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Sample records for acutely acl injured

  1. The acutely ACL injured knee assessed by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, R B; Roos, H P; Roos, E M

    2008-01-01

    depression fractures, meniscal injuries and patient characteristics. METHODS: One hundred and twenty-one subjects (26% women, mean age 26 years) with an ACL rupture to a previously un-injured knee were studied using a 1.5T MR imager within 3 weeks from trauma. Meniscal injuries and fractures were classified...... by type, size and location. BML location and volume were quantified using a multi-spectral image data set analyzed by computer software, edited by an expert radiologist. RESULTS: Fractures were found in 73 (60%) knees. In 67 (92%) of these knees at least one cortical depression fracture was found. Uni......-compartmental meniscal tears were found in 44 (36%) subjects and bi-compartmental in 24 (20%). One hundred and nineteen (98%) knees had at least one BML, all but four (97%) located in the lateral compartment. Knees with a cortical depression fracture had larger BML volumes (P

  2. Healing of the Acutely Injured Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Functional Treatment with the ACL-Jack, a Dynamic Posterior Drawer Brace.

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    Jacobi, Matthias; Reischl, Nikolaus; Rönn, Karolin; Magnusson, Robert A; Gautier, Emanuel; Jakob, Roland P

    2016-01-01

    Background. The injured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has a limited healing capacity leading to persisting instability. Hypothesis/Purpose. To study if the application of a brace, producing a dynamic posterior drawer force, after acute ACL injury reduces initial instability. Study Design. Cohort study. Methods. Patients treated with the ACL-Jack brace were compared to controls treated with primary ACL reconstruction und controls treated nonsurgically with functional rehabilitation. Measurements included anterior laxity (Rolimeter), clinical scores (Lysholm, Tegner, and IKDC), and MRI evaluation. Patients were followed up to 24 months. Results. Patients treated with the ACL-Jack brace showed a significant improvement of anterior knee laxity comparable to patients treated with ACL reconstruction, whereas laxity persisted after nonsurgical functional rehabilitation. The failure risk (secondary reconstruction necessary) of the ACL-Jack group was however 21% (18 of 86) within 24 months. Clinical scores were similar in all treatment groups. Conclusion. Treatment of acute ACL tears with the ACL-Jack brace leads to improved anterior knee laxity compared to nonsurgical treatment with functional rehabilitation.

  3. Healing of the Acutely Injured Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Functional Treatment with the ACL-Jack, a Dynamic Posterior Drawer Brace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Jacobi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The injured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL has a limited healing capacity leading to persisting instability. Hypothesis/Purpose. To study if the application of a brace, producing a dynamic posterior drawer force, after acute ACL injury reduces initial instability. Study Design. Cohort study. Methods. Patients treated with the ACL-Jack brace were compared to controls treated with primary ACL reconstruction und controls treated nonsurgically with functional rehabilitation. Measurements included anterior laxity (Rolimeter, clinical scores (Lysholm, Tegner, and IKDC, and MRI evaluation. Patients were followed up to 24 months. Results. Patients treated with the ACL-Jack brace showed a significant improvement of anterior knee laxity comparable to patients treated with ACL reconstruction, whereas laxity persisted after nonsurgical functional rehabilitation. The failure risk (secondary reconstruction necessary of the ACL-Jack group was however 21% (18 of 86 within 24 months. Clinical scores were similar in all treatment groups. Conclusion. Treatment of acute ACL tears with the ACL-Jack brace leads to improved anterior knee laxity compared to nonsurgical treatment with functional rehabilitation.

  4. The acutely ACL injured knee assessed by MRI: changes in joint fluid, bone marrow lesions, and cartilage during the first year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, R B; Le Graverand, M-P; Buck, R

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate changes in the knee during the first year after acute rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of volumes of joint fluid (JF), bone marrow lesions (BMLs), and cartilage volume (VC), and cartilage thickness (ThCcAB) and cartilage surface area (AC). To identify...... treated with ACL reconstruction followed by a structured rehabilitation program and 24 subjects were treated with structured rehabilitation only. Morphometric data were acquired from computer-assisted segmentation of MR images. Morphometric cartilage change was reported as mean change divided...... (TrF), while an increase of VC and ThCcAB was found in the central medial femur (cMF) (SRM greater than 0.477). ACL reconstruction was directly and significantly related to increased JF volume at 3 and 6 months (P

  5. Reliability and validity of videotaped functional performance tests in ACL-injured subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Porat, Anette; Holmström, Eva; Roos, Ewa

    2008-01-01

    during five functional tests in subjects with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. METHOD: Twelve ACL-injured men, mean age 40 years, were video filmed before and after 12 weeks of knee-specific training when performing five different functional tests: walking, knee bending, step activity......, crossover hop on one leg and one-leg hop. The videos were observed by four physiotherapists, and the knee movement pattern quality, a feature of the loading strategy of the lower extremity, was scored on an 11-point rating scale. To assess the criterion validity, the observational rating was correlated...... validity found indicate that the knee movement pattern quality in ACL-injured subjects can be determined by visual observation of more demanding functional tests such as crossover hop on one leg and one-leg hop for distance....

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament injury alters preinjury lower extremity biomechanics in the injured and uninjured leg: the JUMP-ACL study.

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    Goerger, Benjamin M; Marshall, Stephen W; Beutler, Anthony I; Blackburn, J Troy; Wilckens, John H; Padua, Darin A

    2015-02-01

    Information as to how anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstructive surgery (ACLR) alter lower extremity biomechanics may improve rehabilitation and return to play guidelines, reducing the risk for repeat ACL injury. To compare lower extremity biomechanics before ACL injury and after subsequent ACLR for the injured and uninjured leg. Baseline unilateral lower extremity biomechanics were collected on the dominant leg of participants without ACL injury when they entered the Joint Undertaking to Monitor and Prevent ACL (JUMP-ACL) study. Thirty-one participants with subsequent ACL injury, reconstructive surgery and full return to physical activity completed repeat, follow-up biomechanical testing, as did 39 uninjured, matched controls. Not all injured participants suffered injury to the dominant leg, requiring separation of those with ACL injury into two groups: ACLR-injured leg group (n=12) and ACLR-uninjured leg group (n=19). We compared the landing biomechanics of these three groups (ACLR-injured leg, ACLR-uninjured leg, control) before ACL injury (baseline) with biomechanics after ACL injury, surgery and return to physical activity (follow-up). ACL injury and ACLR altered lower extremity biomechanics, as both ACLR groups demonstrated increases in frontal plane movement (increased hip adduction and knee valgus). The ACLR-injured leg group also exhibited decreased sagittal plane loading (decreased anterior tibial shear force, knee extension moment and hip flexion moment). No high-risk biomechanical changes were observed in control group participants. ACL injury and ACLR caused movement pattern alterations of the injured and uninjured leg that have previously shown to increase the risk for future non-contact ACL injury. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Sagittal plane biomechanics cannot injure the ACL during sidestep cutting.

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    McLean, Scott G; Huang, Xuemei; Su, Anne; Van Den Bogert, Antonie J

    2004-10-01

    Knee joint sagittal plane forces are a proposed mechanism of anterior cruciate ligament injury during sport movements such as sidestep cutting. Ligament force magnitudes for these movements however, remain unknown. The need to examine injury-causing events suggests elucidation via model-based investigations is possible. Using this approach, the current study determined whether sagittal plane knee loading during sidestep cutting could in isolation injure the anterior cruciate ligament. Experiments were performed on subject-specific forward dynamic musculoskeletal models, generated from data obtained from 10 male and 10 female athletes. Models were optimized to simulate subject-specific cutting movements. Random perturbations (n=5000) were applied to initial contact conditions and quadriceps/hamstrings activation levels to simulate their effect on peak 3D knee loads. Injury via the sagittal plane mechanism was based on the criterion of an anterior drawer force greater than 2000 N. Realistic neuromuscular perturbations produced significant increases in external knee anterior force and valgus and internal rotation moments. Peak anterior drawer force never exceeded 2000 N in any model, and thus failed to cause anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Valgus loads reached values that were high enough to rupture the ligament, occurring more frequently in females than in males. Sagittal plane knee joint forces cannot rupture the anterior cruciate ligament during sidestep cutting. The interaction between muscle and joint mechanics and external ground reaction forces in this plane, places a ceiling on ligament loads. Valgus loading is a more likely injury mechanism, especially in females. Modifying sagittal plane biomechanics will thus unlikely contribute to the prevention of anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

  8. Three-dimensional MRI-based statistical shape model and application to a cohort of knees with acute ACL injury.

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    Pedoia, V; Lansdown, D A; Zaid, M; McCulloch, C E; Souza, R; Ma, C B; Li, X

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a novel 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based Statistical Shape Modeling (SSM) and apply it in knee MRIs in order to extract and compare relevant shapes of the tibia and femur in patients with and without acute Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Bilateral MR images were acquired and analyzed for 50 patients with acute ACL injuries and for 19 control subjects. A shape model was extracted for the tibia and femur using an SSM algorithm based on a set of matched landmarks that are computed in a fully automatic manner. Shape differences were detected between the knees in the ACL-injury group and control group, suggesting a common shape feature that may predispose these knees to injury. Some of the detected shape features that discriminate between injured and control knees are related to intercondylar width and posterior tibia slope, features that have been suggested in previous studies as ACL morphological risk factors. However, shape modeling has the great potential to quantify these characteristics with a comprehensive description of the surfaces describing complex 3D deformation that cannot be represented with simple geometric indexes. 3D MRI-based bone shape quantification has the ability to identify specific anatomic risk factors for ACL injury. A better understanding of the role in bony shape on ligamentous injuries could help in the identification of subjects with an increased risk for an ACL tear and to develop targeted prevention strategies, including education and training. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Degeneration in ACL Injured Knees with and without Reconstruction in Relation to Muscle Size and Fat Content-Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia M Jungmann

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL injuries represent a major risk factor for early osteoarthritis (OA.To evaluate the prevalence and 4-year progression of knee OA measured with 3T MR-imaging in individuals with ruptured, reconstructed or normal ACL and to assess the impact of thigh muscle characteristics.A total of 54 knees (23/54 male, 31/54 female were recruited from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI. At baseline, 15/54 subjects had prevalent ACL ruptures and 15/54 subjects had prevalent ACL reconstruction (24/54 normal ACL. Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC scores, Physical Activity Scores of the Elderly (PASE and thigh muscle characteristics including strength, fat infiltration (Goutallier score and thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA MR measurements were obtained at baseline. Whole-organ MR-imaging Scores (WORMS were obtained at baseline and at a 4-year follow-up time-point. Multivariate regression models, adjusting for covariates (age, gender, body mass index, were used for statistical analysis.At baseline, subjects with prevalent ACL ruptures had worse WORMS total scores (mean±SEM, 44.1±3.5 than subjects with ACL reconstruction (30.8±4.0; P = 0.015 and worse than subjects with normal ACL (21.3±3.0; P<0.001. Cartilage scores were worse in both femorotibial compartments in ACL injured knees than in knees with normal ACL (P<0.05. Knees with ACL reconstruction showed an increased degeneration of the medial meniscus (P = 0.036, cartilage degeneration at the medial femoral condyle (P = 0.011. In a multivariate regression model, including both ACL groups and total muscle characteristics as influence parameters, high thigh muscle CSA, high muscle/ fat ratio and low Goutallier scores were associated with less degenerative changes at the knee, independent of ACL status. Knees with ACL reconstruction showed an increased progression of cartilage degeneration at the medial tibia compared to the normal ACL group

  10. The effects of ACL deficiency on meniscal deformation and kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Irvine, James N.; Thorhauer, Eric; Zheng, Liying; Baidoo, Kevin; Abebe, Ermias; Tashman, Scott; Zhang, Xudong; Vyas, Dharmesh; Harner, Christopher D.; Arner, Justin W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The meniscus plays a vital role in knee load transmission by increasing the tibiofemoral joint contact area and distributing the joint forces within the medial and lateral compartments. Clinically, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are commonly concomitant with tears of the lateral meniscus. In isolated ACL tears, it is likely that meniscal behavior is affected as a result of altered tibiofemoral kinematics. However, little is known regarding the effects of acute ACL injur...

  11. Lateral femoral notch depth is not associated with increased rotatory instability in ACL-injured knees: a quantitative pivot shift analysis.

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    Kanakamedala, Ajay C; Burnham, Jeremy M; Pfeiffer, Thomas R; Herbst, Elmar; Kowalczuk, Marcin; Popchak, Adam; Irrgang, James; Fu, Freddie H; Musahl, Volker

    2017-11-08

    A deep lateral femoral notch (LFN) on lateral radiographs is indicative of ACL injury. Prior studies have suggested that a deep LFN may also be a sign of persistent rotatory instability and a concomitant lateral meniscus tear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between LFN depth and both quantitative measures of rotatory knee instability and the incidence of lateral meniscus tears. It was hypothesized that greater LFN depth would be correlated with increased rotatory instability, quantified by lateral compartment translation and tibial acceleration during a quantitative pivot shift test, and incidence of lateral meniscus tears. ACL-injured patients enrolled in a prospective ACL registry from 2014 to 2016 were analyzed. To limit confounders, patients were only included if they had primary ACL tears, no concurrent ligamentous or bony injuries requiring operative treatment, and no previous knee injuries or surgeries to either knee. Eighty-four patients were included in the final analysis. A standardized quantitative pivot shift test was performed pre-operatively under anesthesia in both knees, and rotatory instability, specifically lateral compartment translation and tibial acceleration, was quantified using tablet image analysis software and accelerometer sensors. Standard lateral radiographs and sagittal magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the injured knee were evaluated for LFN depth. There were no significant correlations between LFN depth on either imaging modality and ipsilateral lateral compartment translation or tibial acceleration during a quantitative pivot shift test or side-to-side differences in these measurements. Patients with lateral meniscus tears were found to have significantly greater LFN depths than those without on conventional radiograph and MRI (1.0 vs. 0.6 mm, p quantitative measures of rotatory instability. Concomitant lateral meniscus injury was associated with significantly greater LFN depth. Based on

  12. Knee cartilage assessment with MRI (dGEMRIC) and subjective knee function in ACL injured copers: a cohort study with a 20 year follow-up.

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    Neuman, P; Owman, H; Müller, G; Englund, M; Tiderius, C J; Dahlberg, L E

    2014-01-01

    To assess knee cartilage quality and subjective knee function, 20 years after injury in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured copers. We examined 32 knees using delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC), 20 years after a complete ACL tear. Only subjects who had coped with the ACL injury without ACL reconstruction (ACLR), and who presented without radiographic signs of osteoarthritis (OA) at an earlier 16-year follow-up, were included in this study. The quality of the central weight-bearing parts of the medial and lateral femoral cartilage was estimated with dGEMRIC (T1Gd). These results were compared with corresponding results in 24 healthy individuals, and with the subjects' self-reported subjective knee function using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. The values of T1Gd in the medial and lateral femoral cartilage of the study group (mean (95% CI)), were 404 (385-423) and 427 (399-455) ms, not statistically different from those of the healthy reference group (P = 0.065 and 0.31). The subjective knee function 20 years after the injury, according to the five domains of the KOOS score, was good, with a mean score of 90 ± 11. Values of T1Gd for the medial femoral cartilage were correlated with the KOOS subgroup QOL (P = 0.021, Pearson correlation). Subjects who have managed to cope with their ACL injury for 20 years with sustained good subjective knee function also seem to have knee cartilage of good quality, with T1Gd values not very different from a healthy reference group. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A pair-matched comparison of return to pivoting sports at 1 year in ACL-injured patients after a nonoperative versus operative treatment course

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    Grindem, Hege; Eitzen, Ingrid; Moksnes, Håvard; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Risberg, May Arna

    2013-01-01

    Background The wish to return to level I pivoting sports is a major indication of ACL-reconstruction. Patients usually return to pivoting sports between 6 months and 1 year postoperatively, but no matched study has so far examined 1-year return to sport rates in nonoperatively and operatively treated ACL-injured patients. Hypothesis ACL-injured patients following a nonoperative treatment course, including recommendation of activity modification, will have lower return to pivoting sport rates than operatively treated patients 1 year after baseline testing/surgery, when matched by preinjury sports activity, age and sex. Study Design Pair-matched cohort study Methods Sixty-nine nonoperatively treated ACL-injured patients were pair-matched with 69 operatively treated patients (n=138), based on specific preinjury sport, age and sex. Nonoperatively treated patients were recommended not to return to level I sports. Patients were defined as nonoperatively or operatively treated according to their status at follow-up. The baseline and follow-up testing included registration of sports participation, KT-1000 measurements, 4 hop tests, and patient-reported outcome measures. McNemar’s test and paired t-tests or Wilcoxon’s test were used to compare outcomes of nonoperatively and operatively treated patients. Results No significant baseline differences were found. At 12.9±1.2 months (mean ± standard deviation) after baseline testing (nonoperative) and 12.7±1.2 months after surgery (operative), there was no significant difference in overall return to sport rates (nonoperative: 68.1 %, operative: 68.1 %, p=1.000), or in return to level I sport rates (nonoperative: 54.8 %, operative: 61.9 %, p=0.664). Nonoperatively treated patients who participated in level I sports prior to injury had a significantly lower return to sport rate (54.8 %) than nonoperatively treated patients who participated in level II sports (88.9 %, p=0.003). The nonoperatively treated patients had

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone bruising in the acutely injured knee--short-term outcome

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    Davies, N.H.; Niall, D.; King, L.J.; Lavelle, J.; Healy, J.C. E-mail: j.healy@ic.ac.uk

    2004-05-01

    AIM: To investigate the short-term outcome and associated injuries of bone bruising in the acutely injured knee. METHOD AND MATERIALS: Thirty patients (age range 17-39 years, mean 28 years) with bone bruising identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after an acute knee injury were rescanned 12-14 weeks post-injury. The volume of bone bruising was measured on coronal STIR (short TI inversion recovery) images and correlation made with the presence and type of ligamentous and osteochondral injuries. RESULTS: All bone bruises were present on repeat MRI. Twenty of the 30 patients (67%) had associated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, seven of the 30 (23%) had collateral ligament injuries and three of the 30 (10%) had no associated ligamentous injuries. Greater than 50% reduction in bone bruise volume was demonstrated at repeat scanning in 24 of the 30 patients (80%) and less than 50% in five of the 30 patients (17%). One patient showed an increase in volume of bone bruising at follow-up. There was no correlation between initial size or size reduction of bone bruising and the presence/absence or type of associated injuries. In 21 patients the bone bruises resolved from the periphery, whilst eight patients showed bone bruises that resolved towards the joint margin, all of whom had associated osteochondral injuries. Of the 30 patients, 17 showed bone bruising that extended to the joint margin, 10 of whom had associated osteochondral injuries on MRI. On clinical review some degree of knee pain was still present in all but one of the patients reviewed. The single patient who reported complete resolution of symptoms was one of the three patients with isolated bone bruising CONCLUSION: Bone bruises persist for at least 12-14 weeks, which is longer than previously quoted. Two discrete patterns of bone bruise resolution have been demonstrated. The size and persistence of bone bruising is not related to the presence or absence or type of associated ligamentous

  15. Degeneration in ACL Injured Knees with and without Reconstruction in Relation to Muscle Size and Fat Content-Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

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    Jungmann, Pia M; Baum, Thomas; Nevitt, Michael C; Nardo, Lorenzo; Gersing, Alexandra S; Lane, Nancy E; McCulloch, Charles E; Rummeny, Ernst J; Link, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) injuries represent a major risk factor for early osteoarthritis (OA). To evaluate the prevalence and 4-year progression of knee OA measured with 3T MR-imaging in individuals with ruptured, reconstructed or normal ACL and to assess the impact of thigh muscle characteristics. A total of 54 knees (23/54 male, 31/54 female) were recruited from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). At baseline, 15/54 subjects had prevalent ACL ruptures and 15/54 subjects had prevalent ACL reconstruction (24/54 normal ACL). Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) scores, Physical Activity Scores of the Elderly (PASE) and thigh muscle characteristics including strength, fat infiltration (Goutallier score) and thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) MR measurements were obtained at baseline. Whole-organ MR-imaging Scores (WORMS) were obtained at baseline and at a 4-year follow-up time-point. Multivariate regression models, adjusting for covariates (age, gender, body mass index), were used for statistical analysis. At baseline, subjects with prevalent ACL ruptures had worse WORMS total scores (mean±SEM, 44.1±3.5) than subjects with ACL reconstruction (30.8±4.0; P = 0.015) and worse than subjects with normal ACL (21.3±3.0; Pprevention of early OA.

  16. Acute and Perioperative Care of the Burn-Injured Patient

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    Bittner, Edward A.; Shank, Erik; Woodson, Lee; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2016-01-01

    Care of burn-injured patients requires knowledge of the pathophysiologic changes affecting virtually all organs from the onset of injury until wounds are healed. Massive airway and/or lung edema can occur rapidly and unpredictably after burn and/or inhalation injury. Hemodynamics in the early phase of severe burn injury are characterized by a reduction in cardiac output, increased systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance. Approximately 2–5 days after major burn injury, a hyperdynamic and hypermetabolic state develops. Electrical burns result in morbidity much higher than expected based on burn size alone. Formulae for fluid resuscitation should serve only as guideline; fluids should be titrated to physiologic end points. Burn injury is associated basal and procedural pain requiring higher than normal opioid and sedative doses. Operating room concerns for the burn-injured patient include airway abnormalities, impaired lung function, vascular access, deceptively large and rapid blood loss, hypothermia and altered pharmacology. PMID:25485468

  17. The Effects of Balance Training on Static and Dynamic Postural Stability Indices After Acute ACL Reconstruction

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    Akbari, Asghar; Ghiasi, Fateme; Mir, Mohsen; Hosseinifar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proprioception and postural stability play an important role in knee movements. However, there are controversies about the overall recovery time of proprioception following knee surgery and onset of balance and neuromuscular training after ACL reconstruction. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of balance training in early stage of knee rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of balanc...

  18. Correlation study of podocyte injur y and kidney function in patients with acute kidney injur y

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    You-Gang Feng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the correlation between the podocyte injury indexes in urine such as nephrin, desmin, P-cadherin, podocin, podocalyxin and CD2-associated protein (CD2AP and the kidney function in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI. Methods: A total of 120 severe postsurgical patients treated in the Intensive Care Unit of our hospital from May 2012 to October 2015 were selected and divided into AKI group (n = 38 and non-AKI group (n = 82 according to the diagnostic criteria of AKI. After admission to the Intensive Care Unit for 24 h, their blood samples were collected to detect the contents of serum creatinine (Scr, serum urea (SUrea, b2-microglobulin (b2-MG and cystatin C (Cys-C, and urine samples were collected to detect the contents of kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP, Netrin-1, nephrin, desmin, P-cadherin, podocin, podocalyxin and CD2AP. Results: For patients in AKI group, the contents of Scr, SUrea, b2-MG and Cys-C in their blood samples and the contents of KIM-1, L-FABP, Netrin-1, nephrin, desmin, Pcadherin, podocin, podocalyxin and CD2AP in their urine samples were both significantly higher than those in non-AKI group. The contents of nephrin, desmin, P-cadherin, podocin, podocalyxin and CD2AP in urine samples and contents of Scr, SUrea, b2-MG, Cys-C and neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin in blood samples were positively correlated with the contents of KIM-1, L-FABP, and Netrin-1 in urine. Conclusions: Contents of podocyte injury molecules in urine of patients with acute kidney injury such as nephrin, desmin, P-cadherin, podocin, podocalyxin and CD2AP raised remarkably and the changes were consistent with the changes of kidney function indexes in the blood and urine samples.

  19. ACL Reconstruction

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    ... blow to the knee A course of physical therapy may successfully treat an ACL injury for individuals who are relatively inactive, engage in moderate exercise and recreational activities, or play sports that put less stress on the knees. ACL ...

  20. ACL Injuries

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    ... is an ACL injury? ACL refers to the anterior cruciate ligament. It is 1 of 4 ligaments in your ... best results. After surgery, you will need intense physical therapy to ... allow the ligament to heal naturally. Living with an ACL injury ...

  1. The Effects of Balance Training on Static and Dynamic Postural Stability Indices After Acute ACL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Asghar; Ghiasi, Fateme; Mir, Mohsen; Hosseinifar, Mohammad

    2015-07-31

    Proprioception and postural stability play an important role in knee movements. However, there are controversies about the overall recovery time of proprioception following knee surgery and onset of balance and neuromuscular training after ACL reconstruction. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of balance training in early stage of knee rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of balance exercises on postural stability indices in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The study was a controlled randomized trial study. Twenty four patients who had ACL reconstructed (balance training group) and twenty four healthy adults without any knee injury (control group) were recruited in the study. The balance exercises group performed balance exercises for 2 weeks. Before and after the interventions, overall, anteroposterior, and mediolateral stability indices were measured with a Biodex Balance System in bilateral and unilateral stance positions with the eyes open and closed. T-tests were used for statistical analysis (ptraining and there were not significant differences in static stability indices before and after balance training (p>0.05). Although amount of dynamic stability indices decreased, there were not significant differences in dynamic stability indices before and after balance training (p>0.05). Amount of dynamic stability indices were decreased in balance training group, however, there were not significant differences between groups (p>0.05). These results support that balance exercise could partially improved dynamic stability indices in early stage of ACL reconstruction rehabilitation. The results of this study suggest that balance exercises should be part of the rehabilitation program following ACL reconstruction.

  2. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts

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    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R.L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported. PMID:26312100

  3. [Are there Sex Differences Regarding Ski Length to Height Ratio, Ski Length to Weight Ratio, Sidecut Radius and Ski Boot Sole Abrasion among ACL Injured Male and Female Skiers?

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    Posch, Markus; Ruedl, Gerhard; Tecklenburg, Katja; Helle, Kenneth; Schranz, Alois; Burtscher, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Introduction  Female skiers suffer from knee injuries twice as much as male skiers, and the risk of an injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is three times greater among females compared to males. The sex-specific ACL injury risk depends on internal (e. g. age, skiing skills, fitness level) and external (e. g. slope and weather conditions, ski equipment) factors. However, it is not clear whether male and female recreational skiers with an ACL injury differ regarding the sidecut radius and ski boot sole abrasion. Method  This questionnaire-based study was conducted in the winter seasons 2014/15 and 2015/16. During those periods, data of ACL-injured skiers were collected at an Austrian ski clinic. The questionnaire included information about demographics, skiing skills, type of fall, binding release, and injury diagnosis. Furthermore, the ski length and sidecut radius were notated from the ski, and abrasion of ski boot sole was measured at the toe and heel piece of the ski boot using a caliper. Results  In total 164 ACL-injured skiers (67 % females) with a mean age of 41.7 ± 11.5 years were recorded. Males used significantly longer skies compared to females (168.3 ± 6.6 vs. 157.5 ± 5.9 cm, p ski length to height ratio (94.0 ± 3.4 vs. 94.1 ± 3.3 %) showed no significant difference between the two sexes. The ski length to weight ratio was significantly different between females and males (2.5 ± 0.3 vs. 2.0 ± 0.2 cm/kg). The sidecut radius (13.5 ± 1.4 vs. 15.6 ± 2.6 m, p ski boot soles, neither at the toe piece (5.4 ± 1.2 vs. 5.5 ± 1.1 mm) nor at the heel piece (6.0 ± 1.7 vs. 6.0 ± 1.6 mm) between females and males. For both sexes the most common type of fall was the forward fall with body rotation (approximately 59 %). Failure of binding release was significantly more often reported by females compared to males (86 vs. 44 %, p ski length to weight ratio, and the

  4. Increased sphingosine-1-phosphate improves muscle regeneration in acutely injured mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieronimakis, Nicholas; Pantoja, Mario; Hays, Aislinn L; Dosey, Timothy L; Qi, Junlin; Fischer, Karin A; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Sadilek, Martin; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele; Reyes, Morayma

    2013-08-01

    Presently, there is no effective treatment for the lethal muscle wasting disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here we show that increased sphingosine-1-phoshate (S1P) through direct injection or via the administration of the small molecule 2-acetyl-4(5)-tetrahydroxybutyl imidazole (THI), an S1P lyase inhibitor, has beneficial effects in acutely injured dystrophic muscles of mdx mice. We treated mdx mice with and without acute injury and characterized the histopathological and functional effects of increasing S1P levels. We also tested exogenous and direct administration of S1P on mdx muscles to examine the molecular pathways under which S1P promotes regeneration in dystrophic muscles. Short-term treatment with THI significantly increased muscle fiber size and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle specific force in acutely injured mdx limb muscles. In addition, the accumulation of fibrosis and fat deposition, hallmarks of DMD pathology and impaired muscle regeneration, were lower in the injured muscles of THI-treated mdx mice. Furthermore, increased muscle force was observed in uninjured EDL muscles with a longer-term treatment of THI. Such regenerative effects were linked to the response of myogenic cells, since intramuscular injection of S1P increased the number of Myf5nlacz/+ positive myogenic cells and newly regenerated myofibers in injured mdx muscles. Intramuscular injection of biotinylated-S1P localized to muscle fibers, including newly regenerated fibers, which also stained positive for S1P receptor 1 (S1PR1). Importantly, plasma membrane and perinuclear localization of phosphorylated S1PR1 was observed in regenerating muscle fibers of mdx muscles. Intramuscular increases of S1P levels, S1PR1 and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P-rpS6), and elevated EDL muscle specific force, suggest S1P promoted the upregulation of anabolic pathways that mediate skeletal muscle mass and function. These data show that S1P is beneficial for muscle regeneration and

  5. Neurotrauma: The Crosstalk between Neurotrophins and Inflammation in the Acutely Injured Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindolfo da Silva Meirelles

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among young individuals worldwide. Understanding the pathophysiology of neurotrauma is crucial for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies. After the trauma occurs, immediate neurologic damage is produced by the traumatic forces; this primary injury triggers a secondary wave of biochemical cascades together with metabolic and cellular changes, called secondary neural injury. In the scenario of the acutely injured brain, the ongoing secondary injury results in ischemia and edema culminating in an uncontrollable increase in intracranial pressure. These areas of secondary injury progression, or areas of “traumatic penumbra”, represent crucial targets for therapeutic interventions. Neurotrophins are a class of signaling molecules that promote survival and/or maintenance of neurons. They also stimulate axonal growth, synaptic plasticity, and neurotransmitter synthesis and release. Therefore, this review focuses on the role of neurotrophins in the acute post-injury response. Here, we discuss possible endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms of neurotrophins in the prevailing environment surrounding the injured areas, and highlight the crosstalk between neurotrophins and inflammation with focus on neurovascular unit cells, particularly pericytes. The perspective is that neurotrophins may represent promising targets for research on neuroprotective and neurorestorative processes in the short-term following TBI.

  6. Industrial medicine and acute musculoskeletal rehabilitation. 6. Upper- and lower-limb injections for acute musculoskeletal injuries and injured workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foye, Patrick M; Sullivan, William J; Panagos, Andre; Zuhosky, Joseph P; Sable, Aaron W; Irwin, Robert W

    2007-03-01

    This self-directed study module focuses on the use of corticosteroids and other injections in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis, de Quervain's tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, Achilles' tendinitis, and plantar fasciitis. It is part of the study guide on industrial rehabilitation medicine and acute musculoskeletal rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. To review the medical literature to help clinicians make treatment decisions regarding corticosteroid and other injections in the upper and lower limbs in injured workers.

  7. ACL tears in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliano, Danica N; Solomon, Jennifer L

    2007-08-01

    With the growing number of female athletes, an increase is occurring in the number of sports-related injuries, which can cause physical, psychological, academic, and financial suffering. Female athletes are reported to be two to eight times more likely to sustain an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury than male athletes. Further research on risk factors and preventative strategies for the female ACL is needed, because the cause of the disparity in injury rates remains equivocal and controversial. Individualized treatment for the injured knee is necessary and can include either conservative treatment or reconstructive surgery.

  8. Longitudinal Evaluation of Stair Walking Biomechanics in Patients with ACL Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Adam S; Gribble, Phillip A; Thomas, Abbey C; Tevald, Michael A; Sohn, David H; Pietrosimone, Brian G

    2016-01-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction, abnormal biomechanics during daily tasks may have prominent and detrimental long-term consequences on knee joint health. The purpose of this study was to longitudinally evaluate hip and knee joint biomechanics during stair ascent and descent in patients with acute ACL injury and at return to activity after ACL reconstruction. Twenty individuals with unilateral ACL injury (age, 20.9 ± 4.4 yr; height, 172.4 ± 7.5 cm; mass, 76.2 ± 12.2 kg) that were scheduled to undergo surgical reconstruction were compared with 20 healthy matched controls (age, 21.7 ± 3.7 yr; height, 173.7 ± 9.9 cm; mass, 76.1 ± 19.7 kg). Lower extremity biomechanics were recorded using three-dimensional motion analysis during stair ascent and descent at two testing sessions (before surgery and at approximately 6 months after surgery or when they were allowed to return to unrestricted physical activity). Time between sessions for healthy participants was matched on the basis of the ACL group. Peak sagittal and frontal plane knee and hip joint angles and moments, joint angles at initial contact, and joint excursions across stance phase were evaluated. The ACL-injured limb of patients experienced smaller knee extension moments than the uninjured limb and healthy controls during stair ascent and descent (P < 0.05) before and 6 months after ACL reconstruction. During stair ascent, ACL patients experienced more extended knee joint positions and less sagittal plane knee joint excursions, coupled with greater frontal plane hip joint excursions (P < 0.05). Patients with ACL injury experience reductions in knee flexion angle and knee extension moments during stair walking. These alterations were observed both before and after reconstruction, suggesting that early gait retraining interventions may be beneficial in these patients.

  9. [CHARACTERIZATION OF VESTIBULAR DISORDERS IN THE INJURED PERSONS WITH THE BRAIN CONCUSSION IN ACUTE PERIOD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skobska, O E; Kadzhaya, N V; Andreyev, O A; Potapov, E V

    2015-04-01

    There were examined 32 injured persons, ageing (34.1 ± 1.3) yrs at average, for the brain commotion (BC). The adopted protocol SCAT-3 (Standardized Concussion Assessment Tool, 3rd ed.), DHI (Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaire), computer stabilography (KS) were applied for the vestibular disorders diagnosis. There was established, that in acute period of BC a dyssociation between regression of objective neurological symptoms and permanence of the BC indices occurs, what confirms a latent disorder of the balance function. Changes of basic indices of statokinesiography, including increase of the vibration amplitude enhancement in general centre of pressure in a saggital square and the BC square (235.3 ± 13.7) mm2 in a modified functional test of Romberg with the closed eyes is possible to apply as objective criteria for the BC diagnosis.

  10. Mechanisms of non-contact ACL injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing; Garrett, William E

    2007-08-01

    In soccer one of the most common knee injuries is the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, which usually occurs through non-contact mechanisms. Female soccer players are at higher risk of sustaining non-contact ACL injuries than male soccer players. A good understanding of ACL loading mechanisms is the basis for a good understanding of the mechanisms of non-contact ACL injuries, which in turn is essential for identifying risk factors and developing prevention strategies. Current literature demonstrates that sagittal plane biomechanical factors, such as small knee flexion angle, great posterior ground reaction force and great quadriceps muscle force, are the major ACL loading mechanisms. A great posterior ground reaction force may be associated with a great quadriceps muscle force, which would cause great anterior draw force at the knee. A small knee flexion is associated with a large patella tendon-tibia shaft angle and ACL elevation angle, which would result in great ACL loading. Current literature also demonstrates that the ACL is not the major structure of bearing knee valgus-varus moment and internal-external rotation loadings. Knee valgus-varus moment and internal-external rotation moment alone are not likely to result in isolated ACL injuries without injuring other knee structures.

  11. Reasons for and reservations about research participation in acutely injured adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Elliane; Richmond, Therese S

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the reasons adult patients seeking emergency department care for minor injuries agree to participate in clinical research and to identify their reservations about participating in a research study. This is a secondary analysis of data from a longitudinal cohort study of 275 adults who sought emergency department care for physical injury and were followed over 12 months. At the final interview, participants were asked open-ended short-answer questions about their perception of participating in the study. Free text responses were analyzed using conventional content analysis. The final sample of 214 participants was composed equally of males and females, predominantly Black (54%) and White (42%), with a mean age of 41 years. Six themes about reasons for participation emerged from free text responses: being asked, altruism, potential for personal benefit, financial gain, curiosity, and valuing or knowledge of research. Most did not report reservations. Those reservations identified included time constraints, confidentiality, and whether patients felt well suited to fulfill the study requirements. Although injured patients are identified by the research community as vulnerable, they are willing to participate in research studies for diverse reasons, and their participation is commonly associated with positive experiences. Understanding perceptions of participants' experiences of being in a research study after acute injury can guide researchers to improve future study protocols and recruitment strategies in order to optimize participants' experiences. Recruitment and retention into clinical research studies is essential to build nursing science to enhance the recovery of injured individuals. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  12. Evaluation of Partial Transection versus Synovial Debridement of the ACL as Novel Canine Models for Management of ACL Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozynski, Chantelle C; Kuroki, Keiichi; Stannard, James P; Smith, Patrick A; Stoker, Aaron M; Cook, Cristi R; Cook, James L

    2015-10-01

    A major hurdle in investigating important clinical questions in knee ligament treatment is a lack of valid translational animal models. This study characterizes the effects of partial transection versus synovial debridement of the anterior (cranial) cruciate ligament (ACL) in dogs. A total of 27 adult purpose-bred research hounds underwent surgery and were assessed over the following 8 weeks. Dogs were randomized into the following three ACL status groups: sham control (n = 9), intact ACL with synovial debridement (exposed ACL) (n = 9), and partial transection of the ACL (partial tear ACL) (n = 9). Dogs in the exposed ACL group and partial tear ACL group had significantly (p canine models were successfully developed to evaluate partial transection versus synovial debridement of the ACL and these models will be used to evaluate treatment options for acute management of ACL injuries. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. ACL Revision in Synthetic ACL graft failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Zordán, J.; Escobar, G.; Collazo, C.; Palanconi, M.; Autorino, C.; Salinas, E. Alvarez

    2017-01-01

    The development of synthetic grafts as an alternative to biological grafts for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament dates from 1980. The interest is awakened due to the potential advantages of: The absence of morbidity associated with donor site, and early return to sport. However, this surgical technique has had multiple complications associated with graft: mechanical failures (synthetic graft failure, loss of fixation), synovial foreign body reaction, recurrent stroke, recurrent instability and ultimately, early osteoarthritis. Objectives: We describe the synthetic graft failure LCA, intraoperative findings and details of surgical technique. Methods: Patient 35 years old, with a history of ACL reconstruction four years of evolution in another health center, consultation with the Service knee arthroscopy for acute knee pain left knee during secondary sporting event to a rotation mechanism with fixed foot. On physical examination, presents and positive Lachman maneuver Pivot. Radiografia in a widening of the tibial tunnel is observed. NMR shows a discontinuity of fibers of synthetic graft. Results: First time arthroscopic revision where synthetic plastic LCA identifies with Disruption fiber pattern. Intraoperatively, hypertrophic chronic synovitis localized predominantly in intercóndilo is observed. debridement thereof is performed, and proceeds to the extraction of the synthetic ligament. Then he was made prior cruentado and revival of the edges of the tunnel, filling them with non-irradiated structural bone allograft. At four months as planned and after confirmation by studies incorporating bone graft was performed the second time with the new plastic ACL. It was planned like a primary graft surgery with autologous hamstring prepared in fourfold form, and fixation with modified transtibial technique Biotransfix system proximal and distal screw Biocomposite (arthrex®). A quadruple graft 9 mm was obtained, making good positioning of tunnels and stable

  14. A neuromuscular mechanism of posttraumatic osteoarthritis associated with ACL injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri-Smith, Riann M; Thomas, Abbey C

    2009-07-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury leads to early-onset osteoarthritis. Quadriceps weakness is a consequence of ACL injury and is considered to result from arthrogenic inhibition (AMI). AMI is the neurological "shutdown" of muscles surrounding an injured joint, preventing full activation, reducing strength, and promoting atrophy. As quadriceps function is critical for energy absorption, its dysfunction may contribute to posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

  15. Anatomical Individualized ACL Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ata Rahnemai-Azar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is composed of two bundles, which work together to provide both antero-posterior and rotatory stability of the knee. Understanding the anatomy and function of the ACL plays a key role in management of patients with ACL injury. Anatomic ACL reconstruction aims to restore the function of the native ACL. Femoral and tibial tunnels should be placed in their anatomical location accounting for both the native ACL insertion site and bony landmarks. One main component of anatomical individualized ACL reconstruction is customizing the treatment according to each patient’s individual characteristics, considering preoperative and intraoperative evaluation of the native ACL and knee bony anatomy. Anatomical individualized reconstruction surgery should also aim to restore the size of the native ACL insertion as well. Using this concept, while single bundle ACL reconstruction can restore the function of the ACL in some patients, double bundle reconstruction is indicated in others to achieve optimal outcome.

  16. Kinesio taping as a treatment method in the acute phase of ACL reconstruction: A double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balki, Selvin; Göktaş, Hanım Eda; Öztemur, Zekeriya

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we aimed on investigating the effects of Kinesio taping (KT) in acute postoperative rehabilitation phase of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Thirty male patients (mean age: 28.1 years) with ACL reconstruction were randomly assigned to two groups: (1) an experimental group to receive a KT treatment through the muscle and lymphatic correction techniques; or (2) a control group for sham KT. Both interventions were applied twice during a 10-day period from the fourth postoperative day. All patients received the same rehabilitation program for three months. The groups were compared according to range of motion (ROM), pain, swelling and muscle strength before treatment and on the fifth and tenth treatment days. Subjective evaluations were made with the Lysholm, modified Cincinnati and Tegner scores on the first and third postoperative months. Intragroup comparisons showed significant improvements in both groups on the fifth and tenth day and first and third month evaluations (p < 0.05). In comparison to the control group, the experimental group showed significant improvements in swelling around the patella, all pain measurements and hamstring muscle strength on the fifth KT day and knee flexion range of motion (ROM), night pain, all swelling measurements and hamstring muscle strength on the tenth KT day (p < 0.05). Our results revealed that KT techniques applied in addition to the acute rehabilitation program of ACL reconstruction are beneficial in treatment of pain, swelling, knee flexion ROM, and hamstring muscle strength. Level I, Therapeutic study. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Near-infrared Spectroscopy to Reduce Prophylactic Fasciotomies for and Missed Cases of Acute Compartment Syndrome in Soldiers Injured in OEF/OIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    carpal tunnel or first dorsal compart- ment release. Once we enrolled subjects, we recorded their age, gender, race, and body mass index (BMI). We...fasciotomies for and missed cases of acute compartment syndrome in soldiers injured in OEF/OIF PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: LTC Brett Freedman, M.D...Spectroscopy to Reduce Prophylactic Fasciotomies for and Missed Cases of Acute Compartment Syndrome in Soldiers Injured in OEF/OIF 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  18. Injured workers' construction of expectations of return to work with sub-acute back pain: the role of perceived uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alison M; Polak, Emily; Young, Richard; Schultz, Izabela Z

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about the formation of expectations of return to work (RTW) from the perspective of injured workers with back injuries. This modified grounded theory study uses a biopsychosocial approach that considers the workers' complex social circumstances, to unpack the multidimensional construct of expectations of RTW from the injured worker's perspective. Initial semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 individuals with sub-acute back pain, who were off work between 3 and 6 months. Follow-up interviews were conducted with 7 participants for the purposes of member checking. The interview data was coded, compared and analyzed over the course of data collection, until saturation was reached. Data analysis revealed that expectations of return-to-work are constructed based on perceived uncertainty which subsumes five inter-related categories (1) perceived lack of control over the return-to-work process, (2) perceived lack of recognition by others of the impact of the injury, (3) perceived inability to perform the pre-injury job, (4) fear of re-injury, and (5) perceived need for workplace accommodations. Expectations, once formed, were influenced by the worker's experience of coping with perceived uncertainty. Perceived uncertainty plays a key role in injured workers' formation of expectations of return-to-work. Implications are discussed regarding how this perceived uncertainty plays a role in the development of (re)injury prevention and rehabilitation programs. The importance of further research on perceived uncertainty is presented, along with potential future research considerations.

  19. The influence of posterior-inferior tibial slope in ACL injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostogiannis, Ioannis; Swärd, Per; Neuman, Paul; Fridén, Thomas; Roos, Harald

    2011-04-01

    To explore the effect of different posterior-inferior tibial slope (PITS) angles on ACL injury at non-contact sports, knee laxity and the need for ACL reconstruction. One hundred patients with an acute, arthroscopically verified total ACL rupture were followed prospectively with the intention of treating the injury without reconstruction. Knee laxity was assessed with the Lachman and pivot shift tests with the patients under general anesthesia within 10 days of injury. After 15 years, 22 patients of 94 available for follow-up had undergone reconstruction a mean of 4 years after injury. Reconstruction was performed in case of repeated giving-way episodes (n = 16) or meniscus lesions suitable for fixation (n = 6). Knee radiographs were available from 82 patients. Two independent readers determined the PITS angle. Patients injured in contact sports had a greater mean PITS angle than those injured in non-contact sports (10.5° and 9.3°, respectively, P = 0.03). The mean PITS angle was 10.1 (SD = 2.3) for non-reconstructed knees and 9.1 (SD = 3.0) for reconstructed knees (P = NS). Eight of 17 reconstructed knees showed a PITS angle of less than 7.6° (P = 0.006), and the odds ratio of need for reconstruction was 3.9 (CI 1.26-12.3, P = 0.02). No significant difference in PITS angle was found between patients with low- and high-grade instability. The main finding of the study was that reconstructed knees were overrepresented in knees with extremely low PITS angles. Additionally, patients injured in contact sports had higher PITS angles than those injured in non-contact sports, and PITS angle did not influence knee laxity.

  20. Acute Neuropathic Pain Assessment in Burn Injured Patients: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverner, Tarnia; Prince, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure the prevalence of acute neuropathic pain in patients with acute burn injuries and the demographic and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain in this population. We also evaluated the proportion of patients who received twice-daily evaluation of nurses' documentation of neuropathic pain following introduction of a validated neuropathic pain assessment tool embedded within the pain chart. Retrospective, descriptive study. The sample comprised 86 patients with second- and third-degree burn injuries. The research setting was a burn injury unit in a provincial center in British Columbia, Canada. Medical records over a 1-year prior following introduction of assessment of neuropathic pain into pain charts were retrospectively reviewed, and data collection focused on evidence of nurses undertaking acute neuropathic pain assessment as well as prevalence of report of acute neuropathic pain signs among this patient group. Neuropathic pain was evaluated twice daily using the Douleur Neuropathique 4, a previously validated neuropathic pain assessment tool. Eighty percent of patients cared for received twice-daily neuropathic pain assessment. The prevalence of patients with neuropathic pain based on the Douleur Neuropathique instrument scores was 42%. Males reported neuropathic signs more than female patients, and patients with a greater than 10% body surface burn had a higher prevalence of neuropathic pain. Study findings suggest that patients with acute burn injury are at risk of neuropathic pain. We recommend that nurse assessment of neuropathic pain becomes routine during the acute injury phase.

  1. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruciate ligament injury - anterior; ACL injury; Knee injury - anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ... knee. It prevents the knee from bending out. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is in the middle of the knee. ...

  2. ACL Research Retreat VI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Padua; S.J. Schultz; M. Collins; R.J. Schmitz; A.M. Chaudhari; Anne Benjaminse

    2012-01-01

    It has been well recognized that multiple factors, whether individually or in combination, contribute to noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The ongoing mission of the ACL Research Retreat is to bring clinicians and researchers together to present and discuss the most recent advances

  3. Does the lateral intercondylar ridge disappear in ACL deficient patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, C.F.; Martins, C.A.Q.; Vyas, S.M.; Celentano, U.; van Dijk, C.N.; Fu, F.H.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in the presence of the lateral intercondylar ridge and the lateral bifurcate ridge between patients with sub-acute and chronic ACL injuries. We hypothesized that the ridges would be present less often with chronic ACL deficiency.

  4. Acute Fibrinolysis Shutdown after Injury Occurs Frequently and Increases Mortality: A Multicenter Evaluation of 2,540 Severely Injured Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Hunter B; Moore, Ernest E; Liras, Ioannis N; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Harvin, John A; Holcomb, John B; Sauaia, Angela; Cotton, Bryan A

    2016-04-01

    Fibrinolysis is a physiologic process that maintains microvascular patency by breaking down excessive fibrin clot. Hyperfibrinolysis is associated with a doubling of mortality. Fibrinolysis shutdown, an acute impairment of fibrinolysis, has been recognized as a risk factor for increased mortality. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and outcomes of fibrinolysis phenotypes in 2 urban trauma centers. Injured patients included in the analysis were admitted between 2010 and 2013, were 18 years of age or older, and had an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15. Admission fibrinolysis phenotypes were determined by the clot lysis at 30 minutes (LY30): shutdown ≤ 0.8%, physiologic 0.9% to 2.9%, and hyperfibrinolysis ≥ 3%. Logistic regression was used to adjust for age, arrival blood pressure, ISS, mechanism, and facility. There were 2,540 patients who met inclusion criteria. Median age was 39 years (interquartile range [IQR] 26 to 55 years) and median ISS was 25 (IQR 20 to 33), with a mortality rate of 21%. Fibrinolysis shutdown was the most common phenotype (46%) followed by physiologic (36%) and hyperfibrinolysis (18%). Hyperfibrinolysis was associated with the highest death rate (34%), followed by shutdown (22%), and physiologic (14%, p Fibrinolysis shutdown is the most common phenotype on admission and is associated with increased mortality. These data provide additional evidence of distinct phenotypes of coagulation impairment and that individualized hemostatic therapy may be required. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute traumatic coagulopathy in a critically injured pediatric population: Definition, trend over time, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeper, Christine M; Kutcher, Matthew; Nasr, Isam; McKenna, Christine; Billiar, Timothy; Neal, Matthew; Sperry, Jason; Gaines, Barbara A

    2016-07-01

    While our understanding of acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) in adults is advancing, the pediatric literature on ATC is limited. Children have a unique injury profile and physiologic response to trauma; however, the impact of this phenomenon on ATC has not been fully elucidated. We performed a retrospective review of our trauma registry from 2005 to 2014. Level 1 trauma patients age 0 year to 17 years requiring admission to the intensive care unit were included. Variables included admission vital signs and laboratory studies, product transfusion, injuries, and mortality. Youden index was used to determine optimum cutoff point for admission international normalized ratio (INR) as a predictor of mortality. Logistic regression modeling was used to determine independent predictors of mortality adjusting for hypotension, hypothermia, acidosis, injury severity, hemorrhage, and head injury. χ tests were performed evaluating for association between mortality and 24-hour INR as well as between transfusion and INR correction. A total of 776 patients were analyzed: 29.2% (n = 227) had an admission INR of 1.3 or greater, and 13.3% (n = 103) had an admission INR of 1.5 or greater. Youden index demonstrated optimum cutoff at INR of 1.3 or greater to distinguish survivors and nonsurvivors. Overall mortality rate was 11.1% (n = 86). Elevated INR was independently associated with mortality (odds ratio, 3.77; p population; however, product transfusion did not influence the INR trend or clinical outcome. Further research is warranted to evaluate potential upstream mediators of ATC and targets for intervention in pediatric trauma patients. Prognostic and epidemiologic study, level III.

  6. The role of ACL injury in the development of posttraumatic knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Nicole A; Chu, Constance R

    2013-01-01

    Acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are most frequently sustained by young, physically active individuals. ACL injuries are seen at high incidence in adolescents and young adults performing sports and occupational activities that involve pivoting. Young women participating in pivoting sports have a 3 to 5 times higher risk of ACL injury than men. Studies show that ACL injury increases osteoarthritis (OA) risk with symptomatic OA appearing in roughly half of individuals 10-15 years later. Because the majority of patients sustaining acute ACL tears are younger than 30, this leads to early onset OA with associated pain and disability during premium work and life growth years between ages 30 and 50. Effective strategies to prevent ACL injury and to reduce subsequent OA risk in those sustaining acute ACL tears are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Update on rehabilitation following ACL reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Nyland

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available John Nyland, Emily Brand, Brent FisherDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, Division of Sports Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USAAbstract: As anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction has evolved to less invasive, more anatomical approaches, rehabilitation of the injured athlete has likewise become more progressive and innovative, with a sound understanding of graft and fixation strength and biologic healing-remodeling constraints. This review discusses these innovations including specific considerations before surgery, when planning rehabilitation timetables, and the importance of reestablishing nonimpaired active and passive knee range of motion and biarticular musculotendinous extensibility in positions of function. Concepts of self-efficacy or confidence and reestablishing the “athlete role” are also addressed. Since ACL injury and reinjury are largely related to the influence of structure-form-function on dynamic knee joint stability, the interrelationships between sensorimotor, neuromuscular, and conventional resistance training are also discussed. Although pivot shift “giving way” relates to function loss following ACL injury, anterior translational laxity often does not. Although there is growing evidence that progressive eccentric training may benefit the patient following ACL reconstruction, there is less evidence supporting the use of functional ACL knee braces. Of considerable importance is selecting and achieving a criteria-based progression to sports-specific training, reestablishing osseous homeostasis and improved bone density, blending open and closed kinetic chain exercises at the appropriate time period, and appreciating the influence of the trunk, upper extremities, and sports equipment use on knee loads. We believe that knee dysfunction and functional recovery should be considered from a local, regional, and global perspective. These concepts are consolidated into our approach to prepare

  8. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries What's in this article? What Are ...

  9. No economic benefit of early knee reconstruction over optional delayed reconstruction for ACL tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiadaliri, Aliasghar A; Englund, Martin; Stefan Lohmander, L.

    2016-01-01

    Background To analyse 5-year cost-effectiveness of early versus optional delayed acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods 121 young, active adults with acute ACL injury to a previously uninjured knee were randomised to early ACL reconstruction (n=62, within 10 weeks of injury......) or optional delayed ACL reconstruction (n=59; 30 with ACL reconstruction within 6-55 months); all patients received similar structured rehabilitation. Real life data on health care utilisation and sick leave were obtained from regional and national registers. Costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were...... discounted at 3%. Full-analysis set (based on study randomisation) and as-treated analysis (according to actual treatment over 5 years) principles were applied. Results Mean cost of early ACL reconstruction was €4695 higher than optional delayed ACL reconstruction (p=0.19) and provided an additional 0...

  10. Proprioceptive deficits after ACL injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Otten; K. Postema; S.M. Lephart; M.P. Arnold; P.U. Dijkstra; A. Gokeler; L. Engebretsen; E. Ageberg; T.E. Hewett; Anne Benjaminse; Engelhardt M

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the clinical relevance of proprioceptive deficits reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A literature search was done in electronic databases from January 1990 to June 2009. Inclusion criteria for studies were ACL deficient (ACL-D) and

  11. Gender influences: the role of leg dominance in ACL injury among soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Robert; Silvers, Holly Jacinda; Gonzales, Tyler; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2010-08-01

    This study intends to look at the role of leg dominance in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk among soccer (football) athletes. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that soccer players rupture the ACL of their preferred support leg more frequently than the ACL in their preferred kicking leg, particularly in non-contact injuries, despite differences in gender. Retrospective observational study. Outpatient orthopaedic practice. Subjects who had sustained an ACL injury due to direct participation in soccer. N=93 (41 male, 52 female). These noncontact injuries were sustained while playing soccer. For non-contact injuries, roughly half of the injuries occurred in the preferred kicking leg (30) and the contralateral leg (28). However, by gender, there was a significant difference in the distribution of non-contact injury, as 74.1% of males (20/27) were injured on the dominant kicking leg compared with 32% (10/31) of females (pnon-contact injury mechanism, females are more likely to injure the ACL in their supporting leg, whereas males tend to injure their kicking leg. This research suggests that limb dominance does serve as an aetiological factor with regard to ACL injuries sustained while playing soccer. If follow-up studies confirm that females are more likely to injure their preferred supporting leg, future research should investigate the cause for this discrepancy, which could result from underlying gender-based anatomical differences as well as differences in neuromuscular patterns during cutting manoeuvres or kicking.

  12. An anterior cruciate ligament injury does not affect the neuromuscular function of the non-injured leg except for dynamic balance and voluntary quadriceps activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zult, Tjerk; Gokeler, Alli; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Brouwer, Reinoud W.; Zijdewind, Inge; Hortobagyi, Tibor

    The function of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) patients' non-injured leg is relevant in light of the high incidence of secondary ACL injuries on the contralateral side. However, the non-injured leg's function has only been examined for a selected number of neuromuscular outcomes and often

  13. Effect of vision on postural sway in anterior cruciate ligament injured knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Kazuhiro; Abe, Nobuhiro; Katayama, Yoshimi; Senda, Masuo; Kuroda, Takayuki; Inoue, Hajime

    2005-05-01

    Recent clinical studies have investigated postural sway characteristics in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees, but the relative contributions of vision and ACL remain unclear. In the current study, we measured and compared postural sway during one-leg standing with eyes open and closed to assess the difference between legs with and without ACL injury, and we discuss the contribution of the ligament relative to vision and to postural sway in patients. We examined 32 patients (17 males, 15 females) with ACL injury before surgery from March 2001 through January 2004. None presented obvious dysfunction in the lower limbs or central nervous system. Using a gravicorder, we measured locus length per time (LG) and environmental area (AR) as the factors of postural sway during two-leg and one-leg standing with eyes open or closed. In the ACL-injured knee, the amount of postural sway increased significantly during injured leg standing with eyes closed (LG, P postural sway and the anterior translation of the tibia measured by arthrometer KT2000 or between the muscle strength around the knee. We concluded that the amount of postural sway in the ACL-injured knee increased significantly on injured leg standing with eyes closed, and that vision appears to be dominant in compensating for the decreased contribution of the injured ACL.

  14. High-fidelity simulation enhances ACLS training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdorf, Mark I; Strom, Suzanne L; Yang, Luanna; Canales, Cecilia; Anderson, Craig L; Amin, Alpesh; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    Medical student training and experience in cardiac arrest situations is limited. Traditional Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) teaching methods are largely unrealistic with rare personal experience as team leader. Yet Postgraduate Year 1 residents may perform this role shortly after graduation. We expanded our ACLS teaching to a "Resuscitation Boot Camp" where we taught 2010 ACLS to 19 pregraduation students in didactic (12 hours) and experiential (8 hours) format. Immediately before the course, we recorded students performing an acute coronary syndrome/ventricular fibrillation (VF) scenario. As a final test, we recorded the same scenario for each student. Primary outcomes were time to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation (DF). Secondary measures were total scenario score, dangerous actions, proportion of students voicing "ventricular fibrillation," 12-lead ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) interpretation, and care necessary for return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Two expert ACLS instructors scored both performances on a 121-point scale, with each student serving as their own control. We used t tests and McNemar tests for paired data with statistical significance at pmask ventilation before DF. After instruction, students scored 97±4/121 points (p<.0001) with no dangerous actions. Before training, only 4 of 19 (21%) students performed both CPR and DF within 2 minutes, and 3 of these had ROSC. After training, 14 of 19 (74%) achieved CPR+DF≤2 minutes (p=.002), and all had ROSC. Before training, 5 of 19 (26%) students said "VF" and 4 of 19 obtained an ECG, but none identified STEMI. After training, corresponding performance was 13 of 19 "VF" (68%, p=021) and 100% ECG and STEMI identification (p<.05). This course significantly improved knowledge and psychomotor skills. Critical actions required for resuscitation were much more common after training. ACLS training including high-fidelity simulation decreases time to CPR and DF and

  15. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddie H. Fu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Current Concepts in ACL Reconstruction is a complete reference text composed of the most thorough collection of topics on the ACL and its surgical reconstruction compiled, with contributions from some of the world's experts and most experienced ACL surgeons. Various procedures mentioned throughout the text are also demonstrated in an accompanying video CD-ROM. PURPOSE Composing a single, comprehensive and complete information source on ACL including basic sciences, clinical issues, latest concepts and surgical techniques, from evaluation to outcome, from history to future, editors and contributors have targeted to keep the audience pace with the latest concepts and techniques for the evaluation and the treatment of ACL injuries. FEATURES The text is composed of 27 chapters in 6 sections. The first section is mostly about basic sciences, also history of the ACL, imaging, clinical approach to adolescent and pediatric patients are subjected. In the second section, Graft Choices and Arthroscopy Portals for ACL Reconstruction are mentioned. The third section is about the technique and the outcome of the single-bundle ACL reconstruction. The fourth chapter includes the techniques and outcome of the double-bundle ACL reconstruction. In the fifth chapter revision, navigation technology, rehabilitation and the evaluation of the outcome of ACL reconstruction is subjected. The sixth/the last chapter is about the future advances to reach: What We Have Learned and the Future of ACL Reconstruction. AUDIENCE Orthopedic residents, sports traumatology and knee surgery fellows, orthopedic surgeons, also scientists in basic sciences or clinicians who are studying or planning a research on ACL forms the audience group of this book. ASSESSMENT This is the latest, the most complete and comprehensive textbook of ACL reconstruction produced by the editorial work up of two pioneer and masters "Freddie H. Fu MD and Steven B. Cohen MD" with the contribution of world

  16. A Retrospective Analysis of Concurrent Pathology in ACL-Reconstructed Knees of Elite Alpine Ski Racers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Matthew J; Doyle-Baker, Patricia; Heard, Mark; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, Walter

    2017-07-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is the most frequent injury in alpine ski racing, and there is a high prevalence of ACL reinjury. Limited data exist on the concurrent pathology with primary ACL tears in elite alpine ski racers and the magnitude of injury progression after primary ACL reconstruction (ACLR). To evaluate (1) the involvement of intra-articular and multiligament pathologies at the time of primary ACLR, (2) the subsequent progression in meniscal/chondral injuries, and (3) the occurrence of ACL reinjury in elite alpine ski racers. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Primary ACLR operative reports (n = 28) were obtained for 32 elite alpine ski racers along with the reports of 20 operative procedures that occurred subsequent to primary ACLR. Operative reports were evaluated to identify the presence/location of multiligament injury, meniscal tears, and chondral lesions. At the time of primary ACLR, a majority of knees (82%; 23/28) demonstrated concurrent injury compared with isolated ACL tears; 32% of knees sustained multiligament injuries (9/28), and 8 involved the ipsilateral medial collateral ligament (MCL). Of the ACL-injured knees, 54% had chondral lesions, of which 73% were sustained in the lateral knee compartment, and 82% of meniscal tears (14/17) were complex in nature. Bilateral ACL tears were seen in 22% of the participants, and 28% underwent ACL revision. In the case of ACL revision or future meniscal/chondral surgery, 60% of meniscal tears and 80% of chondral lesions had worsened since the time of primary ACLR. Concurrent injury was common in this group of elite ski racers. Primary ACL tears were typically accompanied by lateral compartment chondral lesions and complex meniscal tears that worsened over time. ACL/MCL tears were the most common multiligament injury pattern.

  17. ACL injury reduces satellite cell abundance and promotes fibrogenic cell expansion within skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Christopher S; Johnson, Darren L; Ireland, Mary Lloyd; Noehren, Brian

    2017-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are associated with significant loss of strength in knee extensor muscles that persists despite physical therapy. The underlying mechanisms responsible for this protracted muscle weakness are poorly understood; however, we recently showed significant myofiber atrophy and altered muscle phenotype following ACL injury. We sought to further explore perturbations in skeletal muscle morphology and progenitor cell activity following an ACL injury. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the injured and non-injured vastus lateralis of young adults (n = 10) following ACL injury, and histochemical/immunohistochemical analyses were undertaken to determine collagen content, abundance of connective tissue fibroblasts, fibrogenic/adipogenic progenitor (FAP) cells, satellite cells, in addition to indices of muscle fiber denervation and myonuclear apoptosis. The injured limb showed elevated collagen content (p injury. The injured limb also displayed reduced satellite cell abundance, increased fiber denervation and DNA damage associated with apoptosis (p muscle itself after the ligament injury. Injury of the ACL induces a myriad of negative outcomes within knee extensor muscles, which likely compromise the restorative capacity and plasticity of skeletal muscle, impeding rehabilitative efforts. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1876-1885, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Derivation of injury-responsive dendritic cells for acute brain targeting and therapeutic protein delivery in the stroke-injured rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Manley

    Full Text Available Research with experimental stroke models has identified a wide range of therapeutic proteins that can prevent the brain damage caused by this form of acute neurological injury. Despite this, we do not yet have safe and effective ways to deliver therapeutic proteins to the injured brain, and this remains a major obstacle for clinical translation. Current targeted strategies typically involve invasive neurosurgery, whereas systemic approaches produce the undesirable outcome of non-specific protein delivery to the entire brain, rather than solely to the injury site. As a potential way to address this, we developed a protein delivery system modeled after the endogenous immune cell response to brain injury. Using ex-vivo-engineered dendritic cells (DCs, we find that these cells can transiently home to brain injury in a rat model of stroke with both temporal and spatial selectivity. We present a standardized method to derive injury-responsive DCs from bone marrow and show that injury targeting is dependent on culture conditions that maintain an immature DC phenotype. Further, we find evidence that when loaded with therapeutic cargo, cultured DCs can suppress initial neuron death caused by an ischemic injury. These results demonstrate a non-invasive method to target ischemic brain injury and may ultimately provide a way to selectively deliver therapeutic compounds to the injured brain.

  19. Biomechanics Associated with Patellofemoral Pain and ACL Injuries in Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Kaitlyn; Whatman, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Knee injuries are prevalent among a variety of competitive sports and can impact an athlete's ability to continue to participate in their sport or, in the worst case, end an athlete's career. The aim was to evaluate biomechanics associated with both patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries (in sports involving landing, change in direction, or rapid deceleration) across the three time points frequently reported in the literature: pre-injury, at the time of injury, and following injury. A search of the literature was conducted for research evaluating biomechanics associated with ACL injury and PFPS. The Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, EBSCO, PubMed, and CINAHL databases, to March 2015, were searched, and journal articles focused on ACL injuries and PFPS in sports that met the inclusion criteria were reviewed. The search methodology was created with the intent of extracting case-control, case, and cohort studies of knee injury in athletic populations. The search strategy was restricted to only full-text articles published in English. These articles were included in the review if they met all of the required selection criteria. The following inclusion criteria were used: (1) The study must report lower extremity biomechanics in one of the following settings: (a) a comparison of currently injured and uninjured participants, (b) a prospective study evaluating risk factors for injury, or (c) a study reporting on the injury event itself. (2) The study must include only currently active participants who were similar at baseline (i.e. healthy, high school level basketball players currently in-season) and include biomechanical analysis of either landing, change in direction, or rapid deceleration. (3) The study must include currently injured participants. The studies were graded on the basis of quality, which served as an indication of risk of bias. An adapted version of the 'Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in

  20. Association Between Lateral Posterior Tibial Slope, Body Mass Index, and ACL Injury Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojicic, Katherine M; Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Imaizumi Krieger, Daniel Y; Ashton-Miller, James A; Wojtys, Edward M

    2017-02-01

    While body mass index (BMI), a modifiable parameter, and knee morphology, a nonmodifiable parameter, have been identified as risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, the interaction between them remains unknown. An understanding of this interaction is important because greater compressive axial force (perhaps due to greater BMI) applied to a knee that is already at an increased risk because of its geometry, such as a steep lateral posterior tibial slope, could further increase the probability of ACL injury. To quantify the relationship between BMI and select knee morphological parameters as potential risk factors for ACL injury. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Sagittal knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) files from 76 ACL-injured and 42 uninjured subjects were gathered from the University of Michigan Health System's archive. The posterior tibial slope (PTS), middle cartilage slope (MCS), posterior meniscus height (PMH), and posterior meniscus bone angle (MBA) in the lateral compartment were measured using MRI. BMI was calculated from demographic data. The association between the knee structural factors, BMI, and ACL injury risk was explored using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. PTS (P = .043) and MCS (P = .037) significantly predicted ACL injury risk. As PTS and MCS increased by 1°, odds of sustaining an ACL injury increased by 12% and 13%, respectively. The multivariate logistic regression analysis, which included PTS, BMI centered around the mean (cBMI), and their interaction, showed that this interaction predicted the odds of ACL rupture (P = .050; odds ratio, 1.03). For every 1-unit increase in BMI from the average that is combined with a 1° increase in PTS, the odds of an ACL tear increased by 15%. An increase in BMI was associated with increased risk of ACL tear in the presence of increased lateral posterior tibial slope. Larger values of PTS or MCS were associated with an increased risk of ACL tear.

  1. ACL Rupture in Collegiate Wrestler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay A. Palmer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To educate others on unique Anterior Cruciate Ligament tears and percentage of usage of the ACL in normal daily function. Background: Patient is an eighteen year old male participating in wrestling and football at the time of the injury. Patient now only participates in wrestling. No previous knee or chronic injuries were reported prior to this injury. Patient was playing football during the time of injury. The patient stated that he planted his foot down and was tackled at the same time when the injury occurred. The patient felt his knee twist and buckle. Patient complained of clicking inside the knee and had minimal swelling. He also complained of it being difficult to bear weight at the time. The patient did not seek further treatment until two months after the injury occurred when he received an MRI. His MRI showed a positive finding for an Anterior Cruciate Ligament rupture. His previous Athletic Trainer could not find a positive diagnosis for the patient prior to the MRI. Differential Diagnosis: Possible meniscal or ACL injury. Treatment: Doctors officially diagnosed the injury as a complete rupture of the ACL. The patient did not receive surgery immediately. Doctors have stated that he only uses about 50% of his ACL on a daily basis compared to a normal person who uses about 95% of their ACL daily. Because of this, the patient played on his rupture for seven months before receiving surgery. He played a whole season of high school football and a whole season of wrestling his senior year with the ACL ruptured. The patient only used a brace for better comfort during the seven months. The patient then received reconstructive surgery to repair the rupture. A hamstring tendon graft was used to repair the ruptured ACL. Because a tendon was taken from the hamstring, patient experienced a tight ACL and hamstring of the left leg post-surgery. The patient participated in Physical Therapy for five months to strengthen and stretch the new

  2. Acute Stress Symptoms in Seriously Injured Patients: Precipitating Versus Cumulative Trauma and the Contribution of Peritraumatic Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, John; Dias, Colin P; Semple, Randye J; Scott, Catherine; Bigras, Noémie; Godbout, Natacha

    2017-08-01

    The relationship between type of trauma exposure, cumulative trauma, peritraumatic distress, and subsequent acute stress disorder (ASD) symptoms was examined prospectively in 96 individuals presenting with acute medical injuries to a Level 1 emergency/trauma department. Common precipitating traumas included motor vehicle-related events, stabbings, shootings, and physical assaults. At 2 to 3 weeks follow-up, 22.9% of participants had developed ASD. Univariate analysis revealed no relationship between type of precipitating trauma and ASD symptoms, whereas robust path analysis indicated direct effects of gender, lifetime cumulative trauma exposure, and peritraumatic distress. Peritraumatic distress did not mediate the association between cumulative trauma and symptoms, but did mediate the association between gender and symptomatology. These results, which account for 23.1% of the variance in ASD symptoms, suggest that ASD may be more due to cumulative trauma exposure than the nature of the precipitating trauma, but that cumulative trauma does not exert its primary effect by increasing peritraumatic distress to the most recent trauma. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  3. Changes in gait pattern and early functional results after ACL repair are comparable to those of ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliemann, Benedikt; Glasbrenner, Johannes; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Lammers, Katharina; Herbort, Mirco; Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Kösters, Clemens

    2017-07-03

    Dynamic intraligamentary stabilization (DIS) has been introduced as a new technique to repair the torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and to restore knee joint kinematics after an acute ACL tear. Aim of the present study was to compare the early post-operative activity, restoration of gait pattern and functional results after DIS in comparison with primary ACL reconstruction (ACLR) for acute ACL tears. It was hypothesized that functional results, post-operative activity and changes in gait pattern after DIS are comparable to those after ACLR. Sixty patients with acute ACL tears were included in this study and underwent either DIS or ACLR with an anatomic semitendinosus autograft in a randomized manner. Patients were equipped with an accelerometric step counter for the first 6 weeks after surgery in order to monitor their early post-operative activity. 3D gait analysis was performed at 6 weeks and 6 months after surgery. Temporal-spatial, kinematic and kinetic parameters were extracted and averaged for each subject. Functional results were recorded at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months after surgery using the Tegner activity scale, International Knee Documentation Committee score and Lysholm score. Patients who underwent DIS showed an increased early post-operative activity with significant differences at week 2 and 3 (p = 0.0241 and 0.0220). No significant differences between groups were found for knee kinematic and kinetic parameters or the functional scores at any time of the follow-up. Furthermore, the difference in anterior tibial translation was not significantly different between the two groups (n.s.). Early functional results and changes in gait pattern after DIS are comparable to those of primary ACLR. Therefore, ACL repair may be an alternative to ACLR in this cohort of patients. I.

  4. Jumping performance differences among elite professional handball players with or without previous ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setuain, I; Millor, N; Alfaro, J; Gorostiaga, E; Izquierdo, M

    2015-10-01

    Handball is one of the most challenging sports for the knee joint. Persistent strength and jumping capacity alterations may be observed among athletes who have suffered anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The aim of this study was to examine unilateral and bilateral jumping ability differences between previously ACL-reconstructed rehabilitated elite handball athletes and sex, age and uninjured sport activity level-pairs of control players. It was a Cross-sectional study with one factor: previous ACL injury. We recruited 22 male (6 ACL-reconstructed and 16 uninjured control players) and 21 female (6 ACL-reconstructed and 15 uninjured control players) elite handball players who were evaluated 6.2±3.4 years after surgical ACL reconstruction. A battery of jump tests, including both bilateral and unilateral maneuvers, was performed. Two-tailed unpaired (intergroup comparison) and paired (intragroup comparison) t-tests were performed for mean comparisons. The P-value cut-off for significance was set at handball athletes demonstrated both lower vertical bilateral drop jump (VBDJ) contact times and lower UTHD scores for the injured leg several years after injury. These deficits could contribute to an increase in ACL re-injury risk.

  5. Prevalence and Impact of Admission Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy on Treatment Intensity, Resource Use, and Mortality: An Evaluation of 956 Severely Injured Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liras, Ioannis N; Caplan, Henry W; Stensballe, Jakob; Wade, Charles E; Cox, Charles S; Cotton, Bryan A

    2017-04-01

    Acute coagulopathy of trauma in children is of potential importance to clinical outcomes, but knowledge is limited and has only been investigated using conventional coagulation testing. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and impact of arrival coagulopathy, determined by viscoelastic hemostatic testing, in severely injured children. Pediatric patients (younger than 17 years of age) who were admitted January 2010 to May 2016 and met highest-level trauma activation were included. Patients were divided into 2 groups (coagulopathy and controls) based on arrival rapid thrombelastography values. Coagulopathy was defined as the presence of any of the following on rapid thrombelastography: activated clotting time ≥128 seconds, α-angle ≤65 degrees, maximum amplitude ≤55 mm, and lysis at 30 minutes from 20-mm amplitude ≥3%. Logistic regression was used to adjust for age, sex, blood pressure, mechanism, and injury severity. Nine hundred and fifty-six patients met inclusion; 507 (57%) were coagulopathic and 449 (43%) were not (noncoagulopathic and control cohort). Coagulopathic patients were younger (median 14 vs 15 years) and more likely to be male (68% vs 60%) and Hispanic (38% vs 31%) (all p coagulopathy was an independent predictor of death, with an odds ratio of 3.67 (95% CI 1.768 to 7.632; p coagulopathy. The presence of admission coagulopathy is associated with high mortality in children, especially among those with head injuries. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury -- aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000681.htm Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury - aftercare To use the sharing features ... that connects a bone to another bone. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is located inside your knee joint and ...

  7. Mechanisms of non‐contact ACL injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Bing; Garrett, William E.

    2007-01-01

    In soccer one of the most common knee injuries is the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, which usually occurs through non‐contact mechanisms. Female soccer players are at higher risk of sustaining non‐contact ACL injuries than male soccer players. A good understanding of ACL loading mechanisms is the basis for a good understanding of the mechanisms of non‐contact ACL injuries, which in turn is essential for identifying risk factors and developing prevention strategies. Current literature ...

  8. Comparison of hamstring muscle behavior for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) patient and normal subject during local marching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amineldin@Aminudin, Nurul Izzaty Bt.; Rambely, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the hamstring muscle activity after the surgery by carrying out an electromyography experiment on the hamstring and to compare the behavior of the ACL muscle activity between ACL patient and control subject. Electromyography (EMG) is used to study the behavior of muscles during walking activity. Two hamstring muscles involved which are semitendinosus and bicep femoris. The EMG data for both muscles were recorded while the subject did maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and marching. The study concluded that there were similarities between bicep femoris of the ACL and control subjects. The analysis showed that the biceps femoris muscle of the ACL subject had no abnormality and the pattern is as normal as the control subject. However, ACL patient has poor semitendinosus muscle strength compared to that of control subject because the differences of the forces produced. The force of semitendinosus value for control subject was two times greater than that of the ACL subject as the right semitendinosus muscle of ACL subject was used to replace the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that was injured.

  9. Evidence-Based ACL Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carlos RODRIGUEZ-MERCHAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is controversy in the literature regarding a number of topics related to anterior cruciate ligament (ACLreconstruction. The purpose of this article is to answer the following questions: 1 Bone patellar tendon bone (BPTB reconstruction or hamstring reconstruction (HR; 2 Double bundle or single bundle; 3 Allograft or authograft; 4 Early or late reconstruction; 5 Rate of return to sports after ACL reconstruction; 6 Rate of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction. A Cochrane Library and PubMed (MEDLINE search of systematic reviews and meta-analysis related to ACL reconstruction was performed. The key words were: ACL reconstruction, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The main criteria for selection were that the articles were systematic reviews and meta-analysesfocused on the aforementioned questions. Sixty-nine articles were found, but only 26 were selected and reviewed because they had a high grade (I-II of evidence. BPTB-R was associated with better postoperative knee stability but with a higher rate of morbidity. However, the results of both procedures in terms of functional outcome in the long-term were similar. The double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique showed better outcomes in rotational laxity, although functional recovery was similar between single-bundle and double-bundle. Autograft yielded better results than allograft. There was no difference between early and delayed reconstruction. 82% of patients were able to return to some kind of sport participation. 28% of patients presented radiological signs of osteoarthritis with a follow-up of minimum 10 years.

  10. Surgical Management and Treatment of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament/Medial Collateral Ligament Injured Knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Kevin M; Bailey, James R; Moorman, Claude T

    2017-01-01

    The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly injured ligament in conjunction with the MCL. Most MCL injuries can be treated nonoperatively, whereas the ACL often requires reconstruction. A good physical examination is essential for diagnosis, whereas radiographs and MRI of the knee confirm diagnosis and help guide treatment planning. Preoperative physical therapy should be completed before surgical management to allow for return of knee range of motion and an attempt at MCL healing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Impact of Self-Reported Fatigue on ACL Injuries in Alpine Skiing: A Sex Comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedl, G; Helle, K; Tecklenburg, K; Schranz, A; Fink, C; Posch, M; Burtscher, M

    2015-12-01

    In recreational alpine skiing, about one third of all injuries affect the knee joint, and the most common diagnosis in adult male and female skiers is a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), which makes up 15 - 21 % of all injuries. General preventive recommendations to reduce the incidence of ski injuries include avoiding fatigue. However, it seems unclear to what extent ACL injuries in male and female recreational skiers are related to perceived fatigue. This study was conducted as a prospective questionnaire-based investigation in two Austrian ski injury clinics during the five winter seasons between 2009/2010 and 2013/2014. In total, 588 skiers (67.9 % females) with a mean age of 42.1 ± 10.9 years were interviewed about demographics, skiing ability, skiing behaviour, fitness, day and time of accident, skiing duration and perceived fatigue at the moment of accident. ACL injured males reported a significantly higher skiing ability and fitness level as well as a more risky behaviour on ski slopes compared to females. About one third of males and females injured their ACL within the first day of the ski trip and about 57 % within the first two days, with no sex differences. However, a significantly higher number of female skiers sustained an ACL injury during the first hour of skiing (28 vs. 17 %) as well as during the first two hours of skiing compared to males (52 vs. 44 %). About 81 % of males and females felt no fatigue or just a trace of fatigue in their legs at the time of accident, with no sex differences. Based on the findings of this study, fatigue does not seem to be a major risk factor for an ACL injury among male and female recreational skiers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. The effect of protein and carbohydrate supplementation on strength training outcome of rehabilitation in ACL patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Esmarck, B.; Mizuno, M.

    2006-01-01

    was therefore to investigate if nutrient supplementation during 12 weeks of conservative rehabilitation strength training could enhance hypertrophy and strength of the quadriceps muscle in ACL-injured patients. Twenty-six ACL-injured men and women were included and randomly distributed into three...... supplementation groups: Protein+Carbohydrate (PC), Isocaloric-Carbohydrate (IC), or Placebo (PL), ingesting the supplementation immediately after each of 36 training sessions. Determined from images of thigh cross-sections (magnetic resonance imaging) the hypertrophy of the quadriceps muscle differed...... significantly between groups at the distal part, with the PC group demonstrating the largest hypertrophy. Peak torque of the quadriceps muscle at constant velocity 60 degrees.s-1 was significantly elevated in the PC group only, and the time to reach peak torque tended to decrease as well only in the PC group...

  13. Differential properties of human ACL and MCL stem cells may be responsible for their differential healing capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Freddie H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human anterior cruciate ligament (hACL and medial collateral ligament (hMCL of the knee joint are frequently injured, especially in athletic settings. It has been known that, while injuries to the MCL typically heal with conservative treatment, ACL injuries usually do not heal. As adult stem cells repair injured tissues through proliferation and differentiation, we hypothesized that the hACL and hMCL contain stem cells exhibiting unique properties that could be responsible for the differential healing capacity of the two ligaments. Methods To test the above hypothesis, we derived ligament stem cells from normal hACL and hMCL samples from the same adult donors using tissue culture techniques and characterized their properties using immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and flow cytometry. Results We found that both hACL stem cells (hACL-SCs and hMCL stem cells (hMCL-SCs formed colonies in culture and expressed stem cell markers nucleostemin and stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4. Moreover, both hACL-SCs and hMCL-SCs expressed CD surface markers for mesenchymal stem cells, including CD44 and CD90, but not those markers for vascular cells, CD31, CD34, CD45, and CD146. However, hACL-SCs differed from hMCL-SCs in that the size and number of hACL-SC colonies in culture were much smaller and grew more slowly than hMCL-SC colonies. Moreover, fewer hACL-SCs in cell colonies expressed stem cell markers STRO-1 and octamer-binding transcription factor-4 (Oct-4 than hMCL-SCs. Finally, hACL-SCs had less multi-differentiation potential than hMCL-SCs, evidenced by differing extents of adipogenesis, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis in the respective induction media. Conclusions This study shows for the first time that hACL-SCs are intrinsically different from hMCL-SCs. We suggest that the differences in their properties contribute to the known disparity in healing capabilities between the two ligaments.

  14. Industrial-Strength Documentation for ACL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Davis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The ACL2 theorem prover is a complex system. Its libraries are vast. Industrial verification efforts may extend this base with hundreds of thousands of lines of additional modeling tools, specifications, and proof scripts. High quality documentation is vital for teams that are working together on projects of this scale. We have developed XDOC, a flexible, scalable documentation tool for ACL2 that can incorporate the documentation for ACL2 itself, the Community Books, and an organization's internal formal verification projects, and which has many features that help to keep the resulting manuals up to date. Using this tool, we have produced a comprehensive, publicly available ACL2+Books Manual that brings better documentation to all ACL2 users. We have also developed an extended manual for use within Centaur Technology that extends the public manual to cover Centaur's internal books. We expect that other organizations using ACL2 will wish to develop similarly extended manuals.

  15. How does functionality proceed in ACL reconstructed subjects? Proceeding of functional performance from pre- to six months post-ACL reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Bernd Josef; Stein, Thorsten; Ellermann, Andree; Flechtenmacher, Johannes; Eberle, Christian; Sell, Stefan; Potthast, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    This is the first study examining functionality of subjects with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears and a subsequent reconstruction comprehensively by multiple test sessions from pre- to six months post-reconstruction. The purpose was to evaluate if a generally applied rehabilitation program restores functionality to levels of healthy controls. Subjects with unilateral tears of the ACL were compared to matched healthy controls throughout the rehabilitation. 20 recreational athletes were tested: T1 (preoperative), 6 weeks after tear; T2, 6 weeks, T3, 3 months, T4, 6 months post-reconstruction. At all test sessions, subjects self-evaluated their activity level with the Tegner activity score and their knee state with the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Passive range of motion during knee flexion and extension and leg circumference were measured as functional clinical tests. Bilateral countermovement jumps, one-leg jumps for distance and isometric force tests in knee flexion and extension with 90° and 110° knee angle were conducted as functional performance tests. For determination of functionality, leg symmetry indices (LSIs) were calculated by dividing values of the injured by the uninjured leg. In the ACL group most LSIs decreased from T1 to T2, and increased from T2 and T3 to T4. LSIs of ACL subjects remained lower than LSIs of healthy controls at 6 months post-reconstruction in nearly all parameters. Self-evaluation of ACL subjects showed, additionally, that activity level was lower than the pre-injury level at 6 months post-reconstruction. Low LSIs and low self-evaluation indicate that knee joint functionality is not completely restored at 6 months post-reconstruction. The study shows that multiple comprehensive testing throughout the rehabilitation gives detailed images of the functional state. Therefore, the functional state of ACL reconstructed individuals should be evaluated comprehensively and continuously throughout the rehabilitation to

  16. The effects of ACL injury on knee proprioception: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relph, N; Herrington, L; Tyson, S

    2014-09-01

    It is suggested the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) plays a significant role in knee proprioception, however, the effect of ACL injury on knee proprioception is unclear. Studies utilising the two most common measurement techniques, joint position sense and threshold to detect passive motion, have provided evidence both for and against a proprioceptive deficient following ACL injury. The objective of the study was to undertake a meta-analysis investigating the effects of ACL injury, treated conservatively or by reconstruction, on proprioception of the knee, measured using joint position sense and/or threshold to detect passive movement techniques. Seven databases were searched from their inception to September 2013 using the subject headings 'anterior cruciate ligament, proprioception, postural sway, joint position sense, balance, equilibrium or posture' to identify relevant studies. PRISMA guidelines were followed as much as possible. Studies that investigated the effect of ACL injury on either knee joint kinaesthesia or position sense were included in this review. Two reviewers independently extracted data using a standardised assessment form. Comparisons were made using a fixed effect model with an inverse variance method using Review Manager Software (V5.1). Patients with ACL injury have poorer proprioception than people without such injuries (SMD=0.35°; P=0.001 and SMD=0.38°; P=0.03) when measured using joint position sense and threshold to detect passive motion techniques respectively. Patients had poorer proprioception in the injured than uninjured leg (SMD=0.52°; Pproprioception of people whose ACL was repaired was better than those whose ligament was left unrepaired (SMD=-0.62°; Pproprioception deficits compared to uninjured knees and control groups. Although differences were statistically significant, the clinical significance of findings can be questioned. Clinical practitioners using joint position sense or threshold to detect passive motion

  17. Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy to Reduce Prophylactic Fasciotomies for and Missed Cases of Acute Compartment Syndrome in Soldiers Injured in OEF/OIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    participants 6 regardless of BMI . Even in the morbidly obese, depth of subcutaneous fat was less than 2cm in 98% of subjects (Figure 1). This data has...difference in adipose tissue thickness (ATT) by injury type Injury Type N Injured ATT Mean (sd) Uninjured ATT Mean (sd) Motor Vehicle Collision >15mph...hours of 76 continuous NIRS data recorded. 77 78 Depth of tissue between the skin and the muscle fascia, or adipose tissue thickness (ATT) was 79

  18. Motor learning in ACL injury prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjaminse, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Motor learning in ACL injury prevention
Anne Benjaminse

The physical and psychosocial consequences of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are large, for example limitations in daily life, reduction of sports participation, development of osteoarthritis in the knee and increased risk for

  19. Treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, Richard B; Roos, Harald P; Roos, Ewa M

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: In young active adults with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, do patient reported or radiographic outcomes after five years differ between those treated with rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction and those treated with rehabilitation and optional delayed ACL...

  20. Treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, Richard B; Roos, Harald P; Roos, Ewa M

    2013-01-01

    To compare, in young active adults with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, the mid-term (five year) patient reported and radiographic outcomes between those treated with rehabilitation plus early ACL reconstruction and those treated with rehabilitation and optional delayed ACL...

  1. Rehabilitation after ACL Injury: A Fluoroscopic Study on the Effects of Type of Exercise on the Knee Sagittal Plane Arthrokinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Norouzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A safe rehabilitation exercise for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries needs to be compatible with the normal knee arthrokinematics to avoid abnormal loading on the joint structures. The objective of this study was to measure the amount of the anterior tibial translation (ATT of the ACL-deficient knees during selective open and closed kinetic chain exercises. The intact and injured knees of fourteen male subjects with unilateral ACL injury were imaged using uniplanar fluoroscopy, while the subjects performed forward lunge and unloaded/loaded open kinetic knee extension exercises. The ATTs were measured from fluoroscopic images, as the distance between the tibial and femoral reference points, at seven knee flexion angles, from 0° to 90°. No significant differences were found between the ATTs of the ACL-deficient and intact knees at all flexion angles during forward lunge and unloaded open kinetic knee extension (. During loaded open kinetic knee extension, however, the ATTs of the ACL deficient knees were significantly larger than those of the intact knees at 0° (. It was suggested that the forward lunge, as a weight-bearing closed kinetic chain exercise, provides a safer approach for developing muscle strength and functional stability in rehabilitation program of ACL-deficient knees, in comparison with open kinetic knee extension exercise.

  2. Rehabilitation after ACL Injury: A Fluoroscopic Study on the Effects of Type of Exercise on the Knee Sagittal Plane Arthrokinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, Sadegh; Esfandiarpour, Fateme; Shakourirad, Ali; Salehi, Reza; Akbar, Mohammad; Farahmand, Farzam

    2013-01-01

    A safe rehabilitation exercise for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries needs to be compatible with the normal knee arthrokinematics to avoid abnormal loading on the joint structures. The objective of this study was to measure the amount of the anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the ACL-deficient knees during selective open and closed kinetic chain exercises. The intact and injured knees of fourteen male subjects with unilateral ACL injury were imaged using uniplanar fluoroscopy, while the subjects performed forward lunge and unloaded/loaded open kinetic knee extension exercises. The ATTs were measured from fluoroscopic images, as the distance between the tibial and femoral reference points, at seven knee flexion angles, from 0° to 90°. No significant differences were found between the ATTs of the ACL-deficient and intact knees at all flexion angles during forward lunge and unloaded open kinetic knee extension (P < 0.05). During loaded open kinetic knee extension, however, the ATTs of the ACL deficient knees were significantly larger than those of the intact knees at 0° (P = 0.002) and 15° (P = 0.012). It was suggested that the forward lunge, as a weight-bearing closed kinetic chain exercise, provides a safer approach for developing muscle strength and functional stability in rehabilitation program of ACL-deficient knees, in comparison with open kinetic knee extension exercise. PMID:24066288

  3. Dynamically tensioned ACL functional knee braces reduce ACL and meniscal strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomescu, Sebastian; Bakker, Ryan; Wasserstein, David; Kalra, Mayank; Nicholls, Micah; Whyne, Cari; Chandrashekar, Naveen

    2017-11-29

    The effectiveness of ACL functional knee braces to reduce meniscal and ACL strain after ACL injury or reconstruction is not well understood. A new dynamic knee tensioning brace system has been designed to apply an active stabilizing force to the knee. The ability of this system to reduce tissue strains is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the ability of the dynamically tensioned brace to reduce strain in both the ACL and meniscus during rehabilitation activities. A combined in vivo/in silico/in vitro method was used to study three activities: gait, double leg squat, and single leg squat. Muscle forces and kinematics for each activity were derived through in vivo motion capture and applied to seven cadaveric knee specimens fitted with custom braces. Medial meniscal strain and ACL strain were measured in ACL intact, deficient and reconstructed conditions. The brace lowered peak and average meniscal strain in ACL deficient knees (P < 0.05) by an average of 1.7%. The brace was also found to lower meniscal strain in reconstructed knees (1.1%) and lower ACL strain in ACL intact (1.3%) and reconstructed knees (1.4%) (P < 0.05). This study supports the use of a brace equipped with a dynamic tensioning system to lower meniscal strain in ACL-deficient knees. Its use may help decrease the risk of subsequent meniscal tears in chronic ACL deficiency or delayed reconstruction. In ACL-intact and reconstructed knees, the brace may be beneficial in injury prophylaxis or in protecting the ACL graft following reconstruction. These results will aid clinicians make informed recommendations for functional brace use in patients with unstable knees. II.

  4. Proprioceptive deficits after ACL injury : are they clinically relevant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gokeler, Alli; Benjaminse, Anne; Hewett, Timothy E.; Lephart, Scott M.; Engebretsen, Lars; Ageberg, Eva; Engelhardt, Martin; Arnold, Markus P.; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Egbert; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    Objective To establish the clinical relevance of proprioceptive deficits reported after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Material and methods A literature search was done in electronic databases from January 1990 to June 2009. Inclusion criteria for studies were ACL deficient (ACL-D) and ACL

  5. No association between static and dynamic postural control and ACL injury risk among female elite handball and football players: a prospective study of 838 players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Kathrin; Nilstad, Agnethe; Krosshaug, Tron; Pasanen, Kati; Killingmo, Aleksander; Bahr, Roald

    2017-02-01

    Research on balance measures as potential risk factors for ACL injury is limited. To assess whether postural control was associated with an increased risk for ACL injuries in female elite handball and football players. Premier league players were tested in the preseason and followed prospectively for ACL injury risk from 2007 through 2015. At baseline, we recorded player demographics, playing experience, ACL and ankle injury history. We measured centre of pressure velocity in single-leg stabilisation tests and reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test. To examine the stability of postural control measures over time, we examined their short-term and long-term reproducibility. We generated logistic regression models, 1 for each of the proposed risk factors. A total of 55 (6.6%) out of 838 players (age 21±4 years; height 170±6 cm; body mass 66±8 kg) sustained a non-contact ACL injury after baseline testing (1.8±1.8 years). When comparing normalised balance measures between injured and uninjured players in univariate analyses, none of the variables were statistically associated with ACL injury risk. Short-term and long-term reproducibility of the selected variables was poor. Players with a previous ACL injury had a 3-fold higher risk of sustaining a new ACL injury compared with previously uninjured players (OR 2.9, CI 1.4 to 5.7). None of postural control measures examined were associated with increased ACL injury risk among female elite handball and football players. Hence, as measured in the current investigation, the variables included cannot be used to predict ACL injury risk. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. ACL Research Retreat VI : An update on ACL injury risk and prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Padua; S.J. Schultz; M. Collins; R.J. Schmitz; A.M. Chaudhari; Anne Benjaminse

    2012-01-01

    It has been well recognized that multiple factors, whether individually or in combination, contribute to noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The ongoing mission of the ACL Research Retreat is to bring clinicians and researchers together to present and discuss the most recent advances

  7. Anterolateral ligament abnormalities in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture are associated with lateral meniscal and osseous injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Smet, Eline de; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Clockaerts, Stefan [University College Hospitals, Department of Orthopaedics, London (United Kingdom); Vanhoenacker, Filip M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); AZ St-Maarten, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Lambrecht, Valerie [Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Kristien [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Biostatistics, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-10-15

    To determine the frequency of anterolateral ligament (ALL) injury in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and to analyse its associated injury patterns. Ninety patients with acute ACL rupture for which MRI was obtained within 8 weeks after the initial trauma were retrospectively identified. Two radiologists assessed the status of the ALL on MRI by consensus. The presence or absence of an ALL abnormality was compared with the existence of medial and lateral meniscal tears diagnosed during arthroscopy. Associated collateral ligament and osseous injuries were documented with MRI. Forty-one of 90 knees (46 %) demonstrated ALL abnormalities on MRI. Of 49 knees with intact ALL, 15 (31 %) had a torn lateral meniscus as compared to 25 torn lateral menisci in 41 knees (61 %) with abnormal ALL (p = 0.008). Collateral ligament (p ≤ 0.05) and osseous injuries (p = 0.0037) were more frequent and severe in ALL-injured as compared with ALL-intact knees. ALL injuries are fairly common in patients with acute ACL rupture and are statistically significantly associated with lateral meniscal, collateral ligament and osseous injuries. (orig.)

  8. Data Definitions in the ACL2 Sedan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Raju Chamarthi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a data definition framework that enables the convenient specification of data types in ACL2s, the ACL2 Sedan. Our primary motivation for developing the data definition framework was pedagogical. We were teaching undergraduate students how to reason about programs using ACL2s and wanted to provide them with an effective method for defining, testing, and reasoning about data types in the context of an untyped theorem prover. Our framework is now routinely used not only for pedagogical purposes, but also by advanced users. Our framework concisely supports common data definition patterns, e.g. list types, map types, and record types. It also provides support for polymorphic functions. A distinguishing feature of our approach is that we maintain both a predicative and an enumerative characterization of data definitions. In this paper we present our data definition framework via a sequence of examples. We give a complete characterization in terms of tau rules of the inclusion/exclusion relations a data definition induces, under suitable restrictions. The data definition framework is a key component of counterexample generation support in ACL2s, but can be independently used in ACL2, and is available as a community book.

  9. ACL-reconstructed and ACL-deficient individuals show differentiated trunk, hip, and knee kinematics during vertical hops more than 20 years post-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markström, Jonas L; Tengman, Eva; Häger, Charlotte K

    2017-03-23

    Little is known regarding movement strategies in the long term following injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and even less about comparisons of reconstructed and deficient knees in relation to healthy controls. The present purpose was to compare trunk, hip, and knee kinematics during a one-leg vertical hop (VH) ~20 years post-ACL injury between persons treated with surgery and physiotherapy (ACLR), solely physiotherapy (ACLPT), and controls (CTRL). Between-leg kinematic differences within groups were also investigated. Sixty-six persons who suffered unilateral ACL injury on average 23 ± 2 years ago (32 ACLR, 34 ACLPT) and 33 controls performed the VH. Peak trunk, hip, and knee angles during Take-off and Landing phases recorded with a 3D motion capture system were analysed with multivariate statistics. Significant group effects during both Take-off and Landing were found, with ACLPT differing from CTRL in Take-off with a combination of less knee flexion and knee internal rotation, and from both ACLR and CTRL in Landing with less hip and knee flexion, knee internal rotation, and greater hip adduction. ACLR also presented different kinematics to ACLPT and CTRL in Take-off with a combination of greater trunk flexion, hip flexion, hip internal rotation, and less knee abduction, and in Landing with greater trunk flexion and hip internal rotation. Further, different kinematics and hop height were found between legs within groups in both Take-off and Landing for both ACL groups, but not for CTRL. Different kinematics for the injured leg for both ACL groups compared to CTRL and between treatment groups, as well as between legs within treatment groups, indicate long-term consequences of injury. Compensatory mechanisms for knee protection seem to prevail over time irrespective of initial treatment, possibly increasing the risk of re-injury and triggering the development of osteoarthritis. Detailed investigation of movement strategies during the VH provides

  10. [Integration of Injured Hands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Reiner

    2017-02-01

    Any injury of a hand more or less disintegrates the injured hand. The rehabilitation of an alienated hand is prolonged. How can the alienation of the own but injured hand and the involuntary and unconscious inhibition of its perception and use be diagnosed, explained, avoided and designated? Medical observations and interviews with patients and therapists on the occasion of rehabilitation of hand injuries resulted in the development of a new concept of biopsychosocial integrating rehabilitation and a creative hand therapy with the objective of integrating injured and alienated hands. The inhibition of the gesture of thinking has been the most revealing sign for the diagnosis of a disintegration of an injured hand. Explanation: The involuntary inhibition to recognize and use an injured hand causes and implicates the alienation of the rested hand. Information by hand surgeons and hand therapists. Creative hand therapy guides the attention to complex and pleasing activities. In complex disintegrations after hand injuries the hand as well as the person need help. Designation: Hypotheses: Posttraumatic Proportionate Regional Disintegration while the tissues heal. Posttraumatic Complex Regional Disintegration, if the disintegration overruns the healing of tissues or if the person suffers. The Complex Regional Pain Syndrome is distinguished as a rare exception of a biopsychosocial disintegration. Posttraumatic regional disintegration seems to be proportionate while the tissues are healing. If the mentioned sensations of the patients and the visible signs of disintegration persist, the disorder spreads onto the biopsychosocial unit of the person. This disorder of hand and person may be designated as a complex disorder. The impact of a proportionate posttraumatic disintegration as well as the formation and exacerbation of a complex posttraumatic disintegration may be prevented by the facilitation of the integration of an injured hand. Scientific prove is needed for: the

  11. Direct versus indirect ACL femoral attachment fibres and their implications on ACL graft placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Samuel G; Steineman, Brett D; Haut Donahue, Tammy L; Fontboté, Cristián A; Cram, Tyler R; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-01-01

    To further elucidate the direct and indirect fibre insertion morphology within the human ACL femoral attachment using scanning electron microscopy and determine where in the footprint each fibre type predominates. The hypothesis was that direct fibre attachment would be found centrally in the insertion site, while indirect fibre attachment would be found posteriorly adjacent to the posterior articular cartilage. Ten cadaveric knees were dissected to preserve and isolate the entirety of the femoral insertion of the ACL. Specimens were then prepared and evaluated with scanning electron microscopy to determine insertional fibre morphology and location. The entirety of the fan-like projection of the ACL attachment site lay posterior to the lateral intercondylar ridge. In all specimens, a four-phase architecture, consistent with previous descriptions of direct fibres, was found in the centre of the femoral attachment site. The posterior margin of the ACL attachment attached directly adjacent to the posterior articular cartilage with some fibres coursing into it. The posterior portion of the ACL insertion had a two-phase insertion, consistent with previous descriptions of indirect fibres. The transition from the ligament fibres to bone had less interdigitations, and the interdigitations were significantly smaller (p fibre area. The interdigitations of the direct fibres were 387 ± 81 μm (range 282-515 μm) wide, while the interdigitations of indirect fibres measured 228 ± 75 μm (range 89-331 μm). The centre of the ACL femoral attachment consisted of a direct fibre structure, while the posterior portion had an indirect fibre structure. These results support previous animal studies reporting that the centre of the ACL femoral insertion was comprised of the strongest reported fibre type. Clinically, the femoral ACL reconstruction tunnel should be oriented to cover the entirety of the central direct ACL fibres and may need to be customized based on graft type

  12. Glycoprotein non-metastatic melanoma protein b (Gpnmb) is highly expressed in macrophages of acute injured kidney and promotes M2 macrophages polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Letian; Zhuo, Hui; Ouyang, Huiyu; Liu, Yexin; Yuan, Fang; Sun, Lin; Liu, Fuyou; Liu, Hong

    2017-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an increasingly common disorder that is strongly linked to short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. During AKI process, macrophages, one of the important immune response cells, can polarize into M1 and M2 subtype from M0 subtype. It is well-known that M1 macrophages play a pro inflammatory role while M2 macrophages play an anti-inflammatory role. Glycoprotein non-metastatic melanoma protein b (Gpnmb) is a glycosylated transmembrane protein highly expressed in numerous cells, including osteoblasts, dendritic cells and macrophages. Gpnmb serves as a negative regulator of inflammation in macrophages and has a protective effect on injuries. In acute kidney injury, the macrophage has been shown diverse roles depending on different phenotype. This study provided gene expression and protein expression evidence that Gpnmb was highly expressed in M2 macrophages in the damaged areas of kidney after ischemia-reperfusion injury. Then, we successful isolated and culture mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMφ) and found that Gpnmb showed different expression levels in M0, M1 and M2 BMMφ: lowest in M1, highest in M2. After knocking down Gpnmb with si-Gpnmb, BMMφ M2 polarization and secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β were inhibited, while M1 polarization and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were promoted. Moreover, IL-4-STAT6 pathway was involved in the promotion of M2 polarization by Gpnmb. Taken together, Gpnmb may serve as a potential biomarker of AKI and play a protective role against the AKI by modulating the polarization of macrophage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reducing the Risk of ACL Injury in Female Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Rasche, Adrienna; Gaudet, Laura; Jackson, Allen

    2010-01-01

    The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is located behind the kneecap (patella) and connects the thigh bone (femur) to the shin bone (tibia). Stabilizing the knee joint is the primary responsibility of the ACL. Injuries that affect the ACL are three to five times more common in females than males. This is a result of anatomical, biomechanical,…

  14. The concept of individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofbauer, M.; Muller, B. [=Bart; Murawski, C. D.; van Eck, C. F.; Fu, F. H.

    2014-01-01

    To describe the concept of individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The PubMed/Medline database was searched using keywords pertaining to ACL reconstruction. Relevant articles were reviewed in order to summarize important concepts of individualized surgery in ACL

  15. Quadriceps function following ACL reconstruction and rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.D. Myer; E. Otten; Anne Benjaminse; P. Eppinga; A. Gokeler; M. Bisschop

    2014-01-01

    Abstract PURPOSE: To determine the most effective practices for quadriceps strengthening after ACL reconstruction. METHODS: An electronic search has been performed for the literature appearing from January 1990 to January 2012. Inclusion criteria were articles written in English, German or Dutch

  16. Functional bracing of ACL injuries: current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sean D; Laprade, Robert F; Jansson, Kyle S; Arøen, Asbjørn; Wijdicks, Coen A

    2014-05-01

    Functional braces are commonly prescribed to treat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The results of the existing literature on functional brace use are mixed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the history and current state of functional ACL bracing and to identify design criteria that could improve upon current bracing technologies. A literature search was performed through the PubMed MEDLINE database in April 2013 for the keywords "anterior cruciate ligament" and "brace". Articles published between January 1, 1980, and April 4, 2013, were retrieved and reviewed. Current functional braces used to treat ACL injury were identified. The function of the native ACL was carefully studied to identify design requirements that could improve upon current bracing technologies. Biomechanical evaluations of functional brace effects at time zero have been mixed. Functional brace use reportedly does not improve long-term patient outcomes following ACL reconstruction, but has been shown to reduce subsequent injury rates while skiing in both ACL-deficient and reconstructed skiers. In situ force in the ACL varies with flexion angle and activity. Currently, no brace has been designed and validated to replicate the force-flexion behavior of the native ACL. Biomechanical and clinical evidence suggests current functional bracing technologies do not sufficiently restore normal biomechanics to the ACL-deficient knee, protect the reconstructed ACL, and improve long-term patient outcomes. Further research into a functional brace designed to apply forces to the knee joint similar in magnitude to the native ACL should be pursued. III.

  17. Meniscus treatment and age associated with narrower radiographic joint space width 2-3 years after ACL reconstruction: data from the MOON onsite cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M H; Spindler, K P; Fleming, B C; Duryea, J; Obuchowski, N A; Scaramuzza, E A; Oksendahl, H L; Winalski, C S; Duong, C L; Huston, L J; Parker, R D; Kaeding, C C; Andrish, J T; Flanigan, D C; Dunn, W R; Reinke, E K

    2015-04-01

    To identify risk factors for radiographic signs of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA) 2-3 years after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction through multivariable analysis of minimum joint space width (mJSW) differences in a specially designed nested cohort. A nested cohort within the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) cohort included 262 patients (148 females, average age 20) injured in sport who underwent ACL reconstruction in a previously uninjured knee, were 35 or younger, and did not have ACL revision or contralateral knee surgery. mJSW on semi-flexed radiographs was measured in the medial compartment using a validated computerized method. A multivariable generalized linear model was constructed to assess mJSW difference between the ACL reconstructed and contralateral control knees while adjusting for potential confounding factors. Unexpectedly, we found the mean mJSW was 0.35 mm wider in ACL reconstructed than in control knees (5.06 mm (95% CI 4.96-5.15 mm) vs 4.71 mm (95% CI 4.62-4.80 mm), P Age (P < 0.001) and meniscus repair (P = 0.001) were also significantly associated with mJSW difference. Semi-flexed radiographs can detect differences in mJSW between ACL reconstructed and contralateral normal knees 2-3 years following ACL reconstruction, and the unexpected wider mJSW in ACL reconstructed knees may represent the earliest manifestation of post-traumatic osteoarthritis and warrants further study. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Functional and muscle morphometric effects of ACL reconstruction. A prospective CT study with 1 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, M; Strandberg, S; Wredmark, T; Felländer-Tsai, L; Henriksson, M

    2013-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to explore if changes in muscle cross-sectional area and quality after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction would be related to knee function. Fourteen females and 23 males (16-54 years) underwent clinical tests, subjective questionnaires, and CT 1 week before and 1 year after ACL surgery with semitendinosus-gracilis (STG) graft and rehabilitation. Postoperatively, knee laxity was decreased and functional knee measures and subjective patient scores improved. The most obvious remaining deficit was the quadriceps atrophy, which was significantly larger if the right leg was injured. Right-leg injury also tended to cause larger compensatory hypertrophy of the combined knee flexor and tibial internal rotator muscles (preoperatively). The quadriceps atrophy was significantly correlated with the scores and functional tests, the latter also being related to the remaining size of the gracilis muscle. Biceps femoris hypertrophy and, in males only, semimembranosus hypertrophy was observed following the ACL reconstruction. The lack of semimembranosus hypertrophy in the women could, via tibial internal rotation torque deficit, contribute to the less favorable functional and subjective outcome recorded for the women. The results indicate that the quadriceps, the combined knee flexor/tibial internal rotator muscles, side of ACL injury, and sex are important to consider in rehabilitation after STG graft. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A randomized trial of treatment for acute anterior cruciate ligament tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, Richard B; Roos, Ewa M; Roos, Harald P

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal management of a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee is unknown. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, controlled trial involving 121 young, active adults with acute ACL injury in which we compared two strategies: structured rehabilitation plus early ACL...

  20. Fourier Series Formalization in ACL2(r

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuong K. Chau

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We formalize some basic properties of Fourier series in the logic of ACL2(r, which is a variant of ACL2 that supports reasoning about the real and complex numbers by way of non-standard analysis. More specifically, we extend a framework for formally evaluating definite integrals of real-valued, continuous functions using the Second Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Our extended framework is also applied to functions containing free arguments. Using this framework, we are able to prove the orthogonality relationships between trigonometric functions, which are the essential properties in Fourier series analysis. The sum rule for definite integrals of indexed sums is also formalized by applying the extended framework along with the First Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and the sum rule for differentiation. The Fourier coefficient formulas of periodic functions are then formalized from the orthogonality relations and the sum rule for integration. Consequently, the uniqueness of Fourier sums is a straightforward corollary. We also present our formalization of the sum rule for definite integrals of infinite series in ACL2(r. Part of this task is to prove the Dini Uniform Convergence Theorem and the continuity of a limit function under certain conditions. A key technique in our proofs of these theorems is to apply the overspill principle from non-standard analysis.

  1. TIBIAL LANDMARKS IN ACL ANATOMIC REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Demesсhenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify anatomical landmarks on tibial articular surface to serve as reference in preparing tibial canal with respect to the center of ACL footprint during single bundle arthroscopic repair.Materials and methods. Twelve frozen knee joint specimens and 68 unpaired macerated human tibia were studied using anatomical, morphometric, statistical methods as well as graphic simulation.Results. Center of the tibial ACL footprint was located 13,1±1,7 mm anteriorly from posterior border of intercondylar eminence, at 1/3 of the distance along the line connecting apexes of internal and external tubercles and 6,1±0,5 mm anteriorly along the perpendicular raised to this point.Conclusion. Internal and external tubercles, as well as posterior border of intercondylar eminence can be considered as anatomical references to determine the center of the tibial ACL footprint and to prepare bone canals for anatomic ligament repair.

  2. The Vertical Drop Jump Is a Poor Screening Test for ACL Injuries in Female Elite Soccer and Handball Players: A Prospective Cohort Study of 710 Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krosshaug, Tron; Steffen, Kathrin; Kristianslund, Eirik; Nilstad, Agnethe; Mok, Kam-Ming; Myklebust, Grethe; Andersen, Thor Einar; Holme, Ingar; Engebretsen, Lars; Bahr, Roald

    2016-04-01

    The evidence linking knee kinematics and kinetics during a vertical drop jump (VDJ) to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk is restricted to a single small sample. Still, the VDJ test continues to be advocated for clinical screening purposes. To test whether 5 selected kinematic and kinetic variables were associated with future ACL injuries in a large cohort of Norwegian female elite soccer and handball players. Furthermore, we wanted to assess whether the VDJ test can be recommended as a screening test to identify players with increased risk. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Elite female soccer and handball players participated in preseason screening tests from 2007 through 2014. The tests included marker-based 3-dimensional motion analysis of a drop-jump landing. We followed a predefined statistical protocol in which we included the following candidate risk factors in 5 separate logistic regression analyses, with new ACL injury as the outcome: (1) knee valgus angle at initial contact, (2) peak knee abduction moment, (3) peak knee flexion angle, (4) peak vertical ground-reaction force, and (5) medial knee displacement. A total of 782 players were tested (age, 21 ± 4 years; height, 170 ± 7 cm; body mass, 67 ± 8 kg), of which 710 were included in the analyses. We registered 42 new noncontact ACL injuries, including 12 in previously ACL-injured players. Previous ACL injury (relative risk, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.1-7.1) and medial knee displacement (odds ratio, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.12-1.74 per 1-SD change) were associated with increased risk for injury. However, among the 643 players without previous injury, we found no association with medial knee displacement. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of medial knee displacement showed an area under the curve of 0.6, indicating a poor-to-failed combined sensitivity and specificity of the test, even when including previously injured players. Of the 5 risk factors considered, medial knee displacement was the

  3. The effects of attentional focus on jump performance and knee joint kinematics in patients after ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokeler, Alli; Benjaminse, Anne; Welling, Wouter; Alferink, Malou; Eppinga, Peter; Otten, Bert

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an internal and external attentional focus on single leg hop jump distance and knee kinematics in patients after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Experimental. Outpatient physical therapy facility. Sixteen patients after ACLR. Patients received either an instruction with an internal focus or an external focus before performing a single leg hop jump. The jump distance, knee valgus angle at initial contact, peak knee valgus angle, knee flexion angle at initial contact, peak knee flexion angle, total ROM and time to peak angles for the injured and non-injured legs were recorded. A repeated measures MANOVA was used to determine significance between the experimental conditions with the primary outcome measures as dependent variables. The external focus group had significant larger knee flexion angles at initial contact, peak knee flexion, total ROM and time to peak knee flexion for the injured legs. This study demonstrates the applicability of using an external focus during rehabilitation of patients after ACLR to enhance safer movement patterns compared to an internal focus of attention and subsequently may help to reduce second ACL injury risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute Management of the Traumatically Injured Pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skitch, Steven; Engels, Paul T

    2018-02-01

    Severe pelvic trauma is a challenging condition. The pelvis can create multifocal hemorrhage that is not easily compressible nor managed by traditional surgical methods such as tying off a blood vessel or removing an organ. Its treatment often requires reapproximation of bony structures, damage control resuscitation, assessment for associated injuries, and triage of investigations, as well as multimodality hemorrhage control (external fixation, preperitoneal packing, angioembolization, REBOA [resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta]) by multidisciplinary trauma specialists (general surgeons, orthopedic surgeons, endovascular surgeons/interventional radiologists). This article explores this complex clinical problem and provides a practical approach to its management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Patients with high-grade pivot-shift phenomenon are associated with higher prevalence of anterolateral ligament injury after acute anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guan-Yang; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Guan; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Xin; Xue, Zhe; Qian, Yi; Feng, Hua

    2017-04-01

    To compare the prevalence of concomitant anterolateral ligament (ALL) injury between patients with high-grade (grades II and III) pivot-shift and those with low-grade (grades 0 and I) pivot-shift phenomenon after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Sixty-eight patients with an acute ACL injury who showed high-grade (grades II and III) pivot-shift phenomenon were enrolled as the study group. They were matched in a 1:1 fashion to another 68 ACL-injured control participants who showed low-grade (grades 0 and I) pivot-shift phenomenon during the same study period. Patients were matched by age, sex, and time from injury to surgery. A standardized pivot-shift test was performed under anesthesia for all the patients. Two blinded musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans for the presence of concomitant ALL injury. The grade of an ALL injury was divided into grade 0 (normal), grade I (sprain), grade II (partial tear), and grade III (complete tear). The prevalence and the grade of concomitant ALL injury were further compared between the study group and the control group. Overall, the prevalence of concomitant ALL injury in the study group (94.1%, 64/68) was significantly higher than that in the control group [60.3%, (41/68), P < 0.05]. Specifically, there were 49 patients (49/64, 76.6%) who showed grade II/III (partial/complete tear) MRI evidence of concomitant ALL injury, which was also significantly higher than that in the control group (12/41, 29.3%). Patients with high-grade pivot-shift phenomenon showed higher prevalence of concomitant ALL injury compared to those with low-grade pivot-shift phenomenon after acute ACL injuries. Careful assessment and proper treatment of this concomitant injury should be considered especially in knees with high-grade pivot-shift phenomenon. III.

  6. Delaying ACL reconstruction and treating with exercise therapy alone may alter prognostic factors for 5-year outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filbay, Stephanie R; Roos, Ewa M; Frobell, Richard B

    2017-01-01

    , body mass index, preinjury activity level, education and smoking. RESULTS: For all participants (n=118), graft/contralateral ACL rupture, non-ACL surgery and worse baseline 36-item Short-Form Mental Component Scores were associated with worse outcomes. Treatment with exercise therapy alone......AIM: Identify injury-related, patient-reported and treatment-related prognostic factors for 5-year outcomes in acutely ACL-ruptured individuals managed with early reconstruction plus exercise therapy, exercise therapy plus delayed reconstruction or exercise therapy alone. METHODS: Exploratory...... was a prognostic factor for less knee symptoms compared with early reconstruction plus exercise therapy (regression coefficient 10.1, 95% CI 2.3 to 17.9). Baseline meniscus lesion was associated with worse sport/recreation function (-14.4, 95% CI -27.6 to -1.3) and osteochondral lesions were associated with worse...

  7. Proof Pad: A New Development Environment for ACL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Eggensperger

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Most software development projects rely on Integrated Development Environments (IDEs based on the desktop paradigm, with an interactive, mouse-driven user interface. The standard installation of ACL2, on the other hand, is designed to work closely with Emacs. ACL2 experts, on the whole, like this mode of operation, but students and other new programmers who have learned to program with desktop IDEs often react negatively to the process of adapting to an unfamiliar form of interaction. This paper discusses Proof Pad, a new IDE for ACL2. Proof Pad is not the only attempt to provide ACL2 IDEs catering to students and beginning programmers. The ACL2 Sedan and DrACuLa systems arose from similar motivations. Proof Pad builds on the work of those systems, while also taking into account the unique workflow of the ACL2 theorem proving system. The design of Proof Pad incorporated user feedback from the outset, and that process continued through all stages of development. Feedback took the form of direct observation of users interacting with the IDE as well as questionnaires completed by users of Proof Pad and other ACL2 IDEs. The result is a streamlined interface and fast, responsive system that supports using ACL2 as a programming language and a theorem proving system. Proof Pad also provides a property-based testing environment with random data generation and automated interpretation of properties as ACL2 theorem definitions.

  8. ACL Reconstruction With Autografts Weighing Performance Considerations and Postoperative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, John A; Mohtadi, Nicholas G

    2003-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is the treatment of choice for patients who experience episodes of instability and a decreased quality of life after ACL rupture. The bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring autografts are the current standards for ACL reconstruction. Primary care physicians, especially sports medicine clinicians, are the first-line providers of nonoperative care for patients who have ACL injuries. Care providers need to know the biologic and biomechanic properties of these grafts, clinical indications for each graft, and rehabilitation considerations to appropriately counsel their patients.

  9. Five-year follow-up of knee joint cartilage thickness changes after acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckstein, F; Wirth, W; Lohmander, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture involves increased risk of osteoarthritis. We explored cartilage thickness changes over five years after ACL rupture. Methods: 121 young active adults (26% women, age 18-35 years) with acute traumatic ACL rupture were studied (the KANON...

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loading in a collegiate athlete during sidestep cutting after ACL reconstruction: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaan, Michael A; Ringleb, Stacie I; Bawab, Sebastian Y; Greska, Eric K; Weinhandl, Joshua T

    2016-08-01

    Athletes with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries usually undergo ACL-reconstruction (ACLR) in order to restore joint stability, so that dynamic maneuvers such as the sidestep cut can be performed. Despite restoration of joint stability after ACLR, many athletes do not return to pre-injury levels and may be at a high risk of a second ACL injury. The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not ACL loading, would increase after ACLR. One female Division I collegiate athlete performed bilateral unanticipated sidestep cuts both before ACL injury and 27months after ACLR. Musculoskeletal simulations were used to calculate ACL loading during the deceleration phase of the sidestep cuts. Twenty-seven months after ACLR, the athlete demonstrated higher total ACL loading in the ipsilateral limb as well as altered joint kinematics, moments, and quadriceps muscle force production. In the contralateral limb, there were no increases in total ACL loading or muscle force production yet altered lower extremity joint kinematics and moments were present after ACLR. Higher total ACL loading in the ipsilateral limb of this athlete may suggest an increased risk of second ACL injury. The results of this study provide an initial step in understanding the effects of ACLR on the risk of second ACL injury in an elite athlete and suggest that it is important to develop a better understanding of this surgical intervention on knee joint loading, in order to reduce the risk of second ACL injury while performing dynamic maneuvers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Experiences of returning to elite alpine skiing after ACL injury and ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordahl, Birgitta; Sjöström, Rita; Westin, Maria; Werner, Suzanne; Alricsson, Marie

    2014-01-01

    To explore the experiences of alpine skiing at the elite level after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction. A qualitative approach where semi-structured interviews were conducted, and an analysis of the manifest content was performed. Five ski high school students, two male and three female skiers, who had suffered ACL injuries and undergone ACL reconstructions. Seven categories were identified. The participants described their perceived opportunities with regard to returning to alpine skiing after ACL injury and reconstruction as something positive to do with self-belief, being mentally and physically prepared, regaining confidence in their own ability, being given time and using active strategies. In contrast, perceived barriers to a return to elite alpine skiing gave rise to negative feelings, for example, fear, disheartenment, a total lack of or ambivalent confidence in their own ability and the use of passive strategies. The two male skiers returned to alpine skiing. They reported confidence in their own ability, active strategies and support on all levels, as well as enhanced physical ability. The female skiers did not return to their pre-injury level of competitive alpine skiing. They stated a lack of support on all levels, deterioration in their physical ability and two out of three reported passive strategies and no or ambivalent confidence in their own ability. The most important factors were family support, support on all levels, access to a physiotherapist and time given.

  12. Industrial hardware and software verification with ACL2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Warren A; Kaufmann, Matt; Moore, J Strother; Slobodova, Anna

    2017-10-13

    The ACL2 theorem prover has seen sustained industrial use since the mid-1990s. Companies that have used ACL2 regularly include AMD, Centaur Technology, IBM, Intel, Kestrel Institute, Motorola/Freescale, Oracle and Rockwell Collins. This paper introduces ACL2 and focuses on how and why ACL2 is used in industry. ACL2 is well-suited to its industrial application to numerous software and hardware systems, because it is an integrated programming/proof environment supporting a subset of the ANSI standard Common Lisp programming language. As a programming language ACL2 permits the coding of efficient and robust programs; as a prover ACL2 can be fully automatic but provides many features permitting domain-specific human-supplied guidance at various levels of abstraction. ACL2 specifications and models often serve as efficient execution engines for the modelled artefacts while permitting formal analysis and proof of properties. Crucially, ACL2 also provides support for the development and verification of other formal analysis tools. However, ACL2 did not find its way into industrial use merely because of its technical features. The core ACL2 user/development community has a shared vision of making mechanized verification routine when appropriate and has been committed to this vision for the quarter century since the Computational Logic, Inc., Verified Stack. The community has focused on demonstrating the viability of the tool by taking on industrial projects (often at the expense of not being able to publish much).This article is part of the themed issue 'Verified trustworthy software systems'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Injured coliforms in drinking water.

    OpenAIRE

    McFeters, G A; Kippin, J S; LeChevallier, M W

    1986-01-01

    Coliforms were enumerated by using m-Endo agar LES and m-T7 agar in 102 routine samples of drinking water from three New England community water systems to investigate the occurrence and significance of injured coliforms. Samples included water collected immediately after conventional treatment, during the backwash cycle, at various points in the distribution system, and 1 week after the break and subsequent repair of a distribution main. Injured coliforms in these samples averaged greater th...

  14. ACL-PCL and intercondylar notch impingement: magnetic resonance imaging of native and double-bundle ACL-reconstructed knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropf, Eric J; Shen, Wei; van Eck, Carola F; Musahl, Volker; Irrgang, James J; Fu, Freddie H

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) define the relationship between the ACL and PCL in normal knees; (2) determine whether ACL-PCL impingement occurs in native knees; and (3) determine whether there is a difference in impingement between double-bundle reconstructed and native knees. Eight subjects were identified (age 20-50; 6 females, 2 males). All were at least 1-year status postanatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction (allograft; AM = 8 mm; PL = 7 mm) and had no history of injury or surgery to the contralateral knee. MRIs of both knees were performed with the knee at 0 and 30° of flexion. The images were evaluated by a non-treating surgeon and two musculoskeletal radiologists. Coronal and sagittal angles of AM and PL bundles, Liu's PCL index and the distance between ACL and PCL on modified axial oblique images were recorded. Impingement was graded (1) no contact; (2) contact without deformation; or (3) contact and distortion of PCL contour. Seventy-five percent (6) of the native ACL's showed no contact with the roof of the intercondylar notch or PCL, compared to 25 % (2) of the double-bundle reconstructed ACLs. One double-bundle reconstructed ACL showed intercondylar notch roof and ACL-PCL impingement (12.5 %). Significant differences were found between the native ACL and the double-bundle reconstructed ACL for the coronal angle of the AM (79° vs. 72°, p = 0.002) and PL bundle (75° vs. 58°, p = 0.001). No differences in ROM or stability were noted at any follow-up interval between groups based on MRI impingement grade. ACL-PCL contact occurred in 25 % of native knees. Contact between the ACL graft and PCL occurred in 75 % of double-bundle reconstructed knees. ACL-PCL impingement, both contact and distortion of the PCL, occurred in one knee after double-bundle reconstruction. This study offers perspective on what can be considered normal contact between the ACL and PCL and how impingement after ACL reconstruction can be detected on MRI

  15. The iliotibial band in acute knee trauma: patterns of injury on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansour, Ramy; Yoong, Philip; McKean, David; Teh, James L. [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    To delineate the spectrum of knee injuries associated with sprains and tears of the distal iliotibial band (ITB). A retrospective review of 200 random MRI scans undertaken for acute knee trauma was performed. Scans were excluded if there was a history of injury over 4 weeks from the time of the scan, septic arthritis, inflammatory arthropathy, previous knee surgery, or significant artefact. In each scan, the ITB was scored as normal, minor sprain (grade 1), severe sprain (grade 2), and torn (grade 3). The menisci, ligaments, and tendons of each knee were also assessed. The mean age was 27.4 years (range, 9-69 years) and 71.5 % (n = 143) of the patients were male. The ITB was injured in 115 cases (57.5 %). The next most common soft tissue structure injured was the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in 53.5 % of cases (n = 107). Grade 1 ITB injury was seen in 90 of these 115 cases (45 %), grade 2 injury in 20 cases, and grade 3 injury in only five cases. There is a significant association between ITB injury and ACL rupture (p < 0.05), as well as acute patellar dislocation (p < 0.05). There were ten cases of significant posterolateral corner injury, and all were associated with ITB injury, including four ITB tears. Only two cases of isolated ITB injury were seen (1 %). ITB injury is common in acute knee trauma and is associated with significant internal derangement of the knee, especially cruciate ligament rupture, posterolateral corner injury, and patellar dislocation. (orig.)

  16. ACL Deficiency Increases Forces on the Medial Femoral Condyle and the Lateral Meniscus with Applied Rotatory Loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Lucas S; Boorman-Padgett, James; Kent, Robert; Stone, Kyle; Wickiewicz, Thomas L; Pearle, Andrew D; Imhauser, Carl W

    2016-10-19

    The articular surfaces and menisci act with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) to stabilize the knee joint. Their role in resisting applied rotatory loads characteristic of instability events is unclear despite commonly observed damage to these intra-articular structures in the acute and chronic ACL injury settings. Ten fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees were mounted to a robotic manipulator. Combined valgus and internal rotation torques were applied in the presence and absence of a 300-N compressive load. Forces carried by the individual menisci and via cartilage-to-cartilage contact on each femoral condyle in ACL-intact and ACL-sectioned states were measured using the principle of superposition. In response to applied valgus and internal rotation torques in the absence of compression, sectioning of the ACL increased the net force carried by the lateral meniscus by at most 65.8 N (p meniscus increased by 25.7 N (p medial femoral condyle by at most 38.9 N (p = 0.006) and 46.7 N (p = 0.040) in the absence and presence of compression, respectively. Additionally, the lateral shear force carried by cartilage-to-cartilage contact on the medial femoral condyle increased by at most 21.0 N (p = 0.005) and by 28.0 N (p = 0.025) in the absence and presence of compression, respectively. Forces carried by the medial meniscus and by cartilage-to-cartilage contact on the lateral femoral condyle changed by meniscus and medial femoral condyle-and the anterior shear and lateral shear forces, respectively-in response to multiplanar valgus and internal rotation torque. These loading patterns provide a biomechanical rationale for clinical patterns of intra-articular derangement such as lateral meniscal injury and osseous remodeling of the medial compartment seen with ACL insufficiency. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  17. Association between Lower Extremity Muscle Strength and Noncontact ACL Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Kathrin; Nilstad, Agnethe; Kristianslund, Eirik Klami; Myklebust, Grethe; Bahr, Roald; Krosshaug, Tron

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to prospectively investigate the association between isolated and functional lower extremity muscle strength and the risk for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in Norwegian female elite handball and football players. From 2007 through 2015, premier league players participated in strength testing and were prospectively followed for ACL injury risk. At baseline, we recorded player demographics, playing and ACL injury history, and measured peak concentric isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring torques (60°·s), hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio, isometric hip abduction strength, and one-repetition maximum in a seated leg press. We followed a predefined statistical protocol where we generated five separate logistic regression models, one for each of the proposed strength risk factors and adjusted for confounding factors. New ACL injury was the outcome, using the leg as the unit of analysis. A total of 57 (6.6%) of 867 players (age = 21 ± 4 yr, height = 170 ± 6 cm, body mass = 66 ± 8 kg) suffered from a noncontact ACL injury after baseline testing (1.8 ± 1.8 yr). The OR of sustaining a new injury among those with an ACL injury history was 3.1 (95% confidence interval = 1.6-6.1). None of the five strength variables selected were statistically associated with an increased risk of ACL rupture when adjusted for sport, dominant leg, ACL injury history, and height. Peak lower extremity strength was not associated with an increased ACL injury risk among female elite handball and football players. Hence, peak strength, as measured in the present study, cannot be used to screen elite female athletes to predict injury risk.

  18. Comparison of kinematics of ACL-deficient and healthy knees during passive flexion and isometric leg press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiarpour, Fateme; Shakourirad, Ali; Talebian Moghaddam, Saeed; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Eslami, Abouzar; Farahmand, Farzam

    2013-12-01

    Studying the kinematics of the ACL deficient (ACLD) knees, during different physiological activities and muscle contraction patterns, can improve our understanding of the joint's altered biomechanics due to ACL deficiency as well as the efficacy and safety of the rehabilitations exercises. Twenty-five male volunteers, including 11 normal and 14 unilateral ACLD subjects, participated in this study. The kinematics of the injured knees of the ACLD subjects was compared with their intact knees and the healthy group during passive flexion and isometric leg press with the knees flexed from full extension to 45° flexion, with 15° intervals. An accurate registration algorithm was used to obtain the three dimensional kinematical parameters, from magnetic resonance images. The ACL deficiency mainly altered the tibial anterior translation, and to some extent its internal rotation, with the change in other parameters not significant. During leg press, the anterior translation of the ACLD knees was significantly larger than that of the normal knees at 30° flexion, but not at 45°. Comparison of the anterior translations of the ACLD knees during leg press with that of the passive flexion revealed improved consistency (CVs changed from 1.2 and 4.0 to 0.6 and 0.6, at 30° and 45° flexion, respectively), but considerable larger translations (means increased by 6.2 and 4.9mm, at 30° and 45° flexion, respectively). The simultaneous contraction of the quadriceps and hamstrings during leg press, although reduces the knee laxity, cannot compensate for the loss of the ACL to restore the normal kinematics of the joint, at least during early flexion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament- specialized post-operative return-to-sports (ACL-SPORTS) training: a randomized control trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is standard practice for athletes that wish to return to high-level activities; however functional outcomes after ACLR are poor. Quadriceps strength weakness, abnormal movement patterns and below normal knee function is reported in the months and years after ACLR. Second ACL injuries are common with even worse outcomes than primary ACLR. Modifiable limb-to-limb asymmetries have been identified in individuals who re-injure after primary ACLR, suggesting a neuromuscular training program is needed to improve post-operative outcomes. Pre-operative perturbation training, a neuromuscular training program, has been successful at improving limb symmetry prior to surgery, though benefits are not lasting after surgery. Implementing perturbation training after surgery may be successful in addressing post-operative deficits that contribute to poor functional outcomes and second ACL injury risk. Methods/Design 80 athletes that have undergone a unilateral ACLR and wish to return to level 1 or 2 activities will be recruited for this study and randomized to one of two treatment groups. A standard care group will receive prevention exercises, quadriceps strengthening and agility exercises, while the perturbation group will receive the same exercise program with the addition of perturbation training. The primary outcomes measures will include gait biomechanics, clinical and functional measures, and knee joint loading. Return to sport rates, return to pre-injury level of activity rates, and second injury rates will be secondary measures. Discussion The results of this ACL-Specialized Post-Operative Return To Sports (ACL-SPORTS) Training program will help clinicians to better determine an effective post-operative treatment program that will improve modifiable impairments that influence outcomes after ACLR. Trial registration Randomized Control Trial NIH 5R01AR048212-07. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01773317 PMID:23522373

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament- specialized post-operative return-to-sports (ACL-SPORTS) training: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kathleen; Di Stasi, Stephanie L; Smith, Angela H; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-03-23

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is standard practice for athletes that wish to return to high-level activities; however functional outcomes after ACLR are poor. Quadriceps strength weakness, abnormal movement patterns and below normal knee function is reported in the months and years after ACLR. Second ACL injuries are common with even worse outcomes than primary ACLR. Modifiable limb-to-limb asymmetries have been identified in individuals who re-injure after primary ACLR, suggesting a neuromuscular training program is needed to improve post-operative outcomes. Pre-operative perturbation training, a neuromuscular training program, has been successful at improving limb symmetry prior to surgery, though benefits are not lasting after surgery. Implementing perturbation training after surgery may be successful in addressing post-operative deficits that contribute to poor functional outcomes and second ACL injury risk. 80 athletes that have undergone a unilateral ACLR and wish to return to level 1 or 2 activities will be recruited for this study and randomized to one of two treatment groups. A standard care group will receive prevention exercises, quadriceps strengthening and agility exercises, while the perturbation group will receive the same exercise program with the addition of perturbation training. The primary outcomes measures will include gait biomechanics, clinical and functional measures, and knee joint loading. Return to sport rates, return to pre-injury level of activity rates, and second injury rates will be secondary measures. The results of this ACL-Specialized Post-Operative Return To Sports (ACL-SPORTS) Training program will help clinicians to better determine an effective post-operative treatment program that will improve modifiable impairments that influence outcomes after ACLR. Randomized Control Trial NIH 5R01AR048212-07. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01773317.

  1. Kinesiophobia is Strongly Associated with Altered Loading after an ACL Reconstruction: Implications for Re-injury Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noehren, Brian; Kline, Paul; Ireland, Mary Lloyd; Johnson, Darren L.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The effect of kinesiophobia (fear of movement) following an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has recently received greater attention. Elevated kinesiophobia as measured on the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK) has been previously found to be associated with poorer outcomes. However, the effect of kinesiophobia in ACL reconstructed patients on high impact and challenging tasks associated with re injury risk such as jumping has not been investigated. Establishing the relationship between kinesiophobia and jump landing mechanics could result in the development of specific treatments to reduce fear of movement and improve jump landing mechanics after ACL reconstruction, resulting in a diminished re-injury risk. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to define the relationship between landing mechanics (axial loading rates and impact forces) with the TSK score in patients 6 months after ACL reconstruction. Methods: Twenty subjects, 6 months post ACL reconstruction, who had completed post-operative physical therapy, and were cleared by their physician to begin return to sport drills participated in the study. Subjects completed an instrumented drop vertical landing assessment with the ground reaction forces recorded while the subjects performed a drop vertical jump task off a 30.48 cm high box. Three trials were taken and the data were analyzed using custom Labview code and Visual 3D software during the period of time from foot contact until initial impact peak. The average loading rate was defined as the linear portion of the vertical ground reaction curve between 20-80% of foot contact to initial impact peak. Subjects also completed the TSK questionnaire. Associations between loading rate and vertical impact peak to the TSK scale were made with Pearson correlation coefficients with significant relationships defined as pkinesiophobia to be associated with a lower weight-bearing in the ACL reconstructed limb. Potentially, subjects who are

  2. Efficacy of a metalloproteinase inhibitor in spinal cord injured dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jonathan M; Cohen, Noah D; Heller, Michael; Fajt, Virginia R; Levine, Gwendolyn J; Kerwin, Sharon C; Trivedi, Alpa A; Fandel, Thomas M; Werb, Zena; Modestino, Augusta; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is elevated within the acutely injured murine spinal cord and blockade of this early proteolytic activity with GM6001, a broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, results in improved recovery after spinal cord injury. As matrix metalloproteinase-9 is likewise acutely elevated in dogs with naturally occurring spinal cord injuries, we evaluated efficacy of GM6001 solubilized in dimethyl sulfoxide in this second species. Safety and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in naïve dogs. After confirming safety, subsequent pharmacokinetic analyses demonstrated that a 100 mg/kg subcutaneous dose of GM6001 resulted in plasma concentrations that peaked shortly after administration and were sustained for at least 4 days at levels that produced robust in vitro inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-9. A randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled study was then conducted to assess efficacy of GM6001 given within 48 hours of spinal cord injury. Dogs were enrolled in 3 groups: GM6001 dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (n = 35), dimethyl sulfoxide (n = 37), or saline (n = 41). Matrix metalloproteinase activity was increased in the serum of injured dogs and GM6001 reduced this serum protease activity compared to the other two groups. To assess recovery, dogs were a priori stratified into a severely injured group and a mild-to-moderate injured group, using a Modified Frankel Scale. The Texas Spinal Cord Injury Score was then used to assess long-term motor/sensory function. In dogs with severe spinal cord injuries, those treated with saline had a mean motor score of 2 (95% CI 0-4.0) that was significantly (Pdogs receiving dimethyl sulfoxide (mean, 5; 95% CI 2.0-8.0) or GM6001 (mean, 5; 95% CI 2.0-8.0). As there was no independent effect of GM6001, we attribute improved neurological outcomes to dimethyl sulfoxide, a pleotropic agent that may target diverse secondary pathogenic events that emerge in the acutely injured cord.

  3. Surgery for ACL Tear Often Successful Over Long Term

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_167352.html Surgery for ACL Tear Often Successful Over Long Term Even 10 years after procedure, ... were scheduled for presentation Friday at the annual meeting of the AOSSM in Toronto. Findings presented at ...

  4. Pediatric ACL Injuries: A Review of Current Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Vikas; Mishra, Panna; Verma, Deepankar

    2017-01-01

    The number of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries reported in skeletally immature athletes has increased over the past 2 decades. The reasons for this increased rate include the growing number of children and adolescents participating in competitive sports vigorous sports training at an earlier age and greater rate of diagnosis because of increased awareness and greater use of advanced medical imaging. There is a growing need for a consensus and evidence based approach for management of these injuries to frame a dedicated age specific treatment strategy. This article does a systematic evidence based literature review of management of Pediatric ACL injuries seen in several forms: tibial eminence avulsion fractures partial ACL tears and full thickness ligament tears and its outcome analysis. The mechanism of Safe and effective surgical techniques for children and adolescents with ACL injuries continues to evolve. The numerous age matched techniques are extensively discussed. Neuromuscular training can reduce the risk of ACL injury in adolescent girls. This review outlines the current state of knowledge on diagnosis treatment and prevention of ACL injuries in children and adolescents and helps in guiding the treatment through a dedicated algorithm.

  5. Outcome of ACL Reconstruction and Concomitant Articular Injury Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Tahami

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Articular cartilage injuries are a common clinical problem at the time of ACL reconstruction with an incidence rate of 16-46%. Good results of ACL reconstruction combined with the treatment of chondral lesions have been published in some studies. Method: After statistical analysis 30 patients were selected and divided in 2 groups. TheFfirst group consisted of 15 patients wite isolated ACL tear without any other concomitant injuries and the second group consisted of 15 patients with ACL tear and concomitant high grade (grade 3 or 4 of outerbridge classification contained articular cartilage injuries during arthroscopy. Group 1 underwent ACL reconstruction and group 2 underwent ACL reconstruction combined with chondroplasty via the drilling and microfracture technique. For each patient the Lysholm knee score questionnaire was completed before surgery, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. Results: The mean Lysholm knee score in both groups improves: 9.6 points after 6 months and 16.06 points after 1 year in group 1 and 23.26 points after 6 months and 30.66 after 1 year in group 2, whict was statistically significant (Pvalue

  6. Management of combined ACL-MCL tears: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Rocco; Osti, Leonardo; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    The optimal management for combined anterior cruciate ligament-medial collateral ligament (ACL-MCL) injuries is controversial. We performed a literature search using Medline, Cochrane and Google Scholar using the keywords: 'ACL' and 'MCL' in combination with 'surgery treatment', 'conservative treatment', 'surgery management', 'conservative management', 'surgical treatment' and 'surgical management'. We identified 23 published studies. Conservative and surgical management for combined ACL-MCL injuries resulted in different functional outcomes. The Coleman Methodology Score showed great heterogeneity in terms of study design, patient characteristics, management methods and outcome assessment and generally low methodological quality. Given the heterogeneity in terms of treatment and results, we did not find a univocal trend over the years regarding MCL management (conservative or surgical). The use of several scoring systems did not allow us to compare outcomes in the different studies. There is a need for a common validated scale for clinical measurements for ACL-MCL injuries, so as to allow easier and more reliable comparison of outcomes in different studies. To improve diagnostic certainty of combined ACL-MCL injuries, all patients should have imaging assessment (MR and stress-radiography) in addition to clinical examination. There is a need to perform appropriately powered randomized clinical trials of conservative and surgical treatment of combined ACL-MCL injuries, using standard diagnostic assessment, common and validated scoring system comparing reported outcomes and duration of follow-up more than 2 years.

  7. Quantitative comparison of the microscopic anatomy of the human ACL femoral and tibial entheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Mélanie L; Carey, Grace E; Schlecht, Stephen H; Wojtys, Edward M; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2015-12-01

    The femoral enthesis of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is known to be more susceptible to injury than the tibial enthesis. To determine whether anatomic differences might help explain this difference, we quantified the microscopic appearance of both entheses in 15 unembalmed knee specimens using light microscopy, toluidine blue stain and image analysis. The amount of calcified fibrocartilage and uncalcified fibrocartilage, and the ligament entheseal attachment angle were then compared between the femoral and tibial entheses via linear mixed-effects models. The results showed marked differences in anatomy between the two entheses. The femoral enthesis exhibited a 3.9-fold more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis (p<0.001), a 43% greater calcified fibrocartilage tissue area (p<0.001), and a 226% greater uncalcified fibrocartilage depth (p<0.001), with the latter differences being particularly pronounced in the central region. We conclude that the ACL femoral enthesis has more fibrocartilage and a more acute ligament attachment angle than the tibial enthesis, which provides insight into why it is more vulnerable to failure. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Anterolateral ligament abnormalities are associated with peripheral ligament and osseous injuries in acute ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Helito, Paulo Victor Partezani; Leão, Renata Vidal; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have used MRI to identify the ALL. As it was shown that it is not possible to precisely characterize this ligament in all examination, it is important to identify concomitant lesions that can help in diagnosing ALL abnormalities. It is important to characterise this injury due to its association with anterolateral knee instability. Thus, the present study was performed to determine the frequency of ALL injuries in patients with acute ACL rupture and to analyse its associated knee lesions. Patients with acute ACL injuries were evaluated by MRI. Among this population, the ALL was classified as non-visualised, injured or normal. The possible abnormalities of the meniscus, collateral ligaments, popliteus tendon, posterior cruciate ligament, Iliotibial band (ITB), anterolateral capsule and osseus injuries were evaluated. The association of an ALL injury with these other knee structures as well as sex and age was calculated. Among the 228 knees evaluated, the ALL could not be entirely identified in 61 (26.7%). Of the remaining 167, 66 (39.5%) presented an ALL abnormality and only four (6.1%) were Segond fractures. ALL abnormalities were associated with lesions of the lateral collateral ligament, medial collateral ligament, popliteus tendon, ITB, anterolateral capsule and osseous contusions of the femoral condyle and tibial plateau. No correlation was found with medial meniscus, lateral meniscus and posterior cruciate ligament injuries. There was no association between ALL injuries and gender, and older patients were more likely to present an ALL injury. ALL injuries are present in approximately 40% of ACL injuries, and a minority of these are Segond fractures. These injuries are associated with peripheral ligament injuries, anterolateral structures lesions and bone contusions, but there is no association with meniscal injuries. Surgeons must be aware of these associations to consider an ALL lesion even if it is not completely clear in imaging evaluation

  9. The Dutch language anterior cruciate ligament return to sport after injury scale (ACL-RSI) - validity and reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagers, Anton J.; Reininga, Inge H. F.; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2017-01-01

    The ACL-Return to Sport after Injury scale (ACL-RSI) measures athletes' emotions, confidence in performance, and risk appraisal in relation to return to sport after ACL reconstruction. Aim of this study was to study the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the ACL-RSI (ACL-RSI (NL)).

  10. Pain and knee function in relation to degree of bone bruise after acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szkopek, K; Warming, Torsten; Neergaard, K

    2012-01-01

    It is unknown whether the bone bruise that occurs in connection with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is causing pain and dysfunction. We followed prospectively 17 patients [10 men, seven women, mean age 28 years (range 23-34)] with acute ACL rupture for 2 months. A magnetic resonance...

  11. Return to Play and Future ACL Injury Risk Following ACL Reconstruction In Soccer Athletes From the MOON Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Robert H.; Schmitz, Leah; Wright, Rick W.; Dunn, Warren R.; Parker, Richard D.; Andrish, Jack T.; McCarty, Eric C.; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited information on outcomes and return to play (RTP) after ACL reconstruction (ACLR) in soccer athletes. Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to (i) test the hypotheses that player sex, side of injury and graft choice do not influence RTP, and (ii) define the risk for future ACL injury in soccer players after ACLR. Study design Retrospective cohort study, Level II. Methods Soccer players in a prospective cohort were contacted to determine RTP following ACLR. Information regarding if and when they returned to play, their current playing status, the primary reason they stopped playing soccer (if relevant) and incidence of subsequent ACL surgery was recorded. Results Initially, 72% of 100 soccer athletes (55 male, 45 female) with a mean age of 24.2 years at the time of ACL reconstruction returned to soccer. At average follow up of 7.0 years, 36% were still playing, a significant decrease compared to initial RTP (psoccer athletes had undergone further ACL surgery, including 9 on the contralateral knee and 3 on the ipsilateral knee. In a univariate analysis, females were more likely to have future ACL surgery (20% v. 5.5%, p=0.03). Soccer athletes who underwent ACLR on their non-dominant limb had a higher future rate of contra-lateral ACLR (16%) than soccer athletes who underwent ACLR on their dominant limb (3.5%) (p=0.03). Conclusion Younger and male soccer players are more likely to return to play after ACL reconstruction. Return to soccer following ACLR declines over time. PMID:23002201

  12. Risk factors for acute knee injury in female youth football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Martin; Waldén, Markus

    2016-03-01

    To prospectively evaluate risk factors for acute time-loss knee injury, in particular ACL injury, in female youth football players. Risk factors were studied in 4556 players aged 12-17 years from a randomised controlled trial during the 2009 season. Covariates were both intrinsic (body mass index, age, relative age effect, onset of menarche, previous acute knee injury or ACL injury, current knee complaints, and familial disposition of ACL injury) and extrinsic (no. of training sessions/week, no. of matches/week, match exposure ratio, match play with other teams, and artificial turf exposure). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from individual variable and multiple Cox regression analyses. Ninety-six acute knee injuries were recorded, 21 of them ACL injuries. Multiple Cox regression showed a fourfold higher ACL injury rate for players with familial disposition of ACL injury (HR 3.57; 95% CI 1.48-8.62). Significant predictor variables for acute knee injury were age >14 years (HR 1.97; 95% CI 1.30-2.97), knee complaints at the start of the season (HR 1.98; 95% CI 1.30-3.02), and familial disposition of ACL injury (HR 1.96; 95% CI 1.22-3.16). No differences in injury rates were seen when playing on artificial turf compared with natural grass. Female youth football players with a familial disposition of ACL injury had an increased risk of ACL injury and acute knee injury. Older players and those with knee complaints at pre-season were more at risk of acute knee injury. Although the predictive values were low, these factors could be used in athlete screening to target preventive interventions. II.

  13. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION OF THE ACL: 49 CLINICAL QUESTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard R. Bach

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION A unique reference that offers opinions, preferences and expert advice associated with management of ACL injuries in the questions and answers format which enhanced by images, diagrams and references. PURPOSE "Curbside Consultation of the ACL" aims to provide some knowledge more than the basic information in the evaluation and the management of ACL injuries. This information is based on the opinion or the advice of an expert. Quick access of audience to these pearl and pit-falls and evidence-based expert advice for complicated cases in ACL reconstruction in the form of brief answers including current concepts is targeted by the authors. FEATURES 49 Clinical questions are outlined in 5 sections. In the first section is about preoperative questions including indications, diagnostic measures, combined ligament injuries, graft choice, preparation before surgery, avulsion of the eminence, examination in posterolateral corner injury. In the second section is preoperative questions are subjected including dropping the graft to the floor, posterior wall blowout, knees without hamstring tendon, graft amputation by interference screw, to avoid vertical tunnel in tibia, fixation methods of graft, femoral and tibial tunnel positioning. Third section is about postoperative questions including postoperative management, differences in postoperative rehabilitation protocols in different type of grafts, postoperative man-agement of meniscal repair, management in difficulties in gaining extension, infection, patellar pain, timing of reop-eration in motion problems, criteria returning to sports, outcome measures, outcome in using different grafts, role of bracing. The fourth section is about failed ACL recon-struction including causes, indications for revision, ex-panded tunnels, graft choice in revision surgery, contro-lateral patellar tendon graft for revision, rehab protocol after revision surgery, hardware removal, early degenera-tive joint disease

  14. ACL2 Meets the GPU: Formalizing a CUDA-based Parallelizable All-Pairs Shortest Path Algorithm in ACL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Hardin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available As Graphics Processing Units (GPUs have gained in capability and GPU development environments have matured, developers are increasingly turning to the GPU to off-load the main host CPU of numerically-intensive, parallelizable computations. Modern GPUs feature hundreds of cores, and offer programming niceties such as double-precision floating point, and even limited recursion. This shift from CPU to GPU, however, raises the question: how do we know that these new GPU-based algorithms are correct? In order to explore this new verification frontier, we formalized a parallelizable all-pairs shortest path (APSP algorithm for weighted graphs, originally coded in NVIDIA's CUDA language, in ACL2. The ACL2 specification is written using a single-threaded object (stobj and tail recursion, as the stobj/tail recursion combination yields the most straightforward translation from imperative programming languages, as well as efficient, scalable executable specifications within ACL2 itself. The ACL2 version of the APSP algorithm can process millions of vertices and edges with little to no garbage generation, and executes at one-sixth the speed of a host-based version of APSP coded in C – a very respectable result for a theorem prover. In addition to formalizing the APSP algorithm (which uses Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm at its core, we have also provided capability that the original APSP code lacked, namely shortest path recovery. Path recovery is accomplished using a secondary ACL2 stobj implementing a LIFO stack, which is proven correct. To conclude the experiment, we ported the ACL2 version of the APSP kernels back to C, resulting in a less than 5% slowdown, and also performed a partial back-port to CUDA, which, surprisingly, yielded a slight performance increase.

  15. Cross-cultural Comparison of Patients Undergoing ACL Reconstruction in the United States and Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Magnussen, Robert A.; GRANAN, Lars-Petter; Dunn, Warren R.; Amendola, Annunziato; Andrish, Jack T.; Brophy, Robert; Carey, James L.; Flanigan, David; Huston, Laura J.; Jones, Morgan

    2010-01-01

    Data from large prospectively collected anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) cohorts are being utilized to address clinical questions regarding ACL injury demographics and outcomes of ACL reconstruction. These data are affected by patient and injury factors as well as surgical factors associated with the site of data collection. The aim of this article is to compare primary ACL reconstruction data from patient cohorts in the United States and Norway, demonstrating the similarities and differences...

  16. Preventing ACL Injuries in Females: What Physical Educators Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, Lisa; Carroll, Brianne

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries happen at a frequent rate, especially in girls and women. While there are many factors that contribute to ACL tears, teaching proper landing techniques and strengthening certain muscles can decrease the incidence of ACL tears, especially in women. This article reviews some of the high-risk factors that…

  17. Review of CD Rom: The Virtual Surgeon: ACL Reconstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THE VIRTUAL SURGEON: ACL RECONSTRUCTION Professor George Bentley ChM FRCS, Russell E LVindsor MD, Mr Andrew Williams FRCS(0rth); 4150 + VAT(UK) The Virtual Surgeon - 3D Anatomy of the Knee 469 + VAT(UK). TVF Multimedia Ltd, 375 City Road, London, EClV lNB, UK ...

  18. ACL graft can replicate the normal ligament's tension curve.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, M.P.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Kampen, A. van

    2005-01-01

    The anatomical femoral insertion of the normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lies on the deep portion of the lateral wall of the intercondylar fossa. Following the deep bone-cartilage border, it stretches from 11 o'clock high in the notch all the way down to its lowest border at 8 o'clock. The

  19. ACL graft can replicate the normal ligament's tension curve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, MP; Verdonschot, N; van Kampen, A

    2005-01-01

    The anatomical femoral insertion of the normal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lies on the deep portion of the lateral wall of the intercondylar fossa. Following the deep bone-cartilage border, it stretches from 11 o'clock high in the notch all the way down to its lowest border at 8 o'clock. The

  20. Twist and its effect on ACL graft forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, M. P.; Blankevoort, L.; ten Ham, A.; Verdonschot, N.; van Kampen, A.

    2004-01-01

    Graft tension is a controversial topic in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Evidence suggests a narrow range of graft tensions, which allow the graft to remodel to a stable and mature neoligament. In previous cadaver experiments, we showed that twisting the graft could modulate the graft

  1. Complications After Pediatric ACL Reconstruction: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stephanie E; Feeley, Brian T; Pandya, Nirav K

    2017-09-22

    The purpose of this meta-analysis is to review clinical outcomes and complications following pediatric anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched for studies on ACL ruptures in the skeletally immature from 1985 to 2016. Full-text studies in English and performed on humans were included (n=5718). Titles included discussed operative intervention on skeletally immature patients with ACL tears (n=160). Studies that reported rerupture and/or complications with ACL reconstruction specific to the pediatric population, specifically growth disturbance, were then included in a secondary analysis (n=45). Complications not specific to the pediatric population were excluded. Demographics, graft type, surgical technique, follow-up, growth disturbance, rerupture, and patient-reported outcome scores were collected. Data were analyzed in aggregate. In total, 45 studies were included with 1321 patients and 1392 knees. The average age was 13.0 years, 67% were male, and mean follow-up was 49.6 months. There were 115 (8.7%) reruptures in the initial 160 studies reviewed. In total, 94.6% of patients with rerupture required revision ACL surgery. There were 58 total growth disturbances (16 required corrective surgery, or 27.6%). Eighteen knees (3.7%) developed angular deformity, most commonly valgus. There were 37 patients (7.5%) had at least a 1 cm limb-length discrepancy. A total of 23 studies reported International Knee Documentation Committee scores (range, 81 to 100, 88% grade A or B). In total, 20 studies reported excellent Lysholm scores with mean scores of 94.6. Growth disturbance can occur with any of the reconstruction techniques. Proper surgical technique is likely more important than the specific reconstruction technique utilized. Patients with rerupture require surgery at much higher rates than those with growth disturbance. Although much attention has been focused on growth disturbance, we suggest that equal attention be

  2. POST-OPERATIVE REHABILITATION PROGRAM AFTER SURGERY ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Đokić

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ACL (anterior cruciate ligament are small ligaments inside the knee capsule that connect the femur tibia, main function is to prevent movement of the femur in front of tibia and to provide stability, it also helps in controlling the movement of the knee, in direction back-forward. Injuries of ACL appear in an increasing number of athletes. Per year, from 100,000 people who have an injury of the knee joint, 30% have the reconstruction surgery of ACL. ACL injury accounts about 40% of all sports injuries. The greatest number of injuries just happens in the most popular sports, such as: basketball, football and handball, often in female athlete. After the injury, about 25% of athletes fail to return to the sport. Recovery time after surgery is usually 6-12 months, depending on individual characteristics, as well as technical and tactical demands of specific sports activities. Choosing an appropriate and efficient rehabilitation protocols, and training is of great importance. The aim of this paper is to present training protocol of 60 days, 3 months after ACL reconstruction surgery, of top handball female athletes. In the first 30 days, a total of 74 training sessions were done, 39 trainings and 21 EMS (Electrical Muscle Stimulation treatments, at the end of each workout. Functional abilities and morphological status were measured at the beginning and end of the treatment program. After the training protocol athlete got individual exercise program of 26 days (30 training sessions. After 20 days began with normal training, the 26th day of the first game played. The applied protocol has proven successful, as the third competition season there is no problem with an injury.

  3. A Retrospective Analysis of Concurrent Pathology in ACL-Reconstructed Knees of Elite Alpine Ski Racers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Matthew J; Doyle-Baker, Patricia; Heard, Mark

    2017-01-01

    , meniscal tears, and chondral lesions. RESULTS: At the time of primary ACLR, a majority of knees (82%; 23/28) demonstrated concurrent injury compared with isolated ACL tears; 32% of knees sustained multiligament injuries (9/28), and 8 involved the ipsilateral medial collateral ligament (MCL). Of the ACL......BACKGROUND: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is the most frequent injury in alpine ski racing, and there is a high prevalence of ACL reinjury. Limited data exist on the concurrent pathology with primary ACL tears in elite alpine ski racers and the magnitude of injury progression after primary...... ACL reconstruction (ACLR). PURPOSE: To evaluate (1) the involvement of intra-articular and multiligament pathologies at the time of primary ACLR, (2) the subsequent progression in meniscal/chondral injuries, and (3) the occurrence of ACL reinjury in elite alpine ski racers. STUDY DESIGN: Case series...

  4. Can PRP effectively treat injured tendons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James H-C

    2014-01-01

    PRP is widely used to treat tendon and other tissue injuries in orthopaedics and sports medicine; however, the efficacy of PRP treatment on injured tendons is highly controversial. In this commentary, I reason that there are many PRP- and patient-related factors that influence the outcomes of PRP treatment on injured tendons. Therefore, more basic science studies are needed to understand the mechanism of PRP on injured tendons. Finally, I suggest that better understanding of the PRP action mechanism will lead to better use of PRP for the effective treatment of tendon injuries in clinics.

  5. Pediatric ACL Injuries: A Review of Current Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Vikas; Mishra, Panna; Verma, Deepankar

    2017-01-01

    Background: The number of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries reported in skeletally immature athletes has increased over the past 2 decades. The reasons for this increased rate include the growing number of children and adolescents participating in competitive sports vigorous sports training at an earlier age and greater rate of diagnosis because of increased awareness and greater use of advanced medical imaging. There is a growing need for a consensus and evidence based approach for m...

  6. Performance and return-to-sport after ACL reconstruction in NFL quarterbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Brandon J; Harris, Joshua D; Heninger, Jacob R; Frank, Rachel; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R

    2014-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a significant injury in National Football League (NFL) quarterbacks. The purpose of this study was to determine (1) return-to-sport (RTS) rate in NFL quarterbacks following ACL reconstruction, (2) performance upon RTS, and (3) the difference in RTS and performance between players who underwent ACL reconstruction and controls. Thirteen quarterbacks (14 knees) who met inclusion criteria underwent ACL reconstruction while in the NFL. Matched controls were selected from the NFL during the same time span to compare and analyze age, body mass index (BMI), position, performance, and NFL experience. Student t tests were performed for analysis of within- and between-group variables. Bonferroni correction was used in the setting of multiple comparisons. Twelve quarterbacks (13 knees; 92%) were able to RTS in the NFL. Mean player age was 27.2±2.39 years. Mean career length in the NFL following ACL reconstruction was 4.85±2.7 years. Only 1 player needed revision ACL reconstruction. In both cases and controls, player performance was not significantly different from preinjury performance after ACL reconstruction (or index year in controls). There was also no significant performance difference between case and control quarterbacks following ACL reconstruction (or index year in controls). There is a high rate of RTS in the NFL following ACL reconstruction. In-game performance following ACL reconstruction was not significantly different from preinjury or from controls. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. The revised Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation System (APACHE II) is more effective than the Glasgow Coma Scale for prediction of mortality in head-injured patients with systemic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgiç, Ali; Ergüngör, Fikret M; Becan, Türker; Elhan, Atila; Okay, Onder; Yüksel, Bülent C

    2009-09-01

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is popular, simple, and reliable, and provides information about the level of consciousness in trauma patients. Nevertheless, the necessity of using a more complex system than GCS has been questioned recently. The revised Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation system (APACHE II) is a physiologically based system including 12 physiological variables, and it also includes GCS. In addition, it is thought to be superior to GCS due to recognition of increasing age and significant chronic health problems, which adversely affect mortality. This retrospective study included 266 patients (195 males, 71 females; mean age 60.5; range 14 to 87 years) with head injury associated with systemic trauma in 2003 and 2004. Mortality increased in the elderly group (pAPACHE II was 38.0 and death score was 68.7 (pAPACHE II at the cut-off point was better than GCS in the prediction of death and survival in patients (pAPACHE II (0.892+/-0.028) than GCS (0.862+/-0.029). For the assessment of mortality, the GCS score still provides simple, less-time consuming and effective information concerning head injury patients, especially in emergencies; however, for the prediction of mortality in multitrauma patients, APACHE II is superior to GCS since it includes the main physiologic parameters of patients.

  8. Knee kinematics and kinetics in former soccer players with a 16-year-old ACL injury – the effects of twelve weeks of knee-specific training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmström Eva

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Training of neuromuscular control has become increasingly important and plays a major role in rehabilitation of subjects with an injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL. Little is known, however, of the influence of this training on knee stiffness during loading. Increased knee stiffness occurs as a loading strategy of ACL-injured subjects and is associated with increased joint contact forces. Increased or altered joint loads contribute to the development of osteoarthritis. The aim of the study was to determine if knee stiffness, defined by changes in knee kinetics and kinematics of gait, step activity and cross-over hop could be reduced through a knee-specific 12-week training programme. Methods A 3-dimensional motion analysis system (VICON and a force plate (AMTI were used to calculate knee kinetics and kinematics before and after 12 weeks of knee-specific training in 12 males recruited from a cohort with ACL injury 16 years earlier. Twelve uninjured males matched for age, sex, BMI and activity level served as a reference group. Self-reported patient-relevant data were obtained by the KOOS questionnaire. Results There were no significant changes in knee stiffness during gait and step activity after training. For the cross-over hop, increased peak knee flexion during landing (from 44 to 48 degrees, p = 0.031 and increased internal knee extensor moment (1.28 to 1.55 Nm/kg, p = 0.017 were seen after training, indicating reduced knee stiffness. The KOOS sport and recreation score improved from 70 to 77 (p = 0.005 and was significantly correlated with the changes in knee flexion during landing for the cross-over hop (r = 0.6, p = 0.039. Conclusion Knee-specific training improved lower extremity kinetics and kinematics, indicating reduced knee stiffness during demanding hop activity. Self-reported sport and recreational function correlated positively with the biomechanical changes supporting a clinical importance of the

  9. No Clinically Relevant Change Between 1 and 2 Year Outcomes Following ACL Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Joseph; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury has an annual incidence of more than 200,000 cases with almost 100,000 undergoing ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Many institutions have built ACL registries to better understand treatment outcomes and raise overall standards of care. One limitation of these registries is the continued compliance of patients to fill out post-operative patient-reported outcome surveys over time, with most beginning data collection 2 years after surgery. With most ...

  10. Rapid hamstrings/quadriceps strength in ACL-reconstructed elite Alpine ski racers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Matthew J; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Because of the importance of hamstrings (HAM) and quadriceps (QUAD) strength for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention and the high incidence of ACL injury in ski racing, HAM and QUAD maximal and explosive strength were assessed in ski racers with and without ACL reconstruction (ACL-R). Uninjured (n = 13 males, n = 8 females) and ACL-R (n = 3 males, n = 5 females, 25.0 ± 11.3 months after operation) elite ski racers performed maximal voluntary isometric HAM and QUAD contractions to obtain maximal torque (MVC) and rate of torque development (RTD) at 0-50, 0-100, 0-150, and 0-200 ms. MVC and RTD (per kilogram body mass) were calculated for the uninjured group to compare between sexes and to compare the control group with the ACL-R limb and unaffected limb of the ACL-R skiers. HAM/QUAD MVC and RTD strength ratios (H/Q ratios) were also compared. The ACL-R limb demonstrated significant HAM and QUAD deficits compared with the contralateral limb for MVC and late-phase RTD (P ski racing, our results suggest the importance of including HAM and QUAD strength assessments in the physical evaluation of uninjured skiers. Furthermore, HAM and QUAD strength should be assessed over a long-term period after surgery to identify chronic strength deficits in ACL-R ski racers.

  11. The feasibility of randomized controlled trials for early arthritis therapies (Earth) involving acute anterior cruciate ligament tear cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Constance R; Beynnon, Bruce D; Dragoo, Jason L; Fleisig, Glenn S; Hart, Joseph M; Khazzam, Michael; Marberry, Kevin M; Nelson, Bradley J

    2012-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability for which disease-modifying treatments are lacking. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear provides opportunities to study potential interventions from the initiation of heightened OA risk at the time of injury. This institutional review board (IRB)-approved prospective cross-sectional study (level of evidence: 2) was performed to test the hypothesis that adequate sample sizes of ACL-injured subjects to support randomized controlled trials (RCT) of early intervention strategies can be achieved. A total of 307 ACL-injured patients were entered into the database from 3-month collection periods at 7 clinical sites, with 65 subjects aged 18 to 30 years passing the inclusion/exclusion criteria. From sites that were IRB approved to ask, 89 of 96 (93%) subjects were willing to participate in an RCT. Extrapolating the 3-month data to a 1-year recruitment period would potentially yield 242 subjects aged 18 to 30 years willing to undergo randomization. This study shows that adequate sample sizes to perform RCT of early intervention strategies in ACL-injured cohorts comprising healthy young adults ages 18 to and 30 without prior joint injuries can be achieved within 1 to 2 years through recruitment at 5 to 7 orthopaedic sports medicine practices. Continued development of ACL-tear cohorts will provide the clinical base to critically evaluate new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that can help transform clinical care of OA from palliation to prevention.

  12. Updating Recommendations for Rehabilitation after ACL Reconstruction: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, John A

    2013-11-01

    To review recent evidence in order to update previous systematic reviews on methods of rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register were searched for the period January 2006 to December 2010, using terms related to ACL, rehabilitation, and randomized controlled trial (RCT). The search was done in triplicate, and the results reconciled (85 studies identified). Relevant studies in English that were peer-reviewed RCTs or prospective comparative studies evaluating methods of ACL rehabilitation were included (n = 29). Evidence was evaluated by all 3 authors using the CONSORT criteria. The data extracted included number of patients, ACL reconstruction method, randomization method, intervention, length of, and loss to, follow-up, outcomes assessed, bias, and findings. The review included evidence on postoperative bracing, accelerated rehabilitation, home-based rehabilitation, proprioceptive and neuromuscular training, and miscellaneous topics that were investigated by single trials. In 6 studies of postoperative bracing, no study found a clinically significant benefit of bracing or of restricted range of knee motion for pain control, knee laxity, or rehabilitation. Postoperative treatment without the use of a brace was not associated with less favorable outcomes. In 5 studies of accelerated strengthening, beginning eccentric quadriceps strengthening and isokinetic hamstring strengthening 2 weeks after ACL surgery improved or accelerated strength gains. Immediately postoperative weight-bearing, range of knee motion from 0° to 90° of flexion, and strengthening with closed-chain exercises were probably all safe. Home-based rehabilitation was evaluated in 2 studies. One study demonstrated that this intervention was at least as successful as a standard accelerated program over the long term. The other study included very low compliance expectations and other methodologic problems that

  13. Preferential loading of the ACL compared with the MCL during landing: a novel in sim approach yields the multiplanar mechanism of dynamic valgus during ACL injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quatman, Carmen E; Kiapour, Ata M; Demetropoulos, Constantine K; Kiapour, Ali; Wordeman, Samuel C; Levine, Jason W; Goel, Vijay K; Hewett, Timothy E

    2014-01-01

    Strong biomechanical and epidemiological evidence associates knee valgus collapse with isolated, noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. However, a concomitant injury to the medial collateral ligament (MCL) would be expected under valgus collapse, based on the MCL's anatomic orientation and biomechanical role in knee stability. Purpose/ The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative ACL to MCL strain patterns during physiological simulations of a wide range of high-risk dynamic landing scenarios. We hypothesized that both knee abduction and internal tibial rotation moments would generate a disproportionate increase in the ACL strain relative to the MCL strain. However, the physiological range of knee abduction and internal tibial rotation moments that produce ACL injuries are not of sufficient magnitude to compromise the MCL's integrity consistently. Controlled laboratory study. A novel in sim approach was used to test our hypothesis. Seventeen cadaveric lower extremities (mean age, 45 ± 7 years; 9 female and 8 male) were tested to simulate a broad range of landings after a jump under anterior tibial shear force, knee abduction, and internal tibial rotation at 25° of knee flexion. The ACL and MCL strains were quantified using differential variable reluctance transducers. An extensively validated, detailed finite element model of the lower extremity was used to help better interpret experimental findings. Anterior cruciate ligament failure occurred in 15 of 17 specimens (88%). Increased anterior tibial shear force and knee abduction and internal tibial rotation moments resulted in significantly higher ACL:MCL strain ratios (P < .05). Under all modes of single-planar and multiplanar loading, the ACL:MCL strain ratio remained greater than 1.7, while the relative ACL strain was significantly higher than the relative MCL strain (P < .01). Relative change in the ACL strain was demonstrated to be significantly greater under combined multiplanar

  14. Modeling Algorithms in SystemC and ACL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. O'Leary

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the formal language MASC, based on a subset of SystemC and intended for modeling algorithms to be implemented in hardware. By means of a special-purpose parser, an algorithm coded in SystemC is converted to a MASC model for the purpose of documentation, which in turn is translated to ACL2 for formal verification. The parser also generates a SystemC variant that is suitable as input to a high-level synthesis tool. As an illustration of this methodology, we describe a proof of correctness of a simple 32-bit radix-4 multiplier.

  15. [Arthroscopic refixation of acute proximal anterior cruciate ligament rupture using suture anchors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achtnich, A; Rosslenbroich, S; Beitzel, K; Imhoff, A B; Petersen, W

    2017-04-01

    Arthroscopic assisted suture anchor refixation combined with microfracturing of the femoral ACL insertion zone in cases of acute proximal anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture to restore anatomical and biomechanical properties of the native ACL. Acute proximal ACL rupture/avulsion, multiligament injury of the knee CONTRAINDICATIONS: Chronic (>6 weeks) proximal ACL rupture, intraligamentary rupture, as well as previous ACL surgery. Arthroscopic examination of the knee joint, debridement of the femoral insertion zone, examination of the ligament quality by a probe, insertion of a curved lasso through the ACL to place the sutures and use of a drill guide to place the anchor in the middle of the femoral ACL insertion. Microfracturing holes around the femoral footprint were made by an awl to enhance healing properties of the ACL. Partial weight bearing was permitted and crutches were used for 6 weeks, knee brace limited for the first 2 weeks 0‑0-0°, then 0‑0-90° for the following 4 weeks. A total of 20 patients who underwent acute proximal ACL suture anchor refixation were evaluated after a mean follow-up of 28 months. Regarding stability, mean values of the KT-1000 arthrometer indicated stable results (Knee Documentation Committee) score indicated that 17 cases were very good to good (12A, 4B) and in 3 cases the results were satisfactory (3C). Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the ALC was found to be intact in 17 cases. The total rate of revision was 15 % (3/20) because of recurrent instability.

  16. ATP released by injured neurons activates Schwann cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuele eNegro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Injured nerve terminals of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs can regenerate. This remarkable and complex response is governed by molecular signals that are exchanged among the cellular components of this synapse: motor axon nerve terminal (MAT, perisynaptic Schwann cells (PSCs, and muscle fibre. The nature of signals that govern MAT regeneration is ill-known. In the present study the spider toxin α-Latrotoxin has been used as tool to investigate the mechanisms underlying peripheral neuroregeneration. Indeed this neurotoxin induces an acute, specific, localized and fully reversible damage of the presynaptic nerve terminal, and its action mimics the cascade of events that leads to nerve terminal degeneration in injured patients and in many neurodegenerative conditions. Here we provide evidence of an early release by degenerating neurons of ATP as alarm messenger, that contributes to the activation of a series of intracellular pathways within SCs that are crucial for nerve regeneration: Ca2+, cAMP, ERK1/2, and CREB. These results contribute to define the cross-talk taking place among degenerating nerve terminals and PSCs, involved in the functional recovery of the NMJ.

  17. The popliteal fibular ligament in acute knee trauma: patterns of injury on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKean, D.; Thomee, E.; Grant, D.; Teh, J.L.; Mansour, R. [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Yoong, P. [Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading (United Kingdom); Yanny, S. [Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    To describe the patterns of injury associated with injury to the popliteofibular ligament injury. A retrospective review was performed of 180 MRI scans undertaken for acute knee trauma. Scans were excluded if the time of injury was over 4 weeks from the time of the scan, or if there was a history of septic arthritis, inflammatory arthropathy, previous knee surgery, or significant artefact. An agreed criterion for assessing the structures of the posterolateral ligamentous complex was defined and in each scan, the popliteofibular ligament (PFL) was scored as normal or injured. The menisci, ligaments, and tendons of each knee were also assessed. The mean age was 25.7 years (range, 9-65 years) and 72.2 % (n = 130) patients were male. The PFL was injured in 36 cases (20 %). There is a significant association between PFL injury and ACL rupture (p = 0.0001), ITB injury (p = 0.0001), PCL injury (p = 0.0373), in addition to associations with injury to other posterolateral corner structures including the lateral collateral ligament (p = 0.0001), biceps femoris tendon (p = 0.0014), and popliteus tendon (p = 0.0014). Of our series of PFL injuries, nine cases (25 %) were associated with further injuries of posterolateral corner structures and in 27 cases (75 %) the PFL was the only posterolateral corner structure torn. PFL injury is not uncommon in acute knee trauma and is associated with significant internal derangement of the knee, especially anterior cruciate ligament rupture, ITB sprain, and injury to other structures within the posterolateral corner. (orig.)

  18. The popliteal fibular ligament in acute knee trauma: patterns of injury on MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, D; Yoong, P; Yanny, S; Thomee, E; Grant, D; Teh, J L; Mansour, R

    2015-10-01

    To describe the patterns of injury associated with injury to the popliteofibular ligament injury. A retrospective review was performed of 180 MRI scans undertaken for acute knee trauma. Scans were excluded if the time of injury was over 4 weeks from the time of the scan, or if there was a history of septic arthritis, inflammatory arthropathy, previous knee surgery, or significant artefact. An agreed criterion for assessing the structures of the posterolateral ligamentous complex was defined and in each scan, the popliteofibular ligament (PFL) was scored as normal or injured. The menisci, ligaments, and tendons of each knee were also assessed. The mean age was 25.7 years (range, 9-65 years) and 72.2% (n = 130) patients were male. The PFL was injured in 36 cases (20%). There is a significant association between PFL injury and ACL rupture (p = 0.0001), ITB injury (p = 0.0001), PCL injury (p = 0.0373), in addition to associations with injury to other posterolateral corner structures including the lateral collateral ligament (p = 0.0001), biceps femoris tendon (p = 0.0014), and popliteus tendon (p = 0.0014). Of our series of PFL injuries, nine cases (25%) were associated with further injuries of posterolateral corner structures and in 27 cases (75%) the PFL was the only posterolateral corner structure torn. PFL injury is not uncommon in acute knee trauma and is associated with significant internal derangement of the knee, especially anterior cruciate ligament rupture, ITB sprain, and injury to other structures within the posterolateral corner.

  19. Stress During ACLS Courses: Is it Important for Learning Skills?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilton Lima Júnior

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the influence of stress on teaching medical emergencies in an Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS course and to verify this influence on learning, and the efficiency of emergency care training. METHODS: Seventeen physicians signed up for an ACLS course. Their pulses were taken and blood pressure (BP verified on the first day, before the beginning of the course, and on the second day, during the theoretical and practical test (TPT. Variations in pulse rates and BP were compared with students' test grades. Then, students answered a questionnaire of variables (QV about the amount of sleep they had during the course, the quantity of study material and the time spent studying for the course, and a stress scale graphic. RESULTS: Seven students had a pulse variation less than 10% between the 2 periods and 10 had a 10% or more variation. Grades on TPT were, respectively, 91.4±2.4 and 87.3±5.2 (p<0.05. Six students had a BP variation less than 20 mmHg, and in 11 it varied more than 21 mmHg. Grades on the TPT were 92.3±3.3 and 86.2± 8.1, respectively (p<0.05. The QV dates did not significantly influence grades. CONCLUSION: Stress, as an isolated variable, had a negative influence on the learning process and on the efficiency of emergency training in this situation.

  20. Prevention and Management of Post-operative Complications Following ACL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrode, Brian J; Carey, James L; Sennett, Brian J; Zgonis, Miltiadis H

    2017-07-14

    The goal of this paper is to review the current management and prevention of post-operative complications after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Trends in rehabilitation techniques will be presented, in addition to suggestions for interventions and expected milestones in ACL reconstruction recovery. ACL reconstruction protocols have evolved to more of a criterion-based progression rather than a tissue-healing time frame. Given the evolution of ACL surgical reconstruction techniques and rehabilitation protocols, the risk of post-operative complications can arise both early and late in the recovery process. This paper will discuss the role of preventative measures as it applies to the post-operative patient with ACL reconstruction. Short-term complications following ACL reconstruction include infection and deficits to knee motion and strength, whereas long-term complications include secondary ACL injury to either the involved or contralateral knee and lack of ability to return to high-level sports following this procedure. Future research should continue to address the multifactorial causes of secondary ACL injury and limited ability of patients to return to high level activities.

  1. MRI diagnosis of ACL bundle tears: value of oblique axial imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Alex W.H.; Griffith, James F.; Hung, Esther H.Y. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong SAR (China); Law, Kan Yip; Yung, Patrick S.H. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2013-02-15

    To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of oblique axial intermediate weighting MR imaging in detecting partial thickness anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) bundle tears. The study protocol was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Sixty-one subjects (43 male, 18 female; mean age 27.4 years; range 9 to 57 years) with clinically suspected ACL tear or meniscal tear between September 2009 and January 2011 were studied with MRI and arthroscopy. Detection of partial tear for the ACL as a whole and for each ACL bundle by protocol A (standard orthogonal sequences) and protocol B (standard orthogonal sequences plus oblique axial intermediate weighted imaging) was compared in a blinded fashion. Performance characteristics for protocol A and protocol B were compared using sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and ROC curves. A two-tailed p value of <0.05 indicated statistical significance. Fifteen (24.6%) normal, 15 (24.6%) partial and 31 complete tears were diagnosed by arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of protocol A for the diagnosis of partial tear of the ACL was 33%, 87% and 74%, while for protocol B the values were 87%, 87% and 87% respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) for the diagnosis of partial ACL tear and individual bundle tear was higher for protocol B, although this difference did not reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). The addition of oblique axial imaging to standard MR imaging improves diagnostic accuracy for detecting partial tears of the ACL as well as individual bundle tears of the ACL. (orig.)

  2. Social psychological aspects of ACL injury prevention and rehabilitation: An integrated model for behavioral adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derwin King Chung Chan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Managing rehabilitation for ACL injury is dependent on uptake of, and compliance with, medical and safety recommendations. In this paper, we propose a multi-theory model that integrates self-determination theory and the theory of planned behavior to identify the motivational determinants ACL injury prevention and management behaviors and the processes involved.

  3. Different knee joint loading patterns in ACL deficient copers and non-copers during walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, Tine; Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B

    2011-01-01

    Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) causes changes in the walking pattern. ACL deficient subjects classified as copers and non-copers have been observed to adopt different post-injury walking patterns. How these different patterns affect the knee compression and shear forces...

  4. Cysts of the anterior horn lateral meniscus and the ACL: is there a relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Eric; Wissman, Robert D; Mehta, Kaushal; Burch, Michael; Kaiser, Andrew; Li, Tianyang

    2015-03-01

    Parameniscal cysts have a very high association with meniscal tears in all locations except the anterior horn lateral meniscus (AHLM). The common insertion of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the AHLM root may provide a pathway for disease. The purpose of our study was to determine if cysts of the ACL are the origin of cysts adjacent to the AHLM. Radiology reports of all magnetic resonance (MR) examinations of the knee over a 7-year period were searched for "cyst", "ganglion", and "ganglia". Two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists independently reviewed those MR examinations reported to have a possible cyst of the AHLM and/or the ACL. The study group consisted of those patients with a cyst located adjacent to the AHLM but no meniscal tear of the adjacent meniscus. The ACL in each of these patients was evaluated for the presence of a cyst. Comparison with age- and gender-matched controls was performed. Of 708 cases that contained the word "cyst", "ganglion", or "ganglia", 121 reports indicated a possible cyst of the ACL or AHLM. Twelve individuals had a cyst located adjacent to the AHLM with no meniscal tear. Six (50%) of these individuals had a cyst of the ACL; no ACL cysts were identified in the control group (p = 0.014). Interreader agreement for AHLM parameniscal cysts and AHLM tears was substantial. Our results suggest that cysts adjacent to the AHLM may in part be explained by cysts or ganglia of the ACL.

  5. Lower extremity performance following ACL rehabilitation in the KANON-trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ericsson, Ylva B; Roos, Ewa M.; Frobell, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    The additional effect of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction on muscle strength and physical performance after a structured exercise programme is not well understood.......The additional effect of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction on muscle strength and physical performance after a structured exercise programme is not well understood....

  6. Comparison of Three-Dimensional Motion During Side-Step Cutting in Pediatric Athletes with Recent ACL Reconstruction and those with No ACL Surgical History

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, James Lee; Mueske, Nicole; Zaslow, Tracy; Katzel, Mia; Chua, Matthew; Wren, Tishya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study assessed differences between pediatric athletes? anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructed limb and non-reconstructed limb compared to limbs with no lower extremity surgical history during a side-step cut. Methods: 28 limbs with an ACL reconstruction within the 12 months prior to testing (operative limbs), 28 contralateral limbs (non-operative limbs) and 56 limbs with no lower extremity surgical history (control limbs; 28 individuals) were included. Lower extremity...

  7. A Retrospective Analysis of Concurrent Pathology in ACL-Reconstructed Knees of Elite Alpine Ski Racers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Matthew J; Doyle-Baker, Patricia; Heard, Mark

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is the most frequent injury in alpine ski racing, and there is a high prevalence of ACL reinjury. Limited data exist on the concurrent pathology with primary ACL tears in elite alpine ski racers and the magnitude of injury progression after primary...... ACL reconstruction (ACLR). PURPOSE: To evaluate (1) the involvement of intra-articular and multiligament pathologies at the time of primary ACLR, (2) the subsequent progression in meniscal/chondral injuries, and (3) the occurrence of ACL reinjury in elite alpine ski racers. STUDY DESIGN: Case series......; Level of evidence, 4. METHODS: Primary ACLR operative reports (n = 28) were obtained for 32 elite alpine ski racers along with the reports of 20 operative procedures that occurred subsequent to primary ACLR. Operative reports were evaluated to identify the presence/location of multiligament injury...

  8. Rapid Hamstrings/Quadriceps strength in ACL-reconstructed elite alpine ski racers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Matthew J; Aagaard, Per; Herzog, Walter

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Due to the importance of hamstrings (HAM) and quadriceps (QUAD) strength for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention, and the high incidence of ACL injury in ski racing, HAM and QUAD maximal and explosive strength was assessed in ski racers with and without ACL reconstruction...... (ACL-R). METHODS: Uninjured (n=13 males; n=8 females) and ACL-R (n=3 males; n=5 females; 25.0±11.3 months post-op) elite ski racers performed maximal voluntary isometric HAM and QUAD contractions to obtain maximal torque (MVC) and rate of torque development (RTD) at 0-50, 0-100, 0-150 and 0-200 ms. MVC...... to uninjured controls (Pski racing, our results suggest the importance of including HAM and QUAD...

  9. Non-contact ACL injuries in female athletes: an International Olympic Committee current concepts statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renstrom, P; Ljungqvist, A; Arendt, E

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury remains high in young athletes. Because female athletes have a much higher incidence of ACL injuries in sports such as basketball and team handball than male athletes, the IOC Medical Commission invited a multidisciplinary group of ACL expert...... clinicians and scientists to (1) review current evidence including data from the new Scandinavian ACL registries; (2) critically evaluate high-quality studies of injury mechanics; (3) consider the key elements of successful prevention programmes; (4) summarise clinical management including surgery...... and conservative management; and (5) identify areas for further research. Risk factors for female athletes suffering ACL injury include: (1) being in the preovulatory phase of the menstrual cycle compared with the postovulatory phase; (2) having decreased intercondylar notch width on plain radiography; and (3...

  10. The role of the anterolateral ligament in ACL insufficient and reconstructed knees on rotary stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavlo, Mette; Eljaja, S; Tranum-Jensen, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggest that the anterolateral ligament (ALL) is important for knee stability. The purpose was to clarify ALL's effect on rotatory and anterior-posterior stability in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-insufficient and reconstructed knees and the effect of reconstruction...... of an insufficient ALL. Eighteen cadaveric knees were included. Stability was tested for intact (+ALL), detached (-ALL) and reconstructed (+ reALL) ALL, with ACL removed (-ACL) and reconstructed (+ACL) in six combinations. All were tested in 0, 30, 60, and 90 °C flexion. Anterior-posterior stability was measured...... with a rolimeter. Rotation with a torque of 8.85 Nm was measured photographically. The ALL was well defined in 78% of knees. ACL reconstruction had a significant effect on anterior-posterior stability. Detaching the ALL had a significant effect on internal rotatory stability and on anterior-posterior stability...

  11. Dimensionality of the Knee Numeric-Entity Evaluation Score (KNEES-ACL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comins, J D; Krogsgaard, M R; Kreiner, Svend

    2013-01-01

    The benefit of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been questioned based on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). Valid interpretation of such results requires confirmation of the psychometric properties of the PROM. Rasch analysis is the gold standard for validation of PROMs......, yet PROMs used for ACL reconstruction have not been validated using Rasch analysis. We used Rasch analysis to investigate the psychometric properties of the Knee Numeric-Entity Evaluation Score (KNEES-ACL), a newly developed PROM for patients treated for ACL deficiency. Two-hundred forty-two patients...... pre- and post-ACL reconstruction completed the pilot PROM. Rasch models were used to assess the psychometric properties (e.g., unidimensionality, local response dependency, and differential item functioning). Forty-one items distributed across seven unidimensional constructs measuring impairment...

  12. Mechanisms of ACL injury in professional rugby union: a systematic video analysis of 36 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Connor; Blackburn, Jeff; Withers, Daniel; Tierney, Gregory; Moran, Cathal; Simms, Ciaran

    2016-12-30

    The mechanisms of ACL injury in rugby are not well defined. To describe the mechanisms of ACL injury in male professional rugby players using systematic video analysis. 36 cases from games played in top professional leagues and international matches were analysed. 5 analysts independently assessed all videos to record the estimated frame/time of initial ground contact, frame/time of ACL tear and a range of play specific variables. This included contact versus non-contact ACL injuries, injury timing, joint flexion angles and foot contact with the ground. 37 side-stepping manoeuvres from a control game were analysed to allow comparison of non-injury versus injury situations. 57% of ACL injuries occurred in a contact manner. 2 main scenarios were identified: (1) offensive running and (2) being tackled, indicating that the ball carrier might be at higher risk of ACL injury. The majority of non-contact ACL injuries resulted from a side-stepping manoeuvre. In most non-contact cases, initial ground contact was through heel strike. Statistical assessment of heel strike at initial ground contact versus non-heel strike cases showed a significant difference in injury versus non-injury outcomes, with heel strike associated with higher injury risk. Non-contact ACL injuries had lower median knee flexion angles and a more dorsiflexed ankle when compared with a control group (10° vs 20°, p≤0.001 and 10° vs 0°, p=0.033 respectively). Over half of ACL injuries in rugby in our analysis resulted from a contact mechanism. For non-contact injuries, lower knee flexion angles and heel-first ground contact in a side-stepping manoeuvre were associated with ACL injury. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. The concept of complete footprint restoration with guidelines for single- and double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebold, Rainer

    2011-05-01

    This article introduces guidelines for single- (SB) and double-bundle (DB) ACL reconstruction based on the concept of complete footprint restoration. The goal is to reconstruct a maximum of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insertion site area to regain a maximum of ACL function. The concept is based on the hypothesis that the restored biomechanical envelope of the knee is a function of reconstructed ACL insertion site area. Individual combinations of graft diameters and drill angles were calculated and matched for all individual insertion site lengths between 8 and 21 mm to maximize the percentage of anatomical footprint restoration. An "insertion site table" was developed to propose individual guidelines during ACL surgery for SB and DB ACL reconstruction based on the intraoperative measurement of the tibial insertion site length. Our calculations support the use of SB in "small footprints" up to 13 mm, which may restore more than 95% of the native insertion site length. "Intermediate footprints" between 14 and 15 mm may be restored by both a SB or DB ACL reconstruction. For "larger footprints" of 16 mm or more, DB has the potential to replicate 97% or more of the insertion site length which cannot be achieved by a SB ACL reconstruction. The concept of complete footprint restoration aims to reconstruct a maximum of ACL insertion site area to restore a maximum of functional envelope of the knee. Depending on the individual situation, different surgical approaches (SB/DB), graft diameters and drill angles may apply. An "insertion site table" was designed to give guidelines for SB and DB reconstruction during surgery. According to the new concept, DB ACL reconstruction is only considered as a surgical tool for large footprints and is not indicated for smaller ones.

  14. Knee functional recovery and limb-to-limb symmetry restoration after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and ACL reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawasreh, Zakariya Hussein

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common sport injury of young athletes who participate in jumping, cutting, and pivoting activities. Although ACL reconstruction (ACLR) surgery has the goal of enabling athletes to return to preinjury activity levels, treatment results often fall short of this goal. The outcomes after ACLR are variable and less than optimal with low rate of return to preinjury activity level and high risk for second ACL injury. Factors related to the knee functional limitations, strength deficits, and limb-to-limb movement asymmetry may be associated with poor outcomes after ACLR. Additionally, the criteria that are used to determine a patient's readiness to return to the preinjury activity level are undefined which may also be associated with poor outcomes after ACLR. The clinical decision-making to clear patients' for safe and successful return to high physical activities should be based on a universal comprehensive set of objective criteria that ensure normal knee function and limb-to-limb symmetry. A battery of return to activity criteria (RTAC) that emphases normal knee function and limb-to-limb movement symmetry has been constituted to better ensure safe and successful return to preinjury activity level. Yet, only variables related to patients' demographics, concomitant injuries, and treatment measures have been used to predict return to preinjury activity levels after ACLR. However, the ability of RTAC variables that ensure normal knee function and limb movement symmetry to predict the return to participate in the same preinjury activity level after ACLR has not been investigated. In light of this background, the first aim of the present study was to compare functional knee performance-based and patient-reported measures of those who PASS and who FAIL on RTAC at 6 months (6-M) following ACLR with those at 12 months (12-M) and 24 months (24-M) following ACLR and to determine how performance-based and patient-reported measures

  15. Neuromuscular coordination deficit persists 12 months after ACL reconstruction but can be modulated by 6 weeks of kettlebell training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, Mette K.; Andersen, Christoffer H.; Bencke, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present single-case study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks' kettlebell training on the neuromuscular risk profile for ACL injury in a high-risk athlete returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. A female elite soccer player (age 21 years) with no previous history of ACL i...

  16. The Dutch language anterior cruciate ligament return to sport after injury scale (ACL-RSI) - validity and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagers, Anton J; Reininga, Inge H F; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2017-02-01

    The ACL-Return to Sport after Injury scale (ACL-RSI) measures athletes' emotions, confidence in performance, and risk appraisal in relation to return to sport after ACL reconstruction. Aim of this study was to study the validity and reliability of the Dutch version of the ACL-RSI (ACL-RSI (NL)). Total 150 patients, who were 3-16 months postoperative, completed the ACL-RSI(NL) and 5 other questionnaires regarding psychological readiness to return to sports, knee-specific physical functioning, kinesiophobia, and health-specific locus of control. Construct validity of the ACL-RSI(NL) was determined with factor analysis and by exploring 10 hypotheses regarding correlations between ACL-RSI(NL) and the other questionnaires. For test-retest reliability, 107 patients (5-16 months postoperative) completed the ACL-RSI(NL) again 2 weeks after the first administration. Cronbach's alpha, Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), SEM, and SDC, were calculated. Bland-Altman analysis was conducted to assess bias between test and retest. Nine hypotheses (90%) were confirmed, indicating good construct validity. The ACL-RSI(NL) showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.94) and test-retest reliability (ICC 0.93). SEM was 5.5 and SDC was 15. A significant bias of 3.2 points between test and retest was found. Therefore, the ACL-RSI(NL) can be used to investigate psychological factors relevant to returning to sport after ACL reconstruction.

  17. Neuromuscular Coordination Deficit Persists 12 Months after ACL Reconstruction But Can Be Modulated by 6 Weeks of Kettlebell Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Christoffer H; Bencke, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present single-case study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks' kettlebell training on the neuromuscular risk profile for ACL injury in a high-risk athlete returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. A female elite soccer player (age 21 years) with no previous history of ACL i...

  18. Circuit de commande pour Anti Collision Lamps ACL

    OpenAIRE

    Gerber, Jérôme; Biner, Hans-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Objectif Les ACL sont des ampoules 28V/200W utilisés dans le domaine de l’éclairage professionnel. Habituellement, 8 ampoules sont branchées en série sur le réseau. Suite à ce montage, une commande individuelle de la luminosité n’est pas possible. L’appareil conçu dans ce projet met toutes les ampoules en parallèle sur un bus de tension continue à 28Vdc. La commande individuelle est maintenant possible. Une protection anti-courtcircuit est aussi conçue afin de sécuriser l’installation. Pour a...

  19. Fluoroscopic Analysis of Tibial Translation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injured Knees With and Without Bracing During Forward Lunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Maryam; Farahmand, Farzam; Mousavi, Seyed Mohammad Ebrahim; Golestanha, Seyed Ali; Rezaeian, Tahmineh; Shirvani Broujeni, Shahram; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Esfandiarpour, Fateme

    2015-07-01

    Despite several studies with different methods, the effect of functional knee braces on knee joint kinematics is not clear. Direct visualization of joint components through medical imaging modalities may provide the clinicians with more useful information. In this study, for the first time in the literature, video fluoroscopy was used to investigate the effect of knee bracing on the sagittal plane kinematics of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured patients. For twelve male unilateral ACL deficient subjects, the anterior tibial translation was measured during lunge exercise in non-braced and braced conditions. Fluoroscopic images were acquired from the subjects using a digital fluoroscopy system with a rate of 10 fps. The image of each frame was scaled using a calibration coin and analyzed in AutoCAD environment. The angle between the two lines, tangent to the posterior cortexes of the femoral and tibial shafts was measured as the flexion angle. For the fluoroscopic images associated with 0°, 15°, 30°, 45° and 60° knee flexion angles, the relative anterior-posterior configuration of the tibiofemoral joint was assessed by measuring the position of landmarks on the tibia and femur. Results indicated that the overall anterior translations of the tibia during the eccentric (down) and concentric (up) phases of lunge exercise were 10.4 ± 1.7 mm and 9.0 ± 2.2 mm for non-braced, and 10.1 ± 3.4 mm and 7.4 ± 2.5 mm, for braced conditions, respectively. The difference of the tibial anterior-posterior translation behaviors of the braced and non-braced knees was not statistically significant. Fluoroscopic imaging provides an effective tool to measure the dynamic behavior of the knee joint in the sagittal plane and within the limitations of this study, the pure mechanical stabilizing effect of functional knee bracing is not sufficient to control the anterior tibial translation of the ACL deficient patients during lunge exercise.

  20. Delaying ACL reconstruction and treating with exercise therapy alone may alter prognostic factors for 5-year outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filbay, Stephanie R; Roos, Ewa M; Frobell, Richard B

    2017-01-01

    analysis of the Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Nonsurgical versus Surgical Treatment (KANON) trial (ISRCTN84752559). Relationships between prognostic factors (baseline cartilage, meniscus and osteochondral damage, baseline extension deficit, baseline patient-reported outcomes, number of rehabilitation......AIM: Identify injury-related, patient-reported and treatment-related prognostic factors for 5-year outcomes in acutely ACL-ruptured individuals managed with early reconstruction plus exercise therapy, exercise therapy plus delayed reconstruction or exercise therapy alone. METHODS: Exploratory...... was a prognostic factor for less knee symptoms compared with early reconstruction plus exercise therapy (regression coefficient 10.1, 95% CI 2.3 to 17.9). Baseline meniscus lesion was associated with worse sport/recreation function (-14.4, 95% CI -27.6 to -1.3) and osteochondral lesions were associated with worse...

  1. Timing of surgery in anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelbourne, K D; Patel, D V

    1995-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the surgical techniques of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the past two decades, there is no consensus of opinion as to the ideal timing for ACL surgery. Based on the evolution of management of patients with ACL injuries over the period 1982-1994, we have found that various factors need to be considered in order to provide the best possible long-term result to the patient with minimal or no complications. In this review, we discuss the perioperative factors that one must consider to determine optimum timing for ACL surgery. Factors such as mental preparation of the patient; school, work, family, and social schedules; preoperative condition of the knee [i.e., minimal or no swelling, good strength, good leg control, and full range of motion (ROM) including full hyperextension]; and associated ligamentous and/or meniscal injuries must be considered before undertaking ACL surgery. With careful consideration of the above-mentioned factors and with our preoperative and postoperative rehabilitation program, we have been able to obtain predictable, successful, long-term results following ACL reconstruction in our athletic population. We emphasize that every patient should be treated on his or her own merit, and treatment decisions must be individualized.

  2. Injured pedestrians in Cape Town - the role of alcohol | Peden ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To establish a profile of injured adult pedestrians and attempt to define the role which alcohol plays in this regard. Design. Prospective survey of injured pedestrians who presented consecutively over 9 weeks to Groote Schuur Hospital. Data on fatally injured pedestrians were retrospectively collected from the ...

  3. Comparison of ACL strain estimated via a data-driven model with in vitro measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinhandl, Joshua T; Hoch, Matthew C; Bawab, Sebastian Y; Ringleb, Stacie I

    2016-11-01

    Computer modeling and simulation techniques have been increasingly used to investigate anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loading during dynamic activities in an attempt to improve our understanding of injury mechanisms and development of injury prevention programs. However, the accuracy of many of these models remains unknown and thus the purpose of this study was to compare estimates of ACL strain from a previously developed three-dimensional, data-driven model with those obtained via in vitro measurements. ACL strain was measured as the knee was cycled from approximately 10° to 120° of flexion at 20 deg s(-1) with static loads of 100, 50, and 50 N applied to the quadriceps, biceps femoris and medial hamstrings (semimembranosus and semitendinosus) tendons, respectively. A two segment, five-degree-of-freedom musculoskeletal knee model was then scaled to match the cadaver's anthropometry and in silico ACL strains were then determined based on the knee joint kinematics and moments of force. Maximum and minimum ACL strains estimated in silico were within 0.2 and 0.42% of that measured in vitro, respectively. Additionally, the model estimated ACL strain with a bias (mean difference) of -0.03% and dynamic accuracy (rms error) of 0.36% across the flexion-extension cycle. These preliminary results suggest that the proposed model was capable of estimating ACL strains during a simple flexion-extension cycle. Future studies should validate the model under more dynamic conditions with variable muscle loading. This model could then be used to estimate ACL strains during dynamic sporting activities where ACL injuries are more common.

  4. Mechanisms, Prediction, and Prevention of ACL Injuries: Cut Risk With Three Sharpened and Validated Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Timothy E.; Myer, Gregory D.; Ford, Kevin R.; Paterno, Mark V.; Quatman, Carmen E.

    2017-01-01

    Economic and societal pressures influence modern medical practice to develop and implement prevention strategies. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury devastates the knee joint leading to short term disability and long term sequelae. Due to the high risk of long term osteoarthritis in all treatment populations following ACL injury, prevention is the only effective intervention for this life-altering disruption in knee health. The “Sequence of Prevention” Model provides a framework to monitor progress towards the ultimate goal of preventing ACL injuries. Utilizing this model, our multidisciplinary collaborative research team has spent the last decade working to delineate injury mechanisms, identify injury risk factors, predict which athletes are at-risk for injury, and develop ACL injury prevention programs. Within this model of injury prevention, modifiable factors (biomechanical and neuromuscular) related to injury mechanisms likely provide the best opportunity for intervention strategies aimed to decrease the risk of ACL injury, particularly in female athletes. Knowledge advancements have led to the development of potential solutions that allow athletes to compete with lowered risk of ACL injury. Design and integration of personalized clinical assessment tools and targeted prevention strategies for athletes at high risk for ACL injury may transform current prevention practices and ultimately significantly reduce ACL injury incidence. This 2016 OREF Clinical Research Award focuses on the authors' work and contributions to the field. The author's acknowledge the many research groups who have contributed to the current state of knowledge in the fields of ACL injury mechanisms, injury risk screening and injury prevention strategies. PMID:27612195

  5. Cadaverous Particles and Infection in Injured Man,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    A D-A 277 941 E J Surg 159: 515-520, 1993 CADAVEROUS PARTICLES AND INFECTION IN INJURED MAN*D T IC Clinical Review based on the Semmelweis Lecture WM...systemic hematogencus dissemination of bacteria versary year of the publication of his findings in Die which had invaded tissue from an infected wound...surgical infections to evaluate therapeutic interventions (35). The effec- and the importance of " cadaverous particles" in the tiveness of topical

  6. Kinematics of the ACL-deficient canine knee during gait: serial changes over two years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashman, Scott; Anderst, William; Kolowich, Patricia; Havstad, Suzanne; Arnoczky, Steven

    2004-09-01

    The ACL-deficient dog is a model for investigating the development and progression of mechanically driven osteoarthrosis of the knee. ACL loss creates dynamic instability in the ACL-deficient knee which presumably leads to progressive joint degeneration, but the nature of this instability over the time course of disease development is not well understood. The goal of this study was to characterize three-dimensional motion of the canine knee during gait, before and serially for two years after ACL transection. Canine tibial-femoral kinematics were assessed during treadmill gait before and serially for two years after ACL transection (ACL-D group; 18 dogs) or sham transection (ACL-I group; five dogs). Kinematic data was collected at 250 frames/s using a biplane video-radiographic system. Six degree-of-freedom motions of the tibia relative to the femur were calculated, and values immediately prior to pawstrike as well as the maximum, minimum, midpoint and range of motion during early/mid stance were extracted. Between-group differences relative to baseline (pre-transection) values, as well as changes over time post-transection, were determined with a repeated-measures ANCOVA. In the ACL-D group, peak anterior tibial translation (ATT) increased by 10 mm (p knee adduction also increased significantly over time (mean increase 3.0 degrees; p = 0.036). All changes occurred primarily between 6 and 12 months. There were no significant differences between groups in the transverse plane, and no significant changes over time in the ACL-I group. In summary, peak anterior tibial translation and coronal-plane instability increased immediately after ACL loss, and did not improve with time. ATT just prior to pawstrike and mean knee adduction throughout stance became progressively more abnormal with time, with the greatest changes occurring between 6 and 12 months after ACL transection. This may be due to overload failure of secondary restraints such as the medial meniscus, which has

  7. Muscle function is associated with future patient-reported outcomes in young adults with ACL injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flosadottir, Vala; Roos, Ewa M; Ageberg, Eva

    2016-01-01

    extremity muscle function and PROs after ACL injury. METHODS: Fifty-four participants (15 women, mean 30 years) with ACL injury or reconstruction, from the Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Nonsurgical versus Surgical Treatment (KANON) trial (ISRCTN84752559), were assessed with hop performance, muscle power......BACKGROUND/AIM: Consequences of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury include worse patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and a decrease in activity level. Muscle function can be improved by targeted exercise. Our aims were to investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations among lower...

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and chronically injured adult rat spinal cord in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guizar-Sahagun, G. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Clinical Research in Neurology and Neurosurgery, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Inst. Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico City (Mexico)); Rivera, F. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico)); Babinski, E. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico)); Berlanga, E. (Dept. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico City (Mexico)); Madrazo, M. (Dept. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico City (Mexico)); Franco-Bourland, R. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Biochemistry, Inst. Nacional de la Nutricion, Mexico City (Mexico)); Grijalva, I. (Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Clinical Research in Neurology and Neurosurgery, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo

    1994-08-01

    We assessed the capacity of MRI to show and characterise the spinal cord (SC) in vivo in normal and chronically injured adult rats. In the chronically injured animals the SC was studied by MRI and histological examination. MRI was performed at 1.5 T, using gradient-echo and spin-echo (SE) sequences, the latter with and without gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). Several positions were tried for good alignment and to diminish interference by respiratory movements. Images of the SC were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. Normal SC was observed as a continuous intensity in both sequences, although contrast resolution was better using SE; it was not possible to differentiate the grey and white matter. Low signal was seen in the damaged area in chronically injured rats, which corresponded to cysts, trabeculae, mononuclear infiltrate, and fibroglial wall on histological examination. Gd-DTPA failed to enhance the SC in normal or chronically injured rats. It did, however, cause enhancement of the lesion after acute SC injury. (orig.)

  9. Effects of a Knee Extension Constraint Brace on Lower Extremity Movements after ACL Reconstruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stanley, Christopher J; Creighton, R Alexander; Gross, Michael T; Garrett, William E; Yu, Bing

    2011-01-01

    ... loading.We determined the effects of a knee extension constraint brace on knee flexion angle, peak posterior ground reaction force, and movement speed in functional activities of patients after ACL...

  10. Relationship jump-landing technique and neuropsychological characteristics, implications for ACL injury prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Gokeler; Anne Benjaminse; N. Cortes; M. Meier

    2014-01-01

    Abstract from the IOC World Conference on Prevention of Injury & Illness in Sport, Monaco 2014 Background: Neuropsychological capabilities in athletes may be associated with a predisposition to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Objective: Assess differences between male and female athletes

  11. Relationship jump-landing technique and neuropsychological characteristics, implications for acl injury prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjaminse, A.; Meijer, M.; Cortes, N.; Gokeler, A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuropsychological capabilities in athletes may be associated with a predisposition to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. OBJECTIVE: Assess differences between male and female athletes in jump-landing technique in relation to their neuropsychological capabilities. DESIGN:

  12. Quadriceps function following ACL reconstruction and rehabilitation : implications for optimisation of current practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gokeler, Alli; Bisschop, Marsha; Benjaminse, Anne; Myer, Greg D.; Eppinga, Peter; Otten, Egbert

    To determine the most effective practices for quadriceps strengthening after ACL reconstruction. An electronic search has been performed for the literature appearing from January 1990 to January 2012. Inclusion criteria were articles written in English, German or Dutch with unilateral

  13. TRANSTIBIAL VERSUS ANTEROMEDIAL PORTAL TECHNIQUES IN ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gabriel Betoni Guglielmetti

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Although the results of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction are well documented in many studies, with good to excellent outcomes in most cases, some issues like tunnel positioning are still discussed and studied. Objective: To compare the objective and subjective clinical outcomes of ACL reconstruction using the transtibial and anteromedial portal techniques. Methods: Prospective randomized study of 80 patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by the same surgeon, with 40 patients operated by the transtibial technique and 40 by anteromedial portal technique. The patients, 34 in the transtibial group and 37 in the anteromedial portal group (nine dropouts, were reassessed during a 2-year follow-up period. The clinical assessment consisted of physical examination, KT-1000TM evaluation, Lysholm score, and objective and subjective International Knee Documentation Committee - IKDC scores. Results: Regarding the Lachman and pivot shift tests, we observed more cases of instability in the transtibial group, but with no statistical significance (p=0.300 and p=0.634, respectively. Regarding the anterior drawer test, the groups presented similar results (p=0.977. Regarding KT-1000TM evaluation, the mean results were 1.44 for the transtibial group and 1.23 for the anteromedial portal group, with no statistical significance (p=0.548. We separated the objective IKDC scores into two groups: Group 1, IKDC A, and Group 2, IKDC B, C, or D, with no statistical significance (p=0.208. Concerning the Lysholm score, the transtibial group had a mean score of 91.32, and the anteromedial portal group had a mean score of 92.81. The mean subjective IKDC scores were 90.65 for the transtibial group and 92.65 for the anteromedial portal group. Three re-ruptures were encountered in the transtibial group and three in the anteromedial portal group. Conclusions: There were no significant differences in the subjective and

  14. ACL Tears in School-Aged Children and Adolescents Over 20 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Nicholas A; Lawrence, J Todd R; Nordin, James D; DeFor, Terese A; Tompkins, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are thought to occur with increasing frequency in young patients. No study has shown increased incidence over time. We hypothesized the incidence of ACL tears in young patients has increased over the past 20 years. This descriptive epidemiology study is a retrospective review of insurance billing data of all patients aged 6 to 18 years with Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Revision codes for ACL tear and reconstruction or International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes from 1994 to 2013. Injuries were normalized to persons per year enrolled in the insurance database based on age and sex. Analysis was performed based on sex and age (6-14, 15-16, and 17-18 years). The rate of ACL tears per 100 000 person-years averaged 121 ± 19 (range 92-151). All trends increased significantly except for the male 6- to 14-year-old and 17- to 18-year-old age groups. Overall there was an annual increase of 2.3%. Females had significantly higher incidence except in the 17- to 18-year-olds. Females peaked at age 16 years and males at age 17 years, with rates of 392 ACL tears and 422 ACL tears per 100 000 person-years, respectively. The incidence of ACL tears in pediatric patients increased over the last 20 years. Females were at higher risk except in the 17- to 18-year -old group. Peak incidence is noted during high school years. These data help target the most at-risk patients for ACL prevention programs. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Restoring tibiofemoral alignment during ACL reconstruction results in better knee biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Zampeli, Frantzeska; Terzidis, Ioannis; Mendes, João de Espregueira; Georgoulis, Jim-Dimitris; Bernard, Manfred; Pappas, Evangelos; Georgoulis, Anastasios D.

    2017-01-01

    "Published online: 24 October 2017" PURPOSE: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (ACLR) aims to restore normal knee joint function, stability and biomechanics and in the long term avoid joint degeneration. The purpose of this study is to present the anatomic single bundle (SB) ACLR that emphasizes intraoperative correction of tibiofemoral subluxation that occurs after ACL injury. It was hypothesized that this technique leads to optimal outcomes and better restoration of path...

  16. Spontaneous healing of bucket handle tear of the medial meniscus associated with ACL tear

    OpenAIRE

    Rabelo,Neiffer Nunes; Rabelo,Nícollas Nunes; Cunha,Aluísio Augusto Gonçalves; Correia,Francisco

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of injury of the medial bucket handle meniscal tears (BH), which resolved spontaneously, in association with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The patient twisted his left knee during a fight in martial arts, progressing to pain and joint locking and a sense of distortion. In NMR it could be seen bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus with displacement of the fragment to the intercondylar region, rupture of the lateral meniscus and ACL tear. After conservative treat...

  17. Torn ACL: A New Bioengineered Substitute Brought from the Laboratory to the Knee Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine Goulet

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries occur at an annual rate of 120 000 in the USA, and many need reconstructive surgery. We report successful results at 1–13 months following implantation of bioengineered ACL (bACL in goats. A bACL has been developed using autologous ACL cells, a collagen matrix and bone plugs. The extremities of the bACL were fully integrated into the femur and tibia of the host. Vascularisation of the grafts was extensive 1 month post-surgery and improved with time. At 6 months post-grafting, histological and ultrastructural observations demonstrated a highly organised ligamentous structure, rich in type I collagen fibres and fibroblasts. At the implants' insertion sites, characteristic fibrocartilage was observed having well aligned chondrocytes and collagen fibrils. After a year, mechanical rupture of the grafts demonstrated a major gain in strength. Eventual applications of this new technology in humans include multiple uses in orthopaedic, dental and reconstructive surgeries.

  18. Non-contact ACL injuries in female athletes: an International Olympic Committee current concepts statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renstrom, P; Ljungqvist, A; Arendt, E; Beynnon, B; Fukubayashi, T; Garrett, W; Georgoulis, T; Hewett, T E; Johnson, R; Krosshaug, T; Mandelbaum, B; Micheli, L; Myklebust, G; Roos, E; Roos, H; Schamasch, P; Shultz, S; Werner, S; Wojtys, E; Engebretsen, L

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury remains high in young athletes. Because female athletes have a much higher incidence of ACL injuries in sports such as basketball and team handball than male athletes, the IOC Medical Commission invited a multidisciplinary group of ACL expert clinicians and scientists to (1) review current evidence including data from the new Scandinavian ACL registries; (2) critically evaluate high-quality studies of injury mechanics; (3) consider the key elements of successful prevention programmes; (4) summarise clinical management including surgery and conservative management; and (5) identify areas for further research. Risk factors for female athletes suffering ACL injury include: (1) being in the preovulatory phase of the menstrual cycle compared with the postovulatory phase; (2) having decreased intercondylar notch width on plain radiography; and (3) developing increased knee abduction moment (a valgus intersegmental torque) during impact on landing. Well-designed injury prevention programmes reduce the risk of ACL for athletes, particularly women. These programmes attempt to alter dynamic loading of the tibiofemoral joint through neuromuscular and proprioceptive training. They emphasise proper landing and cutting techniques. This includes landing softly on the forefoot and rolling back to the rearfoot, engaging knee and hip flexion and, where possible, landing on two feet. Players are trained to avoid excessive dynamic valgus of the knee and to focus on the “knee over toe position” when cutting. PMID:18539658

  19. Dynamic knee stability and ballistic knee movement after ACL reconstruction: an application on instep soccer kick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Nuno; Cortes, Nelson; Fernandes, Orlando; Diniz, Ana; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    The instep soccer kick is a pre-programmed ballistic movement with a typical agonist-antagonist coordination pattern. The coordination pattern of the kick can provide insight into deficient neuromuscular control. The purpose of this study was to investigate knee kinematics and hamstrings/quadriceps coordination pattern during the knee ballistic extension phase of the instep kick in soccer players after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL reconstruction). Seventeen players from the Portuguese Soccer League participated in this study. Eight ACL-reconstructed athletes (experimental group) and 9 healthy individuals (control group) performed three instep kicks. Knee kinematics (flexion and extension angles at football contact and maximum velocity instants) were calculated during the kicks. Rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, biceps femoralis, and semitendinosus muscle activations were quantified during the knee extension phase. The ACL-reconstructed group had significantly lower knee extension angle (-1.2 ± 1.6, p angle and RF muscle activation while performing an instep kick. These findings are in accordance with the knee stability recovery process after ACL reconstruction. No differences were observed in the ballistic control movement pattern between normal and ACL-reconstructed subjects. Performing open kinetic chain exercises using ballistic movements can be beneficial when recovering from ACL reconstruction. The exercises should focus on achieving multi-joint coordination and full knee extension (range of motion). III.

  20. Non-contact ACL injuries in female athletes: an International Olympic Committee current concepts statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renstrom, P; Ljungqvist, A; Arendt, E; Beynnon, B; Fukubayashi, T; Garrett, W; Georgoulis, T; Hewett, T E; Johnson, R; Krosshaug, T; Mandelbaum, B; Micheli, L; Myklebust, G; Roos, E; Roos, H; Schamasch, P; Shultz, S; Werner, S; Wojtys, E; Engebretsen, L

    2008-06-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury remains high in young athletes. Because female athletes have a much higher incidence of ACL injuries in sports such as basketball and team handball than male athletes, the IOC Medical Commission invited a multidisciplinary group of ACL expert clinicians and scientists to (1) review current evidence including data from the new Scandinavian ACL registries; (2) critically evaluate high-quality studies of injury mechanics; (3) consider the key elements of successful prevention programmes; (4) summarise clinical management including surgery and conservative management; and (5) identify areas for further research. Risk factors for female athletes suffering ACL injury include: (1) being in the preovulatory phase of the menstrual cycle compared with the postovulatory phase; (2) having decreased intercondylar notch width on plain radiography; and (3) developing increased knee abduction moment (a valgus intersegmental torque) during impact on landing. Well-designed injury prevention programmes reduce the risk of ACL for athletes, particularly women. These programmes attempt to alter dynamic loading of the tibiofemoral joint through neuromuscular and proprioceptive training. They emphasise proper landing and cutting techniques. This includes landing softly on the forefoot and rolling back to the rearfoot, engaging knee and hip flexion and, where possible, landing on two feet. Players are trained to avoid excessive dynamic valgus of the knee and to focus on the "knee over toe position" when cutting.

  1. A novel first aid stretcher for immobilization and transportation of spine injured patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Sheng Liu

    Full Text Available Effective immobilization and transportation are vital to the life-saving acute medical care needed when treating critically injured people. However, the most common types of stretchers used today are wrought with problems that can lead to further medical complications, difficulty in employment and rescue, and ineffective transitions to hospital treatment. Here we report a novel first aid stretcher called the "emergency carpet", which solves these problems with a unique design for spine injured patients. Polyurethane composite material, obtained by a novel process of manually mixing isocyanate and additives, can be poured into a specially designed fabric bag and allowed to harden to form a rigid human-shaped stretcher. The effectiveness of the emergency carpet was examined in the pre-hospital management of victims with spinal fractures. Additionally, it was tested on flat ground and complex terrain as well as in the sea and air. We demonstrated that the emergency carpet can be assembled and solidified on the scene in 5 minutes, providing effective immobilization to the entire injured body. With the protection of the emergency carpet, none of the 20 patients, who were finally confirmed to have spinal column fracture or dislocation, had any neurological deterioration during transportation. Furthermore, the carpet can be handled and transported by multiple means under differing conditions, without compromising immobilization. Finally, the emergency carpet allows the critically injured patient to receive multiple examinations such as X-ray, CT, and MRI without being removed from the carpet. Our results demonstrate that the emergency carpet has ideal capabilities for immobilization, extrication, and transportation of the spine injured patients. Compared with other stretchers, it allows for better mobility, effective immobilization, remarkable conformity to the body, and various means for transportation. The emergency carpet is promising for its

  2. Primary repair plus intra-articular iliotibial band augmentation in the treatment of an acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture. A follow-up study of 70 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natri, A; Järvinen, M; Kannus, P

    1996-01-01

    Between September 1987 and November 1989, we treated 90 consecutive patients with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture with the multiple suture technique and iliotibial band augmentation. Seventy of these patients were re-examined 2 to 5 years after the operation (mean 3.5 years), the examination consisting of a questionnaire, clinical examination, laxity tests with the KSS machine (Acufex), radiological examination and isokinetic muscle strength testing (Cybex 6000). There were 32 men and 38 women (mean age 34 years). The injury was sustained in sports in 44 (63%) cases, and the sports most frequently involved were downhill skiing (18 cases), soccer (9 cases) and volleyball (5 cases). Of the injuries, 38 were isolated ACL ruptures and 31, ACL ruptures combined with a medial CL rupture. In 9 cases, an additional meniscus injury and in one case an additional posterior CL - lateral CL rupture was found. At the follow-up, 55 patients (79%) were satisfied with the end result, and according to our objective functional criteria 55 (79%) had an excellent or good outcome. According to the Lysholm score, 53 (76%) patients were excellent or good (> or = 82 points). In the Lachman test, 29 knees (41%) were completely stable. The Lachman test was mildy positive in 40 knees (57%) (36 had 1+ laxity and 4, 2+ laxity), and one patient had 3+ laxity with a hard end-point. Similarly, the anterior drawer test was negative in 53 knees (76%), and the other 17 (24%) had mild laxity (16 had 1+ laxity and 1, 2+ laxity). The total anterior-posterior laxity measured with the KSS averaged 9.7 +/- 3.5 mm in the injured knee and 7.3 + 3.0 mm in the uninjured knee (the laxity measured at a knee angle of 20 degrees of flexion). Corresponding values at a knee angle of 90 degrees of flexion were 6.1 +/- 2.4 mm and 4.7 +/- 1.9 mm, respectively. The pivot shift test was negative in 62 patients (89%) and 1+ positive in the remaining 8 patients (11%). Fifty-eight patients (83%) had full

  3. MRI-Based Assessment of Lower Extremity Muscle Volumes in Patients Before and After ACL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norte, Grant E; Knaus, Katherine R; Kuenze, Chris; Handsfield, Geoffrey G; Meyer, Craig H; Blemker, Silvia S; Hart, Joseph M

    2017-03-14

    Study of muscle volumes in patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction (ACL-R) is largely limited to cross-sectional assessment of the thigh musculature, which may inadequately describe post-traumatic and post-surgical muscle function. No studies have prospectively examined the influence of ACL injury and reconstruction on lower extremity muscle volumes. Assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) derived lower extremity muscle volumes, and quantify quadriceps strength and activation in patients following ACL injury and reconstruction. Prospective case series. Research laboratory and MRI facility. Patients (or Other Participants): Four patients (2 males, 2 females, age = 27.4 ± 7.4, height = 169.2 ± 8.1 cm, mass = 74.3 ± 18.5 kg) scheduled for ACL-R. 35 muscle volumes were obtained from a bilateral lower extremity MRI before and after ACL-R. Muscle volumes expressed relative to (1) a normative database pre-and-post-surgery, (2) limb symmetry pre-and-post-surgery, and (3) percentage change pre-to-post-surgery. Quadriceps function was quantified by normalized knee extension maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque and central activation ratio (CAR). Involved vastus lateralis and tibialis anterior were consistently smaller than healthy individuals (Zmuscle volumes exceeded 20% asymmetry post-operatively. Involved gracilis and semitendinosus atrophied more than 30% from pre-to-post-surgery. Involved MVIC torque and CAR increased by 12.7% and 12.5% respectively, yet strength remained 33.2% asymmetric post-surgery. Adaptations in lower extremity muscle volumes are present following ACL injury and reconstruction. Anterior thigh and shank muscles were smaller than healthy individuals, and large asymmetries in quadriceps volumes were observed pre- and post-surgery. Selective atrophy of the semitendinosus and gracilis occurred following surgery. Volumetric deficits of the quadriceps musculature may exist despite improvements in

  4. Translation and measurement properties of the Swedish version of ACL-Return to Sports after Injury questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, J; Österberg, A; Gauffin, H; Tagesson, S; Webster, K; Ardern, C

    2013-10-01

    Psychological factors may be a hindrance for returning to sport after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The ACL-Return to Sport after Injury scale (ACL-RSI) measures athletes' emotions, confidence in performance, and risk appraisal in relation to return to sport. The aim of this study was to translate the ACL-RSI scale from English to Swedish and to examine some of the measurement properties of the Swedish version. The ACL-RSI was translated and culturally adapted. A professional expert group and five patients evaluated face validity. One hundred and eighty-two patients completed the translated ACL-RSI, a project-specific questionnaire, the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), the Knee-Self-Efficacy Scale (K-SES), the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC-C), the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Quality of Life (ACL-QoL) questionnaires. Fifty-three patients answered the ACL-RSI twice to examine reproducibility. The ACL-RSI showed good face validity, internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.948), low floor and ceiling effects and high construct validity when evaluated against the TSK, K-SES, MHLC-C, KOOS, and ACL-QoL scales. The reproducibility was also high (intra-class correlation = 0.893). Therefore, the ACL-RSI can be used to evaluate psychological factors relevant to returning to sport after ACL reconstruction surgery. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. ACL status in arthroplasty patients, why not to preserve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelbadie Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Only 70–85% of patients that had total knee arthroplasty (TKA are satisfied with their knees. The need for a near to normal knee kinematics is crucial and maybe the solution to their needs. Addressing the cruciate ligaments during surgery along with the extent of arthrosis may give a solution to this problem. Material and methods: One hundred consecutive patients in whom a total knee arthroplasty was indicated and performed were prospectively documented. During the knee replacement surgery, the condition of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments and the degree of osteoarthritis (OA in the medial and lateral compartments as well as in the patello-femoral joint were documented using the Outerbridge classification. The patients’ average age was 72.3 years, with the majority being female. In all patients, a total bi-compartmental knee replacement was indicated. Results: Our results showed that in 78% of all patients the anterior, and in 98% the posterior cruciate ligament was still intact. Seventy-one percent of cases suffered from grade 4 medial osteoarthritis, 19% from grade 3 and 10% from grade 2. Thirty-six of patients suffered from grade 4 lateral osteoarthritis, 36% from grade 3, 24% from grade 2 and 4% from grade 1. Grade 4 patello-femoral osteoarthritis was present in 32% of all patients, grade 3 in 60% and grade 2 in 8% of all patients. Discussion: The goal of arthroplasty is to approximate the function of a normal knee. The retention of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL allows for better knee, kinematics, improved proprioception, increased flexion and an overall improvement in knee function. The decreased constraint that is possible with retention of both cruciates may decrease implant stresses and improve the implant survivorship. The distribution of OA shows that the medial and patello-femoral compartments of the joint are primarily affected. This could also allow for a more conservative and patient

  6. The role of resilience in rebuilding lives of injured veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, K-L; Ousey, K

    2016-10-02

    The aim of this commentary is to discuss potential clinical implications of introducing resilience-building interventions into care for veterans who are living with a war wound. Some war veterans are expected to live with a wound upon discharge from an active military role and also to fit into civilian life. These lifestyle adjustments can tax the person's coping abilities and in that context may hinder successful adaptation. The experience of living with a wound or wounds, either acute or chronic, is connected to losses, including loss of mobility, loss of financial capacity (unable to work at times) and losses attached to changed social roles. Psychological stress is also a common experience for veterans returning to civilian life. Psychological stress is associated with impaired wound healing. Modern health practice is centred on symptom reduction and working with pathology, however, working with people's adaptive behaviours such as resilience has not been considered. Using the resilience model as a conceptual framework health-care professionals can engage with veterans towards resilience within the context of their personal experience of ill health. Using this contemporary framework for considering these aspects of care has the potential to facilitate resistance to stressors associated with being injured, possibly preventing quality-of-life impairments. There are no declarations of interest.

  7. Lactate and the injured brain: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzat, Pierre; Oddo, Mauro

    2014-04-01

    Energy metabolism is increasingly recognized as a key factor in the pathogenesis of acute brain injury (ABI). We review the role of cerebral lactate metabolism and summarize evidence showing that lactate may act as supplemental fuel after ABI. The role of cerebral lactate has shifted from a waste product to a potentially preferential fuel and signaling molecule. According to the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle model, glycolytic lactate might act as glucose-sparing substrate. Lactate also is emerging as a key signal to regulate cerebral blood flow (CBF) and a neuroprotective agent after experimental ABI. Clinical investigation using cerebral microdialysis shows the existence of two main lactate patterns, ischemic - from anaerobic metabolism - and nonischemic, from activated glycolysis, whereby lactate can be used as supplemental energy fuel. Preliminary clinical data suggests hypertonic lactate solutions improve cerebral energy metabolism and are an effective treatment for elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) after ABI. Lactate can be a supplemental fuel for the injured brain and is important to regulate glucose metabolism and CBF. Exogenous lactate supplementation may be neuroprotective after experimental ABI. Recent clinical data from ABI patients suggest hypertonic lactate solutions may be a valid therapeutic option for secondary energy dysfunction and elevated ICP.

  8. Retaliatory attitudes and violent behaviors among assault-injured youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland-Linder, Nikeea; Johnson, Sara B; Haynie, Denise L; Chung, Shang-en; Cheng, Tina L

    2012-03-01

    To examine the effect of retaliatory attitudes on subsequent violent behavior and fight-related injuries among youth who presented to the emergency department with assault injuries. Assault-injured youth were interviewed at baseline, 6 months, and 18 months to assess fighting behavior, retaliatory attitudes, weapon carrying, and injury history as part of a larger randomized control trial. Two emergency departments in urban areas were selected for the study. A total of 129 adolescents aged 10-15 years were included in the study. Fighting behavior, assault injury, weapon carrying, and aggressive behavior. Higher retaliatory attitudes at baseline were associated with more aggression and a higher frequency of fighting over time. Retaliatory attitudes may fuel cycles of violence among youth. Medical professionals in acute care settings have an opportunity to identify youths at risk of future assault injury by assessing retaliation, providing anticipatory guidance, and referring to intervention programs. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Lessons learned from the last 20 years of ACL-related in vivo-biomechanics research of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Evangelos; Zampeli, Franceska; Xergia, Sofia A; Georgoulis, Anastasios D

    2013-04-01

    Technological advances in recent years have allowed the easy and accurate assessment of knee motion during athletic activities. Subsequently, thousands of studies have been published that greatly improved our understanding of the aetiology, surgical reconstruction techniques and prevention of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence from biomechanical studies on ACL-related research. High-impact articles that enhanced understanding of ACL injury aetiology, rehabilitation, prevention and adaptations after reconstruction were selected. The importance of restoring internal tibial rotation after ACL reconstruction has emerged in several studies. Criteria-based, individualized rehabilitation protocols have replaced the traditional time-based protocols. Excessive knee valgus, poor trunk control, excessive quadriceps forces and leg asymmetries have been identified as potential high risk biomechanical factors for ACL tear. Injury prevention programmes have emerged as low cost and effective means of preventing ACL injuries, particularly in female athletes. As a result of biomechanical research, clinicians have a better understanding of ACL injury aetiology, prevention and rehabilitation. Athletes exhibiting neuromuscular deficits predisposing them to ACL injury can be identified and enrolled into prevention programmes. Clinicians should assess ACL-reconstructed patients for excessive internal tibial rotation that may lead to poor outcomes.

  10. The concept of double bundle ACL simulation with a single bundle patellar tendon graft. A cadaveric feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Matthias; Magnussen, Robert A; Villa, Vincent; Demey, Guillaume; Neyret, Philippe

    2012-06-07

    There is significant interest in the restoration of the double-bundle anatomy of the native ACL when performing ACL reconstruction. Possible techniques include those utilizing two separate grafts with independent tunnels and those that attempt to mimic this anatomy with a single graft and fewer tunnels. Many of the latter techniques require specific instrumentation and are technically challenging. We demonstrate that the double-bundle anatomy of the native ACL can theoretically be mimicked by a single-bundle reconstruction. We performed single bundle ACL reconstruction with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) graft in two cadaveric knees. Both grafts were placed to mimic the native ACL footprints - one reconstruction was performed with rectangular bone blocks and oval tunnels and one was performed utilizing a standard BTB graft and round tunnels. Qualitative assessment of graft behavior was made as the knees were taken through a range of motion. The ACL graft was able to qualitatively mimic the behavior of the native ACL in both knees provided the bone blocks were correctly orientated. ACL reconstruction with a single BTB graft can qualitatively mimic the behavior of the two bundles of the native ACL. The key to ensuring this behavior was noted to be appropriate orientation of the graft in the tunnels. Quantitative biomechanical investigations are necessary to evaluate the impact of graft orientation on function.

  11. The concept of double bundle ACL simulation with a single bundle patellar tendon graft. A cadaveric feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobi Matthias

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is significant interest in the restoration of the double-bundle anatomy of the native ACL when performing ACL reconstruction. Possible techniques include those utilizing two separate grafts with independent tunnels and those that attempt to mimic this anatomy with a single graft and fewer tunnels. Many of the latter techniques require specific instrumentation and are technically challenging. We demonstrate that the double-bundle anatomy of the native ACL can theoretically be mimicked by a single-bundle reconstruction. Methods We performed single bundle ACL reconstruction with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB graft in two cadaveric knees. Both grafts were placed to mimic the native ACL footprints – one reconstruction was performed with rectangular bone blocks and oval tunnels and one was performed utilizing a standard BTB graft and round tunnels. Qualitative assessment of graft behavior was made as the knees were taken through a range of motion. Results The ACL graft was able to qualitatively mimic the behavior of the native ACL in both knees provided the bone blocks were correctly orientated. Conclusions ACL reconstruction with a single BTB graft can qualitatively mimic the behavior of the two bundles of the native ACL. The key to ensuring this behavior was noted to be appropriate orientation of the graft in the tunnels. Quantitative biomechanical investigations are necessary to evaluate the impact of graft orientation on function.

  12. Effects of maturation on combined female muscle strength and ACL structural factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, S P; McLean, S G

    2016-07-01

    Relations between lower limb muscle strength and female ACL injury risk are well documented. How these relations combine with key ACL geometries however, is unknown. Identifying how these combined factors are impacted by maturation would benefit current risk screening and prevention efforts. This study compared hamstrings and quadriceps strength and ACL cross sectional area (CSA) indices across three maturation groups. Cross-sectional human experimental. MRI scans of the dominant knee were collected in 35 females stratified into early (9.7±0.8yrs), middle (12.9±1.7yrs), and late (14.8±0.6yrs) maturation groups. Hamstring and quadriceps muscle volumes and ACL CSA measures were obtained. Isokinetic strength data were quantified for dominant knee flexors and extensors. Peak hamstring and quadriceps concentric and eccentric strength per unit volume magnitudes (QCSPV, HCSPV, QESPV, HESPV) were determined. Metrics and select ratios were submitted to a one way ANOVA to determine the main effect of maturation. Significant decreases occurred in HESPV (N/cm(3)) and ACL CSA (cm(2)/kgm), respectively, from early (0.188±0.023N/cm(3), 0.007±0.002cm(2)/kgm) to middle (0.157±0.029N/cm(3), 0.005±0.002cm(2)/kgm, p=0.034, p=0.029), and middle to late (0.132±0.031N/cm(3), 0.003±0.001cm(2)/kgm, p=0.044, p=0.018) maturation. A significant decrease in HESPV:QCSPV occurred between early (1.795±0.496) and middle (1.362±0.277, p=0.018) maturation. ACL CSA was significantly greater in late (37.26±13.35) compared to middle (25.81±9.17, p=0.021) maturation. Key ratios between female knee quadriceps and hamstring strength and ACL size parameters, which may directly impact ACL injury risk, are substantially different among three maturation states. The results are potentially hazardous strength mismatches in mid-pubertal females, where a smaller (weaker) ACL may be unable to stabilize quadriceps dominated loading strategies. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by

  13. Advances in the three-portal technique for anatomical single- or double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Paulo H; van Eck, Carola F; Macalena, Jeffrey A; Fu, Freddie H

    2011-08-01

    To describe the "three-portal technique for anatomical ACL single- or double-bundle reconstruction" and the arthroscopic viewing improvement provided by this technique. A "high" anterolateral portal was placed 1 cm lateral to the patellar tendon and the most inferior portion of the portal at the level of the inferior pole of the patella. A "central" portal was placed using a spinal needle under arthroscopic visualization following the orientation of the previous ACL fibers. An accessory medial portal was also placed using a spinal needle respecting a 2-mm distance to the medial femoral condyle. The "high" anterolateral portal permitted a broad and unobstructed view of the ACL tibial attachment. The "central" portal allowed a straightforward view of the ACL femoral remnant and bony landmarks in the intercondylar notch. The accessory medial portal enabled to reach the femoral native insertion site of the ACL. The three-portal technique provides a proper view of the soft tissue remnants and bony landmarks facilitating an anatomical positioning of the graft.

  14. Use of machine learning theory to predict the need for femoral nerve block following ACL repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, Patrick; Laduzenski, Sarah; Edwards, David; Ellis, Neal; Boezaart, Andre P; Aygtug, Haldun

    2011-10-01

    We report on a classification approach using machine learning (ML) algorithms for prediction of postoperative femoral nerve block (FNB) requirement following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. FNBs are commonly performed for ACL reconstruction to control postoperative pain. Ideally, anesthesiologists would target preoperative FNB only to ACL reconstruction patients expected to experience severe postoperative pain. Perioperative factors associated with postoperative FNB placement following ACL reconstruction remain unclear, may differ among separate surgical facilities, and render such predictions difficult. We conducted a chart review of 349 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction at a single outpatient surgical facility. Standard perioperative data commonly available during routine preoperative examination were recorded. ML classifiers based on logistic regression, BayesNet, multilayer perceptron, support vector machine, and alternating decision tree (ADTree) algorithms were then developed to predict which patients would require postoperative FNB. Each of the ML algorithms outperformed traditional logistic regression using a very limited data set as measured by the area under the receiver operating curve, with ADTree achieving the highest score of 0.7 in the cross-validated sample. Logistic regression outperformed all other classifiers with regard to kappa statistics and percent correctly classified. All models were prone to overfitting in comparisons of training vs cross-validated samples. ML classifiers may offer improved predictive capabilities when analyzing medical data sets compared with traditional statistical methodologies in predicting severe postoperative pain requiring peripheral nerve block. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Biomechanics of passive knee joint in drawer: load transmission in intact and ACL-deficient joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglo, K E; Shirazi-Adl, A

    2003-09-01

    A non-linear 3D finite element model of the passive human tibiofemoral knee joint consisting of two bony structures and their articular cartilage layers, menisci, and four principal ligaments was used to investigate the detailed response of the unconstrained joint under up to 100 N posterior femoral force at different flexion angles from 0 to 90 degrees. The analysis was repeated after the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The boundary conditions were selected to assure a stable and unconstrained response of the joint throughout the range of motion. The results indicated the ACL as the primary structure to resist the drawer load throughout the range of flexion considered and that the joint primary and coupled laxities substantially increased in its absence. At full extension under drawer, forces in collateral ligaments increased significantly resulting in larger overall contact forces as the ACL was transected. In the ACL-deficient joint, such large forces in collateral ligaments, however, diminished as flexion angle varied from 0 to 90 degrees. At full extension or flexion angles up to approximately 30 degrees, the medial meniscus and adjacent medial tibial and femoral cartilage layers were subjected to substantially larger loads and stresses following the transection of the ACL. Adequate consideration of such couplings is important in avoiding further damage to joint structures subsequent to an injury and restoring adequate function following injuries to primary components.

  16. Negative feedback regulation of auxin signaling by ATHB8/ACL5-BUD2 transcription module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baima, Simona; Forte, Valentina; Possenti, Marco; Peñalosa, Andrés; Leoni, Guido; Salvi, Sergio; Felici, Barbara; Ruberti, Ida; Morelli, Giorgio

    2014-06-01

    The role of auxin as main regulator of vascular differentiation is well established, and a direct correlation between the rate of xylem differentiation and the amount of auxin reaching the (pro)cambial cells has been proposed. It has been suggested that thermospermine produced by ACAULIS5 (ACL5) and bushy and dwarf2 (BUD2) is one of the factors downstream to auxin contributing to the regulation of this process in Arabidopsis. Here, we provide an in-depth characterization of the mechanism through which ACL5 modulates xylem differentiation. We show that an increased level of ACL5 slows down xylem differentiation by negatively affecting the expression of homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) III and key auxin signaling genes. This mechanism involves the positive regulation of thermospermine biosynthesis by the HD-ZIP III protein Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox8 tightly controlling the expression of ACL5 and BUD2. In addition, we show that the HD-ZIP III protein REVOLUTA contributes to the increased leaf vascularization and long hypocotyl phenotype of acl5 likely by a direct regulation of auxin signaling genes such as like auxin resistant2 (LAX2) and LAX3. We propose that proper formation and differentiation of xylem depend on a balance between positive and negative feedback loops operating through HD-ZIP III genes. © The Author 2014. Published by the Molecular Plant Shanghai Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of CSPB and IPPE, SIBS, CAS.

  17. Strength Asymmetry and Landing Mechanics at Return to Sport after ACL Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Laura C.; Paterno, Mark V.; Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evidence-based quadriceps femoris muscle (QF) strength guidelines for return to sport following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are lacking. This study investigated the impact of QF strength asymmetry on knee landing biomechanics at the time of return to sport following ACL reconstruction. Methods Seventy-seven individuals (17.4 years) at the time of return to sport following primary ACL reconstruction (ACLR group) and 47 uninjured control individuals (17.0 years) (CTRL group) participated. QF strength was assessed and Quadriceps Index calculated (QI = [involved strength/uninvolved strength]*100%). The ACLR group was sub-divided based on QI: High Quadriceps (HQ, QI≥90%) and Low-Quadriceps (LQ, QI.05). In the ACLR group, QF strength estimated limb symmetry during landing after controlling for graft type, meniscus injury, knee pain and symptoms. Conclusion At the time of return to sport, individuals post-ACL reconstruction with weaker QF demonstrate altered landing patterns. Conversely, those with nearly symmetrical QF strength demonstrate landing patterns similar to uninjured individuals. Consideration of an objective QF strength measure may aid clinical decision-making to optimize sports participation following ACL reconstruction. PMID:25373481

  18. Psychoactive substances in seriously injured drivers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Steentoft, Anni; Bernhoft, Inger Marie

    2013-01-01

    found to be above the Danish legal limit in 4.9% of injured drivers. Young men (median age 31 years) were over-represented among injured drivers who violated Danish law for alcohol and drugs. Diazepam (4.4%), tramadol (3.2%), and clonazepam (3.0%) were the medicinal drugs most frequently detected...

  19. Injured pedestrians in Cape Town - the role of alcohol

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    alcohol. Margaret M. Peden, John D. Knotlenbelt,. Johan van der Spuy, Ravi Oodit, Hendrik J. Scholtz,. J. Morris Stokol. Objective. To establish a profile of injured adult pedestrians and attempt to define the role which alcohol plays in this regard. Design. Prospective survey of injured pedestrians who presented consecutively ...

  20. What is the best candidate allograft for ACL reconstruction? An in vitro mechanical and histologic study in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jin; Thoreson, Andrew R; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-07-16

    The knee joint is generally characterized by very low friction and high wear resistance. Several previous studies have compared ACL with the commonly used allografts from tensile properties perspective. No study has reported about the graft tendons from a frictional perspective, which is an important parameter for ACL functional performance. Twenty hind legs were used to harvest FDP tendon, ACL, ACH, and patellar tendon. Samples were evaluated with surface friction testing, indentation testing for tendon compressive moduli, lubricin immunohistochemistry, and histologic analysis. Frictional force of FDP tendon and ACL was significantly less than that of patellar tendon and ACH at first and fifth cycles. At the tenth cycle, the FDP tendon, ACL, and ACH showed significantly less frictional force than patellar tendon; after 100 cycles, the FDP tendon and ACL showed significantly less frictional force than patellar tendon. The compressive moduli of the FDP tendon, ACL, and ACH were significantly greater than that of patellar tendon. Histologic results showed that FDP tendon and ACL had a smooth surface with a thin layer of epitenon cells; patellar tendon and ACH had a rough surface and a layer of paratenon. Lubricin was found on the surface and extracellular matrix of FDP tendon and ACL. There was only limited lubricin expression on the surface and extracellular matrix of the ACH and patellar tendon. The FDP tendon has friction force and lubricin expression similar to those of native ACL. However, patellar tendon and ACH show higher friction force and less lubricin expression than ACL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute non-contact anterior cruciate ligament tears are associated with relatively increased vastus medialis to semimembranosus cross-sectional area ratio: a case-control retrospective MR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieschhoff, Ged G.; Mandell, Jacob C.; Czuczman, Gregory J.; Nikac, Violeta; Shah, Nehal; Smith, Stacy E. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Hamstring muscle deficiency is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the vastus medialis to semimembranosus cross-sectional area (VM:SM CSA) ratio on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with ACL tears compared to controls. One hundred knee MRIs of acute ACL tear patients and 100 age-, sex-, and side-matched controls were included. Mechanism of injury, contact versus non-contact, was determined for each ACL tear subject. The VM:SM CSA was measured on individual axial slices with a novel method using image-processing software. One reader measured all 200 knees and the second reader measured 50 knees at random to assess inter-reader variability. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to evaluate for correlation between readers. T-tests were performed to evaluate for differences in VM:SM CSA ratios between the ACL tear group and control group. The ICC for agreement between the two readers was 0.991 (95% confidence interval 0.984-0.995). Acute ACL tear patients have an increased VM:SM CSA ratio compared to controls (1.44 vs. 1.28; p = 0.005). Non-contact acute ACL tear patients have an increased VM:SM CSA ratio compared to controls (1.48 vs. 1.20; p = 0.003), whereas contact acute ACL tear patients do not (1.23 vs. 1.26; p = 0.762). Acute non-contact ACL tears are associated with increased VM:SM CSA ratios, which may imply a relative deficiency in hamstring strength. This study also demonstrates a novel method of measuring the relative CSA of muscles on MRI. (orig.)

  2. Iliotibial band autograft versus bone-patella-tendon-bone autograft, a possible alternative for ACL reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensbirk, Frederik; Thorborg, Kristian; Konradsen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The long-term results after using the iliotibial band autograft (ITB) in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are not fully known. If equal in quality to conventional methods, the ITB graft could be a useful alternative as a primary graft, in revision surgery or multi-ligament...... reconstruction. Forty-nine participated at follow-up in 2010 (82%). Primary outcome was the failure rate after ACL reconstruction. Secondary outcomes were knee injury osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) [pain, symptoms, Sport/Rec, quality of life (QOL), daily living function], Tegner activity scale, anterior...... reconstruction. The purpose is to assess whether the ITB autograft is a long-term reliable alternative to the bone-patella-tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft, using a prospective randomized controlled trial design. METHODS: From 1995 to 1996, sixty patients scheduled for primary ACL reconstruction were included...

  3. Antagonist muscle moment is increased in ACL deficient subjects during maximal dynamic knee extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Magnusson, S Peter

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Coactivation of the hamstring muscles during dynamic knee extension may compensate for increased knee joint laxity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient subjects. This study examined if antagonist muscle coactivation during maximal dynamic knee extension was elevated...... in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency compared to age-matched healthy controls. METHODS: Electromyography (EMG) and net knee joint moments were recorded during maximal concentric quadriceps and eccentric hamstring contractions, performed in an isokinetic dynamometer (ROM: 90......-10°, angular speed: 30°/s). Hamstring antagonist EMG recorded during concentric quadriceps contraction was converted into antagonist moment based on the EMG-moment relationship observed during eccentric agonist contractions. RESULTS: The magnitude of antagonist hamstring EMG was 65.5% higher in ACL deficient...

  4. Preventive effect of phycocyanin from Spirulina platensis on alloxan-injured mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yu; Lin, Lin; Pan, Qin; Yang, Xuegan; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2012-11-01

    The preventive effect of phycocyanin (obtained from Spirulina platensis) on alloxan-injured mice is investigated. Oral administration of phycocyanin was started two weeks before an alloxan injury and continued until four weeks later. Tests resulted in the following positive results of oral phycocyanin administration on alloxan-injured mice: decrease fasting blood glucose and glycosylated serum protein (GSP); maintain total antioxidative capability (T-AOC); avert malondialdehyde (MDA) formation in the liver, kidney, and pancreas; decrease total cholesterol (TC) level and triglycerides (TG) level in serum and liver; increase the levels of hepatic glycogen level; maintain glucokinase (GK) expression in the liver and decrease p53 expression in the pancreas at mRNA level. The histological observations also supported the above results. Acute toxicity study further shows that phycocyanin is relatively safe. These results led to the conclusion that phycocyanin has significant preventive effect on alloxan-injured mice. The inhibition of p53 pathway could be one of the mechanisms that led to the protection of pancreatic islets from alloxan injury. We also proposed that GK expression that functions to promote liver glycogen synthesis could be the reason for reduced blood glucose level. The encouraging results are the first step in studying the potential of phycocyanin as a clinical measure in preventing diabetes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The importance of Blumensaat's line morphology for accurate femoral ACL footprint evaluation using the quadrant method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahagi, Yoshiyuki; Iriuchishima, Takanori; Horaguchi, Takashi; Suruga, Makoto; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Aizawa, Shin

    2017-03-10

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference in the center position of the ACL footprint based on grid placement using the quadrant method according to the morphological variations of the Blumensaat's line. Fifty-nine non-paired human cadaver knees were used. The ACL was cut in the middle, and the femoral bone was cut at the most proximal point of the femoral notch, and the digital images were evaluated using Image J software. The femoral ACL footprint was periphery outlined and the center position was automatically measured. Following Iriuchishima's classification, the morphology of the Blumensaat's line was classified into straight, small hill, and large hill types. From the images, grid quadrants were placed as: Grid (1) without consideration of hill existence and not including the chondral lesion. Grid (2) without consideration of hill existence and including the chondral lesion. Grid (3) with consideration of hill existence and not including the chondral lesion. Grid (4) with consideration of hill existence and including the chondral lesion. The straight type consisted of 19 knees, the small hill type 13 knees, and the large hill type 27 knees. Depending on the quadrant grid placement, significant center position difference was observed both in the shallow-deep, and high-low direction. When hill existence was considered, the center position of the ACL was significantly changed to a high position. The center position of the ACL footprint exhibited significant differences according to Blumensaat's line morphology. For clinical relevance, when ACL surgery is performed in knees with small or large hill type variations, surgeons should pay close attention to femoral tunnel evaluation and placement, especially when using the quadrant method.

  6. DUI histories in intoxicated injured bicyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximus, Steven; Figueroa, Cesar; Pham, Jacqueline; Kuncir, Eric; Barrios, Cristobal

    2016-10-01

    It has been well documented that the use of alcohol correlates with injury risk, especially in DUI (driving under the influence) and DWI (driving while intoxicated). Consumption of alcohol in patients presenting with bicycle-related injuries is associated with greater injury severity, longer hospitalization, and higher health care costs. We hypothesized that intoxicated patients operating a bicycle with traumatic injuries have previous DUI or DWI convictions and had lost their privilege to drive a motor vehicle, resorted to bicycling, and had continued alcohol consumption despite negative previous consequences. We retrospectively collected data on injured bicyclists older than 18 years with positive blood alcohol content levels treated from the period January 2009 to June 2014 at a large Level 1 urban trauma center. We then matched each patient by name and date of birth and were able to obtain public criminal records through the Superior Court of California for the local of county. A total of 149 injured bicyclists with positive blood alcohol levels were identified. Their average blood alcohol content was 236.0 mg/dL, and their average age was 41 years. Sixty-six (44.2%) of these patients had prior DUI/DWI convictions with suspension of driving privileges. Ninety-five patients in this group (63.8%) had no health insurance, and 51 patients (34.2%) tested positive for other drugs. Intoxicated bicyclists trended toward longer hospital length compared with nonintoxicated bicyclists (4.60 vs. 3.44 days; p = 0.07). Three (0.02%) of 149 patients were charged with bicycling while intoxicated. Intoxicated bicyclists involved in trauma are more likely to have a previous DUI/DWI, have other drug use, tend to have longer hospital stays, and are less likely to have insurance. Bicycle safety education and behavior modification targeting DUI/DWI offenders are warranted. In order to promote injury prevention, resources to increase awareness of this underestimated public health

  7. Development of the Knee Numeric-Entity Evaluation Score (KNEES – ACL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comins, J D; Krogsgaard, M R; Brodersen, J

    2013-01-01

    Patient-related outcome measures (PROMs) are commonly used to gauge treatment effects in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. Valid measures of specific conditions depend on relevant item content. While item content can be derived either from clinicians (face validity) or from...... patients, item relevance and comprehensiveness can only be confirmed by the patient (content validity). Focus group and single interviews were conducted with patients' pre- and post-ACL reconstruction in order to construct a condition-specific PROM for the target patients. One hundred fifty-seven items...

  8. Musculoskeletal Modeling of a Forward Lunge Movement:Implications for ACL Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Wieland, MR; Andersen, MS

    2010-01-01

    Context: The forward lunge is widely used among athletes for training and rehabilitation purposes. The forward lunge movement has also been suggested as a model to study functional adaptation to ACL rupture. Previous investigations indicate that the absence of the ACL influences the movement....... The model and the pelvis. The hips were modeled as spherical joints, the knees as hinge joints, and the ankles as universal joints. Each according to a minimum fatigue criterion. Main Outcome Measures: Muscle and joint reaction forces that pulled the tibia in anterior or posterior direction. The forces were...

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament- and hamstring tendon- derived cells: in vitro differential properties of cells involved in ACL reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghebes, C.A.; Kelder, C.; Schot, T.; Renard, A.J.S.; Pakvis, D.F.M.; Fernandes, H.; Saris, Daniël B.F.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction involves the replacement of the torn ligament with a new graft, often a hamstring tendon (HT). Described as similar, the ACL and HT have intrinsic differences related to their distinct anatomical locations. From a cellular perspective, identifying

  10. Internet-based prevention of posttraumatic stress symptoms in injured trauma patients: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Mouthaan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Injured trauma victims are at risk of developing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD and other post-trauma psychopathology. So far, interventions using cognitive behavioral techniques (CBT have proven most efficacious in treating early PTSD in highly symptomatic individuals. No early intervention for the prevention of PTSD for all victims has yet proven effective. In the acute psychosocial care for trauma victims, there is a clear need for easily applicable, accessible, cost-efficient early interventions. Objective: To describe the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT evaluating the effectiveness of a brief Internet-based early intervention that incorporates CBT techniques with the aim of reducing acute psychological distress and preventing long-term PTSD symptoms in injured trauma victims. Method: In a two armed RCT, 300 injured trauma victims from two Level-1 trauma centers in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, will be assigned to an intervention or a control group. Inclusion criteria are: being 18 years of age or older, having experienced a traumatic event according to the diagnostic criteria of the DSM-IV and understanding the Dutch language. The intervention group will be given access to the intervention's website (www.traumatips.nl, and are specifically requested to login within the first month postinjury. The primary clinical study outcome is PTSD symptom severity. Secondary outcomes include symptoms of depression and anxiety, quality of life, and social support. In addition, a cost-effectiveness analysis of the intervention will be performed. Data are collected at one week post-injury, prior to first login (baseline, and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Analyses will be on an intention-to-treat basis. Discussion: The results will provide more insight into the effects of preventive interventions in general, and Internet-based early interventions specifically, on acute stress reactions and PTSD, in an injured population, during the

  11. Qigong in Injured Military Service Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reb, Anne Marie; Saum, Nancy Seaby; Murphy, Deborah Ann; Breckenridge-Sproat, Sara Todd; Su, Xiaogang; Bormann, Jill Ellen

    2017-03-01

    Wounded, ill, and injured (WII) Military Service members experience significant stress and are at risk for developing chronic conditions including posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. Qigong, a meditative movement practice, may positively affect their ability to engage in successful rehabilitation. We assessed the feasibility of Qigong practice in WII Service members returning from combat; effects on stress, sleep, and somatic symptoms; satisfaction; and participants' experience with the practice. Single-group, pre- and posttest, mixed methods approach. Twenty-six WII were enrolled. The program was designed to include 20 classes over 10 weeks. Participants completed self-report questionnaires, practice logs, and an exit interview. Average attendance was 8.14 classes ( SD = 4.9); mean engagement was 5.7 ( SD = 3.5) weeks. Participants endorsed a high level of satisfaction with the practice. Qualitative themes included coping with stress; feeling more resilient and empowered; improvement in symptoms including sleep and physical function; and factors affecting practice. Participant-reported facilitators included accessibility and portability of the practice; barriers included scheduling conflicts and personal challenges. Participants recommended offering shorter programs with flexible scheduling options, increasing program awareness, and including significant others in future classes. Qigong was safe, portable, and easily adapted for WII Service members.

  12. The effect of anterior cruciate ligament injury on bone curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, D J; Lohmander, Stefan; Makovey, J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigate the 5-year longitudinal changes in bone curvature after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and identify predictors of such changes. METHODS: In the KANON-trial (ISRCTN 84752559), 111/121 young active adults with an acute ACL tear to a previously un-injured knee...

  13. Trauma in children injured by physical violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina S Solovyova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In recent years, legislation has changed to include the rights of children injured because of physical violence. Trauma departments of St. Petersburg outpatient clinics admit children with injuries of varying severity after physical violence. The actions of medical institutions are always aimed at protecting the child. Aims. The aim of the present study was to analyze the cases of children in connection with injuries sustained as a result of physical violence in 2014–2015, and to compare the results with those of previous studies (2007–2008. Material and methods. In 2014–2015, the trauma department of City Children's Outpatient clinic No 62 treated 268 children, who had suffered from physical violence at home, on the street, or in educational institutions, which accounted for 1.6 per 1000 children living in the district, and 1.2% of all children admitted during 2 years. Results. Compared to 2007–2008, the number of children who suffered from physical violence decreased by almost two times in 2014–2015; in addition, the severity of injuries slightly decreased but the frequency of hospital admission of victims remained high (38% in 2007–2008. With regard to the circumstances in which the injury occurred, violence from strangers was lower, but violence among peers was higher. Conclusions. Positive results have been achieved by a complex of measures, including the implementation of the Federal Law “On Basic Guarantees of the Rights of the Child” to improve the care and safety of children, and an investigation of each case of violence is conducted by local authorities for internal affairs.

  14. Retention of movement technique : Implications for primary prevention of ACL injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling, Wouter; Benjaminse, Anne; Gokeler, Alli; Otten, Bert

    2017-01-01

    Background: Retention of movement technique is crucial in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs. It is unknown if specific instructions or video instructions result in changes in kinematic and kinetic measures during a relatively short training session, and in a retention test

  15. Novel methods of instruction in ACL injury prevention programs, a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjaminse, Anne; Welling, Wouter; Otten, Egbert; Gokeler, Alli

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs have been successful in the short term. Motor learning strategies with an internal focus (IF) to body movements have traditionally been utilized, but may be less suitable than an external focus (EF) for the acquisition and control of

  16. Novel methods of instruction in ACL injury prevention programs, a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anne Benjaminse; Bert Otten; A. Gokeler; Wouter Welling

    2014-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs have been successful in the short term. Motor learning strategies with an internal focus (IF) to body movements have traditionally been utilized, but may be less suitable than an external focus (EF) for the acquisition and control of

  17. Pseudocyclops: two cases of ACL graft partial tears mimicking cyclops lesions on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpfendorfer, Claus; Subhas, Naveen; Winalski, Carl S.; Ilaslan, Hakan [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Miniaci, Anthony [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is a common surgical procedure, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure has excellent success rates, complications such as mechanical impingement, graft rupture, and arthrofibrosis can occur, often necessitating additional surgery. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become a valuable tool in evaluating complications after ACL reconstruction. We report two cases of ACL reconstruction complicated by arthroscopically proven partial graft tears. In both cases the torn anterior graft fibers were flipped into the intercondylar notch, mimicking anterior arthrofibrosis, i.e., a ''cyclops lesion,'' on MR imaging. Careful review of the direction of graft fibers on MR imaging in the ''pseudocyclops'' lesions can help differentiate these partial tears from the fibrosis of a true cyclops. The ''pseudocyclops'' lesion is a previously undescribed MR imaging sign of partial ACL graft tear. Larger studies are required to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the sign, as well as the clinical importance of these partial graft tears. (orig.)

  18. Do ground reaction forces during unilateral and bilateral movements exhibit compensation strategies following ACL reconstruction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgart, Christian; Schubert, Markus; Hoppe, Matthias W.; Gokeler, Alli; Freiwald, Juergen

    The aims of the study were (1) to evaluate the leg asymmetry assessed with ground reaction forces (GRFs) during unilateral and bilateral movements of different knee loads in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructed patients and (2) to investigate differences in leg asymmetry depending on the

  19. [The time-related risk for knee osteoarthritis after ACL injury. Results from a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, G; Schiltenwolf, M; Hartmann, B; Grifka, J; Hofmann, G O; Klemm, H-T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the time-related risk for knee osteoarthritis in patients after ACL injury. The primary search was carried out in different medical databases with the deadline 12.01.2014. The search strategy for the evaluation was [ACL] AND [osteoarthritis] including "all fields". All 1656 title/abstracts were reviewed by two independent researchers who selected 140 papers for full text review. Finally, a total of 21 relevant publications were identified for inclusion in this current paper. The incidence of knee osteoarthritis rises significantly over time. Two years after injury it was 6.9%, after 5 years 32.2%, after 7 years 36.3%, and after 10 years 79.6%. At the same time, the crude relative risk of OA rises as the time interval since injury increases. The relative risk of OA has already doubled by 2 years after ACL injury). By 7 years it has increased fivefold and compared with OA status at the time of injury it is still increasing significantly after 10 years. The ACL injury is a significant risk factor for the development of early-onset secondary knee osteoarthritis. Within 5 years of the injury the knee shows clear signs of osteoarthritis on MRI. However, these lesions are often not associated with any clinical signs. Knee osteoarthritis as a severe disease starts 8 years or later after the injury, when it requires treatment.

  20. Forward lunge as a functional performance test in ACL deficient subjects: test-retest reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, Tine; Henriksen, Marius; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    The forward lunge movement may be used as a functional performance test of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient and reconstructed subjects. The purposes were 1) to determine the test-retest reliability of a forward lunge in healthy subjects and 2) to determine the required numbers...

  1. Strategies for revision surgery after primary double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofbauer, Marcus; Muller, Bart; Murawski, Christopher D.; Baraga, Michael; van Eck, Carola Franziska; Fu, Freddie H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to discuss pre- and intra-operative considerations as well as surgical strategies for different femoral and tibial tunnel scenarios in revision surgery following primary double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Based on the current literature of

  2. Technique of anatomical footprint reconstruction of the ACL with oval tunnels and medial portal aimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Wolf; Forkel, Philipp; Achtnich, Andrea; Metzlaff, Sebastian; Zantop, Thore

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to demonstrate an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction technique using oval tunnels. Aim of this single bundle technique is to fit the footprint anatomy of the ACL as closely as possible. TECHNIQUE AND PATIENTS: The presented technique is a single bundle technique using a semitendinosus graft. For femoral tunnel placement, a specific medial portal aimer (Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany) is used. Aiming and drilling of the femoral tunnel are performed via the medial portal. Oval tunnels are created by stepwise dilatation with ovally shaped dilatators. The position of the femoral tunnel is visualized and controlled with the arthroscope via the medial portal. For the tibial tunnel placement, a specific aimer was used as well. With this technique, 24 patients were operated and all intra- and postoperative complications were analyzed prospectively. The tunnel position was documented postoperatively by CT scan. There were no significant intra- and postoperative complications associated with the oval tunnel technique. The postoperative 3D CT scan revealed that all femoral and tibial tunnels were located within the area of the anatomical ACL insertions. This article presents an ACL reconstruction technique using oval dilatators and medial portal aimers to create oval tunnels. These oval tunnels match the insertion site anatomy much closer than round tunnels do. Level IV, case series.

  3. Metallic or bioabsorbable interference screw for graft fixation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Rocco; Vasta, Sebastiano; D'Adamio, Stefano; Giacalone, Antonino; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions are performed in the USA each year. Interference screw fixation is considered the standard for rigid fixation of the graft and provides higher fixation strength compared with other devices such as staples or buttons. The present study summarizes the latest evidence comparing the effectiveness of the available classes of interference screws for fixation of ACL grafts. A comprehensive search of the CINAHL, PubMed, Google Scholar, Embase Biomedical databases and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials was performed in March 2013. Twelve studies met our inclusion criteria. Most studies showed no intergroup difference in terms of outcomes measured with validated clinical scores such as IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee), Lysholm score and Tegner activity level. There was no significant difference regarding range of motion. Knee stability as evaluated with pivot shift and KT arthrometer showed a significant difference only in one study, favouring metallic interference screws. Tunnel widening is much more evident and marked patients who underwent ACL reconstruction with bioabsorbable screws, with no influence on the final clinical results achieved. Complication rates between the two screw classes were similar. The average modified Coleman methodology score was 74.67. AREAS OF UNCERTAINTY/RESEARCH NEED: The data comparing the outcomes achieved by two different materials for fixation, bioabsorbable and metallic, to be used during single-bundle ACL reconstruction, showed no significant difference in the final patient outcomes, in terms of clinical scores, clinical evaluation and imaging.

  4. Hamstrings co-activation in ACL-deficient subjects during isometric whole-leg extensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalbersberg, S.; Kingma, I.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    It has been reported that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient subjects increase the level of hamstrings activation and this has been interpreted as a means to cope with increased anterior tibial laxity in the knee. This study aimed to establish to what extent co-activation strategies in

  5. Quantitative topographic anatomy of the femoral ACL footprint: a micro-CT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Daniel G; Getgood, Alan; Thornby, John; Bird, Jonathan; Turley, Glen A; Spalding, Tim; Williams, Mark A

    2014-11-01

    The femoral footprint of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a much-studied anatomic structure, predominantly due to its importance during ACL reconstruction surgery. A new technique utilising high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is described, allowing detailed three-dimensional (3D) quantitative analysis of this structure. Seven cadaveric knees were scanned using micro-CT, yielding 3D data with a reconstructed voxel size of 60 μm. A novel method of 3D surface extraction was developed and validated, facilitating both qualitative observation of surface details and quantitative topographic assessment using colour-coded relief maps. Images were displayed on an immersive 3D visualisation wall, and ten experienced ACL clinicians were surveyed as to the presence and morphology of osseous landmarks, providing qualitative assessment of whether such features can be reliably identified for navigation during surgery. Both quantitative analysis and qualitative assessment of the footprints in this study showed significant variability in the presence and morphology of osseous landmarks, with the lateral intercondylar ridge being objectively present in four out of seven relief maps, although reportedly seen in six out of seven cases in the qualitative study, suggesting an element of subjectivity and interpretation. This is the first study to utilise micro-CT in the study of ACL anatomy.

  6. Thermography based diagnosis of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in canines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Norsang; Umbaugh, Scott E.; Mishra, Deependra; Dahal, Rohini; Marino, Dominic J.; Sackman, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in canines is a common orthopedic injury in veterinary medicine. Veterinarians use both imaging and non-imaging methods to diagnose the disease. Common imaging methods such as radiography, computed tomography (CT scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have some disadvantages: expensive setup, high dose of radiation, and time-consuming. In this paper, we present an alternative diagnostic method based on feature extraction and pattern classification (FEPC) to diagnose abnormal patterns in ACL thermograms. The proposed method was experimented with a total of 30 thermograms for each camera view (anterior, lateral and posterior) including 14 disease and 16 non-disease cases provided from Long Island Veterinary Specialists. The normal and abnormal patterns in thermograms are analyzed in two steps: feature extraction and pattern classification. Texture features based on gray level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM), histogram features and spectral features are extracted from the color normalized thermograms and the computed feature vectors are applied to Nearest Neighbor (NN) classifier, K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) classifier and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier with leave-one-out validation method. The algorithm gives the best classification success rate of 86.67% with a sensitivity of 85.71% and a specificity of 87.5% in ACL rupture detection using NN classifier for the lateral view and Norm-RGB-Lum color normalization method. Our results show that the proposed method has the potential to detect ACL rupture in canines.

  7. Effect of an internally versus externally focused acl injury prevention program on injury risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallinga, J.; Benjaminse, A.; Gokeler, A.; Otten, Egbert; Lemmink, K.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs have shown mixed results, which may be in part due to suboptimal training components. OBJECTIVE: Determine effects of a prevention program with external and internal focus of attention on (potential) biomechanical risk factors

  8. Complications and Adverse Events of a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing 3 Graft Types for ACL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Nicholas; Barber, Rhamona; Chan, Denise; Paolucci, Elizabeth Oddone

    2016-05-01

    Complications/adverse events of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery are underreported, despite pooled level 1 data in systematic reviews. All adverse events/complications occurring within a 2-year postoperative period after primary ACL reconstruction, as part of a large randomized clinical trial (RCT), were identified and described. Prospective, double-blind randomized clinical trial. Patients and the independent trained examiner were blinded to treatment allocation. University-based orthopedic referral practice. Three hundred thirty patients (14-50 years; 183 males) with isolated ACL deficiency were intraoperatively randomized to ACL reconstruction with 1 autograft type. Graft harvest and arthroscopic portal incisions were identical. Patients were equally distributed to patellar tendon (PT), quadruple-stranded hamstring tendon (HT), and double-bundle (DB) hamstring autograft ACL reconstruction. Adverse events/complications were patient reported, documented, and diagnoses confirmed. Two major complications occurred: pulmonary embolism and septic arthritis. Twenty-four patients (7.3%) required repeat surgery, including 25 separate operations: PT = 7 (6.4%), HT = 9 (8.2%), and DB = 8 (7.3%). Repeat surgery was performed for meniscal tears (3.6%; n = 12), intra-articular scarring (2.7%; n = 9), chondral pathology (0.6%; n = 2), and wound dehiscence (0.3%; n = 1). Other complications included wound problems, sensory nerve damage, muscle tendon injury, tibial periostitis, and suspected meniscal tears and chondral lesions. Overall, more complications occurred in the HT/DB groups (PT = 24; HT = 31; DB = 45), but more PT patients complained of moderate or severe kneeling pain (PT = 17; HT = 9; DB = 4) at 2 years. Overall, ACL reconstructive surgery is safe. Major complications were uncommon. Secondary surgery was necessary 7.3% of the time for complications/adverse events (excluding graft reinjury or revisions) within the first 2 years. Level 1 (therapeutic studies

  9. Functional Brace in ACL Surgery: Force Quantification in an In Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPrade, Robert F; Venderley, Melanie B; Dahl, Kimi D; Dornan, Grant J; Turnbull, Travis Lee

    2017-07-01

    A need exists for a functional anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) brace that dynamically supports the knee joint to match the angle-dependent forces of a native ACL, especially in the early postoperative period. The purpose of this study was to quantify the posteriorly directed external forces applied to the anterior proximal tibia by both a static and a dynamic force ACL brace. The proximal strap forces applied by the static force brace were hypothesized to remain relatively constant regardless of knee flexion angle compared with those of the dynamic force brace. Controlled laboratory study. Seven healthy adult males (mean age, 27.4 ± 3.4 years; mean height, 1.8 ± 0.1 m; mean body mass, 84.1 ± 11.3 kg) were fitted with both a static and a dynamic force ACL brace. Participants completed 3 functional activities: unloaded extension, sit-to-stand, and stair ascent. Kinematic data were collected using traditional motion-capture techniques while posteriorly directed forces applied to the anterior aspect of both the proximal and distal tibia were simultaneously collected using a customized pressure-mapping technique. The mean posteriorly directed forces applied to the proximal tibia at 30° of flexion by the dynamic force brace during unloaded extension (80.2 N), sit-to-stand (57.5 N), and stair ascent (56.3 N) activities were significantly larger, regardless of force setting, than those applied by the static force brace (10.1 N, 9.5 N, and 11.9 N, respectively; P brace, compared with the static force brace, applied significantly larger posteriorly directed forces to the anterior proximal tibia in extension, where the ACL is known to experience larger in vivo forces. Further studies are required to determine whether the physiological behavior of the brace will reduce anterior knee laxity and improve long-term patient outcomes. ACL braces that dynamically restrain the proximal tibia in a manner similar to physiological ACL function may improve pre- and postoperative

  10. Comparison between clinical grading and navigation data of knee laxity in ACL-deficient knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Yuji

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The latest version of the navigation system for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction has the supplementary ability to assess knee stability before and after ACL reconstruction. In this study, we compared navigation data between clinical grades in ACL-deficient knees and also analyzed correlation between clinical grading and navigation data. Methods 150 ACL deficient knees that received primary ACL reconstruction using an image-free navigation system were included. For clinical evaluation, the Lachman, anterior drawer, and pivot shift tests were performed under general anesthesia and were graded by an examiner. For the assessment of knee stability using the navigation system, manual tests were performed again before ACL reconstruction. Navigation data were recorded as anteroposterior (AP displacement of the tibia for the Lachman and anterior drawer tests, and both AP displacement and tibial rotation for the pivot shift test. Results Navigation data of each clinical grade were as follows; Lachman test grade 1+: 10.0 mm, grade 2+: 13.2 ± 3.1 mm, grade 3+: 14.5 ± 3.3 mm, anterior drawer test grade 1+: 6.8 ± 1.4 mm, grade 2+: 7.4 ± 1.8 mm, grade 3+: 9.1 ± 2.3 mm, pivot shift test grade 1+: 3.9 ± 1.8 mm/21.5° ± 7.8°, grade 2+: 4.8 ± 2.1 mm/21.8° ± 7.1°, and grade 3+: 6.0 ± 3.2 mm/21.1° ± 7.1°. There were positive correlations between clinical grading and AP displacement in the Lachman, and anterior drawer tests. Although positive correlations between clinical grading and AP displacement in pivot shift test were found, there were no correlations between clinical grading and tibial rotation in pivot shift test. Conclusions In response to AP force, the navigation system can provide the surgeon with correct objective data for knee laxity in ACL deficient knees. During the pivot shift test, physicians may grade according to the displacement of the tibia, rather than rotation.

  11. Stiff Landings Are Associated With Increased ACL Injury Risk in Young Female Basketball and Floorball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Mari; Pasanen, Kati; Kujala, Urho M; Vasankari, Tommi; Kannus, Pekka; Äyrämö, Sami; Krosshaug, Tron; Bahr, Roald; Avela, Janne; Perttunen, Jarmo; Parkkari, Jari

    2017-02-01

    Few prospective studies have investigated the biomechanical risk factors of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. To investigate the relationship between biomechanical characteristics of vertical drop jump (VDJ) performance and the risk of ACL injury in young female basketball and floorball players. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. At baseline, a total of 171 female basketball and floorball players (age range, 12-21 years) participated in a VDJ test using 3-dimensional motion analysis. The following biomechanical variables were analyzed: (1) knee valgus angle at initial contact (IC), (2) peak knee abduction moment, (3) knee flexion angle at IC, (4) peak knee flexion angle, (5) peak vertical ground-reaction force (vGRF), and (6) medial knee displacement. All new ACL injuries, as well as match and training exposure, were then recorded for 1 to 3 years. Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. Fifteen new ACL injuries occurred during the study period (0.2 injuries/1000 player-hours). Of the 6 factors considered, lower peak knee flexion angle (HR for each 10° increase in knee flexion angle, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.34-0.88) and higher peak vGRF (HR for each 100-N increase in vGRF, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.09-1.45) were the only factors associated with increased risk of ACL injury. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.6 for peak knee flexion and 0.7 for vGRF, indicating a failed-to-fair combined sensitivity and specificity of the test. Stiff landings, with less knee flexion and greater vGRF, in a VDJ test were associated with increased risk of ACL injury among young female basketball and floorball players. However, although 2 factors (decreased peak knee flexion and increased vGRF) had significant associations with ACL injury risk, the ROC curve analyses revealed that these variables cannot be used for screening of athletes.

  12. The gestational power of mast cells in the injured tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Maria-Angeles; Arias, Natalia; Martínez, Vicente; Vergara, Patri; Arias, Jaime

    2018-02-01

    The inflammatory response expressed after wound healing would be the recapitulation of systemic extra-embryonic functions, which would focus on the interstitium of the injured tissue. In the injured tissue, mast cells, provided for a great functional heterogeneity, could play the leading role in the re-expression of extra-embryonic functions, i.e., coelomic-amniotic and trophoblastic-vitelline. Moreover, mast cells would favor the production of a gastrulation-like process, which in certain tissues and organs would induce the regeneration of the injured tissue. Therefore, the engraftment of mesenchymal stem cells and mast cells, both with an extra-embryonic regenerative phenotype, would achieve a blastema, from the repaired and regenerated injured tissue, rather than by fibrosis, which is commonly made through wound-healing.

  13. Long-term clinical outcomes of combined BPTB ACL reconstruction and popliteus tendon plasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcacci, Maurilio; Bonanzinga, Tommaso; Grassi, Alberto; Musiani, Costanza; Benzi, Andrea; Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria; Vaccari, Vittorio; Zaffagnini, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    A deficiency of posterolateral structures significantly increases the varus load on the ACL, while a chronic ACL lesion, the increased tibial rotation and the repetitive non-physiological knee motion, could affect and damage the integrity of the popliteus tendon. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to report the very long clinical outcomes of a combined single-bundle BPTB ACL reconstruction and popliteus plasty according to Bousquets technique, for the treatment of combined chronic anterior and posterolateral laxities. Fifteen patients that underwent combined ACL reconstruction and popliteal plasty according to Bousquets technique were available at mean 26.8 ± 1.0 years (range 25.4-28.0 years). All the patients were evaluated clinically and 13 by means of KT-1000 Arthrometer as well. Subjective evaluation was performed with the subjective IKDC, WOMAC and a 0-10 VAS for pain scales. At clinical evaluation, 10 patients (67 %) presented a negative anterior drawer test; Lachman test was negative in nine patients (60 %); the varus stress test was negative in eight (53 %); and the dial test was negative in all but one patient (93 %). Only two patients (15 %) presented a side-to-side difference >5 mm at the instrumented laxity evaluation. The combined single-bundle BPTB ACL reconstruction and popliteal plasty according to Bousquets technique were able to produce very good long-term results, in terms of knee stability, subjective outcomes, functional results and return to sport activity, in case of chronic anterior and posterolateral laxities. Retrospective case series, Level IV.

  14. Influence of the different anteromedial portal on femoral tunnel orientation during anatomic ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Dong-Kyu; Jo, Ho-Seung; Lee, Dong-Yeong; Kang, Dong-Geun; Byun, June-Ho; Hwang, Sun-Chul

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of femoral tunnel orientation, drilled through the accessory anteromedial (AAM) portal or the high AM portal in anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. In 16 cadaver knees, using o'clock method, centers of the ACL femoral footprint were drilled with an 8-mm reamer via an AAM portal (eight knees) or a high AM portal (eight knees). Computed tomography (CT) scans were taken of each knee. Three-dimensional (3D) models were constructed to identify the femoral tunnel orientation and to create femoral tunnel virtual cylinders for measuring tunnel angles and length. In two of the 16 specimens, we observed a posterior femoral cortex blowout (PFCB) when drilling through a high AM portal. When drilled through the high AM portal, the femoral tunnel length was significantly shorter than when using an AAM portal (30.3 ± 3.8 mm and 38.2 ± 3.1 mm, p portal was significantly higher than that of the AAM portal (52.2 ± 5.9° and 43.0 ± 2.3°, p = 0.003). In anatomic ACL reconstruction, a mal-positioned AM portal can cause abnormal tunnel orientation, which may lead to mechanical failure during ACL reconstruction. Therefore, it is important to select accurate AM portal positioning, and possibly using an AAM portal by measuring an accurate position when drilling a femoral tunnel in anatomic ACL reconstruction. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multi-ligand nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to the injured vascular wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kona, Soujanya

    Pathological conditions like coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery diseases as well as cardiovascular interventions used in the treatment of coronary artery diseases such as angioplasty and stenting damage/injure the blood vessel wall, leading to inflamed or activated endothelial cells that have been implicated in events leading to thrombosis, inflammation, and restenosis. Oral administration of anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory drugs causes systemic toxicity, bleeding, patient incompliance, and inadequate amounts of drugs at the injured area. Though drug-eluting stents have shown therapeutic benefits, complications such as in-stent restenosis and late thrombosis still remain and are a cause for concern. Rapid growth in the field of nanotechnology and nanoscience in recent years has paved the way for new targeted and controlled drug delivery strategies. In this perspective, the development of biodegradable nanoparticles for targeted intracellular drug delivery to the inflamed endothelial cells may offer an improved avenue for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The major objective of this research was to develop "novel multi-ligand nanoparticles," as drug carriers that can efficiently target and deliver therapeutic agents to the injured/inflamed vascular cells under dynamic flow conditions. Our approach mimics the natural binding ability of platelets to injured/activated endothelial cells through glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) bound to P-selectin expressed on inflamed endothelial cells and to the subendothelium through GPIb binding to von Willebrand factor (vWF) deposited onto the injured vascular wall. Our design also exploits the natural cell membrane translocation ability of the internalizing cell peptide - trans-activating transcriptor (TAT) to enhance the nanoparticle uptake by the targeted cells. Our hypothesis is that these multi-ligand nanoparticles would show an increased accumulation at the injury site since GPIb

  16. Acute Management of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries Using Novel Canine Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozynski, Chantelle C; Stannard, James P; Smith, Pat; Hanypsiak, Bryan T; Kuroki, Keiichi; Stoker, Aaron; Cook, Cristi; Cook, James L

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare treatment options for acute management of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries using preclinical models. Twenty-seven adult purpose-bred research hounds underwent knee surgery (sham control, exposed ACL, or partial-tear ACL) and were assessed over the following 8 weeks. Dogs were randomized into three treatment groups: standard of care (i.e., rest and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), washout, or leukoreduced platelet-rich plasma (PRP) so that a total of nine dogs received each treatment. Data from the two ACL-injury groups were pooled for each treatment ( n  = 6 per treatment group) and analyzed for treatment effects. The washout and PRP groups experienced less lameness, pain, and effusion, and greater function and comfortable range of motion compared with the NSAID group, with the PRP group showing most benefits. PRP was associated with the lowest severity of ACL pathology based on arthroscopic assessment. Measurable levels of inflammatory and degradative biomarkers were present in synovial fluid with significant differences noted over time. Based on these findings, washout had positive clinical effects compared with the standard-of-care group especially within the first week of treatment, but became less beneficial over time. A single injection of leukoreduced PRP was associated with favorable clinical results. However, no treatment was significantly "protective" against progression toward osteoarthritis after ACL injury. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Overexpression of ACL1 (abaxially curled leaf 1) increased Bulliform cells and induced Abaxial curling of leaf blades in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Shi, Zhen-Ying; Li, Lin; Shen, Ge-Zhi; Wang, Xin-Qi; An, Lin-Sheng; Zhang, Jing-Liu

    2010-09-01

    Understanding the genetic mechanism underlying rice leaf-shape development is crucial for optimizing rice configuration and achieving high yields; however, little is known about leaf abaxial curling. We isolated a rice transferred DNA (T-DNA) insertion mutant, BY240, which exhibited an abaxial leaf curling phenotype that co-segregated with the inserted T-DNA. The T-DNA was inserted in the promoter of a novel gene, ACL1 (Abaxially Curled Leaf 1), and led to overexpression of this gene in BY240. Overexpression of ACL1 in wild-type rice also resulted in abaxial leaf curling. ACL1 encodes a protein of 116 amino acids with no known conserved functional domains. Overexpression of ACL2, the only homolog of ACL1 in rice, also induced abaxial leaf curling. RT-PCR analysis revealed high expressions of ACLs in leaf sheaths and leaf blades, suggesting a role for these genes in leaf development. In situ hybridization revealed non-tissue-specific expression of the ACLs in the shoot apical meristem, leaf primordium, and young leaf. Histological analysis showed increased number and exaggeration of bulliform cells and expansion of epidermal cells in the leaves of BY240, which caused developmental discoordination of the abaxial and adaxial sides, resulting in abaxially curled leaves. These results revealed an important mechanism in rice leaf development and provided the genetic basis for agricultural improvement.

  18. Eight clinical conundrums relating to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in sport: recent evidence and a personal reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renström, Per A

    2013-04-01

    Over two million anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries occur worldwide annually, and the greater prevalence for ACL injury in young female athletes is one of the major problems in sports medicine. Optimal treatment of ACL injury requires individualised management. Patient selection is of utmost importance, and so is respect for the patient's functional demands and interests. All patients with an ACL tear may not need surgery, however athletes and persons with an active lifestyle with high knee functional demands including cutting motions need and should be offered surgery. In many cases it may not be the choice of graft or technique that is the key for success, but the choice of surgeon. The surgeon should be experienced and use a reconstructive procedure he/she knows very well and is comfortable with. The development of osteoarthritis after an ACL injury depends very much on the injury mechanism and concurrent meniscal injury, as knee articular cartilage continues to heal for 1-2 years after an ACL injury. Therefore the surgeon and rehabilitation team must pay attention to the rehabilitation process and to the decision when to return to sport. Return to sport must be carefully considered, as top-level sport in itself is one main risk factor for osteoarthritis after ACL injury. The present criteria for return to sport need to be revisited, also due to the fact that recurrent injury seems to be an increasing problem. ACL injury prevention programmes are now available in some sports. The key issue for a prevention programme to be successful is proper implementation. Vital factors for success include the individual coaching of the player and well controlled compliance with the training programme. Preventive activities should be more actively supported by the involved athletic community. Despite substantial advances in the field of ACL injury over the past 40 years, substantial management challenges remain.

  19. The Effect of Menstrual Cycle and Contraceptives on ACL Injuries and Laxity: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Simone D; Motu'apuaka, Makalapua L; Lambert, William; Fu, Rongwei; Brady, Jacqueline; Guise, Jeanne-Marie

    2017-07-01

    Women are at substantially greater risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than are men. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature to clarify the effect of the menstrual cycle and contraceptives on the laxity of and noncontact injuries to the ACL. Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Searches were conducted using MEDLINE (1946-August 2016), the Cochrane Library Database, clinical trial registries, and related reference lists. Search terms included athletic injuries, knee injuries, ligaments, joint instability, menstrual cycle, ovulation, hormones, and contraceptives. Investigators independently dually abstracted and reviewed study details and quality using predefined criteria and evaluated overall strength of evidence using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) criteria. Twenty-one studies totaling 68,758 participants were included: 5 on the menstrual cycle and ACL injury, 7 on hormonal contraceptives and ACL injury, as well as 13 on menstrual cycle and ligament laxity. Four of 5 studies of women not using hormonal contraception indicated that the luteal phase was the least associated with ACL injuries. The 2 largest and highest quality studies on hormonal contraceptives suggested that hormonal contraceptives may be protective against ACL injury. Six of 12 studies on ACL laxity provided quantitative data for meta-analysis, finding significantly increased laxity during the ovulatory phase compared with the follicular phase. The literature suggests an association between hormonal fluctuations and ACL injury. Recent studies have suggested that oral contraceptives may offer up to a 20% reduction in risk of injury. The literature on ACL injuries and the menstrual cycle has more than doubled over the past decade, permitting quantitative analysis for the first time. However, the overall strength of this evidence is low. Promising potential directions for future research include long

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament- and hamstring tendon-derived cells: in vitro differential properties of cells involved in ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebes, Corina Adriana; Kelder, Cindy; Schot, Thomas; Renard, Auke J; Pakvis, Dean F M; Fernandes, Hugo; Saris, Daniel B

    2017-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction involves the replacement of the torn ligament with a new graft, often a hamstring tendon (HT). Described as similar, the ACL and HT have intrinsic differences related to their distinct anatomical locations. From a cellular perspective, identifying these differences represents a step forward in the search for new cues that enhance recovery after the reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to characterize the phenotype and multilineage potential of ACL- and HT-derived cells. ACL- and HT-derived cells were isolated from tissue harvest from patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or ACL reconstruction. In total, three ACL and three HT donors were investigated. Cell morphology, self-renewal potential (CFU-F), surface marker profiling, expression of tendon/ligament-related markers (PCR) and multilineage potential were analysed for both cell types; both had fibroblast-like morphology and low self-renewal potential. No differences in the expression of tendon/ligament-related genes or a selected set of surface markers were observed between the two cell types. However, differences in their multilineage potential were observed: while ACL-derived cells showed a high potential to differentiate into chondrocytes and adipocytes, but not osteoblasts, HT-derived cells showed poor potential to form adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Our results demonstrated that HT-derived cells have low multilineage potential compared to ACL-derived cells, further highlighting the need for extrinsic signals to fully restore the function of the ACL upon reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Contact area between femoral tunnel and interference screw in anatomic rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction: a comparison of outside-in and trans-portal inside-out techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Kunihiko; Mae, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Yuta; Nakagawa, Shigeto; Shino, Konsei

    2017-10-20

    The purpose of this study was to compare the femoral tunnel length, the femoral graft bending angle at the femoral tunnel aperture, and the contact area between the femoral tunnel wall and an interference screw used for fixation in anatomic rectangular tunnel anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (ART ACLR). The study included 149 patients with primary ACL injury who underwent ART ACLR. Preoperatively, flexion angle of the index knee was checked under general anaesthesia. Those of less than 130° of passive flexion were assigned to the outside-in (OI) technique (78 patients), while the others to the trans-portal inside-out (TP) technique (71 patients). The patients underwent computed tomography with multiplanar reconstruction at 3-5 weeks post-operatively. Femoral tunnel length, graft bending angle, and contact ratio between the IFS and femoral tunnel were assessed. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The femoral tunnel length in the OI technique was significantly longer than that in the TP technique (P < 0.001). The femoral graft bending angle in the OI technique was significantly more acute than that in the TP technique (P < 0.001). The contact ratio in the OI technique was significantly larger than that in the TP technique at every point in the femoral tunnel (P < 0.001). The OI technique resulted in a more acute femoral graft bending angle, longer mean femoral tunnel length, and larger contact ratio than the TP technique after ART ACLR. Retrospective comparative study, Level III.

  2. Does Extended Preoperative Rehabilitation Influence Outcomes 2 Years After ACL Reconstruction? A Comparative Effectiveness Study Between the MOON and Delaware-Oslo ACL Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, Mathew J; Logerstedt, David S; Grindem, Hege; Axe, Michael J; Risberg, May Arna; Engebretsen, Lars; Huston, Laura J; Spindler, Kurt P; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2016-10-01

    Rehabilitation before anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (ACLR) is effective at improving postoperative outcomes at least in the short term. Less is known about the effects of preoperative rehabilitation on functional outcomes and return-to-sport (RTS) rates 2 years after reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to compare functional outcomes 2 years after ACLR in a cohort that underwent additional preoperative rehabilitation, including progressive strengthening and neuromuscular training after impairments were resolved, compared with a nonexperimental cohort. We hypothesized that the cohort treated with extended preoperative rehabilitation would have superior functional outcomes 2 years after ACLR. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This study compared outcomes after an ACL rupture in an international cohort (Delaware-Oslo ACL Cohort [DOC]) treated with extended preoperative rehabilitation, including neuromuscular training, to data from the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) cohort, which did not undergo extended preoperative rehabilitation. Inclusion and exclusion criteria from the DOC were applied to the MOON database to extract a homogeneous sample for comparison. Patients achieved knee impairment resolution before ACLR, and postoperative rehabilitation followed each cohort's respective criterion-based protocol. Patients completed the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee form and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) at enrollment and again 2 years after ACLR. RTS rates were calculated for each cohort at 2 years. After adjusting for baseline IKDC and KOOS scores, the DOC patients showed significant and clinically meaningful differences in IKDC and KOOS scores 2 years after ACLR. There was a significantly higher (P rehabilitation consisting of progressive strengthening and neuromuscular training, followed by a criterion-based postoperative rehabilitation program, had greater functional

  3. Movement Patterns of the Knee During Gait Following ACL Reconstruction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Ribeiro, Daniel Cury; Theis, Jean-Claude; Webster, Kate E; Sole, Gisela

    2016-12-01

    Altered gait patterns follow ing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) may be associated with long-term impairments and post-traumatic osteoarthritis. This systematic review and meta-analysis compared lower limb kinematics and kinetics of the ACL reconstructed knee with (1) the contralateral limb and (2) healthy age-matched participants during walking, stair climbing, and running. The secondary aim was to describe the differences over time following ACLR for these biomechanical variables. Database searches were conducted from inception to July 2014 and updated in August 2015 for studies exploring peak knee angles and moments following ACLR during walking, stair negotiation, and running. Risk of bias was assessed with a modified Downs and Black quality index for all included studies, and meta-analyses were performed. Forest plots were explored qualitatively for recovery of gait variables over time after surgery. A total of 40 studies were included in the review; 26 of these were rated as low risk and 14 as high risk of bias. The meta-analysis included 27 studies. Strong to moderate evidence indicated no significant difference in peak flexion angles between ACLR and control groups during walking and stair ascent. Strong evidence was found for lower peak flexion moments in participants with ACLR compared with control groups and contralateral limb during walking and stair activities. Strong to moderate evidence was found for lower peak adduction moment in ACLR participants for the injured compared with the contralateral limbs during walking and stair descent. The qualitative assessment for recovery over time indicated a pattern towards restoration of peak knee flexion angle with increasing time from post-surgery. Peak knee adduction moments were lower within the first year following surgery and higher than controls during later phases (5 years). Joint kinematics are restored, on average, 6 years following reconstruction, while knee external flexion moments

  4. Canine ovariohysterectomy and orchiectomy increases the prevalence of ACL injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slauterbeck, J R; Pankratz, K; Xu, K T; Bozeman, S C; Hardy, D M

    2004-12-01

    To determine whether canine ovariohysterectomy or orchiectomy affects the prevalence of anterior cruciate ligament injury, we compared injury rates of anterior cruciate ligaments of animals that had gonadectomy and animals that were sexually intact as a function of gender, breed, or size. Records of 3218 dogs treated in one orthopaedic veterinary practice during a 2-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Anterior cruciate ligament injury, diagnosed by a history of acute hind limb lameness and by positive anterior drawer test, was confirmed at the time of surgery. The prevalence of anterior cruciate ligament rupture in all dogs was 3.48%. Females that had ovariohysterectomy and males that had orchiectomy had a significantly higher prevalence of anterior cruciate ligament rupture than the sexually intact dogs. Larger dogs had an increased prevalence of anterior cruciate ligament injury compared with smaller or medium-sized dogs, with the increased rupture rates for sterilized animals holding across breeds and sizes. Sterilization of either gender increased the prevalence of anterior cruciate ligament injury, suggesting a potential effect of gonadal gender on prevalence of injury of this ligament.

  5. Medial and lateral hamstrings and quadriceps co-activation affects knee joint kinematics and ACL elongation: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Serpell, Benjamin G; Scarvell, Jennie M; Pickering, Mark R; Ball, Nick B; Newman, Phillip; Perriman, Diana; Warmenhoven, John; Smith, Paul N

    2015-01-01

    Many injury prevention and rehabilitation programs aim to train hamstring and quadriceps co-activation to constrain excessive anterior tibial translation and protect the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) from injury...

  6. The anatomy of the proximal tibia in pediatric and adolescent patients: implications for ACL reconstruction and prevention of physeal arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Kevin G; Apel, Peter J; Pfeiffer, Ronald P; Traughber, Paul D

    2007-04-01

    Although the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in skeletally immature patients is still controversial, several studies have advocated ACL reconstruction in selected patients to prevent secondary injury. The proximal tibial physis is a structure at risk during ACL reconstruction in young patients, and physeal growth complications have been reported after surgery in this area. The relationship between the ACL and the proximal tibial physeal/apophyseal regions is poorly understood. This study examined the MRI anatomy of the ACL and the proximal tibia apophysis and epiphysis. MRIs of 59 skeletally immature knees were reviewed (Average age = 12.75 years, range 6-15) to define the anatomy of the epiphyseal and apophyseal regions. Measurements were recorded in three parasagittal planes: (1) at the lateral border of the patellar tendon, (2) the lateral edge of the ACL insertion, and (3) the medial edge of the ACL insertion. A single three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) scan was used to evaluate the position of standard drill holes used in ACL reconstruction to assess for potential degree of injury to the epiphyseal and apophyseal growth plates. In the parasagittal planes, the average height of the epiphysis was 19.6, 20.7, and 21.5 mm at the lateral border of the patellar tendon, the lateral border of the ACL, and the medial border of the ACL, respectively. At the level of the same landmarks, the apophysis extended below the physis at an average of 20.2, 16.8, and 7.0 mm, respectively. Expressed as a percentage of epiphysis height this was an average of 104, 82, and 33%, respectively. Examination of 3D CT images revealed that variations in drill hole placement had effects on the volume of injury to the proximal tibial physis and apophysis. Drill holes that started more medial, distal, and with a steeper angle of inclination reduced the amount of physis and apophysis violated when compared with holes placed more lateral, proximal, and with a

  7. THE ROLE AND IMPLEMENTATION OF ECCENTRIC TRAINING IN ATHLETIC REHABILITATION: TENDINOPATHY, HAMSTRING STRAINS, AND ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The benefits and proposed physiological mechanisms of eccentric exercise have previously been elucidated and eccentric exercise has been used for well over seventy years. Traditionally, eccentric exercise has been used as a regular component of strength training. However, in recent years, eccentric exercise has been used in rehabilitation to manage a host of conditions. Of note, there is evidence in the literature supporting eccentric exercise for the rehabilitation of tendinopathies, muscle strains, and in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rehabilitation. The purpose of this Clinical Commentary is to discuss the physiologic mechanism of eccentric exercise as well as to review the literature regarding the utilization of eccentric training during rehabilitation. A secondary purpose of this commentary is to provide the reader with a framework for the implementation of eccentric training during rehabilitation of tendinopathies, muscle strains, and after ACL reconstruction. PMID:21655455

  8. ACL Injury Prevention Training Results in Modification of Hip and Knee Mechanics During a Drop-Landing Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Christine D; Sigward, Susan M; Powers, Christopher M

    2017-09-01

    Injury prevention training has been shown to be effective in reducing the incidence of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury; however, the underlying reason for the success of these training programs is unclear. To investigate whether an ACL injury prevention program that has been shown to reduce the incidence of ACL injury alters sagittal plane hip and knee biomechanics during a drop-landing task. Descriptive laboratory study. Thirty female club soccer players (age range, 11-17 years) with no history of knee injury participated in this study. Kinematics and ground-reaction forces were collected while each participant performed a drop-landing task prior to and immediately after participation in a 12-week ACL injury prevention training program. After ACL injury prevention training, participants demonstrated decreased knee extensor moments (P = .03), increased energy absorption at the hip (P = .04), decreased knee-to-hip extensor moment ratios (P = .05), and decreased knee-to-hip energy absorption ratios (P = .03). Participation in an ACL injury prevention training program decreased reliance on the knee extensor muscles and improved use of the hip extensor muscles, which may explain the protective effect of this type of training program on ACL injury. Based on these findings, clinicians can better understand how ACL injury prevention training, such as the Prevent Injury and Enhance Performance (PEP) Program, may change movement behavior at both the hip and knee. Furthermore, the study findings may support the implementation of the PEP Program, or a similar program, for clinicians aiming to improve use of the hip in an effort to reduce knee loading and consequent injuries.

  9. Adapting the Advanced Cardiac Life Support for the Experienced Provider (ACLS-EP course for emergency care education in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Cayley Jr

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Advanced Cardiac Life Support for the Experienced Provider (ACLS-EP course uses a case-based curriculum to teach emergency resuscitation principles to experienced health care professionals. This article describes the adaptation of the ACLS-EP curriculum to be used in a family medicine training programme in Rwanda, including lessons learned and recommendations for future use of this material for emergency care education in the African setting.

  10. The Effect of Femoral Nerve Block on Strength and Patient-reported Outcomes Following ACL Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Magnussen, Robert A.; Pottkotter, Kristy; DiStasi, Stephanie; PATERNO, MARK V.; Wordeman, Samuel Clayton; Schmitt, Laura; Flanigan, David C.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Femoral nerve block (FNB) has been proposed for pain control following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Although numerous high level studies have assessed the efficacy of FNB?s, there has been little to no research into the effect of such blocks on post-operative strength and patient-reported outcomes. Exacerbation of post-operative quadriceps weakness by a FNB could negatively impact recovery, particularly in the early post-operative period. We hypothesized that p...

  11. Upright MRI in kinematic assessment of the ACL-deficient knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Jamie A; Sutherland, Alasdair G; Smith, Francis W; Kawasaki, Taku

    2012-01-01

    The ability to quantify in vivo femoro-tibial relations in the knee holds great advantage to further patient care. There is little consensus on the optimal weight-bearing environment and measurement method for MRI assessment of in vivo knee kinematics. This study set out to establish the optimal method of measuring femoro-tibial relations in an upright, weight-bearing environment in normal individuals and those with ACL deficiency. Upright, load bearing, MRI scans of both knees were evaluated by two methods, flexion facet centre (FFC) and femoro-tibial contact point (FTCP), in order to establish femoro-tibial relations in the sagittal plane throughout different angles of knee flexion. A group of healthy volunteers (n=5) and a group with unilateral ACL insufficiency (n=8) were studied. Abnormal femoro-tibial relations were found in all ACL-deficient knees (n=8): the lateral tibial plateau was anteriorly displaced in extension and early flexion and, coupled with smaller changes in the medical compartment, this constitutes internal rotation of the tibia relative to the femur in early flexion. This study found that the FFC measurement technique holds an advantage over the FTCP technique in terms of validity, repeatability and ease of measurements, allowing detection of kinematic changes such as tibial internal rotation in early flexion in ACL-deficient knees in an upright weight-bearing model. We propose that FFC measurement in an upright, weight-bearing position is a reliable and representative tool for the assessment of femoro-tibial movement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship between floor type and risk of ACL injury in team handball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, O E; Myklebust, G; Engebretsen, L; Holme, I; Bahr, R

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the ACL injury rate between two different floor types - wooden floors (parquet, generally having lower friction) and artificial floors (generally having higher friction). ACL injuries have been recorded prospectively from the three top divisions for men and women in Norwegian team handball during seven seasons (1989-2000). A total of 174 ACL injuries have been recorded, and of these 53 occurred in regular league games. The floor types for all regular games from the same seasons have been determined retrospectively based on match schedules. The matches were divided into two groups: those played on wooden floors and those played on artificial floors. A total of nine injuries occurred among men (incidence: 0.24+/-0.09 injuries per 1000 player hours) and 44 among women (0.77+/-0.04 injuries 1000 h(-1); OR vs. men: 3.21 (1.56-6.58); P=0.001). Among men, four injuries occurred on wooden floors (0.32+/-0.13 injuries 1000 h(-1)) and five injuries occurred on artificial floors (0.20+/-0.12 injuries 1000 h(-1); OR vs. wooden floors: 0.63 (0.17-2.37); ns). Among women, eight injuries occurred on wooden floors (0.41+/-0.09 injuries 1000 h(-1); OR vs. men: 1.29 (0.39-4.28); ns) and 36 on artificial floors (0.96+/-0.04 injuries 1000 h(-1); OR vs. wooden floors: 2.35 (1.09-5.07); P=0.03; OR vs. men: 4.77 (1.87-12.18); P=0.001). These results indicate that the risk of ACL injury for women is higher on artificial floors than on wooden floors.

  13. Patellofemoral joint loads in ACL reconstructed elite athletes during running at time of return to sport

    OpenAIRE

    Herrington, LC; Alarifi, SM; Jones, R

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patellofemoral joint pain and degeneration is common in patients who undergo ACL reconstruction (ACLR). The presence of patellofemoral joint pain significantly impacts on the ability to continue to participate in sport and may even have a bearing on participation in activities of daily living. What is currently unclear is the mechanisms behind this process, previous research has identified altered patellofemoral joint loading in individuals with patellofemoral joint pain when runn...

  14. Outcomes of ACL Reconstruction With Fixed Versus Variable Loop Button Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Brent T; Patel, Nick N; Wier, Garrison; Labib, Sameh A

    2017-03-01

    Suspensory femoral fixation of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts with fixed loop button and variable loop button devices has gained popularity for ACL reconstruction. This study examined these 2 methods of fixation to determine their effect on graft laxity and patient-reported outcome scores. A database search was performed to identify patients who had undergone ACL reconstruction with either a fixed loop or a variable loop button technique performed by the primary surgeon. Lysholm, Tegner, and 12-Item Short Form Health Survey scores were obtained, and KT-1000 knee ligament arthrometer (MEDmetric, San Diego, California) mechanical knee testing was performed. Results were compared with the uninjured knee. Of the 112 patients who were identified, 91 met the study criteria. Of these patients, 57 completed KT-1000 knee testing, 33 in the variable group and 24 in the fixed group. The average KT-1000 value for the variable group was 0.38 mm, and the average for the closed group was 0.92 mm (P=.19; 95% confidence interval, -0.28 to 1.35). Among the 19 patients in the variable group and the 13 in the closed group who completed the subjective outcomes questionnaires, no statistically significant difference was found. Clinically lax knees (KT-1000>3 mm) were found in 6.1% and 12.5% of patients in the variable group and the fixed group, respectively (P=.2). The variable group had a rerupture rate of 4.7%, whereas the fixed group had a rerupture rate of 8.7% (P=.21). The study found no statistical difference in ACL graft laxity or postoperative functional outcomes between grafts fixed with the variable loop or fixed loop button technique. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e275-e280.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Transverse femoral implant prominence: four cases demonstrating a preventable complication for ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argintar, Evan; Scherer, Benjamin; Jordan, Tom; Klimkiewicz, John

    2010-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is a commonly occurring injury that often demands surgical reconstruction. Although the utility of this operation is widely accepted, many specific components, including graft fixation technique, remain controversial. Many clinicians favor transverse femoral implant fixation for soft tissue ACL grafts. This technique can be accomplished successfully; however, in a minority of the cases, the femoral implant can be excessively prominent, leading to iatrogenic postoperative iliotibial band syndrome. This article presents 4 patients that developed postoperative iliotibial band syndrome resulting from transverse femoral implant prominence. Despite achievement of knee ligamentous stability, implant prominence compromised final clinical results following ACL reconstruction. Through change in Lysholm value, we reviewed the clinical outcomes of these patients following femoral implant hardware removal for treatment of iliotibial band syndrome. On hardware removal, all patients demonstrated complete symptomatic improvement, mirroring an average Lysholm value increase of 38. We believe transverse femoral implant prominence is avoidable, and subsequent iliotibial band syndrome is a preventable postoperative complication. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. A study of atypical APTT derivative curves on the ACL TOP coagulation analyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, C; Zerafa, P; Bird, R

    2011-02-01

    The graphical representation of clotting data can provide useful information. A novel feature of the ACL TOP software allows display of clot reaction curves with superimposed first and second derivative curves. We noted atypical derivative plots associated with normal 'S'-shaped clot reaction curves in some abnormal activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). We tested 179 citrate plasmas with four different APTT reagents on the ACL TOP. We documented the prevalence and utility of these APTT atypical derivative curves in these patients. Ellagic acid APTT reagents commonly produce atypical derivative curves despite normal 'S'-shaped clot reaction curves. Occasionally, these atypical second derivative curves may cause incorrect APTT results. With silica activator APTT reagents, atypical derivative curves were associated with genuine coagulation abnormalities such as single factor deficiencies and lupus anticoagulants (LAs). To our knowledge, this novel finding has not been reported. Atypical derivative curves seen in ellagic acid APTTs are of limited diagnostic use because of the frequency with which they occur. This may be related to the need to optimize the data reduction utilized on the ACL TOP for these reagents. With silica activator APTTs, the presence of atypical derivative curves proved to be a very simple tool when troubleshooting unexpected abnormal APTT results, commonly predicting a factor deficiency or LA that would warrant further investigation. The cause of these aberrant derivative curves is probably related to abnormal thrombin generation in the APTT test and warrants further study. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Press-fit Femoral Fixation in ACL Reconstruction using Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaseb Mohammad Hasan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone-patellar tendon auto graft is probably the most widely used graft for ACL reconstruction. Several methods for graft fixation have been described. To avoid intra-articular hardware we adopt biological fixation with a femoral trapezoidal press-fit fixation. A prospective study was performed on 30 consecutive active people who underwent ACL reconstruction with this technique by two surgeons between september2004 and march2007 (mean follow-up 15.2 months. Results were evaluated by an independent examiner using radiography, subjective and objective evaluation. Assessment using the IKDC knee scoring revealed 92% of the patients with a normal or nearly normal knee joint. Lysholm's score was 63.6(40- 86 preoperatively and 91.88(73-100 at the latest follow up (P < 0.005. No patient complained of instability at latest follow up. The quadriceps muscle showed mild atrophy at 3 and 6 months and at final follow-up. Five Patients complained of anterior knee pain and had a positive kneeling test. We found no graft displacement on follow up radiographs. All cases showed radiological evidence of graft osteointegration at last follow up. Our results show that press-fit fixation of trapezoidal bone graft in femoral tunnel is a simple, reliable, and cost-effective alternative for ACL recon-struction using bone-patellar tendon-bone graft.

  18. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Thomas R.; Roos, Andrew K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Fredericson, Michael; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (pAchilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries. PMID:28358823

  19. The effect of playing surface on the incidence of ACL injuries in National Collegiate Athletic Association American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoo, Jason L; Braun, Hillary J; Harris, Alex H S

    2013-06-01

    Artificial playing surfaces are widely used for American football practice and competition and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common. This study analyzed the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) men's football ACL injury database from 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 to determine the effect of playing surface on ACL injury in NCAA football athletes. This database was reviewed from the 2004-2005 through 2008-2009 seasons using the specific injury code, "Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) complete tear." The injury rate was computed for competition and practice exposures. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals were calculated using assumptions of a Poisson distribution. Pair-wise, two-sample tests of equality of proportions with a continuity correction were used to estimate the associations of risk factors. There was an incidence rate of 1.73 ACL injuries per 10,000 athlete-exposures (A-Es) (95% CI 1.47-2.0) on artificial playing surfaces compared with a rate of 1.24 per 10,000 A-Es (1.05-1.45, pinjuries occurred more frequently on artificial turf surfaces (44.29%) than on natural grass (36.12%). NCAA football players experience a greater number of ACL injuries when playing on artificial surfaces. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pre-operative factors predicting good outcome in terms of health-related quality of life after ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Månsson, O; Kartus, J; Sernert, N

    2013-02-01

    The life situation of many patients changes after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and subsequent reconstruction, and this may affect their health-related quality of life in many ways. It is well known that the overall clinical results after ACL reconstruction are considered good, but pre-operative predictive factors for a good post-operative clinical outcome after ACL reconstruction have not been studied in as much detail. The purpose of this study was to identify pre-operative factors that predict a good post-operative outcome as measured by the Short Form 36 (SF-36) and Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) 3-6 years after ACL reconstruction. Seventy-three patients scheduled for ACL reconstruction were clinically examined pre-operatively. The SF-36 and KOOS questionnaires were sent by mail to these patients 3-6 years after reconstruction. Predictive factors for health-related quality of life were investigated using a stepwise regression analysis. In conclusion, pre-operative factors, such as pivot shift, knee function, and range of motion, may predict a good post-operative outcome and explain up to 25% in terms of health-related quality of life after ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, it appears that the patients' pre-injury and pre-operative Tegner activity levels are important predictors of post-operative health-related quality of life. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Electrical stimulation promotes regeneration of injured oculomotor nerves in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Du

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional recovery after oculomotor nerve injury is very poor. Electrical stimulation has been shown to promote regeneration of injured nerves. We hypothesized that electrical stimulation would improve the functional recovery of injured oculomotor nerves. Oculomotor nerve injury models were created by crushing the right oculomotor nerves of adult dogs. Stimulating electrodes were positioned in both proximal and distal locations of the lesion, and non-continuous rectangular, biphasic current pulses (0.7 V, 5 Hz were administered 1 hour daily for 2 consecutive weeks. Analysis of the results showed that electrophysiological and morphological recovery of the injured oculomotor nerve was enhanced, indicating that electrical stimulation improved neural regeneration. Thus, this therapy has the potential to promote the recovery of oculomotor nerve dysfunction.

  2. Perceptions of Supervision Among Injured and Non-Injured Teens Working in the Retail or Service Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierold, Kristina M

    2016-04-01

    According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), a teen is injured every 9 minutes at work. Workplace supervision may affect whether teens are injured on the job. Because research on workplace supervision among teens is limited, the objectives of this study were to characterize the perceptions of supervision among injured and non-injured teen workers and assess the characteristics and perceptions of supervisors that may be associated with work-related injuries. In 2011, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among high school students. Teens who worked in retail or service industries (n= 270) were included in the sample. Non-injured teens were more likely to have reported that their supervisors cared about their safety, were helpful, listened well, and ensured that teen workers understood workplace safety. Most teens (70%) did not feel comfortable talking about safety issues with their supervisors. The importance of supervision and how supervisors are perceived in the workplace may be significant in creating a safety culture that leaves a lasting impression. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. [Intra-articular reinforcement of a partially torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using newly developed UHMWPE biomaterial in combination with Hexalon ACL/PCL screws: ex-vivo mechanical testing of an animal knee model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorová, P; Srnec, R; Pěnčík, J; Dvořák, M; Krbec, M; Nečas, A

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Recent trends in the experimental surgical management of a partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in animals show repair of an ACL lesion using novel biomaterials both for biomechanical reinforcement of a partially unstable knee and as suitable scaffolds for bone marrow stem cell therapy in a partial ACL tear. The study deals with mechanical testing of the newly developed ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) biomaterial anchored to bone with Hexalon biodegradable ACL/PCL screws, as a new possibility of intra-articular reinforcement of a partial ACL tear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two groups of ex vivo pig knee models were prepared and tested as follows: the model of an ACL tear stabilised with UHMWPE biomaterial using a Hexalon ACL/PCL screw (group 1; n = 10) and the model of an ACL tear stabilised with the traditional, and in veterinary medicine used, extracapsular technique involving a monofilament nylon fibre, a clamp and a Securos bone anchor (group 2; n = 11). The models were loaded at a standing angle of 100° and the maximum load (N) and shift (mm) values were recorded. RESULTS In group 1 the average maximal peak force was 167.6 ± 21.7 N and the shift was on average 19.0 ± 4.0 mm. In all 10 specimens, the maximum load made the UHMWPE implant break close to its fixation to the femur but the construct/fixation never failed at the site where the material was anchored to the bone. In group 2, the average maximal peak force was 207.3 ± 49.2 N and the shift was on average 24.1 ± 9.5 mm. The Securos stabilisation failed by pullout of the anchor from the femoral bone in nine out of 11 cases; the monofilament fibre ruptured in two cases. CONCLUSIONS It can be concluded that a UHMWPE substitute used in ex-vivo pig knee models has mechanical properties comparable with clinically used extracapsular Securos stabilisation and, because of its potential to carry stem cells and bioactive substances, it can meet the requirements for

  4. Comparison of postural stability between injured and uninjured ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Lee, I-Jung; Liao, Jung-Hsien; Wu, Hong-Wen; Su, Fong-Chin

    2011-06-01

    Ballet movements require a limited base of support; thus, ballet dancers require a high level of postural control. However, postural stability in ballet dancers is still unclear and needs to be understood. To evaluate ballet dancers' postural stability in performing single-leg standing, the en pointe task, and the first and fifth positions and to determine differences in task performance among healthy nondancers, healthy dancers, and dancers with ankle sprains. Controlled laboratory study. Injured dancers, uninjured dancers, and nondancers were recruited for this study (N = 33 age-matched participants; n= 11 per group). The tasks tested were single-leg standing with eyes open and closed, first position, fifth position, and en pointe. Center of pressure parameters were calculated from the ground-reaction force collected with 1 force plate. Analysis of variance was used to assess the differences of center of pressure parameters among 3 groups in single-leg standing; independent t test was used to examine the differences of center of pressure parameters between injured and uninjured dancers. During single-leg standing, injured dancers had significantly greater maximum displacement in the medial-lateral direction and total trajectory of center of pressure, compared with the uninjured dancers and nondancers. During the first and fifth positions, the injured dancers demonstrated significantly greater standard deviation of center of pressure position in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions, compared with the uninjured dancers. During en pointe, the injured dancers had significantly greater maximum displacement in the medial-lateral direction and the anterior-posterior direction, compared with the uninjured dancers. The injured and uninjured dancers demonstrated differences in postural stability in the medial-lateral direction during single-leg standing and the ballet postures. Although the injured dancers received ballet training, their postural stability

  5. Knee joint gait function in patients with ACL rupture before and after the surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Akhpashev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials and methods. The authors studied gait biomechanics in respect of time, velocity and dynamics in 34 patients with verified ACL rupture including 11 patients (first group before the surgery and 23 patients (second group after the surgery. Patients of the first group were followed in the period from 1 week up to 6 years (mean – 18 months, of the second group – from 1.5 months up to 5.5 years (mean – 13 months. Patients of the second group underwent standard arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with semitendinous and gracillis tendon autograft. Biomechanical gait examination was performed using strap down inertial motion sensors that register rotation angles in space. The authors measured time phases of gait cycle, movements in hip and knee joints in three mutually perpendicular planes as well as walking shock load.Results. Time phases of gait cycle in both groups demonstrated normal values both on healthy and affected limbs. Movements in hip and knee joints were within the normal range, no reliable differences in the analogous indices for each limb were reported. Shock load in walking was registered within 1.6 g, symmetrical on both sides; shock load dynamics was absent in the group of patients after the surgery. Study results did not identify functional disorders during random flat surface waking that would be specific for ACL lesion as compared to normal values and to intact limb. However, a certain tendency was observed towards an increase of flexion-extension movement range in the knees following ACL reconstruction. The reported differences were not credible.Conclusion. The authors did not observe any specific functional knee joint instability during normal activities in the first group of patients with ACL rupture. On the one hand, that means that ACL lesion does not manifest in such circumstances, on the other - knee joint instability does not progress during flat surface walking at a random pace. The obtained

  6. ACL Fibers Near the Lateral Intercondylar Ridge Are the Most Load Bearing During Stability Examinations and Isometric Through Passive Flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawabi, Danyal H; Tucker, Scott; Schafer, Kevin A; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik Aernout; Nguyen, Joseph T; Wickiewicz, Thomas L; Imhauser, Carl W; Pearle, Andrew D

    2016-10-01

    The femoral insertion of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has direct and indirect fiber types located within the respective high (anterior) and low (posterior) regions of the femoral footprint. The fibers in the high region of the ACL footprint carry more force and are more isometric than the fibers in the low region of the ACL footprint. Controlled laboratory study. Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were mounted to a robotic manipulator. A 134-N anterior force at 30° and 90° of flexion and combined valgus (8 N·m) and internal (4 N·m) rotation torques at 15° of flexion were applied simulating tests of anterior and rotatory stability. The ACL was sectioned at the femoral footprint by detaching either the higher band of fibers neighboring the lateral intercondylar ridge in the region of the direct insertion or the posterior, crescent-shaped fibers in the region of the indirect insertion, followed by the remainder of the ACL. The kinematics of the ACL-intact knee was replayed, and the reduction in force due to each sectioned portion of insertion fibers was measured. Isometry was assessed at anteromedial, center, and posterolateral locations within the high and low regions of the femoral footprint. With an anterior tibial force at 30° of flexion, the high fibers carried 83.9% of the total anterior ACL load compared with 16.1% in the low fibers (P fibers also carried more anterior force than the low fibers at 90° of flexion (95.2% vs 4.8%; P fibers carried 84.2% of the anterior ACL force compared with 15.8% in the low fibers (P fibers placed at the anteromedial portion of the high region of the femoral footprint were the most isometric, with a maximum length change of 3.9 ± 1.5 mm. ACL fibers located high within the femoral footprint bear more force during stability testing and are more isometric during flexion than low fibers. It may be advantageous to create a "higher" femoral tunnel during ACL reconstruction at the lateral intercondylar ridge. © 2016 The

  7. Return to High School and College Level Football following ACL Reconstruction: A MOON Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Kirk A.; Phelps, Kevin D.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Matava, Matthew J.; Dunn, Warren R.; Parker, Richard D.; Reinke, Emily K.

    2013-01-01

    Background While published studies on return to play for various sports exist in the literature, there is a relative paucity of data regarding the effect of ACL reconstruction on the ability of American high school and collegiate football players to return to play at the same level of competition as before their injury, or to progress to play at the next level of competition. Purpose The purpose of this study was threefold: 1) to identify the percentage of high school and collegiate American football players who successfully returned to play at their previous level of competition; 2) to investigate self-reported performance for those players able to return to play or reason(s) for not returning to play; 3) to elucidate risk factors responsible for players not being able to return to play or not returning to the same level of performance. Study Design Retrospective cohort study; level of evidence, 2. Methods This study was a retrospective analysis of prospective patients taken from the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) cohort who identified football as their primary or secondary sport. Identified patients were then questioned in a structured interview regarding their ACL injury, participation in football prior to their injury, and factors associated with returning to play. Data was analyzed for player position, concurrent meniscal/ligamentous/chondral pathology, surgical technique and graft used for ACL reconstruction, and issues pertaining to timing and ability to return to play. Results 147 players (68 high school, 26 collegiate) met our criteria and were contacted from the 2002 and 2003 MOON cohorts. Return-to-play rates for all high school and collegiate athletes were similar (63% and 69%, respectively). Based on player perception, 43% of the players were able to return to play at the same self-described performance level. Approximately 27% felt they did not perform at a level attained prior to their ACL tear, and 30% were unable to return to play

  8. The "Heel Hook"-A Climbing-Specific Technique to Injure the Leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöffl, Volker; Lutter, Christoph; Popp, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    Acute injuries in rock climbing either come from a fall onto the lower leg or from performing a hard move and injuring the upper extremity. Further evaluations of lower leg injuries in rock climbing athletes have been performed recently finding sport characteristics such as peroneal tendon dislocations or chronic deformations of the feet. One injury mechanism described in case reports is the so-called heel hook position, which is used more frequently today compared with the beginngs of rock climbing. In addition, the number of these injuries is expected to rise with the increase in popularity of climbing and bouldering. Therefore, it is important to further analyze this pathology. We investigated 17 patients with injuries of the lower extremities after performing a heel hook. Copyright © 2016 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Coil embolization of internal mammary artery injured during central vein catheter and cardiac pacemaker lead insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemelli, A.P. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: Andreas.Chemelli@i-med.ac.at; Chemelli-Steingruber, I.E. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bonaros, N. [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Luckner, G. [Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Millonig, G. [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Seppi, K. [Department of Neurology, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Lottersberger, C.; Jaschke, W. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2009-08-15

    Purpose: This study describes several cases of endovascular coil embolization of the proximal internal mammary artery injured by blind approach to the subclavian vein for central venous catheter or pacemaker lead insertion. Materials and methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of five patients with iatrogenic arterial lesions of the internal mammary artery (IMA). The lesions occurred in three patients from a puncture of the subclavian vein during insertion of a central venous catheter and in two patients from a puncture of the subclavian vein for insertion of a pacemaker lead. Four patients had acute symptoms of bleeding with mediastinal hematoma and hematothorax and one patient was investigated in a chronic stage. A pseudoaneurysm was detected in all five patients. All four acute and hemodynamic unstable patients required hemodynamic support. Results: In all patients, embolization was performed using a coaxial catheter technique, and a long segment of the IMA adjacent distally and proximally to the source of bleeding was occluded with pushable microcoils. In one patient, additional mechanically detachable microcoils were used at the very proximal part of the IMA. Microcoil embolization of the IMA was successful in all patients, and the source of bleeding was eliminated in all patients. Conclusion: Transarterial coil embolization is a feasible and efficient method in treating acute bleeding and pseudoaneurysm of the IMA and should be considered if mediastinal hematoma or hemathorax occurs after blind puncture of the subclavian vein.

  10. Sexuality in Spinal-Cord-Injured High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Anne Louise

    1982-01-01

    Presents facts, literature, and organization sources on the sexual functioning of spinal-cord-injured persons. Suggests using this information in counseling situations. Urges counselors to help their clients reach sexual maturity by speaking frankly about sexuality and expressing affection, and by accepting their sexual behavior as normal. (JAC)

  11. Psychoactive substances in seriously injured drivers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Steentoft, Anni; Bernhoft, IM

    2013-01-01

    , which is 0.53 g/l in Denmark. The percentage of seriously injured drivers testing positive for medicinal drugs at levels above the Danish legal limit was 6.8%. Benzodiazepines and Z-drugs (6.4%) comprised the majority of this group. One or more illegal drugs (primarily amphetamines and cannabis) were...

  12. Prehospital transport of spinal cord-injured patients in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Well-organised and efficient prehospital transport is associated with an improved outcome in trauma patients. In Nigeria there is a paucity of information on prehospital transport of spinal cord-injured patients and its relation to mortality. Objective. To determine whether prehospital transportation is a predictor of ...

  13. Prehospital transport of spinal cord-injured patients in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that the means of transport are generally not optimal for those with spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was therefore to highlight the importance of prehospital transport of spinal cord-injured patients and the contribution of these injuries to mortality in Nigeria. Patients, materials and methods. The records of spinal ...

  14. Outcome in elderly injured patients : injury severity versus host factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, CK; Timmer, HW; Eisma, WH; ten Duis, HJ

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the differences between the outcome of elderly patients with severe injuries and that of their contemporaries with a less severe injury, we reviewed 42 severely injured elderly patients and compared them with 76 patients with a femoral neck fracture. We analysed the influence of injury

  15. Addressing the Needs of Children and Families of Combat Injured

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    subsequent treatments. His death was not related to participation in the current study. Participant death , specifically the combat-injured service member...connected her with bereavement services. One participant (service member receiving treatment at WRNMMC) voluntarily withdrew from the study at

  16. Prevent Tipping Furniture from Injuring or Killing Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this! Home » Health Tips » Child Emergencies Prevent Tipping Furniture from Injuring or Killing Young Children The nation’s ... a child — killed by a piece of a furniture, appliance or a television falling on them. “It ...

  17. Effect of sildenafil on erectile dysfunction in spinal Cord injured ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Erectile dysfunction is a preoccupying issue, just like motor and bladder disability, in spinal cord injured (SCI) patients. This is particularly so because of the increasing prevalence of paraplegic and tetraplegic subjects and the fact that these patients are younger, and sexually active. Objective: To determine the ...

  18. Repair and Enumeration of Injured Coliforms by a Plating Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, M. L.; Ray, B.; Read, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Surface plating of coliforms on Trypticase soy agar, followed by 1 to 2 h of incubation at 25 C and subsequent overlay with violet red bile agar, was found to be a useful method for the repair and enumeration of coliforms injured by freezing. PMID:1092266

  19. Assessment of the Impacts of ACLS on the ISS Life Support System using Dynamic Simulations in V-HAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetz, Daniel; Olthoff, Claas; Ewert, Michael K.; Anderson, Molly S.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Closed Loop System (ACLS) is currently under development by Airbus Defense and Space and is slated for launch to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2017. The addition of new hardware into an already complex system such as the ISS life support system (LSS) always poses operational risks. It is therefore important to understand the impacts ACLS will have on the existing systems to ensure smooth operations for the ISS. This analysis can be done by using dynamic computer simulations and one possible tool for such a simulation is Virtual Habitat (V-HAB). Based on Matlab (Registered Trademark) V-HAB has been under development at the Institute of Astronautics of the Technical University Munich (TUM) since 2006 and in the past has been successfully used to simulate the ISS life support systems. The existing V-HAB ISS simulation model treated the interior volume of the space station as one large ideally-stirred container. This model was improved to allow the calculation of the atmospheric composition inside the individual modules of the ISS by splitting it into ten distinct volumes. The virtual volumes are connected by a simulation of the inter-module ventilation flows. This allows for a combined simulation of the LSS hardware and the atmospheric composition aboard the ISS. A dynamic model of ACLS is added to the ISS simulation and different operating modes for both ACLS and the existing ISS life support systems are studied to determine the impacts of ACLS on the rest of the system. The results suggest that the US, Russian and ACLS CO2 systems can operate at the same time without impeding each other. Furthermore, based on the results of this analysis, the US and ACLS Sabatier systems can be operated in parallel as well to achieve the highest possible CO2 recycling together with a low CO2 concentration.

  20. Critical components of neuromuscular training to reduce ACL injury risk in female athletes: meta-regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Dai; Myer, Gregory D; Barber Foss, Kim D; Pepin, Michael J; Micheli, Lyle J; Hewett, Timothy E

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine key components in neuromuscular training that optimise ACL injury reduction in female athletes using meta-regression analyses. Design Systematic review and meta-regression. Data sources The literature search was performed in PubMed and EBSCO. Eligibility criteria Inclusion criteria for the current analysis were: (1) documented the number of ACL injuries, (2) employed a neuromuscular training intervention that aimed to reduce ACL injuries, (3) had a comparison group, (4) used a prospective control study design and (5) recruited female athletes as participants. Two independent reviewers extracted studies which met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality of included study and strength of recommendation were evaluated. Number of ACL injuries and participants in control and intervention groups, age of participants, dosage of neuromuscular training, exercise variations within neuromuscular training and status of verbal feedback were extracted. Results The meta-regression analyses identified age of participants, dosage of neuromuscular training, exercise variations within neuromuscular training and utilisation of verbal feedback as significant predictors of ACL injury reduction (p=0.01 in fixed-effects model, p=0.03 in random-effects model). Inclusion of 1 of the 4 components in neuromuscular training could reduce ACL injury risk by 17.2–17.7% in female athletes. No significant heterogeneity and publication bias effects were detected. Strength of recommendation was rated as A (recommendation based on consistent and good-quality patient-oriented study evidence). Conclusions Age of participants, dosage of neuromuscular training, exercise variations within neuromuscular training and utilisation of verbal feedback are predictors that influence the optimisation of prophylactic effects of neuromuscular training and the resultant ACL injury reduction in female athletes. PMID:27251898

  1. Critical components of neuromuscular training to reduce ACL injury risk in female athletes: meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Dai; Myer, Gregory D; Barber Foss, Kim D; Pepin, Michael J; Micheli, Lyle J; Hewett, Timothy E

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine key components in neuromuscular training that optimise ACL injury reduction in female athletes using meta-regression analyses. Systematic review and meta-regression. The literature search was performed in PubMed and EBSCO. Inclusion criteria for the current analysis were: (1) documented the number of ACL injuries, (2) employed a neuromuscular training intervention that aimed to reduce ACL injuries, (3) had a comparison group, (4) used a prospective control study design and (5) recruited female athletes as participants. Two independent reviewers extracted studies which met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality of included study and strength of recommendation were evaluated. Number of ACL injuries and participants in control and intervention groups, age of participants, dosage of neuromuscular training, exercise variations within neuromuscular training and status of verbal feedback were extracted. The meta-regression analyses identified age of participants, dosage of neuromuscular training, exercise variations within neuromuscular training and utilisation of verbal feedback as significant predictors of ACL injury reduction (p=0.01 in fixed-effects model, p=0.03 in random-effects model). Inclusion of 1 of the 4 components in neuromuscular training could reduce ACL injury risk by 17.2-17.7% in female athletes. No significant heterogeneity and publication bias effects were detected. Strength of recommendation was rated as A (recommendation based on consistent and good-quality patient-oriented study evidence). Age of participants, dosage of neuromuscular training, exercise variations within neuromuscular training and utilisation of verbal feedback are predictors that influence the optimisation of prophylactic effects of neuromuscular training and the resultant ACL injury reduction in female athletes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  2. Painful knee joint after ACL reconstruction using biodegradable interference screws- SPECT/CT a valuable diagnostic tool? A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirschmann Michael T

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the presented case we strive to introduce combined single photon emission computerized tomography and conventional computer tomography (SPECT/CT as new diagnostic imaging modality and illustrate the possible clinical value in patients after ACL reconstruction. We report the case of a painful knee due to a foreign body reaction and delayed degradation of the biodegradable interference screws after ACL reconstruction. The MRI showed an intact ACL graft, a possible tibial cyclops lesion and a patella infera. There was no increased fluid collection within the bone tunnels. The 99mTc-HDP-SPECT/CT clearly identified a highly increased tracer uptake around and within the tibial and femoral tunnels and the patellofemoral joint. On 3D-CT out of the SPECT/CT data the femoral graft attachment was shallow (50% along the Blumensaat's line and high in the notch. At revision arthroscopy a diffuse hypertrophy of the synovium, scarring of the Hoffa fat pad and a cyclops lesion of the former ACL graft was found. The interference screws were partially degraded and under palpation and pressure a grey fluid-like substance drained into the joint. The interference screws and the ACL graft were removed and an arthrolysis performed. In the case presented it was most likely a combination of improper graft placement, delayed degradation of the interference screws and unknown biological factors. The too shallow and high ACL graft placement might have led to roof impingement, chronic intraarticular inflammation and hence the delayed degradation of the screws. SPECT/CT has facilitated the establishment of diagnosis, process of decision making and further treatment in patients with knee pain after ACL reconstruction. From the combination of structural (tunnel position in 3D-CT and metabolic information (tracer uptake in SPECT/CT the patient's cause of the pain was established.

  3. A Prospective Investigation of Biomechanical Risk Factors for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. The Joint Undertaking to Monitor and Prevent ACL Injury (JUMP-ACL) Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-24

    Problems, ninth edition [ICD-9]): 726.69 (unspecified knee enthesopathy), 726.64 (patellar tendonitis), 717.7 ( patella chondromalacia ), and 719.46...13 It has also been proposed that weakness of the thigh and hip musculature can alter the alignment of the patella within the femoral trochlea...traumatic blow to the knee/ patella and the medical record note matched the inclu- sion criteria, we did not include the person in the injured cohort

  4. Role of biomechanics in the understanding of normal, injured, and healing ligaments and tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ho-Joong; Fisher, Matthew B; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2009-05-20

    Ligaments and tendons are soft connective tissues which serve essential roles for biomechanical function of the musculoskeletal system by stabilizing and guiding the motion of diarthrodial joints. Nevertheless, these tissues are frequently injured due to repetition and overuse as well as quick cutting motions that involve acceleration and deceleration. These injuries often upset this balance between mobility and stability of the joint which causes damage to other soft tissues manifested as pain and other morbidity, such as osteoarthritis.The healing of ligament and tendon injuries varies from tissue to tissue. Tendinopathies are ubiquitous and can take up to 12 months for the pain to subside before one could return to normal activity. A ruptured medial collateral ligament (MCL) can generally heal spontaneously; however, its remodeling process takes years and its biomechanical properties remain inferior when compared to the normal MCL. It is also known that a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear has limited healing capability, and reconstruction by soft tissue grafts has been regularly performed to regain knee function. However, long term follow-up studies have revealed that 20-25% of patients experience unsatisfactory results. Thus, a better understanding of the function of ligaments and tendons, together with knowledge on their healing potential, may help investigators to develop novel strategies to accelerate and improve the healing process of ligaments and tendons.With thousands of new papers published in the last ten years that involve biomechanics of ligaments and tendons, there is an increasing appreciation of this subject area. Such attention has positively impacted clinical practice. On the other hand, biomechanical data are complex in nature, and there is a danger of misinterpreting them. Thus, in these review, we will provide the readers with a brief overview of ligaments and tendons and refer them to appropriate methodologies used to obtain

  5. Role of biomechanics in the understanding of normal, injured, and healing ligaments and tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Ho-Joong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are soft connective tissues which serve essential roles for biomechanical function of the musculoskeletal system by stabilizing and guiding the motion of diarthrodial joints. Nevertheless, these tissues are frequently injured due to repetition and overuse as well as quick cutting motions that involve acceleration and deceleration. These injuries often upset this balance between mobility and stability of the joint which causes damage to other soft tissues manifested as pain and other morbidity, such as osteoarthritis. The healing of ligament and tendon injuries varies from tissue to tissue. Tendinopathies are ubiquitous and can take up to 12 months for the pain to subside before one could return to normal activity. A ruptured medial collateral ligament (MCL can generally heal spontaneously; however, its remodeling process takes years and its biomechanical properties remain inferior when compared to the normal MCL. It is also known that a midsubstance anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear has limited healing capability, and reconstruction by soft tissue grafts has been regularly performed to regain knee function. However, long term follow-up studies have revealed that 20–25% of patients experience unsatisfactory results. Thus, a better understanding of the function of ligaments and tendons, together with knowledge on their healing potential, may help investigators to develop novel strategies to accelerate and improve the healing process of ligaments and tendons. With thousands of new papers published in the last ten years that involve biomechanics of ligaments and tendons, there is an increasing appreciation of this subject area. Such attention has positively impacted clinical practice. On the other hand, biomechanical data are complex in nature, and there is a danger of misinterpreting them. Thus, in these review, we will provide the readers with a brief overview of ligaments and tendons and refer them to

  6. Effect of ski boot rear stiffness (SBRS) on maximal ACL force during injury prone landing movements in alpine ski racing: A study with a musculoskeletal simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Robert; Heinrich, Dieter; Kaps, Peter; Oberguggenberger, Michael; Nachbauer, Werner

    2017-06-01

    A common anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury situation in alpine ski racing is landing back-weighted after a jump. Simulated back-weighted landing situations showed higher ACL-injury risk for increasing ski boot rear stiffness (SBRS) without considering muscles. It is well known that muscle forces affect ACL tensile forces during landing. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of different SBRS on the maximal ACL tensile forces during injury prone landings considering muscle forces by a two-dimensional musculoskeletal simulation model. Injury prone situations for ACL-injuries were generated by the musculoskeletal simulation model using measured kinematics of a non-injury situation and the method of Monte Carlo simulation. Subsequently, the SBRS was varied for injury prone landings. The maximal ACL tensile forces and contributing factors to the ACL forces were compared for the different SBRS. In the injury prone landings the maximal ACL tensile forces increased with increasing SBRS. It was found that the higher maximal ACL force was caused by higher forces acting on the tibia by the boot and by higher quadriceps muscle forces both due to the higher SBRS. Practical experience suggested that the reduction of SBRS is not accepted by ski racers due to performance reasons. Thus, preventive measures may concentrate on the reduction of the quadriceps muscle force during impact.

  7. Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Derived Stem Cells Transduced With BMP2 Accelerate Graft-Bone Integration After ACL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yohei; Takayama, Koji; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Tang, Ying; Wang, Bing; Mifune, Yutaka; Cummins, James H; Warth, Ryan J; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Fu, Freddie H; Huard, Johnny

    2017-03-01

    Strong graft-bone integration is a prerequisite for successful graft remodeling after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using soft tissue grafts. Novel strategies to accelerate soft tissue graft-bone integration are needed to reduce the need for bone-tendon-bone graft harvest, reduce patient convalescence, facilitate rehabilitation, and reduce total recovery time after ACL reconstruction. The application of ACL-derived stem cells with enhanced expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) onto soft tissue grafts in the form of cell sheets will both accelerate and improve the quality of graft-bone integration after ACL reconstruction in a rat model. Controlled laboratory study. ACL-derived CD34+ cells were isolated from remnant human ACL tissues, virally transduced to express BMP2, and embedded within cell sheets. In a rat model of ACL injury, bilateral single-bundle ACL reconstructions were performed, in which cell sheets were wrapped around tendon autografts before reconstruction. Four groups containing a total of 48 rats (96 knees) were established (n = 12 rats; 24 knees per group): CD34+BMP2 (100%), CD34+BMP2 (25%), CD34+ (untransduced), and a control group containing no cells. Six rats from each group were euthanized 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, and each graft was harvested for immunohistochemical and histological analyses. The remaining 6 rats in each group were euthanized at 4 and 8 weeks to evaluate in situ tensile load to failure in each femur-graft-tibia complex. In vitro, BMP2 transduction promoted the osteogenic differentiation of ACL-derived CD34+ cells while retaining their intrinsic multipotent capabilities. Osteoblast densities were greatest in the BMP2 (100%) and BMP2 (25%) groups. Bone tunnels in the CD34+BMP2 (100%) and CD34+BMP2 (25%) groups had the smallest cross-sectional areas according to micro-computed tomography analyses. Graft-bone integration occurred most rapidly in the CD34+BMP2 (25%) group. Tensile load to

  8. ACL Roof Impingement Revisited: Does the Independent Femoral Drilling Technique Avoid Roof Impingement With Anteriorly Placed Tibial Tunnels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanksley, John A; Werner, Brian C; Conte, Evan J; Lustenberger, David P; Burrus, M Tyrrell; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Gwathmey, F Winston; Miller, Mark D

    2017-05-01

    Anatomic femoral tunnel placement for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is now well accepted. The ideal location for the tibial tunnel has not been studied extensively, although some biomechanical and clinical studies suggest that placement of the tibial tunnel in the anterior part of the ACL tibial attachment site may be desirable. However, the concern for intercondylar roof impingement has tempered enthusiasm for anterior tibial tunnel placement. To compare the potential for intercondylar roof impingement of ACL grafts with anteriorly positioned tibial tunnels after either transtibial (TT) or independent femoral (IF) tunnel drilling. Controlled laboratory study. Twelve fresh-frozen cadaver knees were randomized to either a TT or IF drilling technique. Tibial guide pins were drilled in the anterior third of the native ACL tibial attachment site after debridement. All efforts were made to drill the femoral tunnel anatomically in the center of the attachment site, and the surrogate ACL graft was visualized using 3-dimensional computed tomography. Reformatting was used to evaluate for roof impingement. Tunnel dimensions, knee flexion angles, and intra-articular sagittal graft angles were also measured. The Impingement Review Index (IRI) was used to evaluate for graft impingement. Two grafts (2/6, 33.3%) in the TT group impinged upon the intercondylar roof and demonstrated angular deformity (IRI type 1). No grafts in the IF group impinged, although 2 of 6 (66.7%) IF grafts touched the roof without deformation (IRI type 2). The presence or absence of impingement was not statistically significant. The mean sagittal tibial tunnel guide pin position prior to drilling was 27.6% of the sagittal diameter of the tibia (range, 22%-33.9%). However, computed tomography performed postdrilling detected substantial posterior enlargement in 2 TT specimens. A significant difference in the sagittal graft angle was noted between the 2 groups. TT grafts were

  9. Identification and functional characterization of AclB, a novel cell-separating enzyme from Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Wang, Ting; Kong, Jian; Wang, Hui-Li

    2015-06-16

    Autolysis of nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) was favorable for the development of flavor compounds during cheese manufacture. Among these bacteria, Lb. casei was regarded as the most important microbiota involved in cheese processes. In this study, a novel autolysin named AclB was identified in the genome of Lb. casei BL23 and its modular structure was predicted through bioinformatic approaches. Subsequently, its transcription profile in the exponential phase, hydrolytic activities against cell walls, enzymatic properties under different conditions, physiological function via gene inactivation and upregulation assays, as well as potential applications to NSLAB's autolysis were fully investigated. According to the results, AclB was recognized as a species-specific cell-separating enzyme, responsible for cell separation after cell division in Lb. casei BL23. The purified AclB showed considerable hydrolyzing activities towards cell walls, indicating its enzymatic nature as peptidoglycan hydrolase, or autolysin. The highest activity of AclB was determined at pH5.0 and 37°C, and the expression vector constructed based on AclB was shown to facilitate the controlled lysis of Lb. casei BL23 hosts. In summary, this study provided insight into the enzymatic properties of a novel autolysin involved in cell separation of Lb. casei BL23, which is promising to accelerate cheese ripening and improve cheese quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. ACL double-bundle reconstruction with one tibial tunnel provides equal stability compared to two tibial tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, Björn Holger; Seitz, Andreas Martin; Huth, Jochen; Bauer, Gerhard; Ignatius, Anita; Dürselen, Lutz

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) double-bundle reconstruction with one tibial tunnel displays the same in vitro stability as a conventional double-bundle reconstruction with two tibial tunnels when using the same tensioning protocol. In 11 fresh-frozen cadaveric knees, ACL double-bundle reconstruction with one and two tibial tunnels was performed. The two grafts were tightened using 80 N in different flexion angles (anteromedial-bundle at 60° and posterolateral-bundle at 15°). Anterior tibial translation (134 N) and translation with combined rotatory and valgus loads (10 Nm valgus stress and 4 Nm internal tibial torque) were determined at 0°, 30°, 60° and 90° flexion. Measurements were taken in intact ACL, resected ACL, three-tunnel reconstruction and four-tunnel reconstruction. Additionally, the tension on the grafts was determined. Student's t test was performed for statistical analysis of the related samples. Significance was set at p tunnels in different flexion angles achieved comparable restoration of stability, although there was different load sharing on the bundles. With regard to individualized ACL reconstruction, the double-bundle technique with one tibial tunnel offers a possibility to address small tibial insertion sites without compromising the advantages of a double-bundle procedure.

  11. CORE STABILIZATION EXERCISES AFTER ACL RECONSTRUCTION SURGERY PROVIDES BETTER OUTCOMES: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilpreet Kaur

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decreased core stability displaces center of gravity away from base of support reducing activity participation of athlete. Present study was conducted to study the effect of core stabilization exercises after reconstruction surgery of ACL on functional outcomes. Methods: 30 subjects following 5 months of ACL reconstruction were randomly assigned to either group that performed (study group or did not performed (control group additional core stabilization exercises in conjugation with standard rehabilitation protocol. Outcome measures were: activity level using Tegnar activity level scale and functional performance using triple hop test. Outcome measures were compared at day 1 and day 42 of the treatment. Result: Significant improvement was seen in the study group for Tegnar score with mean difference changing from 4.5 to 1.5 from day 1 to day 42 of treatment (p=0.039 while the control group showed improvement in mean difference changing from 3.8 to 1.4 (p=.045 from day 1 to day 42 of treatment. Highly significant improvement was seen in the study group for triple hop test with mean difference changing from 25 to 6.7 (p<.001 compared to the control group with mean difference changing from 15.2 to 9.7(p=.005 from day 1 to day 42 of treatment. Conclusions: Both the groups showed improvement for activity level and functional performance but highly significant improvement was seen in the study group for functional performance. Core stabilization exercises in conjugation with the standard ACL rehabilitation protocol results better improvement in the triple hop test.

  12. Influence of proprioceptive training in the improvement of neuromuscular performance after ACL reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubljanin-Raspopović Emilija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available ACL injury leads to a decrease in proprioceptive abilities, which can be improved with ACL surgery and postoperative rehabilitation. The goal of our study was to investigate whether the impact of coordinative training can be differentiated from the influence of surgery on proprioceptive improvement, and whether there is a correlation between improvement in coordinative abilities and other objective parameters of functional recovery. This follow-up study included 45 patients who had undergone ACL reconstruction and who were randomized into a conservative (TH-C and an intensive (TH-I rehabilitation group. In the TH-I group, coordinative training began earlier due to unrestricted weight-bearing. The groups were first compared preoperatively, then postoperatively, after 6 weeks, 4,6,9, and 12 months via the single leg stance test, the one leg hop test, the Lysholm knee score, and the Tegner score. A faster recovery of coordinative skills was registered in the TH-I group. Already after 6 weeks, highly statistically significant progress in one leg stance abilities was noticed, while in the TH-C group the same was not noticed until 4 months after surgery (p<0.01. Such a result speaks for the distinct influence of proprioceptive training on coordinative abilities. Also, a highly statistically significant correlation was noticed between the single leg stance, one leg hop, Lysholm, and Tegner tests (p<0.01, which points out the importance of a good rehabilitation programme, since neuromuscular performance cannot be separated from other parameters of functional recovery.

  13. Loading of the medial meniscus in the ACL deficient knee: A multibody computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guess, Trent M; Razu, Swithin

    2017-03-01

    The menisci of the knee reduce tibiofemoral contact pressures and aid in knee lubrication and nourishment. Meniscal injury occurs in half of knees sustaining anterior cruciate ligament injury and the vast majority of tears in the medial meniscus transpire in the posterior horn region. In this study, computational multibody models of the knee were derived from medical images and passive leg motion for two female subjects. The models were validated against experimental measures available in the literature and then used to evaluate medial meniscus contact force and internal hoop tension. The models predicted that the loss of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) constraint increased contact and hoop forces in the medial menisci by a factor of 4 when a 100N anterior tibial force was applied. Contact forces were concentrated in the posterior horn and hoop forces were also greater in this region. No differences were found in contact or hoop tension between the intact and ACL deficient (ACLd) knees when only a 5Nm external tibial torque was applied about the long axis of the tibia. Combining a 100N anterior tibial force and a 5Nm external tibial torque increased posterior horn contact and hoop forces, even in the intact knee. The results of this study show that the posterior horn region of the medial meniscus experiences higher contact forces and hoop tension, making this region more susceptible to injury, especially with the loss of anterior tibia motion constraint provided by the ACL. The contribution of the dMCL in constraining posterior medial meniscus motion, at the cost of higher posterior horn hoop tension, is also demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pain level after ACL reconstruction: A comparative study between free quadriceps tendon and hamstring tendons autografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buescu, Cristian Tudor; Onutu, Adela Hilda; Lucaciu, Dan Osvald; Todor, Adrian

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the pain levels and analgesic consumption after single bundle ACL reconstruction with free quadriceps tendon autograft versus hamstring tendon autograft. A total of 48 patients scheduled for anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction were randomized into two groups: the free quadriceps tendon autograft group (24 patients) and the hamstring tendons autograft group (24 patients). A basic multimodal analgesic postoperative program was used for all patients and rescue analgesia was provided with tramadol, at pain scores over 30 on the Visual Analog Scale. The time to the first rescue analgesic, the number of doses of tramadol and pain scores were recorded. The results within the same group were compared with the Wilcoxon signed test. Supplementary analgesic drug administration proved significantly higher in the group of subjects with hamstring grafts, with a median (interquartile range) of 1 (1.3) dose, compared to the group of subjects treated with a quadriceps graft, median = 0.5 (0.1.25) (p = 0.009). A significantly higher number of subjects with a quadriceps graft did not require any supplementary analgesic drug (50%) as compared with subjects with hamstring graft (13%; Z-statistics = 3.01, p = 0.002). The percentage of subjects who required a supplementary analgesic drug was 38% higher in the HT group compared with the FQT group. The use of the free quadriceps tendon autograft for ACL reconstruction leads to less pain and analgesic consumption in the immediate postoperative period compared with the use of hamstrings autograft. Level I Therapeutic study. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Inefficacy of Kinesio-Taping(®) on early postoperative pain after ACL reconstruction: Prospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborie, M; Klouche, S; Herman, S; Gerometta, A; Lefevre, N; Bohu, Y

    2015-12-01

    Kinesio-Taping(®) (K-Tape) is used in sports traumatology with the aim of reducing pain and improving blood and lymph circulation. The main objective of the present study was to assess the efficacy of K-Tape on early postoperative pain after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The study hypothesis was that K-Tape significantly decreases pain. A prospective non-randomized comparative study was conducted in 2013-2014 and included all patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction by hamstring graft. Analgesia was standardized. Two groups, "K-Tape" and "controls", were formed according to the days on which the study physiotherapist was present. The K-Tape compression/decompression assembly was applied immediately postoperatively and maintained for 3days. Patients filled out online questionnaires. The main assessment criterion was mean postoperative pain (D0-D3) on a 0-to-10 scale. Secondary criteria were analgesia intake on the three WHO levels, awakening during the night of D0 due to pain, signs of postoperative discomfort, and patient satisfaction. Sixty patients (30 per group) were included, 57 of whom could be assessed: 28 K-Tape, 29 controls; 44 male, 13 female; mean age, 30.9±8.9 years. At inclusion, the two groups were comparable. There was no significant difference in mean (D0-D3) knee pain intensity: 3.8±2.2 for K-Tape, and 3.9±2 for controls (P=0.93). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) found no significant intergroup difference in evolution of pain (P=0.34). There were no other significant differences on the other assessment criteria. K-Tape showed no efficacy on early postoperative pain following ACL reconstruction. III; prospective non-randomized comparative study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Does Extended Preoperative Rehabilitation Influence Outcomes 2 Years After ACL Reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, Mathew J.; Logerstedt, David S.; Grindem, Hege; Axe, Michael J.; Risberg, May Arna; Engebretsen, Lars; Huston, Laura J.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Background Rehabilitation before anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (ACLR) is effective at improving postoperative outcomes at least in the short term. Less is known about the effects of preoperative rehabilitation on functional outcomes and return-to-sport (RTS) rates 2 years after reconstruction. Purpose/Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to compare functional outcomes 2 years after ACLR in a cohort that underwent additional preoperative rehabilitation, including progressive strengthening and neuromuscular training after impairments were resolved, compared with a nonexperimental cohort. We hypothesized that the cohort treated with extended preoperative rehabilitation would have superior functional outcomes 2 years after ACLR. Study Design Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods This study compared outcomes after an ACL rupture in an international cohort (Delaware-Oslo ACL Cohort [DOC]) treated with extended preoperative rehabilitation, including neuromuscular training, to data from the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) cohort, which did not undergo extended preoperative rehabilitation. Inclusion and exclusion criteria from the DOC were applied to the MOON database to extract a homogeneous sample for comparison. Patients achieved knee impairment resolution before ACLR, and postoperative rehabilitation followed each cohort's respective criterion-based protocol. Patients completed the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee form and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) at enrollment and again 2 years after ACLR. RTS rates were calculated for each cohort at 2 years. Results After adjusting for baseline IKDC and KOOS scores, the DOC patients showed significant and clinically meaningful differences in IKDC and KOOS scores 2 years after ACLR. There was a significantly higher (P rehabilitation consisting of progressive strengthening and neuromuscular training, followed by a criterion

  17. Effect of ACL reconstruction tunnels on stress in the distal femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinski, P; O'Farrell, M; Bell, K; Gilbertson, L; Fu, F H

    2013-04-01

    This study examined the change in femoral stress caused by graft tunnels drilled for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Using a computational model, the number, geometry and position of the graft tunnels exits were varied to determine the effect on bone stress. A finite element model of the distal femur was developed from a CT scan of a cadaveric knee. To assess the model, the strain calculated computationally was compared to experimentally measured strains in eleven unpaired human cadaver femurs. Using the computational model, the number, geometry and position of the graft tunnel exits were varied to determine the effect on bone stress based on the stress concentration factor: the ratio of bone stress with tunnels to intact bone stress. The results indicated that the second tunnel in double-bundle ACL reconstruction results in approximately a 20 % increase in the maximum femoral stress as compared to single-bundle reconstruction. The highest stresses occur at the tunnel exits. The position of the tunnel exits effects femoral stress with the stress increasing slightly (AM SCR from 0.7 to 1 and PL SCR from 1.2 to 1.3) when the AM tunnel exit is moved anteriorly and having greater increases as the posterior lateral (PL) tunnel exit is moved laterally (PL SCR from 1.2 to 1.7) or posteriorly (PL SCR from 1.2 to 2). In anatomical ACL reconstruction, the tunnel entrances are dictated by anatomy; however, there can be variations in tunnel exit positions. Consideration should be given when positioning tunnel exits on the effect on stress in the femur. Moving the PL tunnel exit laterally or posteriorly increases in the stress at the PL tunnel exit.

  18. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K Kim

    Full Text Available Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (p<5x10-8. We found, however, four and three polymorphisms with p-values that were borderline significant (p<10-6 for Achilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries.

  19. Differences in muscle strength after ACL reconstruction do not influence cardiorespiratory responses to isometabolic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília S. Andrade

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate whether the muscle strength decrease that follows anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction would lead to different cardiorespiratory adjustments during dynamic exercise. Method: Eighteen active male subjects were submitted to isokinetic evaluation of knee flexor and extensor muscles four months after ACL surgery. Thigh circumference was also measured and an incremental unilateral cardiopulmonary exercise test was performed separately for both involved and uninvolved lower limbs in order to compare heart rate, oxygen consumption, minute ventilation, and ventilatory pattern (breath rate, tidal volume, inspiratory time, expiratory time, tidal volume/inspiratory time at three different workloads (moderate, anaerobic threshold, and maximal. Results: There was a significant difference between isokinetic extensor peak torque measured in the involved (116.5±29.1 Nm and uninvolved (220.8±40.4 Nm limbs, p=0.000. Isokinetic flexor peak torque was also lower in the involved limb than in the uninvolved limb (107.8±15.4 and 132.5±26.3 Nm, p=0.004, respectively. Lower values were also found in involved thigh circumference as compared with uninvolved limb (46.9±4.3 and 48.5±3.9 cm, p=0.005, respectively. No differences were found between the lower limbs in any of the variables of the incremental cardiopulmonary tests at all exercise intensities. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that, four months after ACL surgery, there is a significant deficit in isokinetic strength in the involved limb, but these differences in muscle strength requirement do not produce differences in the cardiorespiratory adjustments to exercise. Based on the hypotheses from the literature which explain the differences in the physiological responses to exercise for different muscle masses, we can deduce that, after 4 months of a rehabilitation program after an ACL reconstruction, individuals probably do not present differences in muscle oxidative and

  20. Nonsurgical or Surgical Treatment of ACL Injuries: Knee Function, Sports Participation, and Knee Reinjury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindem, Hege; Eitzen, Ingrid; Engebretsen, Lars; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Risberg, May Arna

    2014-01-01

    Background: While there are many opinions about the expected knee function, sports participation, and risk of knee reinjury following nonsurgical treatment of injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), there is a lack of knowledge about the clinical course following nonsurgical treatment compared with that after surgical treatment. Methods: This prospective cohort study included 143 patients with an ACL injury. Isokinetic knee extension and flexion strength and patient-reported knee function as recorded on the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) 2000 form were collected at baseline, six weeks, and two years. Sports participation was reported monthly for two years with use of an online activity survey. Knee reinjuries were reported at the follow-up evaluations and in a monthly online survey. Repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA), generalized estimating equation (GEE) models, and Cox regression analysis were used to analyze group differences in functional outcomes, sports participation, and knee reinjuries, respectively. Results: The surgically treated patients (n = 100) were significantly younger, more likely to participate in level-I sports, and less likely to participate in level-II sports prior to injury than the nonsurgically treated patients (n = 43). There were no significant group-by-time effects on functional outcome. The crude analysis showed that surgically treated patients were more likely to sustain a knee reinjury and to participate in level-I sports in the second year of the follow-up period. After propensity score adjustment, these differences were nonsignificant; however, the nonsurgically treated patients were significantly more likely to participate in level-II sports during the first year of the follow-up period and in level-III sports over the two years. After two years, 30% of all patients had an extensor strength deficit, 31% had a flexor strength deficit, 20% had patient-reported knee function below the normal range, and

  1. Reliability of a field-based drop vertical jump screening test for ACL injury risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redler, Lauren H; Watling, Jonathan P; Dennis, Elizabeth R; Swart, Eric; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    There is an epidemic of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in youth athletes. Poor neuromuscular control is an easily modifiable risk factor for ACL injury, and can be screened for by observing dynamic knee valgus on landing in a drop vertical jump test. This study aims to validate a simple, clinically useful population-based screening test to identify at-risk athletes prior to participation in organized sports. We hypothesized that both physicians and allied health professionals would be accurate in subjectively assessing injury risk in real-time field and office conditions without motion analysis data and would be in agreement with each other. We evaluated the inter-rater reliability of risk assessment by various observer groups, including physicians and allied health professionals, commonly involved in the care of youth athletes. Fifteen athletes age 11-17 were filmed performing a drop vertical jump test. These videos were viewed by 242 observers including orthopaedic surgeons, orthopaedic residents/fellows, coaches, athletic trainers (ATCs), and physical therapists (PTs), with the observer asked to subjectively estimate the risk level of each jumper. Objective injury risk was calculated using normalized knee separation distance (measured using Dartfish, Alpharetta, GA), based on previously published studies. Risk assessments by observers were compared to each other to determine inter-rater reliability, and to the objectively calculated risk level to determine sensitivity and specificity. Seventy one observers repeated the test at a minimum of 6 weeks later to determine intra-rater reliability. Between groups, the inter-rater reliability was high, κ = 0.92 (95% CI 0.829-0.969, p vertical jump screening test to identify athletes at risk for ACL injury. Our study shows good inter- and intra-rater reliability and high sensitivity and suggests that screening can be performed without significant training by physicians as well as allied health professionals

  2. Characteristics of injured children attending the emergency department : patients potentially in need of rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturms, L.M.; van der Sluis, C.K.; Groothoff, J.W.; Ten Duis, H.J.; Eisma, W.H.

    Objective: To provide an epidemiological overview of the characteristics of injured children and to compare hospitalized and nonhospitalized injured children to identify predictors of hospitalization and, with that, possible predictors of disablement. Design: Retrospective analysis of data obtained

  3. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome With Valvular Vegetations in Acute Q Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Thuny, Franck; Bardin, Nathalie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Edouard, Sophie; Bessis, Simon; Guimard, Thomas; Weitten, Thierry; Martin-Barbaz, François; Texereau, Michèle; Ayouz, Khelifa; Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Patrizia; Habib, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier

    2016-03-01

    Coxiella burnetii endocarditis is considered to be a late complication of Q fever in patients with preexisting valvular heart disease (VHD). We observed a large transient aortic vegetation in a patient with acute Q fever and high levels of IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (IgG aCL). Therefore, we sought to determine how commonly acute Q fever could cause valvular vegetations associated with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, which would be a new clinical entity. We performed a consecutive case series between January 2007 and April 2014 at the French National Referral Center for Q fever. Age, sex, history of VHD, immunosuppression, and IgG aCL assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were tested as potential predictors. Of the 759 patients with acute Q fever and available echocardiographic results, 9 (1.2%) were considered to have acute Q fever endocarditis, none of whom had a previously known VHD. After multiple adjustment, very high IgG aCL levels (>100 immunoglobulin G-type phospholipid units; relative risk [RR], 24.9 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 4.5-140.2]; P = .002) and immunosuppression (RR, 10.1 [95% CI, 3.0-32.4]; P = .002) were independently associated with acute Q fever endocarditis. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with valvular vegetations in acute Q fever is a new clinical entity. This would suggest the value of systematically testing for C. burnetii in antiphospholipid-associated cardiac valve disease, and performing early echocardiography and antiphospholipid dosages in patients with acute Q fever. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Risk factors for subsequent impaired driving by injured passengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purssell, Roy A; Chan, Herbert; Brown, Douglas; Fang, Ming; Brubacher, Jeffrey R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate of, and risk factors for, subsequent impaired driving activity (IDA) in a cohort of injured passengers who were treated for injuries in a Canadian trauma center. We studied adult passengers who were occupants in vehicles involved in motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) and either included in the British Columbia (BC) trauma registry (January 1, 1992-December 31, 2004) or treated in the emergency department (ED) of Vancouver General Hospital (VGH; January 1, 1999-December 31, 2003). Passengers were linked to their driver's license and hence to their driving record using personal health number and demographic information. Injured passengers were stratified into 3 groups based on their blood alcohol concentration (BAC) at time of ED presentation: group 1: BAC = 0, group 2: 0 17.3 mM (0.08%). Two outcome variables were studied: involvement in a subsequent IDA and time to their first subsequent IDA. IDA was defined as a criminal code conviction for impaired driving, a 24-h or 90-day license suspension for impaired driving, and/or involvement in an MVC where police cited alcohol as a factor. Time to first IDA following the index event among passenger BAC groups was compared with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Cox proportional hazards models were employed to examine the effect of various potential risk factors on time to engage in first IDA. Injured passengers with any BAC at the time of ED visit were more likely to engage in IDA and had their first IDA sooner after the index event than those with zero BAC. Among this cohort of injured passengers, 12.1 percent with BAC = 0, 29.9 percent with 0 17.3 mM (0.08%) engaged in IDA. Compared to passengers with BAC = 0, group 3 passengers and group 2 passengers were 2.06 times and 1.79 times more likely to engage in future IDA. Twenty-five percent of injured passengers engaged their first IDA by 57 and 38 months in groups 2 and 3, respectively. Previous IDA and being male were also

  5. Sialic acid accelerates the electrophoretic velocity of injured dorsal root ganglion neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Chen-xu Li; Guo-ying Ma; Min-fang Guo; Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury has been shown to result in ectopic spontaneous discharges on soma and injured sites of sensory neurons, thereby inducing neuropathic pain. With the increase of membrane proteins on soma and injured site neurons, the negatively charged sialic acids bind to the external domains of membrane proteins, resulting in an increase of this charge. We therefore speculate that the electrophoretic velocity of injured neurons may be faster than non-injured neurons. The present stud...

  6. Relationship between knee kinetic outcome measures in vertical counter movement jumps and self-reported function in ACL reconstructed subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Anders Falk

    2014-01-01

    and Traumatology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark Introduction: Altered loading pattern of the medial aspect of the knee has been associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are associated......Relationship between knee kinetic outcome measures in counter movement jumps and self-reported function in ACL reconstructed subjects Brekke AF1,2, Nielsen DB2, Holsgaard-Larsen A2 1School of physiotherapy, University College Zealand, Denmark 2Orthopaedic Research Unit, Department of Orthopaedics...... with early-onset OA with associated pain, functional limitations, and decreased quality of life. However, specific knee loading pattern of the medial aspect has not been investigated during different jump-tasks in ACL-reconstructed patients. The purpose was to investigate potential kinetic differences...

  7. Falling up the stairs: the equivalent of 'bashing it with a bible' for an ACL ganglion cyst of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacombe, Peter Jonathan; Robinson, James

    2012-03-27

    Intra-articular anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) cysts are rare, the pathogenesis remains unknown, with trauma often implicated. Often asymptomatic, incidental MRI findings, 11% produce symptoms such as pain, locking or instability. Treatment of intra-articular ganglia differs from the traditional 'bash it with a bible' mantra for ganglia elsewhere with surgical debridement generally indicated for symptomatic cases. This case report describes a 43-year-old male car mechanic who presented with a symptomatic ACL cyst diagnosed on MRI. While waiting for surgery the patient fell up his stairs at home, causing forced hyperflexion of his knee. After an initial sharp pain, within 24 h the patient experienced complete resolution of symptoms. Postfall MRI showed no evidence of the initial lesion, leading to our conclusion that for this patient, a fall up the stairs was the equivalent of 'bashing it with a bible' for an ACL ganglion cyst of the knee.

  8. Characterization of high hydrostatic pressure-injured Bacillus subtilis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, Takashi; Kimura, Keitarou; Morimatsu, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Kazutaka

    2017-06-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects various cellular processes. Using a sporulation-deficient Bacillus subtilis strain, we characterized the properties of vegetative cells subjected to HHP. When stationary-phase cells were exposed to 250 MPa of HHP for 10 min at 25 °C, approximately 50% of cells were viable, although they exhibited a prolonged growth lag. The HHP-injured cells autolyzed in the presence of NaCl or KCl (at concentrations ≥100 mM). Superoxide dismutase slightly protected the viability of HHP-treated cells, whereas vegetative catalases had no effect. Thus, unlike HHP-injured Escherichia coli, oxidative stress only slightly affected vegetative B. subtilis subjected to HHP.

  9. ACL reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your surgery. You may have to wear a knee brace for the first 1 to 4 weeks. You also may need crutches for 1 to 4 weeks. Most people are allowed to move their knee right after surgery. This may help prevent stiffness. ...

  10. Imagery use by injured athletes: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driediger, Molly; Hall, Craig; Callow, Nichola

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to expand our knowledge and increase our understanding of imagery use by athletes in sport-injury rehabilitation using a qualitative approach. The participants were 10 injured athletes who were receiving physiotherapy at the time they were interviewed. During the interviews, the athletes provided extensive information about their use of imagery during injury rehabilitation and it was clear that they believed imagery served cognitive, motivational and healing purposes in effectively rehabilitating an injury. Cognitive imagery was used to learn and properly perform the rehabilitation exercises. They employed motivational imagery for goal setting (e.g. imagined being fully recovered) and to enhance mental toughness, help maintain concentration and foster a positive attitude. Imagery was used to manage pain. The methods they employed for controlling pain included using imagery to practise dealing with expected pain, using imagery as a distraction, imagining the pain dispersing, and using imagery to block the pain. With respect to what they imaged (i.e. the content of their imagery), they employed both visual and kinaesthetic imagery and their images tended to be positive and accurate. It was concluded that the implementation of imagery alongside physical rehabilitation should enhance the rehabilitation experience and, therefore, facilitate the recovery rates of injured athletes. Moreover, it was recommended that those responsible for the treatment of injured athletes (e.g. medical doctors, physiotherapists) should understand the benefits of imagery in athletic injury rehabilitation, since it is these practitioners who are in the best position to encourage injured athletes to use imagery.

  11. Psychiatric morbidity among physically injured Syrian refugees in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nuaimi, Saleem; Aldandashi, Samer; Easa, Abdul Kadir Saed; Saqqur, Maher

    2018-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, the mental health status of physically injured Syrian refugees has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among physically injured Syrian refugees in Turkey receiving treatment at the main rehabilitation centre near the Syrian border. This is a cross sectional study. Information was collected from consenting injured Syrian refugees at Dar-el-Shefa'a Hospital in Reyhanlı (Turkey) during a one week period in December 2012 and another one week period in August 2013. A clinical psychiatric interview was conducted to determine a diagnosis according to the diagnostic criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) IV-TR. A total of 40 refugees consented and completed a clinical psychiatric interview. All refugees in this study did not have a significant past psychiatric history. The most prevalent current diagnosis was major depressive disorder (22.5%), adjustment disorder (20%), and post-traumatic stress disorder (15%). Five (12.5%) patients had no evidence of a psychiatric disorder. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among injured Syrian refugees in our study was extremely high. This may help guide the treatment and management of this select population. This study had a low number of participants. The method of assessment was not standardized with a validated tool. This study may help guide the treatment and management of this select population, both in neighbouring countries and as resettled refugees in Western host countries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Early diagnostics of infectiouscomplications in injured persons with heavy traumas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Svistunov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study specific features of the etiological structure of infectiouscomplications occurring early in treatment of heavily injured patients is established and the need is demonstrated for bacteriological examination of clinicalmaterials according to a developed algorithm on the second or third day after admission to hospital, which contributes totimely isolation of etiological agents of infectiouscomplications, rational etiotropic antibacterial treatment and reduced mortality.

  13. Injured pedestrians in Cape Town - the role of alcohol

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    average, 35.6 years old. They were most frequently injured at night and over weekends. The BAC was positive in. 62.1 % of pedestrians, and the mean BAC was 0.19 g/dl. Most pedestrians had at least one lower limb injury and nearly half had a head injury; however, BAC-positive pedestrians were 2.6 times more likely to ...

  14. Posterior horn lateral meniscal tears simulating meniscofemoral ligament attachment in the setting of ACL tear: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Lawrence S.; Jacobson, Jon A.; Jamadar, David A.; Caoili, Elaine; Kalume-Brigido, Monica [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wojtys, Edward [University of Michigan, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive, Box 391, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan Sports Medicine Program, Department of MedSport, 24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive, Box 391, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2007-05-15

    We have noted apparent far lateral meniscal attachment of the meniscofemoral ligament (MFL) with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. This study evaluates MFL attachment and association with posterior horn lateral meniscus (PHLM) tear. Nine months of knee arthroscopy reports were reviewed to classify the PHLM and ACL as torn or normal. After excluding those with prior knee surgery, MR images were reviewed by two radiologists to determine the number of images lateral to PCL, which showed the ligaments of Humphrey and Wrisberg visible as structures separate from the PHLM. Any patient with abnormal PHLM surface signal not continuous with the MFL was excluded. MRI findings were compared with arthroscopy using Student's t test and Fisher's exact test. Of the 54 participants, 5 had PHLM tears and 49 were normal. Twenty-one had ACL tears; all those with an PHLM tear had an ACL tear. The ligament of Humphrey inserted on average 0.9 consecutive images lateral to the PCL without an PHLM tear and 4.7 with an PHLM tear; the ligament of Wrisberg inserted on average 3.0 consecutive images without an PHLM tear and 4.5 with an PHLM tear (slice thickness/gap = 3 mm/0.5 mm). There was a significant association between PHLM tear and number of images (p = 0.0028), and between ACL tear and this type of PHLM tear (p = 0.0064). Apparent far lateral meniscal extension of a meniscofemoral ligament (greater than or equal to four images lateral to the PCL) should be considered as a possible PHLM tear, especially in the setting of an ACL tear. (orig.)

  15. EXPERIMENTAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF FAILED TENDON AUTO- AND ALLOGRAFTS AFTER ACL RECONSTRUCTION IN EARLY POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rybin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study – search for morphological cause of failure for free tendon auto and allografts after ACL reconstruction of the knee joint in early postoperative period during in vivo experiment. Materials and methods. Experiment included two groups of rabbits, each group consisting of 9 animals. In the first group the authors performed ACL autografting by semitendinous tendon harvested from operated limb. In the second group, ACL allografting was made by foot flexor tendon harvested earlier in rabbits excluded from present or other experiments after pretreatment and sterilization in modified Belyakov’s medium. Results. The major cause for failure of ACL tendon grafts after reconstruction in early postoperative period is the necrosis of intraarticular portion of auto or allograft on the 15th day after the procedure. In case of overexposure of the graft in early period the authors observed rupture along intraarticular portion or - more probable - along the demarcation area (serrated line rather than graft slipping from bone tunnel with slackening. Intra-tunnel graft portion during first several days after the procedure became surrounded by granulated tissue in contrast to intraarticular portion that remained bare of such support. Conclusion. Comparative experimental and morphological study of two options of ACL reconstruction demonstrated a uniformity of alterations in dynamics with a certain delay in development of compensatory and adaptive processes after allografting. Necrosis (or homogenization of intraarticular portion of auto or allograft is the cause for potential failure of ACL reconstruction in case of an extremely early and unjustified active rehabilitation.

  16. Steeper posterior tibial slope markedly increases ACL force in both active gait and passive knee joint under compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouane, H; Shirazi-Adl, A; Adouni, M; Hashemi, J

    2014-04-11

    The role of the posterior tibial slope (PTS) in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) risk of injury has been supported by many imaging studies but refuted by some in vitro works. The current investigation was carried out to compute the effect of ±5(o) change in PTS on knee joint biomechanics in general and ACL force/strain in particular. Two validated finite element (FE) models of the knee joint were employed; one active lower extremity musculoskeletal model including a complex FE model of the knee joint driven by in vivo kinematics/kinetics collected in gait of asymptomatic subjects, and the other its isolated unconstrained passive tibiofemoral (TF) joint considered under 1400 N compression at four different knee flexion angles (0°-45°). In the TF model, the compression force was applied at the joint mechanical balance point causing no rotations in sagittal and frontal planes. Changes in PTS moderately affected muscle forces and joint contact forces at mid-stance period. Both active (at mid-stance) and passive (at all flexion angles) models showed a substantial increase in the anterior tibial translation and ACL force as PTS increased with reverse trends as PTS decreased. In the active model of gait at mid-stance, ACL force increased by 75% (from 181 N to 317 N) in steeper PTS but decreased by 44% (to 102 N) in flatter PTS. The posterolateral bundle of ACL carried the load at smaller flexion angles with a shift to its anteromedial bundle as flexion increased. In accordance with earlier imaging studies, greater PTS is a major risk factor for ACL rupture especially in activities involving large compression forces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High non-anatomic tunnel position rates in ACL reconstruction failure using both transtibial and anteromedial tunnel drilling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaecker, Vera; Zapf, Tabea; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Pfeiffer, Thomas; Kanakamedala, Ajay C; Wafaisade, Arasch; Shafizadeh, Sven

    2017-09-01

    Although it is well known from cadaveric and biomechanical studies that transtibial femoral tunnel (TT) positioning techniques are associated with non-anatomic tunnel positions, controversial data exist as so far no clinical differences could have been found, comparing transtibial with anteromedial techniques (AM). The purpose of the study was to analyze if graft failure following TT ACL reconstruction was more commonly associated with non-anatomic tunnel position in comparison with the AM technique. We hypothesized that, compared to AM techniques, non-anatomic tunnel positions correlate with TT tunnel positioning techniques. A total of 147 cases of ACL revision surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Primary ACL reconstructions were analyzed regarding the femoral tunnel drilling technique. Femoral and tibial tunnel positions were determined on CT scans using validated radiographic measurement methods. Correlation analysis was performed to determine differences between TT and AM techniques. A total of 101 cases were included, of whom 64 (63.4%) underwent the TT technique and 37 (36.6%) the AM technique for primary ACL reconstruction. Non-anatomic femoral tunnel positions were found in 77.2% and non-anatomical tibial tunnel positions in 40.1%. No correlations were found comparing tunnel positions in TT and AM techniques, revealing non-anatomic femoral tunnel positions in 79.7 and 73% and non-anatomic tibial tunnel positions in 43.7 and 35.1%, respectively (p > 0.05). Considerable rates of non-anatomic femoral and tibial tunnel positions were found in ACL revisions with both transtibial and anteromedial femoral drilling techniques. Despite the potential of placing tunnels more anatomically using an additional AM portal, this technique does not ensure anatomic tunnel positioning. Consequently, the data highlight the importance of anatomic tunnel positioning in primary ACL reconstruction, regardless of the applied drilling technique.

  18. Use of transtibial aimer via the accessory anteromedial portal to identify the center of the ACL footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celentano, Umberto; Cardoso, Marcos P A; Martins, Cesar A Q; Ramirez, Claudia P; van Eck, Carola F; Smolinski, Patrick; Fu, Freddie H

    2012-01-01

    To assess the ability of a transtibial aimer with a 7-mm off-set in a standardized position to reach the center of the ACL footprint on the femur through the AM portal. Nineteen cadaveric knees were dissected, and the perimeter of the femoral ACL footprint was marked. The aimer was placed just superior to the medial joint line close to the medial condyle through the AM portal. The guide was rested upon the posterior cortex and placed in three different positions: (A) at zero degrees in frontal plane and 60° in axial plane, (B) at 45° in frontal and 45° in axial, and (C) at the center of the ACL insertion site under direct visualization. A digital camera was used to take pictures on the axial plane, and Image J software was used for angle measurement. Aluminum beads were used to mark the three positions indicated by the aimer, and CT scans were performed. The distances from the true center of the ACL to each point were determined. Position A resulted in femoral tunnel placement furthest from the center of the ACL footprint (8.6 mm). Position B was at a distance of 3.2 mm, and position C was the most accurate, with an average distance of 2.0 mm. The angles required by Position C varied with an average of 54° ± 11° in the frontal plane and an average of 44° ± 6° in the axial plane. The 7-mm transtibial aimer was unable to reach the center of ACL footprint at a fixed orientation.

  19. Mitochondria Localize to Injured Axons to Support Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung Min; Baig, Huma S; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-12-21

    Axon regeneration is essential to restore the nervous system after axon injury. However, the neuronal cell biology that underlies axon regeneration is incompletely understood. Here we use in vivo, single-neuron analysis to investigate the relationship between nerve injury, mitochondrial localization, and axon regeneration. Mitochondria translocate into injured axons so that average mitochondria density increases after injury. Moreover, single-neuron analysis reveals that axons that fail to increase mitochondria have poor regeneration. Experimental alterations to axonal mitochondrial distribution or mitochondrial respiratory chain function result in corresponding changes to regeneration outcomes. Axonal mitochondria are specifically required for growth-cone migration, identifying a key energy challenge for injured neurons. Finally, mitochondrial localization to the axon after injury is regulated in part by dual-leucine zipper kinase 1 (DLK-1), a conserved regulator of axon regeneration. These data identify regulation of axonal mitochondria as a new cell-biological mechanism that helps determine the regenerative response of injured neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding contextual influences of community reintegration among injured servicemembers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Brent L; McGuire, Francis A; Linder, Sandra M; Britt, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    As part of a larger mixed-methods research project investigating the influence of contextual factors on community reintegration (CR), this qualitative study sought to understand the subjective experiences of injured servicemembers and their perception of how contextual factors influenced their CR. More specifically, this article addresses how the influences of contextual factors differ between injured servicemembers with different levels of CR. Using a phenomenological framework, semistructured interviews were conducted with nine injured, community-dwelling servicemembers with low, moderate, and high levels of CR (three per category). Participants provided in-depth descriptions of the contextual barriers and facilitators of CR. Thematic analysis indicated the importance of social support and personal factors (e.g., self-efficacy, personal motivation) as the primary means for being reintegrated into their homes and communities. Other themes indicated factors that had an indirect but important influence on CR, including adapted sports, recreation, and other social programs; rehabilitation programs and therapists; school, work, and volunteering; and organizations and policies in developing social supports and personal factors. Comparisons between servicemembers indicated participants with low CR described many more contextual barriers and far fewer contextual facilitators to reintegration than those with high CR. Those with moderate CR were unique in that they described many facilitators and barriers to reintegration.

  1. Importance of considering injured microorganisms in sterilization validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Hideharu

    2006-09-01

    Disinfection or sterilization treatment by heating, irradiation, or chemicals can cause injury to microorganisms at sublethal levels. Microbial injury is the inability to grow under conditions suitable for the uninjured microorganisms. This inability of injured microorganisms to grow is explained in terms of more complex or different nutritional requirements or in terms of increased sensitivity to environmental conditions such as incubation conditions (time or temperature) or to chemical agents such as halogen compounds. Injured microorganisms can be distinguished from those that are dead or mutated by their ability to regain normal physiological activity when placed in appropriate conditions for cultivation. The return to normal physiological function has been termed repair. The extent and severity of sublethal injury, the mechanisms of injury, and the mechanisms and degree of recovery vary with the sterilization procedures, the species, the strains, the condition of the microorganism, and the methods of repair. Injury to spore formers has been detected at different stages of the spore cycle. The sites of injury include damage to enzymes, membrane disruption, and/or damage to DNA or RNA. Information on the sublethal injury and recovery of microorganisms is very important in evaluating sterilization/disinfection procedures. This paper supplies academic as well as practical information dealing with the repair, and detection of injured microorganisms for performing reproducible sterilization validation.

  2. Decreased mortality after prehospital interventions in severely injured trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meizoso, Jonathan P; Valle, Evan J; Allen, Casey J; Ray, Juliet J; Jouria, Jassin M; Teisch, Laura F; Shatz, David V; Namias, Nicholas; Schulman, Carl I; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2015-08-01

    We test the hypothesis that prehospital interventions (PHIs) performed by skilled emergency medical service providers during ground or air transport adversely affect outcome in severely injured trauma patients. Consecutive trauma activations (March 2012 to June 2013) transported from the scene by air or ground emergency medical service providers were reviewed. PHI was defined as intubation, needle decompression, tourniquet, cricothyroidotomy, or advanced cardiac life support. In 3,733 consecutive trauma activations (71% blunt, 25% penetrating, 4% burns), age was 39 years, 74% were male, Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 5, and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) was 15, with 32% traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 7% overall mortality. Those who received PHI (n = 130, 3.5% of the trauma activations) were more severely injured: ISS (26 vs. 5), GCS (3 vs. 15), TBI (57% vs. 31%), Revised Trauma Score (RTS, 5.45 vs. 7.84), Trauma and Injury Severity Score (TRISS, 1.32 vs. 4.89), and mortality (56% vs. 5%) were different (all p blunt injury, high ISS, and long prehospital times (all p blunt trauma, and air transport were similar, but mortality was significantly lower (43% vs. 23%, p= 0.021). In our urban trauma system, PHIs are associated with a lower incidence of mortality in severely injured trauma patients and do not delay transport to definitive care. Prognostic/epidemiologic study, level III; therapeutic study, level IV.

  3. Radioprotection provides functional mechanics but delays healing of irradiated tendon allografts after ACL reconstruction in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Aaron U; Culp, Brian M; Gatt, Charles J; Dunn, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Successful protection of tissue properties against ionizing radiation effects could allow its use for terminal sterilization of musculoskeletal allografts. In this study we functionally evaluate Achilles tendon allografts processed with a previously developed radioprotective treatment based on (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide) crosslinking and free radical scavenging using ascorbate and riboflavin, for ovine anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction was performed using double looped allografts, while comparing radioprotected irradiated and fresh frozen allografts after 12 and 24 weeks post-implantation, and to control irradiated grafts after 12 weeks. Radioprotection was successful at preserving early subfailure mechanical properties comparable to fresh frozen allografts. Twelve week graft stiffness and anterior-tibial (A-T) translation for radioprotected and fresh frozen allografts were comparable at 30 % of native stiffness, and 4.6 and 5 times native A-T translation, respectively. Fresh frozen allograft possessed the greatest 24 week peak load at 840 N and stiffness at 177 N/mm. Histological evidence suggested a delay in tendon to bone healing for radioprotected allografts, which was reflected in mechanical properties. There was no evidence that radioprotective treatment inhibited intra-articular graft healing. This specific radioprotective method cannot be recommended for ACL reconstruction allografts, and data suggest that future efforts to improve allograft sterilization procedures should focus on modifying or eliminating the pre-crosslinking procedure.

  4. Identification of types of landings after blocking in volleyball associated with risk of ACL injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahradnik, David; Jandacka, Daniel; Farana, Roman; Uchytil, Jaroslav; Hamill, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    Landing with a low knee flexion angle after volleyball block jumps may be associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The aim of the present study was to identify the types of volleyball landings after blocks where the knee flexion angle is found to be under a critical knee flexion angle value of 30° at the instant of the first peak of the ground reaction force (GRF). Synchronized kinematic and kinetic data were collected for each trial. T-tests were used to determine if each knee flexion angle at the instant of the peak GRF was significantly different from the critical value of 30°. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare knee flexion angle, time to first peak and the magnitude of the first peak of the resultant GRF and knee stiffness. Significantly lower knee flexion angles were found in the "go" landing (p = .01, ES = 0.6) and the "reverse" landing (p = .02, ES = 0.6) only. The results for knee flexion angle and GRF parameters indicated a significant difference between a "reverse" and "go" and other types of landings, except the "side stick" landing for GRF. The "reverse" and "go" landings may present a risk for ACL injury due to the single-leg landing of these activities that have an associated mediolateral movement.

  5. A comparison of hamstring muscle activity during different screening tests for non-contact ACL injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, Rasmus S; Bencke, Jesper; Andersen, Lars L; Myklebust, Grethe; Kallemose, Thomas; Lauridsen, Hanne B; Hölmich, Per; Aagaard, Per; Zebis, Mette K

    2016-06-01

    Reduced ability to activate the medial hamstring muscles during a sports-specific sidecutting movement has been found to be a potential risk factor for non-contact ACL injury. However, whether a reduced ability to activate the medial hamstring muscle is a general neuromuscular phenomenon and thereby observable independently of the type of clinical screening tests used is not known. This cross sectional study investigated the rank correlation of knee joint neuromuscular activity between three different ACL injury risk screening tests. Sixty-two adolescent female elite football and handball players (16.7±1.3years) participated in the study. Using surface electromyography (EMG) assessment, the neuromuscular activity of medial hamstring muscle (semitendinosus, ST), lateral hamstring muscle (biceps femoris, BF) and quadriceps muscle (vastus lateralis, VL) were monitored during three standardized screening tests - i.e. one-legged horizontal hop (OLH), drop vertical jump (DJ) and sidecutting (SC). Neuromuscular pre-activity was measured in the time interval 10ms prior to initial contact on a force plate. For neuromuscular hamstring muscle pre-activity, correlation analysis (Spearman correlation coefficient) showed low-to-moderate correlations between SC and 1) DJ (rs=0.34-0.36, Pinjury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. ACL Injury Risk Factors Decrease & Jumping Performance Improvement in Female Basketball Players: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Pairot de Fontenay

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this explorative study was to determine the most effective physical training program to reduce neuromuscular risk factors of Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL tear and to improve jumping performance. Twenty-four female basketball players were divided into three groups: Specific Physical Training Group (SPTG, combined specific Physical and Mental Training Group (PMTG and Control Group (CG. The training program was conducted over a period of eight weeks including two sessions per week during basketball practice. Dynamic valgus, Peak Vertical Impact Force (PVIF, Rate of Force Development (RFD, and jumping performance were measured at pre- and post-tests. When all the participants were pooled, statistics showed a decrease (-36% in dynamic valgus. No significant results were observed for PVIF and RFD. Jumping performance improved by 12% in SPTG and remained constant in PMTG and CG. Adding specific physical training to basketball practice should be the most effective program to prevent ACL tear while improving jumping performance in young female basketball players.

  7. Sidestep cutting technique and knee abduction loading: implications for ACL prevention exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristianslund, Eirik; Faul, Oliver; Bahr, Roald; Myklebust, Grethe; Krosshaug, Tron

    2014-05-01

    Sidestep cutting technique is essential in programmes to prevent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. A better understanding of how technique affects potentially harmful joint loading may improve prevention programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of sidestep cutting technique on maximum knee abduction moments. Cross-sectional study. Whole-body kinematics and knee joint kinetics were calculated in 123 female handball players (mean±SD, 22.5±7.0 years, 171±7 cm, 67±7 kg) performing sidestep cutting. Three cuts from each side were analysed. Linear regression was applied between selected technique factors and maximum knee abduction moment during the first 100 ms of the contact phase. Furthermore, we investigated to what degree the abduction moment originated from the magnitude of the ground reaction force (GRF) or the knee abduction moment arm of the GRF. Technique factors explained 62% of the variance in knee abduction moments. Cut width, knee valgus, toe landing, approach speed and cutting angle were the most significant predictors. An increase in one of these factors of 1 SD increased the knee abduction moment from 12% to 19%. The effect of the moment arm of the GRF was more important than the force magnitude for maximum knee abduction moments. Lower knee abduction loads during sidestep cutting may be achieved if cuts are performed as narrow cuts with low knee valgus and toe landings. These factors may be targeted in ACL injury prevention programmes.

  8. MRI of double-bundle ACL reconstruction: evaluation of graft findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiekara, Tommi; Paakkala, Antti [Tampere University Hospital, Medical Imaging Centre, Tampere (Finland); Jaervelae, Timo [Sports Clinic and Hospital Mehilaeinen, Tampere (Finland); Huhtala, Heini [University of Tampere, School of Health Sciences, Tampere (Finland)

    2012-07-15

    To demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of double-bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction grafts. Sixty-six patients with DB ACL reconstruction were evaluated with MRI 2 years postoperatively. Graft thickness was measured separately by two musculoskeletal radiologists. The MRI findings of graft disruption, signal intensity (SI) changes, cystic degeneration, arthrofibrosis, and impingement were analyzed. The statistical significance of the association between MRI findings was calculated. The mean anteromedial (AM) graft thickness was reduced 9% and the mean posterolateral (PL) graft thickness was reduced 18% from the original graft thickness. Disruption was seen in 3% of AM grafts and 6% of PL grafts and a partial tear in 8 and 23%, respectively. Both grafts were disrupted in 3% of patients. Increased SI was seen in 14% of intact AM grafts and in 60% of partially torn AM grafts (p = 0.032). In PL grafts the increased SI was seen in 51% of the intact grafts and in 93% of the partially torn grafts (p = 0.005). Cystic degeneration was seen in 8% of AM grafts and in 5% of PL grafts. Diffuse arthrofibrosis was seen in 5% of patients and a localized cyclops lesion in 3% of patients. Impingement of the AM graft was seen in 8% of patients. Both grafts were disrupted in 3% of patients. Also, the frequencies of other complications were low. The use of orthogonal sequences in the evaluation of the PL graft SI seems to cause volume-averaging artefacts. (orig.)

  9. SYNOVIAL CYST IN THE PROJECTION OF TIBIAL TUNNEL AFTER ACL RECONSTRUCTION (CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Bogatov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ACL  tears  are the  most  widespread  lesions  among  isolated  trauma  of knee  ligaments  that  require  early  surgical treatment especially in young active patients. There  are various ACL reconstruction techniques where femur and tibia tunnels are formed and graft is fixed by cannulated interference screws. One of the possible complications is the formation of a postoperative soft tissue cyst in the projection of tibial tunnel.  The nature  as well as mechanism of cyst formation  is still unclear.A relevant  clinical case of cyst formation  in a patient five years after ACL grating  is described  in this publication. MRI findings demonstrated that  the origin of the cyst was hole of the tibial interference screw.Conclusion. The authors  observed that  synovial cyst was formed due to use of cannulated interference screws where synovial  fluid was leaking  from joint  cavity  through screw holes. Cystectomy and  autografting of tibial  bone tunnel allowed to reduce such complication.

  10. Evaluation of stability, sensorimotor and symmetry of football players after ACL reconstruction by MFT S3 tool

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Šimon

    2014-01-01

    Theme: Evaluation of stability, sensorimotor and symmetry of football players after ACL reconstruction by MFT S3 tool. Student: Bc. Simon Otto Supervisor: PhDr. Ales Kaplan, PhD. Aims: The aim of the diploma thesis is evaluation of stability, sensorimotor and symmetry of chosen group of football players (n=4) after ACL injury by MFT S3 check test. Methodology: The level of stability, sensorimotor and symmetry was measured by MFT S3 tool and then evaluated with activities during the reconditio...

  11. Do graft diameter or patient age influence the results of ACL reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Jean Baptiste; Ruiz, Nicolas; Coupry, Augustin; Bowen, Mark; Robert, Henri

    2016-09-01

    Hamstring tendons are commonly used as a graft source for ACL reconstruction. This study seeks to determine whether either the diameter of the tendon graft or the age of the patient influences the outcome of the ACL reconstruction when measured using a standard, previously validated laxity measurement device. This is a retrospective study of 88 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction with a short, quadrupled tendon technique, using the semitendinosus ± gracilis tendons. Patients included in this study were sequential, unilateral, complete ACL ruptures. The patients were followed for a minimum of 1 year postoperatively, with a mean follow-up of 26 months. Patients were divided into three groups according to the diameter (Ø) of the graft: group 1 (32 patients): 8 mm ≤ Ø ≤ 9 mm; group 2 (28 patients): 9 mm  10 mm. Three groups with differential laxity at 134 N (Δ134 = healthy side vs. operated side) measured with the laximeter GNRB(®) were compared. The risk of residual laxity (OR) between the three groups taking age, gender, BMI and meniscus status into account was calculated. A side-to-side laxity >3 mm was considered as a residual laxity. The mean patient age at the time of reconstruction was 29.4 years. The three groups were comparable. Postoperative Δ134 was 1.50 ± 1.3, 1.59 ± 1.5 and 2 ± 1.7 mm for groups 1 through 3, respectively. Δ134 > 3 mm was observed in three patients in group 1, four patients in group 2 and nine patients in group 3. As compared to group 1, OR was 1.46 (95 % CI 0.35-6.05) and 3.31 (95 % CI 0.89-12.34) in groups 2 and 3, respectively. Adjustment for age, gender, BMI and meniscus did not change the estimates [OR 1.44 (95 % CI 0.34-6.16) and 3.92 (95 % CI 1-15.37)] in groups 2 and 3, respectively. Patients younger than 20 had a significantly higher average postoperative laximetry (2.4 ± 1.5 mm) compared to those aged 20 years and over (1.5 ± 1.5 mm) (p = 0.03), regardless of the

  12. Concurrent assessments of lower limb loading patterns, mechanical muscle strength and functional performance in ACL-patients - A cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Jensen, C; Mortensen, N H M

    2014-01-01

    Full recovery in muscle strength and functional performance may not be achieved after ACL-injury. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate loading patterns during jumping, muscle function and functional performance in ACL-reconstructed patients and to investigate the origin of between-limb...

  13. Description of the attachment geometry of the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles of the ACL from arthroscopic perspective for anatomical tunnel placement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luites, J.W.H.; Wymenga, A.B.; Blankevoort, L.; Kooloos, J.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) consists of an anteromedial bundle (AMB) and a posterolateral bundle (PLB). A reconstruction restoring the functional two-bundled nature should be able to approximate normal ACL function better than the most commonly used single-bundle reconstructions. Accurate

  14. Description of the attachment geometry of the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles of the ACL from arthroscopic perspective for anatomical tunnel placement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luites, Joan W. H.; Wymenga, Ate B.; Blankevoort, Leendert; Kooloos, Jan G. M.

    2007-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) consists of an anteromedial bundle (AMB) and a posterolateral bundle (PLB). A reconstruction restoring the functional two-bundled nature should be able to approximate normal ACL function better than the most commonly used single-bundle reconstructions. Accurate

  15. Joint loads resulting in ACL rupture: Effects of age, sex, and body mass on injury load and mode of failure in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaker, Carina L; Little, Christopher B; Clarke, Elizabeth C

    2017-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are a common knee injury with a known but poorly understood association with secondary joint injuries and post-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA). Female sex and age are known risk factors for ACL injury but these variables are rarely explored in mouse models of injury. This study aimed to further characterize a non-surgical ACL injury model to determine its clinical relevance across a wider range of mouse specifications. Cadaveric and anesthetized C57BL/6 mice (9-52 weeks of age) underwent joint loading to investigate the effects of age, sex, and body mass on ACL injury mechanisms. The ACL injury load (whole joint load required to rupture the ACL) was measured from force-displacement data, and mode of failure was assessed using micro-dissection and histology. ACL injury load was found to increase with body mass and age (p compliments studies in human cadaveric knees, and provides a basis for determining the severity of joint injury relative to a major ACL tear in mice, and for selecting joint loading conditions in future experiments using this model. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1754-1763, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Thrombosis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome during acute Q fever: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Bardin, Nathalie; Bessis, Simon; Nouiakh, Nadia; Douliery, Charlaine; Edouard, Sophie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bosseray, Annick; Epaulard, Olivier; Branger, Stéphanie; Chaudier, Bernard; Blanc-Laserre, Karine; Ferreira-Maldent, Nicole; Demonchy, Elisa; Roblot, France; Reynes, Jacques; Djossou, Felix; Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Patrizia; Camoin-Jau, Laurence; Mege, Jean-Louis; Raoult, Didier

    2017-07-01

    Q fever is a neglected and potentially fatal disease. During acute Q fever, antiphospholipid antibodies are very prevalent and have been associated with fever, thrombocytopenia, acquired heart valve disease, and progression to chronic endocarditis. However, thrombosis, the main clinical criterion of the 2006 updated classification of the antiphospholipid syndrome, has not been assessed in this context. To test whether thrombosis is associated with antiphospholipid antibodies and whether the criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome can be met in patients with acute Q fever, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the French National Referral Center for Q fever.Patients included were diagnosed with acute Q fever in our Center between January 2007 and December 2015. Each patient's history and clinical characteristics were recorded with a standardized questionnaire. Predictive factors associated with thrombosis were assessed using a rare events logistic regression model. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (IgG aCL) assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were tested on the Q fever diagnostic serum. A dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and thrombosis was tested using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.Of the 664 patients identified for inclusion in the study, 313 (47.1%) had positive IgG aCL and 13 (1.9%) were diagnosed with thrombosis. Three patients fulfilled the antiphospholipid syndrome criteria. After multiple adjustments, only positive IgG aCL (relative risk, 14.46 [1.85-113.14], P = .011) were independently associated with thrombosis. ROC analysis identified a dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and occurrence of thrombosis (area under curve, 0.83, 95%CI [0.73-0.93], P acute Q fever, antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and acquired valvular heart disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies should be systematically assessed in acute Q fever patients. Hydroxychloroquine

  17. Rationale for the selective administration of tranexamic acid to inhibit fibrinolysis in the severely injured patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ernest E; Moore, Hunter B; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Sauaia, Angela; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C

    2016-04-01

    Postinjury fibrinolysis can manifest as three distinguishable phenotypes: 1) hyperfibrinolysis, 2) physiologic, and 3) hypofibrinolysis (shutdown). Hyperfibrinolysis is associated with uncontrolled bleeding due to clot dissolution; whereas, fibrinolysis shutdown is associated with organ dysfunction due to microvascular occlusion. The incidence of fibrinolysis phenotypes at hospital arrival in severely injured patients is: 1) hyperfibrinolysis 18%, physiologic 18%, and shutdown 64%. The mechanisms responsible for dysregulated fibrinolysis following injury remain uncertain. Animal work suggests hypoperfusion promotes fibrinolysis, while tissue injury inhibits fibrinolysis. Clinical experience is consistent with these observations. The predominant mediator of postinjury hyperfibrinolysis appears to be tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) released from ischemic endothelium. The effects of tPA are accentuated by impaired hepatic clearance. Fibrinolysis shutdown, on the other hand, may occur from inhibition of circulating tPA, enhanced clot strength impairing the binding of tPA and plasminogen to fibrin, or the inhibition of plasmin. Plasminogen activator inhibitor -1 (PAI-1) binding of circulating tPA appears to be a major mechanism for postinjury shutdown. The sources of PAI-1 include endothelium, platelets, and organ parenchyma. The laboratory identification of fibrinolysis phenotype, at this moment, is best determined with viscoelastic hemostatic assays (TEG, ROTEM). While D-dimer and plasmin antiplasmin (PAP) levels corroborate fibrinolysis, they do not provide real-time assessment of the circulating blood capacity. Our clinical studies indicate that fibrinolysis is a very dynamic process and our experimental work suggests plasma first resuscitation reverses hyperfibrinolysis. Collectively, we believe recent clinical and experimental work suggest antifibrinolytic therapy should be employed selectively in the acutely injured patient, and optimally guided by TEG or

  18. Report of the Clinical and Functional Primary Outcomes in Men of the ACL-SPORTS Trial: Similar Outcomes in Men Receiving Secondary Prevention With and Without Perturbation Training 1 and 2 Years After ACL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arundale, Amelia J H; Cummer, Kathleen; Capin, Jacob J; Zarzycki, Ryan; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2017-02-21

    Athletes often are cleared to return to activities 6 months after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction; however, knee function measures continue to improve up to 2 years after surgery. Interventions beyond standard care may facilitate successful return to preinjury activities and improve functional outcomes. Perturbation training has been used in nonoperative ACL injury and preoperative ACL reconstruction rehabilitation, but has not been examined in postoperative ACL reconstruction rehabilitation, specifically return to sport rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were differences at 1 and 2 years after ACL reconstruction between the male SAP (strengthening, agility, and secondary prevention) and SAP+PERT (SAP protocol with the addition of perturbation training) groups with respect to (1) quadriceps strength and single-legged hop limb symmetry; (2) patient-reported knee outcome scores; (3) the proportion who achieve self-reported normal knee function; and (4) the time from surgery to passing return to sport criteria. Forty men who had completed ACL reconstruction rehabilitation and met enrollment criteria (3-9 months after ACL reconstruction, > 80% quadriceps strength limb symmetry, no pain, full ROM, minimal effusion) were randomized into the SAP or SAP+PERT groups of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Specialised Post-Operative Return to Sports trial (ACL-SPORTS), a single-blind randomized clinical study of secondary prevention and return to sport. Quadriceps strength, single-legged hopping, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) 2000 subjective knee form, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)-sports and recreation, and KOOS-quality-of-life subscales were collected 1 and 2 years after surgery by investigators blind to group. Athletes were categorized as having normal or abnormal knee function at each time point based on IKDC score, and the time until athletes passed strict return

  19. Transtibial ACL reconstruction technique fails to position drill tunnels anatomically in vivo 3D CT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, Sebastian; Forsythe, Brian; Wong, Andrew K; Tashman, Scott; Irrgang, James J; Fu, Freddie H

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to visualize and quantify the positions of femoral and tibial tunnels in patients who underwent traditional transtibial single-bundle ACL reconstruction, as performed by multiple surgeons, utilizing 3D CT models, and to compare these positions to our previously reported anatomical tunnel positions. Fifty-eight knee computed tomography (CT) scans were performed on patients who underwent primary or revision transtibial single-bundle ACL reconstruction, and three-dimensional reconstructions of the CT scans were aligned within an anatomical coordinate system. The position of femoral tunnel aperture centers was measured with (1) the quadrant method and (2) in the anatomic posterior-to-anterior and proximal-to-distal directions. The position of tibia tunnel aperture centers were measured similarly, in the anterior-to-posterior and medial-to-lateral dimensions on the tibial plateau. Comparisons were made to previously established anatomical tunnel positions, and data were presented as "mean value ± standard deviation (range)." The location of tibial tunnels was at 48.0 ± 5.4% (35.6-59.5%) of the anterior-to-posterior plateau depth and at 47.9 ± 2.9% (42.2-57.4%) of the medial-to-lateral plateau width. The location of femoral tunnels was at 55.8 ± 8.0% (41.5-79.5%) in the anatomic posterior-to-anterior direction and at 41.2 ± 10.4% (15.1-67.4%) in the proximal-to-distal directions. Utilizing a quadrant method, femoral tunnels were positioned at 37.4 ± 5.1% (24.9-50.6%) from the proximal condylar surface, parallel to Blumensaat line, and at 11.0 ± 7.3% (-6.0-28.7%) from the notch roof, perpendicular to Blumensaat line. In summary, tibial tunnels were positioned medial to the anatomic PL position (p tunnels were positioned anterior to both AM and PL anatomic tunnel locations (p tunnels within the native ACL insertion site. To achieve anatomical graft placement, other surgical techniques should be considered. IV.

  20. The effects of attentional focus on jump performance and knee joint kinematics in patients after ACL reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gokeler, Alli; Benjaminse, Anne; Welling, Wouter; Alferink, Malou; Eppinga, Peter; Otten, Bert

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an internal and external attentional focus on single leg hop jump distance and knee kinematics in patients after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Design: Experimental. Setting: Outpatient physical therapy facility. Participants: Sixteen

  1. An intelligent recovery progress evaluation system for ACL reconstructed subjects using integrated 3-D kinematics and EMG features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Owais A; Senanayake, S M N Arosha; Zaheer, Dansih

    2015-03-01

    An intelligent recovery evaluation system is presented for objective assessment and performance monitoring of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACL-R) subjects. The system acquires 3-D kinematics of tibiofemoral joint and electromyography (EMG) data from surrounding muscles during various ambulatory and balance testing activities through wireless body-mounted inertial and EMG sensors, respectively. An integrated feature set is generated based on different features extracted from data collected for each activity. The fuzzy clustering and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference techniques are applied to these integrated feature sets in order to provide different recovery progress assessment indicators (e.g., current stage of recovery, percentage of recovery progress as compared to healthy group, etc.) for ACL-R subjects. The system was trained and tested on data collected from a group of healthy and ACL-R subjects. For recovery stage identification, the average testing accuracy of the system was found above 95% (95-99%) for ambulatory activities and above 80% (80-84%) for balance testing activities. The overall recovery evaluation performed by the proposed system was found consistent with the assessment made by the physiotherapists using standard subjective/objective scores. The validated system can potentially be used as a decision supporting tool by physiatrists, physiotherapists, and clinicians for quantitative rehabilitation analysis of ACL-R subjects in conjunction with the existing recovery monitoring systems.

  2. A Life of Learning: Nancy Siraisi. Charles Homer Haskins Prize Lecture for 2010. ACLS Occasional Paper, No. 67

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Council of Learned Societies, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Nancy Siraisi has been a prolific and leading scholar in the history of medicine and science of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. This lecture of hers is the twenty-eighth of series of lectures named for Charles Homer Haskins, first chairman of the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and himself a famed medievalist who brought…

  3. Lower limb asymmetry in mechanical muscle function: A comparison between ski racers with and without ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, M J; Aagaard, P; Herzog, W

    2015-06-01

    Due to a high incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-injury in alpine ski racers, this study aims to assess functional asymmetry in the countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), and leg muscle mass in elite ski racers with and without anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). Elite alpine skiers with ACL-R (n = 9; 26.2 ± 11.8 months post-op) and uninjured skiers (n = 9) participated in neuromuscular screening. Vertical ground reaction force during the CMJ and SJ was assessed using dual force plate methodology to obtain phase-specific bilateral asymmetry indices (AIs) for kinetic impulse (CMJ and SJ phase-specific kinetic impulse AI). Dual x-ray absorptiometry scanning was used to assess asymmetry in lower body muscle mass. Compared with controls, ACL-R skiers had increased AI in muscle mass (P ski racers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Motor learning strategies in basketball players and its implications for ACL injury prevention : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjaminse, Anne; Otten, Bert; Gokeler, Alli; Diercks, Ron L; Lemmink, Koen A P M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Adding external focus of attention (EF, focus on the movement effect) may optimize current anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programmes. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of an EF, by a visual stimulus and an internal focus, by a verbal

  5. Knee complaints and prognosis of osteoarthritis at 10 years : impact of ACL ruptures, meniscal tears, genetic predisposition and surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huetink, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we demonstrated that several known risk factors for knee OA development i.e. ACL ruptures, meniscal tears, the presence of hand OA and increased BMI, are already associated with knee OA development as demonstrated on radiographs and MR images early in life. Identifying these factors

  6. Motor learning strategies in basketball players and its implications for ACL injury prevention : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benjaminse, Anne; Otten, Bert; Gokeler, Alli; Diercks, Ron L.; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.

    Adding external focus of attention (EF, focus on the movement effect) may optimize current anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programmes. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of an EF, by a visual stimulus and an internal focus, by a verbal stimulus during

  7. Acute fatigue impairs neuromuscular activity of anterior cruciate ligament-agonist muscles in female team handball players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, M K; Bencke, J; Andersen, L L

    2011-01-01

    In sports, like team handball, fatigue has been associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. While effects of fatigue on muscle function are commonly assessed during maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC), such measurements may not relate to the muscle...... function during match play. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of muscle fatigue induced by a simulated handball match on neuromuscular strategy during a functional sidecutting movement, associated with the incidence of ACL injury. Fourteen female team handball players were tested...... in response to acute fatigue induced by handball match play. Thus, screening procedures should involve functional movements to reveal specific fatigue-induced deficits in ACL-agonist muscle activation during high-risk phases of match play....

  8. Alexithymia, impulsiveness, and psychopathology in nonsuicidal self-injured adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta, Michela; Dal Santo, Francesco; Rago, Alessio; Spoto, Andrea; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a multifaceted phenomenon and a major health issue among adolescents. A better understanding of self-injury comorbidities is crucial to improve our ability to assess, treat, and prevent NSSI. Purpose This study aimed at analyzing some of the psychobehavioral correlates of NSSI: psychological problems, alexithymia, impulsiveness, and sociorelational aspects. Patients and methods This was a case–control study. The clinical sample (n=33) included adolescents attending our unit for NSSI and other issues; the controls (n=79) were high-school students. Data were collected using six questionnaires: Youth Self-Report, Barratt’s Impulsiveness Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Children’s Depression Inventory, Symptom Checklist-90-R, and Child Behavior Checklist. Results Cases scored significantly higher in all questionnaires. Habitual self-injurers scored higher on impulsiveness and alexithymia. The gesture’s repetition seems relevant to the global clinical picture: habitual self-injurers appear more likely to seek help from the sociosanitary services. We found a difference between the self-injurers’ and their parents’ awareness of the disorder. Conclusion Habitual self-injurers show signs of having difficulty with assessing the consequences of their actions (nonplanning impulsiveness) and the inability to manage their feelings. Given the significantly higher scores found for cases than for controls on all the psychopathological scales, NSSI can be seen as a cross-category psychiatric disorder, supporting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders decision to include it as a pathological entity in its own right. PMID:27672324

  9. In-hospital mortality pattern of severely injured children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Hien Quoc; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although trauma remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children, less attention has been directed to this group of patients. Whilst there is considerable literature on trauma in adults, only few studies describe paediatric trauma. The aim of this study was to describe...... the mortality pattern of severely injured children admitted to a Danish level I trauma centre. METHODS: We included trauma patients aged 15 years or less, who subsequent a trauma team activation were admitted during the 9-year period 1999-2007. Data were collected prospectively for subjects who had a length...

  10. An ACL2 Mechanization of an Axiomatic Framework for Weak Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Selfridge

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Proving the correctness of programs written for multiple processors is a challenging problem, due in no small part to the weaker memory guarantees afforded by most modern architectures. In particular, the existence of store buffers means that the programmer can no longer assume that writes to different locations become visible to all processors in the same order. However, all practical architectures do provide a collection of weaker guarantees about memory consistency across processors, which enable the programmer to write provably correct programs in spite of a lack of full sequential consistency. In this work, we present a mechanization in the ACL2 theorem prover of an axiomatic weak memory model (introduced by Alglave et al.. In the process, we provide a new proof of an established theorem involving these axioms.

  11. Return to sport after ACL reconstruction: how, when and why? A narrative review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffagnini, Stefano; Grassi, Alberto; Serra, Margherita; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Allowing a patient to return to sport and unrestricted physical activity after ACL injury and reconstruction is one of the most challenging and difficult decisions an orthopaedic surgeon has to make. Indeed, many factors have to be taken into account before it can be considered safe for a patients to load a reconstructed knee. The current literature contains plenty of studies aimed at evaluating return to sport, and the factors that may affect or predict this outcome, e.g. intrinsic factors like genetics, biology, type of lesion, anatomical features, motivation and psychology, and extrinsic factors such as graft type, surgical technique, rehabilitation protocols, and biological support. It is possible that awareness of these issues could help the clinician to optimise outcomes, and possibly avoid failures too, although as yet no universal criteria for resuming sport have been produced.

  12. Anatomic single-bundle ACL surgery: consequences of tibial tunnel diameter and drill-guide angle on tibial footprint coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Bracht, H; Verhelst, L; Stuyts, B; Page, B; Bellemans, J; Verdonk, P

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the consequences of differences in drill-guide angle and tibial tunnel diameter on the amount of tibial anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) footprint coverage and the risk of overhang of the tibial tunnel aperture over the edges of the native tibial ACL footprint. Twenty fresh-frozen adult human knee specimens with a median age of 46 years were used for this study. Digital templates mimicking the ellipsoid aperture of tibial tunnels with a different drill-guide angle and a different diameter were designed. The centres of these templates were positioned over the geometric centre of the tibial ACL footprint. The amount of tibial ACL footprint coverage and overhang was calculated. Risk factors for overhang were determined. Footprint coverage and the risk of overhang were also compared between a lateral tibial tunnel and a classic antero-medial tibial tunnel. A larger tibial tunnel diameter and a smaller drill-guide angle both will create significant more footprint coverage and overhang. In 45% of the knees, an overhang was created with a 10-mm diameter tibial tunnel with drill-guide angle 45°. Furthermore, a lateral tibial tunnel was found not to be at increased risk of overhang. A larger tibial tunnel diameter and a smaller drill-guide angle both will increase the amount of footprint coverage. Inversely, larger tibial tunnel diameters and smaller drill-guide angles will increase the risk of overhang of the tibial tunnel aperture over the edges of the native tibial ACL footprint. A lateral tibial tunnel does not increase the risk of overhang.

  13. ACL/MCL transection affects knee ligament insertion distance of healing and intact ligaments during gait in the Ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, Janet E; Funakoshi, Yusei; Hariu, Mitsuhiro; Marchuk, Linda; Thornton, Gail M; Ronsky, Janet L; Zernicke, Ron; Shrive, Nigel G; Frank, Cyril B

    2009-08-25

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of combined transection of the anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments on the intact and healing ligaments in the ovine stifle joint. In vivo 3D stifle joint kinematics were measured in eight sheep during treadmill walking (accuracy: 0.4+/-0.4mm, 0.4+/-0.4 degrees ). Kinematics were measured with the joint intact and at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks after either surgical ligament transection (n=5) or sham surgery without transection (n=3). After sacrifice at 20 weeks, the 3D subject-specific bone and ligament geometry were digitized, and the 3D distances between insertions (DBI) of ligaments during the dynamic in vivo motion were calculated. Anterior cruciate ligament/medial collateral ligament (ACL/MCL) transection resulted in changes in the DBI of not only the transected ACL, but also the intact lateral collateral ligament (LCL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), while the DBI of the transected MCL was not significantly changed. Increases in the maximal ACL DBI (2 week: +4.2mm, 20 week: +5.7mm) caused increases in the range of ACL DBI (2 week: 3.6mm, 20 week: +3.8mm) and the ACL apparent strain (2 week: +18.9%, 20 week: +24.0%). Decreases in the minimal PCL DBI (2 week: -3.2mm, 20 week: -4.3mm) resulted in increases in the range of PCL DBI (2 week: +2.7mm, 20 week: +3.2mm). Decreases in the maximal LCL DBI (2 week: -1.0mm, 20 week: -2.0mm) caused decreased LCL apparent strain (2 week: -3.4%, 20 week: -6.9%). Changes in the mechanical environment of these ligaments may play a significant role in the biological changes observed in these ligaments.

  14. Sex-specific gait adaptations prior to and up to six months after ACL reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Stephanie L. Di; Hartigan, Erin H.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Controlled longitudinal laboratory study. OBJECTIVES Compare sagittal plane gait mechanics of men and women before and up to 6 months after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). BACKGROUND Aberrant gait patterns are ubiquitous after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and persist after ACLR despite skilled physical therapy. Sex influences post-operative function and second ACL injury risk, but its influence on gait adaptations after injury have not been investigated. METHODS Sagittal plane knee and hip joint excursions during midstance and internal knee and hip extension moments at peak knee flexion were collected on 12 women and 27 men using 3-dimensional gait analysis before (Screen) and after pre-operative physical therapy (Pre-sx), and 6 months after ACLR (6mo). Repeated measures analysis of variance models were used to determine whether limb asymmetries changed differently over time in men and women. RESULTS Significant time x limb x sex interactions were identified for hip and knee excursions and internal knee extension moments (P≤.007). Both sexes demonstrated smaller knee excursions on the involved compared to the uninvolved knee at each time point (P≤.007), but only women demonstrated a decrease in the involved knee excursion from pre-sx to 6mo (P=.03). Women also demonstrated smaller hip excursions (P<.001) and internal knee extension moments (P=.005) on the involved limb compared to the uninvolved limb at 6mo. Men demonstrated smaller hip excursions and knee moments on the involved limb compared to the uninvolved limb (main effects, P<.001). CONCLUSION The persistence of limb asymmetries in men and women 6 months after ACLR indicates that current rehabilitation efforts are inadequate for some individuals following ACLR. PMID:25627155

  15. Is there significant variation in the material properties of four different allografts implanted for ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, David; Willet, Thomas L; Glazebrook, Mark; Snow, Martyn; Stanish, William D

    2009-03-01

    The aims of our study were to: (1) determine if there are differences in the material properties of tendon obtained from implanted tibialis anterior, achilles, bone-patella- bone and tibialis posterior allografts; (2) determine the variability in material properties between the implanted specimens. A total of 60 specimens were collected from fresh frozen allografts implanted at ACL reconstruction. Specimens collected included 15 tibialis anterior, 15 tibialis posterior, 15 achilles and 15 bone-patella-bone tendons. Each specimen was mounted in a custom made cryogrip. The mounted specimens were loaded onto a MTS Testline servo-hydraulic testing machine in a uni-axial tensile test configuration. Specimens were subjected to a strain rate of 5% per second until the ultimate tensile stress (UTS), failure strain and high strain modulus was calculated for each specimen after being normalized for specimen dimensions. Individual material properties were tested using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Tukey's B test with a P value of <0.05 considered significant. Homogeneity of variance was assessed using the Levene's test. As a result, no significant difference was found between all four grafts with regards to UTS, failure strain or high strain linear modulus. The UTS was plotted against the modulus demonstrating a linear relationship which is typical of soft tissues. Significant variability in the results were observed. In conclusion, there was no significant statistical difference between the material properties of the four tendon allografts tested. But significant variability in results was observed within groups and between groups, which may provide one explanation for the range of results in allograft ACL reconstruction reported in the literature.

  16. Sialic acid accelerates the electrophoretic velocity of injured dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen-Xu; Ma, Guo-Ying; Guo, Min-Fang; Liu, Ying

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injury has been shown to result in ectopic spontaneous discharges on soma and injured sites of sensory neurons, thereby inducing neuropathic pain. With the increase of membrane proteins on soma and injured site neurons, the negatively charged sialic acids bind to the external domains of membrane proteins, resulting in an increase of this charge. We therefore speculate that the electrophoretic velocity of injured neurons may be faster than non-injured neurons. The present study established rat models of neuropathic pain via chronic constriction injury. Results of the cell electrophoresis test revealed that the electrophoretic velocity of injured neuronal cells was faster than that of non-injured (control) cells. We then treated cells with divalent cations of Ca(2+) and organic compounds with positive charges, polylysine to counteract the negatively charged sialic acids, or neuraminidase to specifically remove sialic acids from the membrane surface of injured neurons. All three treatments significantly reduced the electrophoretic velocity of injured neuronal cells. These findings suggest that enhanced sialic acids on injured neurons may accelerate the electrophoretic velocity of injured neurons.

  17. Sialic acid accelerates the electrophoretic velocity of injured dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-xu Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury has been shown to result in ectopic spontaneous discharges on soma and injured sites of sensory neurons, thereby inducing neuropathic pain. With the increase of membrane proteins on soma and injured site neurons, the negatively charged sialic acids bind to the external domains of membrane proteins, resulting in an increase of this charge. We therefore speculate that the electrophoretic velocity of injured neurons may be faster than non-injured neurons. The present study established rat models of neuropathic pain via chronic constriction injury. Results of the cell electrophoresis test revealed that the electrophoretic velocity of injured neuronal cells was faster than that of non-injured (control cells. We then treated cells with divalent cations of Ca 2+ and organic compounds with positive charges, polylysine to counteract the negatively charged sialic acids, or neuraminidase to specifically remove sialic acids from the membrane surface of injured neurons. All three treatments significantly reduced the electrophoretic velocity of injured neuronal cells. These findings suggest that enhanced sialic acids on injured neurons may accelerate the electrophoretic velocity of injured neurons.

  18. Multiple injections of leukoreduced platelet rich plasma reduce pain and functional impairment in a canine model of ACL and meniscal deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, James L; Smith, Patrick A; Bozynski, Chantelle C; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R; Stoker, Aaron M; Pfeiffer, Ferris M

    2016-04-01

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is used to treat many musculoskeletal disorders. We used a canine model to determine the effects of multiple intra-articular injections of leukoreduced PRP (ACP) on anterior cruciate ligament healing, meniscal healing, and progression of osteoarthritis (OA). With Animal Care and Use Committee (ACUC) approval, 12 dogs underwent partial ACL transection and meniscal release in one knee. At weeks 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8 after insult, dogs were treated with intra-articular injections (2 ml) of either ACP (n = 6) or saline (n = 6). Dogs were assessed over 6 months to determine comfortable range of motion (CROM), lameness, pain, effusion, kinetics, and radiographic and arthroscopic assessments. At 6-month endpoint, dogs were assessed for ACL material properties and histopathology. Saline-treated dogs had significantly (p knees showed moderate to severe synovitis, further ACL disruption, and medial compartment cartilage loss, and ACP-treated knees showed evidence of ACL repair and less severe synovitis. ACL material properties in ACP-treated knees were closer to normal than in saline-treated knees, however, the differences were not statistically significant. ACL histopathology was significantly (pknees compared to saline-treated knees. Five intra-articular injections of leukoreduced PRP had beneficial effects for ACL healing, improved range of motion, decreased pain, and improved limb function for up to 6 months in this model. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Mitochondrial redox signaling enables repair of injured skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Adam; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Defour, Aurelia; Hogarth, Marshall; Sreetama, Sen Chandra; Reed, Aaron; Scheffer, Luana; Chandel, Navdeep S; Jaiswal, Jyoti K

    2017-09-05

    Strain and physical trauma to mechanically active cells, such as skeletal muscle myofibers, injures their plasma membranes, and mitochondrial function is required for their repair. We found that mitochondrial function was also needed for plasma membrane repair in myoblasts as well as nonmuscle cells, which depended on mitochondrial uptake of calcium through the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Calcium uptake transiently increased the mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which locally activated the guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) RhoA, triggering F-actin accumulation at the site of injury and facilitating membrane repair. Blocking mitochondrial calcium uptake or ROS production prevented injury-triggered RhoA activation, actin polymerization, and plasma membrane repair. This repair mechanism was shared between myoblasts, nonmuscle cells, and mature skeletal myofibers. Quenching mitochondrial ROS in myofibers during eccentric exercise ex vivo caused increased damage to myofibers, resulting in a greater loss of muscle force. These results suggest a physiological role for mitochondria in plasma membrane repair in injured cells, a role that highlights a beneficial effect of ROS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  20. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the anterior cruciate ligament-return to sport after injury (ACL-RSI) scale into Turkish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harput, Gulcan; Tok, Damla; Ulusoy, Burak; Eraslan, Leyla; Yildiz, Taha Ibrahim; Turgut, Elif; Demirci, Serdar; Duzgun, Irem; Tunay, Volga Bayrakci; Baltaci, Gul; Ergun, Nevin

    2017-01-01

    To translate and culturally adapt the anterior cruciate ligament-return to sport after injury (ACL-RSI) scale into Turkish (ACL-RSI-Tr) and examine and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Turkish version in individuals who have undergone anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The ACL-RSI was forward- and back-translated, culturally adapted and validated on ninety-three Turkish individuals who had undergone ACL reconstruction (5 females, 88 males; age 28.7 ± 8.6 years; body mass 80.1 ± 13.9 kg; height 178.8 ± 6.9 cm; body mass index 25.0 ± 3.7 kg/m2). All patients completed the translated ACL-RSI, Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and International Knee Documentary Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm questionnaires. We then analysed the internal consistency, reliability and validity of the newly formed ACL-RSI-Tr scale. The ACL-RSI-Tr showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.86) and test-retest reliability (ICC 0.92) and was significantly correlated with the KOOS 'quality of life' (r = 0.58, p < 0.002), 'symptoms and stiffness' (r = 0.35, p = 0.001), 'pain' (r = 0.49, p < 0.001), 'sports' (r = 0.44, p < 0.001) and 'daily life' (r = 0.42, p < 0.001) subscales. The ACL-RSI-Tr also correlated significantly with the TSK (r = - 0.45, p < 0.001), Lysholm (r = 0.45, p < 0.001) and IKDC (r = 0.44, p < 0.001) scores. The Turkish version of the ACL-RSI scale was valid, discriminant, consistent and reliable in patients who had undergone ACL reconstruction. This score could be useful to evaluate the effect of psychological factors on return to sport following ACL surgery. Diagnostic study, Level I.

  1. Sex-dimorphic landing mechanics and their role within the noncontact ACL injury mechanism: evidence, limitations and directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaulieu Mélanie L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries continue to present in epidemic-like proportions, carrying significant short- and longer-term debilitative effects. With females suffering these injuries at a higher rate than males, an abundance of research focuses on delineating the sex-specific nature of the underlying injury mechanism. Examinations of sex-dimorphic lower-limb landing mechanics are common since such factors are readily screenable and modifiable. The purpose of this paper was to critically review the published literature that currently exists in this area to gain greater insight into the aetiology of ACL injuries in females and males. Using strict search criteria, 31 articles investigating sex-based differences in explicit knee and/or hip landing biomechanical variables exhibited during vertical landings were selected and subsequently examined. Study outcomes did not support the generally accepted view that significant sex-based differences exist in lower-limb landing mechanics. In fact, a lack of agreement was evident in the literature for the majority of variables examined, with no sex differences evident when consensus was reached. The one exception was that women were typically found to land with greater peak knee abduction angles than males. Considering knee abduction increases ACL loading and prospectively predicts female ACL injury risk, its contribution to sex-specific injury mechanisms and resultant injury rates seems plausible. As for the lack of consensus observed for most variables, it may arise from study-based variations in test populations and landing tasks, in conjunction with the limited ability to accurately measure lower-limb mechanics via standard motion capture methods. Regardless, laboratory-based comparisons of male and female landing mechanics do not appear sufficient to elucidate causes of injury and their potential sex-specificity. Sex-specific in vivo joint mechanical data, if collected accurately

  2. Incidence and MRI characterization of the spectrum of posterolateral corner injuries occurring in association with ACL rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frois Temponi, Eduardo [Hospital Madre Teresa, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Honorio de Carvalho, Lucio Jr. [Hospital Madre Teresa, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento do Aparelho Locomotor, Faculdade de Medicina, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Saithna, Adnan [Southport and Ormskirk Hospitals, Southport (United Kingdom); University of Liverpool, Department of Clinical Engineering, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Thaunat, Mathieu; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand [Centre Orthopedic Santy, FIFA Medical Center of Excellence, Ramsay-Generale de Sante, Hopital Prive Jean Mermoz, Lyon (France)

    2017-08-15

    To determine the incidence and MRI characteristics of the spectrum of posterolateral corner (PLC) injuries occurring in association with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. We carried out a level IV, retrospective case series study. All patients clinically diagnosed with an ACL rupture between July 2015 and June 2016 who underwent MRI of the knee were included in the study. In addition to standard MRI knee reporting, emphasis was placed on identifying injury to the PLC and a description of involvement of these structures by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Association with PLC involvement was sought with concomitant injuries using correlation analysis and logistic regression. One hundred sixty-two patients with MRI following ACL rupture were evaluated. Thirty-two patients (19.7%) had an injury to at least one structure of the PLC, including the inferior popliteomeniscal fascicle (n = 28), arcuate ligament (n = 20), popliteus tendon (n = 20), superior popliteomeniscal fascicle (n = 18), lateral collateral ligament (n = 8), popliteofibular ligament (n = 7), biceps tendon (n = 4), iliotibial band (n = 3), and fabellofibular ligament (n = 1). Seventy-five percent of all patients with combined ACL and PLC injuries had bone contusions involving the lateral compartment of the knee. The presence of these contusions strongly correlated with superior popliteomeniscal fascicle lesions (p < 0.05). There was no correlation between injuries to other structures of the PLC and other intra-articular lesions. Missed injuries of the PLC lead to considerable morbidity. The relevance of this study is to highlight that these injuries occur more frequently than previously described and that an appropriate index of suspicion, clinical examination, and MRI are all required to reduce the risk of missed diagnoses. The results of this study support previous suggestions that the rate of concomitant PLC injury in the ACL-deficient knee is under-reported. The rate of combined injuries in

  3. [Hospital-based psychological first aid provided to patients injured in the Lushan earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Min; Li, Xiao-Lin; Li, Jing; Huang, Xue-Hua; Tao, Qing-Lan; Luo, Xi

    2015-04-01

    In the aftermath of the 7.0 earthquake that struck Lushan in China's Sichuan Province on April 20, 2013, a psychological crisis intervention working group was established in a hospital that was treating earthquake victims. Patients at this hospital received psychological first aid that was delivered in accordance with scientific, systematic, and standardized principles. This first aid employed a "rooting mode" methodology and was designed as a supportive psychological intervention. Mental assessment results showed that the general mental health, acute stress reactions, and anxiety and depression status of all of the 131 injured who received the psychological intervention had significantly improved (p < .05) during the two-week intervention period. This paper introduces the basic principles used to develop and provide this first aid, the approach used to organize the working groups, the main contents of the intervention, specific methods used, and intervention outcomes. This information is provided as a reference for providing localized psychological assistance in the aftermath of a disaster incident.

  4. Gene expression changes in the injured spinal cord following transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells or olfactory ensheathing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Torres-Espín

    Full Text Available Transplantation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC or olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC have demonstrated beneficial effects after spinal cord injury (SCI, providing tissue protection and improving the functional recovery. However, the changes induced by these cells after their transplantation into the injured spinal cord remain largely unknown. We analyzed the changes in the spinal cord transcriptome after a contusion injury and MSC or OEC transplantation. The cells were injected immediately or 7 days after the injury. The mRNA of the spinal cord injured segment was extracted and analyzed by microarray at 2 and 7 days after cell grafting. The gene profiles were analyzed by clustering and functional enrichment analysis based on the Gene Ontology database. We found that both MSC and OEC transplanted acutely after injury induce an early up-regulation of genes related to tissue protection and regeneration. In contrast, cells transplanted at 7 days after injury down-regulate genes related to tissue regeneration. The most important change after MSC or OEC transplant was a marked increase in expression of genes associated with foreign body response and adaptive immune response. These data suggest a regulatory effect of MSC and OEC transplantation after SCI regarding tissue repair processes, but a fast rejection response to the grafted cells. Our results provide an initial step to determine the mechanisms of action and to optimize cell therapy for SCI.

  5. Acute Lung Injury: Making the Injured Lung Perform Better and Rebuilding Healthy Lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    chemotherapeutic agents, themselves, cause a syndrome with features of ALI. The pathology and pathophysiology of ALI are very complex and include features...pediatric lung disease, hypothyroidism , and neurological impairment (Krude et al., 2002). Inability to access the presumed very rare, multipo- tent...Schnabel, D., Neitzel, H., Tönnies, H., Weise, D., Lafferty, A., Schwarz, S., et al. (2002). Choreoathetosis, hypothyroidism , and pulmonary

  6. Acute Lung Injury: Making the Injured Lung Perform Better and Rebuilding Healthy Lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    original application was to derive new approaches to treat ALI with an emphasis on developing new modes of mechanical ventilation and developing cell...minimizing the known injurious effects of conventional mechanical ventilation in patients with ALI. In this past year, where this grant has been in a...supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation to ensure adequate oxygenation. Type I cells, which comprise the vast majority of the gas exchange surface

  7. Study on radioprotection effects of clinoptilolite on sub-acute radiation-injured mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na LI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To study the protection effect of clinoptilolite (Cp against radiation injury. Methods  Fortyeight male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into 6 groups, namely normal control group (distilled water + sham irradiation, radiation control group (distilled water + irradiation, 300mg/kg 523 group (200mg/kg nilestriol 24h before irradiation and 100mg/ kg nilestriol 4h after irradiation, 56mg/kg Cp group (56mg/kg Cp + irradiation, 167mg/kg Cp group (167mg/kg Cp + irradiation and 500mg/kg Cp group (500mg/kg Cp + irradiation. Seven days after the administration of the drug, all the mice but those from the normal control group were irradiated with γ-ray irradiation of 137Cs in the dose of 4.0Gy, at the rate of 0.75Gy/min. All the mice were given the drug for 14 days after irradiation. RBC, WBC and PLT counts in peripheral blood, superoxide dismutases (SOD activity, malondialdehyde (MDA level, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px level in blood serum, the content of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA and hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow were determined. Results  Compared with radiation control group, on 10th day after irradiation, RBC counts in peripheral blood of 56mg/kg Cp group and 167mg/kg Cp group were significantly higher (P<0.05, P<0.01, and WBC counts in peripheral blood of 56mg/kg Cp group and 500mg/kg Cp group were significantly higher (P<0.01. On 14th day after irradiation, compared with radiation control group, the SOD activities in blood serum of three Cp groups were elevated (P<0.05, P<0.01, the GSH-Px levels were elevated in blood serum of 167mg/kg Cp group and 500mg/kg Cp group (P<0.01, the DNA contents were significantly higher in 56mg/kg Cp group and 500mg/kg Cp group (P<0.05, P<0.01, the hematopoietic stem cells were significantly increased in number in bone marrow of three Cp groups (P<0.01. Conclusion  The clinoptilolite possesses protective effect against injury induced by 137Cs γ-irradiation in mice. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.01.15

  8. Acute Lung Injury: Making Injured Lungs Perform Better and Rebuilding Healthy Lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    derived, highly scalable, and since they can be readily derived from individual mice (or humans) they thereby circumvent immune and ethical issues... placentas collected during delivery, and mucosal cells collected by scraping or swab)? N/A Will the research data in this study be gathered through non...is typically depleted in ALI/ARDS, resulting in decreased lung compliance and increased risk of barotrauma. In vivo studies using normal guinea pigs

  9. Compensatory strategies in the language of closed head injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, C; Cleary, J

    1988-01-01

    The study reported here examined the nature and effectiveness of compensatory strategies appearing in the conversational discourse of six closed head injured patients. Subject performance on a range of communication measures was compared with their judged abilities on a taxonomy of 32 compensatory strategies. Results indicated that all subjects employed a wide range of strategies but to differential effect. The overall effectiveness of these strategies correlated strongly with performance on the oral language subtest of the Western Aphasia Battery, the Communicative Abilities in Daily Living Test and a pragmatic protocol. The development of compensation following brain injury is viewed as a process of equilibration, determined in part by neurological and subject variables, and in part by ecologic variables. The implications for therapeutic management are discussed.

  10. Resuscitation and coagulation in the severely injured trauma patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midwinter, Mark J.; Woolley, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Developments in the resuscitation of the severely injured trauma patient in the last decade have been through the increased understanding of the early pathophysiological consequences of injury together with some observations and experiences of recent casualties of conflict. In particular, the recognition of early derangements of haemostasis with hypocoagulopathy being associated with increased mortality and morbidity and the prime importance of tissue hypoperfusion as a central driver to this process in this population of patients has led to new resuscitation strategies. These strategies have focused on haemostatic resuscitation and the development of the ideas of damage control resuscitation and damage control surgery continuum. This in turn has led to a requirement to be able to more closely monitor the physiological status, of major trauma patients, including their coagulation status, and react in an anticipatory fashion. PMID:21149355

  11. Effects of hypertonic dextrose on injured rat skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunduracioglu, Burak; Ulkar, Bulent; Sabuncuoglu, Bizden T; Can, Belgin; Bayrakci, Kenan

    2006-04-01

    Histological examination of proliferative therapy effects on the healing process of muscular injury. We performed this study between March and August 2002 at Ankara University, School of Medicine, Laboratory of Animal Experiments, Ankara, Turkey. We used an experimental animal model by conducting a standardized cut injury of the gastrocnemius muscle in 30 adult male albino rats, which we divided into 2 groups; proliferative therapy group and control group. We evaluated the injured rat muscles by light microscopy on the fifth, eight, and twelfth day of injury. The muscular regeneration process began at day 5 in both the control and proliferative therapy groups. The proliferative therapy group revealed a prominent inflammatory reaction, fibroblast migration, and necrosis with accompanying regeneration and excessive connective tissue formation. We cannot consider proliferative therapy an appropriate treatment modality for muscular injuries, unless there is evidence of normal muscle physiology and biomechanics post traumatically.

  12. Evaluating Age in the Field Triage of Injured Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoko; Daya, Mohamud; Bulger, Eileen M.; Schreiber, Martin; Mackersie, Robert; Hsia, Renee Y.; Mann, N. Clay; Holmes, James F.; Staudenmayer, Kristan; Sturges, Zachary; Liao, Michael; Haukoos, Jason; Kuppermann, Nathan; Barton, Erik D.; Newgard, Craig D.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective In this study, we evaluated (1) trauma under-triage by age group; (2) the association between age and serious injury after accounting for other field triage criteria and confounders; and (3) the potential impact of a mandatory age triage criterion for field triage. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of injured children and adults transported by 48 EMS agencies to 105 hospitals in 6 regions of the Western U.S. from 2006 through 2008. We used probabilistic linkage to match EMS records to hospital records, including: trauma registries, state discharge databases and emergency department databases. The primary outcome measure was serious injury, as measured by an Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥ 16. We assessed under-triage (ISS ≥ 16 and triage-negative or transport to a non-trauma center) by age decile and used multivariable logistic regression models to estimate the association (linear and non-linear) between age and ISS ≥ 16, adjusted for important confounders. We also evaluated the potential impact of age on triage efficiency and trauma center volume. Results 260,027 injured patients were evaluated and transported by EMS over the 3-year study period. Under-triage increased for patients over 60 years of age, reaching approximately 60% for those older than 90 years. There was a strong non-linear association between age and ISS ≥ 16. For patients not meeting other triage criteria, the probability of serious injury was most notable after 60 years. A mandatory age triage criterion would have decreased under-triage at the expense of over-triage, with one ISS ≥ 16 patient identified for every 60–65 additional patients transported to major trauma centers. Conclusion Trauma under-triage increases in patients older than 60 years. While the probability of serious injury increases among triage-negative patients with increasing age, the use of a mandatory age triage criterion appears inefficient for improving field triage. PMID:22633339

  13. Accuracy of Prehospital Triage in Selecting Severely Injured Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskens, Frank J; van Rein, Eveline A J; van der Sluijs, Rogier; Houwert, Roderick M; Lichtveld, Robert Anton; Verleisdonk, Egbert J; Segers, Michiel; van Olden, Ger; Dijkgraaf, Marcel; Leenen, Luke P H; van Heijl, Mark

    2017-11-01

    A major component of trauma care is adequate prehospital triage. To optimize the prehospital triage system, it is essential to gain insight in the quality of prehospital triage of the entire trauma system. To prospectively evaluate the quality of the field triage system to identify severely injured adult trauma patients. Prehospital and hospital data of all adult trauma patients during 2012 to 2014 transported with the highest priority by emergency medical services professionals to 10 hospitals in Central Netherlands were prospectively collected. Prehospital data collected by the emergency medical services professionals were matched to hospital data collected in the trauma registry. An Injury Severity Score of 16 or more was used to determine severe injury. The quality and diagnostic accuracy of the field triage protocol and compliance of emergency medical services professionals to the protocol. A total of 4950 trauma patients were evaluated of which 436 (8.8%) patients were severely injured. The undertriage rate based on actual destination facility was 21.6% (95% CI, 18.0-25.7) with an overtriage rate of 30.6% (95% CI, 29.3-32.0). Analysis of the protocol itself, regardless of destination facility, resulted in an undertriage of 63.8% (95% CI, 59.2-68.1) and overtriage of 7.4% (95% CI, 6.7-8.2). The compliance to the field triage trauma protocol was 73% for patients with a level 1 indication. More than 20% of the patients with severe injuries were not transported to a level I trauma center. These patients are at risk for preventable morbidity and mortality. This finding indicates the need for improvement of the prehospital triage protocol.

  14. Endovascular transplantation of stem cells to the injured rat CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, Johan; Soederman, Mikael; Andersson, Tommy; Holmin, Staffan [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neuroradiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Le Blanc, Katarina [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Stem Cell Research, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Immunology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-10-15

    Transplantation procedures using intraparenchymal injection of stem cells result in tissue injury in addition to associated surgical risks. Intravenous injection of mesenchymal stem cells gives engraftment to lesions, but the method has low efficiency and specificity. In traumatic brain injuries (TBI), there is a transient breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and an inflammatory response, which increase migration of cells from blood to parenchyma. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the effect of intra-arterial administration on cellular engraftment. Experimental TBI was produced in a rat model. Endovascular technique was used to administer human mesenchymal stem cells in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. Evaluation of engraftment and side effects were performed by immunohistochemical analysis of the brain and several other organs. The results were compared to intravenous administration of stem cells. Intra-arterial transplantion of mesenchymal stem cells resulted in central nervous system (CNS) engraftment without thromboembolic ischemia. We observed a significantly higher number of transplanted cells in the injured hemisphere after intra-arterial compared to intravenous administration both 1 day (p<0.01) and 5 days (p<0.05) after the transplantation. Some cells were also detected in the spleen but not in the other organs analyzed. Selective intra-arterial administration of mesenchymal stem cells to the injured CNS is a minimally invasive method for transplantation. The method is significantly more efficient than the intravenous route and causes no side effects in the current model. The technique can potentially be used for repeated transplantation to the CNS after TBI and in other diseases. (orig.)

  15. approach to and management of acute ankle ligamentous injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    The anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), being the first to get injured ... Treatment protocols range from cast immobilisation to functional rehabilitation to acute ... Right foot: lateral view. Posterior talofibular ligament. Calcaneofibular ligament. Anterior talofibular ligament. Components of lateral. (collateral) ligament of ankle.

  16. The Effects of High-Intensity versus Low-Intensity Resistance Training on Leg Extensor Power and Recovery of Knee Function after ACL-Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bieler, Theresa; Sobol, Nanna Aue; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Persistent weakness is a common problem after anterior cruciate ligament- (ACL-) reconstruction. This study investigated the effects of high-intensity (HRT) versus low-intensity (LRT) resistance training on leg extensor power and recovery of knee function after ACL-reconstruction....... METHODS: 31 males and 19 females were randomized to HRT (n = 24) or LRT (n = 26) from week 8-20 after ACL-reconstruction. Leg extensor power, joint laxity, and self-reported knee function were measured before and 7, 14, and 20 weeks after surgery. Hop tests were assessed before and after 20 weeks. RESULTS......% versus 73% of noninjured leg, resp.; P = 0.027) and at week 20 (98% versus 83% of noninjured leg, resp.; P = 0.006) without adverse effects on joint laxity. No other between-group differences were found. CONCLUSION: High-intensity resistance training during rehabilitation after ACL-reconstruction can...

  17. Analysis of sport-injured pattern of anterior cruciate ligament in the reconstruction period of Chinese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yingjie; Zhou, Pu; Ma, Changyu

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the college students' injury patterns caused by sport activities in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction stage, and to estimate the association between activities at the time of injury and the odds of simplex ACL injuries. A cohort of 2548 college students with primary ACL reconstruction was recruited from Hebei Province, China. Football, basketball, sprint, table tennis and badminton had been chosen as the most prevalent sports activities causing injuries in colleges. The concurrent injury patterns at the time of ACL reconstruction were simplex ACL, meniscus, cartilage, and multi-ligament injuries. Compared with football, college students playing basketball were 4.95 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.61-8.76) times more likely to have simplex ACL tear, 2.31 (95% CI, 1.73-3.05) times more inclined to have lateral meniscus injury, 2.53 (95% CI, 1.22-3.67) times more likely to have a cartilage injury, and 1.93 (95% CI, 1.22-3.04) times more likely to have a medial meniscus injury. Students playing sprint were 2.04 (95% CI, 1.78-3.38) times more likely to have cartilage injury. Injury patterns are associated with certain sports. Compared with football, basketball has a greater possibility of leading to simplex ACL tear, as well as medial meniscus, lateral meniscus and cartilage injuries. Additionally, injury patterns observed during surgery may reflect the forces applied to the knee by the given sports performed.

  18. Oxygen Flow Rate Requirements of Critically Injured Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Military Med. 2013; 178(10):1121-1125. 4. Cabello JB, Burls A, Emparanza JI, Bayliss S, Quinn T. Oxygen therapy for acute myocardial infarction ...Simmonds M, Weatherall M, Beasley R. Routine use of oxygen in the treatment of myocardial infarction : systematic review. Heart. 2009; 95(3):198-202...overused in the prehospital setting, even in patients without severe traumatic injuries [3]. In many acute medical conditions, use of supplemental oxygen

  19. Broken Bioabsorbable Tibial Interference Screw after Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL Reconstruction using a Semitendinosus-gracilis Graft: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang ME Deborah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available When a patient presents with knee pain and locking after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction, a new meniscal injury or an osteochondral loose body are usually considered for differential diagnosis. We present the case of a 22-year-old female with just these complaints 6 months after ACL reconstruction surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the knee showed a broken screw tip which was later arthroscopically removed. At arthroscopy, an 11mm long broken bioabsorbable interference screw tip was found lying in the intercondylar notch; this resulted in a 0.5cm Outerbridge grade II chondral ulcer located at mid- patella. Both menisci and cruciate ligaments were intact and no other loose bodies were found in the knee joint.

  20. Big Five Personality Characteristics and Adherence to Clinic-Based Rehabilitation Activities after ACL Surgery: A Prospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Robert C; Brewer, Britton W; Cornelius, Allen E; Van Raalte, Judy L

    2014-05-30

    A prospective, longitudinal study was conducted to examine Big Five personality characteristics as predictors of adherence to clinic-based rehabilitation activities following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Participants (72 men, 36 women) completed a questionnaire assessing Big Five personality dimensions prior to surgery. For the first 7 weeks after surgery, participants' rehabilitation session attendance was recorded and rehabilitation professionals rated participants' adherence during rehabilitation sessions.. Results of multiple regression analyses indicated that the 5 personality factors explained 11 percent of the variance in attendance and 17 percent of the variance in adherence ratings, that agreeableness was a significant positive predictor of attendance, and that conscientiousness and openness to experience were significant positive predictors of adherence ratings. As a potential contributor to adherence, personality warrants consideration when implementing rehabilitation programs after ACL surgery.

  1. POTENTIAL FOR NON-CONTACT ACL INJURY BETWEEN STEP-CLOSE-JUMP AND HOP-JUMP TASKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-I Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the kinematics and kinetics during the landing of hop-jump and step-close-jump movements in order to provide further inferring that the potential risk of ACL injuries. Eleven elite male volleyball players were recruited to perform hop-jump and step-close-jump tasks. Lower extremity kinematics and ground reaction forces during landing in stop-jump tasks were recorded. Lower extremity kinetics was calculated by using an inverse dynamic process. Step-close-jump tasks demonstrated smaller peak proximal tibia anterior shear forces during the landing phase. In step-close-jump tasks, increasing hip joint angular velocity during initial foot-ground contact decreased peak posterior ground reaction force during the landing phase, which theoretically could reduce the risk of ACL injury

  2. Differentiation of different mixed Listeria strains and also acid-injured, heat-injured, and repaired cells of Listeria monocytogenes using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyarko, Esmond; Donnelly, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to differentiate mixed strains of Listeria monocytogenes and mixed strains of L. monocytogenes and Listeria innocua. FT-IR spectroscopy was also applied to investigate the hypothesis that heat-injured and acid-injured cells would return to their original physiological integrity following repair. Thin smears of cells on infrared slides were prepared from cultures for mixed strains of L. monocytogenes, mixed strains of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua, and each individual strain. Heat-injured and acid-injured cells were prepared by exposing harvested cells of L. monocytogenes strain R2-764 to a temperature of 56 ± 0.2°C for 10 min or lactic acid at pH 3 for 60 min, respectively. Cellular repair involved incubating aliquots of acid-injured and heat-injured cells separately in Trypticase soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract for 22 to 24 h; bacterial thin smears on infrared slides were prepared for each treatment. Spectral collection was done using 250 scans at a resolution of 4 cm(-1) in the mid-infrared wavelength region. Application of multivariate discriminant analysis to the wavelength region from 1,800 to 900 cm(-1) separated the individual L. monocytogenes strains. Mixed strains of L. monocytogenes and L. monocytogenes cocultured with L. innocua were successfully differentiated from the individual strains when the discriminant analysis was applied. Different mixed strains of L. monocytogenes were also successfully separated when the discriminant analysis was applied. A data set for injury and repair analysis resulted in the separation of acid-injured, heat-injured, and intact cells; repaired cells clustered closer to intact cells when the discriminant analysis (1,800 to 600 cm(-1)) was applied. FT-IR spectroscopy can be used for the rapid source tracking of L. monocytogenes strains because it can differentiate between different mixed strains and individual strains of the pathogen.

  3. Effects of isokinetic eccentric training on knee extensor and flexor torque and on gait of individuals with long term ACL reconstruction: A controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Heleodório Honorato dos; Sousa,Catarina de Oliveira; Barela, José Angelo; Barela,Ana Maria Forti; Salvini, Tania de Fatima

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the isokinetic eccentric training (IET) on the knee extensor and flexor torque and kinematic gait parameters in individuals with ACL reconstruction. Sixteen men with ACL reconstructed (ACLr) whose torque and the gait were evaluated, before and after 12 weeks of IET, was compared to a control group (14 individuals). Student t, MANOVA and ANOVA tests were performed with 5% of significance. The training increased the isometric, concentric at 30 and 120º/s (...

  4. Clinical and Arthroscopic Findings of Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Shirakura

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, arthrographic, and arthroscopic findings in 53 patients with acutely torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs were documented. Arthroscopy and instability tests under anesthesia were performed on all patients within 2 weeks after the initial injury. Twenty-three patients complained of extension blocks, and localized tenderness on the medial side was revealed in 26 patients at the initial examination. Aspiration from joints exhibited hemarthrosis in 52 patients. Arthroscopy revealed ACL ruptures in all patients. Four Segond's fractures, 26 meniscus tears (8 medial and 18 lateral, 1 osteochondral fracture, and 19 medial collateral ligament ruptures were revealed. Arthroscopy detected only 1 of the 5 ruptures of the posteromedial corner of the medial meniscus, which were noted on arthrography. Three ACL stumps were protruding among the femorotibial joint, which seemed to be restricting full extension. Statistical analysis showed that tenderness on the medial side was not revealed more frequently in knees with medial collateral ligament injuries than in the others. The volume of aspirated fluids in knees with no leakage in arthrography significantly increased over those with leakages (p < 0.05. Diagnosis of ACL injuries should be completed by clinical, arthrographic, and arthroscopic examinations.

  5. Reliability and methodological concerns of vertical drop jumping and sidestep cutting tasks: implications for ACL injury risk screening

    OpenAIRE

    Mok, Kam-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Avhandling (doktorgrad) - Norges idrettshøgskole, 2015 Vertical drop jumping (VDJ) and sidestep cutting tasks have been suggested as movement screening tasks to identify players with increased risk for ACL injury. Previous studies have investigated the reliability of kinematics and kinetics in the two tasks, however the validity is questionable because of small sample sizes or inappropriate statistical methods. The common method for assessing motion characteristics in such tasks is marker-...

  6. PRE-OPERATIVE QUADRICEPS ACTIVATION IS RELATED TO POST-OPERATIVE ACTIVATION, NOT STRENGTH, IN PATIENTS POST-ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Lindsey K.; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Quadriceps activation failure is considered to contribute to the weakness that lingers following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Importantly, the impact of pre-operative quadriceps activation on post-operative quadriceps function is unknown. Understanding this relationship is clinically important; as the counteractive approach clinicians should employ pre-operatively to mitigate post-operative quadriceps weakness is unclear. Accordingly, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between pre-operative quadriceps activation and post-operative quadriceps strength and activation. METHODS Fifty-four individuals post-ACL injury reported for testing on two occasions: prior-to-surgery and post-surgery once they returned to activity. Quadriceps activation was assessed using the burst superimposition technique and quantified using the central activation ratio. Quadriceps strength was assessed using isometric contractions that were performed at 90° of knee flexion. Multiple linear regressions were utilized to detect the relationships between pre-operative activation and strength and post-operative activation and strength. RESULTS Pre-operative activation was not associated with post-operative strength (R2=0.064, P=0.186). Pre-operative quadriceps activation and strength were associated with post-operative activation (R2=0.383, P≤0.001) and strength (R2=0.465, P≤0.001), respectively. CONCLUSIONS Individuals with better pre-operative quadriceps activation demonstrated greater post-operative activation. Similarly, individuals with better pre-operative strength demonstrated better post-operative strength. Pre-operative quadriceps activation was not a predictor of post-operative strength. From a clinical perspective, our work indicates that clinicians should utilize therapies targeting both quadriceps activation and strength prior to ACL-reconstruction in order to maximize these factors post-ACL reconstruction, as pre

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of tunnel diameters prior to revision ACL reconstruction: a comparison to computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drews, Bjoern Holger; Gulkin, Daniel; Guelke, Joachim; Gebhard, Florian [University of Ulm, Center of Surgery, Department for Orthopedic Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, Ulm (Germany); Merz, Cornelia; Huth, Jochen; Mauch, Frieder [Sportklinik Stuttgart GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Revision ACL reconstruction is becoming more frequent because of a 10% rate of re-ruptures and insufficiencies. Currently, computed tomography (CT) represents the gold standard in detecting and measuring the tunnels of the initial ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to compare measurement results of CT and thin-sliced MRI sequences, which were modified to a high soft tissue-bone contrast. Prior to an ACL revision surgery, 16 consecutive patients had an MRI in addition to the standard CT scan. A dedicated 0.25-T Esaote G-Scan (Esaote Biomedica, Cologne, Germany) with a Turbo 3D T1 sequence was used for MRI. Tunnel diameters were measured at 11 defined points of interest. For the statistical evaluation, the Mann-Whitney U test for connected samples was used. Inter- and intraobserver reliability was additionally calculated. All measured diameters showed significant to highly significant correlations between both diagnostic tools (r = 0.7-0.98). In addition, there was no significant difference (p > 0.5) between the two techniques. Almost all diameters showed nearly perfect intraobserver reliability (ICC 0.8-0.97). Interobserver reliability showed an ICC of 0.91/0.92 for only one diameter in MRI and CT. Prior to ACL revision surgery, bone tunnel measurements can be done using a 3D T1-MRI sequence in low-field MRI. MRI measurements show the same accuracy as CT scans. Preoperative radiation exposure in mainly young patients could be reduced. Also the costs of an additional CT scan could be saved. (orig.)

  8. Brace or no-brace after ACL graft? Four-year results of a prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Hermann O; Stüeken, Paul; Münch, Ernst-Otto; Wolter, Morris; Bernstein, Anke; Suedkamp, Norbert P; Stoehr, Amelie

    2014-05-01

    A controversial discussion is held on using stabilizing knee braces after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. The current study investigated the influence of a stabilizing knee brace on results after ACL reconstruction using patellar tendon autografts. A prospective randomized study was started including 64 patients divided into two equal groups and treated with or without a stabilizing knee brace for 6 weeks post-operatively. A follow-up examination 4 years after operation comprised IKDC 2000, KT1000 measurement, a visual analogue pain scale (VAS; scores 0-10) and radiographic evaluation. The t test for independent and paired samples and the Pearson's Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis (p brace group 90.5 ± 8.9, braceless group 93.2 ± 6.1) and objective results (brace A 30%, B 56%, C 16%; braceless A 32%, B 48%, C 20%) and instrumental measurement of anteroposterior laxity with KT1000 (brace 0.6 ± 2.4 mm, braceless 1.8 ± 3.4 mm) showed no significant differences. VAS pain results were significantly better in the braceless group at 1.0 ± 1.2 versus 1.9 ± 1.4 under sports activity or heavy physical work (p = 0.015). There were no radiographic differences concerning osteoarthritic findings and tunnel widening between the groups. Post-operative treatment with a stabilizing knee brace after ACL replacement showed no advantage over treatment without a brace at 4-year follow-up. The use of a knee-stabilizing brace after isolated ACL reconstruction with autologous patellar tendon graft is not recommended. II.

  9. Considerations for late stage acl rehabilitation and return to sport to limit re-injury risk and maximize athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Daniel P; Dubuque, Thomas J

    2015-04-01

    Despite recent advances in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL) surgical techniques, an improved understanding of the ACL's biomechanical role, and expanding research on optimal rehabilitation practices in ACL-reconstructed (ACLR) patients, the re-tear rate remains alarmingly high and athletic performance deficits persist after completion of the rehabilitation course in a large percentage of patients. Significant deficits may persist in strength, muscular activation, power, postural stability, lower extremity mechanics, and psychological preparedness. Many patients may continue to demonstrate altered movement mechanics associated with increased injury risk. The purpose of this clinical commentary and literature review is to provide a summary of current evidence to assist the rehabilitation professional in recognizing, assessing, and addressing factors which may have been previously underappreciated or unrecognized as having significant influence on ACLR rehabilitation outcomes. A literature review was completed using PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane Database with results limited to peer-reviewed articles published in English. 136 articles were reviewed and included in this commentary. Barriers to successful return to previous level of activity following ACLR are multifactorial.Recent research suggests that changes to the neuromuscular system, movement mechanics, psychological preparedness, and motor learning deficits may be important considerations during late stage rehabilitation. Level 5- Clinical Commentary.

  10. Post-operative bracing after ACL reconstruction has no effect on knee joint effusion. A prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Maria; Wredmark, Torsten; Wretling, Marie-Louise; Henriksson, Marketta; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2015-12-01

    It is unclear what factors contribute to knee joint effusion after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction. Knee homeostasis after injury and surgery is crucial for rehabilitation and knee well-being. We examined if effusion was affected by post-operative bracing, and if patients with effusion fit into a common profile. Patients were randomized to wearing or not wearing a post-operative brace for three weeks after ACL reconstruction with semitendinosus-gracilis tendons. Knee joint effusion was detected by computed tomography in 60 patients (22 women), before and three and 12 months after surgery. Joint effusion, clinical and subjective tests were analyzed. This is the first prospective, randomized study on post-operative bracing for patients with a semitendinosus-gracilis graft showed that bracing had no effect on three-months presence of joint effusion. Excessive joint effusion was present in 68% of the patients three months after surgery and was associated to prior meniscus injury (p=0.05) and higher prior Tegner activity level (p=0.006). We found a positive association between longer time from injury to surgery and joint effusion three months post-operatively (rho=0.29, pknee joint effusion after ACL reconstruction. Post-operative bracing had no effect. A larger clinical cohort is needed to confirm findings of this logistic regression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuromuscular Coordination Deficit Persists 12 Months after ACL Reconstruction But Can Be Modulated by 6 Weeks of Kettlebell Training: A Case Study in Women's Elite Soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Christoffer H; Bencke, Jesper; Ørntoft, Christina; Linnebjerg, Connie; Hölmich, Per; Thorborg, Kristian; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars L

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present single-case study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks' kettlebell training on the neuromuscular risk profile for ACL injury in a high-risk athlete returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. A female elite soccer player (age 21 years) with no previous history of ACL injury went through neuromuscular screening as measured by EMG preactivity of vastus lateralis and semitendinosus during a standardized sidecutting maneuver. Subsequently, the player experienced a noncontact ACL injury. The player was screened again following postreconstruction rehabilitation, then underwent 6-week kettlebell training, and was subsequently screened again at 6-week follow-up. Prior to and after postreconstruction rehabilitation the player demonstrated a neuromuscular profile during sidecutting known to increase the risk for noncontact ACL injury, that is, reduced EMG preactivity for semitendinosus and elevated EMG preactivity for vastus lateralis. Subsequently, the 6-week kettlebell training increased semitendinosus muscle preactivity during sidecutting by 38 percentage points to a level equivalent to a neuromuscular low-risk profile. An ACL rehabilitated female athlete with a high-risk neuromuscular profile changed to low-risk in response to 6 weeks of kettlebell training. Thus, short-term kettlebell exercise with documented high levels of medial hamstring activation was found to transfer into high medial hamstring preactivation during a sidecutting maneuver.

  12. Neuromuscular Coordination Deficit Persists 12 Months after ACL Reconstruction But Can Be Modulated by 6 Weeks of Kettlebell Training: A Case Study in Women’s Elite Soccer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette K. Zebis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present single-case study was to investigate the effect of 6 weeks’ kettlebell training on the neuromuscular risk profile for ACL injury in a high-risk athlete returning to sport after ACL reconstruction. A female elite soccer player (age 21 years with no previous history of ACL injury went through neuromuscular screening as measured by EMG preactivity of vastus lateralis and semitendinosus during a standardized sidecutting maneuver. Subsequently, the player experienced a noncontact ACL injury. The player was screened again following postreconstruction rehabilitation, then underwent 6-week kettlebell training, and was subsequently screened again at 6-week follow-up. Prior to and after postreconstruction rehabilitation the player demonstrated a neuromuscular profile during sidecutting known to increase the risk for noncontact ACL injury, that is, reduced EMG preactivity for semitendinosus and elevated EMG preactivity for vastus lateralis. Subsequently, the 6-week kettlebell training increased semitendinosus muscle preactivity during sidecutting by 38 percentage points to a level equivalent to a neuromuscular low-risk profile. An ACL rehabilitated female athlete with a high-risk neuromuscular profile changed to low-risk in response to 6 weeks of kettlebell training. Thus, short-term kettlebell exercise with documented high levels of medial hamstring activation was found to transfer into high medial hamstring preactivation during a sidecutting maneuver.

  13. Mechanisms and risk factors for noncontact ACL injury in age mature athletes who engage in field or court sports: a summary of the literature since 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpell, Benjamin G; Scarvell, Jennie M; Ball, Nick B; Smith, Paul N

    2012-11-01

    Epidemiological data show that in the last 10 years alone the incidence and rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries have not changed appreciably. Furthermore, many ACL injuries appear to be noncontact in nature and sustained while engaging in some field or court sport. Thus, the need to investigate novel methods and adopt training strategies to prevent ACL injuries is paramount. To do so, however, requires an understanding of the mechanisms and risk factors for the injury. The aim of this review was to investigate the mechanisms and risk factors for noncontact ACL injuries in age mature athletes who compete in field or court sports. A search of the entire MEDLINE database for biomedicine was performed, and an iterative reference check was also conducted. A total of 87 articles disclosed met the eligibility criteria. Articles were grouped into 'themes'; 'anatomical and biomechanical mechanisms and risk factors,' 'intrinsic mechanisms and risk factors,' and 'extrinsic mechanisms and risk factors.' In this review, it is concluded that there are still a number of risk factors and mechanisms for noncontact ACL injury that are not well understood. However, the importance of dynamic knee joint stability is highlighted. It is also suggested that novel methods for preventing ACL injury be investigated and developed.

  14. Employment among Spinal Cord Injured Patients Living in Turkey: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Berrin; Erhan, Belgin; Bardak, Ayse Nur

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of employment and to establish the factors affecting vocational status in spinal cord injured patients living in Turkey. One hundred and fifty-two traumatic spinal cord injured patients older than 18 years with injury duration of at least 1 year and living in the community were included in the study;…

  15. The experience of being a partner to a spinal cord injured person:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Sanne; Buus, Niels

    2011-01-01

    supporting the injured partner and the demanding tasks of everyday life outside the institution. After discharge, partners struggled for the injured partner to regain a well-functioning everyday life and for reestablishing life as a couple. The partner struggled to manage the overwhelming amount of everyday...

  16. Prevalence of alcohol and other psychoactive substances in injured drivers : comparison between Belgium and The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legrand, S.-A. Houwing, S. Hagenzieker, M. & Verstraete, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    The study objective was to compare the prevalence of alcohol and (il)licit drugs in seriously injured drivers in Belgium (BE) and the Netherlands (NL). Injured car and van drivers admitted to the emergency departments of five hospitals in Belgium and three in the Netherlands from January 2008 to May

  17. Alcohol and drugs in seriously injured drivers in six European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legrand, Sara‐Ann; Isalberti, Cristina; Linden, Trudy Van

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the presence of alcohol and drugs in drivers severely injured in traffic crashes in six European countries. Data were collected from 2492 seriously injured drivers of cars and vans in Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Italy, Lithuania, and the Netherlands...

  18. Alcohol and drugs in seriously injured drivers in 6 European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legrand, Sara-Ann; Isalberti, Cristina; Linden, Trudy Van der

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the presence of alcohol and drugs in drivers severely injured in traffic crashes in 6 European countries. Methods: Data were collected from 2492 seriously injured drivers of cars and vans in Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Italy, Lithuania and The Netherlands, between 2007...

  19. 9 CFR 311.27 - Injured animals slaughtered at unusual hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... slaughter an injured animal at night or on Sunday or a holiday when the inspector cannot be obtained, the... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Injured animals slaughtered at unusual hours. 311.27 Section 311.27 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  20. Differences in kinetic asymmetry between injured and noninjured novice runners : A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredeweg, S. W.; Buist, I.; Kluitenberg, B.

    Purpose: The purpose of this prospective study was to describe natural levels of asymmetry in running, compare levels of asymmetry between injured and noninjured novice runners and compare kinetic variables between the injured and noninjured lower limb within the novice runners with an injury.

  1. Ligament tension in the ACL-deficient knee: assessment of medial and lateral gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayman, David; Plaskos, Christopher; Kendoff, Daniel; Wernecke, G; Pearle, Andrew D; Laskin, Richard

    2009-06-01

    Obtaining symmetric and balanced gaps under equilateral loads is a common goal in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)-retaining and -sacrificing TKAs. Owing to limitations in existing surgical tensors, however, tensing knee ligaments with standardized and symmetric loads has been possible only with the patella subluxated or everted. We therefore determined the influences of (1) patellar eversion versus complete reduction, (2) PCL resection, and (3) load magnitude on gap symmetry and balance in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knee. We used a novel computer-controlled tensioner to measure gaps in 10 cadavers with an applied force of 50 N, 75 N, and 100 N per side. Gap data were acquired at 0 masculine, 30 masculine, 60 masculine, 90 masculine, and 120 masculine flexion with the patella reduced and everted and with the PCL intact and resected. Everting the patella tightened the medial and lateral flexion gaps between 90 masculine and 120 masculine by 0.7 mm to 2.7 mm. PCL resection increased gaps from 30 degrees to 120 degrees by 1 mm to 3 mm. Increasing the force from 50 N to 100 N increased the mean gap by 0.5 mm. Everting the patella and resecting the PCL influenced gap balance and symmetry. Surgeons should be aware of how these conditions affect gaps during assessment and balancing.

  2. THE INFLUENCE OF SEX AND MATURATION ON LANDING BIOMECHANICS: IMPLICATIONS FOR ACL INJURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigward, S. M.; Pollard, C. D.; Powers, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    During landing and cutting, females exhibit greater frontal plane moments at the knee (internal knee adductor moments or external knee abduction moments) and favor use of the knee extensors over the hip extensors to attenuate impact forces when compared to males. However, it is not known when this biomechanical profile emerges. The purpose of this study was to compare landing biomechanics between sexes across maturation levels. One hundred and nineteen male and female soccer players (9–22 years) participated. Subjects were grouped based on maturational development. Lower extremity kinematics and kinetics were obtained during a drop-land task. Dependent variables included the average internal knee adductor moment and sagittal plane knee/hip moment and energy absorption ratios during the deceleration phase of landing. When averaged across maturation levels, females demonstrated greater internal knee adductor moments (0.06±0.03 vs. 0.01±0.02 Nm/kg*m; Pbiomechanical pattern that increases ACL loading. This biomechanical strategy already was established in pre-pubertal female athletes. PMID:21210853

  3. Acute Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your cough ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when people ...

  4. Pediatric specific shock index accurately identifies severely injured children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Shannon N; Ross, James T; Partrick, David A; Tong, Suhong; Bensard, Denis D

    2015-02-01

    Shock index (SI) (heart rate/systolic blood pressure)>0.9 predicts mortality in adult trauma patients. We hypothesized that age adjusted SI could more accurately predict outcomes in children. Retrospective review of children age 4-16 years admitted to two trauma centers between 1/07 and 6/13 following blunt trauma with an injury severity score (ISS)>15 was performed. We evaluated the ability of SI>0.9 at emergency department presentation and elevated shock index, pediatric age adjusted (SIPA) to predict outcomes. SIPA was defined by maximum normal HR and minimum normal SBP by age. Cutoffs included SI>1.22 (age 4-6), >1.0 (7-12), and >0.9 (13-16). Among 543 children, 50% of children had an SI>0.9 but this fell to 28% using age adjusted SI (SIPA). SIPA demonstrated improved discrimination of severe injury relative to SI: ISS>30: 37% vs 26%; blood transfusion within the first 24 hours: 27% vs 20%; Grade III liver/spleen laceration requiring blood transfusion: 41% vs 26%; and in-hospital mortality: 11% vs 7%. A pediatric specific shock index (SIPA) more accurately identifies children who are most severely injured, have intraabdominal injury requiring transfusion, and are at highest risk of death when compared to shock index unadjusted for age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Exenatide promotes regeneration of injured rat sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Kuyucu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage to peripheral nerves results in partial or complete dysfunction. After peripheral nerve injuries, a full functional recovery usually cannot be achieved despite the standard surgical repairs. Neurotrophic factors and growth factors stimulate axonal growth and support the viability of nerve cells. The objective of this study is to investigate the neurotrophic effect of exenatide (glucagon like peptide-1 analog in a rat sciatic nerve neurotmesis model. We injected 10 μg/d exenatide for 12 weeks in the experimental group (n = 12 and 0.1 mL/d saline for 12 weeks in the control group (n = 12. We evaluated nerve regeneration by conducting electrophysiological and motor functional tests. Histological changes were evaluated at weeks 1, 3, 6, and 9. Nerve regeneration was monitored using stereomicroscopy. The electrophysiological and motor functions in rats treated with exenatide were improved at 12 weeks after surgery. Histological examination revealed a significant increase in the number of axons in injured sciatic nerve following exenatide treatment confirmed by stereomicroscopy. In an experimentally induced neurotmesis model in rats, exenatide had a positive effect on nerve regeneration evidenced by electromyography, functional motor tests, histological and stereomicroscopic findings.

  6. Rewiring the injured CNS: lessons from the optic nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Larry; Yin, Yuqin

    2008-01-01

    The optic nerve offers a number of advantages for investigating mechanisms that govern axon regeneration in the CNS. Although mature retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) normally show no ability to regenerate injured axons through the optic nerve, this situation can be partially reversed by inducing an inflammatory response in the eye. The secretion of a previously unknown growth factor, oncomodulin, along with co-factors, causes RGCs to undergo dramatic changes in gene expression and regenerate lengthy axons into the highly myelinated optic nerve. By themselves, strategies that counteract inhibitory signals associated with myelin and the glial scar are insufficient to promote extensive regeneration in this system. However, combinatorial treatments that activate neurons' intrinsic growth state and overcome inhibitory signals result in dramatic axon regeneration in vivo. Because of the ease of introducing trophic factors, soluble receptors, drugs, or viruses expressing any gene or small interfering RNA of interest into RGCs, this system is ideal for identifying intracellular signaling pathways, transcriptional cascades, and ligand-receptor interactions that enable axon regeneration to occur in the CNS and to develop means to augment this process. PMID:17610877

  7. Relationship between stress ankle radiographs and injured ligaments on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Chung, Myung Ki; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyungki (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon-Sun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Kyungki (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the injured lateral ankle ligaments on MRI and stress ankle radiographs. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 35.5 years, SD 14.6 years; 136 males and 93 females) that underwent ankle stress radiographs and MRI for lateral ankle instability were included. Tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior translation of talus were measured on stress ankle radiographs. Degree of lateral ligaments (anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular) and deltoid ligament injuries were evaluated and scored as intact (0), partial injury (1), and complete injury (2) on MR images. Effusion of ankle joint was also recorded. The effects of gender, age, injuries of ligaments, and ankle joint effusion on stress radiographs were statistically analyzed. Gender (p = 0.010), age (p = 0.020), and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury (p < 0.001) were the factors significantly affecting tibiotalar tilt angle. Posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) injury (p = 0.014) was found to be the only significant factor affecting the anterior translation on the anterior drawer radiographs. ATFL injury and PTFL injury on MRI significantly affected tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior drawer on stress radiographs. Other factors, such as age and gender, need to be considered in evaluating radiographic lateral ankle instability. (orig.)

  8. Relationship between stress ankle radiographs and injured ligaments on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Kwon, Soon-Sun; Chung, Myung Ki; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok

    2013-11-01

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the injured lateral ankle ligaments on MRI and stress ankle radiographs. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 35.5 years, SD 14.6 years; 136 males and 93 females) that underwent ankle stress radiographs and MRI for lateral ankle instability were included. Tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior translation of talus were measured on stress ankle radiographs. Degree of lateral ligaments (anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular) and deltoid ligament injuries were evaluated and scored as intact (0), partial injury (1), and complete injury (2) on MR images. Effusion of ankle joint was also recorded. The effects of gender, age, injuries of ligaments, and ankle joint effusion on stress radiographs were statistically analyzed. Gender (p = 0.010), age (p = 0.020), and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury (p ligament (PTFL) injury (p = 0.014) was found to be the only significant factor affecting the anterior translation on the anterior drawer radiographs. ATFL injury and PTFL injury on MRI significantly affected tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior drawer on stress radiographs. Other factors, such as age and gender, need to be considered in evaluating radiographic lateral ankle instability.

  9. Social reintegration of traumatic brain-injured: the French experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelle, J-L; Wild, K Von; Onillon, M; Montreuil, M

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) may lead to specific handicap, often hidden, mainly due to cognitive and behavioural sequelae. Social re-entry is a long-term, fluctuant and precarious process. The French experience will be illustrated by 6 initiatives answering to 6 challenges to do with TBI specificities:1. bridging the gap, between initial rehabilitation and community re-entry, via transitional units dealing with assessment, retraining, social/vocational orientation and follow-up. Today, there are 30 such units based on multidisciplinary teams.2. assessing recovery by TBI-specific and validated evaluation tools: EBIS holistic document, BNI Screening of higher cerebral functions, Glasgow outcome extended, and QOLIBRI, a TBI-specific quality of life tool.3. promoting specific re-entry programmes founded on limited medication, ecological neuro-psychological rehabilitation, exchange groups and workshops, violence prevention, continuity of care, environmental structuration, and "resocialisation".4. taking into account the "head injured family"5. facilitating recovery after sports-related concussion6. facing medico-legal consequences and compensation: In that perspective, we developed guidelines for TBI-specific expert appraisal, including mandatory neuro-psychological assessment, family interview and an annual forum gathering lawyers and health professionals.

  10. Management of Sexual Disorders in Spinal Cord Injured Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R Vaccaro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injured (SCI patients have sexual disorders including erectile dysfunction (ED, impotence, priapism, ejaculatory dysfunction and infertility. Treatments for erectile dysfunction include four steps. Step 1 involves smoking cessation, weight loss, and increasing physical activity. Step 2 is phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5I such as Sildenafil (Viagra, intracavernous injections of Papaverine or prostaglandins, and vacuum constriction devices. Step 3 is a penile prosthesis, and Step 4 is sacral neuromodulation (SNM. Priapism can be resolved spontaneously if there is no ischemia found on blood gas measurement or by Phenylephrine. For anejaculatory dysfunction, massage, vibrator, electrical stimulation and direct surgical biopsy can be used to obtain sperm which can then be used for intra-uterine or in-vitro fertilization. Infertility treatment in male SCI patients involves a combination of the above treatments for erectile and anejaculatory dysfunctions. The basic approach to and management of sexual dysfunction in female SCI patients are similar as for men but do not require treatment for erectile or ejaculatory problems.

  11. Wound healing process of injured pulp tissues with emdogain gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaida, Hikaru; Hamachi, Takafumi; Anan, Hisashi; Maeda, Katsumasa

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the wound healing process of injured pulp tissues with Emdogain gel (EMD). Pulpotomy was performed for the first molars of the mandibles in rats. EMD or Vitapex (VIT)-containing calcium hydroxide was applied to the exposed pulp tissues. The treated teeth were extracted after 7, 14, and 28 days and prepared for histologic examination. In the VIT-treated group, the number of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta)-expressing macrophages initially increased, followed by that of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1)-expressing macrophages. The number of cells expressing bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) gradually increased with reparative dentin formation. Meanwhile, in the EMD-treated group, cells expressing IL-1 beta or TGF-beta1 were few. However, the number of BMP-expressing cells, partly macrophages, increased in the early phase, and large amounts of reparative dentin were observed. This study demonstrated that different healing processes existed for EMD and VIT. BMP-expressing macrophages might play important roles in reparative dentin formation.

  12. Plasma fibronectin promotes thrombus growth and stability in injured arterioles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Heyu; Yuen, Peter S. T.; Papalia, Jessie M.; Trevithick, Jane E.; Sakai, Takao; Fässler, Reinhard; Hynes, Richard O.; Wagner, Denisa D.

    2003-01-01

    Mice lacking both of the best-known platelet ligands, von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen, can still form occlusive thrombi in injured arterioles. The platelets of these animals accumulate excessive amounts of fibronectin (FN). These observations led us to examine the contribution of plasma FN (pFN) to thrombus formation. Inactivation of the FN gene in FN conditional knockout mice reduced pFN levels to <2% and platelet FN to ≈20% of the levels in similarly treated control mice. The mice were then observed in a model of arterial injury to evaluate their capacity to form thrombi. The deficiency of pFN did not affect the initial platelet adhesion, but a delay of several minutes in thrombus formation was observed in the arterioles of pFN-deficient mice as compared with control mice. The thrombi that formed in the absence of pFN were stably anchored to the vessel wall but continuously shed platelets or small platelet clumps, thus slowing their growth significantly; the platelet/platelet cohesion was apparently diminished. Consequently the occlusion of pFN-deficient vessels was delayed, with the majority of vessels remaining patent at the end of the 40-min observation period. We conclude that, in addition to von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen, FN plays a significant role in thrombus initiation, growth, and stability at arterial shear rates and that deficiency in each of the three platelet ligands has its own specific impact on platelet plug formation. PMID:12606706

  13. The Diagnostic and Prognostic Value of Ultrasonography in Soccer Players With Acute Hamstring Injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jesper; Thorborg, Kristian; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An injury to the hamstring muscle complex is the most common injury in soccer. Ultrasound of acute hamstring injuries is often used as a clinical tool for diagnosing hamstring injuries and guiding players in when they can return to play. PURPOSE: To (1) investigate the characteristic...... sonographic findings of acute hamstring injuries in soccer players, (2) compare the mean injury severity (time to return to play) in injured players with and without sonographically verified abnormalities, and (3) correlate the length of the injured area and absence from soccer play (time to return to play...... with acute hamstring injuries, 51 underwent ultrasonographic examination of the injured thigh and were included in this study. RESULTS: Ultrasonographic examinations were performed 1 to 10 days after injury (mean, 5.2 ± 3.0 days), and sonographic findings were present in 31 of 51 cases (61%). Two thirds...

  14. Dual-energy computed tomography of cruciate ligament injuries in acute knee trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltola, Erno K. [Helsinki University Hospital, Toeoeloe Trauma Center, Department of Radiology, Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Koskinen, Seppo K. [Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    To examine dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in evaluating cruciate ligament injuries. More specifically, the purpose was to assess the optimal keV level in DECT gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) images and to examine the usefulness of collagen-specific color mapping and dual-energy bone removal in the evaluation of cruciate ligaments and the popliteus tendon. At a level 1 trauma center, a 29-month period of emergency department DECT examinations for acute knee trauma was reviewed by two radiologists for presence of cruciate ligament injuries, visualization of the popliteus tendon and the optimal keV level in GSI images. Three different evaluating protocols (GSI, bone removal and collagen-specific color mapping) were rated. Subsequent MRI served as a reference standard for intraarticular injuries. A total of 18 patients who had an acute knee trauma, DECT and MRI were found. On MRI, six patients had an ACL rupture. DECT's sensitivity and specificity to detect ACL rupture were 79 % and 100 %, respectively. The DECT vs. MRI intra- and interobserver proportions of agreement for ACL rupture were excellent or good (kappa values 0.72-0.87). Only one patient had a PCL rupture. In GSI images, the optimal keV level was 63 keV. GSI of 40-140 keV was considered to be the best evaluation protocol in the majority of cases. DECT is a usable method to evaluate ACL in acute knee trauma patients with rather good sensitivity and high specificity. GSI is generally a better evaluation protocol than bone removal or collagen-specific color mapping in the evaluation of cruciate ligaments and popliteus tendon. (orig.)

  15. Acute coagulopathy in pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Pamela M; Vogel, Adam M

    2014-06-01

    To summarize our current understanding of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of acute traumatic coagulopathy in children. Traumatic coagulopathy is a complex process that leads to global dysfunction of the endogenous coagulation system and results in worse outcomes and increased mortality. Although the cause is multifactorial, it is common in severely injured patients and is driven by significant tissue injury and hypoperfusion. Viscoelastic coagulation tests have been established as a rapid and reliable method to assess traumatic coagulopathy. Additionally, massive transfusion protocols have improved outcomes in adults, but limited studies in pediatrics have not shown any difference in mortality. Prospective studies are needed to determine how to best diagnose and manage acute traumatic coagulopathy in children.

  16. Evidence-based concepts for prevention of knee and ACL injuries. 2017 guidelines of the ligament committee of the German Knee Society (DKG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Julian; Diermeier, Theresa; Herbst, Elmar; Imhoff, Andreas B; Stoffels, Thomas; Zantop, Thore; Petersen, Wolf; Achtnich, Andrea

    2017-10-05

    Knee injuries and especially anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are frequent in athletes. Therefore, primary and secondary prevention of sports-related lower limb injuries is an ongoing topic of interest. The aim of present study was to establish guidelines for the prevention of knee and ACL injuries on the basis of evidence-based concepts represented in current literature. A comprehensive literature review regarding prevention programs for knee and ACL injuries was conducted. Several modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for knee injuries in athletes have been reported in literature. Referring to the ACL, specific injury mechanisms have been identified and are well understood. In particular, it has been demonstrated that dynamic valgus is one of the most important modifiable risk factors. Simple tests like the drop jump test have shown their efficacy in screening and detecting athletes at risk. There is only few evidence for the preventive effect on knee and ACL injuries by single exercises. However, in order to prevent or correct endangering movement patterns including dynamic valgus, several complex prevention programs have been developed in the past. These prevention programs are included in standard warm-up exercises and are focusing on muscle strength, balance, and proprioception, as well as running and flexibility. It is reported that these training programs can reduce the incidence of knee injuries by up to 27% and ACL injuries by up to 51%. Screening, identification, and correction of endangering movement patterns like the dynamic valgus are the first crucial steps in order to prevent knee and ACL injuries in athletes. Furthermore, jumping, running and flexibility exercises as well as balance and strength training are proven to reduce the incidence of these injuries and should, therefore, be integrated into the regular warm up program. Appropriate complete prevention programs are freely accessible via the Internet and should be adapted to the

  17. Concurrent assessments of lower limb loading patterns, mechanical muscle strength and functional performance in ACL-patients--a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsgaard-Larsen, A; Jensen, C; Mortensen, N H M; Aagaard, P

    2014-01-01

    Full recovery in muscle strength and functional performance may not be achieved after ACL-injury. The aim of this study is to investigate loading patterns during jumping, muscle function and functional performance in ACL-reconstructed patients and to investigate the origin of between-limb asymmetry by means of a 3-dimensional movement analysis. Design is cross-sectional. 23 ACL-reconstructed men (27.2±7.5 years, BMI: 25.4±3.2) 27±7 month post-surgery and 25 matched controls (27.2±5.4 years, BMI: 24.1±1.8) were included. Participants performed (i) bilateral and (ii) unilateral counter movement jumps (CMJ). A 3-D movement analysis was performed by a six-camera Vicon MX-system. Subsequently, jump height (JH), knee joint range of motion (ROM), peak and mean sagittal knee moments were analyzed (iii) one-leg maximal jump for distance was performed, and (iv) maximal unilateral isometric knee extensor and flexor strength (MVC) were measured using stabilized dynamometry. No in-between group differences in age or BMI were observed. CMJ: Between-limb asymmetry ratios for ROM differed (p<0.01) between patients and controls in both types of CMJ (96.1% vs. 102.6% and 87.0% vs. 99.9% in bilateral and single-leg CMJs, respectively). Jump for distance: Patients demonstrated greater (p<0.01) asymmetry for jump length (92.9% vs. 98.6%). MVC: Asymmetry in hamstring MVC was greater (p<0.001) for patients than controls (77.4% vs. 101.3%). ACL-patients showed reduced function of the operated leg~2 years post ACL-reconstruction, especially for hamstring MVC. Hamstrings are important protagonists to the ACL, thus representing a potential risk factor for secondary ACL-rupture and/or osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Collegiate ACL Injury Rates Across 15 Sports: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System Data Update (2004-2005 Through 2012-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agel, Julie; Rockwood, Todd; Klossner, David

    2016-11-01

    To present data on the rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in 15 collegiate sports from 2004 to 2005 through 2012 to 2013 updating the 1988-1989 to 2003-2004 data. Prospectively designed descriptive epidemiology study. National Collegiate Athletic Association Schools. National Collegiate Athletic Association School athletes. Injury rate by year and sport. Most ACL injuries to women occurred by a noncontact mechanism (60%) versus a contact mechanism for men (59%). The highest average annual rate of ACL injury for men was found in football (0.17 per 1000 athlete-exposure [A-E]). The highest average annual rate of ACL injury for women was found in lacrosse (0.23 per 1000 A-E). There were statistically significant increases in average annual injury rate for men's (P = 0.04) and women's soccer (P = 0.01) and a statistically significant decrease in women's gymnastics over the 9 years (=0.009). Controlling for exposures, there were statistically significant increases in the average annual number of injuries for men's and women's basketball, ice hockey, field hockey, football, and volleyball and a decrease in the average annual number of injuries for baseball and women's gymnastics. Women continue to sustain ACL injuries at higher rates than men in the comparable sports of soccer, basketball, and lacrosse. Anterior cruciate ligament injury rates continue to rise in men's and women's soccer. Some sports have shown absolute increases in ACL rates, which persist even after exposure rates are taken into account. Despite extensive research and development of prevention programs before and during the time of this study, very few sports showed a reduction in ACL injury rates in this data set.

  19. EXERCISES THAT FACILITATE OPTIMAL HAMSTRING AND QUADRICEPS CO-ACTIVATION TO HELP DECREASE ACL INJURY RISK IN HEALTHY FEMALES: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedinsky, Rachel; Baker, Lindsey; Imbus, Samuel; Bowman, Melissa; Murray, Leigh

    2017-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is common among females due to many anatomic, hormonal, and neuromuscular risk factors. One modifiable risk factor that places females at increased risk of ACL injury is a poor hamstrings: quadriceps (H:Q) co-activation ratio, which should be 0.6 or greater in order to decrease the stress placed on the ACL. Exercises that produce more quadriceps dominant muscle activation can add to the tension placed upon the ACL, potentially increasing the risk of ACL injury. The purpose of this systematic review was to compare quadriceps and hamstring muscle activation during common closed kinetic chain therapeutic exercises in healthy female knees to determine what exercises are able to produce adequate H:Q co-activation ratios. Systematic Review. Multiple online databases were systematically searched and screened for inclusion. Eight articles were identified for inclusion. Data on mean electromyography (EMG) activation of both quadriceps and hamstring muscles, % maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), and H:Q co-activation ratios were extracted from the studies. Quality assessment was performed on all included studies. Exercises analyzed in the studies included variations of the double leg squat, variations of the single leg squat, lateral step-up, Fitter, Stairmaster® (Core Health and Fitness, Vancouver, WA), and slide board. All exercises, except the squat machine with posterior support at the level of the scapula and feet placed 50 cm in front of the hips, produced higher quadriceps muscle activation compared to hamstring muscle activation. Overall, two leg squats demonstrate poor H:Q co-activation ratios. Single leg exercises, when performed between 30 and 90 degrees of knee flexion, produce adequate H:Q ratios, thereby potentially reducing the risk of tensile stress on the ACL and ACL injury. 2a- Systematic Review of Cohort Studies.

  20. Outside-In vs. Anteromedial Portal Drilling During Primary ACL Reconstruction: Comparison at Two Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CarlLee, Tyler; Ries, Zach; Duchman, Kyle; Gao, Yubo; Wolf, Brian; Amendola, Annunziato; Hettrich, Carolyn; Bollier, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Anteromedial (AM) and outside-in (OI) are two commonly used techniques for drilling the femoral tunnel during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and radiographic outcomes of patients undergoing primary ACLR using either AM or OI femoral drilling with minimum two year follow-up. Overall, 138 prospectively enrolled patients undergoing primary ACLR underwent AM or OI femoral drilling. Patients were categorized by femoral drilling technique and were evaluated pre-operatively as well as at six weeks and two years post-operatively. Outcomes scores were collected at each visit using SF-36 PCS and MCS components, KOOS, and the Knee Activity Rating Scale. Complications, including graft failure, stiffness requiring manipulation under anesthesia, and revision surgery were also collected. Overall, 47 (34.1%) patients underwent AM femoral drilling and 91 (65.9%) patients underwent OI femoral drilling. Univariate analysis revealed no difference in pre-operative outcomes with the exception of the AM group having higher KOOS Knee Pain (p=0.023) and WOMAC Pain (p=0.036) scores. Postoperatively, OI femoral tunnels had a higher radiographic coronal angle (68.8°±8.6° vs 51.4°±11.3°; poperative KOOS Knee pain existed but these differences were not significant postoperatively. We conclude no clinically relevant differences by two years in patients undergoing primary ACL reconstruction using either AM or OI femoral drilling techniques. Level of Evidence: Level II Prospective Comparative Study.

  1. Ultrasonographic appearance of normal and injured lateral patellar ligaments in the equine stifle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, R; Whitcomb, M B; Vaughan, B; Galuppo, L D; Spriet, M

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound is widely used in horses with stifle lameness, yet limited information is available regarding the appearance of normal and injured lateral patellar ligaments (LPL). To map the normal ultrasonographic appearance of the LPL. To describe the clinical and ultrasonographic features of LPL injuries. Descriptive study of healthy horses and retrospective case series. Twelve horses without stifle lameness underwent ultrasonographic examination of bilateral LPLs and ultrasonographic features were recorded. Eighteen horses with LPL injury were identified from 1999 to 2011. The normal LPL changes in appearance from origin to insertion. It shows ill-defined margins at the patella, becomes flattened and bilobed over the lateral trochlear ridge, is oval-triangular shaped with variable echogenicity and fibre pattern distal to the LTR, and becomes tapered with striations at the tibial insertion. LPL injury was identified in 18 horses of multiple breeds and uses. All injuries were acute, and 12 had wounds. Eleven horses were severely lame (grade 4-5/5). Ultrasonographic lesions were severe in 78% of cases. The mid to insertional portion of the LPL was most often affected. Radiography showed fractures of the tibial tuberosity (n = 6), patella (n = 4) and lateral trochlear ridge (n = 1). Fractures involved LPL attachments in 9 horses. Five were treated for osteomyelitis and one for synovial sepsis. Recheck ultrasound in 4 horses showed minimal to no change in the appearance of LPL injuries. Nine horses returned to riding, one continued as a broodmare, 2 were retired, one became a broodmare, 2 were lost to follow-up and 3 were subjected to euthanasia owing to concurrent injuries. Normal variations in shape, echogenicity and fibre pattern of the LPL are important considerations to prevent false positive diagnoses during ultrasonography. LPL injuries were often severe and associated with craniolateral stifle trauma. Prognosis varied from good to guarded in horses without

  2. Cerebral metabolic effects of exogenous lactate supplementation on the injured human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzat, Pierre; Sala, Nathalie; Suys, Tamarah; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Feihl, François; Bloch, Jocelyne; Messerer, Mahmoud; Levivier, Marc; Meuli, Reto; Magistretti, Pierre J; Oddo, Mauro

    2014-03-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that lactate is neuroprotective after acute brain injury; however, data in humans are lacking. We examined whether exogenous lactate supplementation improves cerebral energy metabolism in humans with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We prospectively studied 15 consecutive patients with severe TBI monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD), brain tissue PO2 (PbtO2), and intracranial pressure (ICP). Intervention consisted of a 3-h intravenous infusion of hypertonic sodium lactate (aiming to increase systemic lactate to ca. 5 mmol/L), administered in the early phase following TBI. We examined the effect of sodium lactate on neurochemistry (CMD lactate, pyruvate, glucose, and glutamate), PbtO2, and ICP. Treatment was started on average 33 ± 16 h after TBI. A mixed-effects multilevel regression model revealed that sodium lactate therapy was associated with a significant increase in CMD concentrations of lactate [coefficient 0.47 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.31-0.63 mmol/L], pyruvate [13.1 (8.78-17.4) μmol/L], and glucose [0.1 (0.04-0.16) mmol/L; all p < 0.01]. A concomitant reduction of CMD glutamate [-0.95 (-1.94 to 0.06) mmol/L, p = 0.06] and ICP [-0.86 (-1.47 to -0.24) mmHg, p < 0.01] was also observed. Exogenous supplemental lactate can be utilized aerobically as a preferential energy substrate by the injured human brain, with sparing of cerebral glucose. Increased availability of cerebral extracellular pyruvate and glucose, coupled with a reduction of brain glutamate and ICP, suggests that hypertonic lactate therapy has beneficial cerebral metabolic and hemodynamic effects after TBI.

  3. Muscle injury in rats induces upregulation of inflammatory cytokines in injured muscle and calcitonin gene-related peptide in dorsal root ganglia innervating the injured muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Inoue, Gen; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Kamoda, Hiroto; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Orita, Sumihisa; Suzuki, Miyako; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Kubota, Go; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    In this study we evaluated the relationships among the behavioral changes after muscle injury, histological changes, changes in inflammatory cytokines in the injured muscle, and changes in the sensory nervous system innervating the muscle in rats. We established a model of muscle injury in rats using a dropped weight. Behavior was assessed using the CatWalk system. Subsequently, bilateral gastrocnemius muscles and dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) were resected. Muscles were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and inflammatory cytokines in injured muscles were assayed. DRGs were immunostained for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Changes of behavior and upregulation of inflammatory cytokines in injured muscles subsided within 2 days of injury. Repaired tissue was observed 3 weeks after injury. However, upregulation of CGRP in DRG neurons continued for 2 weeks after injury. These findings may explain in part the pathological mechanism of persistent muscle pain. Muscle Nerve 54: 776-782, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Muscle & Nerve Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the French version of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Return to Sport after Injury (ACL-RSI) scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohu, Y; Klouche, S; Lefevre, N; Webster, K; Herman, S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to translate, adapt and validate in French the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Return to Sport after Injury (ACL-RSI), a 12-item English language scale assessing the psychological impact of returning to sports after ACL reconstruction. The ACL-RSI scale was forward and back translated, cross-culturally adapted and validated using international guidelines. The study population included all patients who were active in sports and underwent primary arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. The control group included subjects with no history of knee trauma. At the 6-month follow-up, the study population completed the ACL-RSI scale twice within 3-4 days, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores. Statistical tests assessed the construct validity, discriminant validity, internal consistency, reliability and feasibility of the ACL-RSI scale. Ninety-one patients with ACL tears and 98 control subjects were included: mean age 31.7 ± 8.1 and 21.8 ± 2, respectively. The ACL-RSI scores were correlated with all KOOS sub-categories (r = 0.22-0.64, p sport (72.1 ± 21.4 vs. 60.3 ± 18.1, p = 0.008). Internal consistency was high (α = 0.96). Test-retest reproducibility was excellent: ρ = 0.90 (0.86-0.94), p < 0.00001. Administration time was 1.32 ± 0.7 mn, and all items were answered. This study showed that the cross-cultural adaptation of the English version of the ACL-RSI was successful and validated in a French-speaking population. The discriminant capacity of the scale between patients who underwent reconstruction and healthy subjects was confirmed. II.

  5. Effect of tunnel position for anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction on knee biomechanics in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yuki; Ingham, Sheila J M; Kramer, Scott; Smolinski, Patrick; Saito, Akiyoshi; Fu, Freddie H

    2010-01-01

    Attention has been focused on the importance of anatomical tunnel placement in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of different tunnel positions for single-bundle (SB) ACL reconstruction on knee kinematics. Ten porcine knees were used for the following reconstruction techniques: three different anatomic SB [AM-AM (antero-medial), PL-PL (postero-lateral), and MID-MID] (n = 5 for each group), conventional SB (PL-high AM) (n = 5), and anatomic double-bundle (DB) (n = 5). Using a robotic/universal force-moment sensor testing system, an 89 N anterior load (simulated KT1000 test) at 30, 60, and 90 degrees of knee flexion and a combined internal rotation (4 N m) and valgus (7 N m) moment (simulated pivot-shift test) at 30 and 60 degrees were applied. Anterior tibial translation (ATT) (mm) and in situ forces (N) of reconstructed grafts were calculated. During simulated KT1000 test at 60 degrees of knee flexion, the PL-PL had significantly lower in situ force than the intact ACL (P < 0.01). In situ force of the MID-MID was higher than other SB reconstructions (at 30 degrees : 94.8 +/- 2.5 N; at 60 degrees : 85.2 +/- 5.3 N; and 90 degrees: 66.0 +/- 8.7 N). At 30 degrees of knee flexion, the PL-high AM had the lowest in situ values (67.1 +/- 19.3 N). At 60 and 90 degrees of knee flexion the PL-PL had the lowest in situ values (at 60 degrees : 60.8 +/- 19.9 N; 90 degrees : 38.4 +/- 19.2 N). The MID-MID and DB had no significant in situ force differences at 30 and 60 degrees of knee flexion. During simulated pivot-shift test at 60 degrees of knee flexion, the PL-PL and PL-high AM reconstructions had a significant lower in situ force than the intact ACL (P < 0.01). During simulated KT1000 test at 30, 60, and 90 degrees of knee flexion, the PL-PL and PL-high AM had significantly lower ATT than the intact ACL (P < 0.01). During simulated KT1000 test at 60 and 90 degrees, the MID-MID, AM-AM, and DB had significantly

  6. Can molecular motors drive distance measurements in injured neurons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naaman Kam

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Injury to nerve axons induces diverse responses in neuronal cell bodies, some of which are influenced by the distance from the site of injury. This suggests that neurons have the capacity to estimate the distance of the injury site from their cell body. Recent work has shown that the molecular motor dynein transports importin-mediated retrograde signaling complexes from axonal lesion sites to cell bodies, raising the question whether dynein-based mechanisms enable axonal distance estimations in injured neurons? We used computer simulations to examine mechanisms that may provide nerve cells with dynein-dependent distance assessment capabilities. A multiple-signals model was postulated based on the time delay between the arrival of two or more signals produced at the site of injury-a rapid signal carried by action potentials or similar mechanisms and slower signals carried by dynein. The time delay between the arrivals of these two types of signals should reflect the distance traversed, and simulations of this model show that it can indeed provide a basis for distance measurements in the context of nerve injuries. The analyses indicate that the suggested mechanism can allow nerve cells to discriminate between distances differing by 10% or more of their total axon length, and suggest that dynein-based retrograde signaling in neurons can be utilized for this purpose over different scales of nerves and organisms. Moreover, such a mechanism might also function in synapse to nucleus signaling in uninjured neurons. This could potentially allow a neuron to dynamically sense the relative lengths of its processes on an ongoing basis, enabling appropriate metabolic output from cell body to processes.

  7. Benchmarking outcomes in the critically injured burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Matthew B; Goverman, Jeremy; Hayden, Douglas L; Fagan, Shawn P; McDonald-Smith, Grace P; Alexander, Andrew K; Gamelli, Richard L; Gibran, Nicole S; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Arnoldo, Brett; Wispelwey, Bram; Mindrinos, Michael N; Xiao, Wenzhong; Honari, Shari E; Mason, Philip H; Schoenfeld, David A; Herndon, David N; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2014-05-01

    To determine and compare outcomes with accepted benchmarks in burn care at 6 academic burn centers. Since the 1960s, US morbidity and mortality rates have declined tremendously for burn patients, likely related to improvements in surgical and critical care treatment. We describe the baseline patient characteristics and well-defined outcomes for major burn injuries. We followed 300 adults and 241 children from 2003 to 2009 through hospitalization, using standard operating procedures developed at study onset. We created an extensive database on patient and injury characteristics, anatomic and physiological derangement, clinical treatment, and outcomes. These data were compared with existing benchmarks in burn care. Study patients were critically injured, as demonstrated by mean % total body surface area (TBSA) (41.2 ± 18.3 for adults and 57.8 ± 18.2 for children) and presence of inhalation injury in 38% of the adults and 54.8% of the children. Mortality in adults was 14.1% for those younger than 55 years and 38.5% for those aged 55 years and older. Mortality in patients younger than 17 years was 7.9%. Overall, the multiple organ failure rate was 27%. When controlling for age and % TBSA, presence of inhalation injury continues to be significant. This study provides the current benchmark for major burn patients. Mortality rates, notwithstanding significant % TBSA and presence of inhalation injury, have significantly declined compared with previous benchmarks. Modern day surgical and medically intensive management has markedly improved to the point where we can expect patients younger than 55 years with severe burn injuries and inhalation injury to survive these devastating conditions.

  8. Nursing challenges with a severely injured patient in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossan, Lisa; Cole, Elaine

    2013-09-01

    Patients with severe, multiple, traumatic injuries are challenging to manage in critical care. Early identification of injuries and optimal resuscitation is essential for favourable outcomes. Trauma-related haemorrhage can lead to the lethal triad of hypothermia, coagulopathy and acidosis. Many trauma patients require urgent haemorrhage control and structural fixation through operative intervention. However, metabolic derangement and cardiovascular instability may delay surgery, resulting in an ongoing cycle of deterioration. Damage control surgery (DCS) may be used as a temporizing measure until the patient is stabilized in critical care. The aim of this case study is to discuss the complex issues faced in the critical care management of a severely injured patient. We conducted a patient case study, with analysis of care using published evidence. The key terms used to search for evidence were trauma, injury, damage control surgery, spinal fixation, critical/intensive care and nurse. We report the care of a trauma patient with complex, conflicting injuries requiring management of the lethal triad and DCS. The delay in subsequent definitive repair of spinal column fractures provided many challenges for critical care nurses including restricted patient mobilization, positioning and pressure ulcer prevention. A review of contemporary evidence relating to DCS reveals that whilst this technique is used increasingly in trauma, the research focuses on single system injuries. Evidence and guidelines are required to support DCS for critical care patients with multiple, conflicting injuries including spinal fractures. For patients with delayed surgical intervention, rotational bed therapy may assist critical care nurses in meeting needs. © 2013 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2013 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  9. Hypoperfusion in severely injured trauma patients is associated with reduced coagulation factor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan O; Scarpelini, Sandro; Pinto, Ruxandra; Tien, Homer C; Callum, Jeannie; Rizoli, Sandro B

    2011-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that acute traumatic coagulopathy is associated with hypoperfusion, increased plasma levels of soluble thrombomodulin, and decreased levels of protein C but with no change in factor VII activity. These findings led to the hypothesis that acute traumatic coagulopathy is primarily due to systemic anticoagulation, by activated protein C, rather than decreases in serine protease activity. This study was designed to examine the effect of hypoperfusion secondary to traumatic injury on the activity of coagulation factors. Post hoc analysis of prospectively collected data on severely injured adult trauma patients presenting to a single trauma center within 120 minutes of injury. Venous blood was analyzed for activity of factors II, V, VII, VIII, IX, X, and XI. Base deficit from arterial blood samples was used as a marker of hypoperfusion. Seventy-one patients were identified. The activity of factors II, V, VII, IX, X, and XI correlated negatively with base deficit, and after stratification into three groups, based on the severity of hypoperfusion, a statistically significant dose-related reduction in the activity of factors II, VII, IX, X, and XI was observed. Hypoperfusion is also associated with marked reductions in factor V activity levels, but these appear to be relatively independent of the degree of hypoperfusion. The activity of factor VIII did not correlate with base deficit. Hypoperfusion in trauma patients is associated with a moderate, dose-dependent reduction in the activity of coagulation factors II, VII, IX, X, and XI, and a more marked reduction in factor V activity, which is relatively independent of the severity of shock. These findings suggest that the mechanisms underlying decreased factor V activity--which could be due to activated protein C mediated cleavage, thus providing a possible link between the proposed thrombomodulin/thrombin-APC pathway and the serine proteases of the coagulation cascade--and the reductions in factors

  10. Screening for ASD in adults with ID-moving toward a standard using the DiBAS-R and the ACL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutsaerts, C G; Heinrich, M; Sterkenburg, P S; Sappok, T

    2016-05-01

    Identification of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in persons with intellectual disability (ID) is challenging but essential to allow adequate treatment to be given. This study examines whether the combination of two ASD screening instruments specifically developed for persons with ID, namely, the Diagnostic Behavioral Assessment for ASD-Revised (DiBAS-R) and the Autism Checklist (ACL), improves diagnostic accuracy when used in combination compared to the application of the single instrument. A clinical sample of adults with ID who are suspected of having ASD (N =148) was assessed using two ID specific screening scales (DiBAS-R and ACL). The diagnostic validity of the single instruments and of their combination was assessed. While both instruments showed acceptable diagnostic validity when applied alone (DiBAS-R/ACL: sensitivity: 75%/91%; specificity: 75%/75%; overall agreement: 75%/83%), specificity increased when two positive screening results were used (88%), and sensitivity increased (95%) when at least one positive screening result was used. Different combinations of the ASD screening instruments DiBAS-R and ACL lead to improvements in sensitivity and specificity. The complementary use of the ACL in addition to the sole use of the DiBAS-R improves overall accuracy. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. MUSCLE STRENGTH AND QUALITATIVE JUMP-LANDING DIFFERENCES IN MALE AND FEMALE MILITARY CADETS: THE JUMP-ACL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry P. Boden

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have focused on gender differences in movement patterns as risk factors for ACL injury. Understanding intrinsic and extrinsic factors which contribute to movement patterns is critical to ACL injury prevention efforts. Isometric lower- extremity muscular strength, anthropometrics, and jump-landing technique were analyzed for 2,753 cadets (1,046 female, 1,707 male from the U.S. Air Force, Military and Naval Academies. Jump- landings were evaluated using the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS, a valid qualitative movement screening tool. We hypothesized that distinct anthropometric factors (Q-angle, navicular drop, bodyweight and muscle strength would predict poor jump-landing technique in males versus females, and that female cadets would have higher scores (more errors on a qualitative movement screen (LESS than males. Mean LESS scores were significantly higher in female (5.34 ± 1.51 versus male (4.65 ± 1.69 cadets (p < 0.001. Qualitative movement scores were analyzed using factor analyses, yielding five factors, or "patterns", contributing to poor landing technique. Females were significantly more likely to have poor technique due to landing with less hip and knee flexion at initial contact (p < 0.001, more knee valgus with wider landing stance (p < 0. 001, and less flexion displacement over the entire landing (p < 0.001. Males were more likely to have poor technique due to landing toe-out (p < 0.001, with heels first, and with an asymmetric foot landing (p < 0.001. Many of the identified factor patterns have been previously proposed to contribute to ACL injury risk. However, univariate and multivariate analyses of muscular strength and anthropometric factors did not strongly predict LESS scores for either gender, suggesting that changing an athlete's alignment, BMI, or muscle strength may not directly improve his or her movement patterns

  12. Biomechanics laboratory-based prediction algorithm to identify female athletes with high knee loads that increase risk of ACL injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R; Khoury, Jane; Succop, Paul; Hewett, Timothy E

    2014-01-01

    Objective Knee abduction moment (KAM) during landing predicts non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk with high sensitivity and specificity in female athletes. The purpose of this study was to employ sensitive laboratory (lab-based) tools to determine predictive mechanisms that underlie increased KAM during landing. Methods Female basketball and soccer players (N=744) from a single county public school district were recruited to participate in testing of anthropometrics, maturation, laxity/flexibility, strength and landing biomechanics. Linear regression was used to model KAM, and logistic regression was used to examine high (>25.25 Nm of KAM) versus low KAM as surrogate for ACL injury risk. Results The most parsimonious model included independent predictors (β±1 SE) (1) peak knee abduction angle (1.78±0.05; p<0.001), (2) peak knee extensor moment (0.17±0.01; p<0.001), (3) knee flexion range of motion (0.15±0.03; p<0.01), (4) body mass index (BMI) Z-score (−1.67±0.36; p<0.001) and (5) tibia length (−0.50±0.14; p<0.001) and accounted for 78% of the variance in KAM during landing. The logistic regression model that employed these same variables predicted high KAM status with 85% sensitivity and 93% specificity and a C-statistic of 0.96. Conclusions Increased knee abduction angle, quadriceps recruitment, tibia length and BMI with decreased knee flexion account for 80% of the measured variance in KAM during a drop vertical jump. Clinical relevance Females who demonstrate increased KAM are more responsive and more likely to benefit from neuromuscular training. These findings should significantly enhance the identification of those at increased risk and facilitate neuromuscular training targeted to this important risk factor (high KAM) for ACL injury. PMID:20558526

  13. Effects of different initial bundle tensioning strategies on the outcome of double-bundle ACL reconstruction: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneta Takeshi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to investigate the effects of different strategies and initial tension applied to each one of the bundles, antero-medial (AM and postero-lateral (PL, on clinical outcome in double bundle (DB ACL reconstruction. Methods One hundred fifty-one primary unilateral DB ACL reconstructions performed by a single surgeon from 1994 through 2002 were included in the study with a follow-up of at least 24 months. They were divided in the following 3 groups: Group I - Higher initial tension applied manually in the AM bundle compared to PL. II - Higher tension applied in the PL bundle compared to AM. III - The 2 bundles were attempted to be equally tensioned. All fixations were performed in 30 degrees of flexion. Group I = 59 patients, group II = 53 patients and group III = 39 patients. The groups had no statistical differences concerning demographic distribution. Clinical outcome was retrospectively evaluated by use of knee range of motion, manual knee laxity tests, KT-1000, Lysholm knee scale, subjective recovery scale and sports performance recovery scale. The differences of data were analyzed among the three groups. Results Group I showed a significant extension deficit compared with groups II and III. ANOVA revealed a significant difference of anterior laxity measured by the KT-1000 (average KT difference of 2.1, 2.1 and 1.2 mm in Group I, II and III, respectively. A statistical difference was found among the three groups regarding subjective and sports performance recovery scales with Group II showing higher scores in recovery than Group I. Conclusions The current clinical study does not recommend manual maximum of initial tension applied to the anteromedial or posterolateral bundles with graft tension imbalance at 30 degrees of flexion in double-bundle ACL reconstruction to achieve a better clinical outcome.

  14. Assessment of the Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Injuries of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Helito, Paulo Victor Partezani; Costa, Hugo Pereira; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the epidemiology of injuries and abnormalities of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in cases of acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. MRIs of patients with acute ACL injury were evaluated. Acute injuries of the ACL were considered in cases in which the patient reported knee trauma occurring less than 3 weeks prior and when bone bruise in the femoral condyles and tibial plateau was identified. ALL abnormality was considered when it showed proximal or distal bone detachment, discontinuity of fibers, or irregular contour associated with periligamentous edema. The ALL was divided into femoral, tibial, and meniscal portions, and the lesions and/or abnormalities of each portion were characterized. The correlation of ALL injury with injuries of the lateral meniscus was evaluated. A total of 101 MRIs were initially evaluated. The ALL was not characterized in 13 (12.8%) examinations, resulting in 88 (87.1%) cases of injury evaluation. Of these, 55 (54.4%) patients had a normal ALL, and 33 (32.6%) showed signs of injury. Among the cases with injury, 24 (72%) patients showed proximal lesions, 7 (21%) showed distal lesions, and 2 (6.0%) patients presented both proximal and distal lesions. The meniscal portion of the ALL appeared abnormal in 16 (48%) patients. No relationship was found between ALL injury and lateral meniscus injury. Based on MRI analysis of acute ACL injuries with bone bruising of the lateral femoral condyle and lateral tibial plateau, approximately a third demonstrated ALL injuries of which the majority was proximal. Level IV, case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of targeted exercise on knee-muscle function in patients with persistent hamstring deficiency following ACL reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregenhof, Bo; Jørgensen, Uffe; Aagaard, Per

    2018-01-01

    at 12-24 months' post surgery, will be recruited through outpatient clinics and advertisements. Patients will be randomized to a 12-week progressive, strength and neuromuscular exercise group (SNG) with supervised training twice weekly or a control intervention (CON) consisting of a home-based, low...... harvest site evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), postural control, kinetic/kinematic gait characteristics and knee-related functional capacity. DISCUSSION: This RCT is designed to investigate the effect of combined, progressive-resistance and neuromuscular exercises on knee...... treatment strategies in ACL-reconstructed patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02939677 (recruiting). Registered on 20 October 2016....

  16. Single Wake Meandering, Advection and Expansion - An analysis using an adapted Pulsed Lidar and CFD LES-ACL simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of the wake, and it is compared to the predictions from the Dynamic Wake Meandering model, for a selected 10 minutes dataset. Secondly, the average wake expansion in the fixed frame of reference is determined from measurements and compared to results from CFD simulations. The CFD simulations were conducted...... using the EllipSys3D flow solver using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Actuator Line Technique (ACL) to model the rotor. Discrepancies due to the uncertainties on the wake advection velocity are observed and discussed....

  17. Single Wake Meandering, Advection and Expansion - An analysis using an adapted Pulsed Lidar and CFD LES-ACL simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machefaux, Ewan; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Troldborg, Niels

    2013-01-01

    of the wake, and it is compared to the predictions from the Dynamic Wake Meandering model, for a selected 10 minutes dataset. Secondly, the average wake expansion in the fixed frame of reference is determined from measurements and compared to results from CFD simulations. The CFD simulations were conducted...... using the EllipSys3D flow solver using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Actuator Line Technique (ACL) to model the rotor. Discrepancies due to the uncertainties on the wake advection velocity are observed and discussed....

  18. Does the FIFA 11+ Injury Prevention Program Reduce the Incidence of ACL Injury in Male Soccer Players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvers-Granelli, Holly J; Bizzini, Mario; Arundale, Amelia; Mandelbaum, Bert R; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2017-10-01

    The FIFA 11+ injury prevention program has been shown to decrease the risk of soccer injuries in men and women. The program has also been shown to decrease time loss resulting from injury. However, previous studies have not specifically investigated how the program might impact the rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in male soccer players. The purpose of this study was to examine if the FIFA 11+ injury prevention program can (1) reduce the overall number of ACL injuries in men who play competitive college soccer and whether any potential reduction in rate of ACL injuries differed based on (2) game versus practice setting; (3) player position; (4) level of play (Division I or II); or (5) field type. This study was a prospective cluster randomized controlled trial, which was conducted in 61 Division I and Division II National Collegiate Athletic Association men's soccer teams over the course of one competitive soccer season. The FIFA 11+ is a 15- to 20-minute on-the-field dynamic warm-up program used before training and games and was utilized as the intervention throughout the entire competitive season. Sixty-five teams were randomized: 34 to the control group (850 players) and 31 to the intervention group (675 players). Four intervention teams did not complete the study and did not submit their data, noting insufficient time to complete the program, reducing the number for per-protocol analysis to 61. Compliance to the FIFA 11+ program, athletic exposures, specific injuries, ACL injuries, and time loss resulting from injury were collected and recorded using a secure Internet-based system. At the end of the season, the data in the injury surveillance system were crosshatched with each individual institution's internal database. At that time, the certified athletic trainer signed off on the injury collection data to confirm their accuracy and completeness. A lower proportion of athletes in the intervention group experienced knee injuries (25% [34 of

  19. BAC and crash responsibility of injured older drivers : an analysis of Trauma Center data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the distribution of blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) in injured drivers 65 and older and the relationship of older-driver BAC to driving record and crash responsibility. Researchers conducted a retrospective examination of 11 y...

  20. Sialic acid accelerates the electrophoretic velocity of injured dorsal root ganglion neurons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen-xu Li Guo-ying Ma Min-fang Guo Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    .... With the increase of membrane proteins on soma and injured site neurons, the negatively charged sialic acids bind to the external domains of membrane proteins, resulting in an increase of this charge...

  1. Discrimination of intact and injured Listeria monocytogenes by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mengshi; Al-Holy, Murad; Al-Qadiri, Hamzah; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Cavinato, Anna G; Huang, Yiqun; Rasco, Barbara A

    2004-09-22

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, 4000-600 cm(-)(1)) was used to discriminate between intact and sonication-injured Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19114 and to distinguish this strain from other selected Listeria strains (L. innocua ATCC 51742, L. innocua ATCC 33090, and L. monocytogenes ATCC 7644). FT-IR vibrational overtone and combination bands from mid-IR active components of intact and injured bacterial cells produced distinctive "fingerprints" at wavenumbers between 1500 and 800 cm(-)(1). Spectral data were analyzed by principal component analysis. Clear segregations of different intact and injured strains of Listeria were observed, suggesting that FT-IR can detect biochemical differences between intact and injured bacterial cells. This technique may provide a tool for the rapid assessment of cell viability and thereby the control of foodborne pathogens.

  2. Perceived spasticity in chronic spinal cord injured patients: associations with psychological factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voerman, G.E.; Erren-Wolters, C.V.; Fleuren, J.F.; Hermens, H.J.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To explore the association between perceived spasticity and psychological factors (pain sensations, coping strategies, and illness cognitions) in chronic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients. METHODS: Cross-sectional study using a set of questionnaires was designed for chronic complete

  3. Perceived spasticity in chronic spinal cord injured patients: Associations with psychological factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voerman, Gerlienke; Erren-Wolters, Cathelijne V.; Fleuren, Judith F.M.; Fleuren, J.F.M.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Geurts, Alexander C.H.

    Purpose: To explore the association between perceived spasticity and psychological factors (pain sensations, coping strategies, and illness cognitions) in chronic spinal cord injured (SCI) patients. - Methods: Cross-sectional study using a set of questionnaires was designed for chronic complete

  4. Differences in kinetic variables between injured and noninjured novice runners : A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredeweg, Steef W.; Kluitenberg, Bas; Bessem, Bram; Buist, Ida

    Objectives: This prospective study examined differences in kinetic variables between injured and noninjured novice female and male runners and their potential contribution to RRIs. Design: A prospective cohort study. Methods: At baseline vertical ground reaction forces were assessed with an

  5. Synaptic inputs from stroke-injured brain to grafted human stem cell-derived neurons activated by sensory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero, Daniel; Tsupykov, Oleg; Granmo, Marcus; Rodriguez, Cristina; Grønning-Hansen, Marita; Thelin, Jonas; Smozhanik, Ekaterina; Laterza, Cecilia; Wattananit, Somsak; Ge, Ruimin; Tatarishvili, Jemal; Grealish, Shane; Brüstle, Oliver; Skibo, Galina; Parmar, Malin; Schouenborg, Jens; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2017-03-01

    Transplanted neurons derived from stem cells have been proposed to improve function in animal models of human disease by various mechanisms such as neuronal replacement. However, whether the grafted neurons receive functional synaptic inputs from the recipient's brain and integrate into host neural circuitry is unknown. Here we studied the synaptic inputs from the host brain to grafted cortical neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells after transplantation into stroke-injured rat cerebral cortex. Using the rabies virus-based trans-synaptic tracing method and immunoelectron microscopy, we demonstrate that the grafted neurons receive direct synaptic inputs from neurons in different host brain areas located in a pattern similar to that of neurons projecting to the corresponding endogenous cortical neurons in the intact brain. Electrophysiological in vivo recordings from the cortical implants show that physiological sensory stimuli, i.e. cutaneous stimulation of nose and paw, can activate or inhibit spontaneous activity in grafted neurons, indicating that at least some of the afferent inputs are functional. In agreement, we find using patch-clamp recordings that a portion of grafted neurons respond to photostimulation of virally transfected, channelrhodopsin-2-expressing thalamo-cortical axons in acute brain slices. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that the host brain regulates the activity of grafted neurons, providing strong evidence that transplanted human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons can become incorporated into injured cortical circuitry. Our findings support the idea that these neurons could contribute to functional recovery in stroke and other conditions causing neuronal loss in cerebral cortex. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Vibration modes of injured spine at resonant frequencies under vertical vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Xin; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Yi-Min; Teo, Ee-Chon

    2009-09-01

    A detailed three-dimensional finite element model of the spine segment T12-Pelvis was developed to investigate dynamic characteristics of whole lumbar spine with injured cases. This study investigates the motion mechanism of the human lumbar spine and the effect of component injuries on adjacent spinal components under whole body vibration. Several investigations have analyzed the influence of injured spines on adjacent spinal components under static loadings. However, it is not clear how the spine injury affects dynamic characteristics of whole lumbar spine and adjacent components of the injured segment under vibration. The T12-Pelvis model was used to obtain the modal vibration modes of the spine at resonant frequencies. Injury conditions of the spine were simulated and tested, including denucleation and/or facetectomy with removal of capsular ligaments. The results indicate the first-order vertical resonant frequency of the intact model is 7.21 Hz. After the denucleation at L4-L5, it decreases by more than 4% compared with the intact condition. All the injured conditions including disc injury and ligament injury decrease the resonant frequency of the spine. Due to the denucleation at L4-L5 the anteroposterior displacements of the vertebrae from L2 to L5 decrease and the vertical displacements of the vertebrae from L1 to L4 increase under vibration. The denucleation also decreases the rotational deformations of the vertebrae from L1 to L5. The material property sensitivity analysis shows intervertebral discs have a dominating effect on variation of vertical resonant frequency of the spine. The denucleation may decrease cushioning effects of adjacent motion segments at the injured level under vibration. The injured condition may increase the vertical displacement amplitudes of the spine above the injured level. All the injured conditions may decrease the resonant frequency of the spine system.

  7. Sphincter (ring muscle) gymnastics for spinal cord injured and spinal cord transected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom-Tov, S

    2000-07-01

    Sphincter gymnastics seem to be able to recruit central pattern generators--networks of neurons that generate motor patterns--through peripheral rhythmic stimuli and to activate them without supraspinal signals. This physical therapy method is thus suitable for treating spinal cord injured and spinal cord transected patients, for it can reach below the injured segment and feed signals into the central nervous system, thus activating vital organs. This article presents some observations and discusses a possible mechanism.

  8. Mechanisms and Treatment of Deployment-Related Lung Injury: Repair of the Injured Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-2-0018 TITLE: Mechanisms and Treatment of Deployment-Related Lung Injury: Repair of the Injured Epithelium PRINCIPAL...AND SUBTITLE Mechanisms and Treatment of Deployment-Related Lung Injury: Repair of the Injured Epithelium 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...initial experiments confirm our preliminary data that pretreatment with PM from Iraq or Afghanistan (5- 10 µg/cm2) significantly delay wound closure in

  9. 〈Review〉Psychological Response to Sport Injury and Psychological Skills Interventions for Injured Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Naoi, Airi; Deaner, Heather. R.

    2006-01-01

    [Abstract] This article reviews previous research studies that have examined the psychological responses of injured athletes and the effectiveness of psychological skills interventions for injured athletes. In order to understand psychological response to injury, two models, a cognitive appraisal model of psychological adjustment to athletic injury and an integrated model of psychological response to the sport injury and rehabilitation process, are described. Additionally, the relationship am...

  10. The impact of playing in matches while injured on injury surveillance findings in professional football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, L E; Lilley, J M; Pope, G D; Ribbans, W J

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to analyze the frequency, nature, and consequences of footballers playing matches while injured, and to examine the impact on injury surveillance findings. High levels of inter-rater reliability and content validity were established for a tool designed to document players who were already injured at the start of a match. The tool was implemented in three English football teams (a Championship, League 1, and League 2 team) for one season, using a "time loss" definition of injury. One hundred forty-three matches were surveyed, revealing 102 match appearances by players who were already injured. Almost half of all games featured at least one injured player, with episodes of playing with injury occurring more frequently and lasting longer in League 2 players compared with higher level players. No association was observed between the number of injured players starting matches and match outcome [χ(2) (4, N = 143) = 3.27, P = 0.514]. Fifteen percent of all injury episodes captured were only through prospective documentation of playing while injured. The findings show that both traumatic and overuse injuries are managed by footballers through competitive matches, and have important implications for aiding understanding of the epidemiology of injury in professional football. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Is an Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Required in ACL-Reconstructed Knees With Associated Injury to the Anterolateral Structures? A Robotic Analysis of Rotational Knee Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Frank R; Huser, Lauren E; Jurgensmeier, Darin; Walsh, James; Levy, Martin S

    2017-04-01

    The effect of an anterolateral ligament (ALL) reconstruction on rotational knee stability and corresponding anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft forces using multiple knee loading conditions including the pivot-shift phenomenon has not been determined. First, to determine the rotational stability and ACL graft forces provided by an anatomic bone-patellar tendon-bone ACL reconstruction in the ACL-deficient knee alone and with an associated ALL/iliotibial band (ITB) injury. Second, to determine the added rotational stabilizing effect and reduction in ACL graft forces provided by an ALL reconstruction. Controlled laboratory study. A 6 degrees of freedom robotic simulator was used to test 7 fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens during 5 testing conditions: intact, ACL-sectioned, ACL-reconstructed, ALL/ITB-sectioned, and ALL-reconstructed. Lateral and medial tibiofemoral compartment translations and internal tibial rotations were measured under Lachman test conditions, 5-N·m internal rotation, and 2 pivot-shift simulations. Statistical equivalence within 2 mm and 2° was defined as P < .05. Single-graft ACL reconstruction restored central tibial translation under Lachman testing and internal rotation under 5-N·m internal rotation torque ( P < .05). A modest increase in internal rotation under 5-N·m internal rotation torque occurred after ALL/ITB sectioning of 5.1° (95% CI, 3.6° to 6.7°) and 6.7° (95% CI, 4.3° to 9.1°) at 60° and 90° of flexion, respectively ( P = .99). Lateral compartment translation increases in the pivot-shift tests were <2 mm. ALL reconstruction restored internal rotation within 0.5° (95% CI, -1.9° to 2.9°) and 0.7° (95% CI, -2.0° to 3.4°) of the ACL-reconstructed state at 60° and 90° of flexion, respectively ( P < .05). The ALL procedure reduced ACL graft forces, at most, 75 N in the pivot-shift tests and 81 N in the internal rotation tests. Although the ALL reconstruction corrected the small abnormal changes in the internal rotation

  12. Association between maximal hamstring strength and hamstring muscle pre-activity during a movement associated with non-contact ACL injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Husted, Rasmus; Bencke, Jesper; Thorborg, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Reduced hamstring pre-activity during side-cutting may predispose for non-contact ACL injury. During the last decade resistance training of the lower limb muscles has become an integral part of ACL injury prevention in e.g. soccer and handball. However, it is not known whether a strong...... hamstring (ACL-agonist) musculature is associated with a high level of hamstring muscle pre-activity during high risk movements such as side-cutting. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between hamstring muscle pre-activity recorded during a standardized sidecutting maneuver...... and maximal isometric hamstring muscle strength. Material and Methods Eighty-five female athletes (17 ± 1 yrs) were screened for neuromuscular pre-activity in medial (ST) and lateral (BF) hamstring muscle during a sidecutting maneuver. Maximal hamstring muscle strength [N/kg BW] (MVC) was measured in a static...

  13. Acceleration and Orientation Jumping Performance Differences Among Elite Professional Male Handball Players With or Without Previous ACL Reconstruction: An Inertial Sensor Unit-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setuain, Igor; González-Izal, Miriam; Alfaro, Jesús; Gorostiaga, Esteban; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2015-12-01

    Handball is one of the most challenging sports for the knee joint. Persistent biomechanical and jumping capacity alterations can be observed in athletes with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Commonly identified jumping biomechanical alterations have been described by the use of laboratory technologies. However, portable and easy-to-handle technologies that enable an evaluation of jumping biomechanics at the training field are lacking. To analyze unilateral/bilateral acceleration and orientation jumping performance differences among elite male handball athletes with or without previous ACL reconstruction via a single inertial sensor unit device. Case control descriptive study. At the athletes' usual training court. Twenty-two elite male (6 ACL-reconstructed and 16 uninjured control players) handball players were evaluated. The participants performed a vertical jump test battery that included a 50-cm vertical bilateral drop jump, a 20-cm vertical unilateral drop jump, and vertical unilateral countermovement jump maneuvers. Peak 3-dimensional (X, Y, Z) acceleration (m·s(-2)), jump phase duration and 3-dimensional orientation values (°) were obtained from the inertial sensor unit device. Two-tailed t-tests and a one-way analysis of variance were performed to compare means. The P value cut-off for significance was set at P handball athletes with previous ACL reconstruction demonstrated a jumping biomechanical profile similar to control players, including similar jumping performance values in both bilateral and unilateral jumping maneuvers, several years after ACL reconstruction. These findings are in agreement with previous research showing full functional restoration of abilities in top-level male athletes after ACL reconstruction, rehabilitation and subsequent return to sports at the previous level. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationship between mucoid hypertrophy of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and morphologic change of the intercondylar notch: MRI and arthroscopy correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Ji Hyeon; Shin, Myung Jin; Choi, Byeong Kyoo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Sang Hoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Bin, Sung Il [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between mucoid hypertrophy of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and morphologic change of the intercondylar notch. We retrospectively reviewed the 105 patients with knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with or without knee arthroscopy [group 1: patients with arthroscopic notchplasty (N = 47), group 2: knee arthroscopy demonstrating intact ACL (N = 33), and group 3: patients with normal knee MRI but no arthroscopy (N = 25)]. Groups 2 and 3 served as an arthroscopic and MR control group, respectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all MR examinations. The intercondylar notch width, notch index (width of intercondylar notch/width of femoral condyle), transverse notch angle (TNA), sagittal notch angle (SNA), and notch area were recorded on axial and sagittal MR images at the midpoint of Blumensaat's line which was identified on sagittal images. The diameter of the ACL was recorded on coronal MR images at the posterior end of Blumensaat's line. The mean values of the intercondylar notch width, notch index, TNA, SNA, notch area, and ACL diameter for the three groups were 16.0 mm/0.2/50.3 /36.5 /249.0 mm{sup 2}/7.7 mm (group 1); 19.3 mm/0.3/52.9 /40.2 /323.4 mm{sup 2}/4.8 mm (group 2); and 20.3 mm/0.3/51.4 /39.1 /350.8 mm{sup 2}/4.5 mm (group 3). The intercondylar notch width, notch index, SNA, and notch area were smaller, and ACL diameter was thicker in group 1 compared with the other groups (p < 0.05). Patients with mucoid ACL hypertrophy show a narrower notch, a steeper notch angle, and a smaller notch area than control groups. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of operative times between pressure and flow-control pump versus pressure-control pump for ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Ryan; Bear, Russell; Machen, M Shaun; Owens, Brett D

    2009-10-01

    Evidence suggests that a pressure and flow-control pump provides better visualization than a pressure-control pump alone. Increased visualization may lead to decreased operative time. We sought to perform a direct comparison in terms of operative times in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery using these 2 automated pump systems. We retrospectively studied all ACL reconstruction procedures performed at our institution over an 8-month period. During the first 4-month period, a pressure-driven pump was used (HydroFlex Multipurpose Irrigation Pump; Davol, Warwick, Rhode Island). During the second 4-month period, a pressure and flow-control pump was used (FMS Duo+; DePuy Mitek, Raynham, Massachusetts). Procedures that involved multiligament reconstruction or meniscal repair were excluded. Surgical time was defined as the time from incision to skin closure. The data were analyzed with the Student t test with significance set at Psystem. Mean operative time using the pressure-control pump was 126 minutes (95% CI 118.9, 133.3), while mean operative time using the pressure and flow-control system was 111 minutes (95% CI 104.1, 117.9). This difference was significant (P=.004). These results indicate that the use of pressure and flow-control pump system results in time savings compared with the pressure-control pump.

  16. Investigating physical fitness and race performance as determinants for the ACL injury risk in Alpine ski racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Kai-Uwe; Hörterer, Nicole; Vogt, Michael; Frey, Walter O; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    ACL ruptures in Alpine ski racers are frequently observed. This study analysed the association between physical fitness, race performance and the knee injury history. A retrospective study was conducted to investigate the influence of physical fitness and performance on the knee injury outcome. As part of this study an injury data base (covering 2004-2013) was established that recorded information about the athletes, their fitness status as determined by a standardised fitness test (Swiss Ski Power Test, SSPT) as well as medical information related to injuries. The performance of athletes who sustained knee injury was compared to athletes who suffered no injury or a different injury. Twenty-seven (19f, 8 m) of 70 athletes sustained a knee injury. ACL ruptures accounted for 71 % of these knee injuries. While more females sustained a knee injury, the difference between males and females was not statistically significant. It was shown that athletes with a better FIS (Fédération Internationale de Ski) rank were more prone to knee injury. However, none of the parameters related to physical fitness was linked to a history of knee injury. A general fitness test as SSPT is not associated with a history of knee injury in Alpine skiing. More specific physical fitness test procedures should be investigated to determine relevant fitness factors.

  17. Potential for Non-Contact ACL Injury Between Step-Close-Jump and Hop-Jump Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-I; Gu, Chin-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ling; Chang, Mu-San

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the kinematics and kinetics during the landing of hop-jump and step-close-jump movements in order to provide further inferring that the potential risk of ACL injuries. Eleven elite male volleyball players were recruited to perform hop-jump and step-close-jump tasks. Lower extremity kinematics and ground reaction forces during landing in stop-jump tasks were recorded. Lower extremity kinetics was calculated by using an inverse dynamic process. Step-close-jump tasks demonstrated smaller peak proximal tibia anterior shear forces during the landing phase. In step-close-jump tasks, increasing hip joint angular velocity during initial foot-ground contact decreased peak posterior ground reaction force during the landing phase, which theoretically could reduce the risk of ACL injury. Key pointsThe different landing techniques required for these two stop-jump tasks do not necessarily affect the jump height.Hop-jump decreased the hip joint angular velocity at initial foot contact with ground, which could lead to an increasing peak posterior GRF during the landing phase.Hop-jump decreased hip and knee joint angular flexion displacement during the landing, which could increase the peak vertical loading rate during the landing phase.

  18. The influence of femoral tunnel position in single-bundle ACL reconstruction on functional outcomes and return to sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Fregni, Felipe; Weaver, Kayleen; Pedrinelli, André; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to radiographically investigate the influence of femoral tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction on early outcomes and return to sports due to anatomic and nonanatomic positioning. A prospective study was conducted from 2008 to 2010, with 86 athletes who underwent ACL reconstruction between anteromedial (AM) footprint and high AM position. Knee functional outcomes (IKDC objective and subjective, Tegner score, and Lysholm scale) return to sports and complications were analyzed at 6- and 12-month follow-up. At follow-up, it was observed that tunnel projection along Blumensaat's line was correlated with functional outcomes on Tegner scale (at 6 and 12 months) and IKDC subjective (at 12 months). There was a significant difference in mean tunnel projection along Blumensaat's line when analyzing return to sports (73 ± 1.4 and 79 ± 1.7 %, respectively, for projections on return vs. no return to sports, p = 0.02) and complications (73 ± 1.3 vs. 78 ± 1.6 %, respectively, for projections on no complications vs. complications, p = 0.03). No differences were stated on coronal view. These correlations between tunnel positioning on functional outcomes could not be explained by demographic or baseline characteristics. The clinical relevance of this study is that tunnel positioning along AM footprint and high AM position represented by tunnel projection along Blumensaat's line is associated with early return to sports on previous Tegner level and better functional outcome in athletes.

  19. Bronchitis - acute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute bronchitis is swelling and inflamed tissue in the main ... present only for a short time. Causes When acute bronchitis occurs, it almost always comes after having a ...

  20. Acute cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000264.htm Acute cholecystitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute cholecystitis is sudden swelling and irritation of the gallbladder. ...

  1. The effects of functional knee bracing and taping of the tibio-femoral joint in athletes with an ACL-deficient knee

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi, Abbas

    2001-01-01

    Aims: The aims of this study were to determine the usefulness of a functional knee brace (FKB) or a spiral method of taping in modifying the impaired biomechanics of the ACL-deficient knees towards a safe and more normal pattern, and to assess any compensatory changes at the ankle and hip joints following knee bracing or taping. The study also aimed to compare the difference in gait patterns during simple· level walking and treadmill activities for ACL-deficient subjects. \\ud \\ud Methods: A p...

  2. Translation, cultural adaptation and validation of simplified Chinese version of the anterior cruciate ligament return to sport after injury (ACL-RSI scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianwu Chen

    Full Text Available To translate and cross-culturally adapt the anterior cruciate ligament-return to sport after injury (ACL-RSI into simplified Chinese [ACL-RSI (Cn].In this diagnostic study, the translation, cross-culturally adaptation, and validation of the ACL-RSI was performed according to international guidelines. A total of 112 patients with ACL reconstruction participated in this study. All were capable of competitive sports before the injury and completed the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome (KOOS, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC, the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK, and the Tegner activity score. Forty-eight patients completed the ACL-RSI (Cn twice within two weeks. The validity was tested using seven premade hypotheses. Internal consistency, reliability, and measurement error was assessed.At meanly 15.6 months postoperative, 81 (72.3% patients returned to sport, with 57 (50.9% to competitive sport and 24 (21.4% to recreational sport. Thirty-one (27.7% patients didn't return to any sport, with 19 (17.0% still had planned to return, and 12 (10.7% gave up sport. The ACL-RSI (Cn demonstrated excellent validity with all hypotheses confirmed. The outcome of ACL-RSI (Cn was strongly correlated the KOOS subscale quality of life (r = 0.66, p<0.001, the TSK (r = -0.678, p<0.001, the Tegner score (r = 0.695, p<0.001. There was statistic difference between cases returned (68.6 ± 10.1 and didn't return to sport (41.3 ± 17.7, p<0.001; between cases returned to competitive (71.1 ± 8.9 and recreational sport (62.9 ± 10.5, (P = 0.002; between cases who planned to return (50.7 ± 14.1 and gave up sport (26.5 ± 11.7, (P<0.001. The internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.96 and test-retest reliability [intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC = 0.90] was excellent. The measurement error, floor and ceiling effect was satisfactory. Administration time was 3.2 minutes, and no item was missed.The ACL-RSI (Cn scale was confirmed as a valid

  3. Responses of intact and injured sural nerve fibers to cooling and menthol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teliban, Alina; Bartsch, Fabian; Struck, Marek; Baron, Ralf; Jänig, Wilfrid

    2014-05-01