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Sample records for acute traumatic subdural

  1. Endoscopic Surgery for Traumatic Acute Subdural Hematoma

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    Hiroyuki Kon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH is generally addressed by craniotomy under general anesthesia. We report a patient whose traumatic ASDH was treated under local anesthesia by one-burr-hole endoscopic surgery. This 87-year-old woman had undergone coil embolization for a ruptured right middle-cerebral artery aneurysm and placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for normal pressure hydrocephalus 5 years earlier. Upon admission, she manifested consciousness disturbance after suffering head trauma and right hemiplegia. Her Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 (E2V2M4. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a thick, left-frontotemporal ASDH. Due to her advanced age and poor condition, we performed endoscopic surgery rather than craniotomy to evacuate the ASDH. Under local anesthesia, we made a burr hole in her left forehead and increased its size to 15 mm in diameter. After introducing a transparent sheath into the hematoma cavity with a rigid endoscope, the clot was evacuated with a suction tube. The arterial bleeding point was electrically coagulated. A postoperative CT scan confirmed the reduction of the hematoma. There was neither brain compression nor brain swelling. Her consciousness disturbance and right hemiplegia improved immediately. Endoscopic surgery may represent a viable method to address traumatic intracranial hematomas in some patients.

  2. Frequency of conservatively managed traumatic acute subdural haematoma changing into chronic subdural haematoma

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    Ahmed, E.; Aurangzeb, A.; Khan, S.A.; Ali, A.; Maqbool, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury represents a significant cause of mortality and permanent disability in the adult population. Acute subdural haematoma is one of the conditions most strongly associated with severe brain injury. Knowledge on the natural history of the illness and the outcome of patients conservatively managed may help the neurosurgeon in the decision-making process. Methods: We prospectively analysed 27 patients with age ranges 15-90 years, in whom a CT scan diagnosis of acute subdural haematoma was made, and in whom craniotomy for evacuation was not initially performed, to the neurosurgery department of Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad (2008-2011). Patients with deranged bleeding profile, anticoagulant therapy, chronic liver disease, any other associated intracranial abnormalities, such as cerebral contusions, as shown on CT, were excluded from this study. All patients were followed by serial CT scans, and a neurological assessment was done. Results: There were 18 male and 9 female patients, Cerebral atrophy was present in over half of the sample. In 22 of our patients, the acute subdural haematoma resolved spontaneously, without evidence of damage to the underlying brain, as shown by CT or neurological findings. Four patients subsequently required burr hole drainage for chronic subdural haematoma. In each of these patients, haematoma thickness was greater than 10 mm. The mean delay between injury and operation in this group was 15-21 days. Among these patients 1 patient required craniotomy for haematoma removal due to neurological deterioration. Conclusion: Certain conscious patients with small acute subdural haematomas, without mass effect on CT, may be safely managed conservatively, but due to high risk of these acute subdural haematoma changing into chronic subdural haematoma these patients should be reinvestigated in case of neurological deterioration. (author)

  3. Traumatic acute posterior fossa subdural hematoma – A case report and review of literature

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    Jaiswal Manish

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic subdural hematomas of the posterior fossa are rare but dangerous neurosurgical emergencies that require prompt diagnosis and management to avoid the uniformly poor outcome. We present a case of a teenager with severe TBI and acute subdural hematoma of the posterior fossa that deteriorated rapidly before surgery but eventually made a good recovery. We also the review the literature concerning traumatic posterior fossa subdural hematomas [PFSDH].

  4. Nonsurgical acute traumatic subdural hematoma: what is the risk?

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    Bajsarowicz, Paul; Prakash, Ipshita; Lamoureux, Julie; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Feyz, Mitra; Maleki, Mohammad; Marcoux, Judith

    2015-11-01

    The Brain Trauma Foundation has published guidelines on the surgical management of traumatic subdural hematoma (SDH). However, no data exist on the proportion of patients with SDH that can be selected for conservative management and what is the outcome of these patients. The goals of this study were as follows: 1) to establish what proportion of patients are initially treated conservatively; 2) to determine what proportion of patients will deteriorate and require surgical evacuation; and 3) to identify risk factors associated with deterioration and delayed surgery. All cases of acute traumatic SDH (869 when inclusion criteria were met) presenting over a 4-year period were reviewed. For all conservatively treated SDH, the proportion of delayed surgical intervention and the Glasgow Outcome Scale score were taken as outcome measures. Multiple factors were compared between patients who required delayed surgery and patients without surgery. Of the 869 patients with acute traumatic SDH, 646 (74.3%) were initially treated conservatively. A good outcome was achieved in 76.7% of the patients. Only 6.5% eventually required delayed surgery, and the median delay for surgery was 9.5 days. Factors associated with deterioration were as follows: 1) thicker SDH (p<0.001); 2) greater midline shift (p<0.001); 3) location at the convexity (p=0.001); 4) alcohol abuse (p=0.0260); and 5) history of falls (p=0.018). There was no significant difference in regard to age, sex, Glasgow Coma Scale score, Injury Severity Score, abnormal coagulation, use of blood thinners, and presence of cerebral atrophy or white matter disease. The majority of patients with SDH are treated conservatively. Of those, only 6.5% later required surgery, for raised intracranial pressure or SDH progression. Patients at risk can be identified and followed more carefully.

  5. Predictors for outcome after surgery for traumatic acute subdural hematoma

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    Atanasov Vladimir A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute traumatic subdural hematoma (ASDH is one of the most frequent conditions in neurosurgery demanding emergency surgery. The aim of the study was to identify factors influencing outcome in patients who had surgery for evacuation of ASDH. Methods: From 2005 to 2012 eighty-five patients at age above 18 years had surgery for evacuation of ASDH. Outcome was measured according GOS at discharge and was dichotomized as “favorable outcome” (GOS 4 to 5 and “unfavorable outcome” (GOS 1 to 3. These factors were evaluated with univariate and logistic regression analysis for significance with outcome. Results: The mean age of the 85 patients was 62.7 years (SD±18.5. 45.9% patients were with favorable outcome and 54.1% had unfavorable outcome. Patients with GCS score 3-8 (54.1% had 80.4% unfavorable outcome whereas 78.6% of patients with GCS score 13-15 (32.9% had favorable outcome. All patients with nonreactive pupils (bilaterally or unilaterally - 31.8% had unfavorable outcome whereas patients (36.5% with both reactive pupils (36.5% had in 80.6% favorable outcome. All patients (40% with Rotterdam CT scores 5 and 6 had unfavorable outcome. The factors determining outcome were admission GSC score, Rotterdam CT scores, and prothrombin time. Conclusion: Patients who have GSC score of 3, unresponsive pupil(s or have Rotterdam CT scores 5 and 6 have little chance of survival. Patients with coagulopathy have two times more unfavorable outcome. The patients with ASDH should have surgery as soon as possible after correction of vital parameters in order to avoid deterioration which can be very rapid and irreversible.

  6. Midline shift in relation to thickness of traumatic acute subdural hematoma predicts mortality

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    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Meijer, F.J.; Hoeven, H. van der; Edwards, M.J.; Prokop, M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic acute subdural hematoma has a high mortality despite intensive treatment. Despite the existence of several prediction models, it is very hard to predict an outcome. We investigated whether a specific combination of initial head CT-scan findings is a factor in predicting

  7. Shedding new light on rapidly resolving traumatic acute subdural hematomas.

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    Brooke, Magdalene; Patel, Atul; Castro-Moure, Federico; Victorino, Gregory P

    2017-11-01

    Rapidly resolving acute subdural hematomas (RRASDHs) have been described in case reports and case series but are still poorly understood. We hypothesized that a cohort analysis would confirm previously reported predictors of RRASDH including coagulopathy, additional intracranial hemorrhage, and low-density band on imaging. We also hypothesized that rapid resolution would be associated with improved trauma outcomes. We reviewed all nonoperative acute subdural hematomas (ASDHs) treated at our center from 2011 to 2015. Inclusion criteria were ASDH on computed tomography (CT), admission Glasgow coma score >7, and repeat CT to evaluate ASDH change. RRASDH was defined as reduced hematoma thickness by 50% within 72 h. Clinical data, CT findings, and trauma end points were analyzed for the RRASDH and nonresolving groups. There were 154 ASDH patients included, with 29 cases of RRASDH. The RRASDH group had a lower rate of comorbidities than the nonresolving group (58.6% versus 78.4%, P = 0.03) and a lower rate of prehospital anticoagulation (7.7% versus 37.1%, P = 0.004). Previously reported predictors of RRASDH did not differ between the groups, nor did any clinical outcome measures. When compared with patients who experienced rapid growth (>50% increased width in 72 h), the RRASDH group had lower mortality (3.4% versus 23.5%, P = 0.04). To our knowledge, this is the largest review of RRASDHs. We identified two previously unrecognized factors that may predict resolution; however, previously reported predictors were not associated with resolution. We also found no relationship between RRASDHs and improved standard trauma outcomes, calling into question the clinical significance of RRASDH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Traumatic subdural hematoma in the lumbar spine.

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    Song, Jenn-Yeu; Chen, Yu-Hao; Hung, Kuang-Chen; Chang, Ti-Sheng

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic spinal subdural hematoma is rare and its mechanism remains unclear. This intervention describes a patient with mental retardation who was suffering from back pain and progressive weakness of the lower limbs following a traffic accident. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed a lumbar subdural lesion. Hematoma was identified in the spinal subdural space during an operation. The muscle power of both lower limbs recovered to normal after surgery. The isolated traumatic spinal subdural hematoma was not associated with intracranial subdural hemorrhage. A spinal subdural hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord compression, especially for patients who have sustained spinal trauma. Emergency surgical decompression is usually the optimal treatment for a spinal subdural hematoma with acute deterioration and severe neurological deficits. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Age related outcome in acute subdural haematoma following traumatic head injury.

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    Hanif, S

    2009-09-01

    Acute subdural haematoma (ASDH) is one of the conditions most strongly associated with severe brain injury. Reports prior to 1980 describe overall mortality rates for acute subdural haematomas (SDH\\'s) ranging from 40% to 90% with poor outcomes observed in all age groups. Recently, improved results have been reported with rapid diagnosis and surgical treatment. The elderly are predisposed to bleeding due to normal cerebral atrophy related to aging, stretching the bridging veins from the dura. Prognosis in ASDH is associated with age, time from injury to treatment, presence of pupillary abnormalities, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) or motor score on admission, immediate coma or lucid interval, computerized tomography findings (haematoma volume, degree of midline shift, associated intradural lesion, compression of basal cisterns), post-operative intracranial pressure and type of surgery. Advancing age is known to be a determinant of outcome in head injury. We present the results of a retrospective study carried out in Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland\\'s national neurosurgical centre. The aim of our study was to examine the impact of age on outcome in patients with ASDH following severe head injury. Only cases with acute subdural haematoma requiring surgical evacuation were recruited. Mortality was significantly higher in older patients (50% above 70 years, 25.6% between 40 and 70 years and 26% below 40 years). Overall poor outcome (defined as Glasgow outcome scores 3-5) was also higher in older patients; 74.1% above 70 years, 48% between 40 and 70 years and 30% below 40 years. Poor outcome in traumatic acute subdural haematoma is higher in elderly patients even after surgical intervention.

  10. Traumatic acute subdural haematomas of the posterior fossa: clinicoradiological analysis of 24 patients

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    Avella, D. d'; Conti, A.; Cardali, S.; Tomasello, F.; Servadei, F.; Scerrati, M.; Tomei, G.; Brambilla, G.; Massaro, F.; Stefini, R.; Cristofori, L.

    2003-01-01

    We report 24 patients with a traumatic acute subdural haematoma of the posterior fossa managed between 1997 and 1999 at 8 Italian neurosurgical centres. Each centre provided data about patients clinico-radiological findings, management, and outcomes, which were retrospectively reviewed. A poor result occurred in 14 patients (58.3 %). Ten patients (41.7 %) had favourable results. Patients were divided into two groups according to their admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores. In Group 1 (12/24 cases; GCS score, 8), the outcome was favourable in 75 % of cases. In Group 2 (12/12 cases; GCS score, <8), the outcome was poor in 91.6 % of cases. Nineteen patients underwent posterior fossa surgery. Factors correlating to outcome were GCS score, status of the basal cisterns and the fourth ventricle, and the presence of supratentorial hydrocephalus. Multivariate analysis showed significant independent prognostic effect only for GCS score (P < 0.05). Acute posterior fossa subdural haematomas can be divided into two distinct groups: those patients admitted in a comatose state and those with a moderate/mild head injury on admission. Comatose patients present usually with signs of posterior fossa mass effect and have a high percentage of bad outcomes. On the contrary, patients admitted with a GCS of 8 or higher are expected to recover. In these patients the thickness of the haematoma (< 1 cm) seems to be a guide to indicate surgical evacuation of the haematoma. (author)

  11. Acute infratentorial traumatic subdural hematoma associated with a torn tentorium cerebelli in a one-year-old boy

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    Vielvoye, G.J.; Peters, A.C.B.; Dulken, H. van; Rijksuniversiteit Leiden

    1982-01-01

    The case of a 1-year-old boy with an acute infratentorial subdural hematoma is presented. Surgical intervention revealed a bleeding vein at the edge of a right-sided tentorial tear. Traumatic tentorial tearing has been demonstrated previously only in neonates. Although computed tomography is the most effective method for recognition of this lesion, vertebral angiography may be mandatory for more accurate localization. (orig.)

  12. Hematoma subdural agudo traumático: estudo de 110 pacientes Acute traumatic subdural haematomas: study of 110 cases

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    Nicandro de Figueiredo Neto

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos uma série consecutiva de 110 pacientes com hematoma subdural agudo traumático (HSDA admitidos no serviço de emergência do HBDF no período de 1°-janeiro a 1°-dezembro-1994. Todos os pacientes foram atendidos de acordo com o mesmo protocolo. Houve predominância do sexo masculino (79%, com idade variando entre 14 e 70 anos, sendo os atropelamentos (34% e os acidentes automobilísticos (20% as causas mais comuns. A maioria dos pacientes (85,7% foi admitida muito grave, com 8 pontos ou menos na Escala de Coma Glasgow (ECG, o que influenciou diretamente na mortalidade. A tomografia computadorizada de crânio foi o exame diagnóstico de escolha que mostrou serem as contusões e o inchaço cerebral ("swelling" as lesões intracranianas associadas mais freqüentes. A cirurgia foi realizada em 45,1% dos pacientes, e, em sua maioria, através de craniotomia fronto-têmporo-parietal ampla, com drenagem do hematoma, seguida de plástica da dura-mater. Em 54,9% as condições clínicas não permitiram a realização da cirurgia; neste grupo, cerca de 69,6% estavam em coma profundo à admissão, com 3 pontos na ECG. A letalidade cirúrgica foi de 61,2% e esteve diretamente relacionada à condição clínica inicial e à idade do paciente. A letalidade, incluindo todos os pacientes cirúrgicos e não cirúrgicos com HSDA, mesmo aqueles admitidos já com sinais de falência de tronco cerebral, foi de 79,5%. Além destes pacientes que faleceram, cerca de 7% evoluíram sem seqüelas ou com seqüelas mínimas; outros 11,4% com seqüelas de moderadas a paves e 2,1 % permaneceram em estado vegetativo persistente. Nossos dados estão de acordo com os da literatura no que se refere a elevada taxa de morbidade e mortalidade dos pacientes com HSDA.We report a series of 110 patients with acute traumatic subdural hematoma (ASDH admitted at HBDF emergency within 1994 (January Is1 to December PJ.All patients were treated according to the same protocol

  13. Acute traumatic subdural hematoma in infancy and childhood classification and treatment from CT findings

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    Mochimatsu, Yasuhiko

    1988-11-01

    Acute traumatic subdural hematoma in infancy and childhood has much difference from that in adult on their symptom, clinical course, and indication of surgical treatment. The aim of this study is to examine their clinical course and CT findings just after the injury and to evaluate the treatment modality for types of complex this disease. As the result of these examination, SDH patients are divided into five categories in account of their CT findings, especially according to the relationship between the hemispheric swelling and the amount of SDH. Simple SDH type shows classical clinical course and surgical treatment are frequently essential in rapidly progressive cases. Isodensity hemispheric swelling (IHS) type is more frequently seen in CT findings which shows thin SDH and prominent brain swelling. This IHS (a subtype of diffuse brain injury) type should be recognized for their favourable outcome under conservative treatment. Other three types are; contusion with SDH, acute excerbation of chronic SDH, and battered child. Indication of surgical treatment will be decided considering to the volume of hematomas. (author).

  14. Acute traumatic subdural hematoma in infancy and childhood classification and treatment from CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochimatsu, Yasuhiko

    1988-01-01

    Acute traumatic subdural hematoma in infancy and childhood has much difference from that in adult on their symptom, clinical course, and indication of surgical treatment. The aim of this study is to examine their clinical course and CT findings just after the injury and to evaluate the treatment modality for types of complex this disease. As the result of these examination, SDH patients are divided into five categories in account of their CT findings, especially according to the relationship between the hemispheric swelling and the amount of SDH. Simple SDH type shows classical clinical course and surgical treatment are frequently essential in rapidly progressive cases. Isodensity hemispheric swelling (IHS) type is more frequently seen in CT findings which shows thin SDH and prominent brain swelling. This IHS (a subtype of diffuse brain injury) type should be recognized for their favourable outcome under conservative treatment. Other three types are; contusion with SDH, acute excerbation of chronic SDH, and battered child. Indication of surgical treatment will be decided considering to the volume of hematomas. (author)

  15. Bifrontal acute subdural hematoma

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    Suryapratap Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Though, acute subdural hematoma (ASDH is one of the most common emergencies in neurological surgery practice, bilateral bifrontal ASDH is uncommon and may constitute diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have important roles in the diagnosis of ASDH. We present a case of bifrontal ASDH that was successfully managed in our institution.

  16. MRI findings of traumatic spinal subdural hematoma

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    Jeong, Hyeon Jo; Baek, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yun Suk; Jeong, Sun Ok; Park, Hyun Joo; Jo, Jin Man [Dae rim St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Tae [Inha General Hospital, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-04-01

    To describe the MR imaging findings of traumatic spinal subdural hematoma. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of six patients, with symptoms of acute spinal cord or cauda equena compression after trauma, together with spinal subdural hematoma. We analyzed the extent, location, configuration and signal intensity of the lesions. In five of sex cases, hematomas were distributed extensively throughout the thoracolumbosacral or lumbosacral spinal levels. In five cases they were located in the dorsal portion of the thecal sac, and in one case, in the ventral portion. On axial images, hematomas showed a concave or convex contour, depending on the amount of loculated hematoma. A lobulated appearance was due to limitation of free extension of the hematoma within the subdural space at the lateral sites (nerve root exist zone) at whole spine levels, and at the posteromedian site under lumbar 4-5 levels. In cases of spinal subdural hematoma, the lobulated appearance of hematoma loculation in the subdural space that bounds the lateral sites at al spinal levels and at the posteromedian site under L4-5 levels is a characteristic finding. (author)

  17. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from acute traumatic tentorial subdural hematoma

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    Cui V

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Victoria Cui,1 Timur Kouliev2 1Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA; 2Emergency Department, Beijing United Family Hospital, Beijing, China Abstract: Acute subdural hematoma (SDH resulting from head trauma is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires expedient diagnosis and intervention to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Rapidly expanding or large hematomas, elevated intracranial pressure, and associated complications of brain herniation are associated with high mortality rates and poor recovery of neurological function. However, smaller bleeds (clot thickness <10 mm or hematomas occurring in infrequent locations, such as the tentorium cerebelli, may be difficult to recognize and patients may present with unusual or subtle signs and symptoms, including isolated cranial nerve palsies. Knowledge of neuroanatomy supported by modern neuroimaging can greatly aid in recognition and diagnosis of such lesions. In this report, we present a case of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from compressive tentorial SDH following blunt head trauma, review the literature concerning similar cases, and make recommendations regarding the diagnosis of SDH in patients presenting with isolated cranial nerve palsies. Keywords: head injury, oculomotor, palsy, subdural hematoma, trauma, tentorium, cerebral herniation, intracranial hemorrhage

  18. Relationship between intracranial hypertension and cerebral blood flow after craniotomy in cases with traumatic acute subdural hematoma

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    Karibe, Hiroshi; Onuma, Takehide; Kameyama, Motonobu; Nimura, Taro; Hirano, Takayuki; Kubota, Keiichi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate relationship between the duration of initial intracranial hypertension and postoperative cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in cases with traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH). Intracerebral pressure (ICP) was monitored using ICP catheter in 17 cases with unilateral traumatic ASDH. ICP monitoring was started before craniotomy, and was continued for 7 days. CBF was quantitatively measured at 7 days after craniotomy with 123 I-infetamine (IMP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Clinical outcome was evaluated using Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) at the time of discharge. Patients were divided into 2 groups by the duration of intracranial hypertension: patients who presented with intracranial hypertension (>25 mmHg) and received surgical decompression within 6 hours after deterioration (group A, n=9), and patients who presented with intracranial hypertension and received surgical decompression more than 6 hours after deterioration (group B, n=6). In group A, 7 of 9 patients demonstrated ipsilateral hemispheric hyperperfusion, and the clinical outcome was relatively favorable: Good Recovery (GR) 4 cases, Moderately Disabled (MD) 4 cases, and Severely Disabled (SD) 1 case. In group B, 5 of 6 patients demonstrated ipsilateral hemispheric hypoperfusion, and the clinical outcome was unfavorable: SD 4 cases, and Dead 2 cases. These results suggest that the duration of intracranial hypertension affects on postoperative CBF changes. Duration of intracranial hypertension may also affect on clinical outcome directly, or secondary by altering postoperative CBF changes in patients with traumatic ASDH. (author)

  19. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia: Case Report

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    Besime Utku; Uygar Utku

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous chronic subdural hematoma associated with neoplasm is a rare disorder. A rare case of chronic subdural hematoma associated with acute biphenotypic leukemia presented here. A 78-year-old woman who diagnosed as acute biphenotypic leukemia by hematology was complicated with a large chronic subdural hematoma. She presented to our emergency medicine service of hospital with left-sided weakness. Her non-contrast brain computerized tomography scan showed a non-traumatic right-sided, larg...

  20. Acute Subdural Hematoma

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    Ellen Lester

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 21-year-old female with no past medical history presented to the ED after multiple tonic-clonic seizures over the previous 12 hours, the longest lasting 20 seconds. She returned to baseline after each seizure, had no obvious signs of trauma, and did not exhibit any focal neurologic deficits. She denied illicit drugs or new medications. A family member noted that she had fallen from her bed (approximately 3 feet high 2 days ago. Significant findings: Non-contrast Computed Tomography (CT of the Head showed a dense extra-axial collection along the left frontal and parietal regions, extending superior to the vertex with mild mass effect, but no midline shift. Discussion: Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH is a term to describe any abnormal bleeding within the bony confines of the skull. Most commonly, subdural hemorrhages (SDH result from injury to the bridging veins that lead to bleeding between the dura and arachnoid maters. However, in 20%-30% of cases an arterial source of bleeding can be found.1 For adults, motor vehicle collisions and other unintentional head trauma are typically the provoking factors in developing SDH. Falls in the elderly are a common cause of SDH since diffuse cerebral atrophy leads to increased shear forces upon vasculature structures during the fall. The risk of SDH increases with the use of anti-thrombotic agents.2 Clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic to coma (in 50 percent of acute SDH. Chronic SDH may present with headaches, light-headedness, cognitive impairment, and seizures.1 The risk of posttraumatic epileptic seizures (PTS is higher in acute SDH. Risk factors for acute SDH PTS include low Glasgow Coma Score and craniotomy, whereas risk factors for PTS in chronic SDH include alcohol abuse, change in mental status, previous stroke, and hematoma density on CT.3 CT is the most widely used imaging modality for identifying ICH. Acute SDH (within 1-2 days are visualized as hyperdense

  1. [Three cases of acute interhemispheric subdural hematoma].

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    Takeda, N; Kurihara, E; Matsuoka, H; Kose, S; Tamaki, N; Matsumoto, S

    1988-01-01

    Traumatic acute subdural hematomas over the convexity of the cerebral hemispheres are often encountered, but acute interhemispheric subdural hematomas are rare. Fourty-eight cases of acute subdural hematomas was admitted to our hospital between 1977 and 1986, and three cases of them (6%) were located in the interhemispheric subdural space. In this paper, these three cases are reported with 20 documented cases. Case 1: an 81-year-old female was admitted to our hospital because of headache, nausea and vomiting. She hit her occiput a week ago. CT scan demonstrated contusion in the right frontal lobe and a high density in the interhemispheric space of the right frontal region. Her complaints disappeared gradually by conservative therapy and she returned to her social life. Case 2: a 50-year-old male fell downstairs and hit his vertex. As he lost consciousness, he was admitted to our hospital. He was stuporous and had left-hemiparesis. Skull X-ray film showed fracture line extending from the right temporal bone to the left parietal bone across the midline. CT scan revealed intracerebral hematoma in both frontal lobe and right parietal lobe and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cistern and Sylvian fissure of the right side. And interhemispheric subdural hematoma in the right parietal region was visualized. Angiography demonstrated a lateral displacement of the right callosomarginal artery and an avascular area between the falx and the callosomarginal artery. After admission his consciousness recovered and convulsion was controlled by drug. Left-hemiparesis was improved by conservative therapy and he was discharged on foot.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Contralateral acute subdural hematoma occurring after evacuation of subdural hematoma with coexistent contralateral subdural hygroma

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    Sun, Hsiao-Lun; Chang, Chih-Ju; Hsieh, Cheng-Ta

    2014-01-01

    Burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage is a safe and effective method for the management of chronic subdural hematoma. However, contralateral acute subdural hematoma has been reported to be a rare and devastating complication. Only 3 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we reported an 80-year-old male with chronic subdural hematoma and contralateral subdural hygroma. The burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage was initially performed to treat the chronic s...

  3. Acute Spontaneous Posterior Fossa Subdural Hematoma

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    Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute posterior fossa subdural hematomas are rare and most of them are trauma-related. Non-traumatic ones have been reported in patients who had idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura or those who had been receiving anticoagulant therapy. We report on the case of 57-year-old Iranian man who developed sudden severe occipital headache, drowsiness, repeated vomiting, and instability of stance and gait. He was neither hypertensive nor diabetic. No history of head trauma was obtained and he denied illicit drug or alcohol ingestion. A preliminary diagnosis of acute intra-cerebellar hemorrhage was made. His CT brain scan revealed an acute right-sided, extra-axial, crescent-shaped hyperdense area at the posterior fossa. His routine blood tests, platelets count, bleeding time, and coagulation profile were unremarkable. The patient had spontaneous acute infratentorial subdural hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged home well after 5 days. Since then, we could not follow-up him, clinically and radiologically because he went back to Iran. Our patient’s presentation, clinical course, and imaging study have called for conservative management, as the overall presentation was relatively benign. Unless the diagnosis is entertained and the CT brain scan is well-interpreted, the diagnosis may easily escape detection.

  4. Chronic subdural hematoma secondary to traumatic subdural hygroma

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    Hong, Deok Hwa; Lim, Han Hyuk; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Lee, Kyeong Seok [Soonchunhyang University Chonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    Sometimes chronic subdural hematoma can be developed following posttraumatic subdural hygroma. The purpose of this study is to investigate its incidence, the duration required for their conversion, and characteristic CT and MR findings of subdural hygroma and chronic subdural hamatoma. We studied 8 patients with persistent posttraumatic subdural hygroma which consequently developed chronic subdural hamatoma. The patients were examined with CT initially and followed-up with CT in 3 and MR in 5. We analyzed the location of the lesion, the change of the density or signal intensity, the change of the size, and the degree of enhancement and mass effect. The duration required for the formation of hematoma was 48-166 days (mean, 76 days). The characteristic CT findings of subdural hygroma were a crescentric lesion with CSF density along the inner table with-out contrast enhancement. The mass effect was minimal. The CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma were higher density than that of hygroma in all cases, increase in thickness and size in 3 cases, and contrast enhancement along the inner membrane of the hematoma in 5 cases. The signal intensities of the subdural hygroma were identical to those of CSF on both T1 and T2 weighted images, whereas, those of chronic subdural hamatoma were higher. The increased signal intensity on T1 weighted MR images and increased attenuation or contrast enhancement of the lesion on CT may suggest the conversion of subdural hygroma into chronic subdural hematoma.

  5. Chronic subdural hematoma secondary to traumatic subdural hygroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Deok Hwa; Lim, Han Hyuk; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Lee, Kyeong Seok

    1994-01-01

    Sometimes chronic subdural hematoma can be developed following posttraumatic subdural hygroma. The purpose of this study is to investigate its incidence, the duration required for their conversion, and characteristic CT and MR findings of subdural hygroma and chronic subdural hamatoma. We studied 8 patients with persistent posttraumatic subdural hygroma which consequently developed chronic subdural hamatoma. The patients were examined with CT initially and followed-up with CT in 3 and MR in 5. We analyzed the location of the lesion, the change of the density or signal intensity, the change of the size, and the degree of enhancement and mass effect. The duration required for the formation of hematoma was 48-166 days (mean, 76 days). The characteristic CT findings of subdural hygroma were a crescentric lesion with CSF density along the inner table with-out contrast enhancement. The mass effect was minimal. The CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma were higher density than that of hygroma in all cases, increase in thickness and size in 3 cases, and contrast enhancement along the inner membrane of the hematoma in 5 cases. The signal intensities of the subdural hygroma were identical to those of CSF on both T1 and T2 weighted images, whereas, those of chronic subdural hamatoma were higher. The increased signal intensity on T1 weighted MR images and increased attenuation or contrast enhancement of the lesion on CT may suggest the conversion of subdural hygroma into chronic subdural hematoma

  6. Subdural hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subdural hemorrhage; Traumatic brain injury - subdural hematoma; TBI - subdural hematoma; Head injury - subdural hematoma ... A subdural hematoma is most often the result of a severe head injury. This type of subdural hematoma is among ...

  7. The dangerous gamble of heparinization within two weeks of nonoperative traumatic acute subdural hematoma in patients with increased stroke risk: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, S; Mackey, S J; Kim, S S

    2014-01-01

    In traumatic acute subdural hematoma (aSDH) management, systemic anticoagulation is contraindicated, particularly during the first 2 weeks. We present two cases of patients with nonoperative aSDH whose stroke risk led to heparinization within 2 weeks of the initial hemorrhage and examine their outcomes to illustrate the risks and benefits associated with systemic anticoagulation. Two elderly males, on warfarin at baseline who developed traumatic nonoperative aSDH were heparinized within 2 weeks of aSDH onset. One patient showed a decreased SDH volume on Day 19. The second patient developed sudden onset headache with fixed/dilated pupils on Day 5. In this patient, a CT scan of the brain revealed marked enlargement of the aSDH from 0.9 to 2.4 cm with midline shift of 1.5 cm, and uncal herniation that was incompatible with life. Heparinization within two weeks of aSDH may cause SDH enlargement resulting in rapidly fatal neurologic deterioration. Further study is needed to more definitively address this issue.

  8. Radiologic findings of acute spontaneous subdural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Bae, Won Kyong; Gyu, Cha Jang; Kim, Gun Woo; Cho, Won Su; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Kyung Suk [Soonchunhyang University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of). Chonan Hospital

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate the characteristic CT and cerebral angiographic findings in patients with acute spontaneous subdural hematomas and correlate these imaging findings with causes of bleeding and clinical outcome. Twenty-one patients with nontraumatic acute spontaneous subdural hematoma presenting during the last five years underwent CT scanning and cerebral angiography was performed in twelve. To determine the cause of bleedings, CT and angiographic findings were retrospectively analysed. Clinical history, laboratory and operative findings, and final clinical outcome were reviewed. Acute spontaneous subdural hematoma is a rare condition, and the mortality rate is high. In patients with acute spontaneous subdural hematoma, as seen on CT, associated subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage is strongly indicative of intracerebral vascular abnormalities such as aneurysm and arteriovenous malformation, and cerebral angiography is necessary. To ensure proper treatment and thus markedly reduce mortality, the causes of bleedings should be prompty determined by means of cerebral angiography. (author). 20 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  9. Spontaneous resolution of post-traumatic chronic subdural hematoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here, we present a case of spontaneously resolved post-traumatic bilateral chronic subdural hematoma within a period of one month in a 55-year-old male and we discuss the probable mechanisms of pathophysiology in the spontaneous resolution of chronic subdural hematoma. Keywords: Antiaggregation therapy, chronic ...

  10. Symptomatic Acute-on-Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Clinicopathological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Rudy J; Mojica-Sanchez, Gruschenka; Schwartzbauer, Gary; Hersh, David S

    2017-06-01

    The pathophysiology of acute-on-chronic subdural hematoma (ACSDH) is complex and incompletely understood. Evidence to date indicates that the overall process is initiated by rotational force with movement of the brain inside the skull, which exerts tensile strain and rupture of bridging veins, leading in turn to acute hemorrhage in the subdural potential space. This is followed by the proliferation of mesenchymal elements with angiogenesis and inflammation, which in turn becomes a substrate for repeated hemorrhage and expansion of the lesion. Given the prevalence of traumatic subdural processes in the forensic setting and the importance of proper assessment of timing, etiology, risk factors, and clinicopathological correlation, we studied 47 patients presenting to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, all of whom underwent craniotomy with resection of the outer membrane due to symptomatic ACSDH. The surgically resected tissue was examined for histopathologic features in all cases. Our findings highlight that ACSDH is a condition precipitated by trauma that affects middle-aged and older adults, is relatively indolent, is unilateral or asymmetric, and has a low in-hospital mortality rate. Pathological analysis demonstrates a substantial outer membrane in all cases with varying degrees of inflammation and organization that cannot be precisely dated as a function of clinical presentation. The extrapolation of adult ACSDH to mixed acute and chronic subdural hemorrhage in the pediatric setting is problematic due to substantial differences in clinical presentation, severity of underlying brain injury, gross and microscopic findings, and outcome.

  11. Rapid Spontaneously Resolving Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qi; Zhao, Hexiang; Zhang, Hanmei; You, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study reports a rare patient of a rapid spontaneously resolving acute subdural hematoma. In addition, an analysis of potential clues for the phenomenon is presented with a review of the literature. Patient Presentation: A 1-year-and-2-month-old boy fell from a height of approximately 2 m. The patient was in a superficial coma with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 8 when he was transferred to the authors’ hospital. Computed tomography revealed the presence of an acute subdural hematoma with a midline shift beyond 1 cm. His guardians refused invasive interventions and chose conservative treatment. Repeat imaging after 15 hours showed the evident resolution of the hematoma and midline reversion. Progressive magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the complete resolution of the hematoma, without redistribution to a remote site. Conclusions: Even though this phenomenon has a low incidence, the probability of a rapid spontaneously resolving acute subdural hematoma should be considered when patients present with the following characteristics: children or elderly individuals suffering from mild to moderate head trauma; stable or rapidly recovered consciousness; and simple acute subdural hematoma with a moderate thickness and a particularly low-density band in computed tomography scans. PMID:28468224

  12. Endoscopic burr hole evacuation of an acute subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codd, Patrick J; Venteicher, Andrew S; Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Kahle, Kristopher T; Jho, David H

    2013-12-01

    Acute subdural hematoma evacuations frequently necessitate large craniotomies with extended operative times and high relative blood loss, which can lead to additional morbidity for the patient. While endoscopic minimally invasive approaches to chronic subdural collections have been successfully demonstrated, this technique has not previously been applied to acute subdural hematomas. The authors report their experience with an 87-year-old patient presenting with a large acute right-sided subdural hematoma successfully evacuated via an endoscopic minimally invasive technique. The operative approach is outlined, and the literature on endoscopic subdural collection evacuation reviewed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma in a patient with multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Ahad Wani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute spontaneous subdural hematoma in a patient of multiple myeloma receiving chemotherapy is an unknown event, needing an urgent neurosurgical management. We report this patient who presented with progressive neurological deterioration and a low platelet count. She was successfully managed by craniotomy and evacuation of subdural hematoma with intraoperative transfusion of platelets. The acute spontaneous subdural hematoma in her was probably related to the bleeding diathesis due to thrombocytopenia associated with chemotherapy.

  14. Rapid spontaneous resolution and redistribution of acute subdural hematoma in a patient with chronic alcoholism: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, Edmund Yik Kong. E-mail: yktsui@hongkong.com; Fai Ma, Ka; Cheung, Yu Keung; Chan, Jimmy Hon Mo; Yuen, Ming Keung

    2000-10-01

    We report a case of a 54-year-old man who had documented traumatic acute subdural hematoma. He suffered from a transient episode of confusion and a follow-up CT scan of brain 6 h after the initial scan showed resolution and redistribution of the subdural hematoma. In this case report, we review the literature for the underlying pathophysiology of this uncommon phenomenon.

  15. Rapid spontaneous resolution and redistribution of acute subdural hematoma in a patient with chronic alcoholism: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, Edmund Yik Kong.; Fai Ma, Ka; Cheung, Yu Keung; Chan, Jimmy Hon Mo; Yuen, Ming Keung

    2000-01-01

    We report a case of a 54-year-old man who had documented traumatic acute subdural hematoma. He suffered from a transient episode of confusion and a follow-up CT scan of brain 6 h after the initial scan showed resolution and redistribution of the subdural hematoma. In this case report, we review the literature for the underlying pathophysiology of this uncommon phenomenon

  16. Rapid spontaneous resolution of acute subdural haematoma in a patient with chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios; Chamilos, Christos; Petsanas, Adamantios; Vranos, Georgios; Foteas, Pavlos; Spiridakis, Filokypros

    2012-06-01

    Acute subdural haematoma (ASDH) constitutes one of the most critical emergencies in neurosurgery. There are only several reports that show the rapid disappearance of ASDH without surgical intervention. We report a case of a 64-year-old alcoholic man who had a traumatic subdural haematoma after a fall from a height of about eight meters on level ground. The computed tomography (CT) of the brain on admission demonstrated a left parietooccipital ASDH. A follow-up CT scan after 8 hours showed resolution of the hematoma. The patient was discharged 9 days later with no neurological deficit. We discuss the possible mechanisms of the rapid resolution of the ASDH.

  17. Spontaneous rapid reduction of a large acute subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-Hee; Kang, Dong Ho; Hwang, Soo Hyun; Park, In Sung; Jung, Jin-Myung; Han, Jong Woo

    2009-12-01

    The majority of acute post-traumatic subdural hematomas (ASDH) require urgent surgical evacuation. Spontaneous resolution of ASDH has been reported in some cases. We report here on a case of a patient with a large amount of ASDH that was rapidly reduced. A 61-yr-old man was found unconscious following a high speed motor vehicle accident. On initial examination, his Glasgow Coma Score scale was 4/15. His pupils were fully dilated and non-reactive to bright light. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed a massive right-sided ASDH. The decision was made to treat him conservatively because of his poor clinical condition. Another brain CT approximately 14 hr after the initial scan demonstrated a remarkable reduction of the previous ASDH and there was the new appearance of high density in the subdural space adjacent to the falx and the tentorium. Thirty days after his admission, brain CT revealed chronic SDH and the patient underwent surgery. The patient is currently able to obey simple commands. In conclusion, spontaneous rapid resolution/reduction of ASDH may occur in some patients. The mechanisms are most likely the result of dilution by cerebrospinal fluid and the redistribution of hematoma especially in patients with brain atrophy.

  18. Do Age and Anticoagulants Affect the Natural History of Acute Subdural Hematomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Turner, Ryan C.; Josiah, Darnell; Knotts, Chelsea; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma is a serious complication following traumatic brain injury. Large volume hematomas or those with underlying brain injury can cause mass effect, midline shift, and eventually herniation of the brain. Acute subdural hematomas in the young are associated with high-energy trauma and often have underlying contusions, while acute subdural hematomas in the elderly are associated with minor trauma and an absence of underlying contusions, even though the elderly are more likely to be on anticoagulants or anti-platelet therapy. In the young patients with high impact injuries the hematomas tend to be small and the underlying brain injury and swelling is responsible for the increased intracranial pressure and midline shift. In the elderly, the injuries are low impact (e.g fall from standing), the underlying brain is intact, and the volume of the hematoma itself produces symptoms. In addition the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in the elderly population has been thought to be a poor prognostic indicator and is considered to be responsible for larger hematomas and poor outcome. When managed conservatively, acute subdural hematomas can sometimes progress to chronic subdural hematoma formation, further enlargement, seizures, and progressive midline shift. Another potential difference in the young and the elderly is brain atrophy, which increases the potential space to accommodate a larger hematoma. It is not known if these two groups differ in other ways that might have implications for treatment or prognosis. In this paper, we investigate the clinical course of 80 patients admitted to our institution with acute subdural hematomas, to identify differences in patients above or below the age of 65 years. The natural progression/resolution of acute subdural hematomas was mapped by measuring volume expansion/regression over time. In this retrospective chart review, we investigated clinical baseline metrics and subsequent volumetric expansion

  19. Do Age and Anticoagulants Affect the Natural History of Acute Subdural Hematomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Josiah, Darnell; Knotts, Chelsea; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma is a serious complication following traumatic brain injury. Large volume hematomas or those with underlying brain injury can cause mass effect, midline shift, and eventually herniation of the brain. Acute subdural hematomas in the young are associated with high-energy trauma and often have underlying contusions, while acute subdural hematomas in the elderly are associated with minor trauma and an absence of underlying contusions, even though the elderly are more likely to be on anticoagulants or anti-platelet therapy. In the young patients with high impact injuries the hematomas tend to be small and the underlying brain injury and swelling is responsible for the increased intracranial pressure and midline shift. In the elderly, the injuries are low impact (e.g fall from standing), the underlying brain is intact, and the volume of the hematoma itself produces symptoms. In addition the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in the elderly population has been thought to be a poor prognostic indicator and is considered to be responsible for larger hematomas and poor outcome. When managed conservatively, acute subdural hematomas can sometimes progress to chronic subdural hematoma formation, further enlargement, seizures, and progressive midline shift. Another potential difference in the young and the elderly is brain atrophy, which increases the potential space to accommodate a larger hematoma. It is not known if these two groups differ in other ways that might have implications for treatment or prognosis. In this paper, we investigate the clinical course of 80 patients admitted to our institution with acute subdural hematomas, to identify differences in patients above or below the age of 65 years. The natural progression/resolution of acute subdural hematomas was mapped by measuring volume expansion/regression over time. In this retrospective chart review, we investigated clinical baseline metrics and subsequent volumetric expansion

  20. Metrizamide CT cisternography in cases of traumatic subdural hygroma and chronic subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Tetsuya; Takemura, Kiyoshi; Inui, Shoji; Hori, Yutaka; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Miyamoto, Seiji; Kyoi, Kikuo; Utsumi, Shozaburo

    1987-06-01

    Subdural fluid collection and some cases of chronic subdural hematoma are observed by means of a CT scan as marginal low-density areas (m-LDA) in head-injured patients. It is thought that the cerebro-spinal fluid dynamics may play an important role in the pathogenesis and clinical course of such subdural pathology. We applied metrizamide CT cisternography to these cases. According to the findings of this metrizamide CT cisternography (M-CTC), the examples of subdural pathology can be classified into four types: Type I: Metrizamide filling is seen in both the cortical subarachnoid space and the m-LDA. Type II: Metrizamide filling is seen only in the cortical subarachnoid space, not in the m-LDA. Type III: Metrizamide filling is very poor in both the cortical subarachnoid space and the m-LDA. Type IV: Metrizamide filling extends well into the m-LDA, but only partially into the cortical subarachnoid space. Many of these cases studied had been operated on and the subdural pathology had been ascertained. From a comparison between the M-CTC and subdural types of pathology, subdural pathology of Types I, II, and III can all be classified as cases of a subdural hygroma (subdural fluid collection or subdural effusion), while Type IV is a chronic subdural hematoma. The characteristics and choice of treatment of each type may be briefly shown as follows: For Type I conservative therapy is recommended because of its tendency to decrease rapidly. For Type II a subduro-peritoneal shunt is recommended, for the m-LDA is long-standing and a simple burrhole evacuation sometimes results in an aggravation of the subdural hygroma. For Type III a burrhole evacuation is recommended; also, care must be taken against the development of a chronic subdural hematoma. For Type IV a burrhole evacuation is recommended became such cases are all chronic subdural hematoma. (J.P.N.).

  1. Acute subdural hematoma because of boxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushi, Hidehiko; Saito, Takeshi; Sakagami, Yuichiro; Ohtsuki, Jyoji; Tanjoh, Katsuhisa

    2009-02-01

    To identify factors determining the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) arising from boxing injuries by comparing with ASDH due to any nonboxing cause. Two groups were selected for this study: 10 patients with ASDH because of boxing injuries and 26 patients with nonboxer ASDH. All of the patients underwent neurologic examination by neurosurgeons. Primary resuscitation and stabilization as well as operative therapy were performed to all patients according to the European Brain Injury Consortium Guidelines. Two groups were compared in terms of age, the Glasgow Coma Scale at admission, neurologic findings, craniogram and brain computed tomography scan findings, operative findings, and prognosis. As potential prognostic indicators for boxers, the time interval until surgery, the Glasgow Outcome Scale, hematoma thickness, midline shift, and the site of bleeding were analyzed. The characteristics of patients because of boxing injuries are that patients were younger, had lucid interval, and had no cerebral contusion or contralateral brain injury. There was no significant difference in initial Glasgow Coma Scale, hematoma thickness, midline shift, and their prognosis. The most peculiar clinical presentation of boxers' ASDH was that all bleedings were limited from "bridging veins" or "cortical veins." The prognosis of boxers was most closely correlated with the site of bleeding (r2 = 0.81; p = 0.0001) and the midline shift (r2 = 0.67; p = 0.007). Our study shows that ASDH because of boxing is characterized by bleeding from bridging or cortical veins, and that the site of bleeding is a significant determinant of their prognosis.

  2. The evaluation of acute traumatic pneumocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horimoto, Chozi; Miyazaki, Takayoshi; Miyazaki, Hisaya; Kawano, Masashichi

    1986-01-01

    The authors have encountered 19 cases of acute traumatic pneumocephalus (3.9 %) out of 485 acute-head-injury patients in our hospital during the past 4 years. There were 18 males and 1 female, ranging in age from 17 to 70 years (mean: 29 years). The cases of pneumocephalus were divided into three groups according to the amount and distribution of intracranial air: Group I: Diffuse pneumocephalus with huge subdural air collection (3 cases). Group II: Diffuse pneumocephalus without huge subdural air collection (9 cases). Group III: Localized pneumocephalus (7 cases). Among these 19 patients, eight (42 %) died; the mortality rates of Group I, Group II, and Group III were 100 %, 55.6 %, and 0 % respectively. The duration of acute traumatic pneumocephalus in the cases who lived ranged from 1 to 10 days (mean: 2.5 days); on the other hand, the duration of CSF leakage ranged from 3 to 10 days (mean: 6 days), except for one operative case. The amount and distribution of intracranial air was found to be closely related to the severity and prognosis of acute traumatic pneumocephalus. (author)

  3. Computed tomography of the adult traumatic subdural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ara, Seiji; Matsuzaki, Takayuki; Yasumura, Shuichi; Nishiya, Mikio; Nakamura, Junichi

    1979-01-01

    The present authors, since the installation of the CT scanner in Sept., 1976, have conducted an investigation of 14 adult subdural effusion cases arising from head injury which were available for a follow-up by CT scanning. These cases were examined in the first 13 months after installation. Under CT scanning, subdural effusion was recognized as a low-density area of the subdural space. Our findings indicate that, in spite of the fact that it is a subdural collection, only a limited shift of the midline structure was seen; further, the shrinking of the lateral ventricles of the effusion side was also limited. Judging from the CT findings, the neurological signs and the clinical course, the subdural effusions of the 14 cases could be classified into 2 types: (I) the minimal neurological deficit type and (II) the contusion-effusion type. Representative cases of the above are given, and, in addition, indications of surgery are also mentioned. We further state that, since the subdural effusion cases come under Type I and are characterized by the minimal neurological deficit, in many cases they are apt to be overlooked: hence, the application of CT scanning with special regard to such cases was stressed. In order to differentiate chronic subdural hematoma from subdural effusion under CT scanning, a comparative CT study was made using 20 cases of chronic subdural hematoma, and the difference in CT findings from those of subdural effusion is reported. (author)

  4. Computed tomographic evolution of post-traumatic subdural hygroma in young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuzawa, T.; Sato, F.

    1984-01-01

    The authors report on two cases of post-traumatic subdural hygroma that were encountered in young adults. Serial computed tomograms were taken immediately following trauma and for more than 4 weeks thereafter. In the case of a 28-year-old man with a skull fracture, an initial CT scan revealed a thin crescentic subdural collection in the right frontal area. A successive CT scan on the 36th postoperative day revealed developed subdural hygroma, and the CSF-like fluid was surgically evacuated. In the second case, involving an 18-year-old man, a very thin bifrontal subdural collection was found on the initial CT scan, and on the 15th post-traumatic day CT scan demonstrated a bifrontal subdural hygroma. No surgical treatment was carried out, and the follow-up CT scan on the 29th post-traumatic day demonstrated no change in size. The two young patients were slightly symptomatic during the period involved, and the repeat unenchanced CT scans showed subdural lesions of less than brain density, even in the chronic stage. (orig.)

  5. Acute subdural hematoma, Head injury, Functional reco

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kim

    EVOLUTION DES HÉMATOMES SOUS-DURAUX AIGUS .... likelihood of functional recovery from traumatic brain injury. Howard et ... associated with decreased brainstem blood flow and that ishaemia rather than mechanical compression of.

  6. Surgical options for treatment of traumatic subdural hematomas in children younger than 2 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, José Roberto Tude; Di Rocco, Federico; Bourgeois, Marie; Puget, Stephanie; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Sainte-Rose, Christian; Meyer, Philippe G; Zerah, Michel

    2014-04-01

    Subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common finding on cranial CT in pediatric victims of abusive head trauma (AHT). The hematomas are commonly bilateral and sometimes associated with interhemispheric hyperdensity and/or convexity hemorrhages. There is no consensus regarding the best surgical treatment in such cases nor are there standardized surgical protocols. The authors report their experience and discuss the routine surgical options in the management of traumatic SDH at a Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center. In this paper, the authors describe a cross-sectional study with consecutive revision of data described in the medical records of Hôpital Universitaire Necker-Enfants Malades between January 2008 and January 2013. During this period, all children younger than 2 years of age who were admitted with a traumatic SDH identified on CT scans were included in this study. One hundred eighty-four children who had SDH and were younger than 2 years of age were included. Their median age was 5.8 months (range 5 days-23 months), and 70% of the children were male. On admission CT scans, the SDH was bilateral in 52% of cases and homogeneously hypodense in 77%. Neurosurgical treatment was undertaken in 111 children (60%) with an admission Glasgow Coma Scale score of 12 or less, bulging fontanels, or other signs suggestive of intracranial hypertension. The first surgical option was craniotomy in 1.8% (2) of these 111 cases, decompressive craniectomy in 1.8% (2), transcutaneous subdural puncture in 15% (17), external subdural drainage in 16% (18), subdural-subgaleal shunt placement in 17% (19), and subdural-peritoneal shunt placement in 48% (53). In 82% of the children initially treated with transcutaneous subdural puncture and in 50% of those treated with external subdural drainage, increase or persistence of the SDH, CSF or skin infection, or shunt system malfunction was observed and further surgical intervention was required. There was a 26% rate of complications in patients

  7. Non-traumatic subdural hematoma secondary to septic brain embolism: A rare cause of unexpected death in a drug addict suffering from undiagnosed bacterial endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisenberger, D; Huppertz, L M; Büchsel, M; Kramer, L; Pollak, S; Große Perdekamp, M

    2015-12-01

    Acute subdural hematomas are mostly due to blunt traumatization of the head. In rare instances, subdural bleeding occurs without evidence of a previous trauma following spontaneous hemorrhage, e.g. from a ruptured aneurysm or an intracerebral hematoma perforating the brain surface and the arachnoid. The paper presents the morphological, microbiological and toxicological findings in a 38-year-old drug addict who was found by his partner in a dazed state. When brought to a hospital, he underwent trepanation to empty a right-sided subdural hematoma, but he died already 4h after admission. Autopsy revealed previously undiagnosed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve as well as multiple infarctions of brain, spleen and kidneys obviously caused by septic emboli. The subdural hematoma originated from a subcortical brain hemorrhage which had perforated into the subdural space. Microbiological investigation of the polypous vegetations adhering to the aortic valve revealed colonization by Streptococcus mitis and Klebsiella oxytoca. According to the toxicological analysis, no psychotropic substances had contributed to the lethal outcome. The case reported underlines that all deaths of drug addicts should be subjected to complete forensic autopsy, as apart from intoxications also natural and traumatic causes of death have to be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of Risk Factor for the Development of Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Patients with Traumatic Subdural Hygroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jun Hyong; Jun, Hyo Sub; Kim, Ji Hee; Oh, Jae Keun; Song, Joon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although a high incidence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) following traumatic subdural hygroma (SDG) has been reported, no study has evaluated risk factors for the development of CSDH. Therefore, we analyzed the risk factors contributing to formation of CSDH in patients with traumatic SDG. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients admitted to Hallym University Hospital with traumatic head injury from January 2004 through December 2013. A total of 45 patients with these injuries in which traumatic SDG developed during the follow-up period were analyzed. All patients were divided into two groups based on the development of CSDH, and the associations between the development of CSDH and independent variables were investigated. Results Thirty-one patients suffered from bilateral SDG, whereas 14 had unilateral SDG. Follow-up computed tomography scans revealed regression of SDG in 25 of 45 patients (55.6%), but the remaining 20 patients (44.4%) suffered from transition to CSDH. Eight patients developed bilateral CSDH, and 12 patients developed unilateral CSDH. Hemorrhage-free survival rates were significantly lower in the male and bilateral SDG group (log-rank test; p=0.043 and p=0.013, respectively). Binary logistic regression analysis revealed male (OR, 7.68; 95% CI 1.18–49.78; p=0.033) and bilateral SDG (OR, 8.04; 95% CI 1.41–45.7; p=0.019) were significant risk factors for development of CSDH. Conclusion The potential to evolve into CSDH should be considered in patients with traumatic SDG, particularly male patients with bilateral SDG. PMID:27847577

  9. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Preceded by High-Impact Trauma: Does the Intensity of Trauma Influence the Pathogenesis of Traumatic Chronic Subdural Hematoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Su; Lee, Chang-Heon; Park, Seong-Hyun; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the intensity of trauma influences the pathogenesis of traumatic chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Thirty-one patients treated surgically for traumatic CSDH were divided into high-impact and lowimpact groups according to the intensity of trauma. They were respectively evaluated with respect to clinical and radiological findings at presentation, and the subdural concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor, and beta-trace protein (ΒTP) [a highly specific protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)] related to the pathogenesis of CSDH. If ΒTP (subdural fluid/serum) was > 2, an admixture of CSF to the subdural fluid was indicated. The ΒTP (subdural fluid/serum) was > 2 in all patients with a traumatic CSDH. The mean concentration of subdural ΒTP in the high-impact group was higher than in the low-impact group (6.1 mg/L versus 3.9 mg/L), and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.02). In addition, mean concentrations of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF were higher in the high-impact group, as compared to the low-impact group, though the differences did not reach statistical significance. Trauma may be related to CSF leakage into the subdural space in CSDH, and the intensity of trauma may influence the amount of CSF leakage. Although there is no direct correlation between the amount of CSF leakage and other subdural molecules, the intensity of trauma may be associated with larger concentrations of molecules in traumatic CSDH.

  10. Cerebral and subdural abscess with spatio-temporal multiplicity 12 years after initial craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakui, Daisuke; Nagashima, Goro; Takada, Tatsuro; Ueda, Toshihiro; Itoh, Hidemichi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hashimoto, Takuo

    2012-01-01

    A 34-year-old man presented with a case of subdural empyema and cerebral abscess that developed 12 years after initial neurosurgical intervention for a traffic accident in 1998. Under a diagnosis of acute subdural hematoma and cerebral contusion, several neurosurgical procedures were performed at another hospital, including hematoma removal by craniotomy, external decompression, duraplasty, and cranioplasty. The patient experienced an epileptic seizure, and was referred to our hospital in March 2010. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cerebral abscess extending to the subdural space just under the previous surgical field. Surgical intervention was refused and antimicrobial treatment was initiated, but proved ineffective. Surgical removal of artificial dura and cranium with subdural empyema, and resection of a cerebral abscess were performed on May 12, 2010. No organism was recovered from the surgical samples. Meropenem and vancomycin were selected as perioperative antimicrobial agents. No recurrence of infection has been observed. Postneurosurgical subdural empyema and cerebral abscess are recently emerging problems. Infections of neurosurgical sites containing implanted materials occur in 6% of cases, usually within several months of the surgery. Subdural empyema and cerebral abscess developing 12 years after neurosurgical interventions are extremely rare. The long-term clinical course suggests less pathogenic organisms as a cause of infection, and further investigations to develop appropriate antimicrobial selection and adequate duration of antimicrobial administration for these cases are needed.

  11. Rapid spontaneous resolution of an acute subdural hematoma: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Won Kyong; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byoung Ho; Lee, Kyeong Seok; Bae, Hack Gun; Yun, Il Gyu [Soonchunhyang University, Chonan Hospital, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-10-15

    We present a case of acute subdural hematoma which was rapidly resolved without surgical intervention. This 31 year old man had a hematoma of which thickness was 9 mm and was paraplegic due to fracture-dislocation of thoracic spine at the level of TII-12 Rapid recovery of consciousness despite of sizable hematoma made to take a serial CT scanning instead of immediate surgical interventions. The hematoma was resolved within 4 hours without surgery. Possible mechanism of this rapid spontaneous resolution is discussed with brief review of the related literature.

  12. Computerized tomography findings of acute traumatic epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shiro; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Yajima, Kouzo; Yano, Masami; Otsuka, Toshibumi

    1984-01-01

    During four year period from April, 1977 to March, 1981, 53 cases with acute traumatic epidural hematoma had been encountered out of 430 acute head injured patients examined by computerized tomography (CT) within 24 hours after incurring the trauma. Besides the initial CT, the authors performed contrast enhanced CT (41 cases) and serial CT scanning (31 cases). There were 49 cases of epidural hematoma existing in the supratentorial region, Two cases infratentorial region and 2 cases in the both regions. Two cases of vertex epidural hematoma had been encountered, one of them required vertical scan technique. In 22 (41%) of the 53 patients, the initial CT showed evidence of other cerebral lesions. The most frequent lesion was pneumocephalus (11 cases), 3 cases of them existed in the epidural hematoma. There were also intracerebral hematoma (6 cases), subdural hematoma (4 cases), cerebral contusion (2 cases), intraventricular hemorrhage (2 cases) and 2 cases of them demonstrated ''diffuse traumatic cerebral injury''. During contrast enhanced CT, 11 cases out of 41 cases indicated several enhancement pattern. There were total enhancement of epidural hematoma (2 cases), partial enhancement of hematoma (2 cases) and enhancement of internal margin of hematoma (2 cases). Serial CT scans was performed in 36 out of the 53 patients. Common findings on the serial CT scans were decreased density collection in the subdural space such as subdural effusions or chronic subdural hematomas (8 cases) and enlargement of small epidural hematomas (3 cases). After evacuation of epidural hematoma, there were some cases showing the so-called ''delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma'' (4 cases), appearance of other epidural hematoma (1 case) and development of small cerebral infarction in the basal ganglia. There was one case indicating appearance of a new epidural hematoma contra lateral to the side of evacuation of subdural hematoma. (J.P.N.)

  13. A case of loss of consciousness with contralateral acute subdural haematoma during awake craniotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Kamata, Kotoe; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Ozaki, Makoto; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting the case of a 56-year-old woman who developed loss of consciousness during awake craniotomy. A thin subdural haematoma in the contralateral side of the craniotomy was identified with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and subsequently removed. Our case indicates that contralateral acute subdural haematoma could be a cause of deterioration of the conscious level during awake craniotomy.

  14. A case of loss of consciousness with contralateral acute subdural haematoma during awake craniotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Kotoe; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Ozaki, Makoto; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting the case of a 56-year-old woman who developed loss of consciousness during awake craniotomy. A thin subdural haematoma in the contralateral side of the craniotomy was identified with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and subsequently removed. Our case indicates that contralateral acute subdural haematoma could be a cause of deterioration of the conscious level during awake craniotomy. PMID:25301378

  15. Acute traumatic cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titelbaum, D.S.; Grossman, R.I.; Lloyd, W.C.; Cohen, E.J.; Atlas, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports orbital CT scans of 15 patients with clinically diagnoses traumatic cataracts retrospectively reviewed to determine the presence of radiographically detectable lens abnormalities. Definite lens swelling was clinically observed in a lease five cases. Eleven patients, scanned 4 hours of 3 days after injury, revealed visible and measured decreased CT density of the cataractous lens compared with the normal contralateral lens (average mean difference, 28 HU), suggesting acute lens swelling. In one patient, lens morphologic changes but not HU differences were found, probably due to superimposed hemorrhage. Three patients, scanned 3-8 hours after injury, revealed no detectable lens abnormality. The findings suggest that CT is potentially capable of identifying traumatic cataracts

  16. Two occurrences of delayed epidural hematoma in different areas following decompressive craniectomy for acute subdural hematoma in a single patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruhong; Shi, Jia; Cao, Jiachao; Mao, Yumin; Dong, Bo

    2017-12-04

    Delayed epidural hematoma (DEH) following evacuation of traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) or acute epidural hematoma (EDH) is a rare but devastating complication, especially when it occurs sequentially in a single patient. A 19-year-old man who developed contralateral DEH following craniotomy for evacuation of a traumatic right-side ASDH and then developed a left-side DEH of the posterior cranial fossa after craniotomy for evacuation of the contralateral DEH. He was immediately returned to the operating room for additional surgeries and his neurological outcome was satisfactory. Although DEH occurring after evacuation of ASDH or acute EDH is a rare event, timely recognition is critical to prognosis.

  17. CT findings in a case of neonatal acute subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshu, K.; Horie, Y.; Hirashima, Y.; Endo, S.; Takaku, A.

    1981-01-01

    The CT findings in a case of neonatal accute subdural hematoma are presented. CT demonstrated a crescentic high density area in the subdural space over the left cerebral hemisphere and an oval high density area in the left occipital region. The latter was suspected of being an intracerebral hematoma. Emergency craniotomy revealed that the high density area was due to a subdural hematoma between the occipital lobe and the tentorium cerebelli. (orig.)

  18. Predictors of rapid spontaneous resolution of acute subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Kenji; Otsuka, Tadahiro; Yoshizato, Kimio; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) usually requires emergency surgical decompression, but rare cases exhibit rapid spontaneous resolution. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify factors predictive of spontaneous ASDH resolution. A total of 366 consecutive patients with ASDH treated between January 2006 and September 2012 were identified in our hospital database. Patients with ASDH clot thickness >10mm in the frontoparietotemporal region and showing a midline shift >10mm on the initial computed tomography (CT) scan were divided into two groups according to subsequent spontaneous resolution. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors predictive of rapid spontaneous ASDH resolution. Fifty-six ASDH patients met study criteria and 18 demonstrated rapid spontaneous resolution (32%). Majority of these patients were not operated because of poor prognosis/condition and in accordance to family wishes. Univariate analysis revealed significant differences in use of antiplatelet agents before head injury and in the incidence of a low-density band between the hematoma and inner wall of the skull bone on the initial CT. Use of antiplatelet agents before head injury (OR 19.6, 95% CI 1.5-260.1, p=0.02) and the low-density band on CT images (OR 40.3, 95% CI 3.1-520.2, p=0.005) were identified as independent predictive factors by multivariate analysis. Our analysis suggested that use of antiplatelet agents before head injury and a low-density band between the hematoma and inner skull bone on CT images (indicative of cerebrospinal fluid infusion into the subdural space) increase the probability of rapid spontaneous resolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Computed tomography(CT) of the spontaneous resolution of traumatic epidural and subdural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro; Park, Dong Woo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Sang Gil [Hanyang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-08-15

    During the period of four years and three months from January 1985 to March 1989, 29 cases in 27 patients with traumatic epidural and subdural hematomas which resolved spontaneously on sequential CT examinations, at the Hanyang University Hospital, show the following results. 1. Of 29 hematomas, there are 20 epidural hematomas including 9 cases (45%) in parietal area, and 4 cases (20%) in frontal area, and 9 subdural hematomas including 6 cases (66%) in temporal area. 2. The thickness of all hematomas in less than 2 cm. The thickness of hematoma is 1.0{approx}2.0 cm in 10 epidural hematomas (50%), and less than 0.5 cm in 5 subdural hematomas (56%). 3. The size decrease and complete resolution of hematomas within 4 weeks show 24 of 29 hematomas (83%), of which 18 hematomas (62%) show that between 2 and 4 weeks. 4. No difference between absorption rates of hematomas as the degrees of type or size of hematomas is present.

  20. Computed tomography(CT) of the spontaneous resolution of traumatic epidural and subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro; Park, Dong Woo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Sang Gil

    1989-01-01

    During the period of four years and three months from January 1985 to March 1989, 29 cases in 27 patients with traumatic epidural and subdural hematomas which resolved spontaneously on sequential CT examinations, at the Hanyang University Hospital, show the following results. 1. Of 29 hematomas, there are 20 epidural hematomas including 9 cases (45%) in parietal area, and 4 cases (20%) in frontal area, and 9 subdural hematomas including 6 cases (66%) in temporal area. 2. The thickness of all hematomas in less than 2 cm. The thickness of hematoma is 1.0∼2.0 cm in 10 epidural hematomas (50%), and less than 0.5 cm in 5 subdural hematomas (56%). 3. The size decrease and complete resolution of hematomas within 4 weeks show 24 of 29 hematomas (83%), of which 18 hematomas (62%) show that between 2 and 4 weeks. 4. No difference between absorption rates of hematomas as the degrees of type or size of hematomas is present

  1. Spontaneous acute spinal subdural hematoma: spontaneous recovery from severe paraparesis--case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Michael; Agosti, Reto

    2010-11-01

    Spontaneous idiopathic acute spinal subdural hematomas are highly exceptional. Neurological symptoms are usually severe, and rapid diagnosis with MRI is mandatory. Surgical evacuation has frequently been used therapeutically; however, spontaneous recovery in mild cases has also been reported. We present a case of spontaneous recovery from severe paraparesis after spontaneous acute SSDH, and review the English-speaking literature.

  2. Neuroendoscopic Removal of Acute Subdural Hematoma with Contusion: Advantages for Elderly Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Tamura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Large craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma is sometimes too invasive. We report good outcomes for two cases of neuroendoscopic evacuation of hematoma and contusion by 1 burr hole surgery. Case Presentation. Both patients arrived by ambulance at our hospital with disturbed consciousness after falling. Case 1 was an 81-year-old man who took antiplatelet drugs for brain infarction. Case 2 was a 73-year-old alcoholic woman. CT scanning showed acute subdural hematoma and frontal contusion in both cases. In the acute stage, glycerol was administered to reduce edema; CTs after 48 and 72 hours showed an increase of subdural hematoma and massive contusion of the frontal lobe. Disturbed consciousness steadily deteriorated. The subdural hematoma and contusion were removed as soon as possible by neuroendoscopy under local anesthesia, because neither patient was a good candidate for large craniotomy considering age and past history. 40%~70% of the hematoma was removed, and the consciousness level improved. Conclusion. Neuroendoscopic removal of acute subdural hematoma and contusion has advantages and disadvantages. For patients with underlying medical issues or other risk factors, it is likely to be effective.

  3. Decompressive craniectomy for acute subdural haematoma: An overview of current prognostic factors and a discussion about some novel prognostic parametres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalayci, M.; Gul, S.; Edebali, N.; Acikgoz, B.; Aktunc, E.; Hanci, V.; Cagavi, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify specific factors that can be used to predict functional outcome and to assess the value of decompressive craniectomy in patients with acute subdural haematoma. Methods: The retrospective study was done at the Zonguldak Karaelwas University Practice and Research Hospital, Turkey, and included 34 trauma patients who had undergone decompressive craniectomy for acute subdural haematoma from 2001 to 2009. At the 30th day of the operation, the patients were grouped as survivors and non-survivors. Besides, based on their Glasgow Outcome Scale, which was calculated 6 months post-operatively, the patients were divided into two functional groups: favourable outcomes (4-5 on the scale), and unfavourable outcomes (1-3 on the scale). The characteristics of the groups were compared using SPSS 15 for statistical analysis. Results: One-month mortality was 38.2% (n=13) and 6-month total mortality reached 47% (n=16). Patients with higher pre-operative revised trauma score, Glasgow coma scale, partial anterial pressure of carbon dioxide, arterial oxygen pressure, Charlson co-morbidity index score, blood glucose level, blood urea nitrogen, and lower age had a higher rate of survival and consequently a favourable outcome. Higher platelet values were only found to be a determinant of higher survival at the end of the first month without having any significant effect on the favourable outcome. Conclusion: In patients of traumatic acute subdural haematoma whose Glasgow coma scale on arrival was < 8, a massive craniectomy along with the evacuation of the haematoma, may be considered as a treatment option for intra-operative and post-operative brain swelling. But in patients with a score of 3 on arrival and bilaterally fixed and dilated pupils, decompressive craniectomy is unnecessary. (author)

  4. Traumatic interhemispheric subdural hematoma extending above the tentorium demonstrated as a low-density mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Kunihiko; Takaki, Tadahiro; Fukushima, Takeo; Tomonaga, Masamichi

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a case of traumatic interhemispheric subdural hematoma extending above the right tentorium, which showed a low-density mass in the CT scan and which brought up a problem of differential diagnosis from subdural empyema because the patient had a long history of bilateral chronic otitis media. The 47-year-old man fell downstairs while drunk; this accident was followed by an increasing member of incidents of headache and vomiting, and he was admitted on the 15th day after the episode. Upon admission, his mental state was slightly dull; a neurologic examination revealed a mild choked disc and increased DTRs on the left. There was otorrhea and hearing difficulty on the left side, and his blood pressure was slightly elevated (170/110 mmHg). The laboratory data were negative except for an increased blood-sedimentation ratio (50/80 mm) and 1 + CRP. The precontrast CT scan demonstrated a lentiform low-density mass in the posterior part of the interhemispheric fissure extending above the right tentorium, with an unusual mass effect for the volume and a location of this mass. The postcontrast CT scan showed a marked enhancement of the falx and the tentorium around the mass. Furthermore, the pneumatization of the mastoid cells was markedly decreased. An operation was performed following the day of admission; when subdural hematoma was confirmed, it was evacuated and irrigated. The postoperative course was excellent, and the low-density mass had disappeared by the time of a follow-up CT scan 19 days after the operation. (J.P.N.)

  5. Re-estimation of acute subdural hematoma in children caused by trivial household head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Jun

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify characteristics of acute subdural hematoma in children caused by a trivial household head trauma from a modem neurosurgical and medicolegal standpoint. We performed a retrospective study of 25 children younger than 48 months hospitalized for acute subdural hematoma from December 1, 1993, through February 28, 2003. Inclusion criteria were as follows: acute subdural hematoma caused by trivial household trauma and a history of trauma corroborated by a caretaker, absence of physical injuries consistent with child abuse, fundoscopic examinations performed by a pediatric ophthalmologist, absence of fractures on general bone survey, and child abuse ruled out by long-term follow-up (more than 5 years). Twenty-one of the patients were boys, and 4 were girls. The patients ranged in age from 6 to 17 months, with an average age of 8.5 months. In 17 of 25 patients trauma had been caused by falls to the floor while standing with support or while sitting. Most of the patients were admitted to the hospital because of generalized convulsions or seizures that had developed soon after a trivial household trauma. Fifteen of the 25 (60%) patients had retinal or preretinal hemorrhage and 9 patients had bilateral retinal hemorrhage. Computed tomography showed fluid-type acute subdural hematomas at the frontal convexity or in the interhemispheric fissure in 18 of 25 (72%) patients. Fourteen of 25 (56%) patients had pre-existing external hydrocephalus (enlargements of the subarachnoid space). The long-term outcomes included normal mental development (IQ≥80) in 18 cases, mild mental retardation (IQ<80) in 7 cases, and epilepsy in 3 cases. Acute subdural hematoma in children caused by trivial household trauma is a clinical entity distinct from acute subdural hematoma caused by child abuse or shaken-baby syndrome. (author)

  6. Acute Intracranial and Spinal Subdural Hematoma Associated with Vardenafil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takaaki; Watanabe, Genya; Harada, Ryuhei; Kawasaki, Emiko; Tsukita, Kenichi; Suzuki, Yasushi

    2018-05-02

    A 28-year-old healthy man was admitted to our hospital because of right-sided headache, vomiting, and lower back pain after the administration of vardenafil. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a small, right-sided, subdural hematoma. A lumbar magnetic resonance imaging showed a longitudinally extended subdural hematoma. He had no history of trauma. We speculated that vardenafil might have had an association with the bleeding. Several reports have suggested a relationship between phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors and intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage. Our case suggested that there may also be risks of bleeding into the subdural space. Although headache and nausea are common side effects of vardenafil, hemorrhagic diseases should also be considered when symptoms are severe or prolonged. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P. [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: centro@cerebroecoluna.com.br; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Neurologicas; Andrade, Almir F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Neurocirurgia da Emergencia

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  8. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P.; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A.; Andrade, Almir F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  9. Venous or arterial blood components trigger more brain swelling, tissue death after acute subdural hematoma compared to elderly atrophic brain with subdural effusion (SDE) model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajima, Daisuke; Sato, Fumiya; Kawamura, Kenya; Sugiura, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Soo; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is a frequent complication of severe head injury, whose secondary ischemic lesions are often responsible for the severity of the disease. We focused on the differences of secondary ischemic lesions caused by the components, 0.4ml venous- or arterial-blood, or saline, infused in the subdural space, evaluating the differences in vivo model, using rats. The saline infused rats are made for elderly atrophic brain with subdural effusion (SDE) model. Our data showed that subdural blood, both venous- and arterial-blood, aggravate brain edema and lesion development more than SDE. This study is the first study, in which different fluids in rats' subdural space, ASDH or SDE are compared with the extension of early and delayed brain damage by measuring brain edema and histological lesion volume. Blood constituents started to affect the degree of ischemia underneath the subdural hemorrhage, leading to more pronounced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and brain damage. This indicates that further strategies to treat blood-dependent effects more efficiently are in view for patients with ASDH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Boxing sparring complicated by an acute subdural haematoma and brainstem haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael G; Trivedi, Rikin A; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2012-10-01

    A professional boxer developed an acute subdural haematoma after boxing sparring. Despite timely surgical decompression, he had a poor overall outcome predominantly from a delayed brainstem haematoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to elucidate the pathophysiology of the patients' injury and clinical condition.

  11. A case report of rapid spontaneous redistribution of acute supratentorial subdural hematoma to the entire spinal subdural space presenting as a Pourfour du Petit syndrome and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balik, Vladimir; Kolembus, Petr; Svajdler, Marian; Sulla, Igor; Vaverka, Miroslav; Hrabalek, Lumir

    2013-07-01

    This report illustrates the rare rapid spontaneous redistribution of an acute intracranial supratentorial subdural hematoma (AISSDH) to the entire spinal subdural space (SSS). The study is also unique in that the spinal subdural hematoma (SSH) manifested by the extremely rare Pourfour du Petit Syndrome (PPS). A 66-year-old man sustained blunt head trauma. On admission to the regional hospital, he scored 6 on GCS and his pupils were of equal size reacting to light. Initial computed tomography (CT) scan showed a unilateral AISSDH. The patient was referred to our department and arrived 16 h following the accident, at which time a repeat CT scan revealed almost complete resolution of the AISSDH without clinical improvement. On the 9th postinjury day transient anisocoria and tachycardia without spinal symptomatology developed. Since neither neurological examination nor follow-up CT scans showed intracranial pathology explaining the anisocoria, the patient was treated further conservatively. During the next 3 days circulatory instability developed and the patient succumbed to primary traumatic injury. Autopsy revealed a SSH occupying the entire SSS. This case calls attention to the unique combination of the displacement of an AISSDH to the SSS and the presentation of this clinical entity by the PPS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Selection of Treatment for Large Non-Traumatic Subdural Hematoma Developed during Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul Hee Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A 49-year-old man with end-stage renal disease was admitted to the hospital with a severe headache and vomiting. On neurological examination the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score was 15 and his brain CT showed acute subdural hematoma over the right cerebral convexity with approximately 11-mm thickness and 9-mm midline shift. We chose a conservative treatment of scheduled neurological examination, anticonvulsant medication, serial brain CT scanning, and scheduled hemodialysis (three times per week without using heparin. Ten days after admission, he complained of severe headache and a brain CT showed an increased amount of hemorrhage and midline shift. Emergency burr hole trephination and removal of the hematoma were performed, after which symptoms improved. However, nine days after the operation a sudden onset of general tonic-clonic seizure developed and a brain CT demonstrated an increased amount of subdural hematoma. Under the impression of persistent increased intracranial pressure, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU in order to control intracranial pressure. Management at the ICU consisted of regular intravenous mannitol infusion assisted with continuous renal replacement therapy. He stayed in the ICU for four days. Twenty days after the operation he was discharged without specific neurological deficits.

  13. [Rapid resolution of acute subdural haematoma with significant impact on clinical outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capion, Tenna; Lilja-Cyron, Alexander; Kelsen, Jesper

    2017-09-04

    A 73-year-old woman was admitted to hospital due to anaemia. She suffered a minor head trauma and deteriorated to deep unconsciousness. A CT revealed an acute subdural haematoma (ASDH). Initially, she was not found to be a candidate for neurosurgical intervention, but within 24 hours her level of consciousness improved dramatically, and a renewed CT showed resolution of the ASDH. She underwent acute craniotomy with good outcome. This illustrates the importance of re-evaluation of patients with intracranial haemorrhage.

  14. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in the Aged, Trauma or Degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs) are generally regarded to be a traumatic lesion. It was regarded as a stroke in 17th century, an inflammatory disease in 19th century. From 20th century, it became a traumatic lesion. CSH frequently occur after a trauma, however, it cannot occur when there is no enough subdural space even after a severe head injury. CSH may occur without trauma, when there is sufficient subdural space. The author tried to investigate trends in the causation of CSH. By a review of literature, the author suggested a different view on the causation of CSH. CSH usually originated from either a subdural hygroma or an acute subdural hematoma. Development of CSH starts from the separation of the dural border cell (DBC) layer, which induces proliferation of DBCs with production of neomembrane. Capillaries will follow along the neomembrane. Hemorrhage would occur into the subdural fluid either by tearing of bridge veins or repeated microhemorrhage from the neomembrane. That is the mechanism of hematoma enlargement. Trauma or bleeding tendency may precipitate development of CSH, however, it cannot lead CSH, if there is no sufficient subdural space. The key determinant for development of CSH is a sufficient subdural space, in other words, brain atrophy. The most common and universal cause of brain atrophy is the aging. Modifying Virchow's description, CSH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by degeneration of the brain. Now, it is reasonable that degeneration of brain might play pivotal role in development of CSH in the aged persons.

  15. A case of acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured aneurysm detected by postmortem angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Yajima, Daisuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-03-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is mostly caused by head trauma, but intrinsic causes also exist such as aneurysm rupture. We describe here a case involving a man in his 70s who was found lying on the bedroom floor by his family. CT performed at the hospital showed ASDH and a forensic autopsy was requested. Postmortem cerebral angiography showed dilatation of the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery, which coincided with the dilated part of the Sylvian fissure. Extravasation of contrast medium into the subdural hematoma from this site was suggestive of a ruptured aneurysm. Autopsy revealed a fleshy hematoma (total weight 110 g) in the right subdural space and findings of brain herniation. As indicated on angiography, a ruptured saccular aneurysm was confirmed at the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery. Obvious injuries to the head or face could not be detected on either external or internal examination, and intrinsic ASDH due to a ruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysm was determined as the cause of death. One of the key points of forensic diagnosis is the strict differentiation between intrinsic and extrinsic onset for conditions leading to death. Although most subdural hematomas (SDH) are caused by extrinsic factors, forensic pathologists should consider the possibility of intrinsic SDH. In addition, postmortem angiography can be useful for identifying vascular lesions in such cases.

  16. Outcome of burr hole surgery in the emergency room for severe acute subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young-Soo; Hironaka, Yasuhiro; Motoyama, Yasushi; Asai, Hideki; Watanabe, Tomoo; Nishio, Kenji; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Okuchi, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    We have performed burr hole surgery in the emergency room for severe acute subdural hematoma from April 2007 in twenty five patients. All patients were deep comatose and showed cerebral herniation sign with bilateral pupillary abnormalities. Burr hole surgeries were performed as soon as possible after CT evaluation. Continually decomporresive craiectomies were followed if clinical improvements were achieved and mild baribiturate-moderate hypothermia combined (MB-MH) therapy was induced postoperatively in some cases. The mean average was 65.6 years (range 16-93). The causes of head injuries were traffic accident in 9, fall down in 13 and unknown in 3. The mean Glasgow coma scale (GCS) on admission was 4.4 (range 3-9). The mean time interval from arrival to burr hole surgery was 33.5 minutes (range 21-50 minutes). Decompressive craniectomy was indicated in 14 cases and MB-MH therapy was induced in 13 cases. The overall clinical outcome consisted of good recovery in 3, moderate disability in 2, severe disability in 3, persistent vegetative state in 3 and death in 14. Favorable results can be expected even in patients with serious acute subdural hematoma. Emergent burr hole surgery was effective to decrease intracranial pressure rapidly and to save time. So active burr hole surgery in the emergency room is strongly recommended to all cases of severe acute subdural hematoma. (author)

  17. Acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery: a case report

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    Hagino Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spinal anesthesia is a widely used general purpose anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. Case presentation We report the case of a 73-year-old Japanese woman who had acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery. Conclusion This case highlights the need to pay attention to acute intracranial subdural hemorrhage as a complication after spinal anesthesia. If the headache persists even in a supine position or nausea occurs abruptly, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain should be conducted. An intracranial subdural hematoma may have a serious outcome and is an important differential diagnosis for headache after spinal anesthesia.

  18. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma as an initial presentation of choriocarcinoma: A case report

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    Rocque Brandon G

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Diverse sequelae of central nervous system metastasis of choriocarcinoma have been reported, including infarction, intra or extra axial hemorrhages, aneurysm formation and carotid-cavernous fistula. Here we report a case of subdural hematoma as the first presentation of choriocarcinoma. Case presentation The patient is a 34-year-old woman whose initial presentation of widely metastatic choriocarcinoma was an acute subdural hematoma, requiring decompressive craniectomy. Histopathologic examination of the tissue showed no evidence of choriocarcinoma, but the patient was found to have diffuse metastatic disease and cerebrospinal fluid indices highly suggestive of intracranial metastasis. Conclusion Choriocarcinoma frequently metastasizes intracranially. We review the diverse possible manifestations of this process. In addition, the cerebrospinal fluid:serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin ratio is an important factor in diagnosing these cases. Finally, the role of the neurosurgeon is discussed.

  19. [Subdural empyema due to gemella morbillorum as a complication of acute sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boto, Leonor Reis; Calado, Cláudia; Vieira, Marisa; Camilo, Cristina; Abecasis, Francisco; Campos, Alexandre R; Correia, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    Subdural empyema is a life-threatening infection that may complicate acute sinusitis. The authors report the case of a previously healthy 10 year-old girl who presented with subdural empyema due to Gemella morbillorum after an untreated maxillary, ethmoidal and esphenoidal sinusitis. Despite immediate drainage of the empyema and underlying primary infection and treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics, she later developed frontal cerebritis and refractory intracranial hypertension, needing urgent decompressive craniectomy. She recovered gradually, maintaining to date slight right hemyparesis and aphasia. Even though it is considered a low virulence organism, G. morbillorum has been increasingly described in central nervous system infection. In this case, the prompt institution of broad spectrum antibiotics and surgical drainage, as well as the agressive treatment of complications, including decompressive craniectomy, were crucial to the patient's recovery.

  20. Acute respiratory distress syndrome assessment after traumatic brain injury

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    Shahrooz Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is one of the most important complications associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI. ARDS is caused by inflammation of the lungs and hypoxic damage with lung physiology abnormalities associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Aim of this study is to determine the epidemiology of ARDS and the prevalence of risk factors. Methods: This prospective study performed on patients with acute traumatic head injury hospitalization in the intensive care unit of the Shohaday-e Haftom-e-Tir Hospital (September 2012 to September 2013 done. About 12 months, the data were evaluated. Information including age, sex, education, employment, drug and alcohol addiction, were collected and analyzed. The inclusion criteria were head traumatic patients and exclusion was the patients with chest trauma. Questionnaire was designed with doctors supervision of neurosurgery. Then the collected data were analysis. Results: In this study, the incidence of ARDS was 23.8% and prevalence of metabolic acidosis was 31.4%. Most injury with metabolic acidosis was Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH 48 (60% and Subdural hemorrhage (SDH was Next Level with 39 (48% Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS were significantly decreased (P< 0.0001. The level of consciousness in patients with skull fractures significantly lower than those without fractures (P= 0.009 [(2.3±4.6 vs (4.02±7.07]. Prevalence of metabolic acidosis during hospitalization was 80 patients (31.4%. Conclusion: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Management and treatment is essential to reduce the mortality. In this study it was found the age of patients with ARDS was higher than patients without complications. ARDS risk factor for high blood pressure was higher in men. Most victims were pedestrians. The most common injury associated with ARDS was SDH. Our analysis

  1. Life-threatening acute subdural haematoma after combined spinal–epidural anaesthesia in labour

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    Bulent Bakar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Only few reports in literature have pointed out to the possibility of a cranial subdural haematoma formation associated with dural puncture during spinal or epidural analgesia. We herein describe such a rare case who was diagnosed to have acute subdural haematoma after combined spinal–epidural anaesthesia used in labour. Case report: A 34-year-old, primigravid women with a gestation of 38 weeks underwent caesarean section under combined spinal–epidural anaesthesia and gave birth to a healthy boy. Thirty-two hours after delivery, her moderate headache progressed to a severe headache associated with nausea and vomiting and later was more complicated with a generalized tonic–clonic seizure and ensuing lethargy. Computed tomography of the brain demonstrated a right-sided fronto-temporo-parietal acute subdural haematoma with diffuse cerebral oedema. She underwent urgent FTP craniotomy and evacuation of the haematoma. Early postoperative cranial computed tomography showed a clean operative site. Eight days after subdural haematoma surgery, she became lethargic again, and this time cranial computed tomography disclosed an extradural haematoma under the bone flap for which she had to undergo surgery again. Two days later, she was discharged home with Karnofsky performance score of 90/100. At follow-up exam, she was neurologically intact and her cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance were normal. Conclusions: As conclusion, with the use of this combined spinal–epidural anaesthesia, it should be kept in mind that headache does not always mean low pressure headache associated with spinal anaesthesia and that a catastrophic complication of subdural haematoma may also occur. Resumo: Justificativa e objetivos: Apenas alguns relatos na literatura mencionaram a possibilidade de formação de hematoma subdural craniano associada à punção durante a raquianestesia ou anestesia epidural. O presente relato descreve

  2. Acute epidural-like appearance of an encapsulated solid non-organized chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Ruth; Pascual, José M; Subhi-Issa, Issa; Yus, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    We report the exceptional case of an encapsulated solid non-organized chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) in a 67-year-old woman that was admitted with acute hemiplegia followed by rapid deterioration in consciousness 5 months after a minor head trauma. Computed tomography (CT) showed an extracerebral biconvex shaped hyperdense mass that led to the misdiagnosis of an acute epidural hematoma. Urgent craniotomy revealed an encapsulated mass filled with solid fresh clot in the subdural space. Complete evacuation of this SDH, including both its inner and outer membranes, was achieved, and the patient recovered successfully. Histological analysis confirmed that the content of the hematoma corresponded to a newly formed clot that was enclosed between an inner membrane, composed of two collagen layers, and an outer membrane with a three layered structure. Chronic SDH may seldom present as an encapsulated solid non-organized lesion that consists of a fibrous capsule enclosing a fresh clot and lacking the thick fibrous septations that typically connect the inner and outer membranes of organized chronic SDH. This entity mimics the clinical course and radiological appearance of acute epidural hematomas and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of extracerebral hyperdense biconvex shaped lesions.

  3. Encapsulated Unresolved Subdural Hematoma Mimicking Acute Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report

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    Park, Sang-Soo; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Kwon, Chang-Young

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) has been uncommonly reported. To our knowledge, a few cases of lentiform ASDH have been reported. The mechanism of encapsulated ASDH has been studied but not completely clarified. Encapsulated lentiform ASDH on a computed tomography (CT) scan mimics acute epidural hematoma (AEDH). Misinterpretation of biconvex-shaped ASDH on CT scan as AEDH often occurs and is usually identified by neurosurgical intervention. We report a case of an 85-year-old man presenting with a 2-day history of mental deterioration and right-sided weakness. CT scan revealed a biconvex-shaped hyperdense mass mixed with various densities of blood along the left temporoparietal cerebral convexity, which was misinterpreted as AEDH preoperatively. Emergency craniectomy was performed, but no AEDH was found beneath the skull. In the subdural space, encapsulated ASDH was located. En block resection of encapsulated ASDH was done. Emergency craniectomy confirmed that the preoperatively diagnosed AEDH was an encapsulated ASDH postoperatively. Radiologic studies of AEDH-like SDH allow us to establish an easy differential diagnosis between AEDH and ASDH by distinct features. More histological studies will provide us information on the mechanism underlying encapsulated ASDH. PMID:27169052

  4. A case of acute spinal subdural hematoma with subarachnoid hemorrhage: Rapid spontaneous remission, relapse, and complete resolution

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    Michito Namekawa

    2017-06-01

    In addition to rostrocaudal spreading of bloody components in the subdural space, rupture of the hematoma into the subarachnoid space must have released pressure, compressing the spinal cord. In this case report, we also describe the serial MRI studies and note the limitations of the resolution of spinal MRI in the acute phase.

  5. Rapid reduction of acute subdural hematoma and redistribution of hematoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Arata; Omata, Tomohiro; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    An 88-year-old woman presented with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) which showed rapid resolution on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. She was transferred to our hospital after falling out of bed. On admission, she was comatose with Japan Coma Scale score of 200 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E1V1M2. Brain CT showed a thick left frontotemporal ASDH. Conservative treatment consisted of 200 ml of glycerol administered intravenously twice a day, and maintenance in the approximately 20 degree head-up position to reduce intracranial pressure. Three days later, her consciousness recovered to Japan Coma Scale score of 30 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E2V4M5. CT showed obvious reduction of the hematoma without brain or scalp swelling. Spinal MR imaging detected no redistribution of hematoma to the spine. The present case illustrates that rapid spontaneous reduction of ASDH may occur by redistribution of hematoma, mainly to the supratentorial subdural space because of brain atrophy.

  6. Natural Course of Initially Non-Operated Cases of Acute Subdural Hematoma : The Risk Factors of Hematoma Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seong; Lee, Sang Gu; Kim, Eun Young; Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Woo Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objectives of the present study were to characterize the natural course of initially non-operated traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) and to identify the risk factors of hematoma progression. Methods Retrospective analysis was performed using sequential computed tomography (CT) images maintained in a prospective observational database containing 177 ASDH cases treated from 2005 to 2011. Patients were allocated to four groups as followings; 136 (76.8%) patients to the spontaneous resolution group, 12 (6.8%) who underwent operation between 4 hours and 7 days to the rapid worsening group (RWG), 24 (13.6%) who experienced an increase of hematoma and that underwent operation between 7 and 28 days to the subacute worsening group (SWG), and 5 (2.8%) who developed delayed aggravation requiring surgery from one month after onset to the delayed worsening group (DWG). Groups were compared with respect to various factors. Results No significant intergroup difference was found with respect to age, mechanism of injury, or initial Glasgow Coma Scale. The presence of combined cerebral contusion or subarachnoid hemorrhage was found to be a significant prognostic factor. Regarding CT findings, mixed density was common in the RWG and the SWG. Midline shifting, hematoma thickness, and numbers of CT slices containing hematoma were significant prognostic factors of the RWG and the SWG. Brain atrophy was more severe in the SWG and the DWG. Conclusion A large proportion of initially non-operated ASDHs worsen in the acute or subacute phase. Patients with risk factors should be monitored carefully for progression by repeat CT imaging. PMID:24278650

  7. Acute intracranial hematoma formation following excision of a cervical subdural tumor: a report of two cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuexiao; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Ting; Li, Guizhi; Zhang, Guoqing; Khan, Hassan; Xiang, Hongfei; Chen, Bohua

    2014-01-01

    An intracranial hematoma is a rare, yet significant, complication following spinal surgery. The authors describe two cases with acute intracranial hematoma formation after excision of a cervical subdural schwannoma. One was a 14-year-old girl who developed bilateral intracranial extradural hematomas immediately following excision of the C4 subdural schwannoma. The other was a 59-year-old woman who had an acute cerebellar hematoma after removal of the C2-C5 subdural schwannoma. During the surgeries of both cases, spinal dura was partially removed together with the tumor and the dural sac could not be repaired, resulting in large amounts of intraoperative CSF loss and persistent postoperative CSF leakage. Both patients failed to regain consciousness from anesthesia after surgery, and a cranial CT scan identified large intracranial hematomas. Urgent hematoma evacuation was ultimately performed to save the patients. Based on the authors' experience and literature review, a conclusion was drawn that considerable CSF leakage and a sharp decrease of CSF pressure are common features during the excision of a spinal subdural tumor, which may lead to acute intracranial hematomas. Continual postoperative monitoring in patients with this condition should be of a very high priority. A CT or MRI should be immediately investigated to exclude intracranial hematomas for any patient with delayed emergence from anesthesia following spinal surgery. Hematoma evacuation is indispensable once an intracranial hematoma is identified in the patient who fails to regain consciousness from anesthesia post surgery. Furthermore, the possible pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the formation of an intracranial hematoma after spinal procedures, particularly after manipulations of a cervical subdural tumor, are discussed.

  8. Redistribution of hematoma to spinal subdural space as a mechanism for the rapid spontaneous resolution of posttraumatic intracranial acute subdural hematoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sui To; Yuen, Ming Keung; Fok, Kam Fuk; Yuen, Shing Chau; Yam, Kwong Yui; Fong, Dawson

    2009-01-01

    Rapid spontaneous resolution of posttraumatic intracranial ASDH has been reported in the literature since 1986. We report a case to demonstrate that redistribution of hematoma to the spinal subdural space is a mechanism for the rapid spontaneous resolution of posttraumatic intracranial ASDH. A 73-year-old woman with a slipped-and-fell injury had a worst GCS score of 8/15. Computerized tomography of the brain demonstrated a large intracranial ASDH with mass effect. Conservative management was decided because of her poor premorbid general condition. Rapid clinical improvement was observed within 5 hours after the CT. Progress CT of the brain at 45 hours postinjury showed that the size of the intracranial ASDH was markedly diminished. The CT findings apparently demonstrated a caudal distribution of the intracranial ASDH over the tentorium and then into the posterior fossa. To investigate this further, an MRI of the spine was performed, which showed that there was spinal SDH in the cervical and thoracic spine. This is the first report demonstrating that redistribution of posttraumatic intracranial ASDH to the spinal subdural space is one of the mechanisms behind the rapid spontaneous resolution of posttraumatic intracranial ASDH in the acute phase.

  9. Pathogenesis of chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Yoshio; Nakamura, Norio; Sato, Jun; Hasegawa, Yoshio.

    1982-01-01

    Ten cases of chronic subdural hematoma that were followed by a sequential study with CT from an early posttraumatic period to evolution of chronic subdural hematoma were reported. In four of these 10 cases, the initial CT showed thin subdural collections of high density suggesting acute subdural hematoma. Two weeks later, the density of subdural collections reduced, but their volumes increased. Clinical symptoms such as headache and disorientation occurred three or four weeks later. Preoperative CT showed similar huge subdural collections of low density and marked mass effect. These cases underwent surgery from 24 to 44 days after injury, and development of neomenbranes was confirmed. In the remaining six cases, the initial CT showed thin subdural collections of low density suggesting subdural hygroma. In five of the six cases, the density of the subdural collections was slightly higher than that of cerebrospinal fluid, and in one case, an area of spotted high density was shown. It was suggested that these were mixtures with blood. Follow-up CT scans revealed that the subdural collections increased in size but remained at a uniformly low density for the first month after the head injury, and then the increase in density occurred. Operations were performed 55 to 76 days after injury, and operative findings were not different from those of common chronic subdural hematoma. From these investigations, it was suggested that there were two types of evolution of chronic subdural hematoma. One is the development from acute subdural hematomas, and the other from subdural hygromas. It is supposed that blood and cerebrospinal fluid are very important factors in the evolution of subdural collections into chronic subdural hematomas. (J.P.N.)

  10. Acute intracranial bleeding and recurrence after bur hole craniostomy for chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Chang Hyeun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Chi Heon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Chun Kee; Jung, Hee-Won; Yoo, Heon

    2015-07-01

    There is inconsistency among the perioperative management strategies currently used for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). Moreover, postoperative complications such as acute intracranial bleeding and cSDH recurrence affect clinical outcome of cSDH surgery. This study evaluated the risk factors associated with acute intracranial bleeding and cSDH recurrence and identified an effective perioperative strategy for cSDH patients. A retrospective study of patients who underwent bur hole craniostomy for cSDH between 2008 and 2012 was performed. A consecutive series of 303 cSDH patients (234 males and 69 females; mean age 67.17 years) was analyzed. Postoperative acute intracranial bleeding developed in 14 patients (4.57%) within a mean of 3.07 days and recurrence was observed in 37 patients (12.21%) within a mean of 31.69 days (range 10-104 days) after initial bur hole craniostomy. The comorbidities of hematological disease and prior shunt surgery were clinical factors associated with acute bleeding. There was a significant risk of recurrence in patients with diabetes mellitus, but recurrence did not affect the final neurological outcome (p = 0.776). Surgical details, including the number of operative bur holes, saline irrigation of the hematoma cavity, use of a drain, and type of postoperative ambulation, were not significantly associated with outcome. However, a large amount of drainage was associated with postoperative acute bleeding. Bur hole craniostomy is an effective surgical procedure for initial and recurrent cSDH. Patients with hematological disease or a history of prior shunt surgery are at risk for postoperative acute bleeding; therefore, these patients should be carefully monitored to avoid overdrainage. Surgeons should consider informing patients with diabetes mellitus that this comorbidity is associated with an increased likelihood of recurrence.

  11. A case of diffuse hemispheric gyral high density on CT scan following acute subdural hematoma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannuki, Seiji; Oi, Shizuo

    1986-01-01

    A case of diffuse hemispheric gyral high density area following acute subdural hematoma was reported. A 2 - 10/12 year-old male was admitted to our hospital in comatous state after head injury by fall. Neurological examination revealed deep coma with anisocoria (R < L), absence of light reflex and positive bilateral Babinski reflex. CT scan disclosed left acute subdural hematoma with remarkable midline shift and tentorial herniation sign. Emergency decompressive craniectomy was performed. Posttraumatic hydrocephalus appeared after 10 days. So, ventriculoperitoneal shunt was done. The patient became gradually improved, but was in appalic state. 23 days after craniectomy, suddenly diffuse hemispheric gyral high density appeared on plain CT scan. In spite of this change, no clinical change was found. This high density spontaneously disappeared 10 days after appearance. Cerebral infarction-like phenomenon on postoperative CT scan of acute subdural hematoma in infants was sometimes reported. This phenomenon was sometimes accompanied with hemorrhagic infarction-like high density on CT scan. Diffuse hemispheric gyral high density was probably a kind of those hemorrhagic infarction-like phenomenon. Possible mechanism of this peculiar high density is discussed on the basis of characteristics of child's cerebral artery and pathophysiology of cerebral infarction. (author)

  12. Differentiation of subdural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetterling, T.; Rama, B.

    1989-01-01

    Although X-ray computerized tomography facilitates the diagnosis of intracranial disorders, differentiation of the lesions like extracerebral effusions is often unsatisfactory. Epidural and acute subdural haematoma shown as hyperdensity in CT requires an emergency neurosurgical operation, so that differentiation of these hyperdense effusions may not be required. But the discrimination of the effusions shown as hypodensity in CT (chronic subdural haematoma, subdural hygroma, subdural empyema as well as arachnoid cysts) is urgent because of the different treatment of these effusions. The clinical differentiation is hampered by unspecific neurologic symptoms and the lack of adequate laboratory tests. Some aspects facilitating the diagnostic decision are presented. Recent magnetic resonance (MR) studies promise further progress in differentiating between subdural effusions. (orig.) [de

  13. CT manifestation of diffuse brain injury in cases of serious acute subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikaido, Yuji; Shimomura, Takahide; Fujita, Toyohisa; Hirabayashi, Hidehiro; Utsumi, Shozaburo

    1987-04-01

    Eighty-two adult cases of serious acute subdural hematoma (SDH) of Glasgow Coma Scale 9 or more severe (50 operated-on and 32 non-operated-on cases) were selected in order to study the relation between CT findings at the acute stage and the prognosis of SDH. The CT findings were analyzed in the following respects: size of SDH, midline shift, manifestation of perimesencephalic cisterns, and presence or absence of diffuse hemispheric swelling, diffuse cerebral swelling, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, epidural hematoma, hemorrhagic contusion, and dilatation of the contralateral temporal horn. As a result, the most important prognostic signs were found to be: (1) diffuse hemispheric swelling, (2) diffuse cerebral swelling, (3) subarachnoid hemorrhage of the basal-cistern type, (4) intraventricular hemorrhage, (5) deep-seated contusion, (6) complete effacement of the perimesencephalic cisterns, and (7) dilatation of the contralateral temporal horn. These findings, except for the last item, which indicates the final phase of tentorial herniation, were regarded as various patterns of the CT manifestation of diffuse brain injury; the positively associated diffuse brain injury seemed to determine the prognosis of SDH.

  14. Spontaneous subdural hematoma associated to Duret hemorrhage

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    William Alves Martins, MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma (SH is a neurosurgical emergency, usually caused by head trauma. Non-traumatic causes include aneurysm or arterial–venous malformation rupture, coagulopathy and others. We report the case of a 66 year-old man who developed apparently unprovoked signs of increased intracranial pressure. Brain computed tomography scan showed an acute spontaneous SH, surgically treated. Throughout surgery, a ruptured cortical artery with intensive bleeding appeared and was cauterized. After surgery, patient remained comatose and a new CT demonstrated Duret hemorrhage at the brainstem. Acute spontaneous SH of arterial origin is rare and highly lethal, in which a good prognosis relies on early diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Acute Subdural Hematoma and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Caused by Ruptured Cortical Artery Aneurysm: Case Report and Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekarchizadeh, Ahmad; Masih, Saburi; Reza, Pourkhalili; Seif, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    The present report describes an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), due to ruptured cortical aneurysm. To our knowledge, extremely rare cases of this sort have been reported so far. A 23-year-old male patient without previous trauma presented with severe headache and rapidly decreasing level of consciousness to decerebrate status. Computed tomography (CT) scan has demonstrated an ASDH together with SAH. Hematoma has immediately been evacuated without any evaluation by angiography. After evacuation of the thick subdural clot, a 10-mm aneurysm was revealed on a precentral artery of frontal cortex, which was ligated. However, after 35 days the patient discharged with left side hemiparesis and dysphasia, and just after several months of admission he got symptom free. Ruptured cortical aneurysm should be considered as one of the causes of spontaneous ASDH. Vascular anomaly investigations are suggested for these cases, thus CT angiography or digital subtraction angiography has to be considered if clinical condition allows. PMID:28503501

  16. Process of evolution to chronic subdural hematoma, (1); A study with MRI and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Ryungchan; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Yokoyama, Masato; Sasaki, Takashi (Kanazawa Medical Univ. Uchinada (Japan)); Mun, Jhongbu; Ohi, Masayoshi

    1989-10-01

    The process of evolution to chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) was discussed on the basis of MRI and CT findings. The materials were 22 sides of 15 cases in which CSH had been diagnosed by means of MRI, CT, and/or surgery. These cases were followed by CT with/without MRI after the initial head injury. Various findings were shown in the subdural space, such as subdural hygroma (40%), acute subdural hematoma (25%), normal state (20%), and traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (15%). Regardless of the conditions of the subdural space after the head injury, however, CSH was finally present in all cases after the formation of subdural hygroma and its enlargement. The duration of the formation of hygroma after head injury ranged from 0 to 12 days (mean: 2.7 days), and its final confirmation ranged from 11 to 61 days (mean: 33.4 days). The period from the final confirmation of hygroma to the first recognition of CSH was between 8 and 36 days (mean: 17.7 days), while the period from head injury to the formation of CSH was between 27 and 75 days (mean: 51.1 days). The process of evolution to CSH may be thought to be as follows: A normal subdural space changes into a subdural hygroma by the tearing of the arachnoid membrane due to head injury. Capsule formation follows the process lasting for more than three weeks. CSH develops in consequence of bleeding from the outer membrane. (author).

  17. Acute, Nontraumatic Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma: A Case Report and Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Taylor J.

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (sSDH) is a rare condition outright. Moreover, cases that occur spontaneously in the absence of an identifiable etiology are considerably less common and remain poorly understood. Here, we present the case of a 43-year-old man with spontaneous sSDH presenting with acute onset low back pain and paraplegia. Urgent magnetic resonance imaging identified a dorsal SDH from T8 to T11 with compression of the spinal cord. Emergent T8–T10 laminectomies with intradural exploration and hematoma evacuation were performed. However, despite prompt identification and appropriate action, the patient's recovery was modest and significant disability remained at discharge. This unique and unusual case demonstrates that spontaneous sSDH requires prompt surgical treatment to minimize associated morbidity and supports the association between the presence of severe neurological deficits upon initial presentation with less favorable outcomes. We performed a comprehensive systematic review of spontaneous sSDH of unknown etiology, which demonstrates that emergent surgical intervention is indicated for patients presenting with severe neurological deficits and the presence of these deficits is predictive of poor neurological outcome. Furthermore, conservative management should be considered in patients presenting with mild neurological deficits as spontaneous resolution followed by favorable neurological outcomes is often observed in these patients. PMID:29441210

  18. Plasma aldosterone and CT findings in head injury, especially in acute subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hideaki

    1988-12-01

    As we have already reported, an increase in the plasma aldosterone level was regulary found after severe head injury. And the values of plasma aldosterone in unconscious patients with increased intracranial pressure were significantly higher than those in patients without unconsciousness. Thus, plasma aldosterone in acute phase of head injury seems to be a sensitive index of increased intracranial pressure. In the present study, we measured plasma aldosterone levels in three groups ; subdural hematoma with mid-line shift (group A), cerebral contusion without mid-line shift (group B) and cerebral conceussion (group C). In group A, the peak value of aldosterone was markedly high (283.9 +- 142.5). In B, the peak value (143.7 +- 27.8) was higher than in C (116.3 +- 35.0). And, correlation between the serum aldosterone levels and CT findings, especially the mid-line shift was found. As a conclusion, the serum levels of aldosterone seems to be associated with intracranial pressure.

  19. Chronic subdural hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subdural hemorrhage - chronic; Subdural hematoma - chronic; Subdural hygroma ... A subdural hematoma develops when bridging veins tear and leak blood. These are the tiny veins that run between the ...

  20. Subdural infusion of dexamethasone inhibits leukomyelitis after acute spinal cord injury in a rat model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kwiecien, J. M.; Jarocz, B.; Urdzíková, Lucia; Rola, R.; Dabrowski, W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2015), s. 41-51 ISSN 1641-4640 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : spinal cord injury * leukomyelitis * macrophage s * subdural infusion * dexamethasone Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.233, year: 2015

  1. Subdural effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001422.htm Subdural effusion To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A subdural effusion is a collection of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) trapped ...

  2. Prognosis of patients in coma after acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torné, Ramon; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Romero-Chala, Fabián; Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (aSDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture are rare. Most patients present with coma and their functional prognosis has been classically considered to be very poor. Previous studies mixed good-grade and poor-grade patients and reported variable outcomes. We reviewed our experience by focusing on patients in coma only and hypothesized that aSDH might worsen initial mortality but not long-term functional outcome. Between 2005 and 2013, 440 subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients were admitted to our center. Nineteen (4.3%) were found to have an associated aSDH and 13 (2.9%) of these presented with coma. Their prospectively collected clinical and outcome data were reviewed and compared with that of 104 SAH patients without aSDH who presented with coma during the same period. Median aSDH thickness was 10mm. Four patients presented with an associated aneurysmal cortical laceration and only one had good recovery. Overall, we observed good long-term outcomes in both SAH patients in coma with aSDH and those without aSDH (38.5% versus 26.4%). Associated aSDH does not appear to indicate a poorer long-term functional prognosis in SAH patients presenting with coma. Anisocoria and brain herniation are observed in patients with aSDH thicknesses that are smaller than those observed in trauma patients. Despite a high initial mortality, early surgery to remove the aSDH results in a good outcome in over 60% of survivors. Aneurysmal cortical laceration appears to be an independent entity which shows a poorer prognosis than other types of aneurysmal aSDH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute subdural hemorrhage while traveling by bus: a risk factor in the elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysal, Suna; Topacoglu, Hakan; Acarbay, Sabiha; Ozbas, Kerem

    2005-01-01

    A 71-year-old man was delivered to our emergency department by an intercity bus. About 4 hours into a journey, he had complained of a headache to his wife. After one more hour, she noted a change in his level of alertness and notified the bus driver. A computed tomography scan of the head showed a subdural hemorrhage.

  4. Intervention of Peiyuan Huayu Decoction on the neuron damage in model rats with acute subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xuan Fan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the intervention effect of Peiyuan Huayu Decoction on the neuron damage in model rats with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH. Methods: 160 SD rats were randomly divided into four groups, and the ASDH model rats were made by stereotactic autoblood injection, and sham operation group received craniotomy without blood injection. Sham operation group and model group were normally bred after model establishment, and 6 h after model establishment, the treatment group received intragastric administration of Peiyuan Huayu Decoction, and control group received intragastric administration of Piracetam Tablets, 1 time a day. On the 1d, 3d, 5d and 7d after model establishment, the general conditions of rats (activity, food intake and mental state were observed, blood was collected via auricula dextra, ELISA method was used to determine peripheral plasma NSE and S100毬 protein contents, routine HE staining was conducted after perfusion fixation, the neurons in blood injection side of brain tissue were counted, and the neuron damage was observed. Results: 26 rats were dead in the experiment. The general conditions of sham operation group were significantly better than those of other groups, treatment group was significantly better than model group and control group on the 5d group (P0.05; neuron count of sham operation group was basically stable, treatment group was not different from model group and control group on the 1d (P>0.05, treatment group was better than model group (P0.05 on the 3d, and treatment group was better than model group and control group on the 5d and 7d (P0.05, S100毬 protein and NSE contents decreased significantly on the 3d, and treatment group was significantly different from model group and control group (P<0.05, S100毬 protein and NSE contents increased on the 5d and 7d, the increase in treatment group was slower than that in model group and control group, and there was significant difference (P<0.05. Conclusion

  5. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma: A rare presentation of a dural intracranial fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar, Guilherme Brasileiro; Veiga, José Carlos Esteves; Silva, João Miguel de Almeida; Conti, Mario Luiz Marques

    2016-03-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas are acquired lesions between the meningeal arteries and their associated draining veins. They may have highly variable clinical presentations and evolution, from severe neurological deficit to no or trivial symptoms. Intracranial hemorrhage occurs in less than 24% of all dural fistulas, and the bleeding is usually subarachnoid, more infrequently intracerebral, and rarely in the subdural space. Here, we present a rare case of a patient who presented with a subdural spontaneous hemorrhage. After investigation by cerebral angiography, the diagnosis of a dural arteriovenous fistula was made. The patient underwent uneventful endovascular treatment. As there are with only a few reports in the literature of such a presentation, we present this patient and perform a brief review of the literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of acute complex traumatic wound with a dermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute complex traumatic wounds of the lower limbs are usually ... The recovery is lengthy, and the outcome dependent on the initial injury, the surgical ... of fracture and use of a dermal regeneration template over the fracture site, ...

  7. Patterns of Traumatic Intracranial Bleeds at Kenyatta National

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Valued eMachines Customer

    Conclusion: Acute subdural hematomas are the commonest traumatic ... Most of the intracranial bleeds were acute, 27.5% (n=14) followed by chronic, 9.8% .... Gentry LR, Godersky JC, Thomson B. MR imaging of head trauma: review of the ...

  8. Acute Renal Failure due to Non-Traumatic Rhabdomyolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagehan Aslan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is a musculoskeletal clinical and biochemical syndrome which is seen associated with traumatic and non-traumatic causes and is known as muscular dystrophy. Rhabdomyolysis which develops following crush-type trauma (Crush syndrome is rarely seen but is a well-known clinical event in the etiology of acute renal failure. Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is rare. The case is here presented of a patient who was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis on presentation with acute renal failure and to whom repeated dialysis was applied.

  9. Clinical profile of subdural hematomas: dangerousness of subdural subacute hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kpelao, E; Beketi, K A; Moumouni, A K; Doleagbenou, A; Ntimon, B; Egbohou, P; Mouzou, T; Tomta, K; Sama, D H; Abalo, A; Walla, A; Dossim, A

    2016-04-01

    Subacute subdural hematomas are a poorly individualized nosological entity, often equated clinically to chronic subdural hematomas. Yet, their neurological deterioration which is usually rapid seems to distinguish them from chronic subdural hematomas. We wanted to show this dangerousness by establishing the clinically evolving profile of the three types of subdural hematomas. This was a prospective and retrospective study of 63 subdural hematoma (18 acute, 13 subacute, and 32 chronic) patients admitted between 2012 and 2014 in the neurosurgery unit of Lomé University Hospital. Hematomas were classified according to the elapsed time after head injury and blood density on CT. The main parameter studied was the evolution of the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) in the 3 months following the trauma, enabling to establish an evolving profile of each type of hematoma. The average age of patients was 58.1 years for chronic subdural hematomas and 47.6 years for subacute subdural hematomas. Disease duration before admission was 13.1 days for chronic against 36.6 h for subacute hematoma. The clinical profile shows acute worsening within hours during the second week for patients with subacute hematoma, while it is progressive for patients with chronic hematoma. We noted two deaths, all victims of a subacute hematoma (one operated, one patient waiting for surgery). Iso-density hematoma on CT, especially in a young person, must be considered as a predictive factor of rapid neurological aggravation suggesting an urgent care or increased monitoring by paramedics.

  10. Activated Protein C Drives the Hyperfibrinolysis of Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Ross A; Guerreiro, Maria; Frith, Daniel; Rourke, Claire; Platton, Sean; Cohen, Mitchell; Pearse, Rupert; Thiemermann, Chris; Brohi, Karim

    2017-01-01

    Major trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with hemorrhage accounting for 40% of deaths. Acute traumatic coagulopathy exacerbates bleeding, but controversy remains over the degree to which inhibition of procoagulant pathways (anticoagulation), fibrinogen loss, and fibrinolysis drive the pathologic process. Through a combination of experimental study in a murine model of trauma hemorrhage and human observation, the authors' objective was to determine the predominant pathophysiology of acute traumatic coagulopathy. First, a prospective cohort study of 300 trauma patients admitted to a single level 1 trauma center with blood samples collected on arrival was performed. Second, a murine model of acute traumatic coagulopathy with suppressed protein C activation via genetic mutation of thrombomodulin was used. In both studies, analysis for coagulation screen, activated protein C levels, and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) was performed. In patients with acute traumatic coagulopathy, the authors have demonstrated elevated activated protein C levels with profound fibrinolytic activity and early depletion of fibrinogen. Procoagulant pathways were only minimally inhibited with preservation of capacity to generate thrombin. Compared to factors V and VIII, proteases that do not undergo activated protein C-mediated cleavage were reduced but maintained within normal levels. In transgenic mice with reduced capacity to activate protein C, both fibrinolysis and fibrinogen depletion were significantly attenuated. Other recognized drivers of coagulopathy were associated with less significant perturbations of coagulation. Activated protein C-associated fibrinolysis and fibrinogenolysis, rather than inhibition of procoagulant pathways, predominate in acute traumatic coagulopathy. In combination, these findings suggest a central role for the protein C pathway in acute traumatic coagulopathy and provide new translational opportunities for management of

  11. Clinical features, treatment and outcome of the acute subdural hematoma in JNTDB. Comparison between Project 1998 and Project 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Akihiro; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was clarify the clinical features, a change of the therapy and the effect, connection with the outcome of acute subdural hematoma registered on the Japan Neurotrauma Data Bank (JNTDB) presented in 1998 and 2004. Among those, 421 cases in P1998 and 380 cases in P2004 aged more than 6 years who presented with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 8 or less on admission and with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) on CT findings were retrospectively analyzed. As for the age distribution, two peaks were seen in young aged 16-20 years and old aged 61-65 years. The ratio of the ASDH case in young cases (45 years) decreased compared with P1998. A ratio of traffic accidents decreased, and a ratio of the injury by the fall increased. Surgical treatment was performed to 63.2% (P2004), 65.1% (P1998), and was performed both projects most together by a 46-65 year-old case. Hematoma evacuation group increased to 21.1% from 14.5%, and a burr hole opening decreased to 17.1% (P2004) from 22.3% (P1998). The temperature management was performed to 41.2% (P2004), 20.5% (P1998), especially the younger cases (45 years) in P2004, the temperature management was performed to 56.2%. The overall mortality is 67.7% (P1998), and 54.5% (P2004). The mortality of the temperature management cases was decreased, but the favorable outcome group does not increase. In younger cases (45 years), the favorable outcome group improved to 47.1% (P2004) from 33.3% (P1998) in the hypothermia group, and improved to 45.5% (P2004) from 30.0% (P1998) in the normothermia group. Temperature management after surgical treatment was more common, used to 57.5% (P2004) and 29.2% (P1998). The rate of favorable outcome group tends to increase in the hypothermia and normothermia group with craniotomy, but the mortality was not seen in the difference with the no temperature management group. For the case that used temperature management with a burr hole opening, the effect was not clear. An outcome tends to be good

  12. Acute Spinal Subdural Hematoma after Vertebroplasty: A Case Report Emphasizing the Possible Etiologic Role of Venous Congestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Tobias A; Rehman, Azeem A; Dinh, Dzung H

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Case report and literature review. Objective Spinal subdural hematomas are rare events that often progress with severe neurologic deficits. Although there have been several case reports in the literature of spontaneous spinal subdural hematomas in the setting of anticoagulation, antiplatelet therapy, or coagulation disorders, the exact pathophysiology of such phenomena remains obscure. Methods We present the first report of a subdural hematoma after a percutaneous vertebroplasty and provide a comprehensive review on the anatomy of venous drainage of the vertebral bodies with emphasis on the possible effects of venous congestion caused by cement obstruction. Results Because the subdural hematoma occurred in the absence of major cement extravasation to the spinal canal and two levels above the site of the vertebroplasty, we discuss the possible role of venous congestion as the main etiologic factor leading to rupture of the fragile, valveless radiculomedullary veins into the subdural space. Conclusions The reported case supports a possible new pathophysiological scheme for the development of spinal subdural hematoma in which venous congestion plays a pivotal etiologic role. The reported findings suggests that future anatomical and histologic studies investigating the response of the radiculomedullary veins to congestive venous hypertension may shed new light into the pathophysiology of spinal subdural hematomas.

  13. Haemodialysis for post-traumatic acute renal failure – factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Post-traumatic acute renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy in an intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with high mortality. Objective. To assess indicators of improved survival. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study of 64 consecutive trauma patients (penetrating and blunt trauma and burns) ...

  14. The relationship between neuron-specific enolase and prognosis of patients with acute traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-yang LIU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relationship between neuron-specific enolase (NSE levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI and the prognosis of TBI patients.  Methods A total of 89 patients with acute TBI were divided into light, medium, heavy and severe TBI groups based on admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score. Serum NSE expression levels were detected in all cases and NSE levels in CSF were detected in 18 cases within 12 h after TBI. The expression levels of serum NSE in 20 normal people, except cases of lung disease and nervous system damage, were detected as a control group. Results Compared with the control group, serum NSE expression levels of patients in each TBI group were elevated (P < 0.05, for all, and the NSE levels in severe and heavy TBI groups were higher than that in medium and light groups (P < 0.05, for all. The serum NSE expression levels of patients with cerebral contusion were higher than that of patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI, P = 0.025, subdural hematoma (P = 0.031 and epidural hematoma (P = 0.021. Serum NSE expression levels were negatively correlated with GCS score (rs = - 0.327, P = 0.024 and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS score (rs = - 0.252, P = 0.049. The NSE expression levels of CSF in severe and heavy TBI patients were higher than that of serum (P = 0.039, 0.031.  Conclusions NSE expression changes can be evaluated as an auxiliary indicator in reflecting the degree of acute TBI, typing diagnosis and prognostic evaluation, and NSE levels of CSF is more sensitive than that of serum. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.013

  15. Outcome in Chronic Subdural Hematoma After Subdural vs. Subgaleal Drain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishfaq, Asim

    2017-07-01

    To compare the outcome after surgery for chronic subdural hematoma when the drain is placed in subdural space or subgaleal space. Quasi experimental study. Combined Military Hospital, Lahore, from July 2015 to June 2016. Patients with chronic subdural hematoma of both genders and age, ranging between 55 to 85 years, were included. Patients on antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy and acute on chronic subdural hematoma were excluded. Patients were divided in two equal groups each depending on whether drain was placed in subgaleal space (Group 1), and subdual space (Group 2), (n=31 patients each). Patients were positioned flat in bed after surgery. Clinical and radiological parameters and clinical outcome were compared between the two groups. Statistical test with significance of p hematoma was 15 ±6.5 mm. Patients with subdural drain placement had more complications such as pneumocephalus 11 (35.4%) vs. 6 (19.3%), and intracerebral hemorrhage 4 (12.9%) vs. 2 (6.4%). Clinical outcome was good in both groups 27 (87%) in Group 1 and 28 (90%) in Group 2. Patients of both groups had good outcome after surgery. Complications like pneumocephalus and intracerebral hemorrhage were more common in subdural location of drain, though not reaching statistically significance level to favor one technique over another.

  16. Post-traumatic acute kidney injury: a cross-sectional study of trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Hung; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Hsieh, Ching-Hua; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun

    2016-11-22

    The causes of post-traumatic acute kidney injury (AKI) are multifactorial, and shock associated with major trauma has been proposed to result in inadequate renal perfusion and subsequent AKI in trauma patients. This study aimed to investigate the true incidence and clinical presentation of post-traumatic AKI in hospitalized adult patients and its association with shock at a Level I trauma center. Detailed data of 78 trauma patients with AKI and 14,504 patients without AKI between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2014 were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System. Patients with direct renal trauma were excluded from this study. Two-sided Fisher's exact or Pearson's chi-square tests were used to compare categorical data, unpaired Student's t-test was used to analyze normally distributed continuous data, and Mann-Whitney's U test was used to compare non-normally distributed data. Propensity score matching with a 1:1 ratio with logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of shock on AKI. Patients with AKI presented with significantly older age, higher incidence rates of pre-existing comorbidities, higher odds of associated injures (subdural hematoma, intracerebral hematoma, intra-abdominal injury, and hepatic injury), and higher injury severity than patients without AKI. In addition, patients with AKI had a longer hospital stay (18.3 days vs. 9.8 days, respectively; P < 0.001) and intensive care unit (ICU) stay (18.8 days vs. 8.6 days, respectively; P < 0. 001), higher proportion of admission into the ICU (57.7% vs. 19.0%, respectively; P < 0.001), and a higher odds ratio (OR) of short-term mortality (OR 39.0; 95% confidence interval, 24.59-61.82; P < 0.001). However, logistic regression analysis of well-matched pairs after propensity score matching did not show a significant influence of shock on the occurrence of AKI. We believe that early and aggressive resuscitation, to avoid prolonged untreated shock, may help to prevent the occurrence

  17. Technologies for Hemostasis and Stabilization of the Acute Traumatic Wound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Thomas D. Morris Institute TEG thromboelastography UMM University of Maryland Medical Center UNL University of Nebraska—Lincoln UNMC University of...two subjects, and see what happens. VII. PLAN On the next three consecutive Tuesdays (Mar 25, Apr 1, Apr 8), we will be...Stabilization of the Acute Traumatic Wound" Jessica, Drs. Velander, Larsen, and I have decided to cancel our subcontract with the Thomas D. Morris Institute

  18. Post-traumatic epidural and subdural hematomas of the spinal cord in MR imaging; Pourazowe nadoponowe i podoponowe krwiaki rdzenia kregowego w obrazie MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronarski, J.; Wozniak, E.; Kiwerski, J. [Stoleczne Centrum Rehabilitacji, Konstancin (Poland)]|[Inst. Psychiatrii i Neurologii, Warsaw (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Diagnostics of epi- and subdural hematomas of the spinal cord is discussed on the basis of 1992 records of Konstancin Rehabilitation Center. 54 patients with symptoms of partial or complete cord injury were submitted to MR imaging. In 4 cases (7.5%) epi- and subdural hematoma was found to contribute to neurological condition of the patient. MRI determines indications for surgical intervention. (author). 6 refs, 6 figs.

  19. Technique of stepwise intracranial decompression combined with external ventricular drainage catheters improve the prognosis of acute post-traumatic hemispheric brain swelling patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eShi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute post-traumatic cerebral hemispheric brain swelling (ACHS is a serious disorder that occurs after traumatic brain injury (TBI, and it often requires immediate treatment. The aim of our clinical study was to assess the effects of stepwise intracranial decompression combined with external ventricular drainage catheters on the prognosis of ACHS patients.Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 172 cases of severe craniocerebral trauma patients with acute cerebral hemispheric swelling. The patients were divided into two groups: unilateral stepwise standard large trauma craniectomy (S-SLTC combined with external ventricular drainage (EVD catheter implants (n = 86 and unilateral routine frontal temporal parietal SLTC (control group, n = 86.Result: No significant differences in age, sex, or preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale score were observed between groups (P < 0.05. There were no significant differences in the ipsilateral subdural effusion incidence rates between the S-SLTC+EVD treatment group and the routine SLTC group. However, the incidence rates of intraoperative acute encephalocele and contralateral epidural and subdural hematoma in the S-SLTC+EVD group were significantly lower than those in the SLTC group (17.4% and 3.5% vs. 37.2% and 23.3%, respectively. The mean intracranial pressure (ICP values of patients in the S-SLTC+EVD group were also lower than those in the SLTC group at days 1 through7 (P<0.05. A positive neurological outcome (GOS score 4 to 5, 50.0% and decreased mortality (15.1% was observed in the S-SLTC+EVD group compared to the neurological outcome (GOS score 4 to 5, 33.8%; 36.0% in the SLTC group (P<0.05.Conclusions: Our data suggest that S-SLTC+EVD is more effective for controlling ICP, improving neurological outcome, and decreasing mortality rate compared with routine SLTC.

  20. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui [Pudong New Area People' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai (China)

    2011-05-15

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  1. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  2. Outcome in Chronic Subdural Hematoma After Subdural vs. Subgaleal Drain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishfaq, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcome after surgery for chronic subdural hematoma when the drain is placed in subdural space or subgaleal space. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital, Lahore, from July 2015 to June 2016. Methodology: Patients with chronic subdural hematoma of both genders and age, ranging between 55 to 85 years, were included. Patients on antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy and acute on chronic subdural hematoma were excluded. Patients were divided in two equal groups each depending on whether drain was placed in subgaleal space (Group 1), and subdual space (Group 2), (n=31 patients each). Patients were positioned flat in bed after surgery. Clinical and radiological parameters and clinical outcome were compared between the two groups. Statistical test with significance of p <0.05 was utilized using Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS version 17). Results: Median age of the 62 patients was 72 +-12.5 years. Headache was the most common symptom reported in both groups, (n=47,75.8%) patients. Median thickness of hematoma was 15 +-6.5 mm. Patients with subdural drain placement had more complications such as pneumocephalus 11 (35.4%) vs. 6 (19.3%), and intracerebral hemorrhage 4 (12.9%) vs. 2 (6.4%). Clinical outcome was good in both groups 27 (87%) in Group 1 and 28 (90%) in Group 2. Conclusion: Patients of both groups had good outcome after surgery. Complications like pneumocephalus and intracerebral hemorrhage were more common in subdural location of drain, though not reaching statistically significance level to favor one technique over another. (author)

  3. Chest radiograph in the acute traumatic rupture of the aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinterits, F.; Grabenwoeger, F.; Dock, W.; Bardach, G.

    1987-01-01

    We tried to find out the validity of 16 wellknown signs indicating an acute traumatic aortic rupture on plain chest radiographs of 22 patients. Angiographically 11 of all patients had a tear at the aortic isthmus. It turned out that 7 of the 16 signs (widened mediastinum, loss of the aortic knob contour, opacification in the aortopulmonary window, bulging of the vascular pedicle predominantly to the left, left apical cap, depression of the left main stem bronchus and displacement of the right paraspinous interface) are of great diagnostic value. (orig.) [de

  4. Encapsulated subdural empyema. A case report with special reference to CT findings and operative indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Yoshiharu; Inoue, Masaru; Ishizaka, Hiroaki; Koga, Hiroaki; Kawano, Teruaki; Mori, Kazuo

    1985-04-01

    A case of encapsulated subdural empyema was reported. This 1.5-year-old boy was admitted with the increasing confusion and convulsion. Eight months prior to admission, he had craniotomy for traumatic acute epidural hematoma on the left side. Following a coagulation of the middle meningeal artery which was the bleeding source, the dura was opened but no cortical damage was noted at that time. The computed tomographic (CT) scan on admission revealed a large subdural collection with a thin enhancing rim on the left side. Emergency craniotomy revealed a collection of subdural pus, which was irrigated and a catheter was put for continuous drainage. Postoperatively, the patient did well, however, following removal of the catheter, three weeks after the first operation, the subdural empyema was reexpanded with a very thick enhancing rim on CT scan. Ultrasonography also clearly demonstrated the formation of the thick membranes. The large craniotomy was performed and empyema with the outer and inner memberanes of 8mm thick was totally excised. Post-operative CT scan did not show any enhancing rim, indicating that enchancement was caused by newly formed vessels within the membranes per se. This findings are totally different from those observed in the brain abscess in which ring enhancement on CT continues months to years following so-called extracapsular excision of abscess. In the brain abscess, surrounding glial tissue with plenty neovascularization is left intact, even after the operation. (author).

  5. A critical review of the literature on early rehabilitation of patients with post-traumatic amnesia in acute care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhorn, Leanne; Sorensen, Jens C; Pedersen, Preben U

    2010-01-01

    A critical review of the literature on early rehabilitation of patients with post-traumatic amnesia in acute care......A critical review of the literature on early rehabilitation of patients with post-traumatic amnesia in acute care...

  6. Subdural hematoma from a cavernous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Anne J; Mitha, Alim P; Germain, Rasha; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    To present a case of a cavernous malformation presenting with a subdural hematoma. A 27-year-old woman was admitted with progressively worsening headache, vomiting, weakness, and word-finding difficulties 1 week after she was discharged from an outside hospital, where she was managed conservatively for a presumed traumatic subdural hematoma. Computed tomography revealed an enlarging subacute left hemispheric subdural hematoma for which she underwent drill craniostomy. Postprocedural magnetic resonance imaging showed a posterior left temporal lobe mass consistent with a cavernous malformation juxtaposed with the subdural hematoma. Craniotomy for resection of the lesion was performed. She had an uncomplicated postoperative course and experienced a good recovery. The signs and symptoms, diagnostic imaging, and intraoperative findings suggest that the subdural hematoma was caused by extralesional hemorrhage of the cavernous malformation, which is a rare finding associated with these malformations. The clinical course, radiologic, and intraoperative findings suggest that the subdural hemorrhage was caused by extralesional hemorrhage of the cavernous malformation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  8. Reoccurrence of Bleeding of a Chronic Subdural Haematoma Following a Fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carretero Rafael García

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The case of a 60-year-old patient who presented with an acute-on-chronic subdural haematoma is reported. Chronic haematoma usually remains asymptomatic, and this is considered to be an unusual course of events. Trivial or minor injury may cause the cortical bridge veins and fragile vessels in the former haematoma to rupture with concomitant reoccurrence of bleeding. Old age, repeated traumatic brain injuries, brain atrophy, antiplatelet agents and oral anticoagulants such as warfarin are considered to be the underlying conditions to cause the reoccurrence of bleeding. However, our patient did not have any of those conditions.

  9. Prognostic models for predicting posttraumatic seizures during acute hospitalization, and at 1 and 2 years following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Anne C; Wagner, Amy K; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Brooks, Maria M; Zafonte, Ross D; Pugh, Mary Jo V; Fabio, Anthony; Hammond, Flora M; Dreer, Laura E; Bushnik, Tamara; Walker, William C; Brown, Allen W; Johnson-Greene, Doug; Shea, Timothy; Krellman, Jason W; Rosenthal, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    Posttraumatic seizures (PTS) are well-recognized acute and chronic complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Risk factors have been identified, but considerable variability in who develops PTS remains. Existing PTS prognostic models are not widely adopted for clinical use and do not reflect current trends in injury, diagnosis, or care. We aimed to develop and internally validate preliminary prognostic regression models to predict PTS during acute care hospitalization, and at year 1 and year 2 postinjury. Prognostic models predicting PTS during acute care hospitalization and year 1 and year 2 post-injury were developed using a recent (2011-2014) cohort from the TBI Model Systems National Database. Potential PTS predictors were selected based on previous literature and biologic plausibility. Bivariable logistic regression identified variables with a p-value models. Multivariable logistic regression modeling with backward-stepwise elimination was used to determine reduced prognostic models and to internally validate using 1,000 bootstrap samples. Fit statistics were calculated, correcting for overfitting (optimism). The prognostic models identified sex, craniotomy, contusion load, and pre-injury limitation in learning/remembering/concentrating as significant PTS predictors during acute hospitalization. Significant predictors of PTS at year 1 were subdural hematoma (SDH), contusion load, craniotomy, craniectomy, seizure during acute hospitalization, duration of posttraumatic amnesia, preinjury mental health treatment/psychiatric hospitalization, and preinjury incarceration. Year 2 significant predictors were similar to those of year 1: SDH, intraparenchymal fragment, craniotomy, craniectomy, seizure during acute hospitalization, and preinjury incarceration. Corrected concordance (C) statistics were 0.599, 0.747, and 0.716 for acute hospitalization, year 1, and year 2 models, respectively. The prognostic model for PTS during acute hospitalization did not

  10. Case report: treatment of subdural hematoma in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfora, Wilson T; Klapper, Hendrik B

    2013-08-01

    Patients with acute or chronic subdural hematomas may present with rapidly deteriorating neurological function and are at risk for irreversible brainstem injury. In such cases, rapid surgical intervention is required to evacuate the hematoma and reverse critically elevated intracranial pressure. A variety of surgical drainage methods are in existence, none of which are clearly superior to the others. This report presents the case of a 74-year-old woman who suffered an acute-on-chronic subdural hematoma which was evacuated in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system (SEPS). The SEPS provides for a minimally invasive technique to drain subdural hematomas and is advantageous in that it can be performed at the bedside. The SEPS is relatively simple to use and may be especially useful to emergency department staff in outlying areas where there is a shortage of neurosurgical coverage.

  11. Subdural abscess in infant and child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, E; Shigemori, M; Hayashi, T; Kuratomi, A; Kuramoto, S [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-02-01

    Two cases of subdural abscess in infant and child treated with irrigation via burr holes were reported. The first case was a 1.4-year-old boy with right hemiparesis and mental retardation since severe head trauma at 9 months old. The patient with manifested with an acute onset of high fever followed by disturbance of consciousness and convulsive seizures 2.5 months prior to admission to our department. During admission in the other hospital, the diagnosis of septicemia caused by E. coli was made by blood cultures when CT scan demonstrated a huge lentiform low density area over the right hemisphere and contralateral crescent low density area. The low density area on the right side was well circumscribed by high density rim which was enhanced by contrast medium. Under the diagnosis of bilateral subdural abscess secondary to septicemia caused by E. coli, irrigation of the purulent cavity was carried out. The contralateral low density area was found to be chronic subdural effusion. The second case of 3-month-old infant who complained of high fever, neck stiffness, unconsciousness and right hemiconvulsions 8 days prior to admission. CT scan showed bilateral crescent low density areas indicating subdural effusion. Subdural punctures performed via the fontanelle revealed pus in the left subdural space and xanthocromic fluid in the right side. The low density area on CT scan was changed to the lentiform high density area circumscribed smooth high density rim during the course of the patient. The subdural abscess was treated with irrigation via burr holes. In this report, the etiology of the subdural abscess and route of infection in addition to follow up study of CT findings were presented with the literature.

  12. Recurrent subdural hematoma secondary to headbanging: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Naoki; Jito, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    "Headbanging" is the slang term used to denote violent shaking of one's head in time with the music. This abrupt flexion-extension movement of the head to rock music extremely rarely causes a subdural hematoma. A 24-year-old female was admitted to our department because of right sided partial seizure and acute or subacute subdural hematoma over the left cerebral convexity. She had no history of recent head trauma but performed headbanging at a punk rock concert at 3 days before admission. Since, she had a previous acute subdural hematoma on the same side after an accidental fall from a baby buggy when she was 11 months old, the present was recurrent subdural hematoma probably due to headbanging. Headbanging has the hazardous potential to cause a subdural hematoma.

  13. Definition and drivers of acute traumatic coagulopathy: clinical and experimental investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Christopher Donald; Goslings, J C; Gaarder, C

    2010-01-01

    Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) is an impairment of hemostasis that occurs early after injury and is associated with a 4-fold higher mortality, increased transfusion requirements and organ failure....

  14. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome: MRI-pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quencer, R.M.; Bunge, R.P.; Egnor, M.; Green, B.A.; Puckett, W.; Naidich, T.P.; Post, M.J.D.; Norenberg, M.

    1992-01-01

    The acute traumatic central cord syndrome (ATCCS) is commonly stated to result from an injury which affects primarily the center of the spinal cord and is frequently hemorrhagic. To test the validity of this widely disseminated hypothesis, the magnetic resonance images [MRI] of 11 consecutive cases of ATCCS caused by closed injury to the spine were analyzed and correlated with the gross pathological and histological features of 3 cervical spinal cords obtained at post mortem from patients with ATCCS, including 2 of patients studied by MRI. In this study, the MRI and pathological observations indicate that ATCCS is predominantly a white matter injury and that intramedullary hemorrhage is not a necessary feature of the syndrome; indeed, it is probably an uncommon event in ATCCS. We suggest that the most common mechanism of injury in ATCCS may be direct compression of the cervical spinal cord by buckling of the ligamenta flava into an already narrowed cervical spinal canal; this would explain the predominance of axonal injury in the white matter of the lateral columns. (orig./GDG)

  15. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome: MRI-pathological correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quencer, R.M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami MRI Center, FL (United States) Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, FL (United States)); Bunge, R.P.; Egnor, M.; Green, B.A. (Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, FL (United States) Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (United States)); Puckett, W. (Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, FL (United States)); Naidich, T.P. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami MRI Center, FL (United States) Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, FL (United States) Baptist Hospital of Greater Miami, FL (United States)); Post, M.J.D. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami MRI Center, FL (United States)); Norenberg, M. (Dept. of Neuropathology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    The acute traumatic central cord syndrome (ATCCS) is commonly stated to result from an injury which affects primarily the center of the spinal cord and is frequently hemorrhagic. To test the validity of this widely disseminated hypothesis, the magnetic resonance images [MRI] of 11 consecutive cases of ATCCS caused by closed injury to the spine were analyzed and correlated with the gross pathological and histological features of 3 cervical spinal cords obtained at post mortem from patients with ATCCS, including 2 of patients studied by MRI. In this study, the MRI and pathological observations indicate that ATCCS is predominantly a white matter injury and that intramedullary hemorrhage is not a necessary feature of the syndrome; indeed, it is probably an uncommon event in ATCCS. We suggest that the most common mechanism of injury in ATCCS may be direct compression of the cervical spinal cord by buckling of the ligamenta flava into an already narrowed cervical spinal canal; this would explain the predominance of axonal injury in the white matter of the lateral columns. (orig./GDG).

  16. [A Case of Ruptured Internal Carotid-Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Associated with Acute Subdural Hematoma, Extending from the Interhemispheric Space to the Posterior Fossa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Yuhtaka; Yoshimura, Shouta; Somagawa, Chika; Hiu, Takeshi; Ono, Tomonori; Ushijima, Ryujirou; Toda, Keisuke; Tsutsumi, Keisuke

    2016-06-01

    A 69-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of a sudden severe headache without a history of head trauma. CT and MRI revealed an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) extending from the right interhemispheric space to the posterior fossa bilaterally, with a small amount of subarachnoid hemorrhage that was predominantly localized to the left side of the basal cistern. CT angiogram demonstrated a long protruding ruptured aneurysm at the junction of the right internal carotid and posterior communicating arteries (IC/PC AN) with a posteroinferior projection, associated with a small bleb located near the tentorial edge close to the ipsilateral posterior clinoid process, for which she received clipping surgery. Though rare, IC/PC AN could cause pure or nearly pure ASDH in the above-mentioned distribution. Therefore, in patients with such ASDH, especially without a history of head injury or precise information regarding the situation at the time of onset, urgent imaging evaluation and early intervention are essential to prevent devastating re-rupture events.

  17. Malignant Subdural Hematoma Associated with High-Grade Meningioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Shinichiro; Tsunoda, Akira; Kawamura, Kaito; Sugiyama, Natsuki; Saito, Rikizo; Maruki, Chikashi

    2018-01-01

    A 70-year-old man, who had previously undergone surgical resection of left parasagittal meningioma involving the middle third of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) two times, presented with recurrence of the tumor. We performed removal of the tumor combined with SSS resection as Simpson grade II. After tumor removal, since a left dominant bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) appeared, it was treated by burr hole surgery. However, because the CSDH rapidly and repeatedly recurred and eventually changed to acute subdural hematoma, elimination of the hematoma with craniotomy was accomplished. The patient unfortunately died of worsening of general condition despite aggressive treatment. Histopathology of brain autopsy showed invasion of anaplastic meningioma cells spreading to the whole outer membrane of the subdural hematoma. Subdural hematoma is less commonly associated with meningioma. Our case indicates the possibility that subdural hematoma associated with meningioma is formed by a different mechanism from those reported previously. PMID:29896565

  18. Acute traumatic and depressive symptoms in family members of hospitalized individuals with delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Robert B; Rosenthal, Lisa J

    2015-01-01

    This study characterized symptoms of acute stress and depression in caregivers present during the hospitalization of a loved one with delirium. This is an observational, cross-sectional analysis of caregivers of patients hospitalized with delirium. Standardized questionnaires were used in caregiver interviews to assess psychological reactions to traumatic situations and understanding of medical care. Of the 40 caregivers recruited, half had significant symptoms of acute stress and 12.5% of caregivers were highly symptomatic across all domains related to trauma. Elevated acute stress was positively correlated with both past or current depression and prior mental health treatment (p delirium as having a negative impact on their lives were also at elevated risk (p delirium are at elevated risk for experiencing severe acute traumatic and depressive symptoms, and this response might place them at risk for developing traumatic disorders. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Emotional Reasoning in Acutely Traumatized Children and Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verduijn, Nina J.C.; Vincken, Manon J.B.; Meesters, Cor M.G.; Engelhard, I.M.

    2015-01-01

    After a traumatic event, many children and adolescents develop post-traumatic stress disorder. Studies in adults suggest that emotional reasoning (i.e., drawing conclusions about situations on the basis of one’s emotional responses) is involved in PTSD development or maintenance. This longitudinal

  20. Case Report of Acute Traumatic Rotator Cuff Tear Treatment in Traditional Korean Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hwan Lee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There is no report on treatment of acute traumatic rotator cuff tear in Traditional Korean Medicine. We reported Traditional Korean Treatment for pain relief and better movement of acute traumatic rotator cuff tear. Methods: Shoulder MRI was used to confirm the diagnosis of tear of rotator cuff. The patient was treated with Traditional Korean Methods (Acupuncture, Herbal medicine, Pharmacopuncture for 6 months. We evaluated the patient through VAS (Visual Analogue Scale, UCLA shoulder scale, ROM (Range of motion and Shoulder MRI. Results: After 6 months of treatment, the patient's VAS was decreased whereas UCLA score and Shoulder ROM were increased. Rotator cuff tear was repaired on Shoulder MRI images. Conclusions: In acute traumatic rotator cuff tear, Korean Traditional Treatment is good method for pain relief and better movement.

  1. Traumatic memories, post-traumatic stress disorder and serum cortisol levels in long-term survivors of the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, Daniela; Weis, Florian; Krauseneck, Till; Vogeser, Michael; Schelling, Gustav; Roozendaal, Benno

    2009-01-01

    Survivors of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) often report traumatic memories from the intensive care unit (ICU) and display a high incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As it is known that subjects with PTSD often show sustained reductions in circulating cortisol

  2. Emergency room thoracotomy for acute traumatic cardiac tamponade caused by a blunt cardiac injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Ishida

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: A prompt diagnosis using FAST and treatment can be lifesaving in traumatic acute cardiac tamponade. A pericardiotomy via a thoracotomy is mandatory for lifesaving cardiac decompression in acute traumatic cardiac tamponade in cases of ineffective drainage due to clot formation within the pericardial space.

  3. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    OpenAIRE

    Vien, Christine; Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  4. Remote Hemorrhage after Burr Hole Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Hyeun; Song, Geun Sung; Kim, Young Ha; Kim, Young Soo; Sung, Soon Ki; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2017-10-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and symptomatic subdural hygroma are common diseases that require neurosurgical management. Burr hole trephination is the most popular surgical treatment for CSDH and subdural hygroma because of a low recurrence rate and low morbidity compared with craniotomy with membranectomy, and twist-drill craniotomy. Many reports suggest that placing a catheter in the subdural space for drainage can further reduce the rate of recurrence; however, complications associated with this type of drainage include acute subdural hematoma, cortical injury, and infection. Remote hemorrhage due to overdrainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is another possible complication of burr hole trephination with catheter drainage that has rarely been reported. Here, we present 2 cases of remote hemorrhages following burr hole trephination with catheter drainage for the treatment of CSDH and symptomatic subdural hygroma. One patient developed intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the contralateral hemisphere, while another patient developed remote hemorrhage 3 days after the procedure due to the sudden drainage of a large amount of subdural fluid over a 24-hour period. These findings suggest that catheter drainage should be carefully monitored to avoid overdrainage of CSF after burr hole trephination.

  5. Subdural hematomas: an analysis of 1181 Kashmiri patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayil, Khursheed; Ramzan, Altaf; Sajad, Arif; Zahoor, Sheikh; Wani, Abrar; Nizami, Furqan; Laharwal, Masood; Kirmani, Altaf; Bhat, Rashid

    2012-01-01

    We endeavored to analyze patients of subacute and chronic subdural hematomas studied in a 4-year period at the Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Kashmir, India. The study was a retrospective analysis of 1181 patients of subdural hematomas. Demographic characteristics, clinico-radiologic features, operative modalities, and outcome were studied. Acute subdural hematomas were excluded from the study. The mean age was 60.4 ± 12.4 and males outnumbered females. Chronic subdural collections were more common than subacute subdural hematomas and left side predominated. Two burr holes with closed-system drainage was used in most patients. Incidence of postoperative seizures is very low. Overall recurrence rates were low; however, multilocular hematomas had the highest incidence of recurrence. Morbidity and mortality were 7.53% and 2.96%, respectively. Preoperative neurologic grade correlated with outcome. Subdural hematomas are common in elderly males. Preoperative neurologic grade dictates the outcome. Multilocular hematomas have a higher chance of recurrence. Craniotomy should be reserved for recurrent hematomas, and there may be a scope of craniotomy for multilocular chronic subdural hematomas at the outset. Antiepileptic prophylaxis is not routinely recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute alcohol intoxication in patients with mild traumatic brain injury : Characteristics, recovery, and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; van der Horn, Harm J.; Roks, C.M.A.A.; Yilmaz, Tansel; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M.

    2016-01-01

    A substantial number of patients (30% to 50%) sustains a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) while they are under the influence of alcohol. An acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) at the time of injury has been subject of research in severe TBI, but little is known about the relation between AAI and

  7. Acute Alcohol Intoxication in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Characteristics, Recovery and Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, Myrthe; de Koning, Myrthe; van der Horn, Harm; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the incidence of acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) at the time of sustaining mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), describe the characteristics of this intoxicated subgroup, and evaluate recovery and outcome in comparison to sober mTBI patients. Methods. Multicenter cohort

  8. Acute Alcohol Intoxication in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury : Characteristics, Recovery, and Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; van der Horn, Harm; Roks, Gerwin; Yilmaz, Tansel; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M.

    2016-01-01

    A substantial number of patients (30% to 50%) sustains a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) while they are under the influence of alcohol. An acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) at the time of injury has been subject of research in severe TBI, but little is known about the relation between AAI and

  9. Definition and drivers of acute traumatic coagulopathy: clinical and experimental investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frith, D.; Goslings, J. C.; Gaarder, C.; Maegele, M.; Cohen, M. J.; Allard, S.; Johansson, P. I.; Stanworth, S.; Thiemermann, C.; Brohi, K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) is an impairment of hemostasis that occurs early after injury and is associated with a 4-fold higher mortality, increased transfusion requirements and organ failure. Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to develop a clinically relevant

  10. Detection of acute traumatic coagulopathy and massive transfusion requirements by means of rotational thromboelastometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemo, Jostein S; Christiaans, Sarah C; Stanworth, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to re-evaluate the findings of a smaller cohort study on the functional definition and characteristics of acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC). We also aimed to identify the threshold values for the most accurate identification of ATC and prediction of ma...

  11. Non-traumatic thoracic emergencies: acute chest pain: diagnostic strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonomo, Lorenzo; Di Fabio, Francesca; Rita Larici, Anna; Merlino, Biagio; Luigia Storto, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Acute chest pain may represent the initial and/or accompanying symptom in a variety of disease processes that may occur in the cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, or musculoskeletal system. Although clinical history, risk factors, and physical examination are important factors in establishing the etiology of symptoms in patients presenting with acute chest pain, imaging modalities are frequently utilized. Noncardiac causes of acute chest pain are reviewed in this paper with special reference to the most recently published literature and emphasis on acute aortic diseases. Imaging modalities with indication of appropriateness, optimal technique and practical keys for interpretation are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T.

    2008-01-01

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [de

  13. Imaging of acute traumatic injuries of the thoracic aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintermark, Max; Wicky, Stefan; Schnyder, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Blunt traumatic aortic injuries are a major concern in the settings of high-speed deceleration accidents, since they are associated with a very high mortality rate; however, with prompt diagnosis and surgery, 70% of the patients with a blunt aortic lesion who reach the hospital alive will survive. This statement challenges the emergency radiologist in charge to evaluate the admission radiological survey in a severe chest trauma patient. With a 95% negative predictive value for the identification of blunt traumatic aortic lesions, plain chest film represents an adequate screening test. If aortography remains the gold standard, it tends, at least in hemodynamically stable trauma patients, to be replaced by spiral-CT angiography (SCTA), which demonstrates a 96.2% sensitivity, a 99.8% specificity, and a 99.7% accuracy. In unstable patients, trans-esophageal echography (TEE) plays a major diagnostic role. Knowledge of advantages and pitfalls of these imaging techniques, as reviewed in this article, will help the emergency radiologist to choose the appropriate algorithm in the diagnosis of traumatic aortic injury, for each trauma patient. (orig.)

  14. Acute Non-Traumatic Abdominal Pain in Childhood at Kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The assessment and diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in childhood is clinically challenging. The epidemiologic correlates differ for different paediatric age groups and settings. Objectives To determine the clinical spectrum of acute abdominal pain in childhood at a referral Kenyan public hospital. Design

  15. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome: analysis of clinical and radiological correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, P; Gomez, P; Alday, R

    2008-12-01

    In patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, several studies correlate neurological impairment and radiological findings. However, little information is available about this correspondence in the particular group of acute traumatic central cord syndrome. The object of the present work was to describe the clinical and radiological features of a series of patients presenting with acute traumatic central cord syndrome and to analyze clinical and radiological correlations on admission and at last follow-up. Retrospective review of 15 patients diagnosed of acute traumatic central cord syndrome between 1995 and 2005. Global motor score and motor score in upper extremities were determined on admission and at last follow-up (6 months-4 years, mean 16 months). Plain films, cervical computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) were performed in every patient and retrieved for the study. In seven patients, serial MR studies were performed during follow-up. Clinical and radiological correlations were statistically analyzed with non-parametric tests. Cervical spondylosis appeared associated with older age, falls, and absence of fracture. Spinal cord edema was the most common finding in MR studies but hemorrhage was also observed. The length of spinal cord edema significantly correlated with initial motor score. The decrease in T2-weighted hyperintensity in serial MR studies correlated with the gain of motor power in upper limbs at last follow-up. Elderly patients with more degenerated cervical spines commonly develop acute traumatic central cord syndrome after incidental falls. Length of spinal cord edema correlates with neurological impairment on admission and may provide significant prognostic information.

  16. High risk of rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury after traumatic limb compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Hsuan; Huang, Shih-Tsai; Liu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Lee-Wei; Yang, Kuo-Chung; Hsu, Kuei-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Ta; Ho, Yen-Yi

    2015-05-01

    Rhabdomyolysis often occurs after traumatic compartment syndrome, and high morbidity and mortality have been reported with the acute kidney injury that develops subsequently. We focused on the risk factors for rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in patients with traumatic compartment syndrome. We also analyzed the relation between renal function and rhabdomyolysis in these patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted from January 2006 to March 2012. Inpatients with traumatic compartment syndrome were included. We evaluated patients' demographics, history of illicit drugs use or alcohol consumption, mechanism of injury, symptoms, serum creatine kinase levels, and kidney function. A total of 52 patients with a mean age of 40.9 years were included; 23 patients had rhabdomyolysis (44.2%), of which 9 patients developed acute kidney injury (39.1%). Significant predictive factors for rhabdomyolysis were history of illicit drugs or alcohol use (P=0.039; odds ratio, 5.91) and ischemic injury (P=0.005). We found a moderate correlation between serum creatine kinase levels and serum creatinine levels (R=0.57; PRhabdomyolysis was a predisposing factor for acute kidney injury (P=0.011; odds ratio, 8.68). Four patients with rhabdomyolysis required a short period of renal replacement therapy. A high percentage of patients with traumatic compartment syndrome developed rhabdomyolysis (44.2%). Patients with rhabdomyolysis had a higher possibility of developing acute kidney injury (39.1%), and rhabdomyolysis was correlated to renal function. Early diagnosis, frequent monitoring, and aggressive treatment are suggested once compartment syndrome is suspected. The overall prognosis is good with early diagnosis and proper treatment.

  17. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hoffer

    Full Text Available Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications.

  18. Acute and chronic traumatic encephalopathies: pathogenesis and biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKosky, Steven T.; Blennow, Kaj; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; Gandy, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, public awareness of the long-term pathological consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased. Such awareness has been stimulated mainly by reports of progressive neurological dysfunction in athletes exposed to repetitive concussions in high-impact sports such as boxing and American football, and by the rising number of TBIs in war veterans who are now more likely to survive explosive blasts owing to improved treatment. Moreover, the entity of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)—which is marked by prominent neuropsychiatric features including dementia, parkinsonism, depression, agitation, psychosis, and aggression—has become increasingly recognized as a potential late outcome of repetitive TBI. Annually, about 1% of the population in developed countries experiences a clinically relevant TBI. The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of CTE pathophysiology, and to delineate the key issues that are challenging clinical and research communities, such as accurate quantification of the risk of CTE, and development of reliable biomarkers for single-incident TBI and CTE. PMID:23558985

  19. Dual-Energy CT in Enhancing Subdural Effusions that Masquerade as Subdural Hematomas: Diagnosis with Virtual High-Monochromatic (190-keV) Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodanapally, U K; Dreizin, D; Issa, G; Archer-Arroyo, K L; Sudini, K; Fleiter, T R

    2017-10-01

    Extravasation of iodinated contrast into subdural space following contrast-enhanced radiographic studies results in hyperdense subdural effusions, which can be mistaken as acute subdural hematomas on follow-up noncontrast head CTs. Our aim was to identify the factors associated with contrast-enhancing subdural effusion, characterize diffusion and washout kinetics of iodine in enhancing subdural effusion, and assess the utility of dual-energy CT in differentiating enhancing subdural effusion from subdural hematoma. We retrospectively analyzed follow-up head dual-energy CT studies in 423 patients with polytrauma who had undergone contrast-enhanced whole-body CT. Twenty-four patients with enhancing subdural effusion composed the study group, and 24 randomly selected patients with subdural hematoma were enrolled in the comparison group. Postprocessing with syngo.via was performed to determine the diffusion and washout kinetics of iodine. The sensitivity and specificity of dual-energy CT for the diagnosis of enhancing subdural effusion were determined with 120-kV, virtual monochromatic energy (190-keV) and virtual noncontrast images. Patients with enhancing subdural effusion were significantly older (mean, 69 years; 95% CI, 60-78 years; P subdural effusions was reached within the first 8 hours of contrast administration with a mean of 0.98 mg/mL (95% CI, 0.81-1.13 mg/mL), and complete washout was achieved at 38 hours. For the presence of a hyperdense subdural collection on 120-kV images with a loss of hyperattenuation on 190-keV and virtual noncontrast images, when considered as a true-positive for enhancing subdural effusion, the sensitivity was 100% (95% CI, 85.75%-100%) and the specificity was 91.67% (95% CI, 73%-99%). Dual-energy CT has a high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating enhancing subdural effusion from subdural hematoma. Hence, dual-energy CT has a potential to obviate follow-up studies. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  20. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Vien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  1. [Acute traumatic and especially neglected traumatic hip dislocations are very rare in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, F F; Wirth, T; Eberhardt, O

    2012-09-01

    We report about the first hip arthroscopies of extracapsular neglected hip dislocations with concomitant injuries in two children (2 and 4 years old). The major problem of traumatic hip dislocation is avascular necrosis. Further problems are possible concomitant injuries. It is important not to cause further damage by therapeutic procedures. In a 4-year-old child the hip could be reduced under visualization and in a 2-year-old child with epiphyseal fracture the extent of the operation could be reduced. In both children large avulsion injuries of the ligamentum capitis femoris could be resected via hip arthroscopy. Hip arthroscopy can reduce surgical morbidity considerably and can possibly contribute to prevention of the feared avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  2. Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0195 TITLE: Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration after Traumatic Brain Injury...Purpose: The purpose of this project is to develop a radically different strategy to reduce brain glutamate excitotoxicity and treat TBI. We will...objective of reducing blood levels of glutamate. This will produce a brain -to-blood gradient of glutamate which will enhance the removal of excess

  3. Acute Scrotum Following Traumatic Spermatic Cord Hematoma: A Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pepe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute scrotum constitutes the most common urological emergency secondary to spermatic cord torsion, testicular trauma, orchiepididymitis and hernias. We report a very rare case of unique traumatic spermatic cord hematoma following scrotum injury occurred during a football match. Clinical exam showed an increased volume of the left spermatic cord; the color Doppler ultrasound (CDU demonstrated left testicular ischemia secondary to a large spermatic cord hematoma that needs surgical exploration. Spermatic cord hematoma rarely induces acute scrotum, however it could be treated conservatively surgery is mandatory when pain is persistent or testicular ischemia is confirmed by CDU.

  4. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procacci, Carlo; Mansueto, Giancarlo; D' Onofrio, Mirko; Gasparini, Anna; Ferrara, Rosa Maria [Department of Radiology, University Hospital ' ' G.B. Rossi' ' , Piazza L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona (Italy); Falconi, Massimo [Department of Surgery, University Hospital ' ' G.B. Rossi' ' , Piazza L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    Pancreatic emergency, unrelated to traumatic events, can occur as a consequence of the more significant pancreatic pathologies (acute and chronic pancreatitis, tumors) or of the interventional or surgical treatment carried out as therapy for the above-mentioned lesions. Acute pancreatic conditions are represented by pancreatic infections, the involvement of organs, structures, and adjacent spaces within the pancreatic disease, and, lastly, vascular complications. Acute pancreatic conditions are common in pancreatic diseases and can be catastrophic; even if there is a gamut in the severity of clinical presentation, each can be potentially life threatening. Immediate radiological detection of the lesions together with a correct therapeutic percutaneous radiological approach whenever an interventional procedure is preferable to surgery or, when performed before surgery, whenever it can optimize its results, is of fundamental importance in the management of these patients. This article focuses on the essential role of radiology and the integration of imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions. (orig.)

  5. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procacci, Carlo; Mansueto, Giancarlo; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Gasparini, Anna; Ferrara, Rosa Maria; Falconi, Massimo

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic emergency, unrelated to traumatic events, can occur as a consequence of the more significant pancreatic pathologies (acute and chronic pancreatitis, tumors) or of the interventional or surgical treatment carried out as therapy for the above-mentioned lesions. Acute pancreatic conditions are represented by pancreatic infections, the involvement of organs, structures, and adjacent spaces within the pancreatic disease, and, lastly, vascular complications. Acute pancreatic conditions are common in pancreatic diseases and can be catastrophic; even if there is a gamut in the severity of clinical presentation, each can be potentially life threatening. Immediate radiological detection of the lesions together with a correct therapeutic percutaneous radiological approach whenever an interventional procedure is preferable to surgery or, when performed before surgery, whenever it can optimize its results, is of fundamental importance in the management of these patients. This article focuses on the essential role of radiology and the integration of imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions. (orig.)

  6. Utility of cerebral circulation evaluation in acute traumatic brain injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Mitsuru; Sakata, Yoshihito; Haga, Daisuke; Nomoto, Jun; Noguchi, Yoshitaka; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Machida, Keiichi; Sase, Shigeru

    2007-01-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is well-known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Specifically, TBI has been reported to cause decreases in cerebral blood flow (CBF). In this study, we measured CBF, mean transit time (MTT) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) after TBI. Our purpose was investigate the possibility of assessing TBI outcome and severity with these physiological parameters, and the clinical utility of cerebral circulation evaluation for brain-oriented intensive care. In 37 patients with TBI, xenon-enhanced CT (Xe-CT) and perfusion CT were performed on days 1-3 post-event (phase II). We measured CBF using Xe-CT and MTT by Perfusion CT and calculated CBV using an AZ-7000W98 computer system. Relative intra cranicol pressure (ICP) and CBF showed significant negative correlations. Relative ICP and MTT showed significant positive correlations. Outcomes, correlated with valuse of CBF and MIT. Significant differences in CBF and MTT were found between favorable outcome group (good recovery (GR) and moderate disability (MD)) and poor outcome group (severe disability (SD), vegetative state (VS), and dead (D)). We could estimate the outcome of patients after TBI by analyzing values of CBF and MTT with a probability of 74%. We evaluated cerebral circulation status in patients with TBI by CBF and MTT. These tests can help to optimize management and improve outcome in patients with severe TBI. (author)

  7. Institutional Variation in Traumatic Brain Injury Acute Rehabilitation Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seel, Ronald T; Barrett, Ryan S; Beaulieu, Cynthia L; Ryser, David K; Hammond, Flora M; Cullen, Nora; Garmoe, William; Sommerfeld, Teri; Corrigan, John D; Horn, Susan D

    2015-08-01

    To describe institutional variation in traumatic brain injury (TBI) inpatient rehabilitation program characteristics and evaluate to what extent patient factors and center effects explain how TBI inpatient rehabilitation services are delivered. Secondary analysis of a prospective, multicenter, cohort database. TBI inpatient rehabilitation programs. Patients with complicated mild, moderate, or severe TBI (N=2130). Not applicable. Mean minutes; number of treatment activities; use of groups in occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy, therapeutic recreation, and psychology inpatient rehabilitation sessions; and weekly hours of treatment. A wide variation was observed between the 10 TBI programs, including census size, referral flow, payer mix, number of dedicated beds, clinician experience, and patient characteristics. At the centers with the longest weekday therapy sessions, the average session durations were 41.5 to 52.2 minutes. At centers with the shortest weekday sessions, the average session durations were approximately 30 minutes. The centers with the highest mean total weekday hours of occupational, physical, and speech therapies delivered twice as much therapy as the lowest center. Ordinary least-squares regression modeling found that center effects explained substantially more variance than patient factors for duration of therapy sessions, number of activities administered per session, use of group therapy, and amount of psychological services provided. This study provides preliminary evidence that there is significant institutional variation in rehabilitation practice and that center effects play a stronger role than patient factors in determining how TBI inpatient rehabilitation is delivered. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bilateral chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen-Ranberg, Nina Christine; Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Bergholt, Bo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (bCSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition frequently associated with the need for retreatment. The reason for the high rate of retreatment has not been thoroughly investigated. Thus, the authors focused on determining which independent predictors...... are associated with the retreatment of bCSDH with a focus on surgical laterality. METHODS In a national database of CSDHs (Danish Chronic Subdural Hematoma Study) the authors retrospectively identified all bCSDHs treated in the 4 Danish neurosurgical departments over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2012...... that a separated hematoma density and the absence of postoperative drainage were independent predictors of retreatment. CONCLUSIONS In bCSDHs bilateral surgical intervention significantly lowers the risk of retreatment compared with unilateral intervention and should be considered when choosing a surgical...

  9. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeiras, Rita; Mourelo, Mónica; Pértega, Sonia; Lista, Amanda; Ferreiro, Mª Elena; Salvador, Sebastián; Montoto, Antonio; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) exhibit factors that, in other populations, have been associated with rhabdomyolysis. Purpose: The aim of the study is to determine the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in patients with acute traumatic SCI admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), as well as the development of secondary acute kidney injury and associated factors. Study Design and Setting: This was an observational, retrospective study. Patient Sample: All adult patients admitted to the ICU with acute traumatic SCI who presented rhabdomyolysis, diagnosed through creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels >500 IU/L. Outcome Measures: Incidence of rhabdomyolysis and subsequent renal dysfunction was calculated. Materials and Methods: Data about demographic variables, comorbidity, rhabdomyolysis risk factors, and variables involving SCI, severity scores, and laboratory parameters were obtained from clinical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify renal injury risk factors. Results: In 2006–2014, 200 patients with acute SCI were admitted to ICU. Of these, 103 had rhabdomyolysis (incidence = 51.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.3%–58.7%). The most typical American Spinal Injury Association classification was A (70.3%). The injury severity score was 30.3 ± 12.1 and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was 5.6 ± 3.3 points. During their stay, 57 patients (55.3%; 95% CI: 45.2%–65.4%) presented renal dysfunction (creatinine ≥1.2 mg/dL). In the multivariate analysis, variables associated with renal dysfunction were creatinine at admission (odds ratio [OR] = 9.20; P = 0.006) and hemodynamic SOFA score the day following admission (OR = 1.33; P = 0.024). Creatinine was a better predictor of renal dysfunction than the peak CPK value during the rhabdomyolysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.91 vs. 0.63, respectively). Conclusions: Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent condition in patients

  10. Acute post-traumatic endophthalmitis secondary to Propionibacterium acnes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shailaja, S; Kamath, Yogish; Hazarika, Manali; Vishwanath, Shashidhar

    2013-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes has rarely been reported as the causative organism in acute endophthalmitis following penetrating ocular trauma. We report a 53-year-old man, who presented with best corrected vision of counting fingers at 2 m,

  11. Two cases of subdural hematoma with niveau formation on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Satoshi; Fukuda, Atsuhiro; Sato, Masaharu; Kohama, Akitsugu

    1984-01-01

    The authors report a case of a bilateral chronic subdural hematoma with niveau formation and another rare case of an acute subdural hematoma with niveau formation on plain CT. The different mechanisms of the niveau formation in these cases are speculated about. The first case was a 75-year-old male who showed a drowsy state, urinary incontinence, and muscle weakness of the bilateral lower limbs. No definite history of head trauma could be found. A plain CT scan showed a bilateral-crescent type fluid collection with niveau formation, consisting of a low-density area in the upper part and a high-density area in the lower part. An operation showed bilateral, moderately encapsulated subdural hematomas; they were evacuated. The second case was a 61-year-old male with head trauma due to a fall from a ladder. On admission, neurological examination revealed a decerebrate posture, a deep coma, and anisocoria. A plain CT scan twenty hours after the onset showed a crescent-type fluid collection with niveau formation in the left fronto-parietal region. The operation showed an acute subdural hematoma containing xanthochromic fluid and coagulated blood. No capsule of hematoma could be seen. The incidence of niveau formation in chronic subdural hematomas is not low (5 - 20%); such niveau formation is thought to be caused by rebleeding into the hematoma and the spending of considerable time in the supine position. On the other hand, no case of an acute subdural hematoma with niveau formation has previously been reported. With regard to this mechanism of niveau formation, we speculate that the hematoma is mixed with cerebrospinal fluid from the arachnoidal tear caused by the head trauma; also, a considerable time in the supine position is necessary. (author)

  12. Acute Traumatic Patellar Tendon Rupture at the Tibial Tuberosity Attachment without Avulsion Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Miyamoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patellar tendon rupture in children is especially rare. The fact that the area of traumatic rupture has wide variations makes surgical treatment difficult. We present an 11-year-old boy with acute traumatic patellar tendon rupture at the tibial tuberosity attachment without avulsion fracture. Primary end-to-end repair and reinforcement using 1.5 mm stainless steel wires as a surgical strategy were undertaken. Early range of motion began with a functional knee brace and the reinforced stainless wire was removed 3 months after surgery. Knee function at the final follow-up was satisfactory. We suggest that this strategy may provide a useful option for surgical treatment.

  13. El Salvador earthquakes: relationships among acute stress disorder symptoms, depression, traumatic event exposure, and resource loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, David N; de Alvarado, Ana Maria Glower; de Castro, Norma Blandon; Male, Robert Van; Zetino, A M; Vega, Raphael

    2006-12-01

    Four and seven weeks after powerful earthquakes in El Salvador, the authors examined the relationships among demographics, traumatic event exposure, social support, resource loss, acute stress disorder (ASD) symptoms, depression, and posttraumatic growth. Participants were 253 college students (Study 1) and 83 people in the community (Study 2). In Study 1, female gender, traumatic event exposure, low social support, and loss of personal characteristic, condition, and energy resources contributed to ASD symptoms and depression. In Study 2, damage to home and loss of personal characteristic and object resources contributed to ASD symptoms and depression. Posttraumatic growth was not associated with ASD symptoms or depression. Findings support the conservation of resources stress theory (Hobfoll, 1998). Resource loss spirals, excessive demands on coping, and exposure to multiple disasters are discussed.

  14. Traumatic Tricuspid Insufficiency Requiring Valve Repair in an Acute Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Yoshinori; Sudo, Yoshio; Sueta, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Tricuspid insufficiency due to penetrating cardiac trauma is rare. Patients with tricuspid insufficiency due to trauma can tolerate this abnormality for months or even years. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with penetrating cardiac trauma on the right side of her heart that required tricuspid valve repair in an acute setting. She sustained cut and stab wounds on her bilateral forearms and in the neck and epigastric region. She had cardiac tamponade and developed pulseless electrical activity, which required emergency surgery. The right ventricle and superior vena cava were dissected approximately 5 cm and 2 cm, respectively. After these wounds had been repaired, the patient's inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass suggested rightsided heart failure; transesophageal echocardiography revealed tricuspid insufficiency. Right atriotomy was performed, and a detailed examination revealed that the tricuspid valve septal leaflet was split in two. There was also an atrial septal injury that created a connection with the left atrium; these injuries were not detected from the right ventricular wound. After repair, weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass with mild tricuspid insufficiency was achieved, and she recovered uneventfully. This case emphasized the importance of thoroughly investigating intracardiac injury and transesophageal echocardiography.

  15. The significance of delayed contrast-enhanced CT in chronic subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, Hideharu; Ohya, Shigeru; Ueno, Junji; Watanabe, Saburo; Mikabe, Toshio

    1983-01-01

    We have previously, reported our delayed contrast-enhanced CT (DCECT) findings in traumatic subdural hygromas and chronic subdural hematomas. The purpose of this report is to clarify the relationship between the contrast media within subdural hematomas and the delayed enhancement. The clinical subjects were 35 cases of traumatic subdural hematomas. DCECT examinations were performed in all cases. The concentrations of the contrast media within the hematoma were measured during the operations. DCECT showed that the density of the hematomas increased 3 to 6 hours after the injection of the contrast media. The contrast media were detected within the hematomas a few hours after the injection. The contrast media were still present 24 hours after the injection, but disappeared in 48 hours. These findings suggest that contrast media go in and then come out of the subdural hematomas and that the main factor related to delayed enhancement is the concentration of the contrast media within the hematomas. DCECT examination may be most helpful in evaluating the dynamic changes in subdural collections. (author)

  16. Acute subdural hematoma and diffuse axonal injury in fatal road traffic accident victims: a clinico-pathological study of 15 patients Hematoma subdural agudo e lesão axonal difusa em vítimas fatais de acidente de trânsito: estudo clínico-patológico de 15 pacientes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Nataniel Silva Gusmão

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Although acute subdural hematoma (ASDH and diffuse axonal injury (DAI are commonly associated in victims of head injury due to road traffic accidents, there are only two clinico-pathological studies of this association. We report a clinical and pathological study of 15 patients with ASDH associated with DAI. METHOD: The patients were victims of road traffic accidents and were randomly chosen. The state of consciousness on hospital admission was evaluated by the Glasgow coma scale. For the identification of axons the histological sections of the brain were stained with anti-neurofilament proteins. RESULTS: Twelve of the 15 patients were admitted to hospital in a state of coma; in three patients, the level of consciousness was not evaluated, as they died before hospital admission. CONCLUSION: The poorer prognosis in patients with ASDH who lapse into coma immediately after sustaining a head injury, as described by several authors, can be explained by the almost constant association between ASDH and DAI in victims of fatal road traffic accidents.OBJETIVO: Embora o hematoma subdural agudo (HSDA e a lesão axonal difusa (LAD estejam frequentemente associados em vítimas de trauma crânio-encefálico causado por acidentes de trânsito, há somente dois estudos clínico-patológicos sobre esta associação. Relatamos o estudo clínico-patológico de 15 pacientes com HSDA associado com LAD. MÉTODO: Os pacientes, vítimas de acidentes de trânsito, foram selecionados aleatoriamente. O estado de consciência à admissão hospitalar foi avaliado pela escala de coma de Glasgow. Para a identificação dos axônios, os cortes histológicos do cérebro foram corados com antisoro anti-proteínas do neurofilamento. RESULTADOS: Doze dos 15 pacientes foram admitidos no hospital em estado de coma; em três pacientes, o nível de consciência não foi avaliado, pois eles faleceram antes da admissão hospitalar. CONCLUSÃO: O pior prognóstico em pacientes

  17. Acute Assessment of Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-Traumatic Stress After Exposure to a Deployment-Related Explosive Blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Monty T; Moring, John C; Hale, Willie J; Mintz, Jim; Young-McCaughan, Stacey; Bryant, Richard A; Broshek, Donna K; Barth, Jeffrey T; Villarreal, Robert; Lancaster, Cynthia L; Malach, Steffany L; Lara-Ruiz, Jose M; Isler, William; Peterson, Alan L

    2018-05-18

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are two of the signature injuries in military service members who have been exposed to explosive blasts during deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. Acute stress disorder (ASD), which occurs within 2-30 d after trauma exposure, is a more immediate psychological reaction predictive of the later development of PTSD. Most previous studies have evaluated service members after their return from deployment, which is often months or years after the initial blast exposure. The current study is the first large study to collect psychological and neuropsychological data from active duty service members within a few days after blast exposure. Recruitment for blast-injured TBI patients occurred at the Air Force Theater Hospital, 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing, Joint Base Balad, Iraq. Patients were referred from across the combat theater and evaluated as part of routine clinical assessment of psychiatric and neuropsychological symptoms after exposure to an explosive blast. Four measures of neuropsychological functioning were used: the Military Acute Concussion Evaluation (MACE); the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS); the Headminder Cognitive Stability Index (CSI); and the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics, Version 4.0 (ANAM4). Three measures of combat exposure and psychological functioning were used: the Combat Experiences Scale (CES); the PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M); and the Acute Stress Disorder Scale (ASDS). Assessments were completed by a deployed clinical psychologist, clinical social worker, or mental health technician. A total of 894 patients were evaluated. Data from 93 patients were removed from the data set for analysis because they experienced a head injury due to an event that was not an explosive blast (n = 84) or they were only assessed for psychiatric symptoms (n = 9). This resulted in a total of 801 blast-exposed patients for data

  18. Post-traumatic stress symptom clusters in acute whiplash associated disorder and their prediction of chronic pain-related disability

    OpenAIRE

    Annick Maujean; Matthew J. Gullo; Tonny Elmose Andersen; Sophie Lykkegaard Ravn; Michele Sterling

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. Introduction:. The presence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms has been found to be associated with an increased risk of persisting neck pain and disability in motor vehicle crash (MVC) survivors with whiplash injuries. The findings are mixed as to which PTSD symptom(s) best predicts recovery in this population. Objectives:. The aims were (1) to explore the factor structure of the Post-traumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale (PDS) in a sample of acute whiplash-injured in...

  19. [A case of infected subdural hematoma accompanied by cerebral infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Norio; Naito, Yuichiro; Takanashi, Shigehiko; Ueno, Toshiaki; Nakagomi, Tadayoshi

    2013-05-01

    Infected subdural hematoma(ISH)is a rare disease caused by hematogenous infection of a preexisting subdural hematoma. We report a rare case of ISH accompanied by cerebral infarction. A 76-year-old man who had suffered a closed head injury 3 months before presented fever, headache and left hemiparesis during the medical treatment of acute cholangitis and obstructive jaundice with pancreatic cancer at the department of surgical gastroenterology. At the consultation, computed tomography(CT)scan indicated right chronic subdural hematoma. We performed a burr hole opening surgery on the same day. Abscess and hematoma was aspirated from the subdural space, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA)was detected in this specimen. Thus the diagnosis of the infected subdural hematoma was confirmed. However, despite the antibiotics therapy, follow-up CT showed a low-density area close to the residual abscess, which suggested cerebral infarction. Cerebral angiography showed a vasospasm at the cortical segment of the right middle cerebral artery near the residual abscess. Eventually we carried out a small craniotomy to evacuate the abscess. Our case showed that prompt surgical treatment is required in case of ISH and the whole hematoma and abscess should be removed as soon as possible with an image diagnosis and an additional surgical operation.

  20. A longitudinal fMRI investigation in acute post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Jun; Zhang, Li; Qi, Rongfeng; Li, Weihui; Hou, Cailan; Zhong, Yuan; He, Zhong; Li, Lingjiang; Lu, Guangming

    2016-11-01

    Background Neuroimaging studies have implicated limbic, paralimbic, and prefrontal cortex in the pathophysiology of chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, little is known about the neural substrates of acute PTSD and how they change with symptom improvement. Purpose To examine the neural circuitry underlying acute PTSD and brain function changes during clinical recovery from this disorder. Material and Methods Nineteen acute PTSD patients and nine non-PTSD subjects who all experienced a devastating mining accident underwent clinical assessment as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning while viewing trauma-related and neutral pictures. Two years after the accident, a subgroup of 17 patients completed a second clinical evaluation, of which 13 were given an identical follow-up scan. Results Acute PTSD patients demonstrated greater activation in the vermis and right posterior cingulate, and greater deactivation in the bilateral medial prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal lobules than controls in the traumatic versus neutral condition. At follow-up, PTSD patients showed symptom reduction and decreased activation in the right middle frontal gyrus, bilateral posterior cingulate/precuneus, and cerebellum. Correlation results confirmed these findings and indicated that brain activation in the posterior cingulate/precuneus and vermis was predictive of PTSD symptom improvement. Conclusion The findings support the involvement of the medial prefrontal cortex, inferior parietal lobule, posterior cingulate, and vermis in the pathogenesis of acute PTSD. Brain activation in the vermis and posterior cingulate/precuneus appears to be a biological marker of recovery potential from PTSD. Furthermore, decreased activation of the middle frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate/precuneus, and cerebellum may reflect symptom improvement.

  1. Acute traumatic tear of latissimus dorsi muscle in an elite track athlete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Mesut Çelebi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue injuries constitute 30-50% of all sports related injuries; however, injury to the latissimus dorsi muscle is quite rare with only a few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we describe an acute traumatic tear of the latissimus dorsi muscle in an elite track athlete, which has not been reported in the track and field sports before. The injury was caused by forceful resisted arm adduction that took place at hurdling and starting from the block. A pseudotumor appearance in the axillary region was misdiagnosed as a mass. The diagnosis was made by ultrasound alone and the patient was managed conservatively.

  2. Dating of Early Subdural Haematoma: A Correlative Clinico-Radiological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Murali Gundu; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Sharma, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Determination of post-traumatic interval remains one of the foremost important goals of any forensic investigation related to human crimes. The estimation of time since injury in cases of subdural haemorrhage has been studied only by a few investigators on the histological and radiological front. Aim The purpose of this study was to determine the post-traumatic interval of Subdural Haemorrhage (SDH) based on Hounsfield Unit measurements (HU) on Computed Tomography (CT) in surviving victims of head injury. Materials and Methods The study included a total of 100 cases of closed head injury with subdural haemorrhage. The Post-traumatic Time Interval (PTI) varied from 0.5 hours to a maximum of 249 hours, with a mean of 54.2 hours. Results Statistically significant results were obtained between the HU measurements of the SDH and the post-traumatic intervals and were found to be statistically significant. A rough attempt was made to determine the effect of haematoma volume on attenuation and was found out to be statistically insignificant. Conclusion The density of the subdural haematoma decreases with increase in the post-traumatic interval that concurs with the limited number of studies being conducted in the past. We concluded that further sorting of cases could be done according to its age with additional research and uniformity in the methodology. PMID:27190831

  3. Progesterone for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhui Zeng

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy and safety of progesterone administrated in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI.PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Clinicaltrials.gov, ISRCTN registry and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing progesterone and placebo administrated in acute TBI patients. The primary outcome was mortality and the secondary outcomes were unfavorable outcomes and adverse events. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of progesterone administrated in patients with acute TBI.A total of 6 studies met inclusion criteria, involving 2,476 patients. The risk of bias was considered to be low in 4 studies but high in the other 2 studies. The results of meta-analysis indicated progesterone did not reduce the mortality (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.57-1.20 or unfavorable outcomes (RR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.78-1.02 of acute TBI patients in comparison with placebo. Sensitivity analysis yielded consistent results. Progesterone was basically safe and well tolerated in TBI patients with the exception of increased risk of phlebitis or thrombophlebitis (RR = 3.03, 95% CI = 1.96-4.66.Despite some modest bias, present evidence demonstrated that progesterone was well tolerated but did not reduce the mortality or unfavorable outcomes of adult patients with acute TBI.

  4. Psychological Characteristics in Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: An MMPI-2 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Carlton S; Rogers, David; Kinne, Erica

    2017-01-01

    The psychological characteristics of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received limited research focus, despite empirical evidence of their relevance for subsequent psychological adjustment and early therapeutic intervention. This study addressed a wide range of psychological features in 47 individuals who were hospitalized as a result of acute mild TBI (mTBI). Participants were screened from amongst consecutive TBI admissions for moderate to severe brain injury, and for pre-injury neurological, psychiatric, or substance abuse histories. Clinical and content scale scores on the MMPI-2 were explored in relation to patient gender, age, level of education, and extent of cognitive complaints. The results revealed diverse psychosocial problem areas across the sample, the most common of which were somatic and cognitive complaints, compromised insight, and a naively optimistic self-perception. The mediating roles of injury severity and demographic variables are discussed. Clinical implications and specific recommendations are presented.

  5. Acute Traumatic Swan Neck Deformity: A Case Report of the Oblique Retinacular Ligament Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checcucci, Giuseppe; Biondi, Marco; Faccio, Marina; Zampetti, Piergiuseppe; Galeano, Mariarosaria; Ceruso, Massimo

    2017-09-01

    Swan neck deformity (SND) can be the manifestation of an acute trauma. We present a case report of a young basketball player with an acute traumatic SND determined by the single ulnar oblique retinacular ligament rupture. The patient caught a ball directly upon the tip of his right's hand middle finger into extension. He immediately presented a SND with impossibility to actively flex the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ), while preserving active flexion and extension of the distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ). Hyperextension of PIPJ was reducible with passive mobilization, thus allowing full passive range of motion. The SND was seen to be caused by the lesion of the ulnar oblique retinacular ligament (ORL) on its distal insertion, with consequent dorsomedial migration of the ulnar lateral band. The early surgical distal reinsertion of the ORL allowed the restoration of the original kinematics of the finger flexion-extension.

  6. Non-traumatic acute abdomen in the adult: a critical review of imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buitrago-Tellez, C.; Boos, S.; Heinemann, F.; Wenz, W.

    1992-01-01

    Two different series collected at the University Hospital of Freiburg are presented as a basis for the critical appraisal of available imaging tests and their correlation with anatomic pain sites. The first series comprises 284 patients of non-traumatic acute abdomen admitted to the emergency department during 1990. The radiological approach revealed an increased use of immediate ultrasound (58%) followed by plain film radiography (53%), contrast studies (15%), and computed tomography (9.8%). Five groups of entities were identified according to the diagnostic imaging procedure prior to surgery. In a second series, the clinical presentation, the distribution and the efficacy of imaging studies for the confirmation of acute mesenteric ischemia were evaluated in 55 patients over a period of 14 years. A reduced mortality rate emphasizes the value of early and agressive diagnosis and angiographic management. (orig.)

  7. Acute traumatic brain-stem hemorrhage produced by sudden caudal displacement of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirvis, S.E.; Wolf, A.L.; Thompson, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines in an experimental canine study and a clinical review, whether acute caudal displacement of the brain following blunt trauma produces hemorrhage in the rostral anterior midline of the brain stem by tethering the basilar to the fixed carotid arteries. In four dogs, a balloon catheter was suddenly inflated over the frontal lobe; in two, the carotid-basilar vascular connections were severed prior to balloon inflation. ICP was monitored during and after balloon inflation. Hemorrhage was verified by MR imaging and direct inspection of the fixed brain specimens. Admission CT scans demonstrating acute traumatic brain stem hemorrhage (TBH) in human patients were reviewed to determine the site of TBH, predominant site of impact, and neurologic outcome

  8. Effect of addition of clopidogrel to aspirin on subdural hematoma: meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheet, Majid F; Pearce, Lesly A; Hart, Robert G

    2015-06-01

    Clopidogrel combined with aspirin is routinely prescribed after coronary artery stenting, in patients with acute coronary syndromes, and recently to prevent stroke in patients with acute minor ischemic stroke and TIA. Subdural hematomas are an important complication of antithrombotic treatment, but the risk associated with clopidogrel plus aspirin has not been previously defined. To quantify the risk of subdural hematoma associated with dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel plus aspirin. Randomized clinical trials comparing clopidogrel plus aspirin with aspirin alone were identified by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from 1990 to 2014, and restricted to those with more than 7 days of treatment. Two reviewers independently extracted data about subdural hematomas. Of 24 randomized trials testing clopidogrel added to aspirin, results for subdural hematoma were available for 11 trials, of which eight did not identify any subdural hematomas. The three trials reporting subdural hematomas were double-blind and included patients with recent lacunar stroke, acute coronary syndromes or atrial fibrillation with a total of 23,136 patients (mean age 66 years) and reported 39 subdural hematomas during a mean follow-up 2.1 years per patient. Clopidogrel plus aspirin was associated with a significantly increased risk of subdural hematoma compared with aspirin alone (risk ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.0, 3.8; P = 0.04; fixed effects model; I2 for heterogeneity of 0%, P = 0.51). The average absolute incidence of subdural hematoma averaged 1.1 (95% CI 0.7,1.6) per 1000 patient - years among those assigned clopidogrel plus aspirin in 11 randomized trials. The absolute rate of subdural hematoma during dual antiplatelet therapy is low, averaging 1.1 per 1000 patient-years. Chronic treatment with clopidogrel plus aspirin significantly increases the risk of subdural hematoma compared with aspirin alone. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  9. Surgery for acute subaxial traumatic central cord syndrome without fracture or dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Joonsuk; Mizuno, Junichi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Inoue, Tatsushi

    2005-05-01

    Twenty-two patients with subaxial acute traumatic central cord syndrome (CCS) without fracture or dislocation who underwent surgery between 1995 and 2002 were reviewed, retrospectively. There were 13 males and nine females ranging in age from 24 to 84 years (mean 61.2). Falls were the most common injury (68%), followed by motor vehicle accidents (32%). All patients had dynamic cervical lateral radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cord compression was present in all cases and cervical instability in 11. Associated pathology included disc herniation in seven patients, cervical spondylosis (CS) in 11 and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in four. Anterior decompression and fusion was performed in 12 patients with 1- or 2-level lesions. Posterior decompression and fusion was performed for multilevel lesions in 11 patients, including one patient who required re-operation. The interval between injury and surgery ranged from 1 to 37 days (mean 8.0). Postoperatively, all patients improved clinically. We conclude that surgical management of subaxial acute traumatic CCS without fracture or dislocation improved neurological status and prevented delayed neurological deterioration in our patients.

  10. Acute traumatic spinal cord injury induces glial activation in the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A D; Westmoreland, S V; Evangelous, N R; Graham, A; Sledge, J; Nesathurai, S

    2012-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury leads to direct myelin and axonal damage and leads to the recruitment of inflammatory cells to site of injury. Although rodent models have provided the greatest insight into the genesis of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), recent studies have attempted to develop an appropriate non-human primate model. We explored TSCI in a cynomolgus macaque model using a balloon catheter to mimic external trauma to further evaluate the underlying mechanisms of acute TSCI. Following 1hour of spinal cord trauma, there were focal areas of hemorrhage and necrosis at the site of trauma. Additionally, there was a marked increased expression of macrophage-related protein 8, MMP9, IBA-1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase in macrophages and microglia at the site of injury. This data indicate that acute TSCI in the cynomolgus macaque is an appropriate model and that the earliest immunohistochemical changes noted are within macrophage and microglia populations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Comparison of conventional gauze therapy with vacuum assisted closure wound therapy in acute traumatic wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.H.; Jalil, M.; Butt, Q.; Malik, Z.U

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the Vacuum Assisted Closure (Vac) wound therapy with Conventional Gauze Therapy (CGT) in management of acute traumatic wounds on the basis of time taken to achieve a vital red wound ready for definitive surgical closure. Study Design: Randomized control trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Surgery Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi from Mar 2009 to Sep 2009. Patients and Methods: This study included 82 patients of acute traumatic wounds. Patients were randomly allotted to group A, in which wound was treated with new method of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) wound therapy and to group B, in which wound was managed by conventional gauze therapy (CGT). Outcomes were measured by the presence of vital red wound ready to be closed by surgical intervention. Patients with concomitant systemic pathology were not included in study. Results: Comparison between the two groups revealed mean time for wound healing 13 days in group A and 16.9 days in group B with significant difference (p value =0.029). Conclusion: Vacuum assisted closure wound therapy is an effective method in reducing time of wound healing for definitive surgical closure. (author)

  12. Arthroscopic repair of acute traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrain, M V; Botto, G J; Montenegro, H J; Mauas, D M

    2001-04-01

    To compare the results of arthroscopic repair in acute anterior shoulder traumatic dislocation with those of nonoperative treatment. A prospective nonrandomized study was performed. Between August 1989 and April 1997, 46 patients were seen after a first episode of traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. The average age was 21 years (range, 17 to 27 years). Most dislocations were in rugby players (36 patients). There were 18 patients treated by nonoperative methods and 28 patients treated by acute arthroscopic repair; 22 patients using transglenoid suture and 6 patients with bone anchor suture fixation. Of the patients treated nonoperatively, 94.5% suffered a redislocation between 4 and 18 months (average, 6 months). In the operative group, 96% of the patients (27) obtained excellent results according to the Rowe scale. Only 1 patient suffered a redislocation 1 year after surgery. Three different types of lesions were found during surgery: group I, capsular tear with no labrum lesion (4%); group II, capsular tear with partial labrum detachment (32%); and group III, capsular tear and full anterior labrum detachment (64%). The average follow-up was 67.4 months (range, 28 to 120). There were no surgical complications. The operative group obtained 96% excellent results, but the nonoperative group only obtained 5.5% excellent results, according to the Rowe scale. The nonoperative group showed a high incidence of redislocation (94.5%) compared with the operative group (4%). Based on the findings of this study, we recommend using an arthroscopic evaluation and repair after an initial anterior traumatic shoulder dislocation in young athletes.

  13. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane; Moisi, Marc

    2017-02-16

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation.

  14. Systems biomarkers as acute diagnostics and chronic monitoring tools for traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Moghieb, Ahmed; Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhiqun

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant biomedical problem among military personnel and civilians. There exists an urgent need to develop and refine biological measures of acute brain injury and chronic recovery after brain injury. Such measures "biomarkers" can assist clinicians in helping to define and refine the recovery process and developing treatment paradigms for the acutely injured to reduce secondary injury processes. Recent biomarker studies in the acute phase of TBI have highlighted the importance and feasibilities of identifying clinically useful biomarkers. However, much less is known about the subacute and chronic phases of TBI. We propose here that for a complex biological problem such as TBI, multiple biomarker types might be needed to harness the wide range of pathological and systemic perturbations following injuries, including acute neuronal death, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration to systemic responses. In terms of biomarker types, they range from brain-specific proteins, microRNA, genetic polymorphism, inflammatory cytokines and autoimmune markers and neuro-endocrine hormones. Furthermore, systems biology-driven biomarkers integration can help present a holistic approach to understanding scenarios and complexity pathways involved in brain injury.

  15. Evolution of traumatic intracerebral hematoma. Analysis of sequential CT scans since per-acute stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaseki, Yoshishige; Horikoshi, Satoru [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine; Tamura, Masaru

    1984-05-01

    To clarify the evolution of traumatic intracerebral hematoma (TICH), initial computerized tomography (CT) scans of 28 TICH cases performed within one hour after head trauma were studied along with their follow-up CT scans. They were classified into the following two groups; per-acute group included seven cases in which TICH was completed on the initial CT scans taken within one hour after head injury and acute group included 21 cases in which the initial CT scans revealed isodensity or high density spot and repeat CT scans disclosed TICH by 48 hours after injury. In the per-acute group, initial CT scans showed a homogeneous, well defined, and high density mass (1.5-6.5 cm in diameter). In sequential CT scans of the three cases, the hematoma did not increase but spontaneously disappeared. Other four cases died early after head trauma. Their initial CT scans revealed a large high density mass (3-6.5 cm in diameter) combined with other extracerebral hemorrhages. In the acute group, initial CT scans demonstrated isodensity or high density spot and sequential CT scans showed mottled appearance of salt and pepper appearance, and after a while showed fusion of small high density areas to become a massive high density area (contusional hematoma) by 48 hours after injury. In six cases of this group, the contusional hematoma was removed within 24 hours after injury and in one case at 3.5 days. In other 14 cases, the hematomas shrank or disappeared spontaneously. From these results, it was considered that evolution of TICH's were classified into the two groups; per-acute group resulting from rupture of vessels and acute group resulting from contusion.

  16. The CT frequencies of various non-traumatic acute abdominal emergencies in hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis patients and the general population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergün, Tarkan; Lakadamyal, Hatice

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the frequency of non-traumatic acute abdominal emergencies in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (peritoneal dialysis (PD) and haemodialysis (HD)) patients and in the general population as diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: The abdominal CT findings of ESRD patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal pain during the years 2001–2010 have been retrospectively evaluated. Thirty-three HD (14 females, 19 males, mean age: 62 ± 10.5) and 22 PD patients (12 females, 10 males, mean age: 59 ± 9.4) with acute abdominal pathology based on their CT scans have been included into the study. In addition, 127 individuals (68 females, 59 males, mean age: 40.7 ± 12.8) with normal renal functions who presented with non-traumatic acute abdominal pain diagnosed with an acute abdominal pathology based on their CT scans have been prospectively evaluated during the years 2009–2010. Results: While the most frequent etiology in PD patients was peritonitis (45.4%), acute pancreatitis (13.6%) and perforation (18.1), and in HD patients it was nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (18.1%) and spontaneous intraabdominal bleeding (21.2%). The basic causes of acute abdomen in the general population were ureteral stone (34.6%) and appendicitis (18.1%). Conclusions: The causes of acute abdominal pain in ESRD patients is significantly different when compared to the general population. And within this special patient population the etiology of acute abdomen differs depending on the renal replacement therapy modality they are receiving. Thus, the causes of acute abdomen in PD patients are mostly peritonitis, acute pancreatitis, and perforation, while being mostly nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia and spontaneous intraabdominal bleeding in patients receiving HD therapy.

  17. Spontaneous bilateral subdural haematomas in the posterior cranial fossa revealed by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollo, C.; Porchet, F.; Meuli, R.

    2003-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman treated for acute myeloproliferative disease developed progressive stupor. CT showed obstructive hydrocephalus resulting from unexplained mass effect on the fourth ventricle. MRI revealed bilateral extra-axial collections in the posterior cranial fossa, giving high signal on T1- and T2-weighted images, suggesting subacute subdural haematomas. Subdural haematomas can be suspected on CT when there is unexplained mass effect. MRI may be essential to confirm the diagnosis and plan appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  18. Spontaneous bilateral subdural haematomas in the posterior cranial fossa revealed by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollo, C.; Porchet, F. [Department of Neurosurgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011, Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, R. [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2003-08-01

    A 52-year-old woman treated for acute myeloproliferative disease developed progressive stupor. CT showed obstructive hydrocephalus resulting from unexplained mass effect on the fourth ventricle. MRI revealed bilateral extra-axial collections in the posterior cranial fossa, giving high signal on T1- and T2-weighted images, suggesting subacute subdural haematomas. Subdural haematomas can be suspected on CT when there is unexplained mass effect. MRI may be essential to confirm the diagnosis and plan appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  19. A Prospective, Randomized Investigation of Plasma First Resuscitation for Traumatic Hemorrhage and Attenuation of Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    COMBAT study staff was made aware of a code 10 trauma return of a male patient who sustained an anterior left- chest stab wound. Paramedics enrolled the...Attenuation of Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma . PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ernest E. Moore, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Colorado Denver...Randomized Investigation of “Plasma First Resuscitation” for Traumatic Hemorrhage and Attenuation of Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma . 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  20. Detection of acute traumatic coagulopathy and massive transfusion requirements by means of rotational thromboelastometry: an international prospective validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagemo, Jostein S.; Christiaans, Sarah C.; Stanworth, Simon J.; Brohi, Karim; Johansson, Pär I.; Goslings, J. Carel; Naess, Paal A.; Gaarder, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to re-evaluate the findings of a smaller cohort study on the functional definition and characteristics of acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC). We also aimed to identify the threshold values for the most accurate identification of ATC and prediction of massive transfusion

  1. Tratamiento médico de un hematoma subdural crónico Medical treatment of a chronic subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Guevara Melcón

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una paciente portadora de un hematoma subdural crónico postraumático, que se trató médicamente y se logró su desaparición en el curso de varios meses, sin tratamiento quirúrgico y sin signos evolutivos de empeoramiento neurológico. La furosemida fue usada como medicamento básico en su tratamiento. Se adjuntan imágenes que confirman el valor de este punto de vista terapéutico.This is the case of a patient carrier of a post-traumatic chronic subdural hematoma clinically treated achieving its disappearance over some months without surgical treatment and evolutionary signs of neurologic worsening. The furosemide was used as basic drug in its treatment. The images confirming the value of this point of therapeutical view are enclosed.

  2. Cortical herniation through compressive subdural membrane in an infant with a history of a large bihemispheric subdural hematoma and subdural-peritoneal shunt: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoco, Aleka; Emily Bennett, E; Recinos, Violette

    2017-02-01

    Cortical herniation through subdural membrane formation is a rare complication of chronic subdural fluid collections and may occur following subdural shunting. The authors present a unique case of progressive cortical herniation through a compressive subdural membrane that occurred concomitant with a functioning subdural-peritoneal shunt.

  3. Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis: Background, laboratory features, and acute clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Comelli, Ivan; Benatti, Mario; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Bassi, Antonella; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a relatively rare condition, but its clinical consequences are frequently dramatic in terms of both morbidity and mortality. Although no consensus has been reached so far about the precise definition of this condition, the term rhabdomyolysis describes a rapid breakdown of striated, or skeletal, muscle. It is hence characterized by the rupture and necrosis of muscle fibers, resulting in release of cell degradation products and intracellular elements within the bloodstream and extracellular space. Notably, the percentage of patients with rhabdomyolysis who develop acute kidney injury, the most dramatic consequence, varies from 13% to over 50% according to both the cause and the clinical and organizational setting where they are diagnosed. Despite direct muscle injury (i.e., traumatic rhabdomyolysis) remains the most common cause, additional causes, frequently overlapping, include hypoxic, physical, chemical or biological factors. The conventional triad of symptoms includes muscle pain, weakness and dark urine. The laboratory diagnosis is essentially based on the measurement of biomarkers of muscle injury, being creatine kinase (CK) the biochemical "gold standard" for diagnosis, and myoglobin the "gold standard" for prognostication, especially in patients with non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis. The essential clinical management in the emergency department is based on a targeted intervention to manage the underlying cause, combined with infusion of fluids and eventually sodium bicarbonate. We will present and discuss in this article the pathophysiological and clinical features of non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis, focusing specifically on Emergency Department (ED) management. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of subdural space after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odake, Genya

    1988-09-01

    Subdural low density lesions of two cases were reexplored after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma and thickening of the outer membrane was found in both cases. 1st case was a 88 year-old male, who had shown at least 7 months history of chronic subdural fluid accumulation. Reexploration of residual subdural low density space on CT after 14 days following the evacuation disclosed thickening of the outer membrane and none of fluid. 2nd case was a 71 year-old male who had a history of head injury 2 months before. Reexploration of residual low density lesion 14 days later disclosed a similar thickening of the outer membrane without fluid accumulation. The postoperative low density area in both cases was suspected to be a residual hematoma before reexploratin, but only thickening of the outer membrane of the hematoma was found. The outer membrane of 2nd case was histologically composed of layers of matured granulation, contiguous to the dura and a layer of immature granulation with microhemorrhage, facing the cavity. Thickening of the outer membrane seems to play an important role not only to develope, but to resolve the chronic subdural hematoma. It is neccessary to evaluate other factors than low density space per se to eliminate a needless reexploration.

  5. Evaluation of subdural space after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odake, Genya

    1988-01-01

    Subdural low density lesions of two cases were reexplored after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma and thickening of the outer membrane was found in both cases. 1st case was a 88 year-old male, who had shown at least 7 months history of chronic subdural fluid accumulation. Reexploration of residual subdural low density space on CT after 14 days following the evacuation disclosed thickening of the outer membrane and none of fluid. 2nd case was a 71 year-old male who had a history of head injury 2 months before. Reexploration of residual low density lesion 14 days later disclosed a similar thickening of the outer membrane without fluid accumulation. The postoperative low density area in both cases was suspected to be a residual hematoma before reexploratin, but only thickening of the outer membrane of the hematoma was found. The outer membrane of 2nd case was histologically composed of layers of matured granulation, contiguous to the dura and a layer of immature granulation with microhemorrhage, facing the cavity. Thickening of the outer membrane seems to play an important role not only to develope, but to resolve the chronic subdural hematoma. It is neccessary to evaluate other factors than low density space per se to eliminate a needless reexploration. (author)

  6. Frontal assessment battery (FAB) performance following traumatic brain injury hospitalized in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Natalia; Laguë-Beauvais, Maude; Belisle, Arielle; Lamoureux, Julie; AlSideiri, Ghusn; Marcoux, Judith; Maleki, Mohammed; Alturki, Abdulrahman Y; Anchouche, Sonia; Alquraini, Hanan; Feyz, Mitra; Guise, Elaine de

    2018-01-19

    The Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) has been shown to be useful in several clinical settings. The aim of the present study was to examine the performance of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) on the FAB and to predict their acute outcome. The FAB was administered to 89 patients with mild (27 = uncomplicated and 39 = complicated) and moderate (n = 23) TBI during hospitalization in an acute care setting. The length of stay in days (LOS), Glasgow Outcome Scale-Revised score (GOSE) and Disability Rating Scale (DRS) score were collected. Results showed no significant differences between the three groups on the FAB score, but age and education were significantly associated with the FAB score. Parietal lesions were associated with lower total FAB score, and with the Similarities, Motor series and Conflicting instructions subscales, while frontal lesions were associated with lower performance on the Motor series and Conflicting instructions subscales. Total FAB score was significantly correlated with all outcome measures, and together the FAB total score and the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score explained 30.8% of the variance in the DRS score. The FAB may be useful clinically to acutely assess frontal and parietal lobe functions at bedside in patients with TBI and, in combination with the GCS score to measure TBI severity, can enable clinicians to predict early outcome.

  7. Non-traumatic acute epidural spinal hematomas diagnosed by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, A.; Grive, E.; Pedraza, S.; Capellades, J.; Nos, C.; Alarcon, M.; Rovira, A.

    2000-01-01

    The non-traumatic spinal epidural hematoma (NTSEH) is a rare entity that can be the cause of an acute spinal compression syndrome. the objective of this review is to identify the characteristics by MRI and NTSEH and to analyze the factors that influence in its prognosis. In the years 1994 and 1999, 12 patients with NTSEH have been diagnosed in our hospital, and a MRI was performed during the acute phase. the characteristics of the lesions have been analyzed by MRI, with special emphasis on the topographic data and resonance signal and the factors that can influence in the clinical prognosis of the patients. Initially, all of the patients presented pain in the cervical dorsal or interscapular site, followed by a sensitive-motor deficit picture. The MRI showed a lesion of expansive character and posterior epidural location in every case that would produce varying degrees of compression on the spinal cord. The NTSEH should be considered as one of the causes of acute spinal cord compression. The clinical association of intense cervical, dorsal or interscapular pain followed by a sensomotor deficit picture should lead to the suspicion of this entity, that would require an immediate examination with MRI to verify its diagnosis. Both the clinical manifestations as well as the characteristics observed by MRI of the NTSEH have a prognostic value and determine the therapeutic decision. (Author) 34 refs

  8. Readmission to Acute Care Hospital during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Flora M.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Ryser, David K.; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate frequency, reasons, and factors associated with readmission to acute care (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation. Participants 2,130 consecutive admissions for TBI rehabilitation. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. Results 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total 210 episodes. 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. Mean days from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22 days (SD 22). Mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7 days (SD 8). 84 participants (46%) had >1 RTAC episode for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had >1 RTAC for surgical reasons, and RTAC reason was unknown for 6 (3%) participants. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were: neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurologic (23%), and cardiac (12%). Older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission predicted patients with RTAC. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission Functional Independence Measure Motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Conclusion(s) Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experience RTAC during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation due to RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. PMID:26212405

  9. Readmission to an Acute Care Hospital During Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Flora M; Horn, Susan D; Smout, Randall J; Beaulieu, Cynthia L; Barrett, Ryan S; Ryser, David K; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-08-01

    To assess the incidence of, causes for, and factors associated with readmission to an acute care hospital (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prospective observational cohort. Inpatient rehabilitation. Individuals with TBI admitted consecutively for inpatient rehabilitation (N=2130). Not applicable. RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. A total of 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total of 210 episodes. Of 183 participants, 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. The mean time from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22±22 days. The mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7±8 days. Eighty-four participants (46%) had ≥1 RTAC episodes for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had ≥1 RTAC episodes for surgical reasons, and 6 (3%) participants had RTAC episodes for unknown reasons. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurological (23%), and cardiac (12%). Any RTAC was predicted as more likely for patients with older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission FIM motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experienced RTAC episodes during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation for RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. Copyright

  10. Executive function disorder in acute traumatic brain injury in Manado, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekplin A.S. Sekeon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is known as a major cause of death and chronic disability worldwide. It is one of the leading causes of economic and social problems for patient, family and community. Patients will have serious complication on physics, mental and personality aspect. Executive function disorder is one of the cognitive functions that could be affected by TBI. There is scarcity of data about executive function in acute TBI, especially from developing countries. Our study aimed to investigate the association between acute TBI and executive function disorder. This study was a hospital-based cross-sectional study. Samples consisted of 20 patients and 40 demographically matched controls that meet the inclusion criteria. For executive function measurement we applied TMT-A, TMT-B and Stroop Test. The result showed that mean score of TMT-A for case group was 1.06 minute (95% CI 0.70-1.06 which was longer than control group (0.32 minute. For TMT- B test, the mean score was 2.68 minute (95% CI 2.05-2.8 for case group and 0.77 minute for control group. On Stroop Test 3 we found that the mean score was 17 correct items (95% CI 13.52-20.48 which was lower than control group (52.5. For all of the tests, we detected that acute TBI significantly associate with executive function disorder (p > 0.05. Conclusion: There was a significant association between acute TBI and executive function disorder.

  11. Early detection of consciousness in patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlow, Brian L; Chatelle, Camille; Spencer, Camille A; Chu, Catherine J; Bodien, Yelena G; O'Connor, Kathryn L; Hirschberg, Ronald E; Hochberg, Leigh R; Giacino, Joseph T; Rosenthal, Eric S; Wu, Ona

    2017-09-01

    See Schiff (doi:10.1093/awx209) for a scientific commentary on this article. Patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury may recover consciousness before self-expression. Without behavioural evidence of consciousness at the bedside, clinicians may render an inaccurate prognosis, increasing the likelihood of withholding life-sustaining therapies or denying rehabilitative services. Task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography techniques have revealed covert consciousness in the chronic setting, but these techniques have not been tested in the intensive care unit. We prospectively enrolled 16 patients admitted to the intensive care unit for acute severe traumatic brain injury to test two hypotheses: (i) in patients who lack behavioural evidence of language expression and comprehension, functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography detect command-following during a motor imagery task (i.e. cognitive motor dissociation) and association cortex responses during language and music stimuli (i.e. higher-order cortex motor dissociation); and (ii) early responses to these paradigms are associated with better 6-month outcomes on the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended. Patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging on post-injury Day 9.2 ± 5.0 and electroencephalography on Day 9.8 ± 4.6. At the time of imaging, behavioural evaluation with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised indicated coma (n = 2), vegetative state (n = 3), minimally conscious state without language (n = 3), minimally conscious state with language (n = 4) or post-traumatic confusional state (n = 4). Cognitive motor dissociation was identified in four patients, including three whose behavioural diagnosis suggested a vegetative state. Higher-order cortex motor dissociation was identified in two additional patients. Complete absence of responses to language, music and motor imagery was only observed in coma patients. In patients with behavioural evidence

  12. Computed tomographic findings of traumatic intracranial lesions

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    Jeong, Seong Wook; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Ki Jeoung; Yoon, Il Gyu [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-10-15

    Traumatic intracranial lesion has been one of the most frequent and serious problem in neurosurgical pathology. Computed tomography made it possible to get prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention of intracranial lesions by its safety, fastness and accuracy. Computed tomographic scan was carried out on 1309 cases at Soonchunhyang Chunan Hospital for 15 months from October 1983 to December 1984. We have reviewed the computed tomographic scans of 264 patients which showed traumatic intracranial lesion. The result were as follows: 1. Head trauma was the most frequent diagnosed disease using computed tomographic scans (57.8%) and among 264 cases the most frequent mode of injury was traffic accident (73.9%). 2. Skull fracture was accompanied in frequency of 69.7% and it was detected in CT in 38.6%: depression fracture was more easily detected in 81%. 3. Conutercoup lesion (9.5%) was usually accompanied with temporal and occipital fracture, and it appeared in lower incidence among pediatric group. 4. Intracranial lesions of all 264 cases were generalized cerebral swelling (24.6%), subdural hematoma (22.3%), epidural hematoma (20.8%), intracerebral hematoma (6.1%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (3.0%). 5. The shape of hematoma was usually biconvex (92.7%) in acute epidural hematoma and cresentic (100%) in acute subdural hematoma, but the most chronic the case became, they showed planoconvex and bicconvex shapes. 6. Extra-axial hematoma was getting decreased in density as time gone by. 7. Hematoma density was not in direct proportion to serum hemoglobin level as single factor.

  13. Computed tomographic findings of traumatic intracranial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Seong Wook; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Ki Jeoung; Yoon, Il Gyu

    1985-01-01

    Traumatic intracranial lesion has been one of the most frequent and serious problem in neurosurgical pathology. Computed tomography made it possible to get prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention of intracranial lesions by its safety, fastness and accuracy. Computed tomographic scan was carried out on 1309 cases at Soonchunhyang Chunan Hospital for 15 months from October 1983 to December 1984. We have reviewed the computed tomographic scans of 264 patients which showed traumatic intracranial lesion. The result were as follows: 1. Head trauma was the most frequent diagnosed disease using computed tomographic scans (57.8%) and among 264 cases the most frequent mode of injury was traffic accident (73.9%). 2. Skull fracture was accompanied in frequency of 69.7% and it was detected in CT in 38.6%: depression fracture was more easily detected in 81%. 3. Conutercoup lesion (9.5%) was usually accompanied with temporal and occipital fracture, and it appeared in lower incidence among pediatric group. 4. Intracranial lesions of all 264 cases were generalized cerebral swelling (24.6%), subdural hematoma (22.3%), epidural hematoma (20.8%), intracerebral hematoma (6.1%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (3.0%). 5. The shape of hematoma was usually biconvex (92.7%) in acute epidural hematoma and cresentic (100%) in acute subdural hematoma, but the most chronic the case became, they showed planoconvex and bicconvex shapes. 6. Extra-axial hematoma was getting decreased in density as time gone by. 7. Hematoma density was not in direct proportion to serum hemoglobin level as single factor

  14. Delayed chronic intracranial subdural hematoma complicating resection of a tanycytic thoracic ependymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, Rosario; Giugno, Antonella; Graziano, Francesca; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Giller, Cole; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate that the diagnosis of an intracranial subdural hematoma should be considered for patients presenting with acute or delayed symptoms of intracranial pathology following resection of a spinal tumor. We present a case of a 57-year-old woman found to have a chronic subdural hematoma 1 month following resection of a thoracic extramedullary ependymoma. Evacuation of the hematoma through a burr hole relieved the presenting symptoms and signs. Resolution of the hematoma was confirmed with a computed tomography (CT) scan. Headache and other symptoms not referable to spinal pathology should be regarded as a warning sign of an intracranial subdural hematoma, and a CT scan of the head should be obtained. The mechanism of the development of the hematoma may be related to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid with subsequent intracranial hypotension leading to an expanding subdural space and hemorrhage.

  15. 'Subarachnoid cyst' after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: Case report of an unusual postoperative morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Low Y Y; Wai Hoe, N G

    2016-01-01

    Burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematomas are routine operative procedures done by neurosurgical residents. Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalus, intracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction. We report an interesting post-operative complication of a 'subarachnoid cyst' after burr-hole evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. The authors hypothesize that the 'cyst' is likely secondary to the splitting of the adjacent neomembrane within its arachnoid-brain interface by iatrogenic irrigation of the subdural space. Over time, this 'cyst' develops into an area of gliosis which eventually causes long-term scar epilepsy in the patient. As far as we are aware, this is the first complication of such a 'subarachnoid cyst' post burr-hole drainage reported in the literature.

  16. Management of Recurrent Subdural Hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Virendra R; Scranton, Robert A; Britz, Gavin W

    2017-04-01

    Subdural hematomas commonly recur after surgical evacuation, at a rate of 2% to 37%. Risk factors for recurrence can be patient related, radiologic, or surgical. Patient-related risk factors include alcoholism, seizure disorders, coagulopathy, and history of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Radiologic factors include poor brain reexpansion postoperatively, significant subdural air, greater midline shift, heterogeneous hematomas (layered or multi-loculated), and higher-density hematomas. Surgical factors include lack of or poor postoperative drainage. Most recurrent hematomas are managed successfully with burr hole craniostomies with postoperative closed-system drainage. Refractory hematomas may be managed with a variety of techniques, including craniotomy or subdural-peritoneal shunt placement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 4.7-T diffusion tensor imaging of acute traumatic peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Richard B; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Riley, D Colton; Sexton, Kevin W; Pollins, Alonda C; Shack, R Bruce; Dortch, Richard D; Nanney, Lillian B; Does, Mark D; Thayer, Wesley P

    2015-09-01

    Diagnosis and management of peripheral nerve injury is complicated by the inability to assess microstructural features of injured nerve fibers via clinical examination and electrophysiology. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to accurately detect nerve injury and regeneration in crush models of peripheral nerve injury, but no prior studies have been conducted on nerve transection, a surgical emergency that can lead to permanent weakness or paralysis. Acute sciatic nerve injuries were performed microsurgically to produce multiple grades of nerve transection in rats that were harvested 1 hour after surgery. High-resolution diffusion tensor images from ex vivo sciatic nerves were obtained using diffusion-weighted spin-echo acquisitions at 4.7 T. Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced at the injury sites of transected rats compared with sham rats. Additionally, minor eigenvalues and radial diffusivity were profoundly elevated at all injury sites and were negatively correlated to the degree of injury. Diffusion tensor tractography showed discontinuities at all injury sites and significantly reduced continuous tract counts. These findings demonstrate that high-resolution DTI is a promising tool for acute diagnosis and grading of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries.

  18. Cortisol evaluation during the acute phase of traumatic brain injury-A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensalah, Meriem; Donaldson, Malcolm; Aribi, Yamina; Iabassen, Malek; Cherfi, Lyes; Nebbal, Mustapha; Medjaher, Meriem; Haffaf, ElMehdi; Abdennebi, Benaissa; Guenane, Kamel; Djermane, Adel; Kemali, Zahra; OuldKablia, Samia

    2018-05-01

    Biochemical diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency (AI) is difficult in the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI). To assess the frequency and predictive factors of AI in victims of TBI from Algiers. Between November 2009 and December 2013, TBI victims had a single 8-9 am serum cortisol measurement during the acute postinjury period (0-7 days). AI was defined according to basal cortisol levels of 83, 276 and 414 nmol/L. Variables studied were TBI severity according to Glasgow coma scale, duration of intubation and coma, pupillary status, hypotension, anaemia, brain imaging findings, diabetes insipidus and medication. Insulin tolerance test was performed during the recovery phase, defining AI as peak cortisol 414 nmol/L. Hydrocortisone replacement is advised in TBI patients with morning cortisol <276 nmol/L or those <414 nmol/L with additional risk factors for AI. As acute and subsequent AI are poorly correlated, patients with moderate/severe TBI require adrenal re-evaluation during the recovery phase. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Subdural effusions in children under two years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothenberger, A.; Brandl, H.

    1980-01-01

    We investigated 161 children under 24 months of age by CT of the skull and reviewed the anamnestic and clinical history. 87 children showed subdural effusions, and 74 did not. There were 33 patients with other pathological findings in CT, and 41 had normal scans. Age and sex distribution as well as localization of the subdural effusions were consistent with the literature. The 87 children with subdural effusions represented 1,7% in a sample of about 5.000 CT scans. CT was the most reliable method for diagnosis of subdural effusions, compared to other techniques. There was a preponderance of small subdural effusions from 1 to 7 mm thickness (51%). Other CT abnormalities accompanying subdural effusions were found. Most frequently the interhemispheric sulcus was dilated and an internal hydrocephalus was present. Also in our group there were 7 anamnestical and 6 clinical symptoms highly diagnostic of subdural effusions. (orig.) [de

  20. Understanding recovery in children following traffic-related injuries: exploring acute traumatic stress reactions, child coping, and coping assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, Meghan L; Donlon, Katharine A; Hildenbrand, Aimee K; Winston, Flaura K; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2014-04-01

    Millions of children incur potentially traumatic physical injuries every year. Most children recover well from their injury but many go on to develop persistent traumatic stress reactions. This study aimed to describe children's coping and coping assistance (i.e., the ways in which parents and peers help children cope) strategies and to explore the association between coping and acute stress reactions following an injury. Children (N = 243) rated their acute traumatic stress reactions within one month of injury and reported on coping and coping assistance six months later. Parents completed a measure of coping assistance at the six-month assessment. Children used an average of five to six coping strategies (out of 10), with wishful thinking, social support, and distraction endorsed most frequently. Child coping was associated with parent and peer coping assistance strategies. Significant acute stress reactions were related to subsequent child use of coping strategies (distraction, social withdrawal, problem-solving, blaming others) and to child report of parent use of distraction (as a coping assistance strategy). Findings suggest that children's acute stress reactions may influence their selection of coping and coping assistance strategies. To best inform interventions, research is needed to examine change in coping behaviors and coping assistance over time, including potential bidirectional relationships between trauma reactions and coping.

  1. Haemodialysis for post-traumatic acute renal failure - factors predicting outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machemehl, Thomas; Hsu, Peter; Pahad, Hussein; Williams, Paul; Yilmaz, Tugba H; Vassiliu, Pantelis; Boffard, Kenneth D; Degiannis, Elias; Doll, Dietrich

    2013-07-29

    Post-traumatic acute renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy in an intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with high mortality. To assess indicators of improved survival. This was a retrospective cohort study of 64 consecutive trauma patients (penetrating and blunt trauma and burns) who underwent haemodialysis (HD) over a period of 5 years. Information on pre-hospital and in-hospital resuscitation, trauma scores and physiological scores and daily ICU records were collected. The majority of the patients were dialysed with continuous venovenous haemofiltration in the early years of the study and later with sustained low-efficiency dialysis. Of the 64 patients 47 died, giving an overall mortality rate of 73%. Mortality was highest in the burns patients (84%). Survival in all patients, irrespective of injury, was unrelated to the Revised Trauma Score, Injury Severity Score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation Score or Trauma Injury Severity Score. The duration of HD did not differ significantly between the three trauma groups, and age was not a significant predictor of survival. Patients who were polyuric at the time of the initiation of HD had a lower mortality rate than those who were oliguric, anuric or normouric, although this did not reach statistical significance (p=0.09). Acute renal failure in trauma patients is associated with a low survival rate. Controversial conclusions have been presented in the literature. In this study, none of the parameters previously reported to affect survival proved to be valid, although the number of patients was comparable with those in other studies. Since understanding of the predictors and course of renal failure in trauma patients is still at an early stage, there is a need for multicentre prospective studies.

  2. Chronic subdural hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay; Namdev, Hemant; Bajaj, Jitin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical conditions. There is lack of uniformity in the treatment of CSDH amongst surgeons in terms of various treatment strategies. Clinical presentation may vary from no symptoms to unconsciousness. CSDH is usually diagnosed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is more sensitive in the diagnosis of bilateral isodense CSDH, multiple loculations, intrahematoma membranes, fresh bleeding, hemolysis, and the size of capsule. Contrast-enhanced CT or MRI could detect associated primary or metastatic dural diseases. Although definite history of trauma could be obtained in a majority of cases, some cases may be secondary to coagulation defect, intracranial hypotension, use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, etc., Recurrent bleeding, increased exudates from outer membrane, and cerebrospinal fluid entrapment have been implicated in the enlargement of CSDH. Burr-hole evacuation is the treatment of choice for an uncomplicated CSDH. Most of the recent trials favor the use of drain to reduce recurrence rate. Craniotomy and twist drill craniostomy also play a role in the management. Dural biopsy should be taken, especially in recurrence and thick outer membrane. Nonsurgical management is reserved for asymptomatic or high operative risk patients. The steroids and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may also play a role in the management. Single management strategy is not appropriate for all the cases of CSDH. Better understanding of the nature of the pathology, rational selection of an ideal treatment strategy for an individual patient, and identification of the merits and limitations of different surgical techniques could help in improving the prognosis. PMID:27695533

  3. Acute and long-term pituitary insufficiency in traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, M; Juul, A; Struck, J

    2007-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI), describe the time-course and assess the association with trauma-related parameters and early post-traumatic hormone alterations.......To assess the prevalence of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI), describe the time-course and assess the association with trauma-related parameters and early post-traumatic hormone alterations....

  4. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging seen acutely following mild traumatic brain injury: correlation with neuropsychological tests and delayed recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, David G.; Jackson, Alan; Mason, Damon L.; Berry, Elizabeth; Hollis, Sally; Yates, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common reason for hospital attendance and is associated with significant delayed morbidity. We studied a series of 80 persons with MTBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing were used in the acute phase and a questionnaire for post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and return to work status at 6 months. In 26 subjects abnormalities were seen on MRI, of which 5 were definitely traumatic. There was weak correlation with abnormal neuropsychological tests for attention in the acute period. There was no significant correlation with a questionnaire for PCS and return to work status. Although non-specific abnormalities are frequently seen, standard MRI techniques are not helpful in identifying patients with MTBI who are likely to have delayed recovery. (orig.)

  5. Follow up study and interested cases in subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Mitsumasa; Goh, Jyunto; Koomura, Eiji; Nakao, Kazutami

    1983-01-01

    1. Out of 67 patients ranging from 16 to 82 years old, 20 were followed up by CT scan after operation. 2. Five patients presented hematoma on the both sides after operation, though they had suffered from the lesion of one side before operation. In four patients, hematoma was observed on the both sides before and after operation. Neither preoperative involved side changed nor hematoma appeared on the opposite side after operation in 11 patients. Follow-up examinations lasted up almost three months. 3. The maximum width of the subdural space was divided by the maximum intracranial width. These two factors were measured on horizontal CT scan. The calculated value was expressed in percentage and then, the result was regarded as Subdural Space (SDS) Index. Dividing a difference between the largest SDS Index (before operation) and the smallest by the number of days between the two points gave us a reduction rate of SDS Index. As a result, a reduction rate of 0.4 or less was obtained in all the patients less than 65 years old. There were three patients within the range from 0.7 to 1.0 of the rate. 76-year-old patients showed 2.6 and 5.7. Except the 76-old patients, mean duration of 35.5 days was calculated in Group I and SDS Index was 0, while Group II showed mean duration of 52.4 days, resulting in SDS Index of 0. 4. Specific progresses are shown below: 1) Hemorrhage of the caudate nucleus after operation 2) Subdural effusion of the both sides 3) Appearance of abscess 4) Subtentrial hemorrhage after operation 5) Postoperative epidural hematoma 6) Traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage, resulting in chronic subdural hematoma six months afterward (author)

  6. Chronic spinal subdural haematoma associated with intracranial subdural haematoma: CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillich, M.; Kammerhuber, F.; Reittner, P.; Szolar, D.H.; Leber, K.A.

    1999-01-01

    Chronic spinal subdural haematoma is a uncommon. We describe the CT and MRI appearances of chronic spinal and intracranial subdural haematomas following minor trauma. The aetiology, pathogenesis and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Acute management of traumatic spinal cord injury in a Greek and a Swedish region: a prospective, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divanoglou, A; Seiger, A; Levi, R

    2010-06-01

    Prospective, population-based study. This paper is part of the Stockholm Thessaloniki Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Study (STATSCIS). To characterize patient populations and to compare acute management after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). The Greater Thessaloniki region in Greece and the Greater Stockholm region in Sweden. Inception cohorts with acute TSCI that were hospitalized during the study period, that is September 2006 to October 2007, were identified. Overall, 81 out of 87 cases consented to inclusion in Thessaloniki and 47 out of 49 in Stockholm. Data from Thessaloniki were collected through physical examinations, medical record reviews and communication with TSCI cases and medical teams. Data from Stockholm were retrieved from the Nordic Spinal Cord Injury Registry. There were no significant differences between study groups with regard to core clinical characteristics. In contrast, there were significant differences in (1) transfer logistics from the scene of trauma to a tertiary-level hospital (number of intermediate admissions, modes of transportation and duration of transfer) and (2) acute key therapeutic interventions, that is, the use of mechanical ventilation (49% in Thessaloniki versus 20% in Stockholm), and performance of tracheostomy (36% in Thessaloniki versus 15% in Stockholm); spinal surgery was performed significantly more often and earlier in Stockholm than in Thessaloniki. Despite largely similar core clinical characteristics, Stockholm and Thessaloniki cases underwent significantly different acute management, most probably to be attributed to adaptations to the differing regional approaches of care one following a systematic approach of SCI care and the other not.

  8. Spinal subdural hematoma following cranial subdural hematoma : a case report with a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Gyu Yeul; Oh, Chang Hyun; Chung, Daeyeong; Shin, Dong Ah

    2013-12-01

    Coexistence of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas is rare and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas after previous head trauma. As the pathogenesis of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma yet remains unclear, we developed an alternative theory to those proposed in the literature for their coexistence, the migration of blood through the subdural space.

  9. Pituitary dysfunction in traumatic brain injury: Is evaluation in the acute phase worthwhile?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip P Dalwadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is an under-recognized cause of hypopituitarism. According to recent data, it could be more frequent than previously known. However, there is a scarcity of data in Indian population. Aims: The main aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of pituitary hormone deficiencies in the acute phase of TBI. The secondary objectives were to correlate the severity of trauma with basal hormone levels and to determine whether initial hormone deficiencies predict mortality. Subjects and Methods: Forty-nine TBI patients (41 men and 8 women were included in this study. Pituitary functions were evaluated within 24 h of admission. Results: Gonadotropin deficiency was found in 65.3% patient while 46.9% had low insulin-like growth factor-1, 12.24% had cortisol level <7 mcg/dl. Cortisol and prolactin level were positively correlated with the severity of TBI suggestive of stress response. Free triiodothyronine (fT3 and free thyroxine were significantly lower in patients with increasing severity of tuberculosis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that mortality after TBI was unrelated to the basal pituitary hormone levels except low T3 level, which was found to be positively related to mortality. Conclusions: Pituitary dysfunction is common after TBI and the most commonly affected axes are growth hormone and gonadotropin axis. Low fT3 correlates best with mortality. During the acute phase of TBI, at least an assessment of cortisol is vital as undetected cortisol deficiency can be life-threatening

  10. Functional status predicts acute care readmission in the traumatic spinal cord injury population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Donna; Slocum, Chloe; Silver, Julie K; Morgan, James W; Goldstein, Richard; Zafonte, Ross; Schneider, Jeffrey C

    2018-03-29

    Context/objective Acute care readmission has been identified as an important marker of healthcare quality. Most previous models assessing risk prediction of readmission incorporate variables for medical comorbidity. We hypothesized that functional status is a more robust predictor of readmission in the spinal cord injury population than medical comorbidities. Design Retrospective cross-sectional analysis. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation facilities, Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation data from 2002 to 2012 Participants traumatic spinal cord injury patients. Outcome measures A logistic regression model for predicting acute care readmission based on demographic variables and functional status (Functional Model) was compared with models incorporating demographics, functional status, and medical comorbidities (Functional-Plus) or models including demographics and medical comorbidities (Demographic-Comorbidity). The primary outcomes were 3- and 30-day readmission, and the primary measure of model performance was the c-statistic. Results There were a total of 68,395 patients with 1,469 (2.15%) readmitted at 3 days and 7,081 (10.35%) readmitted at 30 days. The c-statistics for the Functional Model were 0.703 and 0.654 for 3 and 30 days. The Functional Model outperformed Demographic-Comorbidity models at 3 days (c-statistic difference: 0.066-0.096) and outperformed two of the three Demographic-Comorbidity models at 30 days (c-statistic difference: 0.029-0.056). The Functional-Plus models exhibited negligible improvements (0.002-0.010) in model performance compared to the Functional models. Conclusion Readmissions are used as a marker of hospital performance. Function-based readmission models in the spinal cord injury population outperform models incorporating medical comorbidities. Readmission risk models for this population would benefit from the inclusion of functional status.

  11. Influence of Postoperative Thrombosis Prophylaxis on the Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma After Burr-Hole Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licci, Maria; Kamenova, Maria; Guzman, Raphael; Mariani, Luigi; Soleman, Jehuda

    2018-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is a commonly encountered disease in neurosurgic practice, whereas its increasing prevalence is compatible with the ageing population. Recommendations concerning postoperative thrombosis prophylaxis after burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematoma are lacking. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma and postoperative application of thrombosis prophylaxis. Retrospective, consecutive sample of patients undergoing burr-hole drainage for chronic subdural hematoma over 3 years. Single, academic medical center. All patients undergoing surgical evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma with burr-hole drainage. Exclusion: patients under the age of 18 years, who presented with an acute subdural hematoma and those who underwent a craniotomy. We compared patients receiving thrombosis prophylaxis treatment after burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematoma with those who were not treated. Primary outcome measure was reoperation of chronic subdural hematoma due to recurrence. Secondary outcome measures were thromboembolic and cardiovascular events, hematologic findings, morbidity, and mortality. In addition, a subanalysis comparing recurrence rate dependent on the application time of thrombosis prophylaxis ( 48 hr) was undertaken. Overall recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma was 12.7%. Out of the 234 analyzed patients, 135 (57.3%) received postoperative thrombosis prophylaxis (low-molecular-weight heparin) applied subcutaneously. Recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma occurred in the thrombosis prophylaxis group and control group in 12 patients (8.9%) and 17 patients (17.2%), respectively, showing no significant difference (odds ratio, 0.47 [95% CI, 0.21 - 1.04]). A subanalysis comparing recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma dependent on the application time of thrombosis prophylaxis ( 48 hr) showed no significant difference either (odds ratio, 2.80 [95% CI, 0

  12. MRI of subdural fluid collections in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Tsuneyuki; Takagi, Takuji; Nagai, Hajime; Banno, Tatsuo

    1988-01-01

    Twenty cases of subdural fluid collectioin in infants were examined by MRI (0.5 Tesla). The findings of MRI were classified into 3 groups as follows: Group I: Blood component is observed in the entire subdural fluid (4 cases, 20 %). Group II: Blood component is observed in a part of the subdural fluid (4 cases, 20 %). Group III: Subdural fluid consists of pure CSF (12 cases, 60 %). In general, operative treatment should be considered for cases which have blood components in the subdural space and/or symptoms and signs of increased ICP. In group I, operation was performed on 2 cases (50 %). In group II, subdural fluid collections were associated with dilated subarachnoid spaces and 2 cases were operated on in this group (50 %). In group III, only one case was operated on (8.3 %) and subdural fluid collections disappeared spontaneously in 4 cases of this group. The precise anatomical location of subdural fluid collections could not be decided in several cases even by MRI. The cases which had blood components, tended to demonstrate membranes frequently on MRI. However, the existence of blood components did not affect the DQ S significantly. The prognosis of subdural fluid collection is supposedly related to the degree of preexistent brain damage. (author)

  13. Reversible Parkinson-Like Symptoms in Patient with Bilateral Chronic Subdural Hematomas and Cervical Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guppy, Kern H; Khandhar, Suketu M; Ochi, Calvin

    2018-01-01

    Gait abnormalities have been seen in patients with Parkinson disease or Parkinson-like (P-L) disorders and cervical spinal stenosis. Acute presentation of P-L symptoms has been reported in 24 cases caused by chronic subdural hematomas with 11 cases due to bilateral chronic subdural hematomas. When a patient also presents with cervical spinal stenosis, the correct therapeutic decision between P-L disorders and myelopathy is challenging. An 80-year-old male presented with a 2-week history of weakness in his left leg. A few days before presentation, his gait had deteriorated quite dramatically. Neurologic examination showed mild leg weakness, hyperreflexia, and a gait that was slow and wide based, at times festinating but with relatively spared arm movement. He also had masked facial features with increased tone in his extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed cervical stenosis at C5-6, and computed tomography of the head showed large bilateral subdural hematomas. The subdural hematomas were drained. Immediate improvement in his symptoms was observed with complete resolution by his third month of follow-up. The patient never had a history of Parkinson disease. This paper reports for the first time a patient who presented with acute P-L symptoms and cervical myelopathy with findings of both bilateral chronic subdural hematomas and cervical spinal stenosis. The decision to drain the subdural hematoma in our case resulted in full recovery of the patient's gait and other extrapyramidal symptoms. This paper reviews the literature on reversible P-L symptoms caused by bilateral chronic subdural hematomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of technique and timing of tracheostomy in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury undergoing mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganuza, Javier Romero; Forcada, Angel Garcia; Gambarrutta, Claudia; De La Lastra Buigues, Elena Diez; Gonzalez, Victoria Eugenia Merlo; Fuentes, Fátima Paz; Luciani, Alejandro A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of timing and techniques of tracheostomy on morbidity, mortality, and the burden of resources in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) undergoing mechanical ventilation. Design Review of a prospectively collected database. Setting Intensive and intermediate care units of a monographic hospital for the treatment of SCI. Participants Consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) during their first inpatient rehabilitation for cervical and thoracic traumatic SCI. A total of 323 patients were included: 297 required mechanical ventilation and 215 underwent tracheostomy. Outcome measures Demographic data, data relevant to the patients’ neurological injuries (level and grade of spinal cord damage), tracheostomy technique and timing, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay at ICU, incidence of pneumonia, incidence of perioperative and early postoperative complications, and mortality. Results Early tracheostomy (tracheostomy was performed in 101 patients (47%) and late (≥7 days) in 114 (53%). Surgical tracheostomy was employed in 119 cases (55%) and percutaneous tracheostomy in 96 (45%). There were 61 complications in 53 patients related to all tracheostomy procedures. Two were qualified as serious (tracheoesophageal fistula and mediastinal abscess). Other complications were mild. Bleeding was moderate in one case (late, percutaneous tracheostomy). Postoperative infection rate was low. Mortality of all causes was also low. Conclusion Early tracheostomy may have favorable effects in patients with acute traumatic SC. Both techniques, percutaneous and surgical tracheostomy, can be performed safely in the ICU. PMID:21528630

  15. Cognitive activity limitations one year post-trauma in patients admitted to sub-acute rehabilitation after severe traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Jens Bak; Norup, Anne; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine cognitive activity limitations and predictors of outcome 1 year post-trauma in patients admitted to sub-acute rehabilitation after severe traumatic brain injury. Subjects: The study included 119 patients with severe traumatic brain injury admitted to centralized sub-acute re......Objective: To examine cognitive activity limitations and predictors of outcome 1 year post-trauma in patients admitted to sub-acute rehabilitation after severe traumatic brain injury. Subjects: The study included 119 patients with severe traumatic brain injury admitted to centralized sub......-acute rehabilitation in the Eastern part of Denmark during a 5-year period from 2005 to 2009. Methods: Level of consciousness was assessed consecutively during rehabilitation and at 1 year post-trauma. Severity of traumatic brain injury was classified according to duration of post-traumatic amnesia. The cognitive...... subscale of Functional Independence MeasureTM (Cog-FIM) was used to assess cognitive activity limitations. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of an independent level of functioning. Results: The majority of patients progressed to a post-confusional level...

  16. Post-traumatic stress symptom clusters in acute whiplash associated disorder and their prediction of chronic pain-related disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maujean, Annick; Gullo, Matthew J; Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Ravn, Sophie Lykkegaard; Sterling, Michele

    2017-11-01

    The presence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms has been found to be associated with an increased risk of persisting neck pain and disability in motor vehicle crash (MVC) survivors with whiplash injuries. The findings are mixed as to which PTSD symptom(s) best predicts recovery in this population. The aims were (1) to explore the factor structure of the Post-traumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale (PDS) in a sample of acute whiplash-injured individuals following a MVC and (2) to identify the PTSD-symptom clusters that best predict long-term neck pain-related disability in this population as measured by the Neck Pain Disability Index (NDI). A sample (N = 146) of whiplash-injured individuals completed the NDI and the PDS at baseline (whiplash-injured individuals following a MVC.

  17. Acute alcohol intoxication, diffuse axonal injury and intraventricular bleeding in patients with isolated blunt traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Hidetoshi; Shinoda, Masaki; Fujii, Motoharu; Takahashi, Osamu; Murakata, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    The influence of blood alcohol level (BAL) on outcome remains unclear. This study investigated the relationships between BAL, type and number of diffuse axonal injury (DAI), intraventricular bleeding (IVB) and 6-month outcome. This study reviewed 419 patients with isolated blunt traumatic brain injury. First, it compared clinical and radiological characteristics between patients with good recovery and disability. Second, it compared BAL among DAI lesions. Third, it evaluated the correlation between the BAL and severity of IVB, number of DAI and corpus callosum injury lesions. Regardless of BAL, older age, male gender, severe Glasgow Coma Scale score (injury lesions. Acute alcohol intoxication was not associated with type and number of DAI lesion, IVB and disability. This study suggested that a specific type of traumatic lesion, specifically lesion on genu of corpus callosum and IVB, might be more vital for outcome.

  18. Cognitive Training for Post-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Hallock

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantitatively aggregate effects of cognitive training (CT on cognitive and functional outcome measures in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI more than 12-months post-injury.Design: We systematically searched six databases for non-randomized and randomized controlled trials (RCTs of CT in TBI patients at least 12-months post-injury reporting cognitive and/or functional outcomes. Main Measures: Efficacy was measured as standardized mean difference (Hedges’ g of post-training change. We investigated heterogeneity across studies using subgroup analyses and meta-regressions. Results: Fourteen studies encompassing 575 patients were included. The effect of CT on overall cognition was small and statistically significant (g=0.22, 95%CI 0.05 to 0.38; p=0.01, with low heterogeneity (I2=11.71% and no evidence of publication bias. A moderate effect size was found for overall functional outcomes (g=0.32, 95%CI 0.08 to 0.57, p=0.01 with low heterogeneity (I2=14.27% and possible publication bias. Statistically significant effects were also found only for executive function (g=0.20, 95%CI 0.02 to 0.39, p=0.03 and verbal memory (g=0.32, 95%CI 0.14 to 0.50, p<0.01. Conclusions: Despite limited studies in this field, this meta-analysis indicates that CT is modestly effective in improving cognitive and functional outcomes in patients with post-acute TBI and should therefore play a more significant role in TBI rehabilitation.

  19. Subdural Hemorrhage after Scoliosis and Detethering of Cord Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Bhimani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intracranial hypotension may occur when CSF leaks from the subarachnoid space. Formation of intracranial, subdural, and subarachnoid hemorrhage has been observed after significant CSF leak as seen in lumbar puncture or ventricular shunt placement. However, very few cases, referring to these remote complications following spine surgery, have been described in literature. We present a case of a 10-year-old male child operated for idiopathic scoliosis with low-lying conus medullaris who postoperatively developed subdural hemorrhage. Case Report. A case of a 10-year-old male operated for idiopathic scoliosis with low-lying conus medullaris is presented. To correct this, detethering was done at the L3 level, laminectomy was done from L2 to L3 with pedicular screw fixation from T3 to L2, and bone grafting with right costoplasty was done from the 3rd to the 6th ribs. On the 5th day postoperatively, the patient developed convulsions and drowsiness and recovered subsequently by postoperative day 7. Conclusion. We report a rare case of an acute intracranial subdural hemorrhage caused by intracranial hypotension following scoliosis and detethering of cord surgery. This report highlights the potential morbidity associated with CSF leak occurring after this surgery.

  20. Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in family caregivers of adult patients with acute leukemia from a dyadic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Mutian; Li, Jie; Chen, Chunyan; Cao, Fenglin

    2015-12-01

    Acute leukemia is a fatal disease in adults that not only affects the patients who suffer from it but also their family caregivers. No studies have investigated post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSS) in family caregivers of adult patients with acute leukemia using a matched sample. The current study examined PTSS in adult patients with acute leukemia and their family caregivers and investigated the factors associated with caregivers' PTSS. A total of 163 patient-caregiver dyads completed questionnaires assessing their PTSS, psychological resilience, and perceived social support. Hierarchical linear regression was used to explore the related factors of caregivers' PTSS. More caregivers than patients met caseness criteria for PTSS (36.8% vs. 18.4%, p caregivers, being more closely related to the patients (e.g., spouses and parents), having patients with higher PTSS and having lower psychological resilience were independently associated with more severe PTSS. Caregivers of acute leukemia patients had significantly more severe PTSS than did their patients. This study is the first to investigate PTSS among family caregivers of adult patients with acute leukemia and its related factors in a matched sample. More attention should be paid to the caregivers of patients with acute leukemia to minimize their PTSS and thus improve mental health of caregivers and reduce potential negative consequences for the patients themselves. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Blunt abdominal trauma with handlebar injury: A rare cause of traumatic amputation of the appendix associated with acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Jensen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe traumatic appendicitis in a 7-year-old boy who presented after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma to his right lower abdomen secondary to bicycle handlebar injury. With diffuse abdominal pain following injury, he was admitted for observation. Computed axial tomography (CT obtained at an outside hospital demonstrated moderate stranding of the abdomen in the right lower quadrant. The CT was non-contrasted and therefore significant appendiceal distention could not be confirmed. However, there was a calcified structure in the right pelvis with trace amount of free fluid. Patient was observed with conservative management and over the course of 15 h his abdominal pain continued to intensify. With his worsening symptoms, we elected to take him for diagnostic laparoscopy. In the operating room we found an inflamed traumatically amputated appendix with the mesoappendix intact. We therefore proceeded with laparoscopic appendectomy. Pathology demonstrated acute appendicitis with fecalith. It was unclear as to whether the patient's appendicitis and perforation were secondary to fecalith obstruction, his blunt abdominal trauma or if they concurrently caused his appendicitis. Acute appendicitis is a common acute surgical condition in the pediatric population and continues to be a rare and unique cause of operative intervention in the trauma population.

  2. Chronic subdural haematoma complicating spinal anaesthesia: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subdural haematoma is a rare but serious complication of dural puncture. We report a case of chronic subdural haematoma, which occurred following spinal anaesthesia for elective caesarean section. A 34-year-old multiparous woman presented with a post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) following spinal anaesthesia.

  3. Postoperative course of chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tsubone, Kyoji; Kyuma, Yoshikazu; Kuwabara, Takeo

    1983-01-01

    1) Fourty cases of chronic subdural hematoma were operated on by trephination, irrigation and external drainage. Postoperative neurological recovery and decrease of hematoma cavity on CT scan were followed. 2) Operation were effective for recovery of neurological grade in 28 cases, moderately effective in 7 cases and not effective in 5 cases. 3) Withinthe tenth postoperative day, more than half residual hematoma cavity existed in 53% of examined cases. After that, more than half residual cavity existed in only 17%. 4) Preoperative feature of neurologically unimproved cases were no definite history of head trauma and water like low density of hematoma cavity. Postoperative feature was persistence of more than three fourth of residual hematoma cavity on CT scan. 5) A group of unimproved cases described above are thought to have a feature of subdural hygroma rather than subdural hematoma. When possibility of subdural hygroma is high in preoperative differential diagnosis, indication of operation should be different from chronic subdural hematoma. (author)

  4. Comparison Between Cerebral Tissue Oxygen Tension and Energy Metabolism in Experimental Subdural Hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Engell, Susanne I; Johnsen, Rikke Aagaard

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An experimental swine model (n = 7) simulating an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) was employed (1) to explore the relation between the brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO(2)) and the regional cerebral energy metabolism as obtained by microdialysis, and (2) to define the lowest level of PbtO(2...

  5. Guillain Barre Syndrome Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirac Unal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS is an immune-mediated acute inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Infectious agents were usually accused of playing a role in the etiology of GBS. Guillain-Barre syndrome has rarely been reported following subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhage after head trauma. Case Presentation We report on a 63-year-old male patient presenting GBS following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI. Only five other similar cases are described in the literature. Conclusions Sudden onset of GBS symptoms following trauma may erroneously be assessed as secondary complications of the TBI and can lead to unnecessary procedures such as computerized tomography (CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for a definitive diagnosis and may be a waste of time.

  6. Computed tomography of isodense subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jae Won; Kim, Ock Dong; Woo, Won Hyung

    1983-01-01

    Most subdural hematomas with significant differed attenuation from that of adjacent brain tissue can be accurately diagnosed by CT. Difficulty arises when the hematoma is isodense that is exhibited similar attenuation to that of brain. Unilateral isodense subdural hematoma can be identified by indirect sign such as mass effect. Occasionally, the use of intravenous contrast material to aid in identifying isodense subdural hematomas has met with variable success. Moreover, bilateral isodense subdural hematoma may be more difficult. We therefore considered it of interest to evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of CT in isodense subdural hematomas. We have analysed 13 cases surgically provened cases of isodense subdural hematoma examined at Korea General Hospital from October 1981 to April 1982. The results were as follows: 1. One hundred twenty seven cases of subdural hematomas were studied by CT, 13 cases (10.2%) of which were isodense. 2. The age distribution was from 29 years to 69 years and mean age was 52 years. The sex ratio was 11 male to 2 female. 3. Seven (53.8%) of 13 cases has a history of head trauma. 4. The time interval which subdural hematoma became isodense was from 1 week to 4 months and peak time interval was from 1 week to 3 weeks. 5. The precontrast CT scan of isodense subdural hematoma appeared shifting of midline structure, compression and deformity of the ventricles in all 13 cases, effacement of cerebral sulci in 10 cases (76.9%) and dilatation of contralateral ventricles in 4 cases (30.8%). 6. The postcontrast CT scan demonstrated enhancement of the medial margin of the lession in 4 (30.8%) of 13 cases and displacement of cortical vein away from the inner table of the skull in 3 (23.1%) of 13 cases. 7. Bilateral isodense subdural hematomas were 2 (15.4%) of 13 cases

  7. ‘Subarachnoid cyst’ after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: Case report of an unusual postoperative morbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Low Y. Y.; Wai Hoe, NG

    2016-01-01

    Burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematomas are routine operative procedures done by neurosurgical residents. Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalus, intracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction. We report an interesting post-operative complication of a ‘subarachnoid cyst’ after burr-hole evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. The authors hypothesize that the ‘cyst’ is likely secondary to the splitting of the adjacent neomembrane within its arachnoid-brain interface by iatrogenic irrigation of the subdural space. Over time, this ‘cyst’ develops into an area of gliosis which eventually causes long-term scar epilepsy in the patient. As far as we are aware, this is the first complication of such a ‘subarachnoid cyst’ post burr-hole drainage reported in the literature. PMID:27366276

  8. A Case Report of Intra-articular Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture combining with oriental medical treatment for Acute Traumatic Partial Tear of Meniscus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jae-Hoon

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This case was report of intra-articular bee venom pharmacopuncture injection on the patient with Acute Traumatic Partial tear of meniscus. We used intra-articular bee venom pharmacopuncture injection to Acute Traumatic Partial tear of meniscus diagnosed by symptoms and MR imaging. Be under treatment if necessary we prescribed herbal medication and physiotherapy. The state of patient was measured by Visual Analog Scale(VAS and Walking time and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities(WOMAC Index score. After several times of treatments, noticeable reduction of pain was measured and increased time of walking on floor and decreased WOMAC score. This results suggest that intra-articular bee venom pharmacopuncture injection are effective to treatments of Acute Traumatic Partial tear of meniscus.

  9. Correlation of hyperdense and hypodense areas in the computerized tomogram of subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clar, H.E.; Bock, W.J.; Wiechert, H.C.

    1978-01-01

    CT findings of 51 patients with acute, subacute and chronic subdural hematomas were studied. The results showed that direct signs (hyperdensity, isodensity, and hypodensity) and indirect signs (midline-shift, expansive lesion, compression of ventricles, and occlusion of the subarachnoid space) can be distinguished. The following diagnostic procedure is proposed in cases of subdural hematoma: 1. In cases with both, direct and indirect CT signs, no further diagnostic exploration is necessary. 2. In cases without direct signs, application of contrast medium may lead to diagnosis. 3. Cases without direct or indirect signs showing clinical symptoms require further investigation by angiography, or CT control. (orig.) [de

  10. Alterations in the Timing of Huperzine A Cerebral Pharmacodynamics in the Acute Traumatic Brain Injury Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damar, Ugur; Gersner, Roman; Johnstone, Joshua T; Kapur, Kush; Collins, Stephen; Schachter, Steven; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2018-01-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) may affect the pharmacodynamics of centrally acting drugs. Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS) is a safe and noninvasive measure of cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated cortical inhibition. Huperzine A (HupA) is a naturally occurring acetylcholinesterase inhibitor with newly discovered potent GABA-mediated antiepileptic capacity, which is reliably detected by ppTMS. To test whether TBI alters cerebral HupA pharmacodynamics, we exposed rats to fluid percussion injury (FPI) and tested whether ppTMS metrics of cortical inhibition differ in magnitude and temporal pattern in injured rats. Anesthetized adult rats were exposed to FPI or sham injury. Ninety minutes post-TBI, rats were injected with HupA or saline (0.6 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). TBI resulted in reduced cortical inhibition 90 min after the injury (N = 18) compared to sham (N = 13) controls (p = 0.03). HupA enhanced cortical inhibition after both sham injury (N = 6; p = 0.002) and TBI (N = 6; p = 0.02). The median time to maximum HupA inhibition in sham and TBI groups were 46.4 and 76.5 min, respectively (p = 0.03). This was consistent with a quadratic trend comparison that projects HupA-mediated cortical inhibition to last longer in injured rats (p = 0.007). We show that 1) cortical GABA-mediated inhibition, as measured by ppTMS, decreases acutely post-TBI, 2) HupA restores lost post-TBI GABA-mediated inhibition, and 3) HupA-mediated enhancement of cortical inhibition is delayed post-TBI. The plausible reasons of the latter include 1) low HupA volume of distribution rendering HupA confined in the intravascular compartment, therefore vulnerable to reduced post-TBI cerebral perfusion, and 2) GABAR dysfunction and increased AChE activity post-TBI.

  11. A retrospective study of ketamine administration and the development of acute or post-traumatic stress disorder in 274 war-wounded soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mion, G; Le Masson, J; Granier, C; Hoffmann, C

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether ketamine prevents or exacerbates acute or post-traumatic stress disorders in military trauma patients. We conducted a retrospective study of a database from the French Military Health Service, including all soldiers surviving a war injury in Afghanistan (2010-2012). The diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder was made by a psychiatrist and patients were analysed according to the presence or absence of this condition. Analysis included the following covariables: age; sex; acute stress disorder; blast injury; associated fatality; brain injury; traumatic amputation; Glasgow coma scale; injury severity score; administered drugs; number of surgical procedures; physical, neurosensory or aesthetic sequelae; and the development chronic pain. Covariables related to post-traumatic and acute stress disorders with a p ≤ 0.10 were included in a multivariable logistic regression model. The data from 450 soldiers were identified; 399 survived, of which 274 were analysed. Among these, 98 (36%) suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder and 89 (32%) had received ketamine. Fifty-four patients (55%) in the post-traumatic stress disorder group received ketamine vs. 35 (20%) in the no PTSD group (p stress disorder and total number of surgical procedures were independently associated with the development of post-traumatic stress disorder. In this retrospective study, ketamine administration was not a risk factor for the development of post-traumatic stress disorder in the military trauma setting. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Comparison of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT and MRI after Acute and Subacute Closed-Head Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Won Jong; Lee, Sang Hoon; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Lee, Han Jin; Park, Jeong Mi; Chung, Soo Kyo; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee; Shin, Kyung Sub [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT with MRI after acute and subacute closed head injury. There were thirty two focal lesions in all cases of these, Fifteen lesions(47%) were seen on both MRI and SPECT. Fourteen lesions(44%) were seen only on MRI. Three lesions(9%) were seen only on SPECT. Of the 14 lesions seen only on MRl, one was epidural hematoma, two were subdural hematoma, three were subdural hygroma, one was intracerebral hematoma, four were contusion, and three were diffuse axonal injuries. SPECT detected 52% of the focal lesions found on MRI. For the detection of lesions, MRl was superior to SPECT in fourteen cases, while SPECT was superior to MRI in three cases. In conclusion, there was a tendency that detection rate of the traumatic lesions was higher on MRI, but the SPECT could delineate more wide extent of lesion.

  13. Childhood acute non-traumatic coma: aetiology and challenges in management in resource-poor countries of Africa and Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwer, Samson; Chacha, Clifford; Newton, Charles R; Idro, Richard

    2013-08-01

    This review examines the best available evidence on the aetiology of childhood acute non-traumatic coma in resource-poor countries (RPCs), discusses the challenges associated with management, and explores strategies to address them. Publications in English and French which reported on studies on the aetiology of childhood non-traumatic coma in RPCs are reviewed. Primarily, the MEDLINE database was searched using the keywords coma, unconsciousness, causality, aetiology, child, malaria cerebral, meningitis, encephalitis, Africa, Asia, and developing countries. 14 records were identified for inclusion in the review. Cerebral malaria (CM) was the commonest cause of childhood coma in most of the studies conducted in Africa. Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) was the second most common known cause of coma in seven of the African studies. Of the studies in Asia, encephalitides were the commonest cause of coma in two studies in India, and ABM was the commonest cause of coma in Pakistan. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most commonly isolated organism in ABM. Japanese encephalitis, dengue fever and enteroviruses were the viral agents most commonly isolated. Accurate diagnosis of the aetiology of childhood coma in RPCs is complicated by overlap in clinical presentation, limited diagnostic resources, disease endemicity and co-morbidity. For improved outcomes, studies are needed to further elucidate the aetiology of childhood coma in RPCs, explore simple and practical diagnostic tools, and investigate the most appropriate specific and supportive interventions to manage and prevent infectious encephalopathies.

  14. Comparision between Brain Atrophy and Subdural Volume to Predict Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Volumetric CT Imaging Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Min-Wook; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Choi, Seung-Won; Koh, Hyeon-Song; Youm, Jin-Young; Song, Shi-Hun

    2015-10-01

    Brain atrophy and subdural hygroma were well known factors that enlarge the subdural space, which induced formation of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Thus, we identified the subdural volume that could be used to predict the rate of future CSDH after head trauma using a computed tomography (CT) volumetric analysis. A single institution case-control study was conducted involving 1,186 patients who visited our hospital after head trauma from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2014. Fifty-one patients with delayed CSDH were identified, and 50 patients with age and sex matched for control. Intracranial volume (ICV), the brain parenchyme, and the subdural space were segmented using CT image-based software. To adjust for variations in head size, volume ratios were assessed as a percentage of ICV [brain volume index (BVI), subdural volume index (SVI)]. The maximum depth of the subdural space on both sides was used to estimate the SVI. Before adjusting for cranium size, brain volume tended to be smaller, and subdural space volume was significantly larger in the CSDH group (p=0.138, p=0.021, respectively). The BVI and SVI were significantly different (p=0.003, p=0.001, respectively). SVI [area under the curve (AUC), 77.3%; p=0.008] was a more reliable technique for predicting CSDH than BVI (AUC, 68.1%; p=0.001). Bilateral subdural depth (sum of subdural depth on both sides) increased linearly with SVI (pSubdural space volume was significantly larger in CSDH groups. SVI was a more reliable technique for predicting CSDH. Bilateral subdural depth was useful to measure SVI.

  15. Subdural Hematoma Mimickers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Dragos; Koziarz, Alex; Cenic, Aleksa; Nath, Siddharth; Singh, Sheila; Almenawer, Saleh A; Kachur, Edward

    2016-09-01

    A variety of subdural pathologies that may mimic hematomas are reported in the literature. We aimed to identify the atypical clinical and radiologic presentations of subdural masses that may mimic subdural hematomas. A systematic review of MEDLINE and Embase was conducted independently by 2 reviewers to identify articles describing subdural hematoma mimickers. We also present a patient from our institution with a subdural pathology mimicking a subdural hematoma. We analyzed patient clinical presentations, underlying pathologies, radiologic findings, and clinical outcomes. We included 43 articles totaling 48 patients. The mean ± SD patient age was 55.7 ± 16.8 years. Of the 45 cases describing patient history, 13 patients (27%) had a history of trauma. The underlying pathologies of the 48 subdural collections were 10 metastasis (21%), 14 lymphoma (29%), 7 sarcoma (15%), 4 infectious (8%), 4 autoimmune (8%), and 9 miscellaneous (19%). Findings on computed tomography (CT) scan were 18 hyperdense (41%), 11 hypodense (25%), 9 isodense (20%), 3 isodense/hyperdense (7%), and 3 hypodense/isodense (7%). Thirty-four patients (71%) were treated surgically; among these patients, 65% had symptom resolution. Neither the pathology (P = 0.337) nor the management strategy (P = 0.671) was correlated with improved functional outcomes. Identification of atypical history and radiologic features should prompt further diagnostic tests, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to elucidate the proper diagnosis, given that certain pathologies may be managed nonsurgically. A subdural collection that is hyperdense on CT scan and hyperintense on T2-weighted MRI, along with a history of progressive headache with no trauma, may raise the suspicion of an atypical subdural pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Subdural hemorrhage: A unique case involving secondary vitamin K deficiency bleeding due to biliary atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyao, Masashi; Abiru, Hitoshi; Ozeki, Munetaka; Kotani, Hirokazu; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Kobayashi, Naho; Omae, Tadaki; Osamura, Toshio; Tamaki, Keiji

    2012-09-10

    Extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA) is a rare disease characterized by progressive and obliterative cholangiopathy in infants and is one of the major causes of secondary vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) due to cholestasis-induced fat malabsorption. Breast feeding increases the tendency of bleeding in EHBA patients because breast milk contains low amounts of vitamin K. A 2-month-old female infant unexpectedly died, with symptoms of vomiting and jaundice prior to death. She had been born by uncomplicated vaginal delivery and exhibited normal growth and development with breastfeeding. There was no history of trauma. She received vitamin K prophylaxis orally. In an emergency hospital, a CT scan showed a right intracranial hematoma and mass effect with midline shift to the left. In the postmortem examination, severe atresia was observed in the whole extrahepatic bile duct. Histologically, cholestasis, periductal fibrosis, and distorted bile ductules were noted. The gallbladder was not identified. A subdural hematoma and cerebellar tonsillar herniation were found; however, no traumatic injury in any part of the body was observed. Together, these findings suggest that the subdural hemorrhage was caused by secondary vitamin K deficiency resulting from a combination of cholestasis-induced fat malabsorption and breastfeeding. Subdural hemorrhage by secondary VKDB sometimes occurs even when vitamin K prophylaxis is continued. This case demonstrated that intrinsic factors, such as secondary VKDB (e.g., EHBA, neonatal hepatitis, chronic diarrhea), should also be considered in infant autopsy cases presenting with subdural hemorrhage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of subdural empyema with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKillop, J.H.; Holtzman, D.S.; McDougall, I.R.

    1980-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is now the standard method of confirming a diagnosis of suspected subdural empyema. We report a case in which the radionuclide brain scan was abnormal at a time when the CT scan was normal. An 111 In-labeled leukocyte scan was also performed in this patient and demonstrated abnormal uptake in the empyema. The scintigraphic findings in a second case of subdural empyema are also described. The relative roles of radionuclide studies and CT scans in the patient with suspected subdural empyema are discussed

  18. Synergistic impact of acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury on the weaning outcome of patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Kuang; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Ho, Li-Ing; Wang, Jia-Horng; Kou, Yu Ru

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory neuromuscular impairment severity is known to predict weaning outcome among patients with cervical spinal cord injury; however, the impact of non-neuromuscular complications remains unexplored. This study was to evaluate possible neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular factors that may negatively impact weaning outcome. From September 2002 to October 2012, acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury patients who had received mechanical ventilation for >48h were enrolled and divided into successful (n=54) and unsuccessful weaning groups (n=19). Various neuromuscular, non-neuromuscular factors and events during the intensive care unit stay were extracted from medical charts and electronic medical records. Variables presenting with a significant difference (pspinal cord injury (C1-3), lower pulse rates, and lower Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, higher peak blood urea nitrogen, lower trough albumin, and lower trough blood leukocyte counts. Furthermore, unsuccessful weaning patients had a higher incidence of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock and acute kidney injury during the intensive care unit stay. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury were independent risk factors for failure of weaning. Importantly, patients with both risk factors showed a large increase in odds ratio for unsuccessful weaning from mechanical ventilation (pinjury during the intensive care unit stay and high level of cervical spinal injury are two independent risk factors that synergistically work together producing a negative impact on weaning outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Postmortem changes in lungs in severe closed traumatic brain injury complicated by acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Tumanskiy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available V.А. Tumanskіy, S.І. Ternishniy, L.M. Tumanskaya Pathological changes in the lungs were studied in the work of 42 patiens who died from severe closed intracranial injury (SCII. It was complicated with acute respiratory insufficient (ARI. The most modified subpleural areas were selected from every lobe of the lungs for pathological studies. Prepared histological sections were stained by means of hemotoxylin and eosin and by Van Giеson for light microscopy. The results of the investigation have shown absence of the significant difference of pathological changes in the lungs of patients who died from ARI because of severe brain injury and traumatic intracranial hemorrhage. Pathognomic pathological changes in the lungs as a result of acute lung injury syndrome (ALIS were found in deceased patients on the third day since the SCII (n=8. There was a significant bilateral interstitial edema and mild alveolar edema with the presence of red and blood cells in the alveoli, vascular plethora of the septum interalveolar and stasis of blood in the capillaries, the slight pericapillary leukocyte infiltration, subpleural hemorrhage and laminar pulmonary atelectasis. In deceased patients on 4-6 days after SCII that was complicated with ARI (n=14, morphological changes had been detected in the lungs. It was pathognomic for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS with local pneumonic to be layered. A significant interstitial pulmonary edema was observed in the respiratory part of the lungs. The edema has spread from the walls of the alveoli into the interstitial spaces of the bronchioles and blood vessels, and also less marked serous-hemorrhagic alveolar edema with presence of the fibrin in the alveoli and macrophages. The ways of intrapleural lymphatic drainage were dilatated. Histopathological changes in the lungs of those who died on the 7-15th days after severe closed craniocerebral injury with ARI to be complicated (n=12 have been indicative of two

  20. Evaluation of cerebral-cardiac syndrome using echocardiography in a canine model of acute traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Rong; Yang, Weizhong; Wang, Xiumei; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Xiaodong; Sun, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have confirmed that traumatic brain injury (TBI) can induce general adaptation syndrome (GAS), which subsequently results in myocardial dysfunction and damage in some patients with acute TBI; this condition is also termed as cerebral-cardiac syndrome. However, most clinicians ignore the detection and treatment of myocardial dysfunction, and instead concentrate only on the serious neural damage that is observed in acute TBI, which is one of the most important fatal factors. Therefore, clarification is urgently needed regarding the relationship between TBI and myocardial dysfunction. In the present study, we evaluated 18 canine models of acute TBI, by using real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography and strain rate imaging to accurately evaluate myocardial function and regional microcirculation, including the strain rate of the different myocardial segments, time-amplitude curves, mean ascending slope of the curve, and local myocardial blood flow. Our results suggest that acute TBI often results in cerebral-cardiac syndrome, which rapidly progresses to the serious stage within 3 days. This study is the first to provide comprehensive ultrasonic characteristics of cerebral-cardiac syndrome in an animal model of TBI.

  1. Subdural Hematoma Presenting as Recurrent Syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, David I; Jamros, Christine; Cogar, William

    2015-09-01

    Syncope is a common emergency department (ED) complaint. Recurrent syncope is less common, but may be concerning for serious underlying pathology. It often requires a broad diagnostic evaluation that may include neurologic imaging. We present the case of a 75-year-old man with non-small-cell carcinoma who presented to the ED for recurrent syncope after coughing spells over the 2 weeks preceding his arrival at the ED. He had a normal cardiac evaluation, however, he had some subacute neurologic changes that prompted obtaining a computed tomography (CT) scan of the head. This led to the diagnosis of atraumatic subdural hematoma that was causing transient transtentorial herniation leading to the recurrent syncope. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians should be aware that recurrent syncope is a possible presentation of increased intracranial pressure that may be due to a mass lesion, particularly if the patient has any acute or subacute neurologic changes. Although this association with a subdual hematoma is rare, other cases of mass lesions leading to syncope after coughing spells have been reported in the literature. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Unilateral optic neuropathy following subdural hematoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witte Otto W

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Unilateral optic neuropathy is commonly due to a prechiasmatic affliction of the anterior visual pathway, while losses in visual hemifields result from the damage to brain hemispheres. Here we report the unusual case of a patient who suffered from acute optic neuropathy following hemispherical subdural hematoma. Although confirmed up to now only through necropsy studies, our case strongly suggests a local, microcirculatory deficit identified through magnetic resonance imaging in vivo. Case presentation A 70-year-old Caucasian German who developed a massive left hemispheric subdural hematoma under oral anticoagulation presented with acute, severe visual impairment on his left eye, which was noticed after surgical decompression. Neurologic and ophthalmologic examinations indicated sinistral optic neuropathy with visual acuity reduced nearly to amaurosis. Ocular pathology such as vitreous body hemorrhage, papilledema, and central retinal artery occlusion were excluded. An orbital lesion was ruled out by means of orbital magnetic resonance imaging. However, cerebral diffusion-weighted imaging and T2 maps of magnetic resonance imaging revealed a circumscribed ischemic lesion within the edematous, slightly herniated temporomesial lobe within the immediate vicinity of the affected optic nerve. Thus, the clinical course and morphologic magnetic resonance imaging findings suggest the occurrence of pressure-induced posterior ischemic optic neuropathy due to microcirculatory compromise. Conclusion Although lesions of the second cranial nerve following subdural hematoma have been reported individually, their pathogenesis was preferentially proposed from autopsy studies. Here we discuss a dual, pressure-induced and secondarily ischemic pathomechanism on the base of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging diagnostics which may remain unconsidered by computed tomography.

  3. Amplitude of Low-Frequency Fluctuations in Multiple-Frequency Bands in Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jie; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Fuqing; Bai, Lijun; Kuang, Hongmei; He, Laichang; Zeng, Xianjun; Gong, Honghan

    2016-01-01

    Functional disconnectivity during the resting state has been observed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients during the acute stage. However, it remains largely unknown whether the abnormalities are related to specific frequency bands of the low-frequency oscillations (LFO). Here, we used the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) to examine the amplitudes of LFO in different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.073 Hz; and typical: 0.01-0.08 Hz) in patients with acute mTBI. A total of 24 acute mTBI patients and 24 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls participated in this study. In the typical band, acute mTBI patients showed lower standardized ALFF in the right middle frontal gyrus and higher standardized ALFF in the right lingual/fusiform gyrus and left middle occipital gyrus. Further analyses showed that the difference between groups was concentrated in a narrower (slow-4) frequency band. In the slow-5 band, mTBI patients only exhibited higher standardized ALFF in the occipital areas. No significant correlation between the mini-mental state examination score and the standardized ALFF value was found in any brain region in the three frequency bands. Finally, no significant interaction between frequency bands and groups was found in any brain region. We concluded that the abnormality of spontaneous brain activity in acute mTBI patients existed in the frontal lobe as well as in distributed brain regions associated with integrative, sensory, and emotional roles, and the abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in different brain regions could be better detected by the slow-4 band. These findings might contribute to a better understanding of local neural psychopathology of acute mTBI. Future studies should take the frequency bands into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity of mTBI patients.

  4. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in multiple-frequency bands in acute mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie eZhan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional disconnectivity during the resting state has been observed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI patients during the acute stage. However, it remains largely unknown whether the abnormalities are related to specific frequency bands of the low-frequency oscillations (LFO. Here, we used the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF to examine the amplitudes of LFO in different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01–0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027–0.073 Hz; and typical: 0.01–0.08 Hz in patients with acute mTBI. A total of 24 acute mTBI patients and 24 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls (HC participated in this study. In the typical band, acute mTBI patients showed lower standardized ALFF in the right middle frontal gyrus and higher standardized ALFF in the right lingual/fusiform gyrus and left middle occipital gyrus. Further analyses showed that the difference between groups was concentrated in a narrower (slow-4 frequency band. In the slow-5 band, mTBI patients only exhibited higher standardized ALFF in the occipital areas. No significant correlation between the MMSE score and the standardized ALFF value was found in any brain region in the three frequency bands. Finally, no significant interaction between frequency bands and groups was found in any brain region. We concluded that the abnormality of spontaneous brain activity in acute mTBI patients existed in the frontal lobe as well as in distributed brain regions associated with integrative, sensory and emotional roles, and the abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in different brain regions could be better detected by the slow-4 band. These findings might contribute to a better understanding of local neural psychopathology of acute mTBI. Future studies should take the frequency bands into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity of mTBI patients.

  5. Leptomeningeal metastasis mimicking Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Saurabh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The presentation of Leptomeningeal Metastasis varies widely. It can also present a condition very similar to Chronic Subdural Hematoma. One should have a low threshold for suspicion while diagnosing such conditions to avoid catastrophic events.

  6. Leptomeningeal metastasis mimicking Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jain Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    The presentation of Leptomeningeal Metastasis varies widely. It can also present a condition very similar to Chronic Subdural Hematoma. One should have a low threshold for suspicion while diagnosing such conditions to avoid catastrophic events.

  7. GFAP and S100B in the acute phase of mild traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Z.; Wilczak, N.; Rodiger, L. A.; Schaaf, J. M.; van der Naalt, J.

    Objective: The biomarkers glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and S100B are increasingly used as prognostic tools in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Data for mild TBI are scarce. This study aims to analyze the predictive value of GFAP and S100B for outcome in mild TBI and the relation with

  8. Anesthesia with topical lidocaine hydrochloride gauzes in acute traumatic wounds in triage, a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridderikhof, Milan L.; Leenders, Noukje; Goddijn, Helma; Schep, Niels W.; Lirk, Philipp; Goslings, J. Carel; Hollmann, Markus W.

    2016-01-01

    Topical application of lidocaine in wounds has been studied in combination with vasoconstrictive additives, but the effect without these additives is unknown. The objective was to examine use of lidocaine-soaked gauzes without vasoconstrictive agents, in traumatic wounds in adult patients, applied

  9. Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological follow up in mild traumatic brain injury : Acute versus chronic disturbances?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Zwany; Spikman, Jacoba M.; Rodiger, Lars A.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    In a subgroup of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) residual symptoms, interfering with outcome and return to work, are found. With neuropsychological assessment cognitive deficits can be demonstrated although the pathological underpinnings of these cognitive deficits are not fully

  10. Pathophysiological Concepts in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury : Diffusion Tensor Imaging Related to Acute Perfusion CT Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Zwany; Cerliani, Leonardo; Rodiger, Lars A.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2013-01-01

    Background: A subgroup of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) experiences residual symptoms interfering with their return to work. The pathophysiological substrate of the suboptimal outcome in these patients is a source of debate. Objective: To provide greater insight into the

  11. Predictors of cognitive and physical fatigue in post-acute mild-moderate traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiehser, Dawn M; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Jak, Amy J; Hanson, Karen L; Sorg, Scott F; Orff, Henry; Clark, Alexandra L

    2017-10-01

    Post-traumatic fatigue (PTF) is a common, disabling, and often chronic symptom following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Yet, the impact of chronic cognitive and physical fatigue and their associations with psychiatric, sleep, cognitive, and psychosocial sequelae in mild-moderate TBI remain poorly understood. Sixty Veterans with a history of mild-moderate TBI and 40 Veteran controls (VC) were administered the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, a validated measure of TBI-related cognitive and physical fatigue as well as measures of neuropsychiatric, psychosocial, sleep, and objective cognitive functioning. Compared to VC, TBI Veterans endorsed significantly greater levels of cognitive and physical fatigue. In TBI, psychiatric symptoms, sleep disturbance, and post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) were associated with both cognitive and physical fatigue, while loss of consciousness (LOC) and poor attention/processing speed were related to elevations in cognitive fatigue only. In regression analyses, anxiety, sleep disturbance, and LOC significantly predicted cognitive fatigue, while only post-traumatic stress symptoms and PTA contributed to physical fatigue. Cognitive and physical fatigue are problematic symptoms following mild-moderate TBI that are differentially associated with specific injury and psychiatric sequelae. Findings provide potential symptom targets for interventions aimed at ameliorating fatigue, and further underscore the importance of assessing and treating fatigue as a multi-dimensional symptom following TBI.

  12. Parkinsonsim due to a Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosuk Park

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of parkinsonism. We present the case of a 78-year-old man with right-side dominant parkinsonism about 3 months after a minor head injury. MRI reveals a chronic subdural hematoma on the left side with mildly displaced midline structures. The parkinsonian features were almost completely disappeared after neurosurgical evacuation of the hematoma without any anti-parkinson drug.

  13. Parkinsonsim due to a Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bosuk; Song, Sook Keun; Hong, Jin Yong; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2009-01-01

    Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of parkinsonism. We present the case of a 78-year-old man with right-side dominant parkinsonism about 3 months after a minor head injury. MRI reveals a chronic subdural hematoma on the left side with mildly displaced midline structures. The parkinsonian features were almost completely disappeared after neurosurgical evacuation of the hematoma without any anti-parkinson drug. PMID:24868353

  14. The Pathogenesis of Subacute Subdural Hematoma: A Report of 3 Cases and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhi-Qiang; Ding, Sheng-Hong; Huang, Jian-Yue; Zhu, Zhi-Gang

    2018-06-01

    To discuss the pathologic mechanism of subacute subdural hematoma (sASDH). Three typical cases of sASDH were reported, and related literature in Chinese published in the past 15 years was reviewed. Intervals from onset of acute subdural hematoma to surgery or symptom deterioration resulting in sASDH were 12.5-15.5 days (mean 14.1 days). Delayed liquefaction of hematoma clots occurred in all 3 reported cases. One patient achieved good curative effect after administration of dexamethasone, and another patient relapsed owing to poor drainage after evacuation of hematoma. The conversion of acute subdural hematoma to sASDH is an inflammatory reaction process with very regular in time, and it is speculated that the pathologic mechanism may be a delayed hypersensitivity reaction. Antigen released during the liquefaction process of blood clot, with subdural neomembrane cells as antigen-presenting cells, is presented to the T lymphocytes released from the capillaries in the neomembrane and forms sensitized T lymphocytes. When the subsequent antigen is released from the blood clots with a delayed liquefaction and is exposed to sensitized T lymphocytes, the delayed hypersensitivity process occurs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bone bruise in acute traumatic patellar dislocation: volumetric magnetic resonance imaging analysis with follow-up mean of 12 months

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paakkala, Antti; Paakkala, Timo [Tampere University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tampere (Finland); Sillanpaeae, Petri; Maeenpaeae, Heikki [Tampere University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Tampere (Finland); Huhtala, Heini [University of Tampere, School of Public Health, Tampere (Finland)

    2010-07-15

    The aim of the study was to assess volumetric analysis of bone bruises in acute primary traumatic patellar dislocation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resolving resolution of bruises in follow-up MRI. MRI was performed in 23 cases. A follow-up examination was done at a mean of 12 months after dislocation. Volumes of patellar and femur bruises for every patient were evaluated separately by two musculoskeletal radiologists, and mean values of the bruises were assessed. Other MRI findings were evaluated, together with agreement by consensus. Bone bruise volumes were compared with other MR findings. In the acute study 100% of patients showed bruising of the lateral femoral condyle and 96% bruising of the patella. The bruise was located at the medial femoral condyle in 30% and at the patellar median ridge in 74% of patients. The median volume of the femoral bruise was 25,831 mm{sup 3} and of the patellar bruise 2,832 mm{sup 3}. At the follow-up study 22% of patients showed bruising of the lateral femoral condyle and 39% bruising of the patella, the median volumes of the bruises being 5,062 mm{sup 3} and 1,380 mm{sup 3}, respectively. Larger patellar bruise volume correlated with larger femur bruise volume in the acute (r=0.389, P=0.074) and the follow-up (r=1.000, P<0.01) studies. Other MRI findings did not correlate significantly with bone bruise volumes. Bone bruising is the commonest finding in cases of acute patellar dislocation, being seen even 1 year after trauma and indicating significant bone trabecular injury in the patellofemoral joint. A large bruise volume may be associated with subsequent chondral lesion progression at the patella. We concluded that the measurement of bone bruise volume in patients with acute patellar dislocation is a reproducible method but requires further studies to evaluate its clinical use. (orig.)

  16. Bone bruise in acute traumatic patellar dislocation: volumetric magnetic resonance imaging analysis with follow-up mean of 12 months

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paakkala, Antti; Paakkala, Timo; Sillanpaeae, Petri; Maeenpaeae, Heikki; Huhtala, Heini

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess volumetric analysis of bone bruises in acute primary traumatic patellar dislocation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resolving resolution of bruises in follow-up MRI. MRI was performed in 23 cases. A follow-up examination was done at a mean of 12 months after dislocation. Volumes of patellar and femur bruises for every patient were evaluated separately by two musculoskeletal radiologists, and mean values of the bruises were assessed. Other MRI findings were evaluated, together with agreement by consensus. Bone bruise volumes were compared with other MR findings. In the acute study 100% of patients showed bruising of the lateral femoral condyle and 96% bruising of the patella. The bruise was located at the medial femoral condyle in 30% and at the patellar median ridge in 74% of patients. The median volume of the femoral bruise was 25,831 mm 3 and of the patellar bruise 2,832 mm 3 . At the follow-up study 22% of patients showed bruising of the lateral femoral condyle and 39% bruising of the patella, the median volumes of the bruises being 5,062 mm 3 and 1,380 mm 3 , respectively. Larger patellar bruise volume correlated with larger femur bruise volume in the acute (r=0.389, P=0.074) and the follow-up (r=1.000, P<0.01) studies. Other MRI findings did not correlate significantly with bone bruise volumes. Bone bruising is the commonest finding in cases of acute patellar dislocation, being seen even 1 year after trauma and indicating significant bone trabecular injury in the patellofemoral joint. A large bruise volume may be associated with subsequent chondral lesion progression at the patella. We concluded that the measurement of bone bruise volume in patients with acute patellar dislocation is a reproducible method but requires further studies to evaluate its clinical use. (orig.)

  17. Traumatic brain injury and post-acute decline: what role does environmental enrichment play? A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eFrasca

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. While a number of studies provide evidence of neural and cognitive decline in traumatic brain injury (TBI survivors during the post-acute stages of injury, there is a dearth of research on the possible mechanisms underlying this decline. The purposes of this paper, therefore, are to (1 examine evidence that environmental enrichment (EE can influence long-term outcome following TBI, and (2 examine the nature of post-acute environments, whether they vary in degree of EE, and what impact these variations have on outcomes.Methods. We conducted a scoping review to identify studies on EE in animals and humans, and post-discharge experiences that relate to barriers to recovery.Results. Ninety-six articles that met inclusion criteria demonstrated the benefits of EE on brain and behaviour in healthy and brain-injured animals and humans. Nineteen papers on post-discharge experiences provided evidence that variables such as insurance coverage, financial and social support, home therapy, and transition from hospital to home, also play a vital role in regaining independence. Conclusion. There is evidence to suggest that lack of EE, whether from lack of resources or limited ability to engage in such environments, may play a role in post-recovery cognitive and neural decline. Maximizing EE in the post-acute stages of TBI may improve long-term outcomes for the individual, their family and society.

  18. Injury severity and disability in the selection of next level of care following acute medical treatment for traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malec, James F; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Brown, Allen W; Moessner, Anne M

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the association of demographic factors, post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) and a standardized measure of ability limitations with clinical decisions for Next Level of Care following acute hospital treatment for moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). A TBI Clinical Nurse specialist recorded PTA for 212 individuals and rated 159 on the Ability and Adjustment Indices of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) for comparison with clinical decisions. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that independent ratings on the MPAI-4 Ability Index and PTA were associated with the clinical decision to admit to Inpatient Rehabilitation vs discharge to Home in 92.7% of the sample; ratings on the Ability Index alone were associated with this decision in 92.2% of cases. Age over 65 was the only variable associated with discharge to a Skilled Nursing Facility, correctly predicting this decision in 64% of cases. Use of a standardized measure of ability limitations appears feasible to provide supportive documentation and potentially improve the consistency of decision-making in recommending Inpatient Rehabilitation vs discharge to Home. Although age is a significant factor in the decision to discharge to a Skilled Nursing Facility, this decision appears complex and merits further study.

  19. Anatomy and development of the meninges: implications for subdural collections and CSF circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, Julie [Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Squier, Waney [John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Neuropathology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Eastman, James T. [Lancaster General Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Lancaster, PA (United States)

    2009-03-15

    The dura is traditionally viewed as a supportive fibrous covering of the brain containing the dural venous sinuses but otherwise devoid of vessels and lacking any specific function. However, review of the embryology and anatomy reveals the dura to be a complex, vascularized and innervated structure, not a simple fibrous covering. The dura contains an inner vascular plexus that is larger in the infant than in the adult, and this plexus likely plays a role in CSF absorption. This role could be particularly important in the infant whose arachnoid granulations are not completely developed. Although subdural hemorrhage is frequently traumatic, there are nontraumatic conditions associated with subdural hemorrhage, and the inner dural plexus is a likely source of bleeding in these nontraumatic circumstances. This review outlines the development and age-specific vascularity of the dura and offers an alternative perspective on the role of the dura in homeostasis of the central nervous system. (orig.)

  20. Anatomy and development of the meninges: implications for subdural collections and CSF circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Julie; Squier, Waney; Eastman, James T

    2009-03-01

    The dura is traditionally viewed as a supportive fibrous covering of the brain containing the dural venous sinuses but otherwise devoid of vessels and lacking any specific function. However, review of the embryology and anatomy reveals the dura to be a complex, vascularized and innervated structure, not a simple fibrous covering. The dura contains an inner vascular plexus that is larger in the infant than in the adult, and this plexus likely plays a role in CSF absorption. This role could be particularly important in the infant whose arachnoid granulations are not completely developed. Although subdural hemorrhage is frequently traumatic, there are nontraumatic conditions associated with subdural hemorrhage, and the inner dural plexus is a likely source of bleeding in these nontraumatic circumstances. This review outlines the development and age-specific vascularity of the dura and offers an alternative perspective on the role of the dura in homeostasis of the central nervous system.

  1. [Transformation from chronic subdural hematoma into subdural empyema following cat bites: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takuya; Yamada, Kei; Kasahara, Sou; Umeda, Yoshitaka; Oyake, Mutsuo; Fujita, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man developed motor aphasia and right hemiparesis with severe headache, during the treatment of cellulitis and sepsis due to cat bites. Brain CT showed a low density, crescent-shaped lesion in the left subdural space, which was hypointense on brain diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). One week later, when his neurological symptoms had worsened, the signal of the subdural lesion had changed to hyperintense on DWI. The lesion was capsule-shaped when enhanced by Gadolinium. The signal changes on DWI of the lesion indicated the existing hematoma had changed to an empyema, or so-called infected subdural hematoma, due to a hematogenous bacterial infection. Pasteurella multocida, a resident microbe in the oral cavity of cats, could be the responsible pathogen in this case. The patient recovered completely after treatment with intravenous high dose antibiotics. This is an important case report describing the transformation from a chronic subdural hematoma into a subdural empyema by DWI.

  2. Characteristics of acute treatment costs of traumatic brain injury in Eastern China--a multi-centre prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qiang; Liu, Hua; Wu, Xing; Sun, Yirui; Yao, Haijun; Zhou, Liangfu; Hu, Jin

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated acute treatment costs and related factors for traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in eastern China based on a prospective multicentre study. Data were prospectively collected from 80 hospitals in eastern China by standardized structured questionnaires during 2004. Included patients were admitted to hospitals via an emergency service with a diagnosis of TBI. The total acute hospitalization treatment costs derived from unsubsidized total hospital billings were used as the main outcome measure. Univariate and multivariable regression models were used to examine factors associated with each outcome. In total, 13,007 TBI cases were identified from 80 hospitals in eastern China. The median cost per hospitalization was $879 US (range, $72-45,894). The median cost per day was $79 (interquartile range, $49-126). The hospitalization costs varied based on the cause of TBI, with a median of $1017 for traffic accidents, $816 for falls, $490 for blows to the head, and $712 for falls. The hospitalization costs also varied by injury type with a mean of $918 for TBI associated with other injuries and $831 for isolated TBI. Using multiple regression analyses, lower admission Glasgow Coma score, longer hospital stay (LOS), male sex, transient patient status, traffic accident, injury occurring on a construction site, treatment at a tertiary hospital, neurosurgical intensive care unit (NICU) or ICU stay, associated polytrauma, and those who needed a neurosurgical operation had significantly higher total acute hospitalization costs than those of other groups. Good recovery and self-paying patients had lower total costs. A double LOS was associated with a 1.61 (95% confidence interval, 1.59-1.62) times higher hospital cost. Our results have potential implications for health-care resource planning during TBI treatment. Measures to prevent traffic accidents and reduce the LOS may help to reduce acute hospitalization costs. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier

  3. Simultaneous Intracranial and Spinal Subdural Hematoma: Two Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chung Dae; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Seung Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disease. Simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma is extremely rare and only 14 such cases have been reported. We report here on two cases of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma that occurred following a fall-down head injury and intracranial surgery, and we discuss the pathogenesis of the disease.

  4. Focused and divided attention abilities in the acute phase of recovery from moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Kayela; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2017-01-01

    Impairments in attention following traumatic brain injury (TBI) can significantly impact recovery and rehabilitation effectiveness. This study investigated the multi-faceted construct of selective attention following TBI, highlighting the differences on visual nonsearch (focused attention) and search (divided attention) tasks. Participants were 30 individuals with moderate to severe TBI who were tested acutely (i.e. following emergence from PTA) and 30 age- and education-matched controls. Participants were presented with visual displays that contained either two or eight items. In the focused attention, nonsearch condition, the location of the target (if present) was cued with a peripheral arrow prior to presentation of the visual displays. In the divided attention, search condition, no spatial cue was provided prior to presentation of the visual displays. The results revealed intact focused, nonsearch, attention abilities in the acute phase of TBI recovery. In contrast, when no spatial cue was provided (divided attention condition), participants with TBI demonstrated slower visual search compared to the control group. The results of this study suggest that capitalizing on intact focused attention abilities by allocating attention during cognitively demanding tasks may help to reduce mental workload and improve rehabilitation effectiveness.

  5. Flexible endoscope-assisted evacuation of chronic subdural hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Májovský, Martin; Masopust, Václav; Netuka, David; Beneš, Vladimír

    2016-10-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition with an increasing incidence. Standard treatment of CSDHs is surgical evacuation. The objective of this study is to present a modification of standard burr-hole hematoma evacuation using a flexible endoscope and to assess the advantages and risks. Prospectively, 34 consecutive patients diagnosed with CSDH were included in the study. Epidemiological, clinical and radiographical data were collected and reviewed. All patients underwent a burr-hole evacuation of CSDH. A flexible endoscope was inserted and subdural space inspected during surgery. The surgeon was looking specifically for the presence of septations, draining catheter position and acute bleeding. Thirty-four patients underwent 37 endoscope-assisted surgeries. Presenting symptoms were hemiparesis (79%), decreased level of consciousness (18%), gait disturbances (15%), headache (12%), aphasia (6%), cognitive disturbances (6%) and epileptic seizure (3%). Average operative time was 43 min, and the average increase in operative time due to the use of the endoscope was 6 min. Recurrence rate was 8.8%, and clinical outcome was favorable (defined as mRS ≤ 2) in 97% of the cases. To our knowledge, the present cohort of 34 patients is the largest group of patients with CSDH treated using an endoscope. This technique allows decent visualization of the hematoma cavity while retaining the advantages of a minimally invasive approach under a local anesthesia. The main advantages are correct positioning of the catheter under visual control, identification of septations and early detection of cortex or vessel injury during surgery.

  6. Primary traumatic patellar dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Chun-Hao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute traumatic patellar dislocation is a common injury in the active and young adult populations. MRI of the knee is recommended in all patients who present with acute patellar dislocation. Numerous operative and non-operative methods have been described to treat the injuries; however, the ideal management of the acute traumatic patellar dislocation in young adults is still in debate. This article is intended to review the studies to the subjects of epidemiology, initial examination and management.

  7. Acute traumatic orbital encephalocele: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jaiswal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital roof fractures after a blunt injury are an uncommon complication of trauma. Traumatic encephaloceles in the orbital cavity are even rarer, with only 15 cases published till date. Raised intraorbital pressure leading to irreversible damage to the optic nerve can be prevented by early diagnosis and management. Orbital computed tomography (CT with thin axial and coronal sections is helpful in trauma patients with a concurrent orbital trauma. Decompression of the orbital roof is the key step in surgical treatment and should be performed in every case. Repairing the orbital roof has to be performed to avoid transmission of variation in the intracranial pressure to the orbit. We present a case of traumatic orbital encephalocele who underwent surgical treatment via a frontobasal approach with evacuation of the contused herniated brain and reconstruction of the orbital roof using temporalis fascia which is readily available in contrast to costly materials like titanium mesh, screws, bone powder, fibrin glue, and so on, which are not easily available in every hospital. Rapid resolution of proptosis and visual symptoms along with excellent cosmetic outcome was seen at follow-ups after three and nine months. We emphasize the early diagnosis of this rare condition and also emergency treatment to prevent permanent visual loss as well as to achieve good cosmetic results.

  8. Modeling Acute Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock Injury: Challenges and Guidelines for Preclinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremoleda, Jordi L; Watts, Sarah A; Reynolds, Penny S; Thiemermann, Christoph; Brohi, Karim

    2017-12-01

    Trauma is responsible for a large proportion of the world's burden of disease, and is by far the biggest killer of young adults. Hemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable death and its effects are directly correlated with the incidence multi-organ failure in survivors. Trauma research is challenging due to patient heterogeneity, limited randomized controlled trials, and in vitro studies that fail to mimic the systemic injury response. Preclinical research remains essential for mechanistic and therapeutic discovery. Yet modeling the multifaceted nature of traumatic injury poses important experimental and welfare challenges associated with the onset of injury and prehospital and intra-operative care, the limited inter-species validation of coagulation profiles, the use of anesthesia/analgesia, and its impact on the systemic response to trauma; and the challenge of sustaining intensive care in recovery models. Proper model selection depends on the purpose of a given model and the criteria by which the experimental readouts will be clinically relevant. Such complexity warrants further refinement of experimental methodology and outcome measures to improve its clinical efficacy, while ensuring animal well-being. We review the experimental methodologies currently used for modeling traumatic hemorrhagic shock and addressing their impact on clinical translation. The aim of the review is to improve transparency and form a consensus when reporting methodology in trauma modeling.

  9. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kazuko; Sorimachi, Takatoshi; Honda, Yumie; Matsumae, Mitsunori

    2017-09-01

    Sex differences in various diseases recently have been recognized as an important factor in the approach to more efficient preventive and therapeutic medicine. We clarified sex differences in the clinical characteristics of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) by comparing men and women with CSDH, as there is a well-known male predominance in the prevalence of CSDH. Clinical factors and computed tomography findings were investigated retrospectively in 490 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital between 2006 and 2015 who were diagnosed with CSDH. On univariate analysis, women were significantly older than men (P hematoma, and death as outcomes at discharge were significantly more frequent than in men (P < 0.05). In contrast, women had less frequent instances of good recovery and less alcohol intake (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated female sex as an independent predictor of consciousness disturbance at admission. Female sex also was identified as a predictor of death at discharge. We demonstrated sex differences in the clinical characteristics of CSDH. In the future, management of patients with CSDH with regard to sex differences in disease characteristics could be expected to improve the outcomes of women, which have been worse than in men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Resting State Functional Connectivity in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury at the Acute Stage: Independent Component and Seed-Based Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraji, Armin; Benson, Randall R.; Welch, Robert D.; O'Neil, Brian J.; Woodard, John L.; Imran Ayaz, Syed; Kulek, Andrew; Mika, Valerie; Medado, Patrick; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Liu, Tianming; Haacke, E. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) accounts for more than 1 million emergency visits each year. Most of the injured stay in the emergency department for a few hours and are discharged home without a specific follow-up plan because of their negative clinical structural imaging. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly functional MRI (fMRI), has been reported as being sensitive to functional disturbances after brain injury. In this study, a cohort of 12 patients with mTBI were prospectively recruited from the emergency department of our local Level-1 trauma center for an advanced MRI scan at the acute stage. Sixteen age- and sex-matched controls were also recruited for comparison. Both group-based and individual-based independent component analysis of resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) demonstrated reduced functional connectivity in both posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus regions in comparison with controls, which is part of the default mode network (DMN). Further seed-based analysis confirmed reduced functional connectivity in these two regions and also demonstrated increased connectivity between these regions and other regions of the brain in mTBI. Seed-based analysis using the thalamus, hippocampus, and amygdala regions further demonstrated increased functional connectivity between these regions and other regions of the brain, particularly in the frontal lobe, in mTBI. Our data demonstrate alterations of multiple brain networks at the resting state, particularly increased functional connectivity in the frontal lobe, in response to brain concussion at the acute stage. Resting-state functional connectivity of the DMN could serve as a potential biomarker for improved detection of mTBI in the acute setting. PMID:25285363

  11. PATOBIOLOGÍA DEL HEMATOMA SUBDURAL CRÓNICO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Sabogal Barrios

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of subdural cronic hematoma in all ages is a therapeutic challenge. Chronic subdural hematoma is a disease that can be fatal without surgical treatment. A variety of treatment options like subdural tapping, endoscopic washout, shunting and craniotomy have been discussed. In chronic subdural hematoma, spontaneous resolution with conservative treatment is not an common therapeutic method because it has causes high mortality, requires long periods of time, and finally, many patients need surgical treatment. The etiology, physiopathology and surgical alternatives in the treatment of subdural chronic hematoma is discussed.

  12. Is the contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries being underestimated in the acute hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, O

    2011-04-05

    Alcohol consumption in Ireland has nearly doubled during the period 1989-2001. To evaluate the relationship of alcohol to fatal head injuries in the acute hospital setting we created a data base of all fatal traumatic brain injuries in the Department of Neuropathology at Beaumont Hospital over a ten year period (1997-2006 inclusive). 498 cases were identified (351 males: 147 females). Fatalities were highest in males aged 19-25 years (N=101) and 51-70 years (N=109). Falls (N=210) and road traffic accidents (N=183) were the commonest modes of presentation. 36\\/210 (17%) falls had positive blood alcohol testing, 9\\/210 (4.3%) had documentation of alcohol in notes but no testing, 35\\/210 (16.7%) tested negative for alcohol and 130\\/210 (61.9%) were not tested. The RTA group (N=183) comprised drivers (n=79), passengers (n=47) and pedestrians (n=57). 65\\/79 (82.2%) of drivers were males aged 19-25 years. Blood alcohol was only available in 27\\/79 (34.1%) drivers and was positive in 13\\/27 (48.1%). 14\\/75 (18.7%) pedestrians were tested for alcohol, 4\\/14 (28.6%) were positive. Overall 142\\/183 (77.6%) of the RTA group were not tested. The contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries is probably being underestimated due to omission of blood alcohol concentration testing on admission to hospital. Absence of national guidelines on blood alcohol testing in the emergency department compounds the problem.

  13. Cerebral Metabolism and the Role of Glucose Control in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago Blanco, Manuel M; Prashant, Giyarpuram N; Vespa, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    This article reviews key concepts of cerebral glucose metabolism, neurologic outcomes in clinical trials, the biology of the neurovascular unit and its involvement in secondary brain injury after traumatic brain insults, and current scientific and clinical data that demonstrate a better understanding of the biology of metabolic dysfunction in the brain, a concept now known as cerebral metabolic energy crisis. The use of neuromonitoring techniques to better understand the pathophysiology of the metabolic crisis is reviewed and a model that summarizes the triphasic view of cerebral metabolic disturbance supported by existing scientific data is outlined. The evidence is summarized and a template for future research provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Imaging of non-cardiac, non-traumatic causes of acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzl, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.kienzl@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Prosch, Helmut; Töpker, Michael; Herold, Christian [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    Non-traumatic chest pain is a common symptom in patients who present in the emergency department. From a clinical point of view, it is important to differentiate cardiac chest pain from non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). Among the plethora of potential causes of NCCP, life-threatening diseases, such as aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, tension pneumothorax, and esophageal rupture, must be differentiated from non-life threatening causes. The majority of NCCP, however, is reported to be benign in nature. The presentation of pain plays an important role in narrowing the differential diagnosis and initiating further diagnostic management and treatment. As the benign causes tend to recur, and may lead to patient anxiety and great costs, a meticulous evaluation of the patient is necessary to diagnose the underlying disorder or disease.

  15. MR imaging of experimental subdural bleeding. Correlates of brain deformation and tissue water content, and changes in vital physiological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlin, J.R.; Thuomas, K.Aa.; Ponten, U.; Bergstroem, K.; Zwetnow, N.N.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate morphological and physiological changes during acute lethal subdural bleeding in 2 models of anaesthetized dogs. Material and Methods: In model I, blood from the aorta was led into a collapsed subdural rubber balloon while in model II, the blood was directed into the subdural compartment over the left cerebral frontoparietal lobe. Eight vital physiological parameters were continuously registered. MR imaging visualized the compression and displacement of cerebral tissue, and assessed the dynamic changes in cerebral tissue water. Results: In model I, tissue herniation and compression of cerebral ventricles led to death at a haematoma volume corresponding to 8% of the intracranial volume. In model II, the extravasated blood progressed infratentorially and into the spinal sac with a volume that was 3 times larger than that of the lethal haematoma. Tissue water increased almost linearly during bleeding in both models. (orig.)

  16. Acute non-traumatic marrow edema syndrome in the knee: MRI findings at presentation, correlation with spinal DEXA and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karantanas, Apostolos H. [Department of Radiology, University of Crete, Heraklion 711 10 Greece (Greece)], E-mail: apolsen@yahoo.com; Drakonaki, Elena [Department of Radiology, University of Crete, Heraklion 711 10 Greece (Greece); Karachalios, Theophilos [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Thessaly, Larissa 411 10 Greece (Greece); Korompilias, Anastasios V. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ioannina, Ioannina 451 10 (Greece); Malizos, Konstantinos [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Thessaly, Larissa 411 10 Greece (Greece)

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to present the MRI findings of non-traumatic edema-like lesions presented acutely in the adult knee and to correlate them with the 3-year outcome and the bone mineral density (BMD) in the spine. Materials and methods: Ninety-eight patients (40 men, 58 women, mean age 60.1 {+-} 11 years, age range 27-82 years), were followed up clinically as well as with MR imaging, when indicated, for at least 3 years. Patients were classified according to presentation in 3 groups (A: bone marrow edema (BME), B: BME and subchondral fracture, C: BME and articular collapse) and according to outcome in 2 groups (A: reversible BME, B: articular collapse). BMD measurements of the spine were carried out in males over 70 and females over 60 years old using DEXA. Results: The isolated BME pattern was observed in 64.3% (Group A), subchondral fractures without articular collapse in 11.2% (Group B) and articular collapse in 24.5% (Group C). Significant differences were found among the 3 groups at presentation, regarding the age, sex, BMD, affected area and duration of symptoms prior to imaging (p < 0.05). Localization of the lesions in the weight-bearing areas of the knee was shown in 100% of C, in 90.9% of B and in 50.8% of A. The duration of symptoms prior to imaging was longer in C (7.6 {+-} 2.8 m) than in A (2.5 {+-} 1.7 m) and B (4.0 {+-} 3.2 m) (p < 0.05). Group B progressed to articular collapse in 45.5%, the rest demonstrating a favourable outcome. Group C showed clinical improvement in 75% and persistent symptoms that required knee arthroplasty in 25% of cases. Articular collapse was the final outcome in 29.6% and transient BME in 70.4% of patients. These two groups showed significant differences regarding the age (p {approx} 0), sex (p = 0.002), low BMD (p = 0.004), affected area (p {approx} 0), presence of subchondral sparing (p {approx} 0), duration of symptoms prior to imaging (p {approx} 0), time from onset of symptoms to the final outcome (p

  17. Acute non-traumatic marrow edema syndrome in the knee: MRI findings at presentation, correlation with spinal DEXA and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karantanas, Apostolos H.; Drakonaki, Elena; Karachalios, Theophilos; Korompilias, Anastasios V.; Malizos, Konstantinos

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to present the MRI findings of non-traumatic edema-like lesions presented acutely in the adult knee and to correlate them with the 3-year outcome and the bone mineral density (BMD) in the spine. Materials and methods: Ninety-eight patients (40 men, 58 women, mean age 60.1 ± 11 years, age range 27-82 years), were followed up clinically as well as with MR imaging, when indicated, for at least 3 years. Patients were classified according to presentation in 3 groups (A: bone marrow edema (BME), B: BME and subchondral fracture, C: BME and articular collapse) and according to outcome in 2 groups (A: reversible BME, B: articular collapse). BMD measurements of the spine were carried out in males over 70 and females over 60 years old using DEXA. Results: The isolated BME pattern was observed in 64.3% (Group A), subchondral fractures without articular collapse in 11.2% (Group B) and articular collapse in 24.5% (Group C). Significant differences were found among the 3 groups at presentation, regarding the age, sex, BMD, affected area and duration of symptoms prior to imaging (p < 0.05). Localization of the lesions in the weight-bearing areas of the knee was shown in 100% of C, in 90.9% of B and in 50.8% of A. The duration of symptoms prior to imaging was longer in C (7.6 ± 2.8 m) than in A (2.5 ± 1.7 m) and B (4.0 ± 3.2 m) (p < 0.05). Group B progressed to articular collapse in 45.5%, the rest demonstrating a favourable outcome. Group C showed clinical improvement in 75% and persistent symptoms that required knee arthroplasty in 25% of cases. Articular collapse was the final outcome in 29.6% and transient BME in 70.4% of patients. These two groups showed significant differences regarding the age (p ∼ 0), sex (p = 0.002), low BMD (p = 0.004), affected area (p ∼ 0), presence of subchondral sparing (p ∼ 0), duration of symptoms prior to imaging (p ∼ 0), time from onset of symptoms to the final outcome (p ∼ 0) and need for

  18. Hemispheric Chronic Subdural Hematoma Concealing Subdural Metastases: Terrible Surprise Behind Routine Emergency Department Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Riccardo; Pesce, Alessandro; Martines, Valentina

    2017-10-01

    The patient is a 79-year-old male, suffering from advanced metastatic prostate cancer, who developed a progressively worsening ideomotor slowing and was therefore referred to the emergency department of our institution. A plain axial computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a vast hemispheric subdural fluid collection, apparently a subdural hematoma. On closer inspection, and most of all, in hindsight, a tenuously isohyperdense signal irregularity at the frontal aspect of the fluid collection appears. Because of the declined general medical conditions and the paucity of the neurologic impairment, a high-dose, corticosteroid-based conservative strategy was performed. The total body CT scan for the routine oncologic follow-up of the prostate cancer scan fell at 20 days from the first CT of the emergency department. A second contrast-enhanced axial CT scan demonstrated the presence of 2 subdural metastases, presumably the initial pathogenesis of the subdural fluid collection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hepatitis E virus infection and acute non-traumatic neurological injury: A prospective multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, H.R.; Eijk, J.J.J. van; Cintas, P.; Madden, R.G.; Jones, C.; Webb, G.W.; Norton, B.; Pique, J.; Lutgens, S.; Devooght-Johnson, N.; Woolson, K.; Baker, J.; Saunders, M.; Househam, L.; Griffiths, J.; Abravanel, F.; Izopet, J.; Kamar, N.; Alfen, N. van; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Hunter, J.G.; Eijk, A.A. van der; Bendall, R.P.; McLean, B.N.; Jacobs, B.C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been associated with a number of neurological syndromes, but causality has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between HEV and neurological illness by prospective HEV testing of patients presenting with acute

  20. Symptom Differences in Acute and Chronic Presentation of Childhood Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famularo, Richard; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four child abuse victims, age 5-13, were diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Children with the acute form of PTSD exhibited such symptoms as difficulty falling asleep, hypervigilance, nightmares, and generalized anxiety. Children exhibiting chronic PTSD exhibited increased detachment, restricted range of affect,…

  1. Prevalence and Impact of Admission Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy on Treatment Intensity, Resource Utilization, and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liras, Ioannis N; Caplan, Henry W; Stensballe, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute coagulopathy of trauma in children are of potential importance to clinical outcome, but knowledge is limited and has only been investigated using conventional coagulation testing (CCT). The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and impact of arrival coagulopathy, ...

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Mats; Jansson, Kjell; Geijer, Håkan

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. • Low-dose CT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • A systematic review shows that CT has better diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • Radiography has no place in the workup of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

  3. In situ free-floating craniectomy: an unusual cause of chronic post-traumatic cephalalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Raveendran, Savitha

    2012-08-13

    We describe a case of post-traumatic cephalalgia in a 54-year-old man with chronic right parieto-occipital headache 3 years posthead injury. At the initial presentation, his Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 13/15 and CT brain revealed an acute subdural haematoma with fronto-temporal contusions. After 24 h his GCS dropped to 8/15 and subsequently he underwent a right-sided craniotomy and evacuation of the subdural haematoma and contusionectomy and intracranial pressure monitoring. To manage the cerebral oedema, the cranial bone flap was left in situ free-floating and was managed in an intensive care setting. He made good clinical recovery and 3 months postoperatively he complained of right-sided headache not relieved with medication and occipital nerve block. Three years later he underwent an exploration of the previous craniotomy scalp wound and the free-floating bone flap under the scalp was immobilised. The headache completely resolved following the procedure and is currently asymptomatic.

  4. The role of external drains and peritoneal conduits in the treatment of recurrent chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarius, Thomas; Qureshi, Hammad U; Sivakumaran, Ram; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Kirollos, Ramez W; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2010-06-01

    A considerable body of evidence supporting the use of external drainage after evacuation of primary chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) exists in the literature. However, no systematic study of the value of postoperative drainage in the treatment of recurrent CSDH has been published. The aim of the study was to investigate external drains and subdural-to-peritoneal conduit in the treatment of recurrent CSDH. A retrospective review of cases of CSDH treated in our institution between October 2002 and October 2006 was conducted. During the study period, 408 patients had burr hole evacuation. Sixty-four patients (15.9%) had treatment for recurrence. One patient had craniotomy, and the remaining 63 had another burr hole evacuation: 36 without placement of a drain (BHO), 14 with external drainage (SED), and 13 with placement of subdural-peritoneal catheter (SPC). Fifteen patients (24%) developed a secondary recurrence requiring a third drainage procedure. Postoperative drainage (SED or SPC) was associated with a significantly lower secondary recurrence rate when compared to BHO: 3/27 (11%) versus 12/36 (33%) (χ(2), P=.040). There was no significant difference in recurrence rates between SED and SPC. Postoperative complications included acute subdural hematoma (2), subdural empyema (2), brain edema (2), pneumonia (3), and in-hospital death (2). None of the complications was associated with the use of a specific technique. The results indicate that, as in the treatment of primary CSDHs, the use of drain (SED or SPC) with burr hole evacuation is safe and is associated with lower recurrence rate. Further investigation is needed to clarify the indications of currently available surgical techniques in the treatment of recurrent CSDH. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hemorrhagic lumbar facet cysts accompanying a spinal subdural hematoma at the same level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Osamu; Minami, Norihiko; Yamazaki, Masashi; Koda, Masao; Morinaga, Tatsuo

    2015-03-01

    We present a rare and interesting case of hemorrhagic lumbar facet cysts accompanying a spinal subdural hematoma at the same level suggesting a possible mechanism by which spinal subdural hematomas can arise. A 71-year-old man presented with persistent sciatic pain and intermittent claudication. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a multilocular mass lesion that showed high signal intensity in both T1- and T2-weighted images, and was located both inside and outside of the spinal canal. Computed tomographic myelography showed a cap-shaped block of the dural tube at L5 and computed tomography with L5-S facet arthrography demonstrated cystic masses. The patient was diagnosed with lumbar radiculopathy caused by hemorrhagic facet cysts, and then progressed to surgical treatment. Surgery revealed that the cysts contained blood clots, and intraoperative findings that the inside of the dural tube appeared blackish and that the dural tube was tensely ballooned after removal of the cysts led us to explorative durotomy. The durotomy demonstrated concentrated old blood pooling both in the dorsal and ventral subdural space, and these spaces were subsequently drained. After surgery, his sciatic pain and intermittent claudication resolved. There was no evidence of cyst mass recurrence at 2 years of follow-up. We propose a newly described mechanism for the formation of spinal subdural hematomas. We recommend surgeons be alert to epidural lesions causing repeated acute compression of the dural tube, which can cause spinal subdural hematoma, and consider the possible coexistence of these lesions in diagnosis and strategic surgical decisions.

  6. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome--experience using surgical decompression with open-door expansile cervical laminoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Juan; Green, Barth A; Vanni, Steven; Moza, Kapil; Guest, James D; Levi, Allan D

    2005-06-01

    Open-door expansile cervical laminoplasty (ODECL) is an effective surgical technique in the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. In the present study, we reviewed the safety and short-term neurological outcome after expansile cervical laminoplasty in the treatment of acute central cord syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed our database over a 3-year period (January 1997-January 2001) and identified 69 surgically treated cervical spinal cord injuries, including 29 cases of acute traumatic central cord syndrome (ATCCS). Fifteen of these patients underwent expansile cervical laminoplasty, whereas 14 did not because of radiographic evidence of sagittal instability. We collected data on the preoperative and the immediate postoperative and 3-month neurological examinations. Neurological function was assessed using the Asia Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grading system. We also reviewed the occurrence of complications and short-term radiological stability after the index procedure. The median age was 56 years. All patients had hyperextension injuries with underlying cervical spondylosis and stenosis in the absence of overt fracture or instability. The average delay from injury to surgery was 3 days. The preoperative ASIA grade scale was grade C, 8 patients, and grade D, 7 patients. There were no cases of immediate postoperative deterioration or at 3 months follow-up. Neurological outcome: 71.4% (10/14) of patients improved 1 ASIA grade when examined 3 months post injury. Surgical intervention consisting of ODECL can be safely applied in the subset of patients with ATCCS without instability who have significant cervical spondylosis/stenosis. Open-door expansile cervical laminoplasty is a safe, low-morbidity, decompressive procedure, and in our patients did not produce neurological deterioration.

  7. Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging in the acute and sub-acute phase of mild traumatic brain injury: can we see the difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Arnold; Kovacs, Noemi; Perlaki, Gabor; Orsi, Gergely; Aradi, Mihaly; Komaromy, Hedvig; Ezer, Erzsebet; Bukovics, Peter; Farkas, Orsolya; Janszky, Jozsef; Doczi, Tamas; Buki, Andras; Schwarcz, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods were shown to be able to detect the subtle structural consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The objective of this study was to investigate the acute structural alterations and recovery after mTBI, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to reveal axonal pathology, volumetric analysis, and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) to detect microhemorrhage. Fourteen patients with mTBI who had computed tomography with negative results underwent MRI within 3 days and 1 month after injury. High resolution T1-weighted imaging, DTI, and SWI, were performed at both time points. A control group of 14 matched volunteers were also examined following the same imaging protocol and time interval. Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) were performed on DTI data to reveal group differences. T1-weighted images were fed into Freesurfer volumetric analysis. TBSS showed fractional anisotropy (FA) to be significantly (corrected ptime points when performing MRI studies on patients with mTBI.

  8. Comparison of acute and chronic traumatic brain injury using semi-automatic multimodal segmentation of MR volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Andrei; Chambers, Micah C; Alger, Jeffry R; Filippou, Maria; Prastawa, Marcel W; Wang, Bo; Hovda, David A; Gerig, Guido; Toga, Arthur W; Kikinis, Ron; Vespa, Paul M; Van Horn, John D

    2011-11-01

    Although neuroimaging is essential for prompt and proper management of traumatic brain injury (TBI), there is a regrettable and acute lack of robust methods for the visualization and assessment of TBI pathophysiology, especially for of the purpose of improving clinical outcome metrics. Until now, the application of automatic segmentation algorithms to TBI in a clinical setting has remained an elusive goal because existing methods have, for the most part, been insufficiently robust to faithfully capture TBI-related changes in brain anatomy. This article introduces and illustrates the combined use of multimodal TBI segmentation and time point comparison using 3D Slicer, a widely-used software environment whose TBI data processing solutions are openly available. For three representative TBI cases, semi-automatic tissue classification and 3D model generation are performed to perform intra-patient time point comparison of TBI using multimodal volumetrics and clinical atrophy measures. Identification and quantitative assessment of extra- and intra-cortical bleeding, lesions, edema, and diffuse axonal injury are demonstrated. The proposed tools allow cross-correlation of multimodal metrics from structural imaging (e.g., structural volume, atrophy measurements) with clinical outcome variables and other potential factors predictive of recovery. In addition, the workflows described are suitable for TBI clinical practice and patient monitoring, particularly for assessing damage extent and for the measurement of neuroanatomical change over time. With knowledge of general location, extent, and degree of change, such metrics can be associated with clinical measures and subsequently used to suggest viable treatment options.

  9. Alpha desynchronization/synchronization during working memory testing is compromised in acute mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Xianghong; Shoga, Michael; Li, Lianyang; Zouridakis, George; Tran, Thao; Fonteh, Alfred N; Dawlaty, Jessica; Goldweber, Robert; Pogoda, Janice M; Harrington, Michael G

    2018-01-01

    Diagnosing and monitoring recovery of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is challenging because of the lack of objective, quantitative measures. Diagnosis is based on description of injuries often not witnessed, subtle neurocognitive symptoms, and neuropsychological testing. Since working memory (WM) is at the center of cognitive functions impaired in mTBI, this study was designed to define objective quantitative electroencephalographic (qEEG) measures of WM processing that may correlate with cognitive changes associated with acute mTBI. First-time mTBI patients and mild peripheral (limb) trauma controls without head injury were recruited from the emergency department. WM was assessed by a continuous performance task (N-back). EEG recordings were obtained during N-back testing on three occasions: within five days, two weeks, and one month after injury. Compared with controls, mTBI patients showed abnormal induced and evoked alpha activity including event-related desynchronization (ERD) and synchronization (ERS). For induced alpha power, TBI patients had excessive frontal ERD on their first and third visit. For evoked alpha, mTBI patients had lower parietal ERD/ERS at the second and third visits. These exploratory qEEG findings offer new and non-invasive candidate measures to characterize the evolution of injury over the first month, with potential to provide much-needed objective measures of brain dysfunction to diagnose and monitor the consequences of mTBI.

  10. Subdural hematoma and oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintzen, A. R.; Tijssen, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    In a retrospective study of the period 1959 to 1978, the role of anticoagulant therapy (ACT) in the development of subdural hematoma (SH) was investigated. Of 212 cases, 46 were receiving ACT, a proportion highly in excess of the frequency of ACT in the general population of the Leiden area. In this

  11. Developing a model of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jingyang; Ai, Jinglu; Macdonald, R Loch

    2011-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition that has a high incidence in the increasing elderly population of many countries. Pathologically, it is defined as a persistent liquefied hematoma in the subdural space more than 3 weeks old that is generally encased by a membraneous capsule. CSDHs likely originate after minor head trauma, with a key factor in its development being the potential for a subdural cavity to permit its expansion within, which is usually due to craniocerebral disproportion. The pathogenesis of CSDH has been attributed to osmotic or oncotic pressure differences, although measurements of these factors in the CSDH fluid do not support this theory. Current belief is that CSDH arises from recurrent bleeding in the subdural space, caused by a cycle of local angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation and ongoing fibrinolysis. However, because of a lack of detailed knowledge about the precise mechanisms, treatment is often limited to surgical interventions that are invasive and often prone to recurrence. Thus, it is possible that an easily reproducible and representative animal model of CSDH would facilitate research in the pathogenesis of CSDH and aid with development of treatment options.

  12. Cortical enhancement in chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Yoshio; Sato, Jun; Makita, Tadatoshi; Hayashi, Shigetoshi; Nakamura, Norio.

    1981-01-01

    In the CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma, brain enhancement adjacent to a subdural hematoma was seen occasionally after the injection of a contrast material. The authors called this finding ''cortical enhancement'', and 35 cases of chronic subdural hematoma were studied concerning cortical enhancement in relation to age, clinical signs and symptoms, hematoma density, and volume of the hematoma. Eight cases out of the 35 were subjected to measurements of the regional cerebral blood flow preoperatively by the method of the carotid injection of Xe-133. Cortical enhancement was apt to be seen in the cases which revealed intracranial hypertension or disturbance of consciousness, in isodensity or mixed-density hematomas, and in huge subdural hematomas. There was no specific correlation with age distribution. The pathogenesis of cortical enhancement seemed to be the result of cerebral compression with an increase in the contrast material per unit of volume and a prolonged venous outflow from the hemisphere, but no characteristic feature was detected in the average regional cerebral blood flow in our cases. (author)

  13. Bilateral Biconvex Frontal Chronic Subdural Hematoma Mimicking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common clinical entities encountered in daily neurosurgical practice.[1] CSDH is an encapsulated collection of old blood, mostly or totally liquefied and located between the dura mater and arachnoid.[2] We discuss the clinical and radiological findings in a case of ...

  14. Age determination of subdural hematomas: survey among radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, F A M; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Majoie, C B L M; van Rijn, R R

    2014-08-01

    Abusive head trauma is a severe form of child abuse. One important diagnostic finding is the presence of a subdural hematoma. Age determination of subdural hematomas is important to relate radiological findings to the clinical history presented by the caregivers. In court this topic is relevant as dating subdural hematomas can lead to identification of a suspect. The aim of our study is to describe the current practice among radiologists in the Netherlands regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas in children. This is a cross-sectional study, describing the results of an online questionnaire regarding dating subdural hematomas among pediatric and neuro-radiologists in the Netherlands. The questionnaire consisted of sociodemographic questions, theoretical questions and eight pediatric cases in which the participants were asked to date subdural hematomas based on imaging findings. Fifty-one out of 172 radiologists (30 %) filled out the questionnaire. The percentage of participants that reported it was possible to date the subdural hematoma varied between 58 and 90 % for the eight different cases. In four of eight cases (50 %), the age of the subdural hematoma as known from clinical history fell within the range reported by the participants. None of the participants was "very certain" of their age determination. The results demonstrate that there is a considerable practice variation among Dutch radiologists regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas. This implicates that dating of subdural hematomas is not suitable to use in court, as no uniformity among experts exists.

  15. The Association Between Ventriculo-Peritoneal Shunt and Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A 14-Year, Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sher-Wei; Ao, Kam-Hou; Ho, Chung-Han; Tseng, Chien-Jen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chio, Chung-Ching; Kuo, Jinn-Rung

    2017-07-01

    The association between preexisting ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt and the risk of new-onset acute appendicitis in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is not well established. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationships between VP shunt and acute appendicitis in patients with TBI. A longitudinal cohort study matched by a propensity score in patients with TBI with (4781 patients) or without (9562 patients) VP shunt was conducted using the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan between January 1993 and December 2013. The main outcome studied was diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The cumulative probability of acute appendicitis was not different between these 2 groups (P = 0.6244). A Cox model showed central nervous system (CNS) infection to be an independent predictor of acute appendicitis with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.98. Patients with TBI with both a VP shunt and a CNS infection had a greater risk of developing new-onset acute appendicitis (hazard ratio 4.25; 95% confidence interval 1.84-9.81) compared patients with TBI without a VP shunt or CNS infection. We concluded that VP shunt is not a risk factor in the development of appendicitis in patients with TBI. Patients with TBI with a shunt and a CNS infection may have a greater risk of developing acute appendicitis. Therefore, care in avoiding CNS infection is a key for the prevention acute appendicitis in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental models of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abbondanza, Josephine A; Loch Macdonald, R

    2014-02-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical problem. Most studies of pathogenesis and treatment involve humans. Advances in understanding of human diseases may be made using animal models. We reviewed all animal models of CSDH and report here their results, conclusions and limitations in order to set a baseline upon which further advanced experimental work related to this disease can be made. PubMed, Medline, Embase and ISI Web of Knowledge were searched with no time limits using the keyword 'chronic subdural hematoma' and MeSH term 'hematoma, subdural, chronic'. The authors reviewed all papers written related to this disease and selected all publications involving animals. There were no other restrictions. The findings and conclusions of the papers are summarized here. No formal analysis was done because of the variation in species used, methods for induction of CSDH, times of assessment and reporting of results. Attempts to create CSDH have been made in mice, rats, cats, dogs and monkeys. Methods include injection or surgical implantation of clotted blood or various other blood products and mixtures into the potential subdural space or the subcutaneous space. No intracranial model produced a progressively expanding CSDH. Transient hematoma expansion with liquification could be produced by subcutaneous injections in some models. Spontaneous subdural blood collections were found after creation of hydrocephalus in mice by systemic injection of the neurotoxin, 6-aminonicotinamide. The histology of the hematoma membranes in several models resembles the appearance in humans. None of the models has been replicated since its first description. We did not find a report of a reproducible, well-described animal model of human CSDH.

  17. Cerebral hemodynamic changes of mild traumatic brain injury at the acute stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik Doshi

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL. We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively. We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both. mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation.

  18. Moderate traumatic brain injury causes acute dendritic and synaptic degeneration in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Gao

    Full Text Available Hippocampal injury-associated learning and memory deficits are frequent hallmarks of brain trauma and are the most enduring and devastating consequences following traumatic brain injury (TBI. Several reports, including our recent paper, showed that TBI brought on by a moderate level of controlled cortical impact (CCI induces immature newborn neuron death in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In contrast, the majority of mature neurons are spared. Less research has been focused on these spared neurons, which may also be injured or compromised by TBI. Here we examined the dendrite morphologies, dendritic spines, and synaptic structures using a genetic approach in combination with immunohistochemistry and Golgi staining. We found that although most of the mature granular neurons were spared following TBI at a moderate level of impact, they exhibited dramatic dendritic beading and fragmentation, decreased number of dendritic branches, and a lower density of dendritic spines, particularly the mushroom-shaped mature spines. Further studies showed that the density of synapses in the molecular layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus was significantly reduced. The electrophysiological activity of neurons was impaired as well. These results indicate that TBI not only induces cell death in immature granular neurons, it also causes significant dendritic and synaptic degeneration in pathohistology. TBI also impairs the function of the spared mature granular neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. These observations point to a potential anatomic substrate to explain, in part, the development of posttraumatic memory deficits. They also indicate that dendritic damage in the hippocampal dentate gyrus may serve as a therapeutic target following TBI.

  19. OCT imaging of acute vascular changes following mild traumatic brain injury in mice (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chico-Calero, Isabel; Shishkov, Milen; Welt, Jonathan; Blatter, Cedric; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    While most people recover completely from mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) and concussions, a subset develop lasting neurological disorders. Understanding the complex pathophysiology of these injuries is critical to developing improved prognostic and therapeutic approaches. Multiple studies have shown that the structure and perfusion of brain vessels are altered after mTBI. It is possible that these vascular injuries contribute to or trigger neurodegeneration. Intravital microscopy and mouse models of TBI offer a powerful platform to study the vascular component of mTBI. Because optical coherence tomography based angiography is based on perfusion contrast and is not significantly degraded by vessel leakage or blood brain barrier disruption, it is uniquely suited to studies of brain perfusion in the setting of trauma. However, existing TBI imaging models require surgical exposure of the brain at the time of injury which conflates TBI-related vascular changes with those caused by surgery. In this work, we describe a modified cranial window preparation based on a flexible, transparent polyurethane membrane. Impact injuries were delivered directly through this membrane, and imaging was performed immediately after injury without the need for additional surgical procedures. Using this model, we demonstrate that mTBI induces a transient cessation of flow in the capillaries and smaller vessels near the injury point. Reperfusion is observed in all animals within 3 hours of injury. This work describes new insight into the transient vascular changes induced by mTBI, and demonstrates more broadly the utility of the OCT/polyurethane window model platform in preclinical studies of mTBI.

  20. Using external lumbar CSF drainage to treat communicating external hydrocephalus in adult patients after acute traumatic or non-traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manet, Romain; Payen, Jean-François; Guerin, Romain; Martinez, Orianne; Hautefeuille, Serge; Francony, Gilles; Gergelé, Laurent

    2017-10-01

    Despite various treatments to control intracranial pressure (ICP) after brain injury, patients may present a late onset of high ICP or a poor response to medications. External lumbar drainage (ELD) can be considered a therapeutic option if high ICP is due to communicating external hydrocephalus. We aimed at describing the efficacy and safety of ELD used in a cohort of traumatic or non-traumatic brain-injured patients. In this multicentre retrospective analysis, patients had a delayed onset of high ICP after the initial injury and/or a poor response to ICP treatments. ELD was considered in the presence of radiological signs of communicating external hydrocephalus. Changes in ICP values and side effects following the ELD procedure were reported. Thirty-three patients with a median age of 51 years (25-75th percentile: 34-61 years) were admitted after traumatic (n = 22) or non-traumatic (n = 11) brain injuries. Their initial Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 (4-11). Eight patients underwent external ventricular drainage prior to ELD. Median time to ELD insertion was 5 days (4-8) after brain insult. In all patients, ELD was dramatically effective in lowering ICP: 25 mmHg (20-31) before versus 7 mmHg (3-10) after (p hydrocephalus has been made.

  1. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute biliary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menu, Yves; Vuillerme, Marie-Pierre [Department of Radiology, Hopital Beaujon, 92118 Clichy Cedex (France)

    2002-10-01

    Imaging is the standard method for the evaluation of emergency bile ducts and gallbladder diseases. Imaging may help to treat the patient also. In acute cholecystitis, association of clinical and sonographic data is accurate for the diagnosis, even when the patient is examined by a junior radiologist. Computed tomography may be required for those patients with unusual presentation such as emphysematous cholecystitis, perforation, or abscess. Acalculous cholecystitis is a challenging problem. It sometimes requires percutaneous cholecystostomy for diagnosis or treatment purposes. In patients with acute cholangitis, sonography remains the first step for imaging, but its diagnostic accuracy is disappointing. This is related to low sensitivity, despite a high specificity. Computed tomography carries a slightly better sensitivity, and again a high specificity but overall accuracy is not sufficient. Magnetic resonance cholangiography and endosonography are the best methods for the detection. Both have advantages and limitations, including cost and availability, but endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography remains necessary for therapeutic purposes, especially stone extraction. In conclusion, emergency radiologists should be able to put the patient through multiple imaging modalities in order to make a prompt diagnosis with no delay, and be aware of the therapeutic options, including cooperation between radiologist, endoscopist, and surgeon. (orig.)

  2. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute biliary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menu, Yves; Vuillerme, Marie-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Imaging is the standard method for the evaluation of emergency bile ducts and gallbladder diseases. Imaging may help to treat the patient also. In acute cholecystitis, association of clinical and sonographic data is accurate for the diagnosis, even when the patient is examined by a junior radiologist. Computed tomography may be required for those patients with unusual presentation such as emphysematous cholecystitis, perforation, or abscess. Acalculous cholecystitis is a challenging problem. It sometimes requires percutaneous cholecystostomy for diagnosis or treatment purposes. In patients with acute cholangitis, sonography remains the first step for imaging, but its diagnostic accuracy is disappointing. This is related to low sensitivity, despite a high specificity. Computed tomography carries a slightly better sensitivity, and again a high specificity but overall accuracy is not sufficient. Magnetic resonance cholangiography and endosonography are the best methods for the detection. Both have advantages and limitations, including cost and availability, but endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography remains necessary for therapeutic purposes, especially stone extraction. In conclusion, emergency radiologists should be able to put the patient through multiple imaging modalities in order to make a prompt diagnosis with no delay, and be aware of the therapeutic options, including cooperation between radiologist, endoscopist, and surgeon. (orig.)

  3. Non-traumatic spontaneous acute epidural hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serarslan, Yurdal; Aras, Mustafa; Altaş, Murat; Kaya, Hasan; Urfalı, Boran

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (SCD) was referred to our hospital after two days of hospitalization at another hospital for a headache crisis. This headache crisis was due to a raised intracranial pressure; these symptoms were noted and included in her comprehensive list of symptoms. There was an acute drop in the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The cranial CT scan demonstrated a left fronto-parietal acute epidural hematoma (AEH) and a calvarial bone expansion, which was suggestive of medullary hematopoiesis. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. There were no abnormal findings intra-operatively apart from the AEH, except skull thickening and active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries. Repeated CT scan showed a complete evacuation of the hematoma. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. In addition to the factors mentioned in the relevant literature, any active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries on the separated surface of the dura from the skull could have contributed to the expanding of the AEH in our patient. Neurosurgeons and other health care providers should be aware of spontaneous AEH in patients with SCD. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurological and functional outcomes of subdural hematoma evacuation in patients over 70 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Mulligan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subdural hematoma (SDH is a common disease entity treated by neurosurgical intervention. Although the incidence increases in the elderly population, there is a paucity of studies examining their surgical outcomes. Objectives: To determine the neurological and functional outcomes of patients over 70 years of age undergoing surgical decompression for subdural hematoma. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data on 45 patients above 70 years who underwent craniotomy or burr holes for acute, chronic or mixed subdural hematomas. We analyzed both neurological and functional status before and after surgery. Results: Forty-five patients 70 years of age or older were treated in our department during the study period. There was a significant improvement in the neurological status of patients from admission to follow up as assessed using the Markwalder grading scale (1.98 vs. 1.39; P =0.005, yet no improvement in functional outcome was observed as assessed by Glasgow Outcome Score. Forty-one patients were admitted from home, however only 20 patients (44% were discharged home, 16 (36% discharged to nursing home or rehab, 6 (13% to hospice and 3 (7% died in the postoperative period. Neurological function improved in patients who were older, had a worse pre-operative neurological status, were on anticoagulation and had chronic or mixed acute and chronic hematoma. However, no improvement in functional status was observed. Conclusion: Surgical management of SDH in patients over 70 years of age provides significant improvement in neurological status, but does not change functional status.

  5. CT findings of falical and tentorial subdural hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Keun; Jung, Nam Keun; Kim, Kab Tae; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography has been established as an indispensable tool in the detection of intracranial hemorrhages. Extra axial fluid collections are usually easily distinguished from intracerebral hemorrhages. However, hemorrhages in atypical locations, such as in falx and tentorial regions, can be difficult to diagnose with CT. The tentorial and falcial collection of subdural blood are rather unusual. Authors report here 84 cases of falcial and tentorial subdural hemorrhages with reference data that we have encountered in the last two years. The results were as follows; 1. In 589 cases of intracranial hemorrhage, the incidence of subdural hemorrhage was 372 cases (63.2%). 2. Among 372 cases with subdural hemorrhage, 84 cases (22.6%) had falcial and/or tentorial subdural hemorrhage. In 84 cases with falcial and/or tentorial subdural hemorrhage, there were 50 cases (13.4%) of falcial subdural hemorrhages, 21 cases (5.7%) of tentorial subdural hemorrhage and 13 cases (3.5%) of combined falcial and tentorial subdural hemorrhage. 3. The location of falcial subdural hemorrhage was anterior in 30 cases (60%), posterior in 15 cases (30%) and middle in 5 cases (10%). 4. The location of tentorial subdural hemorrhage was petrous edge in 7 cases (33.3%), occipital attachment in 6 cases (28.6%), tentorial hiatus in 5 cases (23.8%), and diffuse in 3 cases (14.3%). 5. In 13 cases showing combined falcial and tentorial subdural hemorrhage, there was 3 cases (23.1%) of posterior falx and tentorial hiatus, 2 cases (15.4%) of anterior falx and petrous edge, 2 cases of anterior falx and tentorial hiatus, 2 cases of posterior falx and petrous edge, 2 cases of posterior falx and occipital attachment, 1 case (7.7%) of posterior falx and diffuse, and 1 case of posterior, middle falx and diffuse. 6. In the cases with falcial and/or tentorial subdural hemorrhage, the incidence of associated intracranial hemorrhage were intracrania subdural hemorrhage in 40 cases (47.6%), hemorrhagic brain

  6. Development of a Traumatic Brain Injury Assessment Score Using Novel Biomarkers Discovered Through Autoimmune Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    10 mm and a subdural or epidural hematoma of 5 mm. The thirty-day extended Glasgow outcome scale ranged from 2 to 7 with an average of 5 for the...0.6) 0 CT- 16 (10) 0 Subdural Hematoma Acute - - CT-Subarachnoid _Hemorrhage 24 (16) 0 CT-Contusion 11 (7) 0 CT-Intracerebral_ Hemorrhage IO (6) 0... Hematoma 0 (0) 0 MRI- 21 (14) 0 Subdural Hematoma Acute - - MRI- 23 (15) 0 Subarachnoid _Hemorrhage MRI-Contusion 19 (12) 0 MRI-IntracerebraJ

  7. Pathophysiology and Nonsurgical Treatment of Chronic Subdural Hematoma: From Past to Present to Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Dana C; Volovici, Victor; Dirven, Clemens M F; Peul, Wilco C; van Kooten, Fop; Jellema, Korné; van der Gaag, Niels A; Miah, Ishita P; Kho, Kuan H; den Hertog, Heleen M; Lingsma, Hester F; Dammers, Ruben

    2018-05-14

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the more frequent pathologic entities in daily neurosurgical practice. Historically, CSDH was considered progressive recurrent bleeding with a traumatic cause. However, recent evidence has suggested a complex intertwined pathway of inflammation, angiogenesis, local coagulopathy, recurrent microbleeds, and exudates. The aim of the present review is to collect existing data on pathophysiology of CSDH to direct further research questions aiming to optimize treatment for the individual patient. We performed a thorough literature search in PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Google scholar, focusing on any aspect of the pathophysiology and nonsurgical treatment of CSDH. After a (minor) traumatic event, the dural border cell layer tears, which leads to the extravasation of cerebrospinal fluid and blood in the subdural space. A cascade of inflammation, impaired coagulation, fibrinolysis, and angiogenesis is set in motion. The most commonly used treatment is surgical drainage. However, because of the pathophysiologic mechanisms, the mortality and high morbidity associated with surgical drainage, drug therapy (dexamethasone, atorvastatin, tranexamic acid, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors) might be a beneficial alternative in many patients with CSDH. Based on pathophysiologic mechanisms, animal experiments, and small patient studies, medical treatment may play a role in the treatment of CSDH. There is a lack of level I evidence in the nonsurgical treatment of CSDH. Therefore, randomized controlled trials, currently lacking, are needed to assess which treatment is most effective in each individual patient. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute traumatic rupture of the patellar tendon in pediatric population: Case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Yousef, Mohamed Abdelhamid; Rosenfeld, Scott

    2017-11-01

    Intact knee extensor mechanism is required for the normal function of the lower extremity. Patellar tendon rupture is a relatively rare injury with peak age incidence around 40 years and usually occurs midsubstance. The occurrence of pure patellar tendon rupture without bony avulsion is an extremely rare injury in the pediatric population with few cases reported in the literature with limited information regarding frequency, complications, and outcomes in children. However, due to increased participation in sports and high-energy recreational activities during childhood, the frequency of such injuries has progressively increased. To evaluate the frequency of pediatric patellar tendon rupture injuries and describe the radiological findings, treatment modalities, and outcome of such injuries. Demographic and clinical data on a series of patients who sustained patellar tendon rupture were reviewed. These data included age at time of injury, sex, laterality, mechanism of injury, associated injuries, complications, presence or absence of Osgood-Schlatter disease, diagnostic imaging such as plain radiographs and magnetic resonance images (MRI), surgical technique, method of fixation, period of postoperative immobilization, total duration of physiotherapy, time to return to sports activities and follow-up duration. Insall-Salvati ratio was calculated on the preoperative lateral x-ray. The functional outcome was evaluated with regard to final knee active range of motion (AROM), manual quadriceps muscle testing, and presence or the absence of terminal extension lag. Clinical outcome rating using knee society score (KSS) was performed and functional outcome was further classified according to the calculated score. Five male patients with patellar tendon rupture (7%) were identified among 71 pediatric patients who sustained acute traumatic injury of the knee extensor mechanism. The mean age at the time of injury was 13.6 years (range: 12-15 years). The injury occurred in

  9. Calcified subdural hematoma associated with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishige, Naoki; Sunami, Kenro; Sato, Akira; Watanabe, Osamu

    1984-01-01

    A case of calcified subdural hematoma associated with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage is reported. A left frontal subdural hematoma with left putaminal hemorrhage was incidentally found when a CT scan was performed to evaluate right hemiparesis and aphasia in a 55-year-old man. The putaminal hemorrhage was not very extensive, but his clinical symptoms were rather serious. Not only the putaminal hemorrhage, but also the presence of the calcified subdural hematoma was considered to have caused his clinical deterioration. The subtotal removal of the calcified subdural hematoma brought about a good result. (author)

  10. Prevalence of subdural collections in children with macrocrania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, M V; Richards, T J; Care, M M; Leach, J L

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between enlarged subarachnoid spaces and subdural collections is poorly understood and creates challenges for clinicians investigating the etiology of subdural collections. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of subdural collections on cross sectional imaging in children with macrocephaly correlating with subarachnoid space enlargement. The radiology information system of a large pediatric medical center was reviewed for "macrocrania" and "macrocephaly" on reports of cranial MRI/CT examinations in children collection presence and subarachnoid space size. Children with prior cranial surgery, parenchymal abnormalities, hydrocephalus, or conditions predisposing to parenchymal volume loss were excluded. Chart review was performed on those with subdural collections. Imaging from 177 children with enlarged head circumference was reviewed. Nine were excluded, for a final cohort of 168 subjects (108 with enlarged subarachnoid space). Subdural collections were identified in 6 (3.6%), all with enlarged subarachnoid space (6/108, 5.6%). In 4, subdural collections were small, homogeneous, and nonhemorrhagic. In 2, the collections were complex (septations or hemorrhage). Two children were reported as victims of child abuse (both with complex collections). No definitive etiology was established in the other cases. The prevalence of subdural collections in imaged children with macrocrania was 3.6%, all occurring in children with enlarged subarachnoid space. Our results suggest that enlarged subarachnoid space can be associated with some subdural collections in this cohort. Despite this, we believe that unexpected subdural collections in children should receive close clinical evaluation for underlying causes, including abusive head trauma.

  11. Incidence and clinical presentation of dysarthria and dysphagia in the acute setting following paediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A T; Mageandran, S-D; Mei, C

    2010-01-01

    A lack of data on dysarthria and dysphagia outcomes for children following traumatic brain injury (TBI) limits our clinical evidence base, and poses daily challenges for the speech language pathologist (SLP) managing this group. The present study aimed to examine dysarthria and dysphagia incidence and the clinical presentation of children with these disorders in the acute phase following TBI. Incidence and characteristics were determined via a comprehensive retrospective medical chart review of children consecutively referred to a tertiary paediatric hospital over an 8-year period. Cases (n= 22 dysarthria, n= 72 dysphagia) and matched controls were compared across ancillary variables (e.g. age, severity of TBI, motor impairment). Incidence across the entire cohort was low [i.e. dysarthria (1.2%, 22/1895), dysphagia (3.8%, 72/1895)], but was markedly higher for the sub-category of children with severe TBI [e.g. dysphagia (76%, 63/83)]. Speech deficits were reported across respiration, phonation, resonance, articulation and prosody. Swallowing deficits included reduced lip closure, delayed swallow initiation, wet voice and coughing. Language and swallowing deficits were often co-morbid with dysarthria. Motor impairment was frequently co-morbid with both dysarthria and dysphagia. Cases had longer periods of hospitalization, ventilation and supplementary feeding compared with controls. Despite the low incidence of dysarthria and dysphagia across the entire TBI cohort, this sub-group may place longer-term burden on SLP services, having prolonged periods of ventilation, extended periods of hospitalization and a complex co-morbid clinical presentation compared with controls. The prevalence of co-morbid communication and swallowing impairments suggests a need for integrated rather than single discipline (i.e. dysphagia stream only) SLP services.

  12. Post-traumatic stress disorder in patients with acute burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibran, E.; Adil, S.E.R.; Rao, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the risk of PTSD in patients with acute burn incidents. Method: This was an observational prospective cross-sectional study conducted in admitted patients in Burns Ward of Civil Hospital, Karachi during a period of 6 months from January 1 to June 30, 2011. Data was collected through questionnaire having socio demographic variables and the Impact of Event-Scale (IES-R) was used to determine the risk of PTSD. Results: Out of 145 patients, 12 (77.3%) were at risk of PTSD with 75 (66.9%) males and 37 (33%) females. Out of these 112 cases, 50% belonged to age group 16-29 years. All burn patients with more than 60% total body surface area (TBSA) involved in injury were at risk. Conclusion: The study reports an astronomic number of burns patients with PTSD risk. PTSD drastically affects the quality of life. The earlier this disorder is diagnosed and assessed; better chances are there for enhanced treatment and better recovery. (author)

  13. An exploratory study of the association of acute posttraumatic stress, depression, and pain to cognitive functioning in mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Jessica S; Meares, Susanne; Batchelor, Jennifer; Bryant, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    Few studies have examined whether psychological distress and pain affect cognitive functioning in the acute to subacute phase (up to 30 days postinjury) following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The current study explored whether acute posttraumatic stress, depression, and pain were associated with performance on a task of selective and sustained attention completed under conditions of increasing cognitive demands (standard, auditory distraction, and dual-task), and on tests of working memory, memory, processing speed, reaction time (RT), and verbal fluency. At a mean of 2.87 days (SD = 2.32) postinjury, 50 adult mTBI participants, consecutive admissions to a Level 1 trauma hospital, completed neuropsychological tests and self-report measures of acute posttraumatic stress, depression, and pain. A series of canonical correlation analyses was used to explore the relationships of a common set of psychological variables to various sets of neuropsychological variables. Significant results were found on the task of selective and sustained attention. Strong relationships were found between psychological variables and speed (r(c) = .56, p = .02) and psychological variables and accuracy (r(c) = .68, p = .002). Pain and acute posttraumatic stress were associated with higher speed scores (reflecting more correctly marked targets) under standard conditions. Acute posttraumatic stress was associated with lower accuracy scores across all task conditions. Moderate but nonsignificant associations were found between psychological variables and most cognitive tasks. Acute posttraumatic stress and pain show strong associations with selective and sustained attention following mTBI. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Postoperative subdural hygroma and chronic subdural hematoma after unruptured aneurysm surgery: age, sex, and aneurysm location as independent risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaechan; Cho, Jae-Hoon; Goh, Duck-Ho; Kang, Dong-Hun; Shin, Im Hee; Hamm, In-Suk

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the incidence and risk factors for the postoperative occurrence of subdural complications, such as a subdural hygroma and resultant chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), following surgical clipping of an unruptured aneurysm. The critical age affecting such occurrences and follow-up results were also examined. The case series included 364 consecutive patients who underwent aneurysm clipping via a pterional or superciliary keyhole approach for an unruptured saccular aneurysm in the anterior cerebral circulation between 2007 and 2013. The subdural hygromas were identified based on CT scans 6-9 weeks after surgery, and the volumes were measured using volumetry studies. Until their complete resolution, all the subdural hygromas were followed using CT scans every 1-2 months. Meanwhile, the CSDHs were classified as nonoperative or operative lesions that were treated by bur-hole drainage. The age and sex of the patients, aneurysm location, history of a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and surgical approach (pterional vs superciliary) were all analyzed regarding the postoperative occurrence of a subdural hygroma or CSDH. The follow-up results of the subdural complications were also investigated. Seventy patients (19.2%) developed a subdural hygroma or CSDH. The results of a multivariate analysis showed that advanced age (p = 0.003), male sex (p 60 years, which achieved a 70% sensitivity and 69% specificity with regard to predicting such subdural complications. The female patients ≤ 60 years of age showed a negligible incidence of subdural complications for all aneurysm groups, whereas the male patients > 60 years of age showed the highest incidence of subdural complications at 50%-100%, according to the aneurysm location. The subdural hygromas detected 6-9 weeks postoperatively showed different follow-up results, according to the severity. The subdural hygromas that converted to a CSDH were larger in volume than the subdural hygromas that resolved

  15. Postoperative CT appearance in chronic subdural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Takaaki; Nishikawa, Michio; Handa, Hajime; Iwaki, Kazuo; Sawai, Teruaki; Munaka, Masahiro

    1988-05-01

    Postoperative CT appearances in 65 cases of chronic subdural hematomas were evaluated in terms of patient's age, preoperative neurological symptoms and CT findings, final outcomes, and so on. All of the cases were treated with trepanation and irrigation. CT appearances were divided into four different types as follows; Type Ia: No abnormal findings in the subdural sapce, Type Ib: The same as above except for a linear high density suggestive of thickened outer membrane, Type II: Persistence subdural fluid collection and widened cortical sulci which indicate underlining brain atrophy, Type III: Remaining hematoma and/or density changes during follow-up period. Although the mean age of the patients in type Ib was higher than those in type Ia and reexpansion of the brain appear to delay in type Ib and preoperative CT in type Ib tended to show mixed density, final outcome in both groups were excellent. Characteristics in type II were that most of cases were in the eighth decade, preceding head injury was unclear, preoperative psychiatric symptoms and disturbance of consciousness were common and postoperative improvement of the symptoms was not satisfactory compared to other types. Aged patients as in type Ib and type II and thick hematomas of over 2 cm depth with mixed or high density tended to show type III postoperatively. All of the nine patients who required reoperation were included in this type. The present study indicates that thick hematomas with sizable mass effect and mixed or high density in the aged must be carefully treated, such as with placement of the subdural drainage or keeping the patient in the Trendelenburg position, to facilitate postoperative reexpansion of the brain.

  16. Surgery for chronic subdural hematoma in nonagenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, J; Sjåvik, K; Ståhl, F

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is a prevalent condition often seen in the elderly, with surgery being the treatment of choice when symptomatic. So far, few have explored the surgical outcomes in patients 90 years or older. The aim of this study was to investigate outcome after c...... neurosurgical centers. In a comparative analysis, the primary end-point was difference in hematoma recurrence rates between the ≥90 y/o and

  17. Subdural Instillation of a Thrombolytic Agent for Treatment of Recurrent Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Mark B; Sarwal, Aarti; Wren, Mary Petrulis; Newey, Christopher R; Couture, Daniel E

    This study aims to report the case of a patient with recurrent subdural hemorrhage (SDH) who was administered tissue plasminogen activator through a subdural drain to enhance drainage and prevent recurrence. An 85-year-old man was treated for subacute over chronic SDH that kept on reaccumulating despite serial twist drill drainage, burr hole drainage, and craniotomy. No coagulopathy was identified with adequate blood pressure control. Treatment with tissue plasminogen activator resulted in successful drainage of the SDH, and the patient had no further recurrence at 9-month follow-up.

  18. Evaluation of reduced-dose CT for acute non-traumatic abdominal pain: evaluation of diagnostic accuracy in comparison to standard-dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed E; Bongers, Malte Niklas; Zinsser, Dominik; Schabel, Christoph; Wichmann, Julian L; Arshid, Rami; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian

    2018-01-01

    Background Patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain often undergo abdominal computed tomography (CT). However, abdominal CT is associated with high radiation exposure. Purpose To evaluate diagnostic performance of a reduced-dose 100 kVp CT protocol with advanced modeled iterative reconstruction as compared to a linearly blended 120 kVp protocol for assessment of acute, non-traumatic abdominal pain. Material and Methods Two radiologists assessed 100 kVp and linearly blended 120 kVp series of 112 consecutive patients with acute non-traumatic pain (onset diagnostic confidence. Both 100 kVp and linearly blended 120 kVp series were quantitatively evaluated regarding radiation dose and image noise. Comparative statistics and diagnostic accuracy was calculated using receiver operating curve (ROC) statistics, with final clinical diagnosis/clinical follow-up as reference standard. Results Image quality was high for both series without detectable significant differences ( P = 0.157). Image noise and artifacts were rated low for both series but significantly higher for 100 kVp ( P ≤ 0.021). Diagnostic accuracy was high for both series (120 kVp: area under the curve [AUC] = 0.950, sensitivity = 0.958, specificity = 0.941; 100 kVp: AUC ≥ 0.910, sensitivity ≥ 0.937, specificity = 0.882; P ≥ 0.516) with almost perfect inter-rater agreement (Kappa = 0.939). Diagnostic confidence was high for both dose levels without significant differences (100 kVp 5, range 4-5; 120 kVp 5, range 3-5; P = 0.134). The 100 kVp series yielded 26.1% lower radiation dose compared with the 120 kVp series (5.72 ± 2.23 mSv versus 7.75 ± 3.02 mSv, P diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

  19. Magnetic resonance maging of epidural and subdural spinal hematomas; Magnetresonanztomographie bei epiduralen und subduralen spinalen Haematomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felber, S. [Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria). Klinik fuer Neurologie]|[Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria). Inst. fuer Magnetresonanz]|[Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie; Langmaier, J. [Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria). Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie; Judmaier, W. [Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria). Inst. fuer Magnetresonanz]|[Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria). Klinik fuer Radiologie; Dessl, A. [Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria). Klinik fuer Radiologie; Ortler, M. [Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria). Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie; Birbamer, G. [Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria). Klinik fuer Neurologie]|[Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria). Inst. fuer Magnetresonanz; Piepgras, U. [Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie

    1994-11-01

    Epidural und subdural spinal hematomas were previously diagnosed by myelography and computed tomography (CT). Recent reports indicate that noninvasive detection is possible with magnetic resonance imaging. We report on nine patients who were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MR) prior to surgery for epidural and subdural spinal hematoma. The MR examinations were performed on 1.5-T and 1-T units. We used surface coils and employed T1-, PD- and T2-weighted spin echo sequences and a T2*-weighted gradient echo sequence. CT was available in four patients and myelography in two patients. Surgical correlation was available in all patients. The hematomas were located in the cervical spine (n=2), thoracic spine (n=6) and lumbar spine (n=2). They were epidural in five patients and subdural in four. Blinded reading correctly indentified all five epidural hematomas and three of the subdural hematomas; one subdural hematoma was misjudged as epidural. Peracute hematomas (<24 h) in three patients appeared isointense or slightly hyperintense on T1-weighted images and had mixed signal intensity on T2- and T2*-weighted images. Acute hematomas (1-3 days) in four patients were also isointense on T1-weighted images but were more hypointense on T2- and T2*-weighted images. Chronic heamatomas in two patients (7 days and 14 days) were hyperintense on all sequences. Differentiation between epi- and subdural hematomas required transverse T2*-weighted gradient echo sequences. Our results underline that MRI at 1 and 1.5 T is capable of identifying epidural and subdural spinal hematoma in the acute and peracute stage. MRI is superior to CT and myelography for the delineation of the craniocaudal extension in epidural and subdural spinal hematomas and should be the primary preoperative diagnostic method. (orig.) [Deutsch] Epidurale und subdurale spinale Haematome sind neurochirurgische Notfaelle, deren Diagnose bisher vorwiegend mittels Myelographie und Computertomographie gestellt

  20. Spinal Subdural Staphylococcus Aureus Abscess: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fligou Fotini

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only 65 cases (including our case of spinal subdural abscesses have been reported to the literature, mostly to the lumbar spine. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial. The symptoms are not caracteristic and contrast – enhanced magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI is the imaging method of choice. The early diagnosis is crucial for the prognosis of the patient. Case presentation We present a patient 75 years old who had a history of diabetes and suffered acute low back pain in the region of the lumbar spine for the last 4 days before his admission to the hospital. He also experienced lower leg weakness, fever and neck stiffness. After having a brain CT scan and a lumbar puncture the patient hospitalized with the diagnosis of meningitis. Five days after his admission the diagnosis of subdural abscess secured with contrast – enhanced MRI but meanwhile the condition of the patient impaired with respiratory failure and quadriplegia and he was admitted to the ICU. A laminectomy was performed eight days after his admission into the hospital but unfortunately the patient died. Conclusion Early diagnosis and treatment are very important for the good outcome in patients with subdural abscess. Although morbidity and mortality are very high, surgical and antibiotic treatment should be established as soon as possible after the diagnosis has secured.

  1. Case report: Calcified chronic subdural haematoma in an elderly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calcified chronic subdural haematoma [CCSDH] is a rare complication of the relatively more common condition of Chronic Subdural Haematoma (CSDH). We present the case of a 68yr old man referred with a 2 week history of sudden onset Right hemi paresis generalized tonic clonic seizures and aphasia. There was a ...

  2. Age determination of subdural hematomas: survey among radiologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, F. A. M.; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; van Rijn, R. R.

    2014-01-01

    Abusive head trauma is a severe form of child abuse. One important diagnostic finding is the presence of a subdural hematoma. Age determination of subdural hematomas is important to relate radiological findings to the clinical history presented by the caregivers. In court this topic is relevant as

  3. A case with Parkinsonism secondary to bilateral subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalet Arıkanoğlu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of secondary Parkinsonism. In this study, we presented a case of Parkinsonian syndrome caused by a bilateral subdural hematoma. The patient’s Parkinsonism completely healed following successful surgical removal of the hematomas without any anti-parkinson drug.

  4. Assessment of drainage techniques for evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjåvik, Kristin; Bartek, Jiri; Sagberg, Lisa Millgård

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical procedures. The benefit of postoperative passive subdural drainage compared with no drains has been established, but other drainage techniques are common, and their effectiveness compared with passive...

  5. MRI findings in spinal subdural and epidural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Petra [Department of Radiology, Hospital La Plana, Ctra. De Vila-real a Borriana km. 0.5, 12540 Vila-real (Castello) (Spain)], E-mail: PetraBraun@gmx.de; Kazmi, Khuram [Department of Radiology, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Nogues-Melendez, Pablo; Mas-Estelles, Fernando; Aparici-Robles, Fernando [Department of Radiology, La Fe Hospital, Avenida Campanar, 21, 46009 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    Background: Spinal hematomas are rare entities that can be the cause of an acute spinal cord compression syndrome. Therefore, an early diagnosis is of great importance. Patients and Methods: From 2001 to 2005 seven patients with intense back pain and/or acute progressive neurological deficit were studied via 1.5 T MRI (in axial and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted sequences). Follow-up MRI was obtained in six patients. Results: Four patients showed the MRI features of a hyperacute spinal hematoma (two spinal subdural hematoma [SSH] and two spinal epidural hematoma [SEH]), isointense to the spinal cord on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences. One patient had an early subacute SEH manifest as heterogeneous signal intensity with areas of high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. Another patient had a late subacute SSH with high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. The final patient had a SEH in the late chronic phase being hypointense on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Discussion: MRI is valuable in diagnosing the presence, location and extent of spinal hematomas. Hyperacute spinal hematoma and the differentiation between SSH and SEH are particular diagnostic challenges. In addition, MRI is an important tool in the follow-up in patients with conservative treatment.

  6. MRI findings in spinal subdural and epidural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, Petra; Kazmi, Khuram; Nogues-Melendez, Pablo; Mas-Estelles, Fernando; Aparici-Robles, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    Background: Spinal hematomas are rare entities that can be the cause of an acute spinal cord compression syndrome. Therefore, an early diagnosis is of great importance. Patients and Methods: From 2001 to 2005 seven patients with intense back pain and/or acute progressive neurological deficit were studied via 1.5 T MRI (in axial and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted sequences). Follow-up MRI was obtained in six patients. Results: Four patients showed the MRI features of a hyperacute spinal hematoma (two spinal subdural hematoma [SSH] and two spinal epidural hematoma [SEH]), isointense to the spinal cord on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences. One patient had an early subacute SEH manifest as heterogeneous signal intensity with areas of high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. Another patient had a late subacute SSH with high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. The final patient had a SEH in the late chronic phase being hypointense on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Discussion: MRI is valuable in diagnosing the presence, location and extent of spinal hematomas. Hyperacute spinal hematoma and the differentiation between SSH and SEH are particular diagnostic challenges. In addition, MRI is an important tool in the follow-up in patients with conservative treatment

  7. Pharmacopuncture and Autohemo-Seperated Regeneration Pharmacopuncture for Acute Traumatic Subdeltoid Bursitis with Patial Tear of Subscapularis Tendon After Bongchuna Treatment - A Case Report -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Kyo Oh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report about effect of soyeom pharmacopuncture, bee venom and autohemo-seperated regeneration pharmacopuncture(ASRP for acute traumatic subdeltoid bursitis with partial tear of subscapularis tendon, which was diagnosed by symptoms and MRI(Magnetic resonance imaging and caused by bongchuna treatment. We evaluated the patient using Visual Analogue Scale(VAS every two or four days and range of movement(ROM, physical examination of shoulder about one per ten days and observed improvement with reexamination by ultrasonography and MRI as well. Pharmacopuncture rapidly reduced pain and improved range of motion and function of shoulder in patients with acute sub-deltoid bursitis even though it was severe symptom. Our result suggest that autohemo-seperated regeneration pharmacopuncture might be effective in regenerating the tear of soft tissue such as subscapularis tendon.

  8. Extramedullary Hematopoiesis: An Unusual Finding in Subdural Hematomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 59-year-old man who was found to have clusters of hyperchromatic, small, round nucleated cells within a subdural hematoma removed after a skull fracture. Immunohistochemistry study confirmed that the cells were hematopoietic components predominantly composed of normoblasts. In this paper, we describe the clinical and pathological findings. A brief review of published information on extramedullary hematopoiesis in subdural hematoma and the mechanisms of pathogenesis are also discussed. While extramedullary hematopoiesis is seen anecdotally by neuropathologists in chronic subdural hematomas, only a few cases are documented in the literature. Furthermore, extramedullary hematopoiesis in subdural hematoma can pose a diagnostic challenge for general pathologists who encounter subdural hematoma evacuations seldom in their surgical pathology practices.

  9. Association of Antithrombotic Drug Use With Subdural Hematoma Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Rodríguez, Luis Alberto García; Hellfritzsch, Maja

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Incidence of subdural hematoma has been reported to be increasing. To what extent this is related to increasing use of antithrombotic drugs is unknown. Objectives: To estimate the association between use of antithrombotic drugs and subdural hematoma risk and determine trends in subdural...... hematoma incidence and antithrombotic drug use in the general population. Design, Setting, and Participants: Case-control study of 10 010 patients aged 20 to 89 years with a first-ever subdural hematoma principal discharge diagnosis from 2000 to 2015 matched by age, sex, and calendar year to 400...... 380 individuals from the general population (controls). Subdural hematoma incidence and antithrombotic drug use was identified using population-based regional data (population: 484 346) and national data (population: 5.2 million) from Denmark. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds...

  10. Intranasal ketamine for acute traumatic pain in the Emergency Department: a prospective, randomized clinical trial of efficacy and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonovich, Shachar; Gigi, Roy; Shapira, Amir; Sarig-Meth, Tal; Nadav, Danielle; Rozenek, Mattan; West, Debra; Halpern, Pinchas

    2016-11-09

    Ketamine has been well studied for its efficacy as an analgesic agent. However, intranasal (IN) administration of ketamine has only recently been studied in the emergency setting. The objective of this study was to elucidate the efficacy and adverse effects of a sub-dissociative dose of IN Ketamine compared to IV and IM morphine. A single-center, randomized, prospective, parallel clinical trial of efficacy and safety of IN ketamine compared to IV and IM morphine for analgesia in the emergency department (ED). A convenience sample of 90 patients aged 18-70 experiencing moderate-severe acute traumatic pain (≥80 mm on 100 mm Visual Analog Scale [VAS]) were randomized to receive either 1.0 mg/kg IN ketamine, 0.1 mg/kg IV MO or 0.15 mg/kg IM MO. Pain relief and adverse effects were recorded for 1 h post-administration. The primary outcome was efficacy of IN ketamine compared to IV and IM MO, measured by "time-to-onset" (defined as a ≥15 mm pain decrease on VAS), as well as time to and degree of maximal pain reduction. The 3 study groups showed a highly significant, similar maximal pain reduction of 56 ± 26 mm for IN Ketamine, and 59 ± 22 and 48 ± 30 for IV MO and IM MO, respectively. IN Ketamine provided clinically-comparable results to those of IV MO with regards to time to onset (14.3 ± 11.2 v. 8.9 ± 5.6 min, respectively) as well as in time to maximal pain reduction (40.4 ± 16.3) versus (33.4 ± 18), respectively. IN ketamine shows efficacy and safety comparable to IV and IM MO. Given the benefits of this mode of analgesia in emergencies, it should be further studied for potential clinical applications. Retrospectively registered on 27 June 2016. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT02817477.

  11. Detection of acute traumatic coagulopathy and massive transfusion requirements by means of rotational thromboelastometry: an international prospective validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemo, Jostein S; Christiaans, Sarah C; Stanworth, Simon J; Brohi, Karim; Johansson, Pär I; Goslings, J Carel; Naess, Paal A; Gaarder, Christine

    2015-03-23

    The purpose of this study was to re-evaluate the findings of a smaller cohort study on the functional definition and characteristics of acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC). We also aimed to identify the threshold values for the most accurate identification of ATC and prediction of massive transfusion (MT) using rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) assays. In this prospective international multicentre cohort study, adult trauma patients who met the local criteria for full trauma team activation from four major trauma centres were included. Blood was collected on arrival to the emergency department and analyzed with laboratory international normalized ratio (INR), fibrinogen concentration and two ROTEM assays (EXTEM and FIBTEM). ATC was defined as laboratory INR >1.2. Transfusion requirements of ≥10 units of packed red blood cells within 24 hours were defined as MT. Performance of the tests were evaluated by receiver operating characteristic curves, and calculation of area under the curve (AUC). Optimal cutoff points were estimated based on Youden index. In total, 808 patients were included in the study. Among the ROTEM parameters, the largest AUCs were found for the clot amplitude (CA) 5 value in both the EXTEM and FIBTEM assays. EXTEM CA5 threshold value of ≤37 mm had a detection rate of 66.3% for ATC. An EXTEM CA5 threshold value of ≤40 mm predicted MT in 72.7%. FIBTEM CA5 threshold value of ≤8 mm detected ATC in 67.5%, and a FIBTEM CA5 threshold value ≤9 mm predicted MT in 77.5%. Fibrinogen concentration ≤1.6 g/L detected ATC in 73.6% and a fibrinogen concentration ≤1.90 g/L predicted MT in 77.8%. Patients with either an EXTEM or FIBTEM CA5 below the optimum detection threshold for ATC received significantly more packed red blood cells and plasma. This study confirms previous findings of ROTEM CA5 as a valid marker for ATC and predictor for MT. With optimum threshold for EXTEM CA5 ≤ 40 mm and FIBTEM CA5 ≤ 9 mm, sensitivity is 72

  12. [Infected subdural hematoma having a surgery of chronic subdural hematoma 1 year ago:a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Chikao; Ando, Shunpei; Haga, Daisuke; Kuroki, Takao; Sugo, Nobuo; Nagao, Takeki

    2015-02-01

    We report a case of an infected subdural hematoma that occurred 1 year after burr-hole irrigation for chronic subdural hematoma. A 78-year-old woman who had developed left hemiparesis was admitted to our hospital. A computed tomography(CT)scan revealed the presence of a chronic subdural hematoma in the right hemisphere. Her clinical symptoms improved immediately after emergency burr-hole irrigation, which allowed her discharge from the hospital. One year after the initial surgery, she developed an infection of the urinary tract infection, which led to severe pyelonephritis and septic shock. Treatment of the urological symptoms eliminated the systemic inflammation. One month after the urinary infection, the patient was readmitted to the hospital in a comatose state. A CT scan showed regrowth of a residual subdural hematoma surrounded by a thick capsule, causing a midline shift in the brain. An emergency operation for removal of the subdural hematoma by burr-hole irrigation was performed, and pus was drained from the subdural mass. Microbiological cultures of the abscess revealed the presence of Proteus mirabilis. After surgery, the patient was administered an antibiotic treatment for three weeks and she was discharged with no neurological deficits. Cultures of blood from the septic shock as well as from the abscess both revealed the presence of Proteus mirabilis. Therefore, a diagnosis of infected subdural hematoma, which was caused by hematogenous infection, was made. We conclude that attention should be paid to the risk of infection of the hematoma capsule in subdural hematomas.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

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    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan [Oerebro University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Norrman, Eva [Oerebro University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Geijer, Mats [Lund University and Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Jansson, Kjell [Oerebro University, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan; Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Mats; Jansson, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  15. Subdural drainage versus subperiosteal drainage in burr-hole trepanation for symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellut, David; Woernle, Christoph Michael; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Kockro, Ralf Alfons; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Krayenbühl, Niklaus

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma (scSDH) is one of the most frequent diseases in neurosurgical practice, and its incidence is increasing. However, treatment modalities are still controversial. The aim of this retrospective single-center study is to compare for the first time two surgical methods in the treatment of subdural hematoma that have been proven to be efficient in previous studies in a direct comparison. We analyzed the data of 143 scSDHs in 113 patients undergoing surgery for subdural hematoma with placement of subperiosteal or subdural drainage after double burr-hole trepanation for hematoma evacuation. Overall, there were no statistically significant differences regarding general patient characteristics, preoperative and postoperative symptoms, postoperative hematoma remnant, rates of recurrences, mortality, complications, and outcome at discharge and at 3-month follow up between the groups. There was a close to significant tendency of lower mortality after placement of subperiosteal drainage system and a tendency towards lower rate of recurrent hematoma after placement of subdural drainage system. Our study shows for the first time a direct comparison of two mainly used surgical techniques in the treatment of scSDH. Both methods proved to be highly effective, and general patient data, complications, outcome and mortality of both groups are equal or superior compared with previously published series. Because there is a clear tendency to less mortality and fewer serious complications, treatment with double burr-hole trepanation, irrigation, and placement of subperiosteal drainage is our treatment of choice in patients with predictable high risk of complications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament in cases of acute traumatic dislocation of the patella: current perspectives and trends in Brazil1,

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    Gustavo Gonçalves Arliani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To evaluate the approaches and procedures used by knee surgeons in Brazil for treating medial patellofemoral lesions (MPFL of the knee in cases of acute traumatic dislocation of the patella.Materials and methods:A questionnaire comprising 15 closed questions on topics relating to treating MPFL of the knee following acute dislocation of the patella was used. It was applied to Brazilian knee surgeons during the three days of the 44th Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in 2012.Results:106 knee surgeons completely filled out the questionnaire and formed part of the sample analyzed. Most of them were from the southeastern region of Brazil. The majority (57% reported that they perform fewer than five MPFL reconstruction procedures per year. Indication of non-surgical treatment after a first episode of acute dislocation of the patella was preferred and done by 93.4% of the sample. Only 9.1% of the participants reported that they had never observed postoperative complications. Intraoperative radioscopy was used routinely by 48%. The professionals who did not use this tool to determine the point of ligament fixation in the femur did not have a statistically greater number of postoperative complications than those who used it (p > 0.05.Conclusions:There are clear evolutionary trends in treatments and rehabilitation for acute dislocation of the patella due to MPFL, in Brazil. However, further prospective controlled studies are needed in order to evaluate the clinical and scientific benefit of these trends.

  17. Acute episodes of predator exposure in conjunction with chronic social instability as an animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Conrad, Cheryl D; Fleshner, Monika; Diamond, David M

    2008-07-01

    People who are exposed to horrific, life-threatening experiences are at risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Some of the symptoms of PTSD include persistent anxiety, exaggerated startle, cognitive impairments and increased sensitivity to yohimbine, an alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor antagonist. We have taken into account the conditions known to induce PTSD, as well as factors responsible for long-term maintenance of the disorder, to develop an animal model of PTSD. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered a total of 31 days of psychosocial stress, composed of acute and chronic components. The acute component was a 1-h stress session (immobilization during cat exposure), which occurred on Days 1 and 11. The chronic component was that on all 31 days the rats were given unstable housing conditions. We found that psychosocially stressed rats had reduced growth rate, reduced thymus weight, increased adrenal gland weight, increased anxiety, an exaggerated startle response, cognitive impairments, greater cardiovascular and corticosterone reactivity to an acute stressor and heightened responsivity to yohimbine. This work demonstrates the effectiveness of acute inescapable episodes of predator exposure administered in conjunction with daily social instability as an animal model of PTSD.

  18. Vertebroplasty and delayed subdural cauda equina hematoma: Review of literature and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropeano, Maria Pia; La Pira, Biagia; Pescatori, Lorenzo; Piccirilli, Manolo

    2017-08-16

    Vertebroplasy is considered an alternative and effective treatment of painful oncologic spine disease. Major complications are very rare, but with high morbidity and occur in less than 1% of patients who undergo vertebroplasty. Spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is an extremely rare complication, usual developing within 12 h to 24 h after the procedure. We report the case of a tardive SDH in an oncologic patient who underwent VP for Myxoid Liposarcoma metastasis. Trying to explain the pathogenesis, we support the hypothesis that both venous congestion of the vertebral venous plexus of the vertebral body and venous congestion due to a traumatic injury can provoke SDH. To our best knowledge, only 4 cases of spinal subdural hematoma following a transpedicular vertebroplasty have been previously described in International literature and only one of them occurred two weeks after that surgical procedures. Percutaneous verteboplasty is a well-known treatment of pain oncologic spine disease, used to provide pain relief and improvement of quality life and is considered a simple surgical procedure, involving a low risk of complications, but related to high morbidity, such as SDH. Therefore it has to be performed by experienced and skilled surgeons, that should also recognize possible risk factors, making SDH more risky.

  19. A case of a traumatic chyle leak following an acute thoracic spine injury: successful resolution with strict dietary manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skinner Ruby A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chylothorax is a rare form of pleural effusion that can be associated with both traumatic and non-traumatic causes. Thoracic duct ligation is often the treatment of choice in postsurgical patients; however the optimal treatment of this disease process after traumatic injury remains unclear 1. We present a rare case of a thoracic duct injury secondary to a blunt thoracic spine fracture and subluxation which was successfully treated non-operatively. Case Presentation A 51 year old male presented as a tier one trauma code due to an automobile versus bicycle collision. His examination and radiographic work-up revealed fractures and a subluxation at the third and fourth thoracic spine levels resulting in paraplegia. He also sustained bilateral hemothoraces secondary to multiple rib fractures. Drainage of the left hemothorax led to the diagnosis of a traumatic chylothorax. The thoracic spine fractures were addressed with surgical stabilization and the chylothorax was successfully treated with drainage and dietary manipulation. Conclusions This unusual and complex blunt thoracic duct injury required a multidisciplinary approach. Although the spine injury required surgical fixation, successful resolution of the chyle leak was achieved without surgical intervention.

  20. Predictors for Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Alexander; Tregubow, Alexander; Kerry, Ghassan; Schrey, Michael; Hammer, Christian; Steiner, Hans-Herbert

    2017-01-01

    This prospective study was designed to analyze the dependence of different factors on the recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) after surgical treatment. Seventy-three consecutive patients, who were surgically treated at our department due to cSDH between 2009 and 2012, were included. The following parameters were analyzed: patient age and gender, occurrence of trauma, time between trauma and admission, neurological symptoms, presence of minor diseases, intake of anticoagulation medication. We classified the results of diagnostic imaging and determined the space-consuming effect via the cerebral midline shift. In addition, we scrutinized intraoperative findings and the dependence of the position of subdural drainage on the recurrence rate of cSDH. In our patient group, cSDH recurrence was significantly associated with aphasia (p=0.008). Moreover an increased cSDH recurrence rate was observed in the patient group that had a separated manifestation of the cSDH in the preoperative diagnostic imaging (p=0.048) and received no drainage implant (p=0.016). Homogeneous isodense cSDH was associated with no apparent recurrence (p=0.037). Within the scope of this study, we detected aphasia and separated cSDH as predictors of cSDH recurrence. Homogeneous isodense cSDH seems to be a good prognostic sign regarding the risk of recurrence development. Furthermore, our data clearly emphasize the importance of surgically applied drainage implants to prevent a recurrence of cSDH.

  1. Parent and Child Agreement for Acute Stress Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Other Psychopathology in a Prospective Study of Children and Adolescents Exposed to Single-Event Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Smith, Patrick; Glucksman, Edward; Yule, William; Dalgleish, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Examining parent-child agreement for Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in children and adolescents is essential for informing the assessment of trauma-exposed children, yet no studies have examined this relationship using appropriate statistical techniques. Parent-child agreement for these disorders was examined…

  2. Unilateral traumatic hemorrhage of the basal ganglion and bihemisferic cerebral infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the various injuries caused by the cerebral tramatic lesion are traumatic brain contusions. Hemorrhagic contusions of the basal ganglia are unusual. Different injuries such as cranial fractures, epidural hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage among others may be associated with brain contusions. In some cases traumatic brain injury arises. We present a case of a patient with unilateral cerebral contusion associated with bihemispheric cerebral infarction.

  3. A case report and technical tip of chronic subdural hematoma treated by the placement of a subdural peritoneal shunt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres M. Alvarez-Pinzon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH tend to occur most commonly in the elderly population, usually resulting from minor or insignificant head trauma. The pathophysiology behind CSDH is often directly associated with cerebral atrophy, and other causes of cerebral atrophy such as alcoholism or dementia. Other predisposing factors include diabetes, coagulopathy, use of anticoagulants (including aspirin, seizure disorders, and CSF shunts. Considerable evidence supporting the use of external drainage after evacuation of primary CSDH is readily available in the literature. Case report: We report the case of a 72 year-old male with a history of recurrent left subdural hematoma presenting to the neurosurgical clinic with a two-day history of personality changes, difficulty speaking, urinary incontinence, and headaches. Burr hole evacuation was performed with the placement of a subdural peritoneal shunt. At the one-month follow-up appointment, the patient had complete resolution of symptoms and CT scan showed no new recurrence of the subdural hematoma. Conclusions: Although several treatment options are available for the management of CSDH, recurrence of hematoma is a major and very common complication that may result in re-injury due to mass effect caused by chronic hematoma. However, placement of subdural peritoneal shunt for the treatment of CSDH can reduce the recurrence rate of CSDH and therefore, reduce the risk of brain re-injury. Keywords: Chronic subdural hematoma, CSDH, Subdural peritoneal shunt, Head trauma

  4. Growth Potential of Subdural Hematomas Under Clinical Observation: Which Subdural Hematomas Tend to Grow and Why They Do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asan, Ziya

    2018-05-01

    To study the prognoses of patients with subdural hematoma (SDH) who were not operated on at the time of the first diagnosis and the causes of enlarged hematomas in some patients during the follow-up period. The records, service files, and radiologic examination results of the patients with diagnoses of SDH were reviewed. The SDH patients were recorded under 5 different categories: acute SDH (ASDH), subacute SDH (SSDH), chronic SDH (CSDH), acute component with chronic SDH (A-CSDH), and subacute component with chronic SDH (S-CSDH). The symptoms, clinical findings, and progression in the patients were correlated with radiologic examinations. A total of 291 patients received diagnoses of SDHs: 80 patients with acute, 29 patients with subacute, and 163 patients with chronic hematoma. Thirty-five patients had diagnoses of SDH with a combination of different components. It was determined that in the follow-up period, patients with A-CSDH showed the greatest increase in hematoma size over time and required surgical intervention the most often. SDHs reveal different prognoses in different age groups. Multicomponent SDHs are within the group that shows the greatest increase in size in the follow-up period. SDHs and CSDHs cause recurrent hemorrhages by sustaining the tension on the bridging veins. The greater the hematoma volume, the greater the growth potential of the hematoma tends to be. CSDHs that do not manifest changes in volume for a long time can be monitored without surgical intervention as long as the clinical picture remains stable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sport-Related Structural Brain Injury: 3 Cases of Subdural Hemorrhage in American High School Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Gardner, Ryan M; Kuhn, Andrew W; Solomon, Gary S; Bonfield, Christopher M; Zuckerman, Scott L

    2017-10-01

    The risk of sport-related concussion (SRC) has emerged as a major public health concern. In rare instances, sport-related head injuries can be even more severe, such as subdural hemorrhage, epidural hemorrhage, or malignant cerebral edema. Unlike SRCs, sport-related structural brain injury (SRSBI) is rare, may require neurosurgical intervention, and can lead to permanent neurologic deficit or death. Data characterizing SRSBI are limited, and many have recognized the need to better understand these catastrophic brain injuries. The goal of the current series is to describe, in detail, the presentation, management, and outcomes of examples of these rare injuries. During the fall of 2015, three high school football players presented with acute subdural hemorrhages following in-game collisions and were treated at our institution within a span of 2 months. For the 2 athletes who required surgical intervention, a previous SRC was sustained within 4 weeks before the catastrophic event. One year after injury, 2 players have returned to school, though with persistent deficits. One patient remains nonverbal and wheelchair bound. None of the athletes has returned to sports. Acute subdural hemorrhage resultant from an in-game football collision is rare. The temporal proximity of the reported SRSBIs to recent SRCs emphasizes the importance of return-to-play protocols and raises questions regarding the possibility of second impact syndrome. Although epidemiologic conclusions cannot be drawn from this small sample, these cases provide a unique opportunity to demonstrate the presentation, management, and long-term outcomes of SRSBI in American high school football. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Complications and results of subdural grid electrode implantation in epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W S; Lee, J K; Lee, S A; Kang, J K; Ko, T S

    2000-11-01

    We assessed the risk of delayed subdural hematoma and other complications associated with subdural grid implantation. Forty-nine patients underwent subdural grid implantation with/without subdural strips or depth electrodes from January 1994 to August 1998. To identify the risk associated with subdural grid implantation, a retrospective review of all patients' medical records and radiological studies was performed. The major complications of 50 subdural grid electrode implantations were as follows: four cases (7.8%) of delayed subdural hematoma at the site of the subdural grid, requiring emergency operation; two cases (3.9%) of infection; one case (2.0%) of epidural hematoma; and one case (2.0%) of brain swelling. After subdural hematoma removal, the electrodes were left in place. CCTV monitoring and cortical stimulation studies were continued thereafter. No delayed subdural hematoma has occurred since routine placement of subdural drains was begun. In our experience the worst complication of subdural grid implantation has been delayed subdural hematoma. Placement of subdural drains and close observation may be helpful to prevent this serious complication.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of traumatic intracranial hypotension (cerebrospinal fluid hypovolemia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinonaga, Masamichi; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2003-01-01

    Patients who complain headache, neck pain, dizziness or vertigo, tinnitus, blurred vision, loss of concentration, memory disturbance and fatigue for over one year after mild head injury and whiplash injury are diagnosed as post-traumatic syndrome. Mechanism and treatment of post-traumatic syndrome are not well established. We studied radioisotope (RI) cisternography and enhanced brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the patient of post-traumatic syndrome. Of 175 cases in post-traumatic syndrome 141 cases (120 cases of motor vehicle accident, 21 cases of sports injury) were diagnosed, as intracranial hypotension (cerebrospinal fluid hypovolemia). RI cisternography showed 86% positive findings (early accumulation of RI in bladder and leakage). Prominent findings in MRI were dilatation of subdural space and venous dilatation. In every case epidural blood patch was performed and symptoms were improved in almost 70% of patients. This study revealed cerebrospinal fluid hypovolemia might be one cause of post-traumatic syndrome. (author)

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of traumatic intracranial hypotension (cerebrospinal fluid hypovolemia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinonaga, Masamichi [Hiratsuka Kyousai Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Suzuki, Shinichi [Inadanoborito Hospital, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2003-11-01

    Patients who complain headache, neck pain, dizziness or vertigo, tinnitus, blurred vision, loss of concentration, memory disturbance and fatigue for over one year after mild head injury and whiplash injury are diagnosed as post-traumatic syndrome. Mechanism and treatment of post-traumatic syndrome are not well established. We studied radioisotope (RI) cisternography and enhanced brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the patient of post-traumatic syndrome. Of 175 cases in post-traumatic syndrome 141 cases (120 cases of motor vehicle accident, 21 cases of sports injury) were diagnosed, as intracranial hypotension (cerebrospinal fluid hypovolemia). RI cisternography showed 86% positive findings (early accumulation of RI in bladder and leakage). Prominent findings in MRI were dilatation of subdural space and venous dilatation. In every case epidural blood patch was performed and symptoms were improved in almost 70% of patients. This study revealed cerebrospinal fluid hypovolemia might be one cause of post-traumatic syndrome. (author)

  9. Non-traumatic acute epidural spinal hematomas diagnosed by magnetic resonance; Hematomas espinales epidurales agudos no traumaticos: diagnostico por resonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, A.; Grive, E.; Pedraza, S.; Capellades, J.; Nos, C.; Alarcon, M.; Rovira, A. [Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron. Barcelona (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The non-traumatic spinal epidural hematoma (NTSEH) is a rare entity that can be the cause of an acute spinal compression syndrome. the objective of this review is to identify the characteristics by MRI and NTSEH and to analyze the factors that influence in its prognosis. In the years 1994 and 1999, 12 patients with NTSEH have been diagnosed in our hospital, and a MRI was performed during the acute phase. the characteristics of the lesions have been analyzed by MRI, with special emphasis on the topographic data and resonance signal and the factors that can influence in the clinical prognosis of the patients. Initially, all of the patients presented pain in the cervical dorsal or interscapular site, followed by a sensitive-motor deficit picture. The MRI showed a lesion of expansive character and posterior epidural location in every case that would produce varying degrees of compression on the spinal cord. The NTSEH should be considered as one of the causes of acute spinal cord compression. The clinical association of intense cervical, dorsal or interscapular pain followed by a sensomotor deficit picture should lead to the suspicion of this entity, that would require an immediate examination with MRI to verify its diagnosis. Both the clinical manifestations as well as the characteristics observed by MRI of the NTSEH have a prognostic value and determine the therapeutic decision. (Author) 34 refs.

  10. Intracranial subdural hematomas with elevated rivaroxaban concentration and subsequently detected spinal subdural hematoma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Koga, Masatoshi; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hino, Tenyu; Yokota, Chiaki; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2016-07-01

    A 79-year-old lean man with a height of 157cm and weight of 42kg (body mass index, 17.2kg/m(2)) receiving rivaroxaban developed an intracranial subdural hematoma and was treated conservatively. Because he had a reduced creatinine clearance of 44mL/min, his dosage of rivaroxaban was reduced from 15 to 10mg daily according to official Japanese prescribing information. However, he developed bilateral intracranial subdural hematomas 2weeks later. Plasma rivaroxaban concentration on anti-factor Xa chromogenic assay was elevated at 301ng/mL, suggesting excessive accumulation. He underwent burr hole drainage and resumed anticoagulation with warfarin. Subsequently, he developed a lumbosacral hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged without neurological sequelae. The main cause of the increased concentration of rivaroxaban was believed to be his older age and low body weight. The etiology of the spinal hematoma was suspected to be the migration of intracranial hematoma to the spinal subdural space. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Spectrophotometry of cerebrospinal fluid in subacute and chronic subdural haematomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellin, K. G.; Steiner, L.

    1974-01-01

    Spectrophotometric examinations were performed on cerebrospinal and subdural fluids in subacute (five patients) and chronic (20 patients) subdural haematomas, with special reference to the diagnostic aid of CSF spectrophotometry. Spectrophotometric xanthochromia of haemorrhagic origin was found in all CSFs examined, while definite visible xanthochromia was observed in only 28% and the CSF was judged as colourless in 52% of those cases. Characteristic bleeding patterns were found spectrophotometrically in all the 20 CSFs examined within 24 hours after lumbar puncture, haematoma patterns being detected in 90-95% of the cases. In many cases the electrophoretically separated protein fractions of CSF and subdural fluids were spectrophotometrically examined. In conclusion, CSF spectrophotometry is a simple, fast, and extremely sensitive method, which in our opinion should be used routinely in the diagnosis of suspected subdural haematomas, if lumbar puncture is not contraindicated. PMID:4140892

  12. Supratentorial arachnoid cyst and associated subdural hematoma: neuroradiologic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochi, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan); Morikawa, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan)]|[Dept. of Radiology, National Nagasaki Chuo Hospital, Ohmura (Japan); Ogino, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan); Nagaoki, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan)]|[Dept. of Radiology, Isahaya General Hospital (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    CT and MR images of 8 patients with supratentorial arachnoid cyst complicated by subdural hematoma were studied and compared with those of 8 patients who developed nontraumatic subdural hematoma without arachnoid cyst. Ot the 8 patients with supratentorial arachnoid cyst, CT and MR disclosed temporal bulging and/or thinning of the temporal squama in all 6 patients with middle fossa arachnoid cysts, and the thinning of the calvaria was evident in another patient with a convexity cyst. Calvarial thinning at the site corresponding to interhemispheric arachnoid cyst was clearly depicted on coronal MR images. In contrast, none of the 8 young patients with nontraumatic subdural hematoma without arachnoid cyst had abnormal calvaria. Temporal bulging and thinning of the overlying calvaria were identified as diagnostic CT and MR features of arachnoid cyst with complicating intracystic and subdural hermorrhage. Radiologists should be aware of this association and should evaluate the bony structure carefully. (orig.)

  13. Analysis of infantile subdural hematoma caused by abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young-Soo; Nishio, Kenji; Fujimoto, Takatoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Okuchi, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    We report infantile subdural hematoma caused by abuse. Between January 2006 and December 2009, 10 cases of definite and highly suspicious abusive subdural hematoma in infants were treated at Nara Medical University Hospital. The mean age was 5.4 months. On CT examination, severe cerebral swelling was seen in 8 (80%) and wide spreading cerebral ischemia and atrophy in 9 (90%). Retinal hemorrhage was commonly seen in this series (90%). Subdural drainage and/or subdural-peritoneal shunt surgeries were performed in 6 cases, and intensive combined therapy of mild hypothermia and barbiturate was adapted in 7 cases. Favorable outcome was achieved in only 3 cases. In spite of aggressive treatment, clinical outcome are still bad. In our series, assailants were predominantly not father but mother. There were various and complex factors for child abuse. Cautious insight and suspicion are necessary to detect abusive injuries in infants. It is very important to endeavor to prevent recurrences of abusive injuries. (author)

  14. Streptococcal Subdural Empyema as a Complication of Varicella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old male infant who presented with a group A streptococcal subdural empyema on day 5 of a varicella skin rash is reported from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

  15. Analysis of chronic subdural hematoma based on CT, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Mikami, Junichi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Takahiro

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-three cases of chronic subdural hematoma were observed soon after head injury for the relationship between its CT findings and clinical symptoms. It has been found that the chronic subdural hematoma is a slowly growing and expanding intracranial disease that starts in an early period of head injury. Chronic subdural hematoma did not present any signs or symptoms initially, except for the gradual occurrence of headache, but finally it presented signs of intracranial hypertension and focal signs. Chronic subdural hematoma in the hygroma-like period did not show any signs and symptoms. In the capsulated period, when changes in CT density suggested intracapsular hemorrhage, a heavy sensation of the head was noted. It was recognized as an abnormal feeling or a full sensation of the head. When the bleeding continued in the cavity, headache became continuous and focal signs gradually appeared. (author)

  16. Traumatic brain injury : from impact to rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halliday, J.; Absalom, A. R.

    Traumatic brain injury is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in our society, particularly among the young. This review discusses the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury, and current management from the acute phase through to rehabilitation of the traumatic brain injury patient.

  17. Influence of Combat Blast-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Acute Symptoms on Mental Health and Service Discharge Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury in an insured population: Subjective complaints and return to employment. Brain Inj. 6, 161 166. 15. Kraus, J., Schaffer, K...B., Haddon, W., Jr., and Long, W.B. (1974). The Injury Severity Score: A method for describing patients with multiple injuries and evaluating...consciousness predict neuropsychological decrements after concussion? Clin. J. Sport Med. 9, 193 198. 26. Gil, S., Caspi, Y., Ben Ari, I.Z., Koren, D., and

  18. Investigating the acute and long-term effects of traumatic brain injury on the immune and fibrinolytic system

    OpenAIRE

    MARIA DAGLAS

    2018-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a serious condition that results in long-term disability in most patients. This thesis investigated the early and long-term effects of the immune and fibrinolytic response (blood clot breakdown), and the link between these two systems after brain injury in mice. A unique discovery was that the chronic immune response, over a period of 8 months, directly contributes to a worse outcome after brain injury. We also found gender-specific differences occurring at the early...

  19. Independent predictors for recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Kyu-Hyon; Lee, Jong-Myong; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young

    2012-09-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is characterized by blood in the subdural space that evokes an inflammatory reaction. Numerous factors potentially associated with recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma have been reported, but these factors have not been sufficiently investigated. In this study, we evaluated the independent risk factors of recurrence. We analyzed data for 420 patients with chronic subdural hematoma treated by the standard surgical procedure for hematoma evacuation at our institution. Ninety-two (21.9 %) patients experienced at least one recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma during the study period. We did not identify any significant differences between chronic subdural hematoma recurrence and current antiplatelet therapy. The recurrence rate was 7 % for the homogeneous type, 21 % for the laminar type, 38 % for the separated type, and 0 % for the trabecular type. The rate of recurrence was significantly lower in the homogeneous and trabecular type than in the laminar and separated type. We performed a multivariate logistic regression analysis and found that postoperative midline shifting (OR, 3.6; 95 % CI, 1.618-7.885; p = 0.001), diabetes mellitus (OR, 2.2; 95 % CI, 1.196-3.856; p = 0.010), history of seizure (OR, 2.6; 95 % CI, 1.210-5.430; p = 0.014), width of hematoma (OR, 2.1; 95 % CI, 1.287-3.538; p = 0.003), and anticoagulant therapy (OR, 2.7; 95 % CI, 1.424-6.960; p = 0.005) were independent risk factors for the recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. We have shown that postoperative midline shifting (≥5 mm), diabetes mellitus, preoperative seizure, preoperative width of hematoma (≥20 mm), and anticoagulant therapy were independent predictors of the recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. According to internal architecture of hematoma, the rate of recurrence was significantly lower in the homogeneous and the trabecular type than the laminar and separated type.

  20. Subdural haemorrhage following endoscopic third ventriculostomy. A rare complication.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, M H

    2012-02-03

    Subdural collections or hematomas are frequently observed after shunt placement [7-9, 13], but rarely after ETV [6]. A review of literature revealed 7 cases [1, 5, 6, 10, 12], of which only 1 was symptomatic [5]. We will discuss the causes, management, and methods of prevention of this complication and we will present a case of symptomatic subdural haematoma, following endoscopic third ventriculostomy for illustration.

  1. A case of subdural hematoma following lumbar puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramatharaknath Vemuri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar puncture (LP is a frequent procedure done for administration of spinal anesthesia or for obtaining cerebrospinal fluid for analysis. The common complications of LP are pain at the local site and headache. Fortunately, the serious complications such as infections of central nervous system, brain stem herniation, and subdural hematoma are rare. We present a rare case of subdural hematoma following a LP.

  2. A Rare Complication of Spinal Anesthesia: Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuldem Yıldırım Dönmez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common complication of spinal anesthesia is postdural puncture headache. Any injury of the dura may cause headache. After the injury of the dura, CSF leakage may occur and due to the tension of the veins between the cortex and the dural sinuses, subdural hematoma may be seen. Herein, we present a patient with persistent headache after the spinal anesthesia given during delivery of her baby, and emphasize a rare complication of spinal anesthesia which is subdural hematoma

  3. CT findings of subdural hematomas: as a special references of atypical CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Whi Yul; Chung, Tae Sub; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik; Kim, Ki Whang; Park, Chang Yun [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Subdural hematomas (SDH) are relatively common and the typical CT findings according to the age of them are well established. The CT findings of 82 patients with SDHs were reviewed and compared with the operative findings. The results were as follow: 1. The most common cause of SDHs was the direct trauma which was noted in 60 cases (73.2%). 2. The atypical CT findings of the mixed density were seen in 19 cases (23.2%), including acute SDH 7 cases (20%), subacute SDH 5 cases (41.7%), and chronic SDH 7 cases (20%). 3. The possible causes of the mixed density in acute SDH were unclotted blood in early stage of hematoma development or serum extruded during the early phase of clot retraction. But the possibility of cerebrospinal fluid within subdural space due to an arachnoid tear could not be excluded. 4. The possible causes of the mixed density in subacute and chronic SDH were serum extruded during the hematoma resolution and rebleeding. 5. Wall enhancement of hematomas was noted in 3 cases (25%) of subacute SDHs and 15 cases (42.9%) of chronic SDHs. 6. Most of SDHs was crescentic in shape, but lenticular in 4 cases (4.9%). Midline shift and compression of ventricles were proportional to the maximum thickness of SDHs. There were seen ipsilateral dilatation of ventricles in 9 cases (11.0%) and brain edema in 11 cases (13.4%)

  4. Chronic subdural hematoma with sedimentation level on CT: correlation with clinical and operative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Hee; Lee, Hyeon Kyeong; Lee, Won Jae [College of Medicine, Dongguk University, Kyungju (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    1994-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to correlate CT findings of the patients with chronic subdural hematoma(SDH) showing a sedimentation level with their clinical and operative findings. We selected 9 patients who showed a sedimentation level within the hematoma after reviewing the CT findings of 55 patients with SDH. We also analyzed their age, initial symptoms, cause of head injury, latent period, the level of consciousness on admission, CT findings, and operative findings. All of the 9 patients were aged persons(over 52 years). They had a history of acute exacerbation of neurologic symptoms. Five of them had an apparent history of head trauma more than one month before the exacerbation. The CT scans showed unilateral, crescent-shaped subdural fluid collection with a sedimentation level except a case of bilateral SDH and 2 cases of planoconvex-shaped SDH. The interface of the sedimentation level was sharp in 3 cases and indistinct in 6 cases. None had bleeding tendency and the hemoglobin level was slightly decreased in 2 patients. All patients revealed membrane of the hematoma during operation. The upper portion of the sedimentation was liquefied blood and the lower portion was fresh blood clots. We could observe fresh RBC's in the hematoma microscopically. A sedimentation level in chronic SDH was operatively proved to represent rebleeding, and was clinically manifested as an acute exacerbation of symptoms.

  5. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Infected by Propionibacterium Acnes: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shusuke; Asahi, Takashi; Akioka, Naoki; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Kuwayama, Naoya; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We present a very rare case of a patient with an infected subdural hematoma due to Propionibacterium acnes. A 63-year-old male complained of dizziness and was admitted to our hospital. He had a history of left chronic subdural hematoma due to a traffic accident, which had been conservatively treated. Physical, neurological and laboratory examinations revealed no definite abnormality. Plain CT scan demonstrated a hypodense crescentic fluid collection over the surface of the left cerebral hemisphere. The patient was diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma and underwent burr hole surgery three times and selective embolization of the middle meningeal artery, but the lesion easily recurred. Repeated culture examinations of white sedimentation detected P. acnes. Therefore, he underwent craniotomy surgery followed by intravenous administration of antibiotics. The infected subdural hematoma was covered with a thick, yellowish outer membrane, and the large volume of pus and hematoma was removed. However, the lesion recurred again and a low-density area developed in the left frontal lobe. Craniotomy surgery was performed a second time, and two Penrose drainages were put in both the epidural and subdural spaces. Subsequently, the lesions completely resolved and he was discharged without any neurological deficits. Infected subdural hematoma may be refractory to burr hole surgery or craniotomy alone, in which case aggressive treatment with craniotomy and continuous drainage should be indicated before the brain parenchyma suffers irreversible damage. PMID:25759659

  6. Trajectories of sleep changes during the acute phase of traumatic brain injury: A 7-day actigraphy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Yean Chiu

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: Poor sleep efficiency and longer sleep duration are common symptoms in acute TBI patients. Both head injury severity and age predicted the trajectories of daytime and 24-hour sleep duration during the acute phase of TBI, whereas gender predicted the trajectories of 24-hour sleep duration in the mild TBI subgroup.

  7. Successful Use of Extracorporeal Life Support after Double Traumatic Tracheobronchial Injury in a Patient with Severe Acute Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Valette

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of an asthmatic patient with blunt trachea and left main bronchus injuries who developed acute severe asthma after surgical repair. Despite medical treatment and ventilatory support, asthma persisted with high airway pressures and severe respiratory acidosis. We proposed venovenous extracorporeal life support for CO2 removal which allowed arterial blood gas normalization and airway pressures decrease. Extracorporeal life support was removed on day five after medical treatment of acute severe asthma. So we report the successful use of extracorporeal life support for operated double blunt tracheobronchial injury with acute severe asthma.

  8. Resting State Functional Connectivity in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury at the Acute Stage: Independent Component and Seed-Based Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Iraji, Armin; Benson, Randall R.; Welch, Robert D.; O'Neil, Brian J.; Woodard, John L.; Imran Ayaz, Syed; Kulek, Andrew; Mika, Valerie; Medado, Patrick; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Liu, Tianming; Haacke, E. Mark; Kou, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) accounts for more than 1 million emergency visits each year. Most of the injured stay in the emergency department for a few hours and are discharged home without a specific follow-up plan because of their negative clinical structural imaging. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly functional MRI (fMRI), has been reported as being sensitive to functional disturbances after brain injury. In this study, a cohort of 12 patients with mTBI were pr...

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage into the subdural space: possible influence on the pathogenesis and recurrence frequency of chronic subdural hematoma and subdural hygroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristof, Rudolf A; Grimm, Jochen M; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage into the subdural space is involved in the genesis of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and subdural hygroma (SH) and to clarify whether this leakage of CSF into the subdural space influences the postoperative recurrence rate of CSDH and SH. In this prospective observational study, 75 cases involving patients treated surgically for CSDH (67 patients) or SH (8 patients) were evaluated with respect to clinical and radiological findings at presentation, the content of beta -trace protein (beta TP) in the subdural fluid (betaTPSF) and serum (betaTPSER), and the CSDH/SH recurrence rate. The betaTPSF was considered to indicate an admixture of CSF to the subdural fluid if betaTPSF/betaTPSER>2. The median beta TPSF level for the whole patient group was 4.29 mg/L (range 0.33-51 mg/L). Cerebrospinal fluid leakage, as indicated by betaTPSF/betaTPSER>2, was found to be present in 93% of the patients with CSDH and in 100% of the patients with SH (p=0.724). In patients who later had to undergo repeated surgery for recurrence of CSDH/SH, the betaTPSF concentrations (median 6.69 mg/L, range 0.59-51 mg/L) were significantly higher (p=0.04) than in patients not requiring reoperation (median 4.12 mg/L, range 0.33-26.8 mg/L). As indicated by the presence of betaTP in the subdural fluid, CSF leakage into the subdural space is present in the vast majority of patients with CSDH and SH. This leakage could be involved in the pathogenesis of CSDH and SH. Patients who experience recurrences of CSDH and SH have significantly higher concentrations of betaTPSF at initial presentation than patients not requiring reoperation for recurrence. These findings are presented in the literature for the first time and have to be confirmed and expanded upon by further studies.

  10. Cerebral Blood Flow and Transcranial Doppler Sonography Measurements of CO(2)-Reactivity in Acute Traumatic Brain Injured Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinstrup, Peter; Ryding, Erik Hilmer; Asgeirsson, Bogi

    2013-01-01

    measurements and cerebrovascular reactivity to hypocapnia were simultaneously evaluated in 27 patients with acute TBI. Measurements were performed preoperatively during controlled normocapnia and hypocapnia in patients scheduled for hematoma evacuation under general anesthesia. MAIN FINDING AND CONCLUSION...

  11. Spontaneous subdural hematoma and antiplatelet therapy: Does efficacy of Ticagrelor come with added risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattanagere Manjunatha Suryanarayana Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antiplatelet therapy has established clinical benefit on cardiovascular outcome and has reduced the rates of re-infarction/in stent thrombosis following percutaneous coronary intervention in acute coronary syndromes. Major bleeding episodes can occur with antiplatelet therapy and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH is one of the most feared complications resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Identification of high risk groups and judicious use of antiplatelet therapy reduces the bleeding risk. Ticagrelor is a newer P2Y12 receptor antagonist with established clinical benefit. However, risks of having an ICH with these newer molecules cannot be ignored. Here, we report a case of spontaneous acute subdural hematoma developing in a patient on antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and ticagrelor. Early recognition, discontinuation of the medication and appropriate management resulted in resolution of hematoma and good clinical outcome. Authors have reviewed the antithrombotic drugs and their tendencies in causing intracranial bleeds from a neurophysicians perspective.

  12. Repeated exposure to conditioned fear stress increases anxiety and delays sleep recovery following exposure to an acute traumatic stressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin N Greenwood

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Repeated stressor exposure can sensitize physiological responses to novel stressors and facilitate the development of stress-related psychiatric disorders including anxiety. Disruptions in diurnal rhythms of sleep-wake behavior accompany stress-related psychiatric disorders and could contribute to their development. Complex stressors that include fear-eliciting stimuli can be a component of repeated stress experienced by humans, but whether exposure to repeated fear can prime the development of anxiety and sleep disturbances is unknown. In the current study, adult male F344 rats were exposed to either control conditions or repeated contextual fear conditioning for 22 days followed by exposure to either no, mild (10, or severe (100 acute uncontrollable tail shock stress. Exposure to acute stress produced anxiety-like behavior as measured by a reduction in juvenile social exploration and exaggerated shock-elicited freezing in a novel context. Prior exposure to repeated fear enhanced anxiety-like behavior as measured by shock-elicited freezing, but did not alter social exploratory behavior. The potentiation of anxiety produced by prior repeated fear was temporary; exaggerated fear was present 1 day but not 4 days following acute stress. Interestingly, exposure to acute stress reduced REM and NREM sleep during the hours immediately following acute stress. This initial reduction in sleep was followed by robust REM rebound and diurnal rhythm flattening of sleep / wake behavior. Prior repeated fear extended the acute stress-induced REM and NREM sleep loss, impaired REM rebound, and prolonged the flattening of the diurnal rhythm of NREM sleep following acute stressor exposure. These data suggest that impaired recovery of sleep / wake behavior following acute stress could contribute to the mechanisms by which a history of prior repeated stress increases vulnerability to subsequent novel stressors and stress-related disorders.

  13. Utility of the Military Acute Concussion Evaluation as a screening tool for mild traumatic brain injury in a civilian trauma population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Melvin E; Safadjou, Saman; Farber, Benjamin; Velazco, Nerissa; Man, Jianliang; Reddy, Srinivas H; Todor, Roxanne; Teperman, Sheldon

    2015-07-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) constitutes 75% of more than 1.5 million traumatic brain injuries annually. There exists no consensus on point-of-care screening for mTBI. The Military Acute Concussion Evaluation (MACE) is a quick and easy test used by the US Army to screen for mTBI; however, its utility in civilian trauma is unclear. It has two parts: a history section and the Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC) score (0-30) previously validated in sports injury. As a performance improvement project, our institution sought to evaluate the MACE as a concussion screening tool that could be used by housestaff in a general civilian trauma population. From June 2013 to May 2014, patients 18 years to 65 years old with suspected concussion were given the MACE within 72 hours of admission to our urban Level I trauma center. Patients with a positive head computed tomography were excluded. Demographic data and MACE scores were recorded in prospect. Concussion was defined as loss of consciousness and/or posttraumatic amnesia; concussed patients were compared with those nonconcussed. Sensitivity and specificity for each respective MACE score were used to plot a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. An ROC curve area of 0.8 was set as the benchmark for a good screening test to distinguish concussion from nonconcussion. There were 84 concussions and 30 nonconcussed patients. Both groups were similar; however, the concussion group had a lower mean MACE score than the nonconcussed patients. Data analysis demonstrated the sensitivity and specificity of a range of MACE scores used to generate an ROC curve area of only 0.65. The MACE showed a lower mean score for individuals with concussion, defined by loss of consciousness and/or posttraumatic amnesia. However, the ROC curve area of 0.65 highly suggests that MACE alone would be a poor screening test for mTBI in a general civilian trauma population. Diagnostic study, level II.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of traumatic intracranial aneurysm in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Juming; Fan Guoping; Zhong Weixing; Zhang Yongping; Peng Haiteng; Zhu Ming; Cheng Yongde

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnosis, safety and efficacy of interventional therapy and surgery for child traumatic intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Five patients with traumatic intracranial aneurysms including three males and two females, age ranged from 2 to 10 years old; 5 had undertaken CT and MR scanings. All of them showed traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage in 2, intracerebral hematoma in the right occipital and the left temporal respectively in 2 and another one with somewhat bleeding at the posterior fossa and right trigone of lateral ventricles and subdural bleeding at the tentorium edge. The detailed vascular involvement diagnosis were made by DSA revealing one of left C1 segmental internal carotid artery traumatic aneurysm, one of the branch of right sylvian artery traumatic aneurysm, one of left middle cerebral artery traumatic aneurysm, one of left posterior cerebral artery traumatic aneurysm, one of the branch of right posterior inferior cerebellar artery traumatic aneurysm. Two of them were treated by embolization therapy with CDC and two by surgery. Results: The CDC embolization in 2 cases and the surgical operation for another 2 were all succeeded without death or complications. The last case was followed up closely. Conclusions: Traumatic intracranial aneurysm is rare in childhood but endovascular treatment with CDC and surgery is efficient and safe, yet the long-term efficacy is still relied on follow-up. (authors)

  15. The risk factors for recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Shigeo; Kinoshita, Yu; Nakagawa, Toru; Murakami, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease in the elderly, and the recurrence rate of CSDH is reported to range from 2.3 to 33%. We performed a retrospective review of a number of CSDH cases and the potential factors associated with CSDH recurrence. The patient population comprised 112 men and 65 women with a mean age of 74.7 years. We analyzed the following factors: age, sex, antiplatelet and anticoagulant use, hematoma laterality, hematoma thickness, degree of midline shift and internal architecture of the hematoma in the preoperative CT films, use of irrigation, direction of the drainage tube, width of the subdural space, and degree of midline shift and the presence of a massive subdural air collection in the postoperative CT films. Univariate analysis revealed that there was a trend for different rates of recurrence among the different types of hematomas. The presence of a postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with the recurrence of hematoma. Multivariate analysis revealed that separated hematomas were significantly associated with CSDH recurrence, whereas the presence of postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with hematoma recurrence. Neither univariate nor multivariate analysis could demonstrate an association between the direction of the drainage tube and the recurrence of CSDH.

  16. Clinical study on the changes of plasma Hcy, β2-m, cortisol, NPY levels and NPY contents in CSF in patients with acute traumatic intracranial hemorrhage as well as patients with cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan Wenhua; Yang Yongqing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To invest/gate the clinical significance of the changes of plasma Hcy, β 2 -m, cortisol, NPY levels and NPY contents in CSF in patients with acute traumatic intracranial hemorrhage as well as patients with cerebral infarction. Methods: Plasma β 2 -m, cortisol, NPY, NPY in CSF (with RIA) and plasma Hey (with CLIA ) contents were measured in 68 patients with acute traumatic intracranial haemorrhage (mild 33, severe 35) as well as 39 patients with cerebral infarction (plus 35 controls). Results: The plasma β 2 -m, Hcy and 8h, 24h cortisol levels in all these patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P 2 -m, Hcy, cortisol levels and NPY contents in CSF were very prominent in all these patients studied. (authors)

  17. Quantitative kinetic analysis of blood vessels in the outer membranes of chronic subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kentaro; Adachi, Keiji; Cho, Kajin; Ishimaru, Sumio; Maeda, Minoru

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic biologic modeling was used to calculate the transfer rate constant for gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and capillary permeability in the outer membrane of chronic subdural hematomas and effusions. Following intravenous Gd-DTPA injection, Gd concentrations in the subdural fluid and in timed arterial blood samples were measured by ion-coupled plasma emission spectrometry in 53 chronic subdural hematomas and 18 chronic subdural effusions. The capillary surface area in outer membrane was assessed morphometrically. Transfer rate constants for subdural hematomas and subdural effusions were 12.4±1.0 and 20.6±1.7 (x 10 -4 )min -1 , respectively. Capillary permeabilities for subdural hematomas and subdural effusions were 16±1.2 and 19±3.7 ml·min -1 (mm 2 /mm 3 ) -1 , respectively. The capillary surface areas for subdural hematomas and subdural effusions were 48±3 and 77±10 mm 2 /mm 3 , respectively. The high degree of infiltration of Gd into subdural effusions reflects the high capillary surface area in the outer membrane rather than greater permeability of individual capillaries. The value of transfer rate constant was correlated inversely with the duration of the chronic subdural fluid collection. Immature outer membrane has a high transfer rate constant which allows extravasation of plasma components into the subdural space, resulting in increasing volume of the subdural effusion. Delayed magnetic resonance imaging following Gd administration may be clinically useful for estimating the age of chronic subdural fluid accumulations. (author)

  18. Retrospective analysis of operative treatment of a series of 100 patients with subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewski, Bartosz; Pawelczyk, Agnieszka; Pawelczyk, Tomasz; Ceranowicz, Katarzyna; Wojdyn, Maciej; Radek, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    This retrospective study of medical records, surgical protocols, patient observation cards, and imaging files of 100 patients treated for subdural hematoma analyzed the type of hematoma, patient age and sex, operative technique, neurological status, cause of injury, duration of hospital stay, mortality rate, and the number of and reasons for reoperations to determine the effects on treatment outcomes. The time between the head injury and onset of neurological symptoms was analyzed versus the type of hematoma determined from computed tomography (CT) scans. Acute hematomas accounted for 38% of the cases, with subacute hematomas representing 20%, and chronic ones accounting for 42%. In trauma patients, the mean time interval between the injury and onset of neurological symptoms was 0.38 days for acute hematomas, 13.8 days for subacute hematomas, and 23.75 days for chronic hematomas. Repeat surgery was carried out in 26% of the cases. Improvement was obtained in 44% of cases, deterioration in 20%, and no change in neurological status in 36%. Timing of the operations was between 15:00 and 23:00 in 45%, between 23:00 and 7:00 in 33%, and between 7:00 and 15:00 in 22%. The classification of hematomas based on CT presentation corresponds to the classification based on the time elapsed between injury and onset of symptoms, and appears to be appropriate and useful in everyday practice. No preceding injury was identified in 31.6% of acute hematomas, 50% of subacute hematomas, and 61.9% of chronic hematomas. Analysis of reoperations indicates that trepanation may be superior to craniotomy as primary surgery for subacute and chronic hematomas. Subdural hematoma surgeries take place at all times of the day, with most carried out outside the usual working hours.

  19. Chronic subdural hematoma with persistent hiccups: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushin Takemoto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Supratentorial hiccup is a rare condition and no patients with persistent hiccups and chronic subdural hematoma have been reported. A 38-year-old man with intractable hiccups, headache, and nausea was admitted to our hospital. Computed tomography revealed a supratentorial chronic subdural hematoma on the left side. After burr hole surgery to remove the hematoma his hiccups disappeared immediately and he was discharged home on the 3rd postoperative day with no neurological deficits. Although the role of the supratentorial nervous system in hiccups is not clearly understood, supratentorial areas play an important role in the stimulation or suppression of the hiccup centers. Chronic hiccups may be a presenting symptom of chronic subdural hematoma attending headache with nausea if it has no gastrointestinal abnormality.

  20. Chronic subdural hematoma fluid and its computerized tomographic density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuzawa, Hideaki; Sato, Jinichi; Kamitani, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Midori

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory and in vivo CT analysis were performed on 19 chronic subdural hematomas and five subdural hygromas. In these 25 hematoma samples, red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, and hemoglobin (Hgb) varied greatly, though, these values correlated well with the CT densities. Plasma protein content was fairly constant with an average of 7.1+-0.8g/dl. There were four hematoma samples with RBC of less than 20x10 4 μl or Hgb of less than 2.0g/dl. Their CT values ranged between 18 and 23 H.U., which were considered close to the in vivo serum level CT density. Five hygroma fluid showed no RBC and very little protein content of less than 0.4g/dl. CT density ranged between -2 and 13 H.U. The edge effect of the skull was experimentally studied using a phantom skull filled with water. This revealed a remarkable overshoot of the CT values within ten pixels from the inner wall of the skull. Visual observation of the original CT pictures revealed four low density hematomas and seven mixed density ones. When compared to the density of the ventricular cavity, all of the low density hematomas and the supernatant part of the mixed density ones were clearly higher in density. All five hygromas appeared CSF dense or lower. In conclusion, because of the edge effect by the skull, thin subdural fluids could not be diagnosed by CT alone. Thick subdural fluids could be differentiated as either hematoma or hygroma by their CT densities. Subdural hematomas had in vivo CT densities of at least serum level or approximately 20 H.U., while subdural hygromas had densities close to CSF. These characteristics were best appreciated by visual observation of the CT scan films. (J.P.N.)

  1. Computerized tomography of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the tentorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Takeshi; Kanazawa, Yasuhisa; Harada, Hideaki; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi.

    1987-01-01

    A case of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the cerebellar tentorium is presented. The clinical feature of this case was gait disturbance with trankial ataxia. An axial CT scan showed only a diffuse high-density area in the cerebellar tentorium, but a coronal CT scan revealed a characteristic high-density lesion just on the cerebellar tentorium. The hematoma was evacuated by opening a burrhole at the convex; the gait disturbance disappeared after this operation. The value of a coronal CT scan in this case is stressed, and the mechanism of gait disturbance in a chronic subdural hematoma is discussed. (author)

  2. Computerized tomography of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the tentorium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, Takeshi; Kanazawa, Yasuhisa; Harada, Hideaki; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    1987-06-01

    A case of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the cerebellar tentorium is presented. The clinical feature of this case was gait disturbance with trankial ataxia. An axial CT scan showed only a diffuse high-density area in the cerebellar tentorium, but a coronal CT scan revealed a characteristic high-density lesion just on the cerebellar tentorium. The hematoma was evacuated by opening a burrhole at the convex; the gait disturbance disappeared after this operation. The value of a coronal CT scan in this case is stressed, and the mechanism of gait disturbance in a chronic subdural hematoma is discussed.

  3. Subdural Empyema Presenting with Seizure, Confusion, and Focal Weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I Bruner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available While sinusitis is a common ailment, intracranial suppurative complications of sinusitis are rare and difficult to diagnose and treat. The morbidity and mortality of intracranial complications of sinusitis have decreased significantly since the advent of antibiotics, but diseases such as subdural empyemas and intracranial abscesses still occur, and they require prompt diagnosis, treatment, and often surgical drainage to prevent death or long-term neurologic sequelae. We present a case of an immunocompetent adolescent male with a subdural empyema who presented with seizures,confusion, and focal arm weakness after a bout of sinusitis.

  4. Subdural Empyema Presenting with Seizure, Confusion, and Focal Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, David I.; Littlejohn, Lanny; Pritchard, Amy

    2012-01-01

    While sinusitis is a common ailment, intracranial suppurative complications of sinusitis are rare and difficult to diagnose and treat. The morbidity and mortality of intracranial complications of sinusitis have decreased significantly since the advent of antibiotics, but diseases such as subdural empyemas and intracranial abscesses still occur, and they require prompt diagnosis, treatment, and often surgical drainage to prevent death or long-term neurologic sequelae. We present a case of an immunocompetent adolescent male with a subdural empyema who presented with seizures, confusion, and focal arm weakness after a bout of sinusitis. PMID:23358438

  5. External Validation and Recalibration of Risk Prediction Models for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury among Critically Ill Adult Patients in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David A; Griggs, Kathryn A; Prabhu, Gita; Gomes, Manuel; Lecky, Fiona E; Hutchinson, Peter J A; Menon, David K; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2015-10-01

    This study validates risk prediction models for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) in critical care units in the United Kingdom and recalibrates the models to this population. The Risk Adjustment In Neurocritical care (RAIN) Study was a prospective, observational cohort study in 67 adult critical care units. Adult patients admitted to critical care following acute TBI with a last pre-sedation Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 15 were recruited. The primary outcomes were mortality and unfavorable outcome (death or severe disability, assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale) at six months following TBI. Of 3626 critical care unit admissions, 2975 were analyzed. Following imputation of missing outcomes, mortality at six months was 25.7% and unfavorable outcome 57.4%. Ten risk prediction models were validated from Hukkelhoven and colleagues, the Medical Research Council (MRC) Corticosteroid Randomisation After Significant Head Injury (CRASH) Trial Collaborators, and the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) group. The model with the best discrimination was the IMPACT "Lab" model (C index, 0.779 for mortality and 0.713 for unfavorable outcome). This model was well calibrated for mortality at six months but substantially under-predicted the risk of unfavorable outcome. Recalibration of the models resulted in small improvements in discrimination and excellent calibration for all models. The risk prediction models demonstrated sufficient statistical performance to support their use in research and audit but fell below the level required to guide individual patient decision-making. The published models for unfavorable outcome at six months had poor calibration in the UK critical care setting and the models recalibrated to this setting should be used in future research.

  6. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Traumatic Brain Injury-Related Mortality: Interrelationships Between Genetics and Acute Systemic and Central Nervous System BDNF Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, Michelle D; Conley, Yvette P; Wagner, Amy K

    2016-01-01

    Older adults have higher mortality rates after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) compared to younger adults. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling is altered in aging and is important to TBI given its role in neuronal survival/plasticity and autonomic function. Following experimental TBI, acute BDNF administration has not been efficacious. Clinically, genetic variation in BDNF (reduced signaling alleles: rs6265, Met-carriers; rs7124442, C-carriers) can be protective against acute mortality. Postacutely, these genotypes carry lower mortality risk in older adults and greater mortality risk among younger adults. Investigate BDNF levels in mortality/outcome following severe TBI in the context of age and genetic risk. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum BDNF were assessed prospectively during the first week following severe TBI (n = 203) and in controls (n = 10). Age, BDNF genotype, and BDNF levels were assessed as mortality/outcome predictors. CSF BDNF levels tended to be higher post-TBI (P = .061) versus controls and were associated with time until death (P = .042). In contrast, serum BDNF levels were reduced post-TBI versus controls (P BDNF serum and gene * age interactions were mortality predictors post-TBI in the same multivariate model. CSF and serum BDNF tended to be negatively correlated post-TBI (P = .07). BDNF levels predicted mortality, in addition to gene * age interactions, suggesting levels capture additional mortality risk. Higher CSF BDNF post-TBI may be detrimental due to injury and age-related increases in pro-apoptotic BDNF target receptors. Negative CSF and serum BDNF correlations post-TBI suggest blood-brain barrier transit alterations. Understanding BDNF signaling in neuronal survival, plasticity, and autonomic function may inform treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Efficacy and safety assessment of acute sports-related traumatic soft tissue injuries using a new ibuprofen medicated plaster: results from a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, Hans-Georg; Connolly, Mark P; Bhatt, Aomesh; Giannetti, Bruno

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of a recently developed ibuprofen medicated plaster in the treatment of acute sports impact injuries/contusions. In this double-blind, multi-center, placebo-controlled, parallel group, phase 3 study (EudraCT Number: 2012-003257-2) patients (n = 132; ages 18 to 60 years) diagnosed with acute sports-related traumatic blunt soft tissue injury/contusion to the upper or lower limbs were randomized to receive either ibuprofen 200 mg plaster (n = 64) or placebo plaster (n = 68). Plasters were administered once daily for five consecutive days. The primary assessment was the area under the curve (AUC) of the visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain on movement (POM) over 0 to 72 h (VAS 0-72 ). The ibuprofen medicated plaster was associated with a reduction in pain on movement (POM) based on lower VAS AUC 0-72h (2399.4 mm*h) compared with placebo (4078.9 mm*h) (least squares mean difference: - 1679.5 mm*h; P ibuprofen medicated plaster compared with placebo at 12, 48, 24, and 120 h (P ibuprofen medicated plaster was associated with greater reduction in tenderness/pain than placebo at each timepoint (P values ibuprofen plaster, and n = 6 [8.8%] for placebo). All drug-related AEs were administration site reactions and were mild in intensity. The results of this study indicate that ibuprofen medicated plaster results in rapid and clinically relevant reduction of pain in patients suffering from blunt musculoskeletal injuries or recurrent pain. The ibuprofen medicated plaster was well tolerated.

  8. The influence of post-acute rehabilitation length of stay on traumatic brain injury outcome: a retrospective exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Jessica G; Ashley, Mark J; Masel, Brent E; Randle, Kevin; Kreber, Lisa A; Singh, Charan; Harrington, David; Griesbach, Grace S

    2018-01-01

    Data regarding length of stay (LOS) in a rehabilitation programme after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are limited. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of LOS and disability on outcome following TBI. Records from patients in a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme at least 3 months after TBI were analysed retrospectively to study the influence of LOS on functional outcome at different levels of disability. Functional status was determined by the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI) and the Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ). Patients were further grouped by time since injury of 3-12 months or over 1 year. Those with a mild and moderate disabilities and over 1 year chronicity showed improvements after 90 days of rehabilitation. Patients with a severe disability and over 1 year chronicity required at least 180 days to show improvements. Moderately and severely disabled patients with an injury chronicity of 3-12 months showed improvements in the MPAI after 90 days. However, further improvement was observed after 180 days in the severely disabled group. Results suggest that both, level of disability and injury chronicity, should be considered when determining LOS. Data also show an association between LOS and changes in the MPAI and CIQ.

  9. Neuroprotection of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in sub-acute traumatic brain injury: not by immediately improving cerebral oxygen saturation and oxygen partial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bao-Chun; Liu, Li-Jun; Liu, Bing

    2016-09-01

    Although hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy can promote the recovery of neural function in patients who have suffered traumatic brain injury (TBI), the underlying mechanism is unclear. We hypothesized that hyperbaric oxygen treatment plays a neuroprotective role in TBI by increasing regional transcranial oxygen saturation (rSO 2 ) and oxygen partial pressure (PaO 2 ). To test this idea, we compared two groups: a control group with 20 healthy people and a treatment group with 40 TBI patients. The 40 patients were given 100% oxygen of HBO for 90 minutes. Changes in rSO 2 were measured. The controls were also examined for rSO 2 and PaO 2 , but received no treatment. rSO 2 levels in the patients did not differ significantly after treatment, but levels before and after treatment were significantly lower than those in the control group. PaO 2 levels were significantly decreased after the 30-minute HBO treatment. Our findings suggest that there is a disorder of oxygen metabolism in patients with sub-acute TBI. HBO does not immediately affect cerebral oxygen metabolism, and the underlying mechanism still needs to be studied in depth.

  10. Patterns of post-acute health care utilization after a severe traumatic brain injury: Results from the PariS-TBI cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Claire; Bayen, Eleonore; Darnoux, Emmanuelle; Ghout, Idir; Azerad, Sylvie; Ruet, Alexis; Vallat-Azouvi, Claire; Pradat-Diehl, Pascale; Aegerter, Philippe; Weiss, Jean-Jacques; Azouvi, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    To assess brain injury services utilization and their determinants using Andersen's model. Prospective follow-up of the PariS-TBI inception cohort. Out of 504 adults with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), 245 survived and 147 received a 4-year outcome assessment (mean age 33 years, 80% men). Provision rates of medical, rehabilitation, social and re-entry services and their relations to patients' characteristics were assessed. Following acute care discharge, 78% of patients received physiotherapy, 61% speech/cognitive therapy, 50% occupational therapy, 41% psychological assistance, 63% specialized medical follow-up, 21% community re-entry assistance. Health-related need factors, in terms of TBI severity, were the main predictors of services. Provision of each therapy was significantly associated with corresponding speech, motor and psychological impairments. However, care provision did not depend on cognitive impairments and cognitive therapy was related to pre-disposing and geographical factors. Community re-entry assistance was provided to younger and more independent patients. These quantitative findings illustrate strengths and weaknesses of late brain injury care provision in urban France and highlight the need to improve treatment of cognitive impairments.

  11. The Nelaton Catheter Guard for Safe and Effective Placement of Subdural Drain for Two-Burr-Hole Trephination in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Jens; Beck, Jürgen; Raabe, A; Stieglitz, Lennart Henning

    2015-09-01

    For chronic subdural hematoma, placement of a Blake drain with a two-burr-hole craniotomy is often preferred. However, the placement of such drains carries the risk of penetrating the brain surface or damaging superficial venous structures. To describe the use of a Nelaton catheter for the placement of a subdural drain in two-burr-hole trephination for chronic subdural hematoma. A Nelaton catheter was used to guide placement of a Blake drain into the subdural hematoma cavity and provide irrigation of the hematoma cavity. With the two-burr-hole method, the Nelaton catheter could be removed easily via the frontal burr hole after the Blake drain was in place. We used the Nelaton catheters in many surgical procedures and found it a safe and easy technique. This method allows the surgeon to safely direct the catheter into the correct position in the subdural space. This tool has two advantages. First, the use of a small and flexible Nelaton catheter is a safe method for irrigation of a chronic subdural hematoma cavity. Second, in comparison with insertion of subdural drainage alone through a burr hole, the placement of the Nelaton catheter in subdural space is easier and the risk of damaging relevant structures such as cortical tissue or bridging veins is lower. Thus this technique may help to avoid complications when placing a subdural drain. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Hematoma subdural crônico: análise de 35 casos Chronic subdural hematoma: analysis of 35 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Flavio M. Araújo

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam 35 casos com diagnóstico de hematoma subdural crônico, operados no período de janeiro-1988 a março-1995. A idade dos pacientes variou entre 19 e 80 anos. Foram eles agrupados retrospectivamente segundo a escala de Bender. Quanto ao tratamento cirúrgico, foram empregadas duas técnicas: craniotomia com membranectomia e dupla trepanação com instilação de solução salina na cavidade ocupada pelo hematoma. O índice de mortalidade entre os pacientes submetidos à craniotomia foi 16,6% e nos pacientes submetidos à trepanação foi nulo. Dentre os pacientes que faleceram, 80% encontravam-se em grau III ou IV na escala de Bender. O hematoma subdural crônico apresenta até os dias atuais alguns aspectos controversos, como quanto à sua fisiopatologia e ao tratamento cirúrgico adequado.Thirty five patients with chronic subdural hematoma were treated surgically between 1988 and 1995. The patients, aged 19 to 80 years, were graded retrospectively according to the Bender scale. The clots were removed via burr-holes with irrigation of the subdural space to ensure as complete an evacuation of subdural colletion, and craniotomy with membranectomy. The mortality rate was 16.6% with craniotomy and 0% with burr-hole. The patients who died, 80% were in grade III or IV. The pathogenesis and surgical treatment of chronic subdural hematoma has been controversial, and still remains obscure.

  13. Subdural Hematoma: An Adverse Event of Electroconvulsive Therapy—Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganath R. Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is commonly used in the management of medication nonresponsive depressive disorder, with proven efficacy in psychiatric practice since many decades. A rare complication of intracranial bleed following this therapeutic procedure has been reported in sporadic case reports in the English literature. We report a case of such a complication in a 42-year-old male, a known case of nonorganic medication nonresponsive depressive disorder for the last two years who required ECT application. Presenting symptoms included altered mental state, urinary incontinence, and repeated episodes of vomiting; following ECT procedure with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain suggestive of bilateral acute subdural hematoma. Despite the view that it may be used in neurological conditions without raised intracranial tension, it will be worthwhile to be vigilant during post-ECT recovery for any emergent complications.

  14. Physiological complexity of acute traumatic brain injury in patients treated with a brain oxygen protocol: utility of symbolic regression in predictive modeling of a dynamical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narotam, Pradeep K; Morrison, John F; Schmidt, Michael D; Nathoo, Narendra

    2014-04-01

    Predictive modeling of emergent behavior, inherent to complex physiological systems, requires the analysis of large complex clinical data streams currently being generated in the intensive care unit. Brain tissue oxygen protocols have yielded outcome benefits in traumatic brain injury (TBI), but the critical physiological thresholds for low brain oxygen have not been established for a dynamical patho-physiological system. High frequency, multi-modal clinical data sets from 29 patients with severe TBI who underwent multi-modality neuro-clinical care monitoring and treatment with a brain oxygen protocol were analyzed. The inter-relationship between acute physiological parameters was determined using symbolic regression (SR) as the computational framework. The mean patient age was 44.4±15 with a mean admission GCS of 6.6±3.9. Sixty-three percent sustained motor vehicle accidents and the most common pathology was intra-cerebral hemorrhage (50%). Hospital discharge mortality was 21%, poor outcome occurred in 24% of patients, and good outcome occurred in 56% of patients. Criticality for low brain oxygen was intracranial pressure (ICP) ≥22.8 mm Hg, for mortality at ICP≥37.1 mm Hg. The upper therapeutic threshold for cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was 75 mm Hg. Eubaric hyperoxia significantly impacted partial pressure of oxygen in brain tissue (PbtO2) at all ICP levels. Optimal brain temperature (Tbr) was 34-35°C, with an adverse effect when Tbr≥38°C. Survivors clustered at [Formula: see text] Hg vs. non-survivors [Formula: see text] 18 mm Hg. There were two mortality clusters for ICP: High ICP/low PbtO2 and low ICP/low PbtO2. Survivors maintained PbtO2 at all ranges of mean arterial pressure in contrast to non-survivors. The final SR equation for cerebral oxygenation is: [Formula: see text]. The SR-model of acute TBI advances new physiological thresholds or boundary conditions for acute TBI management: PbtO2≥25 mmHg; ICP≤22 mmHg; CPP≈60-75

  15. Efficacy and tolerability of a new ibuprofen 200mg plaster in patients with acute sports-related traumatic blunt soft tissue injury/contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, Hans-Georg; Giannetti, Bruno; Connolly, Mark P; Lewis, Fraser; Bhatt, Aomesh

    2018-01-01

    Ibuprofen is used for the treatment of non-serious pain. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of a new ibuprofen plaster for the treatment of pain associated with acute sports impact injuries/contusions. In this randomised, double-blind, multi-centre, placebo controlled, parallel group study, adults (n = 130; 18-58 years of age) diagnosed with acute sports-related blunt soft tissue injury/contusion were randomized to receive either ibuprofen 200 mg plaster or placebo plaster. Plasters were administered once daily for five consecutive days. The primary assessment was area under the visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain on movement (POM) over 0 to three days (VAS AUC 0-3d ). Other endpoints included algometry AUC from 0 to three days (AUC 0-3d ) and 0 to five days (AUC 0-5d ), to evaluate improvement of sensitivity at the injured site, and patient and investigator global assessment of efficacy. Safety was monitored throughout the study. The ibuprofen plaster resulted in superior reduction in AUC 0-3d compared with placebo; the Least Squares (LS) mean difference was 662.82 mm*h in favour of the ibuprofen 200mg plaster (P = 0.0011). The greater improvement in VAS AUC of POM was also observed after 12 h, 24 h, and five days of therapy. Tenderness also significantly improved with the ibuprofen plaster compared with placebo; LS mean difference in algometry/tenderness AUC 0-3d was 1.87 N/cm 2 *d and AUC 0-5d was 1.87 N/cm 2 *d (P values ≤0.0004). At all study timepoints, a greater percentage of patients and investigators rated the effectiveness of the ibuprofen 200 mg plaster as good/excellent than the placebo plaster. Treatment-emergent adverse events for the ibuprofen plaster were few (≤1.5%) and were mild in severity. The results of this study indicate 200 mg plaster is effective and safe for the treatment of pain due to acute sports-related traumatic blunt soft tissue injury/contusion in adults.

  16. Mechanism of subdural effusion evolves into chronic subdural hematoma: IL-8 inducing neutrophil oxidative burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhiqiang; Lin, Yingying; Hu, Maotong; Ding, Shenghong; Li, Jianwei; Qiu, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is still a mysterious disease. Though great success has been has achieved by neuro-surgery treatment, the origin and development of CSDH remains unknown. Tremendous clinical observations have found the correlation of subdural effusion (SDE) and CSDH. However, systematic elucidation of CSDH's origin and progression is lacking while almost all the current hypothesis only explained partial phenomenon. This hypothesis proposes Interleukin (IL)-8 inducing neutrophil respiratory burst is the crucial impact when SDE evolves into CSDH. IL-8 initially secreted by dural border layer cells, accumulates and the concentration of IL-8 rises in the SDE cavity. Accompanied by the formation of neo-membrane under the dura meninges, IL-8 firstly prompts to establish the neo-vasculature in it, and then attracts lymphocytes aggregation in the neo-membrane. Both the newly recruited lymphocytes and endothelial cells assist the further elevation of local IL-8 concentration. When the IL-8 concentration elevated to a particular level, it attracts neutrophils to the inner wall of neo-vessels and primes them to oxidative burst. Lysosomes and superoxide released by these neutrophils make the fragile neo-capillary became leaky, and subsequently the plasma and blood cells run into SDE. However, as long as the erythrocytes come into the cavity, they shall bind large quantity of IL-8 and decrease IL-8 concentration to a lower level relatively that reduce the neutrophils recruit. When this negative feedback is stagnancy, for example, the SDE space is so large in elder man who is experiencing brain atrophy, the neo-vessels have to release more erythrocytes to bind IL-8, the liquid cavity will expand and the high intracranial pressure symptoms appeared. Our hypothesis holds potential for the proper therapeutic intervention of CSDH. IL-8 antagonist and other anti-inflammation drugs like macrolides antibiotics, glucocorticoid and atorvastatin might be optional to resist

  17. Subperiosteal Drainage versus Subdural Drainage in the management of Chronic Subdural Hematoma (A Comparative Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chih, Adrian Ng Wei; Hieng, Albert Wong Sii; Rahman, Noor Azman A; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2017-03-01

    Symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH) remain one of the most frequent diagnoses in current neurosurgical practice. Burr-hole craniostomy with irrigation and placement of close-system drainage is the current recommended surgery for symptomatic CSDH. The aim of this study is to perform a direct comparison between two surgical techniques in the treatment of symptomatic CSDH, which have been proven in previous studies to be efficient. Our main objective was to compare the efficacy of placement of a subperiosteal drain (SPD) and a subdural drain (SDD) following single burr-hole craniostomy and irrigation, and to demonstrate any significant differences in terms of overall surgical complications, functional outcome at three months and mortality rate. The study was carried out in two local neurosurgical centres. The SPD group was performed in Hospital Umum Sarawak (HUS) and the SDD group was performed in Hospital Sultanah Aminah Johor Bahru (HSAJB), from 1 January 2012 till 30 January 2014 with a total of 30 patients in both treatment groups. Overall, there were no statistically significant difference in terms of patient general characteristics, pre-operative and post-operative symptoms, Markwalder grades, post-operative hematoma volume and recurrence, mortality and functional outcome at discharge and at three month follow-up between both groups. Albeit not achieving statistical significance, we observed a lower rate of surgical complication especially for post-operative intracranial hematoma with placement of the SPD system. Our study concludes that both treatment methods proved to be highly effective in the treatment of CSDH. However, with a lower overall surgical complication rate, treatment with single burr-hole craniostomy, irrigation and placement of the SPD system can be considered a treatment of choice for the management of symptomatic CSDH.

  18. Accidental deposition of local anaesthetic in the subdural space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of accidental injection of local anaesthetic into the subdural space during neuraxial blockade is rare. The presentation of unexplainable clinical signs that do not match the clinical picture of subarachnoid or intravascular injection of the local anaesthetic agent should invoke high suspicion of unintentional ...

  19. Apparently Ipsilateral Parkinsonism in a Patient with Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hwan Roh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic parkinsonism secondary to ipsilateral lesion is rarely reported. Although the contribution of the contralateral lesions was assumed in some cases, the pathomechanism remains undetermined. Herein we report a patient with a subdural hematoma, who developed parkinsonism in the ipsilateral hemibody. Structural and functional imaging suggests the contralateral dopaminergic dysfunction as the major culprit of apparently ipsilateral parkinsonism.

  20. Management of Chronic Subdural Haematoma in a Case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and multilobate forms. CT scan of the brain showed a hypodense lesion at left posterior parietal and occipital region suggestive of chronic subdural haematoma with significant mass affect with effacement of ipsilateral ventricles [Figure 1]. She was given two units of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and three units of single donor.

  1. Hypothalamo-Pituitary Dysfunction in Patients With Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hána, V.; Kosák, M.; Masopust, V.; Netuka, D.; Lacinová, Z.; Kršek, M.; Marek, J.; Pecen, Ladislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2012), s. 161-167 ISSN 0862-8408 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NS9794 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : hypopituitarism * subdural hematoma * brain injury * growth hormone deficiency Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  2. Leakage of contrast into a postmeningitic subdural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotti, G.; Harwood-Nash, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    The CT findings in a 6-month-old boy with hemophilus influenzae meningitis, complicated by the occurrence of bilateral subdural effusions, are described. The effusions were hypodense and the contents markedly enhanced (increase of 40 Hounsfield units) after contrast injection. (orig.)

  3. Optical microangiography enabling visualization of change in meninges after traumatic brain injury in mice in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo June; Qin, Wan; Qi, Xiaoli; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a form of brain injury caused by sudden impact on brain by an external mechanical force. Following the damage caused at the moment of injury, TBI influences pathophysiology in the brain that takes place within the minutes or hours involving alterations in the brain tissue morphology, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and pressure within skull, which become important contributors to morbidity after TBI. While many studies for the TBI pathophysiology have been investigated with brain cortex, the effect of trauma on intracranial tissues has been poorly studied. Here, we report use of high-resolution optical microangiography (OMAG) to monitor the changes in cranial meninges beneath the skull of mouse after TBI. TBI is induced on a brain of anesthetized mouse by thinning the skull using a soft drill where a series of drilling exert mechanical stress on the brain through the skull, resulting in mild brain injury. Intracranial OMAG imaging of the injured mouse brain during post-TBI phase shows interesting pathophysiological findings in the meningeal layers such as widening of subdural space as well as vasodilation of subarachnoid vessels. These processes are acute and reversible within hours. The results indicate potential of OMAG to explore mechanism involved following TBI on small animals in vivo.

  4. Surgery for bilateral large intracranial traumatic hematomas: evacuation in a single session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompheak, Heng; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Kim, Dong-Sung; Shin, Dong-Sung; Kim, Bum-Tae

    2014-06-01

    Management guidelines for single intracranial hematomas have been established, but the optimal management of multiple hematomas has little known. We present bilateral traumatic supratentorial hematomas that each has enough volume to be evacuated and discuss how to operate effectively it in a single anesthesia. In total, 203 patients underwent evacuation and/or decompressive craniectomies for acute intracranial hematomas over 5 years. Among them, only eight cases (3.9%) underwent operations for bilateral intracranial hematomas in a single session. Injury mechanism, initial Glasgow Coma Scale score, types of intracranial lesions, surgical methods, and Glasgow outcome scale were evaluated. The most common injury mechanism was a fall (four cases). The types of intracranial lesions were epidural hematoma (EDH)/intracerebral hematoma (ICH) in five, EDH/EDH in one, EDH/subdural hematoma (SDH) in one, and ICH/SDH in one. All cases except one had an EDH. The EDH was addressed first in all cases. Then, the evacuation of the ICH was performed through a small craniotomy or burr hole. All patients except one survived. Bilateral intracranial hematomas that should be removed in a single-session operation are rare. Epidural hematomas almost always occur in these cases and should be removed first to prevent the hematoma from growing during the surgery. Then, the other hematoma, contralateral to the EDH, can be evacuated with a small craniotomy.

  5. Percutaneous augmentation of the superior pubic ramus with polymethyl methacrylate: treatment of acute traumatic and chronic insufficiency fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beall, Douglas P. [University of Oklahoma, Clinical Radiology of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); D' Souza, Sharon L. [University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Costello, Richard F.; Stapp, Annette M. [Clinical Radiology of Oklahoma, Edmond, OK (United States); Prater, Scott D. [University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Edmond, OK (United States); Van Zandt, Bryan L. [University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Martin, Hal D. [Oklahoma Sports Science and Orthopaedics, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The injection of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is a minimally invasive image-guided procedure that is typically used to treat vertebral body fractures due to osteoporosis or neoplastic involvement. The injection of PMMA into various other locations including the sacrum, acetabulum, pedicles, femur and tibia has been reported previously, and these procedures have, overall, been highly effective at alleviating pain and discomfort. Although the injection of PMMA into the vertebral body is a very common procedure that has been performed for over 2 decades for the percutaneous treatment of vertebral body fractures, the percutaneous injection of PMMA has not been reported in the English literature as treatment for superior pubic ramus fractures. We report the percutaneous treatment of an acute superior pubic ramus fracture and of a chronic insufficiency fracture of the superior pubic ramus using a parasymphyseal approach to access the region of injury. (orig.)

  6. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of an Acute Traumatic Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta Complicated by a Distal Low-Flow Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruninx, Guy; Wery, Didier; Dubois, Eric; El Nakadi, Badih; Dueren, Eric van; Verhelst, Guy; Delcour, Christian

    1999-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who suffered major trauma following a motorcycle accident that resulted in multiple fractures, bilateral hemopneumothorax, pulmonary contusions, and an isthmic rupture of the aorta with a pseudoaneurysm compressing the descending aorta. This compression was responsible for distal hypotension and low flow, leading to acute renal insufficiency and massive rhabdomyolysis. Due to the critical clinical status of the patient, which prevented any type of open thoracic surgery, endovascular treatment was performed. An initial stent-graft permitted alleviation of the compression and the re-establishment of normal hemodynamic conditions, but its low position did not allow sufficient coverage of the rupture. A second stent-graft permitted total exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm while preserving the patency of the left subclavian artery

  7. Repeated mild traumatic brain injury can cause acute neurologic impairment without overt structural damage in juvenile rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Meconi

    Full Text Available Repeated concussion is becoming increasingly recognized as a serious public health concern around the world. Moreover, there is a greater awareness amongst health professionals of the potential for repeated pediatric concussions to detrimentally alter the structure and function of the developing brain. To better study this issue, we developed an awake closed head injury (ACHI model that enabled repeated concussions to be performed reliably and reproducibly in juvenile rats. A neurological assessment protocol (NAP score was generated immediately after each ACHI to help quantify the cumulative effects of repeated injury on level of consciousness, and basic motor and reflexive capacity. Here we show that we can produce a repeated ACHI (4 impacts in two days in both male and female juvenile rats without significant mortality or pain. We show that both single and repeated injuries produce acute neurological deficits resembling clinical concussion symptoms that can be quantified using the NAP score. Behavioural analyses indicate repeated ACHI acutely impaired spatial memory in the Barnes maze, and an interesting sex effect was revealed as memory impairment correlated moderately with poorer NAP score performance in a subset of females. These cognitive impairments occurred in the absence of motor impairments on the Rotarod, or emotional changes in the open field and elevated plus mazes. Cresyl violet histology and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI indicated that repeated ACHI did not produce significant structural damage. MRI also confirmed there was no volumetric loss in the cortex, hippocampus, or corpus callosum of animals at 1 or 7 days post-ACHI. Together these data indicate that the ACHI model can provide a reliable, high throughput means to study the effects of concussions in juvenile rats.

  8. TRAUMATIC PANCREATITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Clarence J.; Walters, Robert L.

    1953-01-01

    Traumatic pancreatitis should be considered as a diagnostic possibility when trauma to the epigastrium is followed by phenomena suggestive of intra-abdominal injury. The presence or absence of hyperamylasemia should be established immediately. Even when traumatic pancreatitis is believed to exist, any suggestion of injury to other viscera should indicate laparotomy. Retroperitoneal rupture of the duodenum may simulate traumatic pancreatitis in all respects, including hyperamylasemia. X-ray studies may be of value in differentiation. Non-complicated traumatic pancreatitis is best treated conservatively. Gunshot and knife wounds of the pancreas should be drained. PMID:13094537

  9. A prospective randomised study to compare the utility and outcomes of subdural and subperiosteal drains for the treatment of chronic subdural haematoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2012-11-01

    The usage of a drain following evacuation of a chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) is known to reduce recurrence. In this study we aim to compare the clinical outcomes and recurrence rate of utilising two different types of drains (subperiosteal and subdural drain) following drainage of a CSDH.

  10. Hematoma subdural crónico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Martínez Rozo

    1981-07-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron 169 pacientes con diagnóstico de Hematoma Subdural Crónico (H.S.C. admitidos en el Servicio Neurocirugía del Hospital San Juan de Dios desde 1959 a 1980. Los datos clínicos y paraclínicos fueron recopilados en un formato precodificado y luego perforados en tarjetas de computador. Usando el Computador 360/40 disponible en el Centro de Cálculo de la Universidad Nacional y el Computador Intel de el DANE y utilizando el programa SPSS se clasificó, ordenó y depuró.la información. Se analizaron en cuadro y gráficas los resultados que son los siguientes: el 75% de los pacientes hospitalizados por T.C.E. tenían Hematomas Subdurales Crónicos. El mayor número de casos estaba entre 50 y 60 años. La incidencia de H.S.C. era más elevada en el grupo de los hombres. La cefalea ocurrió en el 75% de los casos, el antecedente traumático estaba presente en 83% de casos y la alteración de la conciencia en el 71%. El 90% de los pacientes consultó dentro de los primeros 4 meses. La angiografía continúa siendo el examen de elección con el 100% de positividad. En la T.A.C.la isodensidad en diferentes etapas de evolución del H.S.C. dificulta el diagnóstico. El E.E.G. tiene una positividad del 93% . La frecuencia de H.S.C. bilateral fue de 20%. La anisocoria fue un índice poco confiable para indicar el sitio del Hematoma porque hubo 11 casos de anisocoria por midriasis derecha que tenían el hematoma contralateral. El predominio parietal en la localización del H.S,C. creemos que se deba a su mecanismo de producción. Se analiza la mortalidad que fue en el estudio de 8% , las secuelas aumentaron con la edad de los pacientes. El estudio de seguimiento se hizo en el 40% de los pacientes que sobrevivieron y demostró la baja morbilidad del H.S.C.

  11. Hemometabolismo cerebral: variações na fase aguda do coma traumático Cerebral hemometabolism: variability in the acute phase of traumatic coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTONIO L. E. FALCÃO

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar as interrelações entre as alterações hemometabólicas cerebrais e sistêmicas em pacientes com traumatismo craniencefálico (TCE grave submetidos a um protocolo terapêutico padronizado. DESENHO: estudo prospectivo, intervencionista em pacientes com coma traumático. LOCAL: uma UTI geral em hospital universitário. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: vinte e sete pacientes (21M e 6F, idade 14-58 anos, com TCE grave, com três a oito pontos na escala de coma de Glasgow, foram avaliados prospectivamente segundo um protocolo cumulativo padronizado para tratamento da hipertensão intracraniana aguda, o qual incluía medidas rotineiras da pressão intracraniana (PIC e da extração cerebral de oxigênio (ECO2. Foram analisadas as interrelações hemometabólicas envolvendo: pressão arterial média (PAM, PIC, pressão parcial de gás carbônico arterial (PaCO2, ECO2, pressão de perfusão cerebral (PPC e extração sistêmica de oxigênio (ESO2. INTERVENÇÕES: apenas as padronizadas no protocolo terapêutico. RESULTADOS: não houve correlação entre a ECO2 e a PPC (r = -0,07; p = 0,41. Houve correlação inversa entre a PaCO2 e a ECO2 (r = -0,24; p = 0,005 e direta entre a ESO2 e a ECO2 (r = 0,24; p = 0,01. A mortalidade geral dos pacientes foi de 25,9% (7/27. CONCLUSÃO: 1 a PPC não se correlaciona com a ECO2 em quaisquer níveis de PIC; 2 a ECO2 está estreitamente relacionada aos diferentes níveis de PaCO2 ; e 3 durante a hiperventilação otimizada existe um acoplamento entre a ECO2 e a ESO2.OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the interrelationships between cerebral and systemic hemometabolic alterations in patients with severe traumatic brain injury managed according to a standardized therapeutic protocol. DESIGN: prospective, interventional study in patients with traumatic coma. SETTING: a general Intensive Care Unit in a teaching hospital. PATIENTS AND METHODS: twenty-seven patients (21M e 6F, aging 14--58 years, with severe acute brain trauma

  12. Comparative response of platelet fV and plasma fV to activated protein C and relevance to a model of acute traumatic coagulopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E Campbell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC has been linked to an increase in activated protein C (aPC from 40 pM in healthy individuals to 175 pM. aPC exerts its activity primarily through cleavage of active coagulation factor Va (fVa. Platelets reportedly possess fVa which is more resistant to aPC cleavage than plasma fVa; this work examines the hypothesis that normal platelets are sufficient to maintain coagulation in the presence of elevated aPC. METHODS: Coagulation responses of normal plasma, fV deficient plasma (fVdp, and isolated normal platelets in fVdp were conducted: prothrombin (PT tests, turbidimetry, and thromboelastography (TEG, including the dose response of aPC on the samples. RESULTS: PT and turbidimetric assays demonstrate that normal plasma is resistant to aPC at doses much higher than those found in ATC. Additionally, an average physiological number of washed normal platelets (200,000 platelets/mm3 was sufficient to eliminate the anti-coagulant effects of aPC up to 10 nM, nearly two orders of magnitude above the ATC concentration and even the steady-state pharmacological concentration of human recombinant aPC, as measured by TEG. aPC also demonstrated no significant effect on clot lysis in normal plasma samples with or without platelets. CONCLUSIONS: Although platelet fVa shows slightly superior resistance to aPC's effects compared to plasma fVa in static models, neither fVa is sufficiently cleaved in simulations of ATC or pharmacologically-delivered aPC to diminish coagulation parameters. aPC is likely a correlative indicator of ATC or may play a cooperative role with other activity altering products generated in ATC.

  13. Reliability of the CARE rule and the HEART score to rule out an acute coronary syndrome in non-traumatic chest pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumneh, Thomas; Richard-Jourjon, Vanessa; Friou, Emilie; Prunier, Fabrice; Soulie-Chavignon, Caroline; Choukroun, Jacques; Mazet-Guilaumé, Betty; Riou, Jérémie; Penaloza, Andréa; Roy, Pierre-Marie

    2018-03-02

    In patients consulting in the Emergency Department for chest pain, a HEART score ≤ 3 has been shown to rule out an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a low risk of major adverse cardiac event (MACE) occurrence. A negative CARE rule (≤ 1) that stands for the first four elements of the HEART score may have similar rule-out reliability without troponin assay requirement. We aim to prospectively assess the performance of the CARE rule and of the HEART score to predict MACE in a chest pain population. Prospective two-center non-interventional study. Patients admitted to the ED for non-traumatic chest pain were included, and followed-up at 6 weeks. The main study endpoint was the 6-week rate of MACE (myocardial infarction, coronary angioplasty, coronary bypass, and sudden unexplained death). 641 patients were included, of whom 9.5% presented a MACE at 6 weeks. The CARE rule was negative for 31.2% of patients, and none presented a MACE during follow-up [0, 95% confidence interval: (0.0-1.9)]. The HEART score was ≤ 3 for 63.0% of patients, and none presented a MACE during follow-up [0% (0.0-0.9)]. With an incidence below 2% in the negative group, the CARE rule seemed able to safely rule out a MACE without any biological test for one-third of patients with chest pain and the HEART score for another third with a single troponin assay.

  14. Design and testing of a controlled electromagnetic spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of acute traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petteys, Rory J; Spitz, Steven M; Syed, Hasan; Rice, R Andrew; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Goodwin, C Rory; Sciubba, Daniel M; Freedman, Brett A

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes debilitating neurological dysfunction and has been observed in warfighters injured in IED blasts. Clinical benefit of SCI treatment remains elusive and better large animal models are needed to assess treatment options. Here, we describe a controlled electromagnetic spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of SCI. A custom spinal cord impactor and platform were fabricated for large animals (e.g., pig, sheep, dog, etc.). Impacts were generated by a voice coil actuator; force and displacement were measured with a load cell and potentiometer respectively. Labview (National Instruments, Austin, TX) software was used to control the impact cycle and import force and displacement data. Software finite impulse response (FIR) filtering was employed for all input data. Silicon tubing was used a surrogate for spinal cord in order to test the device; repeated impacts were performed at 15, 25, and 40 Newtons. Repeated impacts demonstrated predictable results at each target force. The average duration of impact was 71.2 ±6.1ms. At a target force of 40N, the output force was 41.5 ±0.7N. With a target of 25N, the output force was 23.5 ±0.6N; a target of 15Newtons revealed an output force of 15.2 ±1.4N. The calculated acceleration range was 12.5-21.2m/s 2 . This custom spinal cord impactor reliably delivers precise impacts to the spinal cord and will be utilized in future research to study acute traumatic SCI in a large animal. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Does highly symptomatic class membership in the acute phase predict highly symptomatic classification in victims 6 months after traumatic exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maj; Hyland, Philip; Armour, Cherie

    2016-05-01

    Recently studies have indicated the existence of both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and acute stress disorder (ASD) subtypes but no studies have investigated their mutual association. Although ASD may not be a precursor of PTSD per se, there are potential benefits associated with early identification of victims at risk of developing PTSD subtypes. The present study investigates ASD and PTSD subtypes using latent class analysis (LCA) following bank robbery (N=371). Moreover, we assessed if highly symptomatic ASD and selected risk factors increased the probability of highly symptomatic PTSD. The results of LCA revealed a three class solution for ASD and a two class solution for PTSD. Negative cognitions about self (OR=1.08), neuroticism (OR=1.09) and membership of the 'High symptomatic ASD' class (OR=20.41) significantly increased the probability of 'symptomatic PTSD' class membership. Future studies are needed to investigate the existence of ASD and PTSD subtypes and their mutual relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of Subdural Evacuating Port System Following Open Craniotomy with Excision of Native Dura and Membranes for Management of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cage, Tene; Bach, Ashley; McDermott, Michael W

    2017-04-26

    An 86-year-old woman was admitted to the intensive care unit with a chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and rapid onset of worsening neurological symptoms. She was taken to the operating room for a mini-craniotomy for evacuation of the CSDH including excision of the dura and CSDH membrane. Postoperatively, a subdural evacuation port system (SEPS) was integrated into the craniotomy site and left in place rather than a traditional subdural catheter drain to evacuate the subdural space postoperatively. The patient had a good recovery and improvement of symptoms after evacuation and remained clinically well after the SEPS was removed. We offer the technique of dura and CSDH membrane excision plus SEPS drain as an effective postoperative alternative to the standard craniotomy leaving the native dura intact with traditional subdural drain that overlies the cortical surface of the brain in treating patients with CSDH.

  17. Curcumin attenuates acute inflammatory injury by inhibiting the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway in experimental traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiates a neuroinflammatory cascade that contributes to substantial neuronal damage and behavioral impairment, and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important mediator of thiscascade. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin, a phytochemical compound with potent anti-inflammatory properties that is extracted from the rhizome Curcuma longa, alleviates acute inflammatory injury mediated by TLR4 following TBI. Methods Neurological function, brain water content and cytokine levels were tested in TLR4-/- mice subjected to weight-drop contusion injury. Wild-type (WT) mice were injected intraperitoneally with different concentrations of curcumin or vehicle 15 minutes after TBI. At 24 hours post-injury, the activation of microglia/macrophages and TLR4 was detected by immunohistochemistry; neuronal apoptosis was measured by FJB and TUNEL staining; cytokines were assayed by ELISA; and TLR4, MyD88 and NF-κB levels were measured by Western blotting. In vitro, a co-culture system comprised of microglia and neurons was treated with curcumin following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. TLR4 expression and morphological activation in microglia and morphological damage to neurons were detected by immunohistochemistry 24 hours post-stimulation. Results The protein expression of TLR4 in pericontusional tissue reached a maximum at 24 hours post-TBI. Compared with WT mice, TLR4-/- mice showed attenuated functional impairment, brain edema and cytokine release post-TBI. In addition to improvement in the above aspects, 100 mg/kg curcumin treatment post-TBI significantly reduced the number of TLR4-positive microglia/macrophages as well as inflammatory mediator release and neuronal apoptosis in WT mice. Furthermore, Western blot analysis indicated that the levels of TLR4 and its known downstream effectors (MyD88, and NF-κB) were also decreased after curcumin treatment. Similar outcomes were observed in the microglia and

  18. Inhibition of post-traumatic septic proteolysis and ureagenesis and stimulation of hepatic acute-phase protein production by branched-chain amino acid TPN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarla, C; Siegel, J H; Kidd, S; Coleman, B; Mora, R; Tacchino, R; Placko, R; Gum, M; Wiles, C E; Belzberg, H

    1988-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that severe sepsis after major trauma results in the reprioritization of release of hepatic acute-phase proteins (APP). They suggest competition for leucine for nutritional utilization may be responsible. To test this hypothesis, a branched-chain enriched (46.6%) amino acid mixture (BCAA) was administered on a prospective randomized basis with standard TPN therapy to 16 septic post-trauma patients. After sepsis was diagnosed, a randomized therapy (control-TPN or BCAA-TPN) was given for 12 days, or until death occurred. Total calories and amino acid nitrogen (N) administered were not different in the two groups (t-test) and q 8 h (347 study periods) amino acid clearances, urinary urea nitrogen excretion, muscle proteolysis from 3-methyl-histidine (3-MH) excretion, and standard indices of sepsis severity and hepatic function were measured, as well as platelets (PLAT), leucocytes (WBC), albumin (ALB), and six acute-phase proteins: C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1TRIP), fibrinogen (FIBRIN), alpha-2-macroglobulin (AMACRO), ceruloplasmin (CERUL), and transferrin (TRANS). Using Scheffé analysis of all contrasts the data showed: BCAA resulted in a fall in 24-hour urea N excretion (24.0 to 20.0 gm/24 hr) and in proteolysis (138 to 126 gm/24 hr) (p less than 0.0001). Prestudy CRP levels were all elevated, but compared to control where APP reprioritization occurred, over the initial 10 days of therapy BCAA patients had a more rapid fall in CRP with a more rapid rise in FIBRIN, TRANS, CERUL, ALBUMIN, AMACRO, and A1TRIP (all p less than 0.0001) relative to CRP. Also, the sepsis-reduced clearances of glutamine and glutamate, alanine, and proline were increased (p less than 0.0001) during BCAA even though urea nitrogen production was reduced (p less than 0.0001). The increase in leucine clearance with BCAA-enriched TPN was positively correlated (r2 = 0.601; p less than 0.0001) with the increase in the sum of all APP and ALB and was

  19. Chronic Subdural Hematoma development in Accelerated phase of Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia presenting with seizure and rapid progression course with fatal outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheja Amol

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH in leukemia is rare, and most reported cases occurred in relation with acute myeloid leukaemia; however, occurrence is extremely rare in accelerated phase of chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML. Seizure as presentation of SDH development in CML cases is not reported in literature. Authors report an elderly male, who was diagnosed as CML, accelerated phase of developing SDH. Initially presented to local physician with seizure; urgent CT scan head was advised, but ignored and sensorium rapidly worsened over next day and reported to our emergency department in deeply comatose state, where imaging revealed chronic subdural hematoma with hypoxic brain injury with fatal outcome. Seizure, progressive worsening of headache, vomiting and papilloedema are harbinger of intracranial space occupying lesion and requires CT head in emergency medical department for exclusion, who are receiving treatment of haematological malignancy

  20. Trauma memory characteristics and the development of acute stress disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, A; Brewer, N; Meiser-Stedman, R; Nixon, R D V

    2017-03-01

    The present study addresses gaps in knowledge regarding the association between trauma memory processes and posttraumatic stress responses in youth. Our primary goal was to explore the relative contribution of perceptions of trauma memory quality versus narrative trauma memory characteristics to explain overall adjustment. Children (N = 67) were interviewed within four weeks (T1) of an injury leading to hospital treatment and then again eight weeks later (T2). In each interview, the child told a trauma narrative (which were later coded), and answered the Trauma Memory Quality Questionnaire (Meiser-Stedman, Smith, Yule, & Dalgleish, 2007a), a self-report measure indexing the sensory, fragmented, and disorganised characteristics of trauma memory. They then completed measures of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) symptoms and associated psychopathology at T1 and measures of Posttraumatic Stress (PTS) symptoms and associated psychopathology at T2. Self-reported trauma memory characteristics predicted ASD symptoms cross-sectionally at T1 and PTS symptoms prospectively over time. At both time points, self-reported trauma memory characteristics accounted for all of the unique variance in symptoms initially explained by narrative characteristics. A reduction in self-report ratings, but not the hypothesised narrative features (e.g., disorganised or lexical elements of the narrative), significantly predicted a reduction in PTS symptoms over time. The small sample size and the absence of a within-subjects narrative control were the main limitations of the study. These findings underscore the importance of self-reported trauma memory characteristics to the aetiology of PTSD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Giant unusual shaped chronic subdural hematoma in a patient with untreated congenital hydrocephalus

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Arvind; Ojha, Bal. K.; Chandra, Anil; Srivastava, Chhitij; Singh, Sunil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Subdural hematoma is a well known complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion for hydrocephalus and usually spreads out over the cerebral convexity, and appears as a crescent shaped lesion on imaging. Chronic subdural hematoma in a case of untreated compensated congenital hydrocephalus has not been reported in English literature. We report the rare case of an adult with congenital hydrocephalus with a huge unusual shaped hemispheric subdural hematoma.

  2. Secondary encephalocele in infant following subdural empyema repaired endoscopically-A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Roshan K; Kaur, Navjot

    2017-09-01

    Subdural empyema (SDE) is an uncommon entity, mostly associated with meningitis and can be life threatening in infants. Rarely, a subdural empyema can lead to nasal encephalocele which can be challenging situation to manage especially in infant. We present a case of 7 month old infant who presented with subdural empyema that led to formation of nasal encaphalocele after 4 months which was managed endoscopic route. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk factors for reoperation after initial burr hole trephination in chronic subdural hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Falko; Loos, Franz; Dünisch, Pedro; Sakr, Yasser; Safatli, Diaa Al; Kalff, Rolf; Ewald, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The optimal management of chronic subdural hematomas remains a challenge. Twist drill craniotomy or burr hole trephination are considered optimal initial treatments, but the reoperation rate for hematoma recurrence and other complications is still high. Therefore, evaluation of possible risk factors for initial treatment failure is crucial. In this context, we performed a study to define a possible subpopulation that may benefit from a more invasive initial treatment regime. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of 193 patients with 250 chronic subdural hematomas who had undergone burr hole trephination as first-line therapy in our institution between January 2005 and October 2012. To identify risk factors for reoperation, a multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed with reoperation as the dependent variable. Surgical complications, including acute rebleeding, infection and chronic hematoma recurrence, were analyzed separately using a logistic regression model. The mean age of the cohort was 71.4 years. The male/female ratio was 137:56. Reoperation was necessary in 56 cases (29%) for recurrent hematomas and surgical complications. Predictors for reoperation for surgical complications were midline shift (odds ratio [OR] (per mm) 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.29, p=0.006), arterial hypertension (OR 5.44, 95% CI: 1.45-20.41, p=0.012) and bilateral hematomas (OR 4.22, 95% CI: 1.22-14.58, p=0.023). There was a trend toward a higher risk of surgically-relevant hematoma recurrence in patients with prior treatment with vitamin K antagonists (OR 1.76, 95% CI: 0.75-4.13, p=0.191). Burr hole trephination is the therapy of choice in most chronic subdural hematomas, but the rate of recurrent hematomas is high. Every hematoma should be treated individually especially in relation to midline-shift and pre-existing conditions. Further prospective studies evaluating types of treatment and hematoma density are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  4. Bilateral subdural hematoma secondary to accidental dural puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofía Ramírez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 25-year-old woman, who received epidural analgesia for labor pain and subsequently presented post-dural puncture headache. Conservative treatment was applied and epidural blood patch was performed. In the absence of clinical improvement and due to changes in the postural component of the headache, a brain imaging test was performed showing a bilateral subdural hematoma.The post-dural puncture headache is relatively common, but the lack of response to established medical treatment as well as the change in its characteristics and the presence of neurological deficit, should raise the suspicion of a subdural hematoma, which although is rare, can be lethal if not diagnosed and treated at the right time. Resumo: Apresentamos o caso clínico de uma paciente de 25 anos de idade, na qual uma técnica peridural foi realizada durante o trabalho de parto e posteriormente apresentou cefaleia com características de cefaleia pós-punção dural. Foi iniciado tratamento conservador e tampão de sangue peridural. Devido a ausência de melhora clínica e à mudança do componente postural da cefaleia, decidiu-se realizar um exame de imagem cerebral que demostrou a presença de hematoma subdural bilateral.A cefaleia pós-punção dural é relativamente frequente, mas a falta de resposta ao tratamento médico instaurado, assim como a mudança em suas características e a presença de foco neurológico, devem levantar a suspeita de presença de um hematoma subdural que, embora infrequente, pode chegar a ser devastador se não for diagnosticado e tratado oportunamente. Keywords: Accidental dural puncture, Epidural analgesia, Post-dural puncture headache, Subdural hematoma, Epidural blood patch, Palavras chave: Dura-Máter, Analgesia epidural, Cefaleia pós-punção dural, Hematoma subdural, Placa de sangue epidural

  5. Computed tomography findings examined on an event which would originate chronic subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Masayoshi; Fukuda, Seisuke; Awaya, Sakae [Mejiro Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Teramoto, Akira [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) findings examined on an event which would originate chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) in the future are rare. We studied the original events causing CSDH and the following mechanism by which CSDH was originated on the basis of our CT findings examined on the event originating CSDH. Nine patients with traumatic CSDH were reviewed. The patients ranged in age from 48 to 89 years (mean 69.1 years). CT findings examined on the event originating CSDH were analyzed about both extracranial and intracranial lesions. All patients were divided into two groups; non-advanced age (under 70 years, n=5) and advanced age (over 70 years, n=4). All five patients in the non-advanced age group had abnormal findings at least in the extracranial area on CT examined on the event originating CSDH. On the other hand, only one patient had abnormal findings on CT examined on the event originating CSDH in the advanced age group. It is fact that slight head injuries cause CSDH in the advanced age, but it is probably that not slight head injuries such as to reveal abnormal findings at least in the extracranial area on CT cause CSDH in the non-advanced age. (author)

  6. Recurrence factors for chronic subdural hematoma after burr-hole surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Hiroaki; Sakata, Junichi; Ishii, Taiji; Chiba, Yoshiyuki; Miyake, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    Although chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is well known as a curable condition, it also has a significant recurrence rate. To identify risk factors for recurrence, we compared the clinical features in two groups of patients with or without recurrence. The present study included 172 adult patients who had underwent one burr-hole and closed-system drainage between April 2007 and January 2010. Of these 23 cases (13.4%) experienced recurrence after surgery. The factors analyzed were patient background including, gender, age, history of drinking, diabetes, and the use of antiplatelet or anticoagulant medications, and a history of head injury, clinical symptoms, including initial neurologic symptoms, and computed tomography findings such as hematoma thickness, midline-shift, and density of the hematoma factors related to surgery such as duration from trauma to surgery and operation method and the recurrence rate. The results of this study showed that a short duration from trauma to surgery and the absence of traumatic history were recurrence factors for CSDH after burr-hole surgery. These results suggest that any cases with these risk factors should be closely observed after burr hole surgery. (author)

  7. Computed tomography findings examined on an event which would originate chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Masayoshi; Fukuda, Seisuke; Awaya, Sakae; Teramoto, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) findings examined on an event which would originate chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) in the future are rare. We studied the original events causing CSDH and the following mechanism by which CSDH was originated on the basis of our CT findings examined on the event originating CSDH. Nine patients with traumatic CSDH were reviewed. The patients ranged in age from 48 to 89 years (mean 69.1 years). CT findings examined on the event originating CSDH were analyzed about both extracranial and intracranial lesions. All patients were divided into two groups; non-advanced age (under 70 years, n=5) and advanced age (over 70 years, n=4). All five patients in the non-advanced age group had abnormal findings at least in the extracranial area on CT examined on the event originating CSDH. On the other hand, only one patient had abnormal findings on CT examined on the event originating CSDH in the advanced age group. It is fact that slight head injuries cause CSDH in the advanced age, but it is probably that not slight head injuries such as to reveal abnormal findings at least in the extracranial area on CT cause CSDH in the non-advanced age. (author)

  8. Migration of an Intracranial Subdural Hematoma to the Spinal Subdural Space: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O Ik; Son, Dong Wuk; Kim, Young Ha; Kim, Young Soo; Sung, Soon Ki; Lee, Sang Weon; Song, Geun Sung

    2015-09-01

    A 57-year-old man complained of severe lower back pain and radicular pain in both legs for 1 week after falling from a ladder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine showed a subdural hematoma (SDH), which was surgically removed. The patient had no back pain or the radicular leg pain at 2 weeks post-surgery. However, he complained of diffuse headaches upon follow-up. Brain computed tomography (CT) and MRI revealed an intracranial SDH, which was immediately removed by surgery. During his 1-year follow-up, he reported that the pain had resolved without recurrence. Simultaneous spinal and intracranial SDH are rare and no standard treatment exists for this condition. This case suggests that it is possible that an intracranial SDH can migrate into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space through an arachnoid tear. CSF circulation allows the intracranial SDH to enter subarachnoid spaces encasing the spinal cord. In order to prevent irreversible damage, surgical intervention should be considered for case of spinal SDH with progressive neurological deficits.

  9. MRI (1,5 T) of traumatic extracerebral hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, D.; Grodd, W.; Voigt, K.

    1989-09-01

    The advantages of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of subacute and chronic traumatic extracerebral hematomas are described. The characteristic changes in signal intensity for hematomas depend on the magnetic properties of hemoglobin and its derivatives, which shorten the relaxation times and decrease the homogeneity of the local magnetic field. MRI is superior in detecting and depicting the extent of small hematomas adjacent to the skull. Changes in signal intensity with time allow rough estimation of the age of a hematoma. Small hemorrhages were often found (missed by CT) that were contralateral to chronic subdural hematomas. (orig.).

  10. Intracranial hypotension - a look beyond “bilateral subdural hematomas”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penev, B.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: The intracranial hypotension (ICH) is a disorder due to spontaneous or iatrogenic CSF leak and a low intracranial pressure. The clinical presentation is characterized by drug resistant orthostatic headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, neck pain and etc. The intracranial hypotension is defined as a benign disorder and the treatment is predominantly conservative. Due to this fact it is very important to differentiate this entity from subdural hematomas and hygromas which are treated surgically. Magnetic resonance imaging has revolutionized the diagnosis of ICH. Nowadays there are a lot of clinical and imaging features of this disorder. Regardless of clinical varieties and atypical forms, MRI gives enough information for the correct or probable diagnosis in the vast majority of the cases. The initial imaging resemblance with posttraumatic subdural hematomas and hygromas can result in giving the wrong diagnosis and therefore performing unneeded surgical interventions. the aim of this presentation is to discuss the contemporary criteria, algorithm and imaging features of ICH

  11. A rare complication of spinal anesthesia: Intracranial subdural hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Kaplan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal (subarachnoid anesthesia (SA is a widely used general-purpose anesthesia. Postdural Puncture Headaches (PDPHs represent one of the principal complications of spinal anesthesia. A 21-year-old man underwent inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiectomy using spinal anesthesia. Postoperatively, our patient started to have a headache with nausea. The patient received symptomatic therapy, but the severe headache persisted even in the supine position, with his vital signs and neurological examination being normal. Cranial MRI showed a bilateral subdural hematoma from his frontal to temporal region. A postdural puncture headache is a frequent complication after spinal anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as an intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(1.000: 54-56

  12. MR imaging evaluation of subdural hematomas in child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, T.C.; Rumack, C.M.; Horgan, J.G.; Hyden, P.; Krugman, R.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging is the most accurate modality for determining the presence, number, and aging of subdural hematomas. Based on seven patients studied with CT and MR imaging, MR imaging should be the gold standard in child abuse evaluations. Since the history of child abuse is often ambiguous, MR imaging can assist in dating when the injury occurred. MR imaging in two perpendicular planes is needed, with one plane having both T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Chronic subdural hematomas on CT often have the same density as cerebrospinal fluid and may be misdiagnosed as atrophy or unrecognized. Therefore, the child may be returned into a dangerous situation and subjected to recurrent episodes of battering

  13. Analysis of chronic subdural hematoma based on CT, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Mikami, Junichi; Ueda, Mikiya; Ito, Kazunori; Sato, Hiroyuki

    1984-01-01

    Forty-nine cases of chronic subdural hematoma experienced during the past 5 years were analyzed as to the number of days elapsed following head injury, symptoms, and computerized tomography (CT) findings. As a result, the clinical course of chronic subdural hematoma was devided into the following 5 stages on the basis of the presumed pathologic processes. The initial stage corresponded to a period of about 2 weeks after the precipitating injury; symptoms were absent; plain CT showed low-density areas (LDA); and metrizamide CT revealed metrizamide penetration into the LDA. The premature stage corresponded to a period of 2-4 weeks after trauma; no symptoms were present; plain CT showed LDA; and metrizamide CT revealed that metrizamide penetrated into the LDA with difficulty. The mature stage corresponded to a period of 30-60 days after trauma; CT showed iso-density areas (IDA) or high-density areas (HDA) with occasional enhancement effect; metrizamide penetration was not detected; and symptoms such as headache may have been present. The progressive stage typified chronic subdural hematoma; headache and focal symptoms were present; plain CT showed relative LDA, IDA, HDA or mixed-density areas (MDA); and enhancement of the contents of hematoma was observed in roughly half of the cases. The resolving stage was the stage in which hematoma had disappeared; plain CT showed relative LDA or LDA without mass sign; and metrizamide penetration was not detected. This clinical staging was useful in evaluating the pathologic picture of the chronic subdural hematoma and in determining suitable treatment. (author)

  14. Subdural Hematoma in Grave’s Disease Induced Thrombocytopenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, S; Diwan, S; Chandek, S; Nitey, PO; Kakani, A

    2013-01-01

    Subdural hematoma (SDH) usually occurs secondary to trauma, in bleeding disorders it may occur spontaneously. It is a rare complication of immune thrombocytopenia. Here we report a case of 45 years female presenting with presenting with complaints of headache, palpitation and menorrhagia and later diagnosed to be a case of Grave's disease with thrombocytopenia with sub dural hematoma. No such case reports are available in literature.

  15. Subdural Hematoma in Grave’s Disease Induced Thrombocytopenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma (SDH usually occurs secondary to trauma, in bleeding disorders it may occur spontaneously. It is a rare complication of immune thrombocytopenia. Here we report a case of 45 years female presenting with presenting with complaints of headache, palpitation and menorrhagia and later diagnosed to be a case of Grave's disease with thrombocytopenia with sub dural hematoma. No such case reports are available in literature.

  16. Traumatic Anterior Cerebral Artery Pseudoaneurysmal Epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing Lin; Xue, Hao; Qi, Chang Jing; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Dong Hai; Li, Gang

    2017-04-01

    Pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis is a rare but emergent condition. We report a case of traumatic anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis and review the published literature. A 49-year-old man sustained severe head trauma. He was diagnosed with multiple skull bone fractures, left subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pneumocephalus, and right frontal hematoma. Subdural hematoma evacuation was done at a local hospital. In the following months, he experienced repeated epistaxis that required nasal packing to stop the bleeding. Digital subtraction angiography showed an anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm protruding into the posterior ethmoid sinus. Embolization of the aneurysm was performed with microcoils, and the parent artery was occluded by thrombosis. The patient presented 1 month later with another epistaxis episode. Digital subtraction angiography showed recanalization of the parent artery and recurrence of the aneurysm. The parent artery was occluded for the second time with coils and Onyx embolic agent. Pseudoaneurysmal epistaxis is rare, and this is the first report of an anterior cerebral artery pseudoaneurysm that manifested with epistaxis. Endovascular intervention has become the first choice of treatment for this disease. The high recurrence rate is the main disadvantage of endovascular intervention. Aneurysm trapping with bypass surgery is another treatment option. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Meaning of self-management from the perspective of individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury, their caregivers, and acute care and rehabilitation managers: an opportunity for improved care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munce, Sarah E P; Webster, Fiona; Fehlings, Michael G; Straus, Sharon E; Jang, Eunice; Jaglal, Susan B

    2016-01-23

    The trend of decreasing length of stay in rehabilitation facilities has led to individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) entering the community with unmet needs and fewer self-care skills to prevent secondary complications. The implementation of a self-management program for individuals with SCI for the management of these complex needs, including secondary complications, may be one option to fill these care gaps. A greater understanding of the meaning of self-management may facilitate the development of a tailored self-management program in this population. Thus, the current research aims to understand the meaning of self-management in traumatic SCI from the perspectives of individuals with traumatic SCI and their caregivers as well as acute care/trauma and rehabilitation managers. A descriptive qualitative approach was used. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 26 individuals with traumatic SCI, their family members/caregivers, and managers from acute care/trauma and rehabilitation centres. Inductive thematic analysis was applied. The meaning of self-management in SCI related to two overarching themes of internal and external responsibility attribution and revealed differences between the meaning of self-management in SCI among individuals with traumatic SCI and their caregivers versus managers. Overall, the meaning of self-management among the SCI and caregiver participants related principally to internal responsibility attribution. For the manager participants, the meaning of self-management was much narrower and the overarching theme of internal responsibility attribution that was observed among the SCI-caregiver dyads was not as widely expressed by this group. Interventions that are co-created by users and health care professionals are associated with positive physical and mental health outcomes. Thus, the understanding of self-management from these varying perspectives could be applied to the development of a tailored self

  18. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma; Spinales chronisches subdurales Haematom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft, Augsburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [German] Spinale subdurale Haematome sind im Vergleich zu epiduralen Haematomen selten, chronische Verlaufsformen noch seltener. Ursaechlich sind neben Lumbalpunktionen und traumatischen Verletzungen auch Blutgerinnungsstoerungen, Gefaessmalformationen und Tumoren. Aufgrund der Kompression von Myelon und Cauda equina kommt es zu zunehmenden Ruecken- oder radikulaeren Schmerzen mit anschliessender Paraparese sowie einer Darm- und Blasenstoerung, weshalb in den meisten Faellen eine operative Entlastung durchgefuehrt wird. Magnetresonanztomographisch stellen sich die Haematome meist als thorakale bzw. lumbale subdurale Raumforderungen dar, die Signalintensitaet variiert mit dem Blutungsalter. Wir berichten ueber den klinischen Verlauf und die bildgebende Diagnostik von 3 Patienten mit spinalen chronischen subduralen Haematomen. (orig.)

  19. Anticonvulsants for preventing seizures in patients with chronic subdural haematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratilal, Bernardo O; Pappamikail, Lia; Costa, João; Sampaio, Cristina

    2013-06-06

    Anticonvulsant therapy is sometimes used prophylactically in patients with chronic subdural haematoma, although the benefit is unclear. To assess the effects of prophylactic anticonvulsants in patients with chronic subdural haematoma, in both the pre- and post-operative periods. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), PubMed, LILACS, and the databases clinicaltrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and Current Controlled Trials. The search was through 27th March 2013. Randomised controlled trials comparing any anticonvulsant versus placebo or no intervention. Three authors screened the search results to identify relevant studies. No studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. No randomised controlled trials were identified. No formal recommendations can be made about the use of prophylactic anticonvulsants in patients with chronic subdural haematoma based on the literature currently available. There are no randomised controlled trials on this topic, and non-controlled studies have conflicting results. There is an urgent need for well-designed randomised controlled trials.

  20. CT findings of subdural fluid collections and the histology of the organized neomembrane, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taichiro; Nitta, Masahiro; Fukuoka, Hidekazu; Umemura, Satoshi; Nagai, Hajime

    1981-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that, among cases of subdural fluid collection with a low CT density with several weeks after injury, some of the cases developed a chronic subdural hematoma at the same location several months later. On its pathogenesis, it is assumed that the isolated fluid collection between the dura and arachnoid forms a neomembrane and then develops a chronic subdural hematoma. Based upon our 4 cases of subdural fluid collection, we pointed out that the following conditions of subdural low-density lesions are difficult to differentiate from subdural hydroma at the early stage of injury: (1) The existence of a very old chronic subdural hematoma that might have been formed before the recent injury. (2) The occurrence of a minor hemorrhage into the subdural-fluid collection at the time of injury, which is indistinguishable on the CT scan. Therefore, the present authors considered it necessary to investigate the histology of the hematoma membrane in order to make clear the formation process of neomembrane and to compare the relation between the aging of neomembrane and the time interval of injury and CT examination. We consider the histological study very useful to reveal the pathogenesis of a chronic subdural hematoma, for it will make clear the following points: (1) Whether the neomembrane had already been formed prior to the recent head injury, (2) Whether the neomembrane was formed newly due to minor hemorrhage into the subdural fluid collection, and (3) Whether the formation of the neomembrane is possible simply from subdural-fluid collection isolated from the CSF pathway. (author)

  1. Initial hematoma pressure and clinical recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma in cases where percutaneous subdural tapping was performed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Akitake; Kawamoto, Yukihiko; Yoshioka, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Taro; Yonezawa, Koki

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous subdural tapping for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) can measure initial hematoma pressure, which cannot be measured using burr-hole craniotomy. Initial hematoma pressure has not been discussed as a risk factor for recurrence. We evaluated the clinical features for recurrence, which included initial hematoma pressure. The study involved 71 unilateral CSDH cases whose initial hematoma pressure was measured using percutaneous subdural tapping. Clinical recurrence was identified in 19 cases (23%). Age, sex, neurological grading, alcohol consumption, presence of head injury, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, antiplatelet, anticoagulant medication, hematoma volume on computed tomography (CT) images, and initial hematoma pressure were compared between non-recurrence and recurrence groups. The initial hematoma pressure was 12.6±4.5 cmH 2 O in the non-recurrence group, and 15.5±6.2 cmH 2 O in the recurrence group (p<0.05). The other factors did not differ significantly except hematoma volume on CT images (92±45 ml in the non-recurrence group and 123±43 ml in the recurrence group, p<0.05). Cases with high initial hematoma pressure should be closely observed. (author)

  2. Primary Intracranial Sarcoma Presenting as Chronic Subdural Fluid Collections in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Chad A; Fung, Kar-Ming; Tullos, Hurtis J; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y; Gunda, Divya; Mapstone, Timothy B

    2016-02-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma in the pediatric population often results from trauma. Asymptomatic and benign-appearing subdural collections are generally managed conservatively without operative intervention. Primary intracranial sarcomas are uncommon entities. Diagnosis of sarcoma can be difficult because these lesions often manifest as apparent hematoma. Presented is the case of a primary intracranial mucoid spindle cell sarcoma that arose in a child with a history of benign-appearing bilateral subdural fluid collections in the setting of nonaccidental trauma. The patient was initially managed conservatively because her neurological examination result was normal and her subdural collections decreased in size on repeated imaging. The collections did not resolve completely. Years later, she exhibited weakness, seizure, and an increase in the size of her subdural fluid collection. Subdural drainage was attempted without significant effect. Cytologic assessment of fluid was negative for malignant cells. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple enhancing masses along the subdural collection. The patient eventually underwent craniotomy in which a diagnosis of sarcoma was obtained. Pathological and radiographic findings as well as oncological management are reviewed. The authors also review the natural history and treatment of primary intracranial sarcoma in the pediatric population. Early contrasted magnetic resonance imaging should be obtained in patients with subdural fluid collections that appear asymmetric or do not resolve in the expected time course, despite having a normal neurologic examination result. Negative cytologic assessment does not exclude sarcoma diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [A case of non-traumatic tension pneumocephalus 12 years after initial ventriculo-peritoneal shunt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idei, Masaru; Yamane, Kanji; Okita, Shinji; Kumano, Kiyoshi; Nakae, Ryuta; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2009-10-01

    The authors presented a patient with non-traumatic tension pneumocephalus 12 years after initial ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. A 60-year-old man had a past history of subarachnoid hemorrhage. At ÿtime, he underwent clipping surgery and emplacement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt with a low pressure valve, and was discharged from hospital in a bedridden condition. After 12 years, he was transferred to our hospital because of dysarthria and right hemiparesis. On admission, he had multiple dimples of the scalp in the left frontal area where craniotomy had been carried out 12 years before. Head CT scan revealed air located mainly in bilateral subdural space and collapsed ventricles. We suspected that he had a tension pneumocephalus through a scalp-subdural fistula induced by long-term low intracranial pressure. Operation for closure of the fistula was intended. During the operation a subdural abscess was found so, artificial bone and the shunt system was removed. We were able to detect the fistula from the defect of the scalp to the subdural space and closed it by repairing a scalp defect, using dural plasty. Postoperative clinical course was uneventful and the patient was discharged. About 6 month after the operation, cranioplasty and lumbo-peritoneal shunt was performed. We must recognize that appropriate management of intracranial pressure after installation of a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt is necessary for prevention of tension pneumocephalus.

  4. Life-threatening subdural hematoma after aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Tetsuro; Hamasaki, Azumi; Ohba, Eiichi; Yamashita, Atsushi; Hayashi, Jun; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2017-08-08

    Heyde syndrome is known as a triad of calcific aortic stenosis, anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding from angiodysplasia, and acquired type 2A von Willebrand disease. This acquired hemorrhagic disorder is characterized by the loss of the large von Willebrand factor multimers due to the shear stress across the diseased aortic valve. The most frequently observed type of bleeding in these patients is mucosal or skin bleeding, such as epistaxis, followed by gastrointestinal bleeding. On the other hand, intracranial hemorrhage complicating Heyde syndrome is extremely rare. A 77-year-old woman presented to our hospital with severe aortic stenosis and severe anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and was diagnosed with Heyde syndrome. Although aortic valve replacement was performed without recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, postoperative life-threatening acute subdural hematoma occurred with a marked midline shift. Despite prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma, she did not recover consciousness and she died 1 month after the operation. Postoperative subdural hematoma is rare, but it should be kept in mind as a devastating hemorrhagic complication, especially in patients with Heyde syndrome.

  5. Neuropsychiatric Disturbances and Hypopituitarism After Traumatic Brain Injury in an Elderly Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Cheng Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric or cognitive disturbances are common complications after traumatic brain injury. They are commonly regarded as irreversible sequelae of organic brain injuries. We report a case of hypopituitarism in a 77-year-old man who presented with long-term neuropsychiatric disturbances, including cognitive impairment, disturbed sleep patterns, personality change, loss of affect, and visual and auditory hallucinations after a traumatic subdural hemorrhage. The treatment response to hormone replacement therapy was nearly complete. Hypopituitarism is rarely considered in patients who sustain traumatic brain injury and the neuropsychiatric manifestations of posttraumatic hypopituitarism have rarely been reported. This case highlights the importance of hypopituitarism as a potential reversible cause of neuropsychiatric disturbances after traumatic brain injury.

  6. Subdural haematoma complicating shunting for normal pressure hydrocephalus in the setting of concomitant antiplatelet medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Peter; Lauritsen, Jens; Poulsen, Frantz Rom

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report on the occurrence and management of subdural haematoma after shunt implantation for normal pressure hydrocephalus and to determine the risk of recurrence in the setting of antiplatelet medication. METHODS: From a consecutive series of 80 patients implanted with a cerebrospinal...... fluid shunt for normal pressure hydrocephalus, records from 11 patients taking antiplatelet drugs, who subsequently had surgery for subdural haematoma were extracted and retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Patients were followed up for a mean of 1819 days after shunt implantation. Subdural haematomas...... reoperations done before the subdural collection disappeared. Only one patient had a late recurrence almost 11 years after shunt implantation. CONCLUSIONS: Subdural haematoma in the setting of a ventriculoperitoneal implantation for normal pressure hydrocephalus and concomitant antiplatelet medication can...

  7. Decompressive Craniectomy for Acute Subdual Haematoma with Expansile Duraplasty Versus Dura-Slits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, B.; Afridi, E. A. K.; Khan, S. A.; Aurangzeb, A.; Khan, A. A.; Khan, W.; Bhatti, S. N.; Khan, B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traumatic subdural hematoma is one of the lethal injuries to brain. Various surgical techniques are used to evacuate the acute subdural hematoma. The hematoma evacuation can either be done by opening of dura by multiple slits or by opening of dura in single large c shape and then doing the expansile duraplasty. Present study aimed to compare both these techniques. Methods: This randomized control study was conducted in department of neurosurgery, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from July 2011 to July 2013. A total of 59 patients were included in this study, which were randomly allocated in two groups (i.e., group A and group B) for decompressive craniectomy. Thirty-one patients were operated by craniectomy with full dural flap opening (Group A), and 28 patients were operated by craniectomy with multidural-slits (Group B). Glasgow Outcome score (GOS) at 6 weeks after the surgery was used to determine the outcome. Results: Mean age of the patients was 33.4±12.8 years. Majority were males. In group A 51.6 percent (16) of the patients survived out of which a favourable outcome (GOC 3-5) was observed in 41.9 percent of the patients, and 9.1 percent of patients ended up in vegetative state. While in group B 46.4 percent (13) of the patients survived among which favourable outcome was seen in 39.3 percent of patients and 7.1 percent of patients ended up in vegetative state. The difference in outcome measure is insignificant. Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference among the two groups as regards the mortality, GOS, frequency of complications and hospital. While the duration of surgery was significantly shorter in patients operated with dural slits. (author)

  8. [Traumatic tricuspid insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayre, F; Richard, P; Ollivier, J P

    1996-04-01

    Traumatic tricuspid insufficiency is a rare condition. The diagnosis is difficult because of the slow progression of this pathology and the presence of more clinically acute lesions. Non-penetrating chest trauma is responsible for 90% of cases. Echocardiography is the investigation of choice for assessing the mechanism of the tricuspid regurgitation and for diagnosing associated lesions. It should be performed systematically in patients with multiple trauma. The surgical indications are difficult to determine and depend on the patients' symptoms and the type of anatomical lesions. It should be undertaken before right ventricular myocardial dysfunction. Several techniques may be used from valvuloplasty to valve replacement mainly with bioprostheses in symptomatic patients.

  9. Traumatic Pneumatocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Ching Yang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic pneumatocele is a rare complication of blunt chest trauma with uncertain pathogenesis. It occurs primarily in pediatric patients and is characterized by single or multiple pulmonary cystic lesions concomitant with other type of injuries of the lung parenchyma. Herein we present a case of traumatic pneumatocele in a 3-year-old boy, together with a brief review of the literature. This rare entity should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions complicating blunt chest trauma, especially in young adults. The disease generally has a benign and self-limiting course.

  10. Clinically significant changes in the emotional condition of relatives of patients with severe traumatic brain injury during sub-acute rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Kristensen, Karin Spangsberg; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    . On the depression scale the corresponding figures were 44.4% and 41.7%, respectively. When comparing relatives with and without CSC, we found that CSC in symptoms of anxiety was associated with significantly better functional improvement during rehabilitation and a shorter period of post-traumatic amnesia...

  11. M5 segment aneurysm presenting as "pure acute SDH"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Singla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous "pure acute subdural hematoma (SDH" is arguably a rare condition. We report on a pregnant female patient presenting as spontaneous acute SDH without subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH due to rupture of distal (M5 segment middle cerebral artery aneurysm. We hereby discuss the diagnostic dilemma of this rare condition, along with the need for watchful evaluation of acute SDH without preceding head injury presenting in emergency outpatient departments, especially when it is first encountered by a trainee resident.

  12. Membranectomy in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahyouni, Ronald; Mahboubi, Hossein; Tran, Peter; Roufail, John S; Chen, Jefferson W

    2017-08-01

    Initial management strategies of chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) are controversial and range from bedside twist-drill or burr-hole drainage to craniotomy with membranectomy (CWM). We aim to 1) perform a meta-analysis of the available data on the outcomes of CWM for treatment of cSDH in published English-language literature and 2) evaluate collective outcomes of CWM with respect to morbidity, mortality, and recurrence rates. A search of English-language literature performed in PubMed, Ovid, and Cochrane databases using key words ("subdural hematoma" or "chronic subdural hematoma") and ("membrane" or "membranectomy") from inception to December 2016 was conducted. Studies reporting outcomes of CWM in cSDH were included. Mortality, morbidity, follow-up duration, and recurrence rate data were extracted and analyzed. Pooled estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for all outcomes using a random-effects model. Of 301 articles found, 17 articles containing 5369 patients met our eligibility criteria. Mean follow-up duration ranged from 1-30.8 months. Collective mean mortality and morbidity rates were 3.7% and 6.9%, respectively (95% CI 2-5.4% and 2.1-11.6%; P < 0.001 and P = 0.004). The collective mean recurrence rate was 7.6% (95% CI: 5%-10.2%; P < 0.001). Clinical data on outcomes of CWM in cSDH are limited to single institutional analyses, with considerable variation in recurrence rates and follow-up time. The rates we reported are comparable with the 5% mortality and 3%-12% morbidity rates and lower than the 10%-21% recurrence rate in the literature for burr holes or craniotomy without membranectomy. This meta-analysis provides an in-depth analysis of available data and reviews reported outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential diagnostic problems in elderly chronic subdural hematoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Valentin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH are recognized as common in older people (over 70 years. They are produced in minor injuries (falls on the same level. These CSDH have minor symptoms (headache, memory disorders, balance disorders, cognitive disorders, etc. and are classified as signs for the onset of dementia, circulatory failure - basilar vertebra, Alzheimer, etc. A simple brain CT scan can highlight these hematomas and a neurosurgical intervention will achieve extremely favorable prognosis. There are many pitfalls in the differential diagnosis of CSH especially with strokes being so common at this age.

  14. Subdural hematoma cases identified through a Danish patient register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Halle, Bo; Pottegård, Anton

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to assess the usefulness of Danish patient registers for epidemiological studies of subdural hematoma (SDH) and to describe clinical characteristics of validated cases. METHODS: Using a patient register covering a geographically defined area in Denmark, we retrieved...... use did not vary by SDH type (OR 0.9, 95%CI 0.6-1.2). CONCLUSIONS: Danish patient registers are a useful resource for SDH studies. However, choice of International Classification of Diseases code markedly influences diagnostic validity. Distinction between cSDH and aSDH is not possible based on SDH...

  15. Positron emission tomography in the evaluation of subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, K.; Bergstroem, M.; Eriksson, L.

    1980-01-01

    Fifteen patients with 21 subdural effusions were investigated both with transmission computer assisted tomography (CAT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The tracer in the emission studies was 68 Ga-EDTA. Twelve lesions were visualized both with CAT and PET. Five lesions that were negative or doubtful on CAT were visualized with PET, whereas four lesions negative or doubtful on PET were demonstrated by CAT. The two methods complement each other due to the fact that they are based on different mechanisms: CAT mainly on attenuation of the fluid collection. PET on isotope accumulation, particularly in the hematoma membranes

  16. An unusual complication of invasive video-EEG monitoring: subelectrode hematoma without subdural component: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Gokhan; Ayhan, Selim; Dericioglu, Nese; Saygi, Serap; Akalan, Nejat

    2010-08-01

    The potential complications of the subdural electrode implantation providing identification of the seizure focus and direct stimulation of the cerebral cortex for defining the eloquent cortical areas are epidural and subdural hematoma, cortical contusions, infection, brain edema, raised intracranial pressure, CSF leakage, and venous infarction have been previously reported in the literature. To present the first case of subelectrode hematoma without subdural component that was detected during invasive EEG monitoring after subdural electrode implantation. A 19-year-old female with drug resistant seizures was decided to undergo invasive monitoring with subdural electrodes. While good quality recordings had been initially obtained from all electrodes placed on the right parietal convexity, no cerebral cortical activity could be obtained from one electrode 2 days after the first operation. Explorative surgery revealed a circumscribed subelectrode hematoma without a subdural component. Awareness of the potential complications of subdural electrode implantation and close follow-up of the clinical findings of the patient are of highest value for early detection and successful management.

  17. The Economic Burden of Urinary Tract Infection and Pressure Ulceration in Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Admissions: Evidence for Comparative Economics and Decision Analytics from a Matched Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Barry A B; Dea, Nicolas; Street, John T; Cheng, Christiana L; Rivers, Carly S; Attabib, Najmedden; Kwon, Brian K; Fisher, Charles G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2017-10-15

    Secondary complications of spinal cord injury (SCI) are a burden to affected individuals and the rest of society. There is limited evidence of the economic burden or cost of complications in SCI populations in Canada, however, which is necessary for comparative economic analyses and decision analytic modeling of possible solutions to these common health problems. Comparative economic analyses can inform resource allocation decisions, but the outputs are only as good as the inputs. In this article, new evidence of the excess or incremental costs of urinary tract infection (UTI) and pressure ulceration (PU) in acute traumatic SCI from an exploratory case series analysis of admissions to a Level I specialized Canadian spine facility (2008-2013) is presented. Participants in a national SCI registry were case-control matched (1:1) on the predicted probability of experiencing UTI or PU during initial acute SCI admission. The excess costs of UTI and PU are estimated as the mean of the differences in total direct acute SCI admission costs (length of stay, accommodation, nursing, pharmacy) from the perspective of the admitting facility between participants matched or paired on demographic and SCI characteristics. Even relatively minor UTI and PU, respectively, added an average of $7,790 (standard deviation [SD] $6,267) and $18,758 (SD $27,574) to the direct cost of acute SCI admission in 2013 Canadian dollars (CAD). This case series analysis established evidence of the excess costs of UTI and PU in acute SCI admissions, which will support decision-informing analyses in SCI.

  18. Percutaneous evacuation for treatment of subdural hematoma and outcome in 28 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofi, Keyvan; Marnet, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is a frequently encountered entity in neurosurgery in particular in elderly patients. There in a high variance in the treatment in literature. We report our experience of percutaneous evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma in 28 patients. From January 2007 to July 2009, 28 patients underwent percutaneous evacuation. 27 of the 28 patients (96.4%) became asymptomatic or improved clinically. Six weeks later, the scan showed the hematoma had completely disappeared in 18 of the cases. We did not have any postoperative infection. Treatment of chronic subdural hematoma using a percutaneous operative technique is a minimally invasive method with sufficient outcome and a therapeutic alternative to the craniotomy.

  19. The minimally invasive endoscopic management of septated chronic subdural hematomas: surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhouma, M; Jacquesson, T; Jouanneau, E

    2014-12-01

    Fibrin membranes and compartmentalization within the subdural space are a frequent cause of failure in the treatment of chronic subdural hematomas (CSH). This specific subtype of CSH classically requires craniotomy, which carries significant morbidity and mortality rates, particularly in elderly patients. In this work, we describe a minimally invasive endoscopic alternative. Under local scalp anesthesia, a rigid endoscope is inserted through a parietal burr hole in the subdural space to collapse fibrin septa and cut the internal membrane. It also allows cauterization of active bleedings and the placement of a drain under direct visualization. The endoscopic treatment of septated CSH represents a minimally invasive alternative to craniotomy especially for the internal membranectomy.

  20. Unoperated subdural hematomas. Long-term follow-up study by brain scan and electroencephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusins, J.; Jaffe, R.; Bender, M.B.

    1976-01-01

    The authors report nine patients selected from over 100 patients with subdural hematomas successfully treated without surgery. These patients were followed for as long as 5 years. All had angiographically demonstrated subdural hematomas. Electroencephalograms (EEG) documented well the clinical improvement of the patient, but were poor guides to the true size of the hematoma, since EEG returns to normal early in the patient's course. Static scans are a better guide to the presence of a subdural hematoma, but they lag behind clinical improvement and usually remain abnormal for considerable periods of time after a major portion of the hematoma has been reabsorbed, and the patient is asymptomatic

  1. Quantitative estimation of hemorrhage in chronic subdural hematoma using the 51Cr erythrocyte labeling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Saito, K.; Ikeda, K.; Hisada, K.

    1987-01-01

    Red cell survival studies using an infusion of chromium-51-labeled erythrocytes were performed to quantitatively estimate hemorrhage in the chronic subdural hematoma cavity of 50 patients. The amount of hemorrhage was determined during craniotomy. Between 6 and 24 hours after infusion of the labeled red cells, hemorrhage accounted for a mean of 6.7% of the hematoma content, indicating continuous or intermittent hemorrhage into the cavity. The clinical state of the patients and the density of the chronic subdural hematoma on computerized tomography scans were related to the amount of hemorrhage. Chronic subdural hematomas with a greater amount of hemorrhage frequently consisted of clots rather than fluid

  2. Chronic subdural hematoma: epidemiological and prognostic analysis of 176 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAMIL FARHAT NETO

    Full Text Available Objective : To characterize patients with chronic subdural hematoma undergoing surgery and to identify prognostic indicators. Methods : We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH undergoing surgical treatment. We analyzed: age, period from trauma to diagnostic imaging, pre and postoperative Glasgow coma scale, type of surgery, associated comorbidities, use of postoperative drainage and outpatient treatment. Results : The sample consisted of 176 patients, 126 male and 50 female patients (ratio 2.5 : 1, ages ranged from six months to 97 years, with an average of 59.3 years. CSDH was caused by trauma in 52% of patients, with the time from trauma to imaging averaging 25.05 days; 37.7% were hypertensive patients and 20% had a neurological disease. Eighty-five (48.3% patients were elderly and altered consciousness was present in 63% of cases. Of the 91 (51.7% non-elderly patients, 44% presented with headache, altered consciousness occurred in 40% and motor abnormalities in 27.5%. The CSDH was located on the right in 41%, left in 43% and bilaterally in 16% of patients. Conclusion : the change of consciousness was the most common clinical alteration in the elderly and headache in non-elderly. The most associated comorbidity was the arterial hypertension and the most frequent cause, head trauma. The trepanation with two oriffices associated with a closed drainage system was the most used operating, with high efficacy and low complication rate.

  3. Clinical and computerized tomographic studies of chronic subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Takahiro; Maegawa, Mototsugu; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Tanikake, Tatsuo

    1981-01-01

    The authors' experience is based on 84 patients with chronic subdural hematomas verified by surgery. Analysis of CT findings of the chronic subdural hematoma led to a classification of four different types: low, iso-, mixed and high density. The mixed density type was classified into two subdivisions: Type I characterized by the sharp border between two compartments and Type II characterized by high density around the hematoma capsule. There was tendency in the high density type group for the clinical course from onset to be the most rapid, the mass effect for the brain the strongest and the period from onset to surgical intervention the shortest. They were slower, weaker and longer in order of the mixed, iso- and low density types. As a result of analysis of hematoma content, there was no correlation among Ca ion concentration, total protein volume and types of hematoma, but there were some significant correlations among hemoglobin, hematocrit and types of hematoma. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were highest in hematoma content of the high density type and were lower in the order of the high density part of the mixed density type, isodensity type and low density type. However, the hematoma content in the low density type showed the highest value of LDH. (author)

  4. Acute episodes of predator exposure in conjunction with chronic social instability as an animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Zoladz, Phillip R.; Conrad, Cheryl D.; Fleshner, Monika; Diamond, David M.

    2008-01-01

    People who are exposed to horrific, life-threatening experiences are at risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Some of the symptoms of PTSD include persistent anxiety, exaggerated startle, cognitive impairments and increased sensitivity to yohimbine, an α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist. We have taken into account the conditions known to induce PTSD, as well as factors responsible for long-term maintenance of the disorder, to develop an animal model of PTSD. Adult male Spr...

  5. Imaging CT findings in cases of subdural hematoma after cardiovascular surgery. Initial signs of SDH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Michiyuki; Kuriyama, Yoshihiro; Sawada, Tohru; Ogawa, Makoto; Kaneko, Takaji; Sakamoto, Akira; Kawazoe, Kouhei; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Omae, Teruo

    1987-12-01

    A characteristic initial sign of CT findings, as seen in cases of subdural hematoma (SDH) after cardiovascular surgery, was reported. Central-nervous-system (CNS) complications after cardiovascular surgery have been thought to be due mainly to the ischemic brain damage caused by both reduced cerebral perfusion pressure and microembolism during extracorporeal circulation. However, we observed 8 cases of SDH in 39 patients suffering from major CNS complications after cardiovascular surgery. In view of these experiences, SDH was thought to be one of the most significant factors causing CNS complications after cardiovascular surgery. In the sequential CT scans of 8 cases of SDH, four exhibited a typical, small, spotty high-density area in the early period of SDH. The clinical courses of these four patients were relatively acute or subacute, and the initial small high-density area progressed to definite SDH findings in that region in the follow-up CT. These initial findings of CT scans were regarded as ''initial signs of SDH-ISS-''. Although there have been many reports concerning the sequential CT changes in SDH, there has been no report describing the above-mentioned finding. It was emphasized that ''ISS'' is of great importance in the early management for SDH.

  6. [Chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) complicated by bilateral occipital lobe infarction: two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Kanae; Naraoka, Masato; Shimamura, Norihito; Ohkuma, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) is a common disease that is treated with burr hole drainage by neurosurgeons. The outcome of CSH is mostly favorable. We treated 2 cases with bilateral occipital lobe infarction due to CSH. A 57-year-old woman was ambulatory when she visited a clinic for evaluation of headache. One hour after the CT was taken, she developed acute impairment of consciousness, so that she was referred to our hospital. The second patient was a 73-year-old woman with a history of depression who was involved in a traffic accident 5 weeks before admission to our hospital. She was at first admitted to a psychiatric hospital for evaluation of gait disturbance. Three weeks after she was admitted to the psychiatric hospital, she fell into a coma. She was referred to our hospital. Their brain CT on admission revealed compressed ambient and interpeduncular cistern and bilateral CSH. Although burr hole drainage surgery was performed, the 2 patients developed severe sequelae due to occipital lobe infarction caused by central transtentorial herniation.

  7. Exposure to war traumatic experiences, post-traumatic stress disorder and post-traumatic growth among nurses in Gaza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamia, N A; Thabet, A A M; Vostanis, P

    2015-12-01

    What is known on the subject? This study builds on existing research on war-related factors that may affect health-care staff by particularly focusing on trauma exposure in both professional and everyday life, as well as on correlates of later positive psychological changes. What this paper adds to existing knowledge? It shows that one in five nursing staff working in Gaza experienced post-traumatic stress symptoms within the clinical range, 2 years after an incursion on Gaza and after being exposed to substantial trauma during this period. Participants appeared to develop a variety of post-traumatic growth responses following trauma exposure. Although nurses experienced traumatic events both as civilians and in their health-care capacity, personal exposure was strongly associated with PTSD symptoms. What are the implications for practice? Support to nursing and other health-care professionals in war situations should entail different levels, remain available well after an acute conflict, and take into consideration both personal and practice-related traumatic events. Mental health nursing practitioners can play a pivotal role in this. To establish the association between war traumatic experiences, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and post-traumatic growth among nurses in the Gaza Strip, 2 years after an incursion on Gaza, and during a period of ongoing trauma exposure. This study builds on existing evidence by considering exposure to personal and work-related traumatic events, and on factors associated with later positive psychological adaptation. The sample consisted of 274 randomly selected nurses in Gaza who completed the Gaza Traumatic Events Checklist, PTSD Checklist, and Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. Of the nurses, 19.7% reported full PTSD. There was a significant relationship between traumatic events and PTSD scores; as well as between community-related traumatic events and post-traumatic growth. Participants reported a range of traumatic

  8. Chronic subdural hematoma : a systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Weiming; Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Groen, Rob J. M.

    Object. In this paper the authors systematically evaluate the results of different surgical procedures for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Methods. The MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and other databases were scrutinized according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting

  9. Recurrence of Subdural Haematoma in a Population-Based Cohort - Risks and Predictive Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Linnea; Gørtz, Sanne; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the risks of and identify predictors for recurrent subdural haematoma in surgically and conservatively treated patients. METHODS: The cohort comprised all individuals diagnosed with a first-time subdural hematoma in Denmark 1996-2011. Information on potential predictors...... was retrieved from the Danish health registers. Cumulative recurrence risks were estimated using the Aalen-Johansen estimator. Rate ratios (RR) were estimated using Poisson regression. RESULTS: Among 10,158 individuals with a subdural hematoma, 1,555 had a recurrent event. The cumulative risk of recurrent...... subdural hematoma was 9% at 4 weeks after the primary bleeding, increasing to and stabilising at 14% after one year. Predictors associated with recurrence were: Male sex (RR 1.60, 95% CI:1.43-1.80), older age (>70 years compared to 20-49 years; RR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.21-1.65), alcohol addiction (RR 1.20, 95...

  10. Chronic subdural hematoma: A survey of neurosurgeons’ practices in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, Taopheeq B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a commonly encountered condition in neurosurgical practice. In Nigeria, a developing country, patients with CSDH are less likely to be diagnosed and treated by surgical drainage early. Aware of the reported variations in neurosurgeons’ practices regarding CSDH in many parts of the world, we sought to determine the current practices of Nigerian neurosurgeons in managing CSDH. Methods: An Internet-based survey was carried out in which all Nigerian neurosurgeons listed in the Nigerian Academy of Neurological Surgeons directory during the July–December 2012 time period were asked to participate. Questions asked in the survey were: (1) Type of treatment used in patients with CSDH, (2) Use of drains postoperatively, (3) Postoperative patient positioning, (4) Postoperative mobilization, (5) Postoperative complications, and (6) Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan monitoring. Results: Survey information was sent to the 25 practicing neurosurgeons in Nigeria who met the criteria listed above for being included in this study. Each of the 14 neurosurgeons who responded reported that CSDH is often misdiagnosed initially, usually as a stroke having occurred. Once a diagnosis of CSDH was made, the most common method of treatment reported was placement of one or two burr-holes for drainage of the hematoma. Reported, but used in only a few cases, were twist drill craniostomy, craniectomy, and craniotomy. Each neurosurgeon who responded reported irrigation of the subdural space with sterile saline, and in some cases an antibiotic had been added to the irrigation solution. Six of the 14 neurosurgeons left drains in the subdural space for 24-72 hours. Seven neurosurgeons reported positioning patients with their heads elevated 30° during the immediate postoperative period. No neurosurgeon responding reported use of steroids, and only one acknowledged routine use of anticonvulsive medication for patients with CSDH. Only 3 of

  11. Chronic subdural hematoma: A survey of neurosurgeons' practices in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, Taopheeq B

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a commonly encountered condition in neurosurgical practice. In Nigeria, a developing country, patients with CSDH are less likely to be diagnosed and treated by surgical drainage early. Aware of the reported variations in neurosurgeons' practices regarding CSDH in many parts of the world, we sought to determine the current practices of Nigerian neurosurgeons in managing CSDH. An Internet-based survey was carried out in which all Nigerian neurosurgeons listed in the Nigerian Academy of Neurological Surgeons directory during the July-December 2012 time period were asked to participate. Questions asked in the survey were: (1) Type of treatment used in patients with CSDH, (2) Use of drains postoperatively, (3) Postoperative patient positioning, (4) Postoperative mobilization, (5) Postoperative complications, and (6) Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan monitoring. Survey information was sent to the 25 practicing neurosurgeons in Nigeria who met the criteria listed above for being included in this study. Each of the 14 neurosurgeons who responded reported that CSDH is often misdiagnosed initially, usually as a stroke having occurred. Once a diagnosis of CSDH was made, the most common method of treatment reported was placement of one or two burr-holes for drainage of the hematoma. Reported, but used in only a few cases, were twist drill craniostomy, craniectomy, and craniotomy. Each neurosurgeon who responded reported irrigation of the subdural space with sterile saline, and in some cases an antibiotic had been added to the irrigation solution. Six of the 14 neurosurgeons left drains in the subdural space for 24-72 hours. Seven neurosurgeons reported positioning patients with their heads elevated 30° during the immediate postoperative period. No neurosurgeon responding reported use of steroids, and only one acknowledged routine use of anticonvulsive medication for patients with CSDH. Only 3 of the 14 neurosurgeons taking part in

  12. Middle fossa arachnoid cyst with temporal lobe agenesis accompanying isodense subdural hematoma -a case report-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, Hyung Sik; Kim, Myung Joon; Yang, Seoung Oh; Kim, Chang Jin [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-12-15

    Cysts overlying the temporal lobes have been well described in literature. These are often associated with agenesis of the temporal lobes, and of major neurosurgical interest due to their frequent association with subdural hematoma, a combination that is rarely seen with cysts in other regions. Full features of plain, angiographic, and CT findings of arachnoid cyst with temporal lobe agenesis accompanying isodense subdural hematoma are presented, being very rare in radiologic literature.

  13. Kernohan-Woltman notch phenomenon and intention tremors in case of chronic subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasikala P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders are atypical and rare presentation of chronic subdural hematomas. We report a case of 60 year man who presented with intention tremors and altered sensorium. The patient had Kernohan-Woltman notch phenomenon on clinical examination. CT scan brain showed a large left fronto-temporo-parietal chronic subdural hematoma with significant mass effect and midline shift. His symptoms relieved completely after surgical evacuation of the hematoma.

  14. Iatrogenic Spinal Subdural Hematoma due to Apixaban: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Colell

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the clinical relevance for developing safer oral anticoagulants prompted the development of new classes of drugs that have shown a lower risk of life-threatening bleeding events as compared to standard warfarin. Nontraumatic spinal subdural hematoma is an uncommon urgent complication that can be associated with the use of these agents. An unusual case of spinal subdural hematoma related to apixaban treatment for nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation is reported here.

  15. Postoperative intraspinal subdural collections after pediatric posterior fossa tumor resection: incidence, imaging, and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harreld, J H; Mohammed, N; Goldsberry, G; Li, X; Li, Y; Boop, F; Patay, Z

    2015-05-01

    Postoperative intraspinal subdural collections in children after posterior fossa tumor resection may temporarily hinder metastasis detection by MR imaging or CSF analysis, potentially impacting therapy. We investigated the incidence, imaging and clinical features, predisposing factors, and time course of these collections after posterior fossa tumor resection. Retrospective review of postoperative spine MRI in 243 children (5.5 ± 4.6 years of age) from our clinical data base postresection of posterior fossa tumors from October 1994 to August 2010 yielded 37 (6.0 ± 4.8 years of age) subjects positive for postoperative intraspinal subdural collections. Their extent and signal properties were recorded for postoperative (37/37), preoperative (15/37), and follow-up spine (35/37) MRI. Risk factors were compared with age-matched internal controls (n = 37, 5.9 ± 4.5 years of age). Associations of histology, hydrocephalus and cerebellar tonsillar herniation, and postoperative intracranial subdural collections with postoperative intraspinal subdural collections were assessed by the Fisher exact test or χ(2) test. The association between preoperative tumor volume and postoperative intraspinal subdural collections was assessed by the Wilcoxon rank sum test. The overall incidence of postoperative intraspinal subdural collections was 37/243 (15.2%), greatest ≤7 days postoperatively (36%); 97% were seen 0-41 days postoperatively (12.9 ± 11.0 days). They were T2 hyperintense and isointense to CSF on T1WI, homogeneously enhanced, and resolved on follow-up MR imaging (35/35). None were symptomatic. They were associated with intracranial subdural collections (P = .0011) and preoperative tonsillar herniation (P = .0228). Postoperative intraspinal subdural collections are infrequent and clinically silent, resolve spontaneously, and have a distinctive appearance. Preoperative tonsillar herniation appears to be a predisposing factor. In this series, repeat MR imaging by 4 weeks

  16. Anticoagulation therapy a risk factor for the development of chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aspegren, Oskar P.; Åstrand, Ramona; Lundgren, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy.......Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy....

  17. Manual for the psychotherapeutic treatment of acute and post-traumatic stress disorders following multiple shocks from implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jochen; Titscher, Georg; Peregrinova, Ludmila; Kirsch, Holger

    2013-01-01

    In view of the increasing number of implanted cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), the number of people suffering from so-called "multiple ICD shocks" is also increasing. The delivery of more than five shocks (appropriate or inappropriate) in 12 months or three or more shocks (so called multiple shocks) in a short time period (24 hours) leads to an increasing number of patients suffering from severe psychological distress (anxiety disorder, panic disorder, adjustment disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder). Untreated persons show chronic disease processes and a low rate of spontaneous remission and have an increased morbidity and mortality. Few papers have been published concerning the psychotherapeutic treatment for these patients. The aim of this study is to develop a psychotherapeutic treatment for patients with a post-traumatic stress disorder or adjustment disorder after multiple ICD shocks. Explorative feasibility study: Treatment of 22 patients as a natural design without randomisation and without control group. The period of recruitment was three years, from March 2007 to March 2010. The study consisted of two phases: in the first phase (pilot study) we tested different components and dosages of psychotherapeutic treatments. The final intervention programme is presented in this paper. In the second phase (follow-up study) we assessed the residual post-traumatic stress symptoms in these ICD patients. The time between treatment and follow-up measurement was 12 to 30 months. Thirty-one patients were assigned to the Department of Psychocardiology after multiple shocks. The sample consisted of 22 patients who had a post-traumatic stress disorder or an adjustment disorder and were willing and able to participate. They were invited for psychological treatment. 18 of them could be included into the follow-up study. After the clinical assessment at the beginning and at the end of the inpatient treatment a post-treatment assessment with questionnaires followed. In

  18. CT and MRI diagnosis of traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shike; Zhang Yalin; Xu Derong; Zou Gaowei; Chen Dan; He Sujun; Zhou Lichao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze CT and MRI features of traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage and investigate the diagnostic value. Methods: 21 cases with traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage diagnosed by clinic, CT and MRI in our hospital were collected in this study Plain CT scan were immediately performed in 21 cases after injury, plain MR scan were performed in 1 to 3 days. 12 cases of them underwent diffusion weighted imagine (DWI). The CT and MRI findings were retrospectively summarized. Results: 8 cases were found with simple traumatic basal ga