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Sample records for acute viral infection

  1. Constrained pattern of viral evolution in acute and early HCV infection limits viral plasticity.

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    Katja Pfafferott

    Full Text Available Cellular immune responses during acute Hepatitis C virus (HCV and HIV infection are a known correlate of infection outcome. Viral adaptation to these responses via mutation(s within CD8+ T-cell epitopes allows these viruses to subvert host immune control. This study examined HCV evolution in 21 HCV genotype 1-infected subjects to characterise the level of viral adaptation during acute and early HCV infection. Of the total mutations observed 25% were within described CD8+ T-cell epitopes or at viral adaptation sites. Most mutations were maintained into the chronic phase of HCV infection (75%. The lack of reversion of adaptations and high proportion of silent substitutions suggests that HCV has structural and functional limitations that constrain evolution. These results were compared to the pattern of viral evolution observed in 98 subjects during a similar phase in HIV infection from a previous study. In contrast to HCV, evolution during acute HIV infection is marked by high levels of amino acid change relative to silent substitutions, including a higher proportion of adaptations, likely reflecting strong and continued CD8+ T-cell pressure combined with greater plasticity of the virus. Understanding viral escape dynamics for these two viruses is important for effective T cell vaccine design.

  2. Polyphasic innate immune responses to acute and chronic LCMV infection: Innate immunity to acute & chronic viral infection

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    Norris, Brian A; Uebelhoer, Luke S.; Nakaya, Helder I.; Price, Aryn A; Grakoui, Arash; Pulendran, Bali

    2013-01-01

    Resolution of acute and chronic viral infections requires activation of innate cells to initiate and maintain adaptive immune responses. Here we report that infection with acute Armstrong (ARM) or chronic Clone 13 (C13) strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) led to two distinct phases of innate immune response. During the first 72hr of infection, dendritic cells upregulated activation markers, and stimulated anti-viral CD8+ T cells, independent of viral strain. Seven days after ...

  3. VIRAL ETIOLOGY ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS MOLECULAR MONITORING IN CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

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    A. V. Sergeeva; L. Y. Poslova; O. V. Kovalishena; A. S. Blagonravova; N. V. Epifanova; T. A. Sashina; Morozova, O.V.; N. A. Novikova

    2015-01-01

    On the territory of the Russian Federation in the overall structure of acute intestinal infections the proportion of viral diarrhea among children varies from 24 to 78% of cases depending on the season. The acute viral intestinal infections etiological confirmation is performed mainly among patients of infectious hospitals. The prevalence of viral acute intestinal infections in non-infectious hospitals, including infections associated with medical care, remains unclear. Currently estimation o...

  4. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

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    Eliana C.A. Benites

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the prevalence of infection by respiratory viruses in pediatric patients with cancer and acute respiratory infection (ARI and/or fever. METHODS: cross-sectional study, from January 2011 to December 2012. The secretions of nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed in children younger than 21 years with acute respiratory infections. Patients were treated at the Grupo em Defesa da Criança Com Câncer (Grendacc and University Hospital (HU, Jundiaí, SP. The rapid test was used for detection of influenza virus (Kit Biotrin, Inc. Ireland, and real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (FTD, Respiratory pathogens, multiplex Fast Trade Kit, Malta for detection of influenza virus (H1N1, B, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, human parechovirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, and human coronavirus. The prevalence of viral infection was estimated and association tests were used (χ2 or Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: 104 samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate and blood were analyzed. The median age was 12 ± 5.2 years, 51% males, 68% whites, 32% had repeated ARIs, 32% prior antibiotic use, 19.8% cough, and 8% contact with ARIs. A total of 94.3% were in good general status. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (42.3% was the most prevalent neoplasia. Respiratory viruses were detected in 50 samples: rhinoviruses (23.1%, respiratory syncytial virus AB (8.7%, and coronavirus (6.8%. Co-detection occurred in 19% of cases with 2 viruses and in 3% of those with 3 viruses, and was more frequent between rhinovirus and coronavirus 43. Fever in neutropenic patients was observed in 13%, of which four (30.7 were positive for viruses. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS: the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co-detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs.

  5. Viral Infection in Adults with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in Colombia.

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    Yuly Andrea Remolina

    Full Text Available To identify the viral aetiology in adult patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI admitted to sentinel surveillance institutions in Bogotá in 2012.A cross-sectional study was conducted in which microarray molecular techniques for viral identification were used on nasopharyngeal samples of adult patients submitted to the surveillance system, and further descriptions of clinical features and relevant clinical outcomes, such as mortality, need for critical care, use of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay, were obtained.Respiratory infections requiring hospital admission in surveillance centres in Bogotá, Colombia.Ninety-one adult patients with acute respiratory infection (55% were female.Viral identification, intensive care unit admission, hospital stay, and mortality.Viral identification was achieved for 63 patients (69.2%. Comorbidity was frequently identified and mainly involved chronic pulmonary disease or pregnancy. Influenza, Bocavirus and Adenovirus were identified in 30.8%, 28.6% and 18.7% of the cases, respectively. Admission to the intensive care unit occurred in 42.9% of the cases, while mechanical ventilation was required for 36.3%. The average hospital stay was 9.9 days, and mortality was 15.4%. Antibiotics were empirically used in 90.1% of patients.The prevalence of viral aetiology of SARI in this study was high, with adverse clinical outcomes, intensive care requirements and high mortality.

  6. VIRAL ETIOLOGY ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS MOLECULAR MONITORING IN CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

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    A. V. Sergeeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On the territory of the Russian Federation in the overall structure of acute intestinal infections the proportion of viral diarrhea among children varies from 24 to 78% of cases depending on the season. The acute viral intestinal infections etiological confirmation is performed mainly among patients of infectious hospitals. The prevalence of viral acute intestinal infections in non-infectious hospitals, including infections associated with medical care, remains unclear. Currently estimation of viral component in the acute intestinal infections overall structure mainly consists in determination of rotavirus infection prevalence excluding other pathogens. As the part of viral etiology hospital infections epidemiological surveillance in non-infections children’s hospital the study of acute viral intestinal infections etiological structure and molecular genetics characterization of identified enteric viruses is conducted. The syndrome diagnosis of acute intestinal infections cases was introduced — an identification and evaluation of patients with signs of dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract, that is not related to the underlying disease. A set of laboratory methods included identification of various intestinal pathogens DNA (RNA by PCR-RT method; genotyping of enteric viruses using sequencing; nucleotide sequence analysis of cDNA fragments using the BLAST software package for identification of closely related strains and an online service for automatic genotyping of noroviruses by Norovirus Genotyping Tool Version 1.0. Alignment of nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic analysis was performed using the software MEGA 5.0. The obtained sequence fragments of the genome was downloaded in GenBank international database. The use of molecular genetics research methods allowed to differentiate viral pathogens of acute intestinal infections and to establish the fact of nosocomial transmission. The proportion of viral etiology acute intestinal

  7. Origin and function of circulating plasmablasts during acute viral infections

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    Katja eFink

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Activated B cells proliferate and differentiate into antibody-producing cells, long-lived plasma cells and memory B cells after immunization or infection. Repeated encounter of the same antigen triggers the rapid re-activation of pre-existing specific memory B cells, which then possibly enter new germinal center reactions and differentiate into short-lived plasmablasts or remain in the system as memory B cells. Short-lived plasmablasts appear in the circulation transiently and the frequency of these cells can be remarkably high. The specificities and affinities of single plasmablasts have been reported for several viral infections, so far most extensively for influenza and HIV. In general, the immunoglobulin variable regions of plasmablasts are highly mutated and diverse, showing that plasmablasts are derived from memory B cells, yet it is unclear which memory B cell subsets are activated and whether activated memory B cells adapt or mature before differentiation. This review summarizes what is known about the phenotype and the origin of human plasmablasts in the context of viral infections and whether these cells can be predictors of long-lived immunity.

  8. Viral etiology of acute respiratory infections (ari) in old adults from ageriatric care unit

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    Beltrán, Karent Julieth; Grupo de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Línea de investigación Microbiología Molecular y Aplicada de las enfermedades Infecciosas, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá-Colombia.; Segura, Juan Camilo; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá-Colombia; Bettin, Laura; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá-Colombia; Coriat, Jeanette; Programa de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá-Colombia; Mercado, Marcela; Instituto Nacional de Salud, Bogotá-Colombia.; Hidalgo, Marylin; Grupo de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Departamento de Microbiología. Facultad de Ciencias. Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. Bogotá, D.C. Colombia.; Díez, Hugo; Grupo de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá-Colombia.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine viral etiology of acute respiratory infections in older-than-60 adults, living at 4 geriatric care units in Bogota.Methods: The study was performed in two phases: Phase 1: Descriptive prospective study to evaluate incidence of viral respiratory infection during 1 year in old adults. 71 patients, suffering respiratory diseases, were selected, and evaluated, including physical exploration, thorax X-ray, and collection of respiratory samples for analysis. In order to dete...

  9. Clinical guidelines for the management of acute viral infections in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Ramos-Casals, M; Cuadrado, M J; Alba, P; Sanna, G; Brito-Zerón, P; Bertolaccini, L; Babini, A; Moreno, A; D'Cruz, D; Khamashta, M A

    2009-12-01

    In recent decades, many research groups have focused on the role of viral infections in the etiopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the so-called "viral hypothesis". The main candidates are herpes viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV), which have a high seroprevalence in the general population. However, a viral causal agent of SLE has not yet been discovered, although many interesting clinical findings on the complex interactions between viruses and SLE have been made. This review analyzes 88 cases of acute viral infections in adult patients with SLE and identifies situations in which viral infections influenced the diagnosis, prognosis or treatment of SLE. We also propose clinical guidelines for the management of these infections in patients with SLE.

  10. Encephalitis, acute renal failure, and acute hepatitis triggered by a viral infection in an immunocompetent young adult: a case report

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    Khattab Mahmoud

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cytomegalovirus generally causes self-limited, mild and asymptomatic infections in immunocompetent patients. An aggressive course in immunocompetent healthy patients is unusual. Case presentation We report the case of an immunocompetent 16-year-old Egyptian boy with encephalitis, acute renal failure, and acute hepatitis triggered by viral infection with a complete recovery following antiviral treatment. Conclusion We believe that this case adds to the understanding of the molecular biology, clinical presentation and increasing index of suspicion of many viral infections.

  11. Viral respiratory tract infections among patients with acute undifferentiated fever in Vietnam

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    H.L. Phuong; T.T.T. Nga; G.J. van Doornum; J. Groen; T.Q. Binh; P.T. Giao; L.Q. Hung; N.V. Nams; P.A. Kager; P.J. de Vries

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the proportion of viral respiratory tract infections among acute undifferentiated fevers (AUFs) at primary health facilities in southern Vietnam during 2001-2005, patients with AUF not caused by malaria were enrolled at twelve primary health facilities and a clinic for malaria control

  12. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

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    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  13. Viral-bacterial interactions and risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection.

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    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Gent, Janneane F; Pyles, Richard B; Miller, Aaron L; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2011-11-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common complication of upper respiratory tract infection whose pathogenesis involves both viruses and bacteria. We examined risks of acute otitis media associated with specific combinations of respiratory viruses and acute otitis media bacterial pathogens. Data were from a prospective study of children ages 6 to 36 months and included viral and bacterial culture and quantitative PCR for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human bocavirus, and human metapneumovirus. Repeated-measure logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between specific viruses, bacteria, and the risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection. In unadjusted analyses of data from 194 children, adenovirus, bocavirus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis were significantly associated with AOM (P virus loads (≥3.16 × 10(7) copies/ml) experienced increased acute otitis media risk. Higher viral loads of bocavirus and metapneumovirus were not significantly associated with acute otitis media. In adjusted models controlling for the presence of key viruses, bacteria, and acute otitis media risk factors, acute otitis media risk was independently associated with high RSV viral load with Streptococcus pneumoniae (odds ratio [OR], 4.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.90 and 10.19) and Haemophilus influenzae (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.38 and 3.02). The risk was higher for the presence of bocavirus and H. influenzae together (OR, 3.61; 95% CI, 1.90 and 6.86). Acute otitis media risk differs by the specific viruses and bacteria involved. Acute otitis media prevention efforts should consider methods for reducing infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus, bocavirus, and adenovirus in addition to acute otitis media bacterial pathogens.

  14. Host Transcriptional Response to Influenza and Other Acute Respiratory Viral Infections – A Prospective Cohort Study

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    Zhai, Yijie; Franco, Luis M.; Atmar, Robert L.; Quarles, John M.; Arden, Nancy; Bucasas, Kristine L.; Wells, Janet M.; Niño, Diane; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys E.; Shaw, Chad A.; Belmont, John W.; Couch, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the systemic response to naturally acquired acute respiratory viral infections, we prospectively enrolled 1610 healthy adults in 2009 and 2010. Of these, 142 subjects were followed for detailed evaluation of acute viral respiratory illness. We examined peripheral blood gene expression at 7 timepoints: enrollment, 5 illness visits and the end of each year of the study. 133 completed all study visits and yielded technically adequate peripheral blood microarray gene expression data. Seventy-three (55%) had an influenza virus infection, 64 influenza A and 9 influenza B. The remaining subjects had a rhinovirus infection (N = 32), other viral infections (N = 4), or no viral agent identified (N = 24). The results, which were replicated between two seasons, showed a dramatic upregulation of interferon pathway and innate immunity genes. This persisted for 2-4 days. The data show a recovery phase at days 4 and 6 with differentially expressed transcripts implicated in cell proliferation and repair. By day 21 the gene expression pattern was indistinguishable from baseline (enrollment). Influenza virus infection induced a higher magnitude and longer duration of the shared expression signature of illness compared to the other viral infections. Using lineage and activation state-specific transcripts to produce cell composition scores, patterns of B and T lymphocyte depressions accompanied by a major activation of NK cells were detected in the acute phase of illness. The data also demonstrate multiple dynamic gene modules that are reorganized and strengthened following infection. Finally, we examined pre- and post-infection anti-influenza antibody titers defining novel gene expression correlates. PMID:26070066

  15. Host Transcriptional Response to Influenza and Other Acute Respiratory Viral Infections--A Prospective Cohort Study.

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    Yijie Zhai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the systemic response to naturally acquired acute respiratory viral infections, we prospectively enrolled 1610 healthy adults in 2009 and 2010. Of these, 142 subjects were followed for detailed evaluation of acute viral respiratory illness. We examined peripheral blood gene expression at 7 timepoints: enrollment, 5 illness visits and the end of each year of the study. 133 completed all study visits and yielded technically adequate peripheral blood microarray gene expression data. Seventy-three (55% had an influenza virus infection, 64 influenza A and 9 influenza B. The remaining subjects had a rhinovirus infection (N = 32, other viral infections (N = 4, or no viral agent identified (N = 24. The results, which were replicated between two seasons, showed a dramatic upregulation of interferon pathway and innate immunity genes. This persisted for 2-4 days. The data show a recovery phase at days 4 and 6 with differentially expressed transcripts implicated in cell proliferation and repair. By day 21 the gene expression pattern was indistinguishable from baseline (enrollment. Influenza virus infection induced a higher magnitude and longer duration of the shared expression signature of illness compared to the other viral infections. Using lineage and activation state-specific transcripts to produce cell composition scores, patterns of B and T lymphocyte depressions accompanied by a major activation of NK cells were detected in the acute phase of illness. The data also demonstrate multiple dynamic gene modules that are reorganized and strengthened following infection. Finally, we examined pre- and post-infection anti-influenza antibody titers defining novel gene expression correlates.

  16. An accurate two-phase approximate solution to the acute viral infection model

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    Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    During an acute viral infection, virus levels rise, reach a peak and then decline. Data and numerical solutions suggest the growth and decay phases are linear on a log scale. While viral dynamic models are typically nonlinear with analytical solutions difficult to obtain, the exponential nature of the solutions suggests approximations can be found. We derive a two-phase approximate solution to the target cell limited influenza model and illustrate the accuracy using data and previously established parameter values of six patients infected with influenza A. For one patient, the subsequent fall in virus concentration was not consistent with our predictions during the decay phase and an alternate approximation is derived. We find expressions for the rate and length of initial viral growth in terms of the parameters, the extent each parameter is involved in viral peaks, and the single parameter responsible for virus decay. We discuss applications of this analysis in antiviral treatments and investigating host and virus heterogeneities.

  17. [Autochthonous acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis)].

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    Pérez-Ruiz, Mercedes; Vicente, Diego; Navarro-Marí, José María

    2008-07-01

    Rapid diagnosis of acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis) is highly important for the clinical management of the patient and helps to establish early therapy that may solve life-threatening situations, to avoid unnecessary empirical treatments, to reduce hospital stay, and to facilitate appropriate interventions in the context of public health. Molecular techniques, especially real-time polymerase chain reaction, have become the fastest and most sensitive diagnostic procedures for autochthonous viral meningitis and encephalitis, and their role is becoming increasingly important for the diagnosis and control of most frequent acute bacterial meningitides. Automatic and closed systems may encourage the widespread and systematic use of molecular techniques for the diagnosis of these neurological syndromes in most laboratories.

  18. Does Viral Co-Infection Influence the Severity of Acute Respiratory Infection in Children?

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    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses are often detected in children with respiratory infection but the significance of co-infection in pathogenesis, severity and outcome is unclear. Objectives To correlate the presence of viral co-infection with clinical phenotype in children admitted with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Methods We collected detailed clinical information on severity for children admitted with ARI as part of a Spanish prospective multicenter study (GENDRES network) between 2011–2013. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect respiratory viruses in respiratory secretions. Findings were compared to an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results 204 children were recruited in the main cohort and 97 in the replication cohort. The number of detected viruses did not correlate with any markers of severity. However, bacterial superinfection was associated with increased severity (OR: 4.356; P-value = 0.005), PICU admission (OR: 3.342; P-value = 0.006), higher clinical score (1.988; P-value = 0.002) respiratory support requirement (OR: 7.484; P-value < 0.001) and longer hospital length of stay (OR: 1.468; P-value < 0.001). In addition, pneumococcal vaccination was found to be a protective factor in terms of degree of respiratory distress (OR: 2.917; P-value = 0.035), PICU admission (OR: 0.301; P-value = 0.011), lower clinical score (-1.499; P-value = 0.021) respiratory support requirement (OR: 0.324; P-value = 0.016) and oxygen necessity (OR: 0.328; P-value = 0.001). All these findings were replicated in the UK cohort. Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in hospitalized children with ARI is very frequent but it does not seem to have a major clinical impact in terms of severity. However bacterial superinfection increases the severity of the disease course. On the contrary, pneumococcal vaccination plays a protective role. PMID:27096199

  19. Viral etiology and clinical profiles of children with severe acute respiratory infections in China.

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    Chen Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: No comprehensive analysis is available on the viral etiology and clinical characterization among children with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI in China during 2009 H1N1 pandemic and post-pandemic period. METHODS: Cohort of 370 hospitalized children (1 to 72 months with SARI from May 2008 to March 2010 was enrolled in this study. Nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA specimens were tested by a commercial assay for 18 respiratory viral targets. The viral distribution and its association with clinical character were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: Viral pathogen was detected in 350 (94.29% of children with SARI. Overall, the most popular viruses were: enterovirus/rhinovirus (EV/RV (54.05%, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV (51.08%, human bocavirus (BoCA (33.78%, human parainfluenzaviruse type 3 (PIV3 (15.41%, and adenovirus (ADV (12.97%. Pandemic H1N1 was the dominant influenza virus (IFV but was only detected in 20 (5.41% of children. Moreover, detection rate of RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV among suburb participants were significantly higher than that of urban area (P<0.05. Incidence of VSARI among suburb participants was also significant higher, especially among those of 24 to 59 months group (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Piconaviruses (EV/RV and paramyxoviruses are the most popular viral pathogens among children with SARI in this study. RSV and hMPV significantly increase the risk of SARI, especially in children younger than 24 months. Higher incidence of VSARI and more susceptibilities to RSV and hMPV infections were found in suburban patients.

  20. Viral-bacterial co-infection in Australian Indigenous children with acute otitis media

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    Whiley David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute otitis media with perforation (AOMwiP affects 40% of remote Indigenous children during the first 18 months of life. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis are the primary bacterial pathogens of otitis media and their loads predict clinical ear state. Our hypothesis is that antecedent respiratory viral infection increases bacterial density and progression to perforation. Methods A total of 366 nasopharyngeal swabs from 114 Indigenous children were retrospectively examined. A panel of 17 respiratory viruses was screened by PCR, and densities of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis were estimated by quantitative real time PCR. Data are reported by clinical ear state. Results M. catarrhalis (96%, H. influenzae (91%, S. pneumoniae (89% and respiratory viruses (59% were common; including rhinovirus (HRV (38%, polyomavirus (HPyV (14%, adenovirus (HAdV (13%, bocavirus (HBoV (8% and coronavirus (HCoV (4%. Geometric mean bacterial loads were significantly higher in children with acute otitis media (AOM compared to children without evidence of otitis media. Children infected with HAdV were 3 times more likely (p Conclusion This study confirms a positive association between nasopharyngeal bacterial load and clinical ear state, exacerbated by respiratory viruses, in Indigenous children. HAdV was independently associated with acute ear states.

  1. Viral etiologies of hospitalized acute lower respiratory infection patients in China, 2009-2013.

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    Luzhao Feng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs are an important cause of acute illnesses and mortality worldwide and in China. However, a large-scale study on the prevalence of viral infections across multiple provinces and seasons has not been previously reported from China. Here, we aimed to identify the viral etiologies associated with ALRIs from 22 Chinese provinces. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Active surveillance for hospitalized ALRI patients in 108 sentinel hospitals in 24 provinces of China was conducted from January 2009-September 2013. We enrolled hospitalized all-age patients with ALRI, and collected respiratory specimens, blood or serum collected for diagnostic testing for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, human influenza virus, adenoviruses (ADV, human parainfluenza virus (PIV, human metapneumovirus (hMPV, human coronavirus (hCoV and human bocavirus (hBoV. We included 28,369 ALRI patients from 81 (of the 108 sentinel hospitals in 22 (of the 24 provinces, and 10,387 (36.6% were positive for at least one etiology. The most frequently detected virus was RSV (9.9%, followed by influenza (6.6%, PIV (4.8%, ADV (3.4%, hBoV (1.9, hMPV (1.5% and hCoV (1.4%. Co-detections were found in 7.2% of patients. RSV was the most common etiology (17.0% in young children aged <2 years. Influenza viruses were the main cause of the ALRIs in adults and elderly. PIV, hBoV, hMPV and ADV infections were more frequent in children, while hCoV infection was distributed evenly in all-age. There were clear seasonal peaks for RSV, influenza, PIV, hBoV and hMPV infections. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings could serve as robust evidence for public health authorities in drawing up further plans to prevent and control ALRIs associated with viral pathogens. RSV is common in young children and prevention measures could have large public health impact. Influenza was most common in adults and influenza vaccination should be implemented on a wider scale in China.

  2. Acute transverse myelitis and subacute thyroiditis associated with dengue viral infection: A case report and literature review

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    Mo, Zhiming; Dong, Yaxian; Chen, Xiaolian; Yao, Huiyan; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Acute transverse myelitis is a rare manifestation of dengue infection. To the best of our knowledge, only 6 cases of acute transverse myelitis as a manifestation of dengue infection have been reported thus far. The present study described a case of acute transverse myelitis complicated with subacute thyroiditis 6 days after the onset of dengue viral infection. In addition, the available literature was searched to identify similar previous cases. Treatment with intravenous pulse methylprednisolone immunoglobulin plasmapheresis and physiotherapy resulted in partial recovery at 3 months post-infection. In conclusion, the involvement of dengue infection should be considered in patients who develop central nervous system manifestations during or after the recovery period of dengue infection. Furthermore, since methylprednisolone and immunoglobulin are effective during the active phase of the infection, prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatment are crucial. PMID:27703498

  3. ADVANCEMENT IN MEDICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTIONS

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    Kopcha V.S.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute respiratory viral infections are the special group of diseases, which in the structure of infectious pathology firmly occupies one of leading places. The problem of morbidity belongs to the number of leading medical problems not only in Ukraine but also in the whole world. In addition, there is a greater risk of epidemic flashes of acute respiratory infections in the conditions of megapolis with the expressed processes of migration and accumulation of people. Purpose of test – to promote efficiency of patients treatment with acute respiratory viral infections by complex application of preparation «Extralact» on a background traditional (base therapy without the use of other antiviral preparations, thoroughly to probe influence on clinical motion of the indicated illnesses, endogenous intoxication and immune status of organism. Patients & methods. Under a supervision was 60 patients (22 men and 38 women of young and middle age (hesitated from 18 to 58, which treated oneself concerning ARVI. Determined the indexes of Extralact efficiency: general duration of disease; frequency of development of complications; dynamics of clinical displays; dynamics of laboratory indexes, indexes of endogenous intoxication, and immunological indexes. Patients were randomised on 2 groups: a I group (30 persons – 50,0 % got treatment of base therapy preparations; the II group (30 patients – 50,0 % on a background base therapy got preparation «Extralact» for 2 capsules 3 times per days during 5 days. Results & discussion. Based on the examination of 60 patients with ARVI established following. Addition of base therapy of such patients of extralact in a dose 2 caps. 3 times daily during 5 days was accompanied by a significant advantage compared with only basic therapy on several grounds: the greater the number of patients advancing recovery up to 7 days, most regressed cough, relatively less there were complications. After 5 days of

  4. Detection of viral respiratory pathogens in mild and severe acute respiratory infections in Singapore

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    Jiang, Lili; Lee, Vernon Jian Ming; Cui, Lin; Lin, Raymond; Tan, Chyi Lin; Tan, Linda Wei Lin; Lim, Wei-yen; Leo, Yee-Sin; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin; Chen, Mark I-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the performance of laboratory methods and clinical case definitions in detecting the viral pathogens for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) from a prospective community cohort and hospital inpatients, nasopharyngeal swabs from cohort members reporting ARIs (community-ARI) and inpatients admitted with ARIs (inpatient-ARI) were tested by Singleplex Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction (SRT-PCR), multiplex RT-PCR (MRT-PCR) and pathogen-chip system (PathChip) between April 2012 and December 2013. Community-ARI and inpatient-ARI was also combined with mild and severe cases of influenza from a historical prospective study as mild-ARI and severe-ARI respectively to evaluate the performance of clinical case definitions. We analysed 130 community-ARI and 140 inpatient-ARI episodes (5 inpatient-ARI excluded because multiple pathogens were detected), involving 138 and 207 samples respectively. Detection by PCR declined with days post-onset for influenza virus; decrease was faster for community-ARI than for inpatient-ARI. No such patterns were observed for non-influenza respiratory virus infections. PathChip added substantially to viruses detected for community-ARI only. Clinical case definitions discriminated influenza from other mild-ARI but performed poorly for severe-ARI and for older participants. Rational strategies for diagnosis and surveillance of influenza and other respiratory virus must acknowledge the differences between ARIs presenting in community and hospital settings. PMID:28218288

  5. Analysis of plasma viral RNA levels during acute dengue virus infection using quantitative competitor reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudiro, T M; Zivny, J; Ishiko, H; Green, S; Vaughn, D W; Kalayanarooj, S; Nisalak, A; Norman, J E; Ennis, F A; Rothman, A L

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the potential importance of viral burden in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). There is little data available, however, describing the kinetics of viral replication in humans with natural dengue virus (DV) infection. Standard procedures for measuring titers of infectious virus in clinical specimens are either laborious or insensitive. We developed a method for measurement of DV RNA in plasma samples based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using a mutant RNA target as a competitor. This technique was reproducible and accurate for samples containing any of the four DV serotypes, and could be applied to samples containing as few as 250 copies of RNA per reaction. We examined plasma viral RNA levels in 80 children with acute DV infection; sequential plasma samples were tested in 34 of these children. Plasma viral RNA levels ranged as high as 10(9) RNA copies/ml, and correlated with titers of infectious virus measured in mosquitoes (r= 0.69). Plasma viral RNA levels fell rapidly during the last several days of the febrile period. We did not find a significant difference in maximal plasma viral RNA levels between children with DHF and children with dengue fever, but peak viral RNA levels were identified in only 16 subjects. We conclude that this quantitative RT-PCR method will be valuable for further studies of natural DV infections.

  6. Acute hepatitis C in a chronically HIV-infected patient: Evolution of different viral genomic regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diego Flichman; Veronica Kott; Silvia Sookoian; Rodolfo Campos

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the molecular evolution of different viral genomic regions of HCV in an acute HCV infected patient chronically infected with HIV through a 42-month follow-up.METHODS: Serum samples of a chronically HIV infected patient that seroconverted to anti HCV antibodies were sequenced, from the event of superinfection through a period of 17 months and in a late sample (42nd month). Hypervariable genomic regions of HIV (V3 loop of the gp120) and HCV (HVR-1 on the E2 glycoprotein gene) were studied. In order to analyze genomic regions involved in different biological functions and with the cellular immune response, HCV core and NS5A were also chosen to be sequenced. Amplification of the different regions was done by RT-PCR and directly sequenced. Confirmation of sequences was done on reamplified material. Nucleotide sequences of the different time points were aligned with CLUSTAL W 1.5, and the corresponding amino acid ones were deduced.RESULTS: Hypervariable genomic regions of both viruses (HVR1 and gp120 V3 loop) presented several nonsynonymous changes but, while in the gp120 V3 loop mutations were detected in the sample obtained right after HCV superinfection and maintained throughout, they occurred following a sequential and cumulative pattern in the HVR1. In the NS5A region of HCV, two amino acid changes were detected during the follow-up period, whereas the core region presented several amino acid replacements, once the HCV chronic infection had been established.CONCLUSION: During the HIV-HCV superinfection, each genomic region analyzed shows a different evolutionary pattem.Most of the nucleotide substitutions observed are nonsynonymous and clustered in previously described epitopes,thus suggesting an immune-driven evolutionary process.

  7. Acute pancreatitis in acute viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the frequency and characteristics of pancreatic involvement in the course of acute (nonfulminant) viral hepatitis.METHODS: We prospectively assessed the pancreatic involvement in patients with acute viral hepatitis who presented with severe abdomimanl pain.RESULTS: We studied 124 patients with acute viral hepatitis, of whom 24 presented with severe abdominal pain. Seven patients (5.65%) were diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. All were young males. Five patients had pancreatitis in the first week and two in the fourth week after the onset of jaundice. The pancreatitis was mild and all had uneventful recovery from both pancreatitis and hepatitis on conservative treatment.The etiology of pancreatitis was hepatitis E virus in 4,hepatitis A virus in 2, and hepatitis B virus in 1 patient.One patient had biliary sludge along with HEV infection.The abdominal pain of remaining seventeen patients was attributed to stretching of Glisson's capsule.CONCLUSION: Acute pancreatitis occurs in 5.65% of patients with acute viral hepatitis, it is mild and recovers with conservative management.

  8. Acute viral infections in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: description of 23 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Cuadrado, María José; Alba, Paula; Sanna, Giovanni; Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Bertolaccini, Laura; Babini, Alejandra; Moreno, Asunción; D'Cruz, David; Khamashta, Munther A

    2008-11-01

    Few studies have evaluated the impact of viral infections on the daily management of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed the etiology and clinical features of acute viral infections arising in patients with SLE and their influence on the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of SLE. Cases occurring within the last 5 years were selected from the databases of 3 large teaching hospitals. Acute viral infections were confirmed by the identification of specific antiviral IgM antibodies and subsequent seroconversion with detection of specific IgG antibodies. In autopsy studies, macroscopic findings suggestive of viral infection were confirmed by direct identification of the virus or viruses in tissue samples. We performed a MEDLINE search for additional cases reported between January 1985 and March 2008. We included 88 cases (23 from our clinics and 65 from the literature review) of acute viral infections in patients with SLE. Twenty-five patients were diagnosed with new-onset SLE (fulfillment of the 1997 SLE criteria) associated with infection by human parvovirus B19 (n = 15), cytomegalovirus (CMV; n = 6), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV; n = 3), and hepatitis A virus (n = 1). The remaining 63 cases of acute viral infections arose in patients already diagnosed with SLE: in 18 patients, symptoms related to infection mimicked a lupus flare, 36 patients, including 1 patient from the former group who presented with both conditions, presented organ-specific viral infections (mainly pneumonitis, colitis, retinitis, and hepatitis), and 10 patients presented a severe, multiorgan process similar to that described in catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome-the final diagnosis was hemophagocytic syndrome in 5 cases and disseminated viral infection in 5. Twelve patients died due to infection caused by CMV (n = 5), herpes simplex virus (n = 4), EBV (n = 2), and varicella zoster virus (n = 1). Autopsies were performed in 9 patients and disclosed disseminated herpetic

  9. ARGUMENTATION OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTIONS NONSPECIFIC PREVENTION IN GROUPS OF CHILDREN

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    L. R. Ishrefova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI and influenza are among the topical problems of healthcare. The children’s morbidity index in preschool educational institutions in Krasnoselsky district of St. Petersburg in 2008–2014 varied from 1359.6 to 1768.5 per 1000 children attending these institutions. In general educational schools the morbidity index in the aforesaid period were 422.6–521.6 (p < 0.001. From 49.3 to 55.4% of children were vaccinated against influenza; from 3600 to 4700 children annually stayed unimmunized due to medical contraindications and parents’ refusals from prophylactic immunization. The research objective is clinical-epidemiological substantiation of effectiveness of application of Echinacea botanical medicine to reduce the ARVI morbidity and the rate of complications after the disease among children attending educational institutions. As a result of the research it was established that the ARVI morbidity index in the group of the children who received the Echinacea preparation was 76.8; in the comparison group it was 94.2 per 100 people (p < 0.01; RR = 0.80; CI = 0.7–0.9. The rate of complications (bronchitis, otitis, adenoiditis, pneumonia, sinusitis among the children who received the preparation was 2–4.8 times lower.

  10. Viral Agents Causing Acute Respiratory Infections in Children under Five: A Study from Eastern India

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    Pravakar Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute respiratory infections (ARIs are important cause of mortality and morbidity in children under five in developing country. Methods. This observational study was conducted over two-year period in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Eastern India. Nasal and throat swabs were collected, transported to the laboratory at 2–8°C in viral transport media, and then processed for detection of viruses using mono/multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results. A total of 300 children aged 2–60 months with ARIs were included. The most common age group affected with LRI was 2–12 mo and with URI was >12–60 mo. Viruses were detected in 248 cases. In URI, 77 were positive for single virus and 19 were positive for more than one virus; in LRI, 113 were positive for single virus and 12 were positive for more than one virus. The most common viruses isolated from URI cases were rhinovirus and adenovirus. The most common viruses isolated from LRI cases were respiratory syncytial virus and influenza virus. Most cases occurred in the months of January, December, and August. Conclusion. Viruses constitute a significant cause of ARI in children under five. RSV, ADV, RV, and IFV were the most prevalent viruses isolated.

  11. REVIEW OF CLINICAL CASES OF DRUG ALLERGIC REACTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTIONS

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    Sydorchuk A.S.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Problem of drug-induced allergic reaction is especially actual both in well-developing countries as well as in countries of Eastern European region. By the WHO data, distribution of allergy is up to 30 %, and main reasons for that are increasing of pharmaceuticals consumption by a person, change of nutrition style towards more chemicals synthetic substitutions. Generally, a quantity of Europeans with allergy reach 150 mln. Reactions of hypersensitivity to medications is so serious discussion question among physicians and their patients, since it is the most important reason to stop treatment and for refuse remedies. Authors hope, that presenting here clinical material will bring benefit both clinicians and patients like cases of drug-induced allergic reactions due to self-prescribed treatment (antipyretics, antibiotics. Thus, this research paper aimed to analyze the clinical cases of drug-induced allergy in patients with acute respiratory illnesses, which had admitted to Infectious diseases department of Municipal Clinical Hospital of Chernivtsi city (Ukraine. Materials & Methods. Descriptional clinical study enrolled six clinical cases of drug-induced allergy in male patients admitted in different time to the Infectious Diseases Department of Municipal Clinical Hospital of Chernivtsi city (Ukraine with clinical manifestation and epidemiological data of acute respiratory viral infections. Mostly cases of drug-induced allergy confirmed by the indirect immune-termomistry for determination of role of a drug. Results & discussion. First case in male 52 years old patient with signs of polymorphic exudative erythema induced by pills against common cold named «Coldflu». Patient had manifestation clinical features of acute respiratory viral infection and was hospitalized to the Department of Droplet infections for detoxicative and desensitization treatment. Within few days his infectious problem had solved, nevertheless skin rash still

  12. High Programmed Death-1 levels on HCV specific T cells during acute infection are associated with viral persistence and require preservation of cognate antigen during chronic infection1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutebemberwa, Alleluiah; Ray, Stuart C.; Astemborski, Jacquie; Levine, Jordana; Liu, Lin; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Clute, Shalyn; Wang, Changyu; Korman, Alan; Sette, Alessandro; Sidney, John; Pardoll, Drew M.; Cox, Andrea L.

    2009-01-01

    HCV is an important human pathogen that represents a model for chronic infection since the majority of infected individuals fail to clear the infection despite generation of virus-specific T cell responses during the period of acute infection. While viral sequence evolution at targeted MHC class I restricted epitopes represents one mechanism for immune escape in HCV, many targeted epitopes remain intact under circumstances of viral persistence. In order to explore alternative mechanisms of HCV immune evasion, we analyzed patterns of expression of a major inhibitory receptor on T cells, programmed death-1 (PD-1), from the time of initial infection and correlated these with HCV RNA levels, outcome of infection, and sequence escape within the targeted epitope. We show that the level of PD-1 expression in early HCV infection is significantly higher on HCV-specific T cells from those who progress to chronic HCV infection compared to those who clear infection. This correlation is independent of HCV RNA levels, compatible with the notion that high PD-1 expression on HCV-specific CD8 T cells during acute infection inhibits viral clearance. Viral escape during persistent infection is associated with reduction in PD-1 levels on the surface of HCV specific T cells, supporting the necessity of ongoing antigenic stimulation of T cells for maintenance of PD-1 expression. These results support the idea that PD-1 expression on T cells specific for nonescaped epitopes contributes to viral persistence and suggest that PD-1 blockade may alter the outcome of HCV infection. PMID:19050238

  13. [Emergent viral infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, J.M.D.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of viral infections is an ongoing process. Large-scale vaccination programmes led to the eradication or control of some viral infections in the last century, but new viruses are always emerging. Increased travel is leading to a rise in the importation of exotic infecti

  14. Non-oncogenic Acute Viral Infections Disrupt Anti-cancer Responses and Lead to Accelerated Cancer-Specific Host Death

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    Frederick J. Kohlhapp

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In light of increased cancer prevalence and cancer-specific deaths in patients with infections, we investigated whether infections alter anti-tumor immune responses. We report that acute influenza infection of the lung promotes distal melanoma growth in the dermis and leads to accelerated cancer-specific host death. Furthermore, we show that during influenza infection, anti-melanoma CD8+ T cells are shunted from the tumor to the infection site, where they express high levels of the inhibitory receptor programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1. Immunotherapy to block PD-1 reverses this loss of anti-tumor CD8+ T cells from the tumor and decreases infection-induced tumor growth. Our findings show that acute non-oncogenic infection can promote cancer growth, raising concerns regarding acute viral illness sequelae. They also suggest an unexpected role for PD-1 blockade in cancer immunotherapy and provide insight into the immune response when faced with concomitant challenges.

  15. Treatment of acute viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eber, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis represents the most common lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Respiratory syncytial virus is the most frequently identified virus, but many other viruses may also cause acute bronchiolitis. There is no common definition of acute viral bronchiolitis used internationally, and this may explain part of the confusion in the literature. Most children with bronchiolitis have a self limiting mild disease and can be safely managed at home with careful attention to feeding and respiratory status. Criteria for referral and admission vary between hospitals as do clinical practice in the management of acute viral bronchiolitis, and there is confusion and lack of evidence over the best treatment for this condition. Supportive care, including administration of oxygen and fluids, is the cornerstone of current treatment. The majority of infants and children with bronchiolitis do not require specific measures. Bronchodilators should not be routinely used in the management of acute viral bronchiolitis, but may be effective in some patients. Most of the commonly used management modalities have not been shown to have a clear beneficial effect on the course of the disease. For example, inhaled and systemic corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, immunoglobulins and monoclonal antibodies, antibiotics, antiviral therapy, and chest physiotherapy should not be used routinely in the management of bronchiolitis. The potential effect of hypertonic saline on the course of the acute disease is promising, but further studies are required. In critically ill children with bronchiolitis, today there is little justification for the use of surfactant and heliox. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure may be beneficial in children with severe bronchiolitis but a large trial is needed to determine its value. Finally, very little is known on the effect of the various

  16. Detection of viral acute lower respiratory tract infection in hospitalized infants using real-time PCR

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    Bassant Meligy

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: RV was the most commonly detected virus in children under 3 years admitted with acute lower respiratory tract infections. Coinfection was present in the majority of our patients; however it was not related significantly to parameters of disease severity.

  17. A temporal gate for viral enhancers to co-opt Toll-like-receptor transcriptional activation pathways upon acute infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropp, Kai A; Hsieh, Wei Yuan; Isern, Elena; Forster, Thorsten; Krause, Eva; Brune, Wolfram; Angulo, Ana; Ghazal, Peter

    2015-04-01

    series of pharmacologic, siRNA and genetic loss-of-function experiments we determined that signalling mediated by the TLR-adaptor protein MyD88 plays a vital role for governing the inflammatory activation of the CMV enhancer in macrophages. Downstream TLR-regulated transcription factor binding motif disruption for NFκB, AP1 and CREB/ATF in the CMV enhancer demonstrated the requirement of these inflammatory signal-regulated elements in driving viral gene expression and growth in cells as well as in primary infection of neonatal mice. Thus, this study shows that the prototypical CMV enhancer, in a restricted time-gated manner, co-opts through DNA regulatory mimicry elements, innate-immune transcription factors to drive viral expression and replication in the face of on-going pro-inflammatory antiviral responses in vitro and in vivo and; suggests an unexpected role for inflammation in promoting acute infection and has important future implications for regulating latency.

  18. A temporal gate for viral enhancers to co-opt Toll-like-receptor transcriptional activation pathways upon acute infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai A Kropp

    2015-04-01

    macrophages. In a series of pharmacologic, siRNA and genetic loss-of-function experiments we determined that signalling mediated by the TLR-adaptor protein MyD88 plays a vital role for governing the inflammatory activation of the CMV enhancer in macrophages. Downstream TLR-regulated transcription factor binding motif disruption for NFκB, AP1 and CREB/ATF in the CMV enhancer demonstrated the requirement of these inflammatory signal-regulated elements in driving viral gene expression and growth in cells as well as in primary infection of neonatal mice. Thus, this study shows that the prototypical CMV enhancer, in a restricted time-gated manner, co-opts through DNA regulatory mimicry elements, innate-immune transcription factors to drive viral expression and replication in the face of on-going pro-inflammatory antiviral responses in vitro and in vivo and; suggests an unexpected role for inflammation in promoting acute infection and has important future implications for regulating latency.

  19. Induction of anti-viral genes during acute infection with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, John D.; Woodson, James C.; Hershberger, Paul K.; Grady, Courtney; Gregg, Jacob L.; Purcell, Maureen K.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the aquatic rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa results in high mortality in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and is hypothesized to be a potential limiting factor for herring recovery. To investigate anti-viral immunity in the Pacific herring, four immune response genes were identified: the myxovirus resistance (Clpa-Mx), a major histocompatibility complex IB (named Clpa-UAA.001), the inducible immunoproteosome subunit 9 (Clpa-PSMB9) and the neutrophil chemotactic factor (Clpa-LECT2). Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed based on these gene sequences to investigate the host immune response to acute VHSV infection following both injection and immersion challenge. Virus levels were measured by both plaque assay and RT-qPCR and peaked at day 6 during the 10-day exposure period for both groups of fish. The interferon stimulated genes (Clpa-Mx, −UAA.001, and −PSMB9) were significantly up-regulated in response to VHSV infection at both 6 and 10 days post-infection in both spleen and fin. Results from this study indicate that Pacific herring mount a robust, early antiviral response in both fin and spleen tissues. The immunological tools developed in this study will be useful for future studies to investigate antiviral immunity in Pacific herring.

  20. Induction of anti-viral genes during acute infection with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, John D; Woodson, James C; Hershberger, Paul K; Grady, Courtney; Gregg, Jacob L; Purcell, Maureen K

    2012-02-01

    Infection with the aquatic rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genogroup IVa results in high mortality in Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and is hypothesized to be a potential limiting factor for herring recovery. To investigate anti-viral immunity in the Pacific herring, four immune response genes were identified: the myxovirus resistance (Clpa-Mx), a major histocompatibility complex IB (named Clpa-UAA.001), the inducible immunoproteosome subunit 9 (Clpa-PSMB9) and the neutrophil chemotactic factor (Clpa-LECT2). Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays were developed based on these gene sequences to investigate the host immune response to acute VHSV infection following both injection and immersion challenge. Virus levels were measured by both plaque assay and RT-qPCR and peaked at day 6 during the 10-day exposure period for both groups of fish. The interferon stimulated genes (Clpa-Mx, -UAA.001, and -PSMB9) were significantly up-regulated in response to VHSV infection at both 6 and 10 days post-infection in both spleen and fin. Results from this study indicate that Pacific herring mount a robust, early antiviral response in both fin and spleen tissues. The immunological tools developed in this study will be useful for future studies to investigate antiviral immunity in Pacific herring.

  1. Viral etiologies of acute respiratory infections among hospitalized Vietnamese children in Ho Chi Minh City, 2004-2008.

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    Anh Ha Lien Do

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The dominant viral etiologies responsible for acute respiratory infections (ARIs are poorly understood, particularly among hospitalized children in resource-limited tropical countries where morbidity and mortality caused by ARIs are highest. Improved etiological insight is needed to improve clinical management and prevention. OBJECTIVES: We conducted a three-year prospective descriptive study of severe respiratory illness among children from 2 months to 13 years of age within the largest referral hospital for infectious diseases in southern Vietnam. METHODS: Molecular detection for 15 viral species and subtypes was performed on three types of respiratory specimens (nose, throat swabs and nasopharyngeal aspirates using a multiplex RT-PCR kit (Seeplex™ RV detection, Seegene and additional monoplex real-time RT-PCRs. RESULTS: A total of 309 children were enrolled from November 2004 to January 2008. Viruses were identified in 72% (222/309 of cases, including respiratory syncytial virus (24%, influenza virus A and B (17%, human bocavirus (16%, enterovirus (9%, human coronavirus (8%, human metapneumovirus (7%, parainfluenza virus 1-3 (6%, adenovirus (5%, and human rhinovirus A (4%. Co-infections with multiple viruses were detected in 20% (62/309 of patients. When combined, diagnostic yields in nose and throat swabs were similar to nasopharyngeal aspirates. CONCLUSION: Similar to other parts in the world, RSV and influenza were the predominant viral pathogens detected in Vietnamese hospitalized children. Combined nasal and throat swabs are the specimens of choice for sensitive molecular detection of a broad panel of viral agents. Further research is required to better understand the clinical significance of single versus multiple viral coinfections and to address the role of bacterial (co-infections involved in severe respiratory illness.

  2. Prevalence and risk of viral infection in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaodong; Chen, Du; Gu, Xiaoling; Su, Xin; Song, Yong; Shi, Yi

    2014-07-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) lead to substantial morbidity and mortality. Viral infections could be an important cause of acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) and only a few studies report the prevalence of respiratory viruses on this disease. We aimed to update the review on the prevalence of respiratory viral infection in patients with AECOPD with a meta-analysis. We reviewed the prevalence of respiratory viruses on this disease by searching PubMed systematically to identify primary studies published from Jan 1990 to March 2012. Studies met with seven criteria were extracted for meta-analysis. A total of 17 studies were eligible for the meta-analysis. Weighted overall prevalence of respiratory viruses in patients with AECOPD was 39.3% (95% CI 36.9-41.6) with a high degree of a heterogeneity (I (2) > 75%). In contrast, the rate in stable COPD patients from four studies was 13.6% (95% CI 9.0-18.2) without any apparent heterogeneity. Pooled risk ratio for respiratory viral infection was 4.1 (95% CI 2.0-8.5) for AECOPD as compared with stable COPD. Rhinovirus was the most common virus and with a weighted prevalence of 14.8% (95% CI 13.3-16.5). Respiratory viruses probably are important etiological agents in patients with AECOPD as compared with the stable COPD patients. This result would help to provide better strategies for management of AECOPD and health-care planning.

  3. Pediatric knowledge about acute viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Franca,Rita; Silva,Luciana; Melo, Maria Clotildes; Cavalcante,Suzy; Lima, Bruno; Rocha, Anita; Gomes, Cristiana; Franca, Mônica

    2004-01-01

    p.227-235 Knowledge about hepatotropic viruses is crucial for pediatricians because of the high prevalence of viral hepatitis during childhood. The multiplicity of hepatotropic viruses, the spectrum of acute and chronic infections, and the sequels of viral hepatitis result in a need for physicians to better understand the clinical and epidemiological context of patients with viral hepatitis, as well as the importance of prevention measures for hepatitis. A descriptive cross-sectional study...

  4. The Importance of Hematological Parameters in Acute Respiratory Viral Infections in Children

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    L. A. Alekseeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematological studies are basic and mandatory in diagnostics and laboratory monitoring of infectious diseases, which led to their inclusion in the modern standards of laboratory examinations of children. Assessment of hematological parameters used for the provisional differential diagnosis of viral or bacterial nature of the disease. For research currently being used increasingly Hematology analyzers, which allows to facilitate and standardize the results. In this paper a comparison and differences hematological parameters practically healthy children and children with respiratory infections. Identified some changes in indicators of haemogram depending on the etiology and character of the clinical course of the disease. On the basis of the leukocyte formula defined leukocyte indices of intoxication and illustrates their importance in assessing the severity of the infection process.

  5. Viral infections in pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlier, D; Vindevogel, H

    2006-07-01

    This review provides a current update on the major viral diseases of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica), based on scientific reports and clinical experience. Paramyxovirus 1, adenovirus, rotavirus, herpesvirus 1, poxvirus and circovirus infections are described according to common clinical signs and target tissues. Since pigeons are sometimes treated as if they were poultry, the review also summarises the common viral infections of poultry for which pigeons are considered resistant. It is hoped that the review will provide a useful reference for veterinarians and others and offer advice on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the major infectious diseases of pigeons.

  6. Sustained viral response of a case of acute hepatitis C virus infection via needle-stick injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takayuki Kogure; Yu Nakagome; Masashi Ninomiya; Tooru Shimosegawa; Yoshiyuki Ueno; Noriatsu Kanno; Koji Fukushima; Yoko Yamagiwa; Futoshi Nagasaki; Eiji Kakazu; Yasunori Matsuda; Osamu Kido

    2006-01-01

    A 29-year-old nurse with a hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection caused by needle-stick injury was treated with interferon-beta starting about one year after the onset of acute hepatitis. The patient developed acute hepatitis C with symptoms of general fatigues, jaundice, and ascites 4 wk after the needle-stick injury. When these symptoms were presented, the patient was pregnant by artificial insemination. She hoped to continue her pregnancy.After delivery, biochemical liver enzyme returned to normal levels. Nevertheless, HCV RNA was positive and the pathological finding indicated a progression to chronicity. The genotype was 1b with low viral load.Daily intravenous injection of interferon-beta at the dosage of six million units was started and continued for eight weeks. HCV was eradicated without severe adverse effects. In acute hepatitis C, delaying therapy is considered to reduce the efficacy but interferon-beta therapy is one of the useful treatments for hepatitis C infection in chronic phase.

  7. Viral Dose and Immunosuppression Modulate the Progression of Acute BVDV-1 Infection in Calves: Evidence of Long Term Persistence after Intra-Nasal Infection.

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    Rebecca Strong

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV infection of cattle causes a diverse range of clinical outcomes from being asymptomatic, or a transient mild disease, to producing severe cases of acute disease leading to death. Four groups of calves were challenged with a type 1 BVDV strain, originating from a severe outbreak of BVDV in England, to study the effect of viral dose and immunosuppression on the viral replication and transmission of BVDV. Three groups received increasing amounts of virus: Group A received 10(2.55TCID50/ml, group B 10(5.25TCID50/ml and group C 10(6.7TCID 50/ml. A fourth group (D was inoculated with a medium dose (10(5.25TCID50/ml and concomitantly treated with dexamethasone (DMS to assess the effects of chemically induced immunosuppression. Naïve calves were added as sentinel animals to assess virus transmission. The outcome of infection was dose dependent with animals given a higher dose developing severe disease and more pronounced viral replication. Despite virus being shed by the low-dose infection group, BVD was not transmitted to sentinel calves. Administration of dexamethasone (DMS resulted in more severe clinical signs, prolonged viraemia and virus shedding. Using PCR techniques, viral RNA was detected in blood, several weeks after the limit of infectious virus recovery. Finally, a recently developed strand-specific RT-PCR detected negative strand viral RNA, indicative of actively replicating virus, in blood samples from convalescent animals, as late as 85 days post inoculation. This detection of long term replicating virus may indicate the way in which the virus persists and/or is reintroduced within herds.

  8. Experimental depletion of CD8+ cells in acutely SIVagm-Infected African Green Monkeys results in increased viral replication

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    Apetrei Cristian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo CD8+ cell depletions in pathogenic SIV infections identified a key role for cellular immunity in controlling viral load (VL and disease progression. However, similar studies gave discordant results in chronically-infected SMs, leading some authors to propose that in natural hosts, SIV replication is independent of cellular immunity. To assess the role of cellular immune responses in the control of SIV replication in natural hosts, we investigated the impact of CD8+ cell depletion during acute SIV infection in AGMs. Results Nine AGMs were infected with SIVagm.sab and were followed up to day 225 p.i. Four were intravenously infused with the cM-T807 antibody on days 0 (50 mg/kg, 6, and 13 (10 mg/kg, respectively post infection (p.i.. CD8+ cells were depleted for up to 28 days p.i. in peripheral blood and LNs in all treated AGMs. Partial CD8+ T cell depletion occurred in the intestine. SIVagm VLs peaked at similar levels in both groups (107-108 RNA copies/ml. However, while VLs were controlled in undepleted AGMs, reaching set-point levels (104-105 RNA copies/ml by day 28 p.i., high VLs (>106 RNA copies/ml were maintained by day 21 p.i. in CD8-depleted AGMs. By day 42 p.i., VLs were comparable between the two groups. The levels of immune activation and proliferation remained elevated up to day 72 p.i. in CD8-depleted AGMs and returned to preinfection levels in controls by day 28 p.i. None of the CD8-depleted animals progressed to AIDS. Conclusion CD8+ cells are responsible for a partial control of postacute viral replication in SIVagm.sab-infected AGMs. In contrast to macaques, the SIVagm-infected AGMs are able to control viral replication after recovery of the CD8+ T cells and avoid disease progression.

  9. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroetz, Danielle N; Allen, Ronald M; Schaller, Matthew A; Cavallaro, Cleyton; Ito, Toshihiro; Kunkel, Steven L

    2015-12-01

    lungs. Finally, Setdb2 expression by Mϕ suppressed IL-2, IL-10, and IFN-γ production by CD4+ T cells in vitro, as well as proliferation in IAV-infected lungs. Collectively, these findings identify Setdb2 as a novel regulator of the immune system in acute respiratory viral infection.

  10. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle N Kroetz

    2015-12-01

    alveolar Mϕ in the lungs. Finally, Setdb2 expression by Mϕ suppressed IL-2, IL-10, and IFN-γ production by CD4+ T cells in vitro, as well as proliferation in IAV-infected lungs. Collectively, these findings identify Setdb2 as a novel regulator of the immune system in acute respiratory viral infection.

  11. Pediatric Asthma and Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, M Luz; Calvo Rey, Cristina; Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory viral infections, particularly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus, are the most importance risk factors for the onset of wheezing in infants and small children. Bronchiolitis is the most common acute respiratory infection in children under 1year of age, and the most common cause of hospitalization in this age group. RSV accounts for approximately 70% of all these cases, followed by rhinovirus, adenovirus, metapneumovirus and bocavirus. The association between bronchiolitis caused by RSV and the development of recurrent wheezing and/or asthma was first described more than 40years ago, but it is still unclear whether bronchiolitis causes chronic respiratory symptoms, or if it is a marker for children with a genetic predisposition for developing asthma in the medium or long term. In any case, sufficient evidence is available to corroborate the existence of this association, which is particularly strong when the causative agent of bronchiolitis is rhinovirus. The pathogenic role of respiratory viruses as triggers for exacerbations in asthmatic patients has not been fully characterized. However, it is clear that respiratory viruses, and in particular rhinovirus, are the most common causes of exacerbation in children, and some type of respiratory virus has been identified in over 90% of children hospitalized for an episode of wheezing. Changes in the immune response to viral infections in genetically predisposed individuals are very likely to be the main factors involved in the association between viral infection and asthma.

  12. Tracking of peptide-specific CD4+ T-cell responses after an acute resolving viral infection: a study of parvovirus B19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasprowicz, Victoria; Isa, Adiba; Tolfvenstam, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of peptide-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses to acute viral infections of humans is poorly understood. We analyzed the response to parvovirus B19 (B19), a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen with a compact and conserved genome. The magnitude and breadth of the CD4(+) T......-cell response to the two B19 capsid proteins were investigated using a set of overlapping peptides and gamma interferon-specific enzyme-linked immunospot assays of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from a cohort of acutely infected individuals who presented with acute arthropathy. These were compared...

  13. Effect of BSA Antigen Sensitization during the Acute Phase of Influenza A Viral Infection on CD11c+ Pulmonary Antigen Presenting Cells

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    Fumitaka Sato

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: BSA antigen sensitization during the acute phase of influenza A viral infection enhanced IL-10 production from naive CD4+ T cell interaction with CD11c+ pulmonary APCs. The IL-10 secretion evoked Th2 responses in the lungs with downregulation of Th1 responses and was important for the eosinophil recruitment into the lungs after BSA antigen challenge.

  14. Predictors of severe disease in a hospitalized population of children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza-Bernal, Angela M; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Acuña-Cordero, Ranniery

    2016-05-01

    Although predictors of severe viral acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) in children have been reported, there have been few research studies performed in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The aim of the present study was to determine predictors of disease severity in a population of Colombian children disease conditions and the infecting respiratory viruses as predictor variables of severe disease. We defined severe disease as the necessity of pediatric intensive care unit admission. Of a total of 1,180 patients admitted with a diagnosis of ALRI, 416 (35.3%) were included because they were positive for any kind of respiratory virus. After controlling for potential confounders, it was found that a history of pulmonary hypertension (RR 3.62; CI 95% 2.38-5.52; P disease. The present study shows that respiratory viruses are significant causes of ALRI in infants and young children in Colombia, a typical tropical LMIC, especially during the rainy season. Additionally, the results of the present study show that clinical variables such as a history of pulmonary hypertension and a history of recurrent wheezing are more relevant for predicting ALRI severity than the infecting respiratory viruses.

  15. 住院患儿急性呼吸道病毒感染病原学调查%Etiology of acute respiratory viral infections in hospitalized children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝洁; 田小军; 申保生; 罗全贵; 张英

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the distribution of pathogens causing acute respiratory viral infections in chil-dren of Weihui area and analyze the related clinical characteristics so as to provide guidance for clinical prevention and treatment of the acute respiratory viral infections .METHODS A total of 484 hospitalized children with acute respiratory infections who were treated in the hospital from Dec 2012 to Dec 2013 were recruited as the study ob-jects ,then the nasopharyngeal secretions were collected for laboratory virus detection .RESULTS Of the 484 chil-dren with acute respiratory infections ,230 (47 .52% ) had viral infections ,including 65 (13 .43% ) cases of influ-enza virus infections;128 children had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV ) infections ,with the infection rate of 26 .45% ;17 children had adenovirus (ADV) infections ,with the infection rate of 3 .51% ;34 children had parain-fluenza virus (PIV) infections ,accounting for 7 .02% .The incidence of RSV infections was significantly higher in the male children than in the female children(χ2 =4 .2235 ,P4岁患儿的腺病毒感染率显著高于其他年龄组患儿,差异有统计学意义(χ2=23.54,P<0.01).结论 卫辉市急性呼吸道感染住院患儿发病的主要病毒为呼吸道合胞病毒和流感病毒,患儿的临床症状存在一定程度的差异.

  16. Acute lung injury in children : from viral infection and mechanical ventilation to inflammation and apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bern, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI), ook bekend als acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), is een uitgebreide ontstekingsreactie in beide longen door een longziekte of een aandoening elders in het lichaam. Kinderen lijken minder gevoelig voor de ziekte dan volwassenen, wellicht door de manier waarop de lon

  17. Acute respiratory failure and active bleeding are the important fatality predictive factors for severe dengue viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamolwish Laoprasopwattana

    Full Text Available To determine the outcome of severe dengue viral infection (DVI and the main dengue fatality risk factors.The medical records of patients aged <15 years admitted to Songklanagarind Hospital in southern Thailand during 1989-2011 were reviewed. Patients who had dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF grades III-IV, organ failure (cardiovascular, respiratory, liver, renal or hematologic, impaired consciousness, or aspartate aminotransferase more than 1,000 units/L, were classified as having severe DVI. To determine the fatality risk factors of severe DVI, the classification trees were constructed based on manual recursive partitioning.Of the 238 children with severe DVI, 30 (12.6% died. Compared to the non-fatal DVI cases, the fatal cases had higher rates of DHF grade IV (96.7% vs 24.5%, repeated shock (93.3% vs 27.9%, acute respiratory failure (ARF (100% vs 6.7%, acute liver failure (ALF (96.6% vs 6.3%, acute kidney injury (AKI (79.3% vs 4.5%, and active bleeding requiring blood transfusion (93.3% vs 5.4%, all p<0.01. The combined risk factors of ARF and active bleeding considered together predicted fatal outcome with sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values of 0.93 (0.78-0.99, 0.97 (0.93-0.99, 0.99 (0.97-1.00, and 0.82 (0.65-0.93, respectively. The likelihood ratios for a fatal outcome in the patients who had and did not have this risk combination were 32.4 (14.6-71.7 and 0.07 (0.02-0.26, respectively.Severe DVI patients who have ARF and active bleeding are at a high risk of death, while patients without these things together should survive.

  18. Etiology and Incidence of Viral Acute Respiratory Infections Among Refugees Aged 5 Years and Older in Hagadera Camp, Dadaab, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Gedi A; Ahmed, Jamal A; Marano, Nina; Mohamed, Abdinoor; Moturi, Edna; Burton, Wagacha; Otieno, Samora; Fields, Barry; Montgomery, Joel; Kabugi, Willy; Musa, Hashim; Cookson, Susan T

    2015-12-01

    We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Kenya Medical Research Institute Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) Surveillance System data to estimate severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) hospitalization rates, viral etiology, and associated complaints of influenza-like illnesses (ILI) and SARI conditions among those aged 5 years and older in Hagadera, Dadaab refugee camp, Kenya, for 2010-2012. A total of 471 patients aged ≥ 5 years met the case definition for ILI or SARI. SARI hospitalization rates per 10,000 person-years were 14.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.1, 22.2) for those aged 5-14 years; 3.4 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged 15-24 year; and 3.8 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged ≥ 25 years. Persons between the ages of 5 and 14 years had 3.5 greater odds to have been hospitalized as a result of SARI than those aged ≥ 25 years (odds ratio [OR] = 3.5, P < 0.001). Among the 419 samples tested, 169 (40.3%) were positive for one or more virus. Of those samples having viruses, 36.9% had influenza A; 29.9% had adenovirus; 20.2% had influenza B; and 14.4% had parainfluenza 1, 2, or 3. Muscle/joint pain was associated with influenza A (P = 0.002), whereas headache was associated with influenza B (P = 0.019). ARIs were responsible for a substantial disease burden in Hagadera camp.

  19. Bacterial and viral pathogen spectra of acute respiratory infections in under-5 children in hospital settings in Dhaka city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Golam Sarower; Hossain, Mohammad Amir; Sarker, Suprovath Kumar; Rahat, Asifuzzaman; Islam, Md Tarikul; Haque, Tanjina Noor; Begum, Noorjahan; Qadri, Syeda Kashfi; Muraduzzaman, A. K. M.; Islam, Nafisa Nawal; Islam, Mohammad Sazzadul; Sultana, Nusrat; Jony, Manjur Hossain Khan; Khanam, Farhana; Mowla, Golam; Matin, Abdul; Begum, Firoza; Shirin, Tahmina; Ahmed, Dilruba; Saha, Narayan; Qadri, Firdausi

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to examine for the first time the spectra of viral and bacterial pathogens along with the antibiotic susceptibility of the isolated bacteria in under-5 children with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in hospital settings of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Nasal swabs were collected from 200 under-five children hospitalized with clinical signs of ARIs. Nasal swabs from 30 asymptomatic children were also collected. Screening of viral pathogens targeted ten respiratory viruses using RT-qPCR. Bacterial pathogens were identified by bacteriological culture methods and antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was determined following CLSI guidelines. About 82.5% (n = 165) of specimens were positive for pathogens. Of 165 infected cases, 3% (n = 6) had only single bacterial pathogens, whereas 43.5% (n = 87) cases had only single viral pathogens. The remaining 36% (n = 72) cases had coinfections. In symptomatic cases, human rhinovirus was detected as the predominant virus (31.5%), followed by RSV (31%), HMPV (13%), HBoV (11%), HPIV-3 (10.5%), and adenovirus (7%). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequently isolated bacterial pathogen (9%), whereas Klebsiella pneumaniae, Streptococcus spp., Enterobacter agglomerans, and Haemophilus influenzae were 5.5%, 5%, 2%, and 1.5%, respectively. Of 15 multidrug-resistant bacteria, a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate and an Enterobacter agglomerans isolate exhibited resistance against more than 10 different antibiotics. Both ARI incidence and predominant pathogen detection rates were higher during post-monsoon and winter, peaking in September. Pathogen detection rates and coinfection incidence in less than 1-year group were significantly higher (P = 0.0034 and 0.049, respectively) than in 1–5 years age group. Pathogen detection rate (43%) in asymptomatic cases was significantly lower compared to symptomatic group (PStreptococcus pneumonia, and Klebsiella pneumaniae had significant involvement in coinfections with P values of

  20. Dengue viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurugama Padmalal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections.

  1. Serological profile of sporadic acute viral hepatitis in an area of hyper-endemic hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoola Ayobanji

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Located in the south western part of Saudi Arabia, the Gizan region is largely a rural community in which hepatitis B and chronic liver disease including hepatocellular carcinoma are highly prevalent. Aim of study: To determine the relative frequencies of acute hepatitis A, B, C and E in acute viral hepatitis in an area of hyperendemic hepatitis B infection. Methods and materials: In a prospective study 246 consecutive patients (179 males and 67 females diagnosed in a 2-year period were tested for markers of Hepatitis A virus (HAV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C (HCV and hepatitis E virus (HEV. Results: Of the patients tested, 131 (53.3% were children (< 10 years, and 42 (17% were 11 - 20 years in age. Ig M anti -HAV, IgM anti-HBV, anti- HCV and IgM anti-HEV were positive in 37%, 19.1%, 3.7% and 13.7% respectively. Markers of these viruses were absent in 24.4%. Among 131 children (< 10 years the commonest cause of AVH was HAV occurring in 57.3% of the cases. In adults (> 21 years HBV was found in 35.6% and IgM anti -HAV was detected in only 6.8%. In contrast to the age- related decline in the frequency of acute HA, the proportion of acute HE were similar in all age groups (13.7% in children, 16.7% in adolescents and 11.0% in adults. Conclusion: The study indicated that HAV is still a common cause of AVH particularly among children in Gizan. Acute 1-113 had a low occurrence among the children, evidently as a consequence of the integration of HB vaccine into the Saudi Arabian national EPI, 10 years ago. With the availability of combined HB and HA vaccines, It should be possible to graft the vaccination against HAV on to the existing program in Saudi Arabia. Affecting 13.4% of the group studied, sporadic HEV constitute a significant cause of AVH in this population. Until HEV vaccine becomes widely available, its prevention would be mainly by the improvement of socio - economic and hygienic standards of the population.

  2. Greater numbers of nucleotide substitutions are introduced into the genomic RNA of bovine viral diarrhea virus during acute infections of pregnant cattle than of non-pregnant cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neill John D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV strains circulating in livestock herds show significant sequence variation. Conventional wisdom states that most sequence variation arises during acute infections in response to immune or other environmental pressures. A recent study showed that more nucleotide changes were introduced into the BVDV genomic RNA during the establishment of a single fetal persistent infection than following a series of acute infections of naïve cattle. However, it was not known if nucleotide changes were introduce when the virus crossed the placenta and infected the fetus or during the acute infection of the dam. Methods The sequence of the open reading frame (ORF from viruses isolated from four acutely infected pregnant heifers following exposure to persistently infected (PI calves was compared to the sequences of the virus from the progenitor PI calf and the virus from the resulting progeny PI calf to determine when genetic change was introduced. This was compared to genetic change found in viruses isolated from a pregnant PI cow and its PI calf, and in three viruses isolated from acutely infected, non-pregnant cattle exposed to PI calves. Results Most genetic changes previously identified between the progenitor and progeny PI viruses were in place in the acute phase viruses isolated from the dams six days post-exposure to the progenitor PI calf. Additionally, each progeny PI virus had two to three unique nucleotide substitutions that were introduced in crossing the placenta and infection of the fetus. The nucleotide sequence of two acute phase viruses isolated from steers exposed to PI calves revealed that six and seven nucleotide changes were introduced during the acute infection. The sequence of the BVDV-2 virus isolated from an acute infection of a PI calf (BVDV-1a co-housed with a BVDV-2 PI calf had ten nucleotides that were different from the progenitor PI virus. Finally, twenty nucleotide changes were

  3. Acute viral hemorrhage disease:A summary on new viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Somsri Wiwanitkit; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2015-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic disease is an important problem in medicine that can be seen in many countries, especially those in tropical world. There are many causes of acute hemorrhagic disease and the viral infection seems to be the common cause. The well-known infection is dengue, however, there are many new identified viruses that can cause acute hemorrhagic diseases. In this specific short review, the authors present and discuss on those new virus diseases that present as “acute hemorrhagic fever”.

  4. Sphingolipids in viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle

    2015-06-01

    Viruses exploit membranes and their components such as sphingolipids in all steps of their life cycle including attachment and membrane fusion, intracellular transport, replication, protein sorting and budding. Examples for sphingolipid-dependent virus entry are found for: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which besides its protein receptors also interacts with glycosphingolipids (GSLs); rhinovirus, which promotes the formation of ceramide-enriched platforms and endocytosis; or measles virus (MV), which induces the surface expression of its own receptor CD150 via activation of sphingomyelinases (SMases). While SMase activation was implicated in Ebola virus (EBOV) attachment, the virus utilizes the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C protein 1 (NPC1) as 'intracellular' entry receptor after uptake into endosomes. Differential activities of SMases also affect the intracellular milieu required for virus replication. Sindbis virus (SINV), for example, replicates better in cells lacking acid SMase (ASMase). Defined lipid compositions of viral assembly and budding sites influence virus release and infectivity, as found for hepatitis C virus (HCV) or HIV. And finally, viruses manipulate cellular signaling and the sphingolipid metabolism to their advantage, as for example influenza A virus (IAV), which activates sphingosine kinase 1 and the transcription factor NF-κB.

  5. High-programmed death-1 levels on hepatitis C virus-specific T cells during acute infection are associated with viral persistence and require preservation of cognate antigen during chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutebemberwa, Alleluiah; Ray, Stuart C; Astemborski, Jacquie; Levine, Jordana; Liu, Lin; Dowd, Kimberly A; Clute, Shalyn; Wang, Changyu; Korman, Alan; Sette, Alessandro; Sidney, John; Pardoll, Drew M; Cox, Andrea L

    2008-12-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important human pathogen that represents a model for chronic infection given that the majority of infected individuals fail to clear the infection despite generation of virus-specific T cell responses during the period of acute infection. Although viral sequence evolution at targeted MHC class I-restricted epitopes represents one mechanism for immune escape in HCV, many targeted epitopes remain intact under circumstances of viral persistence. To explore alternative mechanisms of HCV immune evasion, we analyzed patterns of expression of a major inhibitory receptor on T cells, programmed death-1 (PD-1), from the time of initial infection and correlated these with HCV RNA levels, outcome of infection, and sequence escape within the targeted epitope. We show that the level of PD-1 expression in early HCV infection is significantly higher on HCV-specific T cells from subjects who progress to chronic HCV infection than from those who clear infection. This correlation is independent of HCV RNA levels, compatible with the notion that high PD-1 expression on HCV-specific CD8 T cells during acute infection inhibits viral clearance. Viral escape during persistent infection is associated with reduction in PD-1 levels on the surface of HCV-specific T cells, supporting the necessity of ongoing antigenic stimulation of T cells for maintenance of PD-1 expression. These results support the idea that PD-1 expression on T cells specific for nonescaped epitopes contributes to viral persistence and suggest that PD-1 blockade may alter the outcome of HCV infection.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of neuroinflammation and injury during acute viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shives, Katherine D; Tyler, Kenneth L; Beckham, J David

    2017-03-11

    Viral infections in the central nervous system are a major cause of encephalitis. West Nile virus (WNV) and Herpes simplex virus (HSV) are the most common causes of viral encephalitis in the United States. We review the role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of WNV and HSV infections in the central nervous system (CNS). We discuss the role of the innate and cell-mediated immune responses in peripheral control of viral infection, viral invasion of the CNS, and in inflammatory-mediated neuronal injury. By understanding the role of specific inflammatory responses to viral infections in the CNS, targeted therapeutic approaches can be developed to maximize control of acute viral infection while minimizing neuronal injury in the CNS.

  7. The use of multiplex PCR for the diagnosis of viral severe acute respiratory infection in children: a high rate of co-detection during the winter season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kholy, A A; Mostafa, N A; Ali, A A; Soliman, M M S; El-Sherbini, S A; Ismail, R I; El Basha, N; Magdy, R I; El Rifai, N; Hamed, D H

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory tract infection is a major cause of hospitalization in children. Although most such infections are viral in origin, it is difficult to differentiate bacterial and viral infections, as the clinical symptoms are similar. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods allow testing for multiple pathogens simultaneously and are, therefore, gaining interest. This prospective case-control study was conducted from October 2013 to February 2014. Nasopharyngeal (NP) and oropharyngeal (throat) swabs were obtained from children admitted with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) at a tertiary hospital. A control group of 40 asymptomatic children was included. Testing for 16 viruses was done by real-time multiplex PCR. Multiplex PCR detected a viral pathogen in 159/177 (89.9 %) patients admitted with SARI. There was a high rate of co-infection (46.9 %). Dual detections were observed in 64 (36.2 %), triple detections in 17 (9.6 %), and quadruple detections in 2 (1.1 %) of 177 samples. Seventy-eight patients required intensive care unit (ICU) admission, of whom 28 (35.8 %) had co-infection with multiple viruses. AdV, HBoV, HRV, HEV, and HCoV-OC43 were also detected among asymptomatic children. This study confirms the high rate of detection of viral nucleic acids by multiplex PCR among hospitalized children admitted with SARI, as well as the high rate of co-detection of multiple viruses. AdV, HBoV, HRV, HEV, and HCoV-OC43 were also detected in asymptomatic children, resulting in challenges in clinical interpretation. Studies are required to provide quantitative conclusions that will facilitate clinical interpretation and application of the results in the clinical setting.

  8. ACUTE ATAXIA, TAKING PLACE AFTER ACUTE RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTION IN 2 Y. O. GIRL, AS A DEBUT NEUROLOGIC SIGN OF THE ANGELMAN SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Voropanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angleman syndrome (АS – is a chromosomal syndrome, which is manifested through atypical autism with feeble minding, epilepsy, outrage of the speech development, movement disorders, ataxia, as well as special (happy behavior of patients, combined with outbursts of laugh. The disease is caused by the mutation of 15q11.2–13 maternal locus or by the gene of UBE3A ubiquitinated complex. Such genes regulate the functional activity of hippocampus neurons, of olfactory bulbs, of the parastriate cortex, of the tentorium. We demonstrate the atypical AS case, which clinical presentation developed after acute respiratory viral infection with febrile temperature. The disease started with episodes of acute ataxia, interrupting daily activities of the child. Step by step the speech development was regressing – several words have fallen out,leaving the space for babbling sounds. Also appeared stereotypic movements of upper extremities (bending of arms in elbow joints, its retraction and joggling of hands, unmotivated laugh. Due to the nonrelevant starting presentation in the acute period following conditions were differentially diagnosed: 1 opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome; 2 cerebral circulation diseases; 3 epilepsy with absences and atonic attacks; 4 paroxysmal dyskenisias and ataxias; 5 start of the neurodegenerative disease; 6 early childhood autism. Results of laboratory research allowed to exclude opsoclonus-myoclonus, the magnetic and resonance tomography and vessels research allowed to exclude the cerebrovascular pathology. Changes, revealed in the course of the videoelectroencephalographic monitoring, as well as anamnesis data (clinical symptoms after fever allowed to narrow the diagnostic search; AS suspected. Provided the combination of ataxia with movement disorders, it was decided to carry out not molecular & genetic, but also micromatrix analysis, in order to exclude the channelopathy, as well as other genetic reasons. The method of

  9. Identification of viral and atypical bacterial pathogens in children hospitalized with acute respiratory infections in Hong Kong by multiplex PCR assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, R Y T; Chan, Paul K S; Tsen, Tracy; Li, A M; Lam, W Y; Yeung, Apple C M; Nelson, E A S

    2009-01-01

    Acute respiratory tract infection is a leading cause of hospital admission of children. This study used a broad capture, rapid and sensitive method (multiplex PCR assay) to detect 20 different respiratory pathogens including influenza A subtypes H1, H3, and H5; influenza B; parainfluenza types 1, 2, 3, and 4; respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) groups A and B; adenoviruses; human rhinoviruses; enteroviruses; human metapneumoviruses; human coronaviruses OC43, 229E, and SARS-CoV; Chlamydophila pneumoniae; Legionella pneumophila; and Mycoplasma pneumoniae; from respiratory specimens of 475 children hospitalized over a 12-month period for acute respiratory tract infections. The overall positive rate (47%) was about twice higher than previous reports based on conventional methods. Influenza A, parainfluenza and RSV accounted for 51%, and non-cultivable viruses accounted for 30% of positive cases. Influenza A peaked at March and June. Influenza B was detected in January, February, and April. Parainfluenza was prevalent throughout the year except from April to June. Most RSV infections were found between February and September. Adenovirus had multiple peaks, whereas rhinovirus and coronavirus OC43 were detected mainly in winter and early spring. RSV infection was associated with bronchiolitis, and parainfluenza was associated with croup; otherwise the clinical manifestations were largely nonspecific. In general, children infected with influenza A, adenovirus and mixed viruses had higher temperatures. In view of the increasing concern about unexpected outbreaks of severe viral infections, a rapid multiplex PCR assay is a valuable tool to enhance the management of hospitalized patients, and for the surveillance for viral infections circulating in the community.

  10. Fatal case of acute gastroenteritis with multiple viral coinfections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Julien; Morel-Baccard, Christine; Michard-Lenoir, Anne-Pascale; Germi, Raphaële; Pothier, Pierre; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Morand, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    We report a fatal case of acute gastroenteritis in a child with autism spectrum disorder. Multiple viral coinfections were detected by PCR in the patient's stool and digestive biopsy specimens. As viral detection is not necessarily associated with symptomatic disease, a semi-quantitative approach using cycle treshold values was proposed for the clinical interpretation of PCR. We discuss whether concomitant viral infections could be a risk factor for severe outcome in gastroenteritis cases. Individual risk factors are also addressed.

  11. Viral markers in HIV infection and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, A L; Dwyer, D E; Dowton, D N

    1993-01-01

    Viral and immune markers are used for monitoring either progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease or response to antiviral therapy. Ideal properties of viral markers are that they are present in all HIV-infected persons at all stages of disease, that they are related to disease pathogenesis, that they can be easily quantitated, that this quantitation correlates rapidly and predictably with both disease stage and response to antivirals, and that they can be developed into rapid, reproducible automated tests. Currently available viral markers include HIV p24 antigenemia (after acid glycine dissociation), anti-p24 antibody titres, quantitative DNA and RNA polymerase chain reaction performed on cells and plasma, and HIV isolate phenotype. In Australia, these markers have been studied in acute HIV seroconversion, in neonatal infection, in body fluids other than blood, and in monitoring of response to antiviral drug therapy.

  12. Viral DNA in horses infected with equine infectious anemia virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, N R; Lequarré, Anne-Sophie; Casey, J W; Lahn, S; Stephens, R. M.; Edwards, J.

    1989-01-01

    The amount and distribution of viral DNA were established in a horse acutely infected with the Wyoming strain of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). The highest concentration of viral DNA were found in the liver, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and spleen. The kidney, choroid plexus, and peripheral blood leukocytes also contained viral DNA, but at a lower level. It is estimated that at day 16 postinoculation, almost all of the viral DNA was located in the tissues, with the liver alone containing...

  13. Complement lysis activity in autologous plasma is associated with lower viral loads during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Huber

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To explore the possibility that antibody-mediated complement lysis contributes to viremia control in HIV-1 infection, we measured the activity of patient plasma in mediating complement lysis of autologous primary virus. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sera from two groups of patients-25 with acute HIV-1 infection and 31 with chronic infection-were used in this study. We developed a novel real-time PCR-based assay strategy that allows reliable and sensitive quantification of virus lysis by complement. Plasma derived at the time of virus isolation induced complement lysis of the autologous virus isolate in the majority of patients. Overall lysis activity against the autologous virus and the heterologous primary virus strain JR-FL was higher at chronic disease stages than during the acute phase. Most strikingly, we found that plasma virus load levels during the acute but not the chronic infection phase correlated inversely with the autologous complement lysis activity. Antibody reactivity to the envelope (Env proteins gp120 and gp41 were positively correlated with the lysis activity against JR-FL, indicating that anti-Env responses mediated complement lysis. Neutralization and complement lysis activity against autologous viruses were not associated, suggesting that complement lysis is predominantly caused by non-neutralizing antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively our data provide evidence that antibody-mediated complement virion lysis develops rapidly and is effective early in the course of infection; thus it should be considered a parameter that, in concert with other immune functions, steers viremia control in vivo.

  14. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maytawan Thanunchai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs are a subset of nonhematopoietic adult stem cells, readily isolated from various tissues and easily culture-expanded ex vivo. Intensive studies of the immune modulation and tissue regeneration over the past few years have demonstrated the great potential of MSCs for the prevention and treatment of steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD, immune-related disorders, and viral diseases. In immunocompromised individuals, the immunomodulatory activities of MSCs have raised safety concerns regarding the greater risk of primary viral infection and viral reactivation, which is a major cause of mortality after allogeneic transplantation. Moreover, high susceptibilities of MSCs to viral infections in vitro could reflect the destructive outcomes that might impair the clinical efficacy of MSCs infusion. However, the interplay between MSCs and virus is like a double-edge sword, and it also provides beneficial effects such as allowing the proliferation and function of antiviral specific effector cells instead of suppressing them, serving as an ideal tool for study of viral pathogenesis, and protecting hosts against viral challenge by using the antimicrobial activity. Here, we therefore review favorable and unfavorable consequences of MSCs and virus interaction with the highlight of safety and efficacy for applying MSCs as cell therapy.

  15. Viral infections of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Peter J; Donnelly, Thomas M

    2013-05-01

    Viral diseases of rabbits have been used historically to study oncogenesis (e.g. rabbit fibroma virus, cottontail rabbit papillomavirus) and biologically to control feral rabbit populations (e.g. myxoma virus). However, clinicians seeing pet rabbits in North America infrequently encounter viral diseases although myxomatosis may be seen occasionally. The situation is different in Europe and Australia, where myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease are endemic. Advances in epidemiology and virology have led to detection of other lapine viruses that are now recognized as agents of emerging infectious diseases. Rabbit caliciviruses, related to rabbit hemorrhagic disease, are generally avirulent, but lethal variants are being identified in Europe and North America. Enteric viruses including lapine rotavirus, rabbit enteric coronavirus and rabbit astrovirus are being acknowledged as contributors to the multifactorial enteritis complex of juvenile rabbits. Three avirulent leporid herpesviruses are found in domestic rabbits. A fourth highly pathogenic virus designated leporid herpesvirus 4 has been described in Canada and Alaska. This review considers viruses affecting rabbits by their clinical significance. Viruses of major and minor clinical significance are described, and viruses of laboratory significance are mentioned.

  16. Autistic disorder and viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbey, Jane E; Sweeten, Thayne L; McMahon, William M; Fujinami, Robert S

    2005-02-01

    Autistic disorder (autism) is a behaviorally defined developmental disorder with a wide range of behaviors. Although the etiology of autism is unknown, data suggest that autism results from multiple etiologies with both genetic and environmental contributions, which may explain the spectrum of behaviors seen in this disorder. One proposed etiology for autism is viral infection very early in development. The mechanism, by which viral infection may lead to autism, be it through direct infection of the central nervous system (CNS), through infection elsewhere in the body acting as a trigger for disease in the CNS, through alteration of the immune response of the mother or offspring, or through a combination of these, is not yet known. Animal models in which early viral infection results in behavioral changes later in life include the influenza virus model in pregnant mice and the Borna disease virus model in newborn Lewis rats. Many studies over the years have presented evidence both for and against the association of autism with various viral infections. The best association to date has been made between congenital rubella and autism; however, members of the herpes virus family may also have a role in autism. Recently, controversy has arisen as to the involvement of measles virus and/or the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine in the development of autism. Biological assays lend support to the association between measles virus or MMR and autism whereas epidemiologic studies show no association between MMR and autism. Further research is needed to clarify both the mechanisms whereby viral infection early in development may lead to autism and the possible involvement of the MMR vaccine in the development of autism.

  17. Cloning of the rhesus lymphocryptovirus viral capsid antigen and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA homologues and use in diagnosis of acute and persistent infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P; Jiang, H; Wang, F

    2000-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the most common cause of infectious mononucleosis and is associated with the development of several human malignancies. A closely related herpesvirus in the same lymphocryptovirus (LCV) genera as EBV naturally infects rhesus monkeys and provides an important animal model for studying EBV pathogenesis. We cloned the small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) homologue from the rhesus LCV and developed a peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine whether epitopes in the rhesus LCV sVCA are a reliable indicator of rhesus LCV infection. In order to define a "gold standard" for rhesus LCV infection, we also cloned the EBV-encoded small RNA 1 (EBER1) and EBER2 homologues from rhesus LCV and developed a reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay to detect persistent LCV infection in rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes. Animals from a conventional and a hand-reared colony were studied to compare the prevalence of rhesus LCV infection in the two groups. There was a 100% correlation between the peptide ELISA and EBER RT-PCR results for rhesus LCV infection. In addition, specificity for LCV infection and exclusion of potential cross-reactivity to the rhesus rhadinovirus sVCA homologue could be demonstrated using sera from experimentally infected animals. These studies establish two novel assays for reliable diagnosis of acute and persistent rhesus LCV infections. The rhesus LCV sVCA peptide ELISA provides a sensitive and reliable assay for routine screening, and these studies of the hand-reared colony confirm the feasibility of raising rhesus LCV-naive animals.

  18. Mast cells in viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Witczak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available  There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9, but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Furthermore, mast cells generate various mediators, cytokines and chemokines which modulate the intensity of inflammation and regulate the course of innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. Indirect evidence for the role of mast cells in viral infections is also provided by clinical observations and results of animal studies. Currently, more and more data indicate that mast cells can be infected by some viruses (dengue virus, adenoviruses, hantaviruses, cytomegaloviruses, reoviruses, HIV-1 virus. It is also demonstrated that mast cells can release pre formed mediators as well as synthesize de novo eicosanoids in response to stimulation by viruses. Several data indicate that virus-stimulated mast cells secrete cytokines and chemokines, including interferons as well as chemokines with a key role in NK and Tc lymphocyte influx. Moreover, some information indicates that mast cell stimulation via TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9 can affect their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and chemotaxis, and influence expression of some membrane molecules. Critical analysis of current data leads to the conclusion that it is not yet possible to make definitive statements about the role of mast cells in innate and acquired defense mechanisms developing in the course of viral infection and/or pathomechanisms of viral diseases.

  19. Integrin Activation and Viral Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-dian GAO; Jun-zheng DU; Jian-hua ZHOU; Hui-yun CHANG; Qing-ge XIE

    2008-01-01

    Integrins are members of a ubiquitous membrane receptor family which includes 18 different α subunits and 8 β subunits forming more than 20 α/β heterodimers. Integrins play key functions in vascular endothelial cell and tumour cell adhesion, lymphocyte trafficking, tumor growth and viral infection. Current understanding of the molecular basis of integrins as viral receptors has been achieved through many decades of study into the biology of transmembrane glycoproteins and their interactions with several viruses. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the molecular bases of interactions between viruses and integrins, which are of potential practical significance. Inhibition of virus-integrin interactions at the points of virus attachment or entry will provide a novel approach for the therapeutic treatment of viral diseases.

  20. Etiology of acute viral respiratory infections in children%儿童急性呼吸道感染的病毒病原学检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓华; 杨海霞; 林锐明

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解广东省中山市博爱医院就诊患儿急性呼吸道感染(ARI)的病毒分离状况,为临床儿童ARI提供病毒病原学诊断依据.方法 采集2011年12月-2012年11月在该院儿科门诊及住院诊治的ARI患儿鼻咽分泌物,用直接免疫荧光方法检测呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)、腺病毒(ADV)、甲型流感病毒(IfuA)、乙型流感病毒(IfuB)及副流感病毒Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ(Para Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ)型7种常见呼吸道病毒抗原,并对检测结果进行分析.结果 9 459例患儿中,病毒检测阳性2 429例,检出率为25.7%,其中RSV阳性1 104例(45.5%),IfuA阳性411例(16.9%),ParaⅢ阳性316例(13.0%),IfuB阳性290例(11.9%),ADV阳性275例(11.3%),Para Ⅰ阳性29例(1.2%),ParaⅡ阳性4例(0.2%).RSV感染主要在冬春季节好发.不同年龄段RSV阳性率差异有统计学意义;6岁以上患儿RSV所占比率明显低于6岁以下患儿.2种或以上病毒混合感染57例(2.3%),其中49例(84.2%)为2种病毒混合感染,9例(15.8%)为3种病毒混合感染.7种病毒中混合感染率最高的是RSV,最常见的类型是RSV和ParaⅢ,16例(28.1%).结论 RSV是该院患儿ARI的主要病毒病原,RSV感染好发于冬春季,多见于1岁以下婴幼儿.RSV阳性率随着年龄的增长逐渐减低.ADV检测的阳性率为11.3%,高于国内外文献报道,可说明近年ADV感染在儿童ARI中可能有增多的趋势.%Objective To investigate the status of viral pathogens of acute respiratory infections in the children treated in Zhongshan BoAi Hospital.Methods A total of 9 459 nasopharyngeal secretion samples were collected from December 2011 to November 2012 in Zhongshan Boai Hospital.Direct immunefluorescence technique was used to detect seven common respiratory viruses,including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV),adenovirus (ADV),influenza virus A and B,parainfluenza virus Ⅰ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ.The prevalence of various viral infections were analyzed in terms of season,age,sex and

  1. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  2. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases but...

  3. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  4. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  5. Viral-bacterial interactions in acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Tal; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2012-12-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a polymicrobial disease, which usually occurs as a complication of viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI). While respiratory viruses alone may cause viral AOM, they increase the risk of bacterial middle ear infection and worsen clinical outcomes of bacterial AOM. URI viruses alter Eustachian tube (ET) function via decreased mucociliary action, altered mucus secretion and increased expression of inflammatory mediators among other mechanisms. Transient reduction in protective functions of the ET allows colonizing bacteria of the nasopharynx to ascend into the middle ear and cause AOM. Advances in research help us to better understand the host responses to viral URI, the mechanisms of viral-bacterial interactions in the nasopharynx and the development of AOM. In this review, we present current knowledge regarding viral-bacterial interactions in the pathogenesis and clinical course of AOM. We focus on the common respiratory viruses and their established role in AOM.

  6. Recycling Endosomes and Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Vale-Costa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many viruses exploit specific arms of the endomembrane system. The unique composition of each arm prompts the development of remarkably specific interactions between viruses and sub-organelles. This review focuses on the viral–host interactions occurring on the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC, and mediated by its regulatory Ras-related in brain (Rab GTPase Rab11. This protein regulates trafficking from the ERC and the trans-Golgi network to the plasma membrane. Such transport comprises intricate networks of proteins/lipids operating sequentially from the membrane of origin up to the cell surface. Rab11 is also emerging as a critical factor in an increasing number of infections by major animal viruses, including pathogens that provoke human disease. Understanding the interplay between the ERC and viruses is a milestone in human health. Rab11 has been associated with several steps of the viral lifecycles by unclear processes that use sophisticated diversified host machinery. For this reason, we first explore the state-of-the-art on processes regulating membrane composition and trafficking. Subsequently, this review outlines viral interactions with the ERC, highlighting current knowledge on viral-host binding partners. Finally, using examples from the few mechanistic studies available we emphasize how ERC functions are adjusted during infection to remodel cytoskeleton dynamics, innate immunity and membrane composition.

  7. [Cycloferon efficacy in the treatment of acute respiratory tract viral infection and influenza during the morbidity outbreak in 2009-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantsov, M G; Golofeevskiĭ, S V

    2010-01-01

    Clinical signs of acute respiratory tract viral infection and influenza in 150 patients under the standard symptomatic therapy with cycloferon, an early interferon 1 and 2 inductor are described. The patients were randomized by the body temperature on the day of the medical advise seeking. The clinical process of the respiratory tract infection was characterized by the second increase of the body temperature stated in 31.8% of the patients. By the clinical signs the infection was mixed (virus-virus) that explained the second increase of the body temperature. Normalization of the temperature was stated on the 4th or 5th day of the observation. The catarrhal and intoxication syndromes were observed for no more than 5 days. When the treatment was started in time (on the day of the medical advise seeking), cycloferon provided minimization of the intoxication and catarrhal syndromes and normalization of the body temperature on the 4th day of the therapy without the use of antibacterial agents.

  8. Neonatal bronchial hyperresponsiveness precedes acute severe viral bronchiolitis in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo L K; Poorisrisak, Porntiva; Johnston, Sebastian L;

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus and other respiratory tract viruses lead to common colds in most infants, whereas a minority develop acute severe bronchiolitis often requiring hospitalization. We hypothesized that such an excessive response to respiratory tract viral infection is caused by host factors...

  9. Mast cells in viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Witczak; Ewa Brzezińska-Błaszczyk

    2012-01-01

     There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9), but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Fu...

  10. A touchdown nucleic acid amplification protocol as an alternative to culture backup for immunofluorescence in the routine diagnosis of acute viral respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feeney Susan A

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunofluorescence and virus culture are the main methods used to diagnose acute respiratory virus infections. Diagnosing these infections using nucleic acid amplification presents technical challenges, one of which is facilitating the different optimal annealing temperatures needed for each virus. To overcome this problem we developed a diagnostic molecular strip which combined a generic nested touchdown protocol with in-house primer master-mixes that could recognise 12 common respiratory viruses. Results Over an 18 month period a total of 222 specimens were tested by both immunofluorescence and the molecular strip. The specimens came from 103 males (median age 3.5 y, 80 females (median age 9 y and 5 quality assurance scheme specimens. Viruses were recovered from a number of specimen types including broncho-alveolar lavage, nasopharyngeal secretions, sputa, post-mortem lung tissue and combined throat and nasal swabs. Viral detection by IF was poor in sputa and respiratory swabs. A total of 99 viruses were detected in the study from 79 patients and 4 quality control specimens: 31 by immunofluorescence and 99 using the molecular strip. The strip consistently out-performed immunofluorescence with no loss of diagnostic specificity. Conclusions The touchdown protocol with pre-dispensed primer master-mixes was suitable for replacing virus culture for the diagnosis of respiratory viruses which were negative by immunofluorescence. Results by immunofluorescence were available after an average of 4–12 hours while molecular strip results were available within 24 hours, considerably faster than viral culture. The combined strip and touchdown protocol proved to be a convenient and reliable method of testing for multiple viruses in a routine setting.

  11. Acute pancreatitis associated with acute viral hepatitis A (HAV) - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafat, S M; Azad, A K; Basher, A; Ananna, M A; Islam, M S; Abdullah, S; Abdullah, A M; Islam, M A

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, a young woman had acute viral hepatitis (HAV) and acute pancreatitis together. She was admitted to our hospital with fever, jaundice and abdominal pain. Hepatic and pancreatic enzymes were elevated. Her serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level was high. An initial abdominal ultrasound was per-formed at hospital and revealed features of acute viral hepatitis. Spiral computed imaging revealed imaging features of an acute stage of pancreatitis and gallbladder wall thickness. HAV infection was diagnosed by the detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) against HAV in the serum. She was closely monitored and treated conservatively. On 10th day of hospital admission she was discharge after an uneventful recovery. In the current literature HAV infections have rarely been reported as a cause of acute pancreatitis.

  12. Innate Lymphoid Cells Are Depleted Irreversibly during Acute HIV-Infection in the Absence of Viral Suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; Kazer, Samuel W.; Mjösberg, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) play a central role in the response to infection by secreting cytokines crucial for immune regulation, tissue homeostasis, and repair. Although dysregulation of these systems is central to pathology, the impact of HIV-on ILCs remains unknown. We found that human blood...

  13. FEATURES OF THE IMMUNE RESPONSE DURING VIRAL INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Borisov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to select using cluster analysis and comparatively characterize immune disorders types in acute and chronic viral infections. Patients with acute and chronic viral infections (n = 896 were examined: 77 patients with acute viral hepatitis B, 94 — chronic viral hepatitis B, 119 — chronic hepatitis C, 531 — recurrent herpes, 75 — human papillomavirus infection. Healthy persons (n = 466 were examined as control. The research of blood lymphocyte phenotype was performed by flow cytometry. Four-color immunophenotyping were used in the following panels: Т-lymphocytes (CD3+CD19–CD16/56–CD45+, Т-helpers (CD3+CD4+CD45+, cytotoxic Т-cells (CD3+CD8+CD45+, NKcells (CD3–CD16/56+CD45+, B-lymphocytes (CD3–CD19+CD16/56+CD45+. Absolute values were obtained on a dualplatform technology using the results of haematological analysis. The immunoglobulin concentrations were determined by ELISA. The clustering was performed by a single linkage method. The number of clusters was determined on the basis of calculating the values of the Euclidean distance between the mean group values. It was found that the parameters, characterizing the functional state of the various parts of the immune system in acute and chronic viral infections, considerable diversity values. Custer analysis allows to allocate 6 immunotypes defined different states of innate and adaptive immunity: characterized by activation of the innate (increasing the number of neutrophils and NK-cells and adaptive immunity humoral response (increasing the concentration of IgG, characterized by hyperreaction of adaptive immunity (a significant increase in the concentration of IgG, discoordinated (multidirectional changes in the values of immunological parameters, immunodeficiency and unresponsiveness (did not differ from the control parameters immunotypes. It is proved that in patients with viral infections most often determined by the

  14. Innate immune response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shohei; Ishii, Ken J; Coban, Cevayir; Akira, Shizuo

    2008-09-01

    In viral infections the host innate immune system is meant to act as a first line defense to prevent viral invasion or replication before more specific protection by the adaptive immune system is generated. In the innate immune response, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are engaged to detect specific viral components such as viral RNA or DNA or viral intermediate products and to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in the infected cells and other immune cells. Recently these innate immune receptors and their unique downstream pathways have been identified. Here, we summarize their roles in the innate immune response to virus infection, discrimination between self and viral nucleic acids and inhibition by virulent factors and provide some recent advances in the coordination between innate and adaptive immune activation.

  15. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinet, Frédéric; Casetti, Luana; François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude; Pillet, Sylvie

    2013-09-01

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition.

  16. Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV, Hepatitis) Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis) Email Facebook Twitter Revised March 2017 What's the ... HIV and of worsening its consequences. What is hepatitis? Photo by ©iStock.com/ Skarie20 Hepatitis is an ...

  17. Management of acute viral bronchiolitis in children: Evidence beyond guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Shaikh Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis is one of the leading causes of worldwide admission of children under 2 years of age during winter months. There is a lack of consensus regarding the clinical definition of acute viral bronchiolitis in children and hence the management varies across the globe. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, assessment and management of children with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis. The available evidence in the worldwide literature suggests that supportive and symptomatic management is still the mainstay of management in this condition. The key to reducing the morbidity and mortality in children with RSV bronchiolitis is through prevention of infection through immunoprophylaxis especially in high-risk children.

  18. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morinet, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.morinet@sls.aphp.fr [Centre des Innovations Thérapeutiques en Oncologie et Hématologie (CITOH), CHU Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité Paris, Paris (France); Casetti, Luana [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Hématologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne (France); Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelynes, Versailles (France); Pillet, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Bactériologie-Virologie-Hygiène, CHU de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne (France); Université de Lyon et Université de Saint-Etienne, Jean Monnet, GIMAP EA3064, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, Lyon (France)

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  19. Cloning of the Rhesus Lymphocryptovirus Viral Capsid Antigen and Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Small RNA Homologues and Use in Diagnosis of Acute and Persistent Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Pasupuleti; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Fred

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the most common cause of infectious mononucleosis and is associated with the development of several human malignancies. A closely related herpesvirus in the same lymphocryptovirus (LCV) genera as EBV naturally infects rhesus monkeys and provides an important animal model for studying EBV pathogenesis. We cloned the small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) homologue from the rhesus LCV and developed a peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine whether e...

  20. Viral infections in asthma and COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Koichiro; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2014-03-01

    Airway viral infections are associated with the pathogenesis of asthma and COPD. It has been argued that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in infancy is a probable causal factor in the development of pediatric asthma. RSV infections tend to induce Th2-biased immune responses in the host airways. RSV infection, atopy, and low pulmonary function in neonates may work synergistically toward the development of pediatric asthma. Human rhinovirus (HRV) is a representative virus associated with the exacerbation of asthma in both children and adults. Viral infections trigger innate immune responses including granulocytic inflammation and worsen the underlying inflammation due to asthma and COPD. The innate immune responses involve type-I and -III interferon (IFN) production, which plays an important role in anti-viral responses, and the airway epithelia of asthmatics reportedly exhibit defects in the virus-induced IFN responses, which renders these individuals more susceptible to viral infection. A similarly impaired IFN response is seen in COPD, and several investigators propose that latent adenoviral infection may be involved in COPD development. Persistent RSV infections were detected in a sub-population of patients with COPD and were associated with the accelerated decline of lung function. The virus-induced upregulation of co-inhibitory molecules in the airway epithelium partly accounts for the persistent infections. Experimental animal models for virus-asthma/COPD interactions have shed light on the underlying immune mechanisms and are expected to help develop novel approaches to treat respiratory diseases.

  1. Fish viral infections in northwest of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledo, A; Lupiani, B; Dopazo, C P; Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L

    1990-06-01

    During a three years survey, a total of 149 samples from 20 farms of rainbow trout, salmon and turbot were examined for the presence of virus with the purpose to study the viral infections affecting cultured fish and their incidence in the fishfarms of Northwestern Spain. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was the only viral agent isolated from salmonid fish. Fry and fingerlings of trout showed the highest infection rate (24%). This virus was not detected in broodstock or embryonated eggs, although it was isolated from ovaric and seminal fluids and from juvenile carriers. From 24 samples of salmon analyzed, IPNV was only detected in one sample of juveniles. Examination of turbot led the isolation of a new virus belonging to the reoviridae family, which affected to the ongrowing population. All of the IPNV tested belonged to serotype Sp regardless of the origin of the trout stocks. During the monitorization of imported embryonated eggs, no virus was detected from any of the samples. However, in some case, IPNV was isolated when testing the fry obtained in our laboratory from those samples of imported eggs. Our findings indicate that: i) the analysis of fingerlings increase the probability to detect viral infections allowing us an optimal control of importations, and ii) most of the viral infections of fish take place in the own fish farms. The detection of mixed viral and bacterial infections emphasize the importance of carrying out an integral microbiological analysis to determine the causal agent(s) of fish mortalities.

  2. The role of respiratory syncytial virus and other viral pathogens in acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, B S; Dollete, F R; Yolken, R H

    1982-07-01

    We utilized recently developed enzyme immunoassay techniques to examine the role of selected viruses in the etiology of acute otitis media. Viral pathogens were found in middle ear fluids obtained from 13 (24%) of 53 children with acute otitis media; respiratory syncytial virus accounted for ten of the 13 viral agents identified. In addition, respiratory syncytial viral antigen was found in nasopharyngeal washings obtained from 15 of the 53 children. Seven of these children had RSV identified as the sole middle ear pathogen, whereas six children had otitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae as either the sole middle ear pathogen or in combination with RSV. Similarly, all three children with respiratory infections caused by influenza virus had ear infections caused by bacterial pathogens, either alone or in combination with influenza virus. These findings suggest that, in patients with viral respiratory infection, coexisting acute otitis media may be associated with the recovery of either viruses or bacteria from the middle ear exudates.

  3. Innate immune response to viral infection of the lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Hayley; Wark, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Viral respiratory tract infections are the most common infectious illnesses, though they are usually self-limiting and confined to the respiratory tract. The rapid identification of viruses and their effective elimination with minimal local and systemic inflammation is a testament to the efficiency of the innate immune response within the airways and lungs. A failure of this response appears to occur in those with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, where viral infection is an important trigger for acute exacerbations. The innate immune response to viruses requires their early detection through pathogen recognition receptors and the recruitment of the efficient antiviral response that is centred around the release of type 1 interferons. The airway epithelium provides both a barrier and an early detector for viruses, and interacts closely with cells of the innate immune response, especially macrophages and dendritic cells, to eliminate infection and trigger a specific adaptive immune response.

  4. Mucosal Immunity and acute viral gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Markus A

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a major killer of the very young worldwide. Rotavirus is the most common intestinal virus, causing acute gastroenteritis and extra-intestinal complications especially in young and chronically ill subjects. As early as 1991, the WHO recommended as high priority the development of a vaccine against rotavirus, the major pathogen causing enteric infections. Since the introduction of rotavirus vaccines for infant immunization programmes in different parts of the world in 2006, vaccination against rotavirus has resulted in substantial declines in severe gastroenteritis. The oral rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq(®) and Rotarix(®) are excellent examples for their unique features and principles of mucosal immunization. We elaborate on rotavirus immunity and the success of rotavirus vaccination and aspects also beyond infants' acute gastroenteritis.

  5. Rapid identification viruses from nasal pharyngeal aspirates in acute viral respiratory infections by RT-PCR and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Fu; Rothman, Richard E; Ramachandran, Padmini; Blyn, Lawrence; Sampath, Rangarajan; Ecker, David J; Valsamakis, Alexandra; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2011-04-01

    Diagnosis of the etiologic agent of respiratory viral infection relies traditionally on culture or antigen detection. This pilot evaluation compared performance characteristics of the RT-PCR and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (RT-PCR/ESI-MS) platform to conventional virologic methods for identifying multiple clinically relevant respiratory viruses in nasopharyngeal aspirates. The RT-PCR/ESI-MS respiratory virus surveillance kit was designed to detect respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B, parainfluenza types 1-4, adenoviridae types A-F, coronaviridae, human bocavirus, and human metapneumovirus. Patients (N=192) attending an emergency department during the 2007-2008 respiratory season consented, and "excess" frozen archived nasopharyngeal aspirates were analysed; 46 were positive by conventional virology and 69 by RT-PCR/ESI-MS, among which there were six samples with multiple viral pathogens detected. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were 89.1% and 80.3%, respectively. Additional viruses that were not identified by conventional virology assays were detected (4 human bocaviruses and 7 coronaviruses). Samples in which the RT-PCR/ESI-MS results disagreed with conventional virology were sent for analysis by a third method using a commercial RT-PCR-based assay, which can identify viruses not detectable by conventional virologic procedures. Time to first result of RT-PCR/ESI-MS was 8h. RT-PCR/ESI-MS demonstrated capacity to detect respiratory viruses identifiable and unidentifiable by conventional methods rapidly.

  6. PREVALENCE OF DIFFERENT VIRAL MARKERS IN PATIENTS OF ACUTE VIRAL HEPATITIS IN AND AROUND VISAKHAPATNAM : HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruna Sree

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute viral hepatitis (AVH is a major public health problem and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing countries. AIM: The aim of the present study is to study the serological profile of acute viral hepatitis in children and adults admitted in King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam and also age and sex distribution of patients suffering from acute viral hepatitis and also comparing the etiological profile by studying serological markers of common viral agents. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Samples were collected from 80 individuals with jaundice and other clinical and biochemical evidences of acute viral hepatitis . They were tested for hepatitis surface antigen, HBcIgM, HAVIgM, HEVIgM, Antibodies to HCV by the enzyme - linked immuno sorbent assay. RESULTS: Out of the 80 viral hepatitis cases (47 adults+33 children. In adults 20(42.5% patients presented HBV (26.96% was identified as the most common cause of acute hepatitis followed by HEV14 (29.8%, HEV+HAV4 (8.5% and HAV 6(12.76%. Co - infections with more than one virus were present in 5cases; HAV - HEV co - infection being the most common. In children 16(48.5% presented with HAV, HAV+HEV11 (33.3%, HEV4 (12.12%, HBV1 (3.03% CONCLUSIONS: Vaccination of adults against hepatitis B is indicated, along with sexual education to decrease the incidence of hepatitis which is found as common etiological agent in adults. The incidence of HAV and HEV in children shows that there is need for improvement in sanitation and food habits.

  7. A viral infection of the hands: Orf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Uluğ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Orf is a viral infection transmitted to humans from sheep and goats. In this report, three cases with orf were presented.Two of our patients had lesions on only one hand, whereas one patient had additional lesions on the other hand. Thelesions were most commonly located on the dorsal aspect of the fingers and typically started as a painless itchy maculethat became papular and, subsequently, purulent with a necrotic center. The lesions were managed conservatively, andno specific therapy was undertaken. The lesions regressed spontaneously and slowly without scarring during the nextfive weeks. In conclusion, we are of the opinion that human infection with orf will continue to occur, and can occur anywhere;thus, all physicians should be aware of the possibility of orf infection and consider orf in the differential diagnosisof cases with relevant animal exposure. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2013; 3(1: 41-44Key words: Orf, skin infection, zoonoses

  8. Targeted killing of virally infected cells by radiolabeled antibodies to viral proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Dadachova

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The HIV epidemic is a major threat to health in the developing and western worlds. A modality that targets and kills HIV-1-infected cells could have a major impact on the treatment of acute exposure and the elimination of persistent reservoirs of infected cells. The aim of this proof-of-principle study was to demonstrate the efficacy of a therapeutic strategy of targeting and eliminating HIV-1-infected cells with radiolabeled antibodies specific to viral proteins in vitro and in vivo. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 labeled with radioisotopes bismuth 213 ((213Bi and rhenium 188 ((188Re selectively killed chronically HIV-1-infected human T cells and acutely HIV-1-infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs in vitro. Treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice harboring HIV-1-infected hPBMCs in their spleens with a (213Bi- or (188Re-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb to gp41 resulted in a 57% injected dose per gram uptake of radiolabeled mAb in the infected spleens and in a greater than 99% elimination of HIV-1-infected cells in a dose-dependent manner. The number of HIV-1-infected thymocytes decreased 2.5-fold in the human thymic implant grafts of SCID mice treated with the (188Re-labeled antibody to gp41 compared with those treated with the (188Re-control mAb. The treatment did not cause acute hematologic toxicity in the treated mice. CONCLUSIONS: The current study demonstrates the effectiveness of HIV-targeted radioimmunotherapy and may provide a novel treatment option in combination with highly active antiretroviral therapy for the eradication of HIV.

  9. Bilateral optic neuritis in acute human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M; Toft, P.B.; Bernhard, P;

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report a case of acute viral disease accompanied by bilateral optic neuritis with substantial paraclinical evidence that human immunodeficiency virus was the causative agent. METHODS: Clinical and paraclinical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: Virus and antibody titers...... as well as reverse lymphocytosis were consistent with acute infection by the human immunodeficiency virus-1. CONCLUSIONS: Human immunodeficiency virus infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute optic neuritis...

  10. Aptamers in Diagnostics and Treatment of Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Wandtke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are in vitro selected DNA or RNA molecules that are capable of binding a wide range of nucleic and non-nucleic acid molecules with high affinity and specificity. They have been conducted through the process known as SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment. It serves to reach specificity and considerable affinity to target molecules, including those of viral origin, both proteins and nucleic acids. Properties of aptamers allow detecting virus infected cells or viruses themselves and make them competitive to monoclonal antibodies. Specific aptamers can be used to interfere in each stage of the viral replication cycle and also inhibit its penetration into cells. Many current studies have reported possible application of aptamers as a treatment or diagnostic tool in viral infections, e.g., HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus, HBV (Hepatitis B Virus, HCV (Hepatitis C Virus, SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, H5N1 avian influenza and recently spread Ebola. This review presents current developments of using aptamers in the diagnostics and treatment of viral diseases.

  11. Acute otitis media and respiratory virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruuskanen, O; Arola, M; Putto-Laurila, A; Mertsola, J; Meurman, O; Viljanen, M K; Halonen, P

    1989-02-01

    We studied the association of acute otitis media with different respiratory virus infections in a pediatric department on the basis of epidemics between 1980 and 1985. Altogether 4524 cases of acute otitis media were diagnosed. The diagnosis was confirmed by tympanocentesis in 3332 ears. Respiratory virus infection was diagnosed during the same period in 989 patients by detecting viral antigen in nasopharyngeal mucus. There was a significant correlation between acute otitis media and respiratory virus epidemics, especially respiratory syncytial virus epidemics. There was no significant correlation between outbreaks of other respiratory viruses and acute otitis media. Acute otitis media was diagnosed in 57% of respiratory syncytial virus, 35% of influenza A virus, 33% of parainfluenza type 3 virus, 30% of adenovirus, 28% of parainfluenza type 1 virus, 18% of influenza B virus and 10% of parainfluenza type 2 virus infections. These observations show a clear association of respiratory virus infections with acute otitis media. In this study on hospitalized children Haemophilus influenzae strains were the most common bacteriologic pathogens in middle ear fluid, occurring in 19% of cases. Streptococcus pneumoniae was present in 16% and Branhamella catarrhalis in 7% of cases. There was no association between specific viruses and bacteria observed in this study.

  12. [Associated infections in acute bronchopulmonary infections in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykova, E A; Vorob'ev, A A; Bokovoĭ, A G; Karazhas, N V; Evseeva, L F

    2003-01-01

    A total of 189 children with bacterial complications of the acute respiratory viral infection (ARVI)--primarily with pneumonia and bronchitis--were dynamically examined for typical and atypical pneumotropic causative agents of the infection process (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Pneumocystis carini, and Citomegalovirus). A high frequency rate of the associative infection involving mycoplasmas and pneumocysts was registered (45-50%); it was lower in the cases involving Chlamydias, hemophilic bacteria, pneumococcus, and cytomegalovirus--up to 25-30%. No sharp difference was found between the indices of an infection degree and those of an active clinical infectious process involving the same pneumotropic agent: the biggest difference was observed in Chlamydia infections (9.4%) and the lowest one--in mycoplasma infections (3%). A dynamic comparison of different classes of immunoglobulins revealed that, in acute bronchitis and pneumonias, the Chlamydia and cytomegalovirus infections are, primarily, of the persistent nature; the hemophilic and pneumocystic infections are of a mixed nature; and the pneumococcus one is of the acute nature. The Mycoplasma infection, which is more often encountered in pre-school children, is of the primary type with a trend towards a prolonged clinical course. All pneumonias had a typical clinical course; the clinical picture was compared in 128 patients with the etiological factor (including a description of characteristic symptoms).

  13. Acute infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus of low or high virulence leads to depletion and redistribution of WC1(+) γδ T cells in lymphoid tissues of beef calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Roberto A; Sakamoto, Kaori; Walz, Heather L; Brock, Kenny V; Hurley, David J

    2015-10-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the abundance and distribution of γδ T lymphocytes in lymphoid tissue during acute infection with high (HV) or low virulence (LV) non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in beef calves. This study was performed using tissue samples from a previous experiment in which thirty beef calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: LV [n=10; animals inoculated intranasally (IN) with LV BVDV-1a (strain SD-1)], HV [n=10; animals inoculated IN with HV BVDV-2 (strain 1373)], and control (n=10; animals inoculated with cell culture medium). On day 5 post inoculation, animals were euthanized, and samples from spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were collected to assess the abundance of WC1(+) γδ T cells. A higher proportion of calves challenged with BVDV showed signs of apoptosis and cytophagy in MLN and spleen samples compared to the control group. A significantly lower number of γδ T cells was observed in spleen and MLN from calves in HV and LV groups than in the control calves (P<0.05). In conclusion, acute infection with HV or LV BVDV resulted in depletion of WC1(+) γδ T cells in mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues at five days after challenge in beef calves. This reduction in γδ T cells in the studied lymphoid tissues could be also due to lymphocyte trafficking to other tissues.

  14. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) A & B

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) A & B - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  15. Parvovirus B19 in an Immunocompetent Adult Patient with Acute Liver Failure: An Underdiagnosed Cause of Acute Non-A-E Viral Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Kee Ho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available There are occasional pediatric reports of parvovirus B19-associated transient acute hepatitis and hepatic failure. A case of a 34-year-old immunocompetent woman who developed severe and prolonged but self-limited acute hepatitis and myelosuppression following acute parvovirus B19 infection is reported. Parvovirus B19 may be the causative agent in some adult cases of acute non-A-E viral hepatitis and acute liver failure.

  16. Cardiac Function Remains Impaired Despite Reversible Cardiac Remodeling after Acute Experimental Viral Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Moritz Becher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Infection with Coxsackievirus B3 induces myocarditis. We aimed to compare the acute and chronic phases of viral myocarditis to identify the immediate effects of cardiac inflammation as well as the long-term effects after resolved inflammation on cardiac fibrosis and consequently on cardiac function. Material and Methods. We infected C57BL/6J mice with Coxsackievirus B3 and determined the hemodynamic function 7 as well as 28 days after infection. Subsequently, we analyzed viral burden and viral replication in the cardiac tissue as well as the expression of cytokines and matrix proteins. Furthermore, cardiac fibroblasts were infected with virus to investigate if viral infection alone induces profibrotic signaling. Results. Severe cardiac inflammation was determined and cardiac fibrosis was consistently colocalized with inflammation during the acute phase of myocarditis. Declined cardiac inflammation but no significantly improved hemodynamic function was observed 28 days after infection. Interestingly, cardiac fibrosis declined to basal levels as well. Both cardiac inflammation and fibrosis were reversible, whereas the hemodynamic function remains impaired after healed viral myocarditis in C57BL/6J mice.

  17. Reverse Genetics for Fusogenic Bat-Borne Orthoreovirus Associated with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Humans: Role of Outer Capsid Protein σC in Viral Replication and Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Kawagishi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nelson Bay orthoreoviruses (NBVs are members of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses and possess 10-segmented double-stranded RNA genomes. NBV was first isolated from a fruit bat in Australia more than 40 years ago, but it was not associated with any disease. However, several NBV strains have been recently identified as causative agents for respiratory tract infections in humans. Isolation of these pathogenic bat reoviruses from patients suggests that NBVs have evolved to propagate in humans in the form of zoonosis. To date, no strategy has been developed to rescue infectious viruses from cloned cDNA for any member of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses. In this study, we report the development of a plasmid-based reverse genetics system free of helper viruses and independent of any selection for NBV isolated from humans with acute respiratory infection. cDNAs corresponding to each of the 10 full-length RNA gene segments of NBV were cotransfected into culture cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase, and viable NBV was isolated using a plaque assay. The growth kinetics and cell-to-cell fusion activity of recombinant strains, rescued using the reverse genetics system, were indistinguishable from those of native strains. We used the reverse genetics system to generate viruses deficient in the cell attachment protein σC to define the biological function of this protein in the viral life cycle. Our results with σC-deficient viruses demonstrated that σC is dispensable for cell attachment in several cell lines, including murine fibroblast L929 cells but not in human lung epithelial A549 cells, and plays a critical role in viral pathogenesis. We also used the system to rescue a virus that expresses a yellow fluorescent protein. The reverse genetics system developed in this study can be applied to study the propagation and pathogenesis of pathogenic NBVs and in the generation of recombinant NBVs for future vaccines and therapeutics.

  18. Suppression of viral infectivity through lethal defection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande-Pérez, Ana; Lázaro, Ester; Lowenstein, Pedro; Domingo, Esteban; Manrubia, Susanna C.

    2005-01-01

    RNA viruses replicate with a very high error rate and give rise to heterogeneous, highly plastic populations able to adapt very rapidly to changing environments. Viral diseases are thus difficult to control because of the appearance of drug-resistant mutants, and it becomes essential to seek mechanisms able to force the extinction of the quasispecies before adaptation emerges. An alternative to the use of conventional drugs consists in increasing the replication error rate through the use of mutagens. Here, we report about persistent infections of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus treated with fluorouracil, where a progressive debilitation of infectivity leading to eventual extinction occurs. The transition to extinction is accompanied by the production of large amounts of RNA, indicating that the replicative ability of the quasispecies is not strongly impaired by the mutagen. By means of experimental and theoretical approaches, we propose that a fraction of the RNA molecules synthesized can behave as a defective subpopulation able to drive the viable class extinct. Our results lead to the identification of two extinction pathways, one at high amounts of mutagen, where the quasispecies completely loses its ability to infect and replicate, and a second one, at lower amounts of mutagen, where replication continues while the infective class gets extinct because of the action of defectors. The results bear on a potential application of increased mutagenesis as an antiviral strategy in that low doses of a mutagenic agent may suffice to drive persistent virus to extinction. PMID:15767582

  19. Pericardial Tamponade in an Adult Suffering from Acute Mumps Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sascha Kahlfuss; Robert Rainer Flieger; Annette Mankertz; Kadir Yilmaz; Torsten Kai Roepke

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a case of a 51-year-old man with acute pericardial tamponade requiring emergency pericardiocentesis after he suffered from sore throat, headache, malaise, and sweats for two weeks. Serological analyses revealed increased mumps IgM and IgG indicating an acute mumps infection whereas other bacterial and viral infections were excluded. In addition, MRI revealed atypical swelling of the left submandibular gland. Whereas mumps has become a rare entity in children due to comprehensi...

  20. STUDY OF PERSISTENT VIRAL INFECTION IN AN ANIMALMODEL OF VIRAL MYOCARDITIS BY PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the role of persistent viral infection in the mechanism of viral myocarditis. Methods A mice model of CVB3m viral myocarditis was made and the viral RNA in mice myocardium and whole blood sample was tested by using polymerase chain reaction ( PCR ) technique. The pathological changes in mice myocardium were determined. Results On day 3, the viral gene in whole blood and myocardium was found, which partly became negative on day 8, but the change of myocardial pathology became obvious. Although the blood specimens were tested negatively on day 12, the viral gene in mice myocardium remained positive within 120d. Conclusion This study indicates that persistent viral infection plays a role in the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis.

  1. T Cell Memory in the Context of Persistent Herpes Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Torti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The generation of a functional memory T cell pool upon primary encounter with an infectious pathogen is, in combination with humoral immunity, an essential process to confer protective immunity against reencounters with the same pathogen. A prerequisite for the generation and maintenance of long-lived memory T cells is the clearance of antigen after infection, which is fulfilled upon resolution of acute viral infections. Memory T cells play also a fundamental role during persistent viral infections by contributing to relative control and immuosurveillance of active replication or viral reactivation, respectively. However, the dynamics, the phenotype, the mechanisms of maintenance and the functionality of memory T cells which develop upon acute/resolved infection as opposed to chronic/latent infection differ substantially. In this review we summarize current knowledge about memory CD8 T cell responses elicited during α-, β-, and γ-herpes viral infections with major emphasis on the induction, maintenance and function of virus-specific memory CD8 T cells during viral latency and we discuss how the peculiar features of these memory CD8 T cell responses are related to the biology of these persistently infecting viruses.

  2. Winter in Wujin Region in Children with Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infection of Viral Etiology Analysis%武进地区冬季儿童急性下呼吸道感染病毒病原学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱松立; 冯罗华

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To understand the winter in Wujin region in children with acute lower respiratory tract infection of viral etiology.Methods:With direct immunofluorescence assay(DIF) from January 2013 to March 2013 116 patients with lower respiratory tract infection in nasopharyngeal secretion in seven respiratory virus detection.Results:In 116 cases,39 cases were detected at least one kind of virus,the total positive rate was 33.6%.Among them,respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) detected the most,for 35 cases,the detection rate was 30.2%,adenovirus(ADV) in 8 cases(6.9%),parainfluenza 3(PIV3) in 3 cases(2.6%). Influenza virus A(IFA),influenza virus B(IFB),parainfluenza 1(PIV1),parainfluenza 2(PIV2) was not detected.RSV,ADV mixed infection in 7 cases,the detection rate was 6.0%.Conclusion:The virus is a major pathogen of lower respiratory tract infection in children.Acute lower respiratory tract infection in winter is the main pathogenic virus in Wujin area are RSV,ADV,PIV.%  目的:了解武进地区冬季儿童急性下呼吸道感染病毒病原学特点。方法:采用直接免疫荧光法(DIF)对2013年1-3月住院的116例下呼吸道感染患儿鼻咽分泌物进行七项呼吸道病毒检测。结果:116例患儿中,39例检出至少1种病毒,总检出率33.6%。其中呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)35例(30.2%),腺病毒(ADV)8例(6.9%),副流感3(PIV3)3例(2.6%)。流感病毒A(IFA)、流感病毒B(IFB)、副流感1(PIV1)、副流感2(PIV2)均未检出。RSV、ADV混合感染7例,检出率6.0%。结论:病毒是儿童下呼吸道感染的主要病原,武进地区冬季急性下呼吸道感染的主要病毒病原是RSV、ADV、PIV。

  3. RT-PCR em pools de soros sangüíneos para o diagnóstico da infecção aguda e de animais persistentemente infectados pelo vírus da diarréia viral bovina RT-PCR in pools of bovine blood serum to detect acute infection and persistently infected animals with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pilz

    2007-02-01

    of serum from groups D and H resulted in positive reactions in serum samples from 11 cows and 12 calves. For the identification of persistently infected (PI animals, three months after the first examination, blood serum samples from 23 positive animals were reevaluated by RT-PCR, resulting in five positive calves. In two of these calves the BVDV was isolated in MDBK cell culture. The specificity of RT-PCR amplicons from one cow with acute infection, one PI calf, and two wild type BVDV strains isolated in cell culture were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. The use of RT-PCR in pools of blood sera proved to be a quick and low cost strategy for the etiological diagnosis of the acute infection as well as to detect PI animals thereby favoring the implementation of control and prophylaxis measures.

  4. Effects of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahamtan, Alireza; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Rygiel, Tomasz P; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat; Salimi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active ingredient in marijuana, and their derivatives have received remarkable attention in the last two decades because they can affect tumor growth and metastasis. There is a large body of evidence from in vivo and in vitro models showing that cannabinoids and their receptors influence the immune system, viral pathogenesis, and viral replication. The present study reviews current insights into the role of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections. The results reported here indicate that cannabinoids and their receptors have different sequels for viral infection. Although activation or inhibition of cannabinoid receptors in the majority of viral infections are proper targets for development of safe and effective treatments, caution is required before using pharmaceutical cannabinoids as a treatment agent for patients with viral infections.

  5. Phosphorylation of the viral coat protein regulates RNA virus infection

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    Hoover HS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Haley S Hoover, C Cheng Kao Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA Abstract: Coat proteins (CPs are the most abundant protein produced during a viral infection. CPs have been shown to regulate the infection processes of RNA viruses, including RNA replication and gene expression. The numerous activities of the CP in infection are likely to require regulation, possibly through posttranslational modifications. Protein posttranslational modifications are involved in signal transduction, expanding and regulating protein function, and responding to changes in the environment. Accumulating evidence suggests that phosphorylation of viral CPs is involved in the regulation of the viral infection process from enabling virion disassembly to regulation of viral protein synthesis and replication. CP phosphorylation also affects viral trafficking and virion assembly. This review focuses on the regulatory roles that phosphorylation of CPs has in the life cycle of viruses with RNA genomes. Keywords: viral capsid protein, posttranslational modification, phosphorylation, protein–RNA interaction

  6. Hepatitis A viral load in relation to severity of the infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Keiichi; Kojima, Hiroshige; Yasui, Shin; Okitsu, Koichiro; Yonemitsu, Yutaka; Omata, Masao; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-02-01

    A correlation between hepatitis A virus (HAV) genomes and the clinical severity of hepatitis A has not been established. The viral load in sera of hepatitis A patients was examined to determine the possible association between hepatitis A severity and HAV replication. One hundred sixty-four serum samples from 91 Japanese patients with sporadic hepatitis A, comprising 11 patients with fulminant hepatitis, 10 with severe acute hepatitis, and 70 with self-limited acute hepatitis, were tested for HAV RNA. The sera included 83 serial samples from 20 patients. Viral load was measured by real-time RT-PCR. The detection rates of HAV RNA from fulminant, severe acute, and acute hepatitis were 10/11 (91%), 10/10 (100%), and 55/70 (79%), respectively. Mean values of HAV RNA at admission were 3.48 ± 1.30 logcopies/ml in fulminant, 4.19 ± 1.03 in severe acute, and 2.65 ± 1.64 in acute hepatitis. Patients with severe infection such as fulminant hepatitis and severe acute hepatitis had higher initial viral load than patients with less severe infection (P hepatitis after clinical onset (P = 0.19). HAV RNA was detectable quantitatively in the majority of the sera of hepatitis A cases during the early convalescent phase by real-time PCR. Higher initial viral replication was found in severely infected patients. An excessive host immune response might follow, reducing the viral load rapidly as a result of the destruction of large numbers of HAV-infected hepatocytes, and in turn severe disease might be induced.

  7. Programmatic Implications of Acute and Early HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthar, Amitabh B; Granich, Reuben M; Kato, Masaya; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Montaner, Julio S G; Williams, Brian G

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes acute, early, chronic, and late stages. Acute HIV infection lasts approximately 3 weeks and early HIV infection, which includes acute HIV infection, lasts approximately 7 weeks. Many testing and blood screening algorithms detect HIV antibodies about 3 weeks after HIV infection. Incidence estimates are based on results of modeling, cohort studies, surveillance, and/or assays. Viral load is the key modifiable risk factor for HIV transmission and peaks during acute and early HIV infection. Empirical evidence characterizing the impact of acute and early HIV infection on the spread of the HIV epidemic are limited. Time trends of HIV prevalence collected from concentrated and generalized epidemics suggest that acute and early HIV infection may have a limited role in population HIV transmission. Collectively, these data suggest that acute and early HIV infection is relatively short and does not currently require fundamentally different programmatic approaches to manage the HIV/AIDS epidemic in most settings. Research and surveillance will inform which epidemic contexts and phases may require tailored strategies for these stages of HIV infection.

  8. [Metabolism of various biogenic amines in acute viral neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynenko, I N; Shchegoleva, R A; Ponomarenko, V P; Leshchinskaia, E V; Kodkind, G Kh

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism of biogenic amines was examined in 62 patients with various acute viral neuroinfections. The control group consisted of 57 persons. Depending on the process character and disease period variations of the levels of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindolylacetic acid, coeruloplasmin and histamine were discovered. A comparison of the results obtained with the clinical course of the diseases revealed a certain correlation, especially in patients with acute meningoencephalitis.

  9. Acute Systemic Viral Infection Masquerading as an Infiltrating Lymphoma in an Elderly Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani M. Babiker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection occurs mainly in adolescents and young adults, with more than 90% of adults having serological evidence of past infection. Primary infection in those over the age of 40 is associated with an atypical and often more severe presentation that can lead to more extensive and invasive, and often unnecessary, diagnostic testing. The incidence of severe EBV-related illness in older adults has been observed to be increasing in industrialized nations. The characteristic presentation of infectious mononucleosis (IM syndrome in elderly patients (age > 65 is not clearly defined in the literature. Here, we describe a case of primary EBV infection in an 80-year-old female and review the literature regarding primary seroconversion in elderly patients.

  10. Chest physical therapy in acute viral bronchiolitis: an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postiaux, Guy; Zwaenepoel, Bruno; Louis, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    We describe the various therapies for infant acute viral bronchiolitis and the contradictory results obtained with chest physical therapy. The treatment target is bronchial obstruction, which is a multifactorial phenomenon that includes edema, bronchoconstriction, and increased mucus production, with a clinical grading defined as severe, moderate, or mild. Chest physical therapy is revisited in its various modalities, according to preliminary scoring of the disease.

  11. Viral etiology in infants hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azkur, Dilek; Özaydın, Eda; Dibek-Mısırlıoğlu, Emine; Vezir, Emine; Tombuloğlu, Duygu; Köse, Gülşen; Kocabaş, Can N

    2014-01-01

    Acute bronchiolitis is predominantly a viral disease. Respiratory syncytial virus is the most common agent, but other newly identified viruses have also been considered as causes. The aim of the present study is to determine the respiratory viruses causing acute bronchiolitis in hospitalized infants. Infants younger than 2 years of age who were hospitalized for acute viral bronchiolitis in a children's hospital between November 2011 and May 2012 were evaluated for the presence of viruses as etiologic agents using a realtime polymerase chain reaction method.A total of 55 infants were included in this study. The mean age of the children was 6.98±5.53 months, and 63.6% were male. In the 55 children, 63 viruses were detected. A single viral pathogen was detected in 47 (85.5%) patients, and two viruses were co-detected in 8 (14.6%) patients. Respiratory syncytial virus was the most common virus identified, accounting for 25 (45.5%) cases, followed by rhinovirus (n=9, 16.4%), and human metapneumovirus (n = 8, 14.5%).Although respiratory syncytial virus remains the major viral pathogen in infants hospitalized for acute broncholitis, more than half of bronchiolitis cases are associated with other respiratory viruses.

  12. [Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis associated with viral hepatitis A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcana, Ronald; Frisancho, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 14 year-old male from Lima. He is a student with a history of bronchial asthma since age 4 receives conditional salbutamol, corticosteroids used for asthma attacks (a crisis in 2010, 1 month ago) Refuses surgery or transfusions. He presented with a two weeks for abdominal pain, nausea, fever, and jaundice. Epigastric pain is colicky and radiated back to righ upper quadrant, refers in addition to nausea and fever, for ten days notice jaundice of skin and sclera. On examen he was lucid, with jaundice of skin and mucous membranes. There was no palpable lymph nodes, abdomen with bowel sounds, soft, depressible, liver span of 15cm, positive Murphy, no peritonitis. The laboratory findings showed hemoglobin 13gr, MCV 90, platelets 461.000/mm3, WBC 4320/mm, lymphocytes 1700 (39%). total bilirubin: 8.8, B Direct: 7.6, ALT (alanine aminotransferase): 3016, AST (aspartate aminotransferase): 984, alkaline phosphatase: 250, albumin: 3.34gr%, globulin: 2.8, amylase: 589 (high serum amylase), TP: 17, INR: 1.6, VHA IgM positive. 89 mg glucose, urea 19 mg%, creatinine 0.5 mg Hemoglobin 13gr, MCV 90 Platelet 461000/mm3, WBC 4320/mm, Lymphocytes 1700 (39%). The nuclear magnetic resonance showed hepatomegaly associated with thickening of gallbladder wall without stones up to 11mm inside. No bile duct dilatation, bile duct 4mm, pancreas increased prevalence of body size. Mild splenomegaly and free fluid in the space of Morrison and right flank. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a gallbladder wall thickness (11mm), without stones in his light. Pancreas to increase volume with peripancreatic fluid free perivesicular with a volume of 430 cc. Findings consistent with acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute pancreatitis. CT-scan showed enlarged pancreas with predominance of body and tail with peripancreatic edema; the gallbladder was thickening. We report this case because the extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis A infection are uncommon, specially the

  13. Immunological and molecular epidemiological characteristics of acute and fulminant viral hepatitis A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Syed A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis A virus is an infection of liver; it is hyperendemic in vast areas of the world including India. In most cases it causes an acute self limited illness but rarely fulminant. There is growing concern about change in pattern from asymptomatic childhood infection to an increased incidence of symptomatic disease in the adult population. Objective In-depth analysis of immunological, viral quantification and genotype of acute and fulminant hepatitis A virus. Methods Serum samples obtained from 1009 cases of suspected acute viral hepatitis was employed for different biochemical and serological examination. RNA was extracted from blood serum, reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified using nested PCR for viral quantification, sequencing and genotyping. Immunological cell count from freshly collected whole blood was carried out by fluorescence activated cell sorter. Results Fulminant hepatitis A was mostly detected with other hepatic viruses. CD8+ T cells count increases in fulminant hepatitis to a significantly high level (P = 0.005 compared to normal healthy control. The immunological helper/suppressor (CD4+/CD8+ ratio of fulminant hepatitis was significantly lower compared to acute cases. The serologically positive patients were confirmed by RT-PCR and total of 72 (69.2% were quantified and sequenced. The average quantitative viral load of fulminant cases was significantly higher (P Conclusions Immunological factors in combination with viral load defines the severity of the fulminant hepatitis A. Phylogenetic analysis of acute and fulminant hepatitis A confirmed genotypes IIIA as predominant against IA with no preference of disease severity.

  14. Acute Viral Hepatitis E Is Associated with the Development of Myocarditis

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    M. Premkumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocarditis, an inflammatory disease of heart muscle, is an important cause of dilated cardiomyopathy worldwide. Viral infection is an important cause of myocarditis. This condition presents with various symptoms, ranging from minimally symptomatic cases to fatal arrhythmia and cardiogenic shock, and may develop chronic myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy in some patients. We report the case of a 26-year-old patient with acute viral hepatitis E who developed symptomatic myocarditis. As far as we could search, this is probably the 3rd case report of this rare association.

  15. RT-PCR and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RT-PCR/ESI-MS) for Identifying Acute Viral Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Fu; Blyn, Lawrence; Rothman, Richard E.; Ramachandran, Padmini; Valsamakis, Alexandra; Ecker, David; Sampath, Rangarajan; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2010-01-01

    Diagnosis of respiratory viruses traditionally relies on culture or antigen detection.We aimed to demonstrate capacity of the RT-PCR/ESI-MS platform to identify clinical relevant respiratory viruses in nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) samples and compare the diagnostic performance characteristics relative to conventional culture- and antigen-based methods. A RT-PCR/ESI-MS respiratory virus surveillance kit designed to detect respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B, parainfluenza types 1-4, adenoviridae types A-F, coronaviridae, human bocavirus, and human metapneumovirus was evaluated using both mock-ups and frozen archived NPA (N=280), 95 of which were positive by clinical virology methods. RT-PCR/ESI-MS detected 74/95 (77.9%) known positive samples and identified an additional 13/185 (7%) from culture negative samples. Viruses that are non-detectable with conventional methods were also identified. Viral load was semi-quantifiable and ranged from 2,400 to >320,000copies/ml. Time to results was 8hrs. RT-PCR/ESI-MS showed promise in rapid detection of respiratory viruses, merits further evaluation for use in clinical settings. PMID:21251562

  16. Invariant NKT cells: regulation and function during viral infection.

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    Jennifer A Juno

    Full Text Available Natural killer T cells (NKT cells represent a subset of T lymphocytes that express natural killer (NK cell surface markers. A subset of NKT cells, termed invariant NKT cells (iNKT, express a highly restricted T cell receptor (TCR and respond to CD1d-restricted lipid ligands. iNKT cells are now appreciated to play an important role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses and have been implicated in infectious disease, allergy, asthma, autoimmunity, and tumor surveillance. Advances in iNKT identification and purification have allowed for the detailed study of iNKT activity in both humans and mice during a variety of chronic and acute infections. Comparison of iNKT function between non-pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection models and chronic HIV-infected patients implies a role for iNKT activity in controlling immune activation. In vitro studies of influenza infection have revealed novel effector functions of iNKT cells including IL-22 production and modulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, but ex vivo characterization of human iNKT cells during influenza infection are lacking. Similarly, as recent evidence suggests iNKT involvement in dengue virus pathogenesis, iNKT cells may modulate responses to a number of emerging pathogens. This Review will summarize current knowledge of iNKT involvement in responses to viral infections in both human and mouse models and will identify critical gaps in knowledge and opportunities for future study. We will also highlight recent efforts to harness iNKT ligands as vaccine adjuvants capable of improving vaccination-induced cellular immune responses.

  17. Studying the immune response to human viral infections using zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Michelle F; Sullivan, Con; Kim, Carol H

    2014-09-01

    Humans and viruses have a long co-evolutionary history. Viral illnesses have and will continue to shape human history: from smallpox, to influenza, to HIV, and beyond. Animal models of human viral illnesses are needed in order to generate safe and effective antiviral medicines, adjuvant therapies, and vaccines. These animal models must support the replication of human viruses, recapitulate aspects of human viral illnesses, and respond with conserved immune signaling cascades. The zebrafish is perhaps the simplest, most commonly used laboratory model organism in which innate and/or adaptive immunity can be studied. Herein, we will discuss the current zebrafish models of human viral illnesses and the insights they have provided. We will highlight advantages of early life stage zebrafish and the importance of innate immunity in human viral illnesses. We will also discuss viral characteristics to consider before infecting zebrafish with human viruses as well as predict other human viruses that may be able to infect zebrafish.

  18. Viral Protein Kinetics of Piscine Orthoreovirus Infection in Atlantic Salmon Blood Cells

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    Hanne Merethe Haatveit

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV is ubiquitous in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar and the cause of heart and skeletal muscle inflammation. Erythrocytes are important target cells for PRV. We have investigated the kinetics of PRV infection in salmon blood cells. The findings indicate that PRV causes an acute infection of blood cells lasting 1–2 weeks, before it subsides into persistence. A high production of viral proteins occurred initially in the acute phase which significantly correlated with antiviral gene transcription. Globular viral factories organized by the non-structural protein µNS were also observed initially, but were not evident at later stages. Interactions between µNS and the PRV structural proteins λ1, µ1, σ1 and σ3 were demonstrated. Different size variants of µNS and the outer capsid protein µ1 appeared at specific time points during infection. Maximal viral protein load was observed five weeks post cohabitant challenge and was undetectable from seven weeks post challenge. In contrast, viral RNA at a high level could be detected throughout the eight-week trial. A proteolytic cleavage fragment of the µ1 protein was the only viral protein detectable after seven weeks post challenge, indicating that this µ1 fragment may be involved in the mechanisms of persistent infection.

  19. Acute encephalitis syndrome following scrub typhus infection

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    Ayan Kar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to find the incidence of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES secondary to scrub infection and to observe the clinical, biochemical, radiological profile, and outcomes in these patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 consecutive patients of AES were evaluated for scrub infection using scrub typhus immunoglobulin M enzyme linked immuno-sorbant assay positivity along with the presence or absence of an eschar. Clinical profile, routine laboratory tests, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis, and neuroimaging were analyzed. Patients were treated with doxycycline and followed-up. Results: Among 20 consecutive patients with AES, 6 (30% were due to scrub infection. They presented with acute onset fever, altered sensorium, seizures. "Eschar" was seen in 50% of patients. CSF done in two of them was similar to consistent with viral meningitis. Magnetic resonance imaging brain revealed cerebral edema, bright lesions in the putamen and the thalamus on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. Renal involvement was seen in all patients. All patients responded well to oral doxycycline. Conclusion: AES is not an uncommon neurological presentation following scrub typhus infection. It should be suspected in all patients with fever, altered sensorium, and renal involvement. Oral doxycycline should be started as early as possible for better outcomes.

  20. Transmission of single and multiple viral variants in primary HIV-1 subtype C infection.

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    Vladimir Novitsky

    Full Text Available To address whether sequences of viral gag and env quasispecies collected during the early post-acute period can be utilized to determine multiplicity of transmitted HIV's, recently developed approaches for analysis of viral evolution in acute HIV-1 infection [1,2] were applied. Specifically, phylogenetic reconstruction, inter- and intra-patient distribution of maximum and mean genetic distances, analysis of Poisson fitness, shape of highlighter plots, recombination analysis, and estimation of time to the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA were utilized for resolving multiplicity of HIV-1 transmission in a set of viral quasispecies collected within 50 days post-seroconversion (p/s in 25 HIV-infected individuals with estimated time of seroconversion. The decision on multiplicity of HIV infection was made based on the model's fit with, or failure to explain, the observed extent of viral sequence heterogeneity. The initial analysis was based on phylogeny, inter-patient distribution of maximum and mean distances, and Poisson fitness, and was able to resolve multiplicity of HIV transmission in 20 of 25 (80% cases. Additional analysis involved distribution of individual viral distances, highlighter plots, recombination analysis, and estimation of tMRCA, and resolved 4 of the 5 remaining cases. Overall, transmission of a single viral variant was identified in 16 of 25 (64% cases, and transmission of multiple variants was evident in 8 of 25 (32% cases. In one case multiplicity of HIV-1 transmission could not be determined. In primary HIV-1 subtype C infection, samples collected within 50 days p/s and analyzed by a single-genome amplification/sequencing technique can provide reliable identification of transmission multiplicity in 24 of 25 (96% cases. Observed transmission frequency of a single viral variant and multiple viral variants were within the ranges of 64% to 68%, and 32% to 36%, respectively.

  1. Sonographic changes of liver and gallbladder in acute viral hepatitis

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    Ebrahimi Daryani N

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepatomegaly, decrease in the liver paranchymal echo and increase in the gallbladder wall thickness has been shown in acute viral hepatitis. The present study was done to determine sonographic changes in acute viral hepatitis. We performed liver and bile ducts sonography and specific tests on 42 patients (mean age: 31.5 and 61% male with acute viral hepatitis. Gallbladder wall thickness was seen in 45.2% and hepatomegaly in 33.3% of patients and liver paranchymal echo was decreased in 19.3%. Age, sex, type of hepatitis, cholecystitis like symptoms, aspartate aminotransfrase, alanine aminotransfrase, alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin did not significantly corralate with these changes. Only raised prothrombin time was strongly correlated to the thickening of the gallbladder and decrease in the liver paranchymal echo and cholesistic like symptoms we can postulate that thickening of the gallbladder and decrease in the liver paranchymal echo is not dependent on the severity and speed of the paranchymal necrosis (as considered with ALT and AST but they depend on the liver function disturbance (as considered with PT because the thickening of the gall bladder is present in 45% of the patients and 10% of the normal population have gallbladder stones, one should not perform the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, only on the basis of sonographic report without attention to the clinical and laboratory data.

  2. Respiratory viral infection predisposing for bacterial disease : a concise review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hament, JM; Kimpen, JLL; Fleer, A; Wolfs, TFW

    1999-01-01

    Although bacterial superinfection in viral respiratory disease is a clinically well documented phenomenon, the pathogenic mechanisms are still poorly understood. Recent studies have revealed some of the mechanisms involved. Physical damage to respiratory cells as a result of viral infection may lead

  3. Sustained CD8+ T-cell responses induced after acute parvovirus B19 infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norbeck, Oscar; Isa, Adiba; Pöhlmann, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Murine models have suggested that CD8+ T-cell responses peak early in acute viral infections and are not sustained, but no evidence for humans has been available. To address this, we longitudinally analyzed the CD8+ T-cell response to human parvovirus B19 in acutely infected individuals. We...... observed striking CD8+ T-cell responses, which were sustained or even increased over many months after the resolution of acute disease, indicating that CD8+ T cells may play a prominent role in the control of parvovirus B19 and other acute viral infections of humans, including potentially those generated...

  4. Prostaglandin E2 As a Modulator of Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Willem J.; O'Neill, Hester G.; Pohl, Carolina H.

    2017-01-01

    Viral infections are a major cause of infectious diseases worldwide. Inflammation and the immune system are the major host defenses against these viral infection. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an eicosanoid generated by cyclooxygenases, has been shown to modulate inflammation and the immune system by regulating the expression/concentration of cytokines. The effect of PGE2 on viral infection and replication is cell type- and virus-family-dependent. The host immune system can be modulated by PGE2, with regards to immunosuppression, inhibition of nitrogen oxide (NO) production, inhibition of interferon (IFN) and apoptotic pathways, and inhibition of viral receptor expression. Furthermore, PGE2 can play a role in viral infection directly by increasing the production and release of virions, inhibiting viral binding and replication, and/or stimulating viral gene expression. PGE2 may also have a regulatory role in the induction of autoimmunity and in signaling via Toll-like receptors. In this review the known effects of PGE2 on the pathogenesis of various infections caused by herpes simplex virus, rotavirus, influenza A virus and human immunodeficiency virus as well the therapeutic potential of PGE2 are discussed. PMID:28261111

  5. Type-I Interferon responses: From Friend to Foe in the Battle against Chronic Viral Infection

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    Armstrong Murira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFN-I have long been heralded as key contributors to effective antiviral responses. More widely understood in the context of acute viral infection, the role of this pleiotropic cytokine has been characterized as triggering antiviral states in cells and potentiating adaptive immune responses. Upon induction in the innate immune response, IFN-I triggers the expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs, which upregulate the effector function of immune cells (e.g., dendritic cells, B cells and T cells towards successful resolution of infections. However, emerging lines of evidence reveal that viral persistence in the course of chronic infections could be driven by deleterious immunomodulatory effects upon sustained IFN-I expression. In this setting, elevation of IFN-I and ISGs is directly correlated to viral persistence and elevated viral loads. It is important to note that the correlation among IFN-I expression, ISGs and viral persistence may be a cause or effect of chronic infection and this is an important distinction to make towards establishing the dichotomous nature of IFN-I responses. The aim of this mini-review is to (i summarize the interaction between IFN-I and downstream effector responses and therefore (ii delineate the function of this cytokine on positive and negative immunoregulation in chronic infection. This is a significant consideration given the current therapeutic administration of IFN-I in chronic viral infections whose therapeutic significance is projected to continue despite emergence of increasingly efficacious antiviral regimens. Furthermore, elucidation of the interplay between virus and the antiviral response in the context of IFN-I will elucidate avenues towards more effective therapeutic and prophylactic measures against chronic viral infections.

  6. Immunological aspects in viral hepatitis B and C infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Irena; Manea, Cristian Nicolae; Miron, Nicolae; Cristea, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, viral hepatitis chronic infections are a serious health problem and a very interesting topic for both clinicians and researchers. Viral hepatitis has a variety of clinical forms: mild, inactive or severe and with a slow evolution, whose architectural structure of the hepatic tissue evolves towards cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Sometimes, the virally induced hepatic injury evolves spectacularly and rapidly leads to exitus. The factors that generate this evolution pattern depend on the immune response of the host and equally on the viral survival and immune surveillance avoidance strategies. This paper aims to resume new discoveries in the field of immunology of the B and C viral hepatitis infection, from the perspective of the complex interactions between virus and host.

  7. A case of acute viral hepatitis interfering with acute fatty liver disease of pregnancy

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    Abdulkadir Turgut

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute hepatitis A is a rarely seen infection during pregnancy.In terms of clinical and laboratory findings, it can beinterfere with acute fatty liver disease which can be quitemortal during pregnancy. Since liver function tests are elevatedin both conditions, hepatitis A infection should alsobe kept in mind in differential diagnosis. We present a 30year-old pregnant woman with 35 weeks of gestation whopresented to our clinic with a suspection of acute fattyliver disease but finally diagnosed as acute hepatitis A infection.J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (1: 123-125Key words: Hepatitis A, pregnancy, acute fatty liver disease

  8. The Ins and Outs of Viral Infection: Keystone Meeting Review

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    Sara W. Bird

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Newly observed mechanisms for viral entry, assembly, and exit are challenging our current understanding of the replication cycle of different viruses. To address and better understand these mechanisms, a Keystone Symposium was organized in the snowy mountains of Colorado (“The Ins and Outs of Viral Infection: Entry, Assembly, Exit, and Spread”; 30 March–4 April 2014, Beaver Run Resort, Breckenridge, Colorado, organized by Karla Kirkegaard, Mavis Agbandje-McKenna, and Eric O. Freed. The meeting served to bring together cell biologists, structural biologists, geneticists, and scientists expert in viral pathogenesis to discuss emerging mechanisms of viral ins and outs. The conference was organized around different phases of the viral replication cycle, including cell entry, viral assembly and post-assembly maturation, virus structure, cell exit, and virus spread. This review aims to highlight important topics and themes that emerged during the conference.

  9. The role of viral agents in aetiopathogenesis of acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgunturk, Rana; Okur, Ilyas; Cirak, Meltem Y; Oguz, Ayse Deniz; Akalin, Nursel; Turet, Sevgi; Tunaoglu, Sedef

    2011-01-01

    The reason why abnormal immune response exists in acute rheumatic fever is not exactly explained. The influence of co-pathogens like certain viruses were mentioned regarding the initiation of the immunological reaction in acute rheumatic fever patients by several authors since 1970. This study was designed to find the role or effect of some viral infections in the development of rheumatic fever. In this study, 47 cases with acute rheumatic fever (acute rheumatic arthritis, acute rheumatic carditis, and chorea), 20 cases with chronic rheumatic fever, 20 cases with streptococcal pharyngitis, and 20 healthy age- and gender-matched control cases were involved. Serological and molecular tests were made including hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, rubella virus, herpes simplex virus (HSV group 1), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). HBsAg, rubella IgM and EBV IgM positivity were not seen in any of patients with rheumatic fever. Although antiHBs seropositivity was higher in the control group, it was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). There was no difference in rubella IgG, HSV IgM seropositivity, either (p > 0.05). EBV DNA was searched by the polymerase chain reaction technique; due to the latent nature of the virus, no significant difference was found between the control group and the other groups (p > 0.05). In this study, no positive correlation could be found to support the synergism theories regarding the streptoccocus infection and viral infections in the development of acute rheumatic fever. Only EBV DNA positivity was found in all acute rheumatic fever cases but not in the control group may lead to further studies with larger series of patients.

  10. Evaluation of the results of acute viral gastroenteritis data in Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency, Virology Reference and Research Laboratory in 2009

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    Nurhan ALBAYRAK

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Norovirus, Rotavirus, Adenovirus and Astrovirus are responsible for most non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis. The incidence of these viral agents in Turkey is not well known. In this study, it was aimed to document the viral etiology of the stool samples which were send to Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency (RSNPHA, Virology Reference and Research Laboratory for investigation of viral acute gastroenteritis agents. Method: A total of 147 stool samples from 11 different provinces were send to the Virology Laboratory for Reference and Research of RSNPHA in 2009. Samples were collected from patients admitted because of acute gastroenteritis and from the cases with the signs of illness at different times of the year and sent by the Provincial Health Directorates to our laboratory. The samples were examined in the laboratory using the commercial multiplex real-time PCR kit for norovirus genotype I, norovirus genotype II, rotavirus, adenovirus and astrovirus. Results: 65 (44.2 % samples were found to be positive at least for one viral agent and 10 (6.8 % samples for more than one viral agent. Norovirus (particularly genotype II infections were detected as the most prevalent viral agent in acute gastroenteritis patients in this period. Rotavirus infections were determined as the second most common infection after norovirus infections. Adenovirus infections have been found to be the least prevalent agent in the laboratory. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that norovirus genotype II has been more commonly responsible for acute diarrhea than the other viral pathogens. The viral agents we have studied should be considered as pathogens that can be seen in all seasons. Viral factors should not be underestimated as the cause of acute gastroenteritis; additionally it should be noted that acute gastroenteritis could be caused by coinfection of viral agents.

  11. Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putkuri, Niina; Kantele, Anu; Levanov, Lev; Kivistö, Ilkka; Brummer-Korvenkontio, Markus; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-05-01

    Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001-2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (<16 years of age) with INKV infection were hospitalized; adults were outpatients with mild disease, except for 1 who was hospitalized with CHATV infection. Symptoms included fever, influenza-like illness, nausea or vomiting, disorientation, nuchal rigidity, headache, drowsiness, and seizures. Although many INKV and CHATV infections appear to be subclinical, these viruses can cause more severe disease, especially in children.

  12. Epidemiological features of acute lower respiratory tract viral infections in children%儿童急性下呼吸道病毒感染的临床流行特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张冰; 王晓; 张微; 陈旭央

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the epidemiological features of acute lower respiratory tract viral infections in chil-dren.MethodsA retrospective epidemiological investigation was conducted to analyze the prevalence rate, seasonality andsusceptible population of seven common respiratory viruses among 4355 hospitalized pediatric patients (<15 y) with acute respiratory tract infection during 2006 to 2010. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were screened for virus by direct immunofluorescent (DIF) assay.ResultsVirus was identified in 1093 out of 4355 patients (25.1%); RSV accounted for 17.6%, followed by PIV-3 (2.7%),ADV( 2%), IV-A( 1.3%), PIV-1 (0.7%), PIV-2(0.3%), IV-B(0.2% )and mixed( 0.3%). The median ages of infected pediatric patients were 4 months for RSV, 9 months for PIV-3, 13 months for ADV, 11 months for PIV-1 and 13.5 months for IV, respectively ( X2= 46.186, P<0.01 ).The infants and younger children were more susceptible for developing RSV and PIV-3 related disease, and RSV often occurred in winter and spring. The prevalence of viral infection in children with bronchiolitis,bronchitis,pneumonia and asthma were 64.5%, 15.6%, 17.6% and 31.7%, respectively.ConclusionThe respiratory viruses are still a main cause oflower respiratory tract infections in children, especially in infants and younger children. RSV remains the main pathogen of bronchiolitis.%目的 了解小儿急性病毒性下呼吸道感染的流行特征.方法 回顾性分析2006 至2010 年住院的急性下呼吸道感染儿童鼻咽吸取物4种7型常见呼吸道病毒的检出情况以及季节和年龄分布特点.直接免疫荧光法检测病毒.结果 4 355例患儿中有1 093例病毒检测阳性,总阳性率25.1%,其中呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)阳性率17.6%,副流感病毒(PIV)-3 为2.7%,腺病毒(ADV)为2.0%,流感病毒(IV)-A1.3%,PIV-1 为0.7%,PIV-2 为0.3%,IV-B 为0.2%,混合感染0.3%.病毒感染患儿年龄中位数RSV 为4个月,PIV-3 为9个月,ADV 为13 个月,PIV-1 为11 个月,IV 为13.5 个

  13. Comparison of viral Env proteins from acute and chronic infections with subtype C human immunodeficiency virus type 1 identifies differences in glycosylation and CCR5 utilization and suggests a new strategy for immunogen design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Li-Hua; Joseph, Sarah B; Anderson, Jeffrey A; Abrahams, Melissa-Rose; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F; Kincer, Laura P; Treurnicht, Florette K; Arney, Leslie; Ojeda, Suany; Zhang, Ming; Keys, Jessica; Potter, E Lake; Chu, Haitao; Moore, Penny; Salazar, Maria G; Iyer, Shilpa; Jabara, Cassandra; Kirchherr, Jennifer; Mapanje, Clement; Ngandu, Nobubelo; Seoighe, Cathal; Hoffman, Irving; Gao, Feng; Tang, Yuyang; Labranche, Celia; Lee, Benhur; Saville, Andrew; Vermeulen, Marion; Fiscus, Susan; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim Abdool; Haynes, Barton F; Shaw, George M; Korber, Bette T; Hahn, Beatrice H; Cohen, Myron S; Montefiori, David; Williamson, Carolyn; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2013-07-01

    Understanding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission is central to developing effective prevention strategies, including a vaccine. We compared phenotypic and genetic variation in HIV-1 env genes from subjects in acute/early infection and subjects with chronic infections in the context of subtype C heterosexual transmission. We found that the transmitted viruses all used CCR5 and required high levels of CD4 to infect target cells, suggesting selection for replication in T cells and not macrophages after transmission. In addition, the transmitted viruses were more likely to use a maraviroc-sensitive conformation of CCR5, perhaps identifying a feature of the target T cell. We confirmed an earlier observation that the transmitted viruses were, on average, modestly underglycosylated relative to the viruses from chronically infected subjects. This difference was most pronounced in comparing the viruses in acutely infected men to those in chronically infected women. These features of the transmitted virus point to selective pressures during the transmission event. We did not observe a consistent difference either in heterologous neutralization sensitivity or in sensitivity to soluble CD4 between the two groups, suggesting similar conformations between viruses from acute and chronic infection. However, the presence or absence of glycosylation sites had differential effects on neutralization sensitivity for different antibodies. We suggest that the occasional absence of glycosylation sites encoded in the conserved regions of env, further reduced in transmitted viruses, could expose specific surface structures on the protein as antibody targets.

  14. Pericardial Tamponade in an Adult Suffering from Acute Mumps Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Kahlfuss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a case of a 51-year-old man with acute pericardial tamponade requiring emergency pericardiocentesis after he suffered from sore throat, headache, malaise, and sweats for two weeks. Serological analyses revealed increased mumps IgM and IgG indicating an acute mumps infection whereas other bacterial and viral infections were excluded. In addition, MRI revealed atypical swelling of the left submandibular gland. Whereas mumps has become a rare entity in children due to comprehensive vaccination regimens in western civilizations, our case highlights mumps as an important differential diagnosis also in adults, where the virus can induce life-threatening complications such as pericardial tamponade.

  15. Pericardial Tamponade in an Adult Suffering from Acute Mumps Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flieger, Robert Rainer; Mankertz, Annette; Yilmaz, Kadir; Roepke, Torsten Kai

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a case of a 51-year-old man with acute pericardial tamponade requiring emergency pericardiocentesis after he suffered from sore throat, headache, malaise, and sweats for two weeks. Serological analyses revealed increased mumps IgM and IgG indicating an acute mumps infection whereas other bacterial and viral infections were excluded. In addition, MRI revealed atypical swelling of the left submandibular gland. Whereas mumps has become a rare entity in children due to comprehensive vaccination regimens in western civilizations, our case highlights mumps as an important differential diagnosis also in adults, where the virus can induce life-threatening complications such as pericardial tamponade.

  16. Viral exploitation of actin:force-generation and scaffolding functions in viral infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Spear; Yuntao Wu

    2014-01-01

    As a fundamental component of the host cellular cytoskeleton, actin is routinely engaged by infecting viruses. Furthermore, viruses from diverse groups, and infecting diverse hosts, have convergently evolved an array of mechanisms for manipulating the actin cytoskeleton for efifcacious infection. An ongoing chorus of research now indicates that the actin cytoskeleton is critical for viral replication at many stages of the viral life cycle, including binding, entry, nuclear localization, genomic transcription and reverse transcription, assembly, and egress/dissemination. Speciifcally, viruses subvert the force-generating and macromolecular scaffolding properties of the actin cytoskeleton to propel viral surifng, internalization, and migration within the cell. Additionally, viruses utilize the actin cytoskeleton to support and organize assembly sites, and eject budding virions for cell-to-cell transmission. It is the purpose of this review to provide an overview of current research, focusing on the various mechanisms and themes of virus-mediated actin modulation described therein.

  17. RNAi, a new therapeutic strategy against viral infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fischer L. TAN; James Q. YIN

    2004-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an adaptive defense mechanism triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). It is a powerful reverse genetic tool that has been widely employed to silence gene expression in mammalian and human cells.RNAi-based gene therapies, especially in viral diseases have become more and more interesting and promising. Recently,small interfering RNA (siRNA) can be used to protect host from viral infection, inhibit the expression of viral antigen and accessory genes, control the transcription and replication of viral genome, hinder the assembly of viral particles, and display influences in virus-host interactions. In this review, we attempt to present recent progresses of this breakthrough technology in the above fields and summarize the possibilities of siRNA-based drugs.

  18. Cytokine responses in acute and persistent human parvovirus B19 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, A; Lundqvist, A; Lindblom, A

    2007-01-01

    at time of the initial peak of B19 viral load in a few patients during acute infection. This pattern was seen in the absence of an interferon (IFN)-gamma response. During follow-up (20-130 weeks post-acute infection) some of these patients had a sustained Th1 cytokine response. The Th1 cytokine response...... correlated with the previously identified sustained CD8+ T cell response and viraemia. A cross-sectional study on patients with persistent B19 infection showed no apparent imbalance of their cytokine pattern, except for an elevated level of IFN-gamma response. No general immunodeficiency was diagnosed...... as an explanation for the viral persistence in this later group. Neither the acutely infected nor the persistently infected patients demonstrated a Th2 cytokine response. In conclusion, the acutely infected patients demonstrated a sustained Th1 cytokine response whereas the persistently infected patients did...

  19. Viral infection, atopy and mycosis fungoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales, Maria; Olsen, Jørn; Johansen, P.;

    2003-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a rare disease with an unknown aetiology, although it has been suggested that infections may play a role. The present study investigates whether infections, atopic disorders and some other diseases are risk indicators for MF. A European multicentre case–control study...

  20. Global mRNA degradation during lytic gammaherpesvirus infection contributes to establishment of viral latency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin M Richner

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available During a lytic gammaherpesvirus infection, host gene expression is severely restricted by the global degradation and altered 3' end processing of mRNA. This host shutoff phenotype is orchestrated by the viral SOX protein, yet its functional significance to the viral lifecycle has not been elucidated, in part due to the multifunctional nature of SOX. Using an unbiased mutagenesis screen of the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 SOX homolog, we isolated a single amino acid point mutant that is selectively defective in host shutoff activity. Incorporation of this mutation into MHV68 yielded a virus with significantly reduced capacity for mRNA turnover. Unexpectedly, the MHV68 mutant showed little defect during the acute replication phase in the mouse lung. Instead, the virus exhibited attenuation at later stages of in vivo infections suggestive of defects in both trafficking and latency establishment. Specifically, mice intranasally infected with the host shutoff mutant accumulated to lower levels at 10 days post infection in the lymph nodes, failed to develop splenomegaly, and exhibited reduced viral DNA levels and a lower frequency of latently infected splenocytes. Decreased latency establishment was also observed upon infection via the intraperitoneal route. These results highlight for the first time the importance of global mRNA degradation during a gammaherpesvirus infection and link an exclusively lytic phenomenon with downstream latency establishment.

  1. NK cell subset redistribution during the course of viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico eLugli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are important effectors of innate immunity that play a critical role in the control of human viral infections. Indeed, given their capability to directly recognize virally infected cells without the need of specific antigen presentation, NK cells are on the first line of defense against these invading pathogens. By establishing cellular networks with a variety of cell types such as dendritic cells, NK cells can also amplify anti-viral adaptive immune responses. In turn, viruses evolved and developed several mechanisms to evade NK cell-mediated immune activity. It has been reported that certain viral diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 as well as cytomegalovirus (CMV infections, are associated with a pathologic redistribution of NK cell subsets in the peripheral blood. In particular, it has been observed the expansion of unconventional CD56neg NK cells, whose effector functions are significantly impaired as compared to that of conventional CD56pos NK cells. In this review, we address the impact of chronic viral infections on the functional and phenotypic perturbations of human NK cell compartment.

  2. The Incubation Period of Primary Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: Viral Dynamics and Immunologic Events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha K Dunmire

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a human herpesvirus that causes acute infectious mononucleosis and is associated with cancer and autoimmune disease. While many studies have been performed examining acute disease in adults following primary infection, little is known about the virological and immunological events during EBV's lengthy 6 week incubation period owing to the challenge of collecting samples from this stage of infection. We conducted a prospective study in college students with special emphasis on frequent screening to capture blood and oral wash samples during the incubation period. Here we describe the viral dissemination and immune response in the 6 weeks prior to onset of acute infectious mononucleosis symptoms. While virus is presumed to be present in the oral cavity from time of transmission, we did not detect viral genomes in the oral wash until one week before symptom onset, at which time viral genomes were present in high copy numbers, suggesting loss of initial viral replication control. In contrast, using a sensitive nested PCR method, we detected viral genomes at low levels in blood about 3 weeks before symptoms. However, high levels of EBV in the blood were only observed close to symptom onset-coincident with or just after increased viral detection in the oral cavity. These data imply that B cells are the major reservoir of virus in the oral cavity prior to infectious mononucleosis. The early presence of viral genomes in the blood, even at low levels, correlated with a striking decrease in the number of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells well before symptom onset, which remained depressed throughout convalescence. On the other hand, natural killer cells expanded only after symptom onset. Likewise, CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells decreased two fold, but only after symptom onset. We observed no substantial virus specific CD8 T cell expansion during the incubation period, although polyclonal CD8 activation was detected in

  3. Viral infections as controlling factors for the deep biosphere? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, B.; Engelhardt, T.; Sahlberg, M.; Cypionka, H.

    2009-12-01

    The marine deep biosphere represents the largest biotope on Earth. Throughout the last years, we have obtained interesting insights into its microbial community composition. However, one component that was completely overlooked so far is the viral inventory of deep-subsurface sediments. While viral infections were identified to have a major impact on the benthic microflora of deep-sea surface sediments (Danavaro et al. 2008), no studies were performed on deep-biosphere samples, so far. As grazers probably play only a minor role in anoxic and highly compressed deep sediments, viruses might be the main “predators” for indigenous microorganisms. Furthermore, the release of cell components, called “the viral shunt”, could have a major impact on the deep biosphere in providing labile organic compounds to non-infected microorganisms in these generally nutrient depleted sediments. However, direct counting of viruses in sediments is highly challenging due to the small size of viruses and the high background of small particles. Even molecular surveys using “universal” PCR primers that target phage-specific genes fail due to the vast phage diversity. One solution for this problem is the lysogenic viral life cycle as many bacteriophages integrate their DNA into the host genome. It is estimated that up to 70% of cultivated bacteria contain prophages within their genome. Therefore, culture collections (Batzke et al. 2007) represent an archive of the viral composition within the respective habitat. These prophages can be induced to become free phage particles in stimulation experiments in which the host cells are set under certain stress situations such as a treatment with UV exposure or DNA-damaging antibiotics. The study of the viral component within the deep biosphere offers to answer the following questions: To which extent are deep-biosphere populations controlled by viral infections? What is the inter- and intra-specific diversity and the host-specific viral

  4. Transfusions of blood and blood products and viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Wróblewska

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Transfusions of blood and blood products are commonly used in medicine, but being biological materials they carry a risk of transmitting infections--viral, bacterial, parasitic, as well as prions. Laboratory tests used for screening of donated blood for viral infections at present cannot detect all infectious units. Criteria for selection of blood donors therefore must be very strict, while methods of inactivation of viruses and laboratory assays for detection of their presence must be improved. Indications for blood transfusion should be restricted.

  5. Viral immunity. Transkingdom control of viral infection and immunity in the mammalian intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Julie K; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-01-15

    Viruses that infect the intestine include major human pathogens (retroviruses, noroviruses, rotaviruses, astroviruses, picornaviruses, adenoviruses, herpesviruses) that constitute a serious public health problem worldwide. These viral pathogens are members of a large, complex viral community inhabiting the intestine termed "the enteric virome." Enteric viruses have intimate functional and genetic relationships with both the host and other microbial constituents that inhabit the intestine, such as the bacterial microbiota, their associated phages, helminthes, and fungi, which together constitute the microbiome. Emerging data indicate that enteric viruses regulate, and are in turn regulated by, these other microbes through a series of processes termed "transkingdom interactions." This represents a changing paradigm in intestinal immunity to viral infection. Here we review recent advances in the field and propose new ways in which to conceptualize this important area.

  6. Airway microbiota and acute respiratory infection in children

    OpenAIRE

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI), such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia, is the leading cause of hospitalization for U.S. infants. While the incidence and severity of ARI can vary widely among children, the reasons for these differences are not fully explained by traditional risk factors (e.g., prematurity, viral pathogens). The recent advent of molecular diagnostic techniques has revealed the presence of highly functional communities of microbes inhabiting the human body (i.e., microbiota) th...

  7. Bovine viral diarrhea virus infections: manifestations of infection and recent advances in understanding pathogenesis and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, B W

    2014-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) continues to be of economic significance to the livestock industry in terms of acute disease and fetal loss. Many of the lesions relating to BVDV infection have been well described previously. The virus is perpetuated in herds through the presence of calves that are persistently infected. Relationships between various species and biotypes of BVDV and host defenses are increasingly understood. Understanding of the host defense mechanisms of innate immunity and adaptive immunity continues to improve, and the effects of the virus on these immune mechanisms are being used to explain how persistent infection develops. The noncytopathic biotype of BVDV plays the major role in its effects on the host defenses by inhibiting various aspects of the innate immune system and creation of immunotolerance in the fetus during early gestation. Recent advances have allowed for development of affordable test strategies to identify and remove persistently infected animals. With these improved tests and removal strategies, the livestock industry can begin more widespread effective control programs.

  8. Liver lesions in hepatitis B viral infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Desmet, V J

    1988-01-01

    A review is made of the various histological lesions observed in hepatitis B virus-related liver diseases, including different forms of acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The elementary lesions discussed include acidophil necrosis (apoptosis), confluent lytic necrosis in its different patterns, piecemeal necrosis, focal necrosis, and dysplastic hepatocytes. Their pathogenesis is explained in the framework of recent developments in the immunopathology of hepa...

  9. Current treatment for acute viral bronchiolitis in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2003-08-01

    This paper provides an update and critical review of available data on the treatment of acute viral bronchiolitis in previously healthy infants, with special focus on new or promising therapies. The main potential benefits of medical assistance in these patients reside in the careful monitoring of their clinical status, the maintenance of adequate hydration and oxygenation, the preservation of the airway opened and cleared of secretions and the option to perform parental education. There is no convincing evidence that any other form of therapy will reliably provide beneficial effects in infants with bronchiolitis and currently, any treatment beyond supportive care should be prescribed on a case-by-case basis with watchful appraisal of its effects. Therapies such as ribavirin, IFN, vitamin A, antibiotics, mist therapy or anticholinergics, have not demonstrated any measurable clinical effect. Several studies and meta-analyses with beta(2)-agonists and corticosteroids have failed to show any benefit of significant extent, however, physicians keep favouring their use. Presently, adrenaline has received rather consistent support from clinical trials but it is not yet widely prescribed. There are other therapeutic strategies, for instance, heliox, hypertonic saline, noninvasive ventilation, physical therapy techniques, thickened feeds or palivizumab that have shown promising potential benefits, but evidence supporting its use is still limited and further studies should be warranted. In the meantime, infants with acute viral bronchiolitis should be treated following evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, keeping the patient central in the process and being sensitive to social, cultural and familiar influences on their treatment strategy.

  10. Current approaches on viral infection: proteomics and functional validations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie eZheng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Viruses could manipulate cellular machinery to ensure their continuous survival and thus become parasites of living organisms. Delineation of sophisticated host responses upon virus infection is a challenging task. It lies in identifying the repertoire of host factors actively involved in the viral infectious cycle and characterizing host responses qualitatively and quantitatively during viral pathogenesis. Mass spectrometry based proteomics could be used to efficiently study pathogen-host interactions and virus-hijacked cellular signaling pathways. Moreover, direct host and viral responses upon infection could be further investigated by activity based functional validation studies. These approaches involve drug inhibition of secretory pathway, immunofluorescence staining, dominant negative mutation of protein target, real time PCR, small interfering siRNA-mediated knockdown, and molecular cloning studies. In this way, functional validation could gain novel insights into the high-content proteomic dataset in an unbiased and comprehensive way.

  11. Environmental modulation of mucosal immunity : Opportunities in respiratory viral infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijf, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The exact cause of severe disease in children during primary RSV infections is not completely clear. There is a link with viral load, but differences virus strains do not seem to be the major reason why in some children the disease manifests as a mild cold while others suffer from a severe lower res

  12. Quantum virology : improved management of viral infections through quantitative measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalpoe, Jaijant Satishkumar

    2007-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of PCR has strongly supported the increased diagnostic use of nucleic acid detection assays in clinical virology. Particularly the improvements in the ability to quantify target nucleic acid sequences offer new opportunities in the management of viral infections. Real-time PCR

  13. Patterns of viral infection in honey bee queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew; Kryger, Per; Nielsen, Steen Lykke

    2013-01-01

    The well-being of a colony and replenishment of the workers depends on a healthy queen. Diseases in queens are seldom reported, and our knowledge on viral infection in queens is limited. In this study, 86 honey bee queens were collected from beekeepers in Denmark. All queens were tested separatel...

  14. Epidemiological aspects of acute viral hepatitis in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. da Silva

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available As few reports on the prevalence of each type of viral hepatitis have been published in our country, we studied 154 patients with acute viral hepatitis consecutively seen at the Liver Unit from November 1980 to November 1984. The frequency of hepatitis A, B and non-A, non-B was 52.6%, 27.3% and 20.1% respectively. Greater frequency in young people, previous contact with infected patients and ingestion of suspected foods were the predominant epidemiological features in the hepatitis A group. Hepatitis B was characterized by the parenteral, non-transfusional exposure, previous contact and a high occurence in health-care workers. A history of blood transfusion was a significant finding in the hepatitis non-A, non-B group. Finally, the routes of transmission were unknown in 30-40% of the three groups of patients.

  15. ISG15 regulates peritoneal macrophages functionality against viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Yángüez

    Full Text Available Upon viral infection, the production of type I interferon (IFN and the subsequent upregulation of IFN stimulated genes (ISGs generate an antiviral state with an important role in the activation of innate and adaptive host immune responses. The ubiquitin-like protein (UBL ISG15 is a critical IFN-induced antiviral molecule that protects against several viral infections, but the mechanism by which ISG15 exerts its antiviral function is not completely understood. Here, we report that ISG15 plays an important role in the regulation of macrophage responses. ISG15-/- macrophages display reduced activation, phagocytic capacity and programmed cell death activation in response to vaccinia virus (VACV infection. Moreover, peritoneal macrophages from mice lacking ISG15 are neither able to phagocyte infected cells nor to block viral infection in co-culture experiments with VACV-infected murine embryonic fibroblast (MEFs. This phenotype is independent of cytokine production and secretion, but clearly correlates with impaired activation of the protein kinase AKT in ISG15 knock-out (KO macrophages. Altogether, these results indicate an essential role of ISG15 in the cellular immune antiviral response and point out that a better understanding of the antiviral responses triggered by ISG15 may lead to the development of therapies against important human pathogens.

  16. Viral infection of human lung macrophages increases PDL1 expression via IFNβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl J Staples

    Full Text Available Lung macrophages are an important defence against respiratory viral infection and recent work has demonstrated that influenza-induced macrophage PDL1 expression in the murine lung leads to rapid modulation of CD8+ T cell responses via the PD1 receptor. This PD1/PDL1 pathway may downregulate acute inflammatory responses to prevent tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of PDL1 regulation by human macrophages in response to viral infection. Ex-vivo viral infection models using influenza and RSV were established in human lung explants, isolated lung macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and analysed by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Incubation of lung explants, lung macrophages and MDM with X31 resulted in mean cellular infection rates of 18%, 18% and 29% respectively. Viral infection significantly increased cell surface expression of PDL1 on explant macrophages, lung macrophages and MDM but not explant epithelial cells. Infected MDM induced IFNγ release from autologous CD8+ T cells, an effect enhanced by PDL1 blockade. We observed increases in PDL1 mRNA and IFNβ mRNA and protein release by MDM in response to influenza infection. Knockdown of IFNβ by siRNA, resulted in a 37.5% reduction in IFNβ gene expression in response to infection, and a significant decrease in PDL1 mRNA. Furthermore, when MDM were incubated with IFNβ, this cytokine caused increased expression of PDL1 mRNA. These data indicate that human macrophage PDL1 expression modulates CD8+ cell IFNγ release in response to virus and that this expression is regulated by autologous IFNβ production.

  17. Innate immune responses of salmonid fish to viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Bertrand

    2014-04-01

    Viruses are the most serious pathogenic threat to the production of the main aquacultured salmonid species the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and the Atlantic salmon Salmo salar. The viral diseases Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis (IPN), Pancreatic Disease (PD), Infectious Haemorrhagic Necrosis (IHN), Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (VHS), and Infectious Salmon Anaemia (ISA) cause massive economic losses to the global salmonid aquaculture industry every year. To date, no solution exists to treat livestock affected by a viral disease and only a small number of efficient vaccines are available to prevent infection. As a consequence, understanding the host immune response against viruses in these fish species is critical to develop prophylactic and preventive control measures. The innate immune response represents an important part of the host defence mechanism preventing viral replication after infection. It is a fast acting response designed to inhibit virus propagation immediately within the host, allowing for the adaptive specific immunity to develop. It has cellular and humoral components which act in synergy. This review will cover inflammation responses, the cell types involved, apoptosis, antimicrobial peptides. Particular attention will be given to the type I interferon system as the major player in the innate antiviral defence mechanism of salmonids. Viral evasion strategies will also be discussed.

  18. High rate of viral identification and coinfections in infants with acute bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Siciliano Nascimento

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the viruses and risk factors associated with hospital and intensive care unit (ICU admissions in infants with acute bronchiolitis. INTRODUCTION: Bronchiolitis is a major cause of morbidity in infants. Widespread use of molecular-based methods has yielded new insights about its etiology, but the impact of viral etiologies on early outcomes is still unclear. METHODS: Seventy-seven infants with bronchiolitis who were under two years of age and visited an emergency unit were included. Using molecular-based methods, samples were tested for 12 different respiratory viruses. Logistic regression models were used to identify clinical and virological variables associated with the main endpoints: hospital admission and ICU admission. RESULTS: We identified at least one virus in 93.5% of patients, and coinfections were found in nearly 40% of patients. RSV was the most common pathogen (63.6%, followed by rhinovirus (39%. Identification of RSV was only associated with an increased risk of hospital admission in the univariate model. Younger age and enterovirus infection were associated with an increased risk of hospital admission, while atopy of a first-degree relative showed a protective effect. Prematurity was associated with an increased risk of admission to the ICU. Coinfections were not associated with worse outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Molecular-based methods resulted in high rates of viral identification but did not change the significant role of RSV in acute bronchiolitis. Younger age and enterovirus infection were risk factors for hospital admission, while prematurity appeared to be a significant risk factor for admission to the ICU in acute viral bronchiolitis.

  19. DETECTION OF AUTOREACTIVE CLASS M ANTIBODIES IN PATIENTS WITH RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Z. Krivitskaya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of this study was to detect some features of autoreactive IgM production that interact with IgGs and normal human cellular antigens in blood sera of patients with acute respiratory viral infections caused by various factors, dependent on their age and clinical features of disease. The antibody concentrations were determined by immunoenzyme technique in paired serum samples from 750 patients and single specimens from 97 healthy persons. The results of analysis have shown that the studied types of autoreactive IgM represent a normal component of humoral immunity, since they are detectable in sufficient number of normal sera from healthy persons over 3 years old. In acute respiratory viral infections of different etiology, the rates of appropriate seroconversions comprised 0 to 16% for age cohort of < 3 years old. Incidence of seroconversions reached 37% among older children and adult patients with respiratory syncitial virus (RSV, or adenoviral infection, thus being 1.7 to 5.1-fold higher than in patients with influenza A, or B, or parainfluenza. In cases of clinical complications of RSV or parainfluenza infections (i.e., respiratory tract obstruction, or pneumonia, the rates of seroconversions to autoreactive IgMs was 1.4 to1.8-fold higher than among the patients with uncomplicated clinical course of these infections. (Med. Immunol., 2008, vol. 10, N 2-3, pp 229-238.

  20. Acute focal infections of dental origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsen, Ingar; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the most important pus-producing acute oral infections (dental infections) that can spread extra-orally. Most of these infections are spread by bacteria entering the bloodstream. However, dental infections have a number of other pathways for dissemination. By forming abscesses

  1. Early infection and prognosis after acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Reith, J;

    2001-01-01

    Infection is a frequent complication in the early course of acute stroke and may adversely affect stroke outcome. In the present study, we investigate early infection developing in patients within 3 days of admission to the hospital and its independent relation to recovery and stroke outcome....... In addition, we identify predictors for early infections, infection subtypes, and their relation to initial stroke severity....

  2. Mechanism of action and application of virocids in health care-associated viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Shahbaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are important causes of acute and chronic diseases in humans. Newer viruses are still being discovered. Apart from frequently causing infections in the general community, many types of viruses are significant nosocomial pathogens that with emerging viruses has become a real issue in medical field. There are specific treatments, vaccine and physical barrier to fight some of these infections. Health care-associated viral infections are an important source of patient’s morbidity and mortality. The method of sterilization or disinfection depends on the intended use of the medical devices (comprising critical, semicritical and noncritical items and failure to perform proper sterilization or disinfection of these items may leads to introduction of viruses, resulting in infection. Disinfection is an essential way in reducing or disruption of transmission of viruses by environmental surfaces, instruments and hands which achieves by chemical disinfectants and antiseptics, respectively. This review discusses about chemical agents with virocids properties (e.g. alcohols, chlorine compounds, formaldehyde, phenolic compounds, glutaraldehyde, ortho-phthaldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, iodophor, ammonium compounds quaternary, bigunides and so on., mechanisms of action and their applications in health care-associated viral infection control. As well as, we described an overview for hierarchy of viruses in challenge with disinfantans, effective agents on viral inactivation, i.e.targect viruses, viral stability or survival duration time in enviromental surfaces and hands. We explained disinfection of surfaces, challenges in emerging viral pathogens inactivation, viral resistance to chemical disinfectants and antiseptics. Because, there are laboratory studies and clinical evidences for some viruses which viral resistance to biocide or failure to perform proper disinfection can lead to infection outbreaks. Also, we described virucidal

  3. Viral aetiology and clinico-epidemiological features of acute encephalitis syndrome in eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, S K; Dwibedi, B; Kar, S K; Dixit, S; Sabat, J; Panda, M

    2014-12-01

    This study reports clinico-epidemiological features and viral agents causing acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) in the eastern Indian region through hospital-based case enrolment during April 2011 to July 2012. Blood and CSF samples of 526 AES cases were investigated by serology and/or PCR. Viral aetiology was identified in 91 (17·2%) cases. Herpes simplex virus (HSV; types I or II) was most common (16·1%), followed by measles (2·6%), Japanese encephalitis virus (1·5%), dengue virus (0·57%), varicella zoster virus (0·38%) and enteroviruses (0·19%). Rash, paresis and cranial nerve palsies were significantly higher (P Case-fatality rates were 10·9% and 6·2% in AES cases with and without viral aetiology, respectively. Simultaneous infection of HSV I and measles was observed in seven cases. This report provides the first evidence on viral aetiology of AES viruses from eastern India showing dominance of HSV that will be useful in informing the public health system.

  4. [Liver transplantation in hepatitis B viral infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanizaj, Tajana Filipec; Colić-Cvrlje, Vesna; Mrzljak, Anna; Ostojić, Rajko

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis B infection (HBV) causes liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma that are indications for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The outcome of OLT depends on the prevention of HBV reinfection and disease relapses. Out of 692 liver transplantations performed at Merkur University Hospital, 30 were done for HBV infection. These patients were treated with HBIG post OLT and lamivudine, entecavir, adefovir, tenofovir prior and post OLT. All patients became HBsAg and HBV DNA negative but four of them became HbsAg positive one year post OLT. The patients survived for 2 months to 7 years post OLT. With the introduction of HBIG immunoprophylaxis and new efficient antiviral treatment, the risk of relapse is only < 10%, and survival is the same as in other indications for OLT. Because of the high cost and long-term treatment, efforts have been made to prevent recurrent HBV disease by using the schedules according to pre- and post-transplant HBV viremia and introducing the new potent antiviral analogue nucleos(t)ides.

  5. Antigen-loaded ER microsomes from APC induce potent immune responses against viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofra, Vassiliki; Mansour, Salah; Liu, Mengya; Gao, Bin; Primpidou, Elisavet; Wang, Ping; Li, Suling

    2009-01-01

    Although matured DC are capable of inducing effective primary and secondary immune responses in vivo, it is difficult to control the maturation and antigen loading in vitro. In this study, we show that ER-enriched microsomal membranes (microsomes) isolated from DC contain more peptide-receptive MHC I and II molecules than, and a similar level of costimulatory molecules to, their parental DC. After loading with defined antigenic peptides, the microsomes deliver antigenic peptide-MHC complexes (pMHC) to both CD4 and CD8 T cells effectively in vivo. The peptide-loaded microsomes accumulate in peripheral lymphoid organs and induce stronger immune responses than peptide-pulsed DC. The microsomal vaccines protect against acute viral infection. Our data demonstrate that peptide-MHC complexes armed microsomes from DC can be an important alternative to DC-based vaccines for protection from viral infection.

  6. Exosome Biogenesis, Regulation, and Function in Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenquer, Marta; Amorim, Maria João

    2015-09-17

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies(MVBs) with the cellular plasma membrane. They originate as intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) during the process of MVB formation. Exosomes were shown to contain selectively sorted functional proteins, lipids, and RNAs, mediating cell-to-cell communications and hence playing a role in the physiology of the healthy and diseased organism. Challenges in the field include the identification of mechanisms sustaining packaging of membrane-bound and soluble material to these vesicles and the understanding of the underlying processes directing MVBs for degradation or fusion with the plasma membrane. The investigation into the formation and roles of exosomes in viral infection is in its early years. Although still controversial, exosomes can, in principle, incorporate any functional factor, provided they have an appropriate sorting signal, and thus are prone to viral exploitation.This review initially focuses on the composition and biogenesis of exosomes. It then explores the regulatory mechanisms underlying their biogenesis. Exosomes are part of the endocytic system,which is tightly regulated and able to respond to several stimuli that lead to alterations in the composition of its sub-compartments. We discuss the current knowledge of how these changes affect exosomal release. We then summarize how different viruses exploit specific proteins of endocytic sub-compartments and speculate that it could interfere with exosome function, although no direct link between viral usage of the endocytic system and exosome release has yet been reported. Many recent reports have ascribed functions to exosomes released from cells infected with a variety of animal viruses, including viral spread, host immunity, and manipulation of the microenvironment, which are discussed. Given the ever-growing roles and importance of exosomes in viral infections, understanding what regulates their composition and levels, and

  7. Acute viral bronchiolitis and its sequelae in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Gilberto Bueno; Teper, Alejandro; Colom, Alejandro J

    2002-12-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis (AVB) is a common disease found throughout the world. Various aspects of it are being studied: its epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. Most of these studies are being conducted in developed countries, with only a few taking place in developing countries. Risk factors such as poor nutrition, an adverse environment and early weaning should be studied where these features are common. Treatment aspects such as cost-effectiveness in low income settings need further study. Use of ribavirin and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-immunoglobulin are good examples. Post-bronchiolitic sequelae also need to be studied in low income countries. There is evidence that bronchiolitis obliterans is unusually frequent in some Latin-American countries such as Argentina and Brazil. It will be helpful to undertake combined studies in countries with the same socio-economics, investigating the preventive and management aspects of AVB and its sequelae to reduce the morbidity and mortality.

  8. Acute viral bronchiolitis in South Africa: Strategies for management and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zar, H J; Madhi, S A; White, D A; Masekela, R; Risenga, S; Lewis, H; Feldman, C; Morrow, B; Jeena, P

    2016-04-01

    Management of acute viral bronchiolitis is largely supportive. There is currently no proven effective therapy other than oxygen for hypoxic children. The evidence indicates that there is no routine benefit from inhaled, rapid short-acting bronchodilators, adrenaline or ipratropium bromide for children with acute viral bronchiolitis. Likewise, there is no demonstrated benefit from routine use of inhaled or oral corticosteroids, inhaled hypertonic saline nebulisation, montelukast or antibiotics. The last should be reserved for children with severe disease, when bacterial co-infection is suspected. Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease remains a challenge. A specific RSV monoclonal antibody, palivizumab, administered as an intramuscular injection, is available for children at risk of severe bronchiolitis, including premature infants, young children with chronic lung disease, immunodeficiency, or haemodynamically significant congenital heart disease. Prophylaxis should be commenced at the start of the RSV season and given monthly during the season. The development of an RSV vaccine may offer a more effective alternative to prevent disease, for which the results of clinical trials are awaited. Education of parents or caregivers and healthcare workers about diagnostic and management strategies should include the following: bronchiolitis is caused by a virus; it is seasonal; it may start as an upper respiratory tract infection with low-grade fever; symptoms are cough and wheeze, often with fast breathing; antibiotics are generally not needed; and the condition is usually self limiting, although symptoms may occur for up to four weeks in some children.

  9. Antiviral defense in shrimp: from innate immunity to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Huang, Tianzhi; Zhang, Xiaobo; He, Jian-Guo

    2014-08-01

    The culture of penaeid shrimp is rapidly developing as a major business endeavor worldwide. However, viral diseases have caused huge economic loss in penaeid shrimp culture industries. Knowledge of shrimp innate immunity and antiviral responses has made important progress in recent years, allowing the design of better strategies for the prevention and control of shrimp diseases. In this study, we have updated information on shrimp antiviral immunity and interactions between shrimp hosts and viral pathogens. Current knowledge and recent progress in immune signaling pathways (e.g., Toll/IMD-NF-κB and JAK-STAT signaling pathways), RNAi, phagocytosis, and apoptosis in shrimp antiviral immunity are discussed. The mechanism of viral infection in shrimp hosts and the interactions between viruses and shrimp innate immune systems are also analyzed.

  10. Viral infection drives tissue fibrosis in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea P. Malizia

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF is a refractory and lethal interstitial lung disease characterized by loss of alveolar epithelial cells, fibroblast proliferation and extra-cellular matrix protein deposition. EBV, localised to alveolar epithelial cells of pulmonary fibrosis patients is associated with a poor prognosis. In this study we utilised a microarray-based differential gene expression analysis strategy to identify molecular drivers of EBV associated with lung fibrosis. A549 cells and an alveolar epithelial cell line infected with EBV (VAAK were used to identify genes whose expression was altered by EBV reactivation. EBV reactivation by TGFbeta1 drives alterations in expression of non-canonical Wnt pathway mediators, implicating it in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT, the molecular event underpinning scar production in tissue fibrosis. Cell invasion, EMT correlated transcripts expression, GSK-3b and c-Jun activation were altered in response to non-canonical Wnt pathway regulation. The role of EBV in promoting fibrosis can be attenuated by antiviral strategies and inhibition of Wnt signalling. Activation of non-canonical Wnt signalling pathway by EBV in epithelial cells suggests a novel mechanism of tissue fibrosis. These data present a framework for further description of the link between infectious agents and fibrosis, a significant disease burden.

  11. Drosophila Adaptation to Viral Infection through Defensive Symbiont Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Vitor G.; Magalhães, Sara; Paulo, Tânia F.; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Microbial symbionts can modulate host interactions with biotic and abiotic factors. Such interactions may affect the evolutionary trajectories of both host and symbiont. Wolbachia protects Drosophila melanogaster against several viral infections and the strength of the protection varies between variants of this endosymbiont. Since Wolbachia is maternally transmitted, its fitness depends on the fitness of its host. Therefore, Wolbachia populations may be under selection when Drosophila is subjected to viral infection. Here we show that in D. melanogaster populations selected for increased survival upon infection with Drosophila C virus there is a strong selection coefficient for specific Wolbachia variants, leading to their fixation. Flies carrying these selected Wolbachia variants have higher survival and fertility upon viral infection when compared to flies with the other variants. These findings demonstrate how the interaction of a host with pathogens shapes the genetic composition of symbiont populations. Furthermore, host adaptation can result from the evolution of its symbionts, with host and symbiont functioning as a single evolutionary unit. PMID:27684942

  12. DMPD: Toll-like receptors regulation of viral infection and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18280610 Toll-like receptors regulation of viral infection and disease. Thompson JM...how Toll-like receptors regulation of viral infection and disease. PubmedID 18280610 Title Toll-like recepto...rs regulation of viral infection and disease. Authors Thompson JM, Iwasaki A. Pub

  13. INADEQUATE ANTIBODY-RESPONSE AGAINST RESPIRATORY VIRAL-INFECTION IN LONG-SURVIVING RAT LUNG ALLOGRAFTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WINTER, JB; GROEN, M; VANDERLOGT, K; WILDEVUUR, CRH; PROP, J

    1995-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients suffer from a high number of viral infections. It has been suggested that the defense against viral infections is impaired in lung transplants, Therefore, we investigated in rat lung transplants whether antibody responses against an intrapulmonary viral infection were impa

  14. Exosome Biogenesis, Regulation, and Function in Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Alenquer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are extracellular vesicles released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies(MVBs with the cellular plasma membrane. They originate as intraluminal vesicles (ILVs duringthe process of MVB formation. Exosomes were shown to contain selectively sorted functionalproteins, lipids, and RNAs, mediating cell-to-cell communications and hence playing a role in thephysiology of the healthy and diseased organism. Challenges in the field include the identificationof mechanisms sustaining packaging of membrane-bound and soluble material to these vesicles andthe understanding of the underlying processes directing MVBs for degradation or fusion with theplasma membrane. The investigation into the formation and roles of exosomes in viral infection is inits early years. Although still controversial, exosomes can, in principle, incorporate any functionalfactor, provided they have an appropriate sorting signal, and thus are prone to viral exploitation.This review initially focuses on the composition and biogenesis of exosomes. It then explores theregulatory mechanisms underlying their biogenesis. Exosomes are part of the endocytic system,which is tightly regulated and able to respond to several stimuli that lead to alterations in thecomposition of its sub-compartments. We discuss the current knowledge of how these changesaffect exosomal release. We then summarize how different viruses exploit specific proteins ofendocytic sub-compartments and speculate that it could interfere with exosome function, althoughno direct link between viral usage of the endocytic system and exosome release has yet beenreported. Many recent reports have ascribed functions to exosomes released from cells infectedwith a variety of animal viruses, including viral spread, host immunity, and manipulation of themicroenvironment, which are discussed. Given the ever-growing roles and importance of exosomesin viral infections, understanding what regulates their composition and levels, and

  15. TREM-2 promotes macrophage survival and lung disease after respiratory viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kangyun; Byers, Derek E.; Jin, Xiaohua; Agapov, Eugene; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Patel, Anand C.; Cella, Marina; Gilfilan, Susan; Colonna, Marco; Kober, Daniel L.; Brett, Tom J.

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections and type 2 immune responses are thought to be critical for the development of chronic respiratory disease, but the link between these events needs to be better defined. Here, we study a mouse model in which infection with a mouse parainfluenza virus known as Sendai virus (SeV) leads to long-term activation of innate immune cells that drive IL-13–dependent lung disease. We find that chronic postviral disease (signified by formation of excess airway mucus and accumulation of M2-differentiating lung macrophages) requires macrophage expression of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2). Analysis of mechanism shows that viral replication increases lung macrophage levels of intracellular and cell surface TREM-2, and this action prevents macrophage apoptosis that would otherwise occur during the acute illness (5–12 d after inoculation). However, the largest increases in TREM-2 levels are found as the soluble form (sTREM-2) long after clearance of infection (49 d after inoculation). At this time, IL-13 and the adapter protein DAP12 promote TREM-2 cleavage to sTREM-2 that is unexpectedly active in preventing macrophage apoptosis. The results thereby define an unprecedented mechanism for a feed-forward expansion of lung macrophages (with IL-13 production and consequent M2 differentiation) that further explains how acute infection leads to chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:25897174

  16. Innate immune responses of calves during transient infection with a noncytopathic strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller-Doblies, D.; Arquint, A.; Schaller, P.

    2004-01-01

    with the temporal activation of the alpha/beta interferon-regulated Mx gene in white blood cells (WBC) and skin as well as the upregulation of the acute-phase serum proteins haptoglobin (Hp) and serum amyloid A (SAA). The viral strain used did provoke transient health impairment, namely, fever and leukopenia...... that were associated with viremia, viral shedding with nasal secretions, and antiviral seroconversion. Complete recovery was observed within 3 weeks. Elevated levels of SAA and Hp were apparent from days 4 to 13 and 8 to 11, respectively. In WBC, the levels of Mx mRNA and Mx protein were elevated from days......In this study, six immunocompetent calves were experimentally infected with a noncytopathic strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and the effects of the viral infection on parameters of the innate immune response of the host were analyzed. Clinical and virological data were compared...

  17. Managing the Morbidity Associated with Respiratory Viral Infections in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Geskey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with congenital heart disease (CHD are at risk for increased morbidity from viral lower respiratory tract infections because of anatomical cardiac lesions than can worsen an already compromised respiratory status. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV remains an important pathogen in contributing toward the morbidity in this population. Although the acute treatment of RSV largely remains supportive, the development of monoclonal antibodies, such as palivuzumab, has reduced the RSV-related hospitalization rate in children with CHD. This review highlights the specific cardiac complications of RSV infection, the acute treatment of bronchiolitis in patients with CHD, and the search for new therapies against RSV, including an effective vaccine, because of the high cost associated with immunoprophylaxis and its lack of reducing RSV-related mortality.

  18. HLA-KIR Interactions and Immunity to Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Sabouri Ghannad

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Host genetic factors play a central role in determining the clinical phenotype of human diseases. Association between two polymorphic loci in human genome, human leukocyte antigen (HLA and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, and genetically complex infectious disease, particularly those of viral etiology, have been historically elusive. Hence, defining the influence of genetic diversity in HLA and KIRs on the outcome of viral infections has been extensively started in clinically well-defined cohort studies. HLA genes encode molecules which present antigenic peptide fragments to T lymphocytes as central players in adaptive immunity against infectious diseases. KIRs are expressed on natural killer cells which perform a crucial role in innate immunity to pathogen infection. The effector functions of NK cells such as direct killing of infected cells, cytokine production, and cross-talk with adaptive immune system depend on activation of NK cells, which is determined by their surface receptors. Among these receptors, KIRs, which interact with HLA class I, are mainly inhibitory and exhibit substantial genetic diversity. An extensive body of association studies indicates a role for HLA–KIRs interactions in infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, cancer, transplantation, and reproduction. Various compound HLA-KIR genotypes appear to affect outcome of viral infections that suggests a role for HLA class I diversity in innate immunity as well as adaptive immune responses. The aim of this review is focusing on the impact of HLA and KIR alleles and different combinations of these alleles on clinical outcome of viral diseases to validate this proof-of-concept with respect to the therapeutic interventions.

  19. Adiponectin promotes coxsackievirus B3 myocarditis by suppression of acute anti-viral immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, A; Holzhauser, L; Löbel, M; Savvatis, K; Wilk, S; Weithäuser, A; Pinkert, S; Tschöpe, C; Klingel, K; Poller, W; Scheibenbogen, C; Schultheiss, H P; Skurk, C

    2014-05-01

    Adiponectin (APN) is an immunomodulatory adipocytokine that improves outcome in patients with virus-negative inflammatory cardiomyopathy and mice with autoimmune myocarditis. Here, we investigated whether APN modulates cardiac inflammation and injury in coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) myocarditis. Myocarditis was induced by CVB3 infection of APN-KO and WT mice. APN reconstitution was performed by adenoviral gene transfer. Expression analyses were performed by qRT-PCR and immunoblot. Cardiac histology was analyzed by H&E-stain and immunohistochemistry. APN-KO mice exhibited diminished subacute myocarditis with reduced viral load, attenuated inflammatory infiltrates determined by NKp46, F4/80 and CD3/CD4/CD8 expression and reduced IFNβ, IFNγ, TNFα, IL-1β and IL-12 levels. Moreover, myocardial injury assessed by necrotic lesions and troponin I release was attenuated resulting in preserved left ventricular function. Those changes were reversed by APN reconstitution. APN had no influence on adhesion, uptake or replication of CVB3 in cardiac myocytes. In acute CVB3 myocarditis, cardiac viral load did not differ between APN-KO and WT mice. However, APN-KO mice displayed an enhanced acute immune response, i.e. increased expression of myocardial CD14, IFNβ, IFNγ, IL-12, and TNFα resulting in increased cardiac infiltration with pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and activated NK cells. Up-regulation of cardiac CD14 expression, type I and II IFNs and inflammatory cell accumulation in APN-KO mice was inhibited by APN reconstitution. Our observations indicate that APN promotes CVB3 myocarditis by suppression of toll-like receptor-dependent innate immune responses, polarization of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages and reduction of number and activation of NK cells resulting in attenuated acute anti-viral immune responses.

  20. [Infections in the child with acute leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, J M; Jiménez, E; Jiménez, R

    1981-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-five febrile episodes in 82 children with acute leukemia were studied; 46% of the patients were from urban and 54% from rural areas. The origin of the fever was identified in 91% of the episodes, prevailing pneumonia, septicemia, chickenpox and herpes zoster. The etiological agent was identified in 46% of the cases. A viral predominance was evident, and among them varicela-zoster, following in importance gram-negative bacteria. Histoplasma capsulatum and Pneumocystis carinii were isolated in two occassions each. Sepsis was found more frequently in children with active leukemia than in those in remission (p less than 0.001). Forty-four febrile episodes occurred in patients with less than 1,000 neutrophils/ul. The daily-risk rate of infection was higher in children fom rural than in those from urban areas (p less than 0.001). After clinical and laboratory studies, methicillin and gentamicin were used, in addition to carbenicillin or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is selected cases. This treatment was effective in 86% of the cases. Twelve (15%) children died, 6 of whom were in remission at that moment.

  1. Complexities in Isolation and Purification of Multiple Viruses from Mixed Viral Infections: Viral Interference, Persistence and Exclusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    Full Text Available Successful purification of multiple viruses from mixed infections remains a challenge. In this study, we investigated peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV mixed infection in goats. Rather than in a single cell type, cytopathic effect (CPE of the virus was observed in cocultured Vero/BHK-21 cells at 6th blind passage (BP. PPRV, but not FMDV could be purified from the virus mixture by plaque assay. Viral RNA (mixture transfection in BHK-21 cells produced FMDV but not PPRV virions, a strategy which we have successfully employed for the first time to eliminate the negative-stranded RNA virus from the virus mixture. FMDV phenotypes, such as replication competent but noncytolytic, cytolytic but defective in plaque formation and, cytolytic but defective in both plaque formation and standard FMDV genome were observed respectively, at passage level BP8, BP15 and BP19 and hence complicated virus isolation in the cell culture system. Mixed infection was not found to induce any significant antigenic and genetic diversity in both PPRV and FMDV. Further, we for the first time demonstrated the viral interference between PPRV and FMDV. Prior transfection of PPRV RNA, but not Newcastle disease virus (NDV and rotavirus RNA resulted in reduced FMDV replication in BHK-21 cells suggesting that the PPRV RNA-induced interference was specifically directed against FMDV. On long-term coinfection of some acute pathogenic viruses (all possible combinations of PPRV, FMDV, NDV and buffalopox virus in Vero cells, in most cases, one of the coinfecting viruses was excluded at passage level 5 suggesting that the long-term coinfection may modify viral persistence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented evidence describing a natural mixed infection of FMDV and PPRV. The study not only provides simple and reliable methodologies for isolation and purification of two epidemiologically and economically important groups of

  2. Human Herpesvirus 6 Infection Presenting as an Acute Febrile Illness Associated with Thrombocytopenia and Leukopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Arnež

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an infant with acute fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia, coming from an endemic region for tick-borne encephalitis, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and hantavirus infection. The primary human herpesvirus 6 infection was diagnosed by seroconversion of specific IgM and IgG and by identification of viral DNA in the acute patient’s serum. The patient did not show skin rash suggestive of exanthema subitum during the course of illness.

  3. Research on viral dynamic models of hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lequan Min; Xisong Dong

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model with cytotoxic cells of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is set up based on a basic model of virus dynamics without cytotoxic cells and experimental observation of anti-viral drug therapy for HBV infection patients. A quantitative analysis of dynamic behaviors shows that the model has three kinds of equilibrium points, which represent the patient's complete recovery without immune ability, complete recovery with immune ability, and HBV persistent infection at the end of the treatment with drug lamivudine, respectively. Our model may provide possible quantitative interpretations for the treatments of chronic HBV infections with the drug lamivudine, in particularly explain why the plasma virus of Nowak et al.'s patients turnover the original level after stopping the lamivudine treatment.

  4. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  5. Acute pericarditis and renal failure complicating acute hepatitis A infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyazit, Yavuz; Guven, Gulay Sain; Kekilli, Murat; Koklu, Seyfettin; Yolcu, Omer Faruk; Shorbagi, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis A infection may result in acute hepatitis, and rarely, fulminant hepatitis may ensue. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis A are uncommon. The authors present the case of a 77-year-old male who had development of acute renal failure and pericarditis during the clinical course of acute hepatitis A infection. He died as a result of septic shock on the fifth day of hospitalization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of both these rare and serious complications appearing in the same patient.

  6. Patterns of hepatitis C virus RNA levels during acute infection: the InC3 study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Hajarizadeh

    Full Text Available Understanding the patterns of HCV RNA levels during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV infection provides insights into immunopathogenesis and is important for vaccine design. This study evaluated patterns of HCV RNA levels and associated factors among individuals with acute infection.Data were from an international collaboration of nine prospective cohorts of acute HCV (InC3 Study. Participants with well-characterized acute HCV infection (detected within three months post-infection and interval between the peak and subsequent HCV RNA levels ≤ 120 days were categorised by a priori-defined patterns of HCV RNA levels: i spontaneous clearance, ii partial viral control with persistence (≥ 1 log IU/mL decline in HCV RNA levels following peak and iii viral plateau with persistence (increase or <1 log IU/mL decline in HCV RNA levels following peak. Factors associated with HCV RNA patterns were assessed using multinomial logistic regression.Among 643 individuals with acute HCV, 162 with well-characterized acute HCV were identified: spontaneous clearance (32%, partial viral control with persistence (27%, and viral plateau with persistence (41%. HCV RNA levels reached a high viraemic phase within two months following infection, with higher levels in the spontaneous clearance and partial viral control groups, compared to the viral plateau group (median: 6.0, 6.2, 5.3 log IU/mL, respectively; P = 0.018. In the two groups with persistence, Interferon lambda 3 (IFNL3 CC genotype was independently associated with partial viral control compared to viral plateau (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.75; 95%CI: 1.08, 7.02. In the two groups with viral control, female sex was independently associated with spontaneous clearance compared to partial viral control (AOR: 2.86; 95%CI: 1.04, 7.83.Among individuals with acute HCV, a spectrum of HCV RNA patterns is evident. IFNL3 CC genotype is associated with initial viral control, while female sex is associated with ultimate

  7. Viral and atypical bacterial infections in the outpatient pediatric cystic fibrosis clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Nielsen, Lars P; Schiotz, Peter Oluf

    2006-01-01

    culture were recorded. RESULTS: Ninety-seven viral and 21 atypical bacterial infections were found. FEV-1 was significantly reduced during viral infection (-12.5%, p=0.048), with the exception of rhinovirus infection. A small change in FEV-1 (-3%) was seen during atypical bacterial infection (p=0...

  8. N-acetyl cysteine therapy in acute viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huseyin Gunduz; Oguz Karabay; Ali Tamer; Resat Ozaras; Ali Mert; Omer Fehmi Tabak

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC)on acute viral hepatitis (AVH).METHODS: We administered 200 mg oral NAC three times daily (600 mg/day) to the study group and placebo capsules to the control group. All patients were hospitalized and diagnosed as AVH. Blood total and direct bilirubin, ALT, AST,alkaline phosphatese, albumin and globulin levels of each patient were measured twice weekly until total bilirubin level dropped under 2 mg/dl, ALT level under 100 U/L, follow up was continued and then the patients were discharged.RESULTS: A total of 41(13 female and 28 male) AVH patients were included in our study. The period for normalization of ALT and total bilirubin in the study group was 19.7±6.9 days and 13.7±8.5 days respectively. In the control group it was 20.4±6.5 days and 16.9±7.8 days respectively (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: NAC administration effected neither the time necessary for normalization of ALT and total bilirubin values nor duration of hospitalization, so we could not suggest NAC for the treatment of icteric AVH cases. However, our results have shown that this drug is not harmful to patients with AVH.

  9. Infections in hemodialysis: a concise review. Part II: blood transmitted viral infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadis, T; Liakopoulos, V; Leivaditis, K; Antoniadi, G; Stefanidis, I

    2011-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) patients are particularly predisposed to infections. It seems that the HD procedure per se as well as disturbances in both innate and adaptive immunity significantly contribute to this susceptibility. Infections are the major cause of morbidity and the second cause of death following cardiovascular events in HD patients. Episodes of bacteremia and pneumonia account for the majority of severe infections in this population. In addition to these bacterial infections another common problem in HD units is the blood transmitted viral infections, particularly infections caused by hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and Human immunodeficiency virus. A number of safety concerns exist for limiting the spread of these viral infections among HD patients and the staff of the unit. The aim of the present review is to present in a concise albeit practical form the difficult aspect of infections in HD. For practical reasons the review is separated in two parts. The previous first part covered bacteremia and respiratory infections, while the present second part covers blood transmitted viral infections. PMID:22110292

  10. Stochastic extinction of viral infectivity through the action of defectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranzo, J.; Manrubia, S. C.

    2009-01-01

    The high error rates of RNA viruses at replication suggest they might be close to the extinction threshold predicted by quasispecies theory. Hence, moderate increases in the mutation rate could drive them to extinction. In persistent infections of an RNA virus treated with a mutagen, it has been observed that infectivity eventually disappears, although the replicative ability of the virus is not affected. By means of a simple model that takes into account two phenotypic traits, we demonstrate that extinction is a purely stochastic phenomenon caused by the intermittent outbreaks of a defective, non-infective subpopulation. The transition between dynamics dominated by population fluctuations (finite system size N) and the mean-field behavior (N→∞) is characterized. We discuss the implications of this alternative pathway to viral extinction.

  11. The herpes simplex virus host shutoff RNase degrades cellular and viral mRNAs made before infection but not viral mRNA made after infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeo, Brunella; Zhang, Weiran; Roizman, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    A herpes simplex virus tegument protein brought into the cell during infection and designated the virion host shutoff protein (VHS) is an endoribonuclease that degrades mRNA. The prevailing view for many years has been that the VHS-RNase does not discriminate between cellular and viral RNAs and that the viruses prevail because the accumulation of viral transcripts outpaces their degradation. Here we report the following. (i) The degradation of viral mRNA made during infection of Vero or HEp-2 cells proceeds at a much-reduced rate compared to that of cellular mRNA. In effect, viral mRNAs are largely stable, whereas cellular mRNAs are rapidly degraded or, in the case of AU-rich mRNA, cleaved and rendered dysfunctional. (ii) In contrast to viral mRNAs made after infection, viral mRNAs expressed by plasmids transfected into cells prior to infection are degraded after infection at a rate comparable to that of cellular mRNAs. Moreover, the mRNA encoded by the transfected plasmid is hyperadenylated in the infected cell. Hyperadenylation but not degradation of mRNAs is blocked by actinomycin D. The results indicate that VHS-mRNA discriminates between viral and cellular mRNA but only in the context of infection and that discrimination is not based on the sequence of the mRNA but most likely on one or more viral factors expressed in the infected cell.

  12. Comparison of ‘HoBi’-like viral populations among persistent infected calves generated under experimental conditions and to inoculum virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like other members from the Pestivirus genus, ‘HoBi’-like pestiviruses cause economic losses for cattle producers due to both acute and persistent infections. Pestivirus exist as quasispecies (swarms of individual viruses) in persistently infected (PI) animals leading to viral populations that are m...

  13. Prognostic Value of Cytochrome C and Cytokines in Acute Viral Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Serum cytochrome c and cytokines were evaluated as prognostic predictors in 29 children (ages 9 mos to 9 yrs 11 mos with viral acute encephalopathies and multiple organ failure at Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Japan.

  14. RNA interference strategies as therapy for respiratory viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVincenzo, John P

    2008-10-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a recently discovered, naturally occurring intracellular process that regulates gene expression through the silencing of specific mRNAs. Methods of harnessing this natural pathway are being developed that allow the catalytic degradation of targeted mRNAs using specifically designed complementary small-interfering RNAs (siRNA). siRNAs are being chemically modified to acquire drug-like properties. Numerous recent high profile publications have provided proofs of concept that RNAi may be of therapeutic use. Much of the design of these siRNAs can be accomplished bioinformatically, thus potentially expediting drug discovery and opening new avenues of therapy for many uncommon, orphan, or emerging diseases. Although endogenous human disease targets can theoretically be affected by RNAi therapeutics, nonendogenous targets (eg, viral targets) are attractive and RNAi therapeutics have been shown to act as antivirals in vivo and in vitro. Respiratory viral infections are particularly attractive targets for RNAi therapeutics because the infected cells exist at the air-lung interface, thereby positioning these cells to be accessible to topical administration of siRNA, for example by aerosol. RNAi therapeutics have been shown to be active against respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza and influenza in vitro and in vivo resulting in profound antiviral effects. The first RNAi therapeutic to be designed as an anti-infective medication has now entered proof of concept clinical trials in man. A discussion of the science behind RNAi is followed by a presentation of the potential practical issues in applying this technology to respiratory viral diseases. RNAi may offer new strategies for the treatment of respiratory syncytial virus and other respiratory viruses.

  15. Radiometric Methods for Rapid Diagnosis of Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    6/ NL IL 1-2 1-N6 U..V. -- V-- 1** ’~r I Ii’sW - -Kw RADIOMETRIC METHODS FOR RAPID DIAGNOSIS OF VIRAL INFECTION o Annual Report Min-Fu Tsan, M.D...REPORT DATE Command November 22, 1976 *U. S.. Army Medical Research and Development/ 13 NUMBER OF P!AGES Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD1 21701,5012 21...by black number) , Radiometric methods Virus r; fV 20. AISSY fRACT (Continue on, reverse sie it nwc. urr and ldvntity by block nuaibe,) -Vrtwo

  16. Prevention and treatment of viral respiratory infections by traditional Chinese herbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiaoguang; Liu Zejing

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review focuses on current knowledge of traditional Chinese herbs on prevention and treatment of viral respiratory infections,especially caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndromes (SARS) virus,respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza viruses.Data sources The data used in this review were obtained from PubMed and CNKI up to May 2013.Terms of Chinese herbs and infections of respiratory tract were used in the search.Study selection Articles related that Chinese herbs preventing and treating infections in respiratory tract were retrieved and reviewed.The risk of bias of included studies was assessed by the method in the "Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reveiws of Interventionsand studies" with high risk of bias were excluded.Four criteria for selections were set as following:randomized controlled trial,particular effective compound or derivative,reproducible result and animal test.Results Infectious respiratory tract diseases cause most mortality among infectious illnesses around the world.As traditional medicines,Chinese herbs have been widely used to deal with diseases for centuries and have been proved effective in practice.The administration of some Chinese herbs stimulates,suppresses or regulates the activity of immune system,thus protecting the respiratory tract or relieving infections of pathogens.Many herbs have remarkable antiviral effects,therefore they are used as substitutes of antimicrobial drugs.Based on the theory of traditional Chinese medicine,mix-using herbs provide a synergistic benefit on preventing and healing respiratory tract infections.Many commercial herbal medicines containing one or more compounds have been successfully applied to prevent and treat viral infections of respiratory tract clinically.Conclusions Traditional Chinese herbs could directly inhibit pathogens infecting respiratory tract,or coordinate the activity of immune system to avoid or relieve infections.With the emergence of antidrug pathogens or new

  17. Dengue viral infections as a cause of encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malavige G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and poor prognostic factors associated with high mortality in dengue encephalopathy. Fifteen patients with confirmed dengue infections, who developed encephalopathy, were recruited from two tertiary care hospitals in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Among the factors that contributed to encephalopathy were: Acute liver failure (73%, electrolyte imbalances (80% and shock (40%. Five (33.3% patients developed seizures. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was seen in five (33.3%. Secondary bacterial infections were observed in 8 (53.3% of our patients. The overall mortality rate was 47%.

  18. Dynamics of viral replication in blood and lymphoid tissues during SIVmac251 infection of macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannioui Abdelkrim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive studies of primary infection are crucial to our understanding of the course of HIV disease. In SIV-infected macaques, a model closely mimicking HIV pathogenesis, we used a combination of three markers -- viral RNA, 2LTR circles and viral DNA -- to evaluate viral replication and dissemination simultaneously in blood, secondary lymphoid tissues, and the gut during primary and chronic infections. Subsequent viral compartmentalization in the main target cells of the virus in peripheral blood during the chronic phase of infection was evaluated by cell sorting and viral quantification with the three markers studied. Results The evolutions of viral RNA, 2LTR circles and DNA levels were correlated in a given tissue during primary and early chronic infection. The decrease in plasma viral load principally reflects a large decrease in viral replication in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT, with viral RNA and DNA levels remaining stable in the spleen and peripheral lymph nodes. Later, during chronic infection, a progressive depletion of central memory CD4+ T cells from the peripheral blood was observed, accompanied by high levels of viral replication in the cells of this subtype. The virus was also found to replicate at this point in the infection in naive CD4+ T cells. Viral RNA was frequently detected in monocytes, but no SIV replication appeared to occur in these cells, as no viral DNA or 2LTR circles were detected. Conclusion We demonstrated the persistence of viral replication and dissemination, mostly in secondary lymphoid tissues, during primary and early chronic infection. During chronic infection, the central memory CD4+ T cells were the major site of viral replication in peripheral blood, but viral replication also occurred in naive CD4+ T cells. The role of monocytes seemed to be limited to carrying the virus as a cargo because there was an observed lack of replication in these cells. These data may have important

  19. Comparison of the breadth and complexity of bovine viral diarrhea (BVDV) populations circulating in 34 persistently infected cattle generated in one outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridpath, J F; Bayles, D O; Neill, J D; Falkenberg, S M; Bauermann, F V; Holler, L; Braun, L J; Young, D B; Kane, S E; Chase, C C L

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) results in acute and persistent infections. Persistent infections result from in utero exposure during the first trimester of gestation. Clinical presentation, in persistently infected cattle (PI), is highly variable. The reasons for this variation is largely unknown. The BVDV circulating in PI exist as quasispecies (swarms of individual viruses). An outbreak resulting in 34 PI cattle presented an opportunity to compare a large number of PI׳s. Methods were developed to compare the circulating viral populations within PI animals. It was found that PI animals generated in the same outbreak carry circulating viral populations that differ widely in size and diversity. Further, it was demonstrated that variation in PI viral populations could be used as a quantifiable phenotype. This observation makes it possible to test the correlation of this phenotype to other phenotypes such as growth rate, congenital defects, viral shed and cytokine expression.

  20. High numbers of IL-2-producing CD8+ T cells during viral infection: correlation with stable memory development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2002-01-01

    Using infections with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and vesicular stomatitis virus in mice as model systems, we have investigated the ability of antigen-primed CD8+ T cells generated in the context of viral infections to produce IL-2. Our results indicate that acute immunizing infection...... normally leads to generation of high numbers of IL-2-producing antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. By costaining for IL-2 and IFN-gamma intracellularly, we found that IL-2-producing cells predominantly constitute a subset of cells also producing IFN-gamma. Comparison of the kinetics of generation revealed...

  1. Consortia's critical role in developing medical countermeasures for re-emerging viral infections: a USA perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts, Maaike; Suto, Mark J; Painter, George R; Whitley, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    Viral infections, such as Ebola, severe acute respiratory syndrome/Middle East respiratory syndrome and West Nile virus have emerged as a serious health threat with no effective therapies. These infections have little commercial potential and are not a high priority for the pharmaceutical industry. However, the academic community has been active in this area for many years. The challenge is how to take this academic virology knowledge into a drug discovery and development domain. One approach is the use of consortia and public-private partnerships - this article highlights ongoing efforts in the USA. Public funds, such as those from government sources, can support research efforts that do not to appear to have commercial value. The key to success is finding a way to combine the different cultural and operational values and reward systems into a productive collaboration to identify new antivirals.

  2. Factors Associated With the Control of Viral Replication and Virologic Breakthrough in a Recently Infected HIV-1 Controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W; Veenhuis, Rebecca T; May, Megan; Luna, Krystle A; Kirkpatrick, Allison R; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Cox, Andrea L; Carrington, Mary; Bailey, Justin R; Arduino, Roberto C; Blankson, Joel N

    2017-02-01

    HIV-1 controllers are patients who control HIV-1 viral replication without antiretroviral therapy. Control is achieved very early in the course of infection, but the mechanisms through which viral replication is restricted are not fully understood. We describe a patient who presented with acute HIV-1 infection and was found to have an HIV-1 RNA level of <100copies/mL. She did not have any known protective HLA alleles, but significant immune activation of CD8+ T cells and natural killer (NK) cells was present, and both cell types inhibited viral replication. Virus cultured from this patient replicated as well in vitro as virus isolated from her partner, a patient with AIDS who was the source of transmission. Virologic breakthrough occurred 9months after her initial presentation and was associated with an increase in CD4+ T cell activation levels and a significant decrease in NK cell inhibitory capacity. Remarkably, CD8+ T cell inhibitory capacity was preserved and there were no new escape mutations in targeted Gag epitopes. These findings suggest that fully replication-competent virus can be controlled in acute HIV-1 infection in some patients without protective HLA alleles and that NK cell responses may contribute to this early control of viral replication.

  3. Factors Associated With the Control of Viral Replication and Virologic Breakthrough in a Recently Infected HIV-1 Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria E. Walker-Sperling

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 controllers are patients who control HIV-1 viral replication without antiretroviral therapy. Control is achieved very early in the course of infection, but the mechanisms through which viral replication is restricted are not fully understood. We describe a patient who presented with acute HIV-1 infection and was found to have an HIV-1 RNA level of <100 copies/mL. She did not have any known protective HLA alleles, but significant immune activation of CD8+ T cells and natural killer (NK cells was present, and both cell types inhibited viral replication. Virus cultured from this patient replicated as well in vitro as virus isolated from her partner, a patient with AIDS who was the source of transmission. Virologic breakthrough occurred 9 months after her initial presentation and was associated with an increase in CD4+ T cell activation levels and a significant decrease in NK cell inhibitory capacity. Remarkably, CD8+ T cell inhibitory capacity was preserved and there were no new escape mutations in targeted Gag epitopes. These findings suggest that fully replication-competent virus can be controlled in acute HIV-1 infection in some patients without protective HLA alleles and that NK cell responses may contribute to this early control of viral replication.

  4. Early immune responses in rainbow trout liver upon viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Rosario; Abós, Beatriz; Pignatelli, Jaime; von Gersdorff Jørgensen, Louise; González Granja, Aitor; Buchmann, Kurt; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Among the essential metabolic functions of the liver, in mammals, a role as mediator of systemic and local innate immunity has also been reported. Although the presence of an important leukocyte population in mammalian liver is well documented, the characterization of leukocyte populations in the teleost liver has been only scarcely addressed. In the current work, we have confirmed the presence of IgM+, IgD+, IgT+, CD8α+, CD3+ cells, and cells expressing major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver by flow cytometry and/or immunohistochemistry analysis. Additionally, the effect of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) on the liver immune response was assessed. First, we studied the effect of viral intraperitoneal injection on the transcription of a wide selection of immune genes at days 1, 2 and 5 post-infection. These included a group of leukocyte markers genes, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), chemokines, chemokine receptor genes, and other genes involved in the early immune response and in acute phase reaction. Our results indicate that T lymphocytes play a key role in the initial response to VHSV in the liver, since CD3, CD8, CD4, perforin, Mx and interferon (IFN) transcription levels were up-regulated in response to VHSV. Consequently, flow cytometry analysis of CD8α+ cells in liver and spleen at day 5 post-infection revealed a decrease in the number of CD8α+ cells in the spleen and an increased population in the liver. No differences were found however in the percentages of B lymphocyte (IgM+ or IgD+) populations. In addition, a strong up-regulation in the transcription levels of several PRRs and chemokines was observed from the second day of infection, indicating an important role of these factors in the response of the liver to viral infections.

  5. Early immune responses in rainbow trout liver upon viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Castro

    Full Text Available Among the essential metabolic functions of the liver, in mammals, a role as mediator of systemic and local innate immunity has also been reported. Although the presence of an important leukocyte population in mammalian liver is well documented, the characterization of leukocyte populations in the teleost liver has been only scarcely addressed. In the current work, we have confirmed the presence of IgM+, IgD+, IgT+, CD8α+, CD3+ cells, and cells expressing major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss liver by flow cytometry and/or immunohistochemistry analysis. Additionally, the effect of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV on the liver immune response was assessed. First, we studied the effect of viral intraperitoneal injection on the transcription of a wide selection of immune genes at days 1, 2 and 5 post-infection. These included a group of leukocyte markers genes, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, chemokines, chemokine receptor genes, and other genes involved in the early immune response and in acute phase reaction. Our results indicate that T lymphocytes play a key role in the initial response to VHSV in the liver, since CD3, CD8, CD4, perforin, Mx and interferon (IFN transcription levels were up-regulated in response to VHSV. Consequently, flow cytometry analysis of CD8α+ cells in liver and spleen at day 5 post-infection revealed a decrease in the number of CD8α+ cells in the spleen and an increased population in the liver. No differences were found however in the percentages of B lymphocyte (IgM+ or IgD+ populations. In addition, a strong up-regulation in the transcription levels of several PRRs and chemokines was observed from the second day of infection, indicating an important role of these factors in the response of the liver to viral infections.

  6. Sensors of Infection: Viral Nucleic Acid PRRs in Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Poynter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Viruses produce nucleic acids during their replication, either during genomic replication or transcription. These nucleic acids are present in the cytoplasm or endosome of an infected cell, or in the extracellular space to be sensed by neighboring cells during lytic infections. Cells have mechanisms of sensing virus-generated nucleic acids; these nucleic acids act as flags to the cell, indicating an infection requiring defense mechanisms. The viral nucleic acids are called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and the sensors that bind them are called pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. This review article focuses on the most recent findings regarding nucleic acids PRRs in fish, including: Toll-like receptors (TLRs, RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, cytoplasmic DNA sensors (CDSs and class A scavenger receptors (SR-As. It also discusses what is currently known of the downstream signaling molecules for each PRR family and the resulting antiviral response, either type I interferons (IFNs or pro-inflammatory cytokine production. The review highlights what is known but also defines what still requires elucidation in this economically important animal. Understanding innate immune systems to virus infections will aid in the development of better antiviral therapies and vaccines for the future.

  7. Slow clearance of human parvovirus B19 viremia following acute infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindblom, Anna; Isa, Adiba; Norbeck, Oscar;

    2005-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 is a common, clinically significant pathogen. Reassessment of the viral kinetics after acute infection showed that the virus is not rapidly cleared from healthy hosts, despite early resolution of symptoms. These findings challenge our current conception of the virus' pathogenesis a...

  8. Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Norbeck, Oscar;

    2005-01-01

    and intact proliferative capacity. Individuals tested many years after infection exhibited lower frequencies of B19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, typically 0.05%-0.5% of CD8+ T cells, which were perforin, CD38, and CCR7 low. CONCLUSION: This is the first example to our knowledge of an "acute" human viral...

  9. Fungal infections in severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Rakesh; Noor, Mohd Talha; Wig, Jaidev

    2011-06-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The majority of deaths related to SAP are the result of infectious complications. Although bacterial infections are most commonly encountered, fungal infections are increasingly being recognized. Candida is the most common fungal infection. The occurrence of fungal infection in patients with acute pancreatitis adversely affects the clinical course, leading to a higher incidence of systemic complications, and possibly mortality as well. Important risk factors for fungal infection in patients with acute pancreatitis include broad-spectrum antibiotics, prolonged hospitalization and surgical/endoscopic interventions, use of total parenteral nutrition, and mechanical ventilation. Patients with higher severity of pancreatitis are at a greater risk. The pathogenesis of fungal infection in patients with acute pancreatitis is multifactorial. Translocation of microorganisms across the gut epithelium, lymphocyte dysfunction, and the virulence of the invading microorganisms play important roles. Histological demonstration of fungi remains the gold standard of diagnosis, but a positive biopsy is rarely obtained. The role of biomarkers in the diagnosis is being investigated. As early diagnosis and treatment can lead to improved outcome, a high index of suspicion is required for prompt diagnosis. Limiting the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, early introduction of enteral nutrition, and timely change of vascular catheters are important preventive strategies. The role of antifungal prophylaxis remains controversial. Surgical necrosectomy with antifungal therapy is the most widely used treatment approach. Clinical trials on antifungal prophylaxis are needed, and indications for surgical intervention need to be clearly defined.

  10. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aevermann, Brian D; Pickett, Brett E; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagen; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean; Clauss, Therese R W; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H; Eisfeld, Amie J; Ellis, Amy; Fan, Shufang; Ferris, Martin T; Gralinski, Lisa E; Green, Richard R; Gritsenko, Marina A; Hatta, Masato; Heegel, Robert A; Jacobs, Jon M; Jeng, Sophia; Josset, Laurence; Kaiser, Shari M; Kelly, Sara; Law, G Lynn; Li, Chengjun; Li, Jiangning; Long, Casey; Luna, Maria L; Matzke, Melissa; McDermott, Jason; Menachery, Vineet; Metz, Thomas O; Mitchell, Hugh; Monroe, Matthew E; Navarro, Garnet; Neumann, Gabriele; Podyminogin, Rebecca L; Purvine, Samuel O; Rosenberger, Carrie M; Sanders, Catherine J; Schepmoes, Athena A; Shukla, Anil K; Sims, Amy; Sova, Pavel; Tam, Vincent C; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Thomas, Paul G; Tilton, Susan C; Totura, Allison; Wang, Jing; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Wen, Ji; Weiss, Jeffrey M; Yang, Feng; Yount, Boyd; Zhang, Qibin; McWeeney, Shannon; Smith, Richard D; Waters, Katrina M; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph; Aderem, Alan; Katze, Michael G; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). By comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells: viral shedding and cell contact-mediated infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asin, Susana N; Wildt-Perinic, Dunja; Mason, Sarah I; Howell, Alexandra L; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-15

    We examined the mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection of human uterine epithelial cells to gain a clearer understanding of the events by which HIV-1 infects cells within the female reproductive tract. We demonstrated that these cells can be productively infected by HIV-1 and that infection is associated with viral RNA reverse transcription, DNA transcription, and secretion of infectious virus. Levels of viral DNA and secreted virus decreased gradually after infection. Moreover, virus released by the uterine epithelial cells shortly after infection was able to infect human T cell lines, but virus released later did not. In contrast, human CD4(+) T cell lines were infected after cocultivation with epithelial cells at both early and late stages of infection. These data demonstrated that HIV-1 infects human epithelial cells of upper reproductive tract origin and that productive viral infection of epithelial cells may be an important mechanism of transmission of HIV-1 infection in women.

  12. Modulation of Microglial Cell Fcγ Receptor Expression Following Viral Brain Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Priyanka; Hu, Shuxian; Sheng, Wen S.; Prasad, Sujata; Lokensgard, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) for IgG couple innate and adaptive immunity through activation of effector cells by antigen-antibody complexes. We investigated relative levels of activating and inhibitory FcγRs on brain-resident microglia following murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Flow cytometric analysis of microglial cells obtained from infected brain tissue demonstrated that activating FcγRs were expressed maximally at 5 d post-infection (dpi), while the inhibitory receptor (FcγRIIB) remained highly elevated during both acute and chronic phases of infection. The highly induced expression of activating FcγRIV during the acute phase of infection was also noteworthy. Furthermore, in vitro analysis using cultured primary microglia demonstrated the role of interferon (IFN)γ and interleukin (IL)-4 in polarizing these cells towards a M1 or M2 phenotype, respectively. Microglial cell-polarization correlated with maximal expression of either FcγRIV or FcγRIIB following stimulation with IFNγ or IL-4, respectively. Finally, we observed a significant delay in polarization of microglia towards an M2 phenotype in the absence of FcγRs in MCMV-infected Fcer1g and FcgR2b knockout mice. These studies demonstrate that neuro-inflammation following viral infection increases expression of activating FcγRs on M1-polarized microglia. In contrast, expression of the inhibitory FcγRIIB receptor promotes M2-polarization in order to shut-down deleterious immune responses and limit bystander brain damage. PMID:28165503

  13. Hepatitis C viral infection as an associated risk factor for necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Danielle; Kanlic, Enes; Bader, Julia; Ortiz, Melchor; Abdelgawad, Amr

    2012-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare soft tissue infection associated with a high mortality rate. Several risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis have been studied, which has given surgeons insight into the types of patients who are more likely to present with this rapidly progressive infection. The concomitant diagnosis of hepatitis C viral infection has not been reported in the literature previously. In this retrospective study covering a 12-year period in 1 Level I trauma center, 10 (34%) of 29 patients presenting with necrotizing fasciitis had an underlying diagnosis of hepatitis C viral infection. The mortality rate in patients with hepatitis C viral infection was 30% compared with 21% for those without hepatitis C viral infection (P=.59). The proportion of patients presenting with the concomitant diagnosis of hepatitis C viral infection and necrotizing fasciitis was statistically greater than that expected from the prevalence of hepatitis C viral infection in the general population (1.8%; Pnecrotizing fasciitis. Although our sample size was too small to show a statistical significance, we believe that a clinically significant increase in mortality of necrotizing fasciitis occurred in patients with concomitant hepatitis C viral infection. Therefore, the presence of hepatitis C viral infection in patients presenting with symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis should raise the clinical suspicion for this diagnosis, with the potential for a worse prognosis.

  14. Cell-Associated Viral Burden Provides Evidence of Ongoing Viral Replication in Aviremic HIV-2-Infected Patients▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Rui S.; Tendeiro, Rita; Foxall, Russell B.; Baptista, António P.; Cavaleiro, Rita; Gomes, Perpétua; Camacho, Ricardo; Valadas, Emília; Doroana, Manuela; Lucas, Margarida; Antunes, Francisco; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Sousa, Ana E.

    2011-01-01

    Viremia is significantly lower in HIV-2 than in HIV-1 infection, irrespective of disease stage. Nevertheless, the comparable proviral DNA burdens observed for these two infections indicate similar numbers of infected cells. Here we investigated this apparent paradox by assessing cell-associated viral replication. We found that untreated HIV-1-positive (HIV-1+) and HIV-2+ individuals, matched for CD4 T cell depletion, exhibited similar gag mRNA levels, indicating that significant viral transcription is occurring in untreated HIV-2+ patients, despite the reduced viremia (undetectable to 2.6 × 104 RNA copies/ml). However, tat mRNA transcripts were observed at significantly lower levels in HIV-2+ patients, suggesting that the rate of de novo infection is decreased in these patients. Our data also reveal a direct relationship of gag and tat transcripts with CD4 and CD8 T cell activation, respectively. Antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-2+ patients showed persistent viral replication, irrespective of plasma viremia, possibly contributing to the emergence of drug resistance mutations, persistent hyperimmune activation, and poor CD4 T cell recovery that we observed with these individuals. In conclusion, we provide here evidence of significant ongoing viral replication in HIV-2+ patients, further emphasizing the dichotomy between amount of plasma virus and cell-associated viral burden and stressing the need for antiretroviral trials and the definition of therapeutic guidelines for HIV-2 infection. PMID:21159859

  15. Clinical and laboratory description of a series of cases of acute viral myositis

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    Silvana Paula Cardin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Describe the clinical and laboratory profile, follow-up, and outcome of a series of cases of acute viral myositis. METHOD: A retrospective analysis of suspected cases under observation in the emergency department was performed, including outpatient follow-up with the recording of respiratory infection and musculoskeletal symptoms, measurement of muscle enzymes, creatine phosphokinase (CPK, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, transaminases (AST and ALT, blood count, C-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in the acute phase and during follow-up until normalization. RESULTS: Between 2000 and 2009, 42 suspected cases were identified and 35 (27 boys were included. The median age was 7 years and the diagnosis was reported in 89% in the first emergency visit. The observed respiratory symptoms were cough (31%, rhinorrhea (23%, and fever (63%, with a mean duration of 4.3 days. Musculoskeletal symptoms were localized pain in the calves (80%, limited ambulation (57%, gait abnormality (40%, and muscle weakness in the lower limbs (71%, with a mean duration of 3.6 days. There was significant increase in CPK enzymes (5507 ± 9180 U/L, LDH (827 ± 598 U/L, and AST (199 ± 245 U/L, with a tendency to leukopenia (4590 ± 1420 leukocytes/mm3. The complete recovery of laboratory parameters was observed in 30 days (median, and laboratory and clinical recurrence was documented in one case after 10 months. CONCLUSION: Typical symptoms with increased muscle enzymes after diagnosis of influenza and self-limited course of the disease were the clues to the diagnosis. The increase in muscle enzymes indicate transient myotropic activity related to seasonal influenza, which should be considered, regardless of the viral identification, possibly associated with influenza virus or other respiratory viruses.

  16. Global analysis of viral infection in an archaeal model system

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    Walid S. Maaty

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The origin and evolutionary relationship of viruses is poorly understood. This makes archaeal virus-host of particular interest because the hosts generally root near the base of phylogenetic trees, while some of the viruses have clear structural similarities to those that infect prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Despite the advantageous position for use in evolutionary studies, little is known about archaeal viruses or how they interact with their hosts, compared to viruses of bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition, many archaeal viruses have been isolated from extreme environments and present a unique opportunity for elucidating factors that are important for existence at the extremes.. In this article we focus on virus-host interactions using a proteomics approach to study Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus (STIV infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2. Using cultures grown from the ATCC cell stock, a single cycle of STIV infection was sampled 6 times over a 72 hr period. More than 700 proteins were identified throughout the course of the experiments. Seventy one host proteins were found to change by nearly two-fold (p<0.05 with 40 becoming more abundant and 31 less abundant. The modulated proteins represent 30 different cell pathways and 14 COG groups. 2D gel analysis showed that changes in post translational modifications were a common feature of the affected proteins. The results from these studies showed that the prokaryotic antiviral adaptive immune system CRISPR associated proteins (CAS proteins were regulated in response to the virus infection. It was found that regulated proteins come from mRNAs with a shorter than average half-life. In addition, activity-based protein profiling (ABPP profiling on 2D gels showed caspase, hydrolase and tyrosine phosphatase enzyme activity labeling at the protein isoform level. Together, this data provides a more detailed global view of archaeal cellular responses to viral infection, demonstrates the

  17. Viral infections in mice with reconstituted human immune system components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münz, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Pathogenic viruses are often difficult to study due to their exclusive tropism for humans. The development of mice with human immune system components opens the possibility to study those human pathogens with a tropism for the human hematopoietic lineage in vivo. These include HCMV, EBV, KSHV, HIV, HTLV-1, dengue virus and JC virus. Furthermore, some human pathogens, like HSV-2, adenovirus, HCV, HBV and influenza A virus, with an additional tropism for somatic mouse tissues or for additional transplanted human tissues, mainly liver, have been explored in these models. The cellular tropism of these viruses, their associated diseases and primarily cell-mediated immune responses to these viral infections will be discussed in this review. Already some exciting information has been gained from these novel chimeric in vivo models and future avenues to gain more insights into the pathology, but also potential therapies, will be outlined. Although the respective in vivo models of human immune responses can still be significantly improved, they already provide preclinical systems for in vivo studies of important viral pathogens of humans.

  18. Viral respiratory infections among Hajj pilgrims in 2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osamah; Barasheed; Harunor; Rashid; Mohammad; Alfelali; Mohamed; Tashani; Mohammad; Azeem; Hamid; Bokhary; Nadeen; Kalantan; Jamil; Samkari; Leon; Heron; Jen; Kok; Janette; Taylor; Haitham; El; Bashir; Ziad; A.Memish; Elizabeth; Haworth; Edward; C.Holmes; Dominic; E; Dwyer; Atif; Asghar; Robert; Booy

    2014-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus(MERS-Co V) has emerged in the Arabian Gulf region, with its epicentre in Saudi Arabia, the host of the ‘Hajj’ which is the world’s the largest mass gathering. Transmission of MERS-Co V at such an event could lead to its rapid worldwide dissemination. Therefore, we studied the frequency of viruses causing influenza-like illnesses(ILI) among participants in a randomised controlled trial at the Hajj 2013. We recruited 1038 pilgrims from Saudi Arabia, Australia and Qatar during the first day of Hajj and followed them closely for four days. A nasal swab was collected from each pilgrim who developed ILI. Respiratory viruses were detected using multiplex RT-PCR. ILI occurred in 112/1038(11%) pilgrims. Their mean age was 35 years, 49(44%) were male and 35(31%) had received the influenza vaccine pre-Hajj. Forty two(38%) pilgrims had laboratory-confirmed viral infections; 28(25%) rhinovirus, 5(4%) influenza A, 2(2%) adenovirus, 2(2%) human coronavirus OC43/229 E, 2(2%) parainfluenza virus 3, 1(1%) parainfluenza virus 1, and 2(2%) dual infections. No MERS-Co V was detected in any sample. Rhinovirus was the commonest cause of ILI among Hajj pilgrims in 2013. Infection control and appropriate vaccination are necessary to prevent transmission of respiratory viruses at Hajj and other mass gatherings.

  19. Kocuria kristinae infection associated with acute cholecystitis

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    Chan Edmond CH

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kocuria, previously classified into the genus of Micrococcus, is commonly found on human skin. Two species, K. rosea and K. kristinae, are etiologically associated with catheter-related bacteremia. Case presentation We describe the first case of K. kristinae infection associated with acute cholecystitis. The microorganism was isolated from the bile of a 56-year old Chinese man who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. He developed post-operative fever that resolved readily after levofloxacin treatment. Conclusion Our report of K. kristinae infection associated with acute cholecystitis expands the clinical spectrum of infections caused by this group of bacteria. With increasing number of recent reports describing the association between Kocuria spp. and infectious diseases, the significance of their isolation from clinical specimens cannot be underestimated. A complete picture of infections related to Kocuria spp. will have to await the documentation of more clinical cases.

  20. Acute neuromuscular weakness associated with dengue infection

    OpenAIRE

    Harmanjit Singh Hira; Amandeep Kaur; Anuj Shukla

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dengue infections may present with neurological complications. Whether these are due to neuromuscular disease or electrolyte imbalance is unclear. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight patients of dengue fever required hospitalization during epidemic in year 2010. Twelve of them presented with acute neuromuscular weakness. We enrolled them for study. Diagnosis of dengue infection based on clinical profile of patients, positive serum IgM ELISA, NS1 antigen, and sero-typing. Complete ...

  1. Constraints on Viral Evolution during Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection Arising from a Common-Source Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Justin R.; Laskey, Sarah; Wasilewski, Lisa N.; Munshaw, Supriya; Fanning, Liam J.; Kenny-Walsh, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Extraordinary viral sequence diversity and rapid viral genetic evolution are hallmarks of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Viral sequence evolution has previously been shown to mediate escape from cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) and neutralizing antibody responses in acute HCV infection. HCV evolution continues during chronic infection, but the pressures driving these changes are poorly defined. We analyzed plasma virus sequence evolution in 5.2-kb hemigenomes from multiple longitudinal time points isolated from individuals in the Irish anti-D cohort, who were infected with HCV from a common source in 1977 to 1978. We found phylogenetically distinct quasispecies populations at different plasma time points isolated late in chronic infection, suggesting ongoing viral evolution and quasispecies replacement over time. We saw evidence of early pressure driving net evolution away from a computationally reconstructed common ancestor, known as Bole1b, in predicted CTL epitopes and E1E2, with balanced evolution toward and away from the Bole1b amino acid sequence in the remainder of the genome. Late in chronic infection, the rate of evolution toward the Bole1b sequence increased, resulting in net neutral evolution relative to Bole1b across the entire 5.2-kb hemigenome. Surprisingly, even late in chronic infection, net amino acid evolution away from the infecting inoculum sequence still could be observed. These data suggest that, late in chronic infection, ongoing HCV evolution is not random genetic drift but rather the product of strong pressure toward a common ancestor and concurrent net ongoing evolution away from the inoculum virus sequence, likely balancing replicative fitness and ongoing immune escape. PMID:22973048

  2. [Neuropsychiatric sequelae of viral meningitis in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgaard, Jesper; Hjerrild, Simon; Renvillard, Signe Groth; Leutscher, Peter Derek Christian

    2011-10-10

    Viral meningitis is considered to be a benign illness with only mild symptoms. In contrast to viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis, the prognosis is usually good. However, retrospective studies have demonstrated that patients suffering from viral meningitis may experience cognitive impairment following the acute course of infection. Larger controlled studies are needed to elucidate the potential neuropsychiatric adverse outcome of viral meningitis.

  3. Amiodarone and metabolite MDEA inhibit Ebola virus infection by interfering with the viral entry process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salata, Cristiano; Baritussio, Aldo; Munegato, Denis; Calistri, Arianna; Ha, Huy Riem; Bigler, Laurent; Fabris, Fabrizio; Parolin, Cristina; Palù, Giorgio; Mirazimi, Ali

    2015-07-01

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) is one of the most lethal transmissible infections characterized by a high fatality rate, and a treatment has not been developed yet. Recently, it has been shown that cationic amphiphiles, among them the antiarrhythmic drug amiodarone, inhibit filovirus infection. In the present work, we investigated how amiodarone interferes with Ebola virus infection. Wild-type Sudan ebolavirus and recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus, pseudotyped with the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein, were used to gain further insight into the ability of amiodarone to affect Ebola virus infection. We show that amiodarone decreases Ebola virus infection at concentrations close to those found in the sera of patients treated for arrhythmias. The drug acts by interfering with the fusion of the viral envelope with the endosomal membrane. We also show that MDEA, the main amiodarone metabolite, contributes to the antiviral activity. Finally, studies with amiodarone analogues indicate that the antiviral activity is correlated with drug ability to accumulate into and interfere with the endocytic pathway. Considering that it is well tolerated, especially in the acute setting, amiodarone appears to deserve consideration for clinical use in EVD.

  4. Viral infection affects sucrose responsiveness and homing ability of forager honey bees, Apis mellifera L.

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    Zhiguo Li

    Full Text Available Honey bee health is mainly affected by Varroa destructor, viruses, Nosema spp., pesticide residues and poor nutrition. Interactions between these proposed factors may be responsible for the colony losses reported worldwide in recent years. In the present study, the effects of a honey bee virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV, on the foraging behaviors and homing ability of European honey bees (Apis mellifera L. were investigated based on proboscis extension response (PER assays and radio frequency identification (RFID systems. The pollen forager honey bees originated from colonies that had no detectable level of honey bee viruses and were manually inoculated with IAPV to induce the viral infection. The results showed that IAPV-inoculated honey bees were more responsive to low sucrose solutions compared to that of non-infected foragers. After two days of infection, around 10⁷ copies of IAPV were detected in the heads of these honey bees. The homing ability of IAPV-infected foragers was depressed significantly in comparison to the homing ability of uninfected foragers. The data provided evidence that IAPV infection in the heads may enable the virus to disorder foraging roles of honey bees and to interfere with brain functions that are responsible for learning, navigation, and orientation in the honey bees, thus, making honey bees have a lower response threshold to sucrose and lose their way back to the hive.

  5. Viral infection affects sucrose responsiveness and homing ability of forager honey bees, Apis mellifera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiguo; Chen, Yanping; Zhang, Shaowu; Chen, Shenglu; Li, Wenfeng; Yan, Limin; Shi, Liangen; Wu, Lyman; Sohr, Alex; Su, Songkun

    2013-01-01

    Honey bee health is mainly affected by Varroa destructor, viruses, Nosema spp., pesticide residues and poor nutrition. Interactions between these proposed factors may be responsible for the colony losses reported worldwide in recent years. In the present study, the effects of a honey bee virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), on the foraging behaviors and homing ability of European honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) were investigated based on proboscis extension response (PER) assays and radio frequency identification (RFID) systems. The pollen forager honey bees originated from colonies that had no detectable level of honey bee viruses and were manually inoculated with IAPV to induce the viral infection. The results showed that IAPV-inoculated honey bees were more responsive to low sucrose solutions compared to that of non-infected foragers. After two days of infection, around 10⁷ copies of IAPV were detected in the heads of these honey bees. The homing ability of IAPV-infected foragers was depressed significantly in comparison to the homing ability of uninfected foragers. The data provided evidence that IAPV infection in the heads may enable the virus to disorder foraging roles of honey bees and to interfere with brain functions that are responsible for learning, navigation, and orientation in the honey bees, thus, making honey bees have a lower response threshold to sucrose and lose their way back to the hive.

  6. Platelets and infection — an emerging role of platelets in viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice eAssinger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are anucleate blood cells that play a crucial role in the maintenance of hemostasis. While platelet activation and elevated platelet counts (thrombocytosis are associated with increased risk of thrombotic complications, low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia and several platelet function disorders increase the risk of bleeding. Over the last years more and more evidence has emerged that platelets and their activation state can also modulate innate and adaptive immune responses and low platelet counts have been identified as a surrogate marker for poor prognosis in septic patients.Viral infections often coincide with platelet activation. Host inflammatory responses result in the release of platelet activating mediators and a pro-oxidative and pro-coagulant environment, which favours platelet activation. However, viruses can also directly interact with platelets and megakaryocytes and modulate their function. Furthermore, platelets can be activated by viral antigen-antibody complexes and in response to some viruses B-lymphocytes also generate anti-platelet antibodies.All these processes contributing to platelet activation result in increased platelet consumption and removal and often lead to thrombocytopenia, which is frequently observed during viral infection. However, virus-induced platelet activation does not only modulate platelet count, but also shapes immune responses. Platelets and their released products have been reported to directly and indirectly suppress infection and to support virus persistence in response to certain viruses, making platelets a double-edged sword during viral infections. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on platelet interaction with different types of viruses, the viral impact on platelet activation and platelet-mediated modulations of innate and adaptive immune responses.

  7. Platelets and infection - an emerging role of platelets in viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assinger, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate blood cells that play a crucial role in the maintenance of hemostasis. While platelet activation and elevated platelet counts (thrombocytosis) are associated with increased risk of thrombotic complications, low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia) and several platelet function disorders increase the risk of bleeding. Over the last years, more and more evidence has emerged that platelets and their activation state can also modulate innate and adaptive immune responses and low platelet counts have been identified as a surrogate marker for poor prognosis in septic patients. Viral infections often coincide with platelet activation. Host inflammatory responses result in the release of platelet activating mediators and a pro-oxidative and pro-coagulant environment, which favors platelet activation. However, viruses can also directly interact with platelets and megakaryocytes and modulate their function. Furthermore, platelets can be activated by viral antigen-antibody complexes and in response to some viruses B-lymphocytes also generate anti-platelet antibodies. All these processes contributing to platelet activation result in increased platelet consumption and removal and often lead to thrombocytopenia, which is frequently observed during viral infection. However, virus-induced platelet activation does not only modulate platelet count but also shape immune responses. Platelets and their released products have been reported to directly and indirectly suppress infection and to support virus persistence in response to certain viruses, making platelets a double-edged sword during viral infections. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on platelet interaction with different types of viruses, the viral impact on platelet activation, and platelet-mediated modulations of innate and adaptive immune responses.

  8. Acute Viral Hepatitis A – Clinical, Laboratory and Epidemiological Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda HORVAT

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Infection with hepatitis A virus is still one of the most common causes of hepatitis worldwide. The clinical manifestation of acute hepatitis A (AHA in adults can vary greatly, ranging from asymptomatic infection to severe and fulminant hepatitis. The aim of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory features and hospital outcome of adult patients with AHA over a consecutive period of 4 years within an area from Eastern European country. Methods: Two hundred and two adult patients diagnosed with AHA were retrospective, observational and analytic analized over a period of 4 years. Based on prothrombin time less than 50, the study group was stratified in medium (79.2% and severe forms (20.8%. We investigated the clinical, laboratory and epidemiological features. Statistical analysis were applied to compare the medium and severe forms of AHA. Results: Most patients (72.7% were younger than 40 years. The main symptoms included: dyspepsia (72.07%, jaundice (86.63%, asteno-adynamia (86.72%, and flu-like symptoms (53.46%. The hemorrhagic cutaneous-mucous manifestations (6.93% associated with the severe forms of AHA (OR =12.19, 95%CI -3.59 - 41.3, p =0.001. We found statistically significant differences for PT (p <0.001, INR (p <0.001, TQ (p <0.001, ALAT (p <0.001, ASAT (p <0.001, ALP (p <0.001 and platelets (p =0.009 between severe and medium AHA forms. We found that TQ, INR, ALAT and ASAT have the highest diagnostic values, statistically significant (p <0.05 for severe AHA forms with AUC (0.99, 0.99, 0.72, 0.70 at values of sensitivity (95%, 90.5%, 89%, 95% and specificity (98%, 99%, 88%,94%. Conclusions Medium severity AHA forms were found in most of the study group patients (79.2%. The severe AHA forms were associated with hemorrhagic cutaneous-mucous manifestations (OR =12.19, p =0.001. The univariate analysis proved a negatively statistically significant correlation between IP and ALAT

  9. Interplay between viral infections and genetic alterations in liver cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Hainaut

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    With over 500 000 annual deaths, Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and a leading cause of death in developing countries where about 80% of the cases arise. Risk factors include chronic hepatitis infections (hepatitis B, (HBV and hepatitis C (HCV viruses, alcohol, dietary contaminants such as falatoxins The incidence shows important geographic variations, accor In southern Asia, HCC development is mainly related to the endemic Hepatitis B Virus (HBV infection, cases with hot spot mutation in codon 249 (249ser of TP53 tumor suppressor gene were also described and associated to a low-intermediate exposure rate to Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1. Presence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection was also detected in 12 - 17% of HCC cases. Despite the increasing number of studies identifying viral/host interactions in viro-induced HCC or describing potential pathways for hepatocarcinogenesis, precise mechanism has not been identified so far. HBV was demonstrated to enhance hepatocarcinogenesis by different manners; HBV chronic infection is associated to active hepatitis (CAH and cirrhosis which are hepatic complications considered as early stage for HCC development. These complications mobilise the host immune response, the resulting inflammation initiates and selects the first genetic alteration at the origin of loss of cell control. Moreover, HBV can also promote carcinogenesis through genetic instability generated by its common integration in host DNA. HBV proteins, as HBx, was proven to interact with a variety of targets in the host cell including protein or host transcription factor such as, in particular, the p53 protein or the transcription factor E4F, which is implicated in growth, differenciation and senescence. Specific HBV mutations or distinct HBV genotypes are associated to higher risks factors for HCC or hepatic complications leading

  10. The association between invasive group A streptococcal diseases and viral respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L Herrera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections of the upper respiratory tract are associated with a variety of invasive diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, the group A streptococcus, including pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, and bacteremia. While these polymicrobial infections, or superinfections, are complex, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of disease. Areas of investigation have included the characterization of virus-induced changes in innate immunity, differences in bacterial adherence and internalization following viral infection, and the efficacy of vaccines in mitigating the morbidity and mortality of superinfections. Here, we briefly summarize viral-S. pyogenes superinfections with an emphasis on those affiliated with influenza viruses.

  11. Pseudo-nitzschia Challenged with Co-occurring Viral Communities Display Diverse Infection Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Michael C G; McCary, Nicolette D; Leach, Terence S; Rocap, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are catalysts of biogeochemical cycling, architects of microbial community structure, and terminators of phytoplankton blooms. Viral lysis of diatoms, a key group of eukaryotic phytoplankton, has the potential to impact carbon export and marine food webs. However, the impact of viruses on diatom abundance and community composition is unknown. Diatom-virus dynamics were explored by sampling every month at two coastal and estuarine locations in Washington state, USA resulting in 41 new isolates of the pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia and 20 environmental virus samples. We conducted a total of 820 pair-wise crosses of the Pseudo-nitzschia isolates and viral communities. Viral communities infected Pseudo-nitzschia isolates in 8% of the crosses overall and 16% of crosses when the host and viral communities were isolated from the same sample. Isolates ranged in their permissivity to infection with some isolates not infected by any viral samples and others infected by up to 10 viral communities. Isolates that were infected by the most viral communities also had the highest maximum observed viral titers (as high as 16000 infectious units ml(-1)). Titers of the viral communities were host dependent, as titers for one viral sample on eight different hosts spanned four orders of magnitude. Sequencing of the Pseudo-nitzschia Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) of the revealed multiple subgroups of hosts with 100% ITS1 identities that were infected by different viral communities. Indeed, we repeatedly isolated groups of isolates with identical ITS1 sequences from the same water sample that displayed different viral infection phenotypes. The interactions between Pseudo-nitzschia and the viral communities highlight the diversity of diatoms and emphasize the complexity and variability of diatom-virus dynamics in the ocean.

  12. Pseudo-nitzschia challenged with co-occurring viral communities display diverse infection phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Curtis Grier Carlson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are catalysts of biogeochemical cycling, architects of microbial community structure, and terminators of phytoplankton blooms. Viral lysis of diatoms, a key group of eukaryotic phytoplankton, has the potential to impact carbon export and marine food webs. However, the impact of viruses on diatom abundance and community composition is unknown. Diatom-virus dynamics were explored by sampling every month at 2 coastal and estuarine locations in Washington state, USA resulting in 41 new isolates of the pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia and 20 environmental virus samples. We conducted a total of 820 pair-wise crosses of the Pseudo-nitzschia isolates and viral communities. Viral communities infected Pseudo-nitzschia isolates in 8% of the crosses overall and 16% of crosses when the host and viral communities were isolated from the same sample. Isolates ranged in their permissivity to infection with some isolates not infected by any viral samples and others infected by up to 10 viral communities. Isolates that were infected by the most viral communities also had the highest maximum observed viral titers (as high as 16000 infectious units ml-1. Titers of the viral communities were host dependent, as titers for one viral sample on 8 different hosts spanned 4 orders of magnitude. Sequencing of the Pseudo-nitzschia Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1 of the revealed multiple subgroups of hosts with 100% ITS1 identity that were infected by different viral communities. Indeed, we repeatedly isolated groups of isolates with identical ITS1 sequences from the same water sample that displayed different viral infection phenotypes. The interactions between Pseudo-nitzschia and the viral communities highlight the diversity of diatoms and emphasize the complexity and variability of diatom-virus dynamics in the ocean.

  13. The stability analysis of a general viral infection model with distributed delays and multi-staged infected progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinliang; Liu, Shengqiang

    2015-01-01

    We investigate an in-host model with general incidence and removal rate, as well as distributed delays in virus infections and in productions. By employing Lyapunov functionals and LaSalle's invariance principle, we define and prove the basic reproductive number R0 as a threshold quantity for stability of equilibria. It is shown that if R0 > 1 , then the infected equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable, while if R0 ⩽ 1 , then the infection free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable under some reasonable assumptions. Moreover, n + 1 distributed delays describe (i) the time between viral entry and the transcription of viral RNA, (ii) the n - 1 -stage time needed for activated infected cells between viral RNA transcription and viral release, and (iii) the time necessary for the newly produced viruses to be infectious (maturation), respectively. The model can describe the viral infection dynamics of many viruses such as HIV-1, HCV and HBV.

  14. [Hepatitis non-A, non-B: epidemiological significance in acute viral hepatitis and chronic active hepatitis of hepatological consultation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jmelnitzky, A C; Basualdo, J A; Belloni, P O; Ponce de León, H H; García, C; Curciarello, J

    1987-01-01

    157 acute viral hepatitis and 60 chronic active ones have been analyzed focusing on NANB etiology. HAV was implicated in 36.3% of the hole acute viral hepatitis sample, HBV in 29.3%, and HNANBV was presumed as etiology in 31.2%, 5 patients (3.2%) had acute infection by HAV, on previous one by HBV, except for Epstein-Barr virus, no other test for viruses were determined (CMV, HSV, etc.). Male/female ratio was 1.4:1, 1.9:1, and 1.4:1 for HAV, HBV and HNANBV acute hepatitis respectively; HAV was the main etiology in the 0-9 age group (72.2%) although it only represents 11.5% of the sample; small occurrence of HAV hepatitis were found in patients over 40 (8.8%); HBV was clearly prevalent in patients over 50 (65.2%); the highest concentration of NANB etiology was found between 20-39 years old, but it was represented in all age-groups. Out of 49 NANB acute hepatitis, 12.2% had related transfusional antecedents, 12.2% belonged to health care worker group, and 4.1% had a close family NANB hepatitis contact; 71.5% had no reported antecedent. Viral source was presumably implicated in 75.0% of chronic active hepatitis, 25.0% attributable to HNANBV. Results seem not feasible to transfer to general population due to the facts that most patients were of specialized consult, and pediatric assistance is unusual to the authors practice.

  15. [Detection of viral infection pathogens in medicinal plants grown in Ukraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, L T; Korenieva, A A; Molchanets', O V; Boĭko, A L

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of viral infection on medicinal plant plantations is carried out. Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, Valeriana officinalis L., Plantago major L. with symptoms of viral infection were revealed. Viral nature of symptoms was proved with biotesting method. Morphology and sizes of virus particles, detected in Panax ginseng method. Morphology and sizes of virus particles, detected in Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, Valeriana officinalis L., Plantago major L., were determined with electron microscopy method. The paper is presented in Ukrainian.

  16. Alzheimer's disease gene signature says: beware of brain viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ianni Manuela

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent findings from a genome wide association investigation in a large cohort of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD and non demented controls (CTR showed that a limited set of genes was in a strong association (p > l0-5 with the disease. Presentation of the hypothesis In this report we suggest that the polymorphism association in 8 of these genes is consistent with a non conventional interpretation of AD etiology. Nectin-2 (NC-2, apolipoprotein E (APOE, glycoprotein carcinoembryonic antigen related cell adhesion molecule- 16 (CEACAM-16, B-cell lymphoma-3 (Bcl-3, translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog (T0MM-40, complement receptor-1 (CR-l, APOJ or clusterin and C-type lectin domain A family-16 member (CLEC-16A result in a genetic signature that might affect individual brain susceptibility to infection by herpes virus family during aging, leading to neuronal loss, inflammation and amyloid deposition. Implications of the hypothesis We hypothesized that such genetic trait may predispose to AD via complex and diverse mechanisms each contributing to an increase of individual susceptibility to brain viral infections

  17. EV71 infection correlates with viral IgG preexisting at pharyngolaryngeal mucosa in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingchang; Xue; Yaoming; Li; Xiaoyi; Xu; Jie; Yu; Hu; Yan; Huimin; Yan

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71(EV71) infection causes severe central nervous system damage, particularly for children under the age of 5 years old, which remains a major public health burden worldwide. Clinical data released that children may be repeatedly infected by different members in enterovirus and get even worsen. Mucosa, especially epithelium of alimentary canal, was considered the primary site of EV71 infection. It has been elusive whether the preexsiting viral antibody in mucosa plays a role in EV71 infection. To answer this question, we respectively measured viral antibody response and EV71 RNA copy number of one hundred throat swab specimens from clinically confirmed EV71-infected children. The results released that low-level of mucosal Ig G antibody against EV71 broadly existed in young population. More importantly, it further elucidated that the children with mucosal preexsiting EV71 Ig G were prone to be infected, which suggested a former viral Ig G mediated enhancement of viral infection in vivo.

  18. 人类博卡病毒载量与儿童呼吸道感染临床特征的相关性%The correlation study of viral load of human bocavirus and clinical features of children with acute respiratory tract infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹芳; 周卫芳; 王美娟; 严永东; 季伟

    2014-01-01

    导致患儿细胞免疫功能紊乱,且HBoV载量愈高,愈能引起婴幼儿发生喘息.对于HBoV低病毒载量的患儿,要考虑存在其他病原体混合感染可能.%Objective To investigate the detection of human bocavirus (HBoV) in children with acute respiratory infection and to explore the relationship between viral load and clinical characteristics of acute respiratory infection in children.Methods A total of 4 501 nasopharyngeal secretion samples were collected from hospitalized children with acute respiratory infection from January 2013 to June 2013.HBoV-positive children were divided into simple infection group and mixed infection group.Children with HBoV DNA≥1 × 104 copy/mL were categorized into high viral load group,while those with HBoV DNA <1 × 104 copy/mL were categorized into low viral load group.HBoV was determined by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV),influenza virus (Inf)-A,Inf-B,parainfluenza virus (Pinf)-Ⅰ 、Pinf-Ⅱ 、Pinf-Ⅲ and adeno virus antigen were detected by direct antigen-specific immunofluorescence assays.Mycoplasm Pnuemonia was detected by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR.Serum mycoplasma antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Bacteria was detected by sputum culture.Over the same period,23 children undergoing elective inguinal hernia operation with no respiratory infection or fever were considered as control group.The percentage of peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets were tested by flow cytometry.Inter-group differences were compared using Chi-square test or Fisher exact test.Viral loads were compared using Mann-Whitney test.Results Two hundred and twenty-two HBoV-positive cases were detected with a positive rate of 5.41% (222/4 105),33.33% (74/222) of which were with high viral load and 66.67% (148/222) were with low viral load.There was a high incidence in the age group of 1-2 years.The simple HBoV infection

  19. Conserved residues in Lassa fever virus Z protein modulate viral infectivity at the level of the ribonucleoprotein.

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    Capul, Althea A; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Buchmeier, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    Arenaviruses are negative-strand RNA viruses that cause human diseases such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, and Lassa hemorrhagic fever. No licensed vaccines exist, and current treatment is limited to ribavirin. The prototypic arenavirus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), is a model for dissecting virus-host interactions in persistent and acute disease. The RING finger protein Z has been identified as the driving force of arenaviral budding and acts as the viral matrix protein. While residues in Z required for viral budding have been described, residues that govern the Z matrix function(s) have yet to be fully elucidated. Because this matrix function is integral to viral assembly, we reasoned that this would be reflected in sequence conservation. Using sequence alignment, we identified several conserved residues in Z outside the RING and late domains. Nine residues were each mutated to alanine in Lassa fever virus Z. All of the mutations affected the expression of an LCMV minigenome and the infectivity of virus-like particles, but to greatly varying degrees. Interestingly, no mutations appeared to affect Z-mediated budding or association with viral GP. Our findings provide direct experimental evidence supporting a role for Z in the modulation of the activity of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex and its packaging into mature infectious viral particles.

  20. Isolation and Genetic Analysis of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus from Infected Cattle in Indiana

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    Roman M. Pogranichniy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Species and biotype distribution was determined in 44 bovine viral diarrhea virus- (BVDV- positive samples submitted to the Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (ADDL in Indiana during 2006–2008. BVDV RNA was detected in the 5′-untranslated region and Npro region using reverse transcriptase PCR followed by sequencing analysis of the PCR product. Additionally, cases were classified into one of six categories according to history and/or lesions: acute symptomatic, hemorrhagic, respiratory distress, reproductive, persistent infection (PI, and mucosal disease (MD. Of 44 BVDV-positive samples, 33 were noncytopathic (ncp, 10 were cytopathic (cp, and one presented both ncp and cp biotypes. Sequencing analysis demonstrated that all samples belonged to BVDV-1a, BVDV-1b, or BVDV-2. The most common isolate was ncp BVDV-1b, (44% followed by ncp BVDV-2a (24%. Among the six categories, respiratory clinical signs were the most common (36% followed by PI (25% and MD (16%.

  1. Viral infections and atopy in asthma pathogenesis: new rationales for asthma prevention and treatment.

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    Holt, Patrick G; Sly, Peter D

    2012-05-04

    Prospective birth cohort studies tracking asthma initiation and consolidation in community cohorts have identified viral infections occurring against a background of allergic sensitization to aeroallergens as a uniquely potent risk factor for the expression of acute severe asthma-like symptoms and for the ensuing development of asthma that can persist through childhood and into adulthood. A combination of recent experimental and human studies have suggested that underlying this bipartite process are a series of interactions between antiviral and atopic inflammatory pathways that are mediated by local activation of myeloid cell populations in the airway mucosa and the parallel programming and recruitment of their replacements from bone marrow. Targeting key components of these pathways at the appropriate stages of asthma provides new opportunities for the treatment of established asthma but, more crucially, for primary and secondary prevention of asthma during childhood.

  2. IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV infection

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    Depla, Marion; Pelletier, Sandy; Bédard, Nathalie; Brunaud, Camille; Bruneau, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Polymorphisms in the type III interferon IFN‐λ3 and the killer cell immunoglobulin‐like receptor (KIR) genes controlling the activity of natural killer (NK) cells can predict spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We hypothesized that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism may modulate NK cell function during acute HCV. Methods We monitored the plasma levels of type III IFNs in relation to the phenotype and the function of NK cells in a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) during acute HCV infection with different outcomes. Results Early acute HCV was associated with high variability in type III IFNs plasma levels and the favorable IFN‐λ3 CC genotype was associated with higher viral loads. Reduced expression of Natural Killer Group Protein 2A (NKG2A) was associated with lower IFN‐λ3 plasma levels and the CC genotype. IFN‐γ production by NK cells was higher in individuals with the CC genotype during acute infection but this did not prevent viral persistence. IFN‐λ3 plasma levels did not correlate with function of NK cells and IFN‐λ3 prestimulation did not affect NK cell activation and function. Conclusions These results suggest that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV but other factors may act in concert to determine the outcome of the infection. PMID:27621819

  3. Absence of Siglec-H in MCMV infection elevates interferon alpha production but does not enhance viral clearance.

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    Franz Puttur

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs express the I-type lectin receptor Siglec-H and produce interferon α (IFNα, a critical anti-viral cytokine during the acute phase of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection. The ligands and biological functions of Siglec-H still remain incompletely defined in vivo. Thus, we generated a novel bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC-transgenic "pDCre" mouse which expresses Cre recombinase under the control of the Siglec-H promoter. By crossing these mice with a Rosa26 reporter strain, a representative fraction of Siglec-H⁺ pDCs is terminally labeled with red fluorescent protein (RFP. Interestingly, systemic MCMV infection of these mice causes the downregulation of Siglec-H surface expression. This decline occurs in a TLR9- and MyD88-dependent manner. To elucidate the functional role of Siglec-H during MCMV infection, we utilized a novel Siglec-H deficient mouse strain. In the absence of Siglec-H, the low infection rate of pDCs with MCMV remained unchanged, and pDC activation was still intact. Strikingly, Siglec-H deficiency induced a significant increase in serum IFNα levels following systemic MCMV infection. Although Siglec-H modulates anti-viral IFNα production, the control of viral replication was unchanged in vivo. The novel mouse models will be valuable to shed further light on pDC biology in future studies.

  4. Assessing pneumococcal meningitis association with viral respiratory infections and antibiotics: insights from statistical and mathematical models.

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    Opatowski, Lulla; Varon, Emmanuelle; Dupont, Claire; Temime, Laura; van der Werf, Sylvie; Gutmann, Laurent; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Watier, Laurence; Guillemot, Didier

    2013-08-01

    Pneumococcus is an important human pathogen, highly antibiotic resistant and a major cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide. Better prevention requires understanding the drivers of pneumococcal infection incidence and antibiotic susceptibility. Although respiratory viruses (including influenza) have been suggested to influence pneumococcal infections, the underlying mechanisms are still unknown, and viruses are rarely considered when studying pneumococcus epidemiology. Here, we propose a novel mathematical model to examine hypothetical relationships between Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis incidence (SPMI), acute viral respiratory infections (AVRIs) and antibiotic exposure. French time series of SPMI, AVRI and penicillin consumption over 2001-2004 are analysed and used to assess four distinct virus-bacteria interaction submodels, ascribing the interaction on pneumococcus transmissibility and/or pathogenicity. The statistical analysis reveals strong associations between time series: SPMI increases shortly after AVRI incidence and decreases overall as the antibiotic-prescription rate rises. Model simulations require a combined impact of AVRI on both pneumococcal transmissibility (up to 1.3-fold increase at the population level) and pathogenicity (up to threefold increase) to reproduce the data accurately, along with diminished epidemic fitness of resistant pneumococcal strains causing meningitis (0.97 (0.96-0.97)). Overall, our findings suggest that AVRI and antibiotics strongly influence SPMI trends. Consequently, vaccination protecting against respiratory virus could have unexpected benefits to limit invasive pneumococcal infections.

  5. INTERRELATIONS BETWEEN IMMUNOLOGICAL ALTERATIONS AND VIRAL LOAD IN ACUTE HEPATITIS B

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    A. A. Savchenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A group of seventy-six patients with acute viral hepatitis B (HB was under study, in order to evaluate immunological parameters, and ability of blood mononuclear cells to produce cytokines, as dependent on individual viral loads. The immune parameters were less affected in cases of low viral load. Meanwhile, the immune profiles exhibited maximal alterations in the patients with medium and high viral loads. Most expressed changes of immune parameters are found in patients with moderate and high  virus load. Meanwhile, moderate  HB  viral  loads  are  associated  with  higher  functional  activity  of  B-cells  and  lower  NK  numbers, whereas high viral loads correlated with increased amounts of peripheral B cells and higher CD25+ lymphocyte levels. Increased background cytokine synthesis is revealed in mononuclear cells of the patients with acute HB, being, however, suppressed upon additional functional induction. An increased viral load is associated with decreased basal levels of TNFα synthesis. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 2-3, pp 181-188 

  6. [A case of sustained cholestasis caused by acute A viral hepatitis in Dubin-Johnson syndrome].

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    Ra, Sang Ho; Sung, Se Yong; Jung, Ho Yeon; Cha, Jae Hwang; Baik, Soon Koo; Cho, Mee Yon; Kim, Moon Young

    2012-04-01

    Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a rare clinical entity. It shows intermittent symptoms such as chronic or intermittent jaundice, abdominal pain, weakness, nausea, vomiting, anorexia and diarrhea. Symptoms are precipitated or aggravated by pregnancy, alcoholism, surgical procedures and intercurrent disease. Chronic idiopathic jaundice is typical of Dubin-Johnson syndrome and its prognosis is good. We describe a case of prolonged cholestasis for more than 10 months caused by acute A viral hepatitis in a patient with Dubin-Johnson syndrome. It is a first report of cholestasis complicated by acute A viral hepatitis in a patient with Dubin-Johnson syndrome.

  7. IL-10: A Multifunctional Cytokine in Viral Infections

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    José M. Rojas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory master regulator IL-10 is critical to protect the host from tissue damage during acute phases of immune responses. This regulatory mechanism, central to T cell homeostasis, can be hijacked by viruses to evade immunity. IL-10 can be produced by virtually all immune cells, and it can also modulate the function of these cells. Understanding the effects of this multifunctional cytokine is therefore a complex task. In the present review we discuss the factors driving IL-10 production and the cellular sources of the cytokine during antiviral immune responses. We particularly focus on the IL-10 regulatory mechanisms that impact antiviral immune responses and how viruses can use this central regulatory pathway to evade immunity and establish chronic/latent infections.

  8. DNA cleavage enzymes for treatment of persistent viral infections: Recent advances and the pathway forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Nicholas D., E-mail: nweber@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Aubert, Martine, E-mail: maubert@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Dang, Chung H., E-mail: cdang@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Stone, Daniel, E-mail: dstone2@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Jerome, Keith R., E-mail: kjerome@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Treatment for most persistent viral infections consists of palliative drug options rather than curative approaches. This is often because long-lasting viral DNA in infected cells is not affected by current antivirals, providing a source for viral persistence and reactivation. Targeting latent viral DNA itself could therefore provide a basis for novel curative strategies. DNA cleavage enzymes can be used to induce targeted mutagenesis of specific genes, including those of exogenous viruses. Although initial in vitro and even in vivo studies have been carried out using DNA cleavage enzymes targeting various viruses, many questions still remain concerning the feasibility of these strategies as they transition into preclinical research. Here, we review the most recent findings on DNA cleavage enzymes for human viral infections, consider the most relevant animal models for several human viral infections, and address issues regarding safety and enzyme delivery. Results from well-designed in vivo studies will ideally provide answers to the most urgent remaining questions, and allow continued progress toward clinical application. - Highlights: • Recent in vitro and in vivo results for DNA cleavage enzymes targeting persistent viral infections. • Analysis of the best animal models for testing enzymes for HBV, HSV, HIV and HPV. • Challenges facing in vivo delivery of therapeutic enzymes for persistent viral infections. • Safety issues to be addressed with proper animal studies.

  9. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

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    Kwofie Theophilus B

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2% were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3% patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%, Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3 in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8% and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3. Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36 of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  10. Infections in acute leukemia in Indian Children

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    B Roy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In the present study acute leukemic children were studied to determine the incidence and principal site of infection, correlation with absolute neutrophil count, causative organisms and to standardize the initial empirical anti microbial therapy. Materials and methods: A total 40 children in the age group 6 month to 12 year with acute leukemia relapse were included in this study. A total 82 infectious episodes including 61 febrile episodes were investigated for infectious etiology. Results: We found that the frequency of infections increased significantly with the degree of immunocompromisation specially neutropenia (ANC < 500/cmm. The skin and soft tissue was the commonest site of infection (26.83%, followed by respiratory tract (21.95%. Staphylococcus nonhemolytic coagulase-negative (34%, followed by Klebsiella (17% were the most common organisms isolated from blood. Staphylococcus non-hemolytic coagulase-negative was also the commonest isolate (26% from other sites of infection. Most strains were sensitive to Cloxacillin, cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Conclusion: For the treatment of febrile episodes, empirical use of beta-lactamase resistant penicillin e.g. Cloxacillin or cephalosporin combined with an aminoglycosides with a broad spectrum antifungal like fluconazole in selective cases at the first sign of infection is recommended. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-1, 40-47 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i1.9672

  11. Viral infection in community-acquired pneumonia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Michael Burk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The advent of PCR has improved the identification of viruses in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Several studies have used PCR to establish the importance of viruses in the aetiology of CAP. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the studies that reported the proportion of viral infection detected via PCR in patients with CAP. We excluded studies with paediatric populations. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with viral infection. The secondary outcome was short-term mortality. Our review included 31 studies. Most obtained PCR via nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal swab. The pooled proportion of patients with viral infection was 24.5% (95% CI 21.5–27.5%. In studies that obtained lower respiratory samples in >50% of patients, the proportion was 44.2% (95% CI 35.1–53.3%. The odds of death were higher in patients with dual bacterial and viral infection (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.32–3.31. Viral infection is present in a high proportion of patients with CAP. The true proportion of viral infection is probably underestimated because of negative test results from nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal swab PCR. There is increased mortality in patients with dual bacterial and viral infection.

  12. Airway microbiota and acute respiratory infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs), such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia, are the leading cause of hospitalization of infants in the US. While the incidence and severity of ARI can vary widely among children, the reasons for these differences are not fully explained by traditional risk factors (e.g., prematurity, viral pathogens). The recent advent of molecular diagnostic techniques has revealed the presence of highly functional communities of microbes inhabiting the human body (i.e., microbiota) that appear to influence development of local and systemic immune response. We propose a 'risk and resilience' model in which airway microbiota are associated with an increased (risk microbiota) or decreased (resilience microbiota) incidence and severity of ARI in children. We also propose that modulating airway microbiota (e.g., from risk to resilience microbiota) during early childhood will optimize airway immunity and, thereby, decrease ARI incidence and severity in children.

  13. Estimating the impact of vaccination in acute SHIV-SIV infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Ruy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infects approxmately 0.5% of the world population, and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. A vaccine for HIV is urgently required, and a variety of vaccine modalities have been tested in animal models of infection. A number of these studies have shown protection in monkey models of infection, although the ability of the vaccine to protect appears to vary with the viral strain and animal model used. The recent failure of a large vaccine study in humans suggests that further understanding of the basic dynamics of infection and impact of vaccination are required, in order to understand the variable efficacy of vaccination in different infections. The dynamics of HIV infection have been studied in humans and in a variety of animal models. The standard model of infection has been used to estimate the basic reproductive ratio (R{sub 0}) of the virus, calculated from the growth rate of virus in acute infection. This method has not been useful in studying the effects of vaccination, since, in the vaccines developed so far, early growth rates of virus do not differ between control and vaccinated animals. Here, we use the standard model of viral dynamics to derive the reproductive ratio from the peak viral load and nadir of target cell numbers in acute infection. We apply this method to data from studies of vaccination in Simian Human Immunodeficiency Virus (SHIV) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) infection and demonstrate that vaccination can reduce the reproductive ratio by 2.3 and 2 fold respectively. This method allows the comparison of vaccination efficacy amongst different viral strains and animal models in vivo.

  14. Comparison of antibody repertoires produced by HIV-1 infection, other chronic and acute infections, and systemic autoimmune disease.

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    Felix Breden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies (Abs produced during HIV-1 infection rarely neutralize a broad range of viral isolates; only eight broadly-neutralizing (bNt monoclonal (MAbs have been isolated. Yet, to be effective, an HIV-1 vaccine may have to elicit the essential features of these MAbs. The V genes of all of these bNt MAbs are highly somatically mutated, and the V(H genes of five of them encode a long (≥ 20 aa third complementarity-determining region (CDR-H3. This led us to question whether long CDR-H3s and high levels of somatic mutation (SM are a preferred feature of anti-HIV bNt MAbs, or if other adaptive immune responses elicit them in general. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assembled a V(H-gene sequence database from over 700 human MAbs of known antigen specificity isolated from chronic (viral infections (ChI, acute (bacterial and viral infections (AcI, and systemic autoimmune diseases (SAD, and compared their CDR-H3 length, number of SMs and germline V(H-gene usage. We found that anti-HIV Abs, regardless of their neutralization breadth, tended to have long CDR-H3s and high numbers of SMs. However, these features were also common among Abs associated with other chronic viral infections. In contrast, Abs from acute viral infections (but not bacterial infections tended to have relatively short CDR-H3s and a low number of SMs, whereas SAD Abs were generally intermediate in CDR-H3 length and number of SMs. Analysis of V(H gene usage showed that ChI Abs also tended to favor distal germline V(H-genes (particularly V(H1-69, especially in Abs bearing long CDR-H3s. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The striking difference between the Abs produced during chronic vs. acute viral infection suggests that Abs bearing long CDR-H3s, high levels of SM and V(H1-69 gene usage may be preferentially selected during persistent infection.

  15. The impact of the interferon-lambda family on the innate and adaptive immune response to viral infections.

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    Egli, Adrian; Santer, Deanna M; O'Shea, Daire; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Houghton, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Type-III interferons (IFN-λ, IFNL) are the most recently described family of IFNs. This family of innate cytokines are increasingly being ascribed pivotal roles in host-pathogen interactions. Herein, we will review the accumulating evidence detailing the immune biology of IFNL during viral infection, and the implications of this novel information on means to advance the development of therapies and vaccines against existing and emerging pathogens. IFNLs exert antiviral effects via induction of IFN-stimulated genes. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IFNL3, IFNL4 and the IFNL receptor α-subunit genes have been strongly associated with IFN-α-based treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The clinical impact of these SNPs may be dependent on the status of viral infection (acute or chronic) and the potential to develop viral resistance. Another important function of IFNLs is macrophage and dendritic cell polarization, which prime helper T-cell activation and proliferation. It has been demonstrated that IFNL increase Th1- and reduce Th2-cytokines. Therefore, can such SNPs affect the IFNL signaling and thereby modulate the Th1/Th2 balance during infection? In turn, this may influence the subsequent priming of cytotoxic T cells versus antibody-secreting B cells, with implications for the breadth and durability of the host response.

  16. Is respiratory viral infection really an important trigger of asthma exacerbations in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-lun; Chiu, Shui-seng Susan; Malik, Peiris Joseph S; Chan, Kwok-hung; Wong, Hing-sang Wilfred; Lau, Yu-lung

    2011-10-01

    We performed a prospective cohort study from September 2003 to December 2004 to delineate attributing the effect of different respiratory viral infections including newly discovered ones to asthma exacerbations in children in Hong Kong. One hundred and fourteen children aged 6-14 years with chronic stable asthma and on regular inhaled steroid were monitored for respiratory symptoms over a full calendar year from recruitment. They would attend the study clinic if peak expiratory flow rate decreased to below 80% of their baselines, if they met a predefined symptom score, or if parents subjectively felt them developing a cold. Virological diagnosis using virus culture, antigen detection, and polymerase chain reaction methods on nasal swab specimens would be attempted for all these visits irrespective of triggers. Physician diagnosed outcome of each episode was documented. Three hundred and five episodes of respiratory illnesses were captured in the cohort. Nasal specimens were available in 166 episodes, 92 of which were diagnosed as asthma exacerbations, and 74 non-asthma related episodes. Respiratory viruses were detected in 61 of 166 episodes (36.7%). There was no significant difference in virus detection rate between asthma exacerbations (32 out of 97 episodes, 34.8%) and non-asthma respiratory illnesses (29 out of 79 episodes, 39.2%). Although newly discovered respiratory viruses were identified in these episodes, rhinovirus was the commonest organism associated with both asthma exacerbations and non-asthma related episodes. Plausible explanations for much lower virus detection rate than previously reported include improved personal hygiene and precautionary measures taken during respiratory tract infections in the immediate post-severe acute respiratory syndrome period together with a significant contribution of other adverse factors like environmental air pollution. We conclude that not all viral infections in children with asthma lead to an asthma exacerbation

  17. A comparative study of regression of jaundice in patients of malaria and acute viral hepatitis

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    D.K. Kochar, K. Kaswan, S.K. Kochar, P. Sirohi, M. Pala, A. Kochar , R.P. Agrawal , A. Das

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Jaundice is one of the common manifestations of severe malaria in adults.The purpose of this study is to compare the pattern of clinical and biochemical parameters such asserum bilirubin and liver enzyme levels in patients of malaria with jaundice and acute viral hepatitis.Methodology: The present study was conducted on 34 patients of malaria with jaundice and 15patients of acute viral hepatitis. Estimation of serum bilirubin, aspartate amino transferase (AST,alanine amino transferase (ALT and alkaline phosphatase was done daily using standard proceduresin malaria patients and weekly in acute viral hepatitis patients.Results: Mean level of serum bilirubin on first day in malaria and acute viral hepatitis patients was7.07 ± 3.94 and 10.38 ± 7.87 mg%, whereas on Day 8 it was 1.19 ± 1.43 and 7.88 ± 7.02 mg%respectively. Mean level of AST on Day 1 in malaria and acute viral hepatitis patients was 158.47 ±120.35 and 1418.6 ± 834.11 IU/L, whereas on Day 8 it was 41 ± 28.33 and 775.3 ± 399.01IU/L respectively. Mean level of ALT on Day 1 in malaria and acute viral hepatitis patients was220.14 ± 145.61 and 1666.67 ± 1112.77 IU/L, whereas on Day 8 it was 50.85 ± 37.31 and 823.8 ±475.06 IU/L respectively. Mean level of serum alkaline phosphatase on Day 1 in malaria and acuteviral hepatitis patients was 394.74 ± 267.78 and 513.4 ± 324.7 IU/L, whereas on Day 8 it was84.76 ± 68.50 and 369.27 ± 207.75 IU/L respectively.Interpretation & conclusion: We observed that resolution of jaundice in malaria took 1–2 weeks incontrast 6 to 8 weeks in viral hepatitis. This difference in duration was statistically significant. Thus,jaundice not resolving in 1–2 weeks time in a patient of malaria requires serious consideration forpresence of other concomitant diseases including viral hepatitis.

  18. Acute psychosis followed by fever: Malignant neuroleptic syndrome or viral encephalitis?

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    Stojanović Zvezdana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is rare, but potentially fatal idiosyncratic reaction to antipsychotic medications. It is sometimes difficult to diagnose some clinical cases as neuroleptic malignant syndrome and differentiate it from the acute viral encephalitis. Case report. We reported a patient diagnosed with acute psychotic reaction which appeared for the first time. The treatment started with typical antipsychotic, which led to febrility. The clinical presentation of the patient was characterised by the signs and symptoms that might have indicated the neuroleptic malignant syndrome as well as central nervous system viral disease. In order to make a detailed diagnosis additional procedures were performed: electroencephalogram, magnetic resonance imaging of the head, lumbar puncture and a serological test of the cerebrospinal fluid. Considering that after the tests viral encephalitis was ruled out and the diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome made, antipsychotic therapy was immediately stopped. The patient was initially treated with symptomatic therapy and after that with atypical antipsychotic and electroconvulsive therapy, which led to complete recovery. Conclusion. We present the difficulties of early diagnosis at the first episode of acute psychotic disorder associated with acute febrile condition. Concerning the differential diagnosis it is necessary to consider both neuroleptic malignant syndrome and viral encephalitis, i.e. it is necessary to make the neuroradiological diagnosis and conduct cerebrospinal fluid analysis and blood test. In neuroleptic malignant syndrome treatment a combined use of electroconvulsive therapy and low doses of atypical antipsychotic are confirmed to be successful.

  19. Synaptic transmission and the susceptibility of HIV infection to anti-viral drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Natalia L.; Levy, David N.; Wodarz, Dominik

    2013-07-01

    Cell-to-cell viral transmission via virological synapses has been argued to reduce susceptibility of the virus population to anti-viral drugs through multiple infection of cells, contributing to low-level viral persistence during therapy. Using a mathematical framework, we examine the role of synaptic transmission in treatment susceptibility. A key factor is the relative probability of individual virions to infect a cell during free-virus and synaptic transmission, a currently unknown quantity. If this infection probability is higher for free-virus transmission, then treatment susceptibility is lowest if one virus is transferred per synapse, and multiple infection of cells increases susceptibility. In the opposite case, treatment susceptibility is minimized for an intermediate number of virions transferred per synapse. Hence, multiple infection via synapses does not simply lower treatment susceptibility. Without further experimental investigations, one cannot conclude that synaptic transmission provides an additional mechanism for the virus to persist at low levels during anti-viral therapy.

  20. p53 Activation following Rift Valley fever virus infection contributes to cell death and viral production.

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    Dana Austin

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is an emerging viral zoonosis that is responsible for devastating outbreaks among livestock and is capable of causing potentially fatal disease in humans. Studies have shown that upon infection, certain viruses have the capability of utilizing particular cellular signaling pathways to propagate viral infection. Activation of p53 is important for the DNA damage signaling cascade, initiation of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and transcriptional regulation of multiple genes. The current study focuses on the role of p53 signaling in RVFV infection and viral replication. These results show an up-regulation of p53 phosphorylation at several serine sites after RVFV MP-12 infection that is highly dependent on the viral protein NSs. qRT-PCR data showed a transcriptional up-regulation of several p53 targeted genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis regulation following RVFV infection. Cell viability assays demonstrate that loss of p53 results in less RVFV induced cell death. Furthermore, decreased viral titers in p53 null cells indicate that RVFV utilizes p53 to enhance viral production. Collectively, these experiments indicate that the p53 signaling pathway is utilized during RVFV infection to induce cell death and increase viral production.

  1. Human rhinovirus infection in young African children with acute wheezing

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    Zar Heather J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections caused by human rhinoviruses (HRVs are important triggers of wheezing in young children. Wheezy illness has increasingly been recognised as an important cause of morbidity in African children, but there is little information on the contribution of HRV to this. The aim of this study was to determine the role of HRV as a cause of acute wheezing in South African children. Methods Two hundred and twenty children presenting consecutively at a tertiary children's hospital with a wheezing illness from May 2004 to November 2005 were prospectively enrolled. A nasal swab was taken and reverse transcription PCR used to screen the samples for HRV. The presence of human metapneumovirus, human bocavirus and human coronavirus-NL63 was assessed in all samples using PCR-based assays. A general shell vial culture using a pool of monoclonal antibodies was used to detect other common respiratory viruses on 26% of samples. Phylogenetic analysis to determine circulating HRV species was performed on a portion of HRV-positive samples. Categorical characteristics were analysed using Fisher's Exact test. Results HRV was detected in 128 (58.2% of children, most (72% of whom were under 2 years of age. Presenting symptoms between the HRV-positive and negative groups were similar. Most illness was managed with ambulatory therapy, but 45 (35% were hospitalized for treatment and 3 (2% were admitted to intensive care. There were no in-hospital deaths. All 3 species of HRV were detected with HRV-C being the most common (52% followed by HRV-A (37% and HRV-B (11%. Infection with other respiratory viruses occurred in 20/128 (16% of HRV-positive children and in 26/92 (28% of HRV-negative samples. Conclusion HRV may be the commonest viral infection in young South African children with acute wheezing. Infection is associated with mild or moderate clinical disease.

  2. Experimental infection of pregnant goats with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV)1 or 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) of the genus pestivirus, family Flaviviridae, are not limited to cattle but occur in various artiodactyls. Persistently infected (PI) cattle are the main source of BVDV. Persistent infections also occur in heterologous hosts such as sheep and deer. ...

  3. Transfusion-transmitted virus in association with hepatitis A-E viral infections in various forms of liver diseases in India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Irshad; Y Sharma; I Dhar; J Singh; YK Joshi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To describe the prevalence of transfusiontransmitted virus (TTV) infection in association with hepatitis A-E viral infections in different forms of liver diseases in North India.METHODS: Sera from a total number of:137 patients,including 37 patients with acute viral hepatitis (AVH), 37patients with chronic viral hepatitis (CVH), 31 patients with cirrhosis of liver and 32 patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), were analyzed both for TTV-DNA and hepatitis A-E viral markers. Presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections was detected in different proportions in different groups. Moreover, TTV-DNA was simultaneously tested in 100 healthy blood donors also.RESULTS: None of the patients had hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) infections. Overall prevalence of TTV-DNA was detected in 27.1% cases with AVH, 18.9% cases with CVH, 48.4% cases with cirrhosis and 9.4% cases with FHF. TTV-DNA simultaneously tested in 100 healthy blood donors showed 27% positivity. On establishing a relation between TTV infection with other hepatitis viral infections, TTV demonstrated co-infection with HBV, HCV and HEV in these disease groups. Correlation of TTV with ALT level in sera did not demonstrate high ALT level in TTV-infected patients, suggesting that TTV does not cause severe liver damage.CONCLUSION: TTV infection is prevalent both in patients and healthy individuals in India. However, it does not have any significant correlation with other hepatitis viral infections, nor does it produce an evidence of severe liver damage in patients with liver diseases.

  4. Immune and viral correlates of "secondary viral control" after treatment interruption in chronically HIV-1 infected patients.

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    Ellen Van Gulck

    Full Text Available Upon interruption of antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected patients usually show viral load rebound to pre-treatment levels. Four patients, hereafter referred to as secondary controllers (SC, were identified who initiated therapy during chronic infection and, after stopping treatment, could control virus replication at undetectable levels for more than six months. In the present study we set out to unravel possible viral and immune parameters or mechanisms of this phenomenon by comparing secondary controllers with elite controllers and non-controllers, including patients under HAART. As candidate correlates of protection, virus growth kinetics, levels of intracellular viral markers, several aspects of HIV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell function and HIV neutralizing antibodies were investigated. As expected all intracellular viral markers were lower in aviremic as compared to viremic subjects, but in addition both elite and secondary controllers had lower levels of viral unspliced RNA in PBMC as compared to patients on HAART. Ex vivo cultivation of the virus from CD4+ T cells of SC consistently failed in one patient and showed delayed kinetics in the three others. Formal in vitro replication studies of these three viruses showed low to absent growth in two cases and a virus with normal fitness in the third case. T cell responses toward HIV peptides, evaluated in IFN-γ ELISPOT, revealed no significant differences in breadth, magnitude or avidity between SC and all other patient groups. Neither was there a difference in polyfunctionality of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, as evaluated with intracellular cytokine staining. However, secondary and elite controllers showed higher proliferative responses to Gag and Pol peptides. SC also showed the highest level of autologous neutralizing antibodies. These data suggest that higher T cell proliferative responses and lower replication kinetics might be instrumental in secondary viral control in the absence of

  5. Distribution pattern of bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 genome in lymphoid tissues of experimentally infected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikalan, M; Rajukumar, K; Mishra, N; Kumar, M; Kalaiyarasu, S; Rajesh, K; Gavade, V; Behera, S P; Dubey, S C

    2016-06-01

    In this study, cellular localization and the distribution pattern of BVDV genome in lymphoid tissues during the course of experimental acute BVDV-1 infection of sheep was investigated. Tonsils, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and spleen were collected on 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 days post infection (dpi) from twenty 4-month-old lambs, experimentally inoculated intra-nasally with 5 × 10(5) TCID50 of a non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV-1 isolate, Ind-17555. Tissues collected from ten mock-infected lambs served as controls. In situ hybridization (ISH) was carried out in paraformaldehyde fixed paraffin embedded tissue sections using digoxigenin labelled riboprobe targeting 5'-UTR of BVDV-1. BVDV genome was detected at all the intervals from 3 dpi to 15 dpi in the lymphoid tissues with variations between the intervals and also amongst the infected sheep. During the early phase of acute infection, presence of viral genome was more in tonsils than MLN and spleen, whereas the distribution was higher in MLN during later stages. BVDV-1 genome positive cells included lymphocytes, macrophages, plasma cells, reticular cells and sometimes crypt epithelial cells. Genome distribution was frequently observed in the lymphoid follicles of tonsils, MLN and spleen, besides the crypt epithelium in tonsils, paracortex and medullary sinus and cords of MLN. Most abundant and widespread distribution of BVDV-1 genome was observed on 6 dpi while there was a reduction in number and intensity of positive signals by 15 dpi in most of the infected animals. This is the first attempt made to study the localisation of BVDV-1 in lymphoid tissues of acutely infected sheep by in situ hybridization. The results show that the kinetics of BVDV-1 distribution in lymphoid tissues of experimentally infected non-pregnant sheep follows almost a similar pattern to that demonstrated in BVDV infected cattle.

  6. Infection Rates among Acute Leukemia Patients Receiving Alternative Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballen, Karen; Woo Ahn, Kwang; Chen, Min; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Ahmed, Ibrahim; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Antin, Joseph; Bhatt, Ami S; Boeckh, Michael; Chen, George; Dandoy, Christopher; George, Biju; Laughlin, Mary J; Lazarus, Hillard M; MacMillan, Margaret L; Margolis, David A; Marks, David I; Norkin, Maxim; Rosenthal, Joseph; Saad, Ayman; Savani, Bipin; Schouten, Harry C; Storek, Jan; Szabolcs, Paul; Ustun, Celalettin; Verneris, Michael R; Waller, Edmund K; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Williams, Kirsten M; Wingard, John R; Wirk, Baldeep; Wolfs, Tom; Young, Jo-Anne H; Auletta, Jeffrey; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lindemans, Caroline; Riches, Marcie L

    2016-09-01

    Alternative graft sources (umbilical cord blood [UCB], matched unrelated donors [MUD], or mismatched unrelated donors [MMUD]) enable patients without a matched sibling donor to receive potentially curative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Retrospective studies demonstrate comparable outcomes among different graft sources. However, the risk and types of infections have not been compared among graft sources. Such information may influence the choice of a particular graft source. We compared the incidence of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections in 1781 adults with acute leukemia who received alternative donor HCT (UCB, n= 568; MUD, n = 930; MMUD, n = 283) between 2008 and 2011. The incidences of bacterial infection at 1 year were 72%, 59%, and 65% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. Incidences of viral infection at 1 year were 68%, 45%, and 53% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. In multivariable analysis, bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were more common after either UCB or MMUD than after MUD (P < .0001). Bacterial and viral but not fungal infections were more common after UCB than MMUD (P = .0009 and <.0001, respectively). The presence of viral infection was not associated with an increased mortality. Overall survival (OS) was comparable among UCB and MMUD patients with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 90% but was inferior for UCB for patients with KPS < 90%. Bacterial and fungal infections were associated with poorer OS. Future strategies focusing on infection prevention and treatment are indicated to improve HCT outcomes.

  7. New animal models for hepatitis C viral infection and pathogenesis studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dina Kremsdorf; Nicolas Brezillon

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).In man, the pathobiological changes associated with HCV infection have been attributed to both the immune system and direct viral cytopathic effects. Until now, the lack of simple culture systems to infect and propagate the virus has hampered progress in understanding the viral life cycle and pathogenesis of HCV infection,including the molecular mechanisms implicated in HCV-induced HCC. This clearly demonstrates the need to develop small animal models for the study of HCV-associated pathogenesis. This review describes and discusses the development of new HCV animal models to study viral infection and investigate the direct effects of viral protein expression on liver disease.

  8. [Acute non-A non-B viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findor, J A; Lafage, M; Bruch Igartua, E M; Domecq, P; Firpo, A M; Domecq, R B

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-one patients HBs Ag negative seen between january 1978 and june 1980 were studied. Twenty-four of them were males and seven females. Their age ranged between 13 and 58 years. All of them were anti-HAV IgM negative. Six patients presented simultaneously Anti HBc and Anti HBs in the two first weeks of the illness. This fact could be imputed to an acquired immunity due to a previous infection with virus B. None of the patients studied had evidence of infectious mononucleosis or cytomegalovirus. In view of the absence of the markers of recent infection due to virus A and B these patients were considered to have a non A non B hepatitis. Twelve patients had evidence of previous hepatitis, thirteen had acquired the infection by parenteral route; four were post-transfusional and in six cases there was an epidemic medium. Forty-five percent of the patients studied had a biphasic elevation of the aminotransferases, and twenty percent had a cholestatic form. Two of the patients turned into a chronic active hepatitis and another one died of submasive necrosis; in both cases the via of infection was parenteral.

  9. [Efficacy of piracetam treatment of acute viral neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niss, A I; Umanskiĭ, K G; Maksutova, E L; Rudometov, Iu P

    1985-01-01

    Piracetam influence on the depth of consciousness loss and psychic function recovery was examined in two groups of 30 patients (study and control) selected at random. The study was carried out in conditions of a specialized department for patients with acute virus neuroinfections. Accelerated periods of egress from unconsciousness (including coma), high rate of reduction of psychoorganic and somatovegetative disorders followed by successful rehabilitation were characteristic of patients given piracetam from the disease onset. The results obtained permit recommending piracetam for wide use in neuroinfections.

  10. Who Regulates Whom? An Overview of RNA Granules and Viral Infections

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    Natalia Poblete-Durán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available After viral infection, host cells respond by mounting an anti-viral stress response in order to create a hostile atmosphere for viral replication, leading to the shut-off of mRNA translation (protein synthesis and the assembly of RNA granules. Two of these RNA granules have been well characterized in yeast and mammalian cells, stress granules (SGs, which are translationally silent sites of RNA triage and processing bodies (PBs, which are involved in mRNA degradation. This review discusses the role of these RNA granules in the evasion of anti-viral stress responses through virus-induced remodeling of cellular ribonucleoproteins (RNPs.

  11. Who Regulates Whom? An Overview of RNA Granules and Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete-Durán, Natalia; Prades-Pérez, Yara; Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    After viral infection, host cells respond by mounting an anti-viral stress response in order to create a hostile atmosphere for viral replication, leading to the shut-off of mRNA translation (protein synthesis) and the assembly of RNA granules. Two of these RNA granules have been well characterized in yeast and mammalian cells, stress granules (SGs), which are translationally silent sites of RNA triage and processing bodies (PBs), which are involved in mRNA degradation. This review discusses the role of these RNA granules in the evasion of anti-viral stress responses through virus-induced remodeling of cellular ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). PMID:27367717

  12. Exceptional Heterogeneity in Viral Evolutionary Dynamics Characterises Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemey, Philippe; Farci, Patrizia; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of HCV infection has seen significant progress, particularly since the approval of new direct-acting antiviral drugs. However these clinical achievements have been made despite an incomplete understanding of HCV replication and within-host evolution, especially compared with HIV-1. Here, we undertake a comprehensive analysis of HCV within-host evolution during chronic infection by investigating over 4000 viral sequences sampled longitudinally from 15 HCV-infected patients. We compare our HCV results to those from a well-studied HIV-1 cohort, revealing key differences in the evolutionary behaviour of these two chronic-infecting pathogens. Notably, we find an exceptional level of heterogeneity in the molecular evolution of HCV, both within and among infected individuals. Furthermore, these patterns are associated with the long-term maintenance of viral lineages within patients, which fluctuate in relative frequency in peripheral blood. Together, our findings demonstrate that HCV replication behavior is complex and likely comprises multiple viral subpopulations with distinct evolutionary dynamics. The presence of a structured viral population can explain apparent paradoxes in chronic HCV infection, such as rapid fluctuations in viral diversity and the reappearance of viral strains years after their initial detection. PMID:27631086

  13. Virulent Properties of Russian Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Strains in Experimentally Infected Calves

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    Alexander G. Glotov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental study of three noncytopathic and two cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV strains isolated from cattle in the Siberian region and belonging to the type 1 (subtypes 1a, 1b, and 1d have been presented. All investigated strains caused the development of infectious process in the seronegative 4–6-month-old calves after aerosol challenge with the dose of 6 log10 TCID50. The greatest virulence had noncytopathic strain and cytopathic strain related to the subtypes 1d and 1b, respectively. All strains in infected calves caused some signs of moderate acute respiratory disease and diarrhea: depression 3–5 days postinfection (p.i., refusal to food, severe hyperthermia to 41.9°С, serous exudate discharges from the nasal cavity and eyes, transient diarrhea with blood, leukopenia (up to 2700 cells/mm3, and macroscopic changes in the respiratory organs and intestine. The infected animals recovered from 12 to 15 days p.i. and in 90% cases formed humoral immune response 25 days p.i. (antibody titers to BVDV: 1 : 4–1 : 16. Our results confirmed the presence of virulent BVDV1 strains and showed the need for researches on the molecular epidemiology of the disease, development of more effective diagnostic systems, and optimization of control programs with use of vaccines.

  14. Presence of viral nucleic acids in the middle ear: acute otitis media pathogen or bystander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Ruohola, Aino; Hendley, J Owen

    2012-04-01

    Viruses play an important role in acute otitis media (AOM) pathogenesis, and live viruses may cause AOM in the absence of pathogenic bacteria. Detection of AOM pathogens generally relies on bacterial culture of middle ear fluid. When viral culture is used and live viruses are detected in the middle ear fluid of children with AOM, the viruses are generally accepted as AOM pathogens. Because viral culture is not sensitive and does not detect the comprehensive spectrum of respiratory viruses, polymerase chain reaction assays are commonly used to detect viral nucleic acids in the middle ear fluid. Although polymerase chain reaction assays have greatly increased the viral detection rate, new questions arise on the significance of viral nucleic acids detected in the middle ear because nucleic acids of multiple viruses are detected simultaneously, and nucleic acids of specific viruses are detected repeatedly and in a high proportion of asymptomatic children. This article first reviews the role of live viruses in AOM and presents the point-counterpoint arguments on whether viral nucleic acids in the middle ear represent an AOM pathogen or a bystander status. Although there is evidence to support both directions, helpful information for interpretation of the data and future research direction is outlined.

  15. Acute viral bronchiolitis in South Africa: Diagnostic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D A; Zar, H J; Madhi, S A; Jeena, P; Morrow, B; Masekela, R; Risenga, S; Green, R

    2016-04-01

    Bronchiolitis may be diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms. In a young child, the diagnosis can be made on the clinical pattern of wheezing and hyperinflation. Clinical symptoms and signs typically start with an upper respiratory prodrome, including rhinorrhoea, low-grade fever, cough and poor feeding, followed 1 - 2 days later by tachypnoea, hyperinflation and wheeze as a consequence of airway inflammation and air trapping.The illness is generally self limiting, but may become more severe and include signs such as grunting, nasal flaring, subcostal chest wall retractions and hypoxaemia. The most reliable clinical feature of bronchiolitis is hyperinflation of the chest, evident by loss of cardiacdullness on percussion, an upper border of the liver pushed down to below the 6th intercostal space, and the presence of a Hoover sign(subcostal recession, which occurs when a flattened diaphragm pulls laterally against the lower chest wall).Measurement of peripheral arterial oxygen saturation is useful to indicate the need for supplemental oxygen. A saturation of <92% at sea level and 90% inland indicates that the child has to be admitted to hospital for supplemental oxygen. Chest radiographs are generally unhelpful and not required in children with a clear clinical diagnosis of bronchiolitis.Blood tests are not needed routinely. Complete blood count tests have not been shown to be useful in diagnosing bronchiolitis or guiding its therapy. Routine measurement of C-reactive protein does not aid in management and nasopharyngeal aspirates are not usually done.Viral testing adds little to routine management. Risk factors in patients with severe bronchiolitis that require hospitalisation and may even cause death, include prematurity, congenital heart disease and congenital lung malformations.

  16. Human papillomavirus type 16 viral load measurement as a predictor of infection clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Andrea; Schlecht, Nicolas F; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; Villa, Luisa L; Franco, Eduardo L

    2013-08-01

    Viral load measurements may predict whether human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 infections may become persistent and eventually lead to cervical lesions. Today, multiple PCR methods exist to estimate viral load. We tested three protocols to investigate viral load as a predictor of HPV clearance. We measured viral load in 418 HPV16-positive cervical smears from 224 women participating in the Ludwig-McGill Cohort Study by low-stringency PCR (LS-PCR) using consensus L1 primers targeting over 40 known HPV types, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) targeting the HPV16 E6 and L1 genes. HPV16 clearance was determined by MY09/11 and PGMY PCR testing on repeated smears collected over 5 years. Correlation between viral load measurements by qRT-PCR (E6 versus L1) was excellent (Spearman's rank correlation, ρ = 0.88), but decreased for L1 qRT-PCR versus LS-PCR (ρ = 0.61). Viral load by LS-PCR was higher for HPV16 and related types independently of other concurrent HPV infections. Median duration of infection was longer for smears with high copy number by all three PCR protocols (log rank P<0.05). Viral load is inversely related to HPV16 clearance independently of concurrent HPV infections and PCR protocol.

  17. Differential neutrophil activation in viral infections: Enhanced TLR-7/8-mediated CXCL8 release in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Francesca S.M.; Van Ly, David; Spann, Kirsten; Reading, Patrick C.; Burgess, Janette K.; Hartl, Dominik; Baines, Katherine J.; Oliver, Brian G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Respiratory viral infections are a major cause of asthma exacerbations. Neutrophils accumulate in the airways and the mechanisms that link neutrophilic inflammation, viral infections and exacerbations are unclear. This study aims to investigate anti-viral responses in neutro

  18. Limiting influenza virus, HIV and dengue virus infection by targeting viral proteostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Nicholas S.; Moshkina, Natasha; Fenouil, Romain; Gardner, Thomas J.; Aguirre, Sebastian; Shah, Priya S.; Zhao, Nan; Manganaro, Lara; Hultquist, Judd; Noel, Justine; Sachs, David; Hamilton, Jennifer; Leon, Paul E.; Chawdury, Amit; Tripathy, Shashank; Melegari, Camilla; Campisi, Laura; Hai, Rong; Metreveli, Giorgi; Gamarnik, Andrea V.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Simon, Viviana; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Krogan, Nevan; Mulder, Lubbertus C.F.; van Bakel, Harm; Tortorella, Domenico; Taunton, Jack; Palese, Peter; Marazzi, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are obligate parasites as they require the machinery of the host cell to replicate. Inhibition of host factors co-opted during active infection is a strategy to suppress viral replication and a potential pan antiviral therapy. To define the cellular proteins and processes required for a virus during infection is thus crucial to understanding the mechanisms of virally induced disease. In this report, we generated fully infectious tagged influenza viruses and used infection-based proteomics to identify pivotal arms of cellular signaling required for influenza virus growth and infectivity. Using mathematical modeling, genetic, and pharmacologic approaches, we revealed that modulation of Sec61-mediated cotranslational translocation selectively impaired glycoprotein proteostasis of influenza as well as HIV and dengue viruses, and led to inhibition of viral growth and infectivity. Thus, by studying virus-human protein-protein interactions in the context of active replication we have identified targetable host factors for broad-spectrum antiviral therapies. PMID:26789921

  19. Lipid rafts both in cellular membrane and viral envelope are critical for PRRSV efficient infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Zhang, Qiong; Tang, Jun; Feng, Wen-Hai

    2015-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) represents a significantly economical challenge to the swine industry worldwide. In this study, we investigated the importance of cellular and viral lipid rafts in PRRSV infection. First, we demonstrated that PRRSV glycoproteins, Gp3 and Gp4, were associated with lipid rafts during viral entry, and disruption of cellular lipid rafts inhibited PRRSV entry. We also showed the raft-location of CD163, which might contribute to the glycoproteins-raft association. Subsequently, raft disruption caused a significant reduction of viral RNA production. Moreover, Nsp9 was shown to be distributed in rafts, suggesting that rafts probably serve as a platform for PRRSV replication. Finally, we confirmed that disassembly of rafts on the virus envelope may affect the integrity of PRRSV particles and cause the leakage of viral proteins, which impaired PRRSV infectivity. These findings might provide insights on our understanding of the mechanism of PRRSV infection.

  20. ACUTE BILATERAL VIRAL NECROTIZING RETINITIS : AN UNCOMMON CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Ku.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A 22 year old male with a history of high grade fever 2 days, diarrhea 3 times and vomiting 2 times presented with diminution of vision in right eye of 1 days duration. His best corrected visual acuity (BCVA was counting finger 1 meter with no pin hole im provement and 20/20 ( S nellen ’ s in the right and left eye respectively. Fundus examination RE revealed white lesion in geographic fashion with clear edge involving macula and in left eye small peanut size white lesion present at paramacular area. Clinicall y a diagnosis of acute necrotizing was made. We started treatment by intra venous antiviral and systemic steroid. ELISA (serum and PCR (aqueous were positive for herpes simplex virus ( I ndex above 1.1 i.e. 1.54 . 1,2 The lesions showed a good response to t he above treatment. At 2 months follow - up, lesion had resolved well with BCVA of 20/40 and 20/20 in right and left eye respectively

  1. No evidence of an increase of bacterial and viral infections following Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Julia; Andrews, Nick; Taylor, Brent; Miller, Elizabeth

    2009-02-25

    The suggestion that multi-antigen vaccines might overload the immune system has led to calls for single antigen vaccines. In 2003 we showed that rather than an increase there appeared to be a reduced risk of severe bacterial infection in the three months following Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine (MMR). The present analysis of illnesses in a general population is based on an additional 10 years of data for bacterial infections and also includes admissions with viral infections. Analyses were carried out using the self-controlled case-series method and separately for bacterial and viral infection cases, using risk periods of 0-30 days, 31-60 days and 61-90 days post MMR vaccine. An analysis was also carried out for those cases which were given MMR and Meningococcal serogroup C (MCC) vaccines concomitantly. A reduced risk was seen in the 0-30-day period for both bacterial infection (relative incidence=0.68, 95% CI 0.54-0.86) and viral infections (relative incidence=0.68, 95% CI 0.49-0.93). There was no increased risk in any period when looking at combined viral or bacterial infections or for individual infections with the single exception of an increased risk in the 31-60 days post vaccination period for herpes infections (relative incidence=1.69, 95% CI 1.06-2.70). For the children given Meningococcal group C vaccines concomitantly no significantly increased risk was seen in either the bacterial (relative incidence=0.54, 95% CI 0.26-1.13) or viral cases (relative incidence=0.46, 95% CI 0.11-1.93). Our study confirms that the MMR vaccine does not increase the risk of invasive bacterial or viral infection in the 90 days after the vaccination and does not support the hypothesis that there is an induced immune deficiency due to overload from multi-antigen vaccines.

  2. Chloroquine could be used for the treatment of filoviral infections and other viral infections that emerge or emerged from viruses requiring an acidic pH for infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpovwa, Hephzibah

    2016-06-01

    Viruses from the Filoviridae family, as many other virus families, require an acidic pH for successful infection and are therefore susceptible to the actions of 4-aminoquinolines, such as chloroquine. Although the mechanisms of action of chloroquine clearly indicate that it might inhibit filoviral infections, several clinical trials that attempted to use chloroquine in the treatment of other acute viral infections - including dengue and influenza A and B - caused by low pH-dependent viruses, have reported that chloroquine had no clinical efficacy, and these results demoted chloroquine from the potential treatments for other virus families requiring low pH for infectivity. The present review is aimed at investigating whether chloroquine could combat the present Ebola virus epidemic, and also at exploring the main reasons for the reported lack of efficacy. Literature was sourced from PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, reference list of articles and textbooks - Fields Virology (Volumes 1and 2), the cytokine handbook, Pharmacology in Medicine: Principles and Practice, and hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine retinopathy. The present analysis concludes that (1) chloroquine might find a place in the treatment of Ebola, either as a monotherapy or in combination therapies; (2) the ineffectiveness of chloroquine, or its analogue, hydroxychloroquine, at treating infections from low pH-dependent viruses is a result of the failure to attain and sustain a steady state concentration sufficient to increase and keep the pH of the acidic organelles to approximately neutral levels; (3) to successfully treat filoviral infections - or other viral infections that emerge or emerged from low pH-dependent viruses - a steady state chloroquine plasma concentration of at least 1 µg/mL(~3.125 μM/L) or a whole blood concentration of 16 μM/L must be achieved and be sustained until the patients' viraemia becomes undetectable. These concentrations, however, do not rule out the efficacy of

  3. [Nebulized hypertonic saline and acute viral bronchiolitis in infants: current aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvaget, E; David, M; Bresson, V; Retornaz, K; Bosdure, E; Dubus, J-C

    2012-06-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis affects infants, is frequent, and can be severe. Its treatment is only based on symptoms. Hypertonic saline (HS) may act favorably in this situation by fighting virus-induced dehydration of the airway liquid surface. Because of an osmotic action, HS attracts the water from the epithelial cells and improves mucociliary clearance. Five double-blind placebo-controlled studies concerning hospitalized infants with acute viral bronchiolitis showed that repeated nebulizations of 3% HS induce a 20% improvement in the clinical severity score and reduced the hospital length of stay by 24h. Tolerance is excellent. On the other hand, a few questions remain unresolved: what is the optimal salt concentration? What is the recommended nebulizer? What is the best frequency for nebulizer use? Can nebulized HS be used at home? What are the results with systematic physiotherapy when HS is used?

  4. Montelukast as an episodic modifier for acute viral bronchiolitis: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedan, Magdy; Gamil, Nareman; El-Assmy, Mohamed; Fayez, Engy; Nasef, Nehad; Fouda, Ashraf; Settin, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of once-daily montelukast therapy on the clinical progress and the cytokine profile of patients with acute viral bronchiolitis. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial included 85 patients (mean age, 3.5 +/- 2.35 months), clinically diagnosed as first-episode acute bronchiolitis in addition to 10 healthy controls of matched age and sex. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either montelukast (4-mg sachets; n = 47) or placebo (n = 38) daily from the time of admission until discharge. The primary outcome measure was the length of hospital stay (LOS), and clinical severity scores (CSs) and changes in plasma levels of interferon gamma and interleukin-4 were secondary outcomes. LOS for the montelukast group was found to be significantly lower than that of the placebo group (p viral bronchiolitis.

  5. Psychiatric context of acute/early HIV infection. The NIMH Multisite Acute HIV Infection Study: IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, J Hampton; Higgins, Jenny A; Vigil, Ofilio; Dubrow, Robert; Remien, Robert H; Steward, Wayne T; Casey, Corinna Young; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Correale, Jackie; Ake, Chris; McCutchan, J Allen; Kerndt, Peter R; Morin, Stephen F; Grant, Igor

    2009-12-01

    Acute/early HIV infection is a period of high risk for HIV transmission. Better understanding of behavioral aspects during this period could improve interventions to limit further transmission. Thirty-four participants with acute/early HIV infection from six US cities were assessed with the Mini International Diagnostic Interview, Beck Depression Inventory II, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Brief COPE, and an in-depth interview. Most had a pre-HIV history of alcohol or substance use disorder (85%); a majority (53%) had a history of major depressive or bipolar disorder. However, post-diagnosis coping was predominantly adaptive, with only mild to moderate elevations of anxious or depressive mood. Respondents described challenges managing HIV in tandem with pre-existing substance abuse problems, depression, and anxiety. Integration into medical and community services was associated with adaptive coping. The psychiatric context of acute/early HIV infection may be a precursor to infection, but not necessarily a barrier to intervention to reduce forward transmission of HIV among persons newly infected.

  6. Invasive fungal infections in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Vijaya R; Viola, George M; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed.

  7. Acute viral gastroenteritis in children hospitalized in Iksan, Korea during December 2010 - June 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Whoan So

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Viral etiology is common in cases of children with acute diarrhea, and antibiotic therapy is usually not required. Therefore, it is important to determine the distribution of common viruses among children hospitalized with acute diarrhea. Methods: We included 186 children who suffered from acute diarrhea and were hospitalized at the Wonkwang University Hospital Pediatric ward from December 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 in this study. Stool samples were collected and multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (multiplex RT-PCR was used to simultaneously determine the viral etiology such as rotavirus, norovirus, astrovirus, or adenovirus.&lt;br&gt; Results: Causative viruses were detected in 72 of the 186 cases (38.7%. The mean age of the viruspositive cases was 1 year and 9 months (range, 1 month to 11 years. Rotavirus was detected in 50/186 (26.9%; norovirus, in 18/186 (9.7%; and astrovirus, in 3/186 cases (1.6%. Adenovirus was not detected in any of the cases. Proportions of norovirus genogroups I and II were 21.1% and 78.9%, respectively. Four of the 51 rotavirus-positive cases (7.8% had received rotavirus vaccination at least once. The mean duration of diarrhea was 2.8 days (range, 1 to 10 days and vomiting occurred in 39 of the 72 cases (54.2%.&lt;br&gt; Conclusion: Viral etiology was confirmed in about one-third of the children with acute diarrhea, and the most common viral agent was rotavirus, followed by norovirus.

  8. Dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Saito, Akatsuki; Katakai, Yuko; Iwasaki, Yuki; Kurosawa, Terue; Hamano, Masataka; Higashino, Atsunori; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Kurane, Ichiro; Akari, Hirofumi

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we examined the dynamics of cellular immune responses in the acute phase of dengue virus (DENV) infection in a marmoset model. Here, we found that DENV infection in marmosets greatly induced responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. Interestingly, the strength of the immune response was greater in animals infected with a dengue fever strain than in those infected with a dengue hemorrhagic fever strain of DENV. In contrast, when animals were re-challenged with the same DENV strain used for primary infection, the neutralizing antibody induced appeared to play a critical role in sterilizing inhibition against viral replication, resulting in strong but delayed responses of CD4/CD8 central memory T and NKT cells. The results in this study may help to better understand the dynamics of cellular and humoral immune responses in the control of DENV infection.

  9. The biofilm electrode sensor system for acute toxicity and viral screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holodnick, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The biofilm electrode sensor (BFE) is designed for the rapid and sensitive detection of toxic and pathogenic environmental contaminants and industrial effluents. It includes a dissolved oxygen electrode which senses respiration changes induced in a biomass film. This study assessed the effects of five chemical on biofilms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and polio virus on biofilms of Buffalo Green Monkey kidney cells (BGMk). Acute toxicity was assessed in 30 min, and viral infectivity in 15-20 hr. Potassium cyanide and cupric nitrate inhibited respiration in a similar manner, 2.5-68.2 %I and 30.2-68.8 %I, respectively. The response of the BFE to cyanide and cupric ions occurred within 5-20 sec. Cadmium ions affected the BFE over the range of 50.0-1000 mg/l, but complexed with components in the support medium at lower concentrations. 2,4-dinitrophenol enhanced respiration in the concentration range of 10.0-50.0 mg/l and inhibited respiration in the concentration range of 85.0-100.0 mg/l. A maximum response of 19 %I was noted at 1200 mg/l phenol, before dissolution of the polysulfone membrane filter occurred. Detection of viruses utilized BGMk cells exposed to 4.7 {times} 10{sup 4}{minus}4.7 {times} 10{sup 8} ID{sub 50}/ml poliovirus for 2 hr prior to immobilization. The response of the BFE was optimal at 15-20 hr, with a %I range of 5-40%.

  10. A method for quantifying mechanical properties of tissue following viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Lam

    Full Text Available Viral infection and replication involves the reorganization of the actin network within the host cell. Actin plays a central role in the mechanical properties of cells. We have demonstrated a method to quantify changes in mechanical properties of fabricated model three-dimensional (3D connective tissue following viral infection. Using this method, we have characterized the impact of infection by the human herpesvirus, cytomegalovirus (HCMV. HCMV is a member of the herpesvirus family and infects a variety of cell types including fibroblasts. In the body, fibroblasts are necessary for maintaining connective tissue and function by creating mechanical force. Using this 3D connective tissue model, we observed that infection disrupted the cell's ability to generate force and reduced the cumulative contractile force of the tissue. The addition of HCMV viral particles in the absence of both viral gene expression and DNA replication was sufficient to disrupt tissue function. We observed that alterations of the mechanical properties are, in part, due to a disruption of the underlying complex actin microfilament network established by the embedded fibroblasts. Finally, we were able to prevent HCMV-mediated disruption of tissue function by the addition of human immune globulin against HCMV. This study demonstrates a method to quantify the impact of viral infection on mechanical properties which are not evident using conventional cell culture systems.

  11. Rapid, targeted and culture-free viral infectivity assay in drop-based microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Rotem, Assaf; Zhang, Huidan; Chang, Connie B; Basu, Anindita; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Koehler, Stephan A; Ren, Yukun; Lin, Jeffrey S; Pipas, James M; Feldman, Andrew B; Wobus, Christiane E; Weitz, David A

    2015-10-07

    A key viral property is infectivity, and its accurate measurement is crucial for the understanding of viral evolution, disease and treatment. Currently viral infectivity is measured using plaque assays, which involve prolonged culturing of host cells, and whose measurement is unable to differentiate between specific strains and is prone to low number fluctuation. We developed a rapid, targeted and culture-free infectivity assay using high-throughput drop-based microfluidics. Single infectious viruses are incubated in a large number of picoliter drops with host cells for one viral replication cycle followed by in-drop gene-specific amplification to detect infection events. Using murine noroviruses (MNV) as a model system, we measure their infectivity and determine the efficacy of a neutralizing antibody for different variants of MNV. Our results are comparable to traditional plaque-based assays and plaque reduction neutralization tests. However, the fast, low-cost, highly accurate genomic-based assay promises to be a superior method for drug screening and isolation of resistant viral strains. Moreover our technique can be adapted to measuring the infectivity of other pathogens, such as bacteria and fungi.

  12. TCF1 Is Required for the T Follicular Helper Cell Response to Viral Infection

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    Tuoqi Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available T follicular helper (TFH and T helper 1 (Th1 cells generated after viral infections are critical for the control of infection and the development of immunological memory. However, the mechanisms that govern the differentiation and maintenance of these two distinct lineages during viral infection remain unclear. We found that viral-specific TFH and Th1 cells showed reciprocal expression of the transcriptions factors TCF1 and Blimp1 early after infection, even before the differential expression of the canonical TFH marker CXCR5. Furthermore, TCF1 was intrinsically required for the TFH cell response to viral infection; in the absence of TCF1, the TFH cell response was severely compromised, and the remaining TCF1-deficient TFH cells failed to maintain TFH-associated transcriptional and metabolic signatures, which were distinct from those in Th1 cells. Mechanistically, TCF1 functioned through forming negative feedback loops with IL-2 and Blimp1. Our findings demonstrate an essential role of TCF1 in TFH cell responses to viral infection.

  13. A multi-strain Synbiotic may reduce viral respiratory infections in asthmatic children: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahanchian, Hamid; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Ansari, Elham; Ganji, Toktam; Kiani, Mohammad Ali; Khalesi, Maryam; Momen, Tooba; Kianifar, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Asthma is a growing problem worldwide. Acute exacerbations impose considerable morbidity, mortality, and increased cost. Viral respiratory infections are the most common cause (80–85%) of pediatric asthma exacerbations and admissions to the hospital. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a new synbiotic Lactocare® on viral respiratory infections and asthma exacerbations in asthmatic children. Methods In this double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, 72 children with mild persistent asthma, aged between 6 and 12 years, were randomized to receive either Lactocare®, a Synbiotic containing 1 billion CFU/Capsule of Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, and Fructooligosacharide (Zist Takhmir, Tehran, Iran) or placebo daily for 60 days. The primary outcome was the number of viral respiratory infections, and secondary outcomes were school absence, salbutamol and prednisolone usage, outpatient visits, and hospital admission for asthma. The outcomes were compared among study groups using the SPSS 11.5 program and the Mann Whitney and Fisher exact tests. Results Of the 72 children who were enrolled with mild persistent asthma, 36 were assigned randomly to be treated with synbiotic and 36 with placebo. The number of viral respiratory infections was significantly higher in placebo group than the synbiotic group during the first month of intervention (0.74 ± 0.12 vs. 0.44 ± 0.1, p < 0.007) but not during the second month (0.5 ± 0.8 vs. 0.5 ± 0.8, p < 0.641). Considering the total duration of the study (two months), infection episodes also were significantly lower in the synbiotic group (0.92 ± 0.15 vs. 0.69 ± 0.11, p < 0.046). Salbutamol consumption was significantly lower in the synbiotic group, but there were no significant differences in school absenteeism, oral

  14. Acute neuromuscular weakness associated with dengue infection

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    Harmanjit Singh Hira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue infections may present with neurological complications. Whether these are due to neuromuscular disease or electrolyte imbalance is unclear. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight patients of dengue fever required hospitalization during epidemic in year 2010. Twelve of them presented with acute neuromuscular weakness. We enrolled them for study. Diagnosis of dengue infection based on clinical profile of patients, positive serum IgM ELISA, NS1 antigen, and sero-typing. Complete hemogram, kidney and liver functions, serum electrolytes, and creatine phosphokinase (CPK were tested. In addition, two patients underwent nerve conduction velocity (NCV test and electromyography. Results: Twelve patients were included in the present study. Their age was between 18 and 34 years. Fever, myalgia, and motor weakness of limbs were most common presenting symptoms. Motor weakness developed on 2 nd to 4 th day of illness in 11 of 12 patients. In one patient, it developed on 10 th day of illness. Ten of 12 showed hypokalemia. One was of Guillain-Barré syndrome and other suffered from myositis; they underwent NCV and electromyography. Serum CPK and SGOT raised in 8 out of 12 patients. CPK of patient of myositis was 5098 IU. All of 12 patients had thrombocytopenia. WBC was in normal range. Dengue virus was isolated in three patients, and it was of serotype 1. CSF was normal in all. Within 24 hours, those with hypokalemia recovered by potassium correction. Conclusions: It was concluded that the dengue virus infection led to acute neuromuscular weakness because of hypokalemia, myositis, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. It was suggested to look for presence of hypokalemia in such patients.

  15. Virally encoded chemokines and chemokine receptors in the role of viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Lüttichau, Hans R; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-01-01

    are the acquisition and modification of host-encoded chemokines and chemokine receptors. The described viral molecules leave nothing to chance and have thoroughly and efficiently corrupted the host immune system. Through this process viruses have identified key molecules in antiviral responses by their inhibition...... of these or potent ways to alter an efficient antiviral response to a weak Th2-driven response. Examples here are the chemokine scavenging by US28, attractance of Th2 cells and regulatory cells by vMIP1-3 and the selective engaging of CCR8 by MC148. Important insights into viral pathology and possible targets...... for antiviral therapies have been provided by UL33, UL78 and in particular ORF74 and the chances are that many more will follow. In HHV8 vMIP-2 and the chemokine-binding proteins potent anti-inflammatory agents have been provided. These have already had their potential demonstrated in animal models and may...

  16. Massive activation of archaeal defense genes during viral infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, T.E.F.; Voet, M.; Sismeiro, O.; Dillies, M.A.; Jagla, B.; Coppée, J.Y.; Sezonov, G.; Forterre, P.; Oost, van der J.; Lavigne, R.; Prangishvili, D.

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal viruses display unusually high genetic and morphological diversity. Studies of these viruses proved to be instrumental for the expansion of knowledge on viral diversity and evolution. The Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) is a model to study virus-host interactions in Archaea

  17. The host type Ⅰ interferon response to viral and bacterial infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea K. PERRY; Gang CHEN; Dahai ZHENG; Hong TANG; Genhong CHENG

    2005-01-01

    Type Ⅰ interferons (IFN) are well studied cytokines with anti-viral and immune-modulating functions. Type Ⅰ IFNs are produced following viral infections, but until recently, the mechanisms of viral recognition leading to IFN production were largely unknown. Toll like receptors (TLRs) have emerged as key transducers of type Ⅰ IFN during viral infections by recognizing various viral components. Furthermore, much progress has been made in defining the signaling pathways downstream of TLRs for type Ⅰ IFN production. TLR7 and TLR9 have become apparent as universally important in inducing type Ⅰ IFN during infection with most viruses, particularly by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. New intracellular viral pattern recognition receptors leading to type Ⅰ IFN production have been identified. Many bacteria can also induce the up-regulation of these cytokines. Interestingly, recent studies have found a detrimental effect on host cells if type Ⅰ IFN is produced during infection with the intracellular gram-positive bacterial pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes. This review will discuss the recent advances made in defining the signaling pathways leading to type Ⅰ IFN production.

  18. HPV infection, risk factors and viral load among Mexican male college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmina Vera-Uehara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the prevalence of HPV and the risky sexual behaviors associated to it in a sample of male college students, taking into account genotype and viral load. Methods: From 2002 to 2003, male students from the Autonomous University of Morelos State completed a questionnaire and provided self-collected genital samples to detect and quantify HPV. We performed a bivariate and a multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify correlates associated with the infection and to assess the viral load as a function of the viral infecting type. The fragments of β-globin gene and L1 of HPV, were amplified, purified and cloned, to evaluate viral load. Results: Among 253 subjects, HPV prevalence was 19.4%, and HPV16 was the most common subtype. History of STIs (OR = 4.8; 95% CI 1.2–18.9, contraceptive pill use by female partner (OR = 2.6; 95% CI 1.1–6.3 and exchanging sex for money (OR = 4.9; 95% CI 1.2–20 were associated to the HPV infection. HPV16 viral load was 7.8 copies (HPV/beta-globin compared to 0.9 copies for other HPV types. Discussion: HPV16 displayed the highest viral load, and it was the most prevalent. It was found that using contraceptive pills by female partners was associated with HPV infection.

  19. Acute viral hepatitis in Lebanon: evidence for a HAV-like non-A non-B hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamma'a, M H

    1984-02-01

    Ninety-three cases of acute viral hepatitis in adult Lebanese patients were followed-up prospectively for a period ranging from 6 to 18 months. These included 33 hepatitis A (HAV), 32 hepatitis B (HBV) and 21 non-A, non-B hepatitis (NANB) cases. The clinical and seroepidemiologic characteristics of the three types were evaluated. HAV was characterized by a short prodroma (less than 1 week) and a high IgM level. HBV did not differ from similar cases reported in the Western world except for a complete absence of male homosexuals and drug addicts as a possible route of transmission. NANB hepatitis in Lebanon is mainly a sporadic infection similar to HAV except that the prodromal phase is prolonged (greater than 14 days) and IgM levels are within normal limits. The failure to develop chronicity in NANB suggests that the virus of sporadic NANB may be different from that which causes post-transfusional (PTH) NANB.

  20. Viral infections and cell cycle G2/M regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard Y.ZHAO; Robert T.ELDER

    2005-01-01

    Progression of cells from G2 phase of the cell cycle to mitosis is a tightly regulated cellular process that requires activation of the Cdc2 kinase, which determines onset of mitosis in all eukaryotic cells. In both human and fission yeast(Schizosaccharomyces pombe) cells, the activity of Cdc2 is regulated in part by the phosphorylation status of tyrosine 15(Tyr15) on Cdc2, which is phosphorylated by Wee1 kinase during late G2 and is rapidly dephosphorylated by the Cdc25 tyrosine phosphatase to trigger entry into mitosis. These Cdc2 regulators are the downstream targets of two well-characterized G2/M checkpoint pathways which prevent cells from entering mitosis when cellular DNA is damaged or when DNA replication is inhibited. Increasing evidence suggests that Cdc2 is also commonly targeted by viral proteins,which modulate host cell cycle machinery to benefit viral survival or replication. In this review, we describe the effect of viral protein R (Vpr) encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on cell cycle G2/M regulation. Based on our current knowledge about this viral effect, we hypothesize that Vpr induces cell cycle G2 arrest through a mechanism that is to some extent different from the classic G2/M checkpoints. One the unique features distinguishing Vpr-induced G2 arrest from the classic checkpoints is the role of phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in Vpr-induced G2 arrest.Interestingly, PP2A is targeted by a number of other viral proteins including SV40 small T antigen, polyomavirus T antigen, HTLV Tax and adenovirus E4orf4. Thus an in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying Vpr-induced G2 arrest will provide additional insights into the basic biology of cell cycle G2/M regulation and into the biological significance of this effect during host-pathogen interactions.

  1. In vivo T2* weighted MRI visualizes cardiac lesions in murine models of acute and chronic viral myocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helluy, Xavier; Sauter, Martina; Ye, Yu-Xiang; Lykowsky, Gunthard; Kreutner, Jakob; Yilmaz, Ali; Jahns, Roland; Boivin, Valerie; Kandolf, Reinhard; Jakob, Peter M.; Hiller, Karl-Heinz; Klingel, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Objective Acute and chronic forms of myocarditis are mainly induced by virus infections. As a consequence of myocardial damage and inflammation dilated cardiomyopathy and chronic heart failure may develop. The gold standard for the diagnosis of myocarditis is endomyocardial biopsies which are required to determine the etiopathogenesis of cardiac inflammatory processes. However, new non-invasive MRI techniques hold great potential in visualizing cardiac non-ischemic inflammatory lesions at high spatial resolution, which could improve the investigation of the pathophysiology of viral myocarditis. Results Here we present the discovery of a novel endogenous T2* MRI contrast of myocardial lesions in murine models of acute and chronic CVB3 myocarditis. The evaluation of infected hearts ex vivo and in vivo by 3D T2w and T2*w MRI allowed direct localization of virus-induced myocardial lesions without any MRI tracer or contrast agent. T2*w weighted MRI is able to detect both small cardiac lesions of acute myocarditis and larger necrotic areas at later stages of chronic myocarditis, which was confirmed by spatial correlation of MRI hypointensity in myocardium with myocardial lesions histologically. Additional in vivo and ex vivo MRI analysis proved that the contrast mechanism was due to a strong paramagnetic tissue alteration in the vicinity of myocardial lesions, effectively pointing towards iron deposits as the primary contributor of contrast. The evaluation of the biological origin of the MR contrast by specific histological staining and transmission electron microscopy revealed that impaired iron metabolism primarily in mitochondria caused iron deposits within necrotic myocytes, which induces strong magnetic susceptibility in myocardial lesions and results in strong T2* contrast. Conclusion This T2*w MRI technique provides a fast and sensitive diagnostic tool to determine the patterns and the severity of acute and chronic enteroviral myocarditis and the precise

  2. Acute hepatitis C: changing epidemiology and association with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brejt, Nick; Gilleece, Yvonne; Fisher, Martin

    2007-03-01

    Over the past 6 to 7 years an increasing incidence of acute hepatitis C virus (AHCV) has been fuelled by two different changing epidemics: (1) a new resurgence of AHCV amongst intravenous drug users (IVDU); and (2) presumed sexually transmitted AHCV amongst predominantly HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Increasing incidence amongst IVDUs is likely to be a consequence of changing injecting behaviour, possibly related to changes in perception of HIV as well as HCV risk and consequences. Increasing incidence amongst MSM is likely to be a consequence of changing sexual practices, for example number of sexual partners and type of sexual behaviour, as well as increasing availability of recreational drugs associated with sexual risk-taking, and wider availability of casual sexual partners via the internet or sex-on-premises venues. It remains unclear whether the current outbreaks in MSM, predominantly seen in HIV-positive individuals, reflect a predisposition to AHCV secondary to HIV status per se, or whether this reflects differences in behaviour amongst HIV-positive versus HIV-negative MSM, or potentially increased screening (either routine or secondary to abnormal liver function tests) in HIV-positive MSM. The majority of individuals with AHCV are asymptomatic and therefore routine screening of individuals in at-risk groups with abnormal liver function tests should be considered. Previous historical studies suggest that individuals with concomitant HIV infection are far less likely than those without to spontaneously clear HCV. It is currently recommended that such individuals acutely infected with HCV should undergo monitoring of HCV viral load levels to determine whether spontaneous clearance is likely or whether the opportunity for early treatment should be considered.

  3. Acute Effects of Viral Exposure on P-Glycoprotein Function in the Mouse Fetal Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrrico Bloise

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Viral infection during pregnancy is known to affect the fetal brain. The toll-like receptor (TLR-3 is a pattern recognition receptor activated by viruses known to elicit adverse fetal neurological outcomes. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp efflux transporter protects the developing fetus by limiting the transfer of substrates across both the placenta and the fetal blood-brain barrier (BBB. As such, inhibition of P-gp at these blood-barrier sites may result in increased exposure of the developing fetus to environmental toxins and xenobiotics present in the maternal circulation. We hypothesized that viral exposure during pregnancy would impair P-gp function in the placenta and in the developing BBB. Here we investigated whether the TLR-3 ligand, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C, increased accumulation of one P-gp substrate in the fetus and in the developing fetal brain. Methods: Pregnant C57BL/6 mice (GD15.5 were injected (i.p. with PolyI:C (5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg or vehicle (saline. [3H]digoxin (P-gp substrate was injected (i.v. 3 or 23h post-treatment and animals were euthanized 1h later. Maternal plasma, ‘fetal-units’ (fetal membranes, amniotic fluid and whole fetus, and fetal brains were collected. Results: PolyI:C exposure (4h significantly elevated maternal plasma IL-6 (P<0.001 and increased [3H]digoxin accumulation in the fetal brain (P<0.05. In contrast, 24h after PolyI:C exposure, no effect on IL-6 or fetal brain accumulation of P-gp substrate was observed. Conclusion: Viral infection modeled by PolyI:C causes acute increases in fetal brain accumulation of P-gp substrates and by doing so, may increase fetal brain exposure to xenobiotics and environmental toxins present in the maternal circulation.

  4. An Epstein-Barr virus encoded inhibitor of Colony Stimulating Factor-1 signaling is an important determinant for acute and persistent EBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Makoto; Fogg, Mark H; Orlova, Nina; Quink, Carol; Wang, Fred

    2012-12-01

    Acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is the most common cause of Infectious Mononucleosis. Nearly all adult humans harbor life-long, persistent EBV infection which can lead to development of cancers including Hodgkin Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, and lymphomas in immunosuppressed patients. BARF1 is an EBV replication-associated, secreted protein that blocks Colony Stimulating Factor 1 (CSF-1) signaling, an innate immunity pathway not targeted by any other virus species. To evaluate effects of BARF1 in acute and persistent infection, we mutated the BARF1 homologue in the EBV-related herpesvirus, or lymphocryptovirus (LCV), naturally infecting rhesus macaques to create a recombinant rhLCV incapable of blocking CSF-1 (ΔrhBARF1). Rhesus macaques orally challenged with ΔrhBARF1 had decreased viral load indicating that CSF-1 is important for acute virus infection. Surprisingly, ΔrhBARF1 was also associated with dramatically lower virus setpoints during persistent infection. Normal acute viral load and normal viral setpoints during persistent rhLCV infection could be restored by Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced immunosuppression prior to oral inoculation with ΔrhBARF1 or infection of immunocompetent animals with a recombinant rhLCV where the rhBARF1 was repaired. These results indicate that BARF1 blockade of CSF-1 signaling is an important immune evasion strategy for efficient acute EBV infection and a significant determinant for virus setpoint during persistent EBV infection.

  5. An Epstein-Barr virus encoded inhibitor of Colony Stimulating Factor-1 signaling is an important determinant for acute and persistent EBV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Ohashi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection is the most common cause of Infectious Mononucleosis. Nearly all adult humans harbor life-long, persistent EBV infection which can lead to development of cancers including Hodgkin Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, and lymphomas in immunosuppressed patients. BARF1 is an EBV replication-associated, secreted protein that blocks Colony Stimulating Factor 1 (CSF-1 signaling, an innate immunity pathway not targeted by any other virus species. To evaluate effects of BARF1 in acute and persistent infection, we mutated the BARF1 homologue in the EBV-related herpesvirus, or lymphocryptovirus (LCV, naturally infecting rhesus macaques to create a recombinant rhLCV incapable of blocking CSF-1 (ΔrhBARF1. Rhesus macaques orally challenged with ΔrhBARF1 had decreased viral load indicating that CSF-1 is important for acute virus infection. Surprisingly, ΔrhBARF1 was also associated with dramatically lower virus setpoints during persistent infection. Normal acute viral load and normal viral setpoints during persistent rhLCV infection could be restored by Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced immunosuppression prior to oral inoculation with ΔrhBARF1 or infection of immunocompetent animals with a recombinant rhLCV where the rhBARF1 was repaired. These results indicate that BARF1 blockade of CSF-1 signaling is an important immune evasion strategy for efficient acute EBV infection and a significant determinant for virus setpoint during persistent EBV infection.

  6. In vivo imaging of alphaherpesvirus infection reveals synchronized activity dependent on axonal sorting of viral proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granstedt, Andrea E; Bosse, Jens B; Thiberge, Stephan Y; Enquist, Lynn W

    2013-09-10

    A clinical hallmark of human alphaherpesvirus infections is peripheral pain or itching. Pseudorabies virus (PRV), a broad host range alphaherpesvirus, causes violent pruritus in many different animals, but the mechanism is unknown. Previous in vitro studies have shown that infected, cultured peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibited aberrant electrical activity after PRV infection due to the action of viral membrane fusion proteins, yet it is unclear if such activity occurs in infected PNS ganglia in living animals and if it correlates with disease symptoms. Using two-photon microscopy, we imaged autonomic ganglia in living mice infected with PRV strains expressing GCaMP3, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, and used the changes in calcium flux to monitor the activity of many neurons simultaneously with single-cell resolution. Infection with virulent PRV caused these PNS neurons to fire synchronously and cyclically in highly correlated patterns among infected neurons. This activity persisted even when we severed the presynaptic axons, showing that infection-induced firing is independent of input from presynaptic brainstem neurons. This activity was not observed after infections with an attenuated PRV recombinant used for circuit tracing or with PRV mutants lacking either viral glycoprotein B, required for membrane fusion, or viral membrane protein Us9, required for sorting virions and viral glycoproteins into axons. We propose that the viral fusion proteins produced by virulent PRV infection induce electrical coupling in unmyelinated axons in vivo. This action would then give rise to the synchronous and cyclical activity in the ganglia and contribute to the characteristic peripheral neuropathy.

  7. Clustering of acute respiratory infection hospitalizations in childcare facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Benn, Christine Stabell; Simonsen, Jacob;

    2010-01-01

    To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics.......To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics....

  8. DMPD: Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18641647 Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune dise... (.csml) Show Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: sensing nucleic acids in viral infection andautoimmune diseases....iral infection andautoimmune diseases. Authors Gilliet M, Cao W, Liu YJ. Publication Nat Rev Immunol. 2008 A

  9. Possible involvement of maize Rop1 in the defence responses of plants to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanyong; Shi, Yan; Li, Yongqiang; Cheng, Yuqin; Zhou, Tao; Fan, Zaifeng

    2012-09-01

    The expression of host genes can be altered during the process of viral infection. To investigate the viral infection-induced up-regulated gene expression changes of maize at different time intervals post-inoculation with Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), a suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA library was constructed. A total of 454 cDNA clones were identified to be viral infection-induced up-regulated genes. The influence of Rop1 on the infection of maize by SCMV was investigated. The results showed that transient silencing of the ZmRop1 gene through virus-induced gene silencing enhanced the accumulation and systemic infection of SCMV and another potyvirus (Pennisetum mosaic virus) in maize plants, whereas transient over-expression of ZmRop1 in maize protoplasts reduced SCMV accumulation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the heterologous expression of ZmRop1 impaired Potato virus X infection in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. These data suggest that ZmRop1 may play a role in plant defence responses to viral infection.

  10. Detection of Herpesvirus, Enterovirus, and Arbovirus infection in patients with suspected central nervous system viral infection in the Western Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Michele S; Lessa, Natália; Naveca, Felipe G; Monte, Rossicléia L; Braga, Wornei S; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu M; Ramasawmy, Rajendranath; Mourão, Maria Paula G

    2014-09-01

    Acute infections of the central nervous system (CNS) can be caused by various pathogens. In this study, the presence of herpesviruses (HHV), enteroviruses (EVs), and arboviruses were investigated in CSF samples from 165 patients with suspected CNS viral infection through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase PCR. The genomes of one or more viral agents were detected in 29.7% (49/165) of the CSF samples. EVs were predominant (16/49; 32.6%) followed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) (22.4%), Varicella-Zoster virus (VZV) (20.4%), Cytomegalovirus (CMV) (18.4%), herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) (4.1%), (HSV-2) (4.1%), and the arboviruses (14.3%). Four of the arboviruses were of dengue virus (DENV) and three of oropouche virus (OROV). The detection of different viruses in the CNS of patients with meningitis or encephalitis highlight the importance of maintaining an active laboratory monitoring diagnostics with rapid methodology of high sensitivity in areas of viral hyperendemicity that may assist in clinical decisions and in the choice of antiviral therapy.

  11. Multipathogen infections in hospitalized children with acute respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xicheng Hong

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To explore the epidemiologic and clinical features of, and interactions among, multipathogen infections in hospitalized children with acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI. A prospective study of children admitted with ARTI was conducted. Peripheral blood samples were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence to detect respiratory agents including respiratory syncytial virus; adenovirus; influenza virus (Flu types A and B; parainfluenza virus (PIV types 1, 2, and 3; chlamydia pneumonia; and mycoplasma pneumonia. A medical history of each child was taken. Results Respiratory agents were detected in 164 (51.9% of 316 children with ARTI. A single agent was identified in 50 (15.8% children, and multiple agents in 114 (36.1%. Flu A was the most frequently detected agent, followed by Flu B. Coinfection occurred predominantly in August and was more frequent in children between 3 and 6 years of age. A significantly higher proportion of Flu A, Flu B, and PIV 1 was detected in samples with two or more pathogens per sample than in samples with a single pathogen. Conclusion Our study suggests that there is a high occurrence of multipathogen infections in children admitted with ARTI and that coinfection is associated with certain pathogens.

  12. Experimental infection of reindeer with bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Morton

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available Two 8-month reindeer (Rangifer tarandus and a 1-month-old Hereford-Holstein calf (Bos taurus were inoculated intranasally with the Singer (cytopathogenic strain of bovine viral diarrhea (BVD virus. Clinical signs in reindeer included loose stools containing blood and mucus, and transient laminitis or coronitis. Signs in the calf were limited to bloody mucus in the stool and lesions in the nasal mucosa. Antibody titers to BVD virus in the reindeer were intermittent, and titers in the calf persisted from days 14 to 63 post-inoculation (PI. Viremia was detected on PI day 4 in one reindeer, days 3-7 in the other, and days 2-7 in the calf. Bovine viral diarrhea virus was isolated from the lung of the calf at necropsy (PI day 63.

  13. Multiple functions of DDX3 RNA helicase in gene regulation, tumorigenesis, and viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 is a multifunctional protein involved in all aspects of RNA metabolism, including transcription, splicing, mRNA nuclear export, translation, RNA decay and ribosome biogenesis. In addition, DDX3 is also implicated in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, Wnt-β-catenin signaling, tumorigenesis, and viral infection. Notably, recent studies suggest that DDX3 is a component of anti-viral innate immune signaling pathways. Indeed, DDX3 contributes to enhance the induction ...

  14. [Presence of autocomplementary RNA with viral specificity in cells infected with herpes virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béchet, J M; Montagnier, L; Latarjet, R

    1975-01-13

    RNA from cells infected with Herpes simplex virus contain a higher percentage of double-stranded RNA than non-infected cells. This percentage increases three-fold upon self-annealing. The complementary RNA sequences were shown to be virus-specific by the following criteria: (1) high melting temperature than double-stranded RNA from non infected cells; (2) higher density in caesium sulphate; (3) specific hybridization with viral DNA.

  15. Effect of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection on dairy calf rearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diéguez, Francisco J; Yus, Eduardo; Vilar, María J; Sanjuán, María L; Arnaiz, Ignacio

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cumulative incidence of mortality, clinical diarrhoea and respiratory disease in calves, during their first six months of age, in herds with different bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection status. Calves' health indicators were tested by comparing proportions in 101 farms with dissimilar infection condition. The results indicate that there was a significant relationship between the BVDV status (actively infected herd or not) and the cumulative incidence of mortality and respiratory disorders.

  16. Defining CD8+ T cell determinants during human viral infection in populations of Asian ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivino, Laura; Tan, Anthony T; Chia, Adeline; Kumaran, Emmanuelle A P; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; MacAry, Paul A; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2013-10-15

    The identification of virus-specific CD8(+) T cell determinants is a fundamental requirement for our understanding of viral disease pathogenesis. T cell epitope mapping strategies increasingly rely on algorithms that predict the binding of peptides to MHC molecules. There is, however, little information on the reliability of predictive algorithms in the context of human populations, in particular, for those expressing HLA class I molecules for which there are limited experimental data available. In this study, we evaluate the ability of NetMHCpan to predict antiviral CD8(+) T cell epitopes that we identified with a traditional approach in patients of Asian ethnicity infected with Dengue virus, hepatitis B virus, or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. We experimentally demonstrate that the predictive power of algorithms defining peptide-MHC interaction directly correlates with the amount of training data on which the predictive algorithm has been constructed. These results highlight the limited applicability of the NetMHCpan algorithm for populations expressing HLA molecules for which there are little or no experimental binding data, such as those of Asian ethnicity.

  17. iNKT Cells and Their potential Lipid Ligands during Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anunya eOpasawatchai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are a unique population of lipid reactive CD1d restricted innate-like T lymphocytes. Despite being a minor population, they serve as an early source of cytokines and promote immunological crosstalk thus bridging innate and adaptive immunity. Diseases ranging from allergy, autoimmunity, and cancer as well as infectious diseases, including viral infection, have been reported to be influenced by iNKT cells. However, it remains unclear how iNKT cells are activated during viral infection, as virus derived lipid antigens have not been reported. Cytokines may activate iNKT cells during infections from influenza and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV, although CD1d dependent activation is evident in other viral infections. Several viruses, such as dengue virus (DENV, induce CD1d upregulation which correlates with iNKT cell activation. In contrast, Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and Human papiloma virus (HPV promote CD1d downregulation as a strategy to evade iNKT cell recognition. These observations suggest the participation of a CD1d-dependent process in the activation of iNKT cells in response to viral infection. Endogenous lipid ligands, including phospholipids as well as glycosphingolipids, such as glucosylceramide have been proposed to mediate iNKT cell activation. Pro-inflammatory signals produced during viral infection may stimulate iNKT cells through enhanced CD1d dependent endogenous lipid presentation. Furthermore, viral infection may alter lipid composition and inhibit endogenous lipid degradation. Recent advances in this field are reviewed.

  18. [Imported viral infections in international travel; from the virtual to real epidemiology of pandemics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jänisch, T; Junghanss, T

    2000-07-15

    Viruses have become more mobile alongside with increasing human mobility and speed of travel. At the same time we get access to information on viral outbreaks and epidemics from large parts of the world faster than ever before. Two recent epidemics will be presented to explore the value and the consequences of communicating epidemiological information through the Internet. The epidemiology, clinical features, diagnostic procedures and prophylaxis of imported viral infections are presented. Risk factors for the emergence and resurgence of viral diseases are being discussed.

  19. Twenty years of psychoneuroimmunology and viral infections in Brain, Behavior, and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneau, Robert H; Padgett, David A; Sheridan, John F

    2007-03-01

    For 20 years, Brain, Behavior, and Immunity has provided an important venue for the publication of studies in psychoneuroimmunology. During this time period, psychoneuroimmunology has matured into an important multidisciplinary science that has contributed significantly to our knowledge of mind, brain, and body interactions. This review will not only focus on the primary research papers dealing with psychoneuroimmunology, viral infections, and anti-viral vaccine responses in humans and animal models that have appeared on the pages of Brain, Behavior, and Immunity during the past 20 years, but will also outline a variety of strategies that could be used for expanding our understanding of the neuroimmune-viral pathogen relationship.

  20. Multiploid CD61+ cells are the pre-dominant cell lineage infected during acute dengue virus infection in bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina B Clark

    Full Text Available Depression of the peripheral blood platelet count during acute infection is a hallmark of dengue. This thrombocytopenia has been attributed, in part, to an insufficient level of platelet production by megakaryocytes that reside in the bone marrow (BM. Interestingly, it was observed that dengue patients experience BM suppression at the onset of fever. However, few studies focus on the interaction between dengue virus (DENV and megakaryocytes and how this interaction can lead to a reduction in platelets. In the studies reported herein, BM cells from normal healthy rhesus monkeys (RM and humans were utilized to identify the cell lineage(s that were capable of supporting virus infection and replication. A number of techniques were employed in efforts to address this issue. These included the use of viral RNA quantification, nonstructural protein and infectivity assays, phenotypic studies utilizing immunohistochemical staining, anti-differentiation DEAB treatment, and electron microscopy. Cumulative results from these studies revealed that cells in the BM were indeed highly permissive for DENV infection, with human BM having higher levels of viral production compared to RM. DENV-like particles were predominantly observed in multi-nucleated cells that expressed CD61+. These data suggest that megakaryocytes are likely the predominant cell type infected by DENV in BM, which provides one explanation for the thrombocytopenia and the dysfunctional platelets characteristic of dengue virus infection.

  1. Radiometric Methods for Rapid Diagnosis of Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-01

    4, 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours postinfection, infection time beginning when the 14C-labeled medium was added. Nucleic acid sT, thesis system. Stationary...coccus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter caloaceticus var. anitratus) had no effect on the DNA synthesis of HSV-1 infected or...7 UNCLASS 41 RADIOMETRIC METHODS FOR RAPID DIAGNIS F VIRA ~ /fl INFECTION (U) JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV BALTIMORE MDUNC . IFEDH N WAG ER FT AL. NOV 75

  2. Liposomal nanocontainers as models for viral infection: monitoring viral genomic RNA transfer through lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, Gerhard; Matscheko, Nena M; Pickl-Herk, Angela; Weiss, Victor U; Subirats, Xavier; Kenndler, Ernst; Blaas, Dieter

    2011-08-01

    After uptake into target cells, many nonenveloped viruses undergo conformational changes in the low-pH environment of the endocytic compartment. This results in exposure of amphipathic viral peptides and/or hydrophobic protein domains that are inserted into and either disrupt or perforate the vesicular membranes. The viral nucleic acids thereby gain access to the cytosol and initiate replication. We here demonstrate the in vitro transfer of the single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome of human rhinovirus 2 into liposomes decorated with recombinant very-low-density lipoprotein receptor fragments. Membrane-attached virions were exposed to pH 5.4, mimicking the in vivo pH environment of late endosomes. This triggered the release of the RNA whose arrival in the liposomal lumen was detected via in situ cDNA synthesis by encapsulated reverse transcriptase. Subsequently, cDNA was PCR amplified. At a low ratio between virions and lipids, RNA transfer was positively correlated with virus concentration. However, membranes became leaky at higher virus concentrations, which resulted in decreased cDNA synthesis. In accordance with earlier in vivo data, the RNA passes through the lipid membrane without causing gross damage to vesicles at physiologically relevant virus concentrations.

  3. Viral infections during pregnancy and in early life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, L; Urrutia, J J; Serrato, G; Mohs, E; Chin, T D

    1977-11-01

    There is evidence that fetal antigenic stimulation and intrauterine infection is much more frequent in developing rural populations than in industrialized societies. A similar contrast is observed for postnatal intestinal infection that is significantly greater in the less developed areas. The differences are explained by the divergence in environmental sanitation and personal hygiene. Intestinal infection is important in that diarrheal disease is one of the main factors leading to malnutrition. It is apparent that for developing nations to attain better nutrition, much of the present burden of intestinal infection needs to be controlled.

  4. Epidemiology of respiratory viral infections in two long-term refugee camps in Kenya, 2007-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Jamal A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Refugees are at risk for poor outcomes from acute respiratory infections (ARI because of overcrowding, suboptimal living conditions, and malnutrition. We implemented surveillance for respiratory viruses in Dadaab and Kakuma refugee camps in Kenya to characterize their role in the epidemiology of ARI among refugees. Methods From 1 September 2007 through 31 August 2010, we obtained nasopharyngeal (NP and oropharyngeal (OP specimens from patients with influenza-like illness (ILI or severe acute respiratory infections (SARI and tested them by RT-PCR for adenovirus (AdV, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, human metapneumovirus (hMPV, parainfluenza viruses (PIV, and influenza A and B viruses. Definitions for ILI and SARI were adapted from those of the World Health Organization. Proportions of cases associated with viral aetiology were calculated by camp and by clinical case definition. In addition, for children Results We tested specimens from 1815 ILI and 4449 SARI patients (median age = 1 year. Proportion positive for virus were AdV, 21.7%; RSV, 12.5%; hMPV, 5.7%; PIV, 9.4%; influenza A, 9.7%; and influenza B, 2.6%; 49.8% were positive for at least one virus. The annual rate of SARI hospitalisation for 2007-2010 was 57 per 1000 children per year. Virus-positive hospitalisation rates were 14 for AdV; 9 for RSV; 6 for PIV; 4 for hMPV; 5 for influenza A; and 1 for influenza B. The rate of SARI hospitalisation was highest in children Conclusions Respiratory viral infections, particularly RSV and AdV, were associated with high rates of illness and make up a substantial portion of respiratory infection in these two refugee settings.

  5. Building and optimizing a virus-specific T cell receptor library for targeted immunotherapy in viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, Nasirah; Chia, Adeline; Ho, Zi Zong; Garcia, Alfonso Tan; Paravasivam, Komathi; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; Bertoletti, Antonio; Gehring, Adam J

    2014-02-25

    Restoration of antigen-specific T cell immunity has the potential to clear persistent viral infection. T cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy can reconstitute CD8 T cell immunity in chronic patients. We cloned 10 virus-specific TCRs targeting 5 different viruses, causing chronic and acute infection. All 10 TCR genetic constructs were optimized for expression using a P2A sequence, codon optimization and the addition of a non-native disulfide bond. However, maximum TCR expression was only achieved after establishing the optimal orientation of the alpha and beta chains in the expression cassette; 9/10 TCRs favored the beta-P2A-alpha orientation over alpha-P2A-beta. Optimal TCR expression was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of IFN-gamma+ T cells. In addition, activating cells for transduction in the presence of Toll-like receptor ligands further enhanced IFN-gamma production. Thus, we have built a virus-specific TCR library that has potential for therapeutic intervention in chronic viral infection or virus-related cancers.

  6. Acute viral bronchiolitis in children- a very common condition with few therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Claire

    2010-03-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis remains a cause of substantial morbidity and health care costs in young infants. It is the most common lower respiratory tract condition and most common reason for admission to hospital in infants. Many respiratory viruses have been associated with acute viral bronchiolitis although respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains the most frequently identified virus. Most infants have a mild self limiting illness while others have more severe illness and require hospital admission and some will need ventilatory support. Differences in innate immune function in response to the respiratory viral insult as well as differences in the geometry of the airways may explain some of the variability in clinical pattern. Young age and history of prematurity remain the most important risk factors although male gender, indigenous status, exposure to tobacco smoke, poor socioeconomic factors and associated co-morbidities such as chronic lung disease and congenital heart disease increase the risks of more severe illness. Supportive therapy remains the major treatment option as no specific treatments to date have been shown to provide clinically important benefits except for inhaled hypertonic saline. Prophylaxis of high risk infants with palivizumab should be considered although the cost effectiveness is still unclear. Many questions remain regarding optimal management approaches for infants requiring hospitalisation with bronchiolitis including use of nasogastric feeding, the optimal role of supplemental oxygen, optimal use of hypertonic saline and the role of combinations of therapies, the use of heliox or modern physiotherapy approaches.

  7. Methamphetamine mediates immune dysregulation in a murine model of chronic viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma eSriram

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is a highly addictive psychostimulant that not only affects the brain and cognitive functions but also greatly impacts the host immune system, rendering the body susceptible to infections and exacerbating the severity of disease. Although there is gathering evidence about METH abuse and increased incidence of HIV and other viral infections, not much is known about the effects on the immune system in a chronic viral infection setting. We have used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV chronic mouse model of viral infection in a chronic METH environment and demonstrate that METH significantly increases CD3 marker on splenocytes and programmed death -1 (PD-1 expression on T cells, a cell surface signaling molecule known to inhibit T cell function and cause exhaustion in a lymphoid organ. Many of these METH effects were more pronounced during early stage of infection, which are gradually attenuated during later stages of infection. An essential cytokine for T-lymphocyte homeostasis, Interleukin-2 (IL-2 in serum was prominently reduced in METH-exposed infected mice. In addition, the serum pro-inflammatory (TNF, IL12 p70, IL1β, IL-6 and KC-GRO and Th2 (IL-2, IL-10 and IL-4 cytokine profiles were also altered in the presence of METH. Interestingly CXCR3, an inflammatory chemokine receptor, showed significant increase in the METH treated LCMV infected mice. Similarly, compared to only infected mice, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in METH exposed LCMV infected mice were up regulated. Collectively, our data suggest that METH alters systemic, peripheral immune responses and modulates key markers on T cells involved in pathogenesis of chronic viral infection.

  8. Viral infection triggers rapid differentiation of human blood monocytes into dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wanqiu; Gibbs, James S; Lu, Xiuju; Brooke, Christopher B; Roy, Devika; Modlin, Robert L; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2012-03-29

    Surprisingly little is known about the interaction of human blood mononuclear cells with viruses. Here, we show that monocytes are the predominant cell type infected when peripheral blood mononuclear cells are exposed to viruses ex vivo. Remarkably, infection with vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, and a variety of influenza A viruses (including circulating swine-origin virus) induces monocytes to differentiate within 18 hours into CD16(-)CD83(+) mature dendritic cells with enhanced capacity to activate T cells. Differentiation into dendritic cells does not require cell division and occurs despite the synthesis of viral proteins, which demonstrates that monocytes counteract the capacity of these highly lytic viruses to hijack host cell biosynthetic capacity. Indeed, differentiation requires infectious virus and viral protein synthesis. These findings demonstrate that monocytes are uniquely susceptible to viral infection among blood mononuclear cells, with the likely purpose of generating cells with enhanced capacity to activate innate and acquired antiviral immunity.

  9. Quantification of infectious HIV-1 plasma viral load using a boosted in vitro infection protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusert, Peter; Fischer, Marek; Joos, Beda; Leemann, Christine; Kuster, Herbert; Flepp, Markus; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian; Günthard, Huldrych F; Trkola, Alexandra

    2004-08-15

    Methods currently used for HIV-1 viral load measurements are very sensitive, but cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious particles. Here we describe the development of a novel, sensitive, and highly reproducible method that allows rapid isolation and quantification of infectious particles from patient plasma. By immobilizing HIV-1 particles in human plasma to platelets using polybrene, we observed a 10- to 1000-fold increase in infectivity over infection protocols using free virus particles. Using this method, we evaluated infectivity in plasma from 52 patients at various disease stages. At plasma viral loads of 1000-10000 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml 18%, at 10,000-50,000 copies/ml 73%, at 50,000-100,000 copies/ml 90%, and above 100,000 copies 96% of cultures were positive. We found that infectious titers among patients vary distinctively but are characteristic for a patient over extended time periods. Furthermore, we demonstrate that by evaluating infectious titers in conjunction with total HIV RNA loads, subtle effects of treatment intervention on viremia levels can be detected. The immobilization procedure does not interfere with viral entry and does not restore the infectivity of neutralized virus. Therefore, this assay system can be utilized to investigate the influence of substances that specifically affect virion infectivity such as neutralizing antibodies, soluble CD4, or protease inhibitors. Measuring viral infectivity may thereby function as an additional, useful marker in monitoring disease progression and evaluating efficacy of antivirals in vivo.

  10. Cytotoxic CD4 T Cells—Friend or Foe during Viral Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juno, Jennifer A.; van Bockel, David; Kent, Stephen J.; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Zaunders, John J.; Munier, C. Mee Ling

    2017-01-01

    CD4 T cells with cytotoxic function were once thought to be an artifact due to long-term in vitro cultures but have in more recent years become accepted and reported in the literature in response to a number of viral infections. In this review, we focus on cytotoxic CD4 T cells in the context of human viral infections and in some infections that affect mice and non-human primates. We examine the effector mechanisms used by cytotoxic CD4 cells, the phenotypes that describe this population, and the transcription factors and pathways that lead to their induction following infection. We further consider the cells that are the predominant targets of this effector subset and describe the viral infections in which CD4 cytotoxic T lymphocytes have been shown to play a protective or pathologic role. Cytotoxic CD4 T cells are detected in the circulation at much higher levels than previously realized and are now recognized to have an important role in the immune response to viral infections. PMID:28167943

  11. Dengue virus life cycle : viral and host factors modulating infectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2010-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV 1-4) represents a major emerging arthropod-borne pathogen. All four DENV serotypes are prevalent in the (sub) tropical regions of the world and infect 50-100 million individuals annually. Whereas the majority of DENV infections proceed asymptomatically or result in self-limited de

  12. Early-onset acute transverse myelitis following hepatitis B vaccination and respiratory infection: case report Mielite transversa aguda de início precoce precedida de vacinação para hepatite B e infecção viral respiratória: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Fonseca

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute transverse myelitis is an acute inflammatory process of the spinal cord and it is a rare clinical syndrome in childhood. In this paper, we report a case of 3 years-old boy who developed acute onset tetraparesia following a viral respiratory infecction and hepatitis B vaccination. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord disclosed signal-intensity abnormalities from C4 to C3. A diagnosis of acute transverse myelitis was made and the patient was treated with IV methylprednisolone and IV immunoglobulin. The child had a fair outcome despite of the very acute course of the disease and the presence of a cervical sensory level which usually harbor a poor prognosis.A mielite transversa aguda é processo inflamatório agudo da medula espinhal de ocorrência rara na infância. Neste artigo, reportamos o caso de um menino de 3 anos que desenvolveu tetraparesia aguda precedida de infecção viral respiratória e pós-vacinação para Hepatite B. A imagem pela Ressonância Magnética da medula espinhal revelou anormalidade de aumento de sinal em C4-T3. Após o diagnóstico da mielite transversa aguda, o paciente foi tratado com metilprednisolona e imunoglobulina. Embora a doença tenha se apresentado de forma aguda e acompanhada de nível sensitivo, o que usualmente levaria a um prognóstico sombrio, a criança evoluiu favoravelmente.

  13. Acute risk for hepatitis E virus infection among HIV-1-positive pregnant women in central Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caron Mélanie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis E virus (HEV, an enterically transmitted pathogen, is highly endemic in several African countries. Pregnant women are at particularly high risk for acute or severe hepatitis E. In Gabon, a central African country, the prevalence of antibodies to HEV among pregnant women is 14.1%. Recent studies have demonstrated unusual patterns of hepatitis E (chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis among immunodeficient patients. Findings We investigated the prevalence of antibodies to HEV among pregnant women infected with HIV-1 or HTLV-1 in Gabon. Of 243 samples collected, 183 were positive for HIV-1 and 60 for HTLV-1; 16 women (6.6% had IgG antibodies to HEV. The seroprevalence was higher among HIV-1-infected women (7.1% than HTLV-1-infected women (5.0%. Moreover, the HIV-1 viral load was significantly increased (p ≤ 0.02 among women with past-HEV exposure (1.3E+05 vs 5.7E+04 copies per ml, whereas no difference was found in HTLV-1 proviral load (9.0E+01 vs 1.1E+03 copies per ml. Conclusions These data provide evidence that HIV-1-infected women are at risk for acute or severe infection if they are exposed to HEV during pregnancy, with an increased viral load.

  14. Contrasting life strategies of viruses that infect photo- and heterotrophic bacteria, as revealed by viral tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Gregory, Ann; Yilmaz, Suzan; Poulos, Bonnie T; Hugenholtz, Philip; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2012-10-30

    Ocean viruses are ubiquitous and abundant and play important roles in global biogeochemical cycles by means of their mortality, horizontal gene transfer, and manipulation of host metabolism. However, the obstacles involved in linking viruses to their hosts in a high-throughput manner bottlenecks our ability to understand virus-host interactions in complex communities. We have developed a method called viral tagging (VT), which combines mixtures of host cells and fluorescent viruses with flow cytometry. We investigated multiple viruses which infect each of two model marine bacteria that represent the slow-growing, photoautotrophic genus Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria) and the fast-growing, heterotrophic genus Pseudoalteromonas (Gammaproteobacteria). Overall, viral tagging results for viral infection were consistent with plaque and liquid infection assays for cyanobacterial myo-, podo- and siphoviruses and some (myo- and podoviruses) but not all (four siphoviruses) heterotrophic bacterial viruses. Virus-tagged Pseudoalteromonas organisms were proportional to the added viruses under varied infection conditions (virus-bacterium ratios), while no more than 50% of the Synechococcus organisms were virus tagged even at viral abundances that exceeded (5 to 10×) that of their hosts. Further, we found that host growth phase minimally impacts the fraction of virus-tagged Synechococcus organisms while greatly affecting phage adsorption to Pseudoalteromonas. Together these findings suggest that at least two contrasting viral life strategies exist in the oceans and that they likely reflect adaptation to their host microbes. Looking forward to the point at which the virus-tagging signature is well understood (e.g., for Synechococcus), application to natural communities should begin to provide population genomic data at the proper scale for predictively modeling two of the most abundant biological entities on Earth. Viral study suffers from an inability to link viruses to hosts en

  15. [Consequences of extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C viral infection (HCV)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełczyk, Agnieszka

    2016-04-21

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a primarily hepatotropic virus. However, numerous extrahepatic symptoms are observed in patients chronically infected with HCV, e.g. cryoglobulinemia, lymphoproliferative disorders, kidney diseases, disturbances of the central and peripheral nervous system, thyroid gland, pancreas, lymph nodes and pituitary gland, that develop at various times after the infection. Complex mechanisms underlie these processes, both molecular, related to direct effects of the virus on cells or tissues and indirect mechanisms, resulting from the response of the immune system to infection (via cytokines or oxidative stress), and from the antiviral treatment used. Understanding these mechanisms may contribute to the definition of new prognostic factors, important for the early diagnosis of the infection, which in turn may improve treatment efficacy. This paper is a review of the incidence of selected extrahepatic manifestations of HCV infection and their underlying pathogenetic mechanisms and risk factors.

  16. [Interaction of the Siberian and Far Eastern subtypes of tick-borne encephalitis virus in mammals with mixed infection. Competition of the subtypes in acute and inapparent infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, S G; Pogodina, V V; Koliasnikova, N M; Karan', L S; Malenko, G V; Levina, L S

    2011-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of natural tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) populations could reveal the change of TBEV subtypes, the displacement of the Far Eastern (FE) subtype, and its substitution for the Siberian (Sib) subtype. Acute and inapparent mixed infections were studied in Syrian hamsters to understand this phenomenon. The animals were inoculated with the Sib subtype and then with the FE one of TBEV (JQ845440-YaroslavI-Aver-08 and Fj214132-Kemerovo-Phateev-1954 strains). The inapparent form developed more frequently in mixed infection. Viral progeny was genotyped by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and hybridization fluorescence detection using genotype-specific probes. Independent reproduction of strains in the brain gave way to competition. The FE subtype dominated in hamster youngsters with acute infection. The Sib subtype had selective benefits in asymptomatic infection (adult hamsters infected intracerebrally and subcutaneously and youngsters infected subcutaneously). The competition of the subtypes was imperfect.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and safety of intravenous cidofovir for life-threatening viral infections in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso Brown, Amy E; Cohen, Mindy N; Tong, Suhong; Braverman, Rebecca S; Rooney, James F; Giller, Roger; Levin, Myron J

    2015-07-01

    Children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at risk for life-threatening viral infections. Cidofovir is often used as a first-line agent for adenovirus infections, despite the absence of randomized controlled trials with HSCT patients, and as a second-line agent for resistant herpesvirus infections. The frequency and severity of adverse effects, particularly nephrotoxicity, in pediatric HSCT recipients are unclear, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of cidofovir in children have not previously been reported. This study was an open-label, nonrandomized, single-dose pilot study to determine the safety and PK of cidofovir in pediatric HSCT recipients with symptomatic adenovirus, nucleoside-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) or herpes simplex virus (HSV), and/or human papovavirus infections. Subsequent dosing and frequency were determined by clinical response and side effects, as assessed by the treating physician. Blood and urine samples were obtained from patients for PK studies and assessment of toxicity and virologic response. Twelve patients were enrolled (median age, 9 years; 33.5 days posttransplantation). Four of seven patients with adenovirus infection were successfully treated and eventually cleared their infections. Four of twelve patients died of disseminated viral disease and multiorgan failure. Two of twelve patients had evidence of acute kidney injury after the first dose, and one of these patients developed chronic kidney disease; two other patients developed late nephrotoxicity. The mean drug half-life was 9.5 h. There was no correlation between nephrotoxicity and plasma maximum concentration, clearance, or half-life. PK were similar to those reported for adults, although the drug half-life was significantly longer than that for adults. Cidofovir was well tolerated in the majority of patients. However, effective therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to support patients until immune reconstitution is achieved.

  18. Antibiotic and Antiinflammatory Therapy Transiently Reduces Inflammation and Hypercoagulation in Acutely SIV-Infected Pigtailed Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandrea, Ivona; Xu, Cuiling; Stock, Jennifer L; Frank, Daniel N; Ma, Dongzhu; Policicchio, Benjamin B; He, Tianyu; Kristoff, Jan; Cornell, Elaine; Haret-Richter, George S; Trichel, Anita; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Tracy, Russell; Wilson, Cara; Landay, Alan L; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Increased chronic immune activation and inflammation are hallmarks of HIV/SIV infection and are highly correlated with progression to AIDS and development of non-AIDS comorbidities, such as hypercoagulability and cardiovascular disease. Intestinal dysfunction resulting in microbial translocation has been proposed as a lead cause of systemic immune activation and hypercoagulability in HIV/SIV infection. Our goal was to assess the biological and clinical impact of a therapeutic strategy designed to reduce microbial translocation through reduction of the microbial content of the intestine (Rifaximin-RFX) and of gut inflammation (Sulfasalazine-SFZ). RFX is an intraluminal antibiotic that was successfully used in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SFZ is an antiinflammatory drug successfully used in patients with mild to moderate inflammatory bowel disease. Both these clinical conditions are associated with increased microbial translocation, similar to HIV-infected patients. Treatment was administered for 90 days to five acutely SIV-infected pigtailed macaques (PTMs) starting at the time of infection; seven untreated SIVsab-infected PTMs were used as controls. RFX+SFZ were also administered for 90 days to three chronically SIVsab-infected PTMs. RFX+SFZ administration during acute SIVsab infection of PTMs resulted in: significantly lower microbial translocation, lower systemic immune activation, lower viral replication, better preservation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and significantly lower levels of hypercoagulation biomarkers. This effect was clear during the first 40 days of treatment and was lost during the last stages of treatment. Administration of RFX+SFZ to chronically SIVsab-infected PTMs had no discernible effect on infection. Our data thus indicate that early RFX+SFZ administration transiently improves the natural history of acute and postacute SIV infection, but has no effect during chronic infection.

  19. Influence of viral infection on essential oil composition of Ocimum basilicum (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Alice; Duarte, Ligia M L; Santos, Déborah Y A C

    2011-08-01

    Ocimum basilicum L., popularly known as sweet basil, is a Lamiaceae species whose essential oil is mainly composed of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and phenylpropanoids. The contents of these compounds can be affected by abiotic and biotic factors such as infections caused by viruses. The main goal of this research was an investigation of the effects of viral infection on the essential oil profile of common basil. Seeds of O. basilicum L. cv. Genovese were sowed and kept in a greenhouse. Plants presenting two pairs of leaves above the cotyledons were inoculated with an unidentified virus isolated from a field plant showing chlorotic yellow spots and foliar deformation. Essential oils of healthy and infected plants were extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GCMS. Changes in essential oil composition due to viral infection were observed. Methyleugenol and p-cresol,2,6-di-tert-butyl were the main constituents. However, methyleugenol contents were significantly decreased in infected plants.

  20. Detection of markers of hepatitis viral infection in the tissue of bile duct carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hou-bao; QIAN Zhen-yu; WANG Bing-sheng; TONG Sai-xiong

    2008-01-01

    @@ Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an admitted oncogenic virus. Many epidemiological and molecular biological studies have demonstrated that chronic infection with HBV is a major risk factor associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic bile duct cancer.1-4 Compared with hepatocytes and intrahepatic bile duct epithelial cells,extrahepatic bile duct epithelial cells have autoploid in embryogenesis,continuity in anatomy and a similar internal environment.The question arises whether extrahepatic bile duct epithelial cells can receive HBV infection or not? The role of hepatitis viral infection in the pathogenesis of bile duct carcinoma has not yet been clarified.although a causative relationship between HBV or HCV infection and extrahepatic bile duct carcinoma has been reported in the literature.5,6 In this study,we focused on the evidence of hepatitis viral infection in tissue of bile duct carcinoma.

  1. Apoptotic killing of HIV-1-infected macrophages is subverted by the viral envelope glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Swingler

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses have evolved strategies to protect infected cells from apoptotic clearance. We present evidence that HIV-1 possesses a mechanism to protect infected macrophages from the apoptotic effects of the death ligand TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. In HIV-1-infected macrophages, the viral envelope protein induced macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. This pro-survival cytokine downregulated the TRAIL receptor TRAIL-R1/DR4 and upregulated the anti-apoptotic genes Bfl-1 and Mcl-1. Inhibition of M-CSF activity or silencing of Bfl-1 and Mcl-1 rendered infected macrophages highly susceptible to TRAIL. The anti-cancer agent Imatinib inhibited M-CSF receptor activation and restored the apoptotic sensitivity of HIV-1-infected macrophages, suggesting a novel strategy to curtail viral persistence in the macrophage reservoir.

  2. Final Technical Report: Viral Infection of Subsurface Microorganisms and Metal/Radionuclide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Karrie A.; Bender, Kelly S.; Li, Yusong

    2013-09-28

    Microbially mediated metabolisms have been identified as a significant factor either directly or indirectly impacting the fate and transport of heavy metal/radionuclide contaminants. To date microorganisms have been isolated from contaminated environments. Examination of annotated finished genome sequences of many of these subsurface isolates from DOE sites, revealed evidence of prior viral infection. To date the role that viruses play influencing microbial mortality and the resulting community structure which directly influences biogeochemical cycling in soils and sedimentary environments remains poorly understood. The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the role of viral infection of subsurface bacteria and the formation of contaminant-bearing viral particles. This objective was approached by examining the following working hypotheses: (i) subsurface microorganisms are susceptible to viral infections by the indigenous subsurface viral community, and (ii) viral surfaces will adsorb heavy metals and radionuclides. Our results have addressed basic research needed to accomplish the BER Long Term Measure to provide sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites would be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical and biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation or natural attenuation and long-term stewardship by establishing viral-microbial relationships on the subsequent fate and transport of heavy metals and radionuclides. Here we demonstrated that viruses play a significant role in microbial mortality and community structure in terrestrial subsurface sedimentary systems. The production of viral-like particles within subsurface sediments in response to biostimulation with dissolved organic carbon and a terminal electron acceptor resulted in the production of viral-like particles. Organic carbon alone did not result in significant viral production and required the addition of a terminal electron acceptor

  3. Final Technical Report: Viral Infection of Subsurface Microorganisms and Metal/Radionuclide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Karrie A.; Bender, Kelly S.; Li, Yusong

    2013-09-28

    Microbially mediated metabolisms have been identified as a significant factor either directly or indirectly impacting the fate and transport of heavy metal/radionuclide contaminants. To date microorganisms have been isolated from contaminated environments. Examination of annotated finished genome sequences of many of these subsurface isolates from DOE sites, revealed evidence of prior viral infection. To date the role that viruses play influencing microbial mortality and the resulting community structure which directly influences biogeochemical cycling in soils and sedimentary environments remains poorly understood. The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the role of viral infection of subsurface bacteria and the formation of contaminant-bearing viral particles. This objective was approached by examining the following working hypotheses: (i) subsurface microorganisms are susceptible to viral infections by the indigenous subsurface viral community, and (ii) viral surfaces will adsorb heavy metals and radionuclides. Our results have addressed basic research needed to accomplish the BER Long Term Measure to provide sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites would be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical and biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation or natural attenuation and long-term stewardship by establishing viral-microbial relationships on the subsequent fate and transport of heavy metals and radionuclides. Here we demonstrated that viruses play a significant role in microbial mortality and community structure in terrestrial subsurface sedimentary systems. The production of viral-like particles within subsurface sediments in response to biostimulation with dissolved organic carbon and a terminal electron acceptor resulted in the production of viral-like particles. Organic carbon alone did not result in significant viral production and required the addition of a terminal electron acceptor

  4. Comparison on Serum Levels of Procalcitonin of Children with Viral and Bacterial Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare and analyze serum levels of procalcitonin (PCT) of children with viral and bacterial infection and probe into the importance of determining the level of serum PCT in the diagnosis of bacterial infection in order to provide evidences of the clinical use of antibiotics. Methods A total of 85 cases of children with an average age of 8.9 years (10 months-12 years) were enrolled in this study, 53 cases were with viral infection and 32 cases with bacterial infection. We determined serum levels of PCT by semi-quantitative solid phase immunoassay, and the serum levels of PCT were divided into four grades as Results The serum level of PCT of the group with bacterial infection were signiifcantly higher than that of the group with viral infection (P Conclusions Serum PCT is a bacterial sensitive marker of bacterial infection in children, and the determination of the level of serum PCT is helpful for the diagnosis of bacterial infection, which can also be a basis for the use of antibiotics.

  5. Sphingosine kinase 1 serves as a pro-viral factor by regulating viral RNA synthesis and nuclear export of viral ribonucleoprotein complex upon influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jin Seo

    Full Text Available Influenza continues to pose a threat to humans by causing significant morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is imperative to investigate mechanisms by which influenza virus manipulates the function of host factors and cellular signal pathways. In this study, we demonstrate that influenza virus increases the expression and activation of sphingosine kinase (SK 1, which in turn regulates diverse cellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of SK suppressed virus-induced NF-κB activation and markedly reduced the synthesis of viral RNAs and proteins. Further, SK blockade interfered with activation of Ran-binding protein 3 (RanBP3, a cofactor of chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1, to inhibit CRM1-mediated nuclear export of the influenza viral ribonucleoprotein complex. In support of this observation, SK inhibition altered the phosphorylation of ERK, p90RSK, and AKT, which is the upstream signal of RanBP3/CRM1 activation. Collectively, these results indicate that SK is a key pro-viral factor regulating multiple cellular signal pathways triggered by influenza virus infection.

  6. Memory CD8+ T cell differentiation in viral infection: A cell for all seasons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry Radziewicz; Luke Uebelhoer; Bertram Bengsch; Arash Grakoui

    2007-01-01

    Chronic viral infections such as hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are major global health problems affecting more than 500 million people worldwide. Virus-specific CD8+ T cells play an important role in the course and outcome of these viral infections and it is hypothesized that altered or impaired differentiation of virusspecific CD8+ T cells contributes to the development of persistence and/or disease progression. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms responsible for functional differentiation of CD8+ T cells is essential for the generation of successful therapies aiming to strengthen the adaptive component of the immune system.

  7. A rare cause of acute abdomen in adults: Parasitic infection-related acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küpeli, Aydın Hakan; Özdemir, Murat; Topuz, Sezgin; Sözütek, Alper; Paksoy, Tuğba

    2015-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is a common parasitic disease all over the world, especially in less developed countries. Acute appendicitis related to parasitic infection is a rare condition. Parasitic infections should be kept in mind in patients who are admitted to the emergency department with acute abdomen, especially in endemic areas.

  8. High Serum Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein Level in Chronic Hepatitis C Viral Infection Is Reduced by Anti-Viral Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nien, Hsiao-Ching; Hsu, Shih-Jer; Su, Tung-Hung; Yang, Po-Jen; Sheu, Jin-Chuan; Wang, Jin-Town; Chow, Lu-Ping; Chen, Chi-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Background Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) has been reported to associate with metabolic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Since chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with metabolic derangements, the relationship between LBP and HCV deserves additional studies. This study aimed to determine the serum LBP level in subjects with or without HCV infection and investigate the change of its level after anti-viral treatments with or without interferon. Methods and Findings We recruited 120 non-HCV subjects, 42 and 17 HCV-infected subjects respectively treated with peginterferon α-2a/ribavirin and direct-acting antiviral drugs. Basic information, clinical data, serum LBP level and abdominal ultrasonography were collected. All the subjects provided written informed consent before being enrolled approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the National Taiwan University Hospital. Serum LBP level was significantly higher in HCV-infected subjects than non-HCV subjects (31.0 ± 8.8 versus 20.0 ± 6.4 μg/mL; p-value < 0.001). After multivariate analyses, LBP at baseline was independently associated with body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and HCV infection. Moreover, the baseline LBP was only significantly positively associated with ALT and inversely with fatty liver in HCV-infected subjects. The LBP level significantly decreased at sustained virologic response (27.4 ± 6.6 versus 34.6 ± 7.3 μg/mL, p-value < 0.001; 15.9 ± 4.4 versus 22.2 ± 5.7 μg/mL, p-value = 0.001), regardless of interferon-based or -free therapy. Conclusions LBP, an endotoxemia associated protein might be used as an inflammatory biomarker of both infectious and non-infectious origins in HCV-infected subjects. PMID:28107471

  9. Acute HIV Infection among Pregnant Women in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Cynthia L.; Mwapasa, Victor; Murdoch, David M.; Kwiek, Jesse J.; Fiscus, Susan A.; Meshnick, Steven R.; Cohen, Myron S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction There are limited data on acute HIV infection (AHI) prevalence during pregnancy. Methods Malawian pregnant women admitted in the third trimester and meeting eligibility criteria underwent dual HIV rapid antibody testing. AHI prevalence was retrospectively detected through HIV RNA pooling of seronegative plasma. Results Among 3825 pregnant women screened, dual HIV rapid testing indicated that 30.2% were HIV positive, 69.7% were HIV negative and 0.1% were indeterminate. Sensitivity and specificity of dual rapid testing was 99.0% and 98.7%, respectively. Of 2666 seronegative specimens, 2327 had samples available for HIV RNA pooling; 5 women (0.21%) (95% CI: 0.03, 0.40%) had AHI with a median peripartum viral load of 1,324,766 copies/mL. Discussion Pregnant women are at risk for AHI, warranting counseling of all women and their sexual partners about incident HIV during pregnancy. Dual HIV rapid tests have high sensitivity and specificity. HIV testing should be repeated in the third trimester and/or at delivery. PMID:20226326

  10. Viral Interleukin-10 Expressed by Human Cytomegalovirus during the Latent Phase of Infection Modulates Latently Infected Myeloid Cell Differentiation ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Avdic, Selmir; Cao, John Z.; Cheung, Allen K.L.; Abendroth, Allison; Slobedman, Barry

    2011-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus UL111A gene is expressed during latent and productive infections, and it codes for homologs of interleukin-10 (IL-10). We examined whether viral IL-10 expressed during latency altered differentiation of latently infected myeloid progenitors. In comparison to infection with parental virus or mock infection, latent infection with a virus in which the gene encoding viral IL-10 has been deleted upregulated cytokines associated with dendritic cell (DC) formation and incre...

  11. Host and viral factors contributing to CD8+ T cell failure in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph Neumann-Haefelin; Hans Christian Spangenberg; Hubert E Blum; Robert Thimme

    2007-01-01

    Virus-specific CD8+ T cells are thought to be the major anti-viral effector cells in hepatitis C virus (HCV)infection. Indeed, viral clearance is associated with vigorous CD8+ T cell responses targeting multiple epitopes. In the chronic phase of infection, HCV-specific CD8+ T cell responses are usually weak, narrowly focused and display often functional defects regarding cytotoxicity, cytokine production, and proliferative capacity. In the last few years, different mechanisms which might contribute to the failure of HCV-specific CD8+ T cells in chronic infection have been identified,including insufficient CD4+ help, deficient CD8+ T cell differentiation, viral escape mutations, suppression by viral factors, inhibitory cytokines, inhibitory ligands, and regulatory T cells. In addition, host genetic factors such as the host's human leukocyte antigen (HLA) background may play an important role in the efficiency of the HCVspecific CD8+ T cell response and thus outcome of infection. The growing understanding of the mechanisms contributing to T cell failure and persistence of HCV infection will contribute to the development of successful immunotherapeutical and -prophylactical strategies.

  12. Viral infection: an evolving insight into the signal transduction pathways responsible for the innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Girish J; Hatch, Steven; Marshall, William L

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune response is initiated by the interaction of stereotypical pathogen components with genetically conserved receptors for extracytosolic pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or intracytosolic nucleic acids. In multicellular organisms, this interaction typically clusters signal transduction molecules and leads to their activations, thereby initiating signals that activate innate immune effector mechanisms to protect the host. In some cases programmed cell death-a fundamental form of innate immunity-is initiated in response to genotoxic or biochemical stress that is associated with viral infection. In this paper we will summarize innate immune mechanisms that are relevant to viral pathogenesis and outline the continuing evolution of viral mechanisms that suppress the innate immunity in mammalian hosts. These mechanisms of viral innate immune evasion provide significant insight into the pathways of the antiviral innate immune response of many organisms. Examples of relevant mammalian innate immune defenses host defenses include signaling to interferon and cytokine response pathways as well as signaling to the inflammasome. Understanding which viral innate immune evasion mechanisms are linked to pathogenesis may translate into therapies and vaccines that are truly effective in eliminating the morbidity and mortality associated with viral infections in individuals.

  13. Lesions and distribution of viral antigen following an experimental infection of young seronegative calves with virulent bovine virus diarrhea virus-type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J A; West, K H; Cortese, V S; Myers, S L; Carman, S; Martin, K M; Haines, D M

    1998-07-01

    During the past several years, acute infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) have been causally linked to hemorrhagic and acute mucosal disease-like syndromes with high mortality. The majority of BVDVs isolated in such cases have been classified as type II on the basis of genetic and antigenic characteristics. It was our objective to examine clinical disease, lesions and potential sites of viral replication, following experimental BVDV type II infection in young calves. On approximately day 35 after birth, calves that had received BVDV-antibody-negative colostrum were infected by intranasal inoculation of 5 x 10(5) TCID50 of BVDV type II isolate 24,515 in 5 mL of tissue culture fluid (2.5 mL/nostril). Calves were monitored twice daily for signs of clinical disease. Approximately 48-72 h after infection, all calves developed transient pyrexia (39.4-40.5 degrees C) and leukopenia. Beginning on approximately day 7 after infection, all calves developed watery diarrhea, pyrexia (40.5-41.6 degrees C), marked leukopenia (> or = 75% drop from preinoculation values), variable thrombocytopenia, and moderate to severe depression. Calves were euthanized on days 10, 11, or 12 after infection due to severe disease. Gross and histological lesions consisted of multifocal bronchointerstitial pneumonia (involving 10%-25% of affected lungs), bone marrow hypoplasia and necrosis, and minimal erosive lesions in the alimentary tract. Immunohistochemical staining for BVDV revealed widespread viral antigen usually within epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mononuclear phagocytes in multiple organs, including lung, Peyer's patches, gastric mucosa, thymus, adrenal gland, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and skin. This BVDV type II isolate caused rapidly progressive, severe multisystemic disease in seronegative calves that was associated with widespread distribution of viral antigen and few gross or histological inflammatory lesions.

  14. PAR-1 contributes to the innate immune response during viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniak, Silvio; Owens, A Phillip; Baunacke, Martin; Williams, Julie C; Lee, Rebecca D; Weithäuser, Alice; Sheridan, Patricia A; Malz, Ronny; Luyendyk, James P; Esserman, Denise A; Trejo, JoAnn; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Blaxall, Burns C; Pawlinski, Rafal; Beck, Melinda A; Rauch, Ursula; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-03-01

    Coagulation is a host defense system that limits the spread of pathogens. Coagulation proteases, such as thrombin, also activate cells by cleaving PARs. In this study, we analyzed the role of PAR-1 in coxsackievirus B3-induced (CVB3-induced) myocarditis and influenza A infection. CVB3-infected Par1(-/-) mice expressed reduced levels of IFN-β and CXCL10 during the early phase of infection compared with Par1(+/+) mice that resulted in higher viral loads and cardiac injury at day 8 after infection. Inhibition of either tissue factor or thrombin in WT mice also significantly increased CVB3 levels in the heart and cardiac injury compared with controls. BM transplantation experiments demonstrated that PAR-1 in nonhematopoietic cells protected mice from CVB3 infection. Transgenic mice overexpressing PAR-1 in cardiomyocytes had reduced CVB3-induced myocarditis. We found that cooperative signaling between PAR-1 and TLR3 in mouse cardiac fibroblasts enhanced activation of p38 and induction of IFN-β and CXCL10 expression. Par1(-/-) mice also had decreased CXCL10 expression and increased viral levels in the lung after influenza A infection compared with Par1(+/+) mice. Our results indicate that the tissue factor/thrombin/PAR-1 pathway enhances IFN-β expression and contributes to the innate immune response during single-stranded RNA viral infection.

  15. DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A associates with viral proteins and impacts HSV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowles, Daniell L; Tsai, Yuan-Chin; Greco, Todd M; Lin, Aaron E; Li, Minghao; Yeh, Justin; Cristea, Ileana M

    2015-06-01

    Viral infections can alter the cellular epigenetic landscape, through modulation of either DNA methylation profiles or chromatin remodeling enzymes and histone modifications. These changes can act to promote viral replication or host defense. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a prominent human pathogen, which relies on interactions with host factors for efficient replication and spread. Nevertheless, the knowledge regarding its modulation of epigenetic factors remains limited. Here, we used fluorescently-labeled viruses in conjunction with immunoaffinity purification and MS to study virus-virus and virus-host protein interactions during HSV-1 infection in primary human fibroblasts. We identified interactions among viral capsid and tegument proteins, detecting phosphorylation of the capsid protein VP26 at sites within its UL37-binding domain, and an acetylation within the major capsid protein VP5. Interestingly, we found a nuclear association between viral capsid proteins and the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), which we confirmed by reciprocal isolations and microscopy. We show that drug-induced inhibition of DNA methyltransferase activity, as well as siRNA- and shRNA-mediated DNMT3A knockdowns trigger reductions in virus titers. Altogether, our results highlight a functional association of viral proteins with the mammalian DNA methyltransferase machinery, pointing to DNMT3A as a host factor required for effective HSV-1 infection.

  16. Pattern recognition receptors and the innate immune response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mikayla R; Kaminski, John J; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2011-06-01

    The innate immune response to viral pathogens is critical in order to mobilize protective immunity. Cells of the innate immune system detect viral infection largely through germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) present either on the cell surface or within distinct intracellular compartments. These include the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), the retinoic acid-inducble gene I-like receptors (RLRs), the nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs, also called NACHT, LRR and PYD domain proteins) and cytosolic DNA sensors. While in certain cases viral proteins are the trigger of these receptors, the predominant viral activators are nucleic acids. The presence of viral sensing PRRs in multiple cellular compartments allows innate cells to recognize and quickly respond to a broad range of viruses, which replicate in different cellular compartments. Here, we review the role of PRRs and associated signaling pathways in detecting viral pathogens in order to evoke production of interferons and cytokines. By highlighting recent progress in these areas, we hope to convey a greater understanding of how viruses activate PRR signaling and how this interaction shapes the anti-viral immune response.

  17. Pattern Recognition Receptors and the Innate Immune Response to Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Fitzgerald

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune response to viral pathogens is critical in order to mobilize protective immunity. Cells of the innate immune system detect viral infection largely through germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs present either on the cell surface or within distinct intracellular compartments. These include the Toll-like receptors (TLRs, the retinoic acid-inducble gene I-like receptors (RLRs, the nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs, also called NACHT, LRR and PYD domain proteins and cytosolic DNA sensors. While in certain cases viral proteins are the trigger of these receptors, the predominant viral activators are nucleic acids. The presence of viral sensing PRRs in multiple cellular compartments allows innate cells to recognize and quickly respond to a broad range of viruses, which replicate in different cellular compartments. Here, we review the role of PRRs and associated signaling pathways in detecting viral pathogens in order to evoke production of interferons and cytokines. By highlighting recent progress in these areas, we hope to convey a greater understanding of how viruses activate PRR signaling and how this interaction shapes the anti-viral immune response.

  18. Impact of Early Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Patients with Acute HIV Infection in Vienna, Austria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Herout

    Full Text Available It is unclear whether antiretroviral therapy (ART should be initiated during acute HIV infection. Most recent data provides evidence of benefits of early ART.We retrospectively compared the clinical and immunological course of individuals with acute HIV infection, who received ART within 3 months (group A or not (group B after diagnosis.Among the 84 individuals with acute HIV infection, 57 (68% received ART within 3 months (A whereas 27 (32% did not receive ART within 3 months (B, respectively. Clinical progression to CDC stadium B or C within 5 years after the diagnosis of HIV was less common in (A when compared to (B (P = 0.002. After twelve months, both the mean increase in CD4+ T cell count and the mean decrease in viral load was more pronounced in (A, when compared to (B (225 vs. 87 cells/μl; P = 0.002 and -4.19 vs. -1.14 log10 copies/mL; P<0.001. Twenty-four months after diagnosis the mean increase from baseline of CD4+ T cells was still higher in group A compared to group B (251 vs. 67 cells/μl, P = 0.004.Initiation of ART during acute HIV infection is associated with a lower probability of clinical progression to more advanced CDC stages and significant immunological benefits.

  19. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  20. Global dynamics of cell mediated immunity in viral infection models with distributed delays

    CERN Document Server

    Nakata, Yukihiko

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate global dynamics for a system of delay differential equations which describes a virus-immune interaction in \\textit{vivo}. The model has two distributed time delays describing time needed for infection of cell and virus replication. Our model admits three possible equilibria, an uninfected equilibrium and infected equilibrium with or without immune response depending on the basic reproduction number for viral infection $R_{0}$ and for CTL response $R_{1}$ such that $R_{1}1$. The immune activation has a positive role in the reduction of the infection cells and the increasing of the uninfected cells if $R_{1}>1$.

  1. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein-based decision tree model for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kraszewska-Głomba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As no specific laboratory test has been identified, PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis remains a diagnosis of exclusion. We searched for a practical use of procalcitonin (PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP in distinguishing PFAPA attacks from acute bacterial and viral infections. Levels of PCT and CRP were measured in 38 patients with PFAPA and 81 children diagnosed with an acute bacterial (n=42 or viral (n=39 infection. Statistical analysis with the use of the C4.5 algorithm resulted in the following decision tree: viral infection if CRP≤19.1 mg/L; otherwise for cases with CRP>19.1 mg/L: bacterial infection if PCT>0.65ng/mL, PFAPA if PCT≤0.65 ng/mL. The model was tested using a 10-fold cross validation and in an independent test cohort (n=30, the rule’s overall accuracy was 76.4% and 90% respectively. Although limited by a small sample size, the obtained decision tree might present a potential diagnostic tool for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections when interpreted cautiously and with reference to the clinical context.

  2. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein-based decision tree model for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraszewska-Głomba, Barbara; Szymańska-Toczek, Zofia; Szenborn, Leszek

    2016-03-10

    As no specific laboratory test has been identified, PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis) remains a diagnosis of exclusion. We searched for a practical use of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in distinguishing PFAPA attacks from acute bacterial and viral infections. Levels of PCT and CRP were measured in 38 patients with PFAPA and 81 children diagnosed with an acute bacterial (n=42) or viral (n=39) infection. Statistical analysis with the use of the C4.5 algorithm resulted in the following decision tree: viral infection if CRP≤19.1 mg/L; otherwise for cases with CRP>19.1 mg/L: bacterial infection if PCT>0.65ng/mL, PFAPA if PCT≤0.65 ng/mL. The model was tested using a 10-fold cross validation and in an independent test cohort (n=30), the rule's overall accuracy was 76.4% and 90% respectively. Although limited by a small sample size, the obtained decision tree might present a potential diagnostic tool for distinguishing PFAPA flares from acute infections when interpreted cautiously and with reference to the clinical context.

  3. Acute hepatitis C virus infection in a nurse trainee following a needlestick injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaggiante, Renzo; Chemello, Liliana; Rinaldi, Roberto; Bartolucci, Giovanni Battista; Trevisan, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after biological accident (needlestick injury) is a rare event. This report describes the first case of acute HCV infection after a needlestick injury in a female nursing student at Padua University Hospital. The student nurse was injured on the second finger of the right hand when recapping a 23-gauge needle after taking a blood sample. The patient who was the source was a 72-year-old female with weakly positive anti-HCV test results. Three months after the injury, at the second step of follow-up, a relevant increase in transaminases with a low viral replication activity (350 IU/mL) was observed in the student, indicating HCV infection. The patient tested positive for the same genotype (1b) of HCV as the injured student. A rapid decline in transaminases, which was not accompanied by viral clearance, and persistently positive HCV-RNA was described 1 mo later. Six months after testing positive for HCV, the student was treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin for 24 wk. A rapid virological response was observed after 4 wk of treatment, and a sustained virological response (SVR) was evident 6 mo after therapy withdrawal, confirming that the patient was definitively cured. Despite the favourable IL28B gene (rs12979860) CC- polymorphism observed in the patient, which is usually predictive of a spontaneous clearance and SVR, spontaneous viral clearance did not take place; however, infection with this genotype was promising for a sustained virological response after therapy. PMID:23382640

  4. Arbidol: a broad-spectrum antiviral that inhibits acute and chronic HCV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pécheur Eve-Isabelle

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Arbidol (ARB is an antiviral compound that was originally proven effective for treatment of influenza and several other respiratory viral infections. The broad spectrum of ARB anti-viral activity led us to evaluate its effect on hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and replication in cell culture. Long-term ARB treatment of Huh7 cells chronically replicating a genomic length genotype 1b replicon resulted in sustained reduction of viral RNA and protein expression, and eventually cured HCV infected cells. Pre-treatment of human hepatoma Huh7.5.1 cells with 15 μM ARB for 24 to 48 hours inhibited acute infection with JFH-1 virus by up to 1000-fold. The inhibitory effect of ARB on HCV was not due to generalized cytotoxicity, nor to augmentation of IFN antiviral signaling pathways, but involved impaired virus-mediated membrane fusion. ARB's affinity for membranes may inhibit several aspects of the HCV lifecycle that are membrane-dependent.

  5. Application of sequence-independent amplification to screen for potentially viral pathogens from clinical respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory tract infection of unknown etiology%应用序列非依赖扩增技术检测儿童呼吸道标本中潜在病毒病原体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭英; 钱渊; 段招军

    2012-01-01

    目的 应用序列非依赖扩增技术(sequence-independent amplification,SIA)检测常见病毒筛查阴性的5岁以下急性呼吸道感染患儿的呼吸道标本中可能存在的潜在病毒病原体,了解SIA扩增文库中各种背景核酸的组成.方法 随机选择45份常见病毒筛查阴性的5岁以下急性呼吸道感染患儿的鼻咽吸出物,0.45μm过滤和DNase/RNase处理去除病毒颗粒外的各种外源性核酸,再通过序列非依赖扩增技术对处理后的标本提取的核酸进行扩增,继而对扩增产物进行克隆、测序和BLAST比对.结果 测序403个克隆,获得有效序列368个,检出16个(16/368,4.3%)真核病毒同源序列,分别与Torque teno mini virus,Torque teno midi virus和Human bocavirus同源.此外,还检出1个真菌病毒( sclerotinia sclerotiorum hypovirulence associated DNA virus 1)同源序列和5个细菌病毒(噬菌体)同源序列.其余检出序列包含206个( 206/368,56.0%)与人基因组DNA同源的序列,11个(11/368,3.0%) rRNA同源序列,72个(72/368,19.6%)细菌同源序列,4个(4/368,1.1%)真菌同源序列,5个(5/368,1.4%)寄生虫同源序列,6个(6/368,1.6%)食源性序列,以及36个(36/368,9.8%)未能确定分类的序列.结论 核酸消化结合SIA方法可以检出常规检测方法所无法检出的潜在病毒病原体,本研究为后续系统性的查找和监测未知病毒提供了基础.%Objective Application of sequence-independent amplification (SIA) to identify the potentially viral pathogens in the clinical respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory tract infection of unknown etiology and characterize the composition of various non-viral sequences in the library of SIA amplicons.Method 45 randomly selected pediatric nasopharyngeal aspirate(NPA) samples for which no causal agent could be identified by common viruses screening were subjected to filtration & DNase/RNase treatments to remove the non-viral nucleic acid and then followed by

  6. Molecular and clinical evaluation of the acute human parvovirus B19 infection: comparison of two cases in children with sickle cell disease and discussion of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav Nanev Slavov

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus B19 is a well-known cause of severe conditions in patients with sickle cell disease, but the molecular mechanisms of the infection are insufficiently understood. The different clinical outcome of the acute parvovirus B19 infection in two pediatric patients with sickle cell disease has been examined. One of them developed life-threatening condition requiring emergency transfusions, while the other had asymptomatic infection, diagnosed occasionally. Both cases had high viral load and identical subgenotype, indicating that the viral molecular characteristics play a minimal role in the infection outcome.

  7. APLASTIC ANEMIA ET CAUSA OF SUSPECT VIRAL HEPATITIS INFECTION: A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    I Wayan Wawan Lismana

    2014-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is anemia that occurs because of a failure of hematopoiesis is relatively rarebut can be life threatening. The cause of aplastic anemia itself is still largely unknown oridiopathic. Minority of cases mainly due to a virus infection, one of which is viral hepatitishas long been known to cause symptoms of aplastic anemia. This report discusses thesuspected aplastic anemia caused by hepatitis virus infection. Course of the disease or theprognosis of aplastic anemia varies, but a ...

  8. Healthcare-associated viral and bacterial infections in dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.; Kistler, J.O.; Belibasakis, G.N.; Valimaa, H.; de Soet, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Infection prevention in dentistry is an important topic that has gained more interest in recent years and guidelines for the prevention of cross-transmission are common practice in many countries. However, little is known about the real risks of cross-transmission, specifically in the dental healthc

  9. Case Report: Emergence of bovine viral diarrhea virus persistently infected calves in a closed herd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) continues to have significant economic impact on the cattle industry worldwide. The virus is primarily maintained in the cattle population due to persistently infected animals. Herd surveillance along with good vaccination programs and biosecurity practices are the...

  10. Resolving bovine viral diarrhea virus subtypes from persistently infected US beef calves with complete genome sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is classified into 2 genotypes, BVDV-1 and BVDV-2, each of which contains distinct subtypes with genetic and antigenic differences. Currently, three major subtypes circulate in the United States: BVDV-1a, 1b, and 2a. In addition, a single case of BVDV-2b infection ...

  11. Viral infection and innate pattern recognition receptors in induction of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohoshi, Kazuki; Takahashi, Yurie; Mori, Kouki

    2011-12-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis, a common organ-specific autoimmune disease, is multifactorial in which both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors including infection play a critical role in its pathogenesis. Viral infection activates both the innate and adaptive immunity and is implicated as a trigger of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Candidate viruses include hepatitis C virus and human parvovirus B19. Viral components, which are recognized by innate receptors including Toll-like receptors (TLRs), are detected in thyroid tissues and sera of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. While conflicting results have been obtained regarding the role of TLRs in autoimmune diseases, our preliminary study suggested a contribution of TLR2 and dectin-1 in combination, TLR4, or TLR7 to the production of anti-thyroglobulin antibody in nonobese diabetic mice, a mouse model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Despite interesting circumstantial evidence, however, whether viral infection and innate receptors are involved in the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis remains largely unclear. In this review, we summarize our knowledge regarding the role of viral infection and innate receptors in the etiology of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  12. RESPIRATORY VIRAL-INFECTIONS AGGRAVATE AIRWAY DAMAGE CAUSED BY CHRONIC REJECTION IN RAT LUNG ALLOGRAFTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WINTER, JB; GOUW, ASH; GROEN, M; WILDEVUUR, C; PROP, J

    1994-01-01

    Airway damage resulting in bronchiolitis obliterans occurs frequently in patients after heart-lung and lung transplantation. Generally, chronic rejection is assumed to be the most important cause of bronchiolitis obliterans. However, viral infections might also be potential causes of airway damage a

  13. Immune biomarkers predictive of respiratory viral infection in elderly nursing home residents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie Johnstone

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine if immune phenotypes associated with immunosenescence predict risk of respiratory viral infection in elderly nursing home residents. METHODS: Residents ≥ 65 years from 32 nursing homes in 4 Canadian cities were enrolled in Fall 2009, 2010 and 2011, and followed for one influenza season. Following influenza vaccination, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were obtained and analysed by flow cytometry for T-regs, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets (CCR7+CD45RA+, CCR7-CD45RA+ and CD28-CD57+ and CMV-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained and tested for viruses in symptomatic residents. A Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex and frailty, determined the relationship between immune phenotypes and time to viral infection. RESULTS: 1072 residents were enrolled; median age 86 years and 72% female. 269 swabs were obtained, 87 were positive for virus: influenza (24%, RSV (14%, coronavirus (32%, rhinovirus (17%, human metapneumovirus (9% and parainfluenza (5%. In multivariable analysis, high T-reg% (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.20-0.81 and high CMV-reactive CD4+ T-cell% (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.03-2.78 were predictive of respiratory viral infection. CONCLUSIONS: In elderly nursing home residents, high CMV-reactive CD4+ T-cells were associated with an increased risk and high T-regs were associated with a reduced risk of respiratory viral infection.

  14. ModeLang: a new approach for experts-friendly viral infections modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasik, Szymon; Prejzendanc, Tomasz; Blazewicz, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling is an important element of systems biology. One of its important applications is modeling complex, dynamical, and biological systems, including viral infections. This type of modeling usually requires close cooperation between biologists and mathematicians. However, such cooperation often faces communication problems because biologists do not have sufficient knowledge to understand mathematical description of the models, and mathematicians do not have sufficient knowledge to define and verify these models. In many areas of systems biology, this problem has already been solved; however, in some of these areas there are still certain problematic aspects. The goal of the presented research was to facilitate this cooperation by designing seminatural formal language for describing viral infection models that will be easy to understand for biologists and easy to use by mathematicians and computer scientists. The ModeLang language was designed in cooperation with biologists and its computer implementation was prepared. Tests proved that it can be successfully used to describe commonly used viral infection models and then to simulate and verify them. As a result, it can make cooperation between biologists and mathematicians modeling viral infections much easier, speeding up computational verification of formulated hypotheses.

  15. The type I interferon response during viral infections: a "SWOT" analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaajetaan, Giel R; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Stassen, Frank R

    2012-03-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) response is a strong and crucial moderator for the control of viral infections. The strength of this system is illustrated by the fact that, despite some temporary discomfort like a common cold or diarrhea, most viral infections will not cause major harm to the healthy immunocompetent host. To achieve this, the immune system is equipped with a wide array of pattern recognition receptors and the subsequent coordinated type I IFN response orchestrated by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and conventional dendritic cells (cDCs). The production of type I IFN subtypes by dendritic cells (DCs), but also other cells is crucial for the execution of many antiviral processes. Despite this coordinated response, morbidity and mortality are still common in viral disease due to the ability of viruses to exploit the weaknesses of the immune system. Viruses successfully evade immunity and infection can result in aberrant immune responses. However, these weaknesses also open opportunities for improvement via clinical interventions as can be seen in current vaccination and antiviral treatment programs. The application of IFNs, Toll-like receptor ligands, DCs, and antiviral proteins is now being investigated to further limit viral infections. Unfortunately, a common threat during stimulation of immunity is the possible initiation or aggravation of autoimmunity. Also the translation from animal models to the human situation remains difficult. With a Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats ("SWOT") analysis, we discuss the interaction between host and virus as well as (future) therapeutic options, related to the type I IFN system.

  16. Comment on ‘Dengue viral infection monitoring from diagnostic to recovery using Raman spectroscopy’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Lademann, Juergen; Brandt, Nikolay N.

    2016-04-01

    The results of the letter ‘Dengue viral infection monitoring from diagnostic to recovery using Raman spectroscopy’ authored by Firdous and Anwar (2015 Laser Phys. Lett. 12 085601) are discussed. We show that the original interpretation of the results is not correct and does not correspond to data in the literature.

  17. Clinical and Associated Immunological Manifestations of HFMD Caused by Different Viral Infections in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Pu, Jing; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Liao, Yun; Wang, Lichun; Guo, Lei; Feng, Min; Liang, Yan; Fan, Shengtao; Cai, Lukui; Zhang, Ying; Li, Qihan

    2016-01-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), with vesiculae on the hands, feet and mouth, is an infectious disease caused by many viral pathogens. However, the differences of immune response induced by these pathogens are unclear. We compared the clinical manifestations and the levels of immunologic indicators from 60 HFMD patients caused by different viral pathogens to analyze the differences in the immune response. It was shown that Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) increased significantly in EV71-infected children; Th1 cytokines (IL-2 and IFN-γ) rose in CA16-infected children; both Th1 and Th2 cytokines elevated in non-EVG-infected children; only individual cytokines (such as IL-10) went up in EVG-infected children. Meanwhile, the antibodies induced by viral infection could not cross-interfere between the different pathogens. These differences might be due to variations in the immune response induced by the individual pathogens or to the pathogenesis of the infections by the individual pathogens. PMID:27336013

  18. Clinical and Associated Immunological Manifestations of HFMD Caused by Different Viral Infections in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Wang MS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD, with vesiculae on the hands, feet and mouth, is an infectious disease caused by many viral pathogens. However, the differences of immune response induced by these pathogens are unclear. We compared the clinical manifestations and the levels of immunologic indicators from 60 HFMD patients caused by different viral pathogens to analyze the differences in the immune response. It was shown that Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10 increased significantly in EV71-infected children; Th1 cytokines (IL-2 and IFN-γ rose in CA16-infected children; both Th1 and Th2 cytokines elevated in non-EVG-infected children; only individual cytokines (such as IL-10 went up in EVG-infected children. Meanwhile, the antibodies induced by viral infection could not cross-interfere between the different pathogens. These differences might be due to variations in the immune response induced by the individual pathogens or to the pathogenesis of the infections by the individual pathogens.

  19. The importance of bacterial and viral infections associated with adult asthma exacerbations in clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoyasu Iikura

    Full Text Available Viral infection is one of the risk factors for asthma exacerbation. However, which pathogens are related to asthma exacerbation in adults remains unclear.The relation between various infections and adult asthma exacerbations was investigated in clinical practice.The study subjects included 50 adult inpatients due to asthma exacerbations and 20 stable outpatients for comparison. The pathogens from a nasopharyngeal swab were measured by multiplex PCR analysis.Asthma exacerbations occurred after a common cold in 48 inpatients. The numbers of patients with viral, bacterial, or both infections were 16, 9, and 9, respectively. The dominant viruses were rhinoviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, and metapneumovirus. The major bacteria were S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. Compared to pathogen-free patients, the patients with pathogens were older and non-atopic and had later onset of disease, lower FeNO levels, lower IgE titers, and a higher incidence of comorbid sinusitis, COPD, or pneumonia. Compared to stable outpatients, asthma exacerbation inpatients had a higher incidence of smoking and comorbid sinusitis, COPD, or pneumonia. Viruses were detected in 50% of stable outpatients, but a higher incidence of rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and metapneumovirus infections was observed in asthma exacerbation inpatients. H. influenzae was observed in stable asthmatic patients. Other bacteria, especially S. pneumoniae, were important in asthma exacerbation inpatients.Viral or bacterial infections were observed in 70% of inpatients with an asthma exacerbation in clinical practice. Infection with S. pneumoniae was related to adult asthma exacerbation.

  20. The acute phase response of haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA) in cattle undergoing experimental infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Godson, D.L.; Toussaint, M.J.M.;

    2000-01-01

    respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), analysing the induction of the two most dominant bovine acute phase proteins haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA). Strong and reproducible acute phase responses were detected for both proteins, peaking at around 7-8 days after inoculation of BRSV, while no response...... was seen in mock-inoculated control animals. The serum concentrations reached for SAA and haptoglobin during the BRSV-induced acute phase response were generally the same or higher than previously reported for bacterial infections in calves. The magnitude and the duration of the haptoglobin response......The ability of a pure virus infection to induce an acute phase protein response is of interest as viral infections are normally considered to be less efficient in inducing an acute phase protein response than bacterial infections. This was studied in a bovine model for infection with bovine...

  1. Acute Parasitic Infections as a Cause of Fever of Unknown Origin in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    patients with acute Fasciola and Beeson, 1961) and tuberculosis was hepatica infection, 9 patients with acute the most common infection causing FUO...fascioliasis Safwat Y and Woody JN. (1990b): in Egypt. Am. J. Trop. Med. -,9g. 32, The treatment of acute Fasciola hepatica 550: 554. infection in children...infection. Clinically, acute Fasciola and patients with an infection. 32 were caused acute Schistosoma infection present a by tuberculosis and of these 32

  2. Does virus-bacteria coinfection increase the clinical severity of acute respiratory infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasio, Guilherme A C; Pereira, Luciane A; Moreira, Suzana D R; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Dalla-Costa, Libera M; Raboni, Sonia M

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the presence of bacteria in respiratory secretions of patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections and analyzed the impact of viral and bacterial coinfection on severity and the mortality rate. A total of 169 patients with acute respiratory infections were included, viruses and bacteria in respiratory samples were detected using molecular methods. Among all samples, 73.3% and 59.7% were positive for viruses and bacteria, respectively; 45% contained both virus and bacteria. Bacterial coinfection was more frequent in patients infected by community respiratory viruses than influenza A H1N1pdm (83.3% vs. 40.6%). The most frequently bacteria detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Both species were co-detected in 54 patients and identified alone in 22 and 21 patients, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences in the period of hospitalization, severity, or mortality rate between patients infected with respiratory viruses alone and those coinfected by viruses and bacteria. The detection of mixed respiratory pathogens is frequent in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory infections, but its impact on the clinical outcome does not appear substantial. However, it should be noted that most of the patients received broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, which may have contributed to this favorable outcome.

  3. Perinatal Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS Enhances Susceptibility to Viral and Secondary Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn A. Claude

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies suggest childhood exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS leads to increased incidence of infections of the lower respiratory tract. The objective of this study was to determine whether perinatal exposure to ETS increases the incidence, morbidity and severity of respiratory influenza infection and whether a secondary bacterial challenge at the peak of a pre-existing viral infection creates an enhanced host-pathogen susceptibility to an opportunistic infection. Timed-pregnant female Balb/c mice were exposed to either ETS for 6 h/day, 7 d/week beginning on gestation day 14 and continuing with the neonates to 6 weeks of age. Control animals were exposed to filtered air (FA. At the end of exposure, mice were intranasally inoculated with a murine-adapted influenza A. One week later, an intranasal inoculation of S. aureus bacteria was administered. The respective treatment groups were: bacteria only, virus only or virus+bacteria for both FA and ETS-exposed animals for a total of six treatment groups. Animal behavior and body weights were documented daily following infection. Mice were necropsied 1-day post-bacterial infection. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF cell analysis demonstrated perinatal exposure to ETS, compared to FA, leads to delayed but enhanced clinical symptoms and enhanced total cell influx into the lungs associated with viral infection followed by bacterial challenge. Viral infection significantly increases the number of neutrophils entering the lungs following bacterial challenge with either FA or ETS exposure, while the influx of lymphocytes and monocytes is significantly enhanced only by perinatal ETS exposure. There is a significant increase in peribronchiolar inflammation following viral infection in pups exposed to ETS compared with pups exposed to FA, but no change is noted in the degree of lung injury between FA and ETS-exposed animals following bacterial challenge. The data suggests perinatal exposure to ETS

  4. Acute tubular nephropathy in a patient with acute HIV infection: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananworanich, Jintanat; Datta, Anandita A; Fletcher, James Lk; Townamchai, Natavudh; Chomchey, Nitiya; Kroon, Eugene; Sereti, Irini; Valcour, Victor; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    We report a 57-year old man with diabetes mellitus and hypertension who presented with acute HIV infection. Routine blood tests showed an elevated blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. Renal biopsy showed acute tubular nephropathy, which has not been reported to occur during acute HIV infection, in the absence of rhabdomyolysis or multiple organ system failure. Antiretroviral therapy was initiated. His renal failure gradually resolved without further intervention. At one year of follow-up his HIV RNA was undetectable, and his renal function was normal. The case illustrates a rare manifestation of acute HIV infection - acute renal failure - in an older man with diabetes and hypertension. In this setting acute kidney injury might mistakenly have been attributed to his chronic comorbidities, and this case supports early HIV-1 testing in the setting of a high index of suspicion.

  5. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis with hepatitis C viral infection and hypocomplementemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Susan; Rouse, Kelly; Appis, Andrew; Novak, Robert; Haller, Nairmeen Awad

    2008-01-01

    Fibrillary glomerulonephritis (FGN) is a relatively rare cause of renal disease, found in only 0.6-1.5% of native renal biopsies. The pathogenesis of FGN is not well described, and very few associations with disease processes other than hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been made. We describe a case that provides evidence in support of the FGN-HCV association, as well as introduces the association of FGN-HCV and hypocomplementemia. The case is a 53-year-old African-American female demonstrating a classical presentation of FGN complicated by a concomitant HCV infection. Treating an HCV infection with alpha-interferon has been shown to result in subsequent improvement in the nephrotic syndrome and renal function. However, this patient is unique in that she is complicated with hypocomplementemia, creating a complex treatment situation.

  6. Lack of association between viral load and severity of acute bronchiolitis in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Duarte de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the correlation between respiratory syncytial viral load and length of hospitalization in infants with acute wheezing episodes. Methods: This was a two-year, cross-sectional study of infants ≤ 12 months of age with bronchiolitis at the time of admission to a tertiary hospital. For the identification of respiratory viruses, nasopharyngeal secretions were collected. Samples were analyzed (throughout the study period by direct immunofluorescence and (in the second year of the study by quantitative real-time PCR. We screened for three human viruses: rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and metapneumovirus. Results: Of 110 samples evaluated by direct immunofluorescence, 56 (50.9% were positive for a single virus, and 16 (14.5% were positive for two or more viruses. Among those 72 samples, the most prevalent virus was respiratory syncytial virus, followed by influenza. Of 56 samples evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, 24 (42.8% were positive for a single virus, and 1 (1.7% was positive for two viruses. Among those 25 samples, the most prevalent virus was again respiratory syncytial virus, followed by human rhinovirus. Coinfection did not influence the length of the hospital stay or other outcome s. In addition, there was no association between respiratory syncytial virus load and the length of hospitalization. Conclusions: Neither coinfection nor respiratory syncytial viral load appears to influence the outcomes of acute bronchiolitis in infants.

  7. Serum Hyperamylasemia as a prognostic indicator of acute viral hepatitis and cirrhosis of liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kaur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Liver disease is a condition that causes liver inflammation or tissue damage and affects liver function. Liver functions tests are abnormal in various liver diseases such as hepatitis, cirrhosis and end stage liver disease. The study of pancreatic enzymes for prognostic purpose in evolving liver disease is gaining ground and act as prognostic indicator for liver diseases. Present study has been planned to assess the serum amylase status in 50 patients of acute viral hepatitis and 50 patients of cirrhosis of liver in comparison to 50 normal healthy control subjects. Levels of serum amylase were determined by CNP- G3 kinetic method. The serum levels of amylase were significantly raised (p<0.0001 in patients compared to control group and levels were observed to be constantly increased with increased severity of liver diseases. The probable cause of variation in serum amylase enzymes in acute viral hepatitis and cirrhosis of liver is its anatomical proximity and common egress system through Ampulla of vater into the duodenum.

  8. Nutritional status, breastfeeding, and evolution of Infants with acute viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornelles, Cristina T L; Piva, Jefferson P; Marostica, Paulo J C

    2007-09-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis is a common respiratory infectious disease of infancy. A prospective study was carried out with 175 infants aged up to six months to evaluate their nutritional and breastfeeding status as possible risk factors for unfavourable evolution of previously-healthy infants from a care hospital. Immunofluorescence test for virus and anthropometric assessment were performed. Outcomes were length of oxygen-use, length of hospital stay, and type of hospital unit needed. Seventy-three percent of the infants were well-nourished, 6% undernourished, 8.6% at a nutritional risk, 10.9% overweight, and 1.7% obese. Eighty-one percent of the undernourished and nutritionally at-risk infants and 72% of the well-nourished, overweight, and obese infants did not receive exclusive breastfeeding. The median length of hospital stay was four days and of oxygen-use was 60 hours. The nutritional status did not affect the clinical course of previously-healthy infants with acute viral brochiolitis. The duration of exclusive breastfeeding, but not type of breastfeeding, was inversely related to the length of oxygen-use and the length of hospital stay. Shorter exclusive breastfeeding was observed in infants who were assigned to a paediatric ward or to an intensive care unit. In conclusion, longer duration of breastfeeding was associated with better clinical outcomes.

  9. Lack of association between viral load and severity of acute bronchiolitis in infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Ana Paula Duarte; Leitão, Lidiane Alves de Azeredo; Luisi, Fernanda; Souza, Rodrigo Godinho; Coutinho, Sandra Eugênia; da Silva, Jaqueline Ramos; Mattiello, Rita; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio Condessa; Stein, Renato Tetelbom; Pinto, Leonardo Araújo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the correlation between respiratory syncytial viral load and length of hospitalization in infants with acute wheezing episodes. Methods: This was a two-year, cross-sectional study of infants ≤ 12 months of age with bronchiolitis at the time of admission to a tertiary hospital. For the identification of respiratory viruses, nasopharyngeal secretions were collected. Samples were analyzed (throughout the study period) by direct immunofluorescence and (in the second year of the study) by quantitative real-time PCR. We screened for three human viruses: rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and metapneumovirus. Results: Of 110 samples evaluated by direct immunofluorescence, 56 (50.9%) were positive for a single virus, and 16 (14.5%) were positive for two or more viruses. Among those 72 samples, the most prevalent virus was respiratory syncytial virus, followed by influenza. Of 56 samples evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, 24 (42.8%) were positive for a single virus, and 1 (1.7%) was positive for two viruses. Among those 25 samples, the most prevalent virus was again respiratory syncytial virus, followed by human rhinovirus. Coinfection did not influence the length of the hospital stay or other outcome s. In addition, there was no association between respiratory syncytial virus load and the length of hospitalization. Conclusions: Neither coinfection nor respiratory syncytial viral load appears to influence the outcomes of acute bronchiolitis in infants. PMID:27832233

  10. Viral Infection of the Central Nervous System Exacerbates Interleukin-10 Receptor Deficiency-Mediated Colitis in SJL Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde, Ann-Kathrin; Herder, Vanessa; Akram Khan, Muhammad; Ciurkiewicz, Malgorzata; Schaudien, Dirk; Teich, René; Floess, Stefan; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Huehn, Jochen; Beineke, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Theiler´s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-infection is a widely used animal model for studying demyelinating disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS). The immunosuppressive cytokine Interleukin (IL)-10 counteracts hyperactive immune responses and critically controls immune homeostasis in infectious and autoimmune disorders. In order to investigate the effect of signaling via Interleukin-10 receptor (IL-10R) in infectious neurological diseases, TMEV-infected SJL mice were treated with IL-10R blocking antibody (Ab) in the acute and chronic phase of the disease. The findings demonstrate that (i) Ab-mediated IL-10 neutralization leads to progressive colitis with a reduction in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and increased numbers of CD8+CD44+ memory T cells as well as activated CD4+CD69+ and CD8+CD69+ T cells in uninfected mice. (ii) Concurrent acute TMEV-infection worsened enteric disease-mediated by IL-10R neutralization. Virus-triggered effects were associated with an enhanced activation of CD4+ T helper cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes and augmented cytokine expression. By contrast, (iii) IL-10R neutralization during chronic TMEV-infection was not associated with enhanced peripheral immunopathology but an increased CD3+ T cell influx in the spinal cord. IL-10R neutralization causes a breakdown in peripheral immune tolerance in genetically predisposed mice, which leads to immune-mediated colitis, resembling inflammatory bowel disease. Hyperactive immune state following IL-10R blockade is enhanced by central nervous system-restricted viral infection in a disease phase-dependent manner.

  11. Acute Renal Failure in Dengue Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanyam, Nambakam Tanuja

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Acute Renal Failure (RF) is a rare but well recognized complication of Dengue Infection (DI). There has been paucity of published data regarding renal involvement in DI. Aim The aim of the present study was to elucidate different clinical presentations, disease outcomes of DI. To study the frequency, severity and predictors of RF in DI. Materials and Methods Patients diagnosed either as Dengue Fever (DF) or Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS) respectively were enrolled for this study. The diagnostic criteria for DI were febrile illness associated with one of the following: 1) detection of dengue-specific IgM capture antibody or Non-Structural Protein1 (NS1) antigen; or 2) a four-fold or greater increase of dengue-specific IgG capture antibody by ELISA and haemoagglutination inhibition assay. Patients were diagnosed as having Acute RF, if serum creatinine was >1.2 mg/dl or who showed improvement by 50% in serum creatinine from the initial value. It is an observational study of medical charts, data of age, gender, and medical history of any underlying diseases in association with the severity of DI of each patient recorded. All of the laboratory results were collected. Parameters that influenced the clinical presentations and outcomes for development of classical DF or DHF/DSS in patients with or without RF were analysed and compared. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was carried. The Statistical software namely SAS 9.2, SPSS 15.0, Stata 10.1, Med Calc 9.0.1, Systat 12.0 and R environment ver.2.11.1 were used. Results Most common symptoms were fever followed by headache and pain in abdomen. Among the patients with RF, all patients had recovery. The patients with DHF/DSS were more susceptible to develop renal failure compared to DF group. There were statistically significant higher frequencies of renal failure, haemoconcentration, thrombocytopenia, low serum cholesterol. Patients in the RF group also had significantly

  12. Induction of interferon-gamma and downstream pathways during establishment of fetal persistent infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Natalia P; Webb, Brett T; McGill, Jodi L; Schaut, Robert G; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Van Campen, Hana; Sacco, Randy E; Hansen, Thomas R

    2014-04-01

    Development of transplacental infection depends on the ability of the virus to cross the placenta and replicate within the fetus while counteracting maternal and fetal immune responses. Unfortunately, little is known about this complex process. Non-cytopathic (ncp) strains of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a pestivirus in the Flaviviridae family, cause persistent infection in early gestational fetuses (infected, PI), but are cleared by immunocompetent animals and late gestational fetuses (>150 days; transiently infected, TI). Evasion of innate immune response and development of immunotolerance to ncp BVDV have been suggested as possible mechanisms for the establishment of the persistent infection. Previously we have observed a robust temporal induction of interferon (IFN) type I (innate immune response) and upregulation of IFN stimulated genes (ISGs) in BVDV TI fetuses. Modest chronic upregulation of ISGs in PI fetuses and calves reflects a stimulated innate immune response during persistent BVDV infection. We hypothesized that establishing persistent fetal BVDV infection is also accompanied by the induction of IFN-gamma (IFN-γ). The aims of the present study were to determine IFN-γ concentration in blood and amniotic fluid from control, TI and PI fetuses during BVDV infection and analyze induction of the IFN-γ downstream pathways in fetal lymphoid tissues. Two experiments with in vivo BVDV infections were completed. In Experiment 1, pregnant heifers were infected with ncp BVDV type 2 on day 75 or 175 of gestation or kept naïve to generate PI, TI and control fetuses, respectively. Fetuses were collected by Cesarean section on day 190. In Experiment 2, fetuses were collected on days 82, 89, 97, 192 and 245 following infection of pregnant heifers on day 75 of gestation. The results were consistent with the hypothesis that ncp BVDV infection induces IFN-γ secretion during acute infection in both TI and PI fetuses and that lymphoid tissues such as spleen

  13. The inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1 beta, mediates loss of astroglial glutamate transport and drives excitotoxic motor neuron injury in the spinal cord during acute viral encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prow, Natalie A; Irani, David N

    2008-05-01

    Astrocytes remove glutamate from the synaptic cleft via specific transporters, and impaired glutamate reuptake may promote excitotoxic neuronal injury. In a model of viral encephalomyelitis caused by neuroadapted Sindbis virus (NSV), mice develop acute paralysis and spinal motor neuron degeneration inhibited by the AMPA receptor antagonist, NBQX. To investigate disrupted glutamate homeostasis in the spinal cord, expression of the main astroglial glutamate transporter, GLT-1, was examined. GLT-1 levels declined in the spinal cord during acute infection while GFAP expression was preserved. There was simultaneous production of inflammatory cytokines at this site, and susceptible animals treated with drugs that blocked IL-1beta release also limited paralysis and prevented the loss of GLT-1 expression. Conversely, infection of resistant mice that develop mild paralysis following NSV challenge showed higher baseline GLT-1 levels as well as lower production of IL-1beta and relatively preserved GLT-1 expression in the spinal cord compared to susceptible hosts. Finally, spinal cord GLT-1 expression was largely maintained following infection of IL-1beta-deficient animals. Together, these data show that IL-1beta inhibits astrocyte glutamate transport in the spinal cord during viral encephalomyelitis. They provide one of the strongest in vivo links between innate immune responses and the development of excitotoxicity demonstrated to date.

  14. Timing and impact of infections in acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, M. G.; van Santvoort, H. C.; Boermeester, M. A.; Nieuwenhuijs, V. B.; van Goor, Harry; Dejong, C. H. C.; Schaapherder, A. F.; Gooszen, H. G.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although infected necrosis is an established cause of death in acute pancreatitis, the impact of bacteraemia and pneumonia is less certain. Methods: This was a cohort study of 731 patients with a primary episode of acute pancreatitis in 2004-2007, including 296 patients involved in a ran

  15. Chikungunya fever: A re-emerging viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhabra M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya (CHIK fever is a re-emerging viral disease characterized by abrupt onset of fever with severe arthralgia followed by constitutional symptoms and rash lasting for 1-7 days. The disease is almost self-limiting and rarely fatal. Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a RNA virus belonging to family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus. Molecular characterization has demonstrated two distinct lineages of strains which cause epidemics in Africa and Asia. These geographical genotypes exhibit differences in the transmission cycles. In contrast to Africa where sylvatic cycle is maintained between monkeys and wild mosquitoes, in Asia the cycle continues between humans and the Aedes aegypti mosquito. CHIKV is known to cause epidemics after a period of quiescence. The first recorded epidemic occurred in Tanzania in 1952-1953. In Asia, CHIK activity was documented since its isolation in Bangkok, Thailand in 1958. Virus transmission continued till 1964. After hiatus, the virus activity re-appeared in the mid-1970s and declined by 1976. In India, well-documented outbreaks occurred in 1963 and 1964 in Kolkata and southern India, respectively. Thereafter, a small outbreak of CHIK was reported from Sholapur district, Maharashtra in 1973. CHIKV emerged in the islands of South West Indian Ocean viz. French island of La Reunion, Mayotee, Mauritius and Seychelles which are reporting the outbreak since February, 2005. After quiescence of about three decades, CHIKV re-emerged in India in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and Tamil Nadu since December, 2005. Cases have also been reported from Rajasthan, Gujarat and Kerala. The outbreak is still continuing. National Institute of Communicable Diseases has conducted epidemiological, entomological and laboratory investigations for confirmation of the outbreak. These have been discussed in detail along with the major challenges that the country faced during the current outbreak.

  16. The ins and outs of eukaryotic viruses: Knowledge base and ontology of a viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulo, Chantal; Masson, Patrick; de Castro, Edouard; Auchincloss, Andrea H.; Foulger, Rebecca; Poux, Sylvain; Lomax, Jane; Bougueleret, Lydie; Xenarios, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are genetically diverse, infect a wide range of tissues and host cells and follow unique processes for replicating themselves. All these processes were investigated and indexed in ViralZone knowledge base. To facilitate standardizing data, a simple ontology of viral life-cycle terms was developed to provide a common vocabulary for annotating data sets. New terminology was developed to address unique viral replication cycle processes, and existing terminology was modified and adapted. The virus life-cycle is classically described by schematic pictures. Using this ontology, it can be represented by a combination of successive terms: “entry”, “latency”, “transcription”, “replication” and “exit”. Each of these parts is broken down into discrete steps. For example Zika virus “entry” is broken down in successive steps: “Attachment”, “Apoptotic mimicry”, “Viral endocytosis/ macropinocytosis”, “Fusion with host endosomal membrane”, “Viral factory”. To demonstrate the utility of a standard ontology for virus biology, this work was completed by annotating virus data in the ViralZone, UniProtKB and Gene Ontology databases. PMID:28207819

  17. Physical status and viral load in women with positive human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in uterine cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Gie; Lee, Eui Don; Zin, Yong Jae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the frequency of viral integration and viral load in women with positive HPV type 16 infection, and showing normal findings, CIN, and cervical cancer. Total 75 (normal, 15; CIN I, 20; CIN III, 20; cervical cancer, 20) cervical swab specimens were used. HPV detection, typing, and viral load was determined by PCR method. Seventy of 75 (93.3%) of cervical swab specimens showed same results with hybrid capture assay and PCR method for detecting HPV DNA. HPV type 16 DNA was identified more frequently with progression from normal to cervical cancer (normal, 13 %; CIN I, 15%; CIN III, 40 %; cervical cancer, 55 %). The frequency of HPV type 16 DNA integration also increased with grade of the lesion (normal, 0 %; CIN I, 33 %; CIN III, 87 %; cervical cancer, 91 %) suggesting most of HPV type 16 present as integration forms in the cells. In addition, high-level of HPV 16 viral load also was found more frequently in CIN III and cervical cancer (normal, 0 %; CIN I, 0 %; CIN III, 87 %; cervical cancer, 100 %). These results suggest that viral integration and high-level of viral load may play an important role in cervical carcinogenesis. (author). 13 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Other Respiratory Viral Infections in Older Adults With Moderate to Severe Influenza-like Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsey, Ann R.; McElhaney, Janet E.; Beran, Jiri; van Essen, Gerrit A.; Duval, Xavier; Esen, Meral; Galtier, Florence; Gervais, Pierre; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Kremsner, Peter; Launay, Odile; Leroux-Roels, Geert; McNeil, Shelly A.; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo; St Rose, Suzanne; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie; Oostvogels, Lidia; Durviaux, Serge; Taylor, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Few studies have prospectively assessed viral etiologies of acute respiratory infections in community-based elderly individuals. We assessed viral respiratory pathogens in individuals ≥65 years with influenza-like illness (ILI). Methods. Multiplex reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction identified viral pathogens in nasal/throat swabs from 556 episodes of moderate-to-severe ILI, defined as ILI with pneumonia, hospitalization, or maximum daily influenza symptom severity score (ISS) >2. Cases were selected from a randomized trial of an adjuvanted vs nonadjuvanted influenza vaccine conducted in elderly adults from 15 countries. Results. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was detected in 7.4% (41/556) moderate-to-severe ILI episodes in elderly adults. Most (39/41) were single infections. There was a significant association between country and RSV detection (P = .004). RSV prevalence was 7.1% (2/28) in ILI with pneumonia, 12.5% (8/64) in ILI with hospitalization, and 6.7% (32/480) in ILI with maximum ISS > 2. Any virus was detected in 320/556 (57.6%) ILI episodes: influenza A (104/556, 18.7%), rhinovirus/enterovirus (82/556, 14.7%), coronavirus and human metapneumovirus (each 32/556, 5.6%). Conclusions. This first global study providing data on RSV disease in ≥65 year-olds confirms that RSV is an important respiratory pathogen in the elderly. Preventative measures such as vaccination could decrease severe respiratory illnesses and complications in the elderly. PMID:24482398

  19. Targeting Viral Proteostasis Limits Influenza Virus, HIV, and Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Nicholas S; Moshkina, Natasha; Fenouil, Romain; Gardner, Thomas J; Aguirre, Sebastian; Shah, Priya S; Zhao, Nan; Manganaro, Lara; Hultquist, Judd F; Noel, Justine; Sachs, David; Sachs, David H; Hamilton, Jennifer; Leon, Paul E; Chawdury, Amit; Tripathi, Shashank; Melegari, Camilla; Campisi, Laura; Hai, Rong; Metreveli, Giorgi; Gamarnik, Andrea V; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Simon, Viviana; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Krogan, Nevan J; Mulder, Lubbertus C F; van Bakel, Harm; Tortorella, Domenico; Taunton, Jack; Palese, Peter; Marazzi, Ivan

    2016-01-19

    Viruses are obligate parasites and thus require the machinery of the host cell to replicate. Inhibition of host factors co-opted during active infection is a strategy hosts use to suppress viral replication and a potential pan-antiviral therapy. To define the cellular proteins and processes required for a virus during infection is thus crucial to understanding the mechanisms of virally induced disease. In this report, we generated fully infectious tagged influenza viruses and used infection-based proteomics to identify pivotal arms of cellular signaling required for influenza virus growth and infectivity. Using mathematical modeling and genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we revealed that modulation of Sec61-mediated cotranslational translocation selectively impaired glycoprotein proteostasis of influenza as well as HIV and dengue viruses and led to inhibition of viral growth and infectivity. Thus, by studying virus-human protein-protein interactions in the context of active replication, we have identified targetable host factors for broad-spectrum antiviral therapies.

  20. Limited efficacy of topical recombinant feline interferon-omega for treatment of cats with acute upper respiratory viral disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballin, Anne C; Schulz, Bianka; Helps, Christopher; Sauter-Louis, Carola; Mueller, Ralf S; Hartmann, Katrin

    2014-12-01

    Despite a lack of controlled studies confirming its efficacy, recombinant feline interferon-omega (rfeIFN-ω) is used in the treatment of feline upper respiratory tract disease (FURTD), which is usually caused by feline calicivirus (FCV) or feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1). The aims of the present study were to investigate whether administration of rfeIFN-ω improves clinical signs in cats with acute FURTD and whether this treatment reduces shedding of FCV. Thirty-seven cats affected with acute FURTD were recruited into a prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. The presence of FCV and/or FHV-1 was determined by performing quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on oropharyngeal and conjunctival swabs. Cats were randomly assigned to treatment groups, receiving either placebo or rfeIFN-ω (2.5 MU/kg) subcutaneously, followed by 0.5 MU topically at 8-h intervals via the conjunctiva, intranasally, and orally for 21 days. All cats received additional treatment with antibiotics, expectorants, and inhalation of nebulised physiological saline with camomile. Clinical signs and FCV shedding were evaluated over 42 days. All cats demonstrated improvement in clinical signs during the course of the study, with no significant difference in any of the assessed variables when comparing the two groups. FCV copy numbers decreased more rapidly in cats receiving rfeIFN-ω. Treatment with rfeIFN-ω was not effective in ameliorating clinical signs of acute viral FURTD compared to placebo, but might accelerate a reduction in FCV load in infected cats.

  1. Epidemiological and Phylogenetic Characteristics of Influenza B Infection in Severe Acute Respiratory Infection Cases in Beijing, 2014 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Peng; Qian, Haiqun; Shi, Weixian; Wu, Shuangsheng; Cui, Shujuan; Zhang, Daitao; Wang, Quanyi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Influenza B viral infection is of great importance, but the epidemiological and phylogenetic characteristics of influenza B infection in severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) cases are still unclear. The clinical information of 2816 SARI cases and 467,737 influenza-like illness (ILI) cases in Beijing area from September 2014 to April 2015 were collected and analyzed. Among them, 91 influenza B viruses isolated from SARI cases were sequenced. The overall yield rate of influenza A/B infection was 14.21% and 27.77% in sampled SARI and ILI cases, respectively. Compared with influenza A infection, the frequency of influenza B infection in SARI cases was higher in younger patients. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that most tested hemagglutination genes belonged to Yamagata lineage Clade 3, which were similar with current circulating viruses but different with 2014 to 2015 influenza season vaccine strain (Clade 2). Importantly, HA-Y3/NA-V4 intralineage reassorting was identified in Beijing area for the first time, which can act as a possible risk factor of SARIs. The influenza activity and virus types/subtypes/lineages among SARI patients were well correlated with that of ILI cases. Furthermore, the potential risk of reassorted influenza B virus infection should not be overlooked. PMID:26717393

  2. Acute kidney injury in dengue virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Muhammad A.M.; Sarwar, Sarfaraz; Chaudry, Muhammad A.; Maqbool, Baila; Khalil, Zarghoona; Tan, Jackson; Yaqub, Sonia; Hussain, Syed A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is a growing public health problem in Pakistan and acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the least studied complications of dengue virus infection (DVI). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency, severity and predictors of AKI in patients with DVI and to study the impact of AKI on the length of hospital stay and mortality. Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients aged ≥14 years hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of DVI at Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi between January 2008 and December 2010. Binary logistic regression models were constructed to identify factors associated with the development of AKI and to study the impact of AKI on hospital stays of more than 3 days. Results Out of 532 patients, AKI was present in 13.3% (71/532). Approximately two-thirds (64.8%) of these patients had mild AKI and a third (35.2%) had moderate to severe AKI. Independent predictors for AKI were male gender [odds ratio (OD) 4.43; 95% CI 1.92–10.23], presence of dengue hemorrhagic and dengue shock syndrome (DSS, OD 2.14; 95% CI 1.06–4.32), neurological involvement (OD 12.08; 95% CI 2.82–51.77) and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT, OD 1.81; 95% CI 1.003–3.26). AKI was associated with a length of stay ≥3 days when compared with those who did not have AKI (OD 2.98; 95% CI 1.66–5.34). Eight patients (11.3%) with AKI died whereas there were no mortalities in patients without AKI (P < 0.001). Only 5 patients (7%) had persistent kidney dysfunction at discharge. Conclusions AKI in DVI is associated with neurological involvement, prolongation of aPTT, greater length of hospital stay and increased mortality. PMID:26019813

  3. Viral metagenomics on animals as a tool for the detection of zoonoses prior to human infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmam, Sarah; Davoust, Bernard; Berenger, Jean-Michel; Raoult, Didier; Desnues, Christelle

    2014-06-10

    Many human viral infections have a zoonotic, i.e., wild or domestic animal, origin. Several zoonotic viruses are transmitted to humans directly via contact with an animal or indirectly via exposure to the urine or feces of infected animals or the bite of a bloodsucking arthropod. If a virus is able to adapt and replicate in its new human host, human-to-human transmissions may occur, possibly resulting in an epidemic, such as the A/H1N1 flu pandemic in 2009. Thus, predicting emerging zoonotic infections is an important challenge for public health officials in the coming decades. The recent development of viral metagenomics, i.e., the characterization of the complete viral diversity isolated from an organism or an environment using high-throughput sequencing technologies, is promising for the surveillance of such diseases and can be accomplished by analyzing the viromes of selected animals and arthropods that are closely in contact with humans. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of viral diversity within such animals (in particular blood-feeding arthropods, wildlife and domestic animals) using metagenomics and present its possible future application for the surveillance of zoonotic and arboviral diseases.

  4. Nuclear sensing of viral DNA, epigenetic regulation of herpes simplex virus infection, and innate immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knipe, David M., E-mail: david_knipe@hms.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. HSV viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. - Highlights: • HSV lytic and latent gene expression is regulated differentially by epigenetic processes. • The sensors of foreign DNA have not been defined fully. • IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to sense viral DNA in HSV-infected cells. • IFI16 plays a role in both innate sensing of HSV DNA and in restricting its expression.

  5. Viral Metagenomics on Animals as a Tool for the Detection of Zoonoses Prior to Human Infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Temmam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many human viral infections have a zoonotic, i.e., wild or domestic animal, origin. Several zoonotic viruses are transmitted to humans directly via contact with an animal or indirectly via exposure to the urine or feces of infected animals or the bite of a bloodsucking arthropod. If a virus is able to adapt and replicate in its new human host, human-to-human transmissions may occur, possibly resulting in an epidemic, such as the A/H1N1 flu pandemic in 2009. Thus, predicting emerging zoonotic infections is an important challenge for public health officials in the coming decades. The recent development of viral metagenomics, i.e., the characterization of the complete viral diversity isolated from an organism or an environment using high-throughput sequencing technologies, is promising for the surveillance of such diseases and can be accomplished by analyzing the viromes of selected animals and arthropods that are closely in contact with humans. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of viral diversity within such animals (in particular blood-feeding arthropods, wildlife and domestic animals using metagenomics and present its possible future application for the surveillance of zoonotic and arboviral diseases.

  6. Interleukin-10 expression during the acute phase is a putative prerequisite for delayed viral elimination in a murine model for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Vanessa; Gerhauser, Ingo; Klein, Stephanie Kristin; Almeida, Pedro; Kummerfeld, Maren; Ulrich, Reiner; Seehusen, Frauke; Rohn, Karl; Schaudien, Dirk; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Huehn, Jochen; Beineke, Andreas

    2012-08-15

    Reduced protective immunity leads to viral persistence and demyelination in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis. The aim of the present study was to compare the phenotype of brain-infiltrating leukocytes and cytokine expression in susceptible SJL and resistant C57BL/6 mice during Theilervirus-induced acute polioencephalitis. In contrast to C57/BL6 mice, SJL mice show an increased number of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells and CD45R(+) B cells associated with delayed viral elimination and elevated IL-10 mRNA transcripts in the brain. Results substantiate the hypothesis that an imbalanced cytokine milieu during the early infection phase contributes to ineffective antiviral immunity in animals with a susceptible genetic background.

  7. Hepatitis C viral infection in a Chinese hemodialysis unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Han; WANG Shi-xiang

    2010-01-01

    Background The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients varies among countries and among dialysis units within a single country. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of HCV infection in MHD patients in a Chinese hemodialysis unit.Methods One hundred and ninety-two patients on MHD for an average of (86.1±30.0) months (range 6-181 months) were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. HCV antibody and HCV-RNA were measured in these MHD patients before hemodialysis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods.According to the result, all the patients were then divided into two groups: GroupⅠwas positive for HCV antibody and/or HCV-RNA (n=32), and Group Ⅱ was negative for HCV antibody and HCV-RNA (n=160). The following information was obtained for all the patients: socio-demographic data, history of blood transfusions and kidney transplantation, and some laboratory values. The MHD patients who were positive for HCV antibody and/or HCV-RNA were followed for more than three years. The disease activities were graded into "asymptomatic" if alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was less than 40 U/L,"low activities" if ALT was 40-79 U/L, and "high activities" if ALT was equal to or above 80 U/L.Results The prevalence of HCV infection in MHD patients in our dialysis unit in May 2009 was 16.7, which was significantly higher than in general population (3.2%). Among the 32 MHD patients with HCV positive, 20 patients were positive for HCV antibody but negative for HCV-RNA, eight patients were positive both for HCV antibody and HCV-RNA,four patients were negative for HCV antibody but positive for HCV-RNA. Eleven patients had a history of kidney transplantation and 12 had a history of blood transfusion, which were significantly more than among the MHD patients without HCV. Thirty of the 32 MHD patients were asymptomatic. There were no significant

  8. Risk factors and molecular characterization of acute sporadic symptomatic hepatitis E virus infection in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kittiyod Poovorawan; Salyavit Jitmitrapab; Sombat Treeprasertsuk; Thanunrat Thongmee; Apiradee Theamboonlers; Pisit Tangkijvanich; Piyawat Komolmit; Yong Poovorawan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To report clinical outcomes and viral genotypes of acute symptomatic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection inThailand.Methods:Forty patients with acute symptomaticHEV infection were recruited during2009-2013.Clinical, demographic and laboratory data were collected.Diagnosis was accomplished by detection of anti-HEVIgM and/orHEVRNA in the serum or stool.HEV genotypes were classified by direct sequencing ofRT-PCRproducts and phylogenetic analysis. Results:The high risk group, comprising immune-compromised, liver cirrhosis and very elderly (>80 years) patients(17 cases), had higher levels of serum alkaline phosphatase at presentation compared with the low risk group.Two fatal cases resulted from acute hepatitisE in the high risk group.Initial clinical presentation did not show statistically significant differences.In six cases (6/40), the virus could be detected in serum or stool byRT-PCR and sequencing.Upon molecular characterization, the viruses were classified asHEV genotype3f and were in the same cluster as Thai swineHEV.Conclusions:Our data showed that acuteHEV infection has various clinical presentations and outcomes.Higher levels of serum alkaline phosphatase were observed in high risk patients.All isolated viruses were identified asHEV genotype3f possibly originating from swine.

  9. Treatment of viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Renan Barros

    2009-03-01

    Several viruses may cause central nervous system diseases with a broad range of clinical manifestations. The time course of the viral encephalitis can be acute, subacute, or chronic. Pathologically there are encephalitis with direct viral entry into the CNS in which brain parenchyma exhibits neuronal damaging and viral antigens and there are postinfectious autoimmune encephalitis associated with systemic viral infections with brain tissue presenting perivascular aggregation of immune cells and myelin damaging. Some virus affect previously healthy individuals while others produce encephalitis among imunocompromised ones. Factors such evolving lifestyles and ecological changes have had a considerable impact on the epidemiology of some viral encephalitis [e.g. West-Nile virus, and Japanese B virus]. Citomegalovirus and JC virus are examples of infections of the brain that have been seen more frequently because they occur in immunocompromised patients. In the other hand many scientific achievements in neuroimaging, molecular diagnosis, antiviral therapy, immunomodulatory treatments, and neurointensive care have allowed more precise and earlier diagnoses and more efficient treatments, resulting in improved outcomes. In this article, we will present the current drug options in the management of the main acute and chronic viral infection of the central nervous system of immunocompetent and immunocompromised adults, focusing on drugs mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects. The early diagnosis and correct management of such diseases can reduce mortality and neurological sequelae; however, even with recent treatment advances, potentially devastating outcomes are still possible.

  10. Immunopathology of rabies infection in mice selected for high or low acute inflammatory reaction

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    S. M. Achkar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is a severe and lethal disease that produces a slight inflammatory response during the infection process. We analyzed the immunopathological mechanisms that occur in the central nervous system (CNS using mice genetically selected for maximal or minimal acute inflammatory reaction (AIRmax or AIRmin. As viral samples, we adopted the antigenic variant 3 (AgV3 of rabies virus from hematophagous bats and a fixed virus strain (PV1 43/3. Titration of specific antibodies was performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. We observed a slight increase in IgG and IgG1 isotypes in infected AIRmax mice. Incubation period, determined by intracerebral inoculation with 100 LD50, was 6-7 days for PV1 43/4 strain and 9-10 days for AgV3. No difference in viral replication was noticed between AIRmax and AIRmin mice. Mortality was 100% with both viral strains. Histopathological analysis of brains and spinal cords showed inflammatory foci in all regions of the CNS. No differences were noticed in the number of neutrophils. Negri bodies were observed in practically all sites analyzed. Results suggested that inflammatory reaction is not a determining factor in the susceptibility to rabies infection.

  11. Sero - Prevalence of Viral Transfusion-transmissible Infections amongst voluntary Blood donors

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    Rashida Elrashid Mohamed Ali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the Sero-prevalence of viral transfusion-transmissible Infectious diseases among blood donors, namely immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and C transmissible infections (TTIs like HBV, HCV. HIV (Human immune viruses.. sero-prevalence of viral transmissible infections. The donated blood for specific antibodies for infections agents. Can largely reduce the risk of TTIs, virus among blood donors. The study was carried out in the blood bank at Khartoum Teaching Hospital, centre, Sudan. Screening of blood samples for hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV Antibodies were done using (ELISA enzyme link immunoassay. The study included (1184 voluntary Blood donors, all were males. The overall prevalence of viral transfusion transmissible Infections were (11.84%. The sero-prevalence for antibody against HIV (6 and hepatitis C Virus was positive in 8 (0.06 and (0.08% donors respectively while HBsAg was detected in 98 (9.8% donors.  situation that need for strict criteria for selection of blood donors and also methods of laboratory assays. Services are high in Sudan due to the endemicity of infections like malaria, nutritional problem and obstetrical emergencies associated with blood loss. Little is known about the level of these infections in Sudan so; this study was conducted to investigate the sero-prevalence of transfusion transmissible viral infectious diseases in particular human B and hepatitis Immunodeficiency, hepatitis C viruses. The mode of transmission for HIV, HBV and HCV is the same and includes unsafe Sexual sharp materials Contact, using contaminated with body fluid, mother to Child and transfusion of blood and blood Products.

  12. A comparative review of HLA associations with hepatitis B and C viral infections across global populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rashmi Singh; Rashmi Kaul; Anil Kaul; Khalid Khan

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) viral infection or co-infection leads to risk of development of chronic infection, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Immigration and globalization have added to the challenges of public health concerns regarding chronic HBV and HCV infections worldwide. The aim of this study is to review existing global literature across ethnic populations on HBV and HCV related human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations in relation to susceptibility, viral persistence and treatment. Extensive literature search was conducted to explore the HLA associations in HBV and HCV infections reported across global populations over the past decade to understand the knowledge status, weaknesses and strengths of this information in different ethnic populations. HLA DR13 is consistently associated with HBV clearance globally. HLADRB1*11/*12 alleles and DQB1*0301 are associated with HBV persistence but with HCV clearance worldwide. Consistent association of DRB1*03 and *07 is observed with HCV susceptibility and non-responsiveness to HBV vaccination across the population. HLA DR13 is protective for vertical HBV and HCV transmission in Chinese and Italian neonates, but different alleles are associated with their susceptibility in these populations. HLA class I molecule interactions with Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptors (KIR) of natural killer (NK) cells modulate HCV infection outcome via regulating immune regulatory cells and molecules. HLA associations with HBV vaccination, interferon therapy in HBV and HCV, and with extra hepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis are also discussed. Systematic studies in compliance with global regulatory standards are required to identify the HLA specific viral epitope, stage specific T cell populations interacting with different HLA alleles during disease progression and viral clearance ofchronic HBV or HCV infections among different ethnic populations. These studies would facilitate stage specific

  13. Evolution of hepatitis C viral quasispecies and hepatic injury in perinatally infected children followed prospectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farci, Patrizia; Quinti, Isabella; Farci, Stefania; Alter, Harvey J; Strazzera, Rita; Palomba, Elvia; Coiana, Alessandra; Cao, Daniele; Casadei, Anna Maria; Ledda, Ritarella; Iorio, Raffaele; Vegnente, Angela; Diaz, Giacomo; Tovo, Pier-Angelo

    2006-05-30

    Perinatal infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is characterized by a wide range of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. The mechanisms responsible for this variability are unknown. We examined whether the evolution of the HCV quasispecies was associated with different ALT profiles in perinatally infected children. Sequences within HCV envelope 1 and 2 genes, inclusive of the hypervariable region 1, the viral load, and the nascent humoral immunity were analyzed in serial serum samples from 12 perinatally infected children prospectively followed for a median of 53 months. These patients were selected to represent two different ALT patterns during the first year of life: 6 had high levels (maximum values ranging from 4.2 to 30 times the normal upper limit), and 6 had normal or slightly elevated levels (evolution were identified according to the ALT profiles. Biochemical evidence of hepatic injury was invariably associated with a mono- or oligoclonal viral population, whereas mild or no liver damage correlated with the early emergence of a heterogeneous viral quasispecies. Consistent with selective immune pressure, amino acid changes occurred almost exclusively within the hypervariable region 1 and were temporally associated with antibody seroconversion; at this time, the difference in genetic diversity between the two groups was highly significant (P = 0.002). The two patterns of viral evolution persisted over time and did not correlate with viral load or genotype. Our study demonstrates that, in perinatally infected children, the evolution of HCV quasispecies correlates with hepatic injury. The sequences reported in this paper have been deposited in the GenBank database (accession nos. DQ 504441-DQ 507112).

  14. Changes in Circulating B Cell Subsets Associated with Aging and Acute SIV Infection in Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Denise F.; Kieu, Hung T.; Castillo, Luis D.; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Barry, Peter A.; Sparger, Ellen E.

    2017-01-01

    Aging and certain viral infections can negatively impact humoral responses in humans. To further develop the nonhuman primate (NHP) model for investigating B cell dynamics in human aging and infectious disease, a flow cytometric panel was developed to characterize circulating rhesus B cell subsets. Significant differences between human and macaque B cells included the proportions of cells within IgD+ and switched memory populations and a prominent CD21-CD27+ unswitched memory population detected only in macaques. We then utilized the expanded panel to analyze B cell alterations associated with aging and acute simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in the NHP model. In the aging study, distinct patterns of B cell subset frequencies were observed for macaques aged one to five years compared to those between ages 5 and 30 years. In the SIV infection study, B cell frequencies and absolute number were dramatically reduced following acute infection, but recovered within four weeks of infection. Thereafter, the frequencies of activated memory B cells progressively increased; these were significantly correlated with the magnitude of SIV-specific IgG responses, and coincided with impaired maturation of anti-SIV antibody avidity, as previously reported for HIV-1 infection. These observations further validate the NHP model for investigation of mechanisms responsible for B cells alterations associated with immunosenescence and infectious disease. PMID:28095513

  15. Innate and adaptive immune responses to in utero infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas R; Smirnova, Natalia P; Webb, Brett T; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Sacco, Randy E; Van Campen, Hana

    2015-06-01

    Infection of pregnant cows with noncytopathic (ncp) bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) induces rapid innate and adaptive immune responses, resulting in clearance of the virus in less than 3 weeks. Seven to 14 days after inoculation of the cow, ncpBVDV crosses the placenta and induces a fetal viremia. Establishment of persistent infection with ncpBVDV in the fetus has been attributed to the inability to mount an immune response before 90-150 days of gestational age. The result is 'immune tolerance', persistent viral replication and shedding of ncpBVDV. In contrast, we describe the chronic upregulation of fetal Type I interferon (IFN) pathway genes and the induction of IFN-γ pathways in fetuses of cows infected on day 75 of gestation. Persistently infected (PI) fetal IFN-γ concentrations also increased at day 97 at the peak of fetal viremia and IFN-γ mRNA was significantly elevated in fetal thymus, liver and spleen 14-22 days post maternal inoculation. PI fetuses respond to ncpBVDV infection through induction of Type I IFN and IFN-γ activated genes leading to a reduction in ncpBVDV titer. We hypothesize that fetal infection with BVDV persists because of impaired induction of IFN-γ in the face of activated Type I IFN responses. Clarification of the mechanisms involved in the IFN-associated pathways during BVDV fetal infection may lead to better detection methods, antiviral compounds and selection of genetically resistant breeding animals.

  16. The importance of viral blips and duration of therapy initiated in primary infection in maintaining viral control after stopping cART

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: After achieving undetectable HIV-RNA on cART, on cessation, HIV-RNA rebounds to pre-treatment values for the majority due to the presence of an inaccessible viral reservoir. There is some evidence that cART during primary HIV infection (PHI) limits the reservoir size, optimizing the chance of maintaining viral control off cART. Data are required to predict possible viral controllers for treatment interruption following cART. This analysis aims to investigate the effect of cART d...

  17. Fulminant bilateral acute retinal necrosis syndrome associated with viral encephalitis: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunkui; Zhu, Lijun; Fang, Shaokuan

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the most common cause of acute viral encephalitis. Acute retinal necrosis (ARN) is a rapidly progressing and potentially blinding eye disease that may be induced by HSV. The present case study reports the very rare case of a patient with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) combined with acute retinal necrosis (ARN). A 47-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with persistent high fever and somnolence for 5 days. Magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormal signals in the right medial temporal lobes, and HSV-1 was identified in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Five days later, despite treatment with intravenous acyclovir and partial improvement in consciousness, the patient suddenly developed blurred vision and bilateral visual pain. Fundus fluorescence angiography revealed bilateral vessel obstruction and flaky reduced fluorescence. ARN was diagnosed clinically. Dexamethasone was administered as an anti-inflammatory adjunct to intravenous acyclovir therapy. The visual acuity of the patient was reduced to mere light perception a further 4 days later. The present case indicates that HSE may be complicated with ARN, causing a reduction in visual acuity to mere light perception within a very short time. PMID:27698716

  18. UNC93B1 mediates innate inflammation and antiviral defense in the liver during acute murine cytomegalovirus infection.

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    Meredith J Crane

    Full Text Available Antiviral defense in the liver during acute infection with the hepatotropic virus murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV involves complex cytokine and cellular interactions. However, the mechanism of viral sensing in the liver that promotes these cytokine and cellular responses has remained unclear. Studies here were undertaken to investigate the role of nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors (TLRs in initiating antiviral immunity in the liver during infection with MCMV. We examined the host response of UNC93B1 mutant mice, which do not signal properly through TLR3, TLR7 and TLR9, to acute MCMV infection to determine whether liver antiviral defense depends on signaling through these molecules. Infection of UNC93B1 mutant mice revealed reduced production of systemic and liver proinflammatory cytokines including IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α when compared to wild-type. UNC93B1 deficiency also contributed to a transient hepatitis later in acute infection, evidenced by augmented liver pathology and elevated systemic alanine aminotransferase levels. Moreover, viral clearance was impaired in UNC93B1 mutant mice, despite intact virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the liver. Altogether, these results suggest a combined role for nucleic acid-sensing TLRs in promoting early liver antiviral defense during MCMV infection.

  19. Vaccination against acute respiratory virus infections and measles in man.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); P. de Vries (Petra)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractSeveral viruses may cause more or less severe acute respiratory infections in man, some of which are followed by systemic infection. Only for influenza and measles are licensed vaccines available at present. The protection induced by influenza vaccines, which are based on inactivated who

  20. Observation on Therapeutic Effects of Shengmai Powder(生脉散)in Treating Acute Viral Myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许之民; 陆秋芬; 赵美华; 许朝辉; 朱向阳; 荣烨之

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of Shengmai Powder (SMP, 生脉散) in treating acute viral myocarditis objectively. Methods: One hundred and twenty-four patients with acute viral myocarditis were randomized into the treated group (SMG, n=64) and the control group(CG, n=60 ). Such myocardial nutrient medicine as ATP, CoA, Vit-C, were given to both groups. And to the treated group, 40 ml of Shengmai Injection per day was given intravenously for 2 weeks, which was followed by oral intake of Shengmai granule, one package three times daily for another 2 weeks in total. The same anti-arrhythmia agents were applied to both groups, and no fructose-1, 6-diphosphate (FDP) for either. Semi-quantitative scoring method was adopted to observe such symptoms as chest stuffiness, palpitation and chest pain before treatment and four weeks after treatment. Meanwhile, ECG, dynamic ECG by Holter monitor, left ventricular enddiastolic dimension (LVEDD), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), serum neutralizing antibody of virus Coxsackie B, cardiac troponin I (cTnl) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) were examined. Results: (1) Compared with the control group, more significant improvement was got in SMG in respects of chest stuffiness, palpitation, chest pain and arrhythmia ( P<0.05 or P<0.01). (2) Negative converting rates of cTnl , cTnT in the two groups were 59.46% vs 35.48%, 68.75% vs 42.31% respectively (P<0.05). (3) LVEDD before and after treatment in SMG was 52.44±3.40 mm and 48.81± 2.23mm respectively, while that in the control group was 52.31±3.74 mm and 49.92±2.67mm respectively; LVEF before and after treatment in SMG was 60.67±4.62 % and 65.02±4.16 % respectively, while that in the control group was 60.91± 4.26 % and 63.67±3.17 %. There was obvious improvement in the two parameters in both groups, but the improvement in SMG was superior to that in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: SMP shows a good effect in improving clinical symptoms and

  1. Identification of bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in Saanen goats in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu-Jung; Chae, Jeong-Byoung; Chae, Joon-Seok; Yu, Do-Hyeon; Park, Jinho; Park, Bae-Keun; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Yoo, Jae-Gyu; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2016-06-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is one of the most important viral pathogens of livestock and causes substantial economic losses to the livestock industry worldwide. BVDV is not necessarily species specific and is known to infect domesticated and wild ruminants. In the present study, BVDV infection was identified in two Saanen goats from one farm, and two different viral subtypes were found, BVDV-1a and BVDV-2a. Each isolate was closely related to cattle isolates identified in the Republic of Korea. The two sequences obtained in this study were not consistent with border disease virus (BDV). The incidence of BVDV in this farm apparently occurred in the absence of contact with cattle and may be associated with grazing. This study demonstrates that BVDV infection may be possible to transmit among goats without exposure to cattle. Therefore, this result indicates that Saanen goats may act as natural reservoirs for BVDV. This is the first report of BVDV-1a infection in a Saanen goat.

  2. Viral latency in blood and saliva of simian foamy virus-infected humans.

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    Rejane Rua

    Full Text Available Simian foamy viruses (SFV are widespread retroviruses among non-human primates (NHP. SFV actively replicate in the oral cavity and can be transmitted to humans through NHP bites, giving rise to a persistent infection. We aimed at studying the natural history of SFV infection in human. We have analyzed viral load and gene expression in 14 hunters from Cameroon previously shown to be infected with a gorilla SFV strain. Viral DNA could be detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR targeting the pol-in region, in most samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs (7.1 ± 6.0 SFV DNA copies/105 PBMCs and saliva (2.4 ± 4.3 SFV DNA copies/105 cells derived from the hunters. However, quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR revealed the absence of SFV viral gene expression in both PBMCs and saliva, suggesting that SFV was latent in the human samples. Our study demonstrates that a latent infection can occur in humans and persist for years, both in PBMCs and saliva. Such a scenario may contribute to the putative lack of secondary human-to-human transmissions of SFV.

  3. Inhibition of Influenza A Virus Infection by Fucoidan Targeting Viral Neuraminidase and Cellular EGFR Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wu, Jiandong; Zhang, Xiaoshuang; Hao, Cui; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Jiao, Guangling; Shan, Xindi; Tai, Wenjing; Yu, Guangli

    2017-01-01

    Development of novel anti-influenza A virus (IAV) drugs with high efficiency and low toxicity is critical for preparedness against influenza outbreaks. Herein, we investigated the anti-IAV activities and mechanisms of fucoidan in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that a fucoidan KW derived from brown algae Kjellmaniella crassifolia effectively blocked IAV infection in vitro with low toxicity. KW possessed broad anti-IAV spectrum and low tendency of induction of viral resistance, superior to the anti-IAV drug amantadine. KW was capable of inactivating virus particles before infection and blocked some stages after adsorption. KW could bind to viral neuraminidase (NA) and inhibit the activity of NA to block the release of IAV. KW also interfered with the activation of EGFR, PKCα, NF-κB, and Akt, and inhibited both IAV endocytosis and EGFR internalization in IAV-infected cells, suggesting that KW may also inhibit cellular EGFR pathway. Moreover, intranasal administration of KW markedly improved survival and decreased viral titers in IAV-infected mice. Therefore, fucoidan KW has the potential to be developed into a novel nasal drop or spray for prevention and treatment of influenza in the future. PMID:28094330

  4. Optic neuritis and acute anterior uveitis associated with influenza A infection: a case report

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    Nakagawa H

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hayate Nakagawa, Hidetaka Noma, Osamu Kotake, Ryosuke Motohashi, Kanako Yasuda, Masahiko Shimura Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Medical University Hachioji Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan Background: A few reports have described ocular complications of influenza A infection, such as impaired ocular movement, parasympathetic ocular nerve, keratitis, macular lesion, and frosted branch angiitis. We encountered a rare case of acute anterior uveitis and optic neuritis associated with influenza A infection. Case presentation: A 70-year-old man presented with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection. A rapid diagnostic test showed a positive result for influenza A. At the same time, he developed ocular symptoms including blurred vision with optic disk edema and hemorrhage in the left eye, and bilateral red eyes. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction performed on aqueous humor sample detected no viral infection. Visual field testing with a Goldmann perimeter showed central and paracentral scotomas in the left eye. In addition to antiviral agent (oseltamivir phosphate 75 mg, the patient was prescribed topical prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension eye drops every 5 hours and high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone 1,000 mg daily for 3 days. Two months later, his best-corrected visual acuity improved to 20/50 with regression of visual field defects in his left eye. Conclusion: We report a case of bilateral acute anterior uveitis and unilateral optic neuritis concomitant with influenza A infection. Topical and systemic corticosteroids were effective to resolve acute anterior uveitis and neuritis. Analysis of aqueous humor sample suggested that acute anterior uveitis and optic neuritis in this case were not caused by influenza A virus infection per se but by autoimmune mechanism. Keywords: optic neuritis, anterior uveitis, influenza virus, multiplex polymerase chain reaction

  5. Novel microRNA-like viral small regulatory RNAs arising during human hepatitis A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Wang, Bin; Wu, Meini; Zhang, Jing; Duan, Zhiqing; Wang, Haixuan; Hu, Ningzhu; Hu, Yunzhang

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), including host miRNAs and viral miRNAs, play vital roles in regulating host-virus interactions. DNA viruses encode miRNAs that regulate the viral life cycle. However, it is generally believed that cytoplasmic RNA viruses do not encode miRNAs, owing to inaccessible cellular miRNA processing machinery. Here, we provide a comprehensive genome-wide analysis and identification of miRNAs that were derived from hepatitis A virus (HAV; Hu/China/H2/1982), which is a typical cytoplasmic RNA virus. Using deep-sequencing and in silico approaches, we identified 2 novel virally encoded miRNAs, named hav-miR-1-5p and hav-miR-2-5p. Both of the novel virally encoded miRNAs were clearly detected in infected cells. Analysis of Dicer enzyme silencing demonstrated that HAV-derived miRNA biogenesis is Dicer dependent. Furthermore, we confirmed that HAV mature miRNAs were generated from viral miRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs) in host cells. Notably, naturally derived HAV miRNAs were biologically and functionally active and induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Genomic location analysis revealed novel miRNAs located in the coding region of the viral genome. Overall, our results show that HAV naturally generates functional miRNA-like small regulatory RNAs during infection. This is the first report of miRNAs derived from the coding region of genomic RNA of a cytoplasmic RNA virus. These observations demonstrate that a cytoplasmic RNA virus can naturally generate functional miRNAs, as DNA viruses do. These findings also contribute to improved understanding of host-RNA virus interactions mediated by RNA virus-derived miRNAs.

  6. Viral infections stimulate the metabolism and shape prokaryotic assemblages in submarine mud volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Danovaro, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Mud volcanoes are geological structures in the oceans that have key roles in the functioning of the global ecosystem. Information on the dynamics of benthic viruses and their interactions with prokaryotes in mud volcano ecosystems is still completely lacking. We investigated the impact of viral infection on the mortality and assemblage structure of benthic prokaryotes of five mud volcanoes in the Mediterranean Sea. Mud volcano sediments promote high rates of viral production (1.65-7.89 × 10(9) viruses g(-1) d(-1)), viral-induced prokaryotic mortality (VIPM) (33% cells killed per day) and heterotrophic prokaryotic production (3.0-8.3 μgC g(-1) d(-1)) when compared with sediments outside the mud volcano area. The viral shunt (that is, the microbial biomass converted into dissolved organic matter as a result of viral infection, and thus diverted away from higher trophic levels) provides 49 mgC m(-2) d(-1), thus fuelling the metabolism of uninfected prokaryotes and contributing to the total C budget. Bacteria are the dominant components of prokaryotic assemblages in surface sediments of mud volcanoes, whereas archaea dominate the subsurface sediment layers. Multivariate multiple regression analyses show that prokaryotic assemblage composition is not only dependant on the geochemical features and processes of mud volcano ecosystems but also on synergistic interactions between bottom-up (that is, trophic resources) and top-down (that is, VIPM) controlling factors. Overall, these findings highlight the significant role of the viral shunt in sustaining the metabolism of prokaryotes and shaping their assemblage structure in mud volcano sediments, and they provide new clues for our understanding of the functioning of cold-seep ecosystems.

  7. Identification of viral infections in the prostate and evaluation of their association with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calderon-Cardenas German

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several viruses with known oncogenic potential infect prostate tissue, among these are the polyomaviruses BKV, JCV, and SV40; human papillomaviruses (HPVs, and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections. Recently, the Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related gammaretrovirus (XMRV was identified in prostate tissue with a high prevalence observed in prostate cancer (PC patients homozygous for the glutamine variant of the RNASEL protein (462Q/Q. Association studies with the R462Q allele and non-XMRV viruses have not been reported. We assessed associations between prostate cancer, prostate viral infections, and the RNASEL 462Q allele in Mexican cancer patients and controls. Methods 130 subjects (55 prostate cancer cases and 75 controls were enrolled in the study. DNA and RNA isolated from prostate tissues were screened for the presence of viral genomes. Genotyping of the RNASEL R462Q variant was performed by Taqman method. Results R/R, R/Q, and Q/Q frequencies for R462Q were 0.62, 0.38, and 0.0 for PC cases and 0.69, 0.24, and 0.07 for controls, respectively. HPV sequences were detected in 11 (20.0% cases and 4 (5.3% controls. XMRV and HCMV infections were detected in one and six control samples, respectively. The risk of PC was significantly increased (Odds Ratio = 3.98; 95% CI: 1.17-13.56, p = 0.027 by infection of the prostatic tissue with HPV. BKV, JCV, and SV40 sequences were not detected in any of the tissue samples examined. Conclusions We report a positive association between PC and HPV infection. The 462Q/Q RNASEL genotype was not represented in our PC cases; thus, its interaction with prostate viral infections and cancer could not be evaluated.

  8. Immune Complex Mediated Glomerulonephritis with Acute Thrombotic Microangiopathy following Newly Detected Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Hannah; Douthwaite, Sam; Newsholme, William; Horsfield, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) presents a risk to patients and staff in renal units. To minimise viral transmission, there are international and UK guidelines recommending HBV immunisation for patients commencing renal replacement therapy (RRT) and HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients. We report the case of a 56-year-old male who was immunised against HBV before starting haemodialysis. He received a deceased donor kidney transplant three years later, at which time there was no evidence of HBV infection. After a further six years he developed an acute kidney injury; allograft biopsy revealed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and C4d staining. Due to a “full house” immunoprofile, tests including virological screening were undertaken, which revealed acute HBV infection. Entecavir treatment resulted in an improvement in viral load and kidney function. HBV genotyping demonstrated a vaccine escape mutant, suggesting “past resolved” infection that reactivated with immunosuppression, though posttransplant acquisition cannot be excluded. This is the first reported case of acute HBV infection associated with immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and TMA. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients, which although addressed by UK guidelines is not currently practiced in all UK units.

  9. Immune Complex Mediated Glomerulonephritis with Acute Thrombotic Microangiopathy following Newly Detected Hepatitis B Virus Infection in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey Salter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV presents a risk to patients and staff in renal units. To minimise viral transmission, there are international and UK guidelines recommending HBV immunisation for patients commencing renal replacement therapy (RRT and HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients. We report the case of a 56-year-old male who was immunised against HBV before starting haemodialysis. He received a deceased donor kidney transplant three years later, at which time there was no evidence of HBV infection. After a further six years he developed an acute kidney injury; allograft biopsy revealed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and C4d staining. Due to a “full house” immunoprofile, tests including virological screening were undertaken, which revealed acute HBV infection. Entecavir treatment resulted in an improvement in viral load and kidney function. HBV genotyping demonstrated a vaccine escape mutant, suggesting “past resolved” infection that reactivated with immunosuppression, though posttransplant acquisition cannot be excluded. This is the first reported case of acute HBV infection associated with immune complex mediated glomerulonephritis and TMA. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of HBV surveillance in kidney transplant recipients, which although addressed by UK guidelines is not currently practiced in all UK units.

  10. Role of viral replication in extrahepatic syndromes related to hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, A

    2006-03-01

    Approximately 20% of patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may experience extrahepatic disease. These manifestations include a viral prodrome with a serum sickness-like syndrome, polyarteritis nodosa, glomerulonephritis, as well as various neurological and dermatologic diseases amongst other manifestations. The viral pathogenesis is not well understood and has been difficult to study due to the lack of an animal model of HBV-related extrahepatic disease. Deposition of immune complexes and activation of the complement cascade has been most widely studied. However, circulating immune complexes are physiologic and occur more frequently than extrahepatic disease. Also, HBV-related extrahepatic syndromes occur in the absence of immune complex formation. Several studies support the notion that HBV replication in extrahepatic tissues may also precipitate disease but extrahepatic replication has commonly been observed without any apparent cytopathic or immune related tissue damage. It is clear that suppression of viral replication with antiviral therapy or spontaneous viral clearance positively correlates with resolution of extrahepatic disease. The use of continuous immunosuppressive therapy has largely been abandoned with the advent of robust antiviral strategies to manage disease. These data support the notion that a combination of factors including inadequate clearance immune complexes and viral replication in extrahepatic tissues play an important role in the pathogenesis. This conceptual framework is potentially significant as it emphasizes the importance of antiviral treatment in the management of extrahepatic disease.

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and interleukin-6 levels in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of children with viral infection-induced encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morichi, Shinichiro; Yamanaka, Gaku; Ishida, Yu; Oana, Shingo; Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Kawashima, Hisashi

    2014-11-01

    We investigated changes in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and interleukin (IL)-6 levels in pediatric patients with central nervous system (CNS) infections, particularly viral infection-induced encephalopathy. Over a 5-year study period, 24 children hospitalized with encephalopathy were grouped based on their acute encephalopathy type (the excitotoxicity, cytokine storm, and metabolic error types). Children without CNS infections served as controls. In serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples, BDNF and IL-6 levels were increased in all encephalopathy groups, and significant increases were noted in the influenza-associated and cytokine storm encephalopathy groups. Children with sequelae showed higher BDNF and IL-6 levels than those without sequelae. In pediatric patients, changes in serum and CSF BDNF and IL-6 levels may serve as a prognostic index of CNS infections, particularly for the diagnosis of encephalopathy and differentiation of encephalopathy types.

  12. The Role of Viral Infection in Inducing Variability in Virus-Free Progeny in Tomato

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liliana Marii; Gheorghe Chiriac

    2009-01-01

    The effect of virus-host interactions on subsequent generations is poorly understood. The evaluation of the effects of viral infection on inheritance of quantitative traits in the progeny of infected plants and elucidation of a possible relationship between chiasma frequency in the infected plants and variability of traits in the progeny were investigated. The current study involved genotypes of four intraspecific hybrids of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), their parental forms and two additional cultivars. Used as infection were the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and potato virus X (PVX). The consequences of the effect of viral infection were evaluated based on chromosome pairing in diakinesis and/or by examining quantitative and qualitative traits in the progeny of the infected tomato plants. Tomato plants infected with TMV + PVX were found to differ in chiasma frequency per pollen mother cell or per bivalent. Deviations have been observed for genotypes of both F1 hybrids and cultivars. At the same time, differences in mean values of the traits under study have only been found for progeny populations (F2-F4) derived from virus-infected F1 hybrids, but not in the case of progeny of the infected cultivars. The rate of recombinants combining traits of both parents increased significantly (2.22-8.24 times) in progeny populations of hybrids infected with TMV + PVX. The above suggests that the observed effects could be the result of modification of recombination frequencies that can be manifested in heterozygous hybrids and make small contributions to variability in cases of 'homozygous' tomato genotypes (I.e. Cultivars).

  13. Carbohydrate-Based Ice Recrystallization Inhibitors Increase Infectivity and Thermostability of Viral Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadloo, Shahrokh M.; Balcerzak, Anna K.; Gargaun, Ana; Muharemagic, Darija; Mironov, Gleb G.; Capicciotti, Chantelle J.; Briard, Jennie G.; Ben, Robert N.; Berezovski, Maxim V.

    2014-07-01

    The inability of vaccines to retain sufficient thermostability has been an obstacle to global vaccination programs. To address this major limitation, we utilized carbohydrate-based ice recrystallization inhibitors (IRIs) to eliminate the cold chain and stabilize the potency of Vaccinia virus (VV), Vesicular Stomatitis virus (VSV) and Herpes virus-1 (HSV-1). The impact of these IRIs was tested on the potency of the viral vectors using a plaque forming unit assay following room temperature storage, cryopreservation with successive freeze-thaw cycles and lyophilization. Viral potency after storage with all three conditions demonstrated that N-octyl-gluconamide (NOGlc) recovered the infectivity of shelf stored VV, 5.6 Log10 PFU mL-1 during 40 days, and HSV-1, 2.7 Log10 PFU mL-1 during 9 days. Carbon-linked antifreeze glycoprotein analogue ornithine-glycine-glycine-galactose (OGG-Gal) increases the recovery of VV and VSV more than 1 Log10 PFU mL-1 after 10 freeze-thaw cycles. In VSV, cryostorage with OGG-Gal maintains high infectivity and reduces temperature-induced aggregation of viral particles by 2 times that of the control. In total, OGG-Gal and NOGlc preserve virus potency during cryostorage. Remarkably, NOGlc has potential to eliminate the cold chain and permit room temperature storage of viral vectors.

  14. [Laboratory diagnosis of HIV infection, viral tropism and resistance to antiretrovirals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Federico; Álvarez, Marta; Bernal, Carmen; Chueca, Natalia; Guillot, Vicente

    2011-04-01

    The accurate diagnosis of HIV infection demands that to consider a positive result, at least three assays with different antigenic base should be used, one of them, Western-Blot being mandatory for confirmation. Fourth generation ELISAs shorten the window phase to 13-15 days, as they now include p24 antigen detection. Proviral DNA or Viral RNA detection by molecular methods have proved useful for addressing complex situations in which serology was inconclusive. Viral load (HIV-RNA) is routinely used to follow-up HIV infected patients and is used for treatment initiation decisions. It is also used to monitor viral failure. When this happens, resistance tests are needed to guide treatment changes. Resistance is also used to assess the transmission of drug resistance to newly diagnosed patients. Finally, before using an anti-CCR5 drug, viral tropism needs to be determined. This can be done using genotypic tests, widely available in many HIV labs, or phenotypic tests, only available at certain sites.

  15. Carbohydrate-based ice recrystallization inhibitors increase infectivity and thermostability of viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadloo, Shahrokh M; Balcerzak, Anna K; Gargaun, Ana; Muharemagic, Darija; Mironov, Gleb G; Capicciotti, Chantelle J; Briard, Jennie G; Ben, Robert N; Berezovski, Maxim V

    2014-07-31

    The inability of vaccines to retain sufficient thermostability has been an obstacle to global vaccination programs. To address this major limitation, we utilized carbohydrate-based ice recrystallization inhibitors (IRIs) to eliminate the cold chain and stabilize the potency of Vaccinia virus (VV), Vesicular Stomatitis virus (VSV) and Herpes virus-1 (HSV-1). The impact of these IRIs was tested on the potency of the viral vectors using a plaque forming unit assay following room temperature storage, cryopreservation with successive freeze-thaw cycles and lyophilization. Viral potency after storage with all three conditions demonstrated that N-octyl-gluconamide (NOGlc) recovered the infectivity of shelf stored VV, 5.6 Log₁₀ PFU mL(-1) during 40 days, and HSV-1, 2.7 Log₁₀ PFU mL(-1) during 9 days. Carbon-linked antifreeze glycoprotein analogue ornithine-glycine-glycine-galactose (OGG-Gal) increases the recovery of VV and VSV more than 1 Log₁₀ PFU mL(-1) after 10 freeze-thaw cycles. In VSV, cryostorage with OGG-Gal maintains high infectivity and reduces temperature-induced aggregation of viral particles by 2 times that of the control. In total, OGG-Gal and NOGlc preserve virus potency during cryostorage. Remarkably, NOGlc has potential to eliminate the cold chain and permit room temperature storage of viral vectors.

  16. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells control persistence of viral CNS infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dajana Reuter

    Full Text Available We earlier established a model of a persistent viral CNS infection using two week old immunologically normal (genetically unmodified mice and recombinant measles virus (MV. Using this model infection we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs as regulators of the immune response in the brain, and assessed whether the persistent CNS infection can be modulated by manipulation of Tregs in the periphery. CD4(+ CD25(+ Foxp3(+ Tregs were expanded or depleted during the persistent phase of the CNS infection, and the consequences for the virus-specific immune response and the extent of persistent infection were analyzed. Virus-specific CD8(+ T cells predominantly recognising the H-2D(b-presented viral hemagglutinin epitope MV-H(22-30 (RIVINREHL were quantified in the brain by pentamer staining. Expansion of Tregs after intraperitoneal (i.p. application of the superagonistic anti-CD28 antibody D665 inducing transient immunosuppression caused increased virus replication and spread in the CNS. In contrast, depletion of Tregs using diphtheria toxin (DT in DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells-mice induced an increase of virus-specific CD8(+ effector T cells in the brain and caused a reduction of the persistent infection. These data indicate that manipulation of Tregs in the periphery can be utilized to regulate virus persistence in the CNS.

  17. Impact of genotype-specific herd immunity on the circulatory dynamism of norovirus: a 10-year longitudinal study of viral acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakon, Naomi; Yamazaki, Kenji; Nakata, Keiko; Kanbayashi, Daiki; Yoda, Tomoko; Mantani, Masanobu; Kase, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo; Komano, Jun

    2015-03-15

    Human norovirus is a major cause of viral acute gastroenteritis worldwide. However, the transition of endemic norovirus genotypes remains poorly understood. The characteristics of natural immunity against norovirus are unclear because few studies have been performed in the natural infection setting. This prospective 10-year surveillance study of acute gastroenteritis in the province of Osaka, Japan, revealed that norovirus spread shows temporal, geographic, and age group-specific features in the humans. Genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) was detected in most sporadic pediatric cases, as well as in foodborne and nursing home outbreaks, respectively. The dominant genotypes in outbreaks at childcare facilities and schools shifted every season and involved GI, GII.2, GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6. Evidence at both the facility and individual levels indicated that genotype-specific herd immunity lasted long enough to influence the endemic norovirus genotype in the next season. Thus, norovirus circulates through human populations in a uniquely dynamic fashion.

  18. Viral encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Tulius T Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While systemic viral infections are exceptionally common, symptomatic viral infections of the brain parenchyma itself are very rare, but a serious neurologic condition. It is estimated that viral encephalitis occurs at a rate of 1.4 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Geography is a major determinant of encephalitis caused by vector-borne pathogens. A diagnosis of viral encephalitis could be a challenge to the clinician, since almost 70% of viral encephalitis cases are left without an etiologic agent identified. In this review, the most common viral encephalitis will be discussed, with focus on ecology, diagnosis, and clinical management.

  19. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Van Duyne, Rachel [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Romerio, Fabio [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah, E-mail: fkashanc@gmu.edu [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  20. Impact of acute vivax malaria on the immune system and viral load of HIV-positive subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小平; 肖斌权; 施文钧; 徐慧芳; 高凯; 饶纪礼; 张周斌

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore the mechanisms of malariotherapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and to identify which stage(s) of HIV infection is suitable for the treatment of malariotherapy.Methods Therapeutic acute vivax malaria was induced and terminated after 10 fever episodes in 12 HIV-1-infected subjects: Group 1 (G1) had 5 patients with CD4 T-cell counts500/μl at baseline, Group 2 (G2) had 5 patients with CD4 at 499-200/μl and Group 3 had 2 patients with CD4<200/μl (not included in statistical analysis). Enzyme-Linked-Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA) was used to measure plasma levels of cytokines and soluble activation markers. Flow cytometry was used to measure levels of lymphocyte subsets and phenotypes and CD4 cell apoptosis. Bayer bDNA assay was used to test plasma levels of HIV-1 RNA (viral load). Samples were taken and tested twice before malaria (baselines), three times during malaria and seven times after termination of malaria (at day 10 and 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months). Results Levels of plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), soluble TNF-α receptor-2 (sTNF-RII), neopterin (NPT) and soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R) significantly increased during malaria and sharply reduced to baselines post malaria in all groups. Stronger responses of the aforementioned factors were seen in G2 than in G1 during malaria (P=0.081, 0.001, 0.013, 0.020). CD4 count and percentage; CD4/CD8 ratio and CD25+ and CD4+CD25+ percentages increased but HLA DR+ percentage decreased either during or post malaria in G2. Most G2 patients experienced sustained increase but most G1 patients underwent natural history decline of CD4 counts and percentages during 2-year follow-up. Percentage of apoptotic CD4 cells decreased post malaria in all groups. G3 patients had weaker immune responses, however, one advanced AIDS patient in this group experienced clinical improvement after malariotherapy. Most of the 12 patients experienced increase of HIV viral load during

  1. Nosocomial infections in patients with acute central nervous system infections

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Due to current increase in the rate of nosocomial infections, our objective was to examine the frequency, risk factors, clinical presentation and etiology of nosocomial infections in patients with central nervous system infections. 2246 patients with central nervous system infections, treated in the intensive care units of the Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade and at the Department of Infectious Diseases of the Clinical Hospital Center Kraguj...

  2. IMBALANCE OF IMMUNOREGULATORY Th1- AND Th2-CYTOKINES IN PERSISTENT VIRAL INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Naslednikova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The article is considering certain features of immunopathogenesis exhibited in persistent viral infections, taking into account modern data and recently introduced immunological techniques. It has been revealed that a long-term persistence of hepatitis B and C viruses, tick-borne encephalitis, and herpes simplex is accompanied by deficient functioning in the T-cell compartment of immune system, and by markedly altered production of immunoregulatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes, mainly characterized by Th2 predominance.

  3. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Aevermann, Brian D.; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Peter S Askovich; III, Armand Bankhead; Bolles, Meagen; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean; Clauss, Therese R.W.; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Ellis, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe...

  4. Reply to Klitz and Niklasson: Can viral infections explain the cross-sectional Austrian diabetes data?

    OpenAIRE

    Thurner, S.; Klimek, P.(Department of Physics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden); Szell, M; Duftschmid, G.; Endel, G.; Kautzky-Willer, A.; Kasper, D.C.

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of diabetes patients suffer from type II diabetes. There are several theories for potential causes of its development, the most favored being the "exhaustion" of beta-cells by chronic excess caloric intake combined with inactivity leading to obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Viral infection could be a potential cause, however mainly for type I diabetes. Furthermore, autoimmunity might play a role in type I patients...

  5. Human TYK2 deficiency: Mycobacterial and viral infections without hyper-IgE syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreins, Alexandra Y.; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Okada, Satoshi; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Ramírez-Alejo, Noé; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Ailal, Fatima; Bousfiha, Aziz; Mansouri, Davood; Nievas, Elma; Ma, Cindy S.; Rao, Geetha; Bernasconi, Andrea; Sun Kuehn, Hye; Niemela, Julie; Stoddard, Jennifer; Deveau, Paul; Cobat, Aurelie; El Azbaoui, Safa; Sabri, Ayoub; Lim, Che Kang; Sundin, Mikael; Avery, Danielle T.; Halwani, Rabih; Grant, Audrey V.; Boisson, Bertrand; Bogunovic, Dusan; Itan, Yuval; Moncada-Velez, Marcela; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Migaud, Melanie; Deswarte, Caroline; Alsina, Laia; Kotlarz, Daniel; Klein, Christoph; Muller-Fleckenstein, Ingrid; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Rose-John, Stefan; Picard, Capucine; Hammarstrom, Lennart; Puel, Anne; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Abel, Laurent; Chaussabel, Damien; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Tangye, Stuart G.; Bustamante, Jacinta; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive, complete TYK2 deficiency was previously described in a patient (P1) with intracellular bacterial and viral infections and features of hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES), including atopic dermatitis, high serum IgE levels, and staphylococcal abscesses. We identified seven other TYK2-deficient patients from five families and four different ethnic groups. These patients were homozygous for one of five null mutations, different from that seen in P1. They displayed mycobacterial and/or viral infections, but no HIES. All eight TYK2-deficient patients displayed impaired but not abolished cellular responses to (a) IL-12 and IFN-α/β, accounting for mycobacterial and viral infections, respectively; (b) IL-23, with normal proportions of circulating IL-17+ T cells, accounting for their apparent lack of mucocutaneous candidiasis; and (c) IL-10, with no overt clinical consequences, including a lack of inflammatory bowel disease. Cellular responses to IL-21, IL-27, IFN-γ, IL-28/29 (IFN-λ), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) were normal. The leukocytes and fibroblasts of all seven newly identified TYK2-deficient patients, unlike those of P1, responded normally to IL-6, possibly accounting for the lack of HIES in these patients. The expression of exogenous wild-type TYK2 or the silencing of endogenous TYK2 did not rescue IL-6 hyporesponsiveness, suggesting that this phenotype was not a consequence of the TYK2 genotype. The core clinical phenotype of TYK2 deficiency is mycobacterial and/or viral infections, caused by impaired responses to IL-12 and IFN-α/β. Moreover, impaired IL-6 responses and HIES do not appear to be intrinsic features of TYK2 deficiency in humans. PMID:26304966

  6. A nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpusik, Adam

    2017-02-01

    We present a nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection. The main advantage of this approach is that it preserves the essential qualitative features of the original continuous model (non-negativity and boundedness of the solution, equilibria and their stability conditions), while being easy to implement. All of the qualitative features are preserved independently of the chosen step-size. Numerical simulations of our approach and comparison with other conventional simulation methods are presented.

  7. Study on Viral Pathogen in Hospitalized Children with Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infection from 2011 to 2012 in Hunan Province%湖南地区2011~2012年急性下呼吸道感染住院儿童的病毒病原研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭颖; 谢乐云; 钟礼立; 张兵; 段招军; 谢志萍

    2014-01-01

    [Objective] To understand the viral pathogen in hospitalized children with acute lower respira-tory tract infection(ALRTI) from 2011 to 2012 in Hunan province .[Methods]A total of 727 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples in hospitalized children due to ALRTI from April 2011 to March 2012 were collected .Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Nest-PCR were used to detect 13 kinds of common re-spiratoryvirusesincludinghumanbocavirus(HBoV),adenovirus(ADV),respiratory syncytialvirus(RSV), human rhinovirus(HRV) ,parainfluenza 1-4(PIV1-4) ,influenza virus A(IFVA) ,influenza virus B(IFVB) , human metapneumovirus (HMPV) ,human coronaviruses NL63 (HCoV-NL63) and human coronaviruses HKU1(HCoV-HKU1) .The positive amplification products were confirmed by gene sequencing .[Results]Vi-ruses were detected in 504 of 727 specimens ,and the total detection rate was 69 .3% (504/727) .The first three viruses were RSV(26 .3% ) ,HRV(18 .7% ) and ADV(18 .6% ) .The high detection rate of viruses was found in spring and summer and children aged less than 3 years old ,and there was significant difference . There was no significant difference in the detection rate of viruses between males and females .The mixed in-fection rate of two or more than two kinds of viruses was 38 .9% .[Conclusion]During the study period ,respir-atory syncytial virus and rhinovirus are the main pathogens in hospitalized children with ALRTI of Hunan province .Compared with former years ,the detection rate of adenovirus is obviously increased ,and becomes the third common virus ,and has important significance .The mixed infection rate of viruses is high .%【目的】了解湖南地区儿童急性下呼吸道感染(ALRTI)住院儿童的病毒病原情况。【方法】收集2011年4月至2012年3月因ALRTI住院的儿童鼻咽抽吸物标本727份,采用RT-PCR以及 Nest-PCR方法检测常见的13种呼吸道病毒,包括人博卡病毒(HBoV ),腺病毒(ADV )

  8. [The lesion predilection and the phenomenology of the basic forms of the mental pathology in acute viral neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksutova, E L

    1993-01-01

    Verified material on 246 cases of acute viral encephalitis and meningoencephalitis was studied prospectively. The clinical and psychopathological analysis shown predilection to cerebral affection in formation of a number of psychopathological syndromes reflecting focal insufficiency and related to etiotopic characteristics of the underlying pathological process.

  9. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection in dairy cattle herds in northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilnont, Theerakul; Aiumlamai, Suneerat; Kanistanont, Kwankate; Inchaisri, Chaidate; Kampa, Jaruwan

    2016-08-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus causes a wide range of clinical manifestation with subsequent economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Our study of a population of dairy cattle in Thailand based on 933 bulk tank milk samples from nine public milk collection centers aimed to monitor infective status and to evaluate the effect of the infection in cows as well as to examine the reproductive performance of heifers to provide effective recommendations for disease control in Thailand. The results showed a moderate antibody-positive prevalence in the herd (62.5 %), with the proportion of class-3 herd, actively infected stage, being 17.3 %. Fourteen persistently infected (PI) animals were identified among 1196 young animals from the class-3 herds. Most of the identified PI animals, 11/14, were born in one sub-area where bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) investigation has not been performed to date. With respect to reproductive performance, class-3 herds also showed higher median values of reproductive indices than those of class-0 herds. Cows and heifers in class-3 herds had higher odds ratio of calving interval (CI) and age at first service (AFS) above the median, respectively, compared to class-0 herds (OR = 1.29; P = 0.02 and OR = 1.63; P = 0.02). Our study showed that PI animals were still in the area that was previously studied. Furthermore, a newly studied area had a high prevalence of BVDV infection and the infection affected the reproductive performance of cows and heifers. Although 37.5 % of the population was free of BVDV, the lack of official disease prevention and less awareness of herd biosecurity may have resulted in continuing viral spread and silent economic losses have potentially occurred due to BVDV. We found that BVDV is still circulating in the region and, hence, a national control program is required.

  10. Effects of acute respiratory virus infection upon tracheal mucous transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerrard, C.S.; Levandowski, R.A.; Gerrity, T.R.; Yeates, D.B.; Klein, E.

    Tracheal mucous velocity was measured in 13 healthy non-smokers using an aerosol labelled with /sup 99m/Tc and a multidetector probe during respiratory virus infections. The movement of boluses of tracheal mucous were either absent or reduced in number in five subjects with myxovirus infection (four influenza and one respiratory syncytial virus) within 48 hr of the onset of symptoms and in four subjects 1 wk later. One subject with influenza still had reduced bolus formation 12-16 wk after infection. Frequent coughing was a feature of those subjects with absent tracheal boluses. In contrast, four subjects with rhinovirus infection had normal tracheal mucous velocity at 48 hr after the onset of symptoms (4.1 +/- 1.3 mm/min). Tracheal mucous velocity was also normal (4.6 +/- 1.1 mm/min) in four subjects in whom no specific viral agent could be defined but had typical symptomatology of respiratory viral infection. During health tracheal mucous velocity was normal (4.8 +/- 1.6 mm/min) in the eleven subjects who had measurements made. Disturbances in tracheal mucous transport during virus infection appear to depend upon the type of virus and are most severe in influenza A and respiratory syncytial virus infection.

  11. [The application of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology in viral infection diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijuan, Yin; Siqi, Hu; Fei, Guo

    2015-05-01

    The RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease from microbial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) adaptive immune system has been used to facilitate efficient genome engineering in eukaryotic cells. The specific targeted genome is recognized and cut by gRNA-directed CRISPR/Cas9 complex, specifically by the endonuclease Cas9. The targeted gene locus could be repaired either by homology-directed repair or nonhomologous end joining, thus achieving a desired editing outcome. Viruses infect cells through specific receptors, and then the viral genome is transcribed, replicated and translated to complete its life cycle. As a result, some DNA virus and retrovirus genomes are integrated into the cellular genome. Gene therapy is a new trend to treat viral infected diseases. Given its designable sequence-specific editing of the targeted genome, CRISPR/Cas9 has tremendous potential in treating persistent and latent viral infections. In this review, we summarize the mechanism and progresses of CRISPR/Cas9, and also highlight its therapeutic application in infectious diseases.

  12. Review of Non-Bacterial Infections in Respiratory Medicine: Viral Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, José María; Rajas, Olga; Aspa, Javier

    2015-11-01

    Although bacteria are the main pathogens involved in community-acquired pneumonia, a significant number of community-acquired pneumonia are caused by viruses, either directly or as part of a co-infection. The clinical picture of these different pneumonias can be very similar, but viral infection is more common in the pediatric and geriatric populations, leukocytes are not generally elevated, fever is variable, and upper respiratory tract symptoms often occur; procalcitonin levels are not generally affected. For years, the diagnosis of viral pneumonia was based on cell culture and antigen detection, but since the introduction of polymerase chain reaction techniques in the clinical setting, identification of these pathogens has increased and new microorganisms such as human bocavirus have been discovered. In general, influenza virus type A and syncytial respiratory virus are still the main pathogens involved in this entity. However, in recent years, outbreaks of deadly coronavirus and zoonotic influenza virus have demonstrated the need for constant alert in the face of new emerging pathogens. Neuraminidase inhibitors for viral pneumonia have been shown to reduce transmission in cases of exposure and to improve the clinical progress of patients in intensive care; their use in common infections is not recommended. Ribavirin has been used in children with syncytial respiratory virus, and in immunosuppressed subjects. Apart from these drugs, no antiviral has been shown to be effective. Prevention with anti-influenza virus vaccination and with monoclonal antibodies, in the case of syncytial respiratory virus, may reduce the incidence of pneumonia.

  13. γδ T cells are involved in acute HIV infection and associated with AIDS progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis is vital to HIV control. γδ T cells play critical roles in viral infections, but their activation in acute HIV infected patients and follow up to 18 months has not been described. METHODS: Changes in γδ T cells, including subsets, function and activation, in treated and untreated acutely HIV-infected patients (n = 79 were compared by cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometry with healthy controls (n = 21 at month 0, 6, 12 and 18. RESULTS: In acutely HIV-infected patients, Vδ1 cell proportion was elevated (P = 0.027 with Vδ2 population reduced (P = 0.002. Effector and central memory γδ T cell factions were decreased (P = 0.006 and P = 0.001, respectively, while proportion of terminal γδ T cells increased (P = 0.002. γδ T cell cytotoxicity was compromised over time. Fraction of IL-17-producing cells increased (P = 0.008, and IFN-γ-producing cells were unaffected (P = 0.115. Elevation of a microbial translocation marker, sCD14, was associated with γδ T cell activation (P = 0.001, which increased in a time-dependent manner, correlating with CD4/CD8 T cell activation set-points and CD4 counts. Antiretroviral therapy did not affect these changes. CONCLUSIONS: γδ T cell subpopulation and functions change significantly in acute HIV infection and over time. Early γδ T cell activation was associated with CD4/CD8 T cell activation set-points, which predict AIDS progression. Therefore, γδ T cell activation represents a potential surrogate marker of AIDS progression.

  14. Acute Myopericarditis Likely Secondary to Disseminated Gonococcal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bunker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI is a rare complication of primary infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Cardiac involvement in this condition is rare, and is usually limited to endocarditis. However, there are a number of older reports suggestive of direct myocardial involvement. We report a case of a 38-year-old male with HIV who presented with chest pain, pharyngitis, tenosynovitis, and purpuric skin lesions. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed acute biventricular dysfunction. Skin biopsy showed diplococci consistent with disseminated gonococcal infection, and treatment with ceftriaxone improved his symptoms and ejection fraction. Though gonococcal infection was never proven with culture or nucleic acid amplification testing, the clinical picture and histologic findings were highly suggestive of DGI. Clinicians should consider disseminated gonococcal infection when a patient presents with acute myocarditis, especially if there are concurrent skin and joint lesions.

  15. Acute Myopericarditis Likely Secondary to Disseminated Gonococcal Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Daniel; Kerr, Leslie Dubin

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI) is a rare complication of primary infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Cardiac involvement in this condition is rare, and is usually limited to endocarditis. However, there are a number of older reports suggestive of direct myocardial involvement. We report a case of a 38-year-old male with HIV who presented with chest pain, pharyngitis, tenosynovitis, and purpuric skin lesions. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed acute biventricular dysfunction. Skin biopsy showed diplococci consistent with disseminated gonococcal infection, and treatment with ceftriaxone improved his symptoms and ejection fraction. Though gonococcal infection was never proven with culture or nucleic acid amplification testing, the clinical picture and histologic findings were highly suggestive of DGI. Clinicians should consider disseminated gonococcal infection when a patient presents with acute myocarditis, especially if there are concurrent skin and joint lesions. PMID:26246922

  16. Cofactor dependence and isotype distribution of anticardiolipin antibodies in viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Guglielmone, H; Vitozzi, S; Elbarcha, O; E. Fernandez

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Antibodies to cardiolipin (aCLs) are often detected in patients with autoimmune disorders or infectious diseases.
OBJECTIVE—To investigate the distribution of aCL isotypes and requirement of protein cofactor in viral infections in order to establish the importance, if any, of these antibodies in these infectious diseases.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—The isotype distribution of aCLs in the sera from 160 patients with infection caused by HIV-1 (n=40), hepatitis A virus (n=40), hepatitis B v...

  17. Four cases with Kawasaki disease and viral infection: aetiology or association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giray, Tuba; Biçer, Suat; Küçük, Öznur; Çöl, Defne; Yalvaç, Zerrin; Gürol, Yeşim; Yilmaz, Gülden; Saç, Ahmet; Mogol, Yigit

    2016-12-01

    The aetiology of Kawasaki disease has not yet been precisely determined. It has been associated with a variety of bacterial and viral agents. Some viruses including human adenovirus, coronavirus, and parainfluenza virus type 3 have been isolated from patients with Kawasaki disease. Clinical presentation of patients with human coronavirus and adenovirus infections mimics Kawasaki disease. In addition, these viruses may also be detected in Kawasaki disease as a coinfection. In this report, we present four Kawasaki disease patients infected with adenovirus, coronavirus OC43/HKU1 and parainfluenza virus type 3.

  18. Gallbladder Hydrops Due to Viral Hepatitis A Infection: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Aldaghi, Mitra; Haghighat, Mahmoud; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) infection is common in the developing countries among children, but hydrops of gallbladder due to hepatitis A infection is an uncommon presentation. Case Presentation: A five-year-old boy was admitted in Namazi Hospital, Shiraz, Iran due to jaundice and severe abdominal pain for 10 days. Physical examination revealed a mass in the right upper quadrant with severe tenderness. Liver function tests were abnormal while other laboratory data such as bloo...

  19. O papel da fisioterapia respiratória na bronquiolite viral aguda = Role of chest physiotherapy in acute viral bronchiolitis

    OpenAIRE

    Luisi,Fernanda

    2008-01-01

    Objetivos: revisar a literatura médica sobre o uso da fisioterapia respiratória em crianças com bronquiolite viral aguda Fonte de dados: revisão, a partir do banco de dados PubMed, Medline e LILACS, de artigos publicados em revistas científicas nacionais e internacionais, bem como dos livros texto mais importantes publicados nos últimos anos Síntese dos dados: a bronquiolite viral aguda é uma infecção muito freqüente em crianças. Apesar da baixa morbidade, representa aproximadamente 75%...

  20. The prevalence of the most important viral infections in renal transplant recipients in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćupić Maja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the main cause of opportunistic infections after kidney transplantation. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of cytomegalovirus (CMV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, B. K. virus (BKV and John Cunningham virus (JCV infections in renal transplant recipients (RTR. This retrospective study of 112 RTR investigated the presence of CMV, EBV and polyomaviruses DNA in plasma and/or urine by PCR. The visualization of PCR products was performed by electrophoresis on 2% agarose gel stained with ethidium bromide and photographed under a UV light. The chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. CMV DNA was detected in 14/112 (12.5%, EBV DNA in 4/49 (8.16%, BKV DNA in 10/31 (32.26% and JCV DNA in 3/31 (9.68% RTR. These results show that CMV infection is more often present in RTR compared to other investigated viral infections. In the light of these results, molecular testing could be useful in identifying recipients at high risk of symptomatic post-transplant viral infection. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175073, br. 175038 and br. 175089

  1. Infection-triggered familial or recurrent cases of acute necrotizing encephalopathy caused by mutations in a component of the nuclear pore, RANBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neilson, Derek E; Adams, Mark D; Orr, Caitlin M D;

    2009-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rapidly progressive encephalopathy that can occur in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections such as influenza and parainfluenza. Most ANE is sporadic and nonrecurrent (isolated ANE). However, we identified a 7 Mb interval containing a ...

  2. The role of viral and host microRNAs in the Aujeszky's disease virus during the infection process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Timoneda

    Full Text Available Porcine production is a primary market in the world economy. Controlling swine diseases in the farm is essential in order to achieve the sector necessities. Aujeszky's disease is a viral condition affecting pigs and is endemic in many countries of the world, causing important economic losses in the swine industry. microRNAs (miRNAs are non-coding RNAs which modulates gene expression in animals, plants and viruses. With the aim of understanding miRNA roles during the Aujeszky's disease virus [ADV] (also known as suid herpesvirus type 1 [SuHV-1] infection, the expression profiles of host and viral miRNAs were determined through deep sequencing in SuHV-1 infected porcine cell line (PK-15 and in an animal experimental SuHV-1 infection with virulent (NIA-3 and attenuated (Begonia strains. In the in vivo approach miR-206, miR-133a, miR-133b and miR-378 presented differential expression between virus strains infection. In the in vitro approach, most miRNAs were down-regulated in infected groups. miR-92a and miR-92b-3p were up-regulated in Begonia infected samples. Functional analysis of all this over expressed miRNAs during the infection revealed their association in pathways related to viral infection processes and immune response. Furthermore, 8 viral miRNAs were detected by stem loop RT-qPCR in both in vitro and in vivo approaches, presenting a gene regulatory network affecting 59 viral genes. Most described viral miRNAs were related to Large Latency Transcript (LLT and to viral transcription activators EP0 and IE180, and also to regulatory genes regarding their important roles in the host-pathogen interaction during viral infection.

  3. The potential influence of common viral infections diagnosed during hospitalization among critically ill patients in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makesha Miggins

    Full Text Available Viruses are the most common source of infection among immunocompetent individuals, yet they are not considered a clinically meaningful risk factor among the critically ill. This work examines the association of viral infections diagnosed during the hospital stay or not documented as present on admission to the outcomes of ICU patients with no evidence of immunosuppression on admission. This is a population-based retrospective cohort study of University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC academic centers in the U.S. from the years 2006 to 2009. The UHC is an alliance of over 90% of the non-profit academic medical centers in the U.S. A total of 209,695 critically ill patients were used in this analysis. Eight hospital complications were examined. Patients were grouped into four cohorts: absence of infection, bacterial infection only, viral infection only, and bacterial and viral infection during same hospital admission. Viral infections diagnosed during hospitalization significantly increased the risk of all complications. There was also a seasonal pattern for viral infections. Specific viruses associated with poor outcomes included influenza, RSV, CMV, and HSV. Patients who had both viral and bacterial infections during the same hospitalization had the greatest risk of mortality RR 6.58, 95% CI (5.47, 7.91; multi-organ failure RR 8.25, 95% CI (7.50, 9.07; and septic shock RR 271.2, 95% CI (188.0, 391.3. Viral infections may play a significant yet unrecognized role in the outcomes of ICU patients. They may serve as biological markers or play an active role in the development of certain adverse complications by interacting with coincident bacterial infection.

  4. Aedes mosquito salivary immune peptides:boost or block dengue viral infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natthanej Luplertlop

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus, one of the most important arthropod-borne viruses, infected to human can severely cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. There are expected about 50 million dengue infections and 500 000 individuals are hospitalized with dengue hemorrhagic fever, mainly in Southeast Asia, Pacific, and in Americas reported each year. The rapid expansion of global dengue is one of a major public health challenge, together with not yet successful solutions of dengue epidemic control strategies. Thus, these dynamic dengue viral infections exhibited high demographic, societal, and public health infrastructure impacts on human. This review aimed to highlight the current understanding of dengue mosquito immune responses and role of mosquito salivary glands on dengue infection. These information may provide a valuable knowledge of disease pathogenesis, especially in mosquito vector and dengue virus interaction, which may help to control and prevent dengue distribution.

  5. Aedes mosquito salivary immune peptides: boost or block dengue viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthanej Luplertlop

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus, one of the most important arthropod-borne viruses, infected to human can severely cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. There are expected about 50 million dengue infections and 500 000 individuals are hospitalized with dengue hemorrhagic fever, mainly in Southeast Asia, Pacific, and in Americas reported each year. The rapid expansion of global dengue is one of a major public health challenge, together with not yet successful solutions of dengue epidemic control strategies. Thus, these dynamic dengue viral infections exhibited high demographic, societal, and public health infrastructure impacts on human. This review aimed to highlight the current understanding of dengue mosquito immune responses and role of mosquito salivary glands on dengue infection. These information may provide a valuable knowledge of disease pathogenesis, especially in mosquito vector and dengue virus interaction, which may help to control and prevent dengue distribution.

  6. Leukotriene B4 induces release of antimicrobial peptides in lungs of virally infecte