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Sample records for acute tryptophan depletion

  1. Acute tryptophan depletion in humans: a review of theoretical, practical and ethical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Simon N.

    2013-01-01

    The acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) technique has been used extensively to study the effect of low serotonin in the human brain. This review assesses the validity of a number of published criticisms of the technique and a number of previously unpublished potential criticisms. The conclusion is that ATD can provide useful information when results are assessed in conjunction with results obtained using other techniques. The best-established conclusion is that low serotonin function after tryptophan depletion lowers mood in some people. However, this does not mean that other variables, altered after tryptophan depletion, are necessarily related to low serotonin. Each aspect of brain function has to be assessed separately. Furthermore, a negative tryptophan depletion study does not mean that low serotonin cannot influence the variable studied. This review suggests gaps in knowledge that need to be filled and guidelines for carrying out ATD studies. PMID:23428157

  2. Converging evidence for central 5-HT effects in acute tryptophan depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crockett, Molly; Clark, Luke; Roiser, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD), a dietary technique for manipulating brain serotonin (5-HT) function, has advanced our understanding of 5-HT mechanisms in the etiology and treatment of depression and other affective disorders.1 A recent review article in Molecular Psychiatry questioned the vali...

  3. Recognizing emotions in faces : effects of acute tryptophan depletion and bright light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    aan het Rot, Marije; Coupland, Nicholas; Boivin, Diane B.; Benkelfat, Chawki; Young, Simon N.

    2010-01-01

    In healthy never-depressed individuals, acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) may selectively decrease the accurate recognition of fearful facial expressions. Here we investigated the perception of facial emotions after ATD in more detail. We also investigated whether bright light, which can reverse

  4. Acute tryptophan depletion in healthy volunteers enhances punishment prediction but does not affect reward prediction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cools, R.; Robinson, O.J.; Sahakian, B.

    2008-01-01

    Central serotonin (5-HT) has been implicated in emotional and behavioral control processes for many decades, but its precise contribution is not well understood. We used the acute tryptophan depletion procedure in young healthy volunteers to test the hypothesis that central 5-HT is critical for

  5. Peripheral Serotonin 1B Receptor Transcription Predicts the Effect of Acute Tryptophan Depletion on Risky Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, Federico; Lockwood, Patricia L; Matarin, Mar; Dolan, Raymond J; Wood, Nick W; Dayan, Peter; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The effects of acute tryptophan depletion on human decision-making suggest that serotonin modulates the processing of rewards and punishments. However, few studies have assessed which of the many types of serotonin receptors are responsible. Methods Using a within-subject, double-blind, sham-controlled design in 26 subjects, we examined whether individual differences in serotonin system gene transcription, measured in peripheral blood, predicted the effect of acute tryptophan depletion on decision-making. Participants performed a task in which they chose between successive pairs of fixed, lower-stakes (control) and variable, higher-stakes (experimental) gambles, each involving wins or losses. In 21 participants, mRNA from 9 serotonin system genes was measured in whole blood prior to acute tryptophan depletion: 5-HT1B, 5-HT1F, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, 5-HT3A, 5-HT3E, 5-HT7 (serotonin receptors), 5-HTT (the serotonin transporter), and tryptophan hydroxylase 1. Results Acute tryptophan depletion did not significantly influence participants’ sensitivity to probability, wins, or losses, although there was a trend for a lower tendency to choose experimental gambles overall following depletion. Significant positive correlations, which survived correction for multiple comparisons, were detected between baseline 5-HT1B mRNA levels and acute tryptophan depletion-induced increases in both the overall tendency to choose the experimental gamble and sensitivity to wins. No significant relationship was observed with any other peripheral serotonin system markers. Computational analyses of decision-making data provided results consistent with these findings. Conclusions These results suggest that the 5-HT1B receptor may modulate the effects of acute tryptophan depletion on risky decision-making. Peripheral levels of serotonin markers may predict response to treatments that act upon the serotonin system, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. PMID:27638901

  6. Effects of a novel method of acute tryptophan depletion on plasma tryptophan and cognitive performance in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, E A T; Tillie, D E; van der Veen, F M; Lieben, C K; Jolles, J; Deutz, N E P; Schmitt, J A J

    2005-02-01

    Disorders associated with low levels of serotonin (5-HT) are characterized by mood and cognitive disturbances. Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) is an established method for lowering 5-HT levels and an important tool to study the effects of reduced 5-HT on mood and cognition in human subjects. The traditional ATD method, i.e., administration of separate amino acids (AAs), has several disadvantages. The AA mixture is costly, unpalatable and associated with gastrointestinal discomfort. The University of Maastricht developed a new and inexpensive method for ATD: a natural collagen protein (CP) mixture with low tryptophan (TRP) content. The reductions in plasma TRP after taking this CP mixture were compared with the reductions achieved taking the traditional AA mixture, and effects on memory and reversal learning were studied. Fifteen healthy young volunteers participated in a double-blind, counterbalanced within-subject study. Reversal learning, verbal memory and pattern recognition were assessed at baseline and 3-4 h after taking the CP mixture. The new ATD method significantly reduced plasma TRP by 74% and the ratio between TRP and the other large AAs (TRP/LNAA) by 82%. The placebo mixture did not change these measures. Delayed recognition reaction time on the verbal learning task was increased following ATD. No other cognitive effects were found. The CP mixture was shown to be an efficient tool for lowering plasma TRP in humans. The validity of this method with regard to behavioral changes remains to be established in healthy, vulnerable and clinical populations.

  7. The effects of acute tryptophan depletion on costly information sampling: impulsivity or aversive processing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, M J; Clark, L; Smillie, L D; Robbins, T W

    2012-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) has been implicated in both aversive processing and impulsivity. Reconciling these accounts, recent studies have demonstrated that 5-HT is important for punishment-induced behavioural inhibition. These studies focused on situations where actions lead directly to punishments. However, decision-making often involves making tradeoffs between small 'local' costs and larger 'global' losses. We aimed to distinguish whether 5-HT promotes avoidance of local losses, global losses, or both, in contrast to an overall effect on reflection impulsivity. We further examined the influence of individual differences in sub-clinical depression, anxiety and impulsivity on global and local loss avoidance. Healthy volunteers (N = 21) underwent an acute tryptophan depletion procedure in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. We measured global and local loss avoidance in a decision-making task where subjects could sample information at a small cost to avoid making incorrect decisions, which resulted in large losses. Tryptophan depletion removed the suppressive effects of small local costs on information sampling behaviour. Sub-clinical depressive symptoms produced effects on information sampling similar to (but independent from) those of tryptophan depletion. Dispositional anxiety was related to global loss avoidance. However, trait impulsivity was unrelated to information sampling. The current findings are consistent with recent theoretical work that characterises 5-HT as pruning a tree of potential decisions, eliminating options expected to lead to aversive outcomes. Our results extend this account by proposing that 5-HT promotes reflexive avoidance of relatively immediate aversive outcomes, potentially at the expense of more globally construed future losses.

  8. Evaluation of acute tryptophan depletion and sham depletion with a gelatin-based collagen peptide protein mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbæk, Dea Siggaard; Einarsdottir, H S; Goregliad-Fjaellingsdal, T

    2016-01-01

    Acute Tryptophan Depletion (ATD) is a dietary method used to modulate central 5-HT to study the effects of temporarily reduced 5-HT synthesis. The aim of this study is to evaluate a novel method of ATD using a gelatin-based collagen peptide (CP) mixture. We administered CP-Trp or CP+Trp mixtures......-points. Repeated measures analysis of variance and Wilcoxon or Mann-Whitney U non-parametric tests were used to analyze the effects of intervention. Intake of the CP-Trp mixture efficiently reduced plasma Trp; however, the CP+Trp mixture induced a large significant increase in plasma Trp. No other significant...... effects of CP-Trp compared to CP+Trp were observed. The transient increase in plasma Trp after CP+Trp may impair comparison to the CP-Trp and we therefore recommend in future studies to use a smaller dose of Trp supplement to the CP mixture....

  9. Influence of acute tryptophan depletion on verbal declarative episodic memory in young adult females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmbold, K; Bubenzer, S; Dahmen, B; Eisert, A; Gaber, T J; Habel, U; Konrad, K; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Zepf, F D

    2013-11-01

    Diminished synthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) in the brain has been linked to disturbed memory processes. The present study investigated the effects of diminished central nervous 5-HT synthesis as achieved by an acute dietary tryptophan depletion (ATD) on verbal declarative episodic memory in young women while controlling for the effects of female sex hormones. Eighteen healthy females (aged 20-31 years) participated in a within-subject repeated measures study, with two separate days of assessment spaced at least one individual menstrual cycle apart. On one day, participants were subjected to ATD, thus lowering central nervous 5-HT synthesis. The other day participants received a tryptophan-balanced amino acid load (BAL = control condition). The study was randomized, counterbalanced and double blind in terms of ATD/BAL administration. Measurements took place in the early follicular phase of the participants' menstrual cycle. Estrogen, FSH and LH levels were assessed at baseline. Verbal declarative episodic memory was assessed using a structured word-learning task. Short-term memory, as indexed by immediate recall, was reduced after ATD intake, whereas delayed recall and recognition after a 25-min delay did not show any differences after intake of ATD or BAL. In young women, verbal short-term memory function was more vulnerable to ATD than consolidation processes. In light of the possible interplay between female sex hormones and 5-HT, further studies comparing different menstrual cycle phases are needed.

  10. Response inhibition and serotonin in autism: a functional MRI study using acute tryptophan depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Christine; Hallahan, Brian; Deeley, Quinton; Craig, Michael; Murphy, Clodagh; Johnston, Patrick; Spain, Debbie; Gillan, Nicola; Gudbrandsen, Maria; Brammer, Michael; Giampietro, Vincent; Lamar, Melissa; Page, Lisa; Toal, Fiona; Schmitz, Nicole; Cleare, Anthony; Robertson, Dene; Rubia, Katya; Murphy, Declan G. M.

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that the restricted, stereotyped and repetitive behaviours typically found in autism are underpinned by deficits of inhibitory control. The biological basis of this is unknown but may include differences in the modulatory role of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, which are implicated in the condition. However, this has never been tested directly. We therefore assessed the modifying role of serotonin on inhibitory brain function during a Go/No-Go task in 14 adults with autism and normal intelligence and 14 control subjects that did not differ in gender, age and intelligence. We undertook a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of acute tryptophan depletion using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Following sham, adults with autism relative to controls had reduced activation in key inhibitory regions of inferior frontal cortex and thalamus, but increased activation of caudate and cerebellum. However, brain activation was modulated in opposite ways by depletion in each group. Within autistic individuals depletion upregulated fronto-thalamic activations and downregulated striato-cerebellar activations toward control sham levels, completely ‘normalizing’ the fronto-cerebellar dysfunctions. The opposite pattern occurred in controls. Moreover, the severity of autism was related to the degree of differential modulation by depletion within frontal, striatal and thalamic regions. Our findings demonstrate that individuals with autism have abnormal inhibitory networks, and that serotonin has a differential, opposite, effect on them in adults with and without autism. Together these factors may partially explain the severity of autistic behaviours and/or provide a novel (tractable) treatment target. PMID:25070512

  11. Acute tryptophan depletion reduces nitric oxide synthase in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haipeng; Zhou, Jian; Fang, Liang; Liu, Zhao; Fan, Songhua; Xie, Peng

    2013-12-01

    Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) is extensively used to investigate the role of central serotonin (5-HT). However, several studies reported that ATD had no significant effect on central 5-HT concentration and some ATD-induced changes was independent of 5-HT in the rodent brain. Therefore, the potential mechanism of ATD might not be ascribed solely to changes in the central 5-HT system. In recent studies, evidence suggests that nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is closely associated with ATD-induced changes in modulation of cerebral blood flow and metabolism, cognitive, and locomotor activity. Thus, NOS is implicated to be an underlying factor contributing to ATD-induced changes. In the present study, the effect of ATD upon central NOS levels in the rat was evaluated. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were orally administered a tryptophan-free protein-carbohydrate mixture. Then, ATD effects upon affective behavior and spatial memory were assessed by the forced swimming test (FST) and Morris water maze test, respectively. Further, NOS activity and neuronal NOS (nNOS) protein levels in the hippocampus were measured after ATD. Our experimental results showed that ATD had no influence on affective behavior in the FST or spatial memory in SD rats. Interestingly, a significant reduction of both constitutive NOS activity and nNOS protein levels after ATD was found in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate ATD does not influence affective behavior and spatial memory despite a direct effect on hippocampal NOS. Our study might provide a valuable clue for exploring earlier reported ATD-induced behavioral and neurochemical changes in rodents.

  12. Effects of acute tryptophan depletion on memory, attention and executive functions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Daniel; Riedel, Wim J; Sambeth, Anke

    2009-06-01

    The serotonergic system is implicated in the regulation of mood and cognition. Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) is an experimental procedure for lowering central serotonin levels. Here, the effects of ATD on psychomotor processing, declarative memory, working memory, executive functions and attention are discussed. The most robust finding is that ATD impairs the consolidation of episodic memory for verbal information. Semantic memory appears to be unaffected by ATD although a limited variety of tasks examined effects in this domain. Similarly, evidence suggests ATD does not influence verbal, spatial and affective working memory. Most studies investigating effects on executive functions have produced non-specific or negative findings. In terms of attention, ATD either does not affect or may improve focused attention and ATD likely does not impact sustained and divided attention or attentional set-shifting. Although ATD is known to affect mood in certain vulnerable populations, the effects of ATD on cognition in non-vulnerable participants are independent of mood changes. Suggestions for future directions and implications for psychiatric illnesses are discussed.

  13. Effect of acute tryptophan depletion on emotions in individuals with personal and family history of depression following a mood induction.

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    Altman, Sarah E; Shankman, Stewart A; Spring, Bonnie

    2010-08-01

    Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) has shown depletion-specific increases in depressed mood and overall depressive symptoms, especially in those with a family history and in remitted patients. However, its effect on a broad range of emotions beyond depressed mood has been inconsistent, and studies have rarely employed a negative mood induction. The present double-blind study administered tryptophan-depleted and taste-matched placebo challenge drinks to individuals with a past diagnosis and family history of depression (i.e. depression-vulnerable subjects) and controls in order to investigate the effect of ATD on positive affect, anxiety, anger and depressed mood following a negative mood induction. Certain aspects of positive affect decreased due to ATD in the depression vulnerables but not in the controls. No differential effects were found on depressed mood and anxiety. A stress-induced blunted hedonic capacity may increase vulnerability to ATD and may be a core emotional abnormality in depression. Additionally, serotonin may have a stronger influence on positive affect than on other depression-related emotions during periods of stress. (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Serotonin 2A Receptors, Citalopram and Tryptophan-Depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macoveanu, Julian; Hornboll, Bettina; Elliott, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    and neural correlates of inhibition using intravenous citalopram and acute tryptophan depletion during functional magnetic resonance imaging. We adapted the NoGo paradigm to isolate effects on inhibition per se as opposed to other aspects of the NoGo paradigm. Successful NoGo inhibition was associated...... tryptophan depletion. Moreover, with the NoGo-type of response inhibition, the right IFG displayed an interaction between the type of serotonergic challenge and neocortical 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. Specifically, acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) produced a relatively larger NoGo response in the right IFG...

  15. Neural and personality correlates of individual differences related to the effects of acute tryptophan depletion on future reward evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoto, Yoshihiko; Okada, Go; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Kunisato, Yoshihiko; Aoyama, Shiori; Onoda, Keiichi; Munakata, Ayumi; Nomura, Michio; Tanaka, Saori C; Schweighofer, Nicolas; Doya, Kenji; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2012-01-01

    In general, humans tend to discount the value of delayed reward. An increase in the rate of discounting leads to an inability to select a delayed reward over a smaller immediate reward (reward-delay impulsivity). Although deficits in the serotonergic system are implicated in this reward-delay impulsivity, there is individual variation in response to serotonin depletion. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the effects of serotonin depletion on the ability to evaluate future reward are affected by individual personality traits or brain activation. Personality traits were assessed using the NEO-Five Factor Inventory and Temperament and Character Inventory. The central serotonergic levels of 16 healthy volunteers were manipulated by dietary tryptophan depletion. Subjects performed a delayed reward choice task that required the continuous estimation of reward value during functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Discounting rates were increased in 9 participants, but were unchanged or decreased in 7 participants in response to tryptophan depletion. Participants whose discounting rate was increased by tryptophan depletion had significantly higher neuroticism and lower self-directedness. Furthermore, tryptophan depletion differentially affected the groups in terms of hemodynamic responses to the value of predicted future reward in the right insula. These results suggest that individuals who have high neuroticism and low self-directedness as personality traits are particularly vulnerable to the effect of low serotonin on future reward evaluation accompanied by altered brain activation patterns. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. The role of serotonin in reward, punishment and behavioural inhibition in humans: insights from studies with acute tryptophan depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Paul; Deakin, J F William

    2014-10-01

    Deakin and Graeff proposed that forebrain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) projections are activated by aversive events and mediate anticipatory coping responses including avoidance learning and suppression of the fight-flight escape/panic response. Other theories proposed 5-HT mediates aspects of behavioural inhibition or reward. Most of the evidence comes from rodent studies. We review 36 experimental studies in humans in which the technique of acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) was used to explicitly address the role of 5-HT in response inhibition, punishment and reward. ATD did not cause disinhibition of responding in the absence of rewards or punishments (9 studies). A major role for 5-HT in reward processing is unlikely but further tests are warranted by some ATD findings. Remarkably, ATD lessened the ability of punishments (losing points or notional money) to restrain behaviour without affecting reward processing in 7 studies. Two of these studies strongly indicate that ATD blocks 5-HT mediated aversively conditioned Pavlovian inhibition and this can explain a number of the behavioural effects of ATD. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Acute tryptophan depletion alters the effective connectivity of emotional arousal circuitry during visceral stimuli in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labus, J S; Mayer, E A; Jarcho, J; Kilpatrick, L A; Kilkens, T O C; Evers, E A T; Backes, W H; Brummer, R-J M; van Nieuwenhoven, M A

    2011-09-01

    Alterations in serotonin signalling within the brain-gut axis have been implicated in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and is a treatment target. Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) decreases brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) levels, and increases visceral perception and negative emotional bias in patients with IBS. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of ATD on brain activity and connectivity during visceral stimuli in healthy women, and to compare the ATD-induced brain connectivity of an arousal circuit in female patients with IBS without ATD. 12 healthy females (19-25 years) were studied under placebo (PLA) conditions and ATD. Functional MRI measurements were performed during a rectal barostat protocol, consisting of random non-painful and maximal tolerable distensions. Partial least squares analyses and structural equation modelling were used to evaluate the effect of ATD on functional and effective brain connectivity during distension. Results in healthy controls under ATD were compared with the effective connectivity of brain responses to 45 mm Hg rectal distension in 14 female patients with constipation-predominant IBS (IBS-C) (24-50 years). In healthy controls, ATD resulted in increased response of an extensive brain network to balloon distension, including the amygdala and nodes of emotional arousal and homeostatic afferent networks. The effect was greater during high inflation, suggesting greater engagement of the central serotonion system with more aversive visceral stimuli. Effective connectivity analysis revealed a profound effect of ATD on coupling between emotional arousal network nodes, resulting in loss of negative feedback inhibition of the amygdala. A near-identical pattern was identified in the patients with IBS-C. The findings are consistent with an ATD-induced disinhibition of and increased connectivity within an emotional arousal network during aversive stimulation. Together with the previous

  18. Specificity of the Acute Tryptophan and Tyrosine Plus Phenylalanine Depletion and Loading Tests I. Review of Biochemical Aspects and Poor Specificity of Current Amino Acid Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla A.-B. Badawy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The acute tryptophan or tyrosine plus phenylalanine depletion and loading tests are powerful tools for studying the roles of serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline in normal subjects and those with behavioural disorders. The current amino acid formulations for these tests, however, are associated with undesirable decreases in ratios of tryptophan or tyrosine plus phenylalanine to competing amino acids resulting in loss of specificity. This could confound biochemical and behavioural findings. Compositions of current formulations are reviewed, the biochemical principles underpinning the tests are revisited and examples of unintended changes in the above ratios and their impact on monoamine function and behaviour will be demonstrated from data in the literature. The presence of excessive amounts of the 3 branched-chain amino acids Leu, Ile and Val is responsible for these unintended decreases and the consequent loss of specificity. Strategies for enhancing the specificity of the different formulations are proposed.

  19. Specificity of the Acute Tryptophan and Tyrosine Plus Phenylalanine Depletion and Loading Tests Part II: Normalisation of the Tryptophan and the Tyrosine Plus Phenylalanine to Competing Amino Acid Ratios in a New Control Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla A.-B. Badawy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Current formulations for acute tryptophan (Trp or tyrosine (Tyr plus phenylalanine (Phe depletion and loading cause undesirable decreases in ratios of Trp or Tyr + Phe to competing amino acids (CAA, thus undermining the specificities of these tests. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA cause these unintended decreases, and lowering their content in a new balanced control formulation in the present study led to normalization of all ratios. Four groups (n = 12 each of adults each received one of four 50 g control formulations, with 0% (traditional, 20%, 30%, or 40% less of the BCAA. The free and total [Trp]/[CAA] and [Phe + Tyr]/[BCAA + Trp] ratios all decreased significantly during the first 5 h following the traditional formulation, but were fully normalized by the formulation containing 40% less of the BCAA. We recommend the latter as a balanced control formulation and propose adjustments in the depletion and loading formulations to enhance their specificities for 5-HT and the catecholamines.

  20. Serotonin and the neural processing of facial emotions in adults with autism: an fMRI study using acute tryptophan depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Eileen M; Deeley, Quinton; Ecker, Christine; Craig, Michael; Hallahan, Brian; Murphy, Clodagh; Johnston, Patrick; Spain, Debbie; Gillan, Nicola; Brammer, Michael; Giampietro, Vincent; Lamar, Melissa; Page, Lisa; Toal, Fiona; Cleare, Anthony; Surguladze, Simon; Murphy, Declan G M

    2012-10-01

    People with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have lifelong deficits in social behavior and differences in behavioral as well as neural responses to facial expressions of emotion. The biological basis to this is incompletely understood, but it may include differences in the role of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, which modulate facial emotion processing in health. While some individuals with ASD have significant differences in the serotonin system, to our knowledge, no one has investigated its role during facial emotion processing in adults with ASD and control subjects using acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) and functional magnetic resonance imaging. To compare the effects of ATD on brain responses to primary facial expressions of emotion in men with ASD and healthy control subjects. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of ATD and functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure brain activity during incidental processing of disgust, fearful, happy, and sad facial expressions. Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, and South London and Maudsley National Health Service Foundation Trust, England. Fourteen men of normal intelligence with autism and 14 control subjects who did not significantly differ in sex, age, or overall intelligence. Blood oxygenation level-dependent response to facial expressions of emotion. Brain activation was differentially modulated by ATD depending on diagnostic group and emotion type within regions of the social brain network. For example, processing of disgust faces was associated with interactions in medial frontal and lingual gyri, whereas processing of happy faces was associated with interactions in middle frontal gyrus and putamen. Modulation of the processing of facial expressions of emotion by serotonin significantly differs in people with ASD compared with control subjects. The differences vary with emotion type and occur in social brain regions that have been shown to be associated with group differences

  1. L-Tryptophan depletion bioreactor, a possible cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Bambauer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The cancer therapeutic strategies knownto date are not adequate for all cancer patients. Most of them are followed by a high rate of side effects and complications. The L-tryptophan depletion bioreactor is described as a possible new method of cancer therapy. L-tryptophan is an essential amino acid which has been recognized as an important cancer nutrient and its removal can lead to destruction of the tumour. Normal human cells or tumor cells cannot synthesize L-tryptophan and therefore tumor resistance is unlikely to develop. L-tryptophan is also a constituent for different bio-molecules such as Serotonin, Melatonin, and is needed for other synthesis processes in the cell growth. L-tryptophan degrading enzymes with 3 iso-enzymes called tryptophan side chain oxydase (TSO I, II, III were isolated. The 3 iso-enzymes can be differentiated by tryptic digestion. They have different molecular weights with different effectivenesses. All the TSO enzymes have heme that can catalyze essentially similar reactions involving L-tryptophan as a substrate. The most effective TSO is the type TSO III. A column which contained TSO as a bioreactor was integrated in a plasmapheresis unit and tested it in different animals. In sheep and rabbits L-tryptophan depletion in plasma was shown at 95% and 100% rates respectively by a single pass through the bioreactor. The results in immune supprimized rats with tumors were impressive, too. In 20 different tumor cell lines there were different efficacies. Brest cancer and medulloblastoma showed the greatest efficacy of L-tryptophan degrading. The gene technology of TSO production from Pseudomonas is associated with formation of endotoxins. This disadvantage can be prevented by different washing procedures or by using fungal sources for the TSO production. TSO III is developed to treat cancer diseases successfully, and has low side effects. A combination of L-tryptophan depletion with all available cancer therapies is

  2. Behavioral Disinhibition Induced by Tryptophan Depletion in Nonalcoholic Young Men With Multigenerational Family Histories of Paternal Alcoholism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LeMarquand, David G; Benkelfat, Chawki; Pihl, Robert O; Palmour, Roberta M; Young, Simon N

    1999-01-01

    .... The present study tested the hypothesis that young men at high risk for alcoholism demonstrate greater behavioral disinhibition after acute dietary depletion of tryptophan, the amino acid precursor of serotonin. METHOD...

  3. Tryptophan depletion affects compulsive behaviour in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merchán, A; Navarro, S V; Klein, A B

    2017-01-01

    RATIONALE: Compulsive behaviour, present in different psychiatric disorders, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia and drug abuse, is associated with altered levels of monoamines, particularly serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) and its receptor system. OBJECTIVES: The present study......-free diet (T-) or a TRP-supplemented diet (T+) RESULTS: The TRP depletion diet effectively reduced 5-HT levels in the frontal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus in both strains of rats. The TRP-depleted HD Wistar rats were more sensitive to 5-HT manipulation, exhibiting more licks on SIP than did the non...

  4. Effects of tryptophan depletion on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor-remitted patients with obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Sean D; Broyd, Annabel; Robinson, Hayley; Lee, Jessica; Hudaib, Abdul-Rahman; Hince, Dana A

    2017-12-01

    Serotonergic antidepressants are first-line medication therapies for obsessive-compulsive disorder, however it is not known if synaptic serotonin availability is important for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor efficacy. The present study tested the hypothesis that temporary reduction in central serotonin transmission, through acute tryptophan depletion, would result in an increase in anxiety in selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor-remitted obsessive-compulsive disorder patients. Eight patients (four males) with obsessive-compulsive disorder who showed sustained clinical improvement with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment underwent acute tryptophan depletion in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects design, over two days one week apart. Five hours after consumption of the depleting/sham drink the participants performed a personalized obsessive-compulsive disorder symptom exposure task. Psychological responses were measured using the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory, Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and Visual Analogue Scales. Free plasma tryptophan to large neutral amino acid ratio decreased by 93% on the depletion day and decreased by 1% on the sham day, as anticipated. Psychological rating scores as measured by Visual Analogue Scale showed a significant decrease in perceived control and increase in interfering thoughts at the time of provocation on the depletion day but not on the sham day. A measure of convergent validity, namely Visual Analogue Scale Similar to past, was significantly higher at the time of provocation on both the depletion and sham days. Both the depletion and time of provocation scores for Visual Analogue Scale Anxiety, Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory, Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and blood pressure were not significant. Acute tryptophan depletion caused a significant decrease in perceived control and increase in interfering thoughts at the time of provocation. Acute tryptophan

  5. Effects of tryptophan depletion on anxiety induced by simulated public speaking

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    P.C. Monteiro-dos-Santos

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence point to the participation of serotonin (5HT in anxiety. Its specific role, however, remains obscure. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of reducing 5HT-neurotransmission through an acute tryptophan depletion on anxiety induced by a simulated public speaking (SPS test. Two groups of 14-15 subjects were submitted to a 24-h diet with a low or normal content of tryptophan and received an amino acid mixture without (TRY- or with (TRY+ tryptophan under double-blind conditions. Five hours later they were submitted to the SPS test. The state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI and the visual analogue mood scale (VAMS were used to measure subjective anxiety. Both scales showed that SPS induced a significant increase in anxiety. Although no overall difference between groups was found, there was a trend (P = 0.078 to an interaction of group x gender x phases of the SPS, and a separate analysis of each gender showed an increase in anxiety measured by the STAI in females of the TRY- group. The results for the female TRY- group also suggested a greater arousing effect of the SPS test. In conclusion, the tryptophan depletion procedure employed in the present study did not induce a significant general change in subjective anxiety, but tended to induce anxiety in females. This suggests a greater sensitivity of the 5HT system to the effects of the procedure in this gender.

  6. The Tryptophan Depletion Theory in Delirium: Not Confirmed in Elderly Hip Fracture Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonghe, Annemarieke; van Munster, Barbara C.; Fekkes, Durk; van Oosten, Hannah E.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The tryptophan depletion theory assumes that low tryptophan levels are present in delirium. These lower levels may be regarded as a biochemical marker for cellular immune activation, which may lead to increased catabolism of tryptophan into kynurenine via stimulation of the enzyme

  7. Clinical and physiological consequences of rapid tryptophan depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P; Landolt, H P; Seifritz, E; Clark, C; Bhatti, T; Kelsoe, J; Rapaport, M; Gillin, J C

    2000-12-01

    We review here the rapid tryptophan depletion (RTD) methodology and its controversial association with depressive relapse. RTD has been used over the past decade to deplete serotonin (5-hydroxy-tryptamine, or 5-HT) in humans and to probe the role of the central serotonin system in a variety of psychiatric conditions. Its current popularity was stimulated by reports that RTD reversed the antidepressant effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) in remitted patients with a history of depression but not in patients treated with antidepressants which promote catecholaminergic rather than serotonergic neurotransmission (such as tricyclic antidepressants or buproprion). However, RTD has inconsistent effects in terms of full clinical relapse in depressed patients. Pooling the data from all published reports, patients who are either unmedicated and/or fully remitted are much less likely to experience relapse (7 of 61, or approximately 9%) than patients who are recently medicated and partially remitted (63 of 133, or approximately 47%; although, the numbers here may reflect patient overlap between reports). Recently remitted patients who have been treated with non-pharmacological therapies such as total sleep deprivation, electroconvulsive therapy, or bright light therapy also do not commonly show full clinical relapse with RTD. We briefly review RTD effects in other psychiatric disorders, many of which are treated with SSRIs. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that RTD affects central serotonergic neurotransmission. Nevertheless, many questions remain about the ability of RTD to reverse the beneficial effects of SSRIs or MAOIs, or to induce symptoms in unmedicated symptomatic or asymptomatic patients.

  8. Effects of tryptophan depletion and a simulated alcohol binge on impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Donald M.; Mullen, Jillian; Hill-Kapturczak, Nathalie; Liang, Yuanyuan; Karns, Tara E.; Lake, Sarah L.; Mathias, Charles W.; Roache, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Researchers have suggested that binge drinkers experience disproportionate increases in impulsivity during the initial period of drinking, leading to a loss of control over further drinking, and that serotonergic mechanisms may underlie such effects. Methods We examined the effects of a simulated-alcohol binge and tryptophan depletion on three types of impulsivity: response initiation (IMT task), response inhibition (GoStop task), and delay discounting (SKIP task), and tested whether observed effects were related to “real world” binge drinking. 179 adults with diverse drinking histories completed a within-subject crossover design over 4 experimental days. Each day, participants underwent one of four test conditions: tryptophan depletion/alcohol, tryptophan depletion/placebo, tryptophan balanced control/alcohol, or tryptophan balanced control/placebo. The simulated binge involved consuming 0.3 g/kg of alcohol at 5, 6, and 7 hours after consuming the tryptophan depletion/balanced mixture. Impulsivity was measured before and after each drink. Results Relative to the placebo beverage condition, when alcohol was consumed, impulsive responding was increased at moderate and high levels of intoxication on the IMT and GoStop, but only at high levels of intoxication on the SKIP. Tryptophan depletion had no effect on impulsivity measured under either placebo or alcohol beverage conditions. Effects of alcohol and tryptophan manipulations on impulsivity were unrelated to patterns of binge drinking outside the laboratory. Conclusion The effects of alcohol consumption on impulsivity depend on the component of impulsivity being measured and the dose of alcohol consumed. Such effects do not appear to be a result of reduced serotonin synthesis. Additionally, “real world” binge drinking behaviors were unrelated to behavioral changes observed in the laboratory. PMID:25730415

  9. Tryptophan depletion disinhibits punishment but not reward prediction: implications for resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Oliver J; Cools, Roshan; Sahakian, Barbara J

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that tryptophan depletion enhances punishment but not reward prediction (Cools et al. in Neuropsychopharmacology 33:2291-2299, 2008b). This provided evidence for a valence-specific role of serotonin (which declines under depleted tryptophan) in aversive processing. Recent theoretical (Dayan and Huys in PLoS Comput Biol 4:e4, 2008) and experimental (Crockett et al. in J Neurosci 29:11993-11999, 2009) approaches have, however, further specified this role by showing that serotonin is critical for punishment-induced inhibition. We sought to examine the role of serotonin in punishment-induced inhibition. We also examined the impact of induced mood on this effect to assess whether effects of tryptophan depletion on affective inhibition are moderated by mood. Healthy females consumed a balanced amino acid mixture with (N = 20) or without (N = 21) the serotonin precursor tryptophan. Each subject completed either negative or neutral mood induction. All subjects completed the reward and punishment reversal learning task adopted in the previous study. We demonstrate a punishment prediction impairment in individuals who consumed tryptophan which was absent in individuals who were depleted of tryptophan. This effect was impervious to mood state. Our results suggest that serotonin promotes the inhibition of responses to punishing outcomes. This may lead to reduced punishment prediction accuracy in the presence of tryptophan and may contribute to resilience to affective disorders. Reduction of serotonin via tryptophan depletion then removes this inhibition. As such, we highlight a mechanism by which reduced serotonin can contribute to disorders of impulsivity and compulsivity as well as disorders of emotion.

  10. Can formulation affect tryptophan depletion results? Hints from studies in experimental panic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, Sjacko; Schruers, Koen

    2014-05-01

    Acute Tryptophan Depletion (ATD) is a specific serotonergic challenge tool. Central serotonergic effects of different ATD procedures are possibly not those that are usually assumed. In this paper we review data of ATD in an experimental fear model to investigate whether and how methodological differences may affect fear outcomes. Next we point to discrepancies of studies in our laboratory in order to test the hypotheses formulated in the review. Literature was searched in PubMed and MEDLINE and studies of our laboratory were compared. Eight studies were included in the review: five in patients with panic disorder, three in healthy individuals. Methodologically the studies in our laboratory were quite similar except for the applied ATD mixtures. ATD exerts fear-enhancing effects in patients with panic disorders, more than in healthy individuals. However, our findings are inconclusive. The discrepant findings of studies in our laboratory can possibly be explained by differences in the ATD mixtures used. We suggest mechanisms as to how these might have affected the central availability of tryptophan and hence serotonin.

  11. The effects of tryptophan depletion on cognitive and affective processing in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, F C; Smith, K A; Cowen, P J; Robbins, T W; Sahakian, B J

    2002-08-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common feature of depressive illness. While accumulating evidence suggests that brain serotonin (5-HT) pathways play an important role in the neurobiology of depression, the extent to which altered 5-HT function is responsible for the associated changes in cognition and emotion remains unclear. The present study examined the effects of acute dietary depletion of tryptophan (TRP) on cognitive and affective processing in healthy volunteers and explored the putative role of 5-HT in the neuropsychology of depression. We administered computerised cognitive tests to healthy control participants following ingestion of TRP-free and nutritionally balanced amino acid drinks in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. The TRP-free amino acid mixture significantly lowered plasma total and free TRP concentrations relative to baseline values and produced selective deficits similar to those observed previously in cases of clinical depression. In particular, TRP depletion increased response times for happy but not sad targets in an affective go/no-go task and slowed responding in a visual discrimination and reversal learning task. These deficits were not due to a global sedative effect, as planning ability was unimpaired. The present data indicate that serotonergic factors may be more involved in the disrupted inhibitory and emotional processing characteristic of depression than in other aspects of executive function, such as planning ability. These findings support the recent proposal that serotonergic manipulation may have greater effects on tasks mediated by frontal circuitry that includes the orbitofrontal cortex than by dorsolateral prefrontal cortex circuitry.

  12. Tryptophan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryptophan is an amino acid needed for normal growth in infants and for nitrogen balance in adults. ... The body uses tryptophan to help make niacin and serotonin. Serotonin is thought to produce healthy sleep and a stable mood. In order ...

  13. The effects of alcohol on laboratory-measured impulsivity after L: -Tryptophan depletion or loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Donald M; Marsh, Dawn M; Mathias, Charles W; Dawes, Michael A; Bradley, Don M; Morgan, Chris J; Badawy, Abdulla A-B

    2007-07-01

    Indirect evidence supports a link between serotonergic activity and individual differences in the behavioral response to alcohol, but few studies have experimentally demonstrated that an individual's biological state can influence the sensitivity to alcohol-induced behaviors. Our purpose was to temporarily modify serotonin synthesis in healthy individuals to determine how altered biological states may interact with alcohol administration to affect impulsive behavior. In a repeated-measures design, 18 normal controls consumed a 50-g L: -tryptophan (Trp) depleting (ATD) or loading (ATL) amino-acid beverage that temporarily decreased or increased (respectively) serotonin synthesis before receiving either a moderate dose of alcohol (0.65 g/kg) or placebo. All participants completed three impulsivity testing sessions on each of the five experimental days. Session one was a baseline session. Session two included testing after ATD-only or ATL-only. Session three included: (1) placebo after ATL (ATL+PBO); (2) placebo after ATD (ATD+PBO); (3) alcohol after ATL (ATL+ALC); (4) alcohol after ATD (ATD+ALC); and (5) Alcohol-only conditions. Impulsivity was assessed using the Immediate Memory Task (Dougherty et al., Behav Res Methods Instrum Comput 34:391-398, 2002), a continuous performance test yielding commission errors that have been previously validated as a component of impulsive behavior. Primary findings were that ATD-only increased impulsive responding compared to ATL-only, and ATD+ALC increased commission errors to levels higher than either the ATL+ALC or Alcohol-only conditions. These findings demonstrate that reduced serotonin synthesis can produce increased impulsivity even among non-impulsive normal controls, and that the behavioral effects of alcohol are, in part, dependent on this biological state.

  14. Tryptophan depletion in context of the inflammatory and general nutritional status of a low-income South African HIV-infected population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bipath, Priyesh; Levay, Peter F; Viljoen, Margaretha

    2016-02-17

    The essential amino acid tryptophan cannot be synthesised in the body and must be acquired through dietary intake. Oxidation of tryptophan, due to immune induction of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), is considered to be the main cause of tryptophan depletion in HIV infection and AIDS. We examined plasma tryptophan levels in a low-income sub-Saharan HIV-infected population and compared it to that of developed countries. Tryptophan levels were further examined in context of the general nutritional and inflammatory status. This cross-sectional study included 105 HIV-positive patients recruited from the Kalafong Hospital in Pretoria, South Africa, and 60 HIV-negative controls. Patient tryptophan levels were in general markedly lower than those reported for developed countries. In contrast to reports from developed countries that showed tryptophan levels on average to be 18.8 % lower than their control values, tryptophan levels in our study were 44.1 % lower than our controls (24.4 ± 4.1 vs. 43.6 ± 11.9 μmol/l; p Tryptophan levels correlated with both CD4 counts (r = 0.341; p = 0.004) and with pro-inflammatory activity as indicated by neopterin levels (r = -0.399; p = 0.0001). Nutritional indicators such as albumin and haemoglobin correlated positively with tryptophan and negatively with the pro-inflammatory indicators neopterin, interleukin 6 and C-reactive protein. The most probable causes of the lower tryptophan levels seen in our population are food insecurity and higher levels of inflammatory activity. We contend that inflammation-induced tryptophan depletion forms part of a much wider effect of pro-inflammatory activity on the nutritional profile of HIV-infected patients.

  15. Dietary tryptophan depletion in humans using a simplified two amino acid formula – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maike Linden

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD is a well-established dietary method in translational brain research used to briefly lower central nervous serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT synthesis. A simplified two amino acid ATD formula (ATDPHE/LEU was developed while reducing the overall amount of amino acids (AAs, with the objective of administration especially in children and adolescents in future studies. Objective: This study investigated tryptophan (TRP influx rates across the blood-brain barrier (BBB after dietary ATDPHE/LEU administration relative to the ATD Moja-De protocol that has been established for use in children and adolescents. Design: Seventy-two healthy adults (50% females were randomized into four groups and administered ATD Moja-De, its TRP-balanced control condition (BAL, ATDPHE/LEU, or its respective control mixture (BALPHE/LEU in a counterbalanced, double-blind, between-subjects design. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at hourly intervals for 6 h after AA intake. Questionnaires about mood, taste, and challenge tolerance were completed at fixed time points. Results: Both challenge mixtures significantly reduced central nervous TRP influx as calculated by Michaelis–Menten kinetics relative to baseline and the respective control conditions with only mild and comparable side effects. A greater decline in TRP influx over the BBB after ATDPHE/LEU administration when compared with ATD Moja-De was detected without group effects for taste, challenge tolerance, and mood. There was unintended initial short increase in plasma TRP concentrations observed after ATDPHE/LEU intake, and a possible redistribution between free and protein-bound TRP triggered by protein synthesis stimulated by the ingested AAs may account for this finding. Moreover, a decline in TRP influx after BALPHE/LEU administration over a 6-h period was observed, and the large amount of PHE in the BALPHE/LEU mixture may be a possible explanation for

  16. Tryptophan pathway alterations in the postpartum period and in acute postpartum psychosis and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veen, Cato; Myint, Aye Mu; Burgerhout, Karin M; Schwarz, Markus J; Schütze, Gregor; Kushner, Steven A; Hoogendijk, Witte J; Drexhage, Hemmo A; Bergink, Veerle

    2016-01-01

    Women are at very high risk for the first onset of acute and severe mood disorders the first weeks after delivery. Tryptophan breakdown is increased as a physiological phenomenon of the postpartum period and might lead to vulnerability for affective psychosis (PP) and severe depression (PD). The aim of the current study was to investigate alterations in tryptophan breakdown in the physiological postpartum period compared to patients with severe postpartum mood disorders. We included 52 patients (29 with PP, 23 with PD), 52 matched healthy postpartum women and 29 healthy non-postpartum women. Analyzes of serum tryptophan metabolites were performed using LC-MS/MS system for tryptophan, kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, kynurenic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. The first two months of the physiological postpartum period were characterized by low tryptophan levels, increased breakdown towards kynurenine and a downstream shift toward the 3-OH-kynurenine arm, away from the kynurenic acid arm. Kynurenine was significantly lower in patients with PP and PD as compared to healthy postpartum women (p=0.011 and p=0.001); the remaining tryptophan metabolites demonstrated few differences between patients and healthy postpartum women. Low prevalence of the investigated disorders and strict exclusion criteria to obtain homogenous groups, resulted in relatively small sample sizes. The high kynurenine levels and increased tryptophan breakdown as a phenomenon of the physiological postpartum period was not present in patients with severe postpartum mood disorders. No differences were observed in the levels of the 'neurotoxic' 3-OH-kynurenine and the 'neuroprotective' kynurenic acid arms between patients and healthy postpartum women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The association of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism with acute brain dysfunction during critical illness*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams Wilson, Jessica R; Morandi, Alessandro; Girard, Timothy D; Thompson, Jennifer L; Boomershine, Chad S; Shintani, Ayumi K; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P

    2012-03-01

    Plasma tryptophan levels are associated with delirium in critically ill patients. Although tryptophan has been linked to the pathogenesis of other neurocognitive diseases through metabolism to neurotoxins via the kynurenine pathway, a role for kynurenine pathway activity in intensive care unit brain dysfunction (delirium and coma) remains unknown. This study examined the association between kynurenine pathway activity as determined by plasma kynurenine concentrations and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios and presence or absence of acute brain dysfunction (defined as delirium/coma-free days) in intensive care unit patients. This was a prospective cohort study that utilized patient data and blood samples from the Maximizing Efficacy of Targeted Sedation and Reducing Neurologic Dysfunction trial, which compared sedation with dexmedetomidine vs. lorazepam in mechanically ventilated patients. Baseline plasma kynurenine and tryptophan concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with or without tandem mass spectrometry. Delirium was assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit. Linear regression examined associations between kynurenine pathway activity and delirium/coma-free days after adjusting for sedative exposure, age, and severity of illness. Among 84 patients studied, median age was 60 yrs and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 28.5. Elevated plasma kynurenine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio were both independently associated with significantly fewer delirium/coma-free days (i.e., fewer days without acute brain dysfunction). Specifically, patients with plasma kynurenine or kynurenine/tryptophan ratios at the 75th percentile of our population had an average of 1.8 (95% confidence interval 0.6-3.1) and 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.0-3.2) fewer delirium/coma-free days than those patients with values at the 25th percentile (p = .006 and p < .001, respectively). Increased kynurenine

  18. Comprehensive analysis of the tryptophan metabolome in urine of patients with acute intermittent porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gomez, Alex; Marcos, Josep; Aguilera, Paula; To-Figueras, Jordi; Pozo, Oscar J

    2017-08-15

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare metabolic disorder due to a deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase, the third enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway. This low enzymatic activity may predispose to the appearance of acute neurological attacks. Seminal studies suggested that AIP was associated with changes in tryptophan homeostasis with inconclusive results. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the urinary metabolome of AIP patients focusing on tryptophan metabolism using state-of-the-art technology. This was a case-control study including a group of 25 AIP patients with active biochemical disease and increased excretion of heme-precursors and 25 healthy controls. Tryptophan and related compounds and metabolites including: large neutral amino acids (LNAAs), serotonin, kynurenine, kynurenic acid and anthranilic acid were quantified in urine by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Twenty-nine biological markers (including metabolic ratios and absolute concentrations) were compared between patients and controls. Significant differences were found in the tryptophan-kynurenine metabolic pathway. Compared to controls, AIP patients showed: (a) increased urinary excretion of kynurenine and anthranilic acid (Ptryptophan ratio (Ptryptophan ratio in urine and a reduction of the kynurenic acid/kynurenine ratio. The modified ratios suggest induction of indoleamine 2,3-deoxygenase and decreased activity of kynurenine aminotransferase in the liver. The results confirm that LC-MS/MS is useful for the characterization of the urinary metabolome of hepatic porphyrias. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. In vitro rescue of genital strains of Chlamydia trachomatis from interferon-γ and tryptophan depletion with indole-positive, but not indole-negative Prevotella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziklo, Noa; Huston, Wilhelmina M; Taing, Kuong; Katouli, Mohammad; Timms, Peter

    2016-12-03

    The natural course of sexually transmitted infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis varies between individuals. In addition to parasite and host effects, the vaginal microbiota might play a key role in the outcome of C. trachomatis infections. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), known for its anti-chlamydial properties, activates the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) in epithelial cells, an enzyme that catabolizes the amino acid L- tryptophan into N-formylkynurenine, depleting the host cell's pool of tryptophan. Although C. trachomatis is a tryptophan auxotroph, urogenital strains (but not ocular strains) have been shown in vitro to have the ability to produce tryptophan from indole using the tryptophan synthase (trpBA) gene. It has been suggested that indole producing bacteria from the vaginal microbiota could influence the outcome of Chlamydia infection. We used two in vitro models (treatment with IFN-γ or direct limitation of tryptophan), to study the effects of direct rescue by the addition of exogenous indole, or by the addition of culture supernatant from indole-positive versus indole-negative Prevotella strains, on the growth and infectivity of C. trachomatis. We found that only supernatants from the indole-positive strains, P. intermedia and P. nigrescens, were able to rescue tryptophan-starved C. trachomatis. In addition, we analyzed vaginal secretion samples to determine physiological indole concentrations. In spite of the complexity of vaginal secretions, we demonstrated that for some vaginal specimens with higher indole levels, there was a link to higher recovery of the Chlamydia under tryptophan-starved conditions, lending preliminary support to the critical role of the IFN-γ-tryptophan-indole axis in vivo. Our data provide evidence for the ability of both exogenous indole as well as supernatant from indole producing bacteria such as Prevotella, to rescue genital C. trachomatis from tryptophan starvation. This adds weight to the hypothesis

  20. Increased Activity of the Immunoregulatory Enzyme Indoleamine-2,3-Dioxygenase with Consecutive Tryptophan Depletion Predicts Death in Patients with Neuroendocrine Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pschowski, René; Pape, Ulrich-Frank; Fusch, Gerhard; Fischer, Christian; Jann, Henning; Baur, Alexander; Arsenic, Ruza; Wiedenmann, Bertram; von Haehling, Stephan; Pavel, Marianne; Schefold, Joerg C

    2017-01-01

    Data from a considerable number of malignancies demonstrate that depletion of the essential amino acid tryptophan via induction of the immunoregulatory enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) serves as an important tumour escape strategy and is of prognostic importance. Here we investigate the predictive value of the activity of IDO as well as levels of tryptophan and respective downstream catabolites in a large cohort of patients with neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN). 142 consecutive Caucasian patients (62 male, aged 60.3 ± 11.9 years) with histologically confirmed NEN were systematically analysed in a retrospective blinded end point analysis. Patients were followed up for a mean period of about 3.9 ± 1.9 years. Clinical outcome, levels of established biomarkers, and tryptophan degradation markers (assessed using tandem mass spectrometry) including estimated IDO activity were recorded. Cox proportional hazards regression models were performed for the assessment of prognostic power. We found that baseline tryptophan levels were significantly lower and IDO activity was significantly increased in non-survivors. The risk for death inclined stepwise and was highest in patients in the upper tertile of IDO activity. Cox proportional regression models identified IDO activity as an independent predictor of death. In this retrospective analysis, we observed that baseline activity of the immunoregulatory enzyme IDO was significantly increased in non-survivors. IDO activity was identified as an independent predictor of death in this cohort of NEN patients. Whether IDO activity or tryptophan depletion serves to guide future therapeutic interventions in NEN remains to be established. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Acute effects of serotonergic antidepressants on tryptophan metabolism and corticosterone levels in rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bano, Samina; Gitay, Mehnaz; Ara, Iffat; Badawy, Abdulla

    2010-01-01

    ...) namely sertraline and citalopram and an herbal St John's Wort (SJW). Liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity, serum tryptophan, corticosterone and brain indoles were determined after drug administration in Albino Wistar rats at a dose of 10 mg/kg...

  2. Depletion of mucosal substance P in acute otitis media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Schmidt, Peter Thelin; Hermansson, Ann

    2004-01-01

    in the hyperacute phase of AOM. This depletion is followed by replenishment and the concentration of SP approaches its normal level 6 days post-inoculation. The release of SP may be the trigger of the concurrent bone resorption and may further augment the inflammatory response to the bacterial colonization.......OBJECTIVE: The neuropeptide substance P (SP) is an inducer of neurogenic inflammation and bone resorption in the middle ear. Resorption of the bone tissue structures surrounding the middle ear cavity is a distinct feature of the initial stage of acute otitis media (AOM), which may be due to nerve...

  3. Acute hyponatremia after cardioplegia by histidine-tryptophane-ketoglutarate – a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindner Gregor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients and is known to be associated with increased mortality. The administration of antegrade single-shot, up to two liters, histidine-tryptophane-ketoglutarate (HTK solution for adequate electromechanical cardiac arrest and myocardial preservation during minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR is a standard procedure. We aimed to determine the impact of HTK infusion on electrolyte and acid–base balance. Methods In this retrospective analysis we reviewed data on patient characteristics, type of surgery, arterial blood gas analysis during surgery and intra-/postoperative laboratory results of patients receiving surgery for MIAVR at a large tertiary care university hospital. Results A total of 25 patients were included in the study. All patients were normonatremic at start of surgery. All patients developed hyponatremia after administration of HTK solution with a significant drop of serum sodium of 15 mmol/L (p  Conclusions Acute hyponatremia during cardioplegia with HTK solution is isotonic and should probably not be corrected without presence of hypotonicity as confirmed by measurement of serum osmolality.

  4. Tryptophan biosynthesis is important for resistance to replicative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Stephen K; Lee, Alison G; Baird, Jared M; Herken, Benjamin W; Bernstein, Kara A

    2016-05-01

    Acute tryptophan depletion is used to induce low levels of serotonin in the brain. This method has been widely used in psychiatric studies to evaluate the effect of low levels of serotonin, and is generally considered a safe and reversible procedure. Here we use the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the effects of tryptophan depletion on growth rate upon exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Surprisingly, we found that budding yeast undergoing tryptophan depletion were more sensitive to DNA-damaging agents such as methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) and hydroxyurea (HU). We found that this defect was independent of several DNA repair pathways, such as homologous recombination, base excision repair and translesion synthesis, and that this damage sensitivity was not due to impaired S-phase signalling. Upon further analysis, we found that the DNA-damage sensitivity of tryptophan depletion was likely due to impaired protein synthesis. These studies describe an important source of variance in budding yeast when using tryptophan as an auxotrophic marker, particularly on studies focusing on DNA repair, and suggest that further testing of the effect of tryptophan depletion on DNA repair in mammalian cells is warranted. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Acute effects of L-tryptophan on tryptophan hydroxylation rate in brain regions (hypothalamus and medulla) of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldegunde, M; Soengas, J L; rozas, G

    2000-02-01

    Levels of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) in brain regions (hypopthalamus and medulla) of rainbow trout were analysed by HPLC-EC 0, 10, 30, and 40 min after intraperitoneal administration of different doses of L-tryptophan (Trp) (0, 12.5, and 25 mg. kg(-1) body weight) in fish treated with 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine (NSD1015; 75 mg. kg(-1)). The results show that, in control fish, 5-HTP levels in hypothalamus (58.03 +/- 6.36 pg. mg(-1) brain tissue) were significantly higher than those observed in medulla (28.04 +/- 4.32 pg. mg(-1) brain tissue). Basal tryptophan hydroxylation rates (after 0 mg. kg(-1) Trp administration) were 0.42 +/- 0.07 pg 5-HTP. mg(-1). min(-1), and 0.63 +/- 0.24 pg 5HTP. mg(-1). min(-1), for hypothalamus and medulla respectively. On the other hand, the results demonstrate that L-tryptophan administration induced significant increases in the rate of tryptophan hydroxylation, both in hypothalamus and medulla. These findings indicate that, in a way similar to that observed in mammals, brain tryptophan hydroxylase is unsaturated by its substrate (tryptophan) under normal physiological conditions. J. Exp. Zool. 286:131-135, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Acute MUS81 depletion leads to replication fork slowing and a constitutive DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Meichun; Wang, Xiaohui; Palmai-Pallag, Timea

    2015-01-01

    have investigated the role of MUS81 in human cells by acutely depleting the protein using shRNAs. We found that MUS81 depletion from human fibroblasts leads to accumulation of ssDNA and a constitutive DNA damage response that ultimately activates cellular senescence. Moreover, we show that MUS81...

  7. Glutathione Depletion and Recovery After Acute Ethanol Administration in the Aging Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Barbara L.; Richie, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in the detoxification of ethanol (EtOH) and acute EtOH administration leads to GSH depletion in the liver and other tissues. Aging is also associated with a progressive decline in GSH levels and impairment in GSH biosynthesis in many tissues. Thus, the present study was designed to examine the effects of aging on EtOH-induced depletion and recovery of GSH in different tissues of the C57Bl/6NNIA mouse. EtOH (2-5 g/kg) or saline was administered i.p. to mice of ages 6 mo (young), 12 mo (mature), and 24 mo (old); and GSH and cyst(e)ine concentrations were measured 0-24 hours thereafter. EtOH administration (5g/kg) depleted hepatic GSH levels >50% by 6 hr in all animals. By 24 hr, levels remained low in both young and old mice, but recovered to baseline levels in mature mice. At 6 hr, the decrease in hepatic GSH was dose-dependent up to 3 g/kg EtOH, but not at higher doses. The extent of depletion at the 3 g/kg dose was dependent upon age, with old mice demonstrating significantly lower GSH levels than mature mice (P<0.001). Altogether these results indicate that aging was associated with a greater degree of EtOH and fasting-induced GSH depletion and subsequent impaired recovery in liver. An impaired ability to recover was also observed in young animals. Further studies are required to determine if an inability to recover from GSH depletion by EtOH is associated with enhanced toxicity. PMID:17343832

  8. The effects of acute tryptophan depletion on speech and behavioural mimicry in individuals at familial risk for depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenelst, Koen; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Leander, N. Pontus; Müller, Barbara C.N.; Schoevers, Robert A.; aan het Rot, Marije

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with abnormalities in speech and behavioural mimicry. These abnormalities may contribute to the impairments in interpersonal functioning that are often seen in MDD patients. MDD has also been associated with disturbances in the brain serotonin

  9. Metabolic effects of acute thiamine depletion are reversed by rapamycin in breast and leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqian Liu

    Full Text Available Thiamine-dependent enzymes (TDEs control metabolic pathways that are frequently altered in cancer and therefore present cancer-relevant targets. We have previously shown that the recombinant enzyme thiaminase cleaves and depletes intracellular thiamine, has growth inhibitory activity against leukemia and breast cancer cell lines, and that its growth inhibitory effects were reversed in leukemia cell lines by rapamycin. Now, we first show further evidence of thiaminase therapeutic potential by demonstrating its activity against breast and leukemia xenografts, and against a primary leukemia xenograft. We therefore further explored the metabolic effects of thiaminase in combination with rapamycin in leukemia and breast cell lines. Thiaminase decreased oxygen consumption rate and increased extracellular acidification rate, consistent with the inhibitory effect of acute thiamine depletion on the activity of the TDEs pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes; these effects were reversed by rapamycin. Metabolomic studies demonstrated intracellular thiamine depletion and the presence of the thiazole cleavage product in thiaminase-treated cells, providing validation of the experimental procedures. Accumulation of ribose and ribulose in both cell lines support the thiaminase-mediated suppression of the TDE transketolase. Interestingly, thiaminase suppression of another TDE, branched chain amino ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH, showed very different patterns in the two cell lines: in RS4 leukemia cells it led to an increase in BCKDH substrates, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cells it led to a decrease in BCKDH products. Immunoblot analyses showed corresponding differences in expression of BCKDH pathway enzymes, and partial protection of thiaminase growth inhibition by gabapentin indicated that BCKDH inhibition may be a mechanism of thiaminase-mediated toxicity. Surprisingly, most of thiaminase-mediated metabolomic effects were also

  10. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-mediated tryptophan catabolism accelerates collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szántó, Sándor; Koreny, Tamás; Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Varga, John

    2007-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is one of the initial and rate-limiting enzymes involved in the catabolism of the essential amino acid tryptophan. In cultured cells, the induction of IDO leads to depletion of tryptophan and tryptophan starvation. Recent studies suggest that modulation of tryptophan concentration via IDO plays a fundamental role in innate immune responses. Induction of IDO by interferon-γ in macrophages and dendritic cells results in tryptophan depletion and suppresses the immune-mediated activation of fibroblasts and T, B, and natural killer cells. To assess the role of IDO in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a model of rheumatoid arthritis characterized by a primarily Th1-like immune response, activity of IDO was inhibited by 1-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT) in vivo. The results showed significantly increased incidence and severity of CIA in mice treated with 1-MT. Activity of IDO, as determined by measuring the levels of kynurenine/tryptophan ratio in the sera, was increased in the acute phase of arthritis and was higher in collagen-immunized mice that did not develop arthritis. Treatment with 1-MT resulted in an enhanced cellular and humoral immune response and a more dominant polarization to Th1 in mice with arthritis compared with vehicle-treated arthritic mice. The results demonstrated that development of CIA was associated with increased IDO activity and enhanced tryptophan catabolism in mice. Blocking IDO with 1-MT aggravated the severity of arthritis and enhanced the immune responses. These findings suggest that IDO may play an important and novel role in the negative feedback of CIA and possibly in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:17511858

  11. Depletion of macrophages and dendritic cells in ischemic acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lawrence; Faubel, Sarah; He, Zhibin; Andres Hernando, Ana; Jani, Alkesh; Kedl, Ross; Edelstein, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is thought to play a role in ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI). We have demonstrated that macrophage and dendritic cell depletion, using liposome-encapsulated clodronate (LEC), is protective against ischemic AKI. To determine whether macrophages or dendritic cells or both play a role in ischemic AKI, we performed ischemic AKI in CD11b-DTR mice that have a diphtheria toxin (DT)-induced depletion of CD11b cells (macrophages) and CD11c-DTR mice that have a DT-induced depletion of CD11c cells (dendritic cells). While LEC-treated animals had a significant functional protection from AKI, CD11b-DTR and CD11c-DTR mice were not protected against AKI despite a similar degree of renal macrophage and dendritic cell depletion. Proinflammatory cytokines are known to play a role in ischemic AKI. To determine the possible reasons for the lack of protection in CD11b-DTR and CD11c-DTR mice compared to LEC-treated mice, 32 cytokines/chemokines were measured in these mice. Of the cytokines/chemokines measured, IL-6, MCP-1, GMCSF, IL-1β and CXCL1 (also known as IL-8 in humans or KC in mice) showed significant differences in the LEC-treated, CD11b-DTR and CD11c-DTR mice. MCP-1 and CXCL1 (known mediators of AKI), and also GMCSF and IL-1β were increased in AKI and decreased in LEC-treated AKI but not AKI in CD11b-DTR or CD11c-DTR mice. These findings suggest that LEC-mediated protection from AKI is not simply mediated by depletion of renal macrophage or dendritic cell subpopulations. Protection against AKI in LEC-treated compared to CD11b-DTR or CD11c-DTR mice may be partially explained by differences in proinflammatory cytokine profiles. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. RNAi mediated acute depletion of Retinoblastoma protein (pRb promotes aneuploidy in human primary cells via micronuclei formation

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    Iovino Flora

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in chromosome number or structure as well as supernumerary centrosomes and multipolar mitoses are commonly observed in human tumors. Thus, centrosome amplification and mitotic checkpoint dysfunctions are believed possible causes of chromosomal instability. The Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB participates in the regulation of synchrony between DNA synthesis and centrosome duplication and it is involved in transcription regulation of some mitotic genes. Primary human fibroblasts were transfected transiently with short interfering RNA (siRNA specific for human pRb to investigate the effects of pRb acute loss on chromosomal stability. Results Acutely pRb-depleted fibroblasts showed altered expression of genes necessary for cell cycle progression, centrosome homeostasis, kinetochore and mitotic checkpoint proteins. Despite altered expression of genes involved in the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC the checkpoint seemed to function properly in pRb-depleted fibroblasts. In particular AURORA-A and PLK1 overexpression suggested that these two genes might have a role in the observed genomic instability. However, when they were post-transcriptionally silenced in pRb-depleted fibroblasts we did not observe reduction in the number of aneuploid cells. This finding suggests that overexpression of these two genes did not contribute to genomic instability triggered by RB acute loss although it affected cell proliferation. Acutely pRb-depleted human fibroblasts showed the presence of micronuclei containing whole chromosomes besides the presence of supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Conclusion Here we show for the first time that RB acute loss triggers centrosome amplification and aneuploidy in human primary fibroblasts. Altogether, our results suggest that pRb-depleted primary human fibroblasts possess an intact spindle checkpoint and that micronuclei, likely caused by mis-attached kinetochores that in turn trigger

  13. Acute dopamine depletion with branched chain amino acids decreases auditory top-down event-related potentials in healthy subjects.

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    Neuhaus, Andres H; Goldberg, Terry E; Hassoun, Youssef; Bates, John A; Nassauer, Katharine W; Sevy, Serge; Opgen-Rhein, Carolin; Malhotra, Anil K

    2009-06-01

    Cerebral dopamine homeostasis has been implicated in a wide range of cognitive processes and is of great pathophysiological importance in schizophrenia. A novel approach to study cognitive effects of dopamine is to deplete its cerebral levels with branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) that acutely lower dopamine precursor amino acid availability. Here, we studied the effects of acute dopamine depletion on early and late attentive cortical processing. Auditory event-related potential (ERP) components N2 and P3 were investigated using high-density electroencephalography in 22 healthy male subjects after receiving BCAAs or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. Total free serum prolactin was also determined as a surrogate marker of cerebral dopamine depletion. Acute dopamine depletion increased free plasma prolactin and significantly reduced prefrontal ERP components N2 and P3. Subcomponent analysis of N2 revealed a significant attenuation of early attentive N2b over prefrontal scalp sites. As a proof of concept, these results strongly suggest that BCAAs are acting on basic information processing. Dopaminergic neurotransmission seems to be involved in auditory top-down processing as indexed by prefrontal N2 and P3 reductions during dopamine depletion. In healthy subjects, intact early cortical top-down processing can be acutely dysregulated by ingestion of BCAAs. We discuss the potential impact of these findings on schizophrenia research.

  14. The Effects of Acute Dopamine Precursor Depletion on the Reinforcing Value of Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa.

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    Caitlin B O'Hara

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether dopaminergic systems are involved in the motivation to engage in behaviours associated with anorexia nervosa (AN, specifically, the drive to exercise. Women recovered from AN (AN REC, n = 17 and healthy controls (HC, n = 15 were recruited. The acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD method was used to transiently decrease dopamine synthesis and transmission. The effect of dopamine precursor depletion on drive to exercise was measured using a progressive ratio (PR exercise breakpoint task. Both groups worked for the opportunity to exercise, and, at baseline, PR breakpoint scores were higher in AN REC than HC. Compared to values on the experimental control session, APTD did not decrease PR breakpoint scores in AN REC, but significantly decreased scores in HC. These data show that women recovered from AN are more motivated to exercise than HC, although in both groups, activity is more reinforcing than inactivity. Importantly, decreasing dopamine does not reduce the motivation to exercise in people recovered from AN, but in contrast, does so in HC. It is proposed that in AN, drive to exercise develops into a behaviour that is largely independent of dopamine mediated reward processes and becomes dependent on cortico-striatal neurocircuitry that regulates automated, habit- or compulsive-like behaviours. These data strengthen the case for the involvement of reward, learning, habit, and dopaminergic systems in the aetiology of AN.

  15. Innate Lymphoid Cells Are Depleted Irreversibly during Acute HIV-Infection in the Absence of Viral Suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; Kazer, Samuel W.; Mjösberg, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) play a central role in the response to infection by secreting cytokines crucial for immune regulation, tissue homeostasis, and repair. Although dysregulation of these systems is central to pathology, the impact of HIV-on ILCs remains unknown. We found that human blood...... ILCs were severely depleted during acute viremic HIV-infection and that ILC numbers did not recover after resolution of peak viremia. ILC numbers were preserved by antiretroviral therapy (ART), but only if initiated during acute infection. Transcriptional profiling during the acute phase revealed...... mechanistic link between acute HIV-infection, lymphoid tissue breakdown, and persistent immune dysfunction....

  16. INDOLEAMINE 2,3-DIOXYGENASE INDUCES EXPRESSION OF A NOVEL TRYPTOPHAN TRANSPORTER IN MOUSE AND HUMAN TUMOR CELLS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Jonathan D.; Lakhal, Samira; Laynes, Robert; Vallius, Laura; Karydis, Ioannis; Marcea, Cornelius; Boyd, C. A. Richard; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, catabolizing tryptophan to kynurenine. Tryptophan depletion by IDO expressing tumors is a common mechanism of immune evasion inducing regulatory T cells and inhibiting effector T cells. As mammalian cells cannot synthesize tryptophan, it remains unclear how IDO positive tumor cells overcome the detrimental effects of local tryptophan depletion. We demonstrate that IDO positive tumor cells express a novel amino acid transporter, which accounts for approximately 50% of the tryptophan uptake. The induced transporter is biochemically distinguished from the constitutively expressed tryptophan transporter System L by increased resistance to inhibitors of System L, resistance to inhibition by high concentrations of most amino acids tested, and high substrate specificity for tryptophan. Under conditions of low extracellular tryptophan, expression of this novel transporter significantly increases tryptophan entry into IDO positive tumors relative to tryptophan uptake through the low affinity System L alone, and further decreases tryptophan levels in the microenvironment. Targeting this additional tryptophan transporter could be a way of pharmacological inhibition of IDO mediated tumor escape. These findings highlight the ability of IDO-expressing tumor cells to thrive in a tryptophan depleted microenvironment by expressing a novel, highly tryptophan-specific transporter, which is resistant to inhibition by most other amino acids. The additional transporter allows tumor cells to strike the ideal balance between supply of tryptophan essential for their own proliferation and survival, and depleting the extracellular milieu of tryptophan to inhibit T cell proliferation. PMID:21742973

  17. Comparison between tryptophan methoxyindole and kynurenine metabolic pathways in normal and preterm neonates and in neonates with acute fetal distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Hoyos, A; Molina-Carballo, A; Macías, M; Rodríguez-Cabezas, T; Martín-Medina, E; Narbona-López, E; Valenzuela-Ruiz, A; Acuña-Castroviejo, D

    1998-07-01

    To analyze the kynurenine and methoxyindole metabolic pathways of tryptophan in order to identify changes in premature neonates and in neonates suffering from fetal distress. One hundred and twelve neonates were assigned to three groups: normal neonates (control group), preterm neonates (neonates born before the 37th gestational week) and neonates suffering from fetal distress. Each of these groups was then divided in two subgroups according to the time of birth corresponding with the time of blood sampling: a diurnal subgroup, comprising neonates whose blood was sampled between 0900 and 2100 h, and a nocturnal subgroup, comprising neonates whose blood was sampled between 2100 and 0900 h. Blood samples from the umbilical artery and vein were taken in the delivery room at birth from each neonate for measurement of melatonin, the main methoxyindole pathway metabolite. Urine samples were collected from 0900 to 2100 h (diurnal groups) and from 2100 to 0900 h (nocturnal groups), and the presence of kynurenic acid, xanturenic acid, 3-hydroxyantranilic acid, L-kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine determined. The results show the existence of diurnal/nocturnal differences in the concentration of melatonin in cord blood and in the urinary excretion of kynurenines. In normal neonates, the production of methoxyindoles (determined as melatonin) is decreased during the day and increases at night, whereas production of kynurenines is high during the day, decreasing at night. In the fetal distress group, a significant increase in the umbilical artery concentration of melatonin was found. This group also showed a reduction in L-kynurenine concentrations in the diurnal and nocturnal groups, and an increase in xanturenic acid and 3-hydroxyantranilic acid during the day. Correlation and regression studies confirmed that the differences in the day/night pattern of the tryptophan metabolic pathways were greater in normal neonates than in the preterm and fetal distress groups. The results

  18. Lycopene Pretreatment Ameliorates Acute Ethanol Induced NAD+ Depletion in Human Astroglial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Guest

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with reduced brain volume and cognition. While the mechanisms by which ethanol induces these deleterious effects in vivo are varied most are associated with increased inflammatory and oxidative processes. In order to further characterise the effect of acute ethanol exposure on oxidative damage and NAD+ levels in the brain, human U251 astroglioma cells were exposed to physiologically relevant doses of ethanol (11 mM, 22 mM, 65 mM, and 100 mM for ≤ 30 minutes. Ethanol exposure resulted in a dose dependent increase in both ROS and poly(ADP-ribose polymer production. Significant decreases in total NAD(H and sirtuin 1 activity were also observed at concentrations ≥ 22 mM. Similar to U251 cells, exposure to ethanol (≥22 mM decreased levels of NAD(H in primary human astrocytes. NAD(H depletion in primary astrocytes was prevented by pretreatment with 1 μM of lycopene for 3.5 hours. Unexpectedly, in U251 cells lycopene treatment at concentrations ≥ 5 μM resulted in significant reductions in [NAD(H]. This study suggests that exposure of the brain to alcohol at commonly observed blood concentrations may cause transitory oxidative damage which may be at least partly ameliorated by lycopene.

  19. Effect of acute L-tryptophan exposure on the brain serotonergic system and behavior in the male medaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutoku, Tomoyuki; Zhang, Rong; Tachibana, Tetsuya; Oshima, Yuji; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exposure to L-tryptophan (TRP) on the metabolism of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) and behavior of medaka. In the first experiment, the fish were exposed to a 0, 1, 2 or 4 g/l of TRP solution for 24 hr. Although no significant difference in the brain 5HT content was detected, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA), a major 5HT metabolite, increased in a dose-dependent fashion. In the second experiment, the fish were maintained in a 0 or 4 g/l of TRP solution for 28 hr, and then their behaviors were monitored. The fish reared in under TRP solution were divided into two groups and transferred to either fresh water or a TRP solution. The locomotion of the TRP-treated group significantly increased compared to the control group irrespective of water conditions. It was suggested that TRP exposure activated the brain 5HTnergic systems and stimulated behavior of medaka.

  20. Depletion of Phagocytic Cells during Nonlethal Plasmodium yoelii Infection Causes Severe Malaria Characterized by Acute Renal Failure in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Nishimura, Maki; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-11

    In the current study, we examined the effects of depletion of phagocytes on the progression of Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL infection in mice. Strikingly, the depletion of phagocytic cells, including macrophages, with clodronate in the acute phase of infection significantly reduced peripheral parasitemia but increased mortality. Moribund mice displayed severe pathological damage, including coagulative necrosis in liver and thrombi in the glomeruli, fibrin deposition, and tubular necrosis in kidney. The severity of infection was coincident with the increased sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes, the systematic upregulation of inflammation and coagulation, and the disruption of endothelial integrity in the liver and kidney. Aspirin was administered to the mice to minimize the risk of excessive activation of the coagulation response and fibrin deposition in the renal tissue. Interestingly, treatment with aspirin reduced the parasite burden and pathological lesions in the renal tissue and improved survival of phagocyte-depleted mice. Our data imply that the depletion of phagocytic cells, including macrophages, in the acute phase of infection increases the severity of malarial infection, typified by multiorgan failure and high mortality. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Depletion of Phagocytic Cells during Nonlethal Plasmodium yoelii Infection Causes Severe Malaria Characterized by Acute Renal Failure in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Nishimura, Maki; Furuoka, Hidefumi

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the effects of depletion of phagocytes on the progression of Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL infection in mice. Strikingly, the depletion of phagocytic cells, including macrophages, with clodronate in the acute phase of infection significantly reduced peripheral parasitemia but increased mortality. Moribund mice displayed severe pathological damage, including coagulative necrosis in liver and thrombi in the glomeruli, fibrin deposition, and tubular necrosis in kidney. The severity of infection was coincident with the increased sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes, the systematic upregulation of inflammation and coagulation, and the disruption of endothelial integrity in the liver and kidney. Aspirin was administered to the mice to minimize the risk of excessive activation of the coagulation response and fibrin deposition in the renal tissue. Interestingly, treatment with aspirin reduced the parasite burden and pathological lesions in the renal tissue and improved survival of phagocyte-depleted mice. Our data imply that the depletion of phagocytic cells, including macrophages, in the acute phase of infection increases the severity of malarial infection, typified by multiorgan failure and high mortality. PMID:26755155

  2. Low tryptophan diet increases stress-sensitivity, but does not affect habituation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanke, Marit A C; Alserda, Edwin; Doornbos, Bennard; van der Most, Peter J; Goeman, Kitty; Postema, Folkert; Korf, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    Cerebral dysfunction of 5-HT (serotonin) has been associated with stress response and with affective disorders. Stress alone is insufficient to induce depression, since only a minor proportion of subjects that have experienced stressful life events develop depressive episodes. We investigated whether long-term brain 5-HT depletion induced in rats by a diet with low content of its precursor tryptophan affects stress-responsiveness in rats. Stress-sensitivity was measured through various physiological parameters and by measuring the rats' response to acoustic stimuli. One group of rats was subjected to daily acoustic stimulus sessions for 5 days. Other groups received both immobilization stress and acoustic stimulus sessions daily for either 9 days (chronic experiment) or 1 day (acute experiment). A low tryptophan diet led to decreases in plasma tryptophan levels, low ratio of tryptophan/large neutral amino acid, whole blood 5-HT, and neuronal 5-HT content in the Dorsal and Median Raphe Nuclei, as well as altered c-fos expression in the brain. Without concomitant immobilization, the diet alone did not affect reactivity and habituation to acoustic stimuli, although plasma corticosterone levels, but not the adrenal weights, were increased on day 5. Low tryptophan and chronic immobilization stress together with the acoustic testing procedure increased adrenal weight, plasma corticosterone levels and reactivity to the acoustic stimuli, but not the rate of habituation to acoustic stimuli. These results show that cerebral dysfunction of serotonin achieved through a low tryptophan diet, increases the sensitivity of rats to external and stressful stimuli, but does not impair the capacity to adapt to these stimuli. Accordingly, brain-serotonin modulates reactivity to stress, but not stress coping.

  3. Experimental depletion of CD8+ cells in acutely SIVagm-Infected African Green Monkeys results in increased viral replication

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    Apetrei Cristian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo CD8+ cell depletions in pathogenic SIV infections identified a key role for cellular immunity in controlling viral load (VL and disease progression. However, similar studies gave discordant results in chronically-infected SMs, leading some authors to propose that in natural hosts, SIV replication is independent of cellular immunity. To assess the role of cellular immune responses in the control of SIV replication in natural hosts, we investigated the impact of CD8+ cell depletion during acute SIV infection in AGMs. Results Nine AGMs were infected with SIVagm.sab and were followed up to day 225 p.i. Four were intravenously infused with the cM-T807 antibody on days 0 (50 mg/kg, 6, and 13 (10 mg/kg, respectively post infection (p.i.. CD8+ cells were depleted for up to 28 days p.i. in peripheral blood and LNs in all treated AGMs. Partial CD8+ T cell depletion occurred in the intestine. SIVagm VLs peaked at similar levels in both groups (107-108 RNA copies/ml. However, while VLs were controlled in undepleted AGMs, reaching set-point levels (104-105 RNA copies/ml by day 28 p.i., high VLs (>106 RNA copies/ml were maintained by day 21 p.i. in CD8-depleted AGMs. By day 42 p.i., VLs were comparable between the two groups. The levels of immune activation and proliferation remained elevated up to day 72 p.i. in CD8-depleted AGMs and returned to preinfection levels in controls by day 28 p.i. None of the CD8-depleted animals progressed to AIDS. Conclusion CD8+ cells are responsible for a partial control of postacute viral replication in SIVagm.sab-infected AGMs. In contrast to macaques, the SIVagm-infected AGMs are able to control viral replication after recovery of the CD8+ T cells and avoid disease progression.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid asparagine depletion during pegylated asparaginase therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Louise Tram; Nersting, Jacob; Raja, Raheel A

    2014-01-01

    . The objective of this study was to describe CSF asparagine depletion during 30 weeks of pegylated asparaginase therapy, 1000 iu/m(2) i.m. every second week, and to correlate CSF asparagine concentration with serum L-asparaginase enzyme activity. Danish children (1-17 years) with ALL, treated according...

  5. Tryptophan catabolizing enzymes – party of three

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    Helen J Ball

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO are tryptophan-degrading enzymes that have independently evolved to catalyze the first step in tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway. The depletion of tryptophan and formation of kynurenine pathway metabolites modulates the activity of the mammalian immune, reproductive and central nervous systems. IDO and TDO enzymes can have overlapping or distinct functions depending on their expression patterns. The expression of TDO and IDO enzymes in mammals differs not only by tissue/cellular localization but also by their induction by distinct stimuli. To add to the complexity, these genes also have undergone duplications in some organisms leading to multiple isoforms of IDO or TDO. For example, many vertebrates, including all mammals, have acquired two IDO genes via gene duplication, although the IDO1-like gene has been lost in some lower vertebrate lineages. Gene duplications can allow the homologs to diverge and acquire different properties to the original gene. There is evidence for IDO enzymes having differing enzymatic characteristics, signaling properties and biological functions. This review analyses the evolutionary convergence of IDO and TDO enzymes as tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes and the divergent evolution of IDO homologs to generate an enzyme family with diverse characteristics not possessed by TDO enzymes, with an emphasis on the immune system.

  6. The Total Body Irradiation Schedule Affects Acute Leukemia Relapse After Matched T Cell–Depleted Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

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    Aristei, Cynthia, E-mail: cynthia.aristei@unipg.it [Radiation Oncology Section, Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, University of Perugia and Perugia General Hospital, Perugia (Italy); Carotti, Alessandra [Division of Hematology and Clinical Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Department of Medicine, Perugia General Hospital and University, Perugia (Italy); Palazzari, Elisa [Radiation Oncology Section, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Amico, Lucia; Ruggeri, Loredana [Division of Hematology and Clinical Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Department of Medicine, Perugia General Hospital and University, Perugia (Italy); Perrucci, Elisabetta; Falcinelli, Lorenzo [Radiation Oncology Division, Perugia General Hospital, Perugia (Italy); Lancellotta, Valentina [Radiation Oncology Section, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Palumbo, Isabella [Radiation Oncology Section, Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, University of Perugia and Perugia General Hospital, Perugia (Italy); Falzetti, Franca [Division of Hematology and Clinical Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Department of Medicine, Perugia General Hospital and University, Perugia (Italy); Aversa, Franco [Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Parma General Hospital and University, Parma (Italy); Merluzzi, Mara; Velardi, Andrea; Martelli, Massimo Fabrizio [Division of Hematology and Clinical Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Department of Medicine, Perugia General Hospital and University, Perugia (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: We sought to determine whether the total body irradiation (TBI) schedule affected outcome in patients with acute leukemia in complete remission who received T cell–depleted allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from HLA identical siblings. Methods and Materials: The study recruited 55 patients (median age, 48 years; age range, 20-66 years; 30 men and 25 women; 34 with acute myeloid leukemia and 21 with acute lymphoid leukemia). Hyperfractionated TBI (HTBI) (1.2 Gy thrice daily for 4 days [for a total dose of 14.4 Gy] from day −12 to day −9) was administered to 29 patients. Single-dose TBI (STBI) (8 Gy, at a median dose rate of 10.7 cGy/min on day −9) was given to 26 patients. Results: All patients achieved primary, sustained engraftment with full donor-type chimerism. At 10 years, the overall cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality was 11% (SE, ±0.1%). It was 7% (SE, ±0.2%) after HTBI and 15% (SE, ±0.5%) after STBI (P=.3). The overall cumulative incidence of relapse was 33% (SE, ±0.5). It was 13% (SE, ±0.5%) after HTBI and 46% (SE, ±1%) after STBI (P=.02). The overall probability of disease-free survival (DFS) was 59% (SE, ±7%). It was 67% (SE, ±0.84%) after HTBI and 37% (SE, ±1.4%) after STBI (P=.01). Multivariate analyses showed the TBI schedule was the only risk factor that significantly affected relapse and DFS (P=.01 and P=.03, respectively). Conclusions: In patients with acute leukemia, HTBI is more efficacious than STBI in eradicating minimal residual disease after HLA-matched T cell–depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, thus affecting DFS.

  7. Early acute depletion of lymphocytes in calicivirus-infected adult rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Raquel M; Costa-E-Silva, António; Aguas, Artur P; Teixeira, Luzia; Ferreira, Paula G

    2010-12-01

    Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD) is a lethal infection caused by calicivirus that kills 90% of the infected adult rabbits within 3 days. The calicivirus replicates in the liver and causes a fulminant hepatitis. Most studies on the pathology of RHD have been focused on the fulminant liver disease. This may not be the only mechanism in the pathogenesis of RHD: calicivirus infection may also induce leukopenia in the infected adult rabbits. We show now by flow cytometry analysis that the calicivirus induces an early decrease in B and T cells, in both spleen and liver. The depletion of B and T cells was associated with apoptosis labelled by annexin V. These changes occurred in rabbits before they showed enzymatic evidence of liver damage and persisted after liver transaminase values were very high. We conclude that depletion of lymphocytes caused by the calicivirus infection precedes or attends liver damage. The relative contribution of this lymphocyte depletion for the pathogenesis of the fatal calicivirus infection of rabbits remains to be investigated.

  8. IL4I1 Is a Novel Regulator of M2 Macrophage Polarization That Can Inhibit T Cell Activation via L-Tryptophan and Arginine Depletion and IL-10 Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinpu Yue

    Full Text Available Interleukin 4-induced gene-1 (IL4I1 was initially described as an early IL-4-inducible gene in B cells. IL4I1 protein can inhibit T cell proliferation by releasing its enzymatic catabolite, H2O2, and this effect is associated with transient down-regulation of T cell CD3 receptor-zeta (TCRζ expression. Herein, we show that IL4I1 contributes to the regulation of macrophage programming. We found that expression of IL4I1 increased during bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMDM differentiation, expression of IL4I1 is much higher in primary macrophages than monocytes, and IL4I1 expression in BMDMs could be induced by Th1 and Th2 cytokines in two different patterns. Gene expression analysis revealed that overexpression of IL4I1 drove the expression of M2 markers (Fizz1, Arg1, YM-1, MR and inhibited the expression of M1-associated cytokines. Conversely, knockdown of IL4I1 by siRNA resulted in opposite effects, and also attenuated STAT-3 and STAT-6 phosphorylation. Furthermore, IL4I1 produced by macrophages catalyzed L-tryptophan degradation, while levo-1-methyl-tryptophan (L-1-MT, but not dextro-1-methyl-tryptophan, partially rescued IL4I1-dependent inhibition of T cell activation. Other inhibitors, such as diphenylene iodonium (DPI, an anti-IL-10Rα blocking antibody, and a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, also had this effect. Overall, our findings indicate that IL4I1 promotes an enhanced M2 functional phenotype, which is most likely associated with the phosphorylation of STAT-6 and STAT-3. Moreover, DPI, L-1-MT, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, and anti-IL-10Rα blocking antibody were all found to be effective IL4I1 inhibitors in vitro.

  9. L-Tryptophan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to decrease mood swings, tension, and irritability in women with PMDD. To help people quit smoking. Taking ... L-tryptophan produced by a single manufacturer in Japan. Currently, under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education ...

  10. Combined treatment with MSC transplantation and neutrophil depletion ameliorates D-GalN/LPS-induced acute liver failure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Shi, Xiaolei; Zhang, Zhiheng; Ma, Hucheng; Yuan, Xianwen; Ding, Yitao

    2016-12-01

    The imbalance of immunity is an important pathogenesis of acute liver failure (ALF). Neutrophils are the hallmark of acute inflammation, which have an essential role in immune regulation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation is a promising therapy in ALF treatment. Recent studies indicated a considerable connection between MSCs and neutrophils in immune regulation. To investigate changes in neutrophils in ALF rats after MSC transplantation, and to explore the therapeutic effect and mechanism of the combined treatment with MSC transplantation and neutrophil depletion in ALF. We employed monotherapy and the combination therapy with MSCs and anti-PMN serum in D-galactosamine (D-GalN)/lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced ALF rats. Rats were sacrificed at 6, 12 and 24h, respectively. Blood samples and liver tissues were collected. Hepatic injury, inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-10), chemokines (CXCL1 and CXCL2), the number and activity of neutrophils and animal survival were assessed at fixed times. MSC transplantation can effectively improve the liver function of ALF rats and reduce the number and activity of neutrophils in both peripheral blood and liver. Compared with MSC transplantation alone, anti-PMN treatment and co-treatment had a better result in diminishing neutrophils. The co-treatment also exhibited a better therapeutical effect in ALF rats compared with monotherapy. In this process, the expressions of inflammatory cytokines in the liver were consistent with liver function. The regulation of the neutrophil-related microenvironment is affected in D-GalN/LPS-induced ALF rats after MSC transplantation. The combined treatment with MSC transplantation and neutrophil depletion may have a better therapeutic effect in ALF rats. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Tryptophan and kynurenines: continuing to court controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Trevor W

    2016-08-01

    The role of the amino acid tryptophan in the generation of 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) has been expanded over the past 30 years with recognition that its oxidation by indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) results in the formation of kynurenine and metabolites which regulate neuronal excitability, psychiatric status, immune cell activity and balance, and probably implantation and the development of embryos. While the amount of work on this kynurenine pathway continues to accelerate, it is important that disagreements about results, differences of interpretation or problems with technical issues are presented openly and discussed thoroughly so that new research is not mis-led in ways that could have been foreseen. In this issue of Clinical Science, Badawy et al. discuss in depth two opposing views of how changes in tryptophan availability or utilisation bring about their effects on cell function. The original concept that local depletion of tryptophan is responsible seems to be less attractive than the view that kynurenine and its metabolites have direct, potent actions on cells. This conclusion not only clarifies our understanding of the importance of tryptophan metabolism to kynurenine but also raises the possibility that the actions of those metabolites could be novel targets for the development of agonists and antagonists with a range of medical implications. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  12. Influence of Tryptophan Contained in 1-Methyl-Tryptophan on Antimicrobial and Immunoregulatory Functions of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Silvia K.; Siepmann, Stephan; Kuhlmann, Katja; Meyer, Helmut E.; Metzger, Sabine; Pudelko, Sabine; Leineweber, Margret; Däubener, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been identified as an important antimicrobial and immunoregulatory effector molecule essential for the establishment of tolerance by regulating local tryptophan (Trp) concentrations. On the other hand, the immunosuppressive capacity of IDO can have detrimental effects for the host as it can lead to deleterious alterations of the immune response by promoting tolerance to some types of tumors. To suppress this disadvantageous IDO effect, the competitive inhibitor 1-Methyl-Tryptophan (1-MT) is being tested in clinical trials. However, it remains inconclusive which stereoisomer of 1-MT is the more effective inhibitor of IDO-mediated immunosuppression. While IDO enzyme activity is more efficiently inhibited by 1-L-MT in cell-free or in vitro settings, 1-D-MT is superior to 1-L-MT in the enhancement of anti-tumor responses in vivo. Here, we present new data showing that commercially available 1-L-MT lots contain tryptophan in amounts sufficient to compensate for the IDO-mediated tryptophan depletion in vitro. The addition of 1-L-MT abrogated IDO-mediated antimicrobial effects and permitted the growth of the tryptophan-auxotroph microorganisms Staphylococcus aureus and Toxoplasma gondii. Consistent with this, the tryptophan within 1-L-MT lots was sufficient to antagonize IDO-mediated inhibition of T cell responses. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed not only tryptophan within 1-L-MT, but also the incorporation of this tryptophan in bacterial and human proteins that were generated in the presence of 1-L-MT in otherwise tryptophan-free conditions. In summary, these data reveal that tryptophan within 1-L-MT can affect the results of in vitro studies in an L-stereospecific and IDO-independent way. PMID:23028625

  13. Possible role of mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects in aristolochic acid I-induced acute nephrotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Zhenzhou, E-mail: jiangcpu@yahoo.com.cn; Bao, Qingli, E-mail: bao_ql@126.com; Sun, Lixin, E-mail: slxcpu@126.com; Huang, Xin, E-mail: huangxinhx66@sohu.com; Wang, Tao, E-mail: wangtao1331@126.com; Zhang, Shuang, E-mail: cat921@sina.com; Li, Han, E-mail: hapo1101@163.com; Zhang, Luyong, E-mail: lyzhang@cpu.edu.cn

    2013-01-15

    This report describes an investigation of the pathological mechanism of acute renal failure caused by toxic tubular necrosis after treatment with aristolochic acid I (AAI) in Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. The rats were gavaged with AAI at 0, 5, 20, or 80 mg/kg/day for 7 days. The pathologic examination of the kidneys showed severe acute tubular degenerative changes primarily affecting the proximal tubules. Supporting these results, we detected significantly increased concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in the rats treated with AAI, indicating damage to the kidneys. Ultrastructural examination showed that proximal tubular mitochondria were extremely enlarged and dysmorphic with loss and disorientation of their cristae. Mitochondrial function analysis revealed that the two indicators for mitochondrial energy metabolism, the respiratory control ratio (RCR) and ATP content, were reduced in a dose-dependent manner after AAI treatment. The RCR in the presence of substrates for complex I was reduced more significantly than in the presence of substrates for complex II. In additional experiments, the activity of respiratory complex I, which is partly encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), was more significantly impaired than that of respiratory complex II, which is completely encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). A real-time PCR assay revealed a marked reduction of mtDNA in the kidneys treated with AAI. Taken together, these results suggested that mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects play critical roles in the pathogenesis of kidney injury induced by AAI, and that the same processes might contribute to aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► AAI-induced acute renal failure in rats and the proximal tubule was the target. ► Tubular mitochondria were morphologically aberrant in ultrastructural examination. ► AAI impair mitochondrial bioenergetic function and mtDNA replication.

  14. Effect of Acute L-Tryptophan Exposure on the Brain Serotonergic System and Behavior in the Male Medaka(Behavior Biology)

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoyuki, Koutoku; Rong, Zhang; Tetsuya, Tachibana; Yuji, Oshima; Mitsuhiro, Furuse; Laboratory of Fisheries Environmental Science, Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University; Laboratory of Advanced Animal and Marine Bioresources, Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exposure to L-tryptophan (TRP) on the metabolism of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) and behavior of medaka. In the first experiment, the fish were exposed to a 0, 1, 2 or 4 g/l of TRP solution for 24 hr. Although no significant difference in the brain 5HT content was detected, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA), a major 5HT metabolite, increased in a dose-dependent fashion. In the second experiment, the fish were maintained in a 0 or 4 g/l of T...

  15. Mephedrone in adolescent rats: residual memory impairment and acute but not lasting 5-HT depletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig P Motbey

    Full Text Available Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone, MMC is a popular recreational drug, yet its potential harms are yet to be fully established. The current study examined the impact of single or repeated MMC exposure on various neurochemical and behavioral measures in rats. In Experiment 1 male adolescent Wistar rats received single or repeated (once a day for 10 days injections of MMC (30 mg/kg or the comparator drug methamphetamine (METH, 2.5 mg/kg. Both MMC and METH caused robust hyperactivity in the 1 h following injection although this effect did not tend to sensitize with repeated treatment. Striatal dopamine (DA levels were increased 1 h following either METH or MMC while striatal and hippocampal serotonin (5-HT levels were decreased 1 h following MMC but not METH. MMC caused greater increases in 5-HT metabolism and greater reductions in DA metabolism in rats that had been previously exposed to MMC. Autoradiographic analysis showed no signs of neuroinflammation ([(125I]CLINDE ligand used as a marker for translocator protein (TSPO expression with repeated exposure to either MMC or METH. In Experiment 2, rats received repeated MMC (7.5, 15 or 30 mg/kg once a day for 10 days and were examined for residual behavioral effects following treatment. Repeated high (30 mg/kg dose MMC produced impaired novel object recognition 5 weeks after drug treatment. However, no residual changes in 5-HT or DA tissue levels were observed at 7 weeks post-treatment. Overall these results show that MMC causes acute but not lasting changes in DA and 5-HT tissue concentrations. MMC can also cause long-term memory impairment. Future studies of cognitive function in MMC users are clearly warranted.

  16. The effect of acute tyrosine phenylalanine depletion on emotion-based decision-making in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Wahlstrom, Dustin; White, Tonya; Luciana, Monica

    2013-04-01

    Despite interest in dopamine's role in emotion-based decision-making, few reports of the effects of dopamine manipulations are available in this area in humans. This study investigates dopamine's role in emotion-based decision-making through a common measure of this construct, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), using Acute Tyrosine Phenylalanine Depletion (ATPD). In a between-subjects design, 40 healthy adults were randomized to receive either an ATPD beverage or a balanced amino acid beverage (a control) prior to completing the IGT, as well as pre- and post-manipulation blood draws for the neurohormone prolactin. Together with conventional IGT performance metrics, choice selections and response latencies were examined separately for good and bad choices before and after several key punishment events. Changes in response latencies were also used to predict total task performance. Prolactin levels increased significantly in the ATPD group but not in the control group. However, no significant group differences in performance metrics were detected, nor were there sex differences in outcome measures. However, the balanced group's bad deck latencies speeded up across the task, while the ATPD group's latencies remained adaptively hesitant. Additionally, modulation of latencies to the bad decks predicted total score for the ATPD group only. One interpretation is that ATPD subtly attenuated reward salience and altered the approach by which individuals achieved successful performance, without resulting in frank group differences in task performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, M. Eugenia, E-mail: maria.sanz@kcl.ac.uk; Cabezas, Carlos, E-mail: ccabezas@qf.uva.es; Mata, Santiago, E-mail: santiago.mata@uva.es; Alonso, Josè L., E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es [Grupo de Espectroscopia Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Parque Científico Uva, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  18. Two new tryptophan derivatives from the seed kernels of Entada rheedei: Effects on cell viability and HIV infectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzowa, L.K.; Teponno, R.B.; Tapondjou, L.A.; Verotta, L.; Liao, Z.; Graham, D.; Zink, M.-C.; Barboni, L.

    2013-01-01

    Two new tryptophan derivatives, N-sulfonyl-L-tryptophan (tryptorheedei A) (1) and 3-(N-sulfonylindolyl)-D-lactic acid (tryptorheedei B) (2) together with the known 5-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (3), 1-O-methylglucopyranoside, entadamide A, homogentisic acid and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-β-sitosterol, were isolated from the seed kernels of Entada rheedei (Mimosaceae). Their structures were established using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and by comparison with spectroscopic data reported in the literature. Compounds 1 and 2 showed no toxicity to TZM and Human PBMC cells. Both compounds 1 and 2 were found to promote early infection events in HIV, likely by inhibiting the enzyme indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and preventing tryptophan depletion. Inhibition of IDO acutely in HIV infection inhibits viral replication, but chronic activation of IDO leads to immune impairment in AIDS. IDO is also the gatekeeper enzyme for kynurenine metabolism, a pathway involved in serotonin and melatonin biosynthesis and the regulation of glutamate and dopamine levels in the brain. Therefore inhibition of IDO might explain both the reported medicinal and neuropsychiatric effects of E. rheedei. PMID:23537889

  19. Influence of Tryptophan and Serotonin on Mood and Cognition with a Possible Role of the Gut-Brain Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisha A. Jenkins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The serotonergic system forms a diffuse network within the central nervous system and plays a significant role in the regulation of mood and cognition. Manipulation of tryptophan levels, acutely or chronically, by depletion or supplementation, is an experimental procedure for modifying peripheral and central serotonin levels. These studies have allowed us to establish the role of serotonin in higher order brain function in both preclinical and clinical situations and have precipitated the finding that low brain serotonin levels are associated with poor memory and depressed mood. The gut-brain axis is a bi-directional system between the brain and gastrointestinal tract, linking emotional and cognitive centres of the brain with peripheral functioning of the digestive tract. An influence of gut microbiota on behaviour is becoming increasingly evident, as is the extension to tryptophan and serotonin, producing a possibility that alterations in the gut may be important in the pathophysiology of human central nervous system disorders. In this review we will discuss the effect of manipulating tryptophan on mood and cognition, and discuss a possible influence of the gut-brain axis.

  20. Influence of Tryptophan and Serotonin on Mood and Cognition with a Possible Role of the Gut-Brain Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Trisha A; Nguyen, Jason C D; Polglaze, Kate E; Bertrand, Paul P

    2016-01-20

    The serotonergic system forms a diffuse network within the central nervous system and plays a significant role in the regulation of mood and cognition. Manipulation of tryptophan levels, acutely or chronically, by depletion or supplementation, is an experimental procedure for modifying peripheral and central serotonin levels. These studies have allowed us to establish the role of serotonin in higher order brain function in both preclinical and clinical situations and have precipitated the finding that low brain serotonin levels are associated with poor memory and depressed mood. The gut-brain axis is a bi-directional system between the brain and gastrointestinal tract, linking emotional and cognitive centres of the brain with peripheral functioning of the digestive tract. An influence of gut microbiota on behaviour is becoming increasingly evident, as is the extension to tryptophan and serotonin, producing a possibility that alterations in the gut may be important in the pathophysiology of human central nervous system disorders. In this review we will discuss the effect of manipulating tryptophan on mood and cognition, and discuss a possible influence of the gut-brain axis.

  1. Influence of Tryptophan and Serotonin on Mood and Cognition with a Possible Role of the Gut-Brain Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Trisha A.; Nguyen, Jason C. D.; Polglaze, Kate E.; Bertrand, Paul P.

    2016-01-01

    The serotonergic system forms a diffuse network within the central nervous system and plays a significant role in the regulation of mood and cognition. Manipulation of tryptophan levels, acutely or chronically, by depletion or supplementation, is an experimental procedure for modifying peripheral and central serotonin levels. These studies have allowed us to establish the role of serotonin in higher order brain function in both preclinical and clinical situations and have precipitated the finding that low brain serotonin levels are associated with poor memory and depressed mood. The gut-brain axis is a bi-directional system between the brain and gastrointestinal tract, linking emotional and cognitive centres of the brain with peripheral functioning of the digestive tract. An influence of gut microbiota on behaviour is becoming increasingly evident, as is the extension to tryptophan and serotonin, producing a possibility that alterations in the gut may be important in the pathophysiology of human central nervous system disorders. In this review we will discuss the effect of manipulating tryptophan on mood and cognition, and discuss a possible influence of the gut-brain axis. PMID:26805875

  2. The effect of raising and lowering tryptophan levels on human mood and social behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Simon N.

    2013-01-01

    Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) studies indicate that low serotonin can lower mood and also increase aggression, although results vary somewhat between studies with similar participants. Lowering of mood after ATD is related to the susceptibility of the study participants to clinical depression, and some participants show no effect on mood. This indicates that low serotonin can contribute to lowered mood, but cannot—by itself—cause lowered mood, unless other unknown systems interact with serotonin to lower mood. Studies using tryptophan supplementation demonstrate that increased serotonin can decrease quarrelsomeness and increase agreeableness in everyday life. Social interactions that are more agreeable and less quarrelsome are associated with better mood. Thus, serotonin may have direct effects on mood, but may also be able to influence mood through changes in social behaviour. The increased agreeableness and decreased quarrelsomeness resulting from increases in serotonin will help foster congenial relations with others and should help to increase social support. As social support and social isolation have an important relationship with both physical and mental health, more research is needed on the implications of the ability of serotonin to modulate social behaviour for the regulation of mood, and for future physical and mental health. PMID:23440461

  3. Tryptophan Metabolism in Allergic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostner, Johanna M; Becker, Katrin; Kofler, Heinz; Strasser, Barbara; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis, as well the early phase of atopic dermatitis, are characterized by a Th2-skewed immune environment. Th2-type cytokines are upregulated in allergic inflammation, whereas there is downregulation of the Th1-type immune response and related cytokines, such as interferon-x03B3; (IFN-x03B3;). The latter is a strong inducer of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1), which degrades the essential amino acid tryptophan, as part of an antiproliferative strategy of immunocompetent cells to halt the growth of infected and malignant cells, and also of T cells - an immunoregulatory intervention to avoid overactivation of the immune system. Raised serum tryptophan concentrations have been reported in patients with pollen allergy compared to healthy blood donors. Moreover, higher baseline tryptophan concentrations have been associated with a poor response to specific immunotherapy. It has been shown that the increase in tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy only exists outside the pollen season, and not during the season. Interestingly, there is only a minor alteration of the kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (Kyn/Trp, an index of tryptophan breakdown). The reason for the higher tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy outside the season remains a matter of discussion. To this regard, the specific interaction of nitric oxide (NO∙) with the tryptophan-degrading enzyme IDO-1 could be important, because an enhanced formation of NO∙ has been reported in patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Importantly, NO∙ suppresses the activity of the heme enzyme IDO-1, which could explain the higher tryptophan levels. Thus, inhibitors of inducible NO∙ synthase should be reconsidered as candidates for antiallergic therapy out of season that may abrogate the arrest of IDO-1 by decreasing the production of NO∙. Considering its association with the pathophysiology of atopic disease, tryptophan metabolism may

  4. Tryptophan Metabolism in Allergic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostner, Johanna M.; Becker, Katrin; Kofler, Heinz; Strasser, Barbara; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2017-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis, as well the early phase of atopic dermatitis, are characterized by a Th2-skewed immune environment. Th2-type cytokines are upregulated in allergic inflammation, whereas there is downregulation of the Th1-type immune response and related cytokines, such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ). The latter is a strong inducer of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO-1), which degrades the essential amino acid tryptophan, as part of an antiproliferative strategy of immunocompetent cells to halt the growth of infected and malignant cells, and also of T cells – an immunoregulatory intervention to avoid overactivation of the immune system. Raised serum tryptophan concentrations have been reported in patients with pollen allergy compared to healthy blood donors. Moreover, higher baseline tryptophan concentrations have been associated with a poor response to specific immunotherapy. It has been shown that the increase in tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy only exists outside the pollen season, and not during the season. Interestingly, there is only a minor alteration of the kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (Kyn/Trp, an index of tryptophan breakdown). The reason for the higher tryptophan concentrations in patients with pollen allergy outside the season remains a matter of discussion. To this regard, the specific interaction of nitric oxide (NO˙) with the tryptophan-degrading enzyme IDO-1 could be important, because an enhanced formation of NO˙ has been reported in patients with asthma and allergic rhinitis. Importantly, NO˙ suppresses the activity of the heme enzyme IDO-1, which could explain the higher tryptophan levels. Thus, inhibitors of inducible NO˙ synthase should be reconsidered as candidates for antiallergic therapy out of season that may abrogate the arrest of IDO-1 by decreasing the production of NO˙. Considering its association with the pathophysiology of atopic disease, tryptophan metabolism may play a

  5. Lower Levels of Cervicovaginal Tryptophan Are Associated With Natural Clearance of Chlamydia in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Stephen J; Olson, Kristin M; Barnes, Stephen; Wilson, Landon S; Berryhill, Taylor F; Bakshi, Rakesh; Brown, LaDraka' T; Press, Christen G; Geisler, William M

    2017-06-15

    Chlamydiatrachomatis (Ct) infection causes significant morbidity. In vitro studies demonstrate that Ct growth inhibition occurs by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-mediated depletion of intracellular tryptophan, and some Ct strains utilize extracellular indole to restore tryptophan levels. Whether tryptophan levels are associated with Ct infection clearance in humans remains unknown. We evaluated tryptophan, indole, and IFN-γ levels in cervicovaginal lavages from women with either naturally cleared or persisting Ct infection. Women who cleared infection had significantly lower tryptophan levels and trended toward lower IFN-γ levels compared to women with persisting infection. Due to its volatility, indole was not measurable in either group. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Acute 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene exposure causes differential concentration-dependent follicle depletion and gene expression in neonatal rat ovaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madden, Jill A. [Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Hoyer, Patricia B. [Department of Physiology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Devine, Patrick J. [INRS—Institut Armand-Frappier Research Centre, University of Quebec, Laval, QC H7V 1B7 (Canada); Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu [Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Physiology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Chronic exposure to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), generated during combustion of organic matter including cigarette smoke, depletes all ovarian follicle types in the mouse and rat, and in vitro models mimic this effect. To investigate the mechanisms involved in follicular depletion during acute DMBA exposure, two concentrations of DMBA at which follicle depletion has (75 nM) and has not (12.5 nM) been observed were investigated. Postnatal day four F344 rat ovaries were maintained in culture for four days before a single exposure to vehicle control (1% DMSO; CT) or DMBA (12 nM; low-concentration or 75 nM; high-concentration). After four or eight additional days of culture, DMBA-induced follicle depletion was evaluated via follicle enumeration. Relative to control, DMBA did not affect follicle numbers after 4 days of exposure, but induced large primary follicle loss at both concentrations after 8 days; while, the low-concentration DMBA also caused secondary follicle depletion. Neither concentration affected primordial or small primary follicle number. RNA was isolated and quantitative RT-PCR performed prior to follicle loss to measure mRNA levels of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism (Cyp2e1, Gstmu, Gstpi, Ephx1), autophagy (Atg7, Becn1), oxidative stress response (Sod1, Sod2) and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway (Kitlg, cKit, Akt1) 1, 2 and 4 days after exposure. With the exception of Atg7 and cKit, DMBA increased (P < 0.05) expression of all genes investigated. Also, BECN1 and pAKT{sup Thr308} protein levels were increased while cKIT was decreased by DMBA exposure. Taken together, these results suggest an increase in DMBA bioactivation, add to the mechanistic understanding of DMBA-induced ovotoxicity and raise concern regarding female low concentration DMBA exposures. - Highlights: • Acute DMBA exposures induce large primary and/or secondary follicle loss. • Acute DMBA exposure did not impact

  7. TRYPTOPHAN PROMOTES CHARITABLE DONATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eSteenbergen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The link between serotonin (5-HT and one of the most important elements of prosocial behavior, charity, has remained largely uninvestigated. In the present study, we tested whether charitable donating can be promoted by administering the food supplement L-Tryptophan (TRP, the biochemical precursor of 5-HT. Participants were compared with respect to the amount of money they donated when given the opportunity to make a charitable donation. As expected, compared to a neutral placebo, TRP appears to increase the participants’ willingness to donate money to a charity. This result supports the idea that the food we eat may act as a cognitive enhancer modulating the way we think and perceive the world and others.

  8. Lymphocyte-depleting induction therapy lowers the risk of acute rejection in African American pediatric kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowson, Cole N; Reed, Rhiannon D; Shelton, Brittany A; MacLennan, Paul A; Locke, Jayme E

    2017-02-01

    The use of lymphocyte-depleting induction immunosuppression has been associated with a reduction in risk of AR after KT among adult recipients, particularly among high-risk subgroups such as AAs. However, data on induction regimen and AR risk are lacking among pediatric KT recipients. We examined outcomes among 7884 first-time pediatric KT recipients using SRTR data (2000-2014). Characteristics were compared across race using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests for continuous and chi-square tests for categorical variables. Risk of AR was estimated using modified Poisson regression, stratified by recipient race, adjusting for recipient age, gender, BMI, primary diagnosis, number of HLA mismatches, maintenance immunosuppression, and donor type. Risk of AR within 1 year was lower in AA recipients receiving lymphocyte-depleting induction (ATG or alemtuzumab; RR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.52-0.83 P induction. This difference was not seen in non-AA recipients receiving lymphocyte-depleting induction (RR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.81-1.06, P = .26) compared to IL-2 induction. These findings support a role for lymphocyte-depleting induction agents in AA pediatric patients undergoing KT and continued use of IL-2 inhibitor induction in non-AA pediatric KT recipients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Acute Pathophysiological Effects of Intratracheal Instillation of Budesonide and Exogenous Surfactant in a Neonatal Surfactant-depleted Piglet Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Feng Yang

    2010-08-01

    Conclusions: Intratracheal instillation of surfactant or surfactant plus budesonide can improve oxygenation and pulmonary histologic outcome in neonatal surfactant-depleted lungs. The additional use of budesonide does not disturb the function of the exogenous surfactant. Intratracheal administration of a corticosteroid combined with surfactant may be an effective method for alleviating local pulmonary inflammation in severe RDS.

  10. Low plasma tryptophan in carcinoid patients is associated with increased urinary cortisol excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanke, Marit A C; Kema, Ido P; Dijck-Brouwer, Janneke; Doornbos, Bennard; De Vries, Elisabeth G E; Korf, Jakob

    2008-10-01

    Previously we observed in patients suffering from a metastatic carcinoid tumor that irritability, aggression and lack of impulse control are associated with low levels of plasma tryptophan and presumably with low brain serotonin function. In rats we showed that a diet of low tryptophan resulted in higher stress responses and higher corticosterone production. Here we tested in carcinoid patients whether tryptophan depletion due to tumor 5-HT overproduction is associated with high cortisol production. Urinary excretion of cortisol, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (the main metabolite of serotonin a marker of tumor activity), plasma levels of tryptophan and platelet content of serotonin (index of peripheral serotonin synthesis) were determined in metastatic midgut carcinoid patients. Patients (N = 25) were divided into two groups based on their plasma tryptophan levels ( or = 49 micromol/l, n = 13). Carcinoid patients with low plasma tryptophan levels had significantly higher urinary excretion of free cortisol (p < 0.01), independent of tumor activity. The inter-individual differences in the low tryptophan group, however, were substantial. In a subgroup of the patients suffering from metastatic carcinoid disease the cerebral access of plasma tryptophan is impaired, thus rendering cerebral serotonin neurotransmission suboptimal and leading to hypercortisolism. The present study provides further support to the idea that low serotonergic function is a risk for developing stress-associated psychopathology.

  11. Exogenous Tryptophan Promotes Cutaneous Wound Healing of Chronically Stressed Mice through Inhibition of TNF-α and IDO Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Graziella Bandeira

    Full Text Available Stress prolongs the inflammatory response compromising the dermal reconstruction and wound closure. Acute stress-induced inflammation increases indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase-stimulated tryptophan catabolism. To investigate the role of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression and tryptophan administration in adverse effects of stress on cutaneous wound healing, mice were submitted to chronic restraint stress and treated with tryptophan daily until euthanasia. Excisional lesions were created on each mouse and 5 or 7 days later, the lesions were analyzed. In addition, murine skin fibroblasts were exposed to elevated epinephrine levels plus tryptophan, and fibroblast activity was evaluated. Tryptophan administration reversed the reduction of the plasma tryptophan levels and the increase in the plasma normetanephrine levels induced by stress 5 and 7 days after wounding. Five days after wounding, stress-induced increase in the protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, and this was inhibited by tryptophan. Stress-induced increase in the lipid peroxidation and the amount of the neutrophils, macrophages and T cells number was reversed by tryptophan 5 days after wounding. Tryptophan administration inhibited the reduction of myofibroblast density, collagen deposition, re-epithelialization and wound contraction induced by stress 5 days after wounding. In dermal fibroblast culture, the tryptophan administration increased the cell migration and AKT phosphorylation in cells treated with high epinephrine levels. In conclusion, tryptophan-induced reduction of inflammatory response and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression may have accelerated cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice.

  12. Exogenous Tryptophan Promotes Cutaneous Wound Healing of Chronically Stressed Mice through Inhibition of TNF-α and IDO Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Luana Graziella; Bortolot, Beatriz Salari; Cecatto, Matheus Jorand; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Romana-Souza, Bruna

    2015-01-01

    Stress prolongs the inflammatory response compromising the dermal reconstruction and wound closure. Acute stress-induced inflammation increases indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase-stimulated tryptophan catabolism. To investigate the role of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression and tryptophan administration in adverse effects of stress on cutaneous wound healing, mice were submitted to chronic restraint stress and treated with tryptophan daily until euthanasia. Excisional lesions were created on each mouse and 5 or 7 days later, the lesions were analyzed. In addition, murine skin fibroblasts were exposed to elevated epinephrine levels plus tryptophan, and fibroblast activity was evaluated. Tryptophan administration reversed the reduction of the plasma tryptophan levels and the increase in the plasma normetanephrine levels induced by stress 5 and 7 days after wounding. Five days after wounding, stress-induced increase in the protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, and this was inhibited by tryptophan. Stress-induced increase in the lipid peroxidation and the amount of the neutrophils, macrophages and T cells number was reversed by tryptophan 5 days after wounding. Tryptophan administration inhibited the reduction of myofibroblast density, collagen deposition, re-epithelialization and wound contraction induced by stress 5 days after wounding. In dermal fibroblast culture, the tryptophan administration increased the cell migration and AKT phosphorylation in cells treated with high epinephrine levels. In conclusion, tryptophan-induced reduction of inflammatory response and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression may have accelerated cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice. PMID:26057238

  13. Vortioxetine, but not escitalopram or duloxetine, reverses memory impairment induced by central 5-HT depletion in rats: evidence for direct 5-HT receptor modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jesper Bornø; du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Song, Dekun; Budac, David; Smagin, Gennady; Sanchez, Connie; Pehrson, Alan Lars

    2014-01-01

    Depressed patients suffer from cognitive dysfunction, including memory deficits. Acute serotonin (5-HT) depletion impairs memory and mood in vulnerable patients. The investigational multimodal acting antidepressant vortioxetine is a 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist, 5-HT1A receptor agonist and 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor that enhances memory in normal rats in novel object recognition (NOR) and conditioned fear (Mørk et al., 2013). We hypothesized that vortioxetine's 5-HT receptor mechanisms are involved in its memory effects, and therefore investigated these effects in 5-HT depleted rats. Four injections of the irreversible tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor 4-chloro-dl-phenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA, 86mg/kg, s.c.) induced 5-HT depletion, as measured in hippocampal homogenate and microdialysate. The effects of acute challenge with vortioxetine or the 5-HT releaser fenfluramine on extracellular 5-HT were measured in PCPA-treated and control rats. PCPA's effects on NOR and spontaneous alternation (SA) performance were assessed along with the effects of acute treatment with 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP), vortioxetine, the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor escitalopram, or the 5-HT norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor duloxetine. SERT occupancies were estimated by ex vivo autoradiography. PCPA depleted central 5-HT by >90% in tissue and microdialysate, and impaired NOR and SA performance. Restoring central 5-HT with 5-HTP reversed these deficits. At similar SERT occupancies (>90%) vortioxetine, but not escitalopram or duloxetine, restored memory performance. Acute fenfluramine significantly increased extracellular 5-HT in control and PCPA-treated rats, while vortioxetine did so only in control rats. Thus, vortioxetine restores 5-HT depletion impaired memory performance in rats through one or more of its receptor activities. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. and ECNP.

  14. Tryptophan supplementation and the response to unfairness in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal eCerit

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Experimental manipulation of serotonin (5-HT availability has been shown to modulate social behavior. For instance, serotonin depletion increased the rejection rates of unfair offers in the Ultimatum Game (UG, whereas a single dose of the serotonin reuptake inhibitor (citalopram decreased rejection rates. These effects were observed immediately after the manipulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolonged Tryptophan (TRP supplementation on UG performance in healthy individuals. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design was used. Healthy volunteers (N=47 completed the UG before and after a 6-day intervention of TRP (2.8 g/day or placebo. Impulsivity was measured with a Go-Stop task. The overall analyses showed that TRP supplementation had no significant effect on UG scores, but the direction of the effect was opposite from expectations. Because repeated performance of the UG may lead to unwanted learning effects or strategical changes, additional analyses were conducted in which participants (N=7 who accepted all offers on the second measurement were excluded. These analyses revealed that the TRP-group rejected very unfair offers more often than the placebo group. The groups did not differ on impulsivity. Increasing serotonin through TRP supplements increased the rejection of very unfair offers. The direction of our findings is inconsistent with earlier studies that showed that increasing 5-HT availability results in less rejection of unfair offers. The current findings thus importantly suggest that effects of acute vs. prolonged enhancement of 5-HT availability may differ. Also, the outcomes show that the UG is a complex task and participants’ decisions may depend on context, e.g., prior experience with the task.

  15. Acute Smc5/6 depletion reveals its primary role in rDNA replication by restraining recombination at fork pausing sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao P Peng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Smc5/6, a member of the conserved SMC family of complexes, is essential for growth in most organisms. Its exact functions in a mitotic cell cycle are controversial, as chronic Smc5/6 loss-of-function alleles produce varying phenotypes. To circumvent this issue, we acutely depleted Smc5/6 in budding yeast and determined the first cell cycle consequences of Smc5/6 removal. We found a striking primary defect in replication of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA array. Each rDNA repeat contains a programmed replication fork barrier (RFB established by the Fob1 protein. Fob1 removal improves rDNA replication in Smc5/6 depleted cells, implicating Smc5/6 in the management of programmed fork pausing. A similar improvement is achieved by removing the DNA helicase Mph1 whose recombinogenic activity can be inhibited by Smc5/6 under DNA damage conditions. DNA 2D gel analyses further show that Smc5/6 loss increases recombination structures at RFB regions; moreover, mph1∆ and fob1∆ similarly reduce this accumulation. These findings point to an important mitotic role for Smc5/6 in restraining recombination events when protein barriers in rDNA stall replication forks. As rDNA maintenance influences multiple essential cellular processes, Smc5/6 likely links rDNA stability to overall mitotic growth.

  16. Outcome of children with acute leukemia given HLA-haploidentical HSCT after αβ T-cell and B-cell depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Franco; Merli, Pietro; Pagliara, Daria; Li Pira, Giuseppina; Falco, Michela; Pende, Daniela; Rondelli, Roberto; Lucarelli, Barbarella; Brescia, Letizia Pomponia; Masetti, Riccardo; Milano, Giuseppe Maria; Bertaina, Valentina; Algeri, Mattia; Pinto, Rita Maria; Strocchio, Luisa; Meazza, Raffaella; Grapulin, Lavinia; Handgretinger, Rupert; Moretta, Alessandro; Bertaina, Alice; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2017-08-03

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from an HLA-haploidentical relative (haplo-HSCT) is a suitable option for children with acute leukemia (AL) either relapsed or at high-risk of treatment failure. We developed a novel method of graft manipulation based on negative depletion of αβ T and B cells and conducted a prospective trial evaluating the outcome of children with AL transplanted with this approach. Eighty AL children, transplanted between September 2011 and September 2014, were enrolled in the trial. All children were given a fully myeloablative preparative regimen. Anti-T-lymphocyte globulin from day -5 to -3 was used for preventing graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD); no patient received any posttransplantation GVHD prophylaxis. Two children experienced primary graft failure. The cumulative incidence of skin-only, grade 1-2 acute GVHD was 30%; no patient developed extensive chronic GVHD. Four patients died, the cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality being 5%, whereas 19 relapsed, resulting in a 24% cumulative incidence of relapse. With a median follow-up of 46 months for surviving patients, the 5-year probability of chronic GVHD-free, relapse-free survival (GRFS) is 71%. Total body irradiation-containing preparative regimen was the only variable favorably influencing relapse incidence and GRFS. The outcomes of these 80 patients are comparable to those of 41 and 51 children given transplantation from an HLA-identical sibling or a 10/10 allelic-matched unrelated donor in the same period. These data indicate that haplo-HSCT after αβ T- and B-cell depletion represents a competitive alternative for children with AL in need of urgent allograft. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01810120. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. The stability of tryptophan, 5-methyl-tryptophan and α-methyl-tryptophan during NaOH hydrolysis of selected foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherfurd, Shane M; Richardson, Russell K; Moughan, Paul J

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the use of 5-methyl-tryptophan, α-methyl-tryptophan or synthetic tryptophan to correct for the losses of protein-bound tryptophan in foods during NaOH hydrolysis. Synthetic tryptophan and each protein source was incubated in 4.5M NaOH containing 5-methyl-tryptophan and α-methyl-tryptophan in nitrogen gas-sparged Teflon vials for 0-144 h at 110 °C. The hydrolysis and loss rates of protein-bound tryptophan, 5-methyl-tryptophan, α-methyl-tryptophan and synthetic tryptophan were predicted using least-squares nonlinear regression. Using 5-methyl-tryptophan or synthetic tryptophan to correct for hydrolytic losses of tryptophan overestimated the tryptophan content by 8.2-19% and -0.3-8.8% respectively, while correction using α-methyl-tryptophan underestimated tryptophan by between 0.2% and 8.1% across the protein sources. Correction using α-methyl-tryptophan or synthetic tryptophan was more accurate than using 5-methyl-tryptophan, but when highly accurate tryptophan composition data are required, least-squares nonlinear regression is the best approach as it removes the need for a hydrolysis correction factor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Tryptophan and the immune response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moffett, John R; Namboodiri, Ma Aryan

    2003-01-01

    ... that break down tryptophan through this pathway are found in numerous cell types, including cells of the immune system. Some of these enzymes are induced by immune activation, including the rate limiting enzyme present in macrophages and dendritic cells, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). It has recently been found that inhibition of IDO can ...

  19. Acute administration of red yeast rice (Monascus purpureus) depletes tissue coenzyme Q(10) levels in ICR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Ting; Lin, Shyh-Hsiang; Huang, Shih-Yi; Chou, Hsin-Ju

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effect of administration of a high quantity of red yeast rice on coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) synthesis in the tissues of ICR mice. Eighty-eight adult male ICR mice were housed and divided into control and experimental groups for red yeast rice treatment. Animals were gavaged with a low (1 g/kg body weight) or a high dose (5 g/kg body weight, approximately five times the typical recommended human dose) of red yeast rice dissolved in soyabean oil. After gavagement, animals of the control group were immediately killed; mice of the experimental groups (eight for each subgroup) were killed at different time intervals of 0.5, 1, 1.5, 4 and 24 h. The liver, heart and kidney were taken for analysis of monacolin K (liver only) and CoQ10 analysis. Liver and heart CoQ10 levels declined dramatically in both groups administered red yeast rice, especially in the high-dose group, within 30 min. After 24 h, the levels of hepatic and cardiac CoQ10 were still reduced. A similar trend was also observed in the heart, but the inhibitory effect began after 90 min. The higher dose of red yeast rice presented a greater suppressive effect than did the lower dose on tissue CoQ10 levels. In conclusion, acute red yeast rice gavage suppressed hepatic and cardiac CoQ10 levels in rodents; furthermore, the inhibitory effect was responsive to the doses administered.

  20. Decreasing amphetamine-induced dopamine release by acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion: A PET/[11C]raclopride study in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyton, Marco; Dagher, Alain; Boileau, Isabelle; Casey, Kevin; Baker, Glen B; Diksic, Mirko; Gunn, Roger; Young, Simon N; Benkelfat, Chawki

    2004-02-01

    Acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD) has been proposed as a new method to decrease catecholamine neurotransmission safely, rapidly, and transiently. Validation studies in animals are encouraging, but direct evidence in human brain is lacking. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that APTD would reduce stimulated dopamine (DA) release, as assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) and changes in [(11)C]raclopride binding potential (BP), a measure of DA D2/D3 receptor availability. Eight healthy men received two PET scans, both following d-amphetamine, 0.3 mg/kg, p.o., an oral dose known to decrease [(11)C]raclopride BP in ventral striatum. On the morning before each scan, subjects ingested, in counter-balanced order, an amino-acid mixture deficient in the catecholamine precursors, phenylalanine, and tyrosine, or a nutritionally balanced mixture. Brain parametric images were generated by calculating [(11)C]raclopride BP at each voxel. BP values were extracted from the t-map (threshold: t=4.2, equivalent to pamphetamine-induced DA release exhibited a linear association with the reduction in plasma tyrosine levels (r=-0.82, pnew tool for human neuropsychopharmacology research.

  1. Tryptophan metabolism, disposition and utilization in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Abdulla A.-B.

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) requirements in pregnancy are several-fold: (1) the need for increased protein synthesis by mother and for fetal growth and development; (2) serotonin (5-HT) for signalling pathways; (3) kynurenic acid (KA) for neuronal protection; (4) quinolinic acid (QA) for NAD+ synthesis (5) other kynurenines (Ks) for suppressing fetal rejection. These goals could not be achieved if maternal plasma [Trp] is depleted. Although plasma total (free + albumin-bound) Trp is decreased in pregnancy, free Trp is elevated. The above requirements are best expressed in terms of a Trp utilization concept. Briefly, Trp is utilized as follows: (1) In early and mid-pregnancy, emphasis is on increased maternal Trp availability to meet the demand for protein synthesis and fetal development, most probably mediated by maternal liver Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition by progesterone and oestrogens. (2) In mid- and late pregnancy, Trp availability is maintained and enhanced by the release of albumin-bound Trp by albumin depletion and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) elevation, leading to increased flux of Trp down the K pathway to elevate immunosuppressive Ks. An excessive release of free Trp could undermine pregnancy by abolishing T-cell suppression by Ks. Detailed assessment of parameters of Trp metabolism and disposition and related measures (free and total Trp, albumin, NEFA, K and its metabolites and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in maternal blood and, where appropriate, placental and fetal material) in normal and abnormal pregnancies may establish missing gaps in our knowledge of the Trp status in pregnancy and help identify appropriate intervention strategies. PMID:26381576

  2. Calmatives for the excitable horse: a review of L-tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmett, A; Sillence, M N

    2005-07-01

    Preparations that contain tryptophan are marketed world wide as calmative agents to treat excitable horses. Tryptophan is the amino acid precursor for serotonin, a neurotransmitter implicated in sedation, inhibition of aggression, fear and stress, in various animal species and humans. Experiments have shown that tryptophan supplementation decreases aggression in humans, dogs, pigs, poultry, and fish, and that it may reduce fearfulness and stress in calves, vixens and poultry. However, behavioural characteristics more closely linked to excitement, such as hyperactivity in dogs, are not modified by tryptophan supplementation. Research using a variety of animals other than horses, has shown that the behavioural response to tryptophan supplementation varies with age, breed and gender, and can be modified by diet, exercise, social status, and level of arousal. Significantly, the response is species-dependent, and there are no scientific publications that confirm the efficacy of tryptophan as a calmative in excitable horses. The few studies where tryptophan has been administered to horses suggest that low doses (relative to those contained in commercial preparations) cause mild excitement, whereas high doses reduce endurance capacity, and cause acute haemolytic anaemia if given orally, due to a toxic hindgut metabolite. As tryptophan continues to be used as an equine calmative, there is an urgent need for research to confirm its efficacy in horses, and to establish a safe therapeutic dose range. In the meantime, available data suggest that it would be imprudent to rely on tryptophan to calm the excitable horse, and instead, that a greater effort should be made to identify the underlying causes of excitability, and to explore more appropriate non-pharmacological remedies.

  3. Partial depletion of natural CD4⁺CD25⁺ regulatory T cells with anti-CD25 antibody does not alter the course of acute influenza A virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Betts

    Full Text Available Foxp3⁺CD4⁺ regulatory T cells represent a T cell subset with well-characterized immunosuppressive effects during immune homeostasis and chronic infections, and there is emerging evidence to suggest these cells temper pulmonary inflammation in response to acute viral infection. Recent studies have demonstrated treatment with PC61 CD25-depleting antibody potentiates inflammation in a murine model of RSV infection, while paradoxically delaying recruitment of CD8⁺ T cells to the site of inflammation. The present study therefore sought to examine the role of these cells in a murine model of acute influenza A virus infection through the administration of PC61 CD25-depleting antibody. PC61 antibody is able to partially deplete CD25⁺Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells to a comparable degree as seen within previous work examining RSV, however this does not alter influenza A-virus induced mortality, weight loss, viral clearance and cellularity within the lung. Collectively, these data demonstrate that partial depletion of CD4⁺CD25⁺ regulatory T cells with PC61 antibody does not alter the course of influenza A virus infection.

  4. Enzyme synthesis of L-tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, R; Plachý, J; Bulantová, H; Sikyta, B; Pavlasová, E; Stejskalová, E

    1990-01-01

    Enzyme synthesis of tryptophan from indole, pyruvate and ammonium salts was studied using Escherichia coli cells exhibiting a significant tryptophanase activity. In addition to the effect of cultivation medium composition and cultivation conditions, factors affecting the course of the conversion were investigated. Production of 32.4 g/L of L-tryptophan was reached after 48 h under optimal conditions.

  5. Tryptophan: a key nutrient in pig diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansman, A.J.M.; Floc'h Le, N.; Melchior, N.; Melchior, D.

    2007-01-01

    During the past decades, the interest in the essential amino acid tryptophan has steadily increased, especially in piglets because they are particularly sensitive to tryptophan. However, how much does the animal actually require in terms of diet, age, health and sanitary housing conditions? This

  6. Gourami lenses convert tryptophan into 3-hydroxykynurenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, R J; Wood, A M

    1994-01-01

    Although free tryptophan was found in the lens of both the kissing gourami (Helostoma temmincki) and the 3-spot gourami (Trichogaster trichopterus), only the lens of the latter species contained 3-hydroxykynurenine. Radiolabel experiments carried out on 3-spot gourami lenses in culture demonstrated that, as in humans, lenticular tryptophan is converted to 3-hydroxykynurenine probably via the intermediate kynurenine.

  7. Distinct Patterns of Tryptophan Maintenance in Tissues during Kynurenine Pathway Activation in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia L Drewes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Induction of the kynurenine pathway (KP of tryptophan catabolism has been proposed to contribute to T cell dysfunction during human/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV infection via depletion of local tryptophan levels and production of immunomodulatory KP metabolites. However, while changes in tryptophan and KP metabolites have been observed in plasma, their levels in lymphoid tissues and levels of enzymes downstream of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1 have been relatively unexplored. We used our SIV-infected pigtailed macaque model to analyze longitudinal changes in KP metabolites and enzymes by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and NanoString nCounter gene expression analysis, respectively, in spleen and blood compared to changes previously established in brain and CSF. We found that tryptophan levels were remarkably stable in tissue sites despite robust depletion in the circulating plasma and CSF. We also demonstrated that intracellular tryptophan reserves were maintained in cultured cells even in the presence of depleted extracellular tryptophan levels. Kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, quinolinic acid, and the KP enzymes all displayed highly divergent patterns in the sites examined, though IDO1 expression always correlated with local kynurenine/tryptophan ratios. Finally, we demonstrated by FACS that myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs and cells of monocytic lineage were the highest producers of IDO1 in chronically infected spleens. Overall our study reveals insights into the tissue-specific regulation of KP enzymes and metabolites and, in particular, highlights the multiple mechanisms by which cells and tissues seek to prevent TRP starvation during inflammation.

  8. Dietary tryptophan alleviates dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis through aryl hydrocarbon receptor in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Jahidul; Sato, Shoko; Watanabe, Kouichi; Watanabe, Takaya; Ardiansyah; Hirahara, Keisuke; Aoyama, Yukihide; Tomita, Shuhei; Aso, Hisashi; Komai, Michio; Shirakawa, Hitoshi

    2017-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis is the typical progression of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Amino acids, particularly tryptophan, have been reported to exert a protective effect against colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), but the precise underlying mechanisms remain incompletely clarified. Tryptophan metabolites are recognized to function as endogenous ligands for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr), which is a critical regulator of inflammation and immunity. Thus, we conducted this study to investigate whether dietary tryptophan supplementation protects against DSS-induced colitis by acting through Ahr. Female wild-type (WT) and Ahr-deficient (knockout; KO) mice (10-12 weeks old) were divided into four groups and fed either a control or 0.5% tryptophan diet. The tryptophan diet ameliorated DSS-induced colitis symptoms and severity in WT mice but not in KO mice, and the diet reduced the mRNA expression of Il-6, Tnfα, Il-1β and the chemokines Ccl2, Cxcl1 and Cxcl2 in the WT groups. Furthermore, Il-22 and Stat3 mRNA expression in the colon was elevated in WT mice fed with the tryptophan diet, which mainly protected epithelial layer integrity, and Ahr also modulated immune homeostasis by regulating Foxp3 and Il-17 mRNA expression. These data suggest that tryptophan-containing diet might ameliorate DSS-induced acute colitis and regulate epithelial homeostasis through Ahr. Thus, tryptophan could serve as a promising preventive agent in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evening dietary tryptophan improves post-sleep behavioral and brain measures of memory function in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markus, C.R.; Jonkman, L.M.; Lammers, J.H.C.M.; Deutz, N.E.P.

    2006-01-01

    Brain serotonin function has been implicated in the control of sleep and sleep related memory dysfunctions are attributed to deficient brain serotonin activity. Depletion of the serotonin precursor tryptophan reduces brain serotonin function and is found to cause sleep abnormalities and cognitive

  10. Insuficiência respiratória aguda como manifestação da síndrome de eosinofilia-mialgia associada à ingestão de L-triptofano Acute respiratory failure as a manifestation of eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome associated with L-tryptophan intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago de Araujo Guerra Grangeia

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome da eosinofilia-mialgia foi descrita em 1989 em pacientes que apresentavam mialgia progressiva e incapacitante e eosinofilia sérica, nos líquidos e secreções. A maioria dos pacientes relatava uso prévio de L-triptofano. Sintomas respiratórios são relatados em até 80% dos casos, eventualmente como manifestação única. O tratamento inclui suspensão da droga e corticoterapia. Relatamos o caso de uma mulher de 61 anos com insuficiência respiratória aguda após uso de L-triptofano, hidroxitriptofano e outras drogas. A paciente apresentava eosinofilia no sangue, lavado broncoalveolar e derrame pleural. Após a suspensão da medicação e corticoterapia, houve melhora clínica e radiológica em poucos dias.Eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome was described in 1989 in patients who presented progressive and incapacitating myalgia and eosinophilia in blood, fluids and secretions. Most patients report previous L-tryptophan intake. Respiratory manifestations are found in up to 80% of the cases, occasionally as the only manifestation. Treatment includes drug discontinuation and administration of corticosteroids. Here, we describe the case of a 61-year-old female admitted with acute respiratory failure after using L-tryptophan, hydroxytryptophan and other drugs. The patient presented eosinophilia, together with elevated eosinophil counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage and pleural effusion. After discontinuation of the drugs previously used, corticosteroids were administered, resulting in clinical and radiological improvement within just a few days.

  11. Structural Characterization of New Microcystins Containing Tryptophan and Oxidized Tryptophan Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddick, Jonathan; Prinsep, Michèle R.; Wood, Susanna A.; Miles, Christopher O.; Rise, Frode; Cary, Stephen Craig; Hamilton, David P.; Wilkins, Alistair L.

    2013-01-01

    Microcystins are cyclic peptides produced by cyanobacteria, which can be harmful to humans and animals when ingested. Eight of the (more than) 90 microcystin variants presently characterized, contain the amino acid tryptophan. The well-researched oxidation products of tryptophan; kynurenine, oxindolylalanine, and N-formylkynurenine, have been previously identified in intact polypeptides but microcystin congeners containing oxidized tryptophan moieties have not been reported. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis of an extract of Microcystis CAWBG11 led to the tentative identification of two new tryptophan-containing microcystins (MC‑WAba and MC-WL), as well as eight other microcystin analogs containing kynurenine, oxindolylalanine and N‑formylkynurenine (Nfk). Investigation of one of these congeners (MC‑NfkA) by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to verify the presence of Nfk in the microcystin. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of a tryptophan oxidation experiment demonstrated that tryptophan-containing microcystins could be converted into oxidized tryptophan analogs and that low levels of oxidized tryptophan congeners were present intracellularly in CAWBG11. MC-NfkR and MC-LNfk were detected in standards of MC-WR and MC-LW, indicating that care during storage of tryptophan-containing microcystins is required. PMID:23966035

  12. Disturbed tryptophan metabolism in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangge, H; Stelzer, I; Reininghaus, E Z; Weghuber, D; Postolache, T T; Fuchs, D

    2014-06-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS), a major pathologic consequence of obesity, is the main etiological factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the most common cause of death in the western world. A systemic chronic low grade immune- mediated inflammation (scLGI) is substantially implicated in AS and its consequences. In particular, proinflammatory cytokines play a major role, with Th1-type cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) being a key mediator. Among various other molecular and cellular effects, IFN-γ activates the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in monocyte-derived macrophages, dendritic, and other cells, which, in turn, decreases serum levels of the essential amino acid tryptophan (TRP). Thus, people with CVD often have increased serum kynurenine to tryptophan ratios (KYN/TRP), a result of an increased TRP breakdown. Importantly, increased KYN/TRP is associated with a higher likelihood of fatal cardiovascular events. A scLGI with increased production of the proinflammatory adipokine leptin, in combination with IFN-γ and interleukin-6 (IL-6), represents another central link between obesity, AS, and CVD. Leptin has also been shown to contribute to Th1-type immunity shifting, with abdominal fat being thus a direct contributor to KYN/TRP ratio. However, TRP is not only an important source for protein production but also for the generation of one of the most important neurotransmitters, 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin), by the tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent TRP 5-hydroxylase. In prolonged states of scLGI, availability of free serum TRP is strongly diminished, affecting serotonin synthesis, particularly in the brain. Additionally, accumulation of neurotoxic KYN metabolites such as quinolinic acid produced by microglia, can contribute to the development of depression via NMDA glutamatergic stimulation. Depression had been reported to be associated with CVD endpoints, but it most likely represents only a secondary loop connecting excess adipose tissue, scLGI and

  13. The impact of chronic GVHD on survival of Patients with acute myeloid leukemia after non-T-cell depleted HLA-identical sibling peripheral blood stem cells transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farhad Shahsavar

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: These data indicate that the occurrence of cGVHD is an important predictor of outcome of non-T-cell depleted HLA-identical sibling allogeneic PBSCT, in those AML patients who develope cGVHD have a high chance of survival.

  14. Acute depletion of Tet1-dependent 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels impairs LIF/Stat3 signaling and results in loss of embryonic stem cell identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, Johannes M; Ghosh, Swati; Lackford, Brad L; Yellaboina, Sailu; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Li, Ruifang; Cuddapah, Suresh; Wade, Paul A; Hu, Guang; Jothi, Raja

    2012-04-01

    The TET family of FE(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes (Tet1/2/3) promote DNA demethylation by converting 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which they further oxidize into 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine. Tet1 is robustly expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and has been implicated in mESC maintenance. Here we demonstrate that, unlike genetic deletion, RNAi-mediated depletion of Tet1 in mESCs led to a significant reduction in 5hmC and loss of mESC identity. The differentiation phenotype due to Tet1 depletion positively correlated with the extent of 5hmC loss. Meta-analyses of genomic data sets suggested interaction between Tet1 and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) signaling. LIF signaling is known to promote self-renewal and pluripotency in mESCs partly by opposing MAPK/ERK-mediated differentiation. Withdrawal of LIF leads to differentiation of mESCs. We discovered that Tet1 depletion impaired LIF-dependent Stat3-mediated gene activation by affecting Stat3's ability to bind to its target sites on chromatin. Nanog overexpression or inhibition of MAPK/ERK signaling, both known to maintain mESCs in the absence of LIF, rescued Tet1 depletion, further supporting the dependence of LIF/Stat3 signaling on Tet1. These data support the conclusion that analysis of mESCs in the hours/days immediately following efficient Tet1 depletion reveals Tet1's normal physiological role in maintaining the pluripotent state that may be subject to homeostatic compensation in genetic models.

  15. Ultrafast polarized fluorescence measurements on tryptophan and a tryptophan-containing peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, O.F.A.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Pandit, A.; van Grondelle, R.; van Amerongen, H.

    2003-01-01

    In this work polarized picosecond fluorescence measurements were performed on isolated tryptophan and tryptophan in a small 22-mer peptide using a streak camera coupled to a spectrograph as a detection system. In both cases the fluorescence decay was multiexponential with decay times of ∼500 ps and

  16. Ultrafast polarized fluorescence measurements on Tryptophan and a Tryptophan-containing peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, O.F.A.; Stokkum, van I.H.M.; Pandit, A.; Grondelle, van R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2003-01-01

    In this work polarized picosecond fluorescence measurements were performed on isolated tryptophan and tryptophan in a small 22-mer peptide using a streak camera coupled to a spectrograph as a detection system. In both cases the fluorescence decay was multiexponential with decay times of similar

  17. Mechanisms of the Pellagragenic Effect of Leucine: Stimulation of Hepatic Tryptophan Oxidation by Administration of Branched-Chain Amino Acids to Healthy Human Volunteers and the Role of Plasma Free Tryptophan and Total Kynurenines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Abdulla A-B; Lake, Sarah L; Dougherty, Donald M

    2014-01-01

    The pellagragenic effect of leucine (Leu) has been proposed to involve modulation of L-tryptophan (Trp) metabolism along the hepatic kynurenine pathway. Here, we discuss some of the mechanisms suggested and report the effects in healthy volunteers of single doses of Leu (4.05–6.75 g) administered in a 16-amino acid mixture on concentrations of plasma Trp and its kynurenine metabolites. Flux of Trp through Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) is dose-dependently enhanced most probably by Leu and can be attributed to TDO activation. Trp oxidation is better expressed using plasma total kynure-nines, rather than kynurenine, and free, rather than total, Trp. Increased hepatic Trp oxidation may be an additional mechanism of action of branched-chain amino acids in the acute Trp depletion test. Inhibition of intestinal absorption or hepatic uptake of Trp by Leu can be excluded. Potential mechanisms of the aggravation of pellagra symptoms by Leu are discussed. PMID:25520560

  18. The tryptophan requirements of young laying pullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, T R; Wethli, E

    1978-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted with laying pullets between 32 and 47 weeks of age. In each trial 1728 White Leghorn and 1728 cross-bred pullets were used. A series of diets of increasing protein content was offered. Protein quality was identical in all diets and tryptophan was demonstrated to be the most limiting amino acid in the protein mixture used. The daily tryptophan requirement of the individual pullet was estimated, by indirect methods, to be 2.25 mg/g egg output plus 10.25 mg/kg body weight. Response curves for flocks of pullets are illustrated. Calculated optimum intakes of tryptophan for various ratios of costs of input to value of output are tabulated. It is estimated that for a flock of mean body weight 1.5 kg, producing 55 g egg mass/hen d and consuming 110 g food/hen d, the optimum dietary tryptophan concentration is 1.7 g/kg when the marginal cost of supplying 1 kg tryptophan is 20 times the marginal value of 1 kg egg output.

  19. Tryptophan mutants in Arabidopsis: the consequences of duplicated tryptophan synthase beta genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, R L; Bissinger, P H; Mahoney, D J; Radwanski, E R; Fink, G R

    1991-01-01

    The cruciferous plant Arabidopsis thaliana has two closely related, nonallelic tryptophan synthase beta genes (TSB1 and TSB2), each containing four introns and a chloroplast leader sequence. Both genes are transcribed, although TSB1 produces greater than 90% of tryptophan synthase beta mRNA in leaf tissue. A tryptophan-requiring mutant, trp2-1, has been identified that has about 10% of the wild-type tryptophan synthase beta activity. The trp2-1 mutation is complemented by the TSB1 transgene and is linked genetically to a polymorphism in the TSB1 gene, strongly suggesting that trp2-1 is a mutation in TSB1. The trp2-1 mutants are conditional: they require tryptophan for growth under standard illumination but not under very low light conditions. Presumably, under low light the poorly expressed gene, TSB2, is capable of supporting growth. Genetic redundancy may be common to many aromatic amino acid biosynthetic enzymes in plants because mutants defective in two other genes (TRP1 and TRP3) also exhibit a conditional tryptophan auxotrophy. The existence of two tryptophan pathways has important consequences for tissue-specific regulation of amino acid and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. PMID:1840915

  20. Pre-transplant donor-specific T-cell alloreactivity is strongly associated with early acute cellular rejection in kidney transplant recipients not receiving T-cell depleting induction therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Crespo

    Full Text Available Preformed T-cell immune-sensitization should most likely impact allograft outcome during the initial period after kidney transplantation, since donor-specific memory T-cells may rapidly recognize alloantigens and activate the effector immune response, which leads to allograft rejection. However, the precise time-frame in which acute rejection is fundamentally triggered by preformed donor-specific memory T cells rather than by de novo activated naïve T cells is still to be established. Here, preformed donor-specific alloreactive T-cell responses were evaluated using the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay in a large consecutive cohort of kidney transplant patients (n = 90, to assess the main clinical variables associated with cellular sensitization and its predominant time-frame impact on allograft outcome, and was further validated in an independent new set of kidney transplant recipients (n = 67. We found that most highly T-cell sensitized patients were elderly patients with particularly poor HLA class-I matching, without any clinically recognizable sensitizing events. While one-year incidence of all types of biopsy-proven acute rejection did not differ between T-cell alloreactive and non-alloreactive patients, Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis indicated the first two months after transplantation as the highest risk time period for acute cellular rejection associated with baseline T-cell sensitization. This effect was particularly evident in young and highly alloreactive individuals that did not receive T-cell depletion immunosuppression. Multivariate analysis confirmed preformed T-cell sensitization as an independent predictor of early acute cellular rejection. In summary, monitoring anti-donor T-cell sensitization before transplantation may help to identify patients at increased risk of acute cellular rejection, particularly in the early phases after kidney transplantation, and thus guide decision-making regarding the use of induction

  1. 21 CFR 582.5915 - Tryptophane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tryptophane. 582.5915 Section 582.5915 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  2. Improving therapeutics in anorexia nervosa with tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2017-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that our diet is an important contributing factor in the development, management and prevention of a number of psychiatric illnesses. Tryptophan, an essential amino acid, is the sole precursor of neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin). Administration of tryptophan can boost serotonin neurotransmission to produce therapeutically important effects in serotonin deficiency disorders. Anorexia nervosa (AN) an eating disorder associated with high levels of psychiatric comorbidity including psychosis, hyperactivity, depression and anxiety has highest lethality of all psychiatric illnesses. Evidence suggests that excessive dieting and food restriction can decrease brain tryptophan and serotonin in AN patients to precipitate depression, psychosis and hyperactivity. There are currently no FDA approved pharmacological treatments available for AN patients; antidepressants and antipsychotics, largely used to treat associated psychiatric comorbidities are also not very effective. The aim of this non-systematic review article is to evaluate and document a potential importance of tryptophan supplementation in improving therapeutics in AN patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Effects of Dietary Tryptophan on Affective Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindseth, Glenda; Helland, Brian; Caspers, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Using a randomized crossover study design, 25 healthy young adults were examined for differences in anxiety, depression, and mood after consuming a high tryptophan and a low tryptophan diet for four days each. There was a two week washout between the diets. A within-subjects analysis of the participants’ mood indicated significantly (p tryptophan diet as compared to a low tryptophan diet. Negative affect differences between the diets were not statistically significant (p > .05). Also, consuming more dietary tryptophan resulted in (p < .05) less depressive symptoms and decreased anxiety. PMID:25858202

  4. Transient depletion of T cells with high LFA-1 expression from peripheral circulation during acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Theander, T G; Abdulhadi, N H

    1991-01-01

    Acute P. falciparum malaria is associated with loss of in vitro T cell responsiveness to antigenic stimulation, and with high plasma levels of soluble interleukin 2 receptor (IL 2R). In the present study peripheral T cells from acute P. falciparum malaria patients from a malaria-endemic area...... of Sudan were analyzed for expression of cell surface antigens associated with T lymphocyte adhesion, activation and maturation. The results were compared to results from T cells obtained from the same donors either before the attack, or during convalescence. Most donors showed a remarkable loss of T cells...... peripheral CD3+ T lymphocytes expressed LFA-1, which had a clearly bimodal distribution on these cells. The T cell subpopulation having high LFA-1 expression (LFA-1++) was composed of both memory and unprimed T cells, according to their expression of CD45RA and CD45R0. Analysis of expression of membrane...

  5. No effect of oral L-tryptophan or alpha-lactalbumin on total tryptophan levels in breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowlati, Yekta; Ravindran, Arun V; Maheux, Maxim; Steiner, Meir; Stewart, Donna E; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2015-06-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common complication of childbearing with a 13% prevalence rate. Sleep disturbances are also common, particularly during early postpartum. In theory, l-tryptophan could improve sleep and reduce depressed mood in early postpartum; however, the first step in clinical development of tryptophan for use in postpartum is to measure the effect of oral l-tryptophan on its concentrations in breast milk, which is presently unknown. The aims were to investigate the effect of oral l-tryptophan and alpha-lactalbumin, a protein with high tryptophan concentration, on total and free tryptophan levels in breast milk and plasma, and to compare free tryptophan levels in breast milk with those in common infant formulas. Thirty healthy breastfeeding women were randomly allocated to receive 2g or 4g of l-tryptophan, or, 20g or 40g of alpha-lactalbumin or no supplement. Free tryptophan levels were also measured in 12 different infant formulas. Total tryptophan in breast milk was unaffected by oral administration of l-tryptophan or alpha-lactalbumin (repeated measures of ANOVA (rANOVA), group effect: p=0.93). Both l-tryptophan and alpha-lactalbumin were associated with greater free tryptophan levels in breast milk (rANOVA, group effect: ptryptophan), but these concentrations were within the range of commonly used infant formulas. In contrast to most sleep inducing medications, l-tryptophan does not affect its total concentration in breast milk. These results support further investigation of dietary l-tryptophan and alpha-lactalbumin as part of a dietary supplementation approach to address sleep disturbances in postpartum and reduce risk of PPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute Depletion of D2 Receptors from the Rat Substantia Nigra Alters Dopamine Kinetics in the Dorsal Striatum and Drug Responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budygin, Evgeny A; Oleson, Erik B; Lee, Yun Beom; Blume, Lawrence C; Bruno, Michael J; Howlett, Allyn C; Thompson, Alexis C; Bass, Caroline E

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have used conditional knockout mice to selectively delete the D2 autoreceptor; however, these approaches result in global deletion of D2 autoreceptors early in development. The present study takes a different approach using RNA interference (RNAi) to knockdown the expression of the D2 receptors (D2R) in the substantia nigra (SN), including dopaminergic neurons, which project primarily to the dorsal striatum (dStr) in adult rats. This approach restricts the knockdown primarily to nigrostriatal pathways, leaving mesolimbic D2 autoreceptors intact. Analyses of dopamine (DA) kinetics in the dStr reveal a decrease in DA transporter (DAT) function in the knockdown rats, an effect not observed in D2 autoreceptor knockout mouse models. SN D2 knockdown rats exhibit a behavioral phenotype characterized by persistent enhancement of locomotor activity in a familiar open field, reduced locomotor responsiveness to high doses of cocaine and the ability to overcome haloperidol-induced immobility on the bar test. Together these results demonstrate that presynaptic D2R can be depleted from specific neuronal populations and implicates nigrostriatal D2R in different behavioral responses to psychotropic drugs.

  7. Altered response to tryptophan supplementation after long-term abstention from MDMA (ecstasy) is highly correlated with human memory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, H Valerie; Verheyden, Suzanne L

    2003-08-01

    MDMA (ecstasy; +3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) damages brain serotonin (5-HT) neurons and, in non-human primates, a loss of various 5-HT axonal markers persists for several years. This raises the question of whether long lasting effects occur in human beings that persist even after they have stopped using MDMA. We therefore assessed the effects of an indirect 5-HT manipulation on functions thought to be affected by MDMA use in people who had stopped using MDMA (ex-users) compared with continuing users and non-users. Ninety-six participants were recruited: 32 ex-users who had stopped using MDMA for >1 year (mean, 2.4 years); 32 current users and 32 polydrug controls who had never used MDMA but were matched with ex-users and controls on cannabis use and pre-morbid IQ. Participants were given an amino acid mixture that contained either no tryptophan (T-) or augmented tryptophan (T+) and assessed before and 5 h after the drink on measures of cognitive function and mood. T+ and T- produced plasma tryptophan augmentation and depletion, respectively, in all three groups. Ex-users' plasma tryptophan levels in response to T+ were significantly higher than other groups. Ex-users' performance on a delayed prose recall task improved after T+ and lessened after T-. Changes in ex-users' free plasma tryptophan levels correlated highly (r=-0.9) with their baseline performance on immediate and delayed prose recall; change in total plasma tryptophan correlated (r=-0.81) with delayed recall. Further, total baseline plasma tryptophan correlated with number of years they had used MDMA before quitting. Baseline differences between groups were found on learning, working memory, aggression and impulsivity. T- did not produce differential effects in the three groups. Our results suggest that prolonged abstinence from MDMA might be associated with altered tryptophan metabolism. Ex-users showing the poorest memory function at baseline were also those who metabolised least tryptophan

  8. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation with T cell-depleted partially matched related donors for advanced acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and adults: a comparative matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, D R; Henslee-Downey, P J; Romond, E H; Harder, E J; Marciniak, E; Munn, R K; Messino, M J; Macdonald, J S; Bishop, M; Rayens, M K; Thompson, J S; Foon, K A

    1996-06-01

    Allogeneic BMT provides the best treatment currently available for long-term disease-free survival in patients with recurrent ALL. Historically, partially matched related donors provided the opportunity for treatment to a greater number of patients than matched related donors at the expense of decreased overall survival. In this study we compare the results in recurrent ALL patients transplanted with either HLA identical sibling bone marrow or partially matched related bone marrow. Thirty-two patients with relapsed ALL received partially matched bone marrows from a relative with one to three HLA, A, B and Dr antigen mismatches. Bone marrow was partially T cell-depleted with murine T10B9.1A-31 moAb. Sixteen patients with relapsed ALL received HLA-matched sibling bone marrows. All partially matched patients received additional GVHD prophylaxis with methylprednisolone in addition to anti-CD5 immunotoxin and/or CYA. All matched patients in addition to methylprednisolone received MTX and/or CYA. We observed no difference in disease-free survival between patients transplanted with partially matched bone marrow (median follow-up 1252 days, range 778-2035 days) vs those transplanted with HLA-matched bone marrow (median follow-up 1472 days, range 1165-2800 days; P = 0.48). Median survival for all patients is 38% (95% CI 24-52%) at 6 years. Patients transplanted in remission had a significant increase in disease-free survival when compared to those in relapse (P = 0.007). Our data suggest that partially matched BMTs from related donors are a comparable alternative to fully matched transplants in patients with ALL.

  9. Inhibition of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Activity by Levo-1-Methyl Tryptophan Blocks Gamma Interferon-Induced Chlamydia trachomatis Persistence in Human Epithelial Cells ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibana, Joyce A.; Belland, Robert J.; Zea, Arnold H.; Schust, Danny J.; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; AbdelRahman, Yasser M.; Tate, David J.; Beatty, Wandy L.; Aiyar, Ashok A.; Quayle, Alison J.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) induces expression of the tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) in human epithelial cells, the permissive cells for the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. IDO1 depletes tryptophan by catabolizing it to kynurenine with consequences for C. trachomatis, which is a tryptophan auxotroph. In vitro studies reveal that tryptophan depletion can result in the formation of persistent (viable but noncultivable) chlamydial forms. Here, we tested the effects of the IDO1 inhibitor, levo-1-methyl-tryptophan (L-1MT), on IFN-γ-induced C. trachomatis persistence. We found that addition of 0.2 mM L-1MT to IFN-γ-exposed infected HeLa cell cultures restricted IDO1 activity at the mid-stage (20 h postinfection [hpi]) of the chlamydial developmental cycle. This delayed tryptophan depletion until the late stage (38 hpi) of the cycle. Parallel morphological and gene expression studies indicated a consequence of the delay was a block in the induction of C. trachomatis persistence by IFN-γ. Furthermore, L-1MT addition allowed C. trachomatis to undergo secondary differentiation, albeit with limited productive multiplication of the bacterium. IFN-γ-induced persistent infections in epithelial cells have been previously reported to be more resistant to doxycycline than normal productive infections in vitro. Pertinent to this observation, we found that L-1MT significantly improved the efficacy of doxycycline in clearing persistent C. trachomatis forms. It has been postulated that persistent forms of C. trachomatis may contribute to chronic chlamydial disease. Our findings suggest that IDO1 inhibitors such as L-1MT might provide a novel means to investigate, and potentially target, persistent chlamydial forms, particularly in conjunction with conventional therapeutics. PMID:21911470

  10. Tryptophan-induced pathogenesis of breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v15i3.36. Cite as: Cao Z-G, Qin X-B, Liu F-F, Zhou L-L. Tryptophan-induced pathogenesis of breast cancer. Afri Health Sci. 2015;15(3):982-5. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v15i3.36. Introduction. Breast cancer, developing from breast tissue, remains the top reason for death of women.

  11. Tryptophan-to-Tryptophan Energy Transfer in UV-B photoreceptor UVR8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiankun; Zhong, Dongping

    UVR8 (UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8) protein is a UV-B photoreceptor in high plants. UVR8 is a homodimer that dissociates into monomers upon UV-B irradiation (280 nm to 315 nm), which triggers various protective mechanisms against UV damages. Uniquely, UVR8 does not contain any external chromophores and utilizes the UV-absorbing natural amino acid tryptophan (Trp) to perceive UV-B. Each UVR8 monomer has 14 tryptophan residues. However, only 2 epicenter Trp (W285 W233) are critical to the light induced dimer-to-monomer transformation. Here, we revealed, using site-directed mutagenesis and spectroscopy, a striking energy flow network, in which other tryptophan chromophores serve as antenna to transfer excitation energy to epicenter Trp, greatly enhancing UVR8 light-harvesting efficiency. Furthermore, Trp-to-Trp energy transfer rates were measured and agree well with theoretical values.

  12. Suppression of androgen production by D-tryptophan-6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolis, G; Mehta, A; Comaru-Schally, A M; Schally, A V

    1981-01-01

    Four male transsexual subjects were given a superactive luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogue, D-tryptophan-6-LHRH at daily doses of 100 micrograms for 3--6 mo. A decrease in beard growth, acne, and erectile potency was noted; the latter was documented objectively with the recordings of nocturnal penile tumescence episodes. Plasma testosterone and dihydrotestosterone levels fell to castrate values; basal prolactin and luteinizing hormone levels showed a small decline, whereas the acutely releasable luteinizing hormone was significantly suppressed. A rise of plasma testosterone from castrate to normal levels was demonstrable with the use of human chorionic gonadotropin. Discontinuation of treatment led to a normalization of erectile potency and plasma testosterone. The suppression of Leydig cell function by D-tryptophan-6-LHRH might have wide application in reproductive biology and in endocrine-dependent neoplasia (where it could replace surgical castration). PMID:6456277

  13. Dietary tryptophan intake and suicide rate in industrialized nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin; Tran, Ulrich S

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the ecological association of dietary tryptophan intake and suicide rates across industrialized nations. Tryptophan, an essential amino acid, is the rate-limiting precursor of serotonin biosynthesis. The serotonergic system has been strongly implicated in the neurobiology of suicide. Contemporary male and female suicide rates for the general population (42 countries) and the elderly (38 countries) were correlated with national estimates of dietary tryptophan intake. Measures of tryptophan intake were significantly negatively associated to national suicide rates. Controlling for national affluence, total alcohol consumption and happiness levels slightly attenuated these associations, but left all of them negative. The effect is an ecological (group-level) finding. Estimated per capita tryptophan supply is only a proxy for actual consumption. Developed nations ranking high in dietary tryptophan intake rank low in suicide rates, independent of national wealth, alcohol intake and happiness.

  14. Tryptophan and kynurenine determination in human hair by liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dario, Michelli F; Freire, Thamires Batello; Pinto, Claudinéia Aparecida Sales de Oliveira; Prado, María Segunda Aurora; Baby, André R; Velasco, Maria Valéria R

    2017-10-15

    Tryptophan, an amino acid found in hair proteinaceous structure is used as a marker of hair photodegradation. Also, protein loss caused by several chemical/physical treatments can be inferred by tryptophan quantification. Kynurenine is a photo-oxidation product of tryptophan, expected to be detected when hair is exposed mainly to UVB (290-320nm) radiation range. Tryptophan from hair is usually quantified directly as a solid or after alkaline hydrolysis, spectrofluorimetrically. However, these types of measure are not sufficiently specific and present several interfering substances. Thus, this work aimed to propose a quantification method for both tryptophan and kynurenine in hair samples, after alkali hydrolysis process, by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorimetric and UV detection. The tryptophan and kynurenine quantification method was developed and validated. Black, white, bleached and dyed (blond and auburn) hair tresses were used in this study. Tryptophan and kynurenine were separated within ∼9min by HPLC. Both black and white virgin hair samples presented similar concentrations of tryptophan, while bleaching caused a reduction in the tryptophan content as well as dyeing process. Unexpectedly, UV/vis radiation did not promote significantly the conversion of tryptophan into its photo-oxidation product and consequently, kynurenine was not detected. Thus, this works presented an acceptable method for quantification of tryptophan and its photooxidation metabolite kynurenine in hair samples. Also, the results indicated that bleaching and dyeing processes promoted protein/amino acids loss but tryptophan is not extensively degraded in human hair by solar radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Requirement of young pigs for apparent ileal digestible tryptophan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, J.B.; Verstraten, A.J.M.A.; Lenis, N.P.; Jong, de J.; Diepen, van J.Th.M.

    1995-01-01

    In 5 growth trials with a total of 420 pigs, tryptophan requirements from 20 to 40 kg liveweight were estimated. L-Tryptophan 0, 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 and 0.60 g/kg was added to a basal diet containing tapioca, barley and maize, with CP 162 g/kg and tryptophan 1.65 g/kg. The control diet was supplemented

  16. Structural insights into regioselectivity in the enzymatic chlorination of tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; De Laurentis, Walter; Leang, Khim; Herrmann, Julia; Ihlefeld, Katja; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H

    2009-08-07

    The regioselectively controlled introduction of chlorine into organic molecules is an important biological and chemical process. This importance derives from the observation that many pharmaceutically active natural products contain a chlorine atom. Flavin-dependent halogenases are one of the principal enzyme families responsible for regioselective halogenation of natural products. Structural studies of two flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenases (PrnA and RebH) have generated important insights into the chemical mechanism of halogenation by this enzyme family. These proteins comprise two modules: a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding module and a tryptophan-binding module. Although the 7-halogenase studies advance a hypothesis for regioselectivity, this has never been experimentally demonstrated. PyrH is a tryptophan 5-halogenase that catalyzes halogenation on tryptophan C5 position. We report the crystal structure of a tryptophan 5-halogenase (PyrH) bound to tryptophan and FAD. The FAD-binding module is essentially unchanged relative to PrnA (and RebH), and PyrH would appear to generate the same reactive species from Cl(-), O(2), and 1,5-dihydroflavin adenine dinucleotide. We report additional mutagenesis data that extend our mechanistic understanding of this process, in particular highlighting a strap region that regulates FAD binding, and may allow communication between the two modules. PyrH has a significantly different tryptophan-binding module. The data show that PyrH binds tryptophan and presents the C5 atom to the reactive chlorinating species, shielding other potential reactive sites. We have mutated residues identified by structural analysis as recognizing the tryptophan in order to confirm their role. This work establishes the method by which flavin-dependent tryptophan halogenases regioselectively control chlorine addition to tryptophan. This method would seem to be general across the superfamily.

  17. Tryptophan promotes morphological and physiological differentiation in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzotto, Emilia; Renzone, Giovanni; Fontana, Pietro; Botta, Luigi; Scaloni, Andrea; Puglia, Anna Maria; Gallo, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating tryptophan biosynthesis in actinomycetes are poorly understood; similarly, the possible roles of tryptophan in the differentiation program of microorganism life-cycle are still underexplored. To unveil the possible regulatory effect of this amino acid on gene expression, an integrated study based on quantitative teverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and proteomic approaches was performed on the actinomycete model Streptomyces coelicolor. Comparative analyses on the microorganism growth in a minimal medium with or without tryptophan supplementation showed that biosynthetic trp gene expression in S. coelicolor is not subjected to a negative regulation by the presence of the end product. Conversely, tryptophan specifically induces the transcription of trp genes present in the biosynthetic gene cluster of the calcium-dependent antibiotic (CDA), a lipopeptide containing D- and L-tryptophan residues. In addition, tryptophan stimulates the transcription of the CDA gene cluster regulator cdaR and, coherently, CDA production. Surprisingly, tryptophan also promotes the production of actinorhodin, another antibiotic that does not contain this amino acid in its structure. Combined 2D-DIGE and nano liquid chromatography electrospray linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-LIT-MS/MS) analyses revealed that tryptophan exerts a growth-stage-dependent global effect on S. coelicolor proteome, stimulating anabolic pathways and promoting the accumulation of key factors associated with morphological and physiological differentiation at the late growth stages. Phenotypic observations by scanning electron microscopy and spore production assays demonstrated an increased sporulation in the presence of tryptophan. Transcriptional analysis of catabolic genes kynA and kynB suggested that the actinomycete also uses tryptophan as a carbon and nitrogen source. In conclusion, this study originally provides the molecular basis underlying the stimulatory

  18. Structural Insights into Regioselectivity in the Enzymatic Chlorination of Tryptophan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; De Laurentis, Walter; Leang, Khim; Herrmann, Julia; Ihlefeld, Katja; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H.

    2009-01-01

    The regioselectively controlled introduction of chlorine into organic molecules is an important biological and chemical process. This importance derives from the observation that many pharmaceutically active natural products contain a chlorine atom. Flavin-dependent halogenases are one of the principal enzyme families responsible for regioselective halogenation of natural products. Structural studies of two flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenases (PrnA and RebH) have generated important insights into the chemical mechanism of halogenation by this enzyme family. These proteins comprise two modules: a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding module and a tryptophan-binding module. Although the 7-halogenase studies advance a hypothesis for regioselectivity, this has never been experimentally demonstrated. PyrH is a tryptophan 5-halogenase that catalyzes halogenation on tryptophan C5 position. We report the crystal structure of a tryptophan 5-halogenase (PyrH) bound to tryptophan and FAD. The FAD-binding module is essentially unchanged relative to PrnA (and RebH), and PyrH would appear to generate the same reactive species from Cl-, O2, and 1,5-dihydroflavin adenine dinucleotide. We report additional mutagenesis data that extend our mechanistic understanding of this process, in particular highlighting a strap region that regulates FAD binding, and may allow communication between the two modules. PyrH has a significantly different tryptophan-binding module. The data show that PyrH binds tryptophan and presents the C5 atom to the reactive chlorinating species, shielding other potential reactive sites. We have mutated residues identified by structural analysis as recognizing the tryptophan in order to confirm their role. This work establishes the method by which flavin-dependent tryptophan halogenases regioselectively control chlorine addition to tryptophan. This method would seem to be general across the superfamily. PMID:19501593

  19. A rapid and specific colorimetric method for free tryptophan quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinan; Wang, Tianmin; Zhang, Chong; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2018-01-01

    Tryptophan is one of the eight essential amino acids and plays an important role in many biological processes. For its interaction with human health, environment and relevant commercial interest in biotechnology-based production, rapid and specific quantification method for this molecule accessible to common laboratories is badly needed. We herein reported a simple colorimetric method for free tryptophan quantification with 96-well-plate-level throughput. Our protocol firstly converted tryptophan to indole enzymatically by purified tryptophanases and then used reactivity of indole with hydroxylamine to form pink product with absorption peak at 530nm, enabling the quantification of tryptophan with simple spectrometry in just two hours. We presented that this method exhibited a linear detection range from 100μM to 600μM (R(2) = 0.9969) with no detection towards other naturally occurring tryptophan analogs or tryptophan residues in proteins. It was very robust in complicated biological samples, as demonstrated by quantifying the titer of 36 mutated tryptophan-producing strains with Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.93 in contrast to that measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Our method should be potent for routine free tryptophan quantification in a high-throughput manner, facilitating studies in medicine, microbiology, food chemistry, metabolic engineering, etc. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Confirmation of antibodies against L-tryptophan-like epitope in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibodies directed against L-tryptophan epitope (WE - W for tryptophan, E for epitope), a constant epitope borne by variant surface glycoproteins (VSG), have been detected in sera of all 152 Human African Trypanosomosis (HAT) patients from Angola. The WE is present in VSG hydrophobic regions of the C terminal ...

  1. Tryptophan Predicts the Risk for Future Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianlu; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Ma, Xiaojing; Bao, Yuqian; Ni, Yan; Hu, Cheng; Rajani, Cynthia; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5 amino acids were identified and verified as important metabolites highly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) development. This report aims to assess the association of tryptophan with the development of T2D and to evaluate its performance with existing amino acid markers. A total of 213 participants selected from a ten-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS) were examined in two ways: 1) 51 subjects who developed diabetes and 162 individuals who remained metabolically healthy in 10 years; 2) the same 51 future diabetes and 23 strictly matched ones selected from the 162 healthy individuals. Baseline fasting serum tryptophan concentrations were quantitatively measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry. First, serum tryptophan level was found significantly higher in future T2D and was positively and independently associated with diabetes onset risk. Patients with higher tryptophan level tended to present higher degree of insulin resistance and secretion, triglyceride and blood pressure. Second, the prediction potential of tryptophan is non-inferior to the 5 existing amino acids. The predictive performance of the combined score improved after taking tryptophan into account. Our findings unveiled the potential of tryptophan as a new marker associated with diabetes risk in Chinese populations. The addition of tryptophan provided complementary value to the existing amino acid predictors.

  2. Tryptophan Metabolism and White Matter Integrity in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappelli, Joshua; Postolache, Teodor T; Kochunov, Peter; Rowland, Laura M; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Shukla, Dinesh K; Tagamets, Malle; Du, Xiaoming; Savransky, Anya; Lowry, Christopher A; Can, Adem; Fuchs, Dietmar; Hong, L Elliot

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with abnormalities in the structure and functioning of white matter, but the underlying neuropathology is unclear. We hypothesized that increased tryptophan degradation in the kynurenine pathway could be associated with white matter microstructure and biochemistry, potentially contributing to white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia. To test this, fasting plasma samples were obtained from 37 schizophrenia patients and 38 healthy controls and levels of total tryptophan and its metabolite kynurenine were assessed. The ratio of kynurenine to tryptophan was used as an index of tryptophan catabolic activity in this pathway. White matter structure and function were assessed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Tryptophan levels were significantly lower (ptryptophan ratios were correspondingly higher (p=0.018) in patients compared with controls. In patients, lower plasma tryptophan levels corresponded to lower structural integrity (DTI fractional anisotropy) (r=0.347, p=0.038). In both patients and controls, the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio was inversely correlated with frontal white matter glutamate level (r=-0.391 and -0.350 respectively, p=0.024 and 0.036). These results provide initial evidence implicating abnormal tryptophan/kynurenine pathway activity in changes to white matter integrity and white matter glutamate in schizophrenia.

  3. Empathic accuracy and oxytocin after tryptophan depletion in adults at risk for depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenelst, Koen; Schoevers, Robert A; Kema, Ido P; Sweep, Fred C G J; Aan Het Rot, Marije

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with disturbances in social functioning and in the brain serotonin system. Reduced levels of serotonin may negatively influence social functioning, for example by impairing the recognition of facial emotion expressions. The present study

  4. Altered tryptophan metabolism in human meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talari, Noble Kumar; Panigrahi, Manas; Madigubba, Sailaja; Challa, Sundaram; Phanithi, Prakash Babu

    2016-10-01

    Meningiomas are the neoplasms that arise from the arachnoid cells of the meninges. It was reported that cancer cells escape from immune system through the metabolism of an aromatic essential amino acid tryptophan (TRP) via Kynurenine (KYN) pathway. However, the role of TRP metabolites such as, 5-Hydroxy tryptophan (5-HTP), 5-Hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT), N-acetyl serotonin (NAS), Melatonin (MEL), KYN, N-acetyl tryptamine, 5-Hydroxy indole acetic acid (5-HIAA) and 5-Methoxy indole acetic acid is not yet evaluated in human meningioma. Therefore, in the current study we have evaluated the levels of TRP and its metabolites in the progression of human meningioma using tumor biopsy samples and autopsy control meninges with Reverse Phase-HPLC. We here report that TRP metabolism favors towards KYN pathway in human meningioma and it could be due to increased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 2 levels as we found its m-RNA levels to be up regulated in human meningioma. We observed significant increase in KYN and 5HIAA levels and significant decrease in TRP, 5-HTP, 5-HT, NAS and MEL levels in meningioma compared to control meninges. Since TRP metabolites regulate inducible nitric oxide synthase (INOS) gene expression and thereby nitric oxide (NO) production, we have also evaluated the INOS and NO levels. The INOS and NO levels were up regulated in human meningioma. The present data corroborates with existing data on TRP metabolism in tumor progression and may serve to target TRP metabolism as a therapeutic intervention.

  5. Maternal nutritional depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, K M

    1994-01-01

    The author discusses maternal nutritional depletion, the negative energy balance and/or micronutrient deficiencies resulting from the energetic burden of frequent reproductive cycling combined with undernutrition and overexertion, and its impact upon a woman's health and nutritional status and that of her offspring. The article is therefore concerned with the impact of nutritional depletion which occurs during a woman's life cycle, as opposed to the effects of nutritional depletion which occur intergenerationally. A brief summary is presented of the recognition and controversy regarding the effects of reproductive stress followed by a description of the factors which make assessment and identification of specific consequences so complex, with approaches suggested to alleviate maternal nutritional depletion. Policy directions and areas for research are suggested.

  6. Alleviation of hysteria in laying hens with dietary tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, S R; Ball, R O

    1990-01-01

    A commercial layer breeder flock that was suffering from hysteria was fed a diet containing 5 grams tryptophan/kg for six days. The incidence of episodes of hysteria declined from five times/hour on day 0 to once/hour on day 6 and none on day 8. Feed consumption increased from 107 g to 145 g/hen/day and egg production increased 23% during the six day feeding period. The tryptophan concentration in plasma doubled (from 95.6 to 188.2 mumol/mL). Plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine also increased. Birds that were not in lay, by postmortem examination, had significantly higher plasma valine concentrations (476.4 vs 372.7 mumol/mL). Tryptophan, serotonin and related metabolites increased in both the hypothalamic region and the remainder of the brain following tryptophan feeding, and subsequently declined. High levels of dietary tryptophan may be useful in alleviating hysteria in poultry. PMID:2357668

  7. Metabolism of Tryptophan in Petioles of Coleus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdovinos, Jack G.; Perley, James E.

    1966-01-01

    Auxin precursors retard abscission when applied to debladed petioles of Coleus blumei Benth. The d and l forms of tryptophan are equally effective in retarding abscission. Tryptamine is more effective than is tryptophan. Both compounds apparently are converted to auxin through an aldehyde intermediate. The evidence presented suggests that a major pathway of tryptophan metabolism proceeds through tryptamine, as can be demonstrated by the use of amine oxidase inhibitors in the petiole tissue. Cell free preparations of the tissues metabolize tryptophan-1-14C with the release of carbon dioxide. The rate of tryptophan mtabolism in abscission tissue is 5 times that in distal petiole tissue. Radioactivity is associated with basic indole conversion products as well as with neutral and acidic fractions. The radioactivity is most concentrated in the neutral fraction. The results indicate that the Coleus petiole itself is capable of producing auxin. PMID:16656450

  8. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. III. Requirements for enzyme synthesis. J. Bacteriol. 84:996–1006. 1962.—The requirements for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase in Escherichia coli during repression release were studied. The kinetics of the formation of tryptophan synthetase differed in the two strains examined; this was attributed to differences in the endogenous level of tryptophan in the bacterial cells. The formation of both enzymes was inhibited by chloramphenicol, and by the absence of arginine in an arginine-requiring mutant. These results are indicative of a requirement for protein synthesis for enzyme formation. Requirements for nucleic acid synthesis were examined by use of a uracil- and thymine-requiring mutant, and with purine and pyrimidine analogues. The results obtained suggest that some type of ribonucleic acid synthesis was necessary for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase. PMID:13959620

  9. Destabilization of artificial biomembrane induced by the penetration of tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Liuhua [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Gan Lihua, E-mail: ganlh@tongji.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Liu Mingxian; Fan Rong; Xu Zijie; Hao Zhixian; Chen Longwu [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2011-03-15

    The effect of tryptophan on the membrane stability was studied by using three artificial biological membranes including liposome, Langmuir monolayer and solid supported bilayer lipid membrane (s-BLM) as models. All the results indicate that the penetration of tryptophan can destabilize different artificial biological membranes. The diameter of liposome and the leakage of calcein from liposome increased with the increase of tryptophan concentration because the penetration of tryptophan was beneficial for dehydrating the polar head groups of lipids and the formation of fusion intermediates. {pi}-A isotherms of lecithin on the subphase of tryptophan solution further confirm that tryptophan can penetrate into lipid monolayer and reduce the stability of lipid monolayer. When the concentration of tryptophan increased from 0 to 2 x 10{sup -3} mol L{sup -1}, the limiting molecular area of lecithin increased from 110.5 to 138.5 A{sup 2}, but the collapse pressure of the monolayer decreased from 47.6 to 42.3 mN m{sup -1}, indicating the destabilization of lipid monolayer caused by the penetration of tryptophan. The resistance spectra of s-BLM demonstrate that the existence of tryptophan leads to the formation of some defects in s-BLM and the destabilization of s-BLM. The values of electron-transfer resistance and double layer capacitance respectively decreased from 5.765 x 10{sup 6} {Omega} and 3.573 x 10{sup -8} F to 1.391 x 10{sup 6} {Omega} and 3.340 x 10{sup -8} F when the concentration of tryptophan increased from 0 to 2 x 10{sup -3} mol L{sup -1}. Correspondingly, the breakdown voltage of s-BLM decreased from 2.51 to 1.72 V.

  10. Destabilization of artificial biomembrane induced by the penetration of tryptophan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liuhua; Gan, Lihua; Liu, Mingxian; Fan, Rong; Xu, Zijie; Hao, Zhixian; Chen, Longwu

    2011-03-01

    The effect of tryptophan on the membrane stability was studied by using three artificial biological membranes including liposome, Langmuir monolayer and solid supported bilayer lipid membrane (s-BLM) as models. All the results indicate that the penetration of tryptophan can destabilize different artificial biological membranes. The diameter of liposome and the leakage of calcein from liposome increased with the increase of tryptophan concentration because the penetration of tryptophan was beneficial for dehydrating the polar head groups of lipids and the formation of fusion intermediates. π-A isotherms of lecithin on the subphase of tryptophan solution further confirm that tryptophan can penetrate into lipid monolayer and reduce the stability of lipid monolayer. When the concentration of tryptophan increased from 0 to 2 × 10 -3 mol L -1, the limiting molecular area of lecithin increased from 110.5 to 138.5 Å 2, but the collapse pressure of the monolayer decreased from 47.6 to 42.3 mN m -1, indicating the destabilization of lipid monolayer caused by the penetration of tryptophan. The resistance spectra of s-BLM demonstrate that the existence of tryptophan leads to the formation of some defects in s-BLM and the destabilization of s-BLM. The values of electron-transfer resistance and double layer capacitance respectively decreased from 5.765 × 10 6 Ω and 3.573 × 10 -8 F to 1.391 × 10 6 Ω and 3.340 × 10 -8 F when the concentration of tryptophan increased from 0 to 2 × 10 -3 mol L -1. Correspondingly, the breakdown voltage of s-BLM decreased from 2.51 to 1.72 V.

  11. Characterisation of the tryptophan synthase alpha subunit in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gierl Alfons

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, such as Salmonella typhimurium, tryptophan is synthesized from indole-3-glycerole phosphate (IGP by a tryptophan synthase αββα heterotetramer. Plants have evolved multiple α (TSA and β (TSB homologs, which have probably diverged in biological function and their ability of subunit interaction. There is some evidence for a tryptophan synthase (TS complex in Arabidopsis. On the other hand maize (Zea mays expresses the TSA-homologs BX1 and IGL that efficiently cleave IGP, independent of interaction with TSB. Results In order to clarify, how tryptophan is synthesized in maize, two TSA homologs, hitherto uncharacterized ZmTSA and ZmTSAlike, were functionally analyzed. ZmTSA is localized in plastids, the major site of tryptophan biosynthesis in plants. It catalyzes the tryptophan synthase α-reaction (cleavage of IGP, and forms a tryptophan synthase complex with ZmTSB1 in vitro. The catalytic efficiency of the α-reaction is strongly enhanced upon complex formation. A 160 kD tryptophan synthase complex was partially purified from maize leaves and ZmTSA was identified as native α-subunit of this complex by mass spectrometry. ZmTSAlike, for which no in vitro activity was detected, is localized in the cytosol. ZmTSAlike, BX1, and IGL were not detectable in the native tryptophan synthase complex in leaves. Conclusion It was demonstrated in vivo and in vitro that maize forms a tryptophan synthase complex and ZmTSA functions as α-subunit in this complex.

  12. Drugs with antidepressant properties affect tryptophan metabolites differently in rodent models with depression-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelund, Amanda; Li, Yan; Budac, David P; Müller, Heidi K; Gulinello, Maria; Sanchez, Connie; Wegener, Gregers

    2017-07-01

    The metabolism of tryptophan through kynurenine and serotonin pathways is linked to depression. Here, effects of different drugs with antidepressant properties (vortioxetine, fluoxetine, and ketamine) on various tryptophan metabolites in different brain regions and plasma were examined using tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), in Flinders Sensitive Line rats, a genetic rat model of depression, and its controls: Flinders Sensitive Line and Sprague-Dawley rats. Protein levels of kynurenine pathway enzymes were measured in the brains and livers of these rat strains. Furthermore, effects of vortioxetine on tryptophan metabolites were assessed in the cortical regions of lupus mice (MRL/MpJ-FasIpr ), a murine model of increased depression-like behavior associated with inflammation. Sustained vortioxetine or fluoxetine (at doses aimed to fully occupy serotonin transporter via food or drinking water for at least 14 days) reduced levels of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QUIN) in various brain regions in all rats. Furthermore, chronic vortioxetine reduced levels of QUIN in MRL/MpJ-FasIpr mice. Acute i.p. administration of fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or vortioxetine (10 mg/kg) led to reduced brain 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in Sprague-Dawley rats (2, 4, 6, and 8 h) and a similar trend was evident in Flinders Sensitive Line and Flinders Sensitive Line rats after 4 h. In contrast, single or repeated administration of ketamine (15 mg/kg i.p.) did not induce significant changes in metabolite levels. In conclusion, sustained vortioxetine and fluoxetine administration decreased QUIN independent of species, while ketamine was ineffective. These results support the hypothesis that modulating tryptophan metabolism may be part of the mechanism of action for some antidepressants. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. The metabolism of L-tryptophan by isolated rat liver cells. Effect of albumin binding and amino acid competition on oxidatin of tryptophan by tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, S A; Pogson, C I

    1980-01-01

    1. Novel methods, using L-[ring-2-14C]tryptophan, are described for the measurement of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase activity and tryptophan accumulation in isolated rat liver cells. 2. The effects of bovine serum albumin, non-esterified fatty acids and neutral amino acids on tryptophan oxidation by hepatocytes and on the partition of tryptophan between free and albumin-bound forms were investigated. 3. Oxidation of physiological concentrations (0.1 mM) of tryptophan was inhibited by approx. 50%...

  14. Expression, Purification and Characterisation of Tryptophan Hydroxylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windahl, Michael Skovbo

    2007-01-01

    hjernen. Unormalheder i serotonins funktion som signalstof i hjernen, menes at spille en rolle i flere psykiske lidelser såsom depression, obsessiv-kompulsiv lidelse (OCD) og skizofreni. Flere varianter af TPH er fremstillet i Escherichia coli og der er udviklet en simpel metode til at oprense store...... og co-substratet tetrahydrobiopterin spalter dioxygen (O2) så det ene oxygen-atom indsættes i aminosyren tryptophan. Der findes to forskellige former af TPH: TPH-1 findes flere forskellige steder i kroppen, mens TPH-2 findes i hjernen hvor det har afgørende betydning for mængden af serotonin i...... røntgenkrystallografi. Denne struktur er af stor betydning for en øget forståelse af dette vigtige enzym....

  15. Mood, food, and cognition: role of tryptophan and serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Barbara; Gostner, Johanna M; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Food is not only necessary as a metabolic fuel for the body, it becomes more and more evident that there exists an association between food and brain functions like mood and cognition. Tryptophan represents a key element for brain functioning, because of its role as a precursor for production of neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine). In clinical conditions, which involve chronic immune system activation or under cytokine therapy, lower tryptophan levels because of high catabolism of tryptophan as indicated by the kynurenine to tryptophan ratio are common and often associate with depressive mood. Studies in the in vitro model of mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed that several phytocompounds, mainly antioxidants like polyphenols and vitamins, can interfere with inflammatory signaling cascades including tryptophan breakdown. If extrapolated to the in vivo situation, such compounds could increase blood and brain tryptophan availability for serotonin production. Although there is some in vivo evidence for the effect of such compounds, outcomes are hardly predictable and most likely depend on the individual's immunological state. Not only a diet rich in tryptophan but also a diet rich in antioxidants can have a positive impact on mood and cognition. This could be of special relevance for individuals who present with low grade inflammation conditions.

  16. A Mathematical Model of Tryptophan Metabolism via the Kynurenine Pathway Provides Insights into the Effects of Vitamin B-6 Deficiency, Tryptophan Loading, and Induction of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase on Tryptophan Metabolites123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Avila, Luisa; Nijhout, H. Frederik; Reed, Michael C.; Sitren, Harry S.; Gregory, Jesse F.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B-6 deficiency is associated with impaired tryptophan metabolism because of the coenzyme role of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) for kynureninase and kynurenine aminotransferase. To investigate the underlying mechanism, we developed a mathematical model of tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway. The model includes mammalian data on enzyme kinetics and tryptophan transport from the intestinal lumen to liver, muscle, and brain. Regulatory mechanisms and inhibition of relevant enzymes were included. We simulated the effects of graded reduction in cellular PLP concentration, tryptophan loads and induction of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) on metabolite profiles and urinary excretion. The model predictions matched experimental data and provided clarification of the response of metabolites in various extents of vitamin B-6 deficiency. We found that moderate deficiency yielded increased 3-hydroxykynurenine and a decrease in kynurenic acid and anthranilic acid. More severe deficiency also yielded an increase in kynurenine and xanthurenic acid and more pronounced effects on the other metabolites. Tryptophan load simulations with and without vitamin B-6 deficiency showed altered metabolite concentrations consistent with published data. Induction of TDO caused an increase in all metabolites, and TDO induction together with a simulated vitamin B-6 deficiency, as has been reported in oral contraceptive users, yielded increases in kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, and xanthurenic acid and decreases in kynurenic acid and anthranilic acid. These results show that the model successfully simulated tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway and can be used to complement experimental investigations. PMID:23902960

  17. Willpower depletion and framing effects

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan, Thomas; van Veldhuizen, Roel

    2013-01-01

    We investigate whether depleting people's cognitive resources (or willpower) affects the degree to which they are susceptible to framing effects. Recent research in social psychology and economics has suggested that willpower is a resource that can be temporarily depleted and that a depleted level of willpower is associated with self-control problems in a variety of contexts. In this study, we extend the willpower depletion paradigm to framing effects and argue that willpower depletion should...

  18. Ozone depletion update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldiron, B M

    1996-03-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion due to chlorofluorocarbons an d increased ultraviolet radiation penetration has long been predicted. To determine if predictions of ozone depletion are correct and, if so, the significance of this depletion. Review of the English literature regarding ozone depletion and solar ultraviolet radiation. The ozone layer is showing definite thinning. Recently, significantly increased ultraviolet radiation transmission has been detected at ground level at several metering stations. It appears that man-made aerosols (air pollution) block increased UVB transmission in urban areas. Recent satellite measurements of stratospheric fluorine levels more directly implicate chlorofluorocarbons as a major source of catalytic stratospheric chlorine, although natural sources may account for up to 40% of stratospheric chlorine. Stratospheric chlorine concentrations, and resultant increased ozone destruction, will be enhanced for at least the next 70 years. The potential for increased transmission of ultraviolet radiation will exist for the next several hundred years. While little damage due to increased ultraviolet radiation has occurred so far, the potential for long-term problems is great.

  19. Different Mechanisms of Catalytic Complex Formation in Two L-Tryptophan Processing Dioxygenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Nienhaus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The human heme enzymes tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (hTDO and indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (hIDO catalyze the initial step in L-tryptophan (L-Trp catabolism, the insertion of dioxygen into L-Trp. Overexpression of these enzymes causes depletion of L-Trp and accumulation of metabolic products, and thereby contributes to tumor immune tolerance and immune dysregulation in a variety of disease pathologies. Understanding the assembly of the catalytically active, ternary enzyme-substrate-ligand complexes is not yet fully resolved, but an essential prerequisite for designing efficient and selective de novo inhibitors. Evidence is mounting that the ternary complex forms by sequential binding of ligand and substrate in a specific order. In hTDO, the apolar L-Trp binds first, decreasing active-site solvation and, as a result, reducing non-productive oxidation of the heme iron by the dioxygen ligand, which may leave the substrate bound to a ferric heme iron. In hIDO, by contrast, dioxygen must first coordinate to the heme iron because a bound substrate would occlude ligand access to the heme iron, so the ternary complex can no longer form. Consequently, faster association of L-Trp at high concentrations results in substrate inhibition. Here, we summarize our present knowledge of ternary complex formation in hTDO and hIDO and relate these findings to structural peculiarities of their active sites.

  20. Molecular analysis of intragenic recombination at the tryptophan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    /fulltext/jgen/092/03/0523-0528. Keywords. mutation; recombination; DNA sequence; primary metabolism; trp-3. Abstract. Fifteen different classically generated and mapped mutations at the tryptophan synthetase locus in Neurospora crassa ...

  1. Tryptophan and ATTO 590: Mutual Fluorescence Quenching and Exciplex Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Ujjal [Ames Laboratory; Beck, Christie [Ames Laboratory; Winter, Arthur [Iowa State University; Wells, Carson [Iowa State University; Petrich, Jacob W [Ames Laboratory

    2014-07-24

    Investigation of fluorescence quenching of probes, such as ATTO dyes, is becoming an increasingly important topic owing to the use of these dyes in super-resolution microscopies and in single-molecule studies. Photoinduced electron transfer is their most important nonradiative pathway. Because of the increasing frequency of the use of ATTO and related dyes to investigate biological systems, studies are presented for inter- and intramolecular quenching of ATTO 590 with tryptophan. In order to examine intramolecular quenching, an ATTO 590–tryptophan conjugate was synthesized. It was determined that tryptophan is efficiently quenching ATTO 590 fluorescence by excited-state charge transfer and two charge transfer complexes are forming. In addition, it was discovered that an exciplex (whose lifetime is 5.6 ns) can be formed between tryptophan and ATTO 590, and it is suggested that the possibility of such exciplex formation should be taken into account when protein fluorescence is monitored in a system tagged with ATTO dyes.

  2. Kernel modifications and tryptophan content in QPM segregating generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    -Ignjatović-Micić Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Maize has poor nutritional value due to deficiency of two essential amino acids - tryptophan and lysine. Although recessive opaque2 (o2 mutation significantly increases their content in the endosperm, incorporation of opaque2 into high yielding cultivars was not commercially successful, because of its numerous agronomic and processing problems due to soft endosperm. Quality protein maize - QPM has lately been introduced as opaque2 maize with improved endosperm hardness and improved agronomic traits, but mostly within tropical and subtropical germplasm. The ongoing breeding project at MRI includes improvement of MRI opaque2 lines and conversion of standard lines to QPM germplasm. The main selection steps in QPM breeding involve assessing kernel modifications and tryptophan level in each generation. Herein, we present the results of the analysis for these traits on F3 and BC1F1 generations of QPM x opaque2, opaque2 x QPM and standard lines x QPM crosses. The results showed that the majority the genotypes had kernel types 2 and 3 (good modifications. The whole grain tryptophan content in F3 and BC1F1 genotypes of crosses between QPM and opaque2 germplasm was at the quality protein level, with a few exceptions. All BC1F1 genotypes of standard lines x QPM had tryptophan content in the range of normal maize, while majority of F3 genotypes had tryptophan content at level of QPM. The progeny (with increased tryptophan levels of QPM and opaque2 crosses had significantly higher tryptophan content compared to the progeny of crosses between standard and QPM lines - 0.098 to 0.114 and 0.080, respectively. All genotypes that had poorly modified kernels and/or low tryptophan content will be discarded from further breeding.

  3. Utilization of DL- and L-tryptophan in young pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, J.B.; Van Weerden, E.J.; Koch, F.

    1988-01-01

    Two trials involving young pigs (total numbers 288 and 400, respectively) were performed to compare the biological activity of Dl- and L-tryptophan under restricted (trial 1) and ad libitum (trial 2) feeding conditions. In trial 1, three additions of Dl-tryptophan (0·3, 0·6 and 0·9 g/kg) and two

  4. Development of Bacillus subtilis mutants to produce tryptophan in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Karin; Cantor, Mette D.; Nørgaard, Jan Værum

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To generate tryptophan-overproducing Bacillus subtilis strains for in situ use in pigs, to reduce the feed cost for farmers and nitrogen pollution. Results A novel concept has been investigated—to generate B. subtilis strains able to produce tryptophan (Trp) in situ in pigs. Mutagenesis......-excreting B. subtilis strains were obtained with UV-mutagenesis and analogue selection and can be used in animal feed applications....

  5. Diagnostic classifications in depression and somatization should include biomarkers, such as disorders in the tryptophan catabolite (TRYCAT) pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michael; Rief, Winfried

    2012-04-30

    The tryptophan catabolite (TRYCAT) pathway is induced by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), which upon activation depletes plasma tryptophan (TRP) and increases the synthesis of TRYCATs. Both phenomena are associated with somatization and depression. The aims of this study are to examine whether disorders in the TRYCAT pathway are specific to depression or somatization and whether the diagnoses somatization, depression, and comorbid depression+somatization reflect qualitatively distinct clinical and biological categories. Plasma TRP, the kynurenine (KY)/TRP and KY/kynurenic acid (KA) ratios were measured in 36 patients with somatization, 35 depressed and 38 depressed+somatization patients and 22 controls. Using pattern recognition methods, the diagnosis comorbid depression+somatization could not be validated, while there was an important overlap between depression and somatization, which form one continuum. Cluster analysis detected a) a control cluster; b) a cluster with lower tryptophan, and higher KY/TRP and KY/KA ratios and somatization scores; and c) a cluster with increased depression but lower KY/TRP values. The differences between both patient clusters were quantitative and not qualitative. Within the patient group, cluster analysis has generated a "pathway phenotype", i.e. aberrations in the TRYCAT pathway, which are associated with somatization rather than with depression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Carbon dots from tryptophan doped glucose for peroxynitrite sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simões, Eliana F.C. [CIQ-UP, Grupo de Ciências Biológicas e Bioanalíticas, Faculdade de Farmácia da Universidade de Coimbra, Pólo das Ciências da Saúde, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); CIQ-UP, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C.G. [CIQ-UP, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Leitão, João M.M., E-mail: jleitao@ff.uc.pt [CIQ-UP, Grupo de Ciências Biológicas e Bioanalíticas, Faculdade de Farmácia da Universidade de Coimbra, Pólo das Ciências da Saúde, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • Synthesis of tryptophan doped carbon dots. • Experimental design optimization of the tryptophan doped carbon dots synthesis. • Fluorescence sensing of peroxynitrite by tryptophan doped carbon dots. • Peroxynitrite quantification in serum samples by tryptophan doped carbon dots. - Abstract: Tryptophan doped carbon dots (Trp-CD) were microwave synthesized. The optimum conditions of synthesizing of the Trp-CD were established by response surface multivariate optimization methodologies and were the following: 2.5 g of glucose and 300 mg of tryptophan diluted in 15 mL of water exposed for 5 min to a microwave radiation of 700 W. Trp-CD have an average size of 20 nm, were fluorescent with a quantum yield of 12.4% and the presence of peroxynitrite anion (ONOO{sup −}) provokes quenching of the fluorescence. The evaluated analytical methodology for ONOO{sup −} detection shows a linear response range from 5 to 25 μM with a limit of detection of 1.5 μM and quantification of 4.9 μM. The capability of the ONOO{sup −} quantification was evaluated in standard solutions and in fortified serum samples.

  7. Identification of essential tryptophan in amylomaltase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachadech, Wanitcha; Nimpiboon, Pitchanan; Naumthong, Wachiraporn; Nakapong, Santhana; Krusong, Kuakarun; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook

    2015-05-01

    This work aims to identify essential tryptophan residue(s) of amylomaltase from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAM) through chemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis techniques. The recombinant enzyme expressed by Escherichia coli was purified and treated with N-bromosuccinimide (NBS), a modifying agent for tryptophan. A significant decrease in enzyme activity was observed indicating that tryptophan is important for catalysis. Inactivation kinetics with NBS resulted in pseudo first-order rate constant (kinact) of 2.31 min(-1). Substrate protection experiment confirmed the active site localization of the NBS-modified tryptophan residue(s) in CgAM. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed on W330, W425 and W673 to localize essential tryptophan residues. Substitution by alanine resulted in the loss of intra- and intermolecular transglucosylation activities for all mutated CgAMs. Analysis of circular dichroism spectra showed no change in the secondary structure of W425A but a significant change for W330A and W673A from that of the WT. From these results in combination with X-ray structural data and interpretation from the binding interactions in the active site region, W425 was confirmed to be essential for catalytic activity of CgAM. The hydrophobicity of this tryptophan was thought to be critical for substrate binding and supporting catalytic action of the three carboxylate residues at the active site. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Intrinsic Depletion or Not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen, Beate; Bruun, Sara; Hansen, Søren

      The presence of a depletion layer of water along extended hydrophobic interfaces, and a possibly related formation of nanobubbles, is an ongoing discussion. The phenomenon was initially reported when we, years ago, chose thick films (~300-400Å) of polystyrene as cushions between a crystalline...... carrier and biomimetic membranes deposited thereupon and exposed to bulk water. While monitoring the sequential build-up of the sandwiched composite structure by continuous neutron reflectivity experiments the formation of an unexpected additional layer was detected (1). Located at the polystyrene surface...... in between he polymer cushion and bulk water the layer was attributed to water of reduced density and was called "depletion layer".  Impurities or preparative artefacts were excluded as its origin. Later on, the formation of nanobubbles from this vapour-like water phase was initiated by tipping the surface...

  9. Bromocontryphan: post-translational bromination of tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, E C; Craig, A G; Watkins, M; Hillyard, D R; Gray, W R; Gulyas, J; Rivier, J E; Cruz, L J; Olivera, B M

    1997-02-04

    We demonstrate that post-translational bromination of a tryptophan residue occurs in the biologically active octapeptide bromocontryphan, purified and characterized from Conus radiatus venom. Clones encoding bromocontryphan were identified from a cDNA library made from C. radiatus venom ducts. The mRNA sequence obtained predicts a prepropeptide which has the mature peptide sequence at the C-terminal end, with the L-6-bromotryptophan residue encoded by UGG, the Trp codon. These data provide the first direct evidence for post-translational bromination of a polypeptide which is translated through the normal cellular machinery. In addition to bromination, the peptide, which induces a "stiff tail" syndrome in mice, has several other modifications as shown by the sequence [Formula: See Text] in which Hyp = hydroxyproline. Asterisks indicate post-translational modifications (left to right): proteolytic cleavage at the N-terminus; hydroxylation of Pro3; epimerization of Trp4; bromination of Trp7, and C-terminal amidation. Bromocontryphan appears to have the highest density of post-translational modifications known among gene-encoded polypeptides. The overall result is a molecule which closely resembles marine natural products produced through specialized biosynthetic pathways comprising many enzyme-catalyzed steps.

  10. Ozone-depleting Substances (ODS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This site includes all of the ozone-depleting substances (ODS) recognized by the Montreal Protocol. The data include ozone depletion potentials (ODP), global warming...

  11. Kynurenine pathway in psychosis: evidence of increased tryptophan degradation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Sandra

    2009-05-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation may serve to integrate disparate abnormalities heretofore identified in research aiming to elucidate the complex aetiopathogenesis of psychotic disorders. Post-mortem brain tissue studies have reported elevated kynurenine and kynurenic acid in the frontal cortex and upregulation of the first step of the pathway in the anterior cingulate cortex of individuals with schizophrenia. In this study, we examined kynurenine pathway activity by measuring tryptophan breakdown, a number of pathway metabolites and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), which is the preferential activator of the first-step enzyme, indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO), in the plasma of patients with major psychotic disorder. Plasma tryptophan, kynurenine pathway metabolites were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 34 patients with a diagnosis on the psychotic spectrum (schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder) and in 36 healthy control subjects. IFN-gamma was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The mean tryptophan breakdown index (kynurenine\\/tryptophan) was significantly higher in the patient group compared with controls (P < 0.05). IFN-gamma measures did not differ between groups (P = 0.23). No relationship was found between measures of psychopathology, symptom severity and activity in the first step in the pathway. A modest correlation was established between the tryptophan breakdown index and illness duration. These results provide evidence for kynurenine pathway upregulation, specifically involving the first enzymatic step, in patients with major psychotic disorder. Increased tryptophan degradation in psychoses may have potential consequences for the treatment of these disorders by informing the development of novel therapeutic compounds.

  12. Intrinsic Depletion or Not

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen, Beate; Bruun, Sara; Hansen, Søren

      The presence of a depletion layer of water along extended hydrophobic interfaces, and a possibly related formation of nanobubbles, is an ongoing discussion. The phenomenon was initially reported when we, years ago, chose thick films (~300-400Å) of polystyrene as cushions between a crystalline...... carrier and biomimetic membranes deposited thereupon and exposed to bulk water. While monitoring the sequential build-up of the sandwiched composite structure by continuous neutron reflectivity experiments the formation of an unexpected additional layer was detected (1). Located at the polystyrene surface...

  13. Increased levels of 3-hydroxykynurenine parallel disease severity in human acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouras, Christos; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Homer, Natalie Z M; Murray, Toby B J; Robertson, Darren; Briody, Lesley; Paterson, Finny; Spence, Heather; Derr, Lisa; Hayes, Alastair J; Tsoumanis, Andreas; Lyster, Dawn; Parks, Rowan W; Garden, O James; Iredale, John P; Uings, Iain J; Liddle, John; Wright, Wayne L; Dukes, George; Webster, Scott P; Mole, Damian J

    2016-09-27

    Inhibition of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) protects against multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) in experimental acute pancreatitis (AP). We aimed to precisely define the kynurenine pathway activation in relation to AP and AP-MODS in humans, by carrying out a prospective observational study of all persons presenting with a potential diagnosis of AP for 90 days. We sampled peripheral venous blood at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 168 hours post-recruitment. We measured tryptophan metabolite concentrations and analysed these in the context of clinical data and disease severity indices, cytokine profiles and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. 79 individuals were recruited (median age: 59.6 years; 47 males, 59.5%). 57 met the revised Atlanta definition of AP: 25 had mild, 23 moderate, and 9 severe AP. Plasma 3-hydroxykynurenine concentrations correlated with contemporaneous APACHE II scores (R2 = 0.273; Spearman rho = 0.581; P < 0.001) and CRP (R2 = 0.132; Spearman rho = 0.455, P < 0.001). Temporal profiling showed early tryptophan depletion and contemporaneous 3-hydroxykynurenine elevation. Furthermore, plasma concentrations of 3-hydroxykynurenine paralleled systemic inflammation and AP severity. These findings support the rationale for investigating early intervention with a KMO inhibitor, with the aim of reducing the incidence and severity of AP-associated organ dysfunction.

  14. Comparison of fractal dimension and Shannon entropy in myocytes from rats treated with histidine-tryptophan-glutamate and histidine-tryptophan cetoglutarate

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseni; Cortez, José Luís Lasso; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Solutions that cause elective cardiac arrest are constantly evolving, but the ideal compound has not yet been found. The authors compare a new cardioplegic solution with histidine-tryptophan-glutamate (Group 2) and other one with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate (Group 1) in a model of isolated rat heart. Objective To quantify the fractal dimension and Shannon entropy in rat myocytes subjected to cardioplegia solution using histidine-tryptophan with glutamate in an experimental model, considering the caspase markers, IL-8 and KI-67. Methods Twenty male Wistar rats were anesthetized and heparinized. The chest was opened, the heart was withdrawn and 40 ml/kg of cardioplegia (with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate or histidine-tryptophan-glutamate solution) was infused. The hearts were kept for 2 hours at 4ºC in the same solution, and thereafter placed in the Langendorff apparatus for 30 min with Ringer-Locke solution. Analyzes were performed for immunohistochemical caspase, IL-8 and KI-67. Results The fractal dimension and Shannon entropy were not different between groups histidine-tryptophan-glutamate and histidine-tryptophan-acetoglutarate. Conclusion The amount of information measured by Shannon entropy and the distribution thereof (given by fractal dimension) of the slices treated with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate and histidine-tryptophan-glutamate were not different, showing that the histidine-tryptophan-glutamate solution is as good as histidine-tryptophan-acetoglutarate to preserve myocytes in isolated rat heart. PMID:25140464

  15. One-step of tryptophan attenuator inactivation and promoter swapping to improve the production of L-tryptophan in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background L-tryptophan is an aromatic amino acid widely used in the food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In Escherichia coli, L-tryptophan is synthesized from phosphoenolpyruvate and erythrose 4-phosphate by enzymes in the shikimate pathway and L-tryptophan branch pathway, while L-serine and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate are also involved in L-tryptophan synthesis. In order to construct a microbial strain for efficient L-tryptophan production from glucose, we developed a one step tryptophan attenuator inactivation and promoter swapping strategy for metabolic flux optimization after a base strain was obtained by overexpressing the tktA, mutated trpE and aroG genes and inactivating a series of competitive steps. Results The engineered E. coli GPT1002 with tryptophan attenuator inactivation and tryptophan operon promoter substitution exhibited 1.67 ~ 9.29 times higher transcription of tryptophan operon genes than the control GPT1001. In addition, this strain accumulated 1.70 g l-1 L-tryptophan after 36 h batch cultivation in 300-mL shake flask. Bioreactor fermentation experiments showed that GPT1002 could produce 10.15 g l-1 L-tryptophan in 48 h. Conclusions The one step inactivating and promoter swapping is an efficient method for metabolic engineering. This method can also be applied in other bacteria. PMID:22380540

  16. Tryptophan hydroxylase 2 in seasonal affective disorder: underestimated perspectives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, Alexander V; Popova, Nina K

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is characterized by recurrent depression occurring generally in fall/winter. Numerous pieces of evidence indicate the association of SAD with decreased brain neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) system functioning. Tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) is the key and rate-limiting enzyme in 5-HT synthesis in the brain. This paper concentrates on the relationship between TPH2 activity and mood disturbances, the association between human TPH2 gene expression and the risk of affective disorder, application of tryptophan to SAD treatment and the animal models of SAD. The main conclusions of this review are as follows: (i) the brain 5-HT deficiency contributes to the mechanism underlying SAD, (ii) TPH2 is involved in the regulation of some kinds of genetically defined affective disorders and (iii) the activation of 5-HT synthesis with exogenous l-tryptophan alone or in combination with light therapy could be effective in SAD treatment. The synergic effect of these combined treatments will have several advantages compared to light or tryptophan therapy alone. First, it is effective in the treatment of patients resistant to light therapy. Secondly, l-tryptophan treatment prolongs the antidepressant effect of light therapy.

  17. Characterization of tryptophan synthase alpha subunit mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwanski, E R; Barczak, A J; Last, R L

    1996-12-13

    Three mutations in the Arabidopsis thaliana gene encoding the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase were isolated by selection for resistance to 5-methylanthranilate or 5-fluoroindole, toxic analogs of tryptophan pathway intermediates. Plants homozygous for trp3-1 and trp3-2 are light-conditional tryptophan auxotrophs, while trp3-100 is a more leaky mutant. Genetic complementation crosses demonstrated that the three mutations are allelic to each other, and define a new complementation group. All three mutants have decreased steady-state levels of tryptophan synthase alpha protein, and the trp3-100 polypeptide exhibits altered electrophoretic mobility. All three mutations were shown to be in the TSA1 (tryptophan synthase alpha subunit) structural gene by several criteria. Firstly, the trp3-1 mutation is linked to TSA1 on the bottom of chromosome 3. Secondly, the trp3-1 mutation was complemented when transformed with the wild-type TSA1 gene. Finally, DNA sequence analysis of the TSA1 gene revealed a single transition mutation in each trp3 mutant.

  18. Photolysis of tryptophan with 337. 1 nm laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkman, R.F.; Hibbard, L.B.; Dillon, J.

    1986-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of L-tryptophan were photolyzed by exposure to 337.1 nm radiation from a pulsed nitrogen laser. These data were compared with results for the 290 nm conventional-source photolysis of tryptophan. The loss of Trp was observed to be first order for 290 nm photolysis but of mixed order for 337.1 nm photolysis. Five photolysis products including N-formylkynurenine, kynurenine, tryptamine and two unknown products were detected. The tryptophan-containing peptides N-acetyl-tryptophanamide (NATA) and tryptophylglycine (Trp-Gly) were also observed to photolyze upon 337.1 nm laser radiation demonstrating that this phenomenon is not restricted to free tryptophan monomer. A number of experiments were performed in an effort to determine the mechanism of photolysis at this wavelength. It is concluded that this photolysis results either from a very weak absorption tail extending to 337.1 nm in tryptophan itself or from a reaction involving an impurity sensitizer which absorbs the 337.1 nm radiation.

  19. Development of Bacillus subtilis mutants to produce tryptophan in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerre, Karin; Cantor, Mette D; Nørgaard, Jan V; Poulsen, Hanne D; Blaabjerg, Karoline; Canibe, Nuria; Jensen, Bent B; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Nielsen, Bea; Derkx, Patrick M F

    2017-02-01

    To generate tryptophan-overproducing Bacillus subtilis strains for in situ use in pigs, to reduce the feed cost for farmers and nitrogen pollution. A novel concept has been investigated-to generate B. subtilis strains able to produce tryptophan (Trp) in situ in pigs. Mutagenesis by UV was combined with selection on Trp and purine analogues in an iterative process. Two mutants from different wild types were obtained, mutant 1 (M1) produced 1 mg Trp/l and mutant 2 (M2) 14 mg Trp/l. Genome sequence analysis revealed that M1 had three single nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) and M2 had two SNPs compared to the wild type strains. In both mutants SNPs were found in genes regulating tryptophan synthesis. Reverse transcription PCR confirmed up-regulation of the tryptophan synthesis genes in both mutants, the expression was up to 3 times higher in M2 than in M1. Tryptophan-excreting B. subtilis strains were obtained with UV-mutagenesis and analogue selection and can be used in animal feed applications.

  20. Neopterin and kynurenine-tryptophan ratio as predictors of coronary events in older adults, the Hordaland Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulo, Gerhard; Vollset, Stein E; Nygård, Ottar; Midttun, Øivind; Ueland, Per Magne; Eussen, Simone J P M; Pedersen, Eva R; Tell, Grethe S

    2013-09-30

    Immune system activation is involved in atherosclerosis. Neopterin production and tryptophan catabolism through the kynurenine pathway, measured by the kynurenine-tryptophan ratio (KTR), are induced by interferon gamma, thus both are considered markers of cell mediated immune activation. This study prospectively investigated their predictive value on acute coronary events among Norwegian community-dwelling older adults without previous coronary heart disease. 1112 men and 1631 women, 71-74 years old were examined during 1997-99 as part of the Hordaland Health Study. They were followed until an acute coronary event (defined as unstable angina, non-fatal or fatal acute myocardial infarction or sudden death) or December 31, 2006. Kaplan-Meier hazard curves were constructed for quartiles of plasma neopterin and KTR. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for sex, body mass index, smoking, hypertension, renal function and cholesterol were used to examine the relation between neopterin and KTR quartiles and the study endpoint. Median (interquartile range) values were 8.6 (7.2-10.4) nmol/L for neopterin and 25.8 (25.3-31.1) nmol/μmol for KTR. During the follow up, 265 participants had at least one acute coronary event. Increased baseline levels of plasma neopterin and KTR were associated with continuous increased risk of developing the study endpoint (P-values for trend older adults without previous coronary heart disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Incorporation of tryptophan analogues into the lantibiotic nisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liang; Shao, Jinfeng; Li, Qian; van Heel, Auke J; de Vries, Marcel P; Broos, Jaap; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2016-05-01

    Lantibiotics are posttranslationally modified peptides with efficient inhibitory activity against various Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to the original modifications, incorporation of non-canonical amino acids can render new properties and functions to lantibiotics. Nisin is the most studied lantibiotic and contains no tryptophan residues. In this study, a system was constructed to incorporate tryptophan analogues into nisin, which included the modification machinery (NisBTC) and the overexpression of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS). Tryptophan and three different tryptophan analogues (5-fluoroTrp (5FW), 5-hydroxyTrp (5HW) and 5-methylTrp (5MeW)) were successfully incorporated at four different positions of nisin (I1W, I4W, M17W and V32W). The incorporation efficiency of tryptophan analogues into mutants I1W, M17W and V32W was over 97 %, while the mutant I4W showed relatively low incorporation efficiency (69-93 %). The variants with 5FW showed relatively higher production yield, while 5MeW-containing variants showed the lowest yield. The dehydration efficiency of serines or threonines was affected by the tryptophan mutants of I4W and V32W. The affinity of the peptides for the cation-ion exchange and reverse phase chromatography columns was significantly reduced when 5HW was incorporated. The antimicrobial activity of IIW and its 5FW analogue both decreased two times compared to that of nisin, while that of its 5HW analogue decreased four times. The 5FW analogue of I4W also showed two times decreased activity than nisin. However, the mutant M17W and its 5HW analogue both showed 32 times reduced activity relative to that of nisin.

  2. Phasor approaches simplify the analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data in protein denaturation studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bader, A.N.; Visser, N.V.; Amerongen, van H.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan is frequently used to investigate the structure of proteins. The analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data is challenging: fluorescence (anisotropy) decays typically have multiple lifetime (correlation time) components and fluorescence spectra are broad and

  3. Maintenance valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan requirements for poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, M B; Sakomura, N K; Dorigam, J C P; da Silva, E P; Ferreira, N T; Fernandes, J B K

    2016-04-01

    Poultry maintenance requirements for valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan were measured by nitrogen balance using different unit systems. The nitrogen balance trial lasted 5 d with 48 h of fasting (with roosters receiving only water+sucrose) and the last 72 h for feeding and excreta collection. Forty grams of each diet first-limiting in valine, isoleucine, or tryptophan was fed by tube each day (3 d) to give a range of intakes from 0 to 101, 0 to 119, and 0 to 34 mg/kg BW d of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan, respectively. A nitrogen-free diet containing energy, vitamins, and minerals, meeting the rooster requirements, was offered ad libitum during these three d. To confirm that the amino acids studied were limiting, a treatment was added with a control diet formulated by adding 0.24 g/kg of L-valine, 0.21 g/kg of L-isoleucine, and 0.10 g/kg of L-tryptophan to the diets with lower amino acid level. Excreta were collected during the last 3 d of the balance period and the nitrogen content of the excreta was analyzed. For each amino acid, a linear regression between nitrogen retention (NR) and amino acid intake was performed. The equations from linear regression were: NR=-98.6 (±10.1)+2.4 (±0.2)×Val, NR=-46.9 (±7.1)+2.3 (±0.1)×Ile, NR=-39.5 (±7.7)+7.3 (±0.4)×Trp; where Val, Ile, and Trp are the intakes of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan in mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. The valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required to maintain the body at zero NR were calculated to be 41, 20, and 5 mg/kg body weight per d, respectively. For the system unit mg per kg of metabolic weight, the intake of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan was 59, 32, and 9, respectively. Considering the degree of maturity of the animal and body protein content (BPm (0.73)×u), the amounts of valine, isoleucine, and tryptophan required for maintenance were calculated to be 247, 134, and 37 mg per unit of maintenance protein (BPm (0.73)×u) per d. Maintenance requirement is more

  4. Isoform-Specific Substrate Inhibition Mechanism of Human Tryptophan Hydroxylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand, Kasper Damgaard; Peters, Günther H.J.; Harris, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, which is associated with a variety of disorders such as depression and irritable bowel syndrome. TPH exists in two isoforms: TPH1 and TPH2. TPH1 catalyzes the initial step in the synthesis...... of serotonin in the peripheral tissues, while TPH2 catalyzes this step in the brain. In this study, the steady-state kinetic mechanism for the catalytic domain of human TPH1 has been determined. Varying substrate tryptophan (Trp) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) results in a hybrid Ping Pong-ordered mechanism...

  5. Metabolomic profiling of permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster identifies a role for tryptophan catabolism in insecticide survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinzer, Robert A; Henderson, Louise; Marchiondo, Alan A; Woods, Debra J; Davies, Shireen A; Dow, Julian A T

    2015-12-01

    Insecticides and associated synergists are rapidly losing efficacy in target insect pest populations making the discovery of alternatives a priority. To discover novel targets for permethrin synergists, metabolomics was performed on permethrin-treated Drosophila melanogaster. Changes were observed in several metabolic pathways including those for amino acids, glycogen, glycolysis, energy, nitrogen, NAD(+), purine, pyrimidine, lipids and carnitine. Markers for acidosis, ammonia stress, oxidative stress and detoxification responses were also observed. Many of these changes had not been previously characterized after permethrin exposure. From the altered pathways, tryptophan catabolism was selected for further investigation. The knockdown of some tryptophan catabolism genes (vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950) in the whole fly and in specific tissues including fat body, midgut and Malpighian tubules using targeted RNAi resulted in altered survival phenotypes against acute topical permethrin exposure. The knockdown of vermilion, cinnabar and CG6950 in the whole fly also altered survival phenotypes against chronic oral permethrin, fenvalerate, DDT, chlorpyriphos and hydramethylnon exposure. Thus tryptophan catabolism has a previously uncharacterized role in defence against insecticides, and shows that metabolomics is a powerful tool for target identification in pesticide research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tryptophan requirement of the enterally fed term infant in the first month of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Lisha; Hogewind-Schoonenboom, Jacomine E.; Zhu, Li; Kraaijenga, Juliette V. S.; van Haren, Nicky P. C.; Voortman, Gardi J.; Schierbeek, Henk; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Huang, Ying; Chen, Chao; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2014-01-01

    Tryptophan not only is an amino acid essential to protein synthesis but also serves as a precursor in 2 important metabolic pathways: the serotonin and the kynurenine pathways. Tryptophan is related to sleeping patterns. The objective of the present study was to determine the tryptophan requirement

  7. Improved survival of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients of HLA-A3/11 absent for donor KIR3DL2 after non-T-cell depleted HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cells transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farhad shahsavar

    2011-08-01

    Conclusion: These data indicate that the absence of HLA class I ligand in the recipient for donor-inhibitory KIR can be a prognostic factor for transplantation outcomes in non-T-cell depleted HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation and that the lack of HLA-A3/11 for donor KIR3DL2 can contribute to improved survival for patients with ALL.

  8. protein, tryptophan and lysine contents in quality protien maize

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    North India. METHODS: The protein, tryptophan and lysine contents of improved genotypes of quality protein maize and two local checks were studied between June 2005 and January 2006 on seeds of Maize grown in three localities in North agro-ecological zones of India. Protein content was determined using micro-.

  9. The tryptophan requirements of pullets in the early production stage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The larger changes in body mass that oc- curred in our experiment could arouse criticism of the experi- mental results reported in this paper. The fact that a considerably higher tryptophan requirement value was estimated from the quadratic equation (parabola) than the value estimated from the Reading model under similar.

  10. Effects of rumen-protected tryptophan on performance, nutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-27

    Jun 27, 2011 ... Thirty-six Liaoning cashmere goat wethers (28.72 ± 0.59 kg) were used to determine the effects of rumen-protected tryptophan .... corn and wheat bran as energy sources and soybean meal as a protein source. Hay was .... plasma Trp penetrates through the blood-brain barrier into the brain, within pineal ...

  11. Preliminary study: voluntary food intake in dogs during tryptophan supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragua, Víctor; González-Ortiz, Gemma; Villaverde, Cecilia; Hervera, Marta; Mariotti, Valentina Maria; Manteca, Xavier; Baucells, María Dolores

    2011-10-01

    Tryptophan, a precursor of important molecules such as serotonin, melatonin and niacin, is an essential amino acid for dogs. In pigs, tryptophan supplementation has been shown to induce a significant increase in food intake. The aim of the present study was to assess whether long-term tryptophan supplementation increases voluntary food intake in dogs and to observe whether this was accompanied by a change in serum ghrelin. In the present study, sixteen adult Beagle dogs were used, with four male and four female dogs fed diets supplemented with tryptophan (1 g/dog per d) during 81 d (Trp) and four male and four female dogs that were not supplemented (control). A voluntary food intake test was performed during 5 d following the supplementation period. The Trp group tended to show a higher food intake during the voluntary food intake test (58.0 (SE 5.37) v. 77.5 (SE 3.65) g/kg metabolic weight per d; P = 0.074). No significant differences were found for serum ghrelin concentrations.

  12. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from tryptophan in human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 119; Issue 2. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from tryptophan in human serum albumin to a bioactive indoloquinolizine system. Paramita Das Arabinda Mallick Basudeb Haldar Alok Chakrabarty Nitin Chattopadhyay. Volume 119 Issue 2 March 2007 pp 77-82 ...

  13. Molecular analysis of intragenic recombination at the tryptophan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-12-12

    Dec 12, 2013 ... Vogel's minimal medium supplemented with tryptophan as described by DeMoss and Bonner (1959). ... aliquot was transferred to liquid Vogel's minimal medium in a 50-mL plastic screw-cap test tube with a ..... Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli. J. Biol. Chem. 264, 3840–3848. Case M. E. and ...

  14. Association between Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 Gene Polymorphism and Completed Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudalej, Sylwia; Ilgen, Mark; Fudalej, Marcin; Kostrzewa, Grazyna; Barry, Kristen; Wojnar, Marcin; Krajewski, Pawel; Blow, Frederic; Ploski, Rafal

    2010-01-01

    The association between suicide and a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs1386483) was examined in the recently identified tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) gene. Blood samples of 143 suicide victims and 162 age- and sex-matched controls were examined. The frequency of the TT genotype in the TPH2 polymorphism was higher in suicide victims than in…

  15. Tryptophan as a link between psychopathology and somatic states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, Sascha; Kema, Ido P; Fokkema, M Rebecca; Boon, Jim C; Willemse, Pax H B; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; den Boer, Johannes A; Korf, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several somatic illnesses are associated with psychiatric comorbidity. Evidence is provided that availability of the essential amino acid tryptophan, which is the precursor of serotonin, may cause this phenomenon. METHODS: We performed a database search to find relevant articles published

  16. Imaging cerebral tryptophan metabolism in brain tumor-associated depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnyák, Edit; Kamson, David O; Behen, Michael E; Barger, Geoffrey R; Mittal, Sandeep; Juhász, Csaba

    2015-12-01

    Depression in patients with brain tumors is associated with impaired quality of life and shorter survival. Altered metabolism of tryptophan to serotonin and kynurenine metabolites may play a role in tumor-associated depression. Our recent studies with alpha[(11)C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT)-PET in brain tumor patients indicated abnormal tryptophan metabolism not only in the tumor mass but also in normal-appearing contralateral brain. In the present study, we explored if tryptophan metabolism in such brain regions is associated with depression. Twenty-one patients (mean age: 57 years) with a brain tumor (10 meningiomas, 8 gliomas, and 3 brain metastases) underwent AMT-PET scanning. MRI and AMT-PET images were co-registered, and AMT kinetic parameters, including volume of distribution (VD', an estimate of net tryptophan transport) and K (unidirectional uptake, related to tryptophan metabolism), were measured in the tumor mass and in unaffected cortical and subcortical regions contralateral to the tumor. Depression scores (based on the Beck Depression Inventory-II [BDI-II]) were correlated with tumor size, grade, type, and AMT-PET variables. The mean BDI-II score was 12 ± 10 (range: 2-33); clinical levels of depression were identified in seven patients (33 %). High BDI-II scores were most strongly associated with high thalamic AMT K values both in the whole group (Spearman's rho = 0.63, p = 0.004) and in the subgroup of 18 primary brain tumors (r = 0.68, p = 0.004). Frontal and striatal VD' values were higher in the depressed subgroup than in non-depressed patients (p Tumor size, grade, and tumor type were not related to depression scores. Abnormalities of tryptophan transport and metabolism in the thalamus, striatum, and frontal cortex, measured by PET, are associated with depression in patients with brain tumor. These changes may indicate an imbalance between the serotonin and kynurenine pathways and serve as a molecular imaging marker of

  17. Ego depletion impairs implicit learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kelsey R; Sanchez, Daniel J; Wesley, Abigail H; Reber, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Implicit skill learning occurs incidentally and without conscious awareness of what is learned. However, the rate and effectiveness of learning may still be affected by decreased availability of central processing resources. Dual-task experiments have generally found impairments in implicit learning, however, these studies have also shown that certain characteristics of the secondary task (e.g., timing) can complicate the interpretation of these results. To avoid this problem, the current experiments used a novel method to impose resource constraints prior to engaging in skill learning. Ego depletion theory states that humans possess a limited store of cognitive resources that, when depleted, results in deficits in self-regulation and cognitive control. In a first experiment, we used a standard ego depletion manipulation prior to performance of the Serial Interception Sequence Learning (SISL) task. Depleted participants exhibited poorer test performance than did non-depleted controls, indicating that reducing available executive resources may adversely affect implicit sequence learning, expression of sequence knowledge, or both. In a second experiment, depletion was administered either prior to or after training. Participants who reported higher levels of depletion before or after training again showed less sequence-specific knowledge on the post-training assessment. However, the results did not allow for clear separation of ego depletion effects on learning versus subsequent sequence-specific performance. These results indicate that performance on an implicitly learned sequence can be impaired by a reduction in executive resources, in spite of learning taking place outside of awareness and without conscious intent.

  18. Formal models of "resource depletion"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, H.M.; van der Molen, M.W.; Bexkens, A.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    The opportunity cost model (OCM) aims to explain various phenomena, among which the finding that performance degrades if executive functions are used repeatedly ("resource depletion"). We argue that an OCM account of resource depletion requires two unlikely assumptions, and we discuss an alternative

  19. Depletable resources and the economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijman, W.J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the depletion of scarce resources. The main question to be answered is how to avoid future resource crises. After dealing with the complex relation between nature and economics, three important concepts in relation with resource depletion are discussed: steady state,

  20. Laser Desorption of Tryptophan from Tryptophan-HCl Salt on a Graphite Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hae Jun; Kim, Jeong Jin; Kang, Hyuk [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Laser spectroscopy of biological molecules in the gas phase has been pioneered by Levy and coworkers when they first produced a supersonic molecular beam of tryptophan (Trp) and obtained its electronic spectrum. They were able to obtain enough vapor pressure needed for spectroscopy by heating a powder sample of Trp, although a special thermal spray was used to minimize fragmentation during heating. Many amine compounds, including biomolecules like amino acids and peptides, are usually available only as HCl salt form in order to prevent oxidation in air. Chemical processing is required to recover a neutral amine compound from its salt, thus limiting the applicability of laser-desorption spectroscopy of biomolecules. The experimental setup is a standard molecular beam machine composed of a pulsed valve with a laser-desorption module in a vacuum chamber, a second buffer chamber, a skimmer that separates the first and the second chambers, and a third vacuum chamber that is a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF MS)

  1. Cloning and characterization of indole synthase (INS) and a putative tryptophan synthase α-subunit (TSA) genes from Polygonum tinctorium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhehao; Kim, Jin-Hee; Park, Sang Un; Kim, Soo-Un

    2016-12-01

    Two cDNAs for indole-3-glycerol phosphate lyase homolog were cloned from Polygonum tinctorium. One encoded cytosolic indole synthase possibly in indigoid synthesis, whereas the other encoded a putative tryptophan synthase α-subunit. Indigo is an old natural blue dye produced by plants such as Polygonum tinctorium. Key step in plant indigoid biosynthesis is production of indole by indole-3-glycerol phosphate lyase (IGL). Two tryptophan synthase α-subunit (TSA) homologs, PtIGL-short and -long, were isolated by RACE PCR from P. tinctorium. The genome of the plant contained two genes coding for IGL. The short and the long forms, respectively, encoded 273 and 316 amino acid residue-long proteins. The short form complemented E. coli ΔtnaA ΔtrpA mutant on tryptophan-depleted agar plate signifying production of free indole, and thus was named indole synthase gene (PtINS). The long form, either intact or without the transit peptide sequence, did not complement the mutant and was tentatively named PtTSA. PtTSA was delivered into chloroplast as predicted by 42-residue-long targeting sequence, whereas PtINS was localized in cytosol. Genomic structure analysis suggested that a TSA duplicate acquired splicing sites during the course of evolution toward PtINS so that the targeting sequence-containing pre-mRNA segment was deleted as an intron. PtINS had about two to fivefolds higher transcript level than that of PtTSA, and treatment of 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole caused the relative transcript level of PtINS over PtTSA was significantly enhanced in the plant. The results indicate participation of PtINS in indigoid production.

  2. Consumption of peptide-included and free tryptophan induced by peroxyl radicals: A kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, E; López-Alarcón, C

    2014-10-01

    It is well-known that tryptophan residues are efficiently oxidized by peroxyl radicals, generating kynurenine, and N-formyl kynurenine as well as hydroperoxide derivatives as products. In the present work we studied the kinetic of such reaction employing free and peptide-included tryptophan. Two azocompounds were used to produce peroxyl radicals: AAPH (2,2'-Azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride) and ABCVA (4,4'-Azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid)), which generate cationic and anionic peroxyl radicals, respectively. Tryptophan consumption was assessed by fluorescence spectroscopy and the reactions were carried out in phosphate buffer (75mM, pH 7.4) at 45°C. Only a slight effect of the peroxyl radical charge was evidenced on the consumption of free tryptophan and the dipeptide Gly-Trp. Employing AAPH as peroxyl radical source, at low free tryptophan concentrations (1-10µM) near 0.3 mol of tryptophan were consumed per each mol of peroxyl radicals introduced into the system. However, at high free tryptophan concentrations (100µM-1mM) such stoichiometry increased in a tryptophan concentration-way. At 1mM three moles of tryptophan were consumed per mol of AAPH-derived peroxyl radicals, evidencing the presence of chain reactions. A similar behavior was observed when di and tri-peptides (Gly-Trp, Trp-Gly, Gly-Trp-Gly, Trp-Ala, Ala-Trp-Ala) were studied. Nonetheless, at low initial concentration (5µM), the initial consumption rate of tryptophan included in the peptides was two times higher than free tryptophan. In contrast, at high concentration (1mM) free and peptide-included tryptophan showed similar initial consumption rates. These results could be explained considering a disproportionation process of tryptophanyl radicals at low free tryptophan concentrations, a process that would be inhibited when tryptophan is included in peptides. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Testing fully depleted CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Ricard; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castander, Francisco J.; Jiménez, Jorge; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-08-01

    The focal plane of the PAU camera is composed of eighteen 2K x 4K CCDs. These devices, plus four spares, were provided by the Japanese company Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. with type no. S10892-04(X). These detectors are 200 μm thick fully depleted and back illuminated with an n-type silicon base. They have been built with a specific coating to be sensitive in the range from 300 to 1,100 nm. Their square pixel size is 15 μm. The read-out system consists of a Monsoon controller (NOAO) and the panVIEW software package. The deafualt CCD read-out speed is 133 kpixel/s. This is the value used in the calibration process. Before installing these devices in the camera focal plane, they were characterized using the facilities of the ICE (CSIC- IEEC) and IFAE in the UAB Campus in Bellaterra (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain). The basic tests performed for all CCDs were to obtain the photon transfer curve (PTC), the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) using X-rays and the EPER method, linearity, read-out noise, dark current, persistence, cosmetics and quantum efficiency. The X-rays images were also used for the analysis of the charge diffusion for different substrate voltages (VSUB). Regarding the cosmetics, and in addition to white and dark pixels, some patterns were also found. The first one, which appears in all devices, is the presence of half circles in the external edges. The origin of this pattern can be related to the assembly process. A second one appears in the dark images, and shows bright arcs connecting corners along the vertical axis of the CCD. This feature appears in all CCDs exactly in the same position so our guess is that the pattern is due to electrical fields. Finally, and just in two devices, there is a spot with wavelength dependence whose origin could be the result of a defectous coating process.

  4. Tryptophan Codon-Dependent Transcription in Chlamydia pneumoniae during Gamma Interferon-Mediated Tryptophan Limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Scot P; Rueden, Kelsey J; Rucks, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    In evolving to an obligate intracellular niche, Chlamydia has streamlined its genome by eliminating superfluous genes as it relies on the host cell for a variety of nutritional needs like amino acids. However, Chlamydia can experience amino acid starvation when the human host cell in which the bacteria reside is exposed to interferon gamma (IFN-γ), which leads to a tryptophan (Trp)-limiting environment via induction of the enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). The stringent response is used to respond to amino acid starvation in most bacteria but is missing from Chlamydia Thus, how Chlamydia, a Trp auxotroph, responds to Trp starvation in the absence of a stringent response is an intriguing question. We previously observed that C. pneumoniae responds to this stress by globally increasing transcription while globally decreasing translation, an unusual response. Here, we sought to understand this and hypothesized that the Trp codon content of a given gene would determine its transcription level. We quantified transcripts from C. pneumoniae genes that were either rich or poor in Trp codons and found that Trp codon-rich transcripts were increased, whereas those that lacked Trp codons were unchanged or even decreased. There were exceptions, and these involved operons or large genes with multiple Trp codons: downstream transcripts were less abundant after Trp codon-rich sequences. These data suggest that ribosome stalling on Trp codons causes a negative polar effect on downstream sequences. Finally, reassessing previous C. pneumoniae microarray data based on codon content, we found that upregulated transcripts were enriched in Trp codons, thus supporting our hypothesis. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Beyond Dinitrophenol Interaction with Tryptophan-Based Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaharia Marius

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP on the spectroscopic parameters (UV-Vis or FT-IR absorbance or fluorescence emission of tryptophan and glycyl-tryptophan were studied. A quenching phenomenon of fluorescence was observed, attributed to interactions between the indole ring of the fluorophore and the aromatic ring of the quencher. The analysis of fluorescence spectra confirms that the quenching is dictated by 2,4-DNP concentration and pH. A combined mechanism of static and dynamic quenching was detected. The quenching phenomenon observed in this work could be employed to explain the mechanism of action of such compounds on large fluorescent peptides or proteins.

  6. Tryptophan Synthase Uses an Atypical Mechanism To Achieve Substrate Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Andrew R; van Roye, Paul; Murciano-Calles, Javier; Arnold, Frances H

    2016-12-27

    Tryptophan synthase (TrpS) catalyzes the final steps in the biosynthesis of l-tryptophan from l-serine (Ser) and indole-3-glycerol phosphate (IGP). We report that native TrpS can also catalyze a productive reaction with l-threonine (Thr), leading to (2S,3S)-β-methyltryptophan. Surprisingly, β-substitution occurs in vitro with a 3.4-fold higher catalytic efficiency for Ser over Thr using saturating indole, despite a >82000-fold preference for Ser in direct competition using IGP. Structural data identify a novel product binding site, and kinetic experiments clarify the atypical mechanism of specificity: Thr binds efficiently but decreases the affinity for indole and disrupts the allosteric signaling that regulates the catalytic cycle.

  7. Low-grade inflammation and tryptophan-kynurenine pathway activation are associated with adverse cardiac remodeling in primary hyperparathyroidism: the EPATH trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyen, Nicolas; Meinitzer, Andreas; Grübler, Martin Robert; Ablasser, Klemens; Kolesnik, Ewald; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; Belyavskiy, Evgeny; Trummer, Christian; Schwetz, Verena; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Voelkl, Jakob; Alesutan, Ioana; Catena, Cristiana; Sechi, Leonardo Alberto; Brussee, Helmut; Lewinski, Dirk von; März, Winfried; Pieske, Burkert; Pilz, Stefan; Tomaschitz, Andreas

    2017-06-27

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) is associated with low-grade inflammation, left ventricular hypertrophy and increased cardiovascular mortality, but the association between inflammatory markers and parameters of adverse cardiac remodeling is unknown. We investigated the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP), the essential amino acid tryptophan and its pro-inflammatory derivatives kynurenine and quinolinic acid (QUIN) with echocardiographic parameters. Cross-sectional baseline data from the "Eplerenone in Primary Hyperparathyroidism" trial were analyzed. Patients with any acute illness were excluded. We assessed associations between CRP, serum levels of tryptophan, kynurenine and QUIN and left ventricular mass index (LVMI), left atrial volume index (LAVI) and E/e'. Among 136 subjects with pHPT (79% females), 100 (73%) had arterial hypertension and the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy was 52%. Multivariate linear regression analyses with LVMI, LAVI and E/e' as respective dependent variables, and C-reactive protein and tryptophan, kynurenine and QUIN as respective independent variables were performed. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, blood pressure, parathyroid hormone, calcium and other cardiovascular risk factors. LVMI was independently associated with CRP (adjusted β-coefficient=0.193, p=0.030) and QUIN (β=0.270, p=0.007), but not kynurenine. LAVI was related with CRP (β=0.315, pTryptophan was not associated with any of the remodeling parameters. [Correction added after online publication (22 April 2017: The sentence "Among 136 subjects with pHPT (79% females), 100 (73%) had left ventricular hypertrophy." was corrected to "Among 136 subjects with pHPT (79% females), 100 (73%) had arterial hypertension and the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy was 52%."] Conclusions: Cardiac remodeling is common in pHPT and is associated with low-grade inflammation and activation of the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway. The potential role of

  8. Nanosensor detection of an immunoregulatory tryptophan influx/kynurenine efflux cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs Kaper

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian cells rely on cellular uptake of the essential amino acid tryptophan. Tryptophan sequestration by up-regulation of the key enzyme for tryptophan degradation, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, e.g., in cancer and inflammation, is thought to suppress the immune response via T cell starvation. Additionally, the excreted tryptophan catabolites (kynurenines induce apoptosis of lymphocytes. Whereas tryptophan transport systems have been identified, the molecular nature of kynurenine export remains unknown. To measure cytosolic tryptophan steady-state levels and flux in real time, we developed genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer nanosensors (FLIPW. The transport properties detected by FLIPW in KB cells, a human oral cancer cell line, and COS-7 cells implicate LAT1, a transporter that is present in proliferative tissues like cancer, in tryptophan uptake. Importantly, we found that this transport system mediates tryptophan/kynurenine exchange. The tryptophan influx/kynurenine efflux cycle couples tryptophan starvation to elevation of kynurenine serum levels, providing a two-pronged induction of apoptosis in neighboring cells. The strict coupling protects cells that overproduce IDO from kynurenine accumulation. Consequently, this mechanism may contribute to immunosuppression involved in autoimmunity and tumor immune escape.

  9. Isoform-Specific Substrate Inhibition Mechanism of Human Tryptophan Hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidemand, Kasper D; Peters, Günther H; Harris, Pernille; Stensgaard, Eva; Christensen, Hans E M

    2017-11-21

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, which is associated with a variety of disorders such as depression and irritable bowel syndrome. TPH exists in two isoforms: TPH1 and TPH2. TPH1 catalyzes the initial step in the synthesis of serotonin in the peripheral tissues, while TPH2 catalyzes this step in the brain. In this study, the steady-state kinetic mechanism for the catalytic domain of human TPH1 has been determined. Varying substrate tryptophan (Trp) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) results in a hybrid Ping Pong-ordered mechanism in which the reaction can either occur through a Ping Pong or a sequential mechanism depending on the concentration of tryptophan. The catalytic domain of TPH1 shares a sequence identity of 81% with TPH2. Despite the high sequence identity, differences in the kinetic parameters of the isoforms have been identified; i.e., only TPH1 displays substrate tryptophan inhibition. This study demonstrates that the difference can be traced to an active site loop which displays different properties in the TPH isoforms. Steady-state kinetic results of the isoforms, and variants with point mutations in a loop lining the active site, show that the kinetic parameters of only TPH1 are significantly changed upon mutations. Mutations in the active site loop of TPH1 result in an increase in the substrate inhibition constant, Ki, and therefore turnover rate. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that this substrate inhibition mechanism occurs through a closure of the cosubstrate, BH4, binding pocket, which is induced by Trp binding.

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of the condensation of pyridoxal hydrochloride with L-tryptophan and D-tryptophan, and the chemical transformation of their products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishchugin, F. V.; Tuleberdiev, I. T.

    2017-10-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of interaction between pyridoxal and L-tryptophan, D-tryptophan, and their derivatives are studied. It is found that condensation reactions proceed via three kinetically distinguishable stages: (1) the rapid intraplanar addition of the NH2 groups of the amino acids to pyridoxal with the formation of amino alcohols; (2) the rotational isomerism of amino alcohol fragments with their subsequent dehydration and the formation of a Schiff base with a specific configuration; (3) the abstraction of α-hydrogen in the product of condensation of pyridoxal with L-tryptophan, or the abstraction of CO2 in the product of condensation of pyridoxal with D-tryptophan with the formation of quinoid structures, hydrolysis of which results in the preparation of pyridoxamine and keto acid or pyridoxal and tryptamine, respectively. Schiff bases resistant to further chemical transformations are formed in the reaction with tryptophan methyl ester.

  11. Early Posttransplant Tryptophan Metabolism Predicts Long-term Outcome of Human Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrincova-Yaghi, Diana; Seelen, Marc A; Kema, Ido P; Deelman, Leo E; van der Heuvel, Marius C; Breukelman, Henk; Van den Eynde, Benoit J; Henning, Rob H; van Goor, Harry; Sandovici, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Chronic transplant dysfunction (CTD) is the leading cause of long-term loss of the renal allograft. So far, no single test is available to reliably predict the risk for CTD. Monitoring of tryptophan (trp) metabolism through indoleamine 2.3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been previously proposed to predict acute rejection of human kidney transplants. Here, we investigate the potential of IDO/trp degradation along the kynurenine (kyn) pathway to predict the long-term outcome of human kidney transplantation. During the 2-year follow-up blood, urine, and kidney biopsies were collected from 48 renal transplant patients. Concentrations of kyn and trp in serum and urine were measured at 2 weeks, 6 months, and 2 years after transplantation. Kynurenine to tryptophan ratio was calculated as an estimate of trp degradation. To evaluate the histological changes and IDO expression, respectively, periodic acid schiff staining and immunohistochemistry for IDO were performed on biopsies taken at 6 months and 2 years. Two years after transplantation, kyn/trp was increased in urine and decreased in serum as compared to 2-week values. In 2-year biopsies, IDO expression was mainly found in infiltrating inflammatory cells and in the glomeruli. The urine level of trp 2 weeks after transplantation predicted the serum creatinine 6 months and the estimated creatinine clearance 2 years after transplantation. Additionally, serum level of kyn 6 months after transplantation predicted the serum creatinine 2 years after transplantation. Early serum and urine levels of trp and kyn may offer a novel route for early detection of patients at risk for developing CTD.

  12. Changes in brain tryptophan metabolism elicited by ageing, social environment, and psychological stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideki; Ozaki, Norio; Shirokawa, Tetsuya; Isobe, Kenichi

    2008-03-01

    The kynurenine (KYN) pathway, which is initiated by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), is a tryptophan (TRP) metabolic pathway. It shares TRP with the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) pathway. In major depression, activation of the KYN pathway may deplete 5-HT. In the present study we investigated the influence of various risk factors for depression, such as ageing, social isolation and psychological stress, on TRP metabolism. Male ICR mice (postnatal day, PND, 21) were divided into two housing conditions, isolation and group housing, reared for 4 weeks (young adult) or 5 months (adult) and exposed to novelty stress. We measured TRP, KYN and 5-HT contents in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and dorsal raphe nuclei to investigate the balance between the KYN and 5-HT pathways. Ageing decreased TRP and KYN and increased 5-HT. Thus, ageing shifted the balance to the latter. In the younger group, social isolation decreased TRP and KYN and increased the 5-HT/TRP ratio, whereas novelty stress increased TRP and KYN and decreased the 5-HT/TRP ratio. Thus, social isolation shifted the balance to the latter, whereas novelty stress shifted it to the former. In the older group, these effects were restricted to specific brain regions. Ageing and social isolation counteracted novelty stress effects on TRP metabolism.

  13. Tryptophan biosynthesis protects mycobacteria from CD4 T cell-mediated killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjia J.; Reddy, Manchi C.; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Rothchild, Alissa C.; Dartois, Veronique; Schuster, Brian M.; Trauner, Andrej; Wallis, Deeann; Galaviz, Stacy; Huttenhower, Curtis; Sacchettini, James C.; Behar, Samuel M.; Rubin, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacteria that cause disease rely on their ability to counteract and overcome host defenses. Here we present a genome-scale study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that uncovers the bacterial determinants of surviving host immunity, sets of genes we term “counteractomes.” Through this, we find that CD4 T cells attempt to starve Mtb of tryptophan through a mechanism that limits Chlamydia and Leishmania infections. In those cases, tryptophan starvation works well, since those pathogens are natural tryptophan auxotrophs. Mtb, however, can synthesize tryptophan, and thus starvation fails as an Mtb-killing mechanism. We then describe a small molecule inhibitor of Mtb tryptophan synthesis, which turns Mtb into a tryptophan auxotroph and restores the efficacy of a failed host defense. Together, our findings demonstrate that the Mtb determinants for surviving host immunity—Mtb’s immune counteractomes—serve as probes of host immunity, uncovering immune-mediated stresses that can be leveraged for therapeutic discovery. PMID:24315099

  14. Proton transfer in histidine-tryptophan heterodimers embedded in helium droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellina, Bruno; Merthe, Daniel J.; Kresin, Vitaly V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 (United States)

    2015-03-21

    We used cold helium droplets as nano-scale reactors to form and ionize, by electron bombardment and charge transfer, aromatic amino acid heterodimers of histidine with tryptophan, methyl-tryptophan, and indole. The molecular interaction occurring through an N–H ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ N hydrogen bond leads to a proton transfer from the indole group of tryptophan to the imidazole group of histidine in a radical cationic environment.

  15. Suppression of aggression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by dietary L-tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winberg, S; Øverli, Ø; Lepage, O

    2001-11-01

    Juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were isolated in individual compartments in observation aquaria and allowed to acclimate for 1 week, during which they were fed commercial trout feed. Thereafter, the fish were tested for aggressive behaviour using a resident/intruder test. Following this first resident/intruder test, the feed was exchanged for an experimental wet feed supplemented with 0.15 % or 1.5 % L-tryptophan (by wet mass). Controls received the same feed but without L-tryptophan supplementation. The fish were fed to satiety daily, and their individual feed intake was recorded. Aggressive behaviour was quantified again after 3 and 7 days of L-tryptophan feeding using the resident/intruder test. Feeding the fish L-tryptophan-supplemented feed for 3 days had no effect on aggressive behaviour, whereas feeding the fish L-tryptophan-supplemented feed for 7 days significantly suppressed aggressive behaviour in the fish, an effect seen at both levels of L-tryptophan supplementation. Fish fed L-tryptophan-supplemented feed showed elevated plasma and brain levels of L-tryptophan. The amino acid L-tryptophan is the precursor of serotonin, and supplementary dietary L-tryptophan was found to elevate levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and the 5-HIAA/serotonin concentration ratio in the brain. Neither feed intake nor plasma cortisol level was significantly affected by dietary L-tryptophan. Central serotonin is believed to have an inhibitory effect on aggressive behaviour, and it is suggested that the suppressive effect of dietary L-tryptophan on aggressive behaviour is mediated by an elevation of brain serotonergic activity.

  16. Redirection of tryptophan leads to production of low indole glucosinolate canola.

    OpenAIRE

    Chavadej, S; Brisson, N; McNeil, J N; De Luca, V

    1994-01-01

    Cruciferous plants are known to produce over a hundred different mustard oil glycosides, which are derived from methionine, phenylalanine, or tryptophan. In oil-producing crops like Brassica napus (canola), the presence of indole glucosinolates in seed protein meals has decreased meal palatability and has limited their value as animal feed. We have transformed canola plants with a gene that encodes tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) in an attempt to redirect tryptophan into tryptamine rather than...

  17. Copper Complexes Of Di-, Tri-, And Tetra-Peptides Containing Tryptophan, Histidine And Arginine

    OpenAIRE

    El Naggar, A. M. [احمد محمد النجار; El-Ghaffar, S. A. A.; Zaher, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    Fifty Seven copper complexes of di-, tri-. and tetra-peptides containing tryptophan, histidine and arginine are studied spectrophotometrically. The ^a, and colour of the complexes are dependent on the sequence of the amino acid in the dipeptide methyl esters of tryptophan and arginine; and independent on the sequence of dipeptides of histidine or in any of the tri- and tetra-peptides of histidine, arginine and tryptophan. The results achieved confirmed that the nitrogen atoms of the indole nu...

  18. Tryptophan-Derived 3-Hydroxyanthranilic Acid Contributes to Angiotensin II-Induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation in Mice In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiongxin; Ding, Ye; Song, Ping; Zhu, Huaiping; Okon, Imoh; Ding, Yang-Nan; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2017-12-05

    Abnormal amino acid metabolism is associated with vascular disease. However, the causative link between dysregulated tryptophan metabolism and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is unknown. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. Mice with deficiencies in both apolipoprotein e (Apoe) and IDO (Apoe-/-/IDO-/-) were generated by cross-breeding IDO-/- mice with Apoe-/- mice. The acute infusion of angiotensin II markedly increased the incidence of AAA in Apoe-/- mice, but not in Apoe-/-/IDO-/- mice, which presented decreased elastic lamina degradation and aortic expansion. These features were not altered by the reconstitution of bone marrow cells from IDO+/+ mice. Moreover, angiotensin II infusion instigated interferon-γ, which induced the expression of IDO and kynureninase and increased 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA) levels in the plasma and aortas of Apoe-/- mice, but not in IDO-/- mice. Both IDO and kynureninase controlled the production of 3-HAA in vascular smooth muscle cells. 3-HAA upregulated matrix metallopeptidase 2 via transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Furthermore, kynureninase knockdown in mice restrained 3-HAA, matrix metallopeptidase 2, and resultant AAA formation by angiotensin II infusion. Intraperitoneal injections of 3-HAA into Apoe-/- and Apoe-/-/IDO-/- mice for 6 weeks increased the expression and activity of matrix metallopeptidase 2 in aortas without affecting metabolic parameters. Finally, human AAA samples had stronger staining with the antibodies against 3-HAA, IDO, and kynureninase than those in adjacent nonaneurysmal aortic sections of human AAA samples. These data define a previously undescribed causative role for 3-HAA, which is a product of tryptophan metabolism, in AAA formation. Furthermore, these findings suggest that 3-HAA reduction may be a new target for treating cardiovascular diseases. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Hsp90 depletion goes wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Mark L; Masel, Joanna

    2012-02-27

    Hsp90 reveals phenotypic variation in the laboratory, but is Hsp90 depletion important in the wild? Recent work from Chen and Wagner in BMC Evolutionary Biology has discovered a naturally occurring Drosophila allele that downregulates Hsp90, creating sensitivity to cryptic genetic variation. Laboratory studies suggest that the exact magnitude of Hsp90 downregulation is important. Extreme Hsp90 depletion might reactivate transposable elements and/or induce aneuploidy, in addition to revealing cryptic genetic variation. See research article http://wwww.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/12/25.

  20. Resource depletion under technological uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, P.; Stiglitz, J.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of uncertainty in the arrival date of a new technology on the rate of depletion of an exhaustible natural resource. It is shown that under a large class of circumstances uncertainty leads to a faster initial depletion rate if the initial resource stock is small and to greater conservation if it is large. A particular kind of certainty equivalence result is proved and the results of the paper are used to comment on possible interpretations of certain historical episodes of resource exhaustion.

  1. Dendritic biomimicry: microenvironmental hydrogen-bonding effects on tryptophan fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, S; Müller, L; Smith, D K

    2001-03-02

    Two series of dendritically modified tryptophan derivatives have been synthesised and their emission spectra measured in a range of different solvents. This paper presents the syntheses of these novel dendritic structures and discusses their emission spectra in terms of both solvent and dendritic effects. In the first series of dendrimers, the NH group of the indole ring is available for hydrogen bonding, whilst in the second series, the indole NH group has been converted to NMe. Direct comparison of the emission wavelengths of analogous NH and NMe derivatives indicates the importance of the Kamlet-Taft solvent beta3 parameter, which reflects the ability of the solvent to accept a hydrogen bond from the NH group, an effect not possible for the NMe series of dendrimers. For the NH dendrimers, the attachment of a dendritic shell to the tryptophan subunit leads to a red shift in emission wavelength. This dendritic effect only operates in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents. For the NMe dendrimers, however, the attachment of a dendritic shell has no effect on the emission spectra of the indole ring. This proves the importance of hydrogen bonding between the branched shell and the indole NH group in causing the dendritic effect. This is the first time a dendritic effect has been unambiguously assigned to individual hydrogen-bonding interactions and indicates that such intramolecular interactions are important in dendrimers, just as they are in proteins. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the use of tryptophan residues as a probe of the microenvironment within proteins--in particular, it stresses the importance of hydrogen bonds formed by the indole NH group.

  2. Cloning, expression, purification and characterization of tryptophan hydroxylase variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Jane

    such as depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Characterization of TPH and elucidation of the enzymes regulation and catalytic mechanism is therefore vital to our understanding of the serotonin balance. This study concerns variants of both human TPH isoform 1 (hTPH1) and human TPH isoform 2 (h PH2......Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter and hormone serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine). Serotonin is involved in many physiological functions, such as appetite and sleep rhythm, as well as a wide range of psychiatric disorders...

  3. Impact of mineral resource depletion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brent, AC

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In a letter to the editor, the authors comment on BA Steen's article on "Abiotic Resource Depletion: different perceptions of the problem with mineral deposits" published in the special issue of the International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment...

  4. Chiral Discrimination of Tryptophan Enantiomers via (1R, 2R-2-Amino-1, 2-Diphenyl Ethanol Modified Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reported that a simple chiral selective interface constructed by (1R, 2R-2-amino-1, 2-diphenyl ethanol had been developed to discriminate tryptophan enantiomers. Cyclic voltammetry (CV and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS were used for the characteristic analysis of the electrode. The results indicated that the interface showed stable and sensitive property to determine the tryptophan enantiomers. Moreover, it exhibited the better stereoselectivity for L-tryptophan than that for D-tryptophan. The discrimination characteristics of the chiral selective interface for discriminating tryptophan enantiomers, including the response time, the effect of tryptophan enantiomers concentration, and the stability, were investigated in detail. In addition, the chiral selective interface was used to determine the enantiomeric composition of L- and D-tryptophan enantiomer mixtures by measuring the relative change of the peak current as well as in pure enantiomeric solutions. These results suggested that the chiral selective interface has the potential for enantiomeric discrimination of tryptophan enantiomers.

  5. Stochastic Resonance Activity Influences Serum Tryptophan Metabolism in Healthy Human Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthold Kepplinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Stochastic resonance therapy (SRT is used for rehabilitation of patients with various neuropsychiatric diseases. An alteration in tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway has been identified in the central and peripheral nervous systems in patients with neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases and during the aging process. This study investigated the effect of SRT as an exercise activity on serum tryptophan metabolites in healthy subjects. Methods Serum L-tryptophan, L-kynurenine, kynurenic acid, and anthranilic acid levels were measured one minute before SRT and at one, 5, 15, 30, and 60 minutes after SRT. We found that SRT affected tryptophan metabolism. Serum levels of L-tryptophan, L-kynurenine, and kynurenic acid were significantly reduced for up to 60 minutes after SRT. Anthranilic acid levels were characterized by a moderate, non significant transient decrease for up to 15 minutes, followed by normalization at 60 minutes. Tryptophan metabolite ratios were moderately altered, suggesting activation of metabolism after SRT. Lowering of tryptophan would generally involve activation of tryptophan catabolism and neurotransmitter, protein, and bone biosynthesis. Lowering of kynurenic acid by SRT might be relevant for improving symptoms in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and depression, as well as certain pain conditions.

  6. Is there a preferential interaction between cholesterol and tryptophan residues in membrane proteins?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holt, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837423; de Almeida, R.F.M.; Nyholm, T.K.M.; Loura, L.M.S.; Daily, A.E.; Staffhorst, R.W.H.M.; Rijkers, D.T.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126713758; Koeppe II, R.E.; Prieto, M.; Killian, J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071792317

    2008-01-01

    Recently, several indications have been found that suggest a preferential interaction between cholesterol and tryptophan residues located near the membrane-water interface. The aim of this study was to investigate by direct methods how tryptophan and cholesterol interact with each other and what the

  7. The association of sleep quality and insomnia with dietary intake of tryptophan and niacin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verster, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/241442702; Fernstrand, A.; Bury, D.; Roth, T.; Garssen, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/086369962

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dietary intake of tryptophan and niacin have been related to sleep. However, the sleep-promoting effects of these nutrients are still under investigation. The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between daily dietary intake of tryptophan and niacin and sleep.

  8. Tryptophan end-tagging for promoted lipopolysaccharide interactions and anti-inflammatory effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Shalini; Datta, Aritreyee; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study is the investigation of possibilities for boosting peptide anti-inflammatory effects by tryptophan end-tagging, including identification of underlying mechanisms for this. In doing so, effects of tryptophan end-tagging of KYE21 (KYEITTIHNLFRKLTHRLFRR), a peptide...

  9. Low plasma tryptophan in carcinoid patients is associated with increased urinary cortisol excretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanke, Marit A. C.; Kema, Ido P.; Dijck-Brouwer, Janneke; Doornbos, Bennard; De Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Korf, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    Background: Previously we observed inpatients suffering from a metastatic carcinoid tumor that irritability, aggression and lack of impulse control are associated with Low levels of plasma tryptophan and presumably with low brain serotonin function. In rats we showed that a diet of low tryptophan

  10. Stereospecific effects of intraduodenal tryptophan on pyloric and duodenal motility in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelbroek, M.; Sun, W. M.; Horowitz, M.; Dent, J.; Smout, A.; Akkermans, L.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: L-Tryptophan delays gastric emptying in animals to a greater extent than D-tryptophan, but none of the possible motor mechanisms responsible for this stereospecific effect have been evaluated. METHODS: In 11 healthy volunteers antropyloroduodenal pressures were recorded in the fasted

  11. Tryptophan content for monitoring breast cancer cell aggressiveness by native fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Pu, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Xu, Baogang; Achilefu, Samuel; Alfano, R. R.

    2014-03-01

    This study shows tryptophan as the key native marker in cells to determine the level of aggressive cancer in breast cell lines using native fluorescence spectroscopy. An algorithm based on the ratio of tryptophan fluorescence intensity at 340 nm to intensity at 460 nm is associated with aggressiveness of the cancer cells. The higher the ratio is, the more aggressive the tumor towards metastasis.

  12. Tryptophan Biochemistry: Structural, Nutritional, Metabolic, and Medical Aspects in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionella Palego

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available L-Tryptophan is the unique protein amino acid (AA bearing an indole ring: its biotransformation in living organisms contributes either to keeping this chemical group in cells and tissues or to breaking it, by generating in both cases a variety of bioactive molecules. Investigations on the biology of Trp highlight the pleiotropic effects of its small derivatives on homeostasis processes. In addition to protein turn-over, in humans the pathways of Trp indole derivatives cover the synthesis of the neurotransmitter/hormone serotonin (5-HT, the pineal gland melatonin (MLT, and the trace amine tryptamine. The breakdown of the Trp indole ring defines instead the “kynurenine shunt” which produces cell-response adapters as L-kynurenine, kynurenic and quinolinic acids, or the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+. This review aims therefore at tracing a “map” of the main molecular effectors in human tryptophan (Trp research, starting from the chemistry of this AA, dealing then with its biosphere distribution and nutritional value for humans, also focusing on some proteins responsible for its tissue-dependent uptake and biotransformation. We will thus underscore the role of Trp biochemistry in the pathogenesis of human complex diseases/syndromes primarily involving the gut, neuroimmunoendocrine/stress responses, and the CNS, supporting the use of -Omics approaches in this field.

  13. Abnormal kynurenine pathway of tryptophan catabolism in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ping; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Wang, Huan; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2017-08-01

    Kynurenine pathway (KP) is the primary path of tryptophan (Trp) catabolism in most mammalian cells. The KP generates several bioactive catabolites, such as kynurenine (Kyn), kynurenic acid (KA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), xanthurenic acid (XA), and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA). Increased catabolite concentrations in serum are associated with several cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including heart disease, atherosclerosis, and endothelial dysfunction, as well as their risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and aging. The first catabolic step in KP is primarily controlled by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Following this first step, the KP has two major branches, one branch is mediated by kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) and kynureninase (KYNU) and is responsible for the formation of 3-HK, 3-HAA, and quinolinic acid (QA); and another branch is controlled by kynurenine amino-transferase (KAT), which generates KA. Uncontrolled Trp catabolism has been demonstrated in distinct CVD, thus, understanding the underlying mechanisms by which regulates KP enzyme expression and activity is paramount. This review highlights the recent advances on the effect of KP enzyme expression and activity in different tissues on the pathological mechanisms of specific CVD, KP is an inflammatory sensor and modulator in the cardiovascular system, and KP catabolites act as the potential biomarkers for CVD initiation and progression. Moreover, the biochemical features of critical KP enzymes and principles of enzyme inhibitor development are briefly summarized, as well as the therapeutic potential of KP enzyme inhibitors against CVD is briefly discussed.

  14. Tryptophan autofluorescence imaging of neoplasms of the human colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Bhaskar; Renkoski, Timothy; Graves, Logan R.; Rial, Nathaniel S.; Tsikitis, Vassiliki Liana; Nfonsom, Valentine; Pugh, Judith; Tiwari, Piyush; Gavini, Hemanth; Utzinger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Detection of flat neoplasia is a major challenge in colorectal cancer screening, as missed lesions can lead to the development of an unexpected `incident' cancer prior to the subsequent endoscopy. The use of a tryptophan-related autofluorescence has been reported to be increased in murine intestinal dysplasia. The emission spectra of cells isolated from human adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa of the colon were studied and showed markedly greater emission intensity from cancerous cells compared to cells obtained from the surrounding normal mucosa. A proto-type multispectral imaging system optimized for ultraviolet macroscopic imaging of tissue was used to obtain autofluorescence images of surgical specimens of colonic neoplasms and normal mucosa after resection. Fluorescence images did not display the expected greater emission from the tumor as compared to the normal mucosa, most probably due to increased optical absorption and scattering in the tumors. Increased fluorescence intensity in neoplasms was observed however, once fluorescence images were corrected using reflectance images. Tryptophan fluorescence alone may be useful in differentiating normal and cancerous cells, while in tissues its autofluorescence image divided by green reflectance may be useful in displaying neoplasms.

  15. Inhibiting tryptophan metabolism enhances interferon therapy in kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Josephine F; Kim, Jeffrey; Abu Aboud, Omran; Wettersten, Hiromi; Stewart, Benjamin; Berryhill, Grace; Uzal, Francisco; Hovey, Russell C; Chen, Ching-Hsien; Anderson, Katie; Graef, Ashley; Sarver, Aaron L; Modiano, Jaime F; Weiss, Robert H

    2016-10-11

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is increasing in incidence, and a complete cure remains elusive. While immune-checkpoint antibodies are promising, interferon-based immunotherapy has been disappointing. Tryptophan metabolism, which produces immunosuppressive metabolites, is enhanced in RCC. Here we show indolamine-2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1) expression, a kynurenine pathway enzyme, is increased not only in tumor cells but also in the microenvironment of human RCC compared to normal kidney tissues. Neither kynurenine metabolites nor IDO inhibitors affected the survival or proliferation of human RCC or murine renal cell adenocarcinoma (RENCA) cells in vitro. However, interferon-gamma (IFNγ) induced high levels of IDO1 in both RCC and RENCA cells, concomitant with enhanced kynurenine levels in conditioned media. Induction of IDO1 by IFNα was weaker than by IFNγ. Neither the IDO1 inhibitor methyl-thiohydantoin-DL-tryptophan (MTH-trp) nor IFNα alone inhibited RENCA tumor growth, however the combination of MTH-trp and IFNα reduced tumor growth compared to IFNα. Thus, the failure of IFNα therapy for human RCC is likely due to its inability to overcome the immunosuppressive environment created by increased IDO1. Based on our data, and given that IDO inhibitors are already in clinical trials for other malignancies, IFNα therapy with an IDO inhibitor should be revisited for RCC.

  16. Flow-injection chemiluminescence determination of tryptophan through its peroxidation and epoxidation by peroxynitrous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yao-Dong; Song, Jun-Feng

    2005-06-01

    A flow-injection chemiluminescence method for the determination of tryptophan was proposed, which was based on an intense chemiluminescence of tryptophan in hydrogen peroxide-nitrite-sulfuric acid medium. The chemiluminescence reaction was attributed to peroxidation and epoxidation of tryptophan by peroxynitrous acid, and subsequent decomposition of the formed dioxetane. The chemiluminescence intensity was linear with tryptophan in the range of 6.0 x 10(-7) to 3.0 x 10(-5)mol l(-1) and the limit of detection (S/N=3) was 1.8 x 10(-7)mol l(-1). The proposed method was applied to the analysis of tryptophan in pharmaceutical preparations and human serum.

  17. Aspects of Tryptophan and Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide in Immunity: A New Twist in an Old Tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Rodriguez Cetina Biefer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence underscores the interesting ability of tryptophan to regulate immune responses. However, the exact mechanisms of tryptophan’s immune regulation remain to be determined. Tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway is known to play an important role in tryptophan’s involvement in immune responses. Interestingly, quinolinic acid, which is a neurotoxic catabolite of the kynurenine pathway, is the major pathway for the de novo synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + . Recent studies have shown that NAD + , a natural coenzyme found in all living cells, regulates immune responses and creates homeostasis via a novel signaling pathway. More importantly, the immunoregulatory properties of NAD + are strongly related to the overexpression of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1. This review provides recent knowledge of tryptophan and NAD + and their specific and intriguing roles in the immune system. Furthermore, it focuses on the mechanisms by which tryptophan regulates NAD + synthesis as well as innate and adaptive immune responses.

  18. Tryptophan-functionalized gold nanoparticles for deep UV imaging of microbial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajović, Jelena D; Dojčilović, Radovan; Božanić, Dušan K; Kaščáková, Slavka; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Dimitrijević-Branković, Suzana; Vodnik, Vesna V; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R; Piscopiello, Emanuela; Luyt, Adriaan S; Djoković, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    Biocompatible fluorescent nanostructures were prepared by a functionalization of gold nanoparticles with the amino acid tryptophan. The gold-tryptophan bioconjugates were investigated by TEM and HRTEM and various spectroscopy methods (XPS, FTIR, UV-vis and photoluminescence). It was found that the gold nanoparticles, initially 8 nm in diameter, aggregate in the presence of the amino acid. From the XPS and FTIR spectroscopy results, it was concluded that the tryptophan gold interactions mainly take place via indole and carboxyl groups. Although the indole group is involved in the interaction with the gold surfaces, the tryptophan-gold hybrids showed strong fluorescence due to the presence of multilayers of tryptophan. Deep ultra violet (DUV) imaging performed at the SOLEIL synchrotron showed that it is possible to detect these hybrid nanostructures within Escherichia coli cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhancement of stability of L-tryptophan dehydrogenase from Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133 and its application to L-tryptophan assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Daisuke; Okazaki, Seiji; Matsuda, Motoki; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-02-20

    Microbial NAD(+)-dependent L-tryptophan dehydrogenase (TrpDH, EC1.4.1.19), which catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination and the reductive amination between L-tryptophan and indole-3-pyruvic acid, was found in the scytonemin biosynthetic pathway of Nostoc punctiforme ATCC29133. The TrpDH exhibited high specificity toward L-tryptophan, but its instability was a drawback for L-tryptophan determination. The mutant enzyme TrpDH L59F/D168G/A234D/I296N with thermal stability was obtained by screening of Escherichia coli transformants harboring various mutant genes, which were generated by error-prone PCR using complementation in an L-tryptophan auxotroph of E. coli. The specific activity and stability of this mutant enzyme were higher than those of the wild type enzyme. We also revealed here that in these four mutation points, the two amino acid residues Asp168 and Ile296 contributed to increase the enzyme stability, and the Leu59, Ala234 residues to increase its specific activity. Growth of the strain harboring the gene of above 4 point mutated enzyme was accelerated by the enhanced performance. In the present study, we demonstrated that TrpDH L59F/D168G/A234D/I296N was available for determination of L-tryptophan in human plasma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Estrogen Treatment Impairs Cognitive Performance following Psychosocial Stress and Monoamine Depletion in Postmenopausal Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Paul A.; Dumas, Julie; Wilkins, Heather; Coderre, Emily; Sites, Cynthia K.; Naylor, Magdalena; Benkelfat, Chawki; Young, Simon N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Recent studies have shown women experience an acceleration of cognitive problems after menopause, and that estrogen treatment can improve or at least maintain current levels of cognitive functioning in postmenopausal women. However, we have previously shown that the negative emotional effects of psychosocial stress are magnified in normal postmenopausal women after estrogen treatment. This study examined whether estradiol administration can modify cognitive performance after exposure to psychological stress and monoamine depletion. Methods Participants consisted of 22 postmenopausal women placed on either oral placebo or 17β-estradiol (E2) (1 mg/day for 1 month, then 2 mg/day for 2 months). At the end of the 3 month treatment phase, participants underwent three depletion challenges in which they ingested one of three amino acid mixtures: deficient in tryptophan, deficient in phenylalanine/tyrosine, or balanced. Five hours later, participants performed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), followed by mood and anxiety ratings and cognitive testing. Cognitive measures included tests of attention, psychomotor function, and verbal episodic memory. Results E2-treated compared to placebo-treated participants exhibited significant worsening of cognitive performance on tasks measuring attentional performance and psychomotor speed. Similar trends for impairment were seen in measures of long-term episodic memory compared to placebo-treated postmenopausal women. E2-treated participants also showed a significant increase in negative mood and anxiety compared to placebo-treated women after but not before the TSST, though the worsening of both cognitive and behavioral functioning were not correlated. These effects were independent of tryptophan or tyrosine/phenylalanine depletion and were not manifest before the TSST or at baseline. Conclusions These data suggest that the relationship between estrogen administration and cognitive/behavioral performance in

  1. Estrogen treatment impairs cognitive performance after psychosocial stress and monoamine depletion in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Paul A; Dumas, Julie; Wilkins, Heather; Coderre, Emily; Sites, Cynthia K; Naylor, Magdalena; Benkelfat, Chawki; Young, Simon N

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that women experience an acceleration of cognitive problems after menopause and that estrogen treatment can improve or at least maintain current levels of cognitive functioning in postmenopausal women. However, we have previously shown that the negative emotional effects of psychosocial stress are magnified in normal postmenopausal women after estrogen treatment. This study examined whether estradiol (E2) administration can modify cognitive performance after exposure to psychological stress and monoamine depletion. Participants consisted of 22 postmenopausal women placed on either oral placebo or 17beta-E2 (1 mg/d for 1 mo, then 2 mg/d for 2 mo). At the end of the 3-month treatment phase, participants underwent three depletion challenges in which they ingested one of three amino acid mixtures: deficient in tryptophan, deficient in phenylalanine/tyrosine, or balanced. Five hours later, participants performed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), followed by mood and anxiety ratings and cognitive testing. Cognitive measures included tests of attention, psychomotor function, and verbal episodic memory. E2-treated compared with placebo-treated participants exhibited significant worsening of cognitive performance on tasks measuring attentional performance and psychomotor speed. Similar trends for impairment were seen in measures of long-term episodic memory compared with placebo-treated postmenopausal women. E2-treated participants also showed a significant increase in negative mood and anxiety compared with placebo-treated women after, but not before, the TSST, although the worsening of both cognitive and behavioral functioning was not correlated. These effects were independent of tryptophan or tyrosine/phenylalanine depletion and were not manifested before the TSST or at baseline. These data suggest that the relationship between estrogen administration and cognitive/behavioral performance in postmenopausal women may be more complex than

  2. Blunted epidermal L-tryptophan metabolism in vitiligo affects immune response and ROS scavenging by Fenton chemistry, part 1: Epidermal H2O2/ONOO(-)-mediated stress abrogates tryptophan hydroxylase and dopa decarboxylase activities, leading to low serotonin and melatonin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallreuter, Karin U; Salem, Mohamed A E L; Gibbons, Nick C J; Martinez, Aurora; Slominski, Radomir; Lüdemann, Jürgen; Rokos, Hartmut

    2012-06-01

    Vitiligo is characterized by a progressive loss of inherited skin color. The cause of the disease is still unknown. To date, there is accumulating in vivo and in vitro evidence for massive oxidative stress via hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) in the skin of affected individuals. Autoimmune etiology is the favored theory. Since depletion of the essential amino acid L-tryptophan (Trp) affects immune response mechanisms, we here looked at epidermal Trp metabolism via tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) with its downstream cascade, including serotonin and melatonin. Our in situ immunofluorescence and Western blot data reveal significantly lower TPH1 expression in patients with vitiligo. Expression is also low in melanocytes and keratinocytes under in vitro conditions. Although in vivo Fourier transform-Raman spectroscopy proves the presence of 5-hydroxytryptophan, epidermal TPH activity is completely absent. Regulation of TPH via microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and L-type calcium channels is severely affected. Moreover, dopa decarboxylase (DDC) expression is significantly lower, in association with decreased serotonin and melatonin levels. Computer simulation supports H(2)O(2)/ONOO(-)-mediated oxidation/nitration of TPH1 and DDC, affecting, in turn, enzyme functionality. Taken together, our data point to depletion of epidermal Trp by Fenton chemistry and exclude melatonin as a relevant contributor to epidermal redox balance and immune response in vitiligo.

  3. Correlation of tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay parameters with sup 1 H NMR-determined rotamer conformations: (tryptophan sup 2 )oxytocin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, J.B.A.; Schwartz, G.P.; Laws, W.R. (Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States)); Wyssbrod, H.R.; Porter, R.A. (Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States)); Michaels, C.A. (Swarthmore Coll., PA (United States))

    1992-02-18

    While the fluorescence decay kinetics of tyrosine model compounds can be explained in terms of heterogeneity derived from the three ground-state {chi}{sup 1} rotamers, a similar correlation has yet to be directly observed for a tryptophan residue. In addition, the asymmetric indole ring might also lead to heterogeneity from {chi}{sup 2} rotations. In this paper, the time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence properties of (tryptophan{sup 2})oxytocin at pH 3 are presented and compared with {sup 1}H NMR results. According to the unrestricted analyses of individual fluorescence decay curves taken as a function of emission wavelength-independent decay constants, only three exponential terms are required. In addition, the preexponential weighting factors (amplitudes) have the same relative relationship (weights) as the {sup 1}H NMR-determined {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations of the indole side chain. {sup 15}N was used in heteronuclear coupling experiments to confirm the rotamer assignments. Inclusion of a linked function restricting the decay amplitudes to the {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations in the individual decay curve analyses and in the global analysis confirms this correlation. According to qualitative nuclear Overhauser data, there are two {chi}{sup 2} populations.

  4. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  5. Dietary l-tryptophan leaves a lasting impression on the brain and the stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Erik; Øverli, Øyvind; Andersson, Madelene Å; Silva, Patricia; Laursen, Danielle Caroline; Moltesen, Maria M; Krogdahl, Åshild; Schjolden, Joachim; Winberg, Svante; Vindas, Marco A; Mayer, Ian; Hillestad, Marie

    2017-05-01

    Comparative models suggest that effects of dietary tryptophan (Trp) on brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) neurochemistry and stress responsiveness are present throughout the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, hypothalamic 5-HT seems to play a central role in control of the neuroendocrine stress axis in all vertebrates. Still, recent fish studies suggest long-term effects of dietary Trp on stress responsiveness, which are independent of hypothalamic 5-HT. Here, we investigated if dietary Trp treatment may result in long-lasting effects on stress responsiveness, including changes in plasma cortisol levels and 5-HT neurochemistry in the telencephalon and hypothalamus of Atlantic salmon. Fish were fed diets containing one, two or three times the Trp content in normal feed for 1 week. Subsequently, fish were reintroduced to control feed and were exposed to acute crowding stress for 1 h, 8 and 21 d post Trp treatment. Generally, acute crowding resulted in lower plasma cortisol levels in fish treated with 3×Trp compared with 1×Trp- and 2×Trp-treated fish. The same general pattern was reflected in telencephalic 5-HTergic turnover, for which 3×Trp-treated fish showed decreased values compared with 2×Trp-treated fish. These long-term effects on post-stress plasma cortisol levels and concomitant 5-HT turnover in the telencephalon lends further support to the fact that the extrahypothalamic control of the neuroendocrine stress response is conserved within the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, they indicate that trophic/structural effects in the brain underlie the effects of dietary Trp treatment on stress reactivity.

  6. Doxycycline induced photodamage to human neutrophils and tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, S.; Glette, J.; Hopen, G.; Solberg, C.O. (Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen (Norway))

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophil function were studied following irradiation (340-380 nm) of the cells in the presence of 22 ..mu..M doxycycline. At increasing light fluence the locomotion, chemiluminescence and glucose oxidation (by the hexose monophosphate shunt) of the neutrophils steadily decreased. The photodamage increased with increasing preincubation temperature and time and was enhanced in D/sub 2/O, reduced in azide and abolished in anaerobiosis. Superoxide dismutase, catalase or mannitol did not influence the photodamage. Photooxidation of tryptophan in the presence of doxycycline was increased 9-10-fold in D/sub 2/O and nearly abolished in the presence of 0.25 mM NaN/sub 3/, indicating that singlet oxygen is the most important reactive oxygen species in the doxycycline-induced photodamage. The results may explain some of the features of tetracycline-induced photosensitivity and why other authors have obtained diverging results when studying the influence of tetracyclines on neutrophil functions.

  7. Methyl N-[1-(Benzoylamino-2-methoxy-2-oxoethyl]-tryptophanate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumaima Karai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, methyl N-[1-(benzoylamino-2-methoxy-2-oxoethyl]tryptophanate 2, was synthesized in high yield, via N-alkylation reaction of methyl 2-azido-2-benzamidoacetate with methyl 2-amino-3-(1H-indol-3-ylpropanoate in acetone, with the presence of diisopropylethylamine as a base. The structure of the prepared compound was characterized by 1H, 13C NMR in addition to MS, X-Ray diffraction data, and elemental analysis. This compound was tested in vitro for its antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, and Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella enteric. The MIC values showed that the synthesized compound had a bactericidal effect against the strains tested.

  8. Functional roles of Tryptophan residues in diketoreductase from Acinetobacter baylyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Huang1, Zhuo Lu1, Min Ma1, Nan Liu1 & Yijun Chen1,2,*

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Diketoreductase (DKR from Acinetobacter baylyi contains twotryptophan residues at positions 149 and 222. Trp-149 andTrp-222 are located along the entry path of substrate into activesite and at the dimer interface of DKR, respectively. Single anddouble substitutions of these positions were generated to probethe roles of tryptophan residues. After replacing Trp with Alaand Phe, biochemical and biophysical characteristics of themutants were thoroughly investigated. Enzyme activity andsubstrate binding affinity of W149A and W149F wereremarkably decreased, suggesting that Trp-149 regulates theposition of substrate at the binding site. Meanwhile, enzymeactivity of W222F was increased by 1.7-fold while W222A wascompletely inactive. In addition to lower thermostability ofTrp-222 mutants, molecular modeling of the mutants revealedthat Trp-222 is vital to protein folding and dimerization of theenzyme.

  9. Tryptophan, Neurodegeneration and HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas W.S. Davies

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an up-to-date assessment of the role of the tryptophan metabolic and catabolic pathways in neurodegenerative disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. The kynurenine pathway and the effects of each of its enzymes and products are reviewed. The differential expression of the kynurenine pathway in cells within the brain, including inflammatory cells, is explored given the increasing recognition of the importance of inflammation in neurodegenerative disease. An overview of common mechanisms of neurodegeneration is presented before a review and discussion of the evidence for a pathogenetic role of the kynurenine pathway in Alzheimer’s disease, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, Huntington’s disease, motor neurone disease, and Parkinson’s disease.

  10. Tryptophan, Neurodegeneration and HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas W.S. Davies

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an up-to-date assessment of the role of the tryptophan metabolic and catabolic pathways in neurodegenerative disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. The kynurenine pathway and the effects of each of its enzymes and products are reviewed. The differential expression of the kynurenine pathway in cells within the brain, including inflammatory cells, is explored given the increasing recognition of the importance of inflammation in neurodegenerative disease. An overview of common mechanisms of neurodegeneration is presented before a review and discussion of the evidence for a pathogenetic role of the kynurenine pathway in Alzheimer's disease, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, Huntington's disease, motor neurone disease, and Parkinson's disease.

  11. Increased Tryptophan Metabolism Is Associated With Activity of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaus, Susanna; Schulte, Berenice; Al-Massad, Natalie; Thieme, Florian; Schulte, Dominik M; Bethge, Johannes; Rehman, Ateequr; Tran, Florian; Aden, Konrad; Häsler, Robert; Moll, Natalie; Schütze, Gregor; Schwarz, Markus J; Waetzig, Georg H; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Szymczak, Silke; Schreiber, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    Administration of tryptophan and some of its metabolites reduces the severity of colitis in mice, whereas removing tryptophan from the diet increases susceptibility to colitis. Transfer of the intestinal microbiome transfers the colitogenic phenotype from tryptophan starved animals to normally nourished mice. We aimed to systematically evaluate serum levels of tryptophan and its metabolites in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and study their association with clinical and serologic features. We studied 535 consecutive patients with IBD (211 with ulcerative colitis [UC], 234 with Crohn's disease [CD]; 236 male), enrolled in Germany from August 2013 through April 2014 and followed until July 2016. Serum samples were collected from patients and 291 matched individuals without IBD (controls); levels of tryptophan were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Metabolites of tryptophan were measured in serum from 148 patients and 100 controls by mass spectrometry. We measured levels of interleukin 22 in serum from 28 patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Paired stool and serum samples were collected from a subset of patients with active UC (n = 10) or CD (n = 8) to investigate associations between serum levels of tryptophan and composition of the fecal microbiota, analyzed by 16S ribosomal DNA amplicon sequencing. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction to measure levels of messenger RNAs in colonic biopsies from 60 patients with UC, 50 with CD, and 30 controls. We collected information on patients' disease activity scores, medications, laboratory assessments, and clinical examinations during recruitment and follow-up visits. Serum levels of tryptophan were significantly lower in patients with IBD than in controls (P = 5.3 × 10-6) with a stronger reduction in patients with CD (vs control; P = 1.1 × 10-10) than UC (vs control; P = 2.8 × 10-3). We found a negative correlation between serum levels of tryptophan and

  12. A review of the immunomodulatory role of dietary tryptophan in livestock and poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Miaomiao; Liu, Hongnan; Xu, Kang; Oso, Abimbola Oladele; Wu, Xin; Liu, Gang; Tossou, Myrlene Carine B; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Xi, Qianyun; Yin, Yinlong

    2017-01-01

    Tryptophan, a nutritionally essential amino acid, is active in the regulation of immune responses in animals. The products of tryptophan metabolism, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, kynurenine, quinolinic acid, and melatonin, may improve immunity in an organism and induce anti-inflammatory responses. The immune tolerance processes mediated by tryptophan metabolites are not well understood. Recent studies have reported that the enzymes that break down tryptophan through the kynurenine metabolic pathway are found in numerous cell types, including immunocytes. Moreover, some tryptophan metabolites have been shown to play a role in the inhibition of T lymphocyte proliferation, elevation of immunoglobulin levels in the blood, and promotion of antigen-presenting organization in tissues. This review summarizes the effects and mechanisms of tryptophan and metabolites in immune functions in livestock and poultry. It also highlights the areas in which our understanding of the role(s) of tryptophan is incomplete and suggests possible future research that might prove of benefit to livestock and poultry producers.

  13. Was the Chlamydial Adaptative Strategy to Tryptophan Starvation an Early Determinant of Plastid Endosymbiosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, Ugo; Ducatez, Mathieu; Kadouche, Derifa; Colleoni, Christophe; Ball, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydiales were recently proposed to have sheltered the future cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids in a common inclusion. The intracellular pathogens are thought to have donated those critical transporters that triggered the efflux of photosynthetic carbon and the consequent onset of symbiosis. Chlamydiales are also suspected to have encoded glycogen metabolism TTS (Type Three Secretion) effectors responsible for photosynthetic carbon assimilation in the eukaryotic cytosol. We now review the reasons underlying other chlamydial lateral gene transfers evidenced in the descendants of plastid endosymbiosis. In particular we show that half of the genes encoding enzymes of tryptophan synthesis in Archaeplastida are of chlamydial origin. Tryptophan concentration is an essential cue triggering two alternative modes of replication in Chlamydiales. In addition, sophisticated tryptophan starvation mechanisms are known to act as antibacterial defenses in animal hosts. We propose that Chlamydiales have donated their tryptophan operon to the emerging plastid to ensure increased synthesis of tryptophan by the plastid ancestor. This would have allowed massive expression of the tryptophan rich chlamydial transporters responsible for symbiosis. It would also have allowed possible export of this valuable amino-acid in the inclusion of the tryptophan hungry pathogens. Free-living single cell cyanobacteria are devoid of proteins able to transport this amino-acid. We therefore investigated the phylogeny of the Tyr/Trp transporters homologous to E. coli TyrP/Mre and found yet another LGT from Chlamydiales to Archaeplastida thereby considerably strengthening our proposal.

  14. Serotonin, tryptophan metabolism and the brain-gut-microbiome axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, S M; Clarke, G; Borre, Y E; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-01-15

    The brain-gut axis is a bidirectional communication system between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Serotonin functions as a key neurotransmitter at both terminals of this network. Accumulating evidence points to a critical role for the gut microbiome in regulating normal functioning of this axis. In particular, it is becoming clear that the microbial influence on tryptophan metabolism and the serotonergic system may be an important node in such regulation. There is also substantial overlap between behaviours influenced by the gut microbiota and those which rely on intact serotonergic neurotransmission. The developing serotonergic system may be vulnerable to differential microbial colonisation patterns prior to the emergence of a stable adult-like gut microbiota. At the other extreme of life, the decreased diversity and stability of the gut microbiota may dictate serotonin-related health problems in the elderly. The mechanisms underpinning this crosstalk require further elaboration but may be related to the ability of the gut microbiota to control host tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway, thereby simultaneously reducing the fraction available for serotonin synthesis and increasing the production of neuroactive metabolites. The enzymes of this pathway are immune and stress-responsive, both systems which buttress the brain-gut axis. In addition, there are neural processes in the gastrointestinal tract which can be influenced by local alterations in serotonin concentrations with subsequent relay of signals along the scaffolding of the brain-gut axis to influence CNS neurotransmission. Therapeutic targeting of the gut microbiota might be a viable treatment strategy for serotonin-related brain-gut axis disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Distinct Contributions of Tryptophan Residues within the Dimerization Domain to Nanog Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Nicholas P; Gagliardi, Alessia; Khoa, Le Tran Phuc; Colby, Douglas; Hall-Ponsele, Elisa; Rowe, Arthur J; Chambers, Ian

    2017-05-19

    The level of the transcription factor Nanog directly determines the efficiency of mouse embryonic stem cell self-renewal. Nanog protein exists as a dimer with the dimerization domain composed of a simple repeat region in which every fifth residue is a tryptophan, the tryptophan repeat (WR). Although WR is necessary to enable Nanog to confer LIF-independent self-renewal, the mechanism of dimerization and the effect of modulating dimerization strength have been unclear. Here we couple mutagenesis with functional and dimerization assays to show that the number of tryptophans within the WR is linked to the strength of homodimerization, Sox2 heterodimerization and self-renewal activity. A reduction in the number of tryptophan residues leads initially to a gradual reduction in activity before a precipitous reduction in activity occurs upon reduction in tryptophan number below eight. Further functional attrition follows subsequent tryptophan number reduction with substitution of all tryptophan residues ablating dimerization and self-renewal function completely. A strong positional influence of tryptophans exists, with residues at the WR termini contributing more to Nanog function, particularly at the N-terminal end. Limited proteolysis demonstrates that a structural core of Nanog encompassing the homeodomain and the tryptophan repeat can support LIF-independent colony formation. These results increase understanding of the molecular interactions occurring between transcription factor subunits at the core of the pluripotency gene regulatory network and will enhance our ability to control pluripotent cell self-renewal and differentiation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. The Case of Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambright, W. Henry

    2005-01-01

    While the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is widely perceived as a space agency, since its inception NASA has had a mission dedicated to the home planet. Initially, this mission involved using space to better observe and predict weather and to enable worldwide communication. Meteorological and communication satellites showed the value of space for earthly endeavors in the 1960s. In 1972, NASA launched Landsat, and the era of earth-resource monitoring began. At the same time, in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the environmental movement swept throughout the United States and most industrialized countries. The first Earth Day event took place in 1970, and the government generally began to pay much more attention to issues of environmental quality. Mitigating pollution became an overriding objective for many agencies. NASA's existing mission to observe planet Earth was augmented in these years and directed more toward environmental quality. In the 1980s, NASA sought to plan and establish a new environmental effort that eventuated in the 1990s with the Earth Observing System (EOS). The Agency was able to make its initial mark via atmospheric monitoring, specifically ozone depletion. An important policy stimulus in many respects, ozone depletion spawned the Montreal Protocol of 1987 (the most significant international environmental treaty then in existence). It also was an issue critical to NASA's history that served as a bridge linking NASA's weather and land-resource satellites to NASA s concern for the global changes affecting the home planet. Significantly, as a global environmental problem, ozone depletion underscored the importance of NASA's ability to observe Earth from space. Moreover, the NASA management team's ability to apply large-scale research efforts and mobilize the talents of other agencies and the private sector illuminated its role as a lead agency capable of crossing organizational boundaries as well as the science-policy divide.

  17. Systemic endotoxin increases L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3-hydroxykynurenine and quinolinic acid content of mouse cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, M P; Quearry, B J; Markey, S P

    1989-07-03

    Systemic infections and injection of endotoxin are known to increase L-tryptophan release from skeletal muscle and increase systemic L-tryptophan catabolism through the kynurenine pathway. To investigate the effects of systemically administered endotoxin on brain L-tryptophan metabolites. C57BL6/6NCR mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of 10 micrograms of lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella abortus equii and samples of serum and cerebral cortex collected. After 9 h, serum L-tryptophan concentration was decreased by 51%. At 9 h and 24 h, increases in L-tryptophan metabolites in cerebral cortex were: L-tryptophan, 42% and 39%; 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 38% and 67%; 3-hydroxykynurenine, 235% and 381%; and quinolinic acid, 76% and 306%. Cortical quinolinic acid concentration was still elevated at 48 h (88%) and 72 h (79%) after lipopolysaccharide. No significant changes in cortical serotonin concentrations were found at the time points examined. When L-tryptophan (0.37 mmol/kg) was administered systemically to either normal or lipopolysaccharide-treated mice, increases in cortical L-tryptophan, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and 3-hydroxykynurenine concentrations were largest in mice treated with both lipopolysaccharide and L-tryptophan. These results suggest that disturbances in L-tryptophan metabolism that follow systemic endotoxin administration extend to the central nervous system. The consequences of these changes in L-tryptophan metabolites remain to be determined.

  18. Assessment of Tryptophan Uptake and Kinetics Using 1-(2-18F-Fluoroethyl)-l-Tryptophan and α-11C-Methyl-l-Tryptophan PET Imaging in Mice Implanted with Patient-Derived Brain Tumor Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Muzik, Otto; Guastella, Anthony R; Klinger, Neil V; Polin, Lisa A; Cai, Hancheng; Xin, Yangchun; Mangner, Thomas J; Zhang, Shaohui; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2017-02-01

    Abnormal tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway is involved in the pathophysiology of a variety of human diseases including cancers. α-11C-methyl-l-tryptophan (11C-AMT) PET imaging demonstrated increased tryptophan uptake and trapping in epileptic foci and brain tumors, but the short half-life of 11C limits its widespread clinical application. Recent in vitro studies suggested that the novel radiotracer 1-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-l-tryptophan (18F-FETrp) may be useful to assess tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway. In this study, we tested in vivo organ and tumor uptake and kinetics of 18F-FETrp in patient-derived xenograft mouse models and compared them with 11C-AMT uptake. Xenograft mouse models of glioblastoma and metastatic brain tumors (from lung and breast cancer) were developed by subcutaneous implantation of patient tumor fragments. Dynamic PET scans with 18F-FETrp and 11C-AMT were obtained for mice bearing human brain tumors 1-7 d apart. The biodistribution and tumoral SUVs for both tracers were compared. 18F-FETrp showed prominent uptake in the pancreas and no bone uptake, whereas 11C-AMT showed higher uptake in the kidneys. Both tracers showed uptake in the xenograft tumors, with a plateau of approximately 30 min after injection; however, 18F-FETrp showed higher tumoral SUV than 11C-AMT in all 3 tumor types tested. The radiation dosimetry for 18F-FETrp determined from the mouse data compared favorably with the clinical 18F-FDG PET tracer. 18F-FETrp tumoral uptake, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry data provide strong preclinical evidence that this new radiotracer warrants further studies that may lead to a broadly applicable molecular imaging tool to examine abnormal tryptophan metabolism in human tumors. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  19. RNAi-induced silencing of embryonic tryptophan oxygenase in the Pyralid moth, Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Kanost, Michael R; Baker, James E

    2004-01-01

    Gene silencing through the introduction of double-stranded RNA (RNA interference, RNAi) provides a powerful tool for the elucidation of gene function in many systems, including those where genomics and proteomics are incomplete. The use of RNAi technology for gene silencing in Lepidoptera has lacked significant attention compared to other systems. To demonstrate that RNAi can be utilized in the lepidopteran, Plodia interpunctella, we cloned a cDNA for tryptophan oxygenase, and showed that silencing of tryptophan oxygenase through RNAi during embryonic development resulted in loss of eye-color pigmentation. The complete amino acid sequence of Plodia tryptophan oxygenase can be accessed through NCBI Protein Database.

  20. Expression, purification and enzymatic characterization of the catalytic domains of human tryptophan hydroxylase isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Boesen, Jane; Karlsen, Pernille Efferbach

    2009-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase exists in two isoforms: Isoform 1 catalyses the first and rate-limiting step in the synthesis of serotonin in the peripheral parts of the body while isoform 2 catalyses this step in the brain. The catalytic domains of human tryptophan hydroxylase 1 and 2 have been expressed......, purified and the kinetic properties have been studied and are compared. Substrate inhibition by tryptophan is observed for isoform 1 but not for isoform 2. Large differences are observed in the K m,tetrahydrobiopterin values for the two isoforms, being >10 times larger for isoform 1 compared to isoform 2....

  1. "When the going gets tough, who keeps going?" Depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, Stefanie J.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; De Vet, Emely; Fennis, Bob M.; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2014-01-01

    Self-control relies on a limited resource that can get depleted, a phenomenon that has been labeled ego-depletion. We argue that individuals may differ in their sensitivity to depleting tasks, and that consequently some people deplete their self-control resource at a faster rate than others. In

  2. "When the going gets tough, who keeps going?" : Depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, Stefanie J.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; De Vet, Emely; Fennis, Bob M.; De Ridder, Denise T. D.

    2014-01-01

    Self-control relies on a limited resource that can get depleted, a phenomenon that has been labeled ego-depletion. We argue that individuals may differ in their sensitivity to depleting tasks, and that consequently some people deplete their self-control resource at a faster rate than others. In

  3. Plasma Tryptophan and the Kynurenine-Tryptophan Ratio are Associated with the Acquisition of Statural Growth Deficits and Oral Vaccine Underperformance in Populations with Environmental Enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, Margaret N; Mduma, Estomih; Kosek, Peter S; Lee, Gwenyth O; Svensen, Erling; Pan, William K Y; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Bream, Jay H; Patil, Crystal; Asayag, Cesar Ramal; Sanchez, Graciela Meza; Caulfield, Laura E; Gratz, Jean; Yori, Pablo Peñataro

    2016-10-05

    Early childhood enteric infections have adverse impacts on child growth and can inhibit normal mucosal responses to oral vaccines, two critical components of environmental enteropathy. To evaluate the role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) activity and its relationship with these outcomes, we measured tryptophan and the kynurenine-tryptophan ratio (KTR) in two longitudinal birth cohorts with a high prevalence of stunting. Children in rural Peru and Tanzania (N = 494) contributed 1,251 plasma samples at 3, 7, 15, and 24 months of age and monthly anthropometrics from 0 to 36 months of age. Tryptophan concentrations were directly associated with linear growth from 1 to 8 months after biomarker assessment. A 1-SD increase in tryptophan concentration was associated with a gain in length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) of 0.17 over the next 6 months in Peru (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11-0.23, P tryptophan and kynurenine as biomarkers for this syndrome, particularly in identifying those at risk for hyporesponsivity to oral vaccines. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  4. CO Depletion: A Microscopic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazaux, S.; Martín-Doménech, R.; Chen, Y. J.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; González Díaz, C.

    2017-11-01

    In regions where stars form, variations in density and temperature can cause gas to freeze out onto dust grains forming ice mantles, which influences the chemical composition of a cloud. The aim of this paper is to understand in detail the depletion (and desorption) of CO on (from) interstellar dust grains. Experimental simulations were performed under two different (astrophysically relevant) conditions. In parallel, Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were used to mimic the experimental conditions. In our experiments, CO molecules accrete onto water ice at temperatures below 27 K, with a deposition rate that does not depend on the substrate temperature. During the warm-up phase, the desorption processes do exhibit subtle differences, indicating the presence of weakly bound CO molecules, therefore highlighting a low diffusion efficiency. IR measurements following the ice thickness during the TPD confirm that diffusion occurs at temperatures close to the desorption. Applied to astrophysical conditions, in a pre-stellar core, the binding energies of CO molecules, ranging between 300 and 850 K, depend on the conditions at which CO has been deposited. Because of this wide range of binding energies, the depletion of CO as a function of AV is much less important than initially thought. The weakly bound molecules, easily released into the gas phase through evaporation, change the balance between accretion and desorption, which result in a larger abundance of CO at high extinctions. In addition, weakly bound CO molecules are also more mobile, and this could increase the reactivity within interstellar ices.

  5. The 1988 Antarctic ozone depletion - Comparison with previous year depletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Krueger, Arlin J.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 spring Antarctic ozone depletion was observed by TOMS to be substantially smaller than in recent years. The minimum polar total ozone values declined only 15 percent during September 1988, compared to nearly 50 percent during September 1987. At southern midlatitudes, exceptionally high total ozone values were recorded beginning in July 1988. The total integrated southern hemispheric ozone increased rapidly during the Austral spring, approaching 1980 levels during October. The high midlatitude total ozone values were associated with a substantial increase in eddy activity as indicated by the standard deviation in total ozone in the zonal band 30-60 deg S. Mechanisms through which the increased midlatitude eddy activity could disrupt the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole are briefly discussed.

  6. Two single-base-pair substitutions causing desensitization to tryptophan feedback inhibition of anthranilate synthase and enhanced expression of tryptophan genes of Brevibacterium lactofermentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, K; Miwa, K; Sano, K

    1987-01-01

    A 5-fluorotryptophan-resistant mutant, termed 1041, was isolated from Brevibacterium lactofermentum AJ12036. The anthranilate synthase of 1041 was insensitive to feedback inhibition by tryptophan, and the specific activities of the anthranilate synthase and anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase of 1041 were 29- and 23-fold higher than those in parental strain AJ12036, respectively. A single-base change (adenine to cytosine) that resulted in a Ser-to-Arg substitution was found in the trpE structural gene of 1041. This substitution was identified as the cause of the desensitization to feedback inhibition by tryptophan of anthranilate synthase in 1041. Another substitution (guanine to adenine) was found at a position in which a mutation would destabilize the rho-independent terminator structure within the putative attenuator. The enhanced synthesis of tryptophan enzymes in 1041 could be caused by this substitution in the attenuator. PMID:3667535

  7. FLIM-FRET image analysis of tryptophan in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Ammasi; Alam, Shagufta R.; Svindrych, Zdenek; Wallrabe, Horst

    2017-07-01

    A region of interest (ROI) based quantitative FLIM-FRET image analysis is developed to quantitate the autofluorescence signals of the essential amino acid tryptophan as a biomarker to investigate the metabolism in prostate cancer cells.

  8. Irritability rather than depression during interferon treatment is linked to increased tryptophan catabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, S; Kema, IP; Haagsma, EB; Boon, JC; Willemse, PHB; Den Boer, JA; De Vries, EGE; Korf, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Treatment with recombinant interferon is associated with high rates of psychiatric comorbidity. We investigated the relation between catabolism of the essential amino acid tryptophan, being rate-limiting of peripheral and cerebral serotonin formation, and psychiatric symptoms in patients

  9. Judgment of pure fermented soy sauce by fluorescence resonance energy transfer of OPA-tryptophan adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, You-Syuan; Hsieh, Bo-Chuan; Cheng, Tzong-Jih; Chen, Richie L C

    2015-07-01

    Tryptophan was detected with a flow-injection manifold after reacting with mM order of fluorogenic o-phthalaldehyde (OPA)/thiol reagent (pH 10.0) in the carrier stream (0.63 mL/min). Based on the intra-molecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer of OPA-tryptophan adduct, the difference in fluorescence intensity obtained at 280 and 300 nm excitation was used to detect tryptophan content with satisfactory precision (CVtryptophan will decompose during manufacturing non-fermented soy sauce by acid-hydrolysis procedure, the method was used to discriminate pure fermented soy sauces, adulterated soy sauces and chemical soy sauces in less than 5 min. The ratio of tryptophan to total amino acid content served as the index for the judgment, and the results were validated by capillary electrophoresis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The tryptophan/kynurenine pathway, systemic inflammation, and long-term outcome after kidney transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Laura V.; Minovic, Isidor; Franssen, Casper F. M.; van Faassen, Martijn; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F.; Berger, Stefan P.; Navis, Gerjan; Kema, Ido P.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    Tryptophan is metabolized along the kynurenine pathway, initially to kynurenine, and subsequently to cytotoxic 3-hydroxykynurenine. There is increasing interest in this pathway because of its proinflammatory nature, and drugs interfering in it have received increasing attention. We aimed to

  11. Creatine pretreatment protects cortical axons from energy depletion in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hua; Goldberg, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Creatine is a natural nitrogenous guanidino compound involved in bioenergy metabolism. Although creatine has been shown to protect neurons of the central nervous system (CNS) from experimental hypoxia/ischemia, it remains unclear if creatine may also protect CNS axons, and if the potential axonal protection depends on glial cells. To evaluate the direct impact of creatine on CNS axons, cortical axons were cultured in a separate compartment from their somas and proximal neurites using a modified two-compartment culture device. Axons in the axon compartment were subjected to acute energy depletion, an in vitro model of white matter ischemia, by exposure to 6 mM sodium azide for 30 min in the absence of glucose and pyruvate. Energy depletion reduced axonal ATP by 65%, depolarized axonal resting potential, and damaged 75% of axons. Application of creatine (10 mM) to both compartments of the culture at 24 h prior to energy depletion significantly reduced axonal damage by 50%. In line with the role of creatine in the bioenergy metabolism, this application also alleviated the axonal ATP loss and depolarization. Inhibition of axonal depolarization by blocking sodium influx with tetrodotoxin also effectively reduced the axonal damage caused by energy depletion. Further study revealed that the creatine effect was independent of glial cells, as axonal protection was sustained even when creatine was applied only to the axon compartment (free from somas and glial cells) for as little as 2 h. In contrast, application of creatine after energy depletion did not protect axons. The data provide the first evidence that creatine pretreatment may directly protect CNS axons from energy deficiency. PMID:22521466

  12. Syntheses and Self-assembling Behaviors of Pentagonal Conjugates of Tryptophane Zipper-Forming Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Kimizuka

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pentagonal conjugates of tryptophane zipper-forming peptide (CKTWTWTE with a pentaazacyclopentadecane core (Pentagonal-Gly-Trpzip and Pentagonal-Ala-Trpzip were synthesized and their self-assembling behaviors were investigated in water. Pentagonal-Gly-Trpzip self-assembled into nanofibers with the width of about 5 nm in neutral water (pH 7 via formation of tryptophane zipper, which irreversibly converted to nanoribbons by heating. In contrast, Pentagonal-Ala-Trpzip formed irregular aggregates in water.

  13. Effects of Tryptophan Content and Backbone Spacing on the Uptake Efficiency of Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.

    2012-07-10

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to traverse cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo. Uptake occurs through both endocytotic and nonendocytotic pathways, but the molecular requirements for efficient internalization are not fully understood. Here we investigate how the presence of tryptophans and their position within an oligoarginine influence uptake mechanism and efficiency. Flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence imaging are used to estimate uptake efficiency, intracellular distribution and toxicity in Chinese hamster ovarian cells. Further, membrane leakage and lipid membrane affinity are investigated. The peptides contain eight arginine residues and one to four tryptophans, the tryptophans positioned either at the N-terminus, in the middle, or evenly distributed along the amino acid sequence. Our data show that the intracellular distribution varies among peptides with different tryptophan content and backbone spacing. Uptake efficiency is higher for the peptides with four tryptophans in the middle, or evenly distributed along the peptide sequence, than for the peptide with four tryptophans at the N-terminus. All peptides display low cytotoxicity except for the one with four tryptophans at the N-terminus, which was moderately toxic. This finding is consistent with their inability to induce efficient leakage of dye from lipid vesicles. All peptides have comparable affinities for lipid vesicles, showing that lipid binding is not a decisive parameter for uptake. Our results indicate that tryptophan content and backbone spacing can affect both the CPP uptake efficiency and the CPP uptake mechanism. The low cytotoxicity of these peptides and the possibilities of tuning their uptake mechanism are interesting from a therapeutic point of view. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. Effects of Exhaustive Aerobic Exercise on Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism in Trained Athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Strasser

    Full Text Available Exhaustive exercise can cause a transient depression of immune function. Data indicate significant effects of immune activation cascades on the biochemistry of monoamines and amino acids such as tryptophan. Tryptophan can be metabolized through different pathways, a major route being the kynurenine pathway, which is often systemically up-regulated when the immune response is activated. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of exhaustive aerobic exercise on biomarkers of immune activation and tryptophan metabolism in trained athletes. After a standardized breakfast 2 h prior to exercise, 33 trained athletes (17 women, 16 men performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test at 60 rpm until exhaustion. After a 20 min rest phase, the participants performed a 20 min maximal time-trial on a cycle ergometer (RBM Cyclus 2, Germany. During the test, cyclists were strongly encouraged to choose a maximal pedalling rate that could be maintained for the respective test duration. Serum concentrations of amino acids tryptophan, kynurenine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were determined by HPLC and immune system biomarker neopterin by ELISA at rest and immediately post exercise. Intense exercise was associated with a strong increase in neopterin concentrations (p<0.001, indicating increased immune activation following intense exercise. Exhaustive exercise significantly reduced tryptophan concentrations by 12% (p<0.001 and increased kynurenine levels by 6% (p = 0.022. Also phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios were lower after exercise as compared with baseline (p<0.001. The kynurenine to tryptophan ratio correlated with neopterin (r = 0.560, p<0.01. Thus, increased tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase appears likely. Peak oxygen uptake correlated with baseline tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations (r = 0.562 and r = 0.511, respectively, both p<0.01. Findings demonstrate that exhaustive aerobic exercise is associated with

  15. Effects of dietary L-tryptophan supplementation on intestinal response to chronic unpredictable stress in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yunshuang; Guo, Yuming; Yang, Ying

    2017-07-01

    Stress has been recognized as a critical risk factor for gastrointestinal diseases in both humans and animals. However, nutritional strategies to attenuate stress-induced intestinal barrier function and underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that L-tryptophan enhanced intestinal barrier function by regulating mucosal serotonin metabolism in chronic unpredictable stress-exposed broilers. One-day-old male broilers (Arbor Acres) were fed a basal diet supplemented with or without L-tryptophan in the absence or presence of chronic unpredictable stress. Feed intake, body weight gain, plasma corticosterone and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), intestinal permeability, mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA), and mRNA levels for tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, protein abundance for claudin-1, occludin, and ZO-1 were determined. Stress exposure led to elevated plasma corticosterone (P L-tryptophan supplementation. Western blot analysis showed that stress exposure resulted in decreased protein abundance for occludin, claudin-1, and ZO-1, which was attenuated by L-tryptophan. mRNA levels for IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were increased, but those for IL-10 were decreased, in the jejunal tissue of broilers subjected to stress. This effect of stress on cytokine expression was abolished by L-tryptophan treatment. The effects of stress were associated with decreased plasma concentration of 5-HT (P L-Tryptophan supplementation markedly attenuated stress-induced alterations in 5-HT and TPH1 mRNA level in jejunal tissues of broilers. Collectively, these results indicate that L-tryptophan supplementation alleviates chronic unpredictable stress-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction by regulating 5-HT metabolism in broilers.

  16. l-Tryptophan-mediated Enhancement of Susceptibility to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is Dependent on the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Yosuke; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Seki, Ekihiro; Hoshi, Masato; Ohtaki, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Yoichi; Ito, Hiroyasu; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Nagaki, Masahito; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Saito, Kuniaki; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most common liver diseases. l-Tryptophan and its metabolite serotonin are involved in hepatic lipid metabolism and inflammation. However, it is unclear whether l-tryptophan promotes hepatic steatosis. To explore this issue, we examined the role of l-tryptophan in mouse hepatic steatosis by using a high fat and high fructose diet (HFHFD) model. l-Tryptophan treatment in combination with an HFHFD exacerbated hepatic steatosis, expression of HNE-modified proteins, hydroxyproline content, and serum alanine aminotransaminase levels, whereas l-tryptophan alone did not result in these effects. We also found that l-tryptophan treatment increases serum serotonin levels. The introduction of adenoviral aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, which stimulates the serotonin synthesis from l-tryptophan, aggravated hepatic steatosis induced by the HFHFD. The fatty acid-induced accumulation of lipid was further increased by serotonin treatment in cultured hepatocytes. These results suggest that l-tryptophan increases the sensitivity to hepatic steatosis through serotonin production. Furthermore, l-tryptophan treatment, adenoviral AADC introduction, and serotonin treatment induced phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and a potent mTOR inhibitor rapamycin attenuated hepatocyte lipid accumulation induced by fatty acid with serotonin. These results suggest the importance of mTOR activation for the exacerbation of hepatic steatosis. In conclusion, l-tryptophan exacerbates hepatic steatosis induced by HFHFD through serotonin-mediated activation of mTOR. PMID:21841000

  17. The crystal structure of tryptophan hydroxylase with bound amino acid substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Petersen, Charlotte Rode; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2008-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) is a mononuclear non-heme iron enzyme, which catalyzes the reaction between tryptophan, O2, and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) to produce 5-hydroxytryptophan and 4a-hydroxytetrahydrobiopterin. This is the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmi......Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) is a mononuclear non-heme iron enzyme, which catalyzes the reaction between tryptophan, O2, and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) to produce 5-hydroxytryptophan and 4a-hydroxytetrahydrobiopterin. This is the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis...... of the neurotransmitter and hormone serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine). We have determined the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the catalytic domain (Δ1−100/Δ415−445) of chicken TPH isoform 1 (TPH1) in complex with the tryptophan substrate and an iron-bound imidazole. This is the first structure of any aromatic amino...... acid hydroxylase with bound natural amino acid substrate. The iron coordination can be described as distorted trigonal bipyramidal coordination with His273, His278, and Glu318 (partially bidentate) and one imidazole as ligands. The tryptophan stacks against Pro269 with a distance of 3.9 Å between...

  18. L-Tryptophan Production in Escherichia coli Improved by Weakening the Pta-AckA Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lina; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Acetate accumulation during the fermentation process of Escherichia coli FB-04, an L-tryptophan production strain, is detrimental to L-tryptophan production. In an initial attempt to reduce acetate formation, the phosphate acetyltransferase gene (pta) from E. coli FB-04 was deleted, forming strain FB-04(Δpta). Unfortunately, FB-04(Δpta) exhibited a growth defect. Therefore, pta was replaced with a pta variant (pta1) from E. coli CCTCC M 2016009, forming strain FB-04(pta1). Pta1 exhibits lower catalytic capacity and substrate affinity than Pta because of a single amino acid substitution (Pro69Leu). FB-04(pta1) lacked the growth defect of FB-04(Δpta) and showed improved fermentation performance. Strain FB-04(pta1) showed a 91% increase in L-tryptophan yield in flask fermentation experiments, while acetate production decreased by 35%, compared with its parent FB-04. Throughout the fed-batch fermentation process, acetate accumulation by FB-04(pta1) was slower than that by FB-04. The final L-tryptophan titer of FB-04(pta1) reached 44.0 g/L, representing a 15% increase over that of FB-04. Metabolomics analysis showed that the pta1 genomic substitution slightly decreased carbon flux through glycolysis and significantly increased carbon fluxes through the pentose phosphate and common aromatic pathways. These results indicate that this strategy enhances L-tryptophan production and decreases acetate accumulation during the L-tryptophan fermentation process.

  19. L-Tryptophan's effects on brain chemistry and sleep in cats and rats: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulovacki, M

    1982-01-01

    In this review I shall discuss published and unpublished work from my laboratory dealing with L-tryptophan's effects on brain monoamines and sleep in cats and rats. From our work it appears that normal animals may not be suitable subjects for testing sleep-inducing effect of tryptophan since their slow-wave sleep (SWS) latency is relatively short. In polyphasic sleepers like cats, we did not observe tryptophan's hypnotic effect with any dosage used (10, 30 or 135 mg/kg). However, we found small, but statistically significant, sleep-inducing effect of tryptophan (30 mg/kg, IP) in normal rats. We have tried, therefore, to create insomniac cats with long sleep latencies by using methysergide, a serotonin receptor blocker. The results show that in insomniac cats hypnotic effect of tryptophan, a precursor to brain serotonin, was observed. It involved not only reduction of sleep latencies but also an increase in SWS. It seems likely that tryptophan's partial reversal of methysergide's effect in cats occurred via a dual mechanism of serotonergic activation and catecholaminergic deactivation, while its sleep-inducing effect in normal rats may have been due to the attenuation of the activity of brain catecholamines.

  20. Tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene and alcohol use among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacek, Paul; Conner, Tamlin S; Tennen, Howard; Kranzler, Henry R; Covault, Jonathan

    2008-09-01

    Genes that regulate serotonin activity are regarded as promising predictors of heavy alcohol use. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH2) plays an important role in serotonergic neurotransmission by serving as the rate-limiting enzyme for serotonin biosynthesis in the midbrain and serotonergic neurons. Despite the link between TPH2 and serotonergic function, TPH2's role in the pathogenesis of alcohol-use disorders remains unclear. The goal of this study was to examine whether a variation in the TPH2 gene is associated with risky alcohol consumption. Specifically, this study examined whether the TPH2 G-703T polymorphism predicted alcohol consumption among college students. In two successive years, 351 undergraduates were asked to record their alcohol use each day for 30 days using an Internet-based electronic diary. Participants' DNA was collected and polymerase chain reaction genotyping was performed. Results show that alcohol consumption was not associated with the TPH2 G-703T polymorphism alone, or the interaction of TPH2 with two other candidate polymorphisms (TPH1 C218A and the SLC6A4 tri-allelic 5-HTTLPR), or negative life events. In conclusion, this study supports recent null findings relating TPH2 to drinking outcomes. It also extends these findings by showing null interactions with the TPH1 C218A polymorphism, the SLC6A4 tri-allelic 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and environmental stressors in predicting sub-clinical alcohol use among Caucasian American young adults.

  1. Updates on the biology of serotonin and tryptophan hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Tara; Weber, H Christian

    2018-02-01

    To summarize the most recent findings relevant to the biology of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and the enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) in human gastrointestinal disease. Serotonin is synthesized in the central nervous system (CNS) and the gastrointestinal tract where it is secreted from enteroendocrine cells. Its biosynthesis is regulated by two isoforms of the enzyme TPH of which TPH1 is localized predominantly in gastrointestinal enteroendocrine cells. Serotonin activates the peristaltic reflexes, regulates gastrointestinal motility, and has a role in intestinal inflammation. Inhibition of TPH with novel molecules represents a new pharmacological tool in the successful management of carcinoid syndrome in patients with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Certain 5-HT receptor subtype agonists and antagonists are useful in the treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest storage organ for serotonin where its biosynthesis is regulated by TPH1. It has several important functions in gastrointestinal motility, secretion, and inflammation. Furthermore, TPH represents a target for inhibitory pharmacological therapy of serotonin access states such as the carcinoid syndrome.

  2. Molecularly imprinted silica-silver nanowires for tryptophan recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Faes López, T.; Díaz-García, M. E.; Badía-Laíño, R.

    2014-10-01

    We report on silver nanowires (AgNWs) coated with molecularly imprinted silica (MIP SiO2) for recognition of tryptophan (Trp). The use of AgNWs as a template confers an imprinted material with adequate mechanical strength and with a capability of recognizing Trp due to its nanomorphology when compared to spherical microparticles with a similar surface-to-volume ratio. Studies on adsorption isotherms showed the MIP-SiO2-AgNWs to exhibit homogeneous affinity sites with narrow affinity distribution. This suggests that the synthesized material behaves as a 1D nanomaterial with a large area and small thickness with very similar affinity sites. Trp release from MIP-SiO2-AgNWs was demonstrated to be dominated by the diffusion rate of Trp as controlled by the specific interactions with the imprinted silica shell. Considering these results and the lack of toxicity of silica sol-gel materials, the material offers potential in the field of drug or pharmaceutical controlled delivery, but also in optoelectronic devices, electrodes and sensors.

  3. Novel tryptophan metabolic pathways in auxin biosynthesis in silkworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Chiaki; Takei, Mami; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Nagata, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshihito

    2017-08-01

    In the course of our study of the biosynthetic pathway of auxin, a class of phytohormones, in insects, we proposed the biosynthetic pathway tryptophan (Trp)→indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOx)→indole-3-acetadehyde (IAAld)→indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). In this study, we identified two branches in the metabolic pathways in the silkworm, possibly affecting the efficiency of IAA production: Trp→indole-3-pyruvic acid→indole-3-lactic acid and IAAld→indole-3-ethanol. We also determined the apparent conversion activities (2.05×10-7UmL-1 for Trp→IAA, 1.30×10-5UmL-1 for IAOx→IAA, and 3.91×10-1UmL-1 for IAAld→IAA), which explain why IAOx and IAAld are barely detectable as either endogenous compounds or metabolites of their precursors. The failure to detect IAAld, even in the presence of an inhibitor of the conversion IAAld→IAA, is explained by a switch in the conversion from IAAld→IAA to IAAld→IEtOH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH 2) single nucleotide polymorphisms, suicide, and alcohol-related suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanc, Tomaž; Pregelj, Peter; Paska, Alja Videtič

    2013-09-01

    Suicide has been identified as a serious public health problem that is often accompanied by alcohol misuse and dependence. It seems that suicide is a result of an interplay between distal (e.g. genetic loading, family history of suicide) and proximal factors (e.g. existence of psychiatric disorder, events conferring acute stress), as well as their interactions. However, like suicide, alcohol dependence seems to be a multifactorial disorder caused by genetic and environmental factors. Serotonergic dysfunction has been implicated to be involved in the pathophysiology of substance abuse, and has also an important role in suicidal behaviour. Studies investigating suicide, alcohol-related suicide and the rate limiting enzyme of serotonin synthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), remain to date rather limited. Recent studies of TPH2 showed a range of strong, mild or no association with suicide and alcohol-related suicide, depending on a study group and genetic variants tested. Overall, to date the clinical effects seems to be quite modest. Among suicide victims with more impulsive and verbal aggressive behaviour more alcohol misuse or dependency was present. Suicide and alcoholism are often comorbid disorders with a complex nature. They are both strongly linked to serotonin modulation, and therefore association studies of SNPs in genes from the serotonergic system could provide an insight into the genetic background of such disorders. However, based on current results we cannot draw any conclusions, but further research to clarify the interplay between serotonergic system dysfunction, suicide, alcohol dependence, impulsivity and the role of TPH2 enzyme is needed.

  5. Can tryptophan supplement intake at breakfast enhance melatonin secretion at night?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Shunsuke; Yamashita, Makoto; Tojo, Chiaki; Kondo, Masayuki; Morita, Takeshi; Wakamura, Tomoko

    2017-02-28

    Tryptophan (TRP) is an essential amino acid, and it has been suggested that TRP intake at breakfast combined with daytime bright light exposure can increase nocturnal melatonin secretion. However, the mechanisms involved are not yet clear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of TRP supplement intake at breakfast on nocturnal melatonin secretion under different daytime light intensities in humans. Twelve subjects (aged 21.3 ± 3.0 years, mean ± standard deviation) participated in a random order in experimental sessions lasting 3 days under four conditions in a laboratory setting. The four conditions were TRP*Bright, Placebo*Bright, TRP*Dim, and Placebo*Dim. A TRP capsule (1000 mg) or a placebo starch capsule (1000 mg) were taken at breakfast. In addition, during the daytime (07:00-18:00), the subjects were asked to stay under different light intensities: >5000 lx (bright) or concentration of melatonin. The time courses of melatonin concentration and dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) were compared among the four conditions using repeated measurements analysis of variance (ANOVA). Nocturnal melatonin concentrations in the bright light condition tended to be higher than in the dim light condition (main effect of light: p = .099). Moreover, in the bright light condition, the change in DLMO between baseline and after the intervention was significantly higher than that in the dim light condition (main effect of light: p breakfast on 1 day did not change nocturnal melatonin secretion, even though TRP is the precursor of melatonin. In contrast, daytime bright light exposure increased nocturnal melatonin secretion and advanced the phase of melatonin onset. Therefore, TRP supplementation, unlike exposure to daytime bright light, does not acutely affect biological rhythm and sleep in humans. UMIN Clinical Trial Registry: UMIN000024121.

  6. Focus on ozone depletion. Stichwort Ozonloch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, K.

    1992-01-01

    The nine chapters of this book discuss the problem of stratospheric ozone, ozone-depleting substances and substitute materials, and the potential effects of ozone depletion. There are several chapters on the greenhouse effect, its consequences, preventive measures, and the interdependences with ozone depletion. The international and national climate policy is gone into, and there is a chapter on changes in the tropospheric ozone. (KW)

  7. [Nutritional depletion in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Yao, Wan-zhen

    2004-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the major diseases worldwide. Nutritional depletion is a common problem in COPD patients and also an independant predictor of survival in these patients. Many data are helpful for determining nutritional depletion, including anthropometric measurement, laboratory markers, body composition analysis (fat-free mass and lean mass), and body weight. The mechanism of nutritional depletion in patients with COPD is still uncertain. It may be associated with energy/metabolism imbalance, tissue hypoxia, systemic inflammation, and leptin/orexin disorders. In patients with nutritional depletion, growth hormone and testosterone can be used for nutritional therapy in addition to nutrition supplementation.

  8. Ego depletion increases risk-taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Asal, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    We investigated how the availability of self-control resources affects risk-taking inclinations and behaviors. We proposed that risk-taking often occurs from suboptimal decision processes and heuristic information processing (e.g., when a smoker suppresses or neglects information about the health risks of smoking). Research revealed that depleted self-regulation resources are associated with reduced intellectual performance and reduced abilities to regulate spontaneous and automatic responses (e.g., control aggressive responses in the face of frustration). The present studies transferred these ideas to the area of risk-taking. We propose that risk-taking is increased when individuals find themselves in a state of reduced cognitive self-control resources (ego-depletion). Four studies supported these ideas. In Study 1, ego-depleted participants reported higher levels of sensation seeking than non-depleted participants. In Study 2, ego-depleted participants showed higher levels of risk-tolerance in critical road traffic situations than non-depleted participants. In Study 3, we ruled out two alternative explanations for these results: neither cognitive load nor feelings of anger mediated the effect of ego-depletion on risk-taking. Finally, Study 4 clarified the underlying psychological process: ego-depleted participants feel more cognitively exhausted than non-depleted participants and thus are more willing to take risks. Discussion focuses on the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

  9. Deep depletion concept for diamond MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, T. T.; Rouger, N.; Masante, C.; Chicot, G.; Udrea, F.; Eon, D.; Gheeraert, E.; Pernot, J.

    2017-10-01

    A stable deep depletion regime is demonstrated in metal oxide semiconductor capacitors using p -type oxygen-terminated (100) diamond as a semiconductor and Al2O3 deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition at 380 °C. Current voltage I(V) and capacitance voltage C(V) measurements were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of diamond semiconductor gate control. An effective modulation of the space charge region width is obtained by the gate bias, where the deep depletion regime is demonstrated for a positive gate bias. The deep depletion concept is described and proposed for MOSFET devices. Finally, a proof of concept of diamond deep depletion MOSFETs is presented.

  10. Acute fluoxetine treatment induces slow rolling of leukocytes on endothelium in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Nadine; Mauler, Maximilian; Witsch, Thilo; Stallmann, Daniela; Schmitt, Stefanie; Mezger, Julius; Bode, Christoph; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Activated platelets release serotonin at sites of inflammation where it acts as inflammatory mediator and enhances recruitment of neutrophils. Chronic treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) depletes the serotonin storage pool in platelets, leading to reduced leukocyte recruitment in murine experiments. Here, we examined the direct and acute effects of SSRI on leukocyte recruitment in murine peritonitis. C57Bl/6 and Tph1-/- (Tryptophan hydroxylase1) mice underwent acute treatment with the SSRI fluoxetine or vehicle. Serotonin concentrations were measured by ELISA. Leukocyte rolling and adhesion on endothelium was analyzed by intravital microscopy in mesentery venules with and without lipopolysaccharide challenge. Leukocyte extravasation in sterile peritonitis was measured by flow cytometry of abdominal lavage fluid. Plasma serotonin levels were elevated 2 hours after fluoxetine treatment (0.70 ± 0.1 µg/ml versus 0.27 ± 0.1, p = 0.03, n = 14), while serum serotonin did not change. Without further stimulation, acute fluoxetine treatment increased the number of rolling leukocytes (63 ± 8 versus 165 ± 17/0.04 mm(2) min(-1)) and decreased their velocity (61 ± 6 versus 28 ± 1 µm/s, both pleukocyte rolling was not significantly influenced by acute fluoxetine treatment. Stimulation with lipopolysaccharide decreased rolling velocity and induced leukocyte adhesion, which was enhanced after fluoxetine pretreatment (27 ± 3 versus 36 ± 2/0.04 mm(2), p = 0.008, n = 10). Leukocyte extravasation in sterile peritonitis, however, was not affected by acute fluoxetine treatment. Acute fluoxetine treatment increased plasma serotonin concentrations and promoted leukocyte-endothelial interactions in-vivo, suggesting that serotonin is a promoter of acute inflammation. E-selectin was upregulated on endothelial cells in the presence of serotonin, possibly explaining the observed increase in leukocyte-endothelial interactions. However transmigration of

  11. 13C-tryptophan breath test detects increased catabolic turnover of tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway in patients with major depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraishi, Toshiya; Hori, Hiroaki; Sasayama, Daimei; Matsuo, Junko; Ogawa, Shintaro; Ota, Miho; Hattori, Kotaro; Kajiwara, Masahiro; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Altered tryptophan–kynurenine (KYN) metabolism has been implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD). The l-[1-13C]tryptophan breath test (13C-TBT) is a noninvasive, stable-isotope tracer method in which exhaled 13CO2 is attributable to tryptophan catabolism via the KYN pathway. We included 18 patients with MDD (DSM-IV) and 24 age- and sex-matched controls. 13C-tryptophan (150 mg) was orally administered and the 13CO2/12CO2 ratio in the breath was monitored for 180 min. The cumulative recovery rate during the 180-min test (CRR0–180; %), area under the Δ13CO2-time curve (AUC; %*min), and the maximal Δ13CO2 (Cmax; %) were significantly higher in patients with MDD than in the controls (p = 0.004, p = 0.008, and p = 0.002, respectively). Plasma tryptophan concentrations correlated negatively with Cmax in both the patients and controls (p = 0.020 and p = 0.034, respectively). Our results suggest that the 13C-TBT could be a novel biomarker for detecting a subgroup of MDD with increased tryptophan–KYN metabolism. PMID:26524975

  12. Depleted argon from underground sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, H.O.; /Princeton U.; Alton, A.; /Augustana U. Coll.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; /Princeton U.; Kendziora, C.; /Fermilab; Loer, B.; /Princeton U.; Montanari, D.; /Fermilab; Mosteiro, P.; /Princeton U.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  13. Molecular imaging correlates of tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway in human meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnyák, Edit; Kamson, David O; Guastella, Anthony R; Varadarajan, Kaushik; Robinette, Natasha L; Kupsky, William J; Muzik, Otto; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Mittal, Sandeep; Juhász, Csaba

    2015-09-01

    Increased tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway (KP) is a key mechanism of tumoral immune suppression in gliomas. However, details of tryptophan metabolism in meningiomas have not been elucidated. In this study, we evaluated in vivo tryptophan metabolism in meningiomas and compared it with gliomas using α-[(11)C]-methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT)-PET. We also explored expression patterns of KP enzymes in resected meningiomas. Forty-seven patients with MRI-detected meningioma (n = 16) and glioma (n = 31) underwent presurgical AMT-PET scanning. Tumoral AMT uptake and tracer kinetic parameters (including K and k3' evaluating unidirectional uptake and trapping, respectively) were measured, correlated with meningioma grade, and compared between meningiomas and gliomas. Patterns of KP enzyme expression were assessed by immunohistochemistry in all meningiomas. Meningioma grade showed a positive correlation with AMT k3' tumor/cortex ratio (r = 0.75, P = .003), and this PET parameter distinguished grade I from grade II/III meningiomas with 92% accuracy. Kinetic AMT parameters could differentiate meningiomas from both low-grade gliomas (97% accuracy by k3' ratios) and high-grade gliomas (83% accuracy by K ratios). Among 3 initial KP enzymes (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1/2, and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase 2 [TDO2]), TDO2 showed the strongest immunostaining, particularly in grade I meningiomas. TDO2 also showed a strong negative correlation with AMT k3' ratios (P = .001). PET imaging of tryptophan metabolism can provide quantitative imaging markers for differentiating grade I from grade II/III meningiomas. TDO2 may be an important driver of in vivo tryptophan metabolism in these tumors. These results can have implications for pharmacological targeting of the KP in meningiomas. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. N-acetyl-l-tryptophan, but not N-acetyl-d-tryptophan, rescues neuronal cell death in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirianni, Ana C; Jiang, Jiying; Zeng, Jiang; Mao, Lilly L; Zhou, Shuanhu; Sugarbaker, Peter; Zhang, Xinmu; Li, Wei; Friedlander, Robert M; Wang, Xin

    2015-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor neuron loss. Evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, glutamate excitotoxicity, and proteasomal dysfunction are all responsible for ALS pathogenesis. N-acetyl-tryptophan has been identified as an inhibitor of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and therefore is a potential neuroprotective agent. By quantifying cell death, we demonstrate that N-acetyl-l-tryptophan (L-NAT) and N-acetyl-DL-tryptophan are neuroprotective in NSC-34 motor neuron-like cells and/or primary motor neurons, while their isomer N-acetyl-d-tryptophan has no protective effect. These findings are consistent with energy minimization and molecular modeling analysis, confirming that L-NAT generates the most stable complex with the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). L-NAT inhibits the secretion of Substance P and IL-1β (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and/or dot blots) and mitochondrial dysfunction by effectively inhibiting the release of cytochrome c/Smac/AIF from mitochondria into the cytoplasm and activation of apoptotic pathways, including the activation of caspase-1, -9, and -3, as well as proteasomal dysfunction through restoring chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like proteasome activity. These data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms by which L-NAT offers neuroprotection in models of ALS and suggest its potential as a novel therapeutic strategy for ALS. We demonstrate that L-NAT (N-acetyl-l-tryptophan), but not D-NAT, rescues NSC-34 cells and primary motor neurons from cell death. L-NAT inhibits the secretion of Substance P and IL-1β, and caspase-1 activation, the release of cytochrome c/Smac/AIF, and the activation of caspase -9, and -3, as well as proteasomal dysfunction. The data suggest the potential of L-NAT as a novel therapeutic strategy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). AIF, apoptosis-inducing factor. © 2015

  15. Plasma Tryptophan and the Kynurenine–Tryptophan Ratio Are Associated with the Acquisition of Statural Growth Deficits and Oral Vaccine Underperformance in Populations with Environmental Enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, Margaret N.; Mduma, Estomih; Kosek, Peter S.; Lee, Gwenyth O.; Svensen, Erling; Pan, William K. Y.; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Bream, Jay H.; Patil, Crystal; Asayag, Cesar Ramal; Sanchez, Graciela Meza; Caulfield, Laura E.; Gratz, Jean; Yori, Pablo Peñataro

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood enteric infections have adverse impacts on child growth and can inhibit normal mucosal responses to oral vaccines, two critical components of environmental enteropathy. To evaluate the role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) activity and its relationship with these outcomes, we measured tryptophan and the kynurenine–tryptophan ratio (KTR) in two longitudinal birth cohorts with a high prevalence of stunting. Children in rural Peru and Tanzania (N = 494) contributed 1,251 plasma samples at 3, 7, 15, and 24 months of age and monthly anthropometrics from 0 to 36 months of age. Tryptophan concentrations were directly associated with linear growth from 1 to 8 months after biomarker assessment. A 1-SD increase in tryptophan concentration was associated with a gain in length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) of 0.17 over the next 6 months in Peru (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11–0.23, P < 0.001) and a gain in LAZ of 0.13 Z-scores in Tanzania (95% CI = 0.03–0.22, P = 0.009). Vaccine responsiveness data were available for Peru only. An increase in kynurenine by 1 μM was associated with a 1.63 (95% CI = 1.13–2.34) increase in the odds of failure to poliovirus type 1, but there was no association with tetanus vaccine response. A KTR of 52 was 76% sensitive and 50% specific in predicting failure of response to serotype 1 of the oral polio vaccine. KTR was associated with systemic markers of inflammation, but also interleukin-10, supporting the association between IDO1 activity and immunotolerance. These results strongly suggest that the activity of IDO1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of environmental enteropathy, and demonstrates the utility of tryptophan and kynurenine as biomarkers for this syndrome, particularly in identifying those at risk for hyporesponsivity to oral vaccines. PMID:27503512

  16. Patchouli alcohol ameliorates dextran sodium sulfate-induced experimental colitis and suppresses tryptophan catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chang; Yuan, Zhong-Wen; Yu, Xiu-Ting; Huang, Yan-Feng; Yang, Guang-Hua; Chen, Jian-Nan; Lai, Xiao-Ping; Su, Zi-Ren; Zeng, Hui-Fang; Xie, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Jun

    2017-07-01

    mice. In summary, the study successfully demonstrated that PA ameliorated DSS-induced mice acute colitis by suppressing inflammation, maintaining the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier, inhibiting cell death signaling, and suppressing tryptophan catabolism. The results provided valuable information and guidance for using PA in treatment of UC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Chemistry and Toxicology of Depleted Uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney A. Katz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural uranium is comprised of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Depleted uranium (DU is a byproduct of the processes for the enrichment of the naturally occurring 235U isotope. The world wide stock pile contains some 1½ million tons of depleted uranium. Some of it has been used to dilute weapons grade uranium (~90% 235U down to reactor grade uranium (~5% 235U, and some of it has been used for heavy tank armor and for the fabrication of armor-piercing bullets and missiles. Such weapons were used by the military in the Persian Gulf, the Balkans and elsewhere. The testing of depleted uranium weapons and their use in combat has resulted in environmental contamination and human exposure. Although the chemical and the toxicological behaviors of depleted uranium are essentially the same as those of natural uranium, the respective chemical forms and isotopic compositions in which they usually occur are different. The chemical and radiological toxicity of depleted uranium can injure biological systems. Normal functioning of the kidney, liver, lung, and heart can be adversely affected by depleted uranium intoxication. The focus of this review is on the chemical and toxicological properties of depleted and natural uranium and some of the possible consequences from long term, low dose exposure to depleted uranium in the environment.

  18. 50 CFR 216.15 - Depleted species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Depleted species. 216.15 Section 216.15 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Prohibitions § 216.15 Depleted species. The following species or population stocks have been designated by the...

  19. Depletion sensitivity predicts unhealthy snack purchases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, Stefanie J.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; Fennis, Bob M.; De Vet, Emely; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to examine the relation between depletion sensitivity - a novel construct referring to the speed or ease by which one's self-control resources are drained - and snack purchase behavior. In addition, interactions between depletion sensitivity and the goal to lose

  20. Depletion sensitivity predicts unhealthy snack purchases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, Stefanie J.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; Fennis, Bob M.; Vet, De Emely; Ridder, De Denise T.D.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to examine the relation between depletion sensitivity - a novel construct referring to the speed or ease by which one's self-control resources are drained - and snack purchase behavior. In addition, interactions between depletion sensitivity and the goal to lose

  1. Specification for the VERA Depletion Benchmark Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-17

    CASL-X-2015-1014-000 iii Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The CASL neutronics simulator MPACT is under development for the neutronics and T-H coupled simulation for the pressurized water reactor. MPACT includes the ORIGEN-API and internal depletion module to perform depletion calculations based upon neutron-material reaction and radioactive decay. It is a challenge to validate the depletion capability because of the insufficient measured data. One of the detoured methods to validate it is to perform a code-to-code comparison for benchmark problems. In this study a depletion benchmark suite has been developed and a detailed guideline has been provided to obtain meaningful computational outcomes which can be used in the validation of the MPACT depletion capability.

  2. Action orientation overcomes the ego depletion effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Junhua; Xiao, Shanshan; Shi, Yucai; Mao, Lihua

    2015-04-01

    It has been consistently demonstrated that initial exertion of self-control had negative influence on people's performance on subsequent self-control tasks. This phenomenon is referred to as the ego depletion effect. Based on action control theory, the current research investigated whether the ego depletion effect could be moderated by individuals' action versus state orientation. Our results showed that only state-oriented individuals exhibited ego depletion. For individuals with action orientation, however, their performance was not influenced by initial exertion of self-control. The beneficial effect of action orientation against ego depletion in our experiment results from its facilitation for adapting to the depleting task. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Neutral gas depletion in low temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtman, A.

    2017-11-01

    Neutral depletion can significantly affect the steady state of low temperature plasmas. Processes that lead to neutral depletion and the resulting plasma–neutrals steady state are reviewed. Two such processes are due to collisions of neutrals with plasma. One process is the drag by ions that collide with neutrals and push them towards the wall. Another process is neutral-gas heating by collisions with plasma that makes the gas hotter at the discharge center. These processes, which usually occur under (static) pressure balance between plasma and neutrals, are called here ‘neutral pumping’. When collisions are negligible, neutrals that move ballistically between the chamber walls are depleted through ionization, a process called here ‘ion pumping’. The effect of the magnetic field on neutral depletion is explored in plasma in which the dynamics is governed by cross-field diffusion. Finally, neutral depletion in a flowing plasma is analyzed.

  4. Lignans from Carthamus tinctorius suppress tryptophan breakdown via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnl, Susanne; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Temml, Veronika; Gostner, Johanna M.; Schennach, Harald; Schuster, Daniela; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Stuppner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Seed extracts of Carthamus tinctorius L. (Asteraceae), safflower, have been traditionally used to treat coronary disease, thrombotic disorders, and menstrual problems but also against cancer and depression. A possible effect of C. tinctorius compounds on tryptophan-degrading activity of enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) could explain many of its activities. To test for an effect of C. tinctorius extracts and isolated compounds on cytokine-induced IDO activity in immunocompetent cells in vitro methanol and ethylacetate seed extracts were prepared from cold pressed seed cakes of C. tinctorius and three lignan derivatives, trachelogenin, arctigenin and matairesinol were isolated. The influence on tryptophan breakdown was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Effects were compared to neopterin production in the same cellular assay. Both seed extracts suppressed tryptophan breakdown in stimulated PBMC. The three structurally closely related isolates exerted differing suppressive activity on PBMC: arctigenin (IC50 26.5 μM) and trachelogenin (IC50 of 57.4 μM) showed higher activity than matairesinol (IC50 >200 μM) to inhibit tryptophan breakdown. Effects on neopterin production were similar albeit generally less strong. Data show an immunosuppressive property of compounds which slows down IDO activity. The in vitro results support the view that some of the anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and antidepressant properties of C. tinctorius lignans might relate to their suppressive influence on tryptophan breakdown. PMID:23867649

  5. Model of Tryptophan Metabolism, Readily Scalable Using Tissue-specific Gene Expression Data*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrum, Anne-Kristin; Heiland, Ines; Schuster, Stefan; Puntervoll, Pål; Ziegler, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Tryptophan is utilized in various metabolic routes including protein synthesis, serotonin, and melatonin synthesis and the kynurenine pathway. Perturbations in these pathways have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Here we present a comprehensive kinetic model of the complex network of human tryptophan metabolism based upon existing kinetic data for all enzymatic conversions and transporters. By integrating tissue-specific expression data, modeling tryptophan metabolism in liver and brain returned intermediate metabolite concentrations in the physiological range. Sensitivity and metabolic control analyses identified expected key enzymes to govern fluxes in the branches of the network. Combining tissue-specific models revealed a considerable impact of the kynurenine pathway in liver on the concentrations of neuroactive derivatives in the brain. Moreover, using expression data from a cancer study predicted metabolite changes that resembled the experimental observations. We conclude that the combination of the kinetic model with expression data represents a powerful diagnostic tool to predict alterations in tryptophan metabolism. The model is readily scalable to include more tissues, thereby enabling assessment of organismal tryptophan metabolism in health and disease. PMID:24129579

  6. Selective Oxidation of Methionine and Tryptophan Residues in a Therapeutic IgG1 Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folzer, Emilien; Diepold, Katharina; Bomans, Katrin; Finkler, Christof; Schmidt, Roland; Bulau, Patrick; Huwyler, Jörg; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Koulov, Atanas V

    2015-09-01

    Oxidation of methionine and tryptophan are common degradation pathways for monoclonal antibodies and present major analytical challenges in biotechnology. Generally, protein oxidation is detectable in stability and/or stressed samples (e.g., exposed to hydrogen peroxide, UV light, or metal ions). The induced chemical modifications may impact the biological activity of antibodies and may have biological consequences. However, these effects and the contribution of individual protein modifications are difficult to delineate as different amino acids are often oxidized simultaneously and accompanied by other degradants such as aggregates, especially in forced degradation studies. Here, we report a new method to obtain selective oxidation of methionine or tryptophan by using oxidation reagents combined with large excess of free tryptophan or methionine, correspondingly. More specifically, using hydrogen peroxide or tert-butyl hydroperoxide in combination with addition of free tryptophan allowed for selective oxidation of methionine. Conversely, the use of 2,2-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride in combination with free methionine resulted in selective tryptophan oxidation, whereas methionine oxidation was not significantly altered. This novel stress model system may prove to be valuable tool in future mechanistic studies of oxidative degradation of protein therapeutics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  7. Serotonin versus catecholamine deficiency: behavioral and neural effects of experimental depletion in remitted depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, P; Neumeister, A; Nugent, A C; Charney, D S; Drevets, W C; Hasler, G

    2015-01-01

    Despite immense efforts into development of new antidepressant drugs, the increases of serotoninergic and catecholaminergic neurotransmission have remained the two major pharmacodynamic principles of current drug treatments for depression. Consequently, psychopathological or biological markers that predict response to drugs that selectively increase serotonin and/or catecholamine neurotransmission hold the potential to optimize the prescriber's selection among currently available treatment options. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential symptomatology and neurophysiology in response to reductions in serotonergic versus catecholaminergic neurotransmission in subjects at high risk of depression recurrence. Using identical neuroimaging procedures with [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography after tryptophan depletion (TD) and catecholamine depletion (CD), subjects with remitted depression were compared with healthy controls in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Although TD induced significantly more depressed mood, sadness and hopelessness than CD, CD induced more inactivity, concentration difficulties, lassitude and somatic anxiety than TD. CD specifically increased glucose metabolism in the bilateral ventral striatum and decreased glucose metabolism in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex, whereas TD specifically increased metabolism in the right prefrontal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex. Although we found direct associations between changes in brain metabolism and induced depressive symptoms following CD, the relationship between neural activity and symptoms was less clear after TD. In conclusion, this study showed that serotonin and catecholamines have common and differential roles in the pathophysiology of depression. PMID:25781231

  8. Impact of in vivo T cell depletion in HLA-identical allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission conditioned with a fludarabine iv-busulfan myeloablative regimen: a report from the EBMT Acute Leukemia Working Party

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Thérèse Rubio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of the use of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG in allogeneic stem cell transplantation performed with HLA-identical sibling donors following fludarabine and 4 days intravenous busulfan myeloablative conditioning regimen has been poorly explored. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 566 patients who underwent a first HLA-identical allogeneic stem cell transplantation with this conditioning regimen for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission between 2006 and 2013 and compared the outcomes of 145 (25.6% patients who received ATG (ATG group to 421 (74.4% who did not (no-ATG group. The Kaplan-Meier estimator, the cumulative incidence function, and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used where appropriate. Results Patients in the ATG group were older, received more frequently peripheral blood stem cell grafts from older donors, and were transplanted more recently. With a median follow-up of 19 months, patients in the ATG group had reduced 2-year cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD (31 vs. 52%, p = 0.0002 and of its extensive form (8 vs. 26%, p < 0.0001 but similar relapse incidence (22 vs. 27%, p = 0.23 leading to improved GVHD and relapse-free survival (GRFS (60 vs. 40%, p = 0.0001. In multivariate analyses, the addition of ATG was independently associated with lower chronic GVHD (HR = 0.46, p = 0.0001, improved leukemia-free survival (HR = 0.67, p = 0.027, overall survival (HR = 0.65, p = 0.027, and GRFS (HR = 0.51, p = 4 × 10−5. Recipient age above 50 years was the only other factor associated with worse survivals. Conclusions These results suggest that the use of ATG with fludarabine and 4 days intravenous busulfan followed by HLA-identical sibling donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia improves overall transplant outcomes due to reduced incidence of chronic GVHD without increased

  9. Tryptophan metabolism in tsetse flies and the consequences of its derangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Gooding

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature comparing salmon and wild type Glossina morsitans morsitans and that comparing tan and wild type Glossina palpalis palpalis is reviewed. New information is presented on behaviour and biochemistry of salmon and wild type G. m. morsitans. The eye color mutants result from two lesions in the tryptophan to xanthommatin pathway: lack of tryptophan oxygenase in G. m morsitans and failure to produce or retain xanthommatin in eyes (but not in testes of G. p. palpalis. The salmon allele in G. m. morsitans is pleiotropic and profoundly affects many aspects of fly biology including longevity, reproductive capacity, vision, vectorial capacity and duration of flight, but not circadian rhythms. The tan allele in G. p. palpalis has little effect upon the biology of flies under laboratory conditions, except that tan flies appear less active than normal. Adult tsetse flies metabolize tryptophan to kynurenine which is excreted; fluctuations in activities of the enzymes producing kynurenine suggest this pathway is under metabolic control.

  10. RNAi-induced silencing of embryonic tryptophan oxygenase in the Pyralid moth, Plodia interpunctella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A. Fabrick

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene silencing through the introduction of double-stranded RNA (RNA interference, RNAi provides a powerful tool for the elucidation of gene function in many systems, including those where genomics and proteomics are incomplete. The use of RNAi technology for gene silencing in Lepidoptera has lacked significant attention compared to other systems. To demonstrate that RNAi can be utilized in the lepidopteran, Plodia interpunctella, we cloned a cDNA for tryptophan oxygenase, and showed that silencing of tryptophan oxygenase through RNAi during embryonic development resulted in loss of eye-color pigmentation. The complete amino acid sequence of Plodia tryptophan oxygenase can be accessed through NCBI Protein Database under NCBI Accession # AY427951.

  11. Digestible tryptophan requirements for broilers from 22 to 42 days old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Ferreira Duarte

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to establish different criteria to evaluate the requirements of digestible tryptophan for broilers from 22 to 42 d of age, using different regression models (quadratic, exponential and Linear Response Plateau and in case of statistical significance the comparison of means by Duncan test at 5% probability was also adopted. A total of 1,920 Cobb 500 male broilers were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design, with 6 treatments (6 digestible tryptophan levels: 0.1395, 0.1610, 0.1825, 0.2040, 0.2255 and 0.2470% and 8 replications containing 40 broilers each. Performance and carcass characteristics were evaluated. The level of 0.2255% of digestible tryptophan numerically improves feed conversion, and the 0.1919% estimated by the quadratic equation significantly improves carcass yield.

  12. Effects of environmental lighting and tryptophan devoid diet on the rat vaginal cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammanco, S; Ernandes, M; La Guardia, M

    1997-09-01

    Cerebral serotonin level influences luteinizing hormone release and, consequently, ovulation. The present study evaluated the effects of precooked maize meal (polenta), a diet almost devoid of tryptophan the serotonin precursor on the alterations of the estrus cycle as measured by vaginal smears analysis in Wistar rats. Several conditions of environmental lighting were used in order to modify ovarian cycle: 1) natural alternating light/dark cycle; 2) continuous darkness; 3) continuous light by sodium steams: 4) continuous light by fluorescent neon tubes. Rats bred in continuous lighting showed estrus-proestrus rate significantly greater than rats bred in normal lighting or in continuous darkness. The feeding with precooked maize meal suppressed persistent estrus in rats bred in continuous lighting, and significantly cut down the estrus-proestrus frequency in any condition of environmental lighting. Our results lead to hypothesize that polenta diet, for its low tryptophan content, cutting down both tryptophan plasma content and serotonin neuronal synthesis, promotes luteinizing hormone peak.

  13. Preparation, characterization, surface modification and redox reactions of silver nanoparticles in the presence of tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jasmine A; Naumov, Sergej; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2011-10-15

    The synthesis and characterization of water-soluble dispersions of Ag nanoparticles by the reduction of AgNO(3) using tryptophan under alkaline synthesis conditions are reported. The Ag nanoparticle formation was very slow at low concentration and rapid at extremes. For surface modification and redox reactions, manipulating the interparticles interaction controlled the size of Ag nanoparticles aggregates. Our results suggest that the replacement of the BH(4)(-) ions adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface by tryptophan destabilizes the particles and further caused aggregation. A mechanism is proposed for the formation of silver nanoparticles by tryptophan. The experimental results are supported by theoretical calculations. The Ag nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis absorption, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Photosensitizer-conjugated tryptophan-containing peptide ligands as new dual-targeted theranostics for cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jisu; Chae, Jihyun; Kim, Jun Soo; Goh, Sung-Ho; Choi, Yongdoo

    2016-11-20

    Here we report that new dual-targeted theranostic anti-cancer agents can be produced by simple conjugation of photosensitizers with tryptophan-containing peptide ligands via cyclic disulfide linkages. In the proof-of-concept study, photosensitizers conjugated with EGFR-targeting peptide GE11 (C-EGFR) were in close proximity with tryptophan residues in the conjugate, resulting in quenching of its fluorescence and singlet oxygen generation. C-EGFR specifically binds to target receptors on the cancer cell surface, after which it is internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Intracellular cleavage of cyclic disulfide bonds allows separation of the photosensitizers from the tryptophan residue, after which they emit near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and produce a phototoxic effect in the target cells. This strategy enabled us to accomplish simultaneous real-time NIR fluorescence imaging of EGFR-overexpressing cancer cells with high contrast and selective photodynamic therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Interfacial Tryptophan Residues: A Role for the Cation-{pi} Effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Frederic Nicolas Rønne; Jensen, Morten Ø.; Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    and electrostatic forces. The flat rigid paddle-like structure of tryptophan, associated with a quadrupolar moment (aromaticity) arising from the pi-electron cloud of the indole, interacts primarily with moieties in the lipid headgroup region hardly penetrating into the bilayer core. We have studied the interaction...... between the nitrogen moiety of lipid molecule headgroups and the pi-electron distribution of gramicidin (gA) tryptophan residues (W(9), W(11), W(13), and W(15)) using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of gA embedded in two hydrated lipid bilayers composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylethanolamine...... (POPE) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidyl-choline (POPC), respectively. We use a force field model for tryptophan in which polarizability is only implicit, but we believe that classical molecular dynamics force fields are sufficient to capture the most prominent features of the cation-pi interaction...

  16. The depletion of NK cells prevents T cell exhaustion to efficiently control disseminating virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kevin D; Whitmire, Jason K

    2013-01-15

    NK cells have well-established functions in immune defense against virus infections and cancer through their cytolytic activity and production of cytokines. In this study, we examined the frequency of NK cells and their influence on T cell responses in mice given variants of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus that cause acute or persisting infection. We found increased frequencies of circulating NK cells during disseminating infection compared with uninfected or acutely infected mice. Consistent with recent reports, we observed that the depletion of NK cells in mice with disseminated infection increased peak numbers of virus-specific cytokine producing CD8(+) T cells and resulted in the rapid resolution of disseminated infection. Additionally, we show that NK cell depletion sustained T cell responses across time and protected against T cell exhaustion. The positive effects of NK cell depletion on T cell responses only occurred when NK cells were depleted within the first 2 d of infection. We find that the improved CD8(+) T cell response correlated with an enhanced ability of APCs from NK cell-depleted mice to stimulate T cell proliferation, independently of the effects of NK cells on CD4(+) T cells. These results indicate that NK cells play an integral role in limiting the CD8 T cell response and contribute to T cell exhaustion by diminishing APC function during persisting virus infection.

  17. Pigment Production on L-Tryptophan Medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaskes, Stuart; Cammer, Michael; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da) from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular) or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin. PMID:24736553

  18. Non-invasive tryptophan fluorescence measurements as a novel method of grading cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erichsen, Jesper Høiberg; Mensah, Aurore; Kessel, Line

    2017-12-01

    Development of non-invasive treatments for cataract calls for a sensitive diagnostic assay. We conducted a study to test whether the ratio of folded tryptophan to non-tryptophan fluorescence emission (F-factor) may be used for grading cataracts in human lenses. The F-factor was measured on aspirated lens material from eyes undergoing femtosecond laser assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) and was compared to a preoperative optical grading of cataract using Scheimpflug imaging. The preoperative optical grading allocated the cataracts to 1 of 4 categories according to the density of the cataract. All cataracts were age-related. Lens material from 16 eyes of 14 patients was included in the study. Cataracts were preoperatively graded in categories 1, 2 and 3. No lenses were category 4. For nuclear cataracts mean values of F-factor were 52.9 (SD 12.2), 61.7 (SD 5.3) and 75.7 (SD 8.9) for categories 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Linear regression on F-factor as a function of preoperative grading category showed increasing values of F-factor with increasing preoperative grading category, R2 = 0.515. Our experiment showed that preoperative optical grading of cataracts by Scheimpflug imaging may correlate to measures of tryptophan and non-tryptophan fluorescence in human lenses. Based on our results we find that measuring the ratio between tryptophan- and non-tryptophan fluorescence may be a future tool for grading cataracts, but further research is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Aspirin down-regulates tryptophan degradation in stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroecksnadel, K; Winkler, C; Wirleitner, B; Schennach, H; Fuchs, D

    2005-04-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is one of the most widely used drugs worldwide, due mainly to its broad therapeutic spectrum with anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, antithrombotic and analgesic effects. However, the exact mechanisms by which aspirin influences inflammation, pain and immune system activation are only partly understood. Within activation of the cellular immune system, Th1-type cytokine interferon (IFN)-gamma induces enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) which converts tryptophan to kynurenine. In parallel, IFN-gamma induces enzyme GTP-cyclohydrolase I, which gives rise to neopterin production by activated human macrophages. Similarly, tryptophan degradation and neopterin formation increase during several disease states involving Th1-type immune activation. Using stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), the effect of aspirin on tryptophan degradation and neopterin production was investigated. Stimulation of PBMC with mitogens concanavalin A, phytohaemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen induced significant tryptophan catabolism as was reflected by a decline in tryptophan levels and a parallel increase in kynurenine concentrations compared with unstimulated cells. In parallel, neopterin production was enhanced. Treatment of stimulated PBMC with increasing doses of 1-5 mM aspirin significantly decreased stimulation-induced tryptophan degradation and neopterin production as well. All the effects of aspirin were dose-dependent. The parallel influence of aspirin on both biochemical pathways implies that there was no direct inhibitory effect of aspirin on IDO; rather, it inhibits production of IFN-gamma in mitogen-treated PBMC. The influence of aspirin on biochemical pathways induced by IFN-gamma may represent an important part of its broad pharmacological effect.

  20. Western diet-induced anxiolytic effects in mice are associated with alterations in tryptophan metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohland, Christina L; Pankiv, Evelina; Baker, Glen; Madsen, Karen L

    2016-10-01

    Western-style diets high in saturated fat and refined carbohydrate have been shown to alter gut microbiota as well as being associated with altered behaviour and learning ability. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of short-term intake of a Western-style diet on intestinal cytokine expression, tryptophan metabolism, and levels of neurotransmitters in the brain. At 7 weeks of age, 129S1/SvImJ mice were placed on a standard chow or Western-style diet (fat 33%, refined carbohydrates 49%) for 3 weeks. Anxiety-like behaviour was assessed by the latency to step-down test and exploration assessed in a Barnes maze. Neurotransmitter levels in forebrains were analysed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Liver metabolism was examined by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Cytokine expression in the intestine was measured using MesoScale discovery platform. mRNA levels of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in the brain and intestine were measured using qPCR. Results showed that mice fed the Western diet displayed reduced exploratory and anxiety-like behaviour. Anxiolytic effects correlated with increased hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tryptophan levels. Brain serotonin was not altered. These changes were associated with reduced expression of small intestinal indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, a tryptophan-processing enzyme. Western diet-fed mice exhibited low-grade systemic and intestinal inflammation along with altered liver metabolic profiles. In conclusion, diets high in fat and refined sugar are associated with increased levels of brain BDNF and tryptophan and decreased exploratory and anxiety-like behaviour. These behavioural changes correlated with altered intestinal tryptophan metabolism and liver metabolic profiles.

  1. Withania coagulans tryptophan decarboxylase gene cloning, heterologous expression, and catalytic characteristics of the recombinant enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadaun, Jyoti Singh; Sangwan, Neelam Singh; Narnoliya, Lokesh Kumar; Tripathi, Sandhya; Sangwan, Rajender Singh

    2017-01-01

    Tryptophan decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.28) catalyzes pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent decarboxylation of tryptophan to produce tryptamine for recruitment in a myriad of biosynthetic pathways of metabolites possessing indolyl moiety. A recent report of certain indolyl metabolites in Withania species calls for a possible predominant functional role of tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) in the genome of Withania species to facilitate production of the indolyl progenitor molecule, tryptamine. Therefore, with this metabolic prospection, we have identified and cloned a full-length cDNA sequence of TDC from aerial tissues of Withania coagulans. The functional WcTDC gene comprises of 1506 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 502 amino acid protein with calculated molecular mass and pI value of 56.38 kDa and 8.35, respectively. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was affinity-purified to homogeneity to discern its kinetics of catalysis. The enzyme (WcTDC) exhibited much higher Km value for tryptophan than for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and was dedicated to catalyze decarboxylation of only tryptophan or, to a limited extent, of its analogue (like 5-hydroxy tryptophan). The observed optimal catalytic functionality of the enzyme on the slightly basic side of the pH scale and at slightly higher temperatures reflected adaptability of the plant to hot and arid regions, the predominant natural habitat of the herb. This pertains to be the first report on cloning and characterization of heterologously expressed recombinant enzyme from W. coagulans and forms a starting point to further understanding of withanamide biosynthesis.

  2. Twenty-four-hour plasma tryptophan concentrations and ratios are below normal in obese subjects and are not normalized by substantial weight reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Leif; Rasmussen, Michael H; Hilsted, Jannik

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasma tryptophan concentrations and the ratio of tryptophan to other large neutral amino acids (plasma tryptophan ratio) are reportedly low in obese subjects. The plasma tryptophan ratio predicts brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin production. If this ratio is low in obese subjects......, serotonin function may also be low. Plasma tryptophan concentrations and ratios have been measured only at single time points in obese subjects; it is not known whether low values for these 2 variables persist throughout a 24-h period. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine whether plasma tryptophan...... concentrations and ratios in obese subjects are lower than those in normal-weight subjects throughout a 24-h period and whether they increase when body weight is reduced. DESIGN: Plasma tryptophan concentrations and ratios were examined in obese subjects before and after weight loss and in nonobese control...

  3. /sup 13/C NMR evidence of the slow exchange of tryptophans in dihydrofolate reductase between stable conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, R.E. (Univ. of California, Los Alamos, NM); Groff, J.P.; Blakley, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    /sup 13/C NMR spectra are reported for dihydrofolate reductase of Streptococcus faecium labeled with (..gamma..-/sup 13/C)tryptophan. Two of the four tryptophans generate unusual resonances indicating slow exchange of the residues between alternative stable conformations. Since 3', 5'-dichloromethotrexate sharpens two of the resonances, it apparently locks the corresponding residues into one conformation.

  4. Interaction of tryptophan and related compounds with oxygen- and carbon-centered radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlov, R L; Brinkevich, S D; Shadyro, O I

    2014-10-01

    Effects of tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin, and melatonin on final product formation during radiolysis of deaerated and oxygen-saturated ethanol and aqueous 1M ethanol solutions were studied. The named amino acids were found to be capable of adding α-hydroxyethyl radicals, thereby suppressing recombination reactions of these species. Unlike melatonin, tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, and serotonin were able to reduce oxygen-centered radicals being formed on radiation-chemical oxidation of ethanol in the presence of oxygen via electron transfer from the amine nitrogen lone pair.

  5. Sulphur depletion altered somatic embryogenesis in Theobroma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sulphur depletion altered somatic embryogenesis in Theobroma cacao L. Biochemical difference related to sulphur metabolism between embryogenic and non embryogenic calli. Minyaka Emile, Niemenak Nicolas, Issali Emmanuel Auguste, Sangare Abdourahamane, Denis Ndoumou Omokolo ...

  6. Plasmonic Nanoprobes for Stimulated Emission Depletion Nanoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Emiliano; Huidobro, Paloma A; Sinclair, Hugo G; Guldbrand, Stina; Peveler, William J; Davies, Timothy; Parrinello, Simona; Görlitz, Frederik; Dunsby, Chris; Neil, Mark A A; Sivan, Yonatan; Parkin, Ivan P; French, Paul M W; Maier, Stefan A

    2016-11-22

    Plasmonic nanoparticles influence the absorption and emission processes of nearby emitters due to local enhancements of the illuminating radiation and the photonic density of states. Here, we use the plasmon resonance of metal nanoparticles in order to enhance the stimulated depletion of excited molecules for super-resolved nanoscopy. We demonstrate stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy with gold nanorods with a long axis of only 26 nm and a width of 8 nm. These particles provide an enhancement of up to 50% of the resolution compared to fluorescent-only probes without plasmonic components irradiated with the same depletion power. The nanoparticle-assisted STED probes reported here represent a ∼2 × 103 reduction in probe volume compared to previously used nanoparticles. Finally, we demonstrate their application toward plasmon-assisted STED cellular imaging at low-depletion powers, and we also discuss their current limitations.

  7. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  8. Depleted Bulk Heterojunction Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.

    2011-05-26

    The first solution-processed depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot solar cells are presented. The architecture allows for high absorption with full depletion, thereby breaking the photon absorption/carrier extraction compromise inherent in planar devices. A record power conversion of 5.5% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions is reported. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Digestible tryptophan:digestible lysine ratio in diets for laying hens from 24 to 40 weeks of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arele Arlindo Calderano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the ideal digestible tryptophan:digestible lysine ratio in diets for laying hens from 24 to 40 weeks of age. Two hundred and forty Hy-Line W-36 laying hens at 24 weeks of age were distributed in a completely randomized design, with five treatments, eight replicates and six birds per experimental unit. The digestible tryptophan levels in the experimental diets were 1.57; 1.68; 1.79; 1.90 and 2.01 g/kg, providing ratios of digestible tryptophan:digestible lysine of 0.215; 0.230; 0.245; 0.260 and 0.275. The increase in the levels of digestible tryptophan in the diet linearly improved the feed intake, digestible tryptophan intake, digestible lysine intake, egg production, egg mass, feed conversion per egg mass and utilization efficiency of digestible lysine for eggs mass. There were quadratic effects from the digestible tryptophan levels on egg weight. For the efficiency of utilization of digestible lysine for egg mass, there was better adjustment of the data to the LRP model. The level of digestible tryptophan in the diet from which the plateau occurred was 0.184%. This level corresponded to the intake of 142 mg/bird/day of digestible tryptophan and digestible tryptophan:digestible lysine ratio of 0.252. The ideal digestible tryptophan:digestible lysine ratio recommended in diets for laying hens from 24 to 40 weeks of age is 0.252 (25.2%.

  10. Nutritional Stress Induced by Tryptophan-Degrading Enzymes Results in ATF4-Dependent Reprogramming of the Amino Acid Transporter Profile in Tumor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timosenko, Elina; Ghadbane, Hemza; Silk, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan degradation is an immune escape strategy shared by many tumors. However, cancer cells' compensatory mechanisms remain unclear. We demonstrate here that a shortage of tryptophan caused by expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) resulted in AT...

  11. Impaired reward learning and intact motivation after serotonin depletion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Carlos, Kathleen; Ostrander, Serena; Rodriguez, Danilo; McCall-Craddolph, Aaron; Yagnik, Gargey; Zhou, Feimeng

    2012-08-01

    Aside from the well-known influence of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) on emotional regulation, more recent investigations have revealed the importance of this monoamine in modulating cognition. Parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA) depletes 5-HT by inhibiting tryptophan hydroxylase, the enzyme required for 5-HT synthesis and, if administered at sufficiently high doses, can result in a depletion of at least 90% of the brain's 5-HT levels. The present study assessed the long-lasting effects of widespread 5-HT depletions on two tasks of cognitive flexibility in Long Evans rats: effort discounting and reversal learning. We assessed performance on these tasks after administration of either 250 or 500 mg/kg PCPA or saline (SAL) on two consecutive days. Consistent with a previous report investigating the role of 5-HT on effort discounting, pretreatment with either dose of PCPA resulted in normal effortful choice: All rats continued to climb tall barriers to obtain large rewards and were not work-averse. Additionally, rats receiving the lower dose of PCPA displayed normal reversal learning. However, despite intact motivation to work for food rewards, rats receiving the largest dose of PCPA were unexpectedly impaired relative to SAL rats on the pretraining stages leading up to reversal learning, ultimately failing to approach and respond to the stimuli associated with reward. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection confirmed 5-HT, and not dopamine, levels in the ventromedial frontal cortex were correlated with this measure of associative reward learning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Short- and long-term effects of dietary l-tryptophan supplementation on the neuroendocrine stress response in seawater-reared Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basic, D.; Krogdahl, T.; Scholden, J.

    2013-01-01

    The essential amino acid l-tryptophan (Trp) is the immediate precursor of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT). Supplementing Trp through diet has been shown to suppress the neuroendocrine stress response in vertebrates including teleosts. In salmonid fish, adjusting to the social environment...... for aquaculture. Fish were given feed containing 1, 2, 3 or 4 times the Trp content in normal feed for one week. Subsequently, the fish were reintroduced to feed containing the lowest Trp level, corresponding to standard commercial feed for a number of days prior to exposure to an acute confinement stressor....... Basal plasma cortisol levels were lower among non-stressed fish at 1 and 10. days post dietary Trp supplementation. By comparison, stressed fish displayed stimulatory post-stress plasma cortisol responses at 1 and 2. days after the Trp regimen was terminated. However, a reversed pattern was observed...

  13. Randomised clinical trial on the effect of a single oral administration of l-tryptophan, at three dose rates, on reaction speed, plasma concentration and haemolysis in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Glenys K; Li, Xiuhua; Zhang, Dagong; Sillence, Martin N

    2016-07-01

    Tryptophan (TRP) is marketed as a calmative for horses despite reservations about its efficacy. The aim of this study was to measure the effect of oral TRP administration on the reaction speed of horses. Sixty mature horses were used in a two stage randomised, blind, cross-over study, receiving a placebo and an oral dose of TRP (30, 60 or 120 mg/kg body weight), before undergoing a reaction speed test. Blood samples were taken up to 96 h after TRP administration, to identify signs of acute haemolytic anaemia. Plasma TRP concentrations were increased (P reaction speed of horses when startled. There was no evidence of alterations in clinical pathology parameters in 432 blood samples. While the safety of these doses of TRP can be confirmed, there was no evidence to suggest that a single dose of TRP is an effective calmative for horses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High Sensitivity Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Detection of Tryptophan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandakkathara, Archana

    Raman spectroscopy has the capability of providing detailed information about molecular structure, but the extremely small cross section of Raman scattering prevents this technique from applications requiring high sensitivity. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on the other hand provides strongly increased Raman signal from molecules attached to metallic nanostructures. SERS is thus a promising technique for high sensitivity analytical applications. One particular area of interest is the application of such techniques for the analysis of the composition of biological cells. However, there are issues which have to be addressed in order to make SERS a reliable technique such as the optimization of conditions for any given analyte, understanding the kinetic processes of binding of the target molecules to the nanostructures and understanding the evolution and coagulation of the nanostructures, in the case of colloidal solutions. The latter processes introduce a delay time for the observation of maximum enhancement factors which must be taken into account for any given implementation of SERS. In the present thesis the goal was to develop very sensitive SERS techniques for the measurement of biomolecules of interest for analysis of the contents of cells. The techniques explored could be eventually be applicable to microfluidic systems with the ultimate goal of analyzing the molecular constituents of single cells. SERS study of different amino acids and organic dyes were performed during the course of this thesis. A high sensitivity detection system based on SERS has been developed and spectrum from tryptophan (Trp) amino acid at very low concentration (10-8 M) has been detected. The concentration at which good quality SERS spectra could be detected from Trp is 4 orders of magnitude smaller than that previously reported in literature. It has shown that at such low concentrations the SERS spectra of Trp are qualitatively distinct from the spectra commonly reported in

  15. Depletion of GGA1 and GGA3 mediates post-injury elevation of BACE1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R.; Kang, Eugene L.; Whalen, Michael J.; Shen, Yong; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most robust environmental risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Compelling evidence is accumulating that a single event of TBI is associated with increased levels of Aβ. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We report here that the BACE1 interacting protein, GGA3, is depleted while BACE1 levels increase in the acute phase post-injury (48hrs) in a mouse model of TBI. We further demonstrated the role of GGA3 in the regulation of BACE1 in vivo by showing that BACE1 levels are increased in the brain of GGA3 null mice. We next found that head trauma potentiates BACE1 elevation in GGA3 null mice in the acute phase post-TBI and discovered that GGA1, a GGA3 homologue, is a novel caspase-3 substrate depleted at 48 hrs post-TBI. Moreover, GGA1 silencing potentiates BACE1 elevation induced by GGA3 deletion in neurons in vitro indicating that GGA1 and GGA3 synergistically regulate BACE1. Accordingly, we found that levels of both GGA1 and GGA3 are depleted while BACE1 levels are increased in a series of post-mortem AD brains. Finally, we show that GGA3 haploinsufficiency results in sustained elevation of BACE1 and Aβ levels while GGA1 levels are restored in the subacute phase (7 days) post-injury. In conclusion, our data indicate that depletion of GGA1 and GGA3 engender a rapid and robust elevation of BACE1 in the acute phase post-injury. However, the efficient disposal of the acutely accumulated BACE1 solely depends on GGA3 levels in the sub-acute phase of injury. PMID:22836275

  16. New Approach For Prediction Groundwater Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Current approaches to quantify groundwater depletion involve water balance and satellite gravity. However, the water balance technique includes uncertain estimation of parameters such as evapotranspiration and runoff. The satellite method consumes time and effort. The work reported in this paper proposes using failure theory in a novel way to predict groundwater saturated thickness depletion. An important issue in the failure theory proposed is to determine the failure point (depletion case). The proposed technique uses depth of water as the net result of recharge/discharge processes in the aquifer to calculate remaining saturated thickness resulting from the applied pumping rates in an area to evaluate the groundwater depletion. Two parameters, the Weibull function and Bayes analysis were used to model and analyze collected data from 1962 to 2009. The proposed methodology was tested in a nonrenewable aquifer, with no recharge. Consequently, the continuous decline in water depth has been the main criterion used to estimate the depletion. The value of the proposed approach is to predict the probable effect of the current applied pumping rates on the saturated thickness based on the remaining saturated thickness data. The limitation of the suggested approach is that it assumes the applied management practices are constant during the prediction period. The study predicted that after 300 years there would be an 80% probability of the saturated aquifer which would be expected to be depleted. Lifetime or failure theory can give a simple alternative way to predict the remaining saturated thickness depletion with no time-consuming processes such as the sophisticated software required.

  17. Crosstalk between Tryptophan Metabolism and Cardiovascular Disease, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular diseases (CVD associated with the highest rates of morbidity are coronary heart disease and stroke, and the primary etiological factor leading to these conditions is atherosclerosis. This long-lasting inflammatory disease, characterized by how it affects the artery wall, results from maladaptive immune responses linked to the vessel wall. Tryptophan (Trp is oxidized in a constitutive manner by tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase in liver cells, and for alternative cell types, it is catalyzed in the presence of a differently inducible indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1 in the context of a specific pathophysiological environment. Resultantly, this leads to a rise in the production of kynurenine (Kyn metabolites. Inflammation in the preliminary stages of atherosclerosis has a significant impact on IDO1, and IDO1 and the IDO1-associated pathway constitute critical mediating agents associated with the immunoinflammatory responses that characterize advanced atherosclerosis. The purpose of this review is to survey the recent literature addressing the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation in CVD, and the author will direct attention to the function performed by IDO1-mediated tryptophan metabolism.

  18. Problem-Solving Test: Attenuation--A Mechanism to Regulate Bacterial Tryptophan Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: tryptophan, transcription unit, operon, "trp" repressor, corepressor, operator, promoter, palindrome, initiation, elongation, and termination of transcription, open reading frame, coupled transcription/translation, chromosome-polysome complex. (Contains 2 figures and 1 footnote.)

  19. Reprint of 'pH tuning of Nafion for selective detection of tryptophan'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frith, K.-A. [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, 6140 (South Africa); Limson, J.L., E-mail: j.limson@ru.ac.z [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, 6140 (South Africa)

    2010-05-30

    Selective and sensitive detection of the amino acid tryptophan is of importance in food processing, pharmaceutical formulations and in biological fluids. Electrochemical methods of detection of tryptophan are hampered by sluggish electron transfer kinetics and in complex matrices through overlapping peaks from interferents. This study examines the potential of the cation exchange membrane Nafion to enhance selectivity and sensitivity of this analyte through a seldom explored feature of this membrane: pH manipulation. A detailed examination of the effect of pH on the selectivity afforded by Nafion as a function of the analyte charge is presented. Selective detection of tryptophan and significant increases in sensitivity of its detection was observed in the presence of melatonin, dopamine and other interferents present in a pharmaceutical formulation through manipulation of the pH of the solution. At pH 3.0 at a Nafion-modified electrode, changes in the protonation of melatonin and tryptophan lowered the anodic potential of the analytes in a non-uniform manner increasing the peak resolution and permitting analyses with detection limits of 1.6 +- 0.1 nM and 1.6 +- 0.2 nM, respectively.

  20. pH tuning of Nafion for selective detection of tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frith, K.-A. [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, 6140 (South Africa); Limson, J.L. [Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, 6140 (South Africa)], E-mail: j.limson@ru.ac.za

    2009-05-01

    Selective and sensitive detection of the amino acid tryptophan is of importance in food processing, pharmaceutical formulations and in biological fluids. Electrochemical methods of detection of tryptophan are hampered by sluggish electron transfer kinetics and in complex matrices through overlapping peaks from interferents. This study examines the potential of the cation exchange membrane Nafion to enhance selectivity and sensitivity of this analyte through a seldom explored feature of this membrane: pH manipulation. A detailed examination of the effect of pH on the selectivity afforded by Nafion as a function of the analyte charge is presented. Selective detection of tryptophan and significant increases in sensitivity of its detection was observed in the presence of melatonin, dopamine and other interferents present in a pharmaceutical formulation through manipulation of the pH of the solution. At pH 3.0 at a Nafion-modified electrode, changes in the protonation of melatonin and tryptophan lowered the anodic potential of the analytes in a non-uniform manner increasing the peak resolution and permitting analyses with detection limits of 1.6 {+-} 0.1 nM and 1.6 {+-} 0.2 nM, respectively.

  1. Synthesis of 5-[18F]Fluoro-α-methyl Tryptophan: New Trp Based PET Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglio, Benjamin C; Fei, Haiyang; Wang, Mengzhe; Wang, Hui; He, Liu; Feng, Huijuan; Wu, Zhanhong; Lu, Hongjian; Li, Zibo

    2017-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) plays a special role in the biology of various cancer types, because it breaks down the essential amino acid tryptophan for immune cell activation. Upregulation of IDO1 significantly correlates with the number of various T cell types in tumor tissues in melanoma and other cancers, suggesting that IDO expression is linked with effective and ineffective ('exhausted') immune response in cancer. Based on the reported IDO inhibitors (α-Methylated and indole-N-methylated tryptophan (Trp)), here we report the synthesis of potential IDO1 imaging agents through direct introduction of 18F into the tryptophan aromatic ring. Overall, the resulting PET agents could be obtained in high radiochemical purity (>97%) with labeling yield ranges from 4.2-14.9% decay corrected yield. Using Trp as the model compound, our results also demonstrate that 18F could be directly introduced to the Trp backbone at the 4, 5, 6, and 7 position. Moreover, our initial imaging study suggests that 5-[18F]F-L-α-methyl tryptophan (5-[18F]F-AMT) holds great potential for cancer imaging. The success of this approach will provide researchers easy access to a library of Trp/Trp-derivative based PET agents for biomedical research, including potential IDO1 targeted imaging.

  2. Experimental Evidence and In Silico Identification of Tryptophan Decarboxylase in Citrus Genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, Luigi; Castaldo, Domenico; Pignone, Domenico; Servillo, Luigi; Facchiano, Angelo

    2017-02-11

    Plant tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) converts tryptophan into tryptamine, precursor of indolealkylamine alkaloids. The recent finding of tryptamine metabolites in Citrus plants leads to hypothesize the existence of TDC activity in this genus. Here, we report for the first time that, in Citrus x limon seedlings, deuterium labeled tryptophan is decarboxylated into tryptamine, from which successively deuterated N,N,N-trimethyltryptamine is formed. These results give an evidence of the occurrence of the TDC activity and the successive methylation pathway of the tryptamine produced from the tryptophan decarboxylation. In addition, with the aim to identify the genetic basis for the presence of TDC, we carried out a sequence similarity search for TDC in the Citrus genomes using as a probe the TDC sequence reported for the plant Catharanthus roseus. We analyzed the genomes of both Citrus clementina and Citrus sinensis, available in public database, and identified putative protein sequences of aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase. Similarly, 42 aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase sequences from 23 plant species were extracted from public databases. Potential sequence signatures for functional TDC were then identified. With this research, we propose for the first time a putative protein sequence for TDC in the genus Citrus.

  3. Long-term tryptophan supplementation decreased the welfare and innate immune status of pikeperch juveniles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandiki, Syaghalirwa N. M.; Redivo, Baptiste; Baekelandt, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that short-term supplementation of L-tryptophan (TRP) can mitigate the primary neuroendocrine response to stress in some fish species, but such stress reduction was reported to be both dose- and context-dependent (Basic et al, 2013; Machado et al, 2015). So, the TRP...

  4. Cross-linking of lens crystallin proteins induced by tryptophan metabolites and metal ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tweeddale, Helen J; Hawkins, Clare Louise; Janmie, Joane F

    2016-01-01

    Long-wavelength solar UV radiation is implicated in photodamage to the human eye. The human lens contains multiple tryptophan-derived compounds that have significant absorbance bands in the UVA region (λ 315-400 nm) that act as efficient physical filters for these wavelengths. The concentrations...

  5. Arabidopsis thaliana tryptophan synthase alpha: gene cloning, expression, and subunit interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwanski, E R; Zhao, J; Last, R L

    1995-10-25

    The tryptophan synthase alpha subunit catalyzes the conversion of indole-3-glycerolphosphate to indole, the penultimate reaction in the biosynthesis of the essential amino acid tryptophan. A cDNA encoding Arabidopsis thaliana tryptophan synthase alpha(TSA1) was isolated by complementation of an Escherichia coli delta trpA mutation and by polymerase chain reaction amplification from a cDNA library using degenerate primers. A TSA1 genomic clone was also isolated and 5 kb of the DNA sequence determined. A single sequence in the Arabidopsis genome with homology to the TSA1 cDNA was detected by high-stringency genomic Southern blot hybridization. In contrast under hybridization conditions of reduced stringency, one or two additional homologous sequences were observed. A 1.4 kb transcript was detected in wild-type RNA with the TSA1 cDNA as a probe. Several lines of evidence, including immunoaffinity chromatography, suggest that the active A. thaliana tryptophan synthase enzyme consists of a heterosubunit complex, presumably analogous to the prokaryotic alpha 2 beta 2 complex. Immunoblot analysis indicated that the plant alpha and beta subunits are present throughout development.

  6. No Tryptophan, Tyrosine and Phenylalanine Abnormalities in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergwerff, C.E.; Luman, M.; Blom, H.J.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the current study was to explore the role of aromatic amino acids (AAAs) in blood in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Given their impact on the synthesis of serotonin and dopamine, decreased concentrations of the AAAs tryptophan, tyrosine and

  7. Tryptophan catabolism restricts IFN-γ-expressing neutrophils and Clostridium difficile immunopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Chang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Min; Franz, Matthew; Shreiner, Andrew; McDermott, Andrew J.; van der Sluijs, Koenraad F.; Lutter, René; Grasberger, Helmut; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Young, Vincent B.; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Kao, John Y.

    2014-01-01

    The interplay between Clostridium difficile and the host's metabolome is believed to influence the severity of infection. However, the mechanism for this phenomenon remains unclear. In this study, we model one of these metabolic pathways by focusing on tryptophan metabolism in the host. We found

  8. Experimental Evidence and In Silico Identification of Tryptophan Decarboxylase in Citrus Genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi De Masi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC converts tryptophan into tryptamine, precursor of indolealkylamine alkaloids. The recent finding of tryptamine metabolites in Citrus plants leads to hypothesize the existence of TDC activity in this genus. Here, we report for the first time that, in Citrus x limon seedlings, deuterium labeled tryptophan is decarboxylated into tryptamine, from which successively deuterated N,N,N-trimethyltryptamine is formed. These results give an evidence of the occurrence of the TDC activity and the successive methylation pathway of the tryptamine produced from the tryptophan decarboxylation. In addition, with the aim to identify the genetic basis for the presence of TDC, we carried out a sequence similarity search for TDC in the Citrus genomes using as a probe the TDC sequence reported for the plant Catharanthus roseus. We analyzed the genomes of both Citrus clementina and Citrus sinensis, available in public database, and identified putative protein sequences of aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase. Similarly, 42 aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase sequences from 23 plant species were extracted from public databases. Potential sequence signatures for functional TDC were then identified. With this research, we propose for the first time a putative protein sequence for TDC in the genus Citrus.

  9. Synthesis of 2-substituted tryptophans via a C3- to C2-alkyl migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Mari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of 3-substituted indoles with dehydroalanine (Dha derivatives under Lewis acid-mediated conditions has been investigated. The formation of 2-substituted tryptophans is proposed to occur through a selective alkylative dearomatization–cyclization followed by C3- to C2-alkyl migration and rearomatization.

  10. Serum Stabilities of Short Tryptophan-and Arginine-Rich Antimicrobial Peptide Analogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, L.T.; Chau, J.K.; Perry, N.A.; de Boer, L.; Zaat, S.A.J.; Vogel, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Several short antimicrobial peptides that are rich in tryptophan and arginine residues were designed with a series of simple modifications such as end capping and cyclization. The two sets of hexapeptides are based on the Trp- and Arg-rich primary sequences from the "antimicrobial

  11. Quenching of Tryptophan Fluorescence in Unfolded Cytochrome "c": A Biophysics Experiment for Physical Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Kats, Dina I.; Kim, Judy E.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiments that focus on protein folding provide excellent opportunities for undergraduate students to learn important topics in the expanding interdisciplinary field of biophysics. Here, we describe the use of Stern-Volmer plots to determine the extent of solvent accessibility of the single tryptophan residue (trp-59) in unfolded and…

  12. Quantification of Small Molecule-Protein Interactions using FRET between Tryptophan and the Pacific Blue Fluorophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Molly M; Peterson, Blake R

    2016-12-31

    We report a new method to quantify the affinity of small molecules for proteins. This method is based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between endogenous tryptophan (Trp) residues and the coumarin-derived fluorophore Pacific Blue (PB). Tryptophan residues are frequently found in proteins near ligand-binding sites, making this approach potentially applicable to a wide range of systems. To improve access to PB, we developed a scalable multigram synthesis of this fluorophore, starting with inexpensive 2,3,4,5-tetrafluorobenzoic acid. This route was used to synthesize fluorescent derivatives of biotin, as well as lower affinity thiobiotin, iminobiotin, and imidazolidinethione analogues that bind the protein streptavidin. Compared with previously published FRET acceptors for tryptophan, PB proved to be superior in both sensitivity and efficiency. These unique properties of PB enabled direct quantification of dissociation constants (Kd) as well as competitive inhibition constants (Ki) in the micromolar to nanomolar range. In comparison to analogous binding studies using fluorescence polarization, fluorescence quenching, or fluorescence enhancement, affinities determined using Trp-FRET were more precise and accurate as validated using independent isothermal titration calorimetry studies. FRET between tryptophan and PB represents a new tool for the characterization of protein-ligand complexes.

  13. Tryptophan Metabolism Along the Kynurenine Pathway Downstream of Toll-like Receptor Stimulation in Peripheral Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, F; Bhat, M; Sandberg, K; Ståhl, S; Piehl, F; Svensson, C; Erhardt, S; Schwieler, L

    2016-11-01

    Tryptophan degradation along the kynurenine pathway is of central importance for the immune function. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), representing the first line of immune defence against pathogens, are expressed in various cell types. The most abundant expression is found on monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. The aim of this study was to investigate whether stimulation with different TLR ligands induces the kynurenine pathway in human peripheral monocytes. Cell supernatants were analysed using a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to measure kynurenine, kynurenic acid (KYNA), quinolinic acid (QUIN) and tryptophan. Stimulation of TLR-2, TLR-3, TLR-4, TLR-7/8 and TLR-9 was found to induce the production of kynurenine, but only stimulation of TLR-3 increased levels of further downstream metabolites, such as KYNA and QUIN. Stimulation of TLR-1, TLR-5 and TLR-6 did not induce the kynurenine pathway. Taken together, this study provides novel evidence demonstrating that TLR activation induces a pattern of downstream tryptophan degradation along the kynurenine pathway in monocytes. The results of this study may implicate that TLRs can be used as new drug targets for the regulation of aberrant tryptophan metabolism along this pathway, a potential therapeutic strategy that may be of importance in several disorders. © 2016 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  14. Stabilization of Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 by L-Phenylalanine Induced Dimerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand, Kasper Damgaard; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager; Hoeck, Niclas

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) catalyses the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, which is associated with a variety of disorders such as depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia. Full length TPH2 is poorly characterized due to low purification...

  15. PYROLYTIC PRODUCTS FROM TRYPTOPHAN AND GLUTAMIC-ACID ARE POSITIVE IN THE MAMMALIAN SPOT-TEST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Juul

    1983-01-01

    Pyrolysates of tryptophan (Trp-P-2) and glutamic acid (Glu-P-1) are known mutagens in in vitro short term mutagenicity tests, and have also shown carcinogenic effects in long term animal studies. The present study demonstrates that they also produce mutations in somatic cells. This result...

  16. Does dietary tryptophan around farrowing affect sow behavior and piglet mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piglet mortality remains a serious welfare and economic problem. Much of the early mortality is due to crushing by the sow. Tryptophan has been shown to reduce aggression and have a calming effect on behaviour, which may reduce the number and type of posture changes, thereby altering risk of crushin...

  17. Crosstalk between Tryptophan Metabolism and Cardiovascular Disease, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Chen, Shuai; Zhong, Jin; Teng, Kunling; Yin, Yulong

    2017-01-01

    The cardiovascular diseases (CVD) associated with the highest rates of morbidity are coronary heart disease and stroke, and the primary etiological factor leading to these conditions is atherosclerosis. This long-lasting inflammatory disease, characterized by how it affects the artery wall, results from maladaptive immune responses linked to the vessel wall. Tryptophan (Trp) is oxidized in a constitutive manner by tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase in liver cells, and for alternative cell types, it is catalyzed in the presence of a differently inducible indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) in the context of a specific pathophysiological environment. Resultantly, this leads to a rise in the production of kynurenine (Kyn) metabolites. Inflammation in the preliminary stages of atherosclerosis has a significant impact on IDO1, and IDO1 and the IDO1-associated pathway constitute critical mediating agents associated with the immunoinflammatory responses that characterize advanced atherosclerosis. The purpose of this review is to survey the recent literature addressing the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation in CVD, and the author will direct attention to the function performed by IDO1-mediated tryptophan metabolism.

  18. Suppression of aggression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by dietary L-tryptophan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winberg, S; Øverli, Ø; Lepage, O

    2001-01-01

    .... Thereafter, the fish were tested for aggressive behaviour using a resident/intruder test. Following this first resident/intruder test, the feed was exchanged for an experimental wet feed supplemented with 0.15 % or 1.5 % L-tryptophan (by wet mass...

  19. Central fatigue and nycthemeral change of serum tryptophan and serotonin in the athletic horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percipalle Maurizio

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serotonergic system is associated with numerous brain functions, including the resetting of the mammalian circadian clock. The synthesis and metabolism of 5-HT in the brain increases in response to exercise and is correlated with high levels of blood-borne tryptophan (TRP. The present investigation was aimed at testing the existence of a daily rhythm of TRP and 5-HT in the blood of athletic horses. Methods Blood samples from 5 Thoroughbred mares were collected at 4-hour intervals for 48 hours (starting at 08:00 hours on day 1 and finishing at 4:00 on day 2 via an intravenous cannula inserted into the jugular vein. Tryptophan and serotonin concentrations were assessed by HPLC. Data analysis was conducted by one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA and by the single cosinor method. Results ANOVA showed a highly significant influence of time both on tryptophan and on serotonin, in all horses, on either day, with p values Conclusion The results showed that serotonin and tryptophan blood levels undergo nycthemeral variation with typical evening acrophases. These results enhance the understanding of the athlete horse's chronoperformance and facilitate the establishment of training programs that take into account the nycthemeral pattern of aminoacids deeply involved in the onset of central fatigue.

  20. The Tryptophan-Kynurenine Pathway, Systemic Inflammation, and Long-Term Outcome after Kidney Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Laura V; Minovic, Isidor; Franssen, Casper Fm; van Faassen, Martijn; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F.; Berger, Stefan P; Navis, Gerjan; Kema, Ido P; Bakker, Stephan Jl

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tryptophan is metabolized along the kynurenine pathway, initially to kynurenine, and subsequently to cytotoxic 3-hydroxykynurenine. There is increasing interest in this pathway, because of its pro-inflammatory nature, and drugs interfering in it receive increasing attention. We aimed to

  1. Effect of a B-vitamin on tryptophan metabolism in South African Bantu with pellagra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankes, L.V.; Jansen, C.R.; DeBruin, E.P.; Schmaeler, M.

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism of kynurenine, a metabolite in the tryptophan-niacin pathway, before and after vitamin B6 therapy was studied in pellagra patients. The patients given vitamin B6 showed a higher metabolism of L-kynurenine-keto-/sup 14/C than the patients without vitamin B6. (ACR)

  2. Redirection of tryptophan leads to production of low indole glucosinolate canola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavadej, S; Brisson, N; McNeil, J N; De Luca, V

    1994-03-15

    Cruciferous plants are known to produce over a hundred different mustard oil glycosides, which are derived from methionine, phenylalanine, or tryptophan. In oil-producing crops like Brassica napus (canola), the presence of indole glucosinolates in seed protein meals has decreased meal palatability and has limited their value as animal feed. We have transformed canola plants with a gene that encodes tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) in an attempt to redirect tryptophan into tryptamine rather than into indole glucosinolates. Transgenic plants that expressed this decarboxylase activity accumulated tryptamine while correspondingly lower levels of tryptophan-derived indole glucosinolates were produced in all plant parts compared with nontransformed controls. Of particular significance, the indole glucosinolate content of mature seeds from transgenic plants was only 3% of that found in nontransformed seeds. These results demonstrate how the creation of artificial metabolic sinks could divert metabolite flow and be used to remove these undesirable indole glucosinolates, thereby increasing the value of the oilseed meals, which are produced after extraction of oil from the seed.

  3. Internal Energies of Ion-Sputtered Neutral Tryptophan and Thymine Molecules Determined by Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jia; Takahashi, Lynelle; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-11

    Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization coupled to secondary neutral mass spectrometry (VUV-SNMS) of deposited tryptophan and thymine films are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline. The resulting mass spectra show that while the intensity of the VUV-SNMS signal is lower than the corresponding secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) signal, the mass spectra are significantly simplified in VUV-SNMS. A detailed examination of tryptophan and thymine neutral molecules sputtered by 25 keV Bi3 + indicates that the ion-sputtered parent molecules have ~;;2.5 eV of internal energy. While this internal energy shifts the appearance energy of the photofragment ions for both tryptophan and thymine, it does not change the characteristic photoionizaton efficiency (PIE) curves of thymine versus photon energy. Further analysis of the mass spectral signals indicate that approximately 80 neutral thymine molecules and 400 tryptophan molecules are sputtered per incident Bi3 + ion. The simplified mass spectra and significant characteristic ion contributions to the VUV-SNMS spectra indicate the potential power of the technique for organic molecule surface analysis.

  4. Groundwater depletion embedded in international food trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalin, Carole; Wada, Yoshihide; Kastner, Thomas; Puma, Michael J.

    2017-03-01

    Recent hydrological modelling and Earth observations have located and quantified alarming rates of groundwater depletion worldwide. This depletion is primarily due to water withdrawals for irrigation, but its connection with the main driver of irrigation, global food consumption, has not yet been explored. Here we show that approximately eleven per cent of non-renewable groundwater use for irrigation is embedded in international food trade, of which two-thirds are exported by Pakistan, the USA and India alone. Our quantification of groundwater depletion embedded in the world’s food trade is based on a combination of global, crop-specific estimates of non-renewable groundwater abstraction and international food trade data. A vast majority of the world’s population lives in countries sourcing nearly all their staple crop imports from partners who deplete groundwater to produce these crops, highlighting risks for global food and water security. Some countries, such as the USA, Mexico, Iran and China, are particularly exposed to these risks because they both produce and import food irrigated from rapidly depleting aquifers. Our results could help to improve the sustainability of global food production and groundwater resource management by identifying priority regions and agricultural products at risk as well as the end consumers of these products.

  5. Depletion sensitivity predicts unhealthy snack purchases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Stefanie J; Adriaanse, Marieke A; Fennis, Bob M; De Vet, Emely; De Ridder, Denise T D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to examine the relation between depletion sensitivity - a novel construct referring to the speed or ease by which one's self-control resources are drained - and snack purchase behavior. In addition, interactions between depletion sensitivity and the goal to lose weight on snack purchase behavior were explored. Participants included in the study were instructed to report every snack they bought over the course of one week. The dependent variables were the number of healthy and unhealthy snacks purchased. The results of the present study demonstrate that depletion sensitivity predicts the amount of unhealthy (but not healthy) snacks bought. The more sensitive people are to depletion, the more unhealthy snacks they buy. Moreover, there was some tentative evidence that this relation is more pronounced for people with a weak as opposed to a strong goal to lose weight, suggesting that a strong goal to lose weight may function as a motivational buffer against self-control failures. All in all, these findings provide evidence for the external validity of depletion sensitivity and the relevance of this construct in the domain of eating behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The tryptophan/kynurenine pathway, systemic inflammation, and long-term outcome after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Laura V; Minović, Isidor; Franssen, Casper F M; van Faassen, Martijn; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F; Berger, Stefan P; Navis, Gerjan; Kema, Ido P; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2017-08-01

    Tryptophan is metabolized along the kynurenine pathway, initially to kynurenine, and subsequently to cytotoxic 3-hydroxykynurenine. There is increasing interest in this pathway because of its proinflammatory nature, and drugs interfering in it have received increasing attention. We aimed to investigate whether serum and urinary parameters of the tryptophan/kynurenine pathway, and particularly cytotoxic 3-hydroxykynurenine, are associated with systemic inflammation and long-term outcome in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Data were collected in outpatient RTR with a functioning graft for >1 yr. Tryptophan, kynurenine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine in serum and urine were measured using LC-MS/MS. A total of 561 RTR (age: 51 ± 12 yr; 56% male) were included at a median of 6.0 (2.6-11.6) yr posttransplantation. Baseline median serum tryptophan was 40.0 (34.5-46.0) µmol/l, serum kynurenine was 1.8 (1.4-2.2) µmol/l, and serum 3-hydroxykynurenine was 42.2 (31.0-61.7) nmol/l. Serum kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine were strongly associated with parameters of systemic inflammation. During follow-up for 7.0 (6.2-7.5) yr, 51 RTR (9%) developed graft failure and 120 RTR (21%) died. Both serum kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine were independently associated with graft failure [HR 1.72 (1.23-2.41), P = 0.002; and HR 2.03 (1.42-2.90), P inflammation and prospectively with adverse long-term outcome after kidney transplantation. Serum 3-hydroxykynurenine may be an interesting biomarker and target for the evaluation of drugs interfering in the tryptophan/kynurenine pathway. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Disturbed tryptophan metabolism correlating to progression and metastasis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing; Jin, Hai; Hou, Xiaobei; Lv, Jie; Gao, Xianfu; Zheng, Guangyong

    2017-05-06

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most frequent malignancies worldwide. Lymph node metastasis is the leading cause of death in ESCC patients. To identify early diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of ESCC and elucidate underlying pathogenesis of the disease, a targeted metabolomics strategy based on liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry was applied to explore tryptophan metabolism between ESCC patients, metastatic ESCC patients (mESCC), and healthy controls. Statistical analysis on metabolite expression abundance and compound concentration ratio was conducted to discriminate patients from healthy controls. The concentration ratio of kynurenine, 5-hydroxytryptophan, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, 5-hydroxytryptamine to their precursor tryptophan were identified as potential biomarkers, presenting high diagnostic capacity for distinguishing ESCC and mESCC patients from healthy controls. Moreover, a prognostic prediction model was also built on these ratios to distinguish metastasis patients from non-metastasis patients successfully. The high performance of ESCC prediction models suggest that concentration ratios of compounds may be used as biomarkers for early diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. In addition, concentration ratios of compounds show a progressively increased trend from non-metastasis to metastasis patients compared with healthy controls, which is in accordance with process of malignant transformation of ESCC. This interested finding suggests that disturbed tryptophan metabolism is correlated to progression and metastasis of ESCC since concentration ratios of compounds reflect activity of enzymes involved in tryptophan metabolism. This study reveals the impact of tryptophan metabolism to tumorigenesis and metastasis of ESCC, which help biologists investigate mechanism of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The role of two Pseudomonas aeruginosa anthranilate synthases in tryptophan and quorum signal production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gregory C.; Jorth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that causes infections in the lungs of individuals with the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Density-dependent production of toxic factors regulated by the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone; PQS) have been proposed to be involved in P. aeruginosa virulence. PQS biosynthesis requires conversion of the central metabolite chorismate to anthranilate by anthranilate synthase. This reaction is also the first step in tryptophan biosynthesis. P. aeruginosa possesses two functional anthranilate synthases, TrpEG and PhnAB, and these enzymes are not functionally redundant, as trpEG mutants are tryptophan auxotrophs but produce PQS while mutants in phnAB are tryptophan prototrophs but do not produce PQS in minimal media. The goal of the work described in this paper was to determine the mechanism for this lack of functional complementation of TrpEG and PhnAB. Our results reveal that overexpression of either enzyme compensates for tryptophan auxotrophy and PQS production in the trpEG and phnAB mutants respectively, leading to the hypothesis that differential regulation of these genes is responsible for the lack of functional complementation. In support of this hypothesis, trpEG was shown to be expressed primarily during low-density growth while phnAB was expressed primarily at high density. Furthermore, dysregulation of phnAB expression eliminated tryptophan auxotrophy in the P. aeruginosa trpEG mutant. Based on these data, we propose a model for anthranilate sequestration by differential transcriptional regulation of the two P. aeruginosa anthranilate synthase enzymes. PMID:23449919

  9. Modulating short tryptophan- and arginine-rich peptides activity by substitution with histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacalum, Mihaela; Janosi, Lorant; Zorila, Florina; Tepes, Ana-Maria; Ionescu, Cristina; Bogdan, Elena; Hadade, Niculina; Craciun, Liviu; Grosu, Ion; Turcu, Ioan; Radu, Mihai

    2017-07-01

    High antimicrobial efficacy of short tryptophan-and arginine-rich peptides makes them good candidates in the fight against pathogens. Substitution of tryptophan and arginine by histidine could be used to modulate the peptides efficacy by optimizing their structures. The peptide (RRWWRWWRR), reported to showed good antimicrobial efficacy, was used as template, seven new analogs being designed substituting tryptophan or arginine with histidine. The peptides' efficacy was tested against E. coli, B. subtilis and S. aureus. The cytotoxicity and hemolytic effect were evaluated and the therapeutic index was inferred for each peptide. Atomic force microscopy and molecular simulation were used to analyze the effects of peptides on bacterial membrane. The substitution of tryptophan by histidine proved to strongly modulate the antimicrobial activity, mainly by changing the peptide-to-membrane binding energy. The substitution of arginine has low effect on the antimicrobial efficacy. The presence of histidine residue reduced the cytotoxic and hemolytic activity of the peptides in some cases maintaining the same efficacy against bacteria. The peptides' antimicrobial activity was correlated to the 3D-hydrophobic moment and to a simple structure-based packing parameter. The results show that some of these peptides have the potential to become good candidates to fight against bacteria. The substitution by histidine proved to fine tune the therapeutic index allowing the optimization of the peptide structure mainly by changing its binding energy and 3D-hydrophobic moment. The short tryptophan reach peptides therapeutic index can be maximized using the histidine substitution to optimize their structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. L-tryptophan and dipeptide derivatives for supercoiled plasmid DNA purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Tiago; Carvalho, Josué; Corvo, Marta C; Cabrita, Eurico J; Queiroz, J A; Cruz, C

    2016-06-01

    The present study focus on the preparation of chromatography supports for affinity-based chromatography of supercoiled plasmid purification. Three l-tryptophan based supports are prepared through immobilization on epoxy-activated Sepharose and characterized by HR-MAS NMR. The SPR is employed for a fast screening of l-tryptophan derivatives, as potential ligands for the biorecognition of supercoiled isoform, as well as, to establish the suitable experimental conditions for the chromatography. The results reveal that the overall affinity is high (KD=10(-9) and 10(-8)M) and the conditions tested show that the use of HEPES 100mM enables the separation and purification of supercoiled at T=10°C. The STD-NMR is performed to accomplish the epitope mapping of the 5'-mononucleotides bound to l-tryptophan derivatives supports. The data shows that the interactions between the three supports and the 5'-mononucleotides are mainly hydrophobic and π-π stacking. The chromatography experiments are performed with l-tryptophan support and plasmids pVAX-LacZ and pPH600. The supercoiled isoform separation is achieved at T=10°C by decreasing the concentration of (NH4)2SO4 from 2.7 to 0M in HEPES for pVAX-LacZ and 2.65M to 0M in HEPES for pPH600. Overall, l-tryptophan derivatives can be a promising strategy to purify supercoiled for pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulating the balance between the kynurenine and serotonin pathways of tryptophan metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Hu, Nan; Yang, Dan; Oxenkrug, Gregory; Yang, Qing

    2017-03-01

    Tryptophan is metabolized along the kynurenine and serotonin pathways, resulting in formation of kynurenine metabolites, neuroactive serotonin and melatonin. Each pathway is critical for maintaining healthy homeostasis. However, the two pathways are extremely unequal in their ability to degrade tryptophan, and little is known about the mechanisms maintaining the balance between them. Here, we demonstrated that in PC12 cells, a change of expression of key genes of one pathway resulted in a change of expression of key genes of the other. Melatonin, the end product of the serotonin pathway, played an important role in tryptophan metabolism by affecting both key enzymes of the two pathways. Melatonin treatment induced the expression of indole-2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) and enhanced the activity of the IDO1 promoter while decreasing the expression of arylalkylamine N-acetyl transferase. Melatonin treatment up-regulated the expression of forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) and enhanced the binding of FoxO1 to the IDO1 promoter. FoxO1 was shown to be a new regulator for IDO1 expression. Melatonin treatment decreased the phosphorylation of FoxO1 by extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and protein kinase B (Akt) and increased the phosphorylation of binding protein 14-3-3 by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and thus the complex of FoxO1-14-3-3 in the cytoplasm was disassembled and FoxO1 was relocated to the nucleus to induce IDO1 expression. The JNK signaling pathway played an important role in melatonin-induced IDO1 up-regulation. In conclusion, this study suggests a link between melatonin, JNK, FoxO1 and IDO1 that acts as a potential balance regulator of tryptophan metabolism, and offers a new approach to treat diseases related to dysregulation of tryptophan metabolism. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. D-tryptophan from probiotic bacteria influences the gut microbiome and allergic airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepert, Inge; Fonseca, Juliano; Müller, Constanze; Milger, Katrin; Hochwind, Kerstin; Kostric, Matea; Fedoseeva, Maria; Ohnmacht, Caspar; Dehmel, Stefan; Nathan, Petra; Bartel, Sabine; Eickelberg, Oliver; Schloter, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Krauss-Etschmann, Susanne

    2017-05-01

    Chronic immune diseases, such as asthma, are highly prevalent. Currently available pharmaceuticals improve symptoms but cannot cure the disease. This prompted demands for alternatives to pharmaceuticals, such as probiotics, for the prevention of allergic disease. However, clinical trials have produced inconsistent results. This is at least partly explained by the highly complex crosstalk among probiotic bacteria, the host's microbiota, and immune cells. The identification of a bioactive substance from probiotic bacteria could circumvent this difficulty. We sought to identify and characterize a bioactive probiotic metabolite for potential prevention of allergic airway disease. Probiotic supernatants were screened for their ability to concordantly decrease the constitutive CCL17 secretion of a human Hodgkin lymphoma cell line and prevent upregulation of costimulatory molecules of LPS-stimulated human dendritic cells. Supernatants from 13 of 37 tested probiotic strains showed immunoactivity. Bioassay-guided chromatographic fractionation of 2 supernatants according to polarity, followed by total ion chromatography and mass spectrometry, yielded C11H12N2O2 as the molecular formula of a bioactive substance. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and enantiomeric separation identified D-tryptophan. In contrast, L-tryptophan and 11 other D-amino acids were inactive. Feeding D-tryptophan to mice before experimental asthma induction increased numbers of lung and gut regulatory T cells, decreased lung TH2 responses, and ameliorated allergic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Allergic airway inflammation reduced gut microbial diversity, which was increased by D-tryptophan. D-tryptophan is a newly identified product from probiotic bacteria. Our findings support the concept that defined bacterial products can be exploited in novel preventative strategies for chronic immune diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Effect of dietary L-tryptophan on osmotic stress tolerance in common carp, Cyprinus carpio, juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Seyyed Morteza; Hosseini, Seyed Abbas

    2010-12-01

    Common carp juveniles were fed two types of diet (control: 0.1% tryptophan and TRP: 0.6% tryptophan) over 15 days. Thereafter, both groups were directly subjected to osmotic challenge (from 0 to 10 ppt) for 168 h. Blood samples were collected at -240, 0, 6, 24, 72 and 168 h after challenge. Survival and serum cortisol, glucose, sodium and chloride levels were measured to determine stress response and osmoregulation condition. While TRP group showed no mortality until 168 h, cumulative mortality was near 100% at 72 h after challenge in control group. Feeding tryptophan-supplemented diet led to increase in prechallenge cortisol, but not glucose, sodium and chloride values at -240 h that stayed elevated until 0 h after challenge. After challenge, cortisol and glucose values did not significantly affected by time of sampling but type of diet and diet×time interaction. Sodium values significantly affected by diet type and time of sampling but not their interaction. Chloride values significantly affected by time of sampling but not diet type and their interaction. Control group had higher cortisol, glucose and sodium than TRP at each time of sampling. Control and TRP group showed increasing and decreasing pattern in cortisol and glucose values when experiment progressed after osmotic challenge. Both group showed increasing pattern in sodium and chloride values when experiment progressed after osmotic challenge. Results indicated that tryptophan supplementation enhanced salt water tolerance of carp that is due to increase in basal cortisol and anti-stress effect of tryptophan and possibly increase in serotonergic activity.

  14. Promoting effect of saccharin and DL-tryptophan in urinary bladder carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S M; Arai, M; Jacobs, J B; Friedell, G H

    1979-04-01

    The existence of at least two stages in bladder carcinogenesis was evaluated in male Fischer rats using N-[14-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl]formamide (FANFT) fed for six weeks at a level of 0.2% of the diet as the initiator. Sodium saccharin and DL-tryptophan were fed at levels of 5 and 2% of the diet, respectively, as possible promoting chemicals, and they were fed either immediately after FANFT administration or after six weeks of FANFT plus six weeks of control diet. All surviving rats were killed at the end of two years. Both chemicals significantly increased the incidence of bladder tumors following FANFT feeding compared to six weeks of FANFT feeding followed by control diet, and the results were similar whether saccharin or tryptophan feeding was started immediately after FANFT feeding was concluded or after a six-week delay. Saccharin was considerably more potent as a promoting agent than was tryptophan, inducing higher incidences of bladder tumors and having a shorter latent period. Long-term administration of FANFT induced a 100% incidence of bladder cancer. Sequential epithelial changes were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy as well as by light microscopy. Pleomorphic microvilli were present on the superficial cells of all tumors examined and on the surface cells of hyperplastic bladder epithelium after six weeks of FANFT plus six weeks of saccharin, but not after six weeks of FANFT and six weeks of control diet. Rats fed only saccharin tryptophan, or control diet did not have bladder tumors or pleomorphic microvilli on bladder epithelium. These data suggest that saccharin and tryptophan might act as tumor-promoting agents during bladder carcinogenesis.

  15. Quenching mechanisms and kinetics of Trolox and ascorbic acid on the riboflavin-photosensitized oxidation of tryptophan and tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yettella, Ramesh R; Min, David B

    2008-11-26

    The effects of 0, 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 mM Trolox and ascorbic acid on the singlet oxygen oxidation of tryptophan and tyrosine containing 25 ppm of riboflavin were determined by measuring tryptophan and tyrosine concentration by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The samples were stored in the a 1000 lx light storage box for 4 h at 30 degrees C. As the concentration of Trolox and ascorbic acid increased, the degradation of tryptophan and tyrosine decreased significantly at p Trolox reduced tryptophan and tyrosine degradation by quenching both singlet oxygen and excited triplet riboflavin, whereas ascorbic acid quenched singlet oxygen only. The total singlet oxygen quenchings of Trolox in the presence of tryptophan and tyrosine were 1.55 x 10(7) and 1.32 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The total singlet oxygen quenchings of ascorbic acid in the presence of tryptophan and tyrosine were 1.16 x 10(7) and 1.10 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Trolox was more effective than ascorbic acid in preventing the degradation of tryptophan and tyrosine.

  16. N-acetyl-L-tryptophan, a substance-P receptor antagonist attenuates aluminum-induced spatial memory deficit in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Joylee; Mudgal, Jayesh; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Arora, Devinder; Basu Mallik, Sanchari; Pai, K S R; Nampoothiri, Madhavan

    2018-01-08

    Neuroinflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Neurokinin substance P is a key mediator which modulates neuroinflammation through neurokinin receptor. Involvement of substance P in Alzheimer's disease is still plausible and various controversies exist in this hypothesis. Preventing the deleterious effects of substance P using N-acetyl-L-tryptophan, a substance P antagonist could be a promising therapeutic strategy. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of N-acetyl-L-tryptophan on aluminum induced spatial memory alterations in rats. Memory impairment was induced using aluminum chloride (AlCl 3 ) at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 42 d. After induction of dementia, rats were exposed to 30 and 50 mg/kg of N-acetyl-L-tryptophan for 28 d. Spatial memory alterations were measured using Morris water maze. Acetylcholinesterase activity and antioxidant enzyme glutathione level were assessed in hippocampus, frontal cortex and striatum. The higher dose of N-acetyl-L-tryptophan (50 mg/kg) significantly improved the aluminum induced memory alterations. N-acetyl-L-tryptophan exposure resulted in significant increase in acetylcholinesterase activity and glutathione level in hippocampus. The neuroprotective effect of N-acetyl-L-tryptophan could be due to its ability to block substance P mediated neuroinflammation, reduction in oxidative stress and anti-apoptotic properties. To conclude, N-acetyl-L-tryptophan may be considered as a novel neuroprotective therapy in Alzheimer's disease.

  17. The role of tryptophan residues in the hemolytic activity of stonustoxin,a lethal factor from stonefish (Synanceja horrida) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, W S; Khoo, H E

    2000-03-01

    Stonustoxin (SNTX) is a pore-forming cytolytic lethal factor, isolated from the venom of the stonefish Synanceja horrida, that has potent hemolytic activity. The role of tryptophan residues in the hemolytic activity of SNTX was investigated. Oxidation of tryptophan residues of SNTX with N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) resulted in loss of hemolytic activity. Binding of 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulphonate (ANS) to SNTX resulted in occlusion of tryptophan residues that resulted in loss of hemolytic activity. Circular dichroism and fluorescence studies indicated that ANS binding resulted in a conformational change of SNTX, in particular, a relocation of surface tryptophan residues to the hydrophobic interior. NBS-modification resulted in oxidised surface tryptophan residues that did not relocate to the hydrophobic interior. These results suggest that native surface tryptophan residues play a pivotal role in the hemolytic activity of STNX, possibly by being an essential component of a hydrophobic surface necessary for pore-formation. This study is the first report on the essentiality of tryptophan residues in the activity of a lytic and lethal factor from a fish venom.

  18. Ego depletion in visual perception: Ego-depleted viewers experience less ambiguous figure reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Marina C; Stirk, Steven; Hancock, Peter J B

    2017-10-01

    This study examined the effects of ego depletion on ambiguous figure perception. Adults (N = 315) received an ego depletion task and were subsequently tested on their inhibitory control abilities that were indexed by the Stroop task (Experiment 1) and their ability to perceive both interpretations of ambiguous figures that was indexed by reversal (Experiment 2). Ego depletion had a very small effect on reducing inhibitory control (Cohen's d = .15) (Experiment 1). Ego-depleted participants had a tendency to take longer to respond in Stroop trials. In Experiment 2, ego depletion had small to medium effects on the experience of reversal. Ego-depleted viewers tended to take longer to reverse ambiguous figures (duration to first reversal) when naïve of the ambiguity and experienced less reversal both when naïve and informed of the ambiguity. Together, findings suggest that ego depletion has small effects on inhibitory control and small to medium effects on bottom-up and top-down perceptual processes. The depletion of cognitive resources can reduce our visual perceptual experience.

  19. The modality effect of ego depletion: Auditory task modality reduces ego depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiong; Wang, Zhenhong

    2016-08-01

    An initial act of self-control that impairs subsequent acts of self-control is called ego depletion. The ego depletion phenomenon has been observed consistently. The modality effect refers to the effect of the presentation modality on the processing of stimuli. The modality effect was also robustly found in a large body of research. However, no study to date has examined the modality effects of ego depletion. This issue was addressed in the current study. In Experiment 1, after all participants completed a handgrip task, one group's participants completed a visual attention regulation task and the other group's participants completed an auditory attention regulation task, and then all participants again completed a handgrip task. The ego depletion phenomenon was observed in both the visual and the auditory attention regulation task. Moreover, participants who completed the visual task performed worse on the handgrip task than participants who completed the auditory task, which indicated that there was high ego depletion in the visual task condition. In Experiment 2, participants completed an initial task that either did or did not deplete self-control resources, and then they completed a second visual or auditory attention control task. The results indicated that depleted participants performed better on the auditory attention control task than the visual attention control task. These findings suggest that altering task modality may reduce ego depletion. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  1. Self-regulation, ego depletion, and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Roy F

    2014-12-01

    Inhibition is a major form of self-regulation. As such, it depends on self-awareness and comparing oneself to standards and is also susceptible to fluctuations in willpower resources. Ego depletion is the state of reduced willpower caused by prior exertion of self-control. Ego depletion undermines inhibition both because restraints are weaker and because urges are felt more intensely than usual. Conscious inhibition of desires is a pervasive feature of everyday life and may be a requirement of life in civilized, cultural society, and in that sense it goes to the evolved core of human nature. Intentional inhibition not only restrains antisocial impulses but can also facilitate optimal performance, such as during test taking. Self-regulation and ego depletion- may also affect less intentional forms of inhibition, even chronic tendencies to inhibit. Broadly stated, inhibition is necessary for human social life and nearly all societies encourage and enforce it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Plasmonic nanoprobes for stimulated emission depletion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cortes, Emiliano; Sinclair, Hugo G; Guldbrand, Stina; Peveler, William J; Davies, Timothy; Parrinello, Simona; Görlitz, Frederik; Dunsby, Chris; Neil, Mark A A; Sivan, Yonatan; Parkin, Ivan P; French, Paul M; Maier, Stefan A

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles influence the absorption and emission processes of nearby emitters due to local enhancements of the illuminating radiation and the photonic density of states. Here, we use the plasmon resonance of metal nanoparticles in order to enhance the stimulated depletion of excited molecules for super-resolved microscopy. We demonstrate stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy with gold nanorods with a long axis of only 26 nm and a width of 8 nm that provide an enhancement of the resolution compared to fluorescent-only probes without plasmonic components irradiated with the same depletion power. These novel nanoparticle-assisted STED probes represent a ~2x10^3 reduction in probe volume compared to previously used nanoparticles and we demonstrate their application to the first plasmon-assisted STED cellular imaging. We also discuss their current limitations.

  3. Thirteen week toxicity study of dietary l-tryptophan in rats with a recovery period of 5 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibui, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Hideki; Masuzawa, Yoko; Ohishi, Takumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi; Sakai, Ryosei

    2018-04-01

    Although l-tryptophan is nutritionally important and widely used in medical applications, toxicity data for its oral administration are limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential toxicity of an experimental diet containing added l-tryptophan at doses of 0 (basal diet), 1.25%, 2.5% and 5.0% when administered to Sprague-Dawley rats for 13 weeks. There were no toxicological changes in clinical signs, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, necropsy, organ weight and histopathology between control rats and those fed additional l-tryptophan. Body weight gain and food consumption significantly decreased throughout the administration period in males in the 2.5% group and in both sexes in the 5.0% group. At the end of the dosing period, decreases in water intake in males in the 5.0% group and in serum glucose in females in the 5.0% group were observed. The changes described above were considered toxicologically significant; however, they were not observed after a 5 week recovery period, suggesting reversibility. Consequently, the no-observed-adverse-effect level of l-tryptophan in the present study was 1.25% for males and 2.5% for females (mean intake of l-tryptophan: 779 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 [males] and 1765 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 [females]). As the basal diet used in this study contained 0.27% of proteinaceous l-tryptophan, the no-observed-adverse-effect level of overall l-tryptophan was 1.52% for males and 2.77% for females (mean intake of overall l-tryptophan: 948 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 (males) and 1956 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 (females)). We conclude that l-tryptophan has a low toxicity profile in terms of human use. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The Effects of Tryptophan on Everyday Interpersonal Encounters and Social Cognitions in Individuals with a Family History of Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoevers, Robert A.; aan het Rot, Marije

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individuals with a family history of depression show subtle abnormalities in the processing of social stimuli. This could negatively affect their interpersonal functioning and contribute to their depression risk. Repeated administration of the serotonin precursor tryptophan has previously been shown to increase agreeable behavior and reduce quarrelsome behavior in irritable people, who are also considered at risk for depression. Methods: To examine the effects of tryptophan on social functioning in individuals with a family history of depression, 40 men and women with at least one first-degree relative with depression received tryptophan (1g three times a day) and placebo for 14 days each in a double-blind crossover design and recorded their social behavior and mood during everyday interpersonal encounters. Participants also provided daily ratings of their positive and negative cognitions concerning their social functioning. Results: Tryptophan improved mood. Unexpectedly, tryptophan increased quarrelsome behavior and reduced agreeable behavior, specifically during interactions at home. The behavioral effects of tryptophan were not moderated by mood or by the interaction partner. Negative social cognitions were lower when tryptophan was given second and lower during placebo when placebo was given second. Conclusion: Overall, tryptophan may not alter social behavior in individuals with a family history of depression as it does in irritable people. However, the behavioral effects of tryptophan at home might be seen as a way for individuals with a family history of depression to achieve more control. Over time, this may positively influence the way they feel and think about themselves in a social context. PMID:25733537

  5. The Chemistry and Toxicology of Depleted Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Sidney A. Katz

    2014-01-01

    Natural uranium is comprised of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Depleted uranium (DU) is a byproduct of the processes for the enrichment of the naturally occurring 235U isotope. The world wide stock pile contains some 1½ million tons of depleted uranium. Some of it has been used to dilute weapons grade uranium (~90% 235U) down to reactor grade uranium (~5% 235U), and some of it has been used for heavy tank armor and for the fabrication of armor-piercing bullets and missiles....

  6. Sensitivity study of control rod depletion coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Blomberg, Joel

    2015-01-01

    This report investigates the sensitivity of the control rod depletion coefficients, Sg, to different input parameters and how this affects the accumulated 10B depletion, β. Currently the coefficients are generated with PHOENIX4, but the geometries can be more accurately simulated in McScram. McScram is used to calculate Control Rod Worth, which in turn is used to calculate Nuclear End Of Life, and Sg cannot be generated in the current version of McScram. Therefore, it is also analyzed whether...

  7. A Brief Historic Overview of Clinical Disorders Associated with Tryptophan: The Relevance to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS and Fibromyalgia (FM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Blankfield

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Last century there was a short burst of interest in the tryptophan related disorders of pellagra and related abnormalities that are usually presented in infancy. 1 , 2 Nutritional physiologists recognized that a severe human dietary deficiency of either tryptophan or the B group vitamins could result in central nervous system (CNS sequelae such as ataxia, cognitive dysfunction and dysphoria, accompanied by skin hyperpigmentation. 3 , 4 The current paper will focus on the emerging role of tryptophan in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS and fibromyalgia (FM.

  8. Effect of neutrophil depletion on gelatinase expression, edema formation and hemorrhagic transformation after focal ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Livia S

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While gelatinase (MMP-2 and -9 activity is increased after focal ischemia/reperfusion injury in the brain, the relative contribution of neutrophils to the MMP activity and to the development of hemorrhagic transformation remains unknown. Results Anti-PMN treatment caused successful depletion of neutrophils in treated animals. There was no difference in either infarct volume or hemorrhage between control and PMN depleted animals. While there were significant increases in gelatinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and activity and edema formation associated with ischemia, neutrophil depletion failed to cause any change. Conclusion The main finding of this study is that, in the absence of circulating neutrophils, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and activity are still up-regulated following focal cerebral ischemia. Additionally, neutrophil depletion had no influence on indicators of ischemic brain damage including edema, hemorrhage, and infarct size. These findings indicate that, at least acutely, neutrophils are not a significant contributor of gelatinase activity associated with acute neurovascular damage after stroke.

  9. Blockade and reversal of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine-induced analgesia following noradrenaline depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, T; Minor, B G; Post, C

    1985-04-29

    The acute effects of the 5-hydroxytryptamine agonist, 5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT), upon pain sensitivity, using shock titration, tail-flick and hot-plate methods, in noradrenaline- and 5-hydroxytryptamine-depleted rats were examined. Noradrenaline depletion, following the systemic administration of N-2-chloroethyl-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4, 2 X 50 mg/kg, i.p.), caused a reversal of the analgesic effect of 5-MeO-DMT on shock-titration from hypo- to hypersensitivity, and a total blockade of the antinociceptive effect of 5-MeO-DMT upon pain responses in the hot-plate and tail-flick tests. Pretreatment with either p-chloroamphetamine (2 X 10 mg/kg) or p-chlorophenylalanine (200, 100, 100 mg/kg), that depletes central 5-hydroxytryptamine stores, failed to alter the analgesia caused by acute 5-MeO-DMT. Strong evidence is provided for the effect of central noradrenaline depletion upon the analgesic effect of the 5-HT agonist. These findings suggest an important tonic influence of the noradrenaline system upon the descending spinal 5-HT pathway in rats.

  10. Depletion of GGA1 and GGA3 mediates postinjury elevation of BACE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R; Kang, Eugene L; Whalen, Michael J; Shen, Yong; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2012-07-25

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most robust environmental risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Compelling evidence is accumulating that a single event of TBI is associated with increased levels of Aβ. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We report here that the BACE1 interacting protein, GGA3, is depleted while BACE1 levels increase in the acute phase after injury (48 h) in a mouse model of TBI. We further demonstrated the role of GGA3 in the regulation of BACE1 in vivo by showing that BACE1 levels are increased in the brain of GGA3-null mice. We next found that head trauma potentiates BACE1 elevation in GGA3-null mice in the acute phase after TBI, and discovered that GGA1, a GGA3 homolog, is a novel caspase-3 substrate depleted at 48 h after TBI. Moreover, GGA1 silencing potentiates BACE1 elevation induced by GGA3 deletion in neurons in vitro, indicating that GGA1 and GGA3 synergistically regulate BACE1. Accordingly, we found that levels of both GGA1 and GGA3 are depleted while BACE1 levels are increased in a series of postmortem AD brains. Finally, we show that GGA3 haploinsufficiency results in sustained elevation of BACE1 and Aβ levels while GGA1 levels are restored in the subacute phase (7 d) after injury. In conclusion, our data indicate that depletion of GGA1 and GGA3 engender a rapid and robust elevation of BACE1 in the acute phase after injury. However, the efficient disposal of the acutely accumulated BACE1 solely depends on GGA3 levels in the subacute phase of injury.

  11. UV-induced CYP1A1 gene expression in human cells is mediated by tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y D; Rannug, U; Rannug, A

    1999-04-01

    Induction of cytochrome P-4501A1 (CYP1A1) activity by UV has been observed earlier in animal studies via a mechanism that has not yet been resolved. Our previous data have indicated that formylated indolocarbazoles which are formed by UV irradiation of tryptophan solutions are very potent Ah-receptor agonists. To evaluate the effect of UV light on cytochrome P4501A1 gene expression, we studied the induction of CYP1A1 mRNA by UV irradiation of cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT cell line), primary human blood lymphocytes and mouse Hepa-1 cells. The cells were exposed to UV light delivered by a bank of 6 Philips TL20/12RS sun lamps emitting primarily in the UVB range in the absence and presence of tryptophan. A semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-linked polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used for analysis of gene expression in the treated cells. The results show that the CYP1A1 mRNA level induced by UV in the presence of tryptophan was higher than that induced by UV alone in both HaCaT cells and lymphocytes after 3 h of incubation post-UV irradiation. To find out if the induction by UV light is caused by the formation of an Ah receptor ligand, Hepa-1 wild-type and Ah receptor deficient c12 cell lines were applied. Wild-type (wt) cells were inducible either by the tryptophan photoproduct 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) or by UV-irradiation but very low or undetectable levels were observed in the c12 cells. This shows that the induction of gene expression by FICZ and UV is Ah receptor dependent. Together, these results indicate that UV-induced CYP1A1 gene expression in mammalian cells is mediated by an Ah receptor ligand formed from tryptophan. Thus, the photoproducts of tryptophan are suggested to be mediators of light via binding to the Ah receptor and as such also could have a role in light-regulated biological rhythms.

  12. Short-chain fluorescent tryptophan tags for on-line detection of functional recombinant proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siepert Eva-Maria

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional fluorescent proteins, such as GFP, its derivatives and flavin mononucleotide based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs are often used as fusion tags for detecting recombinant proteins during cultivation. These reporter tags are state-of-the-art; however, they have some drawbacks, which can make on-line monitoring challenging. It is discussed in the literature that the large molecular size of proteins of the GFP family may stress the host cell metabolism during production. In addition, fluorophore formation of GFP derivatives is oxygen-dependent resulting in a lag-time between expression and fluorescence detection and the maturation of the protein is suppressed under oxygen-limited conditions. On the contrary, FbFPs are also applicable in an oxygen-limited or even anaerobic environment but are still quite large (58% of the size of GFP. Results As an alternative to common fluorescent tags we developed five novel tags based on clustered tryptophan residues, called W-tags. They are only 5-11% of the size of GFP. Based on the property of tryptophan to fluoresce in absence of oxygen it is reasonable to assume that the functionality of our W-tags is also given under anaerobic conditions. We fused these W-tags to a recombinant protein model, the anti-CD30 receptor single-chain fragment variable antibody (scFv Ki-4(scFv and the anti-MucI single-chain fragment variable M12(scFv. During cultivation in Microtiter plates, the overall tryptophan fluorescence intensity of all cultures was measured on-line for monitoring product formation via the different W-tags. After correlation of the scattered light signal representing biomass concentration and tryptophan fluorescence for the uninduced cultures, the fluorescence originating from the biomass was subtracted from the overall tryptophan signal. The resulting signal, thus, represents the product fluorescence of the tagged and untagged antibody fragments. The product fluorescence signal

  13. “When the going gets tough, who keeps going?” Depletion sensitivity moderates the ego-depletion effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, S.J.; Adriaanse, M.A.; Vet, de E.W.M.L.; Fennis, B.M.; Ridder, de D.T.D.

    2014-01-01

    Self-control relies on a limited resource that can get depleted, a phenomenon that has been labeled ego-depletion. We argue that individuals may differ in their sensitivity to depleting tasks, and that consequently some people deplete their self-control resource at a faster rate than others. In

  14. Nitrogen depletion in field red giants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masseron, T.; Lagarde, N.; Miglio, A.

    2017-01-01

    , the behaviour of nitrogen data along the evolution confirms the existence of non-canonical extramixing on the red giant branch (RGB) for all low-mass stars in the field. But more surprisingly, the data indicate that nitrogen has been depleted between the RGB tip and the red clump. This may suggest that some...

  15. Global Warming: Lessons from Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Art

    2010-01-01

    My teaching and textbook have always covered many physics-related social issues, including stratospheric ozone depletion and global warming. The ozone saga is an inspiring good-news story that's instructive for solving the similar but bigger problem of global warming. Thus, as soon as students in my physics literacy course at the University of…

  16. Robust Comparisons of Natural Resources Depletion Indices

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Makdissi; Quentin Wodon

    2004-01-01

    This note applies tools from the stochastic dominance literature on poverty to environmental data in order to test in a robust way whether over-consumption and thereby depletion of natural resources is increasing over time. \\ The method is illustrated with country data on per capita CO_{2} emissions.

  17. Ozone depleting substances management inventory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Ivan Romero Rodríguez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: The care of the ozone layer is an activity that contributes to the planet's environmental stability. For this reason, the Montreal Protocol is created to control the emission of substances that deplete the ozone layer and reduce its production from an organizational point of view. However, it is also necessary to have control of those that are already circulating and those present in the equipment that cannot be replaced yet because of the context of the companies that keep it. Generally, the control mechanisms for classifying the type of substances, equipment and companies that own them, are carried in physical files, spreadsheets and text documents, which makes it difficult to control and manage the data stored in them. Method: The objective of this research is to computerize the process of control of substances that deplete the ozone layer. An evaluation and description of all process to manage Ozone-Depleting Substances (ODS, and its alternatives, is done. For computerization, the agile development methodology SCRUM is used, and for the technological solution tools and free open source technologies are used. Result: As a result of the research, a computer tool was developed that automates the process of control and management of substances that exhaust the ozone layer and its alternatives. Conclusions: The developed computer tool allows to control and manage the ozone-depleting substances and the equipment that use them. It also manages the substances that arise as alternatives to be used for the protection of the ozone layer.

  18. Contrasts between Antarctic and Arctic ozone depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Susan; Portmann, Robert W; Thompson, David W J

    2007-01-09

    This work surveys the depth and character of ozone depletion in the Antarctic and Arctic using available long balloon-borne and ground-based records that cover multiple decades from ground-based sites. Such data reveal changes in the range of ozone values including the extremes observed as polar air passes over the stations. Antarctic ozone observations reveal widespread and massive local depletion in the heart of the ozone "hole" region near 18 km, frequently exceeding 90%. Although some ozone losses are apparent in the Arctic during particular years, the depth of the ozone losses in the Arctic are considerably smaller, and their occurrence is far less frequent. Many Antarctic total integrated column ozone observations in spring since approximately the 1980s show values considerably below those ever observed in earlier decades. For the Arctic, there is evidence of some spring season depletion of total ozone at particular stations, but the changes are much less pronounced compared with the range of past data. Thus, the observations demonstrate that the widespread and deep ozone depletion that characterizes the Antarctic ozone hole is a unique feature on the planet.

  19. Poroelasticity of high porosity chalk under depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    on mechanical test results is found to be low-er than the pretest dynamic Biot coefficient determined from elastic wave propagation for the loading path and with less deviation under depletion. The calculated lateral stress is lower than the experimentally measured lateral stress depending on loading path...

  20. Elephant invasion and escalated depletion of environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For decades, elephants' invasion is known to be associated with severe environmental consequences leading to escalated depletion o environmental resources (plants, water, wildlife and soil). This paper examined the effects of elephants' activity on the environmental resources inHong and Gombi Local Government areas ...

  1. Depletion interactions caused by polydisperse, hard platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    July, C.; Kleshchanok, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323052517; Lang, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate depletion interactions near a wall caused by polydisperse silica-coated gibbsite platelets, using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) to characterize the sphere–wall interaction potential. As no theoretical model for polydisperse platelets exists, we extend a

  2. Evening intake of α-lactalbumin increases plasma tryptophan availability and improves morning alertness and brain measures of attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markus, C.R.; Jonkman, L.M.; Lammers, J.H.C.M.; Deutz, N.E.P.; Messer, M.H.; Rigtering, N.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Brain serotonin function is thought to promote sleep regulation and cognitive processes, whereas sleep abnormalities and subsequent behavioral decline are often attributed to deficient brain serotonin activity. Brain uptake of the serotonin precursor tryptophan is dependent on nutrients

  3. The Effects of Tryptophan on Everyday Interpersonal Encounters and Social Cognitions in Individuals with a Family History of Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenelst, Koen; Schoevers, Robert A.; Rot, Marije Aan Het

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individuals with a family history of depression show subtle abnormalities in the processing of social stimuli. This could negatively affect their interpersonal functioning and contribute to their depression risk. Repeated administration of the serotonin precursor tryptophan has

  4. Neuroendocrine and Immune Responses Undertake Different Fates following Tryptophan or Methionine Dietary Treatment: Tales from a Teleost Model

    OpenAIRE

    Azeredo, Rita; Machado, Marina; Afonso, António; Fierro-Castro, Camino; Reyes-López, Felipe E.; Tort, Lluis; Gesto, Manuel; Conde-Sieira, Marta; Míguez, Jesús M.; José L. Soengas; Kreuz, Eva; Wuertz, Sven; Peres, Helena; Oliva-Teles, Aires; Costas, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Methionine and tryptophan appear to be fundamental in specific cellular pathways involved in the immune response mechanisms, including stimulation of T-regulatory cells by tryptophan metabolites or pro-inflammatory effects upon methionine supplementation. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of these amino acids on the inflammatory and neuroendocrine responses in juveniles of European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax. To achieve this, goal fish were fed for 14 ...

  5. Neuroendocrine and immune responses undertake different fates following tryptophan or methionine dietary treatment: Tales from a teleost model

    OpenAIRE

    Azeredo, Rita; Machado, Marina; Afonso, António; Fierro-Castro, Camino; Reyes-López, Felipe E.; Tort, Lluis; Gesto, Manuel; Conde-Sieira, Marta; Míguez, Jesús M.; José L. Soengas; Kreuz, Eva; Wuertz, Sven; Peres, Helena; Oliva-Teles, Aires; Costas, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Methionine and tryptophan appear to be fundamental in specific cellular pathways involved in the immune response mechanisms, including stimulation of T-regulatory cells by tryptophan metabolites or pro-inflammatory effects upon methionine supplementation. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of these amino acids on the inflammatory and neuroendocrine responses in juveniles of European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax. To achieve this, goal fish were fed for 14 ...

  6. Neuroendocrine and immune responses undertake different fates following tryptophan or methionine dietary treatment: tales from a teleost model

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Azeredo; Marina Machado; António Afonso; Camino Fierro-Castro; Reyes-López, Felipe E.; Lluis Tort; Manuel Gesto; Marta Conde-Sieira; Míguez, Jesús M.; José L. Soengas; Eva Kreuz; Sven Wuertz; Helena Peres; Aires Oliva-Teles; Benjamin Costas

    2017-01-01

    Methionine and tryptophan appear to be fundamental in specific cellular pathways involved in the immune response mechanisms, including stimulation of T-regulatory cells by tryptophan metabolites or pro-inflammatory effects upon methionine supplementation. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of these amino acids on the inflammatory and neuroendocrine responses in juveniles of European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax. To achieve this, goal fish were fed for 14 ...

  7. Physiological roles of tryptophan in teleosts: current knowledge and perspectives for future studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoseini, Seyyed Morteza; Pérez-Jiménez, Amelia; Costas, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    from the neuroendocrine to the immune system in vertebrates. In aquaculture, extensive research has been performed to optimize the levels of tryptophan in the commercial diets for many fish species. Providing adequate levels of this amino acid is critically important for fish growth but also for fish......Tryptophan is an essential amino acid with a huge functional versatility, in addition to its participation in protein synthesis. Because of the complexity of its metabolism, and the functional relevance of several of its metabolites, it directly or indirectly participates in a wide array...... of physiological pathways. This amino acid is a precursor for the synthesis of the neurotransmitter/neuromodulator serotonin (5HT), the hormone melatonin and kynurenine and related compounds such as kynurenic acid, quinolinic acid or niacin. Because of this, it has a key role in the regulation of processes ranging...

  8. The brain tryptophan hydroxylase activity in the sleep-like states in frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, A V; Karmanova, I G; Kozlachkova, E Y; Voronova, I P; Popova, N K

    1994-10-01

    The activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of serotonin biosynthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase, was determined in the brain stem in active awake frogs, and frogs in three sleep-like states: with plastic muscle tone (SLS-1), with rigid muscle tone (SLS-2), and with relaxed muscle tone (SLS-3). Significant decrease in the enzyme activity has been found in frogs in SLS-1 and SLS-2 compared to awake animals. The development in frogs a cataleptic-like immobility after treating the animals with rhythmic lighting was accompanied with a decrease in the brain tryptophan hydroxylase activity. These results provide strong evidence for the involvement of the brain serotonin in frogs in the control of evolutionary ancient sleep-like states, probably by the regulation of muscle tone.

  9. Tryptophan metabolism: entering the field of aging and age-related pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Goot, Annemieke T; Nollen, Ellen A A

    2013-06-01

    Aging is an important risk factor for many debilitating diseases, including cancer and neurodegeneration. In model organisms, interfering with metabolic signaling pathways, including the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 (IIS) and TOR pathways, can protect against age-related pathologies and increase lifespan. Recent studies in multiple organisms have implicated tryptophan metabolism as a powerful regulator of age-related diseases and lifespan. Its high conservation throughout evolution has enabled studies that begin to dissect the contribution of individual enzymes and metabolites. Here, we focus on the emerging view of tryptophan metabolism as a pathway that integrates environmental and metabolic signals to regulate animal biology and health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dietary l-tryptophan leaves a lasting impression on the brain and the stress response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höglund, Erik; Øverli, Øyvind; Åberg Andersson, Madelene

    2017-01-01

    Comparative models suggest that effects of dietary tryptophan (Trp) on brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) neurochemistry and stress responsiveness are present throughout the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, hypothalamic 5-HT seems to play a central role in control of the neuroendocrine stre......, they indicate that trophic/structural effects in the brain underlie the effects of dietary Trp treatment on stress reactivity.......Comparative models suggest that effects of dietary tryptophan (Trp) on brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) neurochemistry and stress responsiveness are present throughout the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, hypothalamic 5-HT seems to play a central role in control of the neuroendocrine stress...... axis in all vertebrates. Still, recent fish studies suggest long-term effects of dietary Trp on stress responsiveness, which are independent of hypothalamic 5-HT. Here, we investigated if dietary Trp treatment may result in long-lasting effects on stress responsiveness, including changes in plasma...

  11. Expression and purification of the metal-containing monooxygenases tryptophan hydroxylase and dopamine β-hydroxylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Pernille Efferbach

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH) are two metal-containing monooxygenases that both function e.g. in the brain where they are involved in the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters. TPH catalyse the ratelimiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, namely the conversion...... to abnormal levels of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine and the regulation of tryptophan hydroxylase and dopamine β-hydroxylase. These include depression, anxiety disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and attention deficit...... to the family of ascorbate dependent type II Cu monooxygenases. Very little knowledge exist on DβH and most of it comes from investigations of related proteins. Attempts to express human DβH in bacterial systems have been done in the Metalloprotein Chemistry and Engineering Group, but at present no system...

  12. Effects of a tryptophan supplemented diet and U.V. radiation on the rat lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, R L; Sahai, P

    1990-01-01

    Rats maintained on a tryptophan supplemented diet and exposed to U.V. radiation showed decreased concentration of ascorbic acid in serum. In the lens, a small increase in the urea-mercaptoethanol soluble fraction was observed suggesting some oxidation of P-SH groups. The decreased concentrations of lens glutathione and ascorbic acid were accompanied with increased concentration of malondialdehyde suggesting increased oxidative stress. The activities of glutathione peroxidase decreased by about 40%. Though the activity of glutathione reductase decreased by about 58%, addition of FAD in the enzyme assay system showed restoration of lost activity. Additive effect of raised serum tryptophan concentration and ultraviolet radiation in causing damage to the eye lens is suggested.

  13. Tryptophan-Assisted Synthesis Reduces Bimetallic Gold/Silver Nanoparticle Cytotoxicity and Improves Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor O. Shmarakov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to reduce the potential in vivo hepato-and nephrotoxicity of Ag/Au bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, an approach involving a simultaneous reduction of silver nitrate and tetrachlorauratic acid using tryptophan (Trp as a reducing/stabilizing agent was applied during NP synthesis. The obtained Ag/Au/Trp NPs (5–15 nm sized were able to form stable aggregates with an average size of 370–450 nm and were potentially less toxic than Ag/Au/SDS in relation to a mouse model system based on clinical biochemical parameters and oxidative damage product estimation. Ag/Au/Trp NPs were shown to exhibit anticancer activity in relation to a Lewis lung carcinoma model. The data generated from the present study support the fact that the use of tryptophan in NP synthesis is effective in attenuating the potential hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of NPs during their in vivo application.

  14. Synthesis and fungicidal activity of tryptophan analogues - the unexpected calycanthaceous alkaloid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shaojun; Gu, Yongdong; Li, Longbo; Zhu, Rui; Cai, Xingwei; Bai, Hongjin; Zhang, Jiwen

    2017-05-01

    A series of 21 N-protected tryptophan derivatives were synthesised from tryptophan in good yields. Their structures were characterised by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, DEPT (90° and 135°) and MS analysis. The synthesised compounds were evaluated against a wide variety of plant pathogen fungi. Compounds a19 and a21 displayed activity against Fusarium oxysporum (F. oxysporum), and compound a21 showed high activity against F. oxysporum and Eggplant Verticillium, with EC50 values of 58.27 and 77.39 μg mL-1, respectively. Considering that the bioassay of the title compounds was evaluated, effects of the chain alkyl substituents may contribute to the significant variations in fungicidal potency. Their structure-antifungal activity relationships were also discussed. These results will pave the way for further design, structural modification and development of calycanthaceous alkaloids as antimicrobial agents.

  15. L-Tryptophan on Cu(111): engineering a molecular labyrinth driven by indole groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yitamben, E. N.; Clayborne, A.; Darling, Seth B.; Guisinger, N. P.

    2015-05-21

    The present article investigates the adsorption and molecular orientation of L-Tryptophan, which is both an essential amino acid important for protein synthesis and of particular interest for the development of chiral molecular electronics and biocompatible processes and devices, on Cu(111) using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy at 55 K and at room temperature. The arrangement of chemisorbed L-Tryptophan on the copper surface varies with both temperature and surface coverage. At low coverage, small clusters form on the surface irrespective of temperature, while at high coverage an ordered chain structure emerges at room temperature, and a tightly packed structure forms a molecular labyrinth at low temperature. The dominating superstructure of the adsorbates arises from intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and pi-bonding interactions between the indole groups of neighboring molecules and the Cu surface.

  16. Tyrosine fluorescence probing of conformational changes in tryptophan-lacking domain of albumins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanova, N. G.; Maksimov, E. G.; Arutyunyan, A. M.; Fadeev, V. V.; Shirshin, E. A.

    2017-03-01

    We addressed the possibility of using tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence for monitoring conformational changes of proteins which are undetectable via tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence. The model objects, human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumins, contain one and two Trp residues, respectively, while Tyr is more uniformly distributed over their structure. The results of the investigation of albumins interaction with ethanol using intrinsic Trp and Tyr steady-state and time-resolved picosecond fluorescence indicated the presence of an intermediate at 10% (v/v) of ethanol in solution, that was supported by the results of extrinsic fluorescence measurements with the Nile Red dye. Based on the comparison of HSA and BSA Trp and Tyr fluorescence, it was suggested that conformational changes at low ethanol concentration are located in the domain III of albumins, which lacks tryptophan residues. The sensitivity of Tyr fluorescence to domain III alterations was further verified by studying albumins interaction with GdnHCl.

  17. Stochastic thermodynamics of a chemical nanomachine: The channeling enzyme tryptophan synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutchko, Dimitri; Eisbach, Maximilian; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    The enzyme tryptophan synthase is characterized by a complex pattern of allosteric interactions that regulate the catalytic activity of its two subunits and opening or closing of their ligand gates. As a single macromolecule, it implements 13 different reaction steps, with an intermediate product directly channeled from one subunit to another. Based on experimental data, a stochastic model for the operation of tryptophan synthase has been earlier constructed [D. Loutchko, D. Gonze, and A. S. Mikhailov, J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 2179 (2016)]. Here, this model is used to consider stochastic thermodynamics of such a chemical nanomachine. The Gibbs energy landscape of the internal molecular states is determined, the production of entropy and its flow within the enzyme are analyzed, and the information exchange between the subunits resulting from allosteric cross-regulations and channeling is discussed.

  18. Rapid Phytotransformation of Benzotriazole Generates Synthetic Tryptophan and Auxin Analogs in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeFevre, Gregory H; Müller, Claudia E; Li, Russell Jingxian; Luthy, Richard G; Sattely, Elizabeth S

    2015-09-15

    Benzotriazoles (BTs) are xenobiotic contaminants widely distributed in aquatic environments and of emerging concern due to their polarity, recalcitrance, and common use. During some water reclamation activities, such as stormwater bioretention or crop irrigation with recycled water, BTs come in contact with vegetation, presenting a potential exposure route to consumers. We discovered that BT in hydroponic systems was rapidly (approximately 1-log per day) assimilated by Arabidopsis plants and metabolized to novel BT metabolites structurally resembling tryptophan and auxin plant hormones; 60% of BT. Glycosylated BT was excreted by the plants into the hydroponic medium, a phenomenon not observed previously. The observed amino acid metabolites are likely formed when tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes substitute synthetic BT for native indolic molecules, generating potential phytohormone mimics. These results suggest that BT metabolism by plants could mask the presence of BT contamination in the environment. Furthermore, BT-derived metabolites are structurally related to plant auxin hormones and should be evaluated for undesirable biological effects.

  19. Stochastic thermodynamics of a chemical nanomachine: The channeling enzyme tryptophan synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutchko, Dimitri; Eisbach, Maximilian; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2017-01-14

    The enzyme tryptophan synthase is characterized by a complex pattern of allosteric interactions that regulate the catalytic activity of its two subunits and opening or closing of their ligand gates. As a single macromolecule, it implements 13 different reaction steps, with an intermediate product directly channeled from one subunit to another. Based on experimental data, a stochastic model for the operation of tryptophan synthase has been earlier constructed [D. Loutchko, D. Gonze, and A. S. Mikhailov, J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 2179 (2016)]. Here, this model is used to consider stochastic thermodynamics of such a chemical nanomachine. The Gibbs energy landscape of the internal molecular states is determined, the production of entropy and its flow within the enzyme are analyzed, and the information exchange between the subunits resulting from allosteric cross-regulations and channeling is discussed.

  20. Multiresponse optimization of a UPLC method for the simultaneous determination of tryptophan and 15 tryptophan-derived compounds using a Box-Behnken design with a desirability function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyaningsih, Widiastuti; Saputro, Irfan E; Carrera, Ceferino A; Palma, Miguel; Barroso, Carmelo G

    2017-06-15

    A Box-Behnken design was used in conjunction with multiresponse optimization based on the desirability function to carry out the simultaneous separation of tryptophan and 15 derivatives by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography. The gradient composition of the mobile phase and the flow rate were optimized with respect to the resolution of severely overlapping chromatographic peaks and the total run time. Two different stationary phases were evaluated (hybrid silica and a solid-core-based C18 column). The methods were validated and a suitable sensitivity was found for all compounds in the concentration range 1-100μgL-1 (R2>0.999). High levels of repeatability and intermediate precision (CV less than 0.25% and 1.7% on average for the retention time and the signal area, respectively) were obtained. The new method was applied to the determination tryptophan and its derivatives in black pigmented glutinous and non-glutinous rice grain samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Altered Placental Tryptophan Metabolism: A Crucial Molecular Pathway for the Fetal Programming of Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does...disorders such as ASD. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Autism, placenta, tryptophan, serotonin, kynurenine, maternal immune activation, fetal brain 16...Several reference genes were tested, and TPB was found to be the most stable between treatment groups and time points in our samples. In order for

  2. Inflammation-related disorders in the tryptophan catabolite pathway in depression and somatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George; Maes, Michael; Berk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A recent study--comparing those with depression, somatization, comorbid depression+somatization, and controls--showed specific changes in the tryptophan catabolite (TRYCAT) pathway in somatization, specifically lowered tryptophan and kynurenic acid, and increased kynurenine/kynurenic acid (KY/KA) and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios. These findings suggest that somatization and depression with somatization are characterized by increased activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and disorders in kynurenine aminotransferase activity, which carry a neurotoxic potential. This chapter reviews the evidence that the TRYCAT pathway may play a pathophysiological role in the onset of somatization and depression with somatization and, furthermore, suggests treatment options based on identified pathophysiological processes. Lowered plasma tryptophan may be associated with enhanced pain, autonomic nervous system responses, gut motility, peripheral nerve function, ventilation, and cardiac dysfunctions. The imbalance in the KY/KA ratio may increase pain, intestinal hypermotility, and peripheral neuropathy through effects of KY and KA acid, both centrally and peripherally, at the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), G-protein-coupled receptor-35 (GPR35), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHr). These alterations in the TRYCAT pathway in somatization and depression may interface with the role of the mu-opioid, serotonin, and oxytocin systems in the regulation of stress reactions and early attachment. It is hypothesized that irregular parenting and insecure attachment paralleled by chronic stress play a key role in the expression of variations in the TRYCAT pathway-both centrally and peripherally-driving the etiology of somatization through interactions with the mu-opioid receptors. Therefore, the TRYCAT pathway, NMDARs, GPR35, and AHrs may be new drug targets in somatization and depression with somatizing. We lastly review new pathophysiologically driven drug candidates for somatization

  3. Serum Levels of Tryptophan, 5-Hydroxytryptophan and Serotonin in Patients Affected with Different Forms of Amenorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Comai

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Tryptophan (Trp is present in the serum, partly bound to albumine and in the free form. The unbound portion of circulating tryptophan has the property of crossing the hematoencephalic barrier and being converted within the brain into serotonin (5-HT through the enzymatic processes of hydroxylation and decarboxylation. The serotoninergic system plays an important role in neuroendocrine control of reproductive hormone secretion, and in particular, it may influence GnRH pulsatility, a function essential for reproductive processes. In this study, we analysed serum levels of tryptophan, serotonin and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP in women with three different forms of amenorrhea: 16 patients were diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, 60 patients with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, and 14 patients with hyperprolactinemia. Data were compared with those of a group of 25 healthy women. Serum Trp levels were significantly (P ≤ 0.05 lower in the anorexic (11.64 ± 0.53 µg/ml, mean ± S.E. than in the control (12.98 ± 0.37 µg/ml groups. In addition, in the anorexic group a statistical dispersion of Trp values was shown indicating a bimodal data distribution suggesting the existence of two different subgroups of patients. Regarding 5-HTP, an increase of its serum level was observed in all the groups with amenorrhea with the highest value in hyperprolactinemic patients. On the contrary, no statistical differences in serum 5-HT levels among the four analyzed groups were observed. This study shows that women affected by various forms of amenorrhea present an altered metabolism of tryptophan via serotonin and, in particular, markedly high differences are observed between the two subgroups of anorexic patients.

  4. Complete phenotypic recovery of an Alzheimer's disease model by a quinone-tryptophan hybrid aggregation inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Scherzer-Attali

    Full Text Available The rational design of amyloid oligomer inhibitors is yet an unmet drug development need. Previous studies have identified the role of tryptophan in amyloid recognition, association and inhibition. Furthermore, tryptophan was ranked as the residue with highest amyloidogenic propensity. Other studies have demonstrated that quinones, specifically anthraquinones, can serve as aggregation inhibitors probably due to the dipole interaction of the quinonic ring with aromatic recognition sites within the amyloidogenic proteins. Here, using in vitro, in vivo and in silico tools we describe the synthesis and functional characterization of a rationally designed inhibitor of the Alzheimer's disease-associated beta-amyloid. This compound, 1,4-naphthoquinon-2-yl-L-tryptophan (NQTrp, combines the recognition capacities of both quinone and tryptophan moieties and completely inhibited Abeta oligomerization and fibrillization, as well as the cytotoxic effect of Abeta oligomers towards cultured neuronal cell line. Furthermore, when fed to transgenic Alzheimer's disease Drosophila model it prolonged their life span and completely abolished their defective locomotion. Analysis of the brains of these flies showed a significant reduction in oligomeric species of Abeta while immuno-staining of the 3(rd instar larval brains showed a significant reduction in Abeta accumulation. Computational studies, as well as NMR and CD spectroscopy provide mechanistic insight into the activity of the compound which is most likely mediated by clamping of the aromatic recognition interface in the central segment of Abeta. Our results demonstrate that interfering with the aromatic core of amyloidogenic peptides is a promising approach for inhibiting various pathogenic species associated with amyloidogenic diseases. The compound NQTrp can serve as a lead for developing a new class of disease modifying drugs for Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Predictive and prognostic role of serum neopterin and tryptophan breakdown in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Renate; Fritz, Josef; Heidegger, Isabel; Steiner, Eberhard; Culig, Zoran; Klocker, Helmut; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2017-04-01

    The γ-interferon-induced enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and GTP-cyclohydrolase are key players in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We quantified serum levels of neopterin and tryptophan breakdown (tryptophan, kynurenine, and kynurenine-to-tryptophan ratio) in addition to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in newly diagnosed prostate cancer (PCa) patients (n = 100) before radical prostatectomy (RP) as well as at time of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after RP (n = 50) in comparison to healthy men (n = 49). Effects of biomarkers on the risk of PCa diagnosis on transrectal biopsy, worse histopathological characteristics of the RP specimens, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) after BCR were investigated. Neopterin (hazard ratio [HR], 2.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-5.61; P = 0.032) and kynurenine (HR, 2.93; 95% CI, 1.26-6.79; P = 0.012) levels were univariately associated with CSS. When adjusted for other biomarkers, only neopterin remained an independent predictor of CSS (HR, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.07-6.12; P = 0.035). Only PSA was associated with an increased risk of PCa diagnosis on biopsy, univariately (odds ratio, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.68-5.88; P tryptophan breakdown cannot be considered as biomarkers in detecting PCa or in predicting worse final pathological findings, neopterin levels are useful for stratifying patients into different prognostic groups after BCR. © 2017 The Authors Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  6. Calcium-Induced Conformational Transition of Trout Ependymins Monitored by Tryptophan Fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Ganss, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Ependymins are secretory, calcium-binding sialoproteins which are the predominant constituents of the cerebrospinal fluid of many teleost fish. A bound form of these regeneration-responsive glycoproteins is associated with collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix. Here, the tryptophan fluorescence of ependymins was monitored at various Ca2+ concentrations. Two distinct states were identified with a relatively sharp transition at about 1 mM Ca2+. In agreement with previous circular dichroi...

  7. Dietary l-tryptophan leaves a lasting impression on the brain and the stress response

    OpenAIRE

    Höglund, Erik; Øverli, Øyvind; Åberg Andersson, Madelene; Silva, Patricia Isabel da Mota E.; Laursen, Danielle Caroline; Moltesen, Maria M; Krogdahl, Åshild; Schjolden, Joachim; Winberg, Svante; Vindas, Marco A; Mayer, Ian; Hillestad, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Comparative models suggest that effects of dietary tryptophan (Trp) on brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) neurochemistry and stress responsiveness are present throughout the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, hypothalamic 5-HT seems to play a central role in control of the neuroendocrine stress axis in all vertebrates. Still, recent fish studies suggest long-term effects of dietary Trp on stress responsiveness, which are independent of hypothalamic 5-HT. Here, we investigated if dietary T...

  8. Dynamic Allostery Mediated by a Conserved Tryptophan in the Tec Family Kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Chopra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk is a Tec family non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a critical role in immune signaling and is associated with the immunological disorder X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA. Our previous findings showed that the Tec kinases are allosterically activated by the adjacent N-terminal linker. A single tryptophan residue in the N-terminal 17-residue linker mediates allosteric activation, and its mutation to alanine leads to the complete loss of activity. Guided by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results, we have employed Molecular Dynamics simulations, Principal Component Analysis, Community Analysis and measures of node centrality to understand the details of how a single tryptophan mediates allostery in Btk. A specific tryptophan side chain rotamer promotes the functional dynamic allostery by inducing coordinated motions that spread across the kinase domain. Either a shift in the rotamer population, or a loss of the tryptophan side chain by mutation, drastically changes the coordinated motions and dynamically isolates catalytically important regions of the kinase domain. This work also identifies a new set of residues in the Btk kinase domain with high node centrality values indicating their importance in transmission of dynamics essential for kinase activation. Structurally, these node residues appear in both lobes of the kinase domain. In the N-lobe, high centrality residues wrap around the ATP binding pocket connecting previously described Catalytic-spine residues. In the C-lobe, two high centrality node residues connect the base of the R- and C-spines on the αF-helix. We suggest that the bridging residues that connect the catalytic and regulatory architecture within the kinase domain may be a crucial element in transmitting information about regulatory spine assembly to the catalytic machinery of the catalytic spine and active site.

  9. Gonadal hormone levels and platelet tryptophan and serotonin concentrations in perimenopausal women with or without depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Ramos, Mónica; Moreno, Julia; Heinze, Gerhard; Aguilera-Pérez, Rafael; Pellicer Graham, Francisco

    2014-03-01

    The etiology of depressive symptoms associated with the transition to menopause is still unknown; hormonal changes, serotonergic system or insomnia, could be a trigger to depressive symptomatology. The aim of the present study was to evaluate gonadal hormonal levels, platelet serotonin concentrations and platelet tryptophan concentrations in a group of depressed perimenopausal women and their healthy counterparts. A total of 63 perimenopausal women between 45 and 55 years old were evaluated; of these, 44 were depressed patients, and 19 were perimenopausal women without depression. The instruments that were applied included the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and the Green Climacteric Scale (GCS); gonadal hormone levels and platelet tryptophan and serotonin concentrations were measured in all participants. Differences in hormonal levels and tryptophan and serotonin concentrations were evaluated with respect to specific symptoms, such as insomnia, hot flashes, nervousness, depressed mood and loss of interest. No differences between groups were observed with respect to hormonal levels and tryptophan and serotonin concentrations; mean sleep hours and insomnia were significantly correlated with platelet tryptophan concentrations. In this sample, all symptoms of depression could not be explained by platelet tryptophan and serotonin concentrations and hormonal levels; differences were observed only when we evaluated insomnia and hot flashes.

  10. Identification of potential sites for tryptophan oxidation in recombinant antibodies using tert-butylhydroperoxide and quantitative LC-MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Hensel

    Full Text Available Amino acid oxidation is known to affect the structure, activity, and rate of degradation of proteins. Methionine oxidation is one of the several chemical degradation pathways for recombinant antibodies. In this study, we have identified for the first time a solvent accessible tryptophan residue (Trp-32 in the complementary-determining region (CDR of a recombinant IgG1 antibody susceptible to oxidation under real-time storage and elevated temperature conditions. The degree of light chain Trp-32 oxidation was found to be higher than the oxidation level of the conserved heavy chain Met-429 and the heavy chain Met-107 of the recombinant IgG1 antibody HER2, which have already been identified as being solvent accessible and sensitive to chemical oxidation. In order to reduce the time for simultaneous identification and functional evaluation of potential methionine and tryptophan oxidation sites, a test system employing tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP and quantitative LC-MS was developed. The optimized oxidizing conditions allowed us to specifically oxidize the solvent accessible methionine and tryptophan residues that displayed significant oxidation in the real-time stability and elevated temperature study. The achieved degree of tryptophan oxidation was adequate to identify the functional consequence of the tryptophan oxidation by binding studies. In summary, the here presented approach of employing TBHP as oxidizing reagent combined with quantitative LC-MS and binding studies greatly facilitates the efficient identification and functional evaluation of methionine and tryptophan oxidation sites in the CDR of recombinant antibodies.

  11. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Matthew J.; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R.; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D.; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I. Martha

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32. PMID:25969535

  12. Tripping up Trp: Modification of protein tryptophan residues by reactive oxygen species, modes of detection, and biological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Deterding, Leesa J; Mason, Ronald P

    2015-12-01

    Proteins comprise a majority of the dry weight of a cell, rendering them a major target for oxidative modification. Oxidation of proteins can result in significant alterations in protein molecular mass such as breakage of the polypeptide backbone and/or polymerization of monomers into dimers, multimers, and sometimes insoluble aggregates. Protein oxidation can also result in structural changes to amino acid residue side chains, conversions that have only a modest effect on protein size but can have widespread consequences for protein function. There are a wide range of rate constants for amino acid reactivity, with cysteine, methionine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan having the highest rate constants with commonly encountered biological oxidants. Free tryptophan and tryptophan protein residues react at a diffusion-limited rate with hydroxyl radical and also have high rate constants for reactions with singlet oxygen and ozone. Although oxidation of proteins in general and tryptophan residues specifically can have effects detrimental to the health of cells and organisms, some modifications are neutral, whereas others contribute to the function of the protein in question or may act as a signal that damaged proteins need to be replaced. This review provides a brief overview of the chemical mechanisms by which tryptophan residues become oxidized, presents both the strengths and the weaknesses of some of the techniques used to detect these oxidative interactions, and discusses selected examples of the biological consequences of tryptophan oxidation in proteins from animals, plants, and microbes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The Relation Between Thermodynamic and Structural Properties and Cellular Uptake of Peptides Containing Tryptophan and Arginine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shirani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs are used for delivering drugs and other macromolecular cargo into living cells. In this paper, we investigated the relationship between the structural/physicochemical properties of four new synthetic peptides containing arginine-tryptophan in terms of their cell membrane penetration efficiency. Methods: The peptides were prepared using solid phase synthesis procedure using FMOC protected amino acids. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence imaging were used to evaluate uptake efficiency. Prediction of the peptide secondary structure and estimation of physicochemical properties was performed using the GOR V method and MPEx 3.2 software (Wimley-White scale, helical wheel projection and total hydrophobic moment. Results: Our data showed that the uptake efficiency of peptides with two tryptophans at the Cand N-terminus were significantly higher (about 4-fold than that of peptides containing three tryptophans at both ends. The distribution of arginine at both ends also increased the uptake efficiency 2.52- and 7.18-fold, compared with arginine distribution at the middle of peptides. Conclusion: According to the obtained results the value of transfer free energies of peptides from the aqueous phase to membrane bilayer could be a good predictor for the cellular uptake efficiency of CPPs.

  14. Differential effects of LSD serotonin and l-tryptophan on visually evoked responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahlendorf, J C; Goldstein, F J; Rossi, G V; Malseed, R T

    1982-01-01

    Alterations in photically-evoked cortical responses were assessed in immobilized artificially respired cats following intraraphe microinjections of LSD and serotonin (5-HT) and IV administration of LSD and l-tryptophan. Both systemic (10-100 micrograms/kg; N = 5) and intraraphe (0.25 microgram; N = 10) LSD significantly increased the amplitudes of the three primary components of the visual evoked response (VER). In contrast, the same VER components were significantly depressed following intraraphe 5-HT (30 micrograms; N = 4) and IV l-tryptophan (100 mg/kg; N = 6), a serotonin precursor that elevates raphe 5-HT levels. Intraraphe cinanserin (180 micrograms; 30 minute pretreatment) completely reversed LSD-induced enhancements in all three components (p less than 0.01). Depressions of VER following intraraphe 5-HT (30 micrograms) were also antagonized by cinanserin, although to lesser degree (p less than 0.05 for first 2 components only) than with LSD. The depressive effects of l-tryptophan (100 mg/kg) were unaffected by cinanserin. Modification of raphe neuronal activity can significantly alter photically evoked responses, and may explain the perceptual disturbances associated with LSD, i.e., depression of an area (raphe) normally inhibiting forebrain areas of the visual system.

  15. The Influence of Dietary Protein Intake on Mammalian Tryptophan and Phenolic Metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Poesen

    Full Text Available Although there has been increasing interest in the use of high protein diets, little is known about dietary protein related changes in the mammalian metabolome. We investigated the influence of protein intake on selected tryptophan and phenolic compounds, derived from both endogenous and colonic microbial metabolism. Furthermore, potential inter-species metabolic differences were studied. For this purpose, 29 healthy subjects were allocated to a high (n = 14 or low protein diet (n = 15 for 2 weeks. In addition, 20 wild-type FVB mice were randomized to a high protein or control diet for 21 days. Plasma and urine samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for measurement of tryptophan and phenolic metabolites. In human subjects, we observed significant changes in plasma level and urinary excretion of indoxyl sulfate (P 0.004 and P 0.001, and in urinary excretion of indoxyl glucuronide (P 0.01, kynurenic acid (P 0.006 and quinolinic acid (P 0.02. In mice, significant differences were noted in plasma tryptophan (P 0.03, indole-3-acetic acid (P 0.02, p-cresyl glucuronide (P 0.03, phenyl sulfate (P 0.004 and phenylacetic acid (P 0.01. Thus, dietary protein intake affects plasma levels and generation of various mammalian metabolites, suggesting an influence on both endogenous and colonic microbial metabolism. Metabolite changes are dissimilar between human subjects and mice, pointing to inter-species metabolic differences with respect to protein intake.

  16. The Potential Role of Cannabinoids in Modulating Serotonergic Signaling by Their Influence on Tryptophan Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar Fuchs

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Phytocannabinoids present in Cannabis plants are well known to exert potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Previously, we have demonstrated that the psychoactive D9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and the non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD modulate mitogen-induced Th1-type immune responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. The suppressive effect of both cannabinoids on mitogen-induced tryptophan degradation mediated by indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, suggests an additional mechanism by which antidepressive effects of cannabinoids might be linked to the serotonergic system. Here, we will review the role of tryptophan metabolism in the course of cell mediated immune responses and the relevance of cannabinoids in serotonergic signaling. We conclude that in particular the non-psychotropic CBD might be useful for the treatment of mood disorders in patients with inflammatory diseases, since this cannabinoid seems to be safe and its effects on activation-induced tryptophan degradation by CBD were more potent as compared to THC.

  17. An oxidized tryptophan facilitates copper binding in Methylococcus capsulatus-secreted protein MopE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helland, Ronny; Fjellbirkeland, Anne; Karlsen, Odd Andre; Ve, Thomas; Lillehaug, Johan R; Jensen, Harald B

    2008-05-16

    Proteins can coordinate metal ions with endogenous nitrogen and oxygen ligands through backbone amino and carbonyl groups, but the amino acid side chains coordinating metals do not include tryptophan. Here we show for the first time the involvement of the tryptophan metabolite kynurenine in a protein metal-binding site. The crystal structure to 1.35 angstroms of MopE* from the methane-oxidizing Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) provided detailed information about its structure and mononuclear copper-binding site. MopE* contains a novel protein fold of which only one-third of the structure displays similarities to other known folds. The geometry around the copper ion is distorted tetrahedral with one oxygen ligand from a water molecule, two histidine imidazoles (His-132 and His-203), and at the fourth distorted tetrahedral position, the N1 atom of the kynurenine, an oxidation product of Trp-130. Trp-130 was not oxidized to kynurenine in MopE* heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, nor did this protein bind copper. Our findings indicate that the modification of tryptophan to kynurenine and its involvement in copper binding is an innate property of M. capsulatus MopE*.

  18. Tryptophan PET Imaging of the Kynurenine Pathway in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R. Guastella BS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence demonstrates the immunosuppressive kynurenine pathway’s (KP role in the pathophysiology of human gliomas. To study the KP in vivo, we used the noninvasive molecular imaging tracer α-[11C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT. The AMT-positron emission tomography (PET has shown high uptake in high-grade gliomas and predicted survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM. We generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX models from dissociated cells, or tumor fragments, from 5 patients with GBM. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were imaged with AMT-PET, and tumors were analyzed to detect the KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO 1, IDO2, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase, and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Overall, PET imaging showed robust tumoral AMT uptake in PDX mice with prolonged tracer accumulation over 60 minutes, consistent with AMT trapping seen in humans. Immunostained tumor tissues demonstrated positive detection of multiple KP enzymes. Furthermore, intracranial implantation of GBM cells was performed with imaging at both 9 and 14 days postimplant, with a marked increase in AMT uptake at 14 days and a corresponding high level of tissue immunostaining for KP enzymes. These results indicate that our PDX mouse models recapitulate human GBM, including aberrant tryptophan metabolism, and offer an in vivo system for development of targeted therapeutics for patients with GBM.

  19. Insights into transport mechanism from LeuT engineered to transport tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piscitelli, Chayne L.; Gouaux, Eric (Oregon HSU)

    2012-01-10

    LeuT is a bacterial homologue of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family and, being the only NSS member to have been structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography, is a model protein for studying transporter structure and mechanism. Transport activity in LeuT was hypothesized to require structural transitions between open-to-out and occluded conformations dependent upon protein:ligand binding complementarity. Here, using crystallographic and functional analysis, we show that binding site modification produces changes in both structure and activity that are consistent with complementarity-dependent structural transitions to the occluded state. The mutation I359Q converts the activity of tryptophan from inhibitor to transportable substrate. This mutation changes the local environment of the binding site, inducing the bound tryptophan to adopt a different conformer than in the wild-type complex. Instead of trapping the transporter open, tryptophan binding now allows the formation of an occluded state. Thus, transport activity is correlated to the ability of the ligand to promote the structural transition to the occluded state, a step in the transport cycle that is dependent on protein:ligand complementarity in the central binding site.

  20. Tryptophan PET Imaging of the Kynurenine Pathway in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastella, Anthony R; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Klinger, Neil V; Kupsky, William J; Polin, Lisa A; Muzik, Otto; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the immunosuppressive kynurenine pathway's (KP) role in the pathophysiology of human gliomas. To study the KP in vivo, we used the noninvasive molecular imaging tracer α-[(11)C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT). The AMT-positron emission tomography (PET) has shown high uptake in high-grade gliomas and predicted survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from dissociated cells, or tumor fragments, from 5 patients with GBM. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were imaged with AMT-PET, and tumors were analyzed to detect the KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, IDO2, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase, and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Overall, PET imaging showed robust tumoral AMT uptake in PDX mice with prolonged tracer accumulation over 60 minutes, consistent with AMT trapping seen in humans. Immunostained tumor tissues demonstrated positive detection of multiple KP enzymes. Furthermore, intracranial implantation of GBM cells was performed with imaging at both 9 and 14 days postimplant, with a marked increase in AMT uptake at 14 days and a corresponding high level of tissue immunostaining for KP enzymes. These results indicate that our PDX mouse models recapitulate human GBM, including aberrant tryptophan metabolism, and offer an in vivo system for development of targeted therapeutics for patients with GBM. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Mechanisms and kinetics of tryptophan N-nitrosation in a gastro-intestinal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Pomélie, Diane; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique; Gatellier, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    The reaction of nitrite with different amino acids containing secondary amino groups was tested under simulated in-vitro conditions of the digestive tract. After treatment, tryptophan was the only amino acid that exhibited specific UV absorbance of nitrosamines at 335nm, supporting the assumption that it is the main source of endogenous nitrosamines. The combined effect of pH (from 2 to 6.5) and nitrite (from 0.1 to 20mM) was analyzed and the mechanisms and kinetic laws of tryptophan N-nitrosation were determined. The model was then completed by the addition of iron and various antioxidants in concentrations reflecting different diets. The results clearly demonstrated that, in the presence of iron, large amounts of N-nitroso-tryptophan can be formed even at neutral pH, as in the intestine. Antioxidants (ascorbic acid, trolox C, β carotene, chlorogenic acid, phytic acid and butylated-hydroxytoluene) had various impacts on the extent of N-nitrosation, depending on the iron level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of Tryptophan Fluorescence Bandwidth-Maximum Plot in Analysis of Monoclonal Antibody Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Yen; Hsieh, Ming-Ching; Zhou, Qinwei

    2017-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become the fastest growing protein therapeutics in recent years. The stability and heterogeneity pertaining to its physical and chemical structures remain a big challenge. Tryptophan fluorescence has been proven to be a versatile tool to monitor protein tertiary structure. By modeling the tryptophan fluorescence emission envelope with log-normal distribution curves, the quantitative measure can be exercised for the routine characterization of monoclonal antibody overall tertiary structure. Furthermore, the log-normal deconvolution results can be presented as a two-dimensional plot with tryptophan emission bandwidth vs. emission maximum to enhance the resolution when comparing samples or as a function of applied perturbations. We demonstrate this by studying four different monoclonal antibodies, which show the distinction on emission bandwidth-maximum plot despite their similarity in overall amino acid sequences and tertiary structures. This strategy is also used to demonstrate the tertiary structure comparability between different lots manufactured for one of the monoclonal antibodies (mAb2). In addition, in the unfolding transition studies of mAb2 as a function of guanidine hydrochloride concentration, the evolution of the tertiary structure can be clearly traced in the emission bandwidth-maximum plot.

  3. Effect of sodium saccharin and L-tryptophan on rat urine during bladder carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, D M; Fukushima, S; Cohen, S M

    1981-01-01

    We examined several parameters of urine excretion during a two-year initiation-promotion experiment in male Fischer rats using four weeks of N-[4-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazoly]formamide at 0.2% of the diet as the initiating agent and either 5% sodium saccharin or 2% L-tryptophan in the diet as promoting agents. Rats fed sodium saccharin increased their intake of water; this was accompanied by diarrhea and an increased urinary volume. Osmolality was decreased slightly. The total amount of sodium excreted was increased, although the concentration in the urine was similar to that of the controls or slightly increased. No abnormalities were observed in urinary potassium, calcium, urea, or other parameters measured except for the pH, which was slightly increased during the first three months of the experiment. There was no increase in the size or concentration of crystals in the urine of rats fed sodium saccharin, and no calculi were observed. Hypoglycemia and hypoglycosuria were present in sodium saccharin-fed rats and to a lesser extent in L-tryptophan-fed rats. No other abnormalities were seen in the urine of rats fed L-tryptophan. These data suggest that none of the urinary factors measured in our experiment, including crystal and calculus formation, correlated with the induction of urinary bladder lesions by sodium saccharin.

  4. Separation of tryptophan enantiomers by ligand-exchange chromatography with novel chiral ionic liquids ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Haiqun; Jiang, Xinyu; Yu, Jingang

    2014-03-01

    Chiral ionic liquids (CILs) with amino acids as cations have been applied as novel chiral ligands coordinated with Cu(2+) to separate tryptophan enantiomers in ligand exchange chromatography. Four kinds of amino acid ionic liquids, including [L-Pro][CF3COO], [L-Pro][NO3], [L-Pro]2[SO4], and [L-Phe][CF3COO] were successfully synthesized and used for separation of tryptophan enantiomers. To optimize the separation conditions, [L-Pro][CF3COO] was selected as the model ligand. Some factors influencing the efficiency of chiral separation, such as copper ion concentration, CILs concentration, methanol ratio (methanol/H2O, v/v), and pH, were investigated. The obtained optimal separation conditions were as follows: 8.0 mmol/L Cu(OAc)2, 4.0 mmol/L [L-Pro][CF3COO], and 20% (v/v) methanol at pH 3.6. Under the optimum conditions, acceptable enantioseparation of tryptophan enantiomers could be observed with a resolution of 1.89. The results demonstrate the good applicability of CILs with amino acids as cations for chiral separation. Furthermore, a comparative study was also conducted for exploring the mechanism of the CILs as new ligands in ligand exchange chromatography. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. CENPA overexpression promotes genome instability in pRb-depleted human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lentini Laura

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aneuploidy is a hallmark of most human cancers that arises as a consequence of chromosomal instability and it is frequently associated with centrosome amplification. Functional inactivation of the Retinoblastoma protein (pRb has been indicated as a cause promoting chromosomal instability as well centrosome amplification. However, the underlying molecular mechanism still remains to be clarified. Results Here we show that pRb depletion both in wild type and p53 knockout HCT116 cells was associated with the presence of multipolar spindles, anaphase bridges, lagging chromosomes and micronuclei harbouring whole chromosomes. In addition aneuploidy caused by pRb acute loss was not affected by p53 loss. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR showed that pRB depletion altered expression of genes involved in centrosome duplication, kinetochore assembly and in the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC. However, despite MAD2 up-regulation pRb-depleted cells seemed to have a functional SAC since they arrested in mitosis after treatments with mitotic poisons. Moreover pRb-depleted HCT116 cells showed BRCA1 overexpression that seemed responsible for MAD2 up-regulation. Post-transcriptional silencing of CENPA by RNA interference, resulting in CENP-A protein levels similar to those present in control cells greatly reduced aneuploid cell numbers in pRb-depleted cells. Conclusion Altogether our findings indicate a novel aspect of pRb acute loss that promotes aneuploidy mainly by inducing CENPA overexpression that in turn might induce micronuclei by affecting the correct attachment of spindle microtubules to kinetochores.

  6. Differential effect of the 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region on emotional eating during stress exposure following tryptophan challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, C Rob; Verschoor, Ellen; Smeets, Tom

    2012-04-01

    Stress and negative moods, which are thought to be partly mediated by reduced brain serotonin function, often increase emotional eating in dieting women (restrainers). Because the short (S) allele polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) is associated with serotonin dysfunction, S allele compared to long (L) allele 5-HTTLPR genotypes may be more susceptible to stress-induced emotional eating. Consequently, serotonin challenge via tryptophan (TRP)-rich protein hydrolysate (TPH) may alleviate stress-induced emotional eating particularly in S/S allele carriers. We tested whether acute stress affects emotional eating in women with high or low dietary restraints depending on their 5-HTTLPR genotype and TPH intake. Nineteen female subjects who were homozygous for the short-allele 5-HTTLPR genotype (S'/S'=S/L(G), L(G)/L(G): restrainers vs. nonrestrainers) and 23 female subjects who were homozygous for the long-allele 5-HTTLPR genotype (L'/L'=L(A)/L(A): restrainers vs. nonrestrainers) were tested in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study of stress-induced emotional eating following intake of TPH or a placebo. TPH intake significantly increased the plasma TRP/large neutral amino acid ratio (Pstress-induced negative mood (P=.037) and the desire for sweet, high-fat foods (P=.011) regardless of dietary restraint. Since TPH caused a greater increase in the plasma TRP/large neutral amino acid ratio in the L'/L' group compared to S'/S' group, the exclusive beneficial effects of L'/L' genotype may be due to enhanced brain 5-HT function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Endoplasmic-Reticulum Calcium Depletion and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekahli, Djalila; Bultynck, Geert; Parys, Jan B.; De Smedt, Humbert; Missiaen, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an intracellular Ca2+ store not only sets up cytosolic Ca2+ signals, but, among other functions, also assembles and folds newly synthesized proteins. Alterations in ER homeostasis, including severe Ca2+ depletion, are an upstream event in the pathophysiology of many diseases. On the one hand, insufficient release of activator Ca2+ may no longer sustain essential cell functions. On the other hand, loss of luminal Ca2+ causes ER stress and activates an unfolded protein response, which, depending on the duration and severity of the stress, can reestablish normal ER function or lead to cell death. We will review these various diseases by mainly focusing on the mechanisms that cause ER Ca2+ depletion. PMID:21441595

  8. Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

    2000-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

  9. Autonomous Self-Control is Less Depleting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraven, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Autonomously motivated self-control may be less depleting than extrinsically motivated self-control. Participants were asked to not eat cookies and their motivation orientation for resisting that temptation was assessed. Their self-control performance was assessed immediately before and after fighting the temptation. As compared to their baseline performance, participants who avoided eating the cookies for more autonomous performed better at the second measure relative to participants who did not eat for more extrinsic reasons. Mood, arousal, and demographic factors were not related to self-control performance and feelings of autonomy. Overall, it appears that feeling compelled to exert self-control may deplete more strength than having more freedom when exerting self-control. The results may increase our understanding of how self-control strength and feelings of autonomy interact. PMID:18704202

  10. Ecological and corrosion behavior of depleted uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Mirjana D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution with radionuclides, particularly uranium and its decay products is a serious global problem. The current scientific studies estimated that the contamination originating from TENORM, caused by nuclear and non-nuclear technologies, has significantly increased natural level of radioactivity in the last thirty years. During the last decades all the more were talking about the "new pollutant" - depleted uranium (DU, which has been used in anti-tank penetrators because of its high density, penetration and pyrophoric properties. It is estimated that during the Gulf War, the war in Bosnia and Yugoslavia and during the invasion of Iraq, 1.4 million missiles with depleted uranium was fired. During the NATO aggression against the ex Yugoslavia in 1999., 112 locations in Kosovo and Metohija, 12 locations in southern Serbia and two locations in Montenegro were bombed. On this occasion, approximately 10 tons of depleted uranium were entered into the environment, mainly on land, where the degree of contamination ranged from 200 Bq / kg to 235 000 Bq/kg, which is up to 1000 times higher than the natural level. Fourteen years ago there was very little information about the behavior of ecological systems damaged by DU penetrators fired. Today, unfortunately, we are increasingly faced with the ―invisible threat" of depleted uranium, which has a strong radioactive and hemotoxic impact on human health. Present paper provides a detailed overview of the current understanding of corrosion and corrosion behavior of DU and environmental factors that control corrosion, together with indicators of environmental impact in order to highlight areas that need further attention in developing remediation programs.

  11. Quantum depletion of a soliton condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoxiang; Deng, L.; Yan, Jiaren; Hu, Bambi

    2006-09-01

    We present rigorous results on the diagonalization of Bogoliubov Hamiltonian for a soliton condensate. Using the complete and orthonormalized set of eigenfunction for the Bogoliubov de Gennes equations, we calculate exactly the quantum depletion of the condensate and show that two degenerate zero-modes, which originate from a U(1) gauge- and a translational-symmetry breaking of the system, induce the quantum diffusion and transverse instability of the soliton condensate.

  12. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  13. Optical assessment of phytoplankton nutrient depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heath, M.R.; Richardson, Katherine; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The ratio of light absorption at 480 and 665 nm by 90% acetone extracts of marine phytoplankton pigments has been examined as a potential indicator of phytoplankton nutritional status in both laboratory and field studies. The laboratory studies demonstrated a clear relationship between nutritional......-replete and nutrient-depleted cells. The field data suggest that the absorption ratio may be a useful indicator of nutritional status of natural phytoplankton populations, and can be used to augment the interpretation of other data....

  14. Diamagnetism and neutrals depletion in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtman, Amnon; Shinohara, Shunjiro

    2017-10-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical findings [Shinohara et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 122108 (2016)] regarding the pressure balance between a cylindrical plasma, an axial magnetic field, and neutral gas are explored further theoretically. The length of the cylinder is assumed much larger than its radius, so that axial losses are small and cross-field transport is dominant. Conditions for either magnetic pressure or neutral pressure balancing the plasma pressure and an associated coupling parameter, which were identified in the above-mentioned recent study, are examined further. In addition, a second coupling parameter is identified which determines which is larger, the relative change in the magnetic field or the relative change in neutral density. An unexpected nonmonotonic variation of the plasma density with the plasma particle flux is demonstrated. It is shown that for plasma beta close to unity, as plasma generation and plasma particle flux increase, the plasma density surprisingly decreases. This decrease follows a decrease in plasma confinement due to an increased plasma diamagnetism. The effect of the magnetic field on neutral depletion is examined. It is shown that an increase in the magnetic field as the plasma density is kept constant results in a decrease in neutral depletion, while an increase in the magnetic field as the plasma particle flux is kept constant results in constant neutral depletion.

  15. Nutritional Stress Induced by Tryptophan-Degrading Enzymes Results in ATF4-Dependent Reprogramming of the Amino Acid Transporter Profile in Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timosenko, Elina; Ghadbane, Hemza; Silk, Jonathan D; Shepherd, Dawn; Gileadi, Uzi; Howson, Lauren J; Laynes, Robert; Zhao, Qi; Strausberg, Robert L; Olsen, Lars R; Taylor, Stephen; Buffa, Francesca M; Boyd, Richard; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2016-11-01

    Tryptophan degradation is an immune escape strategy shared by many tumors. However, cancer cells' compensatory mechanisms remain unclear. We demonstrate here that a shortage of tryptophan caused by expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) resulted in ATF4-dependent upregulation of several amino acid transporters, including SLC1A5 and its truncated isoforms, which in turn enhanced tryptophan and glutamine uptake. Importantly, SLC1A5 failed to be upregulated in resting human T cells kept under low tryptophan conditions but was enhanced upon cognate antigen T-cell receptor engagement. Our results highlight key differences in the ability of tumor and T cells to adapt to tryptophan starvation and provide important insights into the poor prognosis of tumors coexpressing IDO and SLC1A5. Cancer Res; 76(21); 6193-204. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Acute Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your cough ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when people ...

  17. Revisiting the tryptophan-serotonin deficiency and the inflammatory hypotheses of major depression in a biopsychosocial approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Baranyi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this cross-sectional study was to identify important biopsychosocial correlates of major depression. Biological mechanisms, including the inflammatory and the tryptophan-serotonin deficiency hypotheses of major depression, were investigated alongside health-related quality of life, life satisfaction, and social support. Methods The concentrations of plasma tryptophan, plasma kynurenine, plasma kynurenic acid, serum quinolinic acid, and the tryptophan breakdown to kynurenine were determined alongside health-related quality of life (Medical Outcome Study Form, SF-36, life satisfaction (Life Satisfaction Questionnaire, FLZ, and social support (Social Support Survey, SSS in 71 depressive patients at the time of their in-patient admittance and 48 healthy controls. Results Corresponding with the inflammatory hypothesis of major depression, our study results suggest a tryptophan breakdown to kynurenine in patients with major depression, and depressive patients had a lower concentration of neuroprotective kynurenic acid in comparison to the healthy controls (Mann–Whitney-U: 1315.0; p = 0.046. Contradicting the inflammatory theory, the concentrations of kynurenine (t: −0.945; df = 116; p = 0.347 and quinolinic acid (Mann-Whitney-U: 1376.5; p = 0.076 in depressive patients were not significantly different between depressed and healthy controls. Our findings tend to support the tryptophan-serotonin deficiency hypothesis of major depression, as the deficiency of the serotonin precursor tryptophan in depressive patients (t: −3.931; df = 116; p < 0.001 suggests dysfunction of serotonin neurotransmission. A two-step hierarchical linear regression model showed that low tryptophan concentrations, low social support (SSS, occupational requirements (FLZ, personality traits (FLZ, impaired physical role (SF-36, and impaired vitality (SF-36 predict higher Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II scores. Discussion Our study results

  18. Tryptophan-enriched cereal intake improves nocturnal sleep, melatonin, serotonin, and total antioxidant capacity levels and mood in elderly humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, R; Matito, S; Cubero, J; Paredes, S D; Franco, L; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, A B; Barriga, C

    2013-08-01

    Melatonin and serotonin rhythms, which exhibit a close association with the endogenous circadian component of sleep, are attenuated with increasing age. This decrease seems to be linked to sleep alterations in the elderly. Chrononutrition is a field of chronobiology that establishes the principle of consuming foodstuffs at times of the day when they are more useful for health, improving, therefore, biorhythms and physical performance. Our aim was to analyze whether the consumption of cereals enriched with tryptophan, the precursor of both serotonin and melatonin, may help in the reconsolidation of the sleep/wake cycle and counteract depression and anxiety in 35 middle-aged/elderly (aged 55-75 year) volunteers in a simple blind assay. Data were collected for 3 weeks according to the following schedule: The control week participants consumed standard cereals (22.5 mg tryptophan in 30 g cereals per dose) at breakfast and dinner; for the treatment week, cereals enriched with a higher dose of tryptophan (60 mg tryptophan in 30 g cereals per dose) were eaten at both breakfast and dinner; the posttreatment week volunteers consumed their usual diet. Each participant wore a wrist actimeter that logged activity during the whole experiment. Urine was collected to analyze melatonin and serotonin urinary metabolites and to measure total antioxidant capacity. The consumption of cereals containing the higher dose in tryptophan increased sleep efficiency, actual sleep time, immobile time, and decreased total nocturnal activity, sleep fragmentation index, and sleep latency. Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels, and urinary total antioxidant capacity also increased respectively after tryptophan-enriched cereal ingestion as well as improving anxiety and depression symptoms. Cereals enriched with tryptophan may be useful as a chrononutrition tool for alterations in the sleep/wake cycle due to age.

  19. Twins labeling-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry based metabolomics for absolute quantification of tryptophan and its key metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huimin; Jiao, Yu; Wang, Xu; Lu, Tao; Zhang, Zunjian; Xu, Fengguo

    2017-06-30

    Tryptophan metabolism plays a crucial role in mediating gastrointestinal function. Here, in order to absolutely quantify tryptophan and its metabolites, a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based targeted metabolomics approach was developed using N-dimethyl-/N-diethyl-amino naphthalene-1-sulfonyl chloride (Dns/Dens-Cl) as twins labeling (TL) reagents. Dns-Cl is famous in amine and phenol derivations, and structure is similar with Dens-Cl. The introduction of easily protonated moiety of tertiary ammonium-containing part in the derivatives from Dns to tryptophan and its metabolites not only improved the LC separation but also enhanced their MS response. In addition, the Dens labeled standards were used as internal standards to compensate for matrix effects and ensure accurate quantifications. With the proposed method, twelve metabolites in tryptophan pathway could be detected at sub-ng/mL levels using only 20μL rat serum (the limit of detection could reach 3pg/mL for tryptamine, N-acetyl-serotonin and 6-hydroxymelatonin). The sensitivity was enhanced about 1-2 orders of magnitude compared with non-derivatization method. Focusing on tryptophan pathway, the method was successfully applied to determine the absolute serum concentrations of twelve tryptophan metabolites in a vincristine-induced ileus rat model. A significant down-regulation of the tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway and up-regulation of serotonin pathway were uncovered. Our findings provide a deeper insight into the mechanism of gastrointestinal dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Revisiting the tryptophan-serotonin deficiency and the inflammatory hypotheses of major depression in a biopsychosocial approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyi, Andreas; Amouzadeh-Ghadikolai, Omid; von Lewinski, Dirk; Breitenecker, Robert J; Rothenhäusler, Hans-Bernd; Robier, Christoph; Baranyi, Maria; Theokas, Simon; Meinitzer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to identify important biopsychosocial correlates of major depression. Biological mechanisms, including the inflammatory and the tryptophan-serotonin deficiency hypotheses of major depression, were investigated alongside health-related quality of life, life satisfaction, and social support. The concentrations of plasma tryptophan, plasma kynurenine, plasma kynurenic acid, serum quinolinic acid, and the tryptophan breakdown to kynurenine were determined alongside health-related quality of life (Medical Outcome Study Form, SF-36), life satisfaction (Life Satisfaction Questionnaire, FLZ), and social support (Social Support Survey, SSS) in 71 depressive patients at the time of their in-patient admittance and 48 healthy controls. Corresponding with the inflammatory hypothesis of major depression, our study results suggest a tryptophan breakdown to kynurenine in patients with major depression, and depressive patients had a lower concentration of neuroprotective kynurenic acid in comparison to the healthy controls (Mann-Whitney-U: 1315.0; p = 0.046). Contradicting the inflammatory theory, the concentrations of kynurenine (t: -0.945; df = 116; p = 0.347) and quinolinic acid (Mann-Whitney-U: 1376.5; p = 0.076) in depressive patients were not significantly different between depressed and healthy controls. Our findings tend to support the tryptophan-serotonin deficiency hypothesis of major depression, as the deficiency of the serotonin precursor tryptophan in depressive patients (t: -3.931; df = 116; p model showed that low tryptophan concentrations, low social support (SSS), occupational requirements (FLZ), personality traits (FLZ), impaired physical role (SF-36), and impaired vitality (SF-36) predict higher Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) scores. Our study results argue for the validity of a biopsychosocial model of major depression with multiple pathophysiological mechanisms involved.

  1. A simple two step procedure for purification of the catalytic domain of chicken tryptophan hydroxylase 1 in a form suitable for crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Petersen, Charlotte R.; Munch, Astrid

    2008-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) [EC 1.14.16.4] catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan, which is the first and rate-determining step in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin. We have expressed the catalytic domain of chicken (Gallus gallus) TPH isoform 1 in Escheri......Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) [EC 1.14.16.4] catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan, which is the first and rate-determining step in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin. We have expressed the catalytic domain of chicken (Gallus gallus) TPH isoform 1...

  2. Frontline Science: Tryptophan restriction arrests B cell development and enhances microbial diversity in WT and prematurely aging Ercc1-/Δ7 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Adriaan A; Hugenholtz, Floor; Meijer, Ben; Sovran, Bruno; Perdijk, Olaf; Vermeij, Wilbert P; Brandt, Renata M C; Barnhoorn, Sander; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; de Vos, Paul; Leenen, Pieter J M; Hendriks, Rudi W; Savelkoul, Huub F J

    2017-04-01

    With aging, tryptophan metabolism is affected. Tryptophan has a crucial role in the induction of immune tolerance and the maintenance of gut microbiota. We, therefore, studied the effect of dietary tryptophan restriction in young wild-type (WT) mice (118-wk life span) and in DNA-repair deficient, premature-aged (Ercc1-/Δ7 ) mice (20-wk life span). First, we found that the effect of aging on the distribution of B and T cells in bone marrow (BM) and in the periphery of 16-wk-old Ercc1-/Δ7 mice was comparable to that in 18-mo-old WT mice. Dietary tryptophan restriction caused an arrest of B cell development in the BM, accompanied by diminished B cell frequencies in the periphery. In general, old Ercc1-/Δ7 mice showed similar responses to tryptophan restriction compared with young WT mice, indicative of age-independent effects. Dietary tryptophan restriction increased microbial diversity and made the gut microbiota composition of old Ercc1-/Δ7 mice more similar to that of young WT mice. The decreased abundances of Alistipes and Akkermansia spp. after dietary tryptophan restriction correlated significantly with decreased B cell precursor numbers. In conclusion, we report that dietary tryptophan restriction arrests B cell development and concomitantly changes gut microbiota composition. Our study suggests a beneficial interplay between dietary tryptophan, B cell development, and gut microbial composition on several aspects of age-induced changes. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  3. The urinary ratio of 3-hydroxykynurenine/3-hydroxyanthranilic acid is an index to predicting the adverse effects of D-tryptophan in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Katsumi; Ohno, Tomoaki; Sano, Mitsue; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The adverse effects of D-tryptophan and the possibility of it being a surrogate index for predicting adverse effects in rats were investigated. Male rats were fed one of several test diets (20% casein diets with 0% (control), 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%, 0.4%, and 0.5% D-tryptophan) for 21 d, and 24-h urine samples on the final day of the experiment were collected. Analyses of food intake and body-weight changes revealed adverse effects to be observed in the group fed the 0.3% D-tryptophan diet. We propose urinary levels of 3-hydroxykynurenine/3-hydroxyanthranilic acid to be surrogate indicators for predicting the adverse effects of D-tryptophan from the break point of body-weight gains and urinary levels of D-tryptophan metabolites. The reaction 3-hydroxykynurenine→3-hydroxyanthranilic acid is catalyzed by the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme kynureninase. Increasing urinary 3-hydrokykynurenine indicates kynureninase deficiency. Intake of D-tryptophan in rats fed the 0.3% D-tryptophan diet was 0.21 g/kg body weight and feeding of the 0.3% D-tryptophan diet did not elicit adverse effects. Thus, the safe level of D-tryptophan was less than 0.2% in the diet, 0.15 g/kg body weight, in rats.

  4. Long-range depletion forces induced by associating small molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoben, W.; Besseling, N.A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first report of experimental observations of depletion interactions in solutions of a (hydrogen-bonded) reversible supramolecular polymer. Depletion forces were measured directly by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. The range of the depletion force is consistent with existing

  5. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  6. 26 CFR 1.642(e)-1 - Depreciation and depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Depreciation and depletion. 1.642(e)-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(e)-1 Depreciation and depletion. An estate or trust is allowed the deductions for depreciation and depletion, but only to the extent the...

  7. Contamination with depleted or enriched uranium differently affects steroidogenesis metabolism in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignard, Elise; Gueguen, Yann; Grison, Stephane; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A; Gourmelon, Patrick; Souidi, Maamar

    2008-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring heavy metal found in the Earth's crust. It is an alpha-emitter radioactive element from the actinide group that presents both radiotoxicant and chemotoxicant properties. Some studies revealed that uranium could affect the reproductive system. To distinguish chemical versus radiological effects of uranium on the metabolism of the steroids in the testis, rats were contaminated via their drinking water with depleted or enriched uranium. Animals were exposed to radionuclides for 9 months at a dose of 40 mg/L (560 Bq/L for depleted uranium, 1680 Bq/L for enriched uranium). Whereas depleted uranium did not seem to significantly affect the production of testicular steroid hormones in rats, enriched uranium significantly increased the level of circulating testosterone by 2.5-fold. Enriched uranium contamination led to significant increases in the mRNA levels of StAR (Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein; 3-fold, p = .001), cyp11a1 (cytochrome P45011a1; 2.2-fold, p modified following enriched uranium contamination. Altogether, these results show for the first time a differential effect among depleted or enriched uranium contamination on testicular steroidogenesis. It appears that the deleterious effects of uranium are mainly due to the radiological activity of the compound.

  8. Depletion of alveolar macrophages in CD11c diphtheria toxin receptor mice produces an inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lydia M; Ledvina, Hannah E; Tuladhar, Shraddha; Rana, Deepa; Steele, Shaun P; Sempowski, Gregory D; Frelinger, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages play a critical role in initiating the immune response to inhaled pathogens and have been shown to be the first cell type infected following intranasal inoculation with several pathogens, including Francisella tularensis. In an attempt to further dissect the role of alveolar macrophages in the immune response to Francisella, we selectively depleted alveolar macrophages using CD11c.DOG mice. CD11c.DOG mice express the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) under control of the full CD11c promoter. Because mice do not express DTR, tissue restricted expression of the primate DTR followed by treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT) has been widely used as a tool in immunology to examine the effect of acute depletion of a specific immune subset following normal development. We successfully depleted alveolar macrophages via intranasal administration of DT. However, alveolar macrophage depletion was accompanied by many other changes to the cellular composition and cytokine/chemokine milieu in the lung that potentially impact innate and adaptive immune responses. Importantly, we observed a transient influx of neutrophils in the lung and spleen. Our experience serves as a cautionary note to other researchers using DTR mice given the complex changes that occur following DT treatment that must be taken into account when analyzing data. PMID:26029367

  9. Regular moderate or intense exercise prevents depression-like behavior without change of hippocampal tryptophan content in chronically tryptophan-deficient and stressed mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosung Lee

    Full Text Available Regular exercise has an antidepressant effect in human subjects. Studies using animals have suggested that the antidepressant effect of exercise is attributable to an increase of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; however, the precise mechanism underlying the antidepressant action via exercise is unclear. In contrast, the effect of 5-HT on antidepressant activity has not been clarified, in part because the therapeutic response to antidepressant drugs has a time lag in spite of the rapid increase of brain 5-HT upon administration of these drugs. This study was designed to investigate the contribution of brain 5-HT to the antidepressant effect of exercise. Mice were fed a tryptophan-deficient diet and stressed using chronic unpredictable stress (CUS for 4 weeks with or without the performance of either moderate or intense exercise on a treadmill 3 days per week. The findings demonstrated that the onset of depression-like behavior is attributable not to chronic reduction of 5-HT but to chronic stress. Regular exercise, whether moderate or intense, prevents depression-like behavior with an improvement of adult hippocampal cell proliferation and survival and without the recovery of 5-HT. Concomitantly, the mice that exercised showed increased hippocampal noradrenaline. Regular exercise prevents the impairment of not long-term memory but short-term memory in a 5-HT-reduced state. Together, these findings suggest that: (1 chronic reduction of brain 5-HT may not contribute to the onset of depression-like behavior; (2 regular exercise, whether moderate or intense, prevents the onset of chronic stress-induced depression-like behavior independent of brain 5-HT and dependent on brain adrenaline; and (3 regular exercise prevents chronic tryptophan reduction-induced impairment of not long-term but short-term memory.

  10. Depletion of Ammonia Gas onto Jovian Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, T.; Wong, M. H.; Marschall, J.; de Pater, I.; Romani, P. N.; Kalogerakis, K.

    2010-12-01

    The altitude profile of ammonia in Jupiter’s atmosphere, as constrained by microwave spectra, is poorly understood. The microwave spectrum of Jupiter is consistent with supersolar ammonia deeper than 6 bar, and subsolar ammonia at pressures less than 2 bar. In addition, the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer measured a deep NH3/H2 mixing ratio of approximately five times the protosolar ratio. Consequently, a global-scale depletion mechanism for ammonia gas can be anticipated, operating between the 2 and 6 bar levels. Candidate depletion mechanisms include dynamics, condensation of species with higher nitrogen fractions than NH4SH (including clathrates), and adsorption of ammonia onto NH4SH or water ices. Measured uptake coefficients of ammonia provide valuable constraints for model calculations testing the ammonia depletion hypothesis in Jupiter’s atmosphere. We have begun laboratory experiments designed to measure the uptake of ammonia by H2O and H2O-NH4SH ice mixtures with a Knudsen cell apparatus in the temperature range 130-250 K. These conditions are appropriate to the troposphere of Jupiter around the 2-4 bar pressure level. Initial results show that the uptake coefficient is larger than 10-4 in this temperature range. We also plan model calculations to apply the experimental results to Jupiter's atmosphere and will discuss the key parameters and processes that influence the ammonia uptake and their relevance to Jupiter's atmosphere. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program under grant NNX09AB69G.

  11. Ozone depletion: implications for the veterinarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopecky, K E

    1978-09-15

    Man has inadvertently modified the stratosphere. There is a good possibility that the ozone layer is being depleted by the use of jet aircraft (SST), chlorofluoromethane propellants, and nitrogen fertilizers. Under unpolluted conditions, the production of ozone equals its destruction. By man's intervention, however, the destruction may exceed the production. The potential outcome is increased intensity of solar ultraviolet (280-400 nm) radiation and penetration to the earth's surface of previously absorbed wavelengths below about 280 nm. The increased ultraviolet radiation would increase the likelihood of skin cancer in man and ocular squamous cell carcinoma in cattle. The climate also might be modified, possibly in an undesirable way.

  12. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  13. Correlation between cosmic rays and ozone depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Q-B

    2009-03-20

    This Letter reports reliable satellite data in the period of 1980-2007 covering two full 11-yr cosmic ray (CR) cycles, clearly showing the correlation between CRs and ozone depletion, especially the polar ozone loss (hole) over Antarctica. The results provide strong evidence of the physical mechanism that the CR-driven electron-induced reaction of halogenated molecules plays the dominant role in causing the ozone hole. Moreover, this mechanism predicts one of the severest ozone losses in 2008-2009 and probably another large hole around 2019-2020, according to the 11-yr CR cycle.

  14. Scientific assessment of ozone depletion: 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer and the influence of changes in chemical composition of the radiative balance of the climate system. Specifically, since the last international scientific review (1989), there have been five major advances: (1) global ozone decreases; (2) polar ozone; (3) ozone and industrial halocarbons; (4) ozone and climate relations; and (5) ozone depletion potentials (ODP's) and global warming potentials (GWP's). These topics and others are discussed.

  15. Heatstroke Pathophysiology: The Energy Depletion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-12

    Pathophysiology: The Energy Depletion Model Roger W. Hubbard, Ph.D., Director Heat Research Division U. S. Army Research Institute of Environmental...Medicine Natick, MA 01760-5007 USA Send correspondence to: Roger W. Hubbard, Ph.D. Director Heat Research Division USARIEM Kansas St Natick, MA 01760...The NaK-Pump. Part B: Celular Asoects J.C. Skou, J.G. Normy, A.B. Maunsback, and M. Esmann (Eds) New York: Alan R. Uss, 1988, pp. 171-194. 54: Lewis

  16. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy on lithographic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westphal, Volker [Department of NanoBiophotonics, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany); Seeger, Jens [Institut fuer Roentgenphysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany); Salditt, Tim [Institut fuer Roentgenphysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany); Hell, Stefan W [Department of NanoBiophotonics, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany)

    2005-05-14

    Stimulated emission, predicted by Albert Einstein in 1917, not only prepared the grounds for the invention of the laser, but also for a far-field fluorescence microscopy with diffraction-unlimited resolution. In stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, stimulated emission is not used for light amplification but for a saturated quenching of the fluorescence emission. After demonstrating a five-fold improvement of the lateral (x and y) resolution over the diffraction barrier, we apply STED microscopy to nanostructures of stained PMMA. For the first time, periodic line structures of 80 nm width and 40 nm gaps are resolved with focused visible light.

  17. Seasonal iron depletion in temperate shelf seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchill, Antony J.; Milne, Angela; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.; Harris, Carolyn; Annett, Amber; Rusiecka, Dagmara; Achterberg, Eric P.; Gledhill, Martha; Ussher, Simon J.; Worsfold, Paul J.; Geibert, Walter; Lohan, Maeve C.

    2017-09-01

    Our study followed the seasonal cycling of soluble (SFe), colloidal (CFe), dissolved (DFe), total dissolvable (TDFe), labile particulate (LPFe), and total particulate (TPFe) iron in the Celtic Sea (NE Atlantic Ocean). Preferential uptake of SFe occurred during the spring bloom, preceding the removal of CFe. Uptake and export of Fe during the spring bloom, coupled with a reduction in vertical exchange, led to Fe deplete surface waters (supply from remineralized sinking organic material, and cycled independently of particulate Fe over seasonal timescales. These results demonstrate that summer Fe availability is comparable to the seasonally Fe limited Ross Sea shelf and therefore is likely low enough to affect phytoplankton growth and species composition.

  18. Tryptophan interactions with glycerol/water and trehalose/sucrose cryosolvents: infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashnau, Jennifer L; Zelent, Bogumil; Vanderkooi, Jane M

    2005-04-01

    In order to correlate how the solvent affects emission properties of tryptophan, the fluorescence and phosphorescence emission spectra of tryptophan and indole model compounds were compared for solid sugar glass (trehalose/sucrose) matrix and glycerol/water solution and under the same conditions, these matrices were examined by infrared spectroscopy. Temperature was varied from 290 to 12 K. In sugar glass, the fluorescence and phosphorescence emission spectra are constant over this temperature range and the fluorescence remains red shifted; these results are consistent with the static interaction of OH groups with tryptophan in the sugar glass. In sugar glass containing water, the water retains mobility over the entire temperature range as indicated by the HOH infrared bending frequency. The fluorescence of tryptophan in glycerol/water shifts to the blue as temperature decreases and the frequency change of the absorption of the HOH bend mode is larger than in the sugar glass. These results suggest rearrangement of glycerol and water molecules over the entire temperature change. Shifts in the fluorescence emission maximum of indole and tryptophan were relatively larger than shifts for the phosphorescence emission-as expected for the relatively smaller excited triplet state dipole for tryptophan. The fluorescence emission of tryptophan in glycerol/water at low temperature has maxima at 312, 313, and 316 nm at pH 1.4, 7.0, and 10.6, respectively. The spectral shifts are interpreted to be an indication of a charge, or Stark phenomena, effect on the excited state molecule, as supported by ab initio calculations. To check whether the amino acid remains charged over the temperature range, the infrared spectrum of alanine was monitored over the entire range of temperature. The ratio of infrared absorption characteristic of carboxylate/carbonyl was constant in glycerol/water and sugar glass, which indicates that the charge was retained. Tryptophan buried in proteins, namely

  19. Molecular recognition of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Wataru; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2009-05-01

    The identity elements of transfer RNA are the molecular basis for recognition by each cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. In the archaea system, the tryptophan tRNA identity has not been determined in detail. To investigate the molecular recognition mechanism of tryptophan tRNA by tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) from the hyperthermophilic and aerobic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, various mutant transcripts of tryptophan tRNA prepared by an in vitro transcription system were examined by overexpression of A. pernix TrpRS. Substitution of the discriminator base, A73, impaired tryptophan incorporation activity. Changing the G1-C72 base pair to other base pairs also decreased the aminoacylation activity. Substitutions of anticodon CCA revealed that the C34 and C35 mutants dramatically reduced aminoacylation with tryptophan, but the A36 mutants had the same activity as the wild type. The results indicate that the anticodon nucleotides C34, C35, discriminator base A73 and G1-C72 base pair are major recognition sites for A. pernix TrpRS.

  20. Unravelling the Intricacy of the Crowded Environment through Tryptophan Quenching in Lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyanka; Chowdhury, Pramit K

    2017-05-11

    Global conformational modulation of proteins in the presence of crowding agents is well-known. In this work, using the intrinsic tryptophan (Trp) residues of lysozyme, we have studied the effect of the crowding agents on the local conformation of this biomolecule. In presence of the macromolecular crowder Dextran 6, considerable quenching of tryptophan fluorescence was observed, which we have attributed to the enhanced proximity of the surrounding charged residues arising from local perturbation of protein structure. Accessibility of the Trp residues in the presence of crowders as a function of thermal and chemical denaturation has also been monitored using the traditional quenchers, acrylamide and iodide. Quenching in the presence of the crowding agents had to be modeled predominantly using the sphere-of-action model, with the sphere-of-volume "V" being postulated to be a signature of the cage-like environments that can exist in the solutions of such polymeric macromolecular crowding agents. Moreover, percolation of the quencher molecules through the entangled crowder systems was observed to be dependent on the micropolarity of the specific crowding agent being studied, with the neutral quencher acrylamide exhibiting maximum quenching in the presence of Dextran 6, while iodide being charged, exhibits higher quenching efficiency when Dextran 70 was the crowder. Additionally, control studies with the free amino acid tryptophan suggest that the variation in quenching so observed is not only due to the changes in the conformation of lysozyme and hence accessibility of the Trp residues but is also dictated by the underlying details and complexity of the crowder solutions to an appreciable extent.

  1. Tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene polymorphism in anxiety and depressive disorder in kashmiri population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Raheel; Shoib, Sheikh; Shah, Tabindah; Mushtaq, Sahil

    2014-06-01

    The gene of tryptophan hydroxylase is widely recognized as a major candidate gene in many psychiatric disorders. However, no study has been done which investigates tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene polymorphism in anxiety and depressive disorders in Kashmiri population (India). To study tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) C 11993 A gene polymorphism in anxiety and depressive disorders. Sixty patients of depression disorder, 60 patients of anxiety disorder and 40 unrelated healthy volunteers (control) were studied in a case control design. Polymorphism was determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and agarose gel electrophoresis after digestion with HAP II enzyme. Genotypes and allele frequencies were compared using Chi-square tests, Fischer's exact test, odds ratio, 95% confidence interval (C.I) and p-value of <0.05 was considered to be statistical significant. The mean age ± SD of anxiety, depression and control group was 32.73±10.99, 32.20±10 and 29.75±10.12 respectively and the difference was found to be statistically non significant (p=0.349).The mean HAM-A (Hamilton rating scale for anxiety) score and HAM-D (Hamilton rating scale for depression) score was high in both groups (anxiety and depression) and found to be statistically significant (p=0.001).Depression group had AA genotype (55.2%) than control (37.5%) and was found to be statistically non significant (p=0.890).Comparison of allelic frequency revealed no association of A allele in anxiety group (76.67%) compared with control (75.5%) and was found to be statistically non significant (p= 0.866), OR 1.09 (0.56-2.11). TPH2C 11993 A gene was not found to be associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorder in Kashmiri population.

  2. Tryptophan catabolism and immune activation in primary and chronic HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi, Marco; Hartling, Hans J; Ueland, Per M; Ullum, Henrik; Trøseid, Marius; Nielsen, Susanne D

    2017-05-16

    Kynurenine/Tryptophan ratio (KTR) is increased in HIV infection, and linked to immune activation. We hypothesized that early cART initiation results in lower KTR compared to late initiation. Furthermore, we hypothesized that KTR prior to cART is a predictor of the magnitude of subsequent reduction in immune activation. Prospective study including 57 HIV-infected individuals (primary HIV infection (N = 14), early presenters (>350 CD4+ T cells/μL, N = 24), late presenters (tryptophan were analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Total CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were determined and proportion of activated CD38 + HLA-DR+ Tcells was measured using flow cytometry at baseline and after 6 and 12 months of cART. At baseline, primary HIV infection had higher KTR than early presenters. However, similar KTR in primary HIV infection and early presenters was found after cART initiation, while late presenters had higher KTR at all time points. In primary HIV infection and early presenters, KTR was positively associated with proportion of activated cells at baseline. Furthermore, in early presenters the KTR at baseline was associated with proportion of activated cells after 6 and 12 months. Interestingly, in primary HIV infection the KTR at baseline was positively associated with reduction in proportion of CD8 + CD38 + HLA-DR T cells after 6 and 12 months. Lower kynurenine/tryptophan ratio during follow-up was found after early initiation of cART. KTR in primary HIV infection and early presenters was positively associated with immune activation. Importantly, KTR in primary HIV infection predicted the magnitude of subsequent reduction in immune activation. Thus, a beneficial effect of early cART on KTR was suggested.

  3. The Role of Amino Acid Permeases and Tryptophan Biosynthesis in Cryptococcus neoformans Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, João Daniel Santos; Martho, Kevin; Tofik, Veridiana; Vallim, Marcelo A.; Pascon, Renata C.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic diversity is an important factor during microbial adaptation to different environments. Among metabolic processes, amino acid biosynthesis has been demonstrated to be relevant for survival for many microbial pathogens, whereas the association between pathogenesis and amino acid uptake and recycling are less well-established. Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen with many habitats. As a result, it faces frequent metabolic shifts and challenges during its life cycle. Here we studied the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and found that the pathway is essential. RNAi indicated that interruptions in the biosynthetic pathway render strains inviable. However, auxotroph complementation can be partially achieved by tryptophan uptake when a non preferred nitrogen source and lower growth temperature are applied, suggesting that amino acid permeases may be the target of nitrogen catabolism repression (NCR). We used bioinformatics to search for amino acid permeases in the C. neoformans and found eight potential global permeases (AAP1 to AAP8). The transcriptional profile of them revealed that they are subjected to regulatory mechanisms which are known to respond to nutritional status in other fungi, such as (i) quality of nitrogen (Nitrogen Catabolism Repression, NCR) and carbon sources (Carbon Catabolism Repression, CCR), (ii) amino acid availability in the extracellular environment (SPS-sensing) and (iii) nutritional deprivation (Global Amino Acid Control, GAAC). This study shows that C. neoformans has fewer amino acid permeases than other model yeasts, and that these proteins may be subjected to complex regulatory mechanisms. Our data suggest that the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway is an excellent pharmacological target. Furthermore, inhibitors of this pathway cause Cryptococcus growth arrest in vitro. PMID:26162077

  4. The Role of Amino Acid Permeases and Tryptophan Biosynthesis in Cryptococcus neoformans Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Daniel Santos Fernandes

    Full Text Available Metabolic diversity is an important factor during microbial adaptation to different environments. Among metabolic processes, amino acid biosynthesis has been demonstrated to be relevant for survival for many microbial pathogens, whereas the association between pathogenesis and amino acid uptake and recycling are less well-established. Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen with many habitats. As a result, it faces frequent metabolic shifts and challenges during its life cycle. Here we studied the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and found that the pathway is essential. RNAi indicated that interruptions in the biosynthetic pathway render strains inviable. However, auxotroph complementation can be partially achieved by tryptophan uptake when a non preferred nitrogen source and lower growth temperature are applied, suggesting that amino acid permeases may be the target of nitrogen catabolism repression (NCR. We used bioinformatics to search for amino acid permeases in the C. neoformans and found eight potential global permeases (AAP1 to AAP8. The transcriptional profile of them revealed that they are subjected to regulatory mechanisms which are known to respond to nutritional status in other fungi, such as (i quality of nitrogen (Nitrogen Catabolism Repression, NCR and carbon sources (Carbon Catabolism Repression, CCR, (ii amino acid availability in the extracellular environment (SPS-sensing and (iii nutritional deprivation (Global Amino Acid Control, GAAC. This study shows that C. neoformans has fewer amino acid permeases than other model yeasts, and that these proteins may be subjected to complex regulatory mechanisms. Our data suggest that the C. neoformans tryptophan biosynthetic pathway is an excellent pharmacological target. Furthermore, inhibitors of this pathway cause Cryptococcus growth arrest in vitro.

  5. Imaging neurotransmitter uptake and depletion in astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, W. [Ames Laboratory-USDOE and Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)]|[Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-7200 (United States); Haydon, P.G. [Department of Zoology and Genetics, Laboratory of Cellular Signaling, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Yeung, E.S. [Ames Laboratory-USDOE and Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    1997-08-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) laser-based optical microscope and charge-coupled device (CCD) detection system was used to obtain chemical images of biological cells. Subcellular structures can be easily seen in both optical and fluorescence images. Laser-induced native fluorescence detection provides high sensitivity and low limits of detection, and it does not require coupling to fluorescent dyes. We were able to quantitatively monitor serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual astrocytes on the basis of its native fluorescence. Different regions of the cells took up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of uptake kinetics. Similarly, we observed different serotonin depletion dynamics in different astrocyte regions. There were also some astrocyte areas where no serotonin uptake or depletion was observed. Potential applications include the mapping of other biogenic species in cells as well as the ability to image their release from specific regions of cells in response to external stimuli. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  6. Halocarbon ozone depletion and global warming potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Richard A.; Wuebbles, D.; Atkinson, R.; Connell, Peter S.; Dorn, H. P.; Derudder, A.; Derwent, Richard G.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Fisher, D.; Isaksen, Ivar S. A.

    1990-01-01

    Concern over the global environmental consequences of fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has created a need to determine the potential impacts of other halogenated organic compounds on stratospheric ozone and climate. The CFCs, which do not contain an H atom, are not oxidized or photolyzed in the troposphere. These compounds are transported into the stratosphere where they decompose and can lead to chlorine catalyzed ozone depletion. The hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs or HFCs), in particular those proposed as substitutes for CFCs, contain at least one hydrogen atom in the molecule, which confers on these compounds a much greater sensitivity toward oxidation by hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere, resulting in much shorter atmospheric lifetimes than CFCs, and consequently lower potential for depleting ozone. The available information is reviewed which relates to the lifetime of these compounds (HCFCs and HFCs) in the troposphere, and up-to-date assessments are reported of the potential relative effects of CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, and halons on stratospheric ozone and global climate (through 'greenhouse' global warming).

  7. Probing the polarity and water environment at the protein-peptide binding interface using tryptophan analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yi-Ting; Chao, Wei-Chih; Kuo, Hsiou-Ting; Shen, Jiun-Yi; Chen, I-Han; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Cheng, Richard P.; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-01-01

    7-Azatryptophan and 2,7-diazatryptophan are sensitive to polarity changes and water content, respectively, and should be ideal for studying protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions. In this study, we replaced the tryptophan in peptide Baa (LKWKKLLKLLKKLLKLG-NH2) with 7-azatryptophan or 2,7-diazatryptophan, forming (7-aza)Trp-Baa and (2,7-aza)Trp-Baa, to study the calmodulin (CaM)-peptide interaction. Dramatic differences in the (7-aza)Trp-Baa and (2,7-aza)Trp-Baa fluorescence properti...

  8. Stereospecific biosynthesis of β-methyltryptophan from (L)-tryptophan features a stereochemical switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yi; Fang, Qi; Yin, Haixing; Liang, Zutao; Kong, Dekun; Bai, Linquan; Deng, Zixin; Lin, Shuangjun

    2013-12-02

    Make the switch: The three-enzyme cassette MarG/H/I is responsible for stereospecific biosynthesis of β-methyltryptophan from L-tryptophan (1). MarG/I convert 1 into (2S,3R)-β-methyltryptophan, while MarG/I combined with MarH convert 1 into (2S,3S)-β-methyltryptophan. MarH serves as a stereochemical switch by catalyzing the stereoinversion of the β-stereocenter. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Dietary tryptophan and threonine supply to 28 days old weaned piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández, José Adalberto; Strathe, Anders Bjerring

    2009-01-01

    The effects of dietary levels of tryptophan (TRP) and threonine (THR) on appetite, growth performance and faecal score were assessed in an experiment with 360 weaned piglets. Littermate male castrates and females (1:1), weaned at 28 days of age, were given free access to feed during 28 days. Six...... dietary treatments were studied involving two levels of Standardised Ileal Digestible (SID) THR (0.59 vs. 0.69 SID THR:LYS) each with three levels of TRP (0.16, 0.19 and 0.22 SID TRP:LYS). Increasing the level of THR depressed (P

  10. Gold-catalyzed direct alkynylation of tryptophan in peptides using TIPS-EBX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely L. Tolnai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The selective functionalization of peptides containing only natural amino acids is important for the modification of biomolecules. In particular, the installation of an alkyne as a useful handle for bioconjugation is highly attractive, but the use of a carbon linker is usually required. Herein, we report the gold-catalyzed direct alkynylation of tryptophan in peptides using the hypervalent iodine reagent TIPS-EBX (1-[(triisopropylsilylethynyl]-1,2-benziodoxol-3(1H-one. The reaction proceeded in 50–78% yield under mild conditions and could be applied to peptides containing other nucleophilic and aromatic amino acids, such as serine, phenylalanine or tyrosine.

  11. Tryptophan Intake in the US Adult Population Is Not Related to Liver or Kidney Function but Is Associated with Depression and Sleep Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2016-12-01

    Tryptophan is an indispensable amino acid and is a precursor of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Tryptophan metabolites, such as serotonin and melatonin, are thought to participate in the regulation of mood and sleep and tryptophan is used to treat insomnia, sleep apnea, and depression. This study examined the intake of tryptophan and its associations with biochemical, behavioral, sleep, and health and safety outcomes in adults in a secondary analysis of a large, publicly available database of the US population. Data from the NHANES 2001-2012 (n = 29,687) were used to determine daily intakes of tryptophan and its associations with biochemical markers of health- and safety-related outcomes, self-reported depression, and sleep-related variables. Data were adjusted for demographic factors and protein intake. Linear trends were computed across deciles of intake for each outcome variable, and P-trends were determined. The usual tryptophan intake by US adults was 826 mg/d, severalfold higher than the Estimated Average Requirement for adults of 4 mg/(kg ⋅ d) (∼280 mg/d for a 70-kg adult). Most health- and safety-related biochemical markers of liver function, kidney function, and carbohydrate metabolism were not significantly (P-trend > 0.05) associated with deciles of tryptophan intake and were well within normal ranges, even for individuals in the 99th percentile of intake. Usual intake deciles of tryptophan were inversely associated with self-reported depression measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire raw score (0-27; P-trend Tryptophan intake was not related to most markers of liver function, kidney function or carbohydrate metabolism. Levels of tryptophan intake in the US population appear to be safe as shown by the absence of abnormal laboratory findings. Tryptophan intake was inversely associated with self-reported level of depression and positively associated with sleep duration. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Invariant natural killer T cells are depleted in renal impairment and recover after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peukert, Konrad; Wingender, Gerhard; Patecki, Margret; Wagner, Stephan; Schmitt, Roland; Ge, Shuwang; Schwarz, Anke; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Haller, Hermann; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2014-05-01

    Altered immune function in patients with renal failure results in both susceptibility to infection and increased inflammatory response. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a conserved, immunoregulatory T lymphocyte subset that responds to lipid antigens with near-immediate cytokine production and cytotoxicity. iNKT cells are required for the antibacterial host response. Whether renal failure and renal replacement therapy alter iNKT cell abundance or phenotype has not been investigated. iNKT cells were studied by flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of patients with acute renal failure, chronic haemo- and peritoneal dialysis (PD), chronic kidney disease and after renal transplantation. A very marked reduction in iNKT lymphocytes was found in acute renal failure before the first haemodialysis (HD) session. iNKT cells were depleted in end-stage renal disease patients receiving either HD or PD. iNKT cell depletion was accentuated after an HD session. Lesser degrees were observed in patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease. CD56 and CD161 NK cell marker expression was decreased in renal impairment. CD56(+) and CD161(+) iNKT cells produced more interferon-γ than negative cells of the same donor. Within the first year after kidney transplantation, the decrease in iNKT cells and their NK cell markers was reverted. We describe for the first time that iNKT lymphocytes are reduced in end-stage renal disease and further depleted by HD. iNKT cells are important for early host response including activation of other immune cells and their depletion may contribute to immune dysfunction in renal disease.

  13. Mantle depletion and metasomatism recorded in orthopyroxene in highly depleted peridotites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, James; Liu, Jingao; Pearson, D. Graham

    2016-01-01

    Although trace element concentrations in clinopyroxene serve as a useful tool for assessing the depletion and enrichment history of mantle peridotites, this is not applicable for peridotites in which the clinopyroxene component has been consumed (~ 25% partial melting). Orthopyroxene persists in ...

  14. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar B. T. Ghisaidoobe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available F resonance energy transfer (FRET occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (\\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{ex}}\\sim\\ nm, \\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{em}}\\sim\\ 350 nm, in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the proteinlocal environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic F resonance energy transfer (iFRET, a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins.

  15. Synchrotron ultraviolet microspectroscopy on rat cortical bone: involvement of tyrosine and tryptophan in the osteocyte and its environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Pallu

    Full Text Available Alcohol induced osteoporosis is characterized by a bone mass decrease and microarchitecture alterations. Having observed an excess in osteocyte apoptosis, we aimed to assess the bone tissue biochemistry, particularly in the osteocyte and its environment. For this purpose, we used a model of alcohol induced osteoporosis in rats. Bone sections of cortical bone were investigated using synchrotron UV-microspectrofluorescence at subcellular resolution. We show that bone present three fluorescence peaks at 305, 333 and 385 nm, respectively corresponding to tyrosine, tryptophan and collagen. We have determined that tyrosine/collagen and tryptophan/collagen ratios were higher in the strong alcohol consumption group. Tryptophan is related to the serotonin metabolism involved in bone formation, while tyrosine is involved in the activity of tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in osteocytes. Our experiment represents the first combined synchrotron UV microspectroscopy analysis of bone tissue with a quantitative biochemical characterization in the osteocyte and surrounding matrix performed separately.

  16. Genetic differences in the Chlamydia trachomatis tryptophan synthase alpha-subunit can explain variations in serovar pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, A C; Christiansen, G; Roepstorff, P

    2000-01-01

    (IFN-gamma) inhibits chlamydial multiplication in human epithelial cells by induction of the tryptophan degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase. IFN-gamma causes persistent C. trachomatis serovar A infections with atypical reticulate bodies that are unable to redifferentiate into elementary bodies...... and show diminished expression of important immunogens, but not of GroEL. However, the sensitivity to IFN-gamma varies among serovars of C. trachomatis. In our previous study significant IFN-gamma-specific, but tryptophan reversible, induction of proteins in C. trachomatis A and L2 with molecular masses......-subunits of the chlamydial tryptophan synthase using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. DNA sequencing of the trpA genes from C. trachomatis A and C shows that the TrpA in these serovars is a 7.7-kDa truncated version of C. trachomatis D and L2 TrpA. The truncation probably impairs the Trp...

  17. Ingestion of branched-chain amino acids and tryptophan during sustained exercise in man: failure to affect performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Raaymakers, J S; Saris, W H

    1995-01-01

    1. An increased uptake of tryptophan in the brain may increase serotoninergic activity and recently has been suggested to be a cause of fatigue during prolonged exercise. The present study, therefore, investigates whether ingestion of tryptophan or the competing branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs......) affect performance. Ten endurance-trained male athletes were studied during cycle exercise at 70-75% maximal power output, while ingesting, ad random and double-blind, drinks that contained 6% sucrose (control) or 6% sucrose supplemented with (1) tryptophan (3 g l-1), (2) a low dose of BCAA (6 g l-1...... or that manipulation of serotoninergic activity functionally does not contribute to mechanisms of fatigue....

  18. Cord blood glutathione depletion in preterm infants: correlation with maternal cysteine depletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Küster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depletion of blood glutathione (GSH, a key antioxidant, is known to occur in preterm infants. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to determine: 1 whether GSH depletion is present at the time of birth; and 2 whether it is associated with insufficient availability of cysteine (cys, the limiting GSH precursor, or a decreased capacity to synthesize GSH. METHODOLOGY: Sixteen mothers delivering very low birth weight infants (VLBW, and 16 mothers delivering healthy, full term neonates were enrolled. Immediately after birth, erythrocytes from umbilical vein, umbilical artery, and maternal blood were obtained to assess GSH [GSH] and cysteine [cys] concentrations, and the GSH synthesis rate was determined from the incorporation of labeled cysteine into GSH in isolated erythrocytes ex vivo, measured using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Compared with mothers delivering at full term, mothers delivering prematurely had markedly lower erythrocyte [GSH] and [cys] and these were significantly depressed in VLBW infants, compared with term neonates. A strong correlation was found between maternal and fetal GSH and cysteine levels. The capacity to synthesize GSH was as high in VLBW as in term infants. CONCLUSION: The current data demonstrate that: 1 GSH depletion is present at the time of birth in VLBW infants; 2 As VLBW neonates possess a fully active capacity to synthesize glutathione, the depletion may arise from inadequate cysteine availability, potentially due to maternal depletion. Further studies would be needed to determine whether maternal-fetal cysteine transfer is decreased in preterm infants, and, if so, whether cysteine supplementation of mothers at risk of delivering prematurely would strengthen antioxidant defense in preterm neonates.

  19. Effects of L-tryptophan, Fructan, and Casein on Reducing Ammonia, Hydrogen Sulfide, and Skatole in Fermented Swine Manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. K. Sheng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of daily dietary Bacillus subtilis (Bs, and adding L-tryptophan, fructan, or casein to fecal fermentation broths were investigated as means to reduce the production of noxious gas during manure fermentation caused by ammonia, hydrogen sulfide (H2S, and 3-methylindole (skatole. Eighty swine (50.0±0.5 kg were equally apportioned to an experimental group given Bs in daily feed, or a control group without Bs. After 6 weeks, fresh manure was collected from both groups for fermentation studies using a 3×3 orthogonal array, in which tryptophan, casein, and fructan were added at various concentrations. After fermentation, the ammonia, H2S, L-tryptophan, skatole, and microflora were measured. In both groups, L-tryptophan was the principle additive increasing skatole production, with significant correlation (r = 0.9992. L-tryptophan had no effect on the production of ammonia, H2S, or skatole in animals fed Bs. In both groups, fructan was the principle additive that reduced H2S production (r = 0.9981. Fructan and Bs significantly interacted in H2S production (p = 0.014. Casein was the principle additive affecting the concentration of ammonia, only in the control group. Casein and Bs significantly interacted in ammonia production (p = 0.039. The predominant bacteria were Bacillus spp. CWBI B1434 (26% in the control group, and Streptococcus alactolyticus AF201899 (36% in the experimental group. In summary, daily dietary Bs reduced ammonia production during fecal fermentation. Lessening L-tryptophan and increasing fructan in the fermentation broth reduced skatole and H2S.

  20. Social isolation rearing in rats alters plasma tryptophan metabolism and is reversed by sub-chronic clozapine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Marisa; Du Preez, Jan L; Emsley, Robin; Harvey, Brian H

    2012-06-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with increased oxidative stress, although the source of this redox disequilibrium requires further study. Altered tryptophan metabolism has been described in schizophrenia, possibly linked to inflammation and glutamate-directed excitotoxicity. Social isolation rearing (SIR) in rats induces various behavioural manifestations akin to schizophrenia, as well as altered frontal cortical glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor binding and increased oxidative stress, all reversed by antipsychotic treatment. Tryptophan is catabolized via the kynurenine pathway to kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, quinolinic acid (QA), kynurenic acid (KYNA), anthranilic acid and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-OHAA), ultimately contributing to neuronal integrity and redox balance in the brain. We studied tryptophan metabolism and neuroprotective-neurodegenerative balance in post-natal SIR rats, and its response to clozapine treatment. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (10 rats/group) were exposed to SIR or social rearing for 8 weeks, whereupon they received either sub-chronic vehicle or clozapine (5 mg/kg i.p) treatment. Plasma tryptophan metabolites were analysed by liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Plasma tryptophan, kynurenine, anthranilic acid, 3-OHAA and QA were significantly elevated in SIR vs. socially housed rats. KYNA and the neuroprotective ratio were significantly decreased. The latter implies a decrease in KYNA (neuroprotective) but an increase in QA (neurodegenerative) directed components of the pathway. Clozapine significantly reversed all the above alterations in SIR animals. Concluding, SIR in rats significantly disrupts tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway with increased risk for neurodegenerative changes in the brain. These changes are reversed by clozapine, emphasising the importance of these findings for the neurobiology and treatment of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights