated. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that administration of vitamin D, either alone or in combination of metformin can improve metabolic and structural derangements associated with metabolic syndrome. Fifty wistar rats were randomly assigned to serve either as normal control (10 rats) or metabolic syndrome rats, by feeding them with a standard or a high fat diet (HFD), respectively. Metabolic syndrome rats were further assigned to receive either vehicle, Metformin (100mg/Kg orally), vitamin D (6ng/Kg SC.) or both, daily for 8 weeks. Body weight, blood pressure, serum glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, lipid profile, oxidative stress, serum uric acid and Ca(+2) were assessed at the end of the study. Histopathological examination of hepatic, renal and cardiac tissues were also performed. Treatment with vitamin D was associated with a significant improvement of the key features of metabolic syndrome namely obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia with a neutral effect on Ca(+2) level. When combined with metformin, most of the other metabolic abnormalities were ameliorated. Furthermore, a significant attenuation of the associated hepatic steatosis was observed with vitamin D as well as vitamin D/metformin combination. In conclusion, vitamin D can improve hypertension, metabolic and structural abnormalities induced by HFD, and it provides additional benefits when combined with metformin. Therefore, vitamin D could represent a feasible therapeutic option for prevention of metabolic syndrome.

  8. Iron metabolism in hepcidin1 knockout mice in response to phenylhydrazine-induced hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaratana, Patarabutr; Latunde-Dada, Gladys O; Patel, Neeta; Simpson, Robert J; Vaulont, Sophie; McKie, Andrew T

    2012-08-15

    Hepcidin, an iron regulatory peptide, plays a central role in the maintenance of systemic iron homeostasis by inducing the internalization and degradation of the iron exporter, ferroportin. Hepcidin expression in the liver is regulated in response to several stimuli including iron status, erythropoietic activity, hypoxia and inflammation. Hepcidin expression has been shown to be reduced in phenylhydrazine-treated mice, a mouse model of acute hemolysis. In this mouse model, hepcidin suppression was associated with increased expression of molecules involved in iron transport and recycling. The present study aims to explore whether the response to phenylhydrazine treatment is affected by hepcidin deficiency and/or the subsequently altered iron metabolism. Hepcidin1 knockout (Hamp(-/-)) and wild type mice were treated with phenylhydrazine or saline and parameters of iron homeostasis were determined 3 days after the treatment. In wild type mice, phenylhydrazine administration resulted in significantly reduced serum iron, increased tissue non-heme iron levels and suppressed hepcidin expression. The treatment was also associated with increases in membrane ferroportin protein levels and spleen heme oxygenase 1 mRNA expression. In addition, trends toward increased mRNA expression of duodenal iron transporters were also observed. In contrast, serum iron and tissue non-heme iron levels in Hamp(-/-) mice were unaffected by the treatment. Moreover, the effects of phenylhydrazine on the expression of ferroportin and duodenal iron transporters were not observed in Hamp(-/-) mice. Interestingly, mRNA levels of molecules involved in splenic heme uptake and degradation were significantly induced by Hamp disruption. In summary, our study demonstrates that the response to phenylhydrazine-induced hemolysis differs between wild type and Hamp(-/-) mice. This observation may be caused by the absence of hepcidin per se or the altered iron homeostasis induced by the lack of hepcidin in

  9. Effect of mangiferin isolated from Salacia chinensis regulates the kidney carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Periyar Selvam Sellamuthu; Palanisamy Arulselvan; Balu Periamallipatti Muniappan; Murugesan Kandasamy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present investigation was to evaluate the possible anti-diabetic effect of mangiferin from Salacia chinensis (S. chinensis) on the activities of kidney carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in chemically induced diabetic rats. Methods: Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) in adult male rats, as a single intraperitoneal injection at a dose of 55 mg/kg body weight. The STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated by mangiferin and glibenclamide (positive control drug) for 30 days. At the end of the experiment, the rats were sacrificed and carbohydrate metabolic enzyme activities were analyzed in the kidney. Results: Diabetic control rats showed a significant increase in the level of fasting blood glucose and also increase the activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in kidney on successive days of the experiment as compared with their basal values. Daily oral administration of mangiferin showed a significant decrease in the blood glucose when compared to diabetic control. The anti-hyperglycemic effect was obtained with the dose of 40 mg/kg b.wt. In addition, treatment of mangiferin shows alteration in kidney carbohydrate metabolic enzymes including gluconeogenic enzymes like glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-disphosphatase. These results were comparable with positive control drug, glibenclamide. Conclusions: The results obtained in this study provide evidence of the anti-diabetic potential of mangiferin, mediated through the regulation of carbohydrate key metabolic enzyme activities.

  10. Vitamin C improves basal metabolic rate and lipid profile in alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus in rats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D U Owu; A B Antai; K H Udofia; A O Obembe; K O Obasi; M U Eteng

    2006-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multi-factorial disease which is characterized by hyperglycaemia, lipoprotein abnormalities and oxidative stress. This study evaluated effect of oral vitamin C administration on basal metabolic rate and lipid profile of alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Vitamin C was administered at 200 mg/kg body wt. by gavage for four weeks to diabetic rats after which the resting metabolic rate and plasma lipid profile was determined. The results showed that vitamin C administration significantly ( < 0.01) reduced the resting metabolic rate in diabetic rats; and also lowered plasma triglyceride, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. These results suggest that the administration of vitamin C in this model of established diabetes mellitus might be beneficial for the restoration of basal metabolic rate and improvement of lipid profile. This may at least in part reduce the risk of cardiovascular events seen in diabetes mellitus.

  11. Investigation of metabolic changes in STZ-induced diabetic rats with hyperpolarized [1-13C]acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koellisch, Ulrich; Laustsen, Christoffer; Nørlinger, Thomas S;

    2015-01-01

    in diabetes patients. Acetylcarnitine is a metabolic product of acetate, which enables its transport into the mitochondria for energy production. This study investigates whether the ratio of acetylcarnitine to acetate, measured by noninvasive hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]acetate magnetic resonance spectroscopy......In the metabolism of acetate several enzymes are involved, which play an important role in free fatty acid oxidation. Fatty acid metabolism is altered in diabetes patients and therefore acetate might serve as a marker for pathological changes in the fuel selection of cells, as these changes occur......, could serve as a marker for myocardial, hepatic, and renal metabolic changes in rats with Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in vivo. We demonstrate that the conversion of acetate to acetylcarnitine could be detected and quantified in all three organs of interest. More interestingly, we found...

  12. Protective effects of L-arabinose in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Hao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: L-Arabinose is a non-caloric sugar, which could affect glucose and lipid metabolism and suppress obesity. However, few reports have described the effect of L-arabinose in metabolic syndrome, a combination of medical disorders that increase the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Objective: This study was conducted to explore the effects of L-arabinose in rats with metabolic syndrome induced by a high-carbohydrate, high-fat (HCHF diet. Methods: After the rat model for metabolic syndrome was successfully established, L-arabinose was administrated by oral gavage for 6 weeks. The biochemical index and histological analysis were measured, and the expression levels of genes related to fatty acid metabolism were analyzed using real-time PCR. Results: Following treatment with L-arabinose, metabolic syndrome rats had an obvious reduction in body weight, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, serum insulin, TNF-α, and leptin. Further study showed that treatment with L-arabinose significantly increased the expression of mRNA for hepatic CPT-1α and PDK4, but the expression of mRNA for hepatic ACCα was reduced. Conclusions: This work suggests that L-arabinose could lower body weight, Lee's index, and visceral index and improve dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, and viscera function, which indicate that it might be a promising candidate for therapies combating metabolic syndrome.

  13. Metabolic Fingerprint of PS3-Induced Resistance of Grapevine Leaves against Plasmopara viticola Revealed Differences in Elicitor-Triggered Defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Marielle; Lucio, Marianna; Roullier-Gall, Chloé; Héloir, Marie-Claire; Trouvelot, Sophie; Daire, Xavier; Kanawati, Basem; Lemaître-Guillier, Christelle; Poinssot, Benoît; Gougeon, Régis; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Induction of plant resistance against pathogens by defense elicitors constitutes an attractive strategy to reduce the use of fungicides in crop protection. However, all elicitors do not systematically confer protection against pathogens. Elicitor-induced resistance (IR) thus merits to be further characterized in order to understand what makes an elicitor efficient. In this study, the oligosaccharidic defense elicitors H13 and PS3, respectively, ineffective and effective to trigger resistance of grapevine leaves against downy mildew, were used to compare their effect on the global leaf metabolism. Ultra high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) analysis allowed us to obtain and compare the specific metabolic fingerprint induced by each elicitor and to characterize the associated metabolic pathways. Moreover, erythritol phosphate was identified as a putative marker of elicitor-IR.

  14. An Anti-Inflammatory Sterol Decreases Obesity-Related Inflammation-Induced Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L. Reading

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity-related inflammation-induced insulin resistance and metabolic dysregulation were investigated in retrospective analysis of placebo hematologic and metabolic laboratory data from trials associated with increasing chronic low-grade inflammation and body mass index. Studies included healthy subjects and those with progressive stages of metabolic dysregulation, including type 2 diabetes mellitus with uncontrolled hemoglobin A1c. Intrasubject variances in erythroid and metabolic values increased with metabolic dysregulation. Random effects were demonstrated in treatment-naïve diabetes for erythroid, glucose, and HbA1c fluctuations. The anti-inflammatory insulin sensitizer, HE3286, was tested for its ability to decrease obesity-related inflammation-induced insulin resistance and metabolic dysregulation in diabetes. HE3286 significantly decreased erythroid and metabolic variances and improved 1,5-anhydroglucitol (a surrogate of postprandial glucose compared to the placebo group. HE3286 HbA1c decrease correlated with weight loss and inversely with baseline monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 in metformin-treated diabetics. Normalization of HbA1c to the 84-day average hemoglobin revealed that HE3286 HbA1c decrease correlated with high baseline MCP-1 and MCP-1 decrease in treatment-naïve diabetics. HE3286 decreased insulin resistance, increased the frequency of decreased day 84 HbA1c in metformin-treated subjects, and decreased day 112 HbA1c in treatment-naïve diabetics. HE3286 may be useful to restore metabolic homeostasis in type 2 diabetes.

  15. Influence of pre-exercise muscle glycogen content on exercise-induced transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Keller, Charlotte; Steensberg, Adam

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of metabolic genes is transiently induced during recovery from exercise in skeletal muscle of humans. To determine whether pre-exercise muscle glycogen content influences the magnitude and/or duration of this adaptive response, six male subjects performed one-legged cycling exercise...

  16. PINK1-Parkin-Mediated Mitophagy Protects Mitochondrial Integrity and Prevents Metabolic Stress-Induced Endothelial Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Wu

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial injury and dysfunction, a significant feature in metabolic syndrome, triggers endothelial cell dysfunction and cell death. Increasing evidence suggests that mitophagy, a process of autophagic turnover of damaged mitochondria, maintains mitochondrial integrity. PINK1 (phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 and Parkin signaling is a key pathway in mitophagy control. In this study, we examined whether this pathway could protect mitochondria under metabolic stress. We found that palmitic acid (PA induced significant mitophagy and activated PINK1 and Parkin in endothelial cells. Knocking down PINK1 or Parkin reduced mitophagy, leading to impaired clearance of damaged mitochondria and intracellular accumulation of mitochondrial fragments. Furthermore, PINK1 and Parkin prevented PA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production and apoptosis. Finally, we show that PINK1 and Parkin were up-regulated in vascular wall of obese mice and diabetic mice. Our study demonstrates that PINK1-Parkin pathway is activated in response to metabolic stress. Through induction of mitophagy, this pathway protects mitochondrial integrity and prevents metabolic stress-induced endothelial injury.

  17. Arctigenin preferentially induces tumor cell death under glucose deprivation by inhibiting cellular energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Qi, Chunting; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Xiuquan; Zhang, Haohao; Hu, Lihong; Yuan, Junying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-08-15

    Selectively eradicating cancer cells with minimum adverse effects on normal cells is a major challenge in the development of anticancer therapy. We hypothesize that nutrient-limiting conditions frequently encountered by cancer cells in poorly vascularized solid tumors might provide an opportunity for developing selective therapy. In this study, we investigated the function and molecular mechanisms of a natural compound, arctigenin, in regulating tumor cell growth. We demonstrated that arctigenin selectively promoted glucose-starved A549 tumor cells to undergo necrosis by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. In doing so, arctigenin elevated cellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocked cellular energy metabolism in the glucose-starved tumor cells. We also demonstrated that cellular ROS generation was caused by intracellular ATP depletion and played an essential role in the arctigenin-induced tumor cell death under the glucose-limiting condition. Furthermore, we combined arctigenin with the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) and examined their effects on tumor cell growth. Interestingly, this combination displayed preferential cell-death inducing activity against tumor cells compared to normal cells. Hence, we propose that the combination of arctigenin and 2DG may represent a promising new cancer therapy with minimal normal tissue toxicity.

  18. Noninvasive Monitoring of Training Induced Muscle Adaptation with -MRS: Fibre Type Shifts Correlate with Metabolic Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike Hoff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate training induced metabolic changes noninvasively with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (-MRS for measuring muscle fibre type adaptation. Methods. Eleven volunteers underwent a 24-week training, consisting of speed-strength, endurance, and detraining (each 8 weeks. Prior to and following each training period, needle biopsies and -MRS of the resting gastrocnemius muscle were performed. Fibre type distribution was analyzed histologically and tested for correlation with the ratios of high energy phosphates ([PCr]/[], [PCr]/[βATP] and [PCr + ]/[βATP]. The correlation between the changes of the -MRS parameters during training and the resulting changes in fibre composition were also analysed. Results. We observed an increased type-II-fibre proportion after speed-strength and detraining. After endurance training the percentage of fast-twitch fibres was reduced. The progression of the [PCr]/[]-ratio was similar to that of the fast-twitch fibres during the training. We found a correlation between the type-II-fibre proportion and [PCr]/[] (, or [PCr]/[βATP] (, ; the correlations between its changes (delta and the fibre-shift were significant as well (delta[PCr]/[] , delta[PCr]/[βATP] , . Conclusion. Shifts in fibre type composition and high energy phosphate metabolite content covary in human gastrocnemius muscle. Therefore -MRS might be a feasible method for noninvasive monitoring of exercise-induced fibre type transformation.

  19. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury: Implications for temporal homeostasis of lipid metabolism and eicosanoid signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Maria; Gruia, Alexandra T; Nica, Dragos V; Azghadi, Seyed M R; Mic, Ani A; Mic, Felix A

    2015-12-05

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used drug that induces serious hepatotoxicity when overdosed, leading to increased levels of serum aminotransferases. However, little knowledge exists linking acetaminophen to liver free fatty acids and the eicosanoid-mediated signaling pathway. To this end, adult NMRI mice injected with a dose of 400 mg/kg acetaminophen were monitored for one week post-treatment. Consistent changes were observed in serum transaminases, profile of hepatic free fatty acids, expression of cyclooxygenase, elongase, lipogenesis, and lipolysis genes; as well as in expression patterns of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 in the liver. Both linoleic acid and arachidonic acid--substrates in eicosanoid biosynthesis--were significantly influenced by overdose, and the latter peaked first among the free fatty acids examined here. There was a close similarity between the temporal dynamics of linoleic acid and aspartate aminotransferases. Moreover, serum transaminases were reduced by cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, but not by cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitors. Our results hence attest to the hazard of acetaminophen overdose on the temporal homeostasis of hepatic concentrations of free fatty acids and expression of key genes underlying liver lipid metabolism. There is also evidence for activation of a cyclooxygenase-mediated signaling pathway, especially the cyclooxygenase 2-prostanoid pathway, during acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Therefore, the results of the present study should provide valuable information to a wide audience, working to understand the health hazard of this drug and the implications of the eicosanoid signaling pathway in liver pathophysiology.

  20. Salicylic acid alleviates NaCl-induced changes in the metabolism of Matricaria chamomilla plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovácik, Jozef; Klejdus, Borivoj; Hedbavny, Josef; Backor, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Influence of 100 mM NaCl and 50 microM salicylic acid (SA) and their combination on the metabolism of chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) during 7 days was studied. NaCl reduced growth and selected physiological parameters and SA in combined treatment (NaCl + SA) reversed majority of these symptoms. Application of SA reduced NaCl-induced increase of Na+ in the rosettes, but not in the roots. Accumulation of total amino acids was stimulated in NaCl-treated roots, especially due to exceptional increase of proline (4.4-fold). Among phenolic acids, accumulation of protocatechuic acid was the most enhanced in NaCl-exposed leaf rosettes (ca. 3-fold) while chlorogenic and caffeic acids in the roots (2.4- and 2.8-fold, respectively). Total soluble phenols increased after NaCl and SA treatments, but root lignin content was not affected. Activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and shikimate dehydrogenase increased in response to NaCl, but cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase was not affected and polyphenol oxidase decreased. Stress parameters were elevated by NaCl treatment (superoxide radical and malondialdehyde content, activities of catalase, ascorbate- and guaiacol-peroxidase) and substantially prevented by SA, while accumulation of hydrogen peroxide decreased. Overall, SA showed strong beneficial properties against NaCl-induced negative symptoms. Protective effect of SA was the most visible at the level of guaiacol-peroxidase and through amelioration of stress parameters and mineral nutrient contents.

  1. Sodium Butyrate Protects Against High Fat Diet-induced Cardiac Dysfunction and Metabolic Disorders in Type II Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Du, Jianfeng; Yano, Naohiro; Wang, Hao; Zhao, Yu Tina; Patricia, Dubielecka-Szczerba; Zhuang, Shougang; Chin, Eugene Y; Qin, Gangjian; Zhao, Ting C

    2017-01-21

    Histone deacetylases are recently identified to act as key regulators for cardiac pathophysiology and metabolic disorders. However, the function of histone deacetylase (HDAC) in controlling cardiac performance in type II diabetes and obesity remains unknown. Here we determine whether HDAC inhibition attenuates high fat diet (HFD)-induced cardiac dysfunction and improves metabolic features. Adult mice were fed with either HFD or standard chow food for 24 weeks. Starting at 12 weeks, mice were divided into four groups randomly, in which sodium butyrate (1%), a potent HDAC inhibitor, was provided to chow and HFD-fed mice in drinking water, respectively. Glucose intolerance, metabolic parameters, cardiac function, and remodeling were assessed. Histological analysis and cellular signaling were examined at 24 weeks following euthanization of mice. HFD-fed mice demonstrated myocardial dysfunction and profound interstitial fibrosis, which were attenuated by HDAC inhibition. HFD-induced metabolic syndrome features insulin resistance, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, lipid accumulations, and cardiac hypertrophy, these effects were prevented by HDAC inhibition. Furthermore, HDAC inhibition attenuated myocyte apoptosis, reduced production of reactive oxygen species, and increased angiogenesis in the HFD-fed myocardium. Notably, HFD induced decreases in MKK3, p38, p38 regulated/activated protein kinase (PRAK) and Akt-1, but not p44/42 phosphorylation, which were prevented by HDAC inhibition. These results suggest that HDAC inhibition plays a critical role to preserve cardiac performance and mitigate metabolic disorders in obesity and diabetes, which is associated with MKK3/p38/PRAK pathway. The study holds promise in developing a new therapeutic strategy in the treatment of type II diabetic-induced heart failure and metabolic disorders. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Monocrotophos induces the expression and activity of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in pre-sensitized cultured human brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Vinay K; Kumar, Vivek; Singh, Abhishek K; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Jahan, Sadaf; Pandey, Ankita; Alam, Sarfaraz; Khan, Feroz; Khanna, Vinay K; Yadav, Sanjay; Lohani, Mohtshim; Pant, Aditya B

    2014-01-01

    The expression and metabolic profile of cytochrome P450s (CYPs) is largely missing in human brain due to non-availability of brain tissue. We attempted to address the issue by using human brain neuronal (SH-SY5Y) and glial (U373-MG) cells. The expression and activity of CYP1A1, 2B6 and 2E1 were carried out in the cells exposed to CYP inducers viz., 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), cyclophosphamide (CPA), ethanol and known neurotoxicant- monocrotophos (MCP), a widely used organophosphorous pesticide. Both the cells show significant induction in the expression and CYP-specific activity against classical inducers and MCP. The induction level of CYPs was comparatively lower in MCP exposed cells than cells exposed to classical inducers. Pre-exposure (12 h) of cells to classical inducers significantly added the MCP induced CYPs expression and activity. The findings were concurrent with protein ligand docking studies, which show a significant modulatory capacity of MCP by strong interaction with CYP regulators-CAR, PXR and AHR. Similarly, the known CYP inducers- 3-MC, CPA and ethanol have also shown significantly high docking scores with all the three studied CYP regulators. The expression of CYPs in neuronal and glial cells has suggested their possible association with the endogenous physiology of the brain. The findings also suggest the xenobiotic metabolizing capabilities of these cells against MCP, if received a pre-sensitization to trigger the xenobiotic metabolizing machinery. MCP induced CYP-specific activity in neuronal cells could help in explaining its effect on neurotransmission, as these CYPs are known to involve in the synthesis/transport of the neurotransmitters. The induction of CYPs in glial cells is also of significance as these cells are thought to be involved in protecting the neurons from environmental insults and safeguard them from toxicity. The data provide better understanding of the metabolizing capability of the human brain cells against xenobiotics.

  3. Monocrotophos induces the expression and activity of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in pre-sensitized cultured human brain cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay K Tripathi

    Full Text Available The expression and metabolic profile of cytochrome P450s (CYPs is largely missing in human brain due to non-availability of brain tissue. We attempted to address the issue by using human brain neuronal (SH-SY5Y and glial (U373-MG cells. The expression and activity of CYP1A1, 2B6 and 2E1 were carried out in the cells exposed to CYP inducers viz., 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC, cyclophosphamide (CPA, ethanol and known neurotoxicant- monocrotophos (MCP, a widely used organophosphorous pesticide. Both the cells show significant induction in the expression and CYP-specific activity against classical inducers and MCP. The induction level of CYPs was comparatively lower in MCP exposed cells than cells exposed to classical inducers. Pre-exposure (12 h of cells to classical inducers significantly added the MCP induced CYPs expression and activity. The findings were concurrent with protein ligand docking studies, which show a significant modulatory capacity of MCP by strong interaction with CYP regulators-CAR, PXR and AHR. Similarly, the known CYP inducers- 3-MC, CPA and ethanol have also shown significantly high docking scores with all the three studied CYP regulators. The expression of CYPs in neuronal and glial cells has suggested their possible association with the endogenous physiology of the brain. The findings also suggest the xenobiotic metabolizing capabilities of these cells against MCP, if received a pre-sensitization to trigger the xenobiotic metabolizing machinery. MCP induced CYP-specific activity in neuronal cells could help in explaining its effect on neurotransmission, as these CYPs are known to involve in the synthesis/transport of the neurotransmitters. The induction of CYPs in glial cells is also of significance as these cells are thought to be involved in protecting the neurons from environmental insults and safeguard them from toxicity. The data provide better understanding of the metabolizing capability of the human brain cells against

  4. Disruption of sphingolipid metabolism augments ceramide-induced autophagy in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland-Smith, Megan; Ermini, Leonardo; Chauvin, Sarah; Craig-Barnes, Hayley; Tagliaferro, Andrea; Todros, Tullia; Post, Martin; Caniggia, Isabella

    2015-04-01

    Bioactive sphingolipids including ceramides are involved in a variety of pathophysiological processes by regulating cell death and survival. The objective of the current study was to examine ceramide metabolism in preeclampsia, a serious disorder of pregnancy characterized by oxidative stress, and increased trophoblast cell death and autophagy. Maternal circulating and placental ceramide levels quantified by tandem mass spectrometry were elevated in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. Placental ceramides were elevated due to greater de novo synthesis via high serine palmitoyltransferase activity and reduced lysosomal breakdown via diminished ASAH1 expression caused by TGFB3-induced E2F4 transcriptional repression. SMPD1 activity was reduced; hence, sphingomyelin degradation by SMPD1 did not contribute to elevated ceramide levels in preeclampsia. Oxidative stress triggered similar changes in ceramide levels and acid hydrolase expression in villous explants and trophoblast cells. MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry localized the ceramide increases to the trophophoblast layers and syncytial knots of placentae from pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. ASAH1 inhibition or ceramide treatment induced autophagy in human trophoblast cells via a shift of the BOK-MCL1 rheostat toward prodeath BOK. Pharmacological inhibition of ASAH1 activity in pregnant mice resulted in increased placental ceramide content, abnormal placentation, reduced fetal growth, and increased autophagy via a similar shift in the BOK-MCL1 system. Our results reveal that oxidative stress-induced reduction of lysosomal hydrolase activities in combination with elevated de novo synthesis leads to ceramide overload, resulting in increased trophoblast cell autophagy, and typifies preeclampsia as a sphingolipid storage disorder.

  5. Role of hypoxia in obesity-induced disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism in adipose tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Gao, Zhanguo; He, Qing; Zhou, Dequan; Guo, ZengKui; Ye, Jianping

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that adipose tissue hypoxia (ATH) may contribute to endocrine dysfunction in adipose tissue of obese mice. In this study, we examined hypoxia's effects on metabolism in adipocytes. We determined the dynamic relationship of ATH and adiposity in ob/ob mice. The interstitial oxygen pressure (Po2) was monitored in the epididymal fat pads for ATH. During weight gain from 39.5 to 55.5 g, Po2 declined from 34.8 to 20.1 mmHg, which are 40–60% lower than those in the lean mice. Insulin receptor-β (IRβ) and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) were decreased in the adipose tissue of obese mice, and the alteration was observed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes after hypoxia (1% oxygen) treatment. Insulin-induced glucose uptake and Akt Ser473 phosphorylation was blocked by hypoxia in the adipocytes. This effect of hypoxia exhibited cell type specificity, as it was not observed in L6 myotubes and βTC6 cells. In response to hypoxia, free fatty acid (FFA) uptake was reduced and lipolysis was increased in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The molecular mechanism of decreased fatty acid uptake may be related to inhibition of fatty acid transporters (FATP1 and CD36) and transcription factors (PPARγ and C/EBPα) by hypoxia. The hypoxia-induced lipolysis was observed in vivo after femoral arterial clamp. Necrosis and apoptosis were induced by hypoxia in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These data suggest that ATH may promote FFA release and inhibit glucose uptake in adipocytes by inhibition of the insulin-signaling pathway and induction of cell death. PMID:19066318

  6. α-Mangostin Mediated Pharmacological Modulation of Hepatic Carbohydrate Metabolism in Diabetes Induced Wistar Rat

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    Vikas Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Garcinia mangostana L. (Fruit has been commonly used as folklore drug in the treatment of various types of diseases. The present experiment was designed to evaluate the potential effect of α-mangostin mediated pharmacological modulation of hepatic carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT was performed in normoglycemic rats. Single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (60 mg/kg, body weight was used for induction the diabetes in Swiss albino (Wistar strain rats. The rats were divided into different groups. Blood glucose level, body weight, insulin, glycated hemoglobin and hemoglobin levels were recorded at regular intervals. Biochemical parameters, liver enzymes, lipid profile, antioxidant parameters and inflammatory cytokine mediators were also scrutinized. Histopathology study of kidney, pancreas and liver were performed. The result of OGTT study depicted the better utilization of glucose in experimental rats. STZ induced diabetic rats treated with α-mangostin (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o. and glibenclamide depicted the decline in the level of blood glucose; enhanced body weight and showed the better utilization of glucose by different organs. STZ induced diabetic rats treated with α-mangostin illustrated the increased level of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, HDL, total protein, SOD, CAT, GSH and declined level of glycated hemoglobin, fructose-1-6-biphosphatase, glucose-6-Phosphatase, TC, TG, LDL, VLDL, CRE, BUN, SGOT, SGPT, ALP and LPO at effective dose dependent manners. Histological study showed the inflamed blood vessels in diabetic kidney, which was less in α-mangostin treated rats; diabetic pancreatic showed the complete damage of β cells, islets, aciini and producing necrosis, but all damage was less obvious in α-mangostin treating group rats; diabetic liver showed the damage of hepatocytes as well as central vein but was less in treated groups. Considering the

  7. Physical exercise in overweight to obese individuals induces metabolic- and neurotrophic-related structural brain plasticity

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    Karsten eMueller

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous cross-sectional studies on body-weight-related alterations in brain structure revealed profound changes in the gray matter (GM and white matter (WM that resemble findings obtained from individuals with advancing age. This suggests that obesity may lead to structural brain changes that are comparable with brain aging. Here, we asked whether weight-loss-dependent improved metabolic and neurotrophic functioning parallels the reversal of obesity-related alterations in brain structure. To this end we applied magnetic resonance imaging together with voxel-based morphometry and diffusion-tensor imaging in overweight to obese individuals who participated in a fitness course with intensive physical training three days per week over a period of three months. After the fitness course, participants presented, with inter-individual heterogeneity, a reduced body mass index (BMI, reduced serum leptin concentrations, elevated high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, and alterations of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF concentrations suggesting changes of metabolic and neurotrophic function. Exercise-dependent changes in BMI and serum concentration of BDNF, leptin, and HDL-C were related to an increase in GM density in the left hippocampus, the insular cortex, and the left cerebellar lobule. We also observed exercise-dependent changes of diffusivity parameters in surrounding WM structures as well as in the corpus callosum. These findings suggest that weight-loss due to physical exercise in overweight to obese participants induces profound structural brain plasticity, not primarily of sensorimotor brain regions involved in physical exercise, but of regions previously reported to be structurally affected by an increased body weight and functionally implemented in gustation and cognitive processing.

  8. Androgen Deficiency Exacerbates High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Male Mice.

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    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Jardi, Ferran; Antonio, Leen; Lemaire, Katleen; Goyvaerts, Lotte; Deldicque, Louise; Carmeliet, Geert; Decallonne, Brigitte; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Androgen deficiency is associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in men, but the mechanisms behind these associations remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of androgen deficiency and high-fat diet (HFD) on body composition and glucose homeostasis in C57BL/6J male mice. Two models of androgen deficiency were used: orchidectomy (ORX) and androgen receptor knockout mice. Both models displayed higher adiposity and serum leptin levels upon HFD, whereas no differences were seen on a regular diet. Fat accumulation in HFD ORX animals was accompanied by increased sedentary behavior and occurred in spite of reduced food intake. HFD ORX mice showed white adipocyte hypertrophy, correlated with decreased mitochondrial content but not function as well as increased lipogenesis and decreased lipolysis suggested by the up-regulation of fatty acid synthase and the down-regulation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Both ORX and androgen receptor knockout exacerbated HFD-induced glucose intolerance by impairing insulin action in liver and skeletal muscle, as evidenced by the increased triglyceride and decreased glycogen content in these tissues. In addition, serum IL-1β levels were elevated, and pancreatic insulin secretion was impaired after ORX. Testosterone but not dihydrotestosterone supplementation restored the castration effects on body composition and glucose homeostasis. We conclude that sex steroid deficiency in combination with HFD exacerbates adiposity, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure in 2 preclinical male mouse models. Our findings stress the importance of a healthy diet in a clinical context of androgen deficiency and may have implications for the prevention of metabolic alterations in hypogonadal men.

  9. Generation of rat-induced pluripotent stem cells from a new model of metabolic syndrome.

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    Nana Takenaka-Ninagawa

    Full Text Available We recently characterized DahlS.Z-Leprfa/Leprfa (DS/obese rats, derived from a cross between Dahl salt-sensitive rats and Zucker rats, as a new animal model of metabolic syndrome (MetS. Although the phenotype of DS/obese rats is similar to that of humans with MetS, the pathophysiological and metabolic characteristics in each cell type remain to be clarified. Hence, the establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from MetS rats is essential for investigations of MetS in vitro. Reports of rat iPSCs (riPSCs, however, are few because of the difficulty of comparing to other rodents such as mouse. Recently, the advantage of using mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs as a cell source for generating iPSCs was described. We aimed to establish riPSCs from MSCs in adipose tissues of both DS/obese rats and their lean littermates, DahlS.Z-Lepr+/Lepr+ (DS/lean rats using lentivirus vectors with only three factors Oct4, Klf4, and Sox2 without c-Myc. The morphology, gene expression profiles, and protein expression of established colonies showed embryonic stem cell (ESCs-like properties, and the differentiation potential into cells from all three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo (teratomas. Both riPSCs became adipocytes after induction of adipogenesis by insulin, T3, and dexamethasone. Real-time PCR analysis also revealed that both riPSCs and the adipose tissue from DS/obese and DS/lean rats possess similar expression patterns of adipocyte differentiation-related genes. We succeeded in generating riPSCs effectively from MSCs of both DS/obese and DS/lean rats. These riPSCs may well serve as highly effective tools for the investigation of MetS pathophysiology in vitro.

  10. Characterization of energy and neurotransmitter metabolism in cortical glutamatergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells: A novel approach to study metabolism in human neurons.

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    Aldana, Blanca I; Zhang, Yu; Lihme, Maria Fog; Bak, Lasse K; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Holst, Bjørn; Hyttel, Poul; Freude, Kristine K; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-02-24

    Alterations in the cellular metabolic machinery of the brain are associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Novel human cellular disease models are essential in order to study underlying disease mechanisms. In the present study, we characterized major metabolic pathways in neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). With this aim, cultures of hiPSC-derived neurons were incubated with [U-(13)C]glucose, [U-(13)C]glutamate or [U-(13)C]glutamine. Isotopic labeling in metabolites was determined using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and cellular amino acid content was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Additionally, we evaluated mitochondrial function using real-time assessment of oxygen consumption via the Seahorse XF(e)96 Analyzer. Moreover, in order to validate the hiPSC-derived neurons as a model system, a metabolic profiling was performed in parallel in primary neuronal cultures of mouse cerebral cortex and cerebellum. These serve as well-established models of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, respectively. The hiPSC-derived neurons were previously characterized as being forebrain-specific cortical glutamatergic neurons. However, a comparable preparation of predominantly mouse cortical glutamatergic neurons is not available. We found a higher glycolytic capacity in hiPSC-derived neurons compared to mouse neurons and a substantial oxidative metabolism through the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. This finding is supported by the extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rates measured in the cultured human neurons. [U-(13)C]Glutamate and [U-(13)C]glutamine were found to be efficient energy substrates for the neuronal cultures originating from both mice and humans. Interestingly, isotopic labeling in metabolites from [U-(13)C]glutamate was higher than that from [U-(13)C]glutamine. Although the metabolic profile of hiPSC-derived neurons in vitro was

  11. Metabolic and immune impairments induced by the endocrine disruptors benzo[a]pyrene and triclosan in Xenopus tropicalis.

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    Regnault, Christophe; Willison, John; Veyrenc, Sylvie; Airieau, Antinéa; Méresse, Patrick; Fortier, Marlène; Fournier, Michel; Brousseau, Pauline; Raveton, Muriel; Reynaud, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    Despite numerous studies suggesting that amphibians are highly sensitive to cumulative anthropogenic stresses, the role played by endocrine disruptors (EDs) in the decline of amphibian populations remains unclear. EDs have been extensively studied in adult amphibians for their capacity to disturb reproduction by interfering with the sexual hormone axis. Here, we studied the in vivo responses of Xenopus tropicalis males exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of each ED, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and triclosan (TCS) alone (10 μg L(-1)) or a mixture of the two (10 μg L(-1) each) over a 24 h exposure period by following the modulation of the transcription of key genes involved in metabolic, sexual and immunity processes and the cellular changes in liver, spleen and testis. BaP, TCS and the mixture of the two all induced a marked metabolic disorder in the liver highlighted by insulin resistance-like and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)-like phenotypes together with hepatotoxicity due to the impairment of lipid metabolism. For TCS and the mixture, these metabolic disorders were concomitant with modulation of innate immunity. These results confirmed that in addition to the reproductive effects induced by EDs in amphibians, metabolic disorders and immune system disruption should also be considered.

  12. Protective role of metabolism by intestinal microflora in butyl paraben-induced toxicity in HepG2 cell cultures.

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    Khanal, Tilak; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Jin, Sun Woo; Shim, Eol; Han, Hwa Jeong; Noh, Keumhan; Park, Sunkyoung; Lee, Dae Hun; Kang, Wonku; Yeo, Hee Kyung; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2012-09-03

    Parabens are alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (BA), including methyl paraben (MP), ethyl paraben, propyl paraben (PP), and butyl paraben (BP). In the present study, possible role of metabolism by fecalase in BP-induced cytotoxicity was investigated in HepG2 cell cultures. As an intestinal bacterial metabolic system, a human fecalase prepared from human fecal specimen was employed. Among the parabens tested, cytotoxicity of BP was most severe. BA, the de-esterified metabolite, did not induce cytotoxicity when compared to other parabens. When BP was incubated with fecalase, it rapidly disappeared, in association with reduced cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. In addition, BP incubated with fecalase significantly caused an increase in Bcl-2 expression together with a decrease in Bax expression and cleaved caspase-3. Moreover, anti-apoptotic effect by the incubation of BP with fecalase was also confirmed by the TUNEL assay. Furthermore, BP induced a sustained activation of the phosphorylation of JNK only when it was treated alone. Meanwhile, BP-induced cell death was reversed by the pre-incubation of BP with either fecalase or SP600125. Taken together, the findings suggested that metabolism of BP by human fecalase might have protective effects against BP-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells.

  13. The Relation between Fructose-Induced Metabolic Syndrome and Altered Renal Haemodynamic and Excretory Function in the Rat

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    Mohammed H. Abdulla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the possible relationships between dietary fructose and altered neurohumoral regulation of renal haemodynamic and excretory function in this model of metabolic syndrome. Fructose consumption induces hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, insulin resistance, and hypertension. The pathogenesis of fructose-induced hypertension is dubious and involves numerous pathways acting both singly and together. In addition, hyperinsulinemia and hypertension contribute significantly to progressive renal disease in fructose-fed rats. Moreover, increased activity of the renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems leading to downregulation of receptors may be responsible for the blunted vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II and catecholamines, respectively. Various approaches have been suggested to prevent the development of fructose-induced hypertension and/or metabolic alteration. In this paper, we address the role played by the renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems in the haemodynamic alterations that occur due to prolonged consumption of fructose.

  14. The impact of obesity and metabolic syndrome on chronic hepatitis B and drug-induced liver disease.

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    Pais, Raluca; Rusu, Elena; Ratziu, Vlad

    2014-02-01

    Steatosis and insulin resistance (IR) are no more frequent in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) than in the general population. Although experimental studies suggest that the HBx protein induces liver fat, human studies have shown that steatosis and IR are related to coexistent metabolic risk factors, thus epidemiologically linked rather than virally induced. Diabetes and obesity are associated with advanced fibrosis and increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in CHB. Despite abundant experimental data showing that fatty liver is more susceptible to liver injury, drug-induced liver disease seems no more frequent in NAFLD patients, except, possibly, a higher incidence but not severity of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

  15. Thresholds of flow-induced bed disturbances and their effects on stream metabolism in an agricultural river

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    O'Connor, Ben L.; Harvey, Judson W.; McPhillips, Lauren E.

    2012-01-01

    Storm-driven flow pulses in rivers destroy and restructure sediment habitats that affect stream metabolism. This study examined thresholds of bed disturbances that affected patch- and reach-scale sediment conditions and metabolism rates. A 4 year record of discharge and diel changes in dissolved oxygen concentrations (ΔDO) was analyzed for disturbances and recovery periods of the ΔDO signal. Disturbances to the ΔDO signal were associated with flow pulses, and the recovery times for the ΔDO signal were found to be in two categories: less than 5 days (30% of the disturbances) or greater than 15 days (70% of the disturbances). A field study was performed during the fall of 2007, which included a storm event that increased discharge from 3.1 to 6.9 m3/s over a 7 h period. During stable flow conditions before the storm, variability in patch-scale stream metabolism values were associated with sediment texture classes with values ranging from −16.4 to 2.3 g O22/d (negative sign indicates net respiration) that bounded the reach-averaged rate of −5.6 g O22/d. Hydraulic modeling of bed shear stresses demonstrated a storm-induced flow pulse mobilized approximately 25% of the bed and reach-scale metabolism rates shifted from −5 to −40 g O22/d. These results suggest that storm-induced bed disturbances led to threshold behavior with respect to stream metabolism. Small flow pulses resulted in partial-bed mobilization that disrupted stream metabolism by increased turbidity with short recovery times. Large flow pulses resulted in full-bed mobilization that disrupted stream metabolism by destroying periphyton habitats with long recovery times.

  16. Extreme Hypoxic Conditions Induce Selective Molecular Responses and Metabolic Reset in Detached Apple Fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrov, Dubravka; Zermiani, Monica; Brizzolara, Stefano; Cestaro, Alessandro; Licausi, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio; Santucci, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo; Van Veen, Hans; Zuccolo, Andrea; Ruperti, Benedetto; Tonutti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The ripening physiology of detached fruit is altered by low oxygen conditions with profound effects on quality parameters. To study hypoxia-related processes and regulatory mechanisms, apple (Malus domestica, cv Granny Smith) fruit, harvested at commercial ripening, were kept at 1°C under normoxic (control) and hypoxic (0.4 and 0.8 kPa oxygen) conditions for up to 60 days. NMR analyses of cortex tissue identified eight metabolites showing significantly different accumulations between samples, with ethanol and alanine displaying the most pronounced difference between hypoxic and normoxic treatments. A rapid up-regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate-related metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate decarboxylase, alanine aminotransferase) gene expression was detected under both hypoxic conditions with a more pronounced effect induced by the lowest (0.4 kPa) oxygen concentration. Both hypoxic conditions negatively affected ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcript accumulation. Analysis of RNA-seq data of samples collected after 24 days of hypoxic treatment identified more than 1000 genes differentially expressed when comparing 0.4 vs. 0.8 kPa oxygen concentration samples. Genes involved in cell-wall, minor and major CHO, amino acid and secondary metabolisms, fermentation and glycolysis as well as genes involved in transport, defense responses, and oxidation-reduction appeared to be selectively affected by treatments. The lowest oxygen concentration induced a higher expression of transcription factors belonging to AUX/IAA, WRKY, HB, Zinc-finger families, while MADS box family genes were more expressed when apples were kept under 0.8 kPa oxygen. Out of the eight group VII ERF members present in apple genome, two genes showed a rapid up-regulation under hypoxia, and western blot analysis showed that apple MdRAP2.12 proteins were differentially accumulated in normoxic and hypoxic samples, with the highest level reached under 0.4 kPa oxygen. These data suggest

  17. Therapeutic roles of heme oxygenase-1 in metabolic diseases: curcumin and resveratrol analogues as possible inducers of heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yong; Lee, Ju Hwan; Chung, Hun-Taeg; Pae, Hyun-Ock

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and obesity, are associated with a low-grade chronic inflammation (inflammatory stress), oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Because the integration of these stresses is critical to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases, agents and cellular molecules that can modulate these stress responses are emerging as potential targets for intervention and treatment of metabolic diseases. It has been recognized that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in cellular protection. Because HO-1 can reduce inflammatory stress, oxidative stress, and ER stress, in part by exerting antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects, HO-1 has been suggested to play important roles in pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In the present review, we will explore our current understanding of the protective mechanisms of HO-1 in metabolic diseases and present some emerging therapeutic options for HO-1 expression in treating metabolic diseases, together with the therapeutic potential of curcumin and resveratrol analogues that have their ability to induce HO-1 expression.

  18. Therapeutic Roles of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Metabolic Diseases: Curcumin and Resveratrol Analogues as Possible Inducers of Heme Oxygenase-1

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    Yong Son

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and obesity, are associated with a low-grade chronic inflammation (inflammatory stress, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Because the integration of these stresses is critical to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases, agents and cellular molecules that can modulate these stress responses are emerging as potential targets for intervention and treatment of metabolic diseases. It has been recognized that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 plays an important role in cellular protection. Because HO-1 can reduce inflammatory stress, oxidative stress, and ER stress, in part by exerting antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects, HO-1 has been suggested to play important roles in pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In the present review, we will explore our current understanding of the protective mechanisms of HO-1 in metabolic diseases and present some emerging therapeutic options for HO-1 expression in treating metabolic diseases, together with the therapeutic potential of curcumin and resveratrol analogues that have their ability to induce HO-1 expression.

  19. 2-Methylcitric acid impairs glutamate metabolism and induces permeability transition in brain mitochondria.

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    Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Cecatto, Cristiane; Castilho, Roger Frigério; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation of 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA) is observed in methylmalonic and propionic acidemias, which are clinically characterized by severe neurological symptoms. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of brain abnormalities in these diseases are poorly established and very little has been reported on the role of 2MCA. In the present work we found that 2MCA markedly inhibited ADP-stimulated and uncoupled respiration in mitochondria supported by glutamate, with a less significant inhibition in pyruvate plus malate respiring mitochondria. However, no alterations occurred when α-ketoglutarate or succinate was used as respiratory substrates, suggesting a defect on glutamate oxidative metabolism. It was also observed that 2MCA decreased ATP formation in glutamate plus malate or pyruvate plus malate-supported mitochondria. Furthermore, 2MCA inhibited glutamate dehydrogenase activity at concentrations as low as 0.5 mM. Kinetic studies revealed that this inhibitory effect was competitive in relation to glutamate. In contrast, assays of osmotic swelling in non-respiring mitochondria suggested that 2MCA did not significantly impair mitochondrial glutamate transport. Finally, 2MCA provoked a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and induced swelling in Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria supported by different substrates. These effects were totally prevented by cyclosporine A plus ADP or ruthenium red, indicating induction of mitochondrial permeability transition. Taken together, our data strongly indicate that 2MCA behaves as a potent inhibitor of glutamate oxidation by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase activity and as a permeability transition inducer, disturbing mitochondrial energy homeostasis. We presume that 2MCA-induced mitochondrial deleterious effects may contribute to the pathogenesis of brain damage in patients affected by methylmalonic and propionic acidemias. We propose that brain glutamate oxidation is disturbed by 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA), which

  20. Neurochemistry of Pressure-Induced Nitrogen and Metabolically Inert Gas Narcosis in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostain, Jean-Claude; Lavoute, Cécile

    2016-06-13

    Gases that are not metabolized by the organism are thus chemically inactive under normal conditions. Such gases include the "noble gases" of the Periodic Table as well as hydrogen and nitrogen. At increasing pressure, nitrogen induces narcosis at 4 absolute atmospheres (ATAs) and more in humans and at 11 ATA and more in rats. Electrophysiological and neuropharmacological studies suggest that the striatum is a target of nitrogen narcosis. Glutamate and dopamine release from the striatum in rats are decreased by exposure to nitrogen at a pressure of 31 ATA (75% of the anesthetic threshold). Striatal dopamine levels decrease during exposure to compressed argon, an inert gas more narcotic than nitrogen, or to nitrous oxide, an anesthetic gas. Inversely, striatal dopamine levels increase during exposure to compressed helium, an inert gas with a very low narcotic potency. Exposure to nitrogen at high pressure does not change N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor activities in Substantia Nigra compacta and striatum but enhances gama amino butyric acidA (GABAA) receptor activities in Substantia Nigra compacta. The decrease in striatal dopamine levels in response to hyperbaric nitrogen exposure is suppressed by recurrent exposure to nitrogen narcosis, and dopamine levels increase after four or five exposures. This change, the lack of improvement of motor disturbances, the desensitization of GABAA receptors on dopamine cells during recurrent exposures and the long-lasting decrease of glutamate coupled with the higher sensitivity of NMDA receptors, suggest a nitrogen toxicity induced by repetitive exposures to narcosis. These differential changes in different neurotransmitter receptors would support the binding protein theory. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1579-1590, 2016.

  1. Carboxylesterase-mediated insecticide resistance: Quantitative increase induces broader metabolic resistance than qualitative change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Feng; Li, Mei-Xia; Chang, Hai-Jing; Mao, Yun; Zhang, Han-Ying; Lu, Li-Xia; Yan, Shuai-Guo; Lang, Ming-Lin; Liu, Li; Qiao, Chuan-Ling

    2015-06-01

    Carboxylesterases are mainly involved in the mediation of metabolic resistance of many insects to organophosphate (OP) insecticides. Carboxylesterases underwent two divergent evolutionary events: (1) quantitative mechanism characterized by the overproduction of carboxylesterase protein; and (2) qualitative mechanism caused by changes in enzymatic properties because of mutation from glycine/alanine to aspartate at the 151 site (G/A151D) or from tryptophan to leucine at the 271 site (W271L), following the numbering of Drosophila melanogaster AChE. Qualitative mechanism has been observed in few species. However, whether this carboxylesterase mutation mechanism is prevalent in insects remains unclear. In this study, wild-type, G/A151D and W271L mutant carboxylesterases from Culex pipiens and Aphis gossypii were subjected to germline transformation and then transferred to D. melanogaster. These germlines were ubiquitously expressed as induced by tub-Gal4. In carboxylesterase activity assay, the introduced mutant carboxylesterase did not enhance the overall carboxylesterase activity of flies. This result indicated that G/A151D or W271L mutation disrupted the original activities of the enzyme. Less than 1.5-fold OP resistance was only observed in flies expressing A. gossypii mutant carboxylesterases compared with those expressing A. gossypii wild-type carboxylesterase. However, transgenic flies universally showed low resistance to OP insecticides compared with non-transgenic flies. The flies expressing A. gossypii W271L mutant esterase exhibited 1.5-fold resistance to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide compared with non-transgenic flies. The present transgenic Drosophila system potentially showed that a quantitative increase in carboxylesterases induced broader resistance of insects to insecticides than a qualitative change.

  2. PEG-induced osmotic stress in Mentha x piperita L.: Structural features and metabolic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Búfalo, Jennifer; Rodrigues, Tatiane Maria; de Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; Tozin, Luiz Ricardo Dos Santos; Marques, Marcia Ortiz Mayo; Boaro, Carmen Silvia Fernandes

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated whether osmotic stress induced by the exposure of peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.) to moderate and severe stress for short periods of time changes the plant's physiological parameters, leaf anatomy and ultrastructure and essential oil. Plants were exposed to two levels of polyethyleneglycol (50 g L(-1) and 100 g L(-1) of PEG) in a hydroponic experiment. The plants exposed to 50 g L(-1) maintained metabolic functions similar to those of the control group (0 g L(-1)) without changes in gas exchange or structural characteristics. The increase in antioxidant enzyme activity reduced the presence of free radicals and protected membranes, including chloroplasts and mitochondria. In contrast, the osmotic stress caused by 100 g L(-1) of PEG inhibited leaf gas exchange, reduced the essential oil content and changed the oil composition, including a decrease in menthone and an increase in menthofuran. These plants also showed an increase in peroxidase activity, but this increase was not sufficient to decrease the lipid peroxidation level responsible for damaging the membranes of organelles. Morphological changes were correlated with the evaluated physiological features: plants exposed to 100 g L(-1) of PEG showed areas with collapsed cells, increases in mesophyll thickness and the area of the intercellular space, cuticle shrinkage, morphological changes in plastids, and lysis of mitochondria. In summary, our results revealed that PEG-induced osmotic stress in M. x piperita depends on the intensity level of the osmotic stress applied; severe osmotic stress changed the structural characteristics, caused damage at the cellular level, and reduced the essential oil content and quality.

  3. Ablation of succinate production from glucose metabolism in the procyclic trypanosomes induces metabolic switches to the glycerol 3-phosphate/dihydroxyacetone phosphate shuttle and to proline metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebikeme, Charles; Hubert, Jane; Biran, Marc; Gouspillou, Gilles; Morand, Pauline; Plazolles, Nicolas; Guegan, Fabien; Diolez, Philippe; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Portais, Jean-Charles; Bringaud, Frédéric

    2010-10-15

    Trypanosoma brucei is a parasitic protist that undergoes a complex life cycle during transmission from its mammalian host (bloodstream forms) to the midgut of its insect vector (procyclic form). In both parasitic forms, most glycolytic steps take place within specialized peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Here, we studied metabolic adaptations in procyclic trypanosome mutants affected in their maintenance of the glycosomal redox balance. T. brucei can theoretically use three strategies to maintain the glycosomal NAD(+)/NADH balance as follows: (i) the glycosomal succinic fermentation branch; (ii) the glycerol 3-phosphate (Gly-3-P)/dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) shuttle that transfers reducing equivalents to the mitochondrion; and (iii) the glycosomal glycerol production pathway. We showed a hierarchy in the use of these glycosomal NADH-consuming pathways by determining metabolic perturbations and adaptations in single and double mutant cell lines using a combination of NMR, ion chromatography-MS/MS, and HPLC approaches. Although functional, the Gly-3-P/DHAP shuttle is primarily used when the preferred succinate fermentation pathway is abolished in the Δpepck knock-out mutant cell line. In the absence of these two pathways (Δpepck/(RNAi)FAD-GPDH.i mutant), glycerol production is used but with a 16-fold reduced glycolytic flux. In addition, the Δpepck mutant cell line shows a 3.3-fold reduced glycolytic flux compensated by an increase of proline metabolism. The inability of the Δpepck mutant to maintain a high glycolytic flux demonstrates that the Gly-3-P/DHAP shuttle is not adapted to the procyclic trypanosome context. In contrast, this shuttle was shown earlier to be the only way used by the bloodstream forms of T. brucei to sustain their high glycolytic flux.

  4. A virus-induced gene silencing approach to understanding alkaloid metabolism in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscombe, David K; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2011-11-01

    The anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine are bisindole alkaloids derived from coupling vindoline and catharanthine, monoterpenoid indole alkaloids produced exclusively by the Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus). Industrial production of vinblastine and vincristine currently relies on isolation from C. roseus leaves, a process that affords these compounds in 0.0003-0.01% yields. Metabolic engineering efforts to either improve alkaloid content or provide alternative sources of the bisindole alkaloids ultimately rely on the isolation and characterization of the genes involved. Several vindoline biosynthetic genes have been isolated, and the cellular and subcellular organization of the corresponding enzymes has been well studied. However, due to the leaf-specific localization of vindoline biosynthesis, and the lack of production of this precursor in cell suspension and hairy root cultures of C. roseus, further elucidation of this pathway demands the development of reverse genetics approaches to assay gene function in planta. The bipartite pTRV vector system is a Tobacco Rattle Virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) platform that has provided efficient and effective means to assay gene function in diverse plant systems. A VIGS method was developed herein to investigate gene function in C. roseus plants using the pTRV vector system. The utility of this approach in understanding gene function in C. roseus leaves is demonstrated by silencing known vindoline biosynthetic genes previously characterized in vitro.

  5. Targeting inflammation-induced obesity and metabolic diseases by curcumin and other nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2010-08-21

    Extensive research within the past two decades has revealed that obesity, a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, cancer, and other chronic diseases, is a proinflammatory disease. Several spices have been shown to exhibit activity against obesity through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Among them, curcumin, a yellow pigment derived from the spice turmeric (an essential component of curry powder), has been investigated most extensively as a treatment for obesity and obesity-related metabolic diseases. Curcumin directly interacts with adipocytes, pancreatic cells, hepatic stellate cells, macrophages, and muscle cells. There, it suppresses the proinflammatory transcription factors nuclear factor-kappa B, signal transducer and activators of transcription-3, and Wnt/beta-catenin, and it activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma and Nrf2 cell-signaling pathways, thus leading to the downregulation of adipokines, including tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, resistin, leptin, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and the upregulation of adiponectin and other gene products. These curcumin-induced alterations reverse insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and other symptoms linked to obesity. Other structurally homologous nutraceuticals, derived from red chili, cinnamon, cloves, black pepper, and ginger, also exhibit effects against obesity and insulin resistance.

  6. Small for Gestational Age and Magnesium: Intrauterine magnesium deficiency may induce metabolic syndrome in later life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Takaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium deficiency during pregnancy as a result of insufficient or low intake of magnesium is common in developing and developed countries. Previous reports have shown that intracellular magnesium of cord blood platelets is lower among small for gestational age (SGA groups than that of appropriate for gestational age (AGA groups, suggesting that intrauterine magnesium deficiency may result in SGA. Additionally, the risk of adult-onset diseases such as insulin resistance syndrome is greater among children whose mothers were malnourished during pregnancy, and who consequently had a low birth weight. In a number of animal models, poor nutrition during pregnancy leads to offspring that exhibit pathophysiological changes similar to human diseases. The offspring of pregnant rats fed a magensium restricted diet have developed hypermethylation in the hepatic 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 promoter. These findings indicate that maternal magnesium deficiencies during pregnancy influence regulation of non-imprinted genes by altering the epigenetic regulation of gene expression, thereby inducing different metabolic phenotypes. Magnesium deficiency during pregnancy may be responsible for not only maternal and fetal nutritional problems, but also lifelong consequences that affect the offspring throughout their life. Epidemiological, clinical, and basic research on the effects of magnesium deficiency now indicates underlying mechanisms, especially epigenetic processes.

  7. Modification of diazinon-induced changes in carbohydrate metabolism by adrenalectomy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matin, M A; Husain, K; Khan, S N

    1990-06-01

    Treatment with diazinon (40 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in hyperglycemia and depletion of glycogen from cerebral and peripheral tissues 2 hr after its administration in rats. The activities of the glycogenolytic enzymes glycogen phosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase were increased significantly in brain and liver, whereas that of glucose-6-phosphatase was not altered. The activities of the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase and lactate dehydrogenase were increased only in the brain. The cholinesterase activity of the brain was reduced by treatment with diazinon. The activities of the hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes fructose 1,6-diphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were also increased significantly in diazinon-treated animals. The level of lactate was increased in brain and blood, whereas that of pyruvate was not changed. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was not changed significantly. The cholesterol and ascorbic acid contents of adrenals were depleted in diazinon-treated animals. The hyperglycemia and changes in carbohydrate metabolism were abolished by adrenalectomy, suggesting the possible involvement of the adrenals in the induced changes in diazinon-treated animals.

  8. Effect of adrenalectomy on diazinon-induced changes in carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matin, M A; Khan, S N; Hussain, K; Sattar, S

    1989-01-01

    Treatment with diazinon resulted in hyperglycaemia and depletion of glycogen from cerebral and peripheral tissues 2 h after its administration in rats; the changes were maximal after 40 mg/kg diazinon, administered intraperitoneally. The activities of glycogen phosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase were significantly increased in brain and liver, while that of glucose-6-phosphatase was not altered. The activities of the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase and lactate dehydrogenase were increased only in brain. The cholinesterase activity of the brain was reduced by treatment with diazinon. The activities of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes (fructose 1,6 diphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) were also significantly increased in diazinon-treated animals. The level of lactate was increased in brain and blood while that of pyruvate was not changed. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was not significantly changed. Cholesterol and ascorbic acid contents of adrenals were depleted in diazinon-treated animals. Adrenalectomy abolished the hyperglycaemia and changes in carbohydrate metabolism, suggesting the possible involvement of adrenals in the induced changes in diazinon-treated animals.

  9. Cannabinoids inhibit energetic metabolism and induce AMPK-dependent autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, I; Donadelli, M; Costanzo, C; Dalla Pozza, E; D'Alessandro, A; Zolla, L; Palmieri, M

    2013-06-13

    The anti-tumoral effects of cannabinoids have been described in different tumor systems, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but their mechanism of action remains unclear. We used cannabinoids specific for the CB1 (ACPA) and CB2 (GW) receptors and metabolomic analyses to unravel the potential pathways mediating cannabinoid-dependent inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth. Panc1 cells treated with cannabinoids show elevated AMPK activation induced by a ROS-dependent increase of AMP/ATP ratio. ROS promote nuclear translocation of GAPDH, which is further amplified by AMPK, thereby attenuating glycolysis. Furthermore, ROS determine the accumulation of NADH, suggestive of a blockage in the respiratory chain, which in turn inhibits the Krebs cycle. Concomitantly, inhibition of Akt/c-Myc pathway leads to decreased activity of both the pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2), further downregulating glycolysis, and glutamine uptake. Altogether, these alterations of pancreatic cancer cell metabolism mediated by cannabinoids result in a strong induction of autophagy and in the inhibition of cell growth.

  10. Physical Activity Protects the Human Brain against Metabolic Stress Induced by a Postprandial and Chronic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Pruimboom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has become clear that chronic systemic low-grade inflammation is at the root of many, if not all, typically Western diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome. While much focus has been given to sedentary lifestyle as a cause of chronic inflammation, it is less often appreciated that chronic inflammation may also promote a sedentary lifestyle, which in turn causes chronic inflammation. Given that even minor increases in chronic inflammation reduce brain volume in otherwise healthy individuals, the bidirectional relationship between inflammation and sedentary behaviour may explain why humans have lost brain volume in the last 30,000 years and also intelligence in the last 30 years. We review evidence that lack of physical activity induces chronic low-grade inflammation and, consequently, an energy conflict between the selfish immune system and the selfish brain. Although the notion that increased physical activity would improve health in the modern world is widespread, here we provide a novel perspective on this truism by providing evidence that recovery of normal human behaviour, such as spontaneous physical activity, would calm proinflammatory activity, thereby allocating more energy to the brain and other organs, and by doing so would improve human health.

  11. Physical Activity Protects the Human Brain against Metabolic Stress Induced by a Postprandial and Chronic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruimboom, Leo; Raison, Charles L; Muskiet, Frits A J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that chronic systemic low-grade inflammation is at the root of many, if not all, typically Western diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome. While much focus has been given to sedentary lifestyle as a cause of chronic inflammation, it is less often appreciated that chronic inflammation may also promote a sedentary lifestyle, which in turn causes chronic inflammation. Given that even minor increases in chronic inflammation reduce brain volume in otherwise healthy individuals, the bidirectional relationship between inflammation and sedentary behaviour may explain why humans have lost brain volume in the last 30,000 years and also intelligence in the last 30 years. We review evidence that lack of physical activity induces chronic low-grade inflammation and, consequently, an energy conflict between the selfish immune system and the selfish brain. Although the notion that increased physical activity would improve health in the modern world is widespread, here we provide a novel perspective on this truism by providing evidence that recovery of normal human behaviour, such as spontaneous physical activity, would calm proinflammatory activity, thereby allocating more energy to the brain and other organs, and by doing so would improve human health.

  12. Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRα Controls Macrophage Metabolic Signaling and A20 Expression to Negatively Regulate TLR-Induced Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuk, Jae-Min; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Soo Yeon; Lee, Hye-Mi; Han, Jeongsu; Dufour, Catherine Rosa; Kim, Jin Kyung; Jin, Hyo Sun; Yang, Chul-Su; Park, Ki-Sun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jin-Man; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Vanacker, Jean-Marc; Moore, David D; Giguère, Vincent; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2015-07-21

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα; NR3B1) is a key metabolic regulator, but its function in regulating inflammation remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ERRα negatively regulates Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced inflammation by promoting Tnfaip3 transcription and fine-tuning of metabolic reprogramming in macrophages. ERRα-deficient (Esrra(-/-)) mice showed increased susceptibility to endotoxin-induced septic shock, leading to more severe pro-inflammatory responses than control mice. ERRα regulated macrophage inflammatory responses by directly binding the promoter region of Tnfaip3, a deubiquitinating enzyme in TLR signaling. In addition, Esrra(-/-) macrophages showed an increased glycolysis, but impaired mitochondrial respiratory function and biogenesis. Further, ERRα was required for the regulation of NF-κB signaling by controlling p65 acetylation via maintenance of NAD(+) levels and sirtuin 1 activation. These findings unravel a previously unappreciated role for ERRα as a negative regulator of TLR-induced inflammatory responses through inducing Tnfaip3 transcription and controlling the metabolic reprogramming.

  13. A metabolic perturbation by U0126 identifies a role for glutamine in resveratrol-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael R; Kim, Jayoung; Lisanti, Michael P; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence has identified substantial overlap between metabolic and oncogenic biochemical pathways, suggesting novel approaches to cancer intervention. For example, cholesterol lowering statins and the antidiabetes medication metformin both act as chemopreventive agents in prostate and other cancers. The natural compound resveratrol has similar properties: increasing insulin sensitivity, suppressing adipogenesis, and inducing apoptotic death of cancer cells in vitro. However, in vivo tumor xenografts acquire resistance to resveratrol by an unknown mechanism, while mouse models of metabolic disorders respond more consistently to the compound. Here we demonstrate that castration-resistant human prostate cancer C4-2 cells are more sensitive to resveratrol-induced apoptosis than isogenic androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. The MEK inhibitor U0126 antagonized resveratrol-induced apoptosis in C4-2 cells, but this effect was not seen with other MEK inhibitors. U0126 was found to inhibit mitochondrial function and shift cells to aerobic glycolysis independently of MEK. Mitochondrial activity of U0126 arose through decomposition, producing both mitochondrial fluorescence and cyanide, a known inhibitor of complex IV. Applying U0126 mitochondrial inhibition to C4-2 cell apoptosis, we tested the possibility that glutamine supplementation of citric acid cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate may be involved. Suppression of the conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate antagonized resveratrol-induced death in C4-2 cells. A similar effect was also seen by reducing extracellular glutamine concentration in the culture medium, suggesting that resveratrol-induced death is dependent on glutamine metabolism, a process frequently dysregulated in cancer. Further work on resveratrol and metabolism in cancer is warranted to ascertain if the glutamine dependence has clinical implications.

  14. Sublethal Concentrations of Antibiotics Cause Shift to Anaerobic Metabolism in Listeria monocytogenes and Induce Phenotypes Linked to Antibiotic Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Fromberg, Arvid; Ng, Yin

    2016-01-01

    caused the same changes in expression of several metabolic genes indicating a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism and higher ethanol production. A mutant in the bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase encoded by Imo1634 did not have altered antibiotic tolerance. However, a mutant...... in Imo1179 (eutE) encoding an aldehyde oxidoreductase where rerouting caused increased ethanol production was tolerant to three of four antibiotics tested. This shift in metabolism could be a survival strategy in response to antibiotics to avoid generation of ROS production from respiration by oxidation...... of NADH through ethanol production. The monocin locus encoding a cryptic prophage was induced by co-trimoxazole and repressed by ampicillin and gentamicin, and this correlated with an observed antibiotic-dependent biofilm formation. A monocin mutant (Delta lmaDCBA) had increased biofilm formation when...

  15. Effects of olive oil and its minor phenolic constituents on obesity-induced cardiac metabolic changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha Katiucha KHR

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olive oil and its minor constituents have been recommended as important dietary therapeutic interventions in preventive medicine. However, a question remains to be addressed: what are the effects of olive oil and its phenolic compounds on obesity-induced cardiac metabolic changes? Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into two groups (n = 24/group: (C receiving standard-chow; (Ob receiving hypercaloric-chow. After 21 days C and Ob groups were divided into four subgroups (n = 6/group:(C standard-chow and saline; (C-Olivestandard-chow and olive-oil (3.0 g/kg.day; (C-Oleuropeinstandard-chow and oleuropein (0.023 mg/kg/day; (C-Cafeic standard-chow and cafeic-acid (2.66 mg/kg/day; (Obreceiving hypercaloric-chow and saline;(Ob-Olive hypercaloric-chow and olive-oil;(Ob-Oleuropein hypercaloric-chow and oleuropein;(Ob-Cafeic hypercaloric-chow and cafeic-acid. Treatments were given twice a week during 21 days. Results After 42 days, obesity was evidenced in Ob rats from enhanced body-weight, surface-area, and body-mass-index. Energy-expenditure, oxygen consumption(VO2 and fat-oxidation were lower in Ob-group than in C. Despite no morphometric changes, Ob-Olive, Ob-Oleuropein and Ob-Cafeic groups had higher VO2, fat-oxidation, myocardial beta-hydroxyacyl coenzyme-A dehydrogenase and lower respiratory-quotient than Ob. Citrate-synthase was highest in Ob-Olive group. Myocardial lipid-hydroperoxide(LH and antioxidant enzymes were unaffected by olive-oil and its compounds in obesity condition, whereas LH was lower and total-antioxidant-substances were higher in C-Olive and C-Oleuropein than in C. Conclusions The present study demonstrated for the first time that olive-oil, oleuropein and cafeic-acid enhanced fat-oxidation and optimized cardiac energy metabolism in obesity conditions. Olive oil and its phenolic compounds improved myocardial oxidative stress in standard-fed conditions.

  16. Betaine supplementation prevents fatty liver induced by a high-fat diet: effects on one-carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deminice, Rafael; da Silva, Robin P; Lamarre, Simon G; Kelly, Karen B; Jacobs, René L; Brosnan, Margaret E; Brosnan, John T

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of betaine supplementation on the regulation of one-carbon metabolism and liver lipid accumulation induced by a high-fat diet in rats. Rats were fed one of three different liquid diets: control diet, high-fat diet and high-fat diet supplemented with betaine. The control and high-fat liquid diets contained, respectively, 35 and 71 % of energy derived from fat. Betaine supplementation involved the addition of 1 % (g/L) to the diet. After three weeks on the high-fat diet the rats had increased total liver fat concentration, liver triglycerides, liver TBARS and plasma TNF-α. The high-fat diet decreased the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine concentration and the S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio compared to the control as well as altering the expression of genes involved in one-carbon metabolism. Betaine supplementation substantially increased the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine concentration (~fourfold) and prevented fatty liver and hepatic injury induced by the high-fat diet. It was accompanied by the normalization of the gene expression of BHMT, GNMT and MGAT, which code for key enzymes of one-carbon metabolism related to liver fat accumulation. In conclusion, the regulation of the expression of MGAT by betaine supplementation provides an additional and novel mechanism by which betaine supplementation regulates lipid metabolism and prevents accumulation of fat in the liver.

  17. Ferulic Acid Alleviates Changes in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome Induced by High-Carbohydrate, High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketmanee Senaphan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities characterized by obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Ferulic acid (FA is the major phenolic compound found in rice oil and various fruits and vegetables. In this study, we examined the beneficial effects of FA in minimizing insulin resistance, vascular dysfunction and remodeling in a rat model of high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic changes, which is regarded as an analogue of metabolic syndrome (MS in man. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high carbohydrate, high fat (HCHF diet and 15% fructose in drinking water for 16 weeks, where control rats were fed with standard chow diet and tap water. FA (30 or 60 mg/kg was orally administered to the HCHF and control rats during the last six weeks of the study. We observed that FA significantly improved insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles, and reduced elevated blood pressure, compared to untreated controls (p < 0.05. Moreover, FA also improved vascular function and prevented vascular remodeling of mesenteric arteries. The effects of FA in HCHF-induced MS may be realized through suppression of oxidative stress by down-regulation of p47phox, increased nitric oxide (NO bioavailability with up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. Our results suggest that supplementation of FA may have health benefits by minimizing the cardiovascular complications of MS and alleviating its symptoms.

  18. Ferulic Acid Alleviates Changes in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome Induced by High-Carbohydrate, High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senaphan, Ketmanee; Kukongviriyapan, Upa; Sangartit, Weerapon; Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan; Prachaney, Parichat; Greenwald, Stephen E; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol

    2015-08-04

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities characterized by obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Ferulic acid (FA) is the major phenolic compound found in rice oil and various fruits and vegetables. In this study, we examined the beneficial effects of FA in minimizing insulin resistance, vascular dysfunction and remodeling in a rat model of high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic changes, which is regarded as an analogue of metabolic syndrome (MS) in man. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high carbohydrate, high fat (HCHF) diet and 15% fructose in drinking water for 16 weeks, where control rats were fed with standard chow diet and tap water. FA (30 or 60 mg/kg) was orally administered to the HCHF and control rats during the last six weeks of the study. We observed that FA significantly improved insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles, and reduced elevated blood pressure, compared to untreated controls (p < 0.05). Moreover, FA also improved vascular function and prevented vascular remodeling of mesenteric arteries. The effects of FA in HCHF-induced MS may be realized through suppression of oxidative stress by down-regulation of p47phox, increased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability with up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Our results suggest that supplementation of FA may have health benefits by minimizing the cardiovascular complications of MS and alleviating its symptoms.

  19. Concurrence of High Fat Diet and APOE Gene Induces Allele Specific Metabolic and Mental Stress Changes in an AD Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifat Segev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the main risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, evidence indicates that the pathological process begins long before actual cognitive or pathological symptoms are apparent. The long asymptomatic phase and complex integration between genetic, environmental, and metabolic factors make it one of the most challenging diseases to understand and cure. In the present study, we asked whether an environmental factor such as high-fat diet would synergize with a genetic factor to affect the metabolic and cognitive state in the ApoE4 mouse model of AD. Our data suggest that a high-fat diet induces diabetes mellitus-like metabolism in ApoE4 mice, as well as changes in BACE1 protein levels between the two ApoE strains. Furthermore, high-fat diet induces anxiety in this AD mouse model. Our results suggest that young ApoE4 carriers are prone to psychological stress and metabolic abnormalities related to AD, which can easily be triggered via high-fat nutrition.

  20. β3-Adrenoceptor Mediates Metabolic Protein Remodeling in a Rabbit Model of Tachypacing-Induced Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixi Liu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The beta 3-adrenoceptor (β3-AR is closely associated with energy metabolism. This study aimed to explore the role of β3-AR in energy remodeling in a rabbit model of pacing-induced atrial fibrillation (AF. Methods: Rabbits with a sham-operation or pacing-induced AF were used for this study, and the latter group was further divided into three subgroups: 1 the pacing group, 2 the β3-AR agonist (BRL37344-treated group, and 3 the β3-AR antagonist (SR59230A-treated group. Atrial electrogram morphology and surface ECG were used to monitor the induction of AF and atrial effective refractory period (AERP. RT-PCR and western blot (WB were used to show alterations in β3-AR and metabolic-related protein. Results: RT-PCR and WB results showed that β3-AR was significantly upregulated in the pacing group, and that it corresponded with high AF inducibility and significantly decreased AERP200 and ATP production in this group. Inhibition of β3-AR decreased the AF induction rate, reversed AERP200 reduction, and restored ATP levels in the AF rabbits. Further activation of β3-AR using agonist BRL37344 exacerbated AF-induced metabolic disruption. Periodic acid Schiff (PAS and Oil Red O staining showed β3-AR-dependent glycogen and lipid droplet accumulation in cardiac myocytes with AF. Glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4 and CD36, key transporters of glucose and fatty acids, were downregulated in the pacing group. Expression of carnitine-palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1, a key regulator in fatty acid metabolism, was also significantly downregulated in the pacing group. Reduced glucose transportation and fatty acid oxidation could be restored by inhibition of β3-AR. Furthermore, key regulators of metabolism, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα and PPAR co-activator (PGC-1α can be regulated by pharmacological intervention of the β3-AR. Conclusions: β3-AR is involved in metabolic protein remodeling in AF. PPARα/PGC-1α signaling pathway

  1. MUC1 mucin stabilizes and activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha to regulate metabolism in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaika, Nina V.; Gebregiworgis, Teklab; Lewallen, Michelle E.; Purohit, Vinee; Radhakrishnan, Prakash; Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Bo; Mehla, Kamiya; Brown, Roger B.; Caffrey, Thomas; Yu, Fang; Johnson, Keith R.; Powers, Robert; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Singh, Pankaj K.

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant glucose metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer that facilitates cancer cell survival and proliferation. Here, we demonstrate that MUC1, a large, type I transmembrane protein that is overexpressed in several carcinomas including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, modulates cancer cell metabolism to facilitate growth properties of cancer cells. MUC1 occupies the promoter elements of multiple genes directly involved in glucose metabolism and regulates their expression. Furthermore, MUC1 expression enhances glycolytic activity in pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrate that MUC1 expression enhances in vivo glucose uptake and expression of genes involved in glucose uptake and metabolism in orthotopic implantation models of pancreatic cancer. The MUC1 cytoplasmic tail is known to activate multiple signaling pathways through its interactions with several transcription factors/coregulators at the promoter elements of various genes. Our results indicate that MUC1 acts as a modulator of the hypoxic response in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating the expression/stability and activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). MUC1 physically interacts with HIF-1α and p300 and stabilizes the former at the protein level. By using a ChIP assay, we demonstrate that MUC1 facilitates recruitment of HIF-1α and p300 on glycolytic gene promoters in a hypoxia-dependent manner. Also, by metabolomic studies, we demonstrate that MUC1 regulates multiple metabolite intermediates in the glucose and amino acid metabolic pathways. Thus, our studies indicate that MUC1 acts as a master regulator of the metabolic program and facilitates metabolic alterations in the hypoxic environments that help tumor cells survive and proliferate under such conditions. PMID:22869720

  2. Learning-Induced Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Reveals a Role of Neuron -Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling in Long Term Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Tadi, Monika

    2015-10-29

    We examined the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism and particularly those encoding glia (astrocyte)-specific functions in the dorsal hippocampus subsequent to learning. Context-dependent avoidance behavior was tested in mice using the step-through Inhibitory Avoidance (IA) paradigm. Animals were sacrificed 3, 9, 24, or 72 hours after training or 3 hours after retention testing. The quantitative determination of mRNA levels revealed learning-induced changes in the expression of genes thought to be involved in astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling in a time dependent manner. Twenty four hours following IA training, an enhanced gene expression was seen, particularly for genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4), alpha2 subunit of the Na/K-ATPase and glucose transporter type 1. To assess the functional role for one of these genes in learning, we studied MCT1 deficient mice and found that they exhibit impaired memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. Together, these observations indicate that neuron-glia metabolic coupling undergoes metabolic adaptations following learning as indicated by the change in expression of key metabolic genes.

  3. The NAD(+) precursor nicotinamide riboside enhances oxidative metabolism and protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantó, Carles; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Pirinen, Eija; Youn, Dou Y; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Cen, Yana; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Andreux, Pénélope A; Cettour-Rose, Philippe; Gademann, Karl; Rinsch, Chris; Schoonjans, Kristina; Sauve, Anthony A; Auwerx, Johan

    2012-06-06

    As NAD(+) is a rate-limiting cosubstrate for the sirtuin enzymes, its modulation is emerging as a valuable tool to regulate sirtuin function and, consequently, oxidative metabolism. In line with this premise, decreased activity of PARP-1 or CD38-both NAD(+) consumers-increases NAD(+) bioavailability, resulting in SIRT1 activation and protection against metabolic disease. Here we evaluated whether similar effects could be achieved by increasing the supply of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a recently described natural NAD(+) precursor with the ability to increase NAD(+) levels, Sir2-dependent gene silencing, and replicative life span in yeast. We show that NR supplementation in mammalian cells and mouse tissues increases NAD(+) levels and activates SIRT1 and SIRT3, culminating in enhanced oxidative metabolism and protection against high-fat diet-induced metabolic abnormalities. Consequently, our results indicate that the natural vitamin NR could be used as a nutritional supplement to ameliorate metabolic and age-related disorders characterized by defective mitochondrial function.

  4. Learning-Induced Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Reveals a Role of Neuron -Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling in Long Term Memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Tadi

    Full Text Available We examined the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism and particularly those encoding glia (astrocyte-specific functions in the dorsal hippocampus subsequent to learning. Context-dependent avoidance behavior was tested in mice using the step-through Inhibitory Avoidance (IA paradigm. Animals were sacrificed 3, 9, 24, or 72 hours after training or 3 hours after retention testing. The quantitative determination of mRNA levels revealed learning-induced changes in the expression of genes thought to be involved in astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling in a time dependent manner. Twenty four hours following IA training, an enhanced gene expression was seen, particularly for genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4, alpha2 subunit of the Na/K-ATPase and glucose transporter type 1. To assess the functional role for one of these genes in learning, we studied MCT1 deficient mice and found that they exhibit impaired memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. Together, these observations indicate that neuron-glia metabolic coupling undergoes metabolic adaptations following learning as indicated by the change in expression of key metabolic genes.

  5. Small for Gestational Age and Magnesium in Cord Blood Platelets: Intrauterine Magnesium Deficiency May Induce Metabolic Syndrome in Later Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Takaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium deficiency in pregnancy frequently occurs because of inadequate or low intake of magnesium. Magnesium deficiency during pregnancy can induce not only maternal and fetal nutritional problems, but also consequences that might last in offspring throughout life. Many epidemiological studies have disclosed that small for gestational age (SGA is associated with an increased risk of insulin resistance in adult life. We reported that intracellular magnesium of cord blood platelets is lower in SGA groups than that in appropriate for gestational age groups, suggesting that intrauterine magnesium deficiency may result in SGA. Taken together, intrauterine magnesium deficiency in the fetus may lead to or at least program insulin resistance after birth. In this review, we propose that intrauterine magnesium deficiency may induce metabolic syndrome in later life. We discuss the potential contribution of aberrant magnesium regulation to SGA and to the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome.

  6. The transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α is dispensable for chronic overload-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy and metabolic remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Schindler, Joaquín; Summermatter, Serge; Santos, Gesa; Zorzato, Francesco; Handschin, Christoph

    2013-12-10

    Skeletal muscle mass loss and dysfunction have been linked to many diseases. Conversely, resistance exercise, mainly by activating mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), promotes skeletal muscle hypertrophy and exerts several therapeutic effects. Moreover, mTORC1, along with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), regulates skeletal muscle metabolism. However, it is unclear whether PGC-1α is required for skeletal muscle adaptations after overload. Here we show that although chronic overload of skeletal muscle via synergist ablation (SA) strongly induces hypertrophy and a switch toward a slow-contractile phenotype, these effects were independent of PGC-1α. In fact, SA down-regulated PGC-1α expression and led to a repression of energy metabolism. Interestingly, however, PGC-1α deletion preserved peak force after SA. Taken together, our data suggest that PGC-1α is not involved in skeletal muscle remodeling induced by SA.

  7. Long term metabolic syndrome induced by a high fat high fructose diet leads to minimal renal injury in C57BL/6 mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dissard, R.; Klein, J.; Caubet, C.; Breuil, B.; Siwy, J.; Hoffman, J.; Sicard, L.; Ducasse, L.; Rascalou, S.; Payre, B.; Buleon, M.; Mullen, W.; Mischak, H; Tack, I.; Bascands, J.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome can induce chronic kidney disease in humans. Genetically engineered mice on a C57BL/6 background are highly used for mechanistic studies. Although it has been shown that metabolic syndrome induces cardiovascular lesions in C57BL/6 mice, in depth renal phenotyping has never been performed. Therefore in this study we characterized renal function and injury in C57BL/6 mice with long-term metabolic syndrome induced by a high fat and fructose diet (HFFD). C57BL/6 mice received a...

  8. Long Term Metabolic Syndrome Induced by a High Fat High Fructose Diet Leads to Minimal Renal Injury in C57BL/6 Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dissard, Romain; Klein, Julie; Caubet, Cécile; Breuil, Benjamin; Siwy, Justyna; Hoffman, Janosch; Sicard, Laurent; Ducassé, Laure; Rascalou, Simon; Payre, Bruno; Buléon, Marie; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Tack, Ivan; Bascands, Jean-Loup

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome can induce chronic kidney disease in humans. Genetically engineered mice on a C57BL/6 background are highly used for mechanistic studies. Although it has been shown that metabolic syndrome induces cardiovascular lesions in C57BL/6 mice, in depth renal phenotyping has never been performed. Therefore in this study we characterized renal function and injury in C57BL/6 mice with long-term metabolic syndrome induced by a high fat and fructose diet (HFFD). C57BL/6 mice received a...

  9. External factors inducing metabolic adaptations in white adipose tissue in wildtype C57BL/6J mice housed at thermoneutrality

    OpenAIRE

    Schothorst, van, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    This SuperSeries is composed of the following subset Series: Subseries: GSE53802 Hypoxia-induced metabolic dysfunction in WAT GSM1301058 HFD control, normoxia, replicate 1 GSM1301059 HFD control, normoxia, replicate 2 GSM1301060 HFD control, normoxia, replicate 3 GSM1301061 HFD control, normoxia, replicate 4 GSM1301062 HFD control, normoxia, replicate 5 GSM1301063 HFD control, normoxia, replicate 6 GSM1301064 HFD control, normoxia, replicate 7 GSM1301065 HFD control, normoxia, replicate 8 GSM...

  10. Ursolic acid protects monocytes against metabolic stress-induced priming and dysfunction by preventing the induction of Nox4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Ullevig

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: UA protects THP-1 monocytes against dysfunction by suppressing metabolic stress-induced Nox4 expression, thereby preventing the Nox4-dependent dysregulation of redox-sensitive processes, including actin turnover and MAPK-signaling, two key processes that control monocyte migration and adhesion. This study provides a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory and athero- and renoprotective properties of UA and suggests that dysfunctional blood monocytes may be primary targets of UA and related compounds.

  11. Effects of olive leave extract on metabolic disorders and oxidative stress induced by 2.45 GHz WIFI signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Myriam Ben; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Abderraba, Manef

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the effect of olive leaves extract administration on glucose metabolism and oxidative response in liver and kidneys of rats exposed to radio frequency (RF). The exposure of rats to RF (2.45 GHz, 1h/day during 21 consecutive days) induced a diabetes-like status. Moreover, RF decreased the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx, -33.33% and -49.40%) catalase (CAT, -43.39% and -39.62%) and the superoxide dismutase (SOD, -59.29% and -68.53%) and groups thiol amount (-62.68% and -34.85%), respectively in liver and kidneys. Indeed, exposure to RF increased the malondialdehyde (MDA, 29.69% and 51.35%) concentration respectively in liver and kidneys. Olive leaves extract administration (100 mg/kg, ip) in RF-exposed rats prevented glucose metabolism disruption and restored the activities of GPx, CAT and SOD and thiol group amount in liver and kidneys. Moreover, olive leave extract administration was able to bring down the elevated levels of MDA in liver but not in kidneys. Our investigations suggested that RF exposure induced a diabetes-like status through alteration of oxidative response. Olive leaves extract was able to correct glucose metabolism disorder by minimizing oxidative stress induced by RF in rat tissues.

  12. Modulation of fatty acid metabolism is involved in the alleviation of isoproterenol-induced rat heart failure by fenofibrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Luo, Shike; Pan, Chunji; Cheng, Xiaoshu

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure is a disease predominantly caused by an energy metabolic disorder in cardiomyocytes. The present study investigated the inhibitory effects of fenofibrate (FF) on isoproterenol (ISO)‑induced hear failure in rats, and examined the underlying mechanisms. The rats were divided into CON, ISO (HF model), FF and FF+ISO (HF animals pretreated with FF) groups. The cardiac structure and function of the rats were assessed, and contents of free fatty acids and glucose metabolic products were determined. In addition, myocardial cells were isolated from neonatal rats and used in vitro to investigate the mechanisms by which FF relieves heart failure. Western blot analysis was performed to quantify the expression levels of peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor (PPAR)α and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). FF effectively alleviated the ISO‑induced cardiac structural damage, functional decline, and fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolic abnormalities. Compared with the ISO group, the serum levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), free fatty acids, lactic acid and pyruvic acid were decreased in the FF animals. In the cultured myocardial cells, lactic acid and pyruvic acid contents were lower in the supernatants obtained from the FF animals, with lower levels of mitochondrial ROS production and cell necrosis, compared with the ISO group, whereas PPARα upregulation and UCP2 downregulation occurred in the FF+ISO group. The results demonstrated that FF efficiently alleviated heart failure in the ISO‑induced rat model, possibly via promoting fatty acid oxidation.

  13. Dietary Polyphenols Promote Growth of the Gut Bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila and Attenuate High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopchand, Diana E; Carmody, Rachel N; Kuhn, Peter; Moskal, Kristin; Rojas-Silva, Patricio; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Raskin, Ilya

    2015-08-01

    Dietary polyphenols protect against metabolic syndrome, despite limited absorption and digestion, raising questions about their mechanism of action. We hypothesized that one mechanism may involve the gut microbiota. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) containing 1% Concord grape polyphenols (GP). Relative to vehicle controls, GP attenuated several effects of HFD feeding, including weight gain, adiposity, serum inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]α, interleukin [IL]-6, and lipopolysaccharide), and glucose intolerance. GP lowered intestinal expression of inflammatory markers (TNFα, IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase) and a gene for glucose absorption (Glut2). GP increased intestinal expression of genes involved in barrier function (occludin) and limiting triglyceride storage (fasting-induced adipocyte factor). GP also increased intestinal gene expression of proglucagon, a precursor of proteins that promote insulin production and gut barrier integrity. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantitative PCR of cecal and fecal samples demonstrated that GP dramatically increased the growth of Akkermansia muciniphila and decreased the proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes, consistent with prior reports that similar changes in microbial community structure can protect from diet-induced obesity and metabolic disease. These data suggest that GP act in the intestine to modify gut microbial community structure, resulting in lower intestinal and systemic inflammation and improved metabolic outcomes. The gut microbiota may thus provide the missing link in the mechanism of action of poorly absorbed dietary polyphenols.

  14. Metformin-induced metabolic reprogramming of chemoresistant ALDHbright breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioce, Mario; Valerio, MariaCristina; Casadei, Luca; Pulito, Claudio; Sacconi, Andrea; Mori, Federica; Biagioni, Francesca; Manetti, Cesare; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina; Blandino, Giovanni

    2014-06-30

    Metabolic remodeling is a hallmark of cancer progression and may affect tumor chemoresistance. Here we investigated by 1H-NMR/PCA analysis the metabolic profile of chemoresistant breast cancer cell subpopulations (ALDHbright cells) and their response to metformin, a promising anticancer metabolic modulator. The purified ALDHbright cells exhibited a different metabolic profile as compared to their chemosensitive ALDHlow counterparts. Metformin treatment strongly affected the metabolism of the ALDHbright cells thereby affecting, among the others, the glutathione metabolism, whose upregulation is a feature of progenitor-like, chemoresistant cell subpopulations. Globally, metformin treatment reduced the differences between ALDHbright and ALDHlow cells, making the former more similar to the latter. Metformin broadly modulated microRNAs in the ALDHbright cells, with a large fraction of them predicted to target the same metabolic pathways experimentally identified by 1H-NMR. Additionally, metformin modulated the levels of c-MYC and IRS-2, and this correlated with changes of the microRNA-33a levels. In summary, we observed, both by 1H-NMR and microRNA expression studies, that metformin treatment reduced the differences between the chemoresistant ALDHbright cells and the chemosensitive ALDHlow cells. This works adds on the potential therapeutic relevance of metformin and shows the potential for metabolic reprogramming to modulate cancer chemoresistance.

  15. Thyroid Hormone Receptor beta Mediates Acute Illness-Induced Alterations in Central Thyroid Hormone Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Boelen; J. Kwakkel; O. Chassande; E. Fliers

    2009-01-01

    Acute illness in mice profoundly affects thyroid hormone metabolism in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. It remains unknown whether the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-beta is involved in these changes. In the present study, we investigated central thyroid hormone metabolism during lipopolysacchar

  16. Metformin-induced metabolic reprogramming of chemoresistant ALDHbright breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadei, Luca; Pulito, Claudio; Sacconi, Andrea; Mori, Federica; Biagioni, Francesca; Manetti, Cesare; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina; Blandino, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic remodeling is a hallmark of cancer progression and may affect tumor chemoresistance. Here we investigated by 1H-NMR/PCA analysis the metabolic profile of chemoresistant breast cancer cell subpopulations (ALDHbright cells) and their response to metformin, a promising anticancer metabolic modulator. The purified ALDHbright cells exhibited a different metabolic profile as compared to their chemosensitive ALDHlow counterparts. Metformin treatment strongly affected the metabolism of the ALDHbright cells thereby affecting, among the others, the glutathione metabolism, whose upregulation is a feature of progenitor-like, chemoresistant cell subpopulations. Globally, metformin treatment reduced the differences between ALDHbright and ALDHlow cells, making the former more similar to the latter. Metformin broadly modulated microRNAs in the ALDHbright cells, with a large fraction of them predicted to target the same metabolic pathways experimentally identified by 1H-NMR. Additionally, metformin modulated the levels of c-MYC and IRS-2, and this correlated with changes of the microRNA-33a levels. In summary, we observed, both by 1H-NMR and microRNA expression studies, that metformin treatment reduced the differences between the chemoresistant ALDHbright cells and the chemosensitive ALDHlow cells. This works adds on the potential therapeutic relevance of metformin and shows the potential for metabolic reprogramming to modulate cancer chemoresistance. PMID:24980829

  17. Skeletal muscle PGC-1α1 modulates kynurenine metabolism and mediates resilience to stress-induced depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agudelo, Leandro Z; Femenía, Teresa; Orhan, Funda

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a debilitating condition with a profound impact on quality of life for millions of people worldwide. Physical exercise is used as a treatment strategy for many patients, but the mechanisms that underlie its beneficial effects remain unknown. Here, we describe a mechanism by which...... skeletal muscle PGC-1α1 induced by exercise training changes kynurenine metabolism and protects from stress-induced depression. Activation of the PGC-1α1-PPARα/δ pathway increases skeletal muscle expression of kynurenine aminotransferases, thus enhancing the conversion of kynurenine into kynurenic acid......, a metabolite unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Reducing plasma kynurenine protects the brain from stress-induced changes associated with depression and renders skeletal muscle-specific PGC-1α1 transgenic mice resistant to depression induced by chronic mild stress or direct kynurenine administration...

  18. Relaxation response induces temporal transcriptome changes in energy metabolism, insulin secretion and inflammatory pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K Bhasin

    Full Text Available The relaxation response (RR is the counterpart of the stress response. Millennia-old practices evoking the RR include meditation, yoga and repetitive prayer. Although RR elicitation is an effective therapeutic intervention that counteracts the adverse clinical effects of stress in disorders including hypertension, anxiety, insomnia and aging, the underlying molecular mechanisms that explain these clinical benefits remain undetermined. To assess rapid time-dependent (temporal genomic changes during one session of RR practice among healthy practitioners with years of RR practice and also in novices before and after 8 weeks of RR training, we measured the transcriptome in peripheral blood prior to, immediately after, and 15 minutes after listening to an RR-eliciting or a health education CD. Both short-term and long-term practitioners evoked significant temporal gene expression changes with greater significance in the latter as compared to novices. RR practice enhanced expression of genes associated with energy metabolism, mitochondrial function, insulin secretion and telomere maintenance, and reduced expression of genes linked to inflammatory response and stress-related pathways. Interactive network analyses of RR-affected pathways identified mitochondrial ATP synthase and insulin (INS as top upregulated critical molecules (focus hubs and NF-κB pathway genes as top downregulated focus hubs. Our results for the first time indicate that RR elicitation, particularly after long-term practice, may evoke its downstream health benefits by improving mitochondrial energy production and utilization and thus promoting mitochondrial resiliency through upregulation of ATPase and insulin function. Mitochondrial resiliency might also be promoted by RR-induced downregulation of NF-κB-associated upstream and downstream targets that mitigates stress.

  19. Relaxation response induces temporal transcriptome changes in energy metabolism, insulin secretion and inflammatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Manoj K; Dusek, Jeffery A; Chang, Bei-Hung; Joseph, Marie G; Denninger, John W; Fricchione, Gregory L; Benson, Herbert; Libermann, Towia A

    2013-01-01

    The relaxation response (RR) is the counterpart of the stress response. Millennia-old practices evoking the RR include meditation, yoga and repetitive prayer. Although RR elicitation is an effective therapeutic intervention that counteracts the adverse clinical effects of stress in disorders including hypertension, anxiety, insomnia and aging, the underlying molecular mechanisms that explain these clinical benefits remain undetermined. To assess rapid time-dependent (temporal) genomic changes during one session of RR practice among healthy practitioners with years of RR practice and also in novices before and after 8 weeks of RR training, we measured the transcriptome in peripheral blood prior to, immediately after, and 15 minutes after listening to an RR-eliciting or a health education CD. Both short-term and long-term practitioners evoked significant temporal gene expression changes with greater significance in the latter as compared to novices. RR practice enhanced expression of genes associated with energy metabolism, mitochondrial function, insulin secretion and telomere maintenance, and reduced expression of genes linked to inflammatory response and stress-related pathways. Interactive network analyses of RR-affected pathways identified mitochondrial ATP synthase and insulin (INS) as top upregulated critical molecules (focus hubs) and NF-κB pathway genes as top downregulated focus hubs. Our results for the first time indicate that RR elicitation, particularly after long-term practice, may evoke its downstream health benefits by improving mitochondrial energy production and utilization and thus promoting mitochondrial resiliency through upregulation of ATPase and insulin function. Mitochondrial resiliency might also be promoted by RR-induced downregulation of NF-κB-associated upstream and downstream targets that mitigates stress.

  20. Temperature-induced elevation of basal metabolic rate does not affect testis growth in great tits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Samuel P; Visser, Marcel E

    2009-07-01

    The timing of reproduction varies from year to year in many bird species. To adjust their timing to the prevailing conditions of that year, birds use cues from their environment. However, the relative importance of these cues, such as the initial predictive (e.g. photoperiod) and the supplemental factors (e.g. temperature), on the seasonal sexual development are difficult to distinguish. In particular, the fine-tuning effect of temperature on gonadal growth is not well known. One way temperature may affect timing is via its strong effect on energy expenditure as gonadal growth is an energy-demanding process. To study the interaction of photoperiod and temperature on gonadal development, we first exposed 35 individually housed male great tits (Parus major) to mid-long days (after 6 weeks of 8 h L:16 h D at 15 degrees C, photoperiod was set to 13 h L:11 h D at 15 degrees C). Two weeks later, for half of the males the temperature was set to 8 degrees C, and for the other half to 22 degrees C. Unilateral laparotomies were performed at weeks 5 (i.e one week before the birds were transferred to mid-long days), 8 and 11 to measure testis size. Two measures of basal metabolic rate (BMR) were performed at the end of the experiment (weeks 11 and 12). Testis size increased significantly during the course of the experiment, but independently of the temperature treatment. BMR was significantly higher in birds exposed to the cold treatment. These results show that temperature-related elevation of BMR did not impair the long-day-induced testis growth in great tits. As a consequence, temperature may not be a crucial cue and/or constraint factor in the fine-tuning of the gonadal recrudescence in male great tits, and testis growth is not a high energy-demanding seasonal process.

  1. Virus-induced enhancement of arachidonate metabolism by bovine alveolar macrophages in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laegreid, W.W.; Taylor, S.M.; Leid, R.W.; Silflow, R.M.; Evermann, J.R.; Breeze, R.G.; Liggitt, H.D.

    1989-04-01

    Virus infection of alveolar macrophages both in vivo and in vitro has been associated with a variety of changes in cellular function. Some of these changes are identical to the effects that arachidonate-derived mediators, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, have on macrophage function. Virus infection of macrophages has been previously shown to increase the output of some arachidonate metabolites, most notably PGE2. However, the effect of virus infection on arachidonate metabolism in general has not been well described. In our experiments, primary cultures of alveolar macrophages obtained from normal cattle by bronchoalveolar lavage, were infected in vitro with parainfluenza type 3 virus. At days 0 to 4 post-infection (p.i.) these cells were labelled with 3H-arachidonic acid and stimulated with either serum-coated zymosan, the calcium ionophore A23187, or phorbol myristate acetate. The complete spectrum of arachidonate-derived metabolites was determined by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography with UV and on-line radiometric monitoring of column eluant. The total output of metabolites of arachidonic acid by virus-infected alveolar macrophages was increased over that of noninfected controls (with all stimuli tested) by day 4 p.i. (P less than or equal to 0.05). The production of metabolites by the cyclooxygenase, 12- and 5-lipoxygenase enzyme systems was significantly increased, as was the release of 3H-arachidonate. The lack of stimulus specificity and the increases in arachidonate release suggest that greater substrate availability, due either to increased phospholipase activity or direct virus-membrane interaction, may be responsible for the virus-induced enhancement of metabolite output.

  2. Targeting ceramide metabolic pathway induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vethakanraj, Helen Shiphrah; Babu, Thabraz Ahmed; Sudarsanan, Ganesh Babu; Duraisamy, Prabhu Kumar; Ashok Kumar, Sekar, E-mail: sekarashok@gmail.com

    2015-08-28

    The sphingolipid ceramide is a pro apoptotic molecule of ceramide metabolic pathway and is hydrolyzed to proliferative metabolite, sphingosine 1 phosphate by the action of acid ceramidase. Being upregulated in the tumors of breast, acid ceramidase acts as a potential target for breast cancer therapy. We aimed at targeting this enzyme with a small molecule acid ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF 7 and MDA MB 231. Ceranib 2 effectively inhibited the growth of both the cell lines in dose and time dependant manner. Morphological apoptotic hallmarks such as chromatin condensation, fragmented chromatin were observed in AO/EtBr staining. Moreover, ladder pattern of fragmented DNA observed in DNA gel electrophoresis proved the apoptotic activity of Ceranib 2 in breast cancer cell lines. The apoptotic events were associated with significant increase in the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (Bad, Bax and Bid) and down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (Bcl 2). Interestingly, increase in sub G1 population of cell cycle phase analysis and elevated Annexin V positive cells after Ceranib 2 treatment substantiated its apoptotic activity in MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines. Thus, we report Ceranib 2 as a potent therapeutic agent against both ER{sup +} and ER{sup −} breast cancer cell lines. - Highlights: • Acid Ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 induced apoptosis in Breast cancer cell lines (MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines). • Apoptosis is mediated by DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest. • Ceranib 2 upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes and down regulated anti-apoptotic gene expression. • More potent compared to the standard drug Tamoxifen.

  3. L-carnitine ameliorated fasting-induced fatigue, hunger, and metabolic abnormalities in patients with metabolic syndrome: a randomized controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jun-Jie; Wu, Zhi-bing; Cai, You-jin; Ke, Bin; Huang, Ying-juan; Qiu, Chao-ping; Yang, Yu-bing; Shi, Lan-Ying; QIN, JIAN

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to determine that whether L-carnitine infusion could ameliorate fasting-induced adverse effects and improve outcomes. Method In this 7-day, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot study, 15 metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients (11/4 F/M; age 46.9 ± 9.14 years; body mass index [BMI] 28.2 ± 1.8 kg/m2) were in the L-carnitine group (LC) and 15 (10/5 F/M; age 46.8 ± 10.9 years; BMI 27.1 ± 2.3 kg/m2) were in the control group (CT). All participants unde...

  4. Global metabolic profiling of infection by an oncogenic virus: KSHV induces and requires lipogenesis for survival of latent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracie Delgado

    Full Text Available Like cancer cells, virally infected cells have dramatically altered metabolic requirements. We analyzed global metabolic changes induced by latent infection with an oncogenic virus, Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. KSHV is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS, the most common tumor of AIDS patients. Approximately one-third of the nearly 200 measured metabolites were altered following latent infection of endothelial cells by KSHV, including many metabolites of anabolic pathways common to most cancer cells. KSHV induced pathways that are commonly altered in cancer cells including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, amino acid production and fatty acid synthesis. Interestingly, over half of the detectable long chain fatty acids detected in our screen were significantly increased by latent KSHV infection. KSHV infection leads to the elevation of metabolites involved in the synthesis of fatty acids, not degradation from phospholipids, and leads to increased lipid droplet organelle formation in the infected cells. Fatty acid synthesis is required for the survival of latently infected endothelial cells, as inhibition of key enzymes in this pathway led to apoptosis of infected cells. Addition of palmitic acid to latently infected cells treated with a fatty acid synthesis inhibitor protected the cells from death indicating that the products of this pathway are essential. Our metabolomic analysis of KSHV-infected cells provides insight as to how oncogenic viruses can induce metabolic alterations common to cancer cells. Furthermore, this analysis raises the possibility that metabolic pathways may provide novel therapeutic targets for the inhibition of latent KSHV infection and ultimately KS tumors.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide functions as a secondary messenger for brassinosteroids-induced CO2 assimilation and carbohydrate metabolism in Cucumis sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu-ping; Cheng, Fei; Zhou, Yan-hong; Xia, Xiao-jian; Mao, Wei-hua; Shi, Kai; Chen, Zhi-xiang; Yu, Jing-quan

    2012-10-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are potent regulators of photosynthesis and crop yield in agricultural crops; however, the mechanism by which BRs increase photosynthesis is not fully understood. Here, we show that foliar application of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) resulted in increases in CO(2) assimilation, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) accumulation, and leaf area in cucumber. H(2)O(2) treatment induced increases in CO(2) assimilation whilst inhibition of the H(2)O(2) accumulation by its generation inhibitor or scavenger completely abolished EBR-induced CO(2) assimilation. Increases of light harvesting due to larger leaf areas in EBR- and H(2)O(2)-treated plants were accompanied by increases in the photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Φ(PSII)) and photochemical quenching coefficient (q(P)). EBR and H(2)O(2) both activated carboxylation efficiency of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate oxygenase/carboxylase (Rubisco) from analysis of CO(2) response curve and in vitro measurement of Rubisco activities. Moreover, EBR and H(2)O(2) increased contents of total soluble sugar, sucrose, hexose, and starch, followed by enhanced activities of sugar metabolism such as sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase, and invertase. Interestingly, expression of transcripts of enzymes involved in starch and sugar utilization were inhibited by EBR and H(2)O(2). However, the effects of EBR on carbohydrate metabolisms were reversed by the H(2)O(2) generation inhibitor diphenyleneodonium (DPI) or scavenger dimethylthiourea (DMTU) pretreatment. All of these results indicate that H(2)O(2) functions as a secondary messenger for EBR-induced CO(2) assimilation and carbohydrate metabolism in cucumber plants. Our study confirms that H(2)O(2) mediates the regulation of photosynthesis by BRs and suggests that EBR and H(2)O(2) regulate Calvin cycle and sugar metabolism via redox signaling and thus increase the photosynthetic potential and yield of crops.

  6. Short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides modulate intestinal microbiota and metabolic parameters of humanized gnotobiotic diet induced obesity mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respondek, Frederique; Gerard, Philippe; Bossis, Mathilde; Boschat, Laura; Bruneau, Aurélia; Rabot, Sylvie; Wagner, Anne; Martin, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    Prebiotic fibres like short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS) are known to selectively modulate the composition of the intestinal microbiota and especially to stimulate Bifidobacteria. In parallel, the involvement of intestinal microbiota in host metabolic regulation has been recently highlighted. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of scFOS on the composition of the faecal microbiota and on metabolic parameters in an animal model of diet-induced obesity harbouring a human-type microbiota. Forty eight axenic C57BL/6J mice were inoculated with a sample of faecal human microbiota and randomly assigned to one of 3 diets for 7 weeks: a control diet, a high fat diet (HF, 60% of energy derived from fat)) or an isocaloric HF diet containing 10% of scFOS (HF-scFOS). Mice fed with the two HF gained at least 21% more weight than mice from the control group. Addition of scFOS partially abolished the deposition of fat mass but significantly increased the weight of the caecum. The analysis of the taxonomic composition of the faecal microbiota by FISH technique revealed that the addition of scFOS induced a significant increase of faecal Bifidobacteria and the Clostridium coccoides group whereas it decreased the Clostridium leptum group. In addition to modifying the composition of the faecal microbiota, scFOS most prominently affected the faecal metabolome (e.g. bile acids derivatives, hydroxyl monoenoic fatty acids) as well as urine, plasma hydrophilic and plasma lipid metabolomes. The increase in C. coccoides and the decrease in C. leptum, were highly correlated to these metabolic changes, including insulinaemia, as well as to the weight of the caecum (empty and full) but not the increase in Bifidobacteria. In conclusion scFOS induce profound metabolic changes by modulating the composition and the activity of the intestinal microbiota, that may partly explain their effect on the reduction of insulinaemia.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide functions as a secondary messenger for brassinosteroids-induced CO2 assimilation and carbohydrate metabolism in Cucumis sativus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-ping JIANG; Fei CHENG; Yan-hong ZHOU; Xiao-jian XIA; Wei-hua MAO; Kai SHI; Zhi-xiang CHEN; Jing-quan YU

    2012-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are potent regulators of photosynthesis and crop yield in agricultural crops;however,the mechanism by which BRs increase photosynthesis is not fully understood.Here,we show that foliar application of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) resulted in increases in CO2 assimilation,hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation,and leaf area in cucumber.H2O2 treatment induced increases in CO2 assimilation whilst inhibition of the H2O2 accumulation by its generation inhibitor or scavenger completely abolished EBR-induced CO2 assimilation.Increases of light harvesting due to larger leaf areas in EBR- and H2O2-treated plants were accompanied by increases in the photochemical efficiency of photosystem Ⅱ (ΦPSⅡ) and photochemical quenching coefficient (qp).EBR and H2O2 both activated carboxylation efficiency of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate oxygenase/carboxylase (Rubisco) from analysis of CO2 response curve and in vitro measurement of Rubisco activities.Moreover,EBR and H2O2 increased contents of total soluble sugar,sucrose,hexose,and starch,followed by enhanced activities of sugar metabolism such as sucrose phosphate synthase,sucrose synthase,and invertase.Interestingly,expression of transcripts of enzymes involved in starch and sugar utilization were inhibited by EBR and H2O2.However,the effects of EBR on carbohydrate metabolisms were reversed by the H2O2 generation inhibitor diphenyleneodonium (DPI) or scavenger dimethylthiourea (DMTU) pretreatment.All of these results indicate that H2O2 functions as a secondary messenger for EBR-induced CO2 assimilation and carbohydrate metabolism in cucumber plants.Our study confirms that H2O2 mediates the regulation of photosynthesis by BRs and suggests that EBR and H2O2 regulate Calvin cycle and sugar metabolism via redox signaling and thus increase the photosynthetic potential and yield of crops.

  8. Metabolic acidosis-induced hypercalcemia in an azotemic patient with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegar, Mandana; Levine, Barton S; Felsenfeld, Arnold J

    2014-06-01

    A 58-year-old man with Stage 3b chronic kidney disease and primary hyperparathyroidism treated with cinacalcet was admitted for acute cholecystitis. A cholecystostomy tube was placed, estimated glomerular filtration rate decreased, metabolic acidosis developed and ionized calcium increased from 1.33 to 1.76 mM despite cinacalcet administration. A sodium bicarbonate infusion corrected the metabolic acidosis restoring ionized calcium to normal despite no improvement in renal function. The correlation between the increase in serum bicarbonate and decrease in ionized calcium was r = -0.93, P metabolic acidosis increasing calcium efflux from bone while renal failure decreased the capacity to excrete calcium.

  9. Combining p53 stabilizers with metformin induces synergistic apoptosis through regulation of energy metabolism in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Ahmad, Nihal; Liu, Xiaoqi

    2016-01-01

    Since altered energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, many drugs targeting metabolic pathways are in active clinical trials. The tumor suppressor p53 is often inactivated in cancer, either through downregulation of protein or loss-of-function mutations. As such, stabilization of p53 is considered as one promising approach to treat those cancers carrying wild type (WT) p53. Herein, SIRT1 inhibitor Tenovin-1 and polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) inhibitor BI2536 were used to stabilize p53. We found that both Tennovin-1 and BI2536 increased the anti-neoplastic activity of metformin, an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation, in a p53 dependent manner. Since p53 has also been shown to regulate metabolic pathways, we further analyzed glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation upon drug treatments. We showed that both Tennovin-1 and BI2536 rescued metformin-induced glycolysis and that both Tennovin-1 and BI2536 potentiated metformin-associated inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. Of significance, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) C4-2 cells show a much more robust response to the combination treatment than the parental androgen-dependent prostate cancer LNCaP cells, indicating that targeting energy metabolism with metformin plus p53 stabilizers might be a valid approach to treat CRPC carrying WT p53.

  10. PHO13 deletion-induced transcriptional activation prevents sedoheptulose accumulation during xylose metabolism in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiqing; Kim, Sooah; Sorek, Hagit; Lee, Youngsuk; Jeong, Deokyeol; Kim, Jungyeon; Oh, Eun Joong; Yun, Eun Ju; Wemmer, David E; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-03-01

    The deletion of PHO13 (pho13Δ) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a phosphatase enzyme of unknown specificity, results in the transcriptional activation of genes related to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) such as TAL1 encoding transaldolase. It has been also reported that the pho13Δ mutant of S. cerevisiae expressing a heterologous xylose pathway can metabolize xylose efficiently compared to its parental strain. However, the interaction between the pho13Δ-induced transcriptional changes and the phenotypes of xylose fermentation was not understood. Thus we investigated the global metabolic changes in response to pho13Δ when cells were exponentially growing on xylose. Among the 134 intracellular metabolites that we identified, the 98% reduction of sedoheptulose was found to be the most significant change in the pho13Δ mutant as compared to its parental strain. Because sedoheptulose-7-phosphate (S7P), a substrate of transaldolase, reduced significantly in the pho13Δ mutant as well, we hypothesized that limited transaldolase activity in the parental strain might cause dephosphorylation of S7P, leading to carbon loss and inefficient xylose metabolism. Mutants overexpressing TAL1 at different degrees were constructed, and their TAL1 expression levels and xylose consumption rates were positively correlated. Moreover, as TAL1 expression levels increased, intracellular sedoheptulose concentration dropped significantly. Therefore, we concluded that TAL1 upregulation, preventing the accumulation of sedoheptulose, is the most critical mechanism for the improved xylose metabolism by the pho13Δ mutant of engineered S. cerevisiae.

  11. D-pinitol attenuates the impaired activities of hepatic key enzymes in carbohydrate metabolism of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Selvaraj; Subramanian, Sorimuthu P

    2009-09-01

    During diabetes mellitus, endogenous hepatic glucose production is increased as a result of impaired activities of the key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, which leads to the condition known as hyperglycemia. D-pinitol, a bioactive constituent isolated from soybeans, has been shown to reduce hyperglycemia in experimental diabetes. We therefore designed this study to investigate the effect of oral administration of D-pinitol (50 mg/kg b. w. for 30 days) on the activities of key enzymes in carbohydrate and glycogen metabolism in the liver tissues of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The efficacy was compared with glyclazide, a standard hypoglycemic drug. Oral administration of D-pinitol to diabetic group of rats showed a marked decrease in the levels of blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin and an increase in plasma insulin and body weight. The activities of the hepatic enzymes such as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen synthase and hepatic glycogen content were significantly (p pinitol. The results suggest that alterations in the activities of key metabolic enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism could be one of the biochemical rationale by which D-pinitol attenuates the hyperglycemic effect in diabetic rats.

  12. Control of Nutrient Stress-Induced Metabolic Reprogramming by PKCζ in Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Tao, Yongzhen; Duran, Angeles; Llado, Victoria; Galvez, Anita; Barger, Jennifer F.; Castilla, Elias A.; Chen, Jing; Yajima, Tomoko; Porollo, Aleksey; Medvedovic, Mario; Brill, Laurence M.; Plas, David R.; Riedl, Stefan J.; Leitges, Michael; Diaz-Meco, Maria T.; Richardson, Adam D.; Moscat, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Tumor cells have high-energetic and anabolic needs and are known to adapt their metabolism to be able to survive and keep proliferating under conditions of nutrient stress. We show that PKCζ deficiency promotes the plasticity necessary for cancer cells to reprogram their metabolism to utilize glutamine through the serine biosynthetic pathway in the absence of glucose. PKCζ represses the expression of two key enzymes of the pathway, PHGDH and PSAT1, and phosphorylates PHGDH at key residues to inhibit its enzymatic activity. Interestingly, the loss of PKCζ in mice results in enhanced intestinal tumorigenesis and increased levels of these two metabolic enzymes, whereas patients with low levels of PKCζ have a poor prognosis. Furthermore, PKCζ and caspase-3 activities are correlated with PHGDH levels in human intestinal tumors. Taken together, this demonstrates that PKCζ is a critical metabolic tumor suppressor in mouse and human cancer. PMID:23374352

  13. Lactoferrin dampens high-fructose corn syrup-induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Chieh; Hsieh, Chang-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome are related obesity, type 2 diabetes/insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Here we investigated how the anti-inflammatory properties of lactoferrin can protect against the onset of hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome by using a murine model administered with high-fructose corn syrup. Our results show that a high-fructose diet stimulates intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increases intestinal permeability, leading to the introduction of endotoxin into blood circulation and liver. Immunohistochemical staining of Toll-like receptor-4 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin indicated that lactoferrin can modulate lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory cascade. The important regulatory roles are played by adipokines including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and adiponectin, ultimately reducing hepatitis and decreasing serum alanine aminotransferase release. These beneficial effects of lactoferrin related to the downregulation of the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cascade in the liver. Furthermore, lactoferrin reduced serum and hepatic triglycerides to prevent lipid accumulation in the liver, and reduced lipid peroxidation, resulting in 4-hydroxynonenal accumulation. Lactoferrin reduced oral glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Lactoferrin administration thus significantly lowered liver weight, resulting from a decrease in the triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis that activates hepatic steatosis. Taken together, these results suggest that lactoferrin protected against high-fructose corn syrup induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome.

  14. Lactoferrin dampens high-fructose corn syrup-induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chieh Li

    Full Text Available Hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome are related obesity, type 2 diabetes/insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Here we investigated how the anti-inflammatory properties of lactoferrin can protect against the onset of hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome by using a murine model administered with high-fructose corn syrup. Our results show that a high-fructose diet stimulates intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increases intestinal permeability, leading to the introduction of endotoxin into blood circulation and liver. Immunohistochemical staining of Toll-like receptor-4 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin indicated that lactoferrin can modulate lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory cascade. The important regulatory roles are played by adipokines including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and adiponectin, ultimately reducing hepatitis and decreasing serum alanine aminotransferase release. These beneficial effects of lactoferrin related to the downregulation of the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cascade in the liver. Furthermore, lactoferrin reduced serum and hepatic triglycerides to prevent lipid accumulation in the liver, and reduced lipid peroxidation, resulting in 4-hydroxynonenal accumulation. Lactoferrin reduced oral glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Lactoferrin administration thus significantly lowered liver weight, resulting from a decrease in the triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis that activates hepatic steatosis. Taken together, these results suggest that lactoferrin protected against high-fructose corn syrup induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome.

  15. Downregulation of the Werner syndrome protein induces a metabolic shift that compromises redox homeostasis and limits proliferation of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baomin; Iglesias-Pedraz, Juan Manuel; Chen, Leng-Ying; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique; Reddy, Sita; Comai, Lucio

    2014-04-01

    The Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is a nuclear protein required for cell growth and proliferation. Loss-of-function mutations in the Werner syndrome gene are associated with the premature onset of age-related diseases. How loss of WRN limits cell proliferation and induces replicative senescence is poorly understood. Here, we show that WRN depletion leads to a striking metabolic shift that coordinately weakens the pathways that generate reducing equivalents for detoxification of reactive oxygen species and increases mitochondrial respiration. In cancer cells, this metabolic shift counteracts the Warburg effect, a defining characteristic of many malignant cells, resulting in altered redox balance and accumulation of oxidative DNA damage that inhibits cell proliferation and induces a senescence-like phenotype. Consistent with these findings, supplementation with antioxidant rescues at least in part cell proliferation and decreases senescence in WRN-knockdown cancer cells. These results demonstrate that WRN plays a critical role in cancer cell proliferation by contributing to the Warburg effect and preventing metabolic stress.

  16. Predator-induced phenotypic plasticity in metabolism and rate of growth: rapid adaptation to a novel environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, Corey A; Broder, E Dale; Dalton, Christopher M; Ruell, Emily W; Myrick, Christopher A; Reznick, David N; Ghalambor, Cameron K

    2013-12-01

    Novel environments often impose directional selection for a new phenotypic optimum. Novel environments, however, can also change the distribution of phenotypes exposed to selection by inducing phenotypic plasticity. Plasticity can produce phenotypes that either align with or oppose the direction of selection. When plasticity and selection are parallel, plasticity is considered adaptive because it provides a better pairing between the phenotype and the environment. If the plastic response is incomplete and falls short of producing the optimum phenotype, synergistic selection can lead to genetic divergence and bring the phenotype closer to the optimum. In contrast, non-adaptive plasticity should increase the strength of selection, because phenotypes will be further from the local optimum, requiring antagonistic selection to overcome the phenotype-environment mismatch and facilitate adaptive divergence. We test these ideas by documenting predator-induced plasticity for resting metabolic rate and growth rate in populations of the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata) adapted to high and low predation. We find reduced metabolic rates and growth rates when cues from a predator are present during development, a pattern suggestive of adaptive and non-adaptive plasticity, respectively. When we compared populations recently transplanted from a high-predation environment into four streams lacking predators, we found evidence for rapid adaptive evolution both in metabolism and growth rate. We discuss the implications for predicting how traits will respond to selection, depending on the type of plasticity they exhibit.

  17. Peripheral nerve metabolism and zinc levels in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Effect of diets high in fish and corn oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J.P.; Fenton, M.R. (Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine, Philadelphia (United States))

    1991-03-15

    This study was designed to assess the effects of diets high in fish and corn oil on peripheral nerve metabolism in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. A type I diabetic state was induced in female Sprague-Dawley rats by injection of STZ. Animals were divided into three dietary groups; normal rat chow, high corn oil diet and high fish oil diet. After 4 weeks animals were analyzed for nerve conduction velocity, bled and then sacrificed. Sciatic nerves were removed, processed and several biochemical parameters determined. Plasma zinc levels were elevated in the STZ normal chow group compared to non-diabetic controls. Both corn oil and fish oil diets tended to eliminate the rise in plasma zinc. Differences in subcellular distribution of zinc in sciatic nerves were also observed. Normal chow STZ animals displayed a 20% decrease in nerve conduction velocity compared to control. Dietary supplementation with either fish or corn oil seemed to ameliorate these effects. Biochemical analysis of Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase and protein kinase C revealed a decrease in activity in normal chow animals compared to control groups. Again, dietary intervention with either fish or corn oil seemed to return these activities back to normal. The results suggest a link between zinc metabolism and peripheral nerve metabolism which can be modified by dietary intervention.

  18. Metabolic profiling-based data-mining for an effective chemical combination to induce apoptosis of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazoe, Motofumi; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Hidaka, Shiori; Kim, Yoonhee; Murayama, Kanako; Takai, Mika; Huang, Yuhui; Yamashita, Shuya; Murata, Motoki; Miura, Daisuke; Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2015-03-31

    Green tea extract (GTE) induces apoptosis of cancer cells without adversely affecting normal cells. Several clinical trials reported that GTE was well tolerated and had potential anti-cancer efficacy. Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) is the primary compound responsible for the anti-cancer effect of GTE; however, the effect of EGCG alone is limited. To identify GTE compounds capable of potentiating EGCG bioactivity, we performed metabolic profiling of 43 green tea cultivar panels by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Here, we revealed the polyphenol eriodictyol significantly potentiated apoptosis induction by EGCG in vitro and in a mouse tumour model by amplifying EGCG-induced activation of the 67-kDa laminin receptor (67LR)/protein kinase B/endothelial nitric oxide synthase/protein kinase C delta/acid sphingomyelinase signalling pathway. Our results show that metabolic profiling is an effective chemical-mining approach for identifying botanical drugs with therapeutic potential against multiple myeloma. Metabolic profiling-based data mining could be an efficient strategy for screening additional bioactive compounds and identifying effective chemical combinations.

  19. Ameliorating effect of eugenol on hyperglycemia by attenuating the key enzymes of glucose metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Subramani; Sathish, Gajendren; Jayanthi, Mahadevan; Muthukumaran, Jayachandran; Muruganathan, Udaiyar; Ramachandran, Vinayagam

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that diabetes mellitus is a serious health burden for both governments and healthcare providers. This study was hypothesized to evaluate the antihyperglycemic potential of eugenol by determine the activities of key enzymes of glucose metabolism in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced into male albino Wistar rats by intraperitoneal administration of STZ (40 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)). Eugenol was administered to diabetic rats intragastrically at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg b.w. for 30 days. The dose 10 mg/kg b.w. significantly reduced the levels of blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and increased plasma insulin level. The altered activities of the key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism such as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, and liver marker enzymes (AST, ALT, and ALP), creatine kinase and blood urea nitrogen in serum and blood of diabetic rats were significantly reverted to near normal levels by the administration of eugenol. Further, eugenol administration to diabetic rats improved body weight and hepatic glycogen content demonstrated the antihyperglycemic potential of eugenol in diabetic rats. The present findings suggest that eugenol can potentially ameliorate key enzymes of glucose metabolism in experimental diabetes, and it is sensible to broaden the scale of use of eugenol in a trial to alleviate the adverse effects of diabetes.

  20. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in rats treated with a hepatic drug-metabolizing enzyme inducer p,p'-DDT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yuko; Tomita, Mariko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Katoh, Yoshitaka; Ohnuma-Koyama, Aya; Takahashi, Naofumi; Soma, Katsumi; Kojima, Sayuri; Ohtsuka, Ryoichi; Takeda, Makio; Kuwahara, Maki; Harada, Takanori

    2015-03-01

    Hepatocellular hypertrophy in association with drug-metabolizing enzyme induction is considered to be an adaptive change associated with drug metabolism. To improve our understanding of liver hypertrophy, we determined the effect of a single ip injection of either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or vehicle in male F344 rats with hepatocellular hypertrophy induced by oral delivery of p,p'-DDT for 2 weeks. The rats were sacrificed 3h or 24h after LPS or vehicle injection. LPS induced a focal hepatocellular necrosis in rats fed the control diet. When rats pre-treated with p,p'-DDT were injected with LPS, necrotic foci surrounded by ballooned hepatocytes were observed in the liver. The change was consistent with reduced LPS-mediated increases in plasma hepatic biomarkers, neutrophil influx, and apoptosis, and also associated with hepatic mRNA levels of TNF-α, CYPs, and NOS2. By contrast, when combined with p,p'-DDT and LPS, faint hepatocellular fatty change was extended, together with a synergistic increase in total blood cholesterol. These results suggest that hepatocytes exposed to p,p'-DDT are protected from the cell-lethal toxic effects of an exogenous stimulus, resulting in cell ballooning rather than necrosis in association with reduced inflammation and apoptosis, but compromised by an adverse effect on lipid metabolism.

  1. Aluminium-induced excessive ROS causes cellular damage and metabolic shifts in black gram Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowra, Umakanta; Yanase, Emiko; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Panda, Sanjib Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Aluminium-induced oxidative damage caused by excessive ROS production was evaluated in black gram pulse crop. Black gram plants were treated with different aluminium (Al(3+)) concentrations (10, 50 and 100 μM with pH 4.7) and further the effects of Al(3+) were characterised by means of root growth inhibition, histochemical assay, ROS content analysis, protein carbonylation quantification and (1)H-NMR analysis. The results showed that aluminium induces excessive ROS production which leads to cellular damage, root injury, stunt root growth and other metabolic shifts. In black gram, Al(3+) induces cellular damage at the earliest stage of stress which was characterised from histochemical analysis. From this study, it was observed that prolonged stress can activate certain aluminium detoxification defence mechanism. Probably excessive ROS triggers such defence mechanism in black gram. Al(3+) can induce excessive ROS initially in the root region then transported to other parts of the plant. As much as the Al(3+) concentration increases, the rate of cellular injury and ROS production also increases. But after 72 h of stress, plants showed a lowered ROS level and cellular damage which indicates the upregulation of defensive mechanisms. Metabolic shift analysis also showed that the black gram plant under stress has less metabolic content after 24 h of treatment, but gradually, it was increased after 72 h of treatment. It was assumed that ROS played the most important role as a signalling molecule for aluminium stress in black gram.

  2. Metabolically induced liver inflammation leads to NASH and differs from LPS- or IL-1 beta-induced chronic inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Wen; Lindeman, Jan H.; Menke, Aswin L.; Koonen, Debby P.; Morrison, Martine; Havekes, Louis M.; van den Hoek, Anita M.; Kleemann, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the chronic inflammatory component that drives the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is unclear and possible inflammatory triggers have not been investigated systematically. We examined the effect of non-metabolic triggers (lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-1 beta

  3. Metabolically induced liver inflammation leads to NASH and differs from LPS-or IL-1β-induced chronic inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, W.; Lindeman, J.H.; Menke, A.L.; Koonen, D.P.; Morrison, M.; Havekes, L.M.; Hoek, A.M. van den; Kleemann, R.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the chronic inflammatory component that drives the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is unclear and possible inflammatory triggers have not been investigated systematically. We examined the effect of non-metabolic triggers (lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-1β (IL

  4. Sublethal Concentrations Of Antibiotics Cause Shift To Anaerobic Metabolism In Listeria Monocytogenes And Induce Phenotypes Linked To Antibiotic Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Ng, Yin; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can cause the severe infection listeriosis, which have up to 20-30% mortality, but if discovered in time, it can be treated with antibiotics. Most antibiotics are bacteriostatic against L. monocytogenes. This could be due...... to the coexistence with antibiotic-producing organisms during its saprophytic lifestyle. To determine if tolerance could be induced or potentially alter virulence, we investigated the transcriptome after exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations. Results: Four antibiotics caused induction of the alcohol...... dehydrogenase gene lmo1634 and repression of alsA and lmo1992, which are involved in acetoin production leading to more ethanol and less acetoin production. This shift in central metabolism indicates a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, that could reduce oxidative stress and be a survival strategy...

  5. New Nordic Diet induced weight loss is accompanied by changes in metabolism and AMPK signalling in adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel; Lundsgaard, Anne-Marie; Jordy, Andreas Børsting

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: The molecular mechanisms behind diet-induced metabolic improvements remain to be studied. The Objective was to investigate whether expression of proteins in skeletal muscle or adipose tissue could explain improvements in glucose and lipid homeostasis after weight loss. DESIGN: Volunteers...... regulation of key glucose and lipid handling proteins suggests an improved metabolic capacity in adipose tissue after weight loss....... consumed a New Nordic Diet (NND) or an Average Danish Diet (ADD) for 26 weeks in a controlled, free-living setting. SUBJECTS: 64 moderately obese women and men (44±2 years and BMI 31±1 kg·m(2)). INTERVENTION: Fasting blood samples and biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle and subcutaneous abdominal...

  6. The functional assessment of Alpinia pricei on metabolic syndrome induced by sucrose-containing drinking water in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yi-Chun; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Chen, Gou-Chun; Lin, Yu-Shen; Chao, Pei-Min

    2009-04-01

    This study was designed to test whether Alpinia pricei (AP), a member of the ginger family indigenous to Taiwan, reduced metabolic syndrome induced by sucrose-containing drinking water in C57BL/6J mice. Mice given a chow diet were divided into a control group (C) or a test group given 30% sucrose water (SW) to drink ad libitum. After 22 weeks, mice in the SW group were subdivided into SW and SW + AP groups, the latter receiving a chow diet with an ethanol extract of AP (1500 mg/kg dosage). Four weeks later, bio-indexes associated with metabolic syndrome were measured. Compared with the C group, the SW group had significantly higher body weight, visceral fat weights, serum and tissue lipid, serum insulin level and the area under the curve for blood glucose of the insulin tolerance test (p water drinking might be alleviated by AP supplementation.

  7. Irradiation of protoporphyric mice induces down-regulation of epidermal eicosanoid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, D.; Lim, H.W. (Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1991-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of radiation on clinical and histologic changes, and on cutaneous eicosanoid metabolism, in Skh:HR-1 hairless albino mice rendered protoporphyric by the administration of collidine. At 0.1-18 h after exposure to 12 kJ/m2 of 396-406 nm irradiation, thicknesses of back skin and ears were measured, and histologic changes were evaluated by using hematoxylin and eosin (H-E) and Giemsa's stains. Activities of eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes in epidermal and dermal homogenates were assessed by incubating the tissue homogenates with 3H-AA, followed by quantitation of the eicosanoids generated by radio-TLC. In irradiated protoporphyric mice, an increase of back-skin thickness was noted at 0.1 h, reaching a peak at 18 h, whereas maximal increase in ear thickness was observed at 12 h. Histologic changes included dermal edema, increased mast cell degranulation, and mononuclear cells in the dermis. In these irradiated protoporphyric animals, generations of 6 keto-PGF1a, PGF2a, PGE2, PGD2, and HETE by epidermal eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes were markedly suppressed at all the timepoints studied. Dermal eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes of irradiated protoporphyric mice generated increased amounts of PGE2 and HETE at 18 h, probably reflecting the presence of dermal cellular infiltrates. The suppression of the activities of epidermal eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes was prevented by intraperitoneal injection of WR-2721, a sulfhydryl group generator, prior to irradiation, suggesting that the suppression was secondary to photo-oxidative damage of the enzymes during the in vivo phototoxic response. These results suggest that the effect of protoporphyrin and radiation on cutaneous eicosanoid metabolism in this animal model in vivo is that of a down regulation of the activities of epidermal eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes.

  8. Peripheral reduction of FGFR4 with antisense oligonucleotides increases metabolic rate and lowers adiposity in diet-induced obese mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Xian Yu

    Full Text Available Obesity is a primary risk factor for multiple metabolic disorders. Many drugs for the treatment of obesity, which mainly act through CNS as appetite suppressants, have failed during development or been removed from the market due to unacceptable adverse effects. Thus, there are very few efficacious drugs available and remains a great unmet medical need for anti-obesity drugs that increase energy expenditure by acting on peripheral tissues without severe side effects. Here, we report a novel approach involving antisense inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4 in peripheral tissues. Treatment of diet-induce obese (DIO mice with FGFR4 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO specifically reduced liver FGFR4 expression that not only resulted in decrease in body weight (BW and adiposity in free-feeding conditions, but also lowered BW and adiposity under caloric restriction. In addition, combination treatment with FGFR4 ASO and rimonabant showed additive reduction in BW and adiposity. FGFR4 ASO treatment increased basal metabolic rate during free-feeding conditions and, more importantly, prevented adaptive decreases of metabolic rate induced by caloric restriction. The treatment increased fatty acid oxidation while decreased lipogenesis in both liver and fat. Mechanistic studies indicated that anti-obesity effect of FGFR4 ASO was mediated at least in part through an induction of plasma FGF15 level resulted from reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression. The anti-obesity effect was accompanied by improvement in plasma glycemia, whole body insulin sensitivity, plasma lipid levels and liver steatosis. Therefore, FGFR4 could be a potential novel target and antisense reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression could be an efficacious therapy as an adjunct to diet restriction or to an appetite suppressant for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  9. Musa Paradisiaca flower extract improves carbohydrate metabolism in hepatic tissues of streptozotocin-induced experimental diabetes in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanmuga Sundaram.C; Subramanian.S

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Musa Paradisiaca, commonly known as plantains have been traditionally used for various medicinal purposes. In the absence of an ideal drug to alleviate the primary and secondary complications of diabetes mellitus, search for novel drugs without side effects, preferably from plant origin continues. Recently, we have reported the presence of biologically active phytochemicals as well as the hypoglycemic activity of Musa paradisiaca tepals extract in STZ induced experimental diabetes in rats. The present study was aimed to evaluate the role of tepals, an integrated part of Musa paradisiaca flowers on carbohydrate metabolism in hepatic tissues of experimental diabetic rats. Methods: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated with ethanolic extract of tepals at a concentration of 200mg/kg body weight/day for 30 days. The levels of fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin and glycosylated hemoglobin were estimated. The activities of key enzymes in carbohydrate metabolism such as glucokinase, pyruvate kinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase in hepatic tissues were assayed. The levels of glycogen in hepatic tissues were also estimated. Results: Oral administration ofMusa paradisiaca tepals extract significantly improved the altered levels of blood glucose, plasma insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin and modulated the activities of carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes. The glycogen content in hepatic tissues was significantly increased in diabetic rats treated with tepals extract. Conclusions: The results of the present study clearly indicate that the tepals extract plays pivotal role to maintain normoglycemia in diabetes by modulating the activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes.

  10. Peripheral reduction of FGFR4 with antisense oligonucleotides increases metabolic rate and lowers adiposity in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xing Xian; Watts, Lynnetta M; Manchem, Vara Prasad; Chakravarty, Kaushik; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L; Bhanot, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a primary risk factor for multiple metabolic disorders. Many drugs for the treatment of obesity, which mainly act through CNS as appetite suppressants, have failed during development or been removed from the market due to unacceptable adverse effects. Thus, there are very few efficacious drugs available and remains a great unmet medical need for anti-obesity drugs that increase energy expenditure by acting on peripheral tissues without severe side effects. Here, we report a novel approach involving antisense inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) in peripheral tissues. Treatment of diet-induce obese (DIO) mice with FGFR4 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) specifically reduced liver FGFR4 expression that not only resulted in decrease in body weight (BW) and adiposity in free-feeding conditions, but also lowered BW and adiposity under caloric restriction. In addition, combination treatment with FGFR4 ASO and rimonabant showed additive reduction in BW and adiposity. FGFR4 ASO treatment increased basal metabolic rate during free-feeding conditions and, more importantly, prevented adaptive decreases of metabolic rate induced by caloric restriction. The treatment increased fatty acid oxidation while decreased lipogenesis in both liver and fat. Mechanistic studies indicated that anti-obesity effect of FGFR4 ASO was mediated at least in part through an induction of plasma FGF15 level resulted from reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression. The anti-obesity effect was accompanied by improvement in plasma glycemia, whole body insulin sensitivity, plasma lipid levels and liver steatosis. Therefore, FGFR4 could be a potential novel target and antisense reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression could be an efficacious therapy as an adjunct to diet restriction or to an appetite suppressant for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  11. Diet-induced hyperinsulinemia differentially affects glucose and protein metabolism: a high-throughput metabolomic approach in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxeberria, U; de la Garza, A L; Martínez, J A; Milagro, F I

    2013-09-01

    Metabolomics is a high-throughput tool that quantifies and identifies the complete set of biofluid metabolites. This "omics" science is playing an increasing role in understanding the mechanisms involved in disease progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether a nontargeted metabolomic approach could be applied to investigate metabolic differences between obese rats fed a high-fat sucrose (HFS) diet for 9 weeks and control diet-fed rats. Animals fed with the HFS diet became obese, hyperleptinemic, hyperglycemic, hyperinsulinemic, and resistant to insulin. Serum samples of overnight-fasted animals were analyzed by (1)H NMR technique, and 49 metabolites were identified and quantified. The biochemical changes observed suggest that major metabolic processes like carbohydrate metabolism, β-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, Kennedy pathway, and folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism were altered in obese rats. The circulating levels of most amino acids were lower in obese animals. Serum levels of docosahexaenoic acid, linoleic acid, unsaturated n-6 fatty acids, and total polyunsaturated fatty acids also decreased in HFS-fed rats. The circulating levels of urea, six water-soluble metabolites (creatine, creatinine, choline, acetyl carnitine, formate, and allantoin), and two lipid compounds (phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelin) were also significantly reduced by the HFS diet intake. This study offers further insight of the possible mechanisms implicated in the development of diet-induced obesity. It suggests that the HFS diet-induced hyperinsulinemia is responsible for the decrease in the circulating levels of urea, creatinine, and many amino acids, despite an increase in serum glucose levels.

  12. Low-dose aspartame consumption differentially affects gut microbiota-host metabolic interactions in the diet-induced obese rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie S A Palmnäs

    Full Text Available Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat and further into ad libitum water control (W or low-dose aspartame (A, 5-7 mg/kg/d in drinking water treatments for 8 week (n = 10-12 animals/treatment. Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (P<0.05. Within HF, aspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation.

  13. D-Xylose suppresses adipogenesis and regulates lipid metabolism genes in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eunjin; Lim, Ji Ye; Shin, Jae-Ho; Seok, Pu Reum; Jung, Sangwon; Yoo, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yuri

    2015-07-01

    D-Xylose, a natural pentose, has been reported to reduce postprandial glucose levels, although its effect on lipid metabolism has not been investigated. Therefore, this study hypothesized that d-xylose, as an alternative sweetener, suppresses adipogenesis and lipid metabolism by regulating blood lipid profiles, blood glucose levels, and related gene expression in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Mice were fed a normal diet, a 60% HFD diet, or an HFD with 5% or 10% of the total sucrose content supplemented with d-xylose (Xylo 5 and Xylo 10 diets, respectively). Weight gain, food intake, and serum lipid levels for each group were measured. After 12 weeks, histopathology of liver sections and assays of gene expression related to adipogenesis and lipid metabolism in visceral fat and liver tissues were analyzed. Body weight gain; fasting blood glucose levels; weights of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues; and serum biochemical markers, including total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-/high-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein, were significantly lowered in the Xylo 5 and Xylo 10 groups. In addition, d-xylose supplementation resulted in the down-regulation of adipogenesis-related genes, including sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1C, fatty acid synthase, adipocyte protein 2, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α in visceral adipose tissues. Histopathologically, Xylo 5 and Xylo 10 supplementation reduced HFD-induced fat accumulation in the liver and decreased expressions of fatty acid synthase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. D-Xylose supplementation also enhanced lipid oxidation by increasing expressions of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A; cytochrome P450, family 4, subfamily a, polypeptide 10; and acyl-CoA oxidase. In conclusion, our finding suggests that d-xylose may help prevent or attenuate the progression of obesity-related metabolic disorders by alleviating adipogenesis

  14. Low-dose aspartame consumption differentially affects gut microbiota-host metabolic interactions in the diet-induced obese rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmnäs, Marie S A; Cowan, Theresa E; Bomhof, Marc R; Su, Juliet; Reimer, Raylene A; Vogel, Hans J; Hittel, Dustin S; Shearer, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat) or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat) and further into ad libitum water control (W) or low-dose aspartame (A, 5-7 mg/kg/d in drinking water) treatments for 8 week (n = 10-12 animals/treatment). Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (Paspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation.

  15. Oral Gingival Cell Cigarette Smoke Exposure Induces Muscle Cell Metabolic Disruption

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    Andrea C. Baeder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke exposure compromises health through damaging multiple physiological systems, including disrupting metabolic function. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of oral gingiva in mediating the deleterious metabolic effects of cigarette smoke exposure on skeletal muscle metabolic function. Using an in vitro conditioned medium cell model, skeletal muscle cells were incubated with medium from gingival cells treated with normal medium or medium containing suspended cigarette smoke extract (CSE. Following incubation of muscle cells with gingival cell conditioned medium, muscle cell mitochondrial respiration and insulin signaling and action were determined as an indication of overall muscle metabolic health. Skeletal muscle cells incubated with conditioned medium of CSE-treated gingival cells had a profound reduction in mitochondrial respiration and respiratory control. Furthermore, skeletal muscle cells had a greatly reduced response in insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glycogen synthesis. Altogether, these results provide a novel perspective on the mechanism whereby cigarette smoke affects systemic metabolic function. In conclusion, we found that oral gingival cells treated with CSE create an altered milieu that is sufficient to both disrupted skeletal muscle cell mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity.

  16. Caffeine-induced activated glucocorticoid metabolism in the hippocampus causes hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis inhibition in fetal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dan; Zhang, Benjian; Liang, Gai; Ping, Jie; Kou, Hao; Li, Xiaojun; Xiong, Jie; Hu, Dongcai; Chen, Liaobin; Magdalou, Jacques; Wang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations have shown that fetuses with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) are susceptible to adult metabolic syndrome. Clinical investigations and experiments have demonstrated that caffeine is a definite inducer of IUGR, as children who ingest caffeine-containing food or drinks are highly susceptible to adult obesity and hypertension. Our goals for this study were to investigate the effect of prenatal caffeine ingestion on the functional development of the fetal hippocampus and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and to clarify an intrauterine HPA axis-associated neuroendocrine alteration induced by caffeine. Pregnant Wistar rats were intragastrically administered 20, 60, and 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from gestational days 11-20. The results show that prenatal caffeine ingestion significantly decreased the expression of fetal hypothalamus corticotrophin-releasing hormone. The fetal adrenal cortex changed into slight and the expression of fetal adrenal steroid acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), as well as the level of fetal adrenal endogenous corticosterone (CORT), were all significantly decreased after caffeine treatment. Moreover, caffeine ingestion significantly increased the levels of maternal and fetal blood CORT and decreased the expression of placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 (11β-HSD-2). Additionally, both in vivo and in vitro studies show that caffeine can downregulate the expression of fetal hippocampal 11β-HSD-2, promote the expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and enhance DNA methylation within the hippocampal 11β-HSD-2 promoter. These results suggest that prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits the development of the fetal HPA axis, which may be associated with the fetal overexposure to maternal glucocorticoid and activated glucocorticoid metabolism in the fetal hippocampus. These results will be beneficial in

  17. The protective role of amla (Emblica officinalis Gaertn.) against fructose-induced metabolic syndrome in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Young; Okubo, Tsutomu; Juneja, Lekh Raj; Yokozawa, Takako

    2010-02-01

    We investigated the effects of amla (Emblica officinalis Gaertn.) on fructose-induced metabolic syndrome using a rat model. Male Wistar rats were fed a high-fructose (65 %) diet or standard chow for 1 week, and treated with an ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract of amla, a polyphenol-rich fraction, at 10 or 20 mg/kg body weight per d, or vehicle, for 2 weeks. Serum glucose, TAG, total cholesterol and blood pressure levels of the high-fructose diet-fed rats were increased compared with those of the normal rats (P amla ameliorated the high fructose-induced metabolic syndrome, including hypertriacylglycerolaemia and hypercholesterolaemia. Also, the elevated levels of hepatic TAG and total cholesterol in rats given the high-fructose diet were significantly reduced by 33.8 and 24.6 %, respectively (P amla at the dose of 20 mg/kg with the regulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1 expression. The protein levels of PPARalpha and SREBP-2 were not affected by the feeding of the high-fructose diet or EtOAc extract of amla. In addition, oral administration of the amla extract at the dose of 20 mg/kg significantly inhibited the increased serum and hepatic mitochondrial thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels (21.1 and 43.1 %, respectively; P amla extract inhibited the increase of cyclo-oxygenase-2 with the regulation of NF-kappaB and bcl-2 proteins in the liver, while the elevated expression level of bax was significantly decreased by 8.5 and 10.2 % at the doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. These findings suggest that fructose-induced metabolic syndrome is attenuated by the polyphenol-rich fraction of amla.

  18. White spot syndrome virus induces metabolic changes resembling the warburg effect in shrimp hemocytes in the early stage of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Tung; Aoki, Takashi; Huang, Yun-Tzu; Hirono, Ikuo; Chen, Tsan-Chi; Huang, Jiun-Yan; Chang, Geen-Dong; Lo, Chu-Fang; Wang, Han-Ching

    2011-12-01

    The Warburg effect is an abnormal glycolysis response that is associated with cancer cells. Here we present evidence that metabolic changes resembling the Warburg effect are induced by a nonmammalian virus. When shrimp were infected with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), changes were induced in several metabolic pathways related to the mitochondria. At the viral genome replication stage (12 h postinfection [hpi]), glucose consumption and plasma lactate concentration were both increased in WSSV-infected shrimp, and the key enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), showed increased activity. We also found that at 12 hpi there was no alteration in the ADP/ATP ratio and that oxidative stress was lower than that in uninfected controls. All of these results are characteristic of the Warburg effect as it is present in mammals. There was also a significant decrease in triglyceride concentration starting at 12 hpi. At the late stage of the infection cycle (24 hpi), hemocytes of WSSV-infected shrimp showed several changes associated with cell death. These included the induction of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP), increased oxidative stress, decreased glucose consumption, and disrupted energy production. A previous study showed that WSSV infection led to upregulation of the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which is known to be involved in both the Warburg effect and MMP. Here we show that double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) silencing of the VDAC reduces WSSV-induced mortality and virion copy number. For these results, we hypothesize a model depicting the metabolic changes in host cells at the early and late stages of WSSV infection.

  19. Increased plasma citrulline in mice marks diet-induced obesity and may predict the development of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Manuela; Dahlhoff, Christoph; Giesbertz, Pieter; Eidens, Mena K; de Wit, Nicole; Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel; Boekschoten, Mark V; Müller, Michael; Daniel, Hannelore

    2013-01-01

    In humans, plasma amino acid concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and aromatic amino acids (AAA) increase in states of obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. We here assessed whether these putative biomarkers can also be identified in two different obesity and diabetic mouse models. C57BL/6 mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO) mimic the metabolic impairments of obesity in humans characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Mice treated with streptozotocin (STZ) to induce insulin deficiency were used as a type 1 diabetes model. Plasma amino acid profiling of two high fat (HF) feeding trials revealed that citrulline and ornithine concentrations are elevated in obese mice, while systemic arginine bioavailability (ratio of plasma arginine to ornithine + citrulline) is reduced. In skeletal muscle, HF feeding induced a reduction of arginine levels while citrulline levels were elevated. However, arginine or citrulline remained unchanged in their key metabolic organs, intestine and kidney. Moreover, the intestinal conversion of labeled arginine to ornithine and citrulline in vitro remained unaffected by HF feeding excluding the intestine as prime site of these alterations. In liver, citrulline is mainly derived from ornithine in the urea cycle and DIO mice displayed reduced hepatic ornithine levels. Since both amino acids share an antiport mechanism for mitochondrial import and export, elevated plasma citrulline may indicate impaired hepatic amino acid handling in DIO mice. In the insulin deficient mice, plasma citrulline and ornithine levels also increased and additionally these animals displayed elevated BCAA and AAA levels like insulin resistant and diabetic patients. Therefore, type 1 diabetic mice but not DIO mice show the "diabetic fingerprint" of plasma amino acid changes observed in humans. Additionally, citrulline may serve as an early indicator of the obesity-dependent metabolic impairments.

  20. Genetically Engineered Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 Synbiotics Reduce Metabolic Effects Induced by Chronic Consumption of Dietary Fructose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somabhai, Chaudhari Archana; Raghuvanshi, Ruma; Nareshkumar, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess protective efficacy of genetically modified Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) on metabolic effects induced by chronic consumption of dietary fructose. Materials and Methods EcN was genetically modified with fructose dehydrogenase (fdh) gene for conversion of fructose to 5-keto-D-fructose and mannitol-2-dehydrogenase (mtlK) gene for conversion to mannitol, a prebiotic. Charles foster rats weighing 150–200 g were fed with 20% fructose in drinking water for two months. Probiotic treatment of EcN (pqq), EcN (pqq-glf-mtlK), EcN (pqq-fdh) was given once per week 109 cells for two months. Furthermore, blood and liver parameters for oxidative stress, dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia were estimated. Fecal samples were collected to determine the production of short chain fatty acids and pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) production. Results EcN (pqq-glf-mtlK), EcN (pqq-fdh) transformants were confirmed by restriction digestion and functionality was checked by PQQ estimation and HPLC analysis. There was significant increase in body weight, serum glucose, liver injury markers, lipid profile in serum and liver, and decrease in antioxidant enzyme activity in high-fructose-fed rats. However the rats treated with EcN (pqq-glf-mtlK) and EcN (pqq-fdh) showed significant reduction in lipid peroxidation along with increase in serum and hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities. Restoration of liver injury marker enzymes was also seen. Increase in short chain fatty acids (SCFA) demonstrated the prebiotic effects of mannitol and gluconic acid. Conclusions Our study demonstrated the effectiveness of probiotic EcN producing PQQ and fructose metabolizing enzymes against the fructose induced hepatic steatosis suggesting that its potential for use in treating fructose induced metabolic syndrome. PMID:27760187

  1. Acute but not chronic metabolic acidosis potentiates the acetylcholine-induced reduction in blood pressure: an endothelium-dependent effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celotto, A C; Ferreira, L G; Capellini, V K; Albuquerque, A A S; Rodrigues, A J; Evora, P R B

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic acidosis has profound effects on vascular tone. This study investigated the in vivo effects of acute metabolic acidosis (AMA) and chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) on hemodynamic parameters and endothelial function. CMA was induced by ad libitum intake of 1% NH4Cl for 7 days, and AMA was induced by a 3-h infusion of 6 M NH4Cl (1 mL/kg, diluted 1:10). Phenylephrine (Phe) and acetylcholine (Ach) dose-response curves were performed by venous infusion with simultaneous venous and arterial blood pressure monitoring. Plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) was measured by chemiluminescence. The CMA group had a blood pH of 7.15±0.03, which was associated with reduced bicarbonate (13.8±0.98 mmol/L) and no change in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). The AMA group had a pH of 7.20±0.01, which was associated with decreases in bicarbonate (10.8±0.54 mmol/L) and PaCO2 (47.8±2.54 to 23.2±0.74 mmHg) and accompanied by hyperventilation. Phe or ACh infusion did not affect arterial or venous blood pressure in the CMA group. However, the ACh infusion decreased the arterial blood pressure (ΔBP: -28.0±2.35 mm Hg [AMA] to -4.5±2.89 mmHg [control]) in the AMA group. Plasma NOx was normal after CMA but increased after AMA (25.3±0.88 to 31.3±0.54 μM). These results indicate that AMA, but not CMA, potentiated the Ach-induced decrease in blood pressure and led to an increase in plasma NOx, reinforcing the effect of pH imbalance on vascular tone and blood pressure control.

  2. Increased plasma citrulline in mice marks diet-induced obesity and may predict the development of the metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Sailer

    Full Text Available In humans, plasma amino acid concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA and aromatic amino acids (AAA increase in states of obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. We here assessed whether these putative biomarkers can also be identified in two different obesity and diabetic mouse models. C57BL/6 mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO mimic the metabolic impairments of obesity in humans characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Mice treated with streptozotocin (STZ to induce insulin deficiency were used as a type 1 diabetes model. Plasma amino acid profiling of two high fat (HF feeding trials revealed that citrulline and ornithine concentrations are elevated in obese mice, while systemic arginine bioavailability (ratio of plasma arginine to ornithine + citrulline is reduced. In skeletal muscle, HF feeding induced a reduction of arginine levels while citrulline levels were elevated. However, arginine or citrulline remained unchanged in their key metabolic organs, intestine and kidney. Moreover, the intestinal conversion of labeled arginine to ornithine and citrulline in vitro remained unaffected by HF feeding excluding the intestine as prime site of these alterations. In liver, citrulline is mainly derived from ornithine in the urea cycle and DIO mice displayed reduced hepatic ornithine levels. Since both amino acids share an antiport mechanism for mitochondrial import and export, elevated plasma citrulline may indicate impaired hepatic amino acid handling in DIO mice. In the insulin deficient mice, plasma citrulline and ornithine levels also increased and additionally these animals displayed elevated BCAA and AAA levels like insulin resistant and diabetic patients. Therefore, type 1 diabetic mice but not DIO mice show the "diabetic fingerprint" of plasma amino acid changes observed in humans. Additionally, citrulline may serve as an early indicator of the obesity-dependent metabolic

  3. Metabolomics reveals trichloroacetate as a major contributor to trichloroethylene-induced metabolic alterations in mouse urine and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Krausz, Kristopher W; Tanaka, Naoki; Li, Fei; Qu, Aijuan; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2013-11-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE)-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis is believed to be mediated in part by activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). However, the contribution of the two TCE metabolites, dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) to the toxicity of TCE, remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the metabolite profiles in serum and urine upon exposure of mice to TCE, to aid in determining the metabolic response to TCE exposure and the contribution of DCA and TCA to TCE toxicity. C57BL/6 mice were administered TCE, TCA, or DCA, and urine and serum subjected to ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-QTOFMS)-based global metabolomics analysis. The ions were identified through searching metabolomics databases and by comparison with authentic standards, and quantitated using multiple reactions monitoring. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction of mRNA, biochemical analysis, and liver histology were also performed. TCE exposure resulted in a decrease in urine of metabolites involved in fatty acid metabolism, resulting from altered expression of PPARα target genes. TCE treatment also induced altered phospholipid homeostasis in serum, as revealed by increased serum lysophosphatidylcholine 18:0 and 18:1, and phosphatidylcholine metabolites. TCA administration revealed similar metabolite profiles in urine and serum upon TCE exposure, which correlated with a more robust induction of PPARα target gene expression associated with TCA than DCA treatment. These data show the metabolic response to TCE exposure and demonstrate that TCA is the major contributor to TCE-induced metabolite alterations observed in urine and serum.

  4. Bacteroides uniformis CECT 7771 ameliorates metabolic and immunological dysfunction in mice with high-fat-diet induced obesity.

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    Paola Gauffin Cano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Associations have been made between obesity and reduced intestinal numbers of members of the phylum Bacteroidetes, but there is no direct evidence of the role these bacteria play in obesity. Herein, the effects of Bacteroides uniformis CECT 7771 on obesity-related metabolic and immune alterations have been evaluated. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Adult (6-8 week male wild-type C57BL-6 mice were fed a standard diet or a high-fat-diet HFD to induce obesity, supplemented or not with B. uniformis CECT 7771 for seven weeks. Animal weight was monitored and histologic, biochemical, immunocompetent cell functions, and features of the faecal microbiota were analysed after intervention. The oral administration of B. uniformis CECT 7771 reduced body weight gain, liver steatosis and liver cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations and increased small adipocyte numbers in HFD-fed mice. The strain also reduced serum cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, insulin and leptin levels, and improved oral tolerance to glucose in HFD fed mice. The bacterial strain also reduced dietary fat absorption, as indicated by the reduced number of fat micelles detected in enterocytes. Moreover, B. uniformis CECT 7771 improved immune defence mechanisms, impaired in obesity. HFD-induced obesity led to a decrease in TNF-α production by peritoneal macrophages stimulated with LPS, conversely, the administration of B. uniformis CECT 7771 increased TNF-α production and phagocytosis. Administering this strain also increased TNF-α production by dendritic cells (DCs in response to LPS stimulation, which was significantly reduced by HFD. B. uniformis CECT 7771 also restored the capacity of DCs to induce a T-cell proliferation response, which was impaired in obese mice. HFD induced marked changes in gut microbiota composition, which were partially restored by the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, the findings indicate that administration of B. uniformis CECT 7771 ameliorates HFD-induced

  5. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis as a novel player in metabolic syndrome-induced erectile dysfunction: an experimental study in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignozzi, Linda; Filippi, Sandra; Comeglio, Paolo; Cellai, Ilaria; Sarchielli, Erica; Morelli, Annamaria; Rastrelli, Giulia; Maneschi, Elena; Galli, Andrea; Vannelli, Gabriella Barbara; Saad, Farid; Mannucci, Edoardo; Adorini, Luciano; Maggi, Mario

    2014-03-25

    A pathogenic link between erectile dysfunction (ED) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) is now well established. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the hepatic hallmark of MetS, is regarded as an active player in the pathogenesis of MetS-associated cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study was aimed at evaluating the relationship between MetS-induced NASH and penile dysfunction. We used a non-genomic, high fat diet (HFD)-induced, rabbit model of MetS, and treated HFD rabbits with testosterone (T), with the selective farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist obeticholic acid (OCA), or with the anti-TNFα mAb infliximab. Rabbits fed a regular diet were used as controls. Liver histomorphological and gene expression analysis demonstrated NASH in HFD rabbits. Several genes related to inflammation (including TNFα), activation of stellate cells, fibrosis, and lipid metabolism parameters were negatively associated to maximal acetylcholine (Ach)-induced relaxation in penis. When all these putative liver determinants of penile Ach responsiveness were tested as covariates in a multivariate model, only the association between hepatic TNFα expression and Ach response was confirmed. Accordingly, circulating levels of TNFα were increased 15-fold in HFD rabbits. T and OCA dosing in HFD rabbits both reduced TNFα liver expression and plasma levels, with a parallel increase of penile eNOS expression and responsiveness to Ach. Also neutralization of TNFα with infliximab treatment fully normalized HFD-induced hypo-responsiveness to Ach, as well as responsiveness to vardenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor. Thus, MetS-induced NASH in HFD rabbits plays an active role in the pathogenesis of ED, likely through TNFα, as indicated by treatments reducing liver and circulating TNFα levels (T or OCA), or neutralizing TNFα action (infliximab), which significantly improve penile responsiveness to Ach in HFD rabbits.

  6. Analysis of hormone-induced changes of phosphoinositide metabolism in rat liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, M.A.; Fain, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between hormone-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover and Ca/sup 2 +/ flux can be investigated using radiolabelled hepatocytes and the subcellular fractions derived from them or from whole liver. Comparison of the results obtained using intact cells to those from subcellular fractions should ultimately lead to a reconstruction of the transmembrane signaling events through which hormone such as vasopressin, angiotensin, and catecholamines acutely activate liver glycogenolysis. The paper reviews hormone-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in intact hepatocytes as well as hepatic enzymes involved in phosphoinositide metabolism. Also discussed is the current status of studies on hormone action in broken cell preparations in liver.

  7. L-CARNITINE-INDUCED MODULATION OF PLASMA FATTY ACIDS METABOLISM IN HYPERLIPIDEMIC RABBITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hernández Rosales PhD

    2006-02-01

    mejoramiento del metabolismo de las lipoproteínas. ABSTRACTThe present study was designed to examine whether the hipocholesterolemic effect of L-carnitine supplementation is related with lipoprotein fatty acid metabolism. Fatty acid compositional and cholesterol content changes were measured in lipoproteins of six different groups of rabbits. Group 1, rabbits fed a standard diet; group 2, rabbits fed standard diet plus L-carnitine 80 mg/kg bw; group 3, rabbits fed a 0.5 % cholesterol diet; group 4, rabbits fed a 0.5 % cholesterol diet plus L-carnitine 80 mg/kg b.w. These four groups were fed their diets during 126 days. Group 5 and 6 were fed the same diet as group 4 in a previous period of 126 days, and after this time, group 5 was fed the same diet as group 1, and group 6 fed the same diet as group 2, during a second period of 65 days.However, the progression of hypercholesterolemia was reduced 50 % by L-carnitine administration in those animals fed cholesterol diet. Fatty acid compositional changes in lipoprotein-cholesteryl esters were found in all groups of animals supplemented with L-carnitine. During the standard-fed period the saturated and unsaturated fatty acid ratio was increased in VLDL and HDL particles whereas was decreased in LDL. In the hyperlipidemia progression period the saturated to unsaturated fatty acid ratio in HDL fraction was slightly enhanced and in the VLDL+LDL modified particle was diminished. In the hyperlipidemia regression period, plasma cholesterol level was additionally reduced in a 33 % in the group 6; and the saturated to unsaturated fatty ratio had the same behaviour from that observed in the progression period for HDL and VLDL+LDL particles. A remarkable reduction (75% of aorta atherosclerotic plaques in the group 6 was found. From these results we concluded that L-carnitine, in this experimental model, induces an improved lipoprotein metabolism.

  8. Separation Anxiety: Detachment from the Extracellular Matrix Induces Metabolic Changes that Can Stimulate Tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdalena A. Cichon; Derek C. Radisky

    2010-01-01

    @@ One of the earliest stages of tumor progression involves the ability of cells to survive and proliferate when not attached to the extracellular matrix (ECM). New research using a physiologically relevant breast cancer model reveals how separation from the ECM stimulates metabolic changes characteristic of developing tumors.

  9. Associations between endotoxin-induced metabolic changes and temperament in Brahman bulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of temperament on the alteration of metabolic parameters in response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge was investigated. Brahman bulls were selected for this study based on temperament score. Bulls were fitted with indwelling jugular catheters for serial sampling to evaluate peri...

  10. Physical Activity Protects the Human Brain against Metabolic Stress Induced by a Postprandial and Chronic Inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruimboom, Leo; Raison, Charles L.; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that chronic systemic low-grade inflammation is at the root of many, if not all, typically Western diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome. While much focus has been given to sedentary lifestyle as a cause of chronic inflammation, it is less often appreci

  11. Illness-induced changes in thyroid hormone metabolism: focus on the tissue level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kwakkel; E. Fliers; A. Boelen

    2011-01-01

    During illness changes in thyroid hormone metabolism occur, collectively known as the non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). NTIS is characterised by low serum thyroid hormone levels without the expected rise in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, indicating a major change in thyroid hormone feedback

  12. Coconut, Fish, and Olive Oil-Rich Diets Modify Ozone-Induced Metabolic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary health effects of ozone (O3) exposure are well known; however, the cardiovascular and metabolic consequences are still under investigation. Fish oil (FO) and olive oil (OO) dietary supplementation have several cardioprotective benefits, but it is not established if thes...

  13. Cyanidin 3-glucoside improves diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaswant, Maharshi; Fanning, Kent; Netzel, Michael; Mathai, Michael L; Panchal, Sunil K; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-12-01

    Increased consumption of dark-coloured fruits and vegetables may mitigate metabolic syndrome. This study has determined the changes in metabolic parameters, and in cardiovascular and liver structure and function, following chronic administration of either cyanidin 3-glucoside (CG) or Queen Garnet plum juice (QG) containing cyanidin glycosides to rats fed either a corn starch (C) or a high-carbohydrate, high-fat (H) diet. Eight to nine-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups for 16-week feeding with C, C with CG or QG, H or H with CG or QG. C or H were supplemented with CG or QG at a dose of ∼ 8 mg/kg/day cyanidin glycosides from week 8 to 16. H rats developed signs of metabolic syndrome including visceral adiposity, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertension, cardiovascular remodelling, increased collagen deposition in left ventricle, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, increased plasma liver enzymes and increased inflammatory cell infiltration in the heart and liver. Both CG and QG reversed these cardiovascular, liver and metabolic signs. However, no intact anthocyanins or common methylated/conjugated metabolites could be detected in the plasma samples and plasma hippuric acid concentrations were unchanged. Our results suggest CG is the most likely mediator of the responses to QG but that further investigation of the pharmacokinetics of oral CG in rats is required.

  14. Nitrogen deficiency in barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings induces molecular and metabolic adjustments that trigger aphid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comadira, Gloria; Rasool, Brwa; Karpinska, Barbara; Morris, Jenny; Verrall, Susan R; Hedley, Peter E; Foyer, Christine H; Hancock, Robert D

    2015-06-01

    Agricultural nitrous oxide (N2O) pollution resulting from the use of synthetic fertilizers represents a significant contribution to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, providing a rationale for reduced use of nitrogen (N) fertilizers. Nitrogen limitation results in extensive systems rebalancing that remodels metabolism and defence processes. To analyse the regulation underpinning these responses, barley (Horedeum vulgare) seedlings were grown for 7 d under N-deficient conditions until net photosynthesis was 50% lower than in N-replete controls. Although shoot growth was decreased there was no evidence for the induction of oxidative stress despite lower total concentrations of N-containing antioxidants. Nitrogen-deficient barley leaves were rich in amino acids, sugars and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. In contrast to N-replete leaves one-day-old nymphs of the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) failed to reach adulthood when transferred to N-deficient barley leaves. Transcripts encoding cell, sugar and nutrient signalling, protein degradation and secondary metabolism were over-represented in N-deficient leaves while those associated with hormone metabolism were similar under both nutrient regimes with the exception of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in auxin metabolism and responses. Significant similarities were observed between the N-limited barley leaf transcriptome and that of aphid-infested Arabidopsis leaves. These findings not only highlight significant similarities between biotic and abiotic stress signalling cascades but also identify potential targets for increasing aphid resistance with implications for the development of sustainable agriculture.

  15. Genetic polymorphism of metabolic enzymes modifies the risk of chronic solvent-induced encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kezic; F. Calkoen; M.A.M. Wenker; J.J.L. Jacobs; M.M. Verberk

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate whether genetic polymorphism in enzymes involved in the metabolism of organic solvents influences susceptibility to chronic solvent encephalopathy (CSE), which is one of the major effects of long-term exposure to organic solvents. Polymorphisms in the genes encod

  16. Exercise- and Hypoxia-Induced Anaerobic Metabolism and Recovery: A Student Laboratory Exercise Using Teleost Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, B. B.; Boily, P.; Williamson, L. A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic metabolism is recruited in vertebrates under conditions of intense exercise or lowered environmental oxygen availability (hypoxia), typically resulting in the accumulation of lactate in blood and tissues. Lactate will be cleared over time after the reoxygenation of tissues, eventually returning to control levels. Here, we present a…

  17. Plant biostimulants: physiological responses induced by protein hydrolyzed-based products and humic substances in plant metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenella Nardi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In recent years, the use of biostimulants in sustainable agriculture has been growing. Biostimulants can be obtained from different organic materials and include humic substances (HS, complex organic materials, beneficial chemical elements, peptides and amino acids, inorganic salts, seaweed extracts, chitin and chitosan derivatives, antitranspirants, amino acids and other N-containing substances. The application of biostimulants to plants leads to higher content of nutrients in their tissue and positive metabolic changes. For these reasons, the development of new biostimulants has become a focus of scientific interest. Among their different functions, biostimulants influence plant growth and nitrogen metabolism, especially because of their content in hormones and other signalling molecules. A significant increase in root hair length and density is often observed in plants treated with biostimulants, suggesting that these substances induce a “nutrient acquisition response” that favors nutrient uptake in plants via an increase in the absorptive surface area. Furthermore, biostimulants positively influence the activity and gene expression of enzymes functioning in the primary and secondary plant metabolism. This article reviews the current literature on two main classes of biostimulants: humic substances and protein-based biostimulants. The characteristic of these biostimulants and their effects on plants are thoroughly described.

  18. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns.

  19. Decolorization of acid and basic dyes: understanding the metabolic degradation and cell-induced adsorption/precipitation by Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerboneschi, Matteo; Corsi, Massimo; Bianchini, Roberto; Bonanni, Marco; Tegli, Stefania

    2015-10-01

    Escherichia coli strain DH5α was successfully employed in the decolorization of commercial anthraquinone and azo dyes, belonging to the general classes of acid or basic dyes. The bacteria showed an aptitude to survive at different pH values on any dye solution tested, and a rapid decolorization was obtained under aerobic conditions for the whole collection of dyes. A deep investigation about the mode of action of E. coli was carried out to demonstrate that dye decolorization mainly occurred via three different pathways, specifically bacterial induced precipitation, cell wall adsorption, and metabolism, whose weight was correlated with the chemical nature of the dye. In the case of basic azo dyes, an unexpected fast decolorization was observed after just 2-h postinoculation under aerobic conditions, suggesting that metabolism was the main mechanism involved in basic azo dye degradation, as unequivocally demonstrated by mass spectrometric analysis. The reductive cleavage of the azo group by E. coli on basic azo dyes was also further demonstrated by the inhibition of decolorization occurring when glucose was added to the dye solution. Moreover, no residual toxicity was found in the E. coli-treated basic azo dye solutions by performing Daphnia magna acute toxicity assays. The results of the present study demonstrated that E. coli can be simply exploited for its natural metabolic pathways, without applying any recombinant technology. The high versatility and adaptability of this bacterium could encourage its involvement in industrial bioremediation of textile and leather dyeing wastewaters.

  20. Fructose-induced aberration of metabolism in familial gout identified by sup 31 P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seegmiller, J.E. (John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (England) Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)); Dixon, R.M.; Kemp, G.J.; Rajagopalan, B.; Radda, G.K. (John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (England)); Angus, P.W. (John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (England) Austin Hospital, Heidelburg, Victoria (Australia)); McAlindon, T.E.; Dieppe, P. (Univ. of Bristol (England))

    1990-11-01

    The hyperuricemia responsible for the development of gouty arthritis results from a wide range of environmental factors and underlying genetically determined aberrations of metabolism. {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of children with hereditary fructose intolerance revealed a readily detectable rise in phosphomonoesters with a marked fall in inorganic phosphate in their liver in vivo and a rise in serum urate in response to very low doses of oral fructose. Parents and some family members heterozygous for this enzyme deficiency showed a similar pattern when given a substantially larger dose of fructose. Three of the nine heterozygotes thus identified also had clinical gout, suggesting the possibility of this defect being a fairly common cause of gout. In the present study this same noninvasive technology was used to identify the same spectral pattern in 2 of the 11 families studied with hereditary gout. In one family, the index patient's three brothers and his mother all showed the fructose-induced abnormality of metabolism, in agreement with the maternal inheritance of metabolism, in agreement with the maternal inheritance of the gout in this family group. The test dose of fructose used produced a significantly larger increment in the concentration of serum urate in the patients showing the changes in {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectra than in the other patients with familial gout or in nonaffected members, thus suggesting a simpler method for initial screening for the defect.

  1. Xanthohumol improves dysfunctional glucose and lipid metabolism in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Cristobal L; Elias, Valerie D; Hay, Joshua J; Choi, Jaewoo; Reed, Ralph L; Stevens, Jan F

    2016-06-01

    Xanthohumol (XN) is a prenylated flavonoid found in hops (Humulus lupulus) and beer. The dose-dependent effects of XN on glucose and lipid metabolism in a preclinical model of metabolic syndrome were the focus of our study. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice, 9 weeks of age, were randomly divided into three XN dose groups of 16 animals. The mice were fed a high-fat diet (60% kcal as fat) supplemented with XN at dose levels of 0, 30, or 60 mg/kg body weight/day, for 12 weeks. Dietary XN caused a dose-dependent decrease in body weight gain. Plasma levels of glucose, total triglycerides, total cholesterol, and MCP-1 were significantly decreased in mice on the 60 mg/kg/day treatment regimen. Treatment with XN at 60 mg/kg/day resulted in reduced plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), IL-6, insulin and leptin levels by 80%, 78%, 42%, and 41%, respectively, compared to the vehicle control group. Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin Kexin 9 (PCSK-9) levels were 44% lower in the 60 mg/kg dose group compared to the vehicle control group (p ≤ 0.05) which may account for the LDL-C lowering activity of XN. Our results show that oral administration of XN improves markers of systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice.

  2. Long-term management of sevelamer hydrochloride-induced metabolic acidosis aggravation and hyperkalemia in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonikian, Macroui; Metaxaki, Polyxeni; Iliopoulos, Anastasios; Marioli, Stamatia; Vlassopoulos, Dimosthenis

    2006-01-01

    Sevelamer hydrochloride use in hemodialysis patients is complicated by metabolic acidosis aggravation and hyperkalemia. Rare reports about a short-term correction of this complication have been published. The current authors investigated the long-term correction of metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia in sevelamer hydrochloride-treated patients at doses adequate to achieve serum phosphate levels within K/DOQI recommendations. The authors followed 20 hemodialysis patients for 24 months in an open-label prospective study. The dialysate bicarbonate concentration was increased stepwise to a maximum 40 mEq/L and adjusted to reach patient serum bicarbonate levels of 22 mEq/L, according to K/DOQI recommendations. Laboratory results for serum bicarbonate, potassium, calcium, phosphate, albumin, alkaline phosphatase, iPTH, cholesterol (HDL-LDL), triglycerides, Kt/V, systolic-diastolic arterial pressure were recorded. Sevelamer hydrochloride-induced metabolic acidosis aggravation and hyperkalemia in hemodialysis patients were corrected, on the long-term, by an increase in dialysate bicarbonate concentration. Further improvement in bone biochemistry was noted with this adequate acidosis correction and parallel sevelamer hydrochloride administration, in sufficiently large doses to achieve K/DOQI phosphate recommendations.

  3. Low and high doses of UV-B differentially modulate chlorpyrifos-induced alterations in nitrogen metabolism of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prabhat Kumar; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2014-09-01

    The present study assessed the comparative responses on the specific growth rate, nitrogen metabolism and enzymes associated with nitrogen metabolism in two nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria-Nostoc muscorum and Phormidium foveolarum exposed to two UV-B doses (low; UV-BL: 0.5472kJm(-2) and high; UV-BH: 5.472kJm(-2)) and two doses of the insecticide chlorpyrifos (O,O-diethyl O-3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl phosphorothioate; low i.e. CPL, 1µgml(-1) and high i.e. CPH, 2µgml(-1)) singly and in combination. The specific growth rate, NO3(-) and NO2(-) uptake, nitrate assimilating enzymes - nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase and ammonium assimilating enzymes - glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase were severely affected when treated either with CPH or/and UV-BH while glutamate dehydrogenase exhibited a stimulatory response. CPL also reduced all the measured parameters (except GDH activity) after 24h, however, a stimulatory effect was observed after 72h due to an increase in nitrogen metabolism (and other antioxidant) enzymes during this period. UV-BL did not cause significant alteration in the studied parameters while in combination with CP doses, it either alleviated the inhibitory effects or further enhanced the CPL induced activities of these enzymes (except GDH). Overall results indicate the resistant nature of P. foveolarum against the inhibitory doses of UV-B and chlorpyrifos in comparison to N. muscorum.

  4. Ginseng Extracts Restore High-Glucose Induced Vascular Dysfunctions by Altering Triglyceride Metabolism and Downregulation of Atherosclerosis-Related Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Hoi-huen Chan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The king of herbs, Panax ginseng, has been used widely as a therapeutic agent vis-à-vis its active pharmacological and physiological effects. Based on Chinese pharmacopeia Ben Cao Gang Mu and various pieces of literature, Panax ginseng was believed to exert active vascular protective effects through its antiobesity and anti-inflammation properties. We investigated the vascular protective effects of ginseng by administrating ginseng extracts to rats after the induction of diabetes. We found that Panax ginseng can restore diabetes-induced impaired vasorelaxation and can reduce serum triglyceride but not cholesterol level in the diabetic rats. The ginseng extracts also suppressed the expression of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered the expression of lipid-related genes. The results provide evidence that Panax ginseng improves vascular dysfunction induced by diabetes and the protective effects may possibly be due to the downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered lipid metabolism, which help to restore normal endothelium functions.

  5. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate-induced cytotoxicity is accompanied by a rapid and drastic modulation of glutathione metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Mami; Xu, Shenghui; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko; Kennedy, David Opare; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao

    2009-01-01

    The effect of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), an anticarcinogenic compound naturally obtained from rhizomes and seeds of South East Asia plants, on the intracellular concentration of glutathione and the activities of enzymes related to glutathione metabolism was studied in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. We showed in a previous study that ACA induced apoptosis in tumor cells and the cell death was reversed by the addition of N-acetlycysteine or glutathione ethylester. Here we found that ACA caused a rapid decrease in glutathione level in less than 10 min after ACA exposure. At the time, glutathione reductase activity was significantly inhibited and gamma-glutamyl cysteine increased by ACA exposure. These results show that ACA caused the decrease in the intracellular GSH levels in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, suggesting that ACA-induced decrease of the cellular GSH levels can lead to growth arrest of cancer and enhancement of the efficacy other anticancer drugs.

  6. Anticonvulsant effect of time-restricted feeding in a pilocarpine-induced seizure model: Metabolic and epigenetic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge eLandgrave-Gómez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new generation of antiepileptic drugs has emerged; however, one-third of epilepsy patients do not properly respond to pharmacological treatments. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether time-restricted feeding has an anticonvulsant effect and whether this restrictive diet promotes changes in energy metabolism and epigenetic modifications in a pilocarpine-induced seizure model. To resolve our hypothesis, one group of rats had free access to food and water ad libitum (AL and a second group underwent a time-restricted feeding (TRF schedule. We used the lithium-pilocarpine model to induce status epilepticus (SE, and behavioral seizure monitoring was analyzed. Additionally, an electroencephalography (EEG recording was performed to verify the effect of TRF on cortical electrical activity after a pilocarpine injection. For biochemical analysis, animals were sacrificed 24 hours after SE and hippocampal homogenates were used to evaluate the proteins related to metabolism and chromatin structure. Our results showed that TRF had an anticonvulsant effect as measured by the prolonged latency of forelimb clonus seizure, a decrease in the seizure severity score and fewer animals reaching SE. Additionally, the power of the late phase EEG recordings in the AL group was significantly higher than the TRF group. Moreover, we found that TRF is capable of inducing alterations in signaling pathways that regulate energy metabolism, including an increase in the phosphorylation of AMP dependent kinase (AMPK and a decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt kinase. Furthermore, we found that TRF was able to significantly increase the beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB concentration, an endogenous inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs. Finally, we found a significant decrease in HDAC activity as well as an increase in acetylation on histone 3 (H3 in hippocampal homogenates from the TRF group. These findings suggest that alterations in energy metabolism and the

  7. Naringin Reverses Hepatocyte Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress Associated with HIV-1 Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors-Induced Metabolic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwafeyisetan O. Adebiyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs have not only improved therapeutic outcomes in the treatment of HIV infection but have also led to an increase in associated metabolic complications of NRTIs. Naringin’s effects in mitigating NRTI-induced complications were investigated in this study. Wistar rats, randomly allotted into seven groups (n = 7 were orally treated daily for 56 days with 100 mg/kg zidovudine (AZT (groups I, II III, 50 mg/kg stavudine (d4T (groups IV, V, VI and 3 mL/kg of distilled water (group VII. Additionally, rats in groups II and V were similarly treated with 50 mg/kg naringin, while groups III and VI were treated with 45 mg/kg vitamin E. AZT or d4T treatment significantly reduced body weight and plasma high density lipoprotein concentrations but increased liver weights, plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol compared to controls, respectively. Furthermore, AZT or d4T treatment significantly increased oxidative stress, adiposity index and expression of Bax protein, but reduced Bcl-2 protein expression compared to controls, respectively. However, either naringin or vitamin E significantly mitigated AZT- or d4T-induced weight loss, dyslipidemia, oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis compared to AZT- or d4T-only treated rats. Our results suggest that naringin reverses metabolic complications associated with NRTIs by ameliorating oxidative stress and apoptosis. This implies that naringin supplements could mitigate lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia associated with NRTI therapy.

  8. Steroid receptor coactivator-3 regulates glucose metabolism in bladder cancer cells through coactivation of hypoxia inducible factor 1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Chang, Cunjie; Cui, Yangyan; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Yang, Jun; Shen, Lan; Zhou, Ji; Hou, Zhibo; Zhang, Zhen; Ye, Changxiao; Hasenmayer, Donald; Perkins, Robert; Huang, Xiaojing; Yao, Xin; Yu, Like; Huang, Ruimin; Zhang, Dianzheng; Guo, Hongqian; Yan, Jun

    2014-04-18

    Cancer cell proliferation is a metabolically demanding process, requiring high glycolysis, which is known as "Warburg effect," to support anabolic growth. Steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC-3), a steroid receptor coactivator, is overexpressed and/or amplified in multiple cancer types, including non-steroid targeted cancers, such as urinary bladder cancer (UBC). However, whether SRC-3 regulates the metabolic reprogramming for cancer cell growth is unknown. Here, we reported that overexpression of SRC-3 accelerated UBC cell growth, accompanied by the increased expression of genes involved in glycolysis. Knockdown of SRC-3 reduced the UBC cell glycolytic rate under hypoxia, decreased tumor growth in nude mice, with reduction of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and lactate dehydrogenase expression levels. We further revealed that SRC-3 could interact with hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α), which is a key transcription factor required for glycolysis, and coactivate its transcriptional activity. SRC-3 was recruited to the promoters of HIF1α-target genes, such as glut1 and pgk1. The positive correlation of expression levels between SRC-3 and Glut1 proteins was demonstrated in human UBC patient samples. Inhibition of glycolysis through targeting HK2 or LDHA decelerated SRC-3 overexpression-induced cell growth. In summary, overexpression of SRC-3 promoted glycolysis in bladder cancer cells through HIF1α to facilitate tumorigenesis, which may be an intriguing drug target for bladder cancer therapy.

  9. Endotoxin-induced basal respiration alterations of renal HK-2 cells: A sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quoilin, C., E-mail: cquoilin@ulg.ac.be [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Mouithys-Mickalad, A. [Center of Oxygen Research and Development, Department of Chemistry, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Duranteau, J. [Department of Anaesthesia and Surgical ICU, CHU Bicetre, University Paris XI Sud, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Gallez, B. [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite catholique de Louvain, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Hoebeke, M. [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A HK-2 cells model of inflammation-induced acute kidney injury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two oximetry methods: high resolution respirometry and ESR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen consumption rates of renal cells decrease when treated with LPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells do not recover normal respiration when the LPS treatment is removed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This basal respiration alteration is a sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation. -- Abstract: To study the mechanism of oxygen regulation in inflammation-induced acute kidney injury, we investigate the effects of a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) on the basal respiration of proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2) both by high-resolution respirometry and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These two complementary methods have shown that HK-2 cells exhibit a decreased oxygen consumption rate when treated with LPS. Surprisingly, this cellular respiration alteration persists even after the stress factor was removed. We suggested that this irreversible decrease in renal oxygen consumption after LPS challenge is related to a pathologic metabolic down-regulation such as a lack of oxygen utilization by cells.

  10. Drug activity screening based on microsomes-hydrogel system in predicting metabolism induced antitumor effect of oroxylin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiying; Li, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yuanting; Zhou, Lu; Tong, Shanshan; Zhao, Bei; Cai, Weimin

    2016-02-24

    A novel microsomes-hydrogel added cell culture system (MHCCS) was employed in the antitumor activity screening of natural compounds, aiming to achieve drug screening with better in vivo correlation, higher initiative to explore the potential active metabolites, and investigation of the antitumor mechanism from the perspective of metabolism. MTT assay and cell apoptosis detection showed that test drug oroxylin A (OA) had enhanced cytotoxicity and wogonin (W) with reduced cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cell line upon MHCCS incubation. In vivo antitumor evaluations also demonstrated that OA induced higher tumor inhibition than W at the same dosage. To explore the reasons, nine major metabolites of OA were separated and collected through UPLC-Q-TOF and semi-preparative HPLC. Metabolites M318 exhibited higher cytotoxicity than OA and other metabolites by MTT assay. (1)H NMR spectrums, HPLC and TOF MS/MS results revealed that OA was catalyzed into its active metabolite M318 via a ring-opening reaction. M318 induced significant cell apoptosis and S-phase arrest through affecting tumor survival related genes after mechanism study. In conclusion, our MHCCS could be a useful tool for drug activity screening from a perspective of metabolism.

  11. Astragaloside IV ameliorates 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis implicating regulation of energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xu-Guang; Sun, Kai; Liu, Yu-Ying; Yan, Li; Wang, Ming-Xia; Fan, Jing-Yu; Mu, Hong-Na; Li, Chong; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Chuan-She; Han, Jing-Yan

    2017-02-02

    Dysfunction of energy metabolism is involved in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study was designed to investigate the potential of astragaloside IV (ASIV), an active ingredient of Radix Astragalus, to ameliorate colonic mucosal injury, with focusing on the implication of energy restoration in the underlying mechanism. Experimental colitis model was established in rats by injecting 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) through anus. After 24 hours, ASIV was administrated once daily by gavage for 6 days. On day 1 and day 7, colon tissue was collected for macroscopic and histological examination, ELISA, Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. TNBS impaired colonic mucosa with an injured epithelial architecture, increased inflammatory cell infiltration, and decreased colonic blood flow. Lgr5 positive cell number in crypt and β-catenin nuclear translocation were down-regulated by TNBS treatment. TNBS induced epithelial F-actin disruption and junctional protein degradation. Furthermore, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content and ATP synthase subunit β expression in the colon tissue were significantly decreased after TNBS stimulation. All of the aforementioned alterations were relieved by ASIV post-treatment. The present study revealed that ASIV promoted mucosal healing process in TNBS-induced colitis, which was most likely attributed to regulating energy metabolism.

  12. SU-E-J-122: Detecting Treatment-Induced Metabolic Abnormalities in Craniopharyngioma Patients Undergoing Surgery and Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, C; Shulkin, B; Li, Y; LI, X; Merchant, T [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Indelicato, D [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Boop, F [Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To identify treatment-induced defects in the brain of children with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). Methods: Forty seven patients were enrolled on a clinical trial for craniopharyngioma with serial imaging and functional evaluations. Proton therapy was delivered using the double-scattered beams with a prescribed dose of 54 Cobalt Gray Equivalent. FDG tracer uptake in each of 63 anatomical regions was computed after warping PET images to a 3D reference template in Talairach coordinates. Regional uptake was deemed significantly low or high if exceeding two standard deviations of normal population from the mean. For establishing the normal ranges, 132 children aged 1–20 years with noncentral nervous system related diseases and normal-appearing cerebral PET scans were analyzed. Age- and gender-dependent regional uptake models were developed by linear regression and confidence intervals were calculated. Results: Most common PET abnormality before proton therapy was significantly low uptake in the frontal lobe, the occipital lobe (particularly in cuneus), the medial and ventral temporal lobe, cingulate gyrus, caudate nuclei, and thalamus. They were related to injury from surgical corridors, tumor mass effect, insertion of a ventricular catheter, and the placement of an Ommaya reservoir. Surprisingly a significantly high uptake was observed in temporal gyri and the parietal lobe. In 13 patients who already completed 18-month PET scans, metabolic abnormalities improved in 11 patients from baseline. One patient had persistent abnormalities. Only one revealed new uptake abnormalities in thalamus, brainstem, cerebellum, and insula. Conclusion: Postoperative FDG PET of craniopharyngioma patients revealed metabolic abnormalities in specific regions of the brain. Proton therapy did not appear to exacerbate these surgery- and tumor-induced defects. In patients with persistent and

  13. Alkylphospholipids deregulate cholesterol metabolism and induce cell-cycle arrest and autophagy in U-87 MG glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Marco, Pablo; Martín-Fernández, Mario; Soria-Bretones, Isabel; Ríos, Antonio; Carrasco, María P; Marco, Carmen

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common malignant primary brain tumour in adults and one of the most lethal of all cancers. Growing evidence suggests that human tumours undergo abnormal lipid metabolism, characterised by an alteration in the mechanisms that regulate cholesterol homeostasis. We have investigated the effect that different antitumoural alkylphospholipids (APLs) exert upon cholesterol metabolism in the U-87 MG glioblastoma cell line. APLs altered cholesterol homeostasis by interfering with its transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus hindering its esterification. At the same time they stimulated the synthesis of cholesterol from radiolabelled acetate and its internalisation from low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), inducing both 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and LDL receptor (LDLR) genes. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that these effects promoted the accumulation of intracellular cholesterol. Filipin staining demonstrated that this accumulation was not confined to the late endosome/lysosome (LE/LY) compartment since it did not colocalise with LAMP2 lysosomal marker. Furthermore, APLs inhibited cell growth, producing arrest at the G2/M phase. We also used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate ultrastructural alterations induced by APLs and found an abundant presence of autophagic vesicles and autolysosomes in treated cells, indicating the induction of autophagy. Thus our findings clearly demonstrate that antitumoural APLs interfere with the proliferation of the glioblastoma cell line via a complex mechanism involving cholesterol metabolism, cell-cycle arrest or autophagy. Knowledge of the interrelationship between these processes is fundamental to our understanding of tumoural response and may facilitate the development of novel therapeutics to improve treatment of glioblastoma and other types of cancer.

  14. Modulators of hepatic lipoprotein metabolism identified in a search for small-molecule inducers of tribbles pseudokinase 1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek M Nagiec

    Full Text Available Recent genome wide association studies have linked tribbles pseudokinase 1 (TRIB1 to the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD. Based on the observations that increased expression of TRIB1 reduces secretion of VLDL and is associated with lower plasma levels of LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, higher plasma levels of HDL cholesterol and reduced risk for myocardial infarction, we carried out a high throughput phenotypic screen based on quantitative RT-PCR assay to identify compounds that induce TRIB1 expression in human HepG2 hepatoma cells. In a screen of a collection of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS-derived compounds, we identified a series of benzofuran-based compounds that upregulate TRIB1 expression and phenocopy the effects of TRIB1 cDNA overexpression, as they inhibit triglyceride synthesis and apoB secretion in cells. In addition, the compounds downregulate expression of MTTP and APOC3, key components of the lipoprotein assembly pathway. However, CRISPR-Cas9 induced chromosomal disruption of the TRIB1 locus in HepG2 cells, while confirming its regulatory role in lipoprotein metabolism, demonstrated that the effects of benzofurans persist in TRIB1-null cells indicating that TRIB1 is sufficient but not necessary to transmit the effects of the drug. Remarkably, active benzofurans, as well as natural products capable of TRIB1 upregulation, also modulate hepatic cell cholesterol metabolism by elevating the expression of LDLR transcript and LDL receptor protein, while reducing the levels of PCSK9 transcript and secreted PCSK9 protein and stimulating LDL uptake. The effects of benzofurans are not masked by cholesterol depletion and are independent of the SREBP-2 regulatory circuit, indicating that these compounds represent a novel class of chemically tractable small-molecule modulators that shift cellular lipoprotein metabolism in HepG2 cells from lipogenesis to scavenging.

  15. L-Arginine improves multiple physiological parameters in mice exposed to diet-induced metabolic disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard; Smajilovic, Sanela;

    2012-01-01

    L: -Arginine (L: -Arg) is a conditionally essential amino acid and a natural constituent of dietary proteins. Studies in obese rats and type 2 diabetic humans have indicated that dietary supplementation with L: -Arg can diminish gain in white adipose tissue (WAT) and improve insulin sensitivity...... on locomotor activity, substrate metabolism or expression of uncoupling proteins (UCP1 and UCP2) in adipose tissues was displayed. In conclusion, dietary L: -Arg supplementation substantially affects an array of metabolic-associated parameters including a reduction in WAT, hyperphagia, improved insulin...... groups. Glucose homeostasis experiments revealed a major effect of L: -Arg supplementation on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, interestingly, independent of a parallel regulation in whole-body adiposity. Increased L: -Arg ingestion also raised energy expenditure; however, no concurrent effect...

  16. Dietary Fiber-Induced Improvement in Glucose Metabolism Is Associated with Increased Abundance of Prevotella

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Nilsson, Anne; Akrami, Rozita

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays an important role in human health by interacting with host diet, but there is substantial inter-individual variation in the response to diet. Here we compared the gut microbiota composition of healthy subjects who exhibited improved glucose metabolism following 3-day...... consumption of barley kernel-based bread (BKB) with those who responded least to this dietary intervention. The Prevotella/Bacteroides ratio was higher in responders than non-responders after BKB. Metagenomic analysis showed that the gut microbiota of responders was enriched in Prevotella copri and had...... increased potential to ferment complex polysaccharides after BKB. Finally, germ-free mice transplanted with microbiota from responder human donors exhibited improved glucose metabolism and increased abundance of Prevotella and liver glycogen content compared with germ-free mice that received non...

  17. The effect of inducing agents on the metabolism of trypanocidal diamidines by isolated rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsriku, C; Watson, D G; Grant, M H; Skellern, G G

    2003-12-15

    This study has investigated the effect of phenobarbitone (PB), 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), and deltamethrin (DM) on the metabolism of two trypanocidal diamidines; pentamidine isethionate and diminazene aceturate in freshly isolated Sprague-Dawley rat hepatocytes. There were significant increases in the total cytochrome p450 content of hepatocytes obtained from rats pre-treated with PB and 3-MC, whereas pre-treatment with DM did not produce any significant induction of cytochrome p450. However, pre-treatment of rats with each of the three agents led to inhibition of pentamidine metabolism following a 3h incubation of pentamidine (100 microM) with freshly isolated rat hepatocytes (5 x 10(6) cells ml(-1)). Pre-treatment with 3-MC caused the highest inhibitory effect on pentamidine metabolism (8-fold inhibition), compared with PB (4.8-fold) and DM (2.2-fold). Six previously reported phase I metabolites of pentamidine were identified in cells from all the pre-treated animals as well as controls. When compared to the control group, there were significant differences between the profiles of the three major metabolites of pentamidine, 1,5-di(4'-amidinophenoxy)-2-pentanol, 1,5-di(4'-amidinophenoxy)-3-pentanol and 5-(4'-amidinophenoxy) pentanoic acid, in hepatocytes from the DM and 3-MC pre-treated rats, whereas no significant differences were observed in the cells from the PB pre-treated group. In contrast, diminazene was not metabolised with the same experimental conditions. Differences in the metabolic profiles of pentamidine and its metabolites as a result of concomitant exposure to environmental xenobiotics could have important toxicological and pharmacological implications for patients that receive the drug.

  18. Quantifying Diet-Induced Metabolic Changes of the Human Gut Microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shoaie, Saeed; Ghaffari, Pouyan; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia

    2015-01-01

    The human gut microbiome is known to be associated with various human disorders, but a major challenge is to go beyond association studies and elucidate causalities. Mathematical modeling of the human gut microbiome at a genome scale is a useful tool to decipher microbe-microbe, diet-microbe and ......The human gut microbiome is known to be associated with various human disorders, but a major challenge is to go beyond association studies and elucidate causalities. Mathematical modeling of the human gut microbiome at a genome scale is a useful tool to decipher microbe-microbe, diet......-microbe and microbe-host interactions. Here, we describe the CASINO (Community And Systems-level INteractive Optimization) toolbox, a comprehensive computational platform for analysis of microbial communities through metabolic modeling. We first validated the toolbox by simulating and testing the performance...... of single bacteria and whole communities in vitro. Focusing on metabolic interactions between the diet, gut microbiota, and host metabolism, we demonstrated the predictive power of the toolbox in a diet-intervention study of 45 obese and overweight individuals and validated our predictions by fecal...

  19. Metabolome profiling reveals metabolic cooperation between Bacillus megaterium and Ketogulonicigenium vulgare during induced swarm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Ma, Qian; Yi, Hong; Wang, Lili; Song, Hao; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2011-10-01

    The metabolic cooperation in the ecosystem of Bacillus megaterium and Ketogulonicigenium vulgare was investigated by cultivating them spatially on a soft agar plate. We found that B. megaterium swarmed in a direction along the trace of K. vulgare on the agar plate. Metabolomics based on gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) was employed to analyze the interaction mechanism between the two microorganisms. We found that the microorganisms interact by exchanging a number of metabolites. Both intracellular metabolism and cell-cell communication via metabolic cooperation were essential in determining the population dynamics of the ecosystem. The contents of amino acids and other nutritional compounds in K. vulgare were rather low in comparison to those in B. megaterium, but the levels of these compounds in the medium surrounding K. vulgare were fairly high, even higher than in fresh medium. Erythrose, erythritol, guanine, and inositol accumulated around B. megaterium were consumed by K. vulgare upon its migration. The oxidization products of K. vulgare, including 2-keto-gulonic acids (2KGA), were sharply increased. Upon coculturing of B. megaterium and K. vulgare, 2,6-dipicolinic acid (the biomarker of sporulation of B. megaterium), was remarkably increased compared with those in the monocultures. Therefore, the interactions between B. megaterium and K. vulgare were a synergistic combination of mutualism and antagonism. This paper is the first to systematically identify a symbiotic interaction mechanism via metabolites in the ecosystem established by two isolated colonies of B. megaterium and K. vulgare.

  20. Oximetry: a new non-invasive method to detect metabolic effects induced by a local application of mechanical vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, A.; Trombetta, C.; Abundo, P.; Foti, C.; Rosato, N.

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical vibrations application is increasingly common in clinical practice due to the effectiveness induced by these stimuli on the human body. Local vibration (LV) application allows to apply and act only where needed, focusing the treatment on the selected body segment. An experimental device for LV application was used to generate the vibrations. The aim of this study was to detect and analyze the metabolic effects induced by LV on the brachial bicep muscle by means of an oximeter. This device monitors tissue and muscle oxygenation using NIRS (Near Infrared Spectroscopy) and is able to determine the concentration of haemoglobin and oxygen saturation in the tissue. In a preliminary stage we also investigated the effects induced by LV application, by measuring blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation and temperature. These data confirmed that the effects induced by LV application are actually localized. The results of the measurements obtained using the oximeter during the vibration application, have shown a variation of the concentrations. In particular an increase of oxygenate haemoglobin was shown, probably caused by an increased muscle activity and/or a rise in local temperature detected during the application.

  1. Targeted metabolomic study indicating glycyrrhizin’s protection against acetaminophen-induced liver damage through reversing fatty acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jian; Jiang, Yang-Shen; Jiang, Yuan; Peng, Yan-Fang; Sun, Zhuang; Dai, Xiao-Nan; Cao, Qiu-Ting; Sun, Ying-Ming; Han, Jing-Chun; Gao, Ya-Jie

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to give a short report on a possible mechanism of glycyrrhizin to acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity. Seven-day intraperitoneal administration of glycyrrhizin (400 mg/kg/day) to 2- to 3-month-old male C57BL/6N mice (mean weight 27 g) significantly prevents acetaminophen-induced liver damage, as indicated by the activity of alanine transaminase and aspartate aminotransferase. Metabolomics analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) using ultra-fast liquid chromatography coupled to triple time-of-flight mass spectrometer were performed. PCA separated well the control, glycyrrhizin-treated, acetaminophen-treated, and glycyrrhizin+acetaminophen-treated groups. Long-chain acylcarnitines were listed as the top ions that contribute to this good separation, which include oleoylcarnitine, palmitoylcarnitine, palmitoleoylcarnitine, and myristoylcarnitine. The treatment of glycyrrhizin significantly reversed the increased levels of long-chain acylcarnitines induced by acetaminophen administration. In conclusion, this metabolomic study indicates a significant glycyrrhizin protection effect against acetaminophen-induced liver damage through reversing fatty acid metabolism.

  2. New inducible genetic method reveals critical roles of GABA in the control of feeding and metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently available inducibleCre/loxPsystems, despite their considerable utility in gene manipulation, have pitfalls in certain scenarios, such as unsatisfactory recombination rates and deleterious effects on physiology and behavior. To overcome these limitations, we designed a new, inducible gene-t...

  3. Contribution of Gene Expression to Metabolic Fluxes in Hypermetabolic Livers Induced Through Burn Injury and Cecal Ligation and Puncture in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Banta, Scott; Vemula, Murali; Yokoyama, Tadaaki; Jayaraman, Arul; Berthiaume, François; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2007-01-01

    Severe injury activates many stress-related and inflammatory pathways that can lead to a systemic hyper-metabolic state. Prior studies using perfused hypermetabolic rat livers have identified intrinsic metabolic flux changes that were not dependent upon the continual presence of elevated stress hormones and substrate loads. We investigated the hypothesis that such changes may be due to persistent alterations in gene expression. A systemic hypermetabolic response was induced in rats by applyin...

  4. Alcohol-induced One-carbon Metabolism Impairment Promotes Dysfunction of DNA Base Excision Repair in Adult Brain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Anna-Kate; Hewetson, Aveline; Agrawal, Rajiv G.; Dagda, Marisela; Dagda, Raul; Moaddel, Ruin; Balbo, Silvia; Sanghvi, Mitesh; Chen, Yukun; Hogue, Ryan J.; Bergeson, Susan E.; Henderson, George I.; Kruman, Inna I.

    2012-01-01

    The brain is one of the major targets of chronic alcohol abuse. Yet the fundamental mechanisms underlying alcohol-mediated brain damage remain unclear. The products of alcohol metabolism cause DNA damage, which in conditions of DNA repair dysfunction leads to genomic instability and neural death. We propose that one-carbon metabolism (OCM) impairment associated with long term chronic ethanol intake is a key factor in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity, because OCM provides cells with DNA precursors for DNA repair and methyl groups for DNA methylation, both critical for genomic stability. Using histological (immunohistochemistry and stereological counting) and biochemical assays, we show that 3-week chronic exposure of adult mice to 5% ethanol (Lieber-Decarli diet) results in increased DNA damage, reduced DNA repair, and neuronal death in the brain. These were concomitant with compromised OCM, as evidenced by elevated homocysteine, a marker of OCM dysfunction. We conclude that OCM dysfunction plays a causal role in alcohol-induced genomic instability in the brain because OCM status determines the alcohol effect on DNA damage/repair and genomic stability. Short ethanol exposure, which did not disturb OCM, also did not affect the response to DNA damage, whereas additional OCM disturbance induced by deficiency in a key OCM enzyme, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) in Mthfr+/− mice, exaggerated the ethanol effect on DNA repair. Thus, the impact of long term ethanol exposure on DNA repair and genomic stability in the brain results from OCM dysfunction, and MTHFR mutations such as Mthfr 677C→T, common in human population, may exaggerate the adverse effects of ethanol on the brain. PMID:23118224

  5. Performance and metabolic profile of dairy cows during a lactational and deliberately induced negative energy balance with subsequent realimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, J; van Dorland, H A; Bruckmaier, R M; Schwarz, F J

    2011-04-01

    Homeorhetic and homeostatic controls in dairy cows are essential for adapting to alterations in physiological and environmental conditions. To study the different mechanisms during adaptation processes, effects of a deliberately induced negative energy balance (NEB) by feed restriction near 100 d in milk (DIM) on performance and metabolic measures were compared with lactation energy deficiency after parturition. Fifty multiparous cows were studied in 3 periods (1=early lactation up to 12 wk postpartum; 2=feed restriction for 3 wk beginning at 98±7 DIM with a feed-restricted and control group; and 3=a subsequent realimentation period for the feed-restricted group for 8 wk). In period 1, despite NEB in early lactation [-42 MJ of net energy for lactation (NE(L))/d, wk 1 to 3] up to wk 9, milk yield increased from 27.5±0.7 kg to a maximum of 39.5±0.8 kg (wk 6). For period 2, the NEB was induced by individual limitation of feed quantity and reduction of dietary energy density. Feed-restricted cows experienced a greater NEB (-63 MJ of NEL/d) than did cows in early lactation. Feed-restricted cows in period 2 showed only a small decline in milk yield of -3.1±1.1 kg and milk protein content of -0.2±0.1% compared with control cows (30.5±1.1 kg and 3.8±0.1%, respectively). In feed-restricted cows (period 2), plasma glucose was lower (-0.2±0.0 mmol/L) and nonesterified fatty acids higher (+0.1±0.1 mmol/L) compared with control cows. Compared with the NEB in period 1, the decreases in body weight due to the deliberately induced NEB (period 2) were greater (56±4 vs. 23±3 kg), but decreases in body condition score (0.16±0.03 vs. 0.34±0.04) and muscle diameter (2.0±0.4 vs. 3.5±0.4 mm) were lesser. The changes in metabolic measures in period 2 were marginal compared with the adjustments directly after parturition in period 1. Despite the greater induced energy deficiency at 100 DIM than the early lactation NEB, the metabolic load experienced by the dairy cows was not

  6. Metabolic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Michael J; Young, G Bryan

    2011-11-01

    Kinnier Wilson coined the term metabolic encephalopathy to describe a clinical state of global cerebral dysfunction induced by systemic stress that can vary in clinical presentation from mild executive dysfunction to deep coma with decerebrate posturing; the causes are numerous. Some mechanisms by which cerebral dysfunction occurs in metabolic encephalopathies include focal or global cerebral edema, alterations in transmitter function, the accumulation of uncleared toxic metabolites, postcapillary venule vasogenic edema, and energy failure. This article focuses on common causes of metabolic encephalopathy, and reviews common causes, clinical presentations and, where relevant, management.

  7. High-intensity exercise training increases the diversity and metabolic capacity of the mouse distal gut microbiota during diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denou, Emmanuel; Marcinko, Katarina; Surette, Michael G; Steinberg, Gregory R; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2016-06-01

    Diet and exercise underpin the risk of obesity-related metabolic disease. Diet alters the gut microbiota, which contributes to aspects of metabolic disease during obesity. Repeated exercise provides metabolic benefits during obesity. We assessed whether exercise could oppose changes in the taxonomic and predicted metagenomic characteristics of the gut microbiota during diet-induced obesity. We hypothesized that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would counteract high-fat diet (HFD)-induced changes in the microbiota without altering obesity in mice. Compared with chow-fed mice, an obesity-causing HFD decreased the Bacteroidetes-to-Firmicutes ratio and decreased the genetic capacity in the fecal microbiota for metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. After HFD-induced obesity was established, a subset of mice were HIIT for 6 wk, which increased host aerobic capacity but did not alter body or adipose tissue mass. The effects of exercise training on the microbiota were gut segment dependent and more extensive in the distal gut. HIIT increased the alpha diversity and Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio of the distal gut and fecal microbiota during diet-induced obesity. Exercise training increased the predicted genetic capacity related to the TCA cycle among other aspects of metabolism. Strikingly, the same microbial metabolism indexes that were increased by exercise were all decreased in HFD-fed vs. chow diet-fed mice. Therefore, exercise training directly opposed some of the obesity-related changes in gut microbiota, including lower metagenomic indexes of metabolism. Some host and microbial pathways appeared similarly affected by exercise. These exercise- and diet-induced microbiota interactions can be captured in feces.

  8. High-fat diet induces metabolic changes and reduces oxidative stress in female mouse hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Ignasi; Miró-Casas, Elisabet; Torrecilla, José L; Pladevall, Eulàlia; Tejedor, Sergi; Sebastián-Pérez, Rubén; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Berrendero, José R; Cuevas, Antonio; García-Dorado, David

    2017-02-01

    After an acute myocardial infarction, obese patients generally have a better prognosis than their leaner counterparts, known as the "obesity paradox". In addition, female sex is associated with a lower risk of cardiac ischemic events and smaller infarct size compared to males. The objective of the present work was to study the metabolic phenotype and mitochondrial function associated to female sex and short-term high-fat diet. (1)H NMR spectra of mice heart extracts were analysed by mRMR variable selection and linear discriminant analysis was used to evaluate metabolic changes. In separate experiments, O2 consumption and H2O2 production were measured from isolated mitochondria as well as serum oxidation susceptibility. Fingerprinting showed that male hearts contained more myo-inositol, taurine and glutamate than female hearts. HFD reduced the levels of creatine, taurine citrate and acetate. Profiling showed increased alanine and fumarate in HFD suggesting altered glycolitic and Krebs cycle pathways. Female mice contained less glucose than males. Female sex nor HFD altered mitochondria oxygen consumption but both conditions reduced the amount of H2O2 produced in an additive manner. Serum of females had lower oxidation susceptibility than serum from males but there were no differences associated with HFD. In conclusion, female sex and short-term HFD have an effect on the myocardial metabolic pattern and reduce the amount of H2O2 produced by mitochondria in an additive manner suggesting different mechanisms of action. This could explain, at least in part, the protection afforded by female sex and the "obesity paradox".

  9. Intracellular Metabolite Pool Changes in Response to Nutrient Depletion Induced Metabolic Switching in Streptomyces coelicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Wentzel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A metabolite profiling study of the antibiotic producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2 has been performed. The aim of this study was to monitor intracellular metabolite pool changes occurring as strains of S. coelicolor react to nutrient depletion with metabolic re-modeling, so-called metabolic switching, and transition from growth to secondary metabolite production phase. Two different culture media were applied, providing depletion of the key nutrients phosphate and L-glutamate, respectively, as the triggers for metabolic switching. Targeted GC-MS and LC-MS methods were employed to quantify important primary metabolite groups like amino acids, organic acids, sugar phosphates and other phosphorylated metabolites, and nucleotides in time-course samples withdrawn from fully-controlled batch fermentations. A general decline, starting already in the early growth phase, was observed for nucleotide pools and phosphorylated metabolite pools for both the phosphate and glutamate limited cultures. The change in amino acid and organic acid pools were more scattered, especially in the phosphate limited situation while a general decrease in amino acid and non-amino organic acid pools was observed in the L-glutamate limited situation. A phoP deletion mutant showed basically the same metabolite pool changes as the wild-type strain M145 when cultivated on phosphate limited medium. This implies that the inactivation of the phoP gene has only little effect on the detected metabolite levels in the cell. The energy charge was found to be relatively constant during growth, transition and secondary metabolite production phase. The results of this study and the employed targeted metabolite profiling methodology are directly relevant for the evaluation of precursor metabolite and energy supply for both natural and heterologous production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor.

  10. Role of hypoxia in obesity-induced disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism in adipose tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Jun; Gao, Zhanguo; He, Qing; Zhou, Dequan; Guo, ZengKui; Ye, Jianping

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that adipose tissue hypoxia (ATH) may contribute to endocrine dysfunction in adipose tissue of obese mice. In this study, we examined hypoxia's effects on metabolism in adipocytes. We determined the dynamic relationship of ATH and adiposity in ob/ob mice. The interstitial oxygen pressure (Po2) was monitored in the epididymal fat pads for ATH. During weight gain from 39.5 to 55.5 g, Po2 declined from 34.8 to 20.1 mmHg, which are 40–60% lower than those in the lean mice. ...

  11. Increased excitability and metabolism in pilocarpine induced epileptic rats: effect of Bacopa monnieri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Jobin; Paul, Jes; Nandhu, M S; Paulose, C S

    2010-09-01

    We have evaluated the acetylcholine esterase and malate dehydrogenase activity in the muscle, epinephrine, norepinephrine, insulin and T3 content in the serum of epileptic rats. Acetylcholine esterase and malate dehydrogenase activity increased in the muscle and decreased in the heart of the epileptic rats compared to control. Insulin and T3 content were increased significantly in the serum of the epileptic rats. Our results suggest that repetitive seizures resulted in increased metabolism and excitability in epileptic rats. Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A treatment prevents the occurrence of seizures there by reducing the impairment on peripheral nervous system.

  12. [ROLE OF CAPSAICIN-SENSITIVE NERVES IN THE REGULATION OF DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE SULFATE BLOOD CONTENT UNDER NORMAL AND FRUCTOSE-INDUCED METABOLIC SYNDROME].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiridonov, V K; Tolochko, Z S; Ovcjukova, M V; Kostina, N E; Obut, T A

    2015-08-01

    The effects of the stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves (capsaicin, 1 mg/kg, s/c) and their eafferentation (capsaicin, 150 mg/kg, s/c) on the blood content of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) was investigated in normal rats and rats with fructose-induced metabolic syndrome (12.5% fructose solution, 10 weeks). An increase in blood of tryglyceride, lipid peroxidation, glucose (fasting and after loading glucose, 2 mg/kg, i/p) was considered as symptoms of metabolic syndrome. It was shown that in normal rats drinking tap water the stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves resulted in the increase of DHEAS content while their deafferentation reduced the concentration of this hormone in the blood. The fructose diet caused the decrease in content of DHEAS, triglyceridemia, lipid peroxidation, impaired tolerance glucose. In rats with the metabolic syndrome the stimulation capsaicin-sensitive nerves prevented the fructose-induced decrease of DHEAS content as well as decreased the symptoms of metabolic syndrome. In fructose fed rats the stimulation-induced effects were prevented by the deafferentation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves. It is suggested that capsaicin-sensitive nerves contribute both to the regulation of blood content of DHEAS under normal and fructose-induced metabolic syndrome.

  13. Metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Salim

    2007-01-01

    Acute metabolic acidosis is frequently encountered in critically ill patients. Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids that consumes bicarbonate (high anion gap metabolic acidosis) or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney (hyperchloremic or normal anion gap metabolic acidosis). The cause of high anion gap metabolic acidosis includes lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis, renal failure and intoxication with ethylene glycol, methanol, salicylate and less commonly with pyroglutamic acid (5-oxoproline), propylene glycole or djenkol bean (gjenkolism). The most common causes of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis are gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss, renal tubular acidosis, drugs-induced hyperkalemia, early renal failure and administration of acids. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis, in particular organic form of acidosis such as lactic acidosis, has been very controversial. The only effective treatment for organic acidosis is cessation of acid production via improvement of tissue oxygenation. Treatment of acute organic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate failed to reduce the morbidity and mortality despite improvement in acid-base parameters. Further studies are required to determine the optimal treatment strategies for acute metabolic acidosis.

  14. Is individual nasal sensitivity related to cellular metabolism of formaldehyde and susceptibility towards formaldehyde-induced genotoxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Jasmin; Ulrich, Alexandra; Mueller, Joerg U; Riegert, Clarissa; Neuss, Simone; Bruckner, Thomas; Triebig, Gerhard; Speit, Günter

    2011-07-14

    Forty-one volunteers (male non-smokers, aged 32 ± 9.6yrs) were tested for susceptibility towards unspecific nasal irritation (sensitivity towards CO(2)) in order to define subgroups of hypersensitive and hyposensitive subjects. Blood samples were taken and the expression (mRNA level) of the GSH-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase gene (FDH, identical to alcohol dehydrogenase 5, ADH5; EC 1.2.1.46) was measured in leukocytes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR with TaqMan probes. FDH is the most important enzyme for the metabolic inactivation of FA. Blood samples were exposed to 150μM formaldehyde (FA) for 2h and the induction of DNA-protein crosslinks (DPX) in leukocytes was measured by means of a modification of the alkaline comet assay (i.e., by assessing the reduction of DNA migration induced by γ-radiation). Removal of DPX was determined by the abolition of FA-induced reduction in DNA migration within 4h after the end of the exposure. Furthermore, the induction of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in cultured lymphocytes was studied after treatment of whole blood cultures with FA (150μM). A correlation analysis was performed for all parameters tested for the whole study group and for hypersensitive and hyposensitive subgroups. The results indicate that despite large differences in CO(2)-sensitivity, the susceptibility towards nasal irritation was not related to the induction of genotoxic effects (DPX, SCE) in peripheral blood or to the protection of blood cells against FA-induced effects (expression of FDH, repair capacity for FA-induced DPX). There was no correlation between CO(2)-sensitivity and the expression of FDH. There was also no close correlation between the various indicators of cellular sensitivity towards FA-induced genotoxic effects and no subgroups were identified with particular mutagen sensitivity towards FA.

  15. Targeted Inhibition of EGFR and Glutaminase Induces Metabolic Crisis in EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Momcilovic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells exhibit increased use of nutrients, including glucose and glutamine, to support the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of proliferation. We tested the small-molecule inhibitor of glutaminase CB-839 in combination with erlotinib on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC as a therapeutic strategy to simultaneously impair cancer glucose and glutamine utilization and thereby suppress tumor growth. Here, we show that CB-839 cooperates with erlotinib to drive energetic stress and activate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK pathway in EGFR (del19 lung tumors. Tumor cells undergo metabolic crisis and cell death, resulting in rapid tumor regression in vivo in mouse NSCLC xenografts. Consistently, positron emission tomography (PET imaging with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG and 11C-glutamine (11C-Gln of xenografts indicated reduced glucose and glutamine uptake in tumors following treatment with CB-839 + erlotinib. Therefore, PET imaging with 18F-FDG and 11C-Gln tracers can be used to non-invasively measure metabolic response to CB-839 and erlotinib combination therapy.

  16. Gut microbiome remodeling induces depressive-like behaviors through a pathway mediated by the host's metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, P; Zeng, B; Zhou, C; Liu, M; Fang, Z; Xu, X; Zeng, L; Chen, J; Fan, S; Du, X; Zhang, X; Yang, D; Yang, Y; Meng, H; Li, W; Melgiri, N D; Licinio, J; Wei, H; Xie, P

    2016-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the result of complex gene-environment interactions. According to the World Health Organization, MDD is the leading cause of disability worldwide, and it is a major contributor to the overall global burden of disease. However, the definitive environmental mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of MDD remain elusive. The gut microbiome is an increasingly recognized environmental factor that can shape the brain through the microbiota-gut-brain axis. We show here that the absence of gut microbiota in germ-free (GF) mice resulted in decreased immobility time in the forced swimming test relative to conventionally raised healthy control mice. Moreover, from clinical sampling, the gut microbiotic compositions of MDD patients and healthy controls were significantly different with MDD patients characterized by significant changes in the relative abundance of Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Fecal microbiota transplantation of GF mice with 'depression microbiota' derived from MDD patients resulted in depression-like behaviors compared with colonization with 'healthy microbiota' derived from healthy control individuals. Mice harboring 'depression microbiota' primarily exhibited disturbances of microbial genes and host metabolites involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. This study demonstrates that dysbiosis of the gut microbiome may have a causal role in the development of depressive-like behaviors, in a pathway that is mediated through the host's metabolism.

  17. Obesity Drives Th17 Cell Differentiation by Inducing the Lipid Metabolic Kinase, ACC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Endo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation due to obesity contributes to the development of metabolic diseases, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. Reciprocal interactions between metabolic systems and immune cells have pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of obesity-associated diseases, although the mechanisms regulating obesity-associated inflammatory diseases are still unclear. In the present study, we performed transcriptional profiling of memory phenotype CD4 T cells in high-fat-fed mice and identified acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1, the gene product of Acaca as an essential regulator of Th17 cell differentiation in vitro and of the pathogenicity of Th17 cells in vivo. ACC1 modulates the DNA binding of RORγt to target genes in differentiating Th17 cells. In addition, we found a strong correlation between IL-17A-producing CD45RO+CD4 T cells and the expression of ACACA in obese subjects. Thus, ACC1 confers the appropriate function of RORγt through fatty acid synthesis and regulates the obesity-related pathology of Th17 cells.

  18. Metabolic Effects of CX3CR1 Deficiency in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Shah

    Full Text Available The fractalkine (CX3CL1-CX3CR1 chemokine system is associated with obesity-related inflammation and type 2 diabetes, but data on effects of Cx3cr1 deficiency on metabolic pathways is contradictory. We examined male C57BL/6 Cx3cr1-/- mice on chow and high-fat diet to determine the metabolic effects of Cx3cr1 deficiency. We found no difference in body weight and fat content or feeding and energy expenditure between Cx3cr1-/- and WT mice. Cx3cr1-/- mice had reduced glucose intolerance assessed by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests at chow and high-fat fed states, though there was no difference in glucose-stimulated insulin values. Cx3cr1-/- mice also had improved insulin sensitivity at hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, with higher glucose infusion rate, rate of disposal, and hepatic glucose production suppression compared to WT mice. Enhanced insulin signaling in response to acute intravenous insulin injection was demonstrated in Cx3cr1-/- by increased liver protein levels of phosphorylated AKT and GSK3β proteins. There were no differences in adipose tissue macrophage populations, circulating inflammatory monocytes, adipokines, lipids, or inflammatory markers. In conclusion, we demonstrate a moderate and reproducible protective effect of Cx3cr1 deficiency on glucose intolerance and insulin resistance.

  19. Fumonisin B₁ (FB₁) Induces Lamellar Separation and Alters Sphingolipid Metabolism of In Vitro Cultured Hoof Explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Nicole; Dohnal, Ilse; Nagl, Veronika; Schaumberger, Simone; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Mayer, Elisabeth

    2016-03-24

    One of the most important hoof diseases is laminitis. Yet, the pathology of laminitis is not fully understood. Different bacterial toxins, e.g. endotoxins or exotoxins, seem to play an important role. Additionally, ingestion of mycotoxins, toxic secondary metabolites of fungi, might contribute to the onset of laminitis. In this respect, fumonsins are of special interest since horses are regarded as species most susceptible to this group of mycotoxins. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of fumonisin B₁ (FB₁) on primary isolated epidermal and dermal hoof cells, as well as on the lamellar tissue integrity and sphingolipid metabolism of hoof explants in vitro. There was no effect of FB₁ at any concentration on dermal or epidermal cells. However, FB₁ significantly reduced the separation force of explants after 24 h of incubation. The Sa/So ratio was significantly increased in supernatants of explants incubated with FB₁ (2.5-10 µg/mL) after 24 h. Observed effects on Sa/So ratio were linked to significantly increased sphinganine concentrations. Our study showed that FB₁ impairs the sphingolipid metabolism of explants and reduces lamellar integrity at non-cytotoxic concentrations. FB₁ might, therefore, affect hoof health. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are necessary to elucidate the effects of FB₁ on the equine hoof in more detail.

  20. UV-B stress induced metabolic rearrangements explored with comparative proteomics in three Anabaena species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Alok Kumar; Chatterjee, Antra; Yadav, Shivam; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Singh, Shilpi; Rai, L C

    2015-09-01

    Comparative proteomics together with physiological variables revealed different responses among three species of diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena exposed to UV-B stress at the same time points. Perceptible decline in PSII activity, ATP pool, nitrogenase activity and respiration rate was observed for all the three species; this being maximum in Anabaena doliolum, followed by Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and minimum in Anabaena L31. Statistical analysis of the protein abundance divided majority of them as early accumulated in A. L31, late accumulated in A. sp. PCC 7120 and downregulated in A. doliolum. Tolerance of A. L31 may be ascribed to post-translational modification reflected through the highest number of protein isoforms in its proteome followed by A. PCC 7120 and A. doliolum. Furthermore, increase in abundance of cyanophycinase, glutamine synthetase and succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase in A. L31 suggests operation of an alternate pathway for assimilation of nitrogen and carbon under UV-B stress. An early accumulation of four proteins viz., glutamate ammonia ligase (Alr2328), transketolase (Alr3344), inorganic pyrophosphatase (All3570), and trigger protein (Alr3681) involved respectively in amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism, biosynthesis of cofactor and trigger protein and chaperone like activity across three species, suggests them to be marker of UV-B stress in Anabaena spp. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India.

  1. Olanzapine-induced cerebral metabolic changes related to symptom improvement in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Vicente; Gispert, Juan D; Reig, Santiago; Pascau, Javier; Martínez, Raúl; Sanz, Javier; Palomo, Tomás; Desco, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    The pattern of brain metabolic changes produced by olanzapine has yet to be described, despite the theoretical and clinical interest of this new antipsychotic. We studied a group of 17 schizophrenic patients who underwent two fluoro-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) studies under two different conditions: a baseline scan during treatment with either conventional antipsychotics (n=15) or risperidone (n=2) and a second scan performed 17-24 weeks after switching to olanzapine. PET scans were obtained while performing a standard cognitive paradigm (Continuous Performance Test) and analysed by means of Statistical Parametric Mapping. No significant metabolic changes were found in the comparison between pre- and post-olanzapine conditions. A brain map of the statistical power of our design showed that changes up to 3% in the frontal and up to 8% in the occipital region were not likely to exist (1-beta=0.8). The degree of improvement in positive symptoms was related to the amount of activity decrease in the right orbital region and to the amount of activity increase in the primary visual area. Improvement in negative symptoms was associated with an activity increase in the dorsal prefrontal cortex, and a higher baseline activity in both temporal poles. These correlation patterns suggest that the functional mechanism of action of olanzapine may share traits from both typical and atypical neuroleptics.

  2. Effects of diet-induced obesity on metabolic parameters and reproductive function in female Ossabaw minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell-Fugate, Annie E; Taibl, Jessica N; Clark, Sherrie G; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Sturek, Michael; Krisher, Rebecca L

    2014-02-01

    This study characterizes the effect of an excess-calorie, high-fat, high-cholesterol, high-fructose diet on metabolic parameters and reproductive function in female Ossabaw minipigs. Cycling sows were fed a hypercaloric, high-fat, high-cholesterol, and high-fructose diet (obese, n = 4) or a control diet (control, n = 5) for 13 mo. During the final 4 mo, ovarian ultrasonography was done, blood was collected, and weights and measures were taken. Pigs then underwent ovarian stimulation. Cycle length and androstenedione, total testosterone, progesterone, estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, insulin, fructosamine, lipid, and glucose levels were measured. In addition, adipose tissue aromatase gene expression was assessed. As compared with control pigs, obese pigs were hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic; had elevated total cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin levels, and demonstrated abdominal adiposity. Visceral adipose tissue of obese pigs, as compared with control pigs, showed increased aromatase gene expression. Obese pigs had longer estrous cycles, higher serum androstenedione, and higher luteal phase serum luteinizing hormone, compared with control pigs. During the luteal phase, obese pigs had more medium, ovulatory, and cystic ovarian follicles, whereas control pigs had more small ovarian follicles. When fed an excess-calorie, high-fat, high-cholesterol, high-fructose diet, female Ossabaw minipigs develop obesity, metabolic syndrome, and abnormal reproductive function. This animal model may be applicable to studies of the effects of obesity on fertility in women.

  3. Salicylic acid-induced changes to growth and phenolic metabolism in Matricaria chamomilla plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovácik, Jozef; Grúz, Jirí; Backor, Martin; Strnad, Miroslav; Repcák, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    The influence of salicylic acid (SA) doses of 50 and 250 microM, for a period of up to 7 days, on selected physiological aspects and the phenolic metabolism of Matricaria chamomilla plants was studied. SA exhibited both growth-promoting (50 microM) and growth-inhibiting (250 microM) properties, the latter being correlated with decrease of chlorophylls, water content and soluble proteins. In terms of phenolic metabolism, it seems that the higher SA dose has a toxic effect, based on the sharp increase in phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity (24 h after application), which is followed by an increase in total soluble phenolics, lignin accumulation and the majority of the 11 detected phenolic acids. Guaiacol-peroxidase activity was elevated throughout the experiment in 250 microM SA-treated plants. In turn, some responses can be explained by mechanisms associated with oxidative stress tolerance; these mitigate acute SA stress (which is indicated by an increase in malondialdehyde content). However, PAL activity decreased with prolonged exposure to SA, indicating its inhibition. Accumulation of coumarin-related compounds (umbelliferone and herniarin) was not affected by SA treatments, while (Z)- and (E)-2-beta-D: -glucopyranosyloxy-4-methoxycinnamic acids increased in the 250 microM SA-treated rosettes. Free SA content in the rosettes increased significantly only in the 250 microM SA treatment, with levels tending to decrease towards the end of the experiment and the opposite trend was observed in the roots.

  4. Impact of adrenaline and metabolic stress on exercise-induced intracellular signaling and PGC-1α mRNA response in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Nina; Gunnarsson, Thomas Gunnar Petursson; Hostrup, Morten

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that elevated plasma adrenaline or metabolic stress enhances exercise-induced PGC-1α mRNA and intracellular signaling in human muscle. Trained (VO2-max: 53.8 ± 1.8 mL min(-1) kg(-1)) male subjects completed four different exercise protocols (work load of the legs...... exercise than at rest in all protocols, and higher (P adrenaline nor muscle metabolic stress determines the magnitude of PGC-1α mRNA response in human muscle. Furthermore, higher exercise-induced changes in AMPK, p38, and CREB...

  5. Mechanisms of formation and function of eosinophil lipid bodies: inducible intracellular sites involved in arachidonic acid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozza Patricia T

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid bodies, inducible lipid-rich cytoplasmic inclusions, are characteristically abundant in cells associated with inflammation, including eosinophils. Here we reviewed the formation and function of lipid bodies in human eosinophils. We now have evidence that the formation of lipid bodies is not attributable to adverse mechanisms, but is centrally mediated by specific signal transduction pathways. Arachidonic acid and other cis fatty acids by an NSAID-inhibitable process, diglycerides, and PAF by a 5-lipoxygenase dependent pathway are potent stimulators of lipid body induction. Lipid body formation develops rapidly by processes that involve PKC, PLC, and de novo mRNA and protein synthesis. These structures clearly serve as repositoires of arachidonyl-phospholipids and are more than inert depots. Specific enzymes, including cytosolic phospholipase A2, MAP kinases, lipoxygenases and cyclooxygenases, associate with lipid bodies. Lipid bodies appear to be dynamic, organelle-like structures involved in intracellular pathways of lipid mobilization and metabolism. Indeed, increases in lipid body numbers correlated with enhanced production of both lipoxygenase- and cyclooxygenase-derived eicosanoids. We hypothesize that lipid bodies are distinct inducible sites for generating eicosanoids as paracrine mediators with varied activities in inflammation. The capacity of lipid body formation to be specifically and rapidly induced in leukocytes enhances eicosanoid mediator formation, and conversely pharmacologic inhibition of lipid body induction represents a potential novel and specific target for anti-inflammatory therapy.

  6. Effects of exercise training on myocardial fatty acid metabolism in rats with depressed cardiac function induced by transient ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liguang; Nohara, Ryuji; Hirai, Taku [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine] (and others)

    2001-06-01

    The effects of exercise training on metabolic and functional recovery after myocardial transient ischemia were investigated in a rat model. Male Wistar Kyoto rats were subjected either to a 30-min left coronary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion or to a sham operation. At 4 weeks after operation, the rats were randomly assigned either to sedentary conditions or to exercise training for 6 weeks. In the ischemic rats, pinhole SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging with thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl) and {sup 123}I-({rho}-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) showed a reduction of both myocardial perfusion and fatty acid metabolism in the risk zone of the left ventricle (LV). The LV was dilated and the ejection fraction was decreased after ischemic injury. The severity score showed a significant decrease on both {sup 201}Tl and BMIPP ({sup 201}Tl, from 19.9{+-}2.7 to 17.0{+-}2.2, p<0.05; BMIPP, from 21.5{+-}2.4 to 18.6{+-}1.9, p<0.05) after exercise training in the ischemic trained rats, but did not change significantly in their sedentary counterparts. Plasma levels of free fatty acids normalized in the ischemic trained rats, but elevated in the ischemic sedentary rats (0.53{+-}0.05 vs 0.73{+-}0.06 mmol/L, p<0.05). Furthermore, the trained rats had a significant increase in LV stroke volume (0.25{+-}0.02 vs 0.21{+-}0.01 ml/beat, p<0.05) and adaptive cardiac hypertrophy. These findings demonstrate that adaptive improvements in myocardial perfusion, fatty-acid metabolism and LV function were induced by exercise training after transient ischemia. (author)

  7. Cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector C is reduced by caloric restriction and regulates adipocyte lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Björn; Gummesson, Anders; Glad, Camilla A M; Goedecke, Julia H; Jernås, Margareta; Lystig, Theodore C; Carlsson, Björn; Fagerberg, Björn; Carlsson, Lena M S; Svensson, Per-Arne

    2008-09-01

    Members of the cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector (CIDE) gene family have been shown to regulate lipid metabolism. In this article, we report that the third member of the human CIDE family, CIDEC, is down-regulated in response to a reduced caloric intake. The down-regulation was demonstrated by microarray and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue in 2 independent studies on obese patients undergoing treatment with a very low calorie diet. By analysis of CIDEC expression in 65 human tissues, we conclude that human CIDEC is predominantly expressed in subcutaneous adipocytes. Together, these observations led us to investigate the effect of decreased CIDEC expression in cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CIDEC resulted in an increased basal release of nonesterified fatty acids, decreased responsiveness to adrenergic stimulation of lipolysis, and increased oxidation of endogenous fatty acids. Thus, we suggest that CIDEC is a regulator of adipocyte lipid metabolism and may be important for the adipocyte to adapt to changes in energy availability.

  8. Changes in metabolic proteins in ex vivo rat retina during glutamate-induced neural progenitor cell induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Baron, Byron; Kitagawa, Takao; Tokuda, Nobuko; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how energy metabolism and related proteins influence neural progenitor cells in adult tissues is critical for developing new strategies in clinical tissue regeneration therapy. We have recently reported that a subtoxic concentration of glutamate-induced neural progenitor cells in the mature ex vivo rat retina. We herein explore changes in the metabolic pathways during the process. We firstly observed an increase in lactate and lactate dehydrogenase concentration in the glutamate-treated retina. We then investigated the levels of glycolytic enzymes and confirmed significant upregulation of pyruvate kinase M type (PKM), especially PKM2, enolase, phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1), and inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH1) in the glutamate-treated retina compared to the untreated retina. An analysis of the subcellular localization of PKM2 revealed nuclear translocation in the treated retina, which has been reported to regulate cell cycle proliferation and glycolytic enzymes. Our findings indicate that the mature rat retina undergoes an increase in aerobic glycolysis. PKM2, both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, may thus play an important role during neural progenitor cell induction, as it does in other proliferating cells.

  9. Anti-Diabetic Activity and Metabolic Changes Induced by Andrographis paniculata Plant Extract in Obese Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tayyab Akhtar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Andrographis paniculata is an annual herb and widely cultivated in Southeast Asian countries for its medicinal use. In recent investigations, A. paniculata was found to be effective against Type 1 diabetes mellitus (Type 1 DM. Here, we used a non-genetic out-bred Sprague-Dawley rat model to test the antidiabetic activity of A. paniculata against Type 2 diabetes mellitus (Type 2 DM. Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analyses was used to evaluate the A. paniculata and metformin induced metabolic effects on the obese and obese–diabetic (obdb rat models. Compared to the normal rats, high levels of creatinine, lactate, and allantoin were found in the urine of obese rats, whereas, obese-diabetic rats were marked by high glucose, choline and taurine levels, and low lactate, formate, creatinine, citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, dimethylamine, acetoacetate, acetate, allantoin and hippurate levels. Treatment of A. paniculata leaf water extract was found to be quite effective in restoring the disturbed metabolic profile of obdb rats back towards normal conditions. Thisstudy shows the anti-diabetic potential of A. paniculata plant extract and strengthens the idea of using this plant against the diabetes. Further classical genetic methods and state of the art molecular techniques could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and anti-diabetic effects of A. paniculata water extract.

  10. Trans-10,cis-12-CLA dysregulate lipid and glucose metabolism and induce hepatic NR4A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Maria A; Badimon, Lina; Rodriguez, Cristina; Arnal, Carmen; Noone, Enda J; Roche, Helen M; Osada, Jesus; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose

    2010-01-01

    Our aim was to assess the effect of two isomers of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), cis-9,trans-11-CLA (c9,t11-CLA) and trans-10,cis-12-CLA (t10,c12-CLA), on glucose metabolism and hepatic expression of NR4A receptors, key transcription factors regulating gluconeogenesis. ApoE-deficient mice were fed isocaloric, isonitrogenous westernized diets enriched with c9,t11-CLA, t10,c12-CLA or linoleic acid (control diet). Plasma glucose, NEFA, triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations were significantly higher in the t10,c12-CLA group compared with c9,t11-CLA or control group. Plasma insulin concentrations were lowered by c9,t11-CLA compared with either control or t10,c12-CLA group. Hepatic expression of NR4A receptors (Nur77, Nurr1 and NOR-1) was induced by t10,c12-CLA while c9,t11-CLA had not effect. Consistently t10,c12-CLA up-regulated key genes involved in gluconeogenesis including glucose-6-phosphatase, enolase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase. Hepatic expression of NR4A receptors correlated with plasma NEFA, with the expression of their target gene fatty acid transporter (FAT)/CD36 and with the accumulation of fat in the liver. These results suggest that t10,c12-CLA promote dysregulation of lipid and glucose metabolism, at least in part, by an isomer-specific modulation of hepatic expression of NR4A receptors.

  11. Avocado Oil Supplementation Modifies Cardiovascular Risk Profile Markers in a Rat Model of Sucrose-Induced Metabolic Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Carvajal-Zarrabal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of avocado oil administration on biochemical markers of cardiovascular risk profile in rats with metabolic changes induced by sucrose ingestion. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: a control group (CG; basic diet, a sick group (MC; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution, and three other groups (MCao, MCac, and MCas; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution plus olive oil and avocado oil extracted by centrifugation or using solvent, resp.. Glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, low- and high-density lipoproteins (LDL, HDL, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL, lactic dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration were analyzed. Avocado oil reduces TG, VLDL, and LDL levels, in the LDL case significantly so, without affecting HDL levels. An effect was exhibited by avocado oil similar to olive oil, with no significant difference between avocado oil extracted either by centrifugation or solvent in myocardial injury biochemical indicators. Avocado oil decreased hs-CRP levels, indicating that inflammatory processes were partially reversed. These findings suggested that avocado oil supplementation has a positive health outcome because it reduces inflammatory events and produces positive changes in the biochemical indicators studied, related to the development of metabolic syndrome.

  12. The programming effects of nutrition-induced catch-up growth on gut microbiota and metabolic diseases in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia; Xiao, Xinhua; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Miao; Xu, Jianping; Qi, Cuijuan; Wang, Tong

    2016-04-01

    Substantial evidence indicated that catch-up growth could increase the susceptibility to obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in adulthood. However, investigations into the "programming" effects of catch-up growth on gut microbiota in the offspring are limited. C57/BL6 mice were fed on either low protein (LP) or normal chow (NC) diet throughout gestation and lactation. Then, the offspring were randomly weaned to either NC or high fat (HF) diet until 32 weeks of age, generating four experimental groups: NC-NC, NC-HF, LP-NC, and LP-HF. Metabolic parameters and gut microbiota were examined in the offspring. It showed that the NC-HF and LP-HF offspring displayed higher body weight (P r = -0.886, P = 0.019). In conclusion, catch-up growth predisposes the offspring to gut microbiota perturbation, obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. Our study is novel in showing the "programming" effects of nutrition-induced catch-up growth on gut microbiota and metabolic diseases in later life.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) mediates a Ski oncogene-induced shift from glycolysis to oxidative energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fang; Lemieux, Hélène; Hoppel, Charles L; Hanson, Richard W; Hakimi, Parvin; Croniger, Colleen M; Puchowicz, Michelle; Anderson, Vernon E; Fujioka, Hisashi; Stavnezer, Ed

    2011-11-18

    Overexpression of the Ski oncogene induces oncogenic transformation of chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs). However, unlike most other oncogene-transformed cells, Ski-transformed CEFs (Ski-CEFs) do not display the classical Warburg effect. On the contrary, Ski transformation reduced lactate production and glucose utilization in CEFs. Compared with CEFs, Ski-CEFs exhibited enhanced TCA cycle activity, fatty acid catabolism through β-oxidation, glutamate oxidation, oxygen consumption, as well as increased numbers and mass of mitochondria. Interestingly, expression of PPARγ, a key transcription factor that regulates adipogenesis and lipid metabolism, was dramatically elevated at both the mRNA and protein levels in Ski-CEFs. Accordingly, PPARγ target genes that are involved in lipid uptake, transport, and oxidation were also markedly up-regulated by Ski. Knocking down PPARγ in Ski-CEFs by RNA interference reversed the elevated expression of these PPARγ target genes, as well as the shift to oxidative metabolism and the increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Moreover, we found that Ski co-immunoprecipitates with PPARγ and co-activates PPARγ-driven transcription.

  14. Avocado oil supplementation modifies cardiovascular risk profile markers in a rat model of sucrose-induced metabolic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Zarrabal, Octavio; Nolasco-Hipolito, Cirilo; Aguilar-Uscanga, M Guadalupe; Melo-Santiesteban, Guadalupe; Hayward-Jones, Patricia M; Barradas-Dermitz, Dulce M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of avocado oil administration on biochemical markers of cardiovascular risk profile in rats with metabolic changes induced by sucrose ingestion. Twenty-five rats were divided into five groups: a control group (CG; basic diet), a sick group (MC; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution), and three other groups (MCao, MCac, and MCas; basic diet plus 30% sucrose solution plus olive oil and avocado oil extracted by centrifugation or using solvent, resp.). Glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids, low- and high-density lipoproteins (LDL, HDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), lactic dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration were analyzed. Avocado oil reduces TG, VLDL, and LDL levels, in the LDL case significantly so, without affecting HDL levels. An effect was exhibited by avocado oil similar to olive oil, with no significant difference between avocado oil extracted either by centrifugation or solvent in myocardial injury biochemical indicators. Avocado oil decreased hs-CRP levels, indicating that inflammatory processes were partially reversed. These findings suggested that avocado oil supplementation has a positive health outcome because it reduces inflammatory events and produces positive changes in the biochemical indicators studied, related to the development of metabolic syndrome.

  15. Mitochondrial physiology and gene expression analyses reveal metabolic and translational dysregulation in oocyte-induced somatic nuclear reprogramming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma C Esteves

    Full Text Available While reprogramming a foreign nucleus after somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT, the enucleated oocyte (ooplasm must signal that biomass and cellular requirements changed compared to the nucleus donor cell. Using cells expressing nuclear-encoded but mitochondria-targeted EGFP, a strategy was developed to directly distinguish maternal and embryonic products, testing ooplasm demands on transcriptional and post-transcriptional activity during reprogramming. Specifically, we compared transcript and protein levels for EGFP and other products in pre-implantation SCNT embryos, side-by-side to fertilized controls (embryos produced from the same oocyte pool, by intracytoplasmic injection of sperm containing the EGFP transgene. We observed that while EGFP transcript abundance is not different, protein levels are significantly lower in SCNT compared to fertilized blastocysts. This was not observed for Gapdh and Actb, whose protein reflected mRNA. This transcript-protein relationship indicates that the somatic nucleus can keep up with ooplasm transcript demands, whilst transcription and translation mismatch occurs after SCNT for certain mRNAs. We further detected metabolic disturbances after SCNT, suggesting a place among forces regulating post-transcriptional changes during reprogramming. Our observations ascribe oocyte-induced reprogramming with previously unsuspected regulatory dimensions, in that presence of functional proteins may no longer be inferred from mRNA, but rather depend on post-transcriptional regulation possibly modulated through metabolism.

  16. Anti-Diabetic Activity and Metabolic Changes Induced by Andrographis paniculata Plant Extract in Obese Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Muhammad Tayyab; Bin Mohd Sarib, Mohamad Syakir; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Abas, Faridah; Ismail, Amin; Lajis, Nordin Hj; Shaari, Khozirah

    2016-08-09

    Andrographis paniculata is an annual herb and widely cultivated in Southeast Asian countries for its medicinal use. In recent investigations, A. paniculata was found to be effective against Type 1 diabetes mellitus (Type 1 DM). Here, we used a non-genetic out-bred Sprague-Dawley rat model to test the antidiabetic activity of A. paniculata against Type 2 diabetes mellitus (Type 2 DM). Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (¹H-NMR) spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analyses was used to evaluate the A. paniculata and metformin induced metabolic effects on the obese and obese-diabetic (obdb) rat models. Compared to the normal rats, high levels of creatinine, lactate, and allantoin were found in the urine of obese rats, whereas, obese-diabetic rats were marked by high glucose, choline and taurine levels, and low lactate, formate, creatinine, citrate, 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, dimethylamine, acetoacetate, acetate, allantoin and hippurate levels. Treatment of A. paniculata leaf water extract was found to be quite effective in restoring the disturbed metabolic profile of obdb rats back towards normal conditions. Thisstudy shows the anti-diabetic potential of A. paniculata plant extract and strengthens the idea of using this plant against the diabetes. Further classical genetic methods and state of the art molecular techniques could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and anti-diabetic effects of A. paniculata water extract.

  17. Relationship of (/sup 3/H)GA/sub 9/ metabolism to photoperiod-induced flowering in pisum sativum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proebsting, W.M.; Heftmann, E.

    1980-07-01

    The late flowering line of pea designated G is an obligate long day plant with respect to flowering. (/sup 3/H)GA/sub 9/ metabolism by leaves of G was studied. In short days (SD), (/sup 3/H)GA/sub 9/ was converted to a series of polar compounds. The synthesis of these polar compounds was blocked by 1 long day (D). One LD also induced flowering. Reproductive G plants which reverted to the vegetative state regained the ability to synthesize polar gibberellins from (/sup 3/H)GA/sub 9/. These observations support the hypothesis that flowering in Pisum is inhibited by a polar gibberellin produced in SD. LD prevent the synthesis of polar gibberellins, permitting flowering to take place.

  18. Pharmacological Modulation of Dopamine Receptor D2-Mediated Transmission Alters the Metabolic Phenotype of Diet Induced Obese and Diet Resistant C57Bl6 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. de Leeuw van Weenen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High fat feeding induces a variety of obese and lean phenotypes in inbred rodents. Compared to Diet Resistant (DR rodents, Diet Induced Obese (DIO rodents are insulin resistant and have a reduced dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2 mediated tone. We hypothesized that this differing dopaminergic tone contributes to the distinct metabolic profiles of these animals. C57Bl6 mice were classified as DIO or DR based on their weight gain during 10 weeks of high fat feeding. Subsequently DIO mice were treated with the DRD2 agonist bromocriptine and DR mice with the DRD2 antagonist haloperidol for 2 weeks. Compared to DR mice, the bodyweight of DIO mice was higher and their insulin sensitivity decreased. Haloperidol treatment reduced the voluntary activity and energy expenditure of DR mice and induced insulin resistance in these mice. Conversely, bromocriptine treatment tended to reduce bodyweight and voluntary activity, and reinforce insulin action in DIO mice. These results show that DRD2 activation partly redirects high fat diet induced metabolic anomalies in obesity-prone mice. Conversely, blocking DRD2 induces an adverse metabolic profile in mice that are inherently resistant to the deleterious effects of high fat food. This suggests that dopaminergic neurotransmission is involved in the control of metabolic phenotype.

  19. Evaluation of the systemic innate immune response and metabolic alterations of nonlactating cows with diet-induced subacute ruminal acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lecompte, J C; Kroeker, A D; Ceballos-Márquez, A; Li, S; Plaizier, J C; Gomez, D E

    2014-12-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) increases lipopolysaccharide endotoxin in the rumen, which might translocate into the systemic circulation, triggering a cascade of clinical and immunological alterations. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical immune and metabolic responses to ruminal-derived lipopolysaccharide in nonlactating cows induced with SARA using 2 challenges, a grain-based SARA challenge (GBSC) or an alfalfa-pellet SARA challenge (APSC). Six dry, nonlactating Holstein cows were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square arrangement of treatments with 4-wk experimental cycles. All cows received the control diet containing 70% forage and 30% mixed concentrates (dry matter basis) for 3 wk. In wk 4, cows received a control diet, GBSC (38% wheat-barley pellets, 32% other mixed concentrate, and 30% forages), or APSC (45% mixed concentrate, 32% alfalfa pellets, and 23% other forages). Total plasma proteins and immunology-related proteins, acute phase proteins, blood cells, serum chemistry, mRNA gene expression of peripheral blood cell surface markers, and selected proinflammatory cytokines were evaluated. Ruminal pH was lower in both groups with induced SARA compared with a control group. Ruminal endotoxins were higher in GBSC; however, plasma endotoxin was not detected in any study group. No significant differences in feed intake, rectal temperature, white blood cell counts, or differentials were found between control and SARA challenge groups; changes in glucose, urea, Ca, and Mg were observed in SARA groups. Total plasma proteins were lower in both SARA groups, and acute phase proteins were higher in GBSC. The expression of CD14, MD2, and TLR4 mRNA in peripheral blood leukocytes was not affected by SARA induction. The induction of SARA as a result of GBSC or APSC challenge was successful; however, LPS was not detected in plasma. Changes in clinical, metabolic, and inflammatory responses were not observed in the SARA-challenged cows, suggesting that

  20. Metabolic and biochemical changes in streptozotocin induced obese-diabetic rats treated with Phyllanthus niruri extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediani, Ahmed; Abas, Faridah; Maulidiani, M; Khatib, Alfi; Tan, Chin Ping; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Shaari, Khozirah; Ismail, Amin; Lajis, N H

    2016-09-05

    Herbal medicine has been proven to be an effective therapy offering a variety of benefits, such as moderate reduction in hypoglycemia, in the treatment and prevention of obesity and diabetes. Phyllanthus niruri has been used as a treatment for diabetes mellitus. Herein, the induction of type 2 diabetes in Sprague-Dawley rats was achieved by a low dose of streptozotocin (STZ) (25mg/kgbw). Here, we evaluated the in vivo antidiabetic properties of two concentrations (250 and 500mg/kg bw) of P. niruri via metabolomics approach. The administration of 500mg/kgbw of P. niruri extract caused the metabolic disorders of obese diabetic rats to be improved towards the normal state. The extract also clearly decreased the serum glucose level and improved the lipid profile in obese diabetic rats. The results of this study may contribute towards better understanding the molecular mechanism of this medicinal plant in managing diabetes mellitus.

  1. Pregnancy and maternal behavior induce changes in glia, glutamate and its metabolism within the cingulate cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalina Salmaso

    Full Text Available An upregulation of the astrocytic proteins GFAP and bFGF within area 2 of the cingulate cortex (Cg2 occurs within 3 hours of parturition in rats. These changes are the result of an interaction between hormonal state and maternal experience and are associated with increased dendritic spine density in this area. Here, we examined whether this upregulation of astrocytic proteins generalized to other glial markers and, in particular those associated with glutamate metabolism. We chose glial markers commonly used to reflect different aspects of glial function: vimentin, like GFAP, is a marker of intermediate filaments; glutamine synthetase (GS, and S-100beta, are used as markers for mature astrocytes and GS has also been used as a specific marker for glutamatergic enzymatic activity. In addition, we examined levels of proteins associated with glutamine synthetase, glutamate, glutamine and two excitatory amino acid transporters found in astrocytes, glt-1 and glast. S100beta immunoreactivity did not vary with reproductive state in either Cg2 or MPOA suggesting no change in the number of mature astrocytes across these conditions. Vimentin-ir did not differ across groups in Cg2, but expression of this protein decreased from Day 1 postpartum onwards in the MPOA. By contrast, GS-ir was increased within 24 h postpartum in Cg2 but not MPOA and similarly to GFAP and bFGF this upregulation of GS resulted from an interaction between hormonal state and maternal experience. Within Cg2, upregulation of GS was not accompanied by changes in the astrocytic glutamatergic transporters, glt-1 and glast, however, an increase in both glutamate and glutamine proteins were observed within the Cg2 of postpartum animals. Together, these changes suggest postpartum upregulation of glutamatergic activity and metabolism within Cg2 that is stimulated by pregnancy hormones and maternal experience.

  2. Dysfunction of intraflagellar transport-A causes hyperphagia-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon T. Jacobs

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary cilia extend from the plasma membrane of most vertebrate cells and mediate signaling pathways. Ciliary dysfunction underlies ciliopathies, which are genetic syndromes that manifest multiple clinical features, including renal cystic disease and obesity. THM1 (also termed TTC21B or IFT139 encodes a component of the intraflagellar transport-A complex and mutations in THM1 have been identified in 5% of individuals with ciliopathies. Consistent with this, deletion of murine Thm1 during late embryonic development results in cystic kidney disease. Here, we report that deletion of murine Thm1 during adulthood results in obesity, diabetes, hypertension and fatty liver disease, with gender differences in susceptibility to weight gain and metabolic dysfunction. Pair-feeding of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice relative to control littermates prevented the obesity and related disorders, indicating that hyperphagia caused the obese phenotype. Thm1 ablation resulted in increased localization of adenylyl cyclase III in primary cilia that were shortened, with bulbous distal tips on neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, an integrative center for signals that regulate feeding and activity. In pre-obese Thm1 conditional knock-out mice, expression of anorexogenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc was decreased by 50% in the arcuate nucleus, which likely caused the hyperphagia. Fasting of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice did not alter Pomc nor orexogenic agouti-related neuropeptide (Agrp expression, suggesting impaired sensing of changes in peripheral signals. Together, these data indicate that the Thm1-mutant ciliary defect diminishes sensitivity to feeding signals, which alters appetite regulation and leads to hyperphagia, obesity and metabolic disease.

  3. Dysfunction of intraflagellar transport-A causes hyperphagia-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Damon T; Silva, Luciane M; Allard, Bailey A; Schonfeld, Michael P; Chatterjee, Anindita; Talbott, George C; Beier, David R; Tran, Pamela V

    2016-07-01

    Primary cilia extend from the plasma membrane of most vertebrate cells and mediate signaling pathways. Ciliary dysfunction underlies ciliopathies, which are genetic syndromes that manifest multiple clinical features, including renal cystic disease and obesity. THM1 (also termed TTC21B or IFT139) encodes a component of the intraflagellar transport-A complex and mutations in THM1 have been identified in 5% of individuals with ciliopathies. Consistent with this, deletion of murine Thm1 during late embryonic development results in cystic kidney disease. Here, we report that deletion of murine Thm1 during adulthood results in obesity, diabetes, hypertension and fatty liver disease, with gender differences in susceptibility to weight gain and metabolic dysfunction. Pair-feeding of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice relative to control littermates prevented the obesity and related disorders, indicating that hyperphagia caused the obese phenotype. Thm1 ablation resulted in increased localization of adenylyl cyclase III in primary cilia that were shortened, with bulbous distal tips on neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, an integrative center for signals that regulate feeding and activity. In pre-obese Thm1 conditional knock-out mice, expression of anorexogenic pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) was decreased by 50% in the arcuate nucleus, which likely caused the hyperphagia. Fasting of Thm1 conditional knock-out mice did not alter Pomc nor orexogenic agouti-related neuropeptide (Agrp) expression, suggesting impaired sensing of changes in peripheral signals. Together, these data indicate that the Thm1-mutant ciliary defect diminishes sensitivity to feeding signals, which alters appetite regulation and leads to hyperphagia, obesity and metabolic disease.

  4. Pb2+ exposure induced microsatellite instability in Pisum sativum in a locus related with glutamine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E; Azevedo, R; Moreira, H; Souto, L; Santos, Conceição

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic element, but its putative mutagenic effects in plant cells, using molecular markers, remain to unveil. To evaluate if Pb induces mutagenicity, Pisum sativum L. seedlings were exposed to Pb(2+) (up to 2000 mg L(-1)) for 28 days and the instability of microsatellites (or Simple Sequence Repeats, SSR) was analyzed in leaves and roots. The analysis of eight selected microsatellites (SSR1-SSR8) demonstrated that only at the highest dosage microsatellite instability (MSI) occurred, at a frequency of 4.2%. Changes were detected in one microsatellite (SSR6) that is inserted in the locus for glutamine synthetase. SSR6 products of roots exposed to the highest concentration of Pb were 3 bp larger than those of the control. Our data demonstrate that: (a) SSR technique is sensitive to detect Pb-induced mutagenicity in plants. MSI instability is Pb dose dependent and organ dependent (roots are more sensitive); (b) the Pb-sensitive SSR6 is inserted in the glutamine synthetase locus, with still unknown relation with functional changes of this enzyme; (c) Pb levels inducing MSI are much above the maximum admitted levels in some European Union countries for agricultural purpose waters. In conclusion, we propose here the potential use of SSR to evaluate Pb(2+)-induced mutagenicity, in combination with other genetic markers.

  5. Effect of luteolin on glycoproteins metabolism in 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine induced experimental colon carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Vaiyapuri

    2008-12-01

    carcinogenesis. Thus, the present study indicates that luteolin has protected the cell surface and maintained the structural integrity of the cell membranes during DMH induced colon carcinogenesis. Keywords: Colon cancer, 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine, luteolin, glycoproteins Received: 23 January 2009 / Received in revised form: 17 February 2009, Accepted: 28 February 2009, Published online: 3 March 2009

  6. 3-Hydroxybutyrate regulates energy metabolism and induces BDNF expression in cerebral cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marosi, Krisztina; Kim, Sang Woo; Moehl, Keelin

    2016-01-01

    . The mechanism by which 3OHB induces Bdnf gene expression involves generation of reactive oxygen species, activation of the transcription factor NF-κB, and activity of the histone acetyltransferase p300/EP300. Because BDNF plays important roles in synaptic plasticity and neuronal stress resistance, our findings...

  7. Dietary enrichment with fish oil prevents high fat-induced metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philp, Lisa K; Heilbronn, Leonie K; Janovska, Alena; Wittert, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    High saturated fat (HF-S) diets increase intramyocellular lipid, an effect ameliorated by omega-3 fatty acids in vitro and in vivo, though little is known about sex- and muscle fiber type-specific effects. We compared effects of standard chow, HF-S, and 7.5% HF-S replaced with fish oil (HF-FO) diets on the metabolic profile and lipid metabolism gene and protein content in red (soleus) and white (extensor digitorum longus) muscles of male and female C57BL/6 mice (n = 9-12/group). Weight gain was similar in HF-S- and HF-FO-fed groups. HF-S feeding increased mesenteric fat mass and lipid marker, Oil Red O, in red and mixed muscle; HF-FO increased interscapular brown fat mass. Compared to chow, HF-S and HF-FO increased expression of genes regulating triacylglycerol synthesis and fatty acid transport, HF-S suppressed genes and proteins regulating fatty acid oxidation, whereas HF-FO increased oxidative genes, proteins and enzymes and lipolytic gene content, whilst suppressing lipogenic genes. In comparison to HF-S, HF-FO further increased fat transporters, markers of fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial content, and reduced lipogenic genes. No diet-by-sex interactions were observed. Neither diet influenced fiber type composition. However, some interactions between muscle type and diet were observed. HF-S induced changes in triacylglycerol synthesis and lipogenic genes in red, but not white, muscle, and mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative genes were suppressed by HF-S and increased by HF-FO in red muscle only. In conclusion, HF-S feeding promotes lipid storage in red muscle, an effect abrogated by the fish oil, which increases mediators of lipolysis, oxidation and thermogenesis while inhibiting lipogenic genes. Greater storage and synthesis, and lower oxidative genes in red, but not white, muscle likely contribute to lipid accretion encountered in red muscle. Despite several gender-dimorphic genes, both sexes exhibited a similar HF-S-induced metabolic and gene

  8. Dietary enrichment with fish oil prevents high fat-induced metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K Philp

    Full Text Available High saturated fat (HF-S diets increase intramyocellular lipid, an effect ameliorated by omega-3 fatty acids in vitro and in vivo, though little is known about sex- and muscle fiber type-specific effects. We compared effects of standard chow, HF-S, and 7.5% HF-S replaced with fish oil (HF-FO diets on the metabolic profile and lipid metabolism gene and protein content in red (soleus and white (extensor digitorum longus muscles of male and female C57BL/6 mice (n = 9-12/group. Weight gain was similar in HF-S- and HF-FO-fed groups. HF-S feeding increased mesenteric fat mass and lipid marker, Oil Red O, in red and mixed muscle; HF-FO increased interscapular brown fat mass. Compared to chow, HF-S and HF-FO increased expression of genes regulating triacylglycerol synthesis and fatty acid transport, HF-S suppressed genes and proteins regulating fatty acid oxidation, whereas HF-FO increased oxidative genes, proteins and enzymes and lipolytic gene content, whilst suppressing lipogenic genes. In comparison to HF-S, HF-FO further increased fat transporters, markers of fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial content, and reduced lipogenic genes. No diet-by-sex interactions were observed. Neither diet influenced fiber type composition. However, some interactions between muscle type and diet were observed. HF-S induced changes in triacylglycerol synthesis and lipogenic genes in red, but not white, muscle, and mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative genes were suppressed by HF-S and increased by HF-FO in red muscle only. In conclusion, HF-S feeding promotes lipid storage in red muscle, an effect abrogated by the fish oil, which increases mediators of lipolysis, oxidation and thermogenesis while inhibiting lipogenic genes. Greater storage and synthesis, and lower oxidative genes in red, but not white, muscle likely contribute to lipid accretion encountered in red muscle. Despite several gender-dimorphic genes, both sexes exhibited a similar HF-S-induced metabolic

  9. Beneficial effects of co-enzyme Q10 and rosiglitazone in fructose-induced metabolic syndrome in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan M. Mansour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased fructose consumption is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome (MS. This study was performed to elucidate the role of co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ and/or rosiglitazone (Rosi in fructose induced MS. Four groups of rats (n = 8–10 were fed on fructose-enriched diet (FED for 16 weeks. One served as FED-control while the remaining groups were treated with CoQ (10 mg/kg/day, Rosi (4 mg/kg/day or their combination during the last 6 weeks. Another group was fed on normal laboratory chow (normal control. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were collected for estimation of markers related to MS. In addition, histological examination of liver, kidney and pancreas samples was done. Induction of the MS was associated with increased body weight gain (34% coupled with elevated levels of blood glucose (48%, insulin (86%, insulin resistance (270%, uric acid (69%, urea (155%, creatinine (129% and blood lipids with different degrees. Fructose-induced MS also reduced plasma catalase (62% and glutathione peroxidase (89% activities parallel to increased serum leptin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α levels. These changes were coupled by marked histological changes in the examined tissues. Treatment with CoQ or Rosi attenuated most of MS-induced changes. Besides, the combination of both agents further reduced blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and urea levels, as well as, normalized serum levels of leptin and TNF-α. In addition, combined therapy of both agents elevated HDL-cholesterol level and glutathione peroxidase activity. In conclusion, the present study proves the benefits of co-supplementation of CoQ and Rosi in a fructose-induced model of insulin resistance.

  10. Generation of enterocyte-like cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells for drug absorption and metabolism studies in human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Tatsuya; Takayama, Kazuo; Okamoto, Ryota; Negoro, Ryosuke; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Kawabata, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-12

    Enterocytes play an important role in drug absorption and metabolism. However, a widely used enterocyte model, Caco-2 cell, has difficulty in evaluating both drug absorption and metabolism because the expression levels of some drug absorption and metabolism-related genes in these cells differ largely from those of human enterocytes. Therefore, we decided to generate the enterocyte-like cells from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells (hiPS-ELCs), which are applicable to drug absorption and metabolism studies. The efficiency of enterocyte differentiation from human iPS cells was significantly improved by using EGF, SB431542, and Wnt3A, and extending the differentiation period. The gene expression levels of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and peptide transporter 1 in the hiPS-ELCs were higher than those in Caco-2 cells. In addition, CYP3A4 expression in the hiPS-ELCs was induced by treatment with 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 or rifampicin, which are known to induce CYP3A4 expression, indicating that the hiPS-ELCs have CYP3A4 induction potency. Moreover, the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) value of the hiPS-ELC monolayer was approximately 240 Ω*cm(2), suggesting that the hiPS-ELC monolayer could form a barrier. In conclusion, we succeeded in establishing an enterocyte model from human iPS cells which have potential to be applied for drug absorption and metabolism studies.

  11. Metabolic enhancer piracetam attenuates rotenone induced oxidative stress: a study in different rat brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Joshi, Neeraj; Raju, Kunumuri Sivarama; Wahajuddin, Muhammad; Singh, Rama Kant; Singh, Sarika

    2015-01-01

    Piracetam is clinically being used nootropic drug but the details of its neuroprotective mechanism are not well studied. The present study was conducted to assess the effects of piracetam on rotenone induced oxidative stress by using both ex vivo and in vivo test systems. Rats were treated with piracetam (600 mg/kg b.w. oral) for seven constitutive days prior to rotenone administration (intracerebroventricular, 12 µg) in rat brain. Rotenone induced oxidative stress was assessed after 1 h and 24 h of rotenone administration. Ex vivo estimations were performed by using two experimental designs. In one experimental design the rat brain homogenate was treated with rotenone (1 mM, 2 mM and 4 mM) and rotenone+piracetam (10 mM) for 1 h. While in second experimental design the rats were pretreated with piracetam for seven consecutive days. On eighth day the rats were sacrificed, brain homogenate was prepared and treated with rotenone (1 mM, 2 mM and 4mM) for 1h. After treatment the glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in brain homogenate. In vivo study showed that pretreatment of piracetam offered significant protection against rotenone induced decreased GSH and increased MDA level though the protection was region specific. But the co-treatment of piracetam with rotenone did not offer significant protection against rotenone induced oxidative stress in ex vivo study. Whereas ex vivo experiments in rat brain homogenate of piracetam pretreated rats, showed the significant protection against rotenone induced oxidative stress. Findings indicated that pretreatment of piracetam significantly attenuated the rotenone induced oxidative stress though the protection was region specific. Piracetam treatment to rats led to its absorption and accumulation in different brain regions as assessed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. In conclusion, study indicates the piracetam is able to enhance the antioxidant capacity in brain cells

  12. The role of arachidonic acid metabolism in virus-induced alveolar macrophage dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laegreid, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) recovered from virus-infected lungs have decreased phagocytic, respiratory burst and bactericidal activities. The studies described below investigated the role of eicosanoids in virus induced AM bactericidal dysfunction. The spectrum of eicosanoid metabolites which bovine AM are capable of producing was determined. Cultured AM were exposed to {sup 3}H-arachidonate for 1 hour, stimulated for 4 hours with A23187, phorbol myristate acetate or zymosan and the supernatants extracted and analyzed by HPLC. All stimuli tested caused the release of these cyclooxygenase metabolites: thromboxane B{sub 2}, PGF{sub 2}, PGE{sub 2}, PGD{sub 2} and HHT. The effect of this enhanced release of arachidonate metabolites on the ability of AM to kill bacteria was evaluated. Preincubation with cyclooxygenase inhibitors or dual cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors resulted in partial reversal of the virus-induced bactericidal deficit in PI3 infected AM.

  13. Protective effects of vescalagin from pink wax apple [Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merrill and Perry] fruit against methylglyoxal-induced inflammation and carbohydrate metabolic disorder in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Chang; Shen, Szu-Chuan; Wu, James Swi-Bea

    2013-07-24

    The unbalance of glucose metabolism in humans may cause the excessive formation of methylglyoxal (MG), which can react with various biomolecules to form the precursor of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Vescalagin (VES) is an ellagitannin that alleviates insulin resistance in cell study. Results showed that VES reduced the value of oral glucose tolerance test, cardiovascular risk index, AGEs, and tumor necrosis factor-α contents while increasing C-peptide and d-lactate contents significantly in rats orally administered MG and VES together. The preventive effect of VES on MG-induced inflammation and carbohydrate metabolic disorder in rats was thus proved. On the basis of the experiment data, a mechanism, which involves the increase in d-lactate to retard AGE formation and the decrease in cytokine release to prevent β-cell damage, is proposed to explain the bioactivities of VES in antiglycation and in the alleviation of MG-induced carbohydrate metabolic disorder in rats.

  14. Detecting plant metabolic responses induced by ground shock using hyperspectral remote sensing and physiological contact measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickles, W.L.; Cater, G.A.

    1996-12-03

    A series of field experiments were done to determine if ground shock could have induced physiological responses in plants and if the level of the response could be observed. The observation techniques were remote sensing techniques and direct contact physiological measurements developed by Carter for detecting pre-visual plant stress. The remote sensing technique was similar to that used by Pickles to detect what appeared to be ground shock induced plant stress above the 1993 Non Proliferation Experiment`s underground chemical explosion. The experiment was designed to provide direct plant physiological measurements and remote sensing ratio images and from the same plants at the same time. The simultaneous direct and remote sensing measurements were done to establish a ground truth dataset to compare to the results of the hyperspectral remote sensing measurements. In addition, the experiment was designed to include data on what was thought to be the most probable interfering effect, dehydration. The experimental design included investigating the relative magnitude of the shock induced stress effects compared to dehydration effects.

  15. Ozone Induced Impairment of Systemic Metabolic Processes: Influence of Prior Ozone Exposure and Metformin Pre-treatment on Aged Wistar Kyoto (WKY) Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOT2014 Abstract for presentation: March 23-27, 2014; Phoenix, AZ Ozone Induced Impairment of Systemic Metabolic Processes: Influence of Prior Ozone Exposure and Metformin Pre-treatment on Aged Wistar Kyoto (WKY) Rats. V. Bass, D. Andrews, J. Richards, M. Schladweiler, A. Ledb...

  16. Metabolism of 2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 136) atropisomers in tissue slices from phenobarbital or dexamethasone-induced rats is sex-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xianai; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Dammanahalli, Karigowda J; Duffel, Michael; Lein, Pamela J; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2013-11-01

    1. Chiral polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) such as PCB 136 enantioselectively sensitize the ryanodine receptor (RyR). In light of recent evidence that PCBs cause developmental neurotoxicity via RyR-dependent mechanisms, this suggests that enantioselective PCB metabolism may influence the developmental neurotoxicity of chiral PCBs. However, enantioselective disposition of PCBs has not been fully characterized. 2. The effect of sex and cytochrome P450 (P450) enzyme induction on the enantioselective metabolism of PCB 136 was studied using liver tissue slices prepared from naïve control (CTL), phenobarbital (PB; CYP2B inducer) or dexamethasone (DEX; CYP3A inducer) pretreated adult Sprague-Dawley rats. PCB 136 metabolism was also examined in hippocampal slices derived from untreated rat pups. 3. In liver tissue slices, hydroxylated PCB (OH-PCB) profiles depended on sex and inducer pretreatment, and OH-PCB levels followed the rank orders male > female and PB > DEX > CTL. In contrast, the enantiomeric enrichment of PCB 136 and its metabolites was independent of sex and inducer pretreatment. Only small amounts of PCB 136 partitioned into hippocampal tissue slices and no OH-PCB metabolites were detected. 4. Our results suggest that enantioselective metabolism, sex and induction status of P450 enzymes in the liver may modulate the neurotoxic outcomes of developmental exposure to chiral PCBs.

  17. Acute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for Society of Toxicology, March 22-25, 2015, San Diego, CAAcute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II DiabetesS.J. Snow1,3, D. Miller2, V. Bass2, M. Schladweiler3, A. Ledbetter3, J. Richards3, C...

  18. Hypoglycemic effects of Zanthoxylum alkylamides by enhancing glucose metabolism and ameliorating pancreatic dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yuming; Ren, Ting; Zhang, Shiqi; Shirima, Gerald Gasper; Cheng, YaJiao; Liu, Xiong

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the hypoglycemic effect of Zanthoxylum alkylamides and explore the potential mechanism in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetic rats were orally treated with 3, 6, and 9 mg per kg bw alkylamides daily for 28 days. As the alkylamide dose increased, the relative weights of the liver and kidney, fasting blood glucose, and fructosamine levels were significantly decreased. The alkylamides also significantly increased the body weight and improved the oral glucose tolerance of the rats. Likewise, the alkylamides significantly increased the levels of liver and muscle glycogen and plasma insulin. These substances further alleviated the histopathological changes in the pancreas of the diabetic rats. The beneficial effects of high-dose alkylamides showed a comparable activity to the anti-diabetic drug glibenclamide. Western blot and real-time PCR results revealed that the alkylamide treatment significantly decreased the expression levels of the key enzymes (phosphoenolpyruvate caboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase) involved in gluconeogenesis and increased the glycolysis enzyme (glucokinase) in the liver, and enhanced the expression levels of pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1, glucokinase, and glucose transporter 2 in the pancreas. In addition, it was also observed that the alkylamides, unlike glibenclamide, increased the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 and decreased cannabinoid receptor 1 expressions in the liver and pancreas. Therefore, alkylamides can prevent STZ-induced hyperglycemia by altering the expression levels of the genes related to glucose metabolism and by ameliorating pancreatic dysfunction.

  19. Protective Effects of PGC-1α Against Lead-Induced Oxidative Stress and Energy Metabolism Dysfunction in Testis Sertoli Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Ye, Jingping; Wang, Lu; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Yucheng; Sun, Jiantao; Du, Chuang; Wang, Chunhong; Xu, Siyuan

    2017-02-01

    The reproductive system is sensitive to lead (Pb) toxicity, which has long been an area of research interest, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be illustrated. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is pivotal in mitochondrial function. In this study, mouse testis Sertoli cells (TM4 cells), PGC-1α lower-expression (PGC-1α(-)) TM4 cells and PGC-1α overexpression (PGC-1α(+)) TM4 cells were used to explore the protective roles of PGC-1α against lead toxicity on the mouse reproductive system. Lead acetate (PbAc) exposure decreased the expression level of PGC-1α, increased the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and reduced the level of ATP in the three TM4 cell lines. The effects of PbAc on intracellular ATP level and on ROS content were significantly weakened in PGC-1α(+)TM4 cells versus TM4 cells and were significantly amplified in PGC-1α(-)TM4 cells versus TM4 cells. These results suggest that PGC-1α is a protective factor against PbAc-induced oxidative stress and energy metabolism dysfunction in the mouse reproductive system, thereby holding the potential of being developed as a preventive or therapeutic strategy against disorders induced by lead exposure.

  20. Senescence-inducible expression of isopentenyl transferase extends leaf life, increases drought stress resistance and alters cytokinin metabolism in cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Wen-Quan; Zhang, Gen-Liang; Kaminek, Miroslav; Dobrev, Petre; Xu, Jia; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2010-07-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) sheds its leaves during growth, especially within the tropical dry season. With the production of SAG12-IPT transgenic cassava we want to test the level of leaf retention and altered cytokinin metabolism of transgenic plants via the autoregulatory senescence inhibition system. After confirmation of transgene expression by molecular analysis and phenotype examination in greenhouse plants, two transgenic plant lines, 529-28 and 529-48, were chosen for further investigation. Detached mature leaves of 529-28 plants retained high levels of chlorophyll compared with wild-type leaves after dark-induced senescence treatment. Line 529-28 showed significant drought tolerance as indicated by stay-green capacity after drought stress treatment. Field experiments proved that leaf senescence syndrome was significantly delayed in 529-28 plants in comparison with wild-type and 529-48 plants. Physiological and agronomical characterizations of these plants also revealed that the induced expression of IPT had effects on photosynthesis, sugar allocation and nitrogen partitioning. Importantly, the 529-28 plants accumulated a high level of trans-zeatin-type cytokinins particularly of corresponding storage O-glucosides to maintain cytokinin homeostasis. Our study proves the feasibility of prolonging the leaf life of woody cassava and also sheds light on the control of cytokinin homeostasis in cassava leaves.

  1. Effect of linseed oil and macadamia oil on metabolic changes induced by high-fat diet in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrena, Helenton C; Schiavon, Fabiana P M; Cararra, Marcia A; Marques, Any de Castro R; Schamber, Christiano R; Curi, Rui; Bazotte, Roberto B

    2014-06-01

    The effects of linseed oil (LO) and macadamia oil (MO) on the metabolic changes induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) rich in saturated fatty acid were investigated. For the purpose of this study, the vegetable oil present in the HFD, i.e. soybean oil (SO) was replaced with LO (HFD-LO) or MO (HFD-MO). For comparative purposes, a group was included, which received a normal fat diet (NFD). Male Swiss mice (6-week old) were used. After 14 days under the dietary conditions, the mice were fasted for 18 h, and experiments were then performed. The HFD-SO, HFD-LO and HFD-MO groups showed higher glycaemia (p fat weights were higher (p < 0.05) in the HFD-SO and HFD-MO groups as compared with the NFD group. However, there was no significant difference in these parameters between the NFD and HFD-LO groups. Thus, the protective role of LO on lipid accumulation induced by an HFD rich in saturated fatty acid is potentially mediated by the high content of ɷ-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid in LO.

  2. Huang Qi Jian Zhong Pellet Attenuates TNBS-Induced Colitis in Rats via Mechanisms Involving Improvement of Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Duan-Yong; Pan, Chun-Shui; Liu, Yu-Ying; Wei, Xiao-Hong; Zhou, Chang-Man; Sun, Kai; He, Ke; Li, Chong; Yan, Li; Fan, Jing-Yu; Wang, Chuan-She; Hibi, Toshifumi; Liu, Hong-Ning; Han, Jing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Huang Qi Jian Zhong Pellet (HQJZ) is a famous Chinese medicine formula for treatment of various gastrointestinal tract diseases. This study investigated the role of HQJZ in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- (TNBS-) induced colitis and its underlying mechanism. Colonic mucosal injury was induced by TNBS in the Sprague-Dawley rats. In the HQJZ treatment group, HQJZ was administered (2 g/kg) for 14 days starting from day 1 after TNBS infusion. Colonic mucosal injury occurred obviously 1 day after TNBS challenge and did not recover distinctively until day 15, including an increase in macro- and microscopic scores, a colonic weight index, a decrease in colonic length, a number of functional capillaries, and blood flow. Inverted intravital microscopy and ELISA showed colonic microcirculatory disturbances and inflammatory responses after TNBS stimulation, respectively. TNBS decreased occludin, RhoA, and ROCK-I, while increasing Rac-1, PAK-1, and phosphorylated myosin light chain. In addition, ATP content and ATP5D expression in colonic mucosa decreased after TNBS challenge. Impressively, treatment with HQJZ significantly attenuated all of the alterations evoked by TNBS, promoting the recovery of colonic injury. The present study demonstrated HQJZ as a multitargeting management for colonic mucosal injury, which set in motion mechanisms involving improvement of energy metabolism.

  3. Huang Qi Jian Zhong Pellet Attenuates TNBS-Induced Colitis in Rats via Mechanisms Involving Improvement of Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan-Yong Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Huang Qi Jian Zhong Pellet (HQJZ is a famous Chinese medicine formula for treatment of various gastrointestinal tract diseases. This study investigated the role of HQJZ in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- (TNBS- induced colitis and its underlying mechanism. Colonic mucosal injury was induced by TNBS in the Sprague-Dawley rats. In the HQJZ treatment group, HQJZ was administered (2 g/kg for 14 days starting from day 1 after TNBS infusion. Colonic mucosal injury occurred obviously 1 day after TNBS challenge and did not recover distinctively until day 15, including an increase in macro- and microscopic scores, a colonic weight index, a decrease in colonic length, a number of functional capillaries, and blood flow. Inverted intravital microscopy and ELISA showed colonic microcirculatory disturbances and inflammatory responses after TNBS stimulation, respectively. TNBS decreased occludin, RhoA, and ROCK-I, while increasing Rac-1, PAK-1, and phosphorylated myosin light chain. In addition, ATP content and ATP5D expression in colonic mucosa decreased after TNBS challenge. Impressively, treatment with HQJZ significantly attenuated all of the alterations evoked by TNBS, promoting the recovery of colonic injury. The present study demonstrated HQJZ as a multitargeting management for colonic mucosal injury, which set in motion mechanisms involving improvement of energy metabolism.

  4. Metabolic respiration induces AMPK- and Ire1p-dependent activation of the p38-Type HOG MAPK pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Adhikari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionarily conserved mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways regulate the response to stress as well as cell differentiation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, growth in non-preferred carbon sources (like galactose induces differentiation to the filamentous cell type through an extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK-type MAPK pathway. The filamentous growth MAPK pathway shares components with a p38-type High Osmolarity Glycerol response (HOG pathway, which regulates the response to changes in osmolarity. To determine the extent of functional overlap between the MAPK pathways, comparative RNA sequencing was performed, which uncovered an unexpected role for the HOG pathway in regulating the response to growth in galactose. The HOG pathway was induced during growth in galactose, which required the nutrient regulatory AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK Snf1p, an intact respiratory chain, and a functional tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. The unfolded protein response (UPR kinase Ire1p was also required for HOG pathway activation in this context. Thus, the filamentous growth and HOG pathways are both active during growth in galactose. The two pathways redundantly promoted growth in galactose, but paradoxically, they also inhibited each other's activities. Such cross-modulation was critical to optimize the differentiation response. The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans showed a similar regulatory circuit. Thus, an evolutionarily conserved regulatory axis links metabolic respiration and AMPK to Ire1p, which regulates a differentiation response involving the modulated activity of ERK and p38 MAPK pathways.

  5. Tyrosol, a phenolic compound, ameliorates hyperglycemia by regulating key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramohan, Ramasamy; Pari, Leelavinothan; Rathinam, Ayyasamy; Sheikh, Bashir Ahmad

    2015-03-05

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of tyrosol, a phenolic compound, on the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in the control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced in rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (40 mg/kg body weight). Experimental rats were administered tyrosol 1 ml intra gastrically at the doses of 5, 10 and 20mg/kg body weight and glibenclamide 1 ml at a dose of 600 μg/kg body weight once a day for 45 days. At the end of the experimental period, diabetic control rats exhibited significant (ptyrosol to diabetic rats reversed all the above mentioned biochemical parameters to near normal in a dose dependent manner. Tyrosol at a dose of 20mg/kg body weight showed the highest significant effect than the other two doses. Immunohistochemical staining of pancreas revealed that tyrosol treated diabetic rats showed increased insulin immunoreactive β-cells, which confirmed the biochemical findings. The observed results were compared with glibenclamide, a standard oral hypoglycemic drug. The results of the present study suggest that tyrosol decreases hyperglycemia, by its antioxidant effect.

  6. Dietary fat interacts with PCBs to induce changes in lipid metabolism in LDL receptor deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, B.; Reiterer, G.; Toborek, M.; Matveev, S.V.; Daugherty, A.; Smart, E. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States); Robertson, L.W. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)

    2004-09-15

    From epidemiological studies, there is substantial evidence that cardiovascular diseases are linked to environmental pollution and that exposure to polycyclic and/or polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons can lead to human cardiovascular toxicity. A major route of exposure to PCBs in humans is via oral ingestion of contaminated food products. Therefore, circulating environmental contaminants derived from diets, such as PCBs, are in intimate contact with the vascular endothelium. Endothelial activation and dysfunction is an important factor in the overall regulation of vascular lesion pathology. In addition to endothelial barrier dysfunction, another functional change in atherosclerosis is the activation of the endothelium that is manifested as an increase in the expression of specific cytokines and adhesion molecules. These cytokines and adhesion molecules are proposed to mediate the inflammatory aspects of the disease by regulating the vascular entry of leukocytes. Alterations in lipid profile and lipid metabolism as a result of exposure to PCBs may be important components of endothelial cell dysfunction. Little is known about the interaction of dietary fats and PCBs in the pathology of atherosclerosis. We have reported a significant disruption in endothelial barrier function when cells were exposed to linoleic acid. In the current study we aimed to demonstrate the PCB-fatty acid interaction in vivo and hypothesized that PCB toxicity can be modulated by the type of fat consumed.

  7. Changes in metabolic pathways of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 cells induced by molybdate excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rashmi R; Silveira, Célia M; Diniz, Mário S; Almeida, Maria G; Moura, Jose J G; Rivas, Maria G

    2015-03-01

    The activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) intensifies the problems associated to corrosion of metals and the solution entails significant economic costs. Although molybdate can be used to control the negative effects of these organisms, the mechanisms triggered in the cells exposed to Mo-excess are poorly understood. In this work, the effects of molybdate ions on the growth and morphology of the SRB Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 (DaG20) were investigated. In addition, the cellular localization, ion uptake and regulation of protein expression were studied. We found that molybdate concentrations ranging between 50 and 150 µM produce a twofold increase in the doubling time with this effect being more significant at 200 µM molybdate (five times increase in the doubling time). It was also observed that 500 µM molybdate completely inhibits the cellular growth. On the context of protein regulation, we found that several enzymes involved in energy metabolism, cellular division and metal uptake processes were particularly influenced under the conditions tested. An overall description of some of the mechanisms involved in the DaG20 adaptation to molybdate-stress conditions is discussed.

  8. The role of adrenals in diazinon-induced changes in carbohydrate metabolism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matin, M A; Sattar, S; Husain, K

    1990-12-01

    Treatment of rats with diazinon (40 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in hyperglycaemia and depletion of glycogen from the brain and peripheral tissues two hours after administration. The activities of glycogen phosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase were significantly higher in the brain and liver; that of glucose-6-phosphatase was not altered. The activities of the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase and lactate dehydrogenase were increased only in the brain. The cholinesterase activity in the brain was reduced by treatment with diazinon. The activities of the hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes fructose 1,6-diphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were significantly increased. The lactate level was increased in the brain and blood, whereas that of pyruvate was not changed. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was not changed to any major extent. Cholesterol and ascorbic acid contents of adrenals were depleted in diazinon-treated animals. The changes were pronounced after intraperitoneal administration of 40 mg/kg diazinon, they were slight but significant after 20 mg/kg, and absent after 10 mg/kg. Hyperglycaemia and changes in carbohydrate metabolism were abolished by adrenalectomy suggesting possible involvement of adrenals.

  9. Microscopic analysis of cell death by metabolic stress-induced autophagy in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changou, Chun; Cheng, R. Holland; Bold, Richard; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y. S.

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular recycling mechanism that helps cells to survive against environmental stress and nutritional starvation. We have recently shown that prostate cancers undergo metabolic stress and caspase-independent cell death following exposure to arginine deiminase (ADI, an enzyme that degrades arginine in tissue). The aims of our current investigation into the application of ADI as a novel cancer therapy are to identify the components mediating tumor cell death, and to determine the role of autophagy (stimulated by ADI and/or rapamycin) on cell death. Using advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques including 3D deconvolution and superresolution structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), we show that prostate tumor cells that are killed after exposure to ADI for extended periods, exhibit a morphology that is distinct from caspase-dependent apoptosis; and that autophagosomes forming as a result of ADI stimulation contain DAPI-stained nuclear material. Fluorescence imaging (as well as cryo-electron microscopy) show a breakdown of both the inner and outer nuclear membranes at the interface between the cell nucleus and aggregated autophagolysosomes. Finally, the addition of N-acetyl cysteine (or NAC, a scavenger for reactive oxygen species) effectively abolishes the appearance of autophagolysosomes containing nuclear material. We hope to continue this research to understand the processes that govern the survival or death of these tumor cells, in order to develop methods to improve the efficacy of cancer pharmacotherapy.

  10. Nitrogen-induced metabolic changes and molecular determinants of carbon allocation in Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kenneth Wei Min; Lin, Huixin; Shen, Hui; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2016-11-16

    Certain species of microalgae are natural accumulators of lipids, while others are more inclined to store starch. However, what governs the preference to store lipids or starch is not well understood. In this study, the microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta was used as a model to study the global gene expression profile regulating starch accumulation in microalgae. D. tertiolecta, when depleted of nitrogen, produced only 1% of dry cell weight (DCW) in neutral lipids, while starch was rapidly accumulated up to 46% DCW. The increased in starch content was accompanied by a coordinated overexpression of genes shunting carbon towards starch synthesis, a response not seen in the oleaginous microalgae Nannochloropsis oceanica, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii or Chlorella vulgaris. Genes in the central carbon metabolism pathways, particularly those of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, were also simultaneously upregulated, indicating a robust interchange of carbon skeletons for anabolic and catabolic processes. In contrast, fatty acid and triacylglycerol synthesis genes were downregulated or unchanged, suggesting that lipids are not a preferred form of storage in these cells. This study reveals the transcriptomic influence behind storage reserve allocation in D. tertiolecta and provides valuable insights into the possible manipulation of genes for engineering microorganisms to synthesize products of interest.

  11. Intrinsic and TME-induced metabolism adaptations of T cells and impact on their differentiation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    soumaya ekouidhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. In this context, multilevel interactions between metabolic system and T lymphocyte signaling and fate exist. This review will discuss different potential cell metabolism pathways involved in shaping T lymphocyte function and differentiation. We will also provide a general framework for understanding how tumor microenvironmental metabolism, associated with hypoxic stress, interferes with T-cell priming and expansion. How T cell metabolism drives T cell–mediated immunity and how the manipulation of metabolic programming for therapeutic purposes will be also discussed.

  12. Intrinsic and Tumor Microenvironment-Induced Metabolism Adaptations of T Cells and Impact on Their Differentiation and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouidhi, Soumaya; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Kieda, Claudine; Elgaaied, Amel Benammar; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. In this context, multilevel interactions between metabolic system and T lymphocyte signaling and fate exist. This review will discuss different potential cell metabolism pathways involved in shaping T lymphocyte function and differentiation. We will also provide a general framework for understanding how tumor microenvironmental metabolism, associated with hypoxic stress, interferes with T-cell priming and expansion. How T-cell metabolism drives T-cell-mediated immunity and how the manipulation of metabolic programing for therapeutic purposes will be also discussed. PMID:27066006

  13. The Metabolism of the Pancreas Carcinogen N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropylAmine by Hamster Pancreas Duct Epithelial Cell Clones; Evidence for Different Metabolic Efficiencies and Response to Cytochrome P450 Inducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolar C

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: We have isolated five stable clones from a primary culture of Syrian golden hamster pancreatic duct epithelial cells and have designated them as CK1 through CK5. DESIGN: Here we describe the ability of two of these, CK1 and CK5, to metabolize the pancreas carcinogen N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropylamine. The metabolism was assessed as the production of mutated V79 cells in a CK cell/V79 co-culture set up. RESULTS: At a dose of 0.1 mM N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropylamine, the CK1 cells produced 82.3 +/- 17.2 mutants/1,000,000 survivors while the CK5 cells produced only 33.2 +/- 10.8 mutants/1,000,000 survivors, both are mean +/- SD (n = 8. Furthermore, both cell types responded differently to two inducers of cytochrome P450 activity, namely Arochlor 1254 and EtOH. Arochlor 1254 treatment did not affect the metabolizing ability of CK1 cells while EtOH treatment resulted in a twofold increase in the mutation frequency. Arochlor and EtOH treatment inhibited the ability of CK5 cells to metabolize N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropylamine. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that the duct epithelium of the pancreas is a multi-cellular tissue and the different cell types within the epithelium have different abilities to metabolize xenobiotic chemicals.

  14. Oxidative state and oxidative metabolism in the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; de Castro Ghizoni, Cristiane Vizioli; Bersani Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar; Comar, Jurandir Fernando

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the oxidative status of the brain of arthritic rats, based mainly on the observation that arthritis induces a pronounced oxidative stress in the liver of arthritis rats and that morphological alterations have been reported to occur in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis were used. These animals presented higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the total brain homogenate (25% higher) and in the mitochondria (+55%) when compared to healthy rats. The nitrite plus nitrate contents, nitric oxide (NO) markers, were also increased in both mitochondria (+27%) and cytosol (+14%). Arthritic rats also presented higher levels of protein carbonyl groups in the total homogenate (+43%), mitochondria (+69%) and cytosol (+145%). Arthritis caused a diminution of oxygen consumption in isolated brain mitochondria only when ascorbate was the electron donor. The disease diminished the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity by 55%, but increased the transmembrane potential by 16%. The pro-oxidant enzyme xanthine oxidase was 150%, 110% and 283% higher, respectively, in the brain homogenate, mitochondria and cytosol of arthritic animals. The same occurred with the calcium-independent NO-synthase activity that was higher in the brain homogenate (90%) and cytosol (122%) of arthritic rats. The catalase activity, on the other hand, was diminished by arthritis in all cellular fractions (between 30 and 40%). It is apparent that the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis presents a pronounced oxidative stress and a significant injury to lipids and proteins, a situation that possibly contributes to the brain symptoms of the arthritis disease.

  15. Metabolic disruptions induced by reduced ambulatory activity in free-living humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyfault, John P; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    to answer these questions. Previous studies have successfully used more extreme models of inactivity, including bed rest, or the cessation of exercise in highly trained endurance athletes, to provide novel findings. However, these models do not accurately reflect the type of inactivity experienced...... and increased central adiposity. This review will discuss the outcomes of these studies, their implications for the cause/effect relationship between central adiposity and insulin resistance, and provide rationale for why inactivity induces these factors. In addition, the experimental challenges of directly...

  16. PGC-1alpha in exercise- and exercise training-induced metabolic adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm

    and interferes with the exercise-induced adaptive response in human skeletal muscle. Study II demonstrates that mouse liver glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) mRNA content increased in recovery from acute exercise in both wildtype (WT) and PGC-1α knockout (KO) mice, while phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK...... content in WT, but not in PGC-1α KO mice. This shows that exercise training increases UCP1, COXIV and CD31 protein in mouse iWAT, likely as a cumulative effect of transient increases in mRNA expression after each exercise bout, and that PGC-1α is required for these adaptations. Study IV demonstrates...

  17. Short-term captivity influences maximal cold-induced metabolic rates and their repeatability in summer-acclimatized American goldfinches Spinus tristis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David L.SWANSON; Marisa O.KING

    2013-01-01

    Studies of metabolic variation in birds have involved both wild and captive individuals,but few studies have investigated whether captivity directly influences metabolic rates,despite such variation potentially confounding conclusions regarding how metabolic rates respond to the conditions under study.In addition,whether short-term captivity influences metabolic rate repeatability in birds is currently uninvestigated.In this study,we measured Msum (maximal cold-induced metabolic rates) in summer acclimatized American goldfinches Spinus tristis directly after capture from wild populations,after approximately 2 weeks of indoor captivity (Captive 1),and again after an additional 1-2 weeks of captivity (Captive 2).Msum increased significantly (16.9%) following the initial captive period,but remained stable thereafter.Body mass (Mb) also increased significantly (9.2%) during the initial captive period but remained stable thereafter,suggesting that muscle growth and/or remodeling of body composition produced the observed metabolic variation.Mb and Msum were not significantly repeatable between wild and Captive 1 birds,but were significantly repeatable between Captive 1 and Captive 2 groups.These data suggest that caution must be exercised when extrapolating metabolic rates from short-term captive to wild populations.In addition,Msum was a repeatable trait for birds under conditions where mean metabolic rates remained stable,but Msum repeatability disappeared during acclimation to conditions promoting phenotypically flexible metabolic responses.This suggests that the capacity for phenotypic flexibility varies among individuals,and such variation could have fitness consequences.

  18. Glycated albumin suppresses glucose-induced insulin secretion by impairing glucose metabolism in rat pancreatic β-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muto Takashi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycated albumin (GA is an Amadori product used as a marker of hyperglycemia. In this study, we investigated the effect of GA on insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells. Methods Islets were collected from male Wistar rats by collagenase digestion. Insulin secretion in the presence of non-glycated human albumin (HA and GA was measured under three different glucose concentrations, 3 mM (G3, 7 mM (G7, and 15 mM (G15, with various stimulators. Insulin secretion was measured with antagonists of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS, and the expression of iNOS-mRNA was investigated by real-time PCR. Results Insulin secretion in the presence of HA and GA was 20.9 ± 3.9 and 21.6 ± 5.5 μU/3 islets/h for G3 (P = 0.920, and 154 ± 9.3 and 126.1 ± 7.3 μU/3 islets/h (P = 0.046, for G15, respectively. High extracellular potassium and 10 mM tolbutamide abrogated the inhibition of insulin secretion by GA. Glyceraldehyde, dihydroxyacetone, methylpyruvate, GLP-1, and forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, did not abrogate the inhibition. Real-time PCR showed that GA did not induce iNOS-mRNA expression. Furthermore, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase, aminoguanidine, and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester did not abrogate the inhibition of insulin secretion. Conclusion GA suppresses glucose-induced insulin secretion from rat pancreatic β-cells through impairment of intracellular glucose metabolism.

  19. Oral salmon calcitonin enhances insulin action and glucose metabolism in diet-induced obese streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigh, Michael; Hjuler, Sara T; Andreassen, Kim V; Gydesen, Sofie; Ottosen, Ida; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Christiansen, Claus; Karsdal, Morten A; Henriksen, Kim

    2014-08-15

    We previously reported that oral delivery of salmon calcitonin (sCT) improved energy and glucose homeostasis and attenuated diabetic progression in animal models of diet-induced obesity (DIO) and type 2 diabetes, although the glucoregulatory mode of action was not fully elucidated. In the present study we hypothesized that oral sCT as pharmacological intervention 1) exerted anti-hyperglycemic efficacy, and 2) enhanced insulin action in DIO-streptozotocin (DIO-STZ) diabetic rats. Diabetic hyperglycemia was induced in male selectively bred DIO rats by a single low dose (30mg/kg) injection of STZ. Oral sCT by gavage was delivered as once-daily administration with lead-in (2mg/kg) and maintenance (0.5mg/kg) dose of oral sCT for a total of 21 days. Food intake, body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, glucose and insulin tolerance test, and parameters of insulin sensitivity were investigated. Plasma glucoregulatory hormones and pancreatic insulin content were analyzed. Oral sCT treatment induced a pronounced anorectic action during the 7 days lead-in period and markedly reduced food intake and body weight in conjunction with improved glucose homeostasis. During the maintenance period, oral sCT normalized food intake and attenuated weight loss, albeit sustained glycemic control by reducing fasting blood glucose and HbA1c levels compared to those of vehicle-treated rats at the end of study. Notably, plasma levels of insulin, glucagon, leptin and adiponectin were unaltered, albeit insulin action was enhanced in conjunction with protection of pancreatic insulin content. The results of the present study indicate that oral sCT exerts a novel insulin-sensitizing effect to improve glucose metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  20. Implications of altered glutathione metabolism in aspirin-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Raza

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin, ASA induces cell cycle arrest, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in HepG2 cells. In the present study, we have further elucidated that altered glutathione (GSH-redox metabolism in HepG2 cells play a critical role in ASA-induced cytotoxicity. Using selected doses and time point for ASA toxicity, we have demonstrated that when GSH synthesis is inhibited in HepG2 cells by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, prior to ASA treatment, cytotoxicity of the drug is augmented. On the other hand, when GSH-depleted cells were treated with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, cytotoxicity/apoptosis caused by ASA was attenuated with a significant recovery in oxidative stress, GSH homeostasis, DNA fragmentation and some of the mitochondrial functions. NAC treatment, however, had no significant effects on the drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase activity and ATP synthesis in GSH-depleted cells. Our results have confirmed that aspirin increases apoptosis by increased reactive oxygen species production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory functions. These effects were further amplified when GSH-depleted cells were treated with ASA. We have also shown that some of the effects of aspirin might be associated with reduced GSH homeostasis, as treatment of cells with NAC attenuated the effects of BSO and aspirin. Our results strongly suggest that GSH dependent redox homeostasis in HepG2 cells is critical in preserving mitochondrial functions and preventing oxidative stress associated complications caused by aspirin treatment.

  1. Ethanol Promotes Chemically Induced Oral Cancer in Mice through Activation of the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway of Arachidonic Acid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yizhu; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Xinyan; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol drinking is a known risk factor for oral cancer in humans. However, previous animal studies on the promoting effect of ethanol on oral carcinogenesis were inconclusive. It is necessary to develop an animal model with which the molecular mechanism of ethanol-related oral carcinogenesis may be elucidated in order to develop effective prevention strategies. In this study, mice were first treated with 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO, 100μg/ml in drinking water) for 8 weeks, and then given water or ethanol (8%) as the sole drink for another 16 weeks. During the experiment, 8% ethanol was well tolerated by mice. The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) increased from 20% (8/41) to 43% (17/40; p<0.05). Expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) was increased in dysplasia and SCC of 4NQO-treated tongues, and further enhanced by ethanol. Using this mouse model, we further demonstrated that fewer cancers were induced in Alox5−/− mice, as were cell proliferation, inflammation, and angiogenesis in the tongue, as compared with Alox5+/+ mice. Interestingly, Cox-2 expression was induced by ethanol in knockout mice, while 5-Lox and leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) expression and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) biosynthesis were dramatically reduced. Moreover, ethanol enhanced expression and nuclear localization of 5-Lox and stimulated LTB4 biosynthesis in human tongue SCC cells (SCC-15 and SCC-4) in vitro. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrated that ethanol promoted 4NQO-induced oral carcinogenesis, at least in part, through further activation of the 5-Lox pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism. PMID:21881027

  2. Mechanisms for epigallocatechin gallate induced inhibition of drug metabolizing enzymes in rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Zuquan; Greenhaw, James; Salminen, William F; Shi, Qiang

    2012-11-15

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) inhibits drug metabolizing enzymes by unknown mechanisms. Here we examined if the inhibition is due to covalent-binding of EGCG to the enzymes or formation of protein aggregates. EGCG was incubated with rat liver microsomes at 1-100μM for 30min. The EGCG-binding proteins were affinity purified using m-aminophenylboronic acid agarose and probed with antibodies against glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), actin, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B1/2, CYP2E1, CYP3A, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and microsomal glutathione transferase 1 (MGST1). All but actin and soluble COMT were positively detected at ≥1μM EGCG, indicating EGCG selectively bound to a subset of proteins including membrane-bound COMT. The binding correlated well with inhibition of CYP activities, except for CYP2E1 whose activity was unaffected despite evident binding. The antioxidant enzyme MGST1, but not cytosolic GSTs, was remarkably inhibited, providing novel evidence supporting the pro-oxidative effects of EGCG. When microsomes incubated with EGCG were probed on Western blots, all but the actin and CYP2E1 antibodies showed a significant reduction in binding at ≥1μM EGCG, suggesting that a fraction of the indicated proteins formed aggregates that likely contributed to the inhibitory effects of EGCG but were not recognizable by antibodies against the intact proteins. This raised the possibility that previous reports on EGCG regulating protein expression using GAPDH as a reference should be revisited for accuracy. Remarkable protein aggregate formation in EGCG-treated microsomes was also observed by analyzing Coomassie Blue-stained SDS-PAGE gels. EGCG effects were partially abolished in the presence of 1mM glutathione, suggesting they are particularly relevant to the in vivo conditions when glutathione is depleted by toxicant insults.

  3. Ethanol Sensitization during Adolescence or Adulthood Induces Different Patterns of Ethanol Consumption without Affecting Ethanol Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara-Nascimento, Priscila F.; Hoffmann, Lucas B.; Contó, Marcos B.; Marcourakis, Tania; Camarini, Rosana

    2017-01-01

    In previous study, we demonstrated that ethanol preexposure may increase ethanol consumption in both adolescent and adult mice, in a two-bottle choice model. We now questioned if ethanol exposure during adolescence results in changes of consumption pattern using a three-bottle choice procedure, considering drinking-in-the-dark and alcohol deprivation effect as strategies for ethanol consumption escalation. We also analyzed aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity as a measurement of ethanol metabolism. Adolescent and adult Swiss mice were treated with saline (SAL) or 2.0 g/kg ethanol (EtOH) during 15 days (groups: Adolescent-SAL, Adolescent-EtOH, Adult-SAL and Adult-EtOH). Five days after the last injection, mice were exposed to the three-bottle choice protocol using sucrose fading procedure (4% + sucrose vs. 8%–15% ethanol + sucrose vs. water + sucrose) for 2 h during the dark phase. Sucrose was faded out from 8% to 0%. The protocol was composed of a 6-week acquisition period, followed by four withdrawals and reexposures. Both adolescent and adult mice exhibited ethanol behavioral sensitization, although the magnitude of sensitization in adolescents was lower than in adults. Adolescent-EtOH displayed an escalation of 4% ethanol consumption during acquisition that was not observed in Adult-EtOH. Moreover, Adult-EtOH consumed less 4% ethanol throughout all the experiment and less 15% ethanol in the last reexposure period than Adolescent-EtOH. ALDH activity varied with age, in which older mice showed higher ALDH than younger ones. Ethanol pretreatment or the pattern of consumption did not have influence on ALDH activity. Our data suggest that ethanol pretreatment during adolescence but not adulthood may influence the pattern of ethanol consumption toward an escalation in ethanol consumption at low dose, without exerting an impact on ALDH activity.

  4. Aging-like skin changes induced by ultraviolet irradiation in an animal model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akase, Tomoko; Nagase, Takashi; Huang, Lijuan; Ibuki, Ai; Minematsu, Takeo; Nakagami, Gojiro; Ohta, Yasunori; Shimada, Tsutomu; Aburada, Masaki; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2012-04-01

    Both physiological skin aging and pathologic photo-aging caused by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are mediated by latent inflammation and oxidative stress. Although numerous animal skin-aging models have used UV irradiation, most require massive doses or long-term irradiation. To establish a more refined skin-aging model, we focused on an animal model of metabolic syndrome (MS) because MS involves damage to various organs via oxidative stress or inflammation, similar to the changes associated with aging. We hypothesized that MS skin might exhibit more aging-like changes after milder, shorter-term UV irradiation than would normal animal skin under similar conditions, thus providing a useful model for skin aging. The authors therefore examined the skin from Tsumura Suzuki obese diabetic (TSOD) mice (MS model) and control Tsumura Suzuki non-obese (TSNO) mice before and after UV irradiation. Skin from TSOD mice had a thinner epidermis and dermis, a thicker fatty layer, reduced density and convolution of the fragmented collagen fibers, and upregulated expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a dual marker for inflammation and aging, compared to the skin from TSNO mice. UV irradiation affected TSOD skin more severely than TSNO skin, resulting in various changes resembling those in aged human skin, including damage to the dermis and subcutaneous fatty tissue, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and further upregulation of TNF-α expression. These results suggest that UV-irradiated TSOD mice may provide a new model of skin aging and imply that skin from humans with MS is more susceptible to UV- or aging-related damage than normal human skin.

  5. Effect of exercise on burn-induced changes in tissue-specific glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Edward A; Paul, Kasie; Bonab, Ali A; Tompkins, Ronald G; Fischman, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is a component of the clinical management for burn patients, to help reduce muscle wasting associated with prolonged hospitalization. In the present study the authors examined 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG) uptake in mice subjected to burn injury with and without exercise. Mice had their the dorsums shaven, were placed in molds, and the exposed area was immersed in 90°C water for 9 seconds followed by resuscitation with saline (2 ml) to produce a 30% full-thickness burn injury. Twenty-four hours later, the mice were subjected to treadmill exercise for 1 hour. Before exercise, mice were injected with ~50 μCi 18FDG. Mice were killed after running and a complete biodistribution was performed. Exercise produced a stimulation of 18FDG update by skeletal muscle and heart, while reducing 18FDG accumulation in brain. Burn injury had no significant effect on 18FDG update by skeletal muscle, but did increase 18FDG accumulation in heart, while reducing 18FDG accumulation in brain. However, exercise combined with a burn injury produced a significant increase in 18FDG uptake in the skeletal muscle compared with the burned mice, as great as that produced in the sham animals subjected to exercise. The combination of burn plus exercise appeared to prevent the stimulation of 18FDG uptake by the heart produced by burn injury alone. Exercise treatment did not correct the changes in 18FDG uptake in the brain produced by burn injury. Separately, exercise and burn injury significantly increased serum interleukin-6 levels, increases that were higher when exercise was combined with the burn injury. These findings suggest that exercise may exert some therapeutic effects in burn patients by tissue-specific modulation of glucose metabolism, and these changes may be related to interleukin-6.

  6. Surfactant-induced alteration of arachidonic acid metabolism of mammalian cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leo, V A; Harber, L C; Kong, B M; De Salva, S J

    1987-04-01

    Primary irritancy in human and animal skin is characterized by an inflammatory reaction mediated, in part, by membrane-derived arachidonate metabolites. One of the mechanisms of this reaction was investigated in cultured mammalian cells using three surfactants: linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS), alkyl ethoxylate sulfate (AEOS), and TWEEN 20. These compounds listed in order in vivo irritancy are LAS greater than AEOS greater than TWEEN 20. Each of these compounds was studied in C3H-10T1/2 cells and human keratinocytes which had been prelabeled with 3H-labeled arachidonic acid (AA). After labeling, media were removed, cells were washed, and fresh media with or without surfactant were added. Cells were then incubated for 2 hr, media were removed and centrifuged, and an aliquot was assayed by liquid scintillation for release of label. In C3H-10T1/2 cells LAS and AEOS in 5-50 microM concentration stimulated 2 to 10 times the release of [3H]AA as compared to controls. In contrast, concentrations of 50-100 microM of TWEEN were required to release [3H]AA. With keratinocytes the same rank order of surfactant concentrations necessary for release was obtained as found with C3H-10T1/2 cells. High-performance liquid chromatography of media extracts of both cell systems revealed surfactant stimulation of the production of cyclooxygenase AA metabolites. These results confirm the induction of release by primary irritants of fatty acid groups from membrane phospholipids. Subsequent metabolism of these fatty acid groups are an integral part of the primary irritant response. Data presented with three known irritants in this in vitro model show a direct correlation with in vivo studies.

  7. Emersion induces nitrogen release and alteration of nitrogen metabolism in the intertidal genus Porphyra.

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    Jang K Kim

    Full Text Available We investigated emersion-induced nitrogen (N release from Porphyra umbilicalis Kütz. Thallus N concentration decreased during 4 h of emersion. Tissue N and soluble protein contents of P. umbilicalis were positively correlated and decreased during emersion. Growth of P. umbilicalis did not simply dilute the pre-emersion tissue N concentration. Rather, N was lost from tissues during emersion. We hypothesize that emersion-induced N release occurs when proteins are catabolized. While the δ(15N value of tissues exposed to emersion was higher than that of continuously submerged tissues, further discrimination of stable N isotopes did not occur during the 4 h emersion. We conclude that N release from Porphyra during emersion did not result from bacterial denitrification, but possibly as a consequence of photorespiration. The release of N by P. umbilicalis into the environment during emersion suggests a novel role of intertidal seaweeds in the global N cycle. Emersion also altered the physiological function (nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase activity, growth rate of P. umbilicalis and the co-occurring upper intertidal species P. linearis Grev., though in a seasonally influenced manner. Individuals of the year round perennial species P. umbilicalis were more tolerant of emersion than ephemeral, cold temperate P. linearis in early winter. However, the mid-winter populations of both P. linearis and P. umbilicalis, had similar temporal physiological patterns during emersion.

  8. Adenylosuccinate Is an Insulin Secretagogue Derived from Glucose-Induced Purine Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R. Gooding

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islet failure, involving loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS from islet β cells, heralds the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D. To search for mediators of GSIS, we performed metabolomics profiling of the insulinoma cell line 832/13 and uncovered significant glucose-induced changes in purine pathway intermediates, including a decrease in inosine monophosphate (IMP and an increase in adenylosuccinate (S-AMP, suggesting a regulatory role for the enzyme that links the two metabolites, adenylosuccinate synthase (ADSS. Inhibition of ADSS or a more proximal enzyme in the S-AMP biosynthesis pathway, adenylosuccinate lyase, lowers S-AMP levels and impairs GSIS. Addition of S-AMP to the interior of patch-clamped human β cells amplifies exocytosis, an effect dependent upon expression of sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1. S-AMP also overcomes the defect in glucose-induced exocytosis in β cells from a human donor with T2D. S-AMP is, thus, an insulin secretagogue capable of reversing β cell dysfunction in T2D.

  9. Melatonin ameliorates metabolic risk factors, modulates apoptotic proteins, and protects the rat heart against diabetes-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Ali H; El-Missiry, Mohamed A; Othman, Azza I

    2015-01-15

    The present study investigated the ability of melatonin in reducing metabolic risk factors and cardiac apoptosis induced by diabetes. Streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into male rats, and after diabetic induction melatonin (10mg/kg i.g.) was administered orally for 21 days. Diabetic hearts showed increased number of apoptotic cells with downregulation of Bcl-2 and activation of p53 and CD95 as well as the caspases 9, 8 and 3. In addition, there was a significant decrease in insulin level, hyperglycemia, elevated HOMA-IR, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total lipids, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low and very low-density lipoprotein and decreased high-density lipoprotein. These changes were coupled with a significant increase in the activities of creatin kinase-MB (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the serum of the diabetic rats indicating myocardium injury. Oral administration of melatonin for 3 weeks after diabetes induction ameliorated the levels of hyperglycemia, insulin, HbA1c, lipids profile and HOMA-IR. The oral melatonin treatment of diabetic rats significantly decreased the number of apoptotic cells in the heart compared to diabetic rats. It enhanced Bcl-2 expression and blocked the activation of CD95 as well as caspases 9, 8 and 3. These changes were accompanied with significant improvement of CK-MB and LDH in the serum indicating the ameliorative effect of melatonin on myocardium injury. Melatonin effectively ameliorated diabetic myocardium injury, apoptosis, reduced the metabolic risk factors and modulated important steps in both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis. Thus, melatonin may be a promising pharmacological agent for ameliorating potential cardiomyopathy associated with diabetes.

  10. Transport and metabolism at blood-brain interfaces and in neural cells: relevance to bilirubin-induced encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eGazzin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bilirubin, the end-product of heme catabolism, circulates in non pathological plasma mostly as a protein-bound species. When bilirubin concentration builds up, the free fraction of the molecule increases. Unbound bilirubin then diffuses across blood-brain interfaces into the brain, where it accumulates and exerts neurotoxic effects. In this classical view of bilirubin neurotoxicity, blood-brain interfaces act merely as structural barriers impeding the penetration of the pigment-bound carrier protein, and neural cells are considered as passive targets of its toxicity. Yet, the role of blood-brain interfaces in the occurrence of bilirubin encephalopathy appears more complex than being simple barriers to the diffusion of bilirubin, and neural cells such as astrocytes and neurons can play an active role in controlling the balance between the neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects of bilirubin. This article reviews the emerging in vivo and in vitro data showing that transport and metabolic detoxification mechanisms at the blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers may modulate bilirubin flux across both cellular interfaces, and that these protective functions can be affected in chronic hyperbilirubinemia. Then the in vivo and in vitro arguments in favor of the physiological antioxidant function of intracerebral bilirubin are presented, as well as with the potential role of transporters such as ABCC-1 and metabolizing enzymes such as cytochromes P-450 in setting the cerebral cell- and structure-specific toxicity of bilirubin following hyperbilirubinemia. The relevance of these data to the pathophysiology of bilirubin-induced neurological diseases is discussed.

  11. Melatonin normalizes clinical and biochemical parameters of mild inflammation in diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano Barquilla, Pilar; Pagano, Eleonora S; Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Fernández-Mateos, Pilar; Esquifino, Ana I; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of melatonin to affect mild inflammation in the metabolic syndrome (MS) induced by a high-fat diet in rats. Adult Wistar male rats were divided into four groups (n = 16/group): (i) control diet (3% fat); (ii) high-fat (35%) diet; (iii) high-fat diet + melatonin; and (iv) melatonin. Rats had free access to high-fat or control chow and one of the following drinking solutions for 10 wk: (a) tap water; (b) 25 μg/mL of melatonin. Plasma interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured at two time intervals, that is, the middle of daylight period and the middle of the scotophase. In addition, a number of somatic and metabolic components employed clinically to monitor the MS were measured. Melatonin decreased the augmented circulating levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and CRP seen in obese rats and restored the depressed levels of IL-4 and IL-10. Rats fed with the high-fat diet showed significantly higher body weights and augmented systolic blood pressure from the third and fourth week onwards, respectively, melatonin effectively preventing these changes. In high-fat-fed rats, circulating low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride concentration augmented significantly, melatonin being effective to counteract these changes. Melatonin-treated rats showed a decreased insulin resistance, the highest values of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and the lowest values of plasma uric acid. The results indicate that melatonin is able to normalize the altered biochemical pro-inflammatory profile seen in rats fed with a high-fat diet.

  12. High-fat diet combined with low-dose streptozotocin injections induces metabolic syndrome in Macaca mulatta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linzhao; Liao, Guangneng; Yang, Guang; Lu, Yanrong; Du, Xiaojiong; Liu, Jingping; Li, Lan; Wang, Chengshi; Li, Li; Ren, Yan; Zhong, Zhihui; Cheng, Jingqiu; Chen, Younan

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with abdominal obesity, hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Given the complex multifactorial pathogenesis of MetS, qualified animal models are currently seriously limited for researchers. The aim of our study was to develop a MetS model in juvenile rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Rhesus monkeys (1-year-old) fed a high-fat diet (15 % fat, 2 % cholesterol) were used as the HF group (n = 6), and those on a normal diet (5 % fat) were used as the control group (n = 4). After being fed a high-fat diet for approximately 12 months, 2 monkeys (HF + STZ group) were injected with low-dose streptozotocin (STZ, 25 mg/kg) twice, with a 7 days interval, and were then fed the same diet continuously for another 24 months. After 36 months of treatment, the high-fat diet monkeys, including the HF and HF + STZ groups, had acquired increased body weights, abnormal serum lipids, and impaired glucose tolerance compared to the control group. In addition, much more marked metabolic changes were observed in the two monkeys of the HF + STZ group, particularly in terms of high-blood glucose level and insulin resistance. Morphological observation of biopsies of liver and pancreatic tissues showed decreased islet number and mass and decreased insulin staining in the monkeys of the HF + STZ group. In addition, Oil red O staining suggested remarkable accumulation of lipid droplets in the hepatocytes. Our study suggested that a long-term high-fat diet followed with a low-dose STZ was able to induce MetS in juvenile rhesus monkeys with faster pathophysiological progress compared with high-fat diet induction alone. Our primary data showed that this method may have potentials to develop MetS animal model in non-human primates.

  13. Effects of a nonnutritive sweetener on body adiposity and energy metabolism in mice with diet-induced obesity

    OpenAIRE

    光冨, 公彦

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Nonnutritive sweeteners (NNSs) have been studied in terms of their potential roles in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and related metabolic disorders. Several studies have suggested that NNSs have several specific effects on metabolism such as reduced postprandial hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. However, the detailed effects of NNSs on body adiposity and energy metabolism have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of an NNS on energy metabolism in mice with diet-in...

  14. Multiple univariate data analysis reveals the inulin effects on the high-fat-diet induced metabolic alterations in rat myocardium and testicles in the preobesity state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixuan; An, Yanpeng; Li, Ning; Liu, Bifeng; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2013-07-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic and a well-known risk factor for many diseases affecting billions of people's health and well-being. However, little information is available for metabolic changes associated with the effects of obesity development and interventions on cardiovascular and reproduction systems. Here, we systematically analyzed the effects of high-fat diet (HFD) and inulin intake on the metabolite compositions of myocardium and testicle using NMR spectroscopy. We developed a useful high-throughput method based on multiple univariate data analysis (MUDA) to visualize and efficiently extract information on metabolites significantly affected by an intervention. We found that HFD caused widespread metabolic changes in both rat myocardium and testicles involving fatty acid β-oxidation together with the metabolisms of choline, amino acids, purines and pyrimidines even before HFD caused significant body-weight increases. Inulin intake ameliorated some of the HFD-induced metabolic changes in both myocardium (3-HB, lactate and guanosine) and testicle tissues (3-HB, inosine and betaine). A remarkable elevation of scyllo-inositol was also observable with inulin intake in both tissues. These findings offered essential information for the inulin effects on the HFD-induced metabolic changes and demonstrated this MUDA method as a powerful alternative to traditionally used multivariate data analysis for metabonomics.

  15. Myocardial metabolic abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy assessed by iodine-123-labeled beta-methyl-branched fatty acid myocardial scintigraphy and its relation to exercise-induced ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Masayuki; Mitsunami, Kenichi; Kinoshita, Masahiko [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Reversible thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl) abnormalities during exercise stress have been used as markers of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and are most likely to identify relatively underperfused myocardium. Although metabolic abnormalities in HCM were reported, the relationship between impaired energy metabolism and exercise-induced ischemia has not been fully elucidated as yet. To assess the relationship between myocardial perfusion abnormalities and fatty acid metabolic abnormalities, 28 patients with HCM underwent exercise {sup 201}Tl and rest {sup 123}I-15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-methyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) scintigraphy. Perfusion abnormalities were observed by exercise {sup 201}Tl in 19/28 patients with HCM. {sup 123}I-BMIPP uptake was decreased compared with delayed {sup 201}Tl in 106/364 (29%) of the total myocardial segments (p<0.01, McNemar symmetry test). Such disparity between {sup 123}I-BMIPP and {sup 201}Tl was observed more often in the 49/75 (65%) segments with reversible exercise {sup 201}Tl defects (p<0.001). Our results indicate that exercise-induced myocardial ischemia exists in HCM, resulting in metabolic abnormalities. The combination of {sup 123}I-BMIPP and {sup 201}Tl suggests that myocardial ischemia may play an important role in metabolic abnormalities in HCM. (author)

  16. Effect of spices on lipid metabolism in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalini, N; Manju, V; Menon, V P

    2006-01-01

    Colon cancer is the second most common cancer among men and women worldwide. We investigated the effect of red chilli (Capsicum annum L.), cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.), and black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) on colon cancer induced in rats by a colon-specific carcinogen, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). Colon cancer was induced by subcutaneous injection of DMH at a dosage of 20 mg/kg of body weight (15 doses, at 1-week intervals). The rats were continued with the standard pellet diet and supplemented red chilli [C. annum L., 0.015% (wt/wt) mixed with the diet], cumin seeds [C. cyminum L., 1.25% (wt/wt) mixed with the diet], and black pepper (P. nigrum L., 0.5% (wt/wt) mixed with the diet] throughout the experimental period. After the total experimental period of 32 weeks (including 2 weeks of acclimatization) the incidence and number of tumors in the colon were observed to be significantly higher in the rats administered DMH and/or red chillis, as compared with the cumin + DMH and black pepper + DMH groups. No tumors were observed in the control, cumin + DMH, or black pepper + DMH groups. The levels of fecal bile acids and neutral sterols in 24-hour fecal samples were significantly decreased in DMH + chilli-administered rats, while the excretion of fecal bile acids and neutral sterols was significantly increased in cumin + DMH- and black pepper + DMH-administered rats. In DMH-, chilli-, and chilli + DMH-administered rats the levels of cholesterol, cholesterol/phospholipid ratio, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity were decreased in cumin + DMH- and black pepper + DMH-treated rats. The phospholipid levels were reduced in the DMH, chilli, and chilli + DMH groups as compared with the cumin + DMH and black pepper + DMH groups. Our results show that chilli supplementation promotes colon carcinogenesis, whereas cumin or black pepper suppresses colon carcinogensis in the presence of the procarcinogen DMH.

  17. Metabolic effects of quail eggs in diabetes-induced rats: comparison with chicken eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lontchi-Yimagou, Eric; Tanya, Agatha; Tchankou, Carine; Ngondi, Judith; Oben, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Background Quail eggs as a food item have recently been introduced into the diet of some Cameroonians. These eggs are being sold in local markets, but with many unfounded health claims. One claim is that quail eggs can reduce blood glucose levels in diabetics. It was therefore necessary to evaluate the effect of consuming quail eggs on blood glucose levels, lipid profiles, and oxidative stress parameters in diabetes-induced rats. Methods Twenty Wistar rats weighing, on average, 250 g were divided into four groups of five rats each. Group 1 consisted of rats with normal blood glucose, and the other three groups (2, 3, and 4) consisted of diabetes-induced rats achieved by intravenous injection of streptozotocin. During 16 days, rats in groups 1 and 2 received distilled water; and rats in groups 3 and 4 received quail and chicken eggs, respectively, with gastroesophageal probe at a dose of 1 mL/200 g body weight. Fasting blood glucose levels were determined in all the groups on the 1st, 7th, 14th, and 17th days after induction of diabetes. On the 17th day, the fasting rats were sacrificed, and blood and liver samples were collected for biochemical analyses. Results In 17 days, the consumption of quail and chicken eggs had no effect on blood glucose levels of diabetic rats. Total cholesterol levels were higher in groups 3 (75.59 mg/dL) and 4 (59.41 mg/dL) compared to group 2 (55.67 mg/dl), although these differences were not significant (all p>0.05). Triglyceride levels were significantly higher (pdiabetic rats at the tested dose had no effect on blood glucose level and oxidative stress parameters and may have a negative effect on lipid profile. PMID:27717410

  18. Increased gut permeability and microbiota change associate with mesenteric fat inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in diet-induced obese mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Y Lam

    Full Text Available We investigated the relationship between gut health, visceral fat dysfunction and metabolic disorders in diet-induced obesity. C57BL/6J mice were fed control or high saturated fat diet (HFD. Circulating glucose, insulin and inflammatory markers were measured. Proximal colon barrier function was assessed by measuring transepithelial resistance and mRNA expression of tight-junction proteins. Gut microbiota profile was determined by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-6 mRNA levels were measured in proximal colon, adipose tissue and liver using RT-qPCR. Adipose macrophage infiltration (F4/80⁺ was assessed using immunohistochemical staining. HFD mice had a higher insulin/glucose ratio (P = 0.020 and serum levels of serum amyloid A3 (131%; P = 0.008 but reduced circulating adiponectin (64%; P = 0.011. In proximal colon of HFD mice compared to mice fed the control diet, transepithelial resistance and mRNA expression of zona occludens 1 were reduced by 38% (P<0.001 and 40% (P = 0.025 respectively and TNF-α mRNA level was 6.6-fold higher (P = 0.037. HFD reduced Lactobacillus (75%; P<0.001 but increased Oscillibacter (279%; P = 0.004 in fecal microbiota. Correlations were found between abundances of Lactobacillus (r = 0.52; P = 0.013 and Oscillibacter (r = -0.55; P = 0.007 with transepithelial resistance of the proximal colon. HFD increased macrophage infiltration (58%; P = 0.020, TNF-α (2.5-fold, P<0.001 and IL-6 mRNA levels (2.5-fold; P = 0.008 in mesenteric fat. Increased macrophage infiltration in epididymal fat was also observed with HFD feeding (71%; P = 0.006 but neither TNF-α nor IL-6 was altered. Perirenal and subcutaneous adipose tissue showed no signs of inflammation in HFD mice. The current results implicate gut dysfunction, and attendant inflammation of contiguous adipose, as salient features of the metabolic dysregulation of diet-induced obesity.

  19. Effect of Hypericum perforatum L. extract on insulin resistance and lipid metabolic disorder in high-fat-diet induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jin-ying; Tao, Rong-ya; Zhang, Xiao-lin; Liu, Qian; He, Yi-Bo; Su, Ya-lun; Ji, Teng-fei; Ye, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Natural product Hypericum perforatum L. has been used in folk medicine to improve mental performance. However, the effect of H. perforatum L. on metabolism is still unknown. In order to test whether H. perforatum L. extract (EHP) has an effect on metabolic syndrome, we treated diet induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6J mice with the extract. The chemical characters of EHP were investigated with thin-layer chromatography, ultraviolet, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and HPLC-mass spectrometry fingerprint analysis. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), insulin tolerance test (ITT), and the glucose infusion rate (GIR) in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp test were performed to evaluate the glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Skeletal muscle was examined for lipid metabolism. The results suggest that EHP can significantly improve the glucose and lipid metabolism in DIO mice. In vitro, EHP inhibited the catalytic activity of recombinant human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and reduced the protein and mRNA levels of PTP1B in the skeletal muscle. Moreover, expressions of genes related to fatty acid uptake and oxidation were changed by EHP in the skeletal muscle. These results suggest that EHP may improve insulin resistance and lipid metabolism in DIO mice.

  20. Below-ambient levels of UV induce chloroplast structural change and alter starch metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerberg, W R

    2007-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) in the 400-700 nm bandwidth of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) has been established as an important source of energy for photosynthesis and environmental signals regulating many aspects of green-plant life. Above-ambient levels of UV-B radiation (290-320 nm) under high-PAR conditions have been shown to elicit responses in chloroplasts of Brassica napus similar to those of chloroplasts at low-PAR exposure (W. Fagerberg and J. Bornman, Physiol. Plant. 101: 833-844, 1997). The question arises as to whether UV at normal levels can also evoke similar responses. Here we provide evidence that even below-ambient levels of UV-B (1/28 ambient; Durham, N.H., U.S.A., 1200 hours, March) were capable of inducing an increase in thylakoid surface area relative to the chloroplast volume typical of a low-PAR response (shade response) in sunflowers. This response occurred even though leaves were concurrently exposed to PAR levels that normally induce a "sun" or high-PAR response in the absence of UV-B. Subambient levels of UV-B were also associated with a decrease in chloroplast and starch volume. Exposure to levels of UV-A 1/10 of ambient appeared to enhance the high-PAR response of the chloroplast, characterized by an increase in the amounts of stored starch, an increase in chloroplast volume density ratio values, and a decrease in thylakoid surface area density ratios relative to the high-light controls. These effects were opposite to those seen in UV-B-exposed tissue. In a general sense, subambient levels of UV-B evoked a response similar to that elicited by low-PAR irradiance, while subambient UV-A elicited responses similar to those typical of high-PAR irradiance. The fact that below-ambient levels of UV altered a normal chloroplast structural response to PAR provides evidence that UV may be an important environmental signal for plants.

  1. Plasma Proteome Profiles Associated with Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome and the Early Onset of Metabolic Syndrome in a Pig Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, te M.F.W.; Koopmans, S.J.; Kruijt, L.; Calus, M.P.L.; Smits, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and related diabetes are important health threatening multifactorial metabolic diseases and it has been suggested that 25% of all diabetic patients are unaware of their patho-physiological condition. Biomarkers for monitoring and control are available, but early stage predictive biomarkers e

  2. A hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic programmed alteration in offspring rats of IUGR induced by prenatal caffeine ingestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, D. [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wu, Y.; Liu, F.; Liu, Y.S.; Shen, L.; Lei, Y.Y.; Liu, J. [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Ping, J. [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Qin, J. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, C. [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Chen, L.B. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Magdalou, J. [UMR 7561 CNRS-Nancy Université, Faculté de Médicine, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Wang, H., E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2012-11-01

    Caffeine is a definite factor of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Previously, we have confirmed that prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits the development of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, and alters the glucose and lipid metabolism in IUGR fetal rats. In this study, we aimed to verify a programmed alteration of neuroendocrine metabolism in prenatal caffeine ingested-offspring rats. The results showed that prenatal caffeine (120 mg/kg.day) ingestion caused low body weight and high IUGR rate of pups; the concentrations of blood adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone in caffeine group were significantly increased in the early postnatal period followed by falling in late stage; the level of blood glucose was unchanged, while blood total cholesterol (TCH) and triglyceride (TG) were markedly enhanced in adult. After chronic stress, the concentrations and the gain rates of blood ACTH and corticosterone were obviously increased, meanwhile, the blood glucose increased while the TCH and TG decreased in caffeine group. Further, the hippocampal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) expression in caffeine group was initially decreased and subsequently increased after birth. After chronic stress, the 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1, glucocorticoid receptor (GR), MR as well as the MR/GR ratio were all significantly decreased. These results suggested that prenatal caffeine ingestion induced the dysfunction of HPA axis and associated neuroendocrine metabolic programmed alteration in IUGR offspring rats, which might be related with the functional injury of hippocampus. These observations provide a valuable experimental basis for explaining the susceptibility of IUGR offspring to metabolic syndrome and associated diseases. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion induced HPA axis dysfunction in IUGR offspring rats. ► Caffeine induced a neuroendocrine metabolic programmed alteration in offspring rats. ► Caffeine induced a functional injury

  3. Genomic DNA hypomethylation is associated with neural tube defects induced by methotrexate inhibition of folate metabolism.

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    Xiuwei Wang

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is thought to be involved in the etiology of neural tube defects (NTDs. However, the exact mechanism between DNA methylation and NTDs remains unclear. Herein, we investigated the change of methylation in mouse model of NTDs associated with folate dysmetabolism by use of ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS, liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, microarray, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Real time quantitative PCR. Results showed that NTD neural tube tissues had lower concentrations of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF, P = 0.005, 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-FoTHF, P = 0.040, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM, P = 0.004 and higher concentrations of folic acid (P = 0.041, homocysteine (Hcy, P = 0.006 and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, P = 0.045 compared to control. Methylation levels of genomic DNA decreased significantly in the embryonic neural tube tissue of NTD samples. 132 differentially methylated regions (35 low methylated regions and 97 high methylated regions were selected by microarray. Two genes (Siah1b, Prkx in Wnt signal pathway demonstrated lower methylated regions (peak and higher expression in NTDs (P<0.05; P<0.05. Results suggest that DNA hypomethylation was one of the possible epigenetic variations correlated with the occurrence of NTDs induced by folate dysmetabolism and that Siah1b, Prkx in Wnt pathway may be candidate genes for NTDs.

  4. Genomic DNA hypomethylation is associated with neural tube defects induced by methotrexate inhibition of folate metabolism.

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    Wang, Xiuwei; Guan, Zhen; Chen, Yan; Dong, Yanting; Niu, Yuhu; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is thought to be involved in the etiology of neural tube defects (NTDs). However, the exact mechanism between DNA methylation and NTDs remains unclear. Herein, we investigated the change of methylation in mouse model of NTDs associated with folate dysmetabolism by use of ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS), liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), microarray, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Real time quantitative PCR. Results showed that NTD neural tube tissues had lower concentrations of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF, P = 0.005), 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-FoTHF, P = 0.040), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM, P = 0.004) and higher concentrations of folic acid (P = 0.041), homocysteine (Hcy, P = 0.006) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, P = 0.045) compared to control. Methylation levels of genomic DNA decreased significantly in the embryonic neural tube tissue of NTD samples. 132 differentially methylated regions (35 low methylated regions and 97 high methylated regions) were selected by microarray. Two genes (Siah1b, Prkx) in Wnt signal pathway demonstrated lower methylated regions (peak) and higher expression in NTDs (P<0.05; P<0.05). Results suggest that DNA hypomethylation was one of the possible epigenetic variations correlated with the occurrence of NTDs induced by folate dysmetabolism and that Siah1b, Prkx in Wnt pathway may be candidate genes for NTDs.

  5. Molecular fingerprint of high fat diet induced urinary bladder metabolic dysfunction in a rat model.

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    Andreas Oberbach

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Diabetic voiding dysfunction has been reported in epidemiological dimension of individuals with diabetes mellitus. Animal models might provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of this dysfunction to facilitate early diagnosis and to identify new drug targets for therapeutic interventions. METHODS: Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats received either chow or high-fat diet for eleven weeks. Proteomic alterations were comparatively monitored in both groups to discover a molecular fingerprinting of the urinary bladder remodelling/dysfunction. Results were validated by ELISA, Western blotting and immunohistology. RESULTS: In the proteome analysis 383 proteins were identified and canonical pathway analysis revealed a significant up-regulation of acute phase reaction, hypoxia, glycolysis, β-oxidation, and proteins related to mitochondrial dysfunction in high-fat diet rats. In contrast, calcium signalling, cytoskeletal proteins, calpain, 14-3-3η and eNOS signalling were down-regulated in this group. Interestingly, we found increased ubiquitin proteasome activity in the high-fat diet group that might explain the significant down-regulation of eNOS, 14-3-3η and calpain. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Thus, high-fat diet is sufficient to induce significant remodelling of the urinary bladder and alterations of the molecular fingerprint. Our findings give new insights into obesity related bladder dysfunction and identified proteins that may indicate novel pathophysiological mechanisms and therefore constitute new drug targets.

  6. Beneficial effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

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    Abdulrazaq, Nafiu Bidemi; Cho, Maung Maung; Win, Ni Ni; Zaman, Rahela; Rahman, Mohammad Tariqur

    2012-10-01

    Zingiber officinale (ZO), commonly known as ginger, has been traditionally used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Several studies have reported the hypoglycaemic properties of ginger in animal models. The present study evaluated the antihyperglycaemic effect of its aqueous extract administered orally (daily) in three different doses (100, 300, 500 mg/kg body weight) for a period of 30 d to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. A dose-dependent antihyperglycaemic effect revealed a decrease of plasma glucose levels by 38 and 68 % on the 15th and 30th day, respectively, after the rats were given 500 mg/kg. The 500 mg/kg ZO significantly (Pdiabetic rats v. control rats, although the decrease in liver weight (% body weight) was not statistically significant. Kidney glycogen content increased significantly (Pdiabetic controls v. normal controls. ZO (500 mg/kg) also significantly decreased kidney glycogen (Pdiabetic rats when compared to diabetic controls. Activities of glucokinase, phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase in diabetic controls were decreased by 94, 53 and 61 %, respectively, when compared to normal controls; and ZO significantly increased (Pdiabetic rats. Therefore, the present study showed that ginger is a potential phytomedicine for the treatment of diabetes through its effects on the activities of glycolytic enzymes.

  7. Metabolic and electric brain patterns during pleasant and unpleasant emotions induced by music masterpieces.</