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Sample records for acute traumatic injuries

  1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome assessment after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrooz Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is one of the most important complications associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI. ARDS is caused by inflammation of the lungs and hypoxic damage with lung physiology abnormalities associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Aim of this study is to determine the epidemiology of ARDS and the prevalence of risk factors. Methods: This prospective study performed on patients with acute traumatic head injury hospitalization in the intensive care unit of the Shohaday-e Haftom-e-Tir Hospital (September 2012 to September 2013 done. About 12 months, the data were evaluated. Information including age, sex, education, employment, drug and alcohol addiction, were collected and analyzed. The inclusion criteria were head traumatic patients and exclusion was the patients with chest trauma. Questionnaire was designed with doctors supervision of neurosurgery. Then the collected data were analysis. Results: In this study, the incidence of ARDS was 23.8% and prevalence of metabolic acidosis was 31.4%. Most injury with metabolic acidosis was Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH 48 (60% and Subdural hemorrhage (SDH was Next Level with 39 (48% Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS were significantly decreased (P< 0.0001. The level of consciousness in patients with skull fractures significantly lower than those without fractures (P= 0.009 [(2.3±4.6 vs (4.02±7.07]. Prevalence of metabolic acidosis during hospitalization was 80 patients (31.4%. Conclusion: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Management and treatment is essential to reduce the mortality. In this study it was found the age of patients with ARDS was higher than patients without complications. ARDS risk factor for high blood pressure was higher in men. Most victims were pedestrians. The most common injury associated with ARDS was SDH. Our analysis

  2. Nonoperative treatment of acute traumatic spinal injuries: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic spinal injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is no agreed method of care. Neurological recovery in complete injury has been dismal. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the neurological recovery at discharge in traumatic spinal injury patients ...

  3. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

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    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P. [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: centro@cerebroecoluna.com.br; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Neurologicas; Andrade, Almir F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Neurocirurgia da Emergencia

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  4. Systemic inflammatory response following acute traumatic brain injury.

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    Lu, Jia; Goh, Samantha Jianli; Tng, Priscilla Ying Lei; Deng, Yi Yu; Ling, Eng-Ang; Moochhala, Shabbir

    2009-01-01

    The early, delayed, and systemic effects of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) are the result of inflammatory mediators which initiate systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), subsequent complement deficits and coagulopathy. Once SIRS is triggered by acute inflammation, it can detrimentally self-propagate. Systemic inflammation causes tissue damage leading to further inflammation and damage, leaving the body in a vicious cycle of hyperinflammation. Therefore, important inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-1 beta, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, are targeted in compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) in an attempt to control the development of SIRS. The hypothalamus-pituitary (HPA)-axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) efferent limbs in CARS provide negative feedback for the production of inflammatory mediators. However, in the case of acute TBI, the activation of CARS often leads to the complication of immunosuppression which may result in multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and mortality. In light of this, the activation of the SIRS following acute TBI does not bode well. If left uncontrolled, multiple systems will be implicated making it difficult to remedy.

  5. Exacerbation of Acute Traumatic Brain Injury by Circulating Extracellular Vesicles.

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    Hazelton, Isla; Yates, Abi; Dale, Ashley; Roodselaar, Jay; Akbar, Naveed; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Anthony, Daniel C; Couch, Yvonne

    2018-02-15

    Inflammatory lesions in the brain activate a systemic acute-phase response (APR), which is dependent on the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) into the circulation. The resulting APR is responsible for regulating leukocyte mobilization and subsequent recruitment to the brain. Factors that either exacerbate or inhibit the APR will also exacerbate or inhibit central nervous system (CNS) inflammation as a consequence and have the potential to influence ongoing secondary damage. Here, we were interested to discover how the circulating EV population changes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and how manipulation of the circulating EV pool impacts on the outcome of TBI. We found the number of circulating EVs increased rapidly post-TBI, and this was accompanied by an increase in CNS and hepatic leukocyte recruitment. In an adoptive transfer study, we then evaluated the outcomes of TBI after administering EVs derived from either in vitro macrophage or endothelial cell lines stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or from murine plasma from an LPS challenge using the air-pouch model. By manipulating the circulating EV population, we were able to demonstrate that each population of transferred EVs increased the APR. However, the characteristics of the response were dependent on the nature of the EVs; specifically, it was significantly increased when animals were challenged with macrophage-derived EVs, suggesting that the cellular origins of EVs may determine their function. Selectively targeting EVs from macrophage/monocyte populations is likely to be of value in reducing the impact of the systemic inflammatory response on the outcome of traumatic CNS injury.

  6. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

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    Galeiras, Rita; Mourelo, Mónica; Pértega, Sonia; Lista, Amanda; Ferreiro, Mª Elena; Salvador, Sebastián; Montoto, Antonio; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) exhibit factors that, in other populations, have been associated with rhabdomyolysis. Purpose: The aim of the study is to determine the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in patients with acute traumatic SCI admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), as well as the development of secondary acute kidney injury and associated factors. Study Design and Setting: This was an observational, retrospective study. Patient Sample: All adult patients admitted to the ICU with acute traumatic SCI who presented rhabdomyolysis, diagnosed through creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels >500 IU/L. Outcome Measures: Incidence of rhabdomyolysis and subsequent renal dysfunction was calculated. Materials and Methods: Data about demographic variables, comorbidity, rhabdomyolysis risk factors, and variables involving SCI, severity scores, and laboratory parameters were obtained from clinical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify renal injury risk factors. Results: In 2006–2014, 200 patients with acute SCI were admitted to ICU. Of these, 103 had rhabdomyolysis (incidence = 51.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.3%–58.7%). The most typical American Spinal Injury Association classification was A (70.3%). The injury severity score was 30.3 ± 12.1 and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was 5.6 ± 3.3 points. During their stay, 57 patients (55.3%; 95% CI: 45.2%–65.4%) presented renal dysfunction (creatinine ≥1.2 mg/dL). In the multivariate analysis, variables associated with renal dysfunction were creatinine at admission (odds ratio [OR] = 9.20; P = 0.006) and hemodynamic SOFA score the day following admission (OR = 1.33; P = 0.024). Creatinine was a better predictor of renal dysfunction than the peak CPK value during the rhabdomyolysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.91 vs. 0.63, respectively). Conclusions: Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent condition in patients

  7. Risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

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    Song, J; Shao, J; Qi, H-H; Song, D-W; Zhu, W

    2015-01-01

    To analyze risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). Total 180 tetraplegia cases after acute traumatic CSCI treated in Shanghai Changzheng Hospital from 2001 to 2011 were reviewed retrospectively and the frequency of respiratory failure in these patients were analyzed against the factors including age, gender, cause of injury, level/severity of injury, high-dose methylprednisolone (MP) therapy, and surgery intervention, using Chi-square test to look into the correlations of the prevalence of respiratory failure to those factors. Of the 180 tetraplegia with acute traumatic CSCI, 29 patients (16.11%) developed respiratory failure. The factors, including age, level and severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention, were found to significantly correlate with the appearance of respiratory failure in tetraplegia after acute traumatic CSCI (p < 0.05), while no significant correlation was found between the other factors: gender and cause of injury and the frequency of respiratory failure. Age, level/severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention are the four major relevant factors of respiratory failure in patients with acute traumatic CSCI. The appropriate and timing treatments involving high-dose MP therapy and surgical decompression and reconstruction can substantially increase the rates of clinical improvements and reduce the frequency of respiratory failure.

  8. Acute Alcohol Intoxication in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury : Characteristics, Recovery, and Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; van der Horn, Harm; Roks, Gerwin; Yilmaz, Tansel; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M.

    2016-01-01

    A substantial number of patients (30% to 50%) sustains a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) while they are under the influence of alcohol. An acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) at the time of injury has been subject of research in severe TBI, but little is known about the relation between AAI and

  9. Acute Traumatic Cervical Cord Injury in Pediatric Patients with os Odontoideum: A Series of 6 Patients.

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    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Wang, Honggang; Liu, Chao

    2015-06-01

    Os odontoideum can lead to instability of the atlantoaxial joint and places the spinal cord at significant risk for acute traumatic catastrophic events or chronic neurologic change. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively review acute cervical cord injury after minor trauma in 6 pediatric patients with os odontoideum. Between 2012 and 2013, 6 pediatric patients with os odontoideum who suffered acute traumatic cervical cord injury were reviewed retrospectively. Their clinical history, neurologic symptoms, radiological investigations, follow-up period, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment classification, and motor score were reviewed. There were 2 male and 4 female subjects ranging in age from 4 to 18 years (mean 11.8 years). Before the traumatic injury, 2 cases were asymptomatic and 4 complained of myelopathic feature with unsteadiness on feet. Falls were the most common injury (n = 5), followed by a minor motor vehicle accident (n = 1). Atlantoaxial instability and cord compression were presented in all cases with dynamic cervical lateral radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. Most patients presented with spinal cord thinning and hyperintensity on T2-weighted sequences in magnetic resonance imaging. Spinal cord compression was anterior in 2 cases and both anterior and posterior in 4. Two patients was classified as ASIA B, 1 as ASIA C, and 3 as ASIA D category on admission. Two patients presented with respiratory failure with mechanical ventilation for over 2 weeks in perioperative period. Postoperatively, all patients improved neurologically and clinically after underwent posterior atlantoaxial fixation and fusion. Pediatric patients with asymptomatic or myelopathic atlantoaxial instability secondary to os odontoideum are at risk for acute spinal cord injury even after minor traumatic injury. Sufficient fixation and fusion should be undertaken as prophylactic treatment of developing myelopathy and to improve neurologic symptoms with

  10. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hoffer

    Full Text Available Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications.

  11. Acute phase complications following traumatic spinal cord injury in Dutch level 1 trauma centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, K.C. van; Schouten, E.J.; Hofstede, J.; Meent, H. van de; Holtslag, H.R.; Berg-Emons, R.J. van den

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the number and nature of complications during the acute phase following traumatic spinal cord injury and to explore the relationship between number of complications and length of hospital stay. DESIGN: Multi-centre prospective cohort study. PATIENTS: A total of 54 patients with

  12. High risk of rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury after traumatic limb compartment syndrome.

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    Tsai, Wei-Hsuan; Huang, Shih-Tsai; Liu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Lee-Wei; Yang, Kuo-Chung; Hsu, Kuei-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Ta; Ho, Yen-Yi

    2015-05-01

    Rhabdomyolysis often occurs after traumatic compartment syndrome, and high morbidity and mortality have been reported with the acute kidney injury that develops subsequently. We focused on the risk factors for rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in patients with traumatic compartment syndrome. We also analyzed the relation between renal function and rhabdomyolysis in these patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted from January 2006 to March 2012. Inpatients with traumatic compartment syndrome were included. We evaluated patients' demographics, history of illicit drugs use or alcohol consumption, mechanism of injury, symptoms, serum creatine kinase levels, and kidney function. A total of 52 patients with a mean age of 40.9 years were included; 23 patients had rhabdomyolysis (44.2%), of which 9 patients developed acute kidney injury (39.1%). Significant predictive factors for rhabdomyolysis were history of illicit drugs or alcohol use (P=0.039; odds ratio, 5.91) and ischemic injury (P=0.005). We found a moderate correlation between serum creatine kinase levels and serum creatinine levels (R=0.57; PRhabdomyolysis was a predisposing factor for acute kidney injury (P=0.011; odds ratio, 8.68). Four patients with rhabdomyolysis required a short period of renal replacement therapy. A high percentage of patients with traumatic compartment syndrome developed rhabdomyolysis (44.2%). Patients with rhabdomyolysis had a higher possibility of developing acute kidney injury (39.1%), and rhabdomyolysis was correlated to renal function. Early diagnosis, frequent monitoring, and aggressive treatment are suggested once compartment syndrome is suspected. The overall prognosis is good with early diagnosis and proper treatment.

  13. Acute white matter differences in the fornix following mild traumatic brain injury using diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallampalli, Ragini; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Bigler, Erin D; McCauley, Stephen R; Hanten, Gerri; Troyanskaya, Maya; Hunter, Jill V; Chu, Zili; Li, Xiaoqi; Levin, Harvey S

    2013-04-01

    The integrity of the fornix using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in adolescent participants with acute mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) compared to a demographically matched control group was examined. Fractional anisotropy (FA) in the fornix was elevated in the mild traumatic brain injured group. Performance on the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) was lower in the group with mTBI. A relation was found between lower performance on cognitive tasks and higher FA. The potential role of fornix injury as a basis of memory and processing speed deficits in mTBI is discussed. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  14. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  15. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui [Pudong New Area People' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai (China)

    2011-05-15

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  16. Functional Outcome Prediction after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Based on Acute Clinical Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Ludovic; Cordemans, Virginie; Cernat, Eduard; M'Bra, Kouamé Innocent; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-06-15

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that affects patients on both a personal and societal level. The objective of the study is to improve the prediction of long-term functional outcome following SCI based on the acute clinical findings. A total of 76 patients with acute traumatic SCI were prospectively enrolled in a cohort study in a single Level I trauma center. Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) at 1 year after the trauma was the primary outcome. Potential predictors of functional outcome were recorded during the acute hospitalization: age, sex, level and type of injury, comorbidities, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS), ASIA Motor Score (AMS), ASIA Light Touch score (LT), ASIA Pin Prick score (PP), Injury Severity Score (ISS), traumatic brain injury, and delay from trauma to surgery. A linear regression model was created with the primary outcome modeled relative to the acute clinical findings. Only four variables were selected in the model, with performance averaging an R-square value of 0.57. In descending order, the best predictors for SCIM at 1 year were: LT, AIS grade, ISS, and AMS. One-year functional outcome (SCIM) can be estimated by a simple equation that takes into account four parameters of the initial physical examination. Estimating the patient long-term outcome early after traumatic SCI is important in order to define the management strategies that might diminish the costs and to give the patient and family a better view of the long-term expectations.

  17. Functional Outcome Prediction after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Based on Acute Clinical Factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminski, Ludovic; Cordemans, Virginie; Cernat, Eduard; M'Bra, Kouamé Innocent; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that affects patients on both a personal and societal level. The objective of the study is to improve the prediction of long-term functional outcome following SCI based on the acute clinical findings. A total of 76 patients with acute traumatic SCI were prospectively enrolled in a cohort study in a single Level I trauma center. Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) at 1 year after the trauma was the primary outcome. Potential predictors of...

  18. Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy Accompanying Isolated Traumatic Brain Injury is Associated with Worse Long-Term Functional and Cognitive Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalik, Peter A; Boorman, David W; Tracy, Joseph; Jallo, Jack; Rincon, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with isolated traumatic brain injury (iTBI) present with acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC). ATC is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its effects on long-term functional and cognitive outcomes are not as well characterized. Data from the Citicoline Brain Injury Treatment Trial (COBRIT) were analyzed retrospectively. Exclusion criteria were renal failure or malignancy, and any extracranial injury severity score >3. ATC was defined as INR > 1.3, PTT > 38 s, or platelets  6), and the DRS (i.e., score < 2) at 180 days, for which ATC was found to be an independent predictor with binary logistic regression. ATC patients also performed significantly worse on several components of the CVLT-II at 180 days. ATC accompanying iTBI is associated with worse functional and cognitive outcomes at 180 days.

  19. [Acute traumatic spinal cord injuries: Epidemiology and prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonjon, N; Perrin, F E; Lonjon, M; Fattal, C; Segnarbieux, F; Privat, A; Bauchet, L

    2012-10-01

    Specify the epidemiological data on the acute spinal cord injuries and define a group of patients that could benefit from cellular transplantation therapy designed with the aim of repair and regeneration of damaged spinal cord tissues. Five years monocentric (Gui-de-Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier, France) retrospective analysis of patients suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal cord injured-patients, defined as sensory-motor complete, underwent a clinical evaluation following American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) and functional type 2 Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM2) scorings as well as radiological evaluation through spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred and fifty-seven medical records were reviewed and we selected and re-examined 20 patients with complete thoracic spinal cord lesion. Clinical and radiological evaluations of these patients demonstrated, in 75 % of the cases, an absence of clinical progression after a mean of 49months. Radiological abnormalities were constantly present in the initial (at the admission to hospital) and control (re-evaluation) MRI and no reliable predictive criteria of prognosis had been found. We compare our results to the literature and discuss advantages and limits of cellular transplantation strategies for these patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Patients' and relatives' experience of difficulties following severe traumatic brain injury: the sub-acute stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sara; Schönberger, Michael; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    ' and relatives' reports of patient difficulties, and (3) explore the role of injury severity, disability and other factors on subjective experience of difficulties. The primary measure was the European Brain Injury Questionnaire (EBIQ) administered to patients and to one of their close relatives at discharge......The present study aimed to (1) identify the difficulties most frequently reported by individuals with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) at the time of discharge from a sub-acute rehabilitation brain injury unit as well as difficulties reported by their relatives, (2) compare patients...... was low compared to other studies using the EBIQ. Furthermore, the effects of injury severity and general level of functioning had limited impact on the subjective experience of difficulties. Implications of these findings, specifically as they pertain to the sub-acute stage are discussed Udgivelsesdato...

  1. Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0195 TITLE: Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration after Traumatic Brain Injury...Purpose: The purpose of this project is to develop a radically different strategy to reduce brain glutamate excitotoxicity and treat TBI. We will...objective of reducing blood levels of glutamate. This will produce a brain -to-blood gradient of glutamate which will enhance the removal of excess

  2. Psychological Characteristics in Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: An MMPI-2 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Carlton S; Rogers, David; Kinne, Erica

    2017-01-01

    The psychological characteristics of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received limited research focus, despite empirical evidence of their relevance for subsequent psychological adjustment and early therapeutic intervention. This study addressed a wide range of psychological features in 47 individuals who were hospitalized as a result of acute mild TBI (mTBI). Participants were screened from amongst consecutive TBI admissions for moderate to severe brain injury, and for pre-injury neurological, psychiatric, or substance abuse histories. Clinical and content scale scores on the MMPI-2 were explored in relation to patient gender, age, level of education, and extent of cognitive complaints. The results revealed diverse psychosocial problem areas across the sample, the most common of which were somatic and cognitive complaints, compromised insight, and a naively optimistic self-perception. The mediating roles of injury severity and demographic variables are discussed. Clinical implications and specific recommendations are presented.

  3. Synergistic impact of acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury on the weaning outcome of patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Kuang; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Ho, Li-Ing; Wang, Jia-Horng; Kou, Yu Ru

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory neuromuscular impairment severity is known to predict weaning outcome among patients with cervical spinal cord injury; however, the impact of non-neuromuscular complications remains unexplored. This study was to evaluate possible neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular factors that may negatively impact weaning outcome. From September 2002 to October 2012, acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury patients who had received mechanical ventilation for >48h were enrolled and divided into successful (n=54) and unsuccessful weaning groups (n=19). Various neuromuscular, non-neuromuscular factors and events during the intensive care unit stay were extracted from medical charts and electronic medical records. Variables presenting with a significant difference (pspinal cord injury (C1-3), lower pulse rates, and lower Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, higher peak blood urea nitrogen, lower trough albumin, and lower trough blood leukocyte counts. Furthermore, unsuccessful weaning patients had a higher incidence of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock and acute kidney injury during the intensive care unit stay. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury were independent risk factors for failure of weaning. Importantly, patients with both risk factors showed a large increase in odds ratio for unsuccessful weaning from mechanical ventilation (pinjury during the intensive care unit stay and high level of cervical spinal injury are two independent risk factors that synergistically work together producing a negative impact on weaning outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Age and Diet Affect Genetically Separable Secondary Injuries that Cause Acute Mortality Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeccah J. Katzenberger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes of traumatic brain injury (TBI vary because of differences in primary and secondary injuries. Primary injuries occur at the time of a traumatic event, whereas secondary injuries occur later as a result of cellular and molecular events activated in the brain and other tissues by primary injuries. We used a Drosophila melanogaster TBI model to investigate secondary injuries that cause acute mortality. By analyzing mortality percentage within 24 hr of primary injuries, we previously found that age at the time of primary injuries and diet afterward affect the severity of secondary injuries. Here, we show that secondary injuries peaked in activity 1–8 hr after primary injuries. Additionally, we demonstrate that age and diet activated distinct secondary injuries in a genotype-specific manner, and that concurrent activation of age- and diet-regulated secondary injuries synergistically increased mortality. To identify genes involved in secondary injuries that cause mortality, we compared genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of uninjured and injured flies under age and diet conditions that had different mortalities. During the peak period of secondary injuries, innate immune response genes were the predominant class of genes that changed expression. Furthermore, age and diet affected the magnitude of the change in expression of some innate immune response genes, suggesting roles for these genes in inhibiting secondary injuries that cause mortality. Our results indicate that the complexity of TBI outcomes is due in part to distinct, genetically controlled, age- and diet-regulated mechanisms that promote secondary injuries and that involve a subset of innate immune response genes.

  5. Age and Diet Affect Genetically Separable Secondary Injuries that Cause Acute Mortality Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Ganetzky, Barry; Wassarman, David A

    2016-12-07

    Outcomes of traumatic brain injury (TBI) vary because of differences in primary and secondary injuries. Primary injuries occur at the time of a traumatic event, whereas secondary injuries occur later as a result of cellular and molecular events activated in the brain and other tissues by primary injuries. We used a Drosophila melanogaster TBI model to investigate secondary injuries that cause acute mortality. By analyzing mortality percentage within 24 hr of primary injuries, we previously found that age at the time of primary injuries and diet afterward affect the severity of secondary injuries. Here, we show that secondary injuries peaked in activity 1-8 hr after primary injuries. Additionally, we demonstrate that age and diet activated distinct secondary injuries in a genotype-specific manner, and that concurrent activation of age- and diet-regulated secondary injuries synergistically increased mortality. To identify genes involved in secondary injuries that cause mortality, we compared genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of uninjured and injured flies under age and diet conditions that had different mortalities. During the peak period of secondary injuries, innate immune response genes were the predominant class of genes that changed expression. Furthermore, age and diet affected the magnitude of the change in expression of some innate immune response genes, suggesting roles for these genes in inhibiting secondary injuries that cause mortality. Our results indicate that the complexity of TBI outcomes is due in part to distinct, genetically controlled, age- and diet-regulated mechanisms that promote secondary injuries and that involve a subset of innate immune response genes. Copyright © 2016 Katzenberger et al.

  6. Systems biomarkers as acute diagnostics and chronic monitoring tools for traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Moghieb, Ahmed; Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhiqun

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant biomedical problem among military personnel and civilians. There exists an urgent need to develop and refine biological measures of acute brain injury and chronic recovery after brain injury. Such measures "biomarkers" can assist clinicians in helping to define and refine the recovery process and developing treatment paradigms for the acutely injured to reduce secondary injury processes. Recent biomarker studies in the acute phase of TBI have highlighted the importance and feasibilities of identifying clinically useful biomarkers. However, much less is known about the subacute and chronic phases of TBI. We propose here that for a complex biological problem such as TBI, multiple biomarker types might be needed to harness the wide range of pathological and systemic perturbations following injuries, including acute neuronal death, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration to systemic responses. In terms of biomarker types, they range from brain-specific proteins, microRNA, genetic polymorphism, inflammatory cytokines and autoimmune markers and neuro-endocrine hormones. Furthermore, systems biology-driven biomarkers integration can help present a holistic approach to understanding scenarios and complexity pathways involved in brain injury.

  7. 4.7-T diffusion tensor imaging of acute traumatic peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Richard B; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Riley, D Colton; Sexton, Kevin W; Pollins, Alonda C; Shack, R Bruce; Dortch, Richard D; Nanney, Lillian B; Does, Mark D; Thayer, Wesley P

    2015-09-01

    Diagnosis and management of peripheral nerve injury is complicated by the inability to assess microstructural features of injured nerve fibers via clinical examination and electrophysiology. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to accurately detect nerve injury and regeneration in crush models of peripheral nerve injury, but no prior studies have been conducted on nerve transection, a surgical emergency that can lead to permanent weakness or paralysis. Acute sciatic nerve injuries were performed microsurgically to produce multiple grades of nerve transection in rats that were harvested 1 hour after surgery. High-resolution diffusion tensor images from ex vivo sciatic nerves were obtained using diffusion-weighted spin-echo acquisitions at 4.7 T. Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced at the injury sites of transected rats compared with sham rats. Additionally, minor eigenvalues and radial diffusivity were profoundly elevated at all injury sites and were negatively correlated to the degree of injury. Diffusion tensor tractography showed discontinuities at all injury sites and significantly reduced continuous tract counts. These findings demonstrate that high-resolution DTI is a promising tool for acute diagnosis and grading of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries.

  8. 4.7-T diffusion tensor imaging of acute traumatic peripheral nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Richard B.; Kelm, Nathaniel D.; Riley, D. Colton; Sexton, Kevin W.; Pollins, Alonda C.; Shack, R. Bruce; Dortch, Richard D.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Does, Mark D.; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of peripheral nerve injury is complicated by the inability to assess microstructural features of injured nerve fibers via clinical examination and electrophysiology. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to accurately detect nerve injury and regeneration in crush models of peripheral nerve injury, but no prior studies have been conducted on nerve transection, a surgical emergency that can lead to permanent weakness or paralysis. Acute sciatic nerve injuries were performed microsurgically to produce multiple grades of nerve transection in rats that were harvested 1 hour after surgery. High-resolution diffusion tensor images from ex vivo sciatic nerves were obtained using diffusion-weighted spin-echo acquisitions at 4.7 T. Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced at the injury sites of transected rats compared with sham rats. Additionally, minor eigenvalues and radial diffusivity were profoundly elevated at all injury sites and were negatively correlated to the degree of injury. Diffusion tensor tractography showed discontinuities at all injury sites and significantly reduced continuous tract counts. These findings demonstrate that high-resolution DTI is a promising tool for acute diagnosis and grading of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26323827

  9. Prediction of functional recovery six months following traumatic spinal cord injury during acute care hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Denis, Andréane; Feldman, Debbie; Thompson, Cynthia; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-02-15

    To determine factors associated with functional status six months following a traumatic cervical and thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI), with a particular interest in factors related to the acute care hospitalization stay. This is a prospective cohort study. Sixteen potential predictive variables were studied. Univariate regression analyses were first performed to determine the strength of association of each variable independently with the total Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) score. Significant ones were then included in a General linear model in order to determine the most relevant predictive factors among them. Analyses were carried out separately for tetraplegia and paraplegia. A single specialized Level I trauma center. One hundred fifty-nine patients hospitalized for an acute traumatic SCI between January 2010 and February 2015. Not applicable. The SCIM (version 3) functional score. Motor-complete SCI (AIS-A,B) was the main predictive factor associated with decreased total SCIM score in tetraplegia and paraplegia. Longer acute care length of stay and the occurrence of acute medical complications (either pneumonia, urinary tract infections or pressure ulcers) were predictors of decreased functional outcome following tetraplegia, while increased body mass index and higher trauma severity were predictive of decreased functional outcome following paraplegia. This study supports previous work while adding information regarding the importance of optimizing acute care hospitalization as it may influence chronic functional status following traumatic SCI.

  10. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Kimberly B. Bjugstad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI. Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP. Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p≤0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS, Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS, and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS. Antioxidant capacity (icORP on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p<0.05. Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients’ response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome.

  11. Acute traumatic spinal cord injury induces glial activation in the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A D; Westmoreland, S V; Evangelous, N R; Graham, A; Sledge, J; Nesathurai, S

    2012-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury leads to direct myelin and axonal damage and leads to the recruitment of inflammatory cells to site of injury. Although rodent models have provided the greatest insight into the genesis of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), recent studies have attempted to develop an appropriate non-human primate model. We explored TSCI in a cynomolgus macaque model using a balloon catheter to mimic external trauma to further evaluate the underlying mechanisms of acute TSCI. Following 1hour of spinal cord trauma, there were focal areas of hemorrhage and necrosis at the site of trauma. Additionally, there was a marked increased expression of macrophage-related protein 8, MMP9, IBA-1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase in macrophages and microglia at the site of injury. This data indicate that acute TSCI in the cynomolgus macaque is an appropriate model and that the earliest immunohistochemical changes noted are within macrophage and microglia populations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Cognitive Improvement after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Measured with Functional Neuroimaging during the Acute Period.

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    Glenn R Wylie

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging studies in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI have been largely limited to patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, utilizing images obtained months to years after the actual head trauma. We sought to distinguish acute and delayed effects of mild traumatic brain injury on working memory functional brain activation patterns < 72 hours after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI and again one-week later. We hypothesized that clinical and fMRI measures of working memory would be abnormal in symptomatic mTBI patients assessed < 72 hours after injury, with most patients showing clinical recovery (i.e., improvement in these measures within 1 week after the initial assessment. We also hypothesized that increased memory workload at 1 week following injury would expose different cortical activation patterns in mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, compared to those with full clinical recovery. We performed a prospective, cohort study of working memory in emergency department patients with isolated head injury and clinical diagnosis of concussion, compared to control subjects (both uninjured volunteers and emergency department patients with extremity injuries and no head trauma. The primary outcome of cognitive recovery was defined as resolution of reported cognitive impairment and quantified by scoring the subject's reported cognitive post-concussive symptoms at 1 week. Secondary outcomes included additional post-concussive symptoms and neurocognitive testing results. We enrolled 46 subjects: 27 with mild TBI and 19 controls. The time of initial neuroimaging was 48 (+22 S.D. hours after injury (time 1. At follow up (8.7, + 1.2 S.D., days after injury, time 2, 18 of mTBI subjects (64% reported moderate to complete cognitive recovery, 8 of whom fully recovered between initial and follow-up imaging. fMRI changes from time 1 to time 2 showed an increase in posterior cingulate activation in the mTBI subjects

  13. Acute and long-term pituitary insufficiency in traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, M; Juul, A; Struck, J

    2007-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI), describe the time-course and assess the association with trauma-related parameters and early post-traumatic hormone alterations....

  14. Investigating metacognition, cognition, and behavioral deficits of college students with acute traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Sarah; Davalos, Deana

    2016-07-01

    Executive dysfunction in college students who have had an acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) was investigated. The cognitive, behavioral, and metacognitive effects on college students who endorsed experiencing a brain injury were specifically explored. Participants were 121 college students who endorsed a mild TBI, and 121 college students with no history of a TBI were matched on sex and ethnicity to examine potential differences between groups. Participants completed the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX). A Rasch analysis indicated that the TBI group had significantly higher total scores on the DEX than the control group. Moreover, when compared with the control group, the students with a TBI had higher scores on all 3 subcomponents of the DEX. These findings suggest that students who endorse brain injuries may experience more difficulty with specific facets of college. Thus, the importance of academic and personal resources available for students with a TBI is discussed.

  15. Traumatic brain injury : from impact to rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halliday, J.; Absalom, A. R.

    Traumatic brain injury is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in our society, particularly among the young. This review discusses the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury, and current management from the acute phase through to rehabilitation of the traumatic brain injury patient.

  16. Age related outcome in acute subdural haematoma following traumatic head injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanif, S

    2009-09-01

    Acute subdural haematoma (ASDH) is one of the conditions most strongly associated with severe brain injury. Reports prior to 1980 describe overall mortality rates for acute subdural haematomas (SDH\\'s) ranging from 40% to 90% with poor outcomes observed in all age groups. Recently, improved results have been reported with rapid diagnosis and surgical treatment. The elderly are predisposed to bleeding due to normal cerebral atrophy related to aging, stretching the bridging veins from the dura. Prognosis in ASDH is associated with age, time from injury to treatment, presence of pupillary abnormalities, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) or motor score on admission, immediate coma or lucid interval, computerized tomography findings (haematoma volume, degree of midline shift, associated intradural lesion, compression of basal cisterns), post-operative intracranial pressure and type of surgery. Advancing age is known to be a determinant of outcome in head injury. We present the results of a retrospective study carried out in Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland\\'s national neurosurgical centre. The aim of our study was to examine the impact of age on outcome in patients with ASDH following severe head injury. Only cases with acute subdural haematoma requiring surgical evacuation were recruited. Mortality was significantly higher in older patients (50% above 70 years, 25.6% between 40 and 70 years and 26% below 40 years). Overall poor outcome (defined as Glasgow outcome scores 3-5) was also higher in older patients; 74.1% above 70 years, 48% between 40 and 70 years and 30% below 40 years. Poor outcome in traumatic acute subdural haematoma is higher in elderly patients even after surgical intervention.

  17. Acute glucose and lactate metabolism are associated with cognitive recovery following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Christina; Glenn, Thomas C; Hovda, David A; Vespa, Paul M; McArthur, David L; Van Horn, John D; Wright, Matthew J

    2018-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with acute cerebral metabolic crisis (ACMC). ACMC-related atrophy appears to be prominent in frontal and temporal lobes following moderate-to-severe TBI. This atrophy is correlated with poorer cognitive outcomes in TBI. The current study investigated ability of acute glucose and lactate metabolism to predict long-term recovery of frontal-temporal cognitive function in participants with moderate-to-severe TBI. Cerebral metabolic rate of glucose and lactate were measured by the Kety-Schmidt method on days 0-7 post-injury. Indices of frontal-temporal cognitive processing were calculated for six months post-injury; 12 months post-injury; and recovery (the difference between the six- and 12-month scores). Glucose and lactate metabolism were included in separate regression models, as they were highly intercorrelated. Also, glucose and lactate values were centered and averaged and included in a final regression model. Models for the prediction frontal-temporal cognition at six and 12 months post-injury were not significant. However, average glucose and lactate metabolism predicted recovery of frontal-temporal cognition, accounting for 23% and 22% of the variance, respectively. Also, maximum glucose metabolism, but not maximum lactate metabolism, was an inverse predictor in the recovery of frontal-temporal cognition, accounting for 23% of the variance. Finally, the average of glucose and lactate metabolism predicted frontal-temporal cognitive recovery, accounting for 22% of the variance. These data indicate that acute glucose and lactate metabolism both support cognitive recovery from TBI. Also, our data suggest that control of endogenous fuels and/or supplementation with exogenous fuels may have therapeutic potential for cognitive recovery from TBI. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  19. Post-acute traumatic brain injury rehabilitation: effects on outcome measures and life care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbach, Grace S; Kreber, Lisa A; Harrington, David; Ashley, Mark J

    2015-05-15

    Rehabilitation is the predominant post-acute treatment for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of post-acute TBI rehabilitation by comparing outcome measures and life care cost with that of patients with cerebrovascular accident (CVA) who underwent a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program within the same facility. To better assess the effects of rehabilitation, we only included patients with no benefit limitations from the insurance carrier. Functional effectiveness was determined by comparing outcome scales, which included the Disability Rating Scale, Mayo Portland Inventory, Occupational Status Scale, Living Status Scale, and the Centre for Neuro Skills Scale. Cost-effectiveness was determined by having certified life care planners create separate cost projections from the admission and discharge patient files. This allowed us to compare cost projections with and without rehabilitation for each patient. Significant decreases in the cost projections, i.e., rehabilitation savings (RS), were found after rehabilitation for TBI. These RS were equivalent to those of patients with CVA. Likewise, equivalent improvements were found on all of the outcome scales for both brain injury groups. We also evaluated if the latency from TBI to admission in the rehabilitation program had an influence on outcome. Cost and functional effectiveness was more marked when rehabilitation was initiated within the first year after TBI. The effects of age of TBI were also evaluated. Although RS were most marked in younger patients, improvements in outcome measures were observed in all age groups after post-acute rehabilitation.

  20. Correlation of Computed Tomography findings with Glasgow Coma Scale in patients with acute traumatic brain injury

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    SK Sah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To correlate Computed Tomography (CT findings with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS in patients with acute traumatic brain injury attending in Chitwan Medical College teaching hospital Chitwan, Nepal. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was performed among 50 patients of acute (less than24 hours cases of craniocerebral trauma over a period of four months. The patient’s level of consciousness (GCS was determined and a brain CT scan without contrast media was performed. A sixth generation General Electric (GE CT scan was utilized and 5mm and 10mm sections were obtained for infratentorial and supratentorial parts respectively. RESULT The age range of the patients was 1 to 75 years (mean age 35.6± 21.516 years and male: female ratio was 3.1:1. The most common causes of head injury were road traffic accident (RTA (60%, fall injury (20%, physical assault (12% and pedestrian injuries (8%. The distribution of patients in accordance with consciousness level was found to be 54% with mild TBI (GCS score 12 to 14, 28% with moderate TBI (GCS score 11 to 8 and 18% with severe TBI (GCS score less than 7. The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan was accompanied by lower GCS. CONCLUSION The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan were accompanied with lower GCS. Patients having single lesion had more GCS level than mixed level and mid line shift type of injury.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i2.12947 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(2; 4-9

  1. Calorie and Protein Intake in Acute Rehabilitation Inpatients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Versus Other Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity and its consequences affect patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a paucity of data with regard to the dietary intake patterns of patients with SCI in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Our hypothesis is that acute rehabilitation inpatients with SCI consume significantly more calories and protein than other inpatient rehabilitation diagnoses. Objective: To compare calorie and protein intake in patients with new SCI versus other diagnoses (new traumatic brain injury [TBI], new stroke, and Parkinson’s disease [PD]) in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Methods: The intake of 78 acute rehabilitation inpatients was recorded by registered dieticians utilizing once-weekly calorie and protein intake calculations. Results: Mean ± SD calorie intake (kcal) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 1,967.9 ± 611.6, 1,546.8 ± 352.3, 1,459.7 ± 443.2, and 1,459.4 ± 434.6, respectively. ANOVA revealed a significant overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 4.74, P = .004. Mean ± SD protein intake (g) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 71.5 ± 25.0, 61.1 ± 12.8, 57.6 ± 16.6, and 55.1 ± 19.1, respectively. ANOVA did not reveal an overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 2.50, P = .066. Conclusions: Given the diet-related comorbidities and energy balance abnormalities associated with SCI, combined with the intake levels demonstrated in this study, education with regard to appropriate calorie intake in patients with SCI should be given in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. PMID:23960707

  2. The functional results of acute nerve grafting in traumatic sciatic nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayvada, Haluk; Demirdöver, Cenk; Menderes, Adnan; Yılmaz, Mustafa; Karaca, Can

    2013-03-01

    The sciatic and peroneal nerves are the most frequently injured in lower extremities, followed by tibial and femoral nerves. The aim of this study is to evaluate the functional results of acute nerve grafting in traumatic sciatic nerve injuries. A total of 9 patients with sciatic nerve defect were treated with primary nerve grafting. The mean age was 31.7 years. The etiologic factors were gunshot wounds, traffic accident, and penetrating trauma. All of the patients had sciatic nerve defects ranging from 3.4 to 13.6 cm. The follow-up period ranged between 25 and 84 months. The tibial nerve motor function was "good" or "very good" (M3-M4) in 5 patients (55.6%). The plantar flexion was not sufficient for the rest of the patients. The peroneal nerve motor function was also "good" and "very good" in 3 patients (33.3%). The functional results of the acute nerve grafting of the sciatic nerve within the first week after the injury are poorer than reported in the related literature. This protocol should only be applied to select patients who have adequate soft tissue coverage and healthy nerve endings.

  3. Early detection of consciousness in patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlow, Brian L; Chatelle, Camille; Spencer, Camille A; Chu, Catherine J; Bodien, Yelena G; O'Connor, Kathryn L; Hirschberg, Ronald E; Hochberg, Leigh R; Giacino, Joseph T; Rosenthal, Eric S; Wu, Ona

    2017-09-01

    See Schiff (doi:10.1093/awx209) for a scientific commentary on this article. Patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury may recover consciousness before self-expression. Without behavioural evidence of consciousness at the bedside, clinicians may render an inaccurate prognosis, increasing the likelihood of withholding life-sustaining therapies or denying rehabilitative services. Task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography techniques have revealed covert consciousness in the chronic setting, but these techniques have not been tested in the intensive care unit. We prospectively enrolled 16 patients admitted to the intensive care unit for acute severe traumatic brain injury to test two hypotheses: (i) in patients who lack behavioural evidence of language expression and comprehension, functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography detect command-following during a motor imagery task (i.e. cognitive motor dissociation) and association cortex responses during language and music stimuli (i.e. higher-order cortex motor dissociation); and (ii) early responses to these paradigms are associated with better 6-month outcomes on the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended. Patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging on post-injury Day 9.2 ± 5.0 and electroencephalography on Day 9.8 ± 4.6. At the time of imaging, behavioural evaluation with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised indicated coma (n = 2), vegetative state (n = 3), minimally conscious state without language (n = 3), minimally conscious state with language (n = 4) or post-traumatic confusional state (n = 4). Cognitive motor dissociation was identified in four patients, including three whose behavioural diagnosis suggested a vegetative state. Higher-order cortex motor dissociation was identified in two additional patients. Complete absence of responses to language, music and motor imagery was only observed in coma patients. In patients with behavioural evidence

  4. Sleep Duration and Sleep Quality following Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Propensity Score Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Yun Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI has been widely studied and the effects of injury can be long term or even lifelong. This research aims to characterize the sleep problems of patients following acute mTBI. Methods. A total of 171 patients with mTBI within one month and 145 non-mTBI controls were recruited in this study. The questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, was used to evaluate seven aspects of sleep problems. A propensity score method was used to generate a quasirandomized design to account for the background information, including gender, age, Beck’s Anxiety Index, Beck’s Depression Index, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The effect was evaluated via cumulative logit regression including propensity scores as a covariate. Results. Before adjustment, about 60% mTBI patients and over three quarters of control subjects had mild sleep disturbance while one third mTBI patients had moderate sleep disturbance. After adjusting by the propensity scores, the scores of sleep quality and duration were significant between mTBI and control groups. Conclusion. Our study supports that sleep problem is common in mTBI group. After adjusting the confounders by propensity score, sleep duration and subjective sleep quality are the most frequently reported problems in mTBI patients within one month after the injury.

  5. Association between Peripheral Oxidative Stress and White Matter Damage in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ming Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative stress is believed to be one of the mechanisms involved in the neuronal damage after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI. However, the disease severity correlation between oxidative stress biomarker level and deep brain microstructural changes in acute TBI remains unknown. In present study, twenty-four patients with acute TBI and 24 healthy volunteers underwent DTI. The peripheral blood oxidative biomarkers, like serum thiol and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS concentrations, were also obtained. The DTI metrics of the deep brain regions, as well as the fractional anisotropy (FA and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured and correlated with disease severity, serum thiol, and TBARS levels. We found that patients with TBI displayed lower FAs in deep brain regions with abundant WMs and further correlated with increased serum TBARS level. Our study has shown a level of anatomic detail to the relationship between white matter (WM damage and increased systemic oxidative stress in TBI which suggests common inflammatory processes that covary in both the peripheral and central reactions after TBI.

  6. Understanding recovery in children following traffic-related injuries: exploring acute traumatic stress reactions, child coping, and coping assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, Meghan L; Donlon, Katharine A; Hildenbrand, Aimee K; Winston, Flaura K; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2014-04-01

    Millions of children incur potentially traumatic physical injuries every year. Most children recover well from their injury but many go on to develop persistent traumatic stress reactions. This study aimed to describe children's coping and coping assistance (i.e., the ways in which parents and peers help children cope) strategies and to explore the association between coping and acute stress reactions following an injury. Children (N = 243) rated their acute traumatic stress reactions within one month of injury and reported on coping and coping assistance six months later. Parents completed a measure of coping assistance at the six-month assessment. Children used an average of five to six coping strategies (out of 10), with wishful thinking, social support, and distraction endorsed most frequently. Child coping was associated with parent and peer coping assistance strategies. Significant acute stress reactions were related to subsequent child use of coping strategies (distraction, social withdrawal, problem-solving, blaming others) and to child report of parent use of distraction (as a coping assistance strategy). Findings suggest that children's acute stress reactions may influence their selection of coping and coping assistance strategies. To best inform interventions, research is needed to examine change in coping behaviors and coping assistance over time, including potential bidirectional relationships between trauma reactions and coping.

  7. Functional status predicts acute care readmission in the traumatic spinal cord injury population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Donna; Slocum, Chloe; Silver, Julie K; Morgan, James W; Goldstein, Richard; Zafonte, Ross; Schneider, Jeffrey C

    2018-03-29

    Context/objective Acute care readmission has been identified as an important marker of healthcare quality. Most previous models assessing risk prediction of readmission incorporate variables for medical comorbidity. We hypothesized that functional status is a more robust predictor of readmission in the spinal cord injury population than medical comorbidities. Design Retrospective cross-sectional analysis. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation facilities, Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation data from 2002 to 2012 Participants traumatic spinal cord injury patients. Outcome measures A logistic regression model for predicting acute care readmission based on demographic variables and functional status (Functional Model) was compared with models incorporating demographics, functional status, and medical comorbidities (Functional-Plus) or models including demographics and medical comorbidities (Demographic-Comorbidity). The primary outcomes were 3- and 30-day readmission, and the primary measure of model performance was the c-statistic. Results There were a total of 68,395 patients with 1,469 (2.15%) readmitted at 3 days and 7,081 (10.35%) readmitted at 30 days. The c-statistics for the Functional Model were 0.703 and 0.654 for 3 and 30 days. The Functional Model outperformed Demographic-Comorbidity models at 3 days (c-statistic difference: 0.066-0.096) and outperformed two of the three Demographic-Comorbidity models at 30 days (c-statistic difference: 0.029-0.056). The Functional-Plus models exhibited negligible improvements (0.002-0.010) in model performance compared to the Functional models. Conclusion Readmissions are used as a marker of hospital performance. Function-based readmission models in the spinal cord injury population outperform models incorporating medical comorbidities. Readmission risk models for this population would benefit from the inclusion of functional status.

  8. Non-terminal animal model of post-traumatic osteoarthritis induced by acute joint injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, M K; Trumble, T N; Carlson, C S; Groschen, D M; Merritt, K A; Brown, M P

    2013-05-01

    Develop a non-terminal animal model of acute joint injury that demonstrates clinical and morphological evidence of early post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). An osteochondral (OC) fragment was created arthroscopically in one metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint of 11 horses and the contralateral joint was sham operated. Eleven additional horses served as unoperated controls. Every 2 weeks, force plate analysis, flexion response, joint circumference, and synovial effusion scores were recorded. At weeks 0 and 16, radiographs (all horses) and arthroscopic videos (OC injured and sham joints) were graded. At week 16, synovium and cartilage biopsies were taken arthroscopically from OC injured and sham joints for histologic evaluation and the OC fragment was removed. OC fragments were successfully created and horses were free of clinical lameness after fragment removal. Forelimb gait asymmetry was observed at week 2 (P = 0.0012), while joint circumference (P < 0.0001) and effusion scores (P < 0.0001) were increased in injured limbs compared to baseline from weeks 2 to 16. Positive flexion response of injured limbs was noted at multiple time points. Capsular enthesophytes were seen radiographically in injured limbs. Articular cartilage damage was demonstrated arthroscopically as mild wear-lines and histologically as superficial zone chondrocyte death accompanied by mild proliferation. Synovial hyperemia and fibrosis were present at the site of OC injury. Acute OC injury to the MCP joint resulted in clinical, imaging, and histologic changes in cartilage and synovium characteristic of early PTOA. This model will be useful for defining biomarkers of early osteoarthritis and for monitoring response to therapy and surgery. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The relationship between neuron-specific enolase and prognosis of patients with acute traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-yang LIU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relationship between neuron-specific enolase (NSE levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI and the prognosis of TBI patients.  Methods A total of 89 patients with acute TBI were divided into light, medium, heavy and severe TBI groups based on admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score. Serum NSE expression levels were detected in all cases and NSE levels in CSF were detected in 18 cases within 12 h after TBI. The expression levels of serum NSE in 20 normal people, except cases of lung disease and nervous system damage, were detected as a control group. Results Compared with the control group, serum NSE expression levels of patients in each TBI group were elevated (P < 0.05, for all, and the NSE levels in severe and heavy TBI groups were higher than that in medium and light groups (P < 0.05, for all. The serum NSE expression levels of patients with cerebral contusion were higher than that of patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI, P = 0.025, subdural hematoma (P = 0.031 and epidural hematoma (P = 0.021. Serum NSE expression levels were negatively correlated with GCS score (rs = - 0.327, P = 0.024 and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS score (rs = - 0.252, P = 0.049. The NSE expression levels of CSF in severe and heavy TBI patients were higher than that of serum (P = 0.039, 0.031.  Conclusions NSE expression changes can be evaluated as an auxiliary indicator in reflecting the degree of acute TBI, typing diagnosis and prognostic evaluation, and NSE levels of CSF is more sensitive than that of serum. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.013

  10. Cortisol evaluation during the acute phase of traumatic brain injury-A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensalah, Meriem; Donaldson, Malcolm; Aribi, Yamina; Iabassen, Malek; Cherfi, Lyes; Nebbal, Mustapha; Medjaher, Meriem; Haffaf, ElMehdi; Abdennebi, Benaissa; Guenane, Kamel; Djermane, Adel; Kemali, Zahra; OuldKablia, Samia

    2018-05-01

    Biochemical diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency (AI) is difficult in the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI). To assess the frequency and predictive factors of AI in victims of TBI from Algiers. Between November 2009 and December 2013, TBI victims had a single 8-9 am serum cortisol measurement during the acute postinjury period (0-7 days). AI was defined according to basal cortisol levels of 83, 276 and 414 nmol/L. Variables studied were TBI severity according to Glasgow coma scale, duration of intubation and coma, pupillary status, hypotension, anaemia, brain imaging findings, diabetes insipidus and medication. Insulin tolerance test was performed during the recovery phase, defining AI as peak cortisol 414 nmol/L. Hydrocortisone replacement is advised in TBI patients with morning cortisol <276 nmol/L or those <414 nmol/L with additional risk factors for AI. As acute and subsequent AI are poorly correlated, patients with moderate/severe TBI require adrenal re-evaluation during the recovery phase. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Loss of Microstructural Integrity in the Limbic-Subcortical Networks for Acute Symptomatic Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies reported discrepant white matter diffusivity in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI on the base of Glasgow Coma Scale, which are unreliable for some TBI severity indicators and the frequency of missing documentation in the medical record. In the present study, we adopted the Mayo classification system for TBI severity. In this system, the mTBI is also divided into two groups as “probable and symptomatic” TBI. We aimed to investigate altered microstructural integrity in symptomatic acute TBI (<1 week by using tract-based spatial statics (TBSS approach. A total of 12 patients and 13 healthy volunteers were involved and underwent MRI scans including conventional scan, and SWI and DTI. All the patients had no visible lesions by using conventional and SWI neuroimaging techniques, while showing widespread declines in the fractional anisotropy (FA of gray matter and white matter throughout the TBSS skeleton, particularly in the limbic-subcortical structures. By contrast, symptomatic TBI patients showed no significant enhanced changes in FA compared to the healthy controls. A better understanding of the acute changes occurring following symptomatic TBI may increase our understanding of neuroplasticity and continuing degenerative change, which, in turn, may facilitate advances in management and intervention.

  12. Cognitive Training for Post-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Hallock

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantitatively aggregate effects of cognitive training (CT on cognitive and functional outcome measures in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI more than 12-months post-injury.Design: We systematically searched six databases for non-randomized and randomized controlled trials (RCTs of CT in TBI patients at least 12-months post-injury reporting cognitive and/or functional outcomes. Main Measures: Efficacy was measured as standardized mean difference (Hedges’ g of post-training change. We investigated heterogeneity across studies using subgroup analyses and meta-regressions. Results: Fourteen studies encompassing 575 patients were included. The effect of CT on overall cognition was small and statistically significant (g=0.22, 95%CI 0.05 to 0.38; p=0.01, with low heterogeneity (I2=11.71% and no evidence of publication bias. A moderate effect size was found for overall functional outcomes (g=0.32, 95%CI 0.08 to 0.57, p=0.01 with low heterogeneity (I2=14.27% and possible publication bias. Statistically significant effects were also found only for executive function (g=0.20, 95%CI 0.02 to 0.39, p=0.03 and verbal memory (g=0.32, 95%CI 0.14 to 0.50, p<0.01. Conclusions: Despite limited studies in this field, this meta-analysis indicates that CT is modestly effective in improving cognitive and functional outcomes in patients with post-acute TBI and should therefore play a more significant role in TBI rehabilitation.

  13. Acute neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Li, Ling; Wang, Yan-Gang; Fei, Zhou; Zhong, Jun; Wei, Li-Zhou; Long, Qian-Fa; Liu, Wei-Ping

    2012-05-10

    Traumatic brain injury commonly has a result of a short window of opportunity between the period of initial brain injury and secondary brain injury, which provides protective strategies and can reduce damages of brain due to secondary brain injury. Previous studies have reported neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields. However, the effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on neural damage after traumatic brain injury have not been reported yet. The present study aims to investigate effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the model of lateral fluid percussion injury, which were placed in non-electromagnetic fields and 15 Hz (Hertz) electromagnetic fields with intensities of 1 G (Gauss), 3 G and 5 G. At various time points (ranging from 0.5 to 30 h) after lateral fluid percussion injury, rats were treated with kainic acid (administered by intraperitoneal injection) to induce apoptosis in hippocampal cells. The results were as follows: (1) the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was dramatically decreased during the neuroprotective time window. (2) The kainic acid-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus was significantly decreased in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields. (3) Electromagnetic fields exposure shortened the escape time in water maze test. (4) Electromagnetic fields exposure accelerated the recovery of the blood-brain barrier after brain injury. These findings revealed that extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields significantly prolong the window of opportunity for brain protection and enhance the intensity of neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Amelioration of Acute Sequelae of Blast Induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury by N-Acetyl Cysteine: A Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    Sensory neuroprotection, mitochondrial preservation, and therapeutic potential of N-acetyl-cysteine after nerve injury . Neuroscience 125: 91–101. 11...929. 31. Lew HL, Jerger JF, Guillory SB, Henry JA (2007) Auditory dysfunction in traumatic brain injury . J Rehab Research, Development 44: 921–928. 32...Amelioration of Acute Sequelae of Blast Induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury by N-Acetyl Cysteine: A Double- Blind, Placebo Controlled Study Michael E

  15. Acute management of traumatic spinal cord injury in a Greek and a Swedish region: a prospective, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divanoglou, A; Seiger, A; Levi, R

    2010-06-01

    Prospective, population-based study. This paper is part of the Stockholm Thessaloniki Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Study (STATSCIS). To characterize patient populations and to compare acute management after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). The Greater Thessaloniki region in Greece and the Greater Stockholm region in Sweden. Inception cohorts with acute TSCI that were hospitalized during the study period, that is September 2006 to October 2007, were identified. Overall, 81 out of 87 cases consented to inclusion in Thessaloniki and 47 out of 49 in Stockholm. Data from Thessaloniki were collected through physical examinations, medical record reviews and communication with TSCI cases and medical teams. Data from Stockholm were retrieved from the Nordic Spinal Cord Injury Registry. There were no significant differences between study groups with regard to core clinical characteristics. In contrast, there were significant differences in (1) transfer logistics from the scene of trauma to a tertiary-level hospital (number of intermediate admissions, modes of transportation and duration of transfer) and (2) acute key therapeutic interventions, that is, the use of mechanical ventilation (49% in Thessaloniki versus 20% in Stockholm), and performance of tracheostomy (36% in Thessaloniki versus 15% in Stockholm); spinal surgery was performed significantly more often and earlier in Stockholm than in Thessaloniki. Despite largely similar core clinical characteristics, Stockholm and Thessaloniki cases underwent significantly different acute management, most probably to be attributed to adaptations to the differing regional approaches of care one following a systematic approach of SCI care and the other not.

  16. Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological follow up in mild traumatic brain injury : Acute versus chronic disturbances?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Zwany; Spikman, Jacoba M.; Rodiger, Lars A.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    In a subgroup of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) residual symptoms, interfering with outcome and return to work, are found. With neuropsychological assessment cognitive deficits can be demonstrated although the pathological underpinnings of these cognitive deficits are not fully

  17. Pathophysiological Concepts in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury : Diffusion Tensor Imaging Related to Acute Perfusion CT Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Zwany; Cerliani, Leonardo; Rodiger, Lars A.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2013-01-01

    Background: A subgroup of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) experiences residual symptoms interfering with their return to work. The pathophysiological substrate of the suboptimal outcome in these patients is a source of debate. Objective: To provide greater insight into the

  18. Acute Inflammatory Response in Rodent Brain and Blood Following a Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    dehydrated with 30% sucrose before storing at -80 °C. Thirty micron coronal sections were stained with a primary antibody against microglia ...strongly Iba-1 stained cells as compared to controls. These results indicate blast exposure induces activation of microglia in the hippocampus... Neuroinflammation after traumatic brain injury: Opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Brain, behaviour and Immunity 26: 1191-1201. Loane, D. J

  19. Pituitary dysfunction in traumatic brain injury: Is evaluation in the acute phase worthwhile?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip P Dalwadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is an under-recognized cause of hypopituitarism. According to recent data, it could be more frequent than previously known. However, there is a scarcity of data in Indian population. Aims: The main aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of pituitary hormone deficiencies in the acute phase of TBI. The secondary objectives were to correlate the severity of trauma with basal hormone levels and to determine whether initial hormone deficiencies predict mortality. Subjects and Methods: Forty-nine TBI patients (41 men and 8 women were included in this study. Pituitary functions were evaluated within 24 h of admission. Results: Gonadotropin deficiency was found in 65.3% patient while 46.9% had low insulin-like growth factor-1, 12.24% had cortisol level <7 mcg/dl. Cortisol and prolactin level were positively correlated with the severity of TBI suggestive of stress response. Free triiodothyronine (fT3 and free thyroxine were significantly lower in patients with increasing severity of tuberculosis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that mortality after TBI was unrelated to the basal pituitary hormone levels except low T3 level, which was found to be positively related to mortality. Conclusions: Pituitary dysfunction is common after TBI and the most commonly affected axes are growth hormone and gonadotropin axis. Low fT3 correlates best with mortality. During the acute phase of TBI, at least an assessment of cortisol is vital as undetected cortisol deficiency can be life-threatening

  20. Prospective comparison of acute confusion severity with duration of post-traumatic amnesia in predicting employment outcome after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakase-Richardson, Risa; Yablon, Stuart A; Sherer, Mark

    2007-08-01

    Measurement of the duration of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) is common practice, serving as an important index of the severity of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a predictor of functional outcome. However, controversy exists regarding the nature of PTA; some studies indicate that it is a confusional state with symptoms that extend beyond disorientation and amnesia. To evaluate the contribution of the severity of acute confusion 1 month after TBI to prediction of employment at 1 year after injury, comparing it with PTA duration. Prospective study involving 171 participants with complete data, who met the study criteria, from 228 consecutive TBI Model System admissions. Outcome measures included weekly administration of the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DelRS-R98) to measure the severity of acute confusion. Evaluations closest to 1 month after injury were used for study purposes. Duration of PTA was defined as the interval from injury until two consecutive Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test scores of > or = 76 were obtained within a period of 24-72 h. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to predict employment status at 1 year after injury. Age, education and DelRS-R98 were significant predictors accounting for 34% of outcome variance. Individuals with greater confusion severity at 1 month after injury, older age and lower levels of education were less likely to be employed at 1 year after injury. Severity of confusion was more strongly associated with employment outcome (r(s) = -0.39) than was PTA duration (r(s) = -0.34). In addition to demographic indices, severity of acute confusion makes a unique contribution to predicting late outcome after TBI.

  1. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging seen acutely following mild traumatic brain injury: correlation with neuropsychological tests and delayed recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, David G.; Jackson, Alan; Mason, Damon L.; Berry, Elizabeth; Hollis, Sally; Yates, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common reason for hospital attendance and is associated with significant delayed morbidity. We studied a series of 80 persons with MTBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing were used in the acute phase and a questionnaire for post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and return to work status at 6 months. In 26 subjects abnormalities were seen on MRI, of which 5 were definitely traumatic. There was weak correlation with abnormal neuropsychological tests for attention in the acute period. There was no significant correlation with a questionnaire for PCS and return to work status. Although non-specific abnormalities are frequently seen, standard MRI techniques are not helpful in identifying patients with MTBI who are likely to have delayed recovery. (orig.)

  2. Connectomic and Surface-Based Morphometric Correlates of Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Acqua, Patrizia; Johannes, Sönke; Mica, Ladislav; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Glaab, Richard; Fandino, Javier; Schwendinger, Markus; Meier, Christoph; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Müller, Andreas; Jäncke, Lutz; Hänggi, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Reduced integrity of white matter (WM) pathways and subtle anomalies in gray matter (GM) morphology have been hypothesized as mechanisms in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, findings on structural brain changes in early stages after mTBI are inconsistent and findings related to early symptoms severity are rare. Fifty-one patients were assessed with multimodal neuroimaging and clinical methods exclusively within 7 days following mTBI and compared to 53 controls. Whole-brain connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging was subjected to network-based statistics, whereas cortical surface area, thickness, and volume based on T1-weighted MRI scans were investigated using surface-based morphometric analysis. Reduced connectivity strength within a subnetwork of 59 edges located predominantly in bilateral frontal lobes was significantly associated with higher levels of self-reported symptoms. In addition, cortical surface area decreases were associated with stronger complaints in five clusters located in bilateral frontal and postcentral cortices, and in the right inferior temporal region. Alterations in WM and GM were localized in similar brain regions and moderately-to-strongly related to each other. Furthermore, the reduction of cortical surface area in the frontal regions was correlated with poorer attentive-executive performance in the mTBI group. Finally, group differences were detected in both the WM and GM, especially when focusing on a subgroup of patients with greater complaints, indicating the importance of classifying mTBI patients according to severity of symptoms. This study provides evidence that mTBI affects not only the integrity of WM networks by means of axonal damage but also the morphology of the cortex during the initial post-injury period. These anomalies might be greater in the acute period than previously believed and the involvement of frontal brain regions was consistently pronounced in both findings. The dysconnected subnetwork

  3. Connectomic and surface-based morphometric correlates of acute mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia eDall'Acqua

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reduced integrity of white matter (WM pathways and subtle anomalies in gray matter (GM morphology have been hypothesized as mechanisms in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI. However, findings on structural brain changes in early stages after mTBI are inconsistent and findings related to early symptoms severity are rare.Fifty-one patients were assessed with multimodal neuroimaging and clinical methods exclusively within 7 days following mTBI and compared to 53 controls. Whole-brain connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging was subjected to network-based statistics, whereas cortical surface area, thickness, and volume based on T1-weighted MRI scans were investigated using surface-based morphometric analysis. Reduced connectivity strength within a subnetwork of 59 edges located predominantly in bilateral frontal lobes was significantly associated with higher levels of self-reported symptoms. In addition, cortical surface area decreases were associated with stronger complaints in five clusters located in bilateral frontal and postcentral cortices, and in the right inferior temporal region. Alterations in WM and GM were localized in similar brain regions and moderately-to-strongly related to each other. Furthermore, the reduction of cortical surface area in the frontal regions was correlated with poorer attentive-executive performance in the mTBI group. Finally, group differences were detected in both the WM and GM, especially when focusing on a subgroup of patients with greater complaints, indicating the importance of classifying mTBI patients according to severity of symptoms. This study provides evidence that mTBI affects not only the integrity of WM networks by means of axonal damage but also the morphology of the cortex during the initial post-injury period. These anomalies might be greater in the acute period than previously believed and the involvement of frontal brain regions was consistently pronounced in both findings. The dysconnected

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury: Hope Through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a traumatic brain injury, marked by difficulty with perception, thinking, remembering, and concentration; during this acute stage, ... of nerve cells in the brain causing strange sensations, emotions, and behavior, or sometimes convulsions, muscle spasms, ...

  5. Effect of technique and timing of tracheostomy in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury undergoing mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganuza, Javier Romero; Forcada, Angel Garcia; Gambarrutta, Claudia; De La Lastra Buigues, Elena Diez; Gonzalez, Victoria Eugenia Merlo; Fuentes, Fátima Paz; Luciani, Alejandro A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of timing and techniques of tracheostomy on morbidity, mortality, and the burden of resources in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) undergoing mechanical ventilation. Design Review of a prospectively collected database. Setting Intensive and intermediate care units of a monographic hospital for the treatment of SCI. Participants Consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) during their first inpatient rehabilitation for cervical and thoracic traumatic SCI. A total of 323 patients were included: 297 required mechanical ventilation and 215 underwent tracheostomy. Outcome measures Demographic data, data relevant to the patients’ neurological injuries (level and grade of spinal cord damage), tracheostomy technique and timing, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay at ICU, incidence of pneumonia, incidence of perioperative and early postoperative complications, and mortality. Results Early tracheostomy (tracheostomy was performed in 101 patients (47%) and late (≥7 days) in 114 (53%). Surgical tracheostomy was employed in 119 cases (55%) and percutaneous tracheostomy in 96 (45%). There were 61 complications in 53 patients related to all tracheostomy procedures. Two were qualified as serious (tracheoesophageal fistula and mediastinal abscess). Other complications were mild. Bleeding was moderate in one case (late, percutaneous tracheostomy). Postoperative infection rate was low. Mortality of all causes was also low. Conclusion Early tracheostomy may have favorable effects in patients with acute traumatic SC. Both techniques, percutaneous and surgical tracheostomy, can be performed safely in the ICU. PMID:21528630

  6. Prognostic models for predicting posttraumatic seizures during acute hospitalization, and at 1 and 2 years following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Anne C; Wagner, Amy K; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Brooks, Maria M; Zafonte, Ross D; Pugh, Mary Jo V; Fabio, Anthony; Hammond, Flora M; Dreer, Laura E; Bushnik, Tamara; Walker, William C; Brown, Allen W; Johnson-Greene, Doug; Shea, Timothy; Krellman, Jason W; Rosenthal, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    Posttraumatic seizures (PTS) are well-recognized acute and chronic complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Risk factors have been identified, but considerable variability in who develops PTS remains. Existing PTS prognostic models are not widely adopted for clinical use and do not reflect current trends in injury, diagnosis, or care. We aimed to develop and internally validate preliminary prognostic regression models to predict PTS during acute care hospitalization, and at year 1 and year 2 postinjury. Prognostic models predicting PTS during acute care hospitalization and year 1 and year 2 post-injury were developed using a recent (2011-2014) cohort from the TBI Model Systems National Database. Potential PTS predictors were selected based on previous literature and biologic plausibility. Bivariable logistic regression identified variables with a p-value load, and pre-injury limitation in learning/remembering/concentrating as significant PTS predictors during acute hospitalization. Significant predictors of PTS at year 1 were subdural hematoma (SDH), contusion load, craniotomy, craniectomy, seizure during acute hospitalization, duration of posttraumatic amnesia, preinjury mental health treatment/psychiatric hospitalization, and preinjury incarceration. Year 2 significant predictors were similar to those of year 1: SDH, intraparenchymal fragment, craniotomy, craniectomy, seizure during acute hospitalization, and preinjury incarceration. Corrected concordance (C) statistics were 0.599, 0.747, and 0.716 for acute hospitalization, year 1, and year 2 models, respectively. The prognostic model for PTS during acute hospitalization did not discriminate well. Year 1 and year 2 models showed fair to good predictive validity for PTS. Cranial surgery, although medically necessary, requires ongoing research regarding potential benefits of increased monitoring for signs of epileptogenesis, PTS prophylaxis, and/or rehabilitation/social support. Future studies should

  7. Prediction of behavioural and cognitive deficits in patients with traumatic brain injury at an acute rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guise, E; LeBlanc, J; Feyz, M; Lamoureux, J; Greffou, S

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify factors that would predict short-term neuropsychological outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) hospitalized in an acute rehabilitation setting. Data was collected in the context of an acute early rehabilitation setting of a trauma centre. A brief neuropsychological assessment was carried out for 348 patients within a month following their trauma. Length of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) was the best predictor of behavioural, memory and executive function variables within a month post TBI. The odds of being agitated, labile, irritable and disinhibited at one month post trauma were almost six times higher for those with PTA that lasted more than 7 days compared to those with a PTA of less than 24 hours. Also, the odds of having a higher mental manipulation score (less significant executive function impairment) were almost two times lower for those with frontal lesions, and three to six times lower for those with PTA of more than 24 hours. In addition, TBI severity, education and age were considered good predictors of some aspects of neuropsychological outcome. This model may help clinicians and administrators recognize the probable post-traumatic deficits as quickly as possible and to plan interventions as well as post-acute discharge orientation accordingly and early on.

  8. Blunt abdominal trauma with handlebar injury: A rare cause of traumatic amputation of the appendix associated with acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Jensen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe traumatic appendicitis in a 7-year-old boy who presented after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma to his right lower abdomen secondary to bicycle handlebar injury. With diffuse abdominal pain following injury, he was admitted for observation. Computed axial tomography (CT obtained at an outside hospital demonstrated moderate stranding of the abdomen in the right lower quadrant. The CT was non-contrasted and therefore significant appendiceal distention could not be confirmed. However, there was a calcified structure in the right pelvis with trace amount of free fluid. Patient was observed with conservative management and over the course of 15 h his abdominal pain continued to intensify. With his worsening symptoms, we elected to take him for diagnostic laparoscopy. In the operating room we found an inflamed traumatically amputated appendix with the mesoappendix intact. We therefore proceeded with laparoscopic appendectomy. Pathology demonstrated acute appendicitis with fecalith. It was unclear as to whether the patient's appendicitis and perforation were secondary to fecalith obstruction, his blunt abdominal trauma or if they concurrently caused his appendicitis. Acute appendicitis is a common acute surgical condition in the pediatric population and continues to be a rare and unique cause of operative intervention in the trauma population.

  9. Cognitive activity limitations one year post-trauma in patients admitted to sub-acute rehabilitation after severe traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Jens Bak; Norup, Anne; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    -acute rehabilitation in the Eastern part of Denmark during a 5-year period from 2005 to 2009. Methods: Level of consciousness was assessed consecutively during rehabilitation and at 1 year post-trauma. Severity of traumatic brain injury was classified according to duration of post-traumatic amnesia. The cognitive...... of consciousness during the first year post-trauma. At follow-up 33-58% of patients had achieved functional independence within the cognitive domains on the Cog-FIM. Socio-economic status, duration of acute care and post-traumatic amnesia were significant predictors of outcome. Conclusion: Substantial recovery...

  10. Traumatic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Miner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 48-year-old male with unknown past medical history presents as a trauma after being hit by a car traveling approximately 25 miles per hour. On initial presentation, the patient is confused, combative, and not answering questions appropriately. The patient is hypotensive with a blood pressure of 68/40 and a heart rate of 50 beats per minute, with oxygen saturation at 96% on room air. FAST scan is positive for fluid in Morrison’s pouch, splenorenal space, and pericardial space. Significant findings: The initial chest x-ray showed an abnormal superior mediastinal contour (blue line, suggestive of a possible aortic injury. The CT angiogram showed extensive circumferential irregularity and outpouching of the distal aortic arch (red arrows compatible with aortic transection. In addition, there was a circumferential intramural hematoma, which extended through the descending aorta to the proximal infrarenal abdominal aorta (green arrow. There was also an extensive surrounding mediastinal hematoma extending around the descending aorta and supraaortic branches (purple arrows. Discussion: Traumatic aortic injury is a life-threatening event. The incidence of blunt thoracic aortic injury is low, between 1 to 2 percent of those patients with blunt thoracic trauma.1 However, approximately 80% of patients with traumatic aortic injury die at the scene.2 Therefore it is imperative to diagnose traumatic aortic injury in a timely fashion. The diagnosis can be difficult due to the non-specific signs and symptoms and other distracting injuries. Clinical suspicion should be based on the mechanism of the injury and the hemodynamic status of the patient. In any patient with blunt or penetrating trauma to the chest that is hemodynamically unstable, traumatic aortic injury should be on the differential. Chest x-ray can be used as a screening tool. A normal chest x-ray has a negative predictive value of approximately 97%. CTA chest is the

  11. OCT imaging of acute vascular changes following mild traumatic brain injury in mice (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chico-Calero, Isabel; Shishkov, Milen; Welt, Jonathan; Blatter, Cedric; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    While most people recover completely from mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) and concussions, a subset develop lasting neurological disorders. Understanding the complex pathophysiology of these injuries is critical to developing improved prognostic and therapeutic approaches. Multiple studies have shown that the structure and perfusion of brain vessels are altered after mTBI. It is possible that these vascular injuries contribute to or trigger neurodegeneration. Intravital microscopy and mouse models of TBI offer a powerful platform to study the vascular component of mTBI. Because optical coherence tomography based angiography is based on perfusion contrast and is not significantly degraded by vessel leakage or blood brain barrier disruption, it is uniquely suited to studies of brain perfusion in the setting of trauma. However, existing TBI imaging models require surgical exposure of the brain at the time of injury which conflates TBI-related vascular changes with those caused by surgery. In this work, we describe a modified cranial window preparation based on a flexible, transparent polyurethane membrane. Impact injuries were delivered directly through this membrane, and imaging was performed immediately after injury without the need for additional surgical procedures. Using this model, we demonstrate that mTBI induces a transient cessation of flow in the capillaries and smaller vessels near the injury point. Reperfusion is observed in all animals within 3 hours of injury. This work describes new insight into the transient vascular changes induced by mTBI, and demonstrates more broadly the utility of the OCT/polyurethane window model platform in preclinical studies of mTBI.

  12. Acute, transient hemorrhagic hypotension does not aggravate structural damage or neurologic motor deficits but delays the long-term cognitive recovery following mild to moderate traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Christian; Stover, John F.; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Hoover, Rachel C.; Morales, Diego M.; Schouten, Joost W.; McMillan, Asenia; Soltesz, Kristie; Motta, Melissa; Spangler, Zachery; Neugebauer, Edmund; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2008-01-01

    . Conclusions A single, acute hypotensive event lasting 30 mins did not aggravate the short- and long-term structural and motor deficits but delayed the speed of recovery of cognitive function associated with experimental traumatic brain injury. PMID:16424733

  13. Emergency room thoracotomy for acute traumatic cardiac tamponade caused by a blunt cardiac injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Ishida

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: A prompt diagnosis using FAST and treatment can be lifesaving in traumatic acute cardiac tamponade. A pericardiotomy via a thoracotomy is mandatory for lifesaving cardiac decompression in acute traumatic cardiac tamponade in cases of ineffective drainage due to clot formation within the pericardial space.

  14. Alpha desynchronization/synchronization during working memory testing is compromised in acute mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Xianghong; Shoga, Michael; Li, Lianyang; Zouridakis, George; Tran, Thao; Fonteh, Alfred N; Dawlaty, Jessica; Goldweber, Robert; Pogoda, Janice M; Harrington, Michael G

    2018-01-01

    Diagnosing and monitoring recovery of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is challenging because of the lack of objective, quantitative measures. Diagnosis is based on description of injuries often not witnessed, subtle neurocognitive symptoms, and neuropsychological testing. Since working memory (WM) is at the center of cognitive functions impaired in mTBI, this study was designed to define objective quantitative electroencephalographic (qEEG) measures of WM processing that may correlate with cognitive changes associated with acute mTBI. First-time mTBI patients and mild peripheral (limb) trauma controls without head injury were recruited from the emergency department. WM was assessed by a continuous performance task (N-back). EEG recordings were obtained during N-back testing on three occasions: within five days, two weeks, and one month after injury. Compared with controls, mTBI patients showed abnormal induced and evoked alpha activity including event-related desynchronization (ERD) and synchronization (ERS). For induced alpha power, TBI patients had excessive frontal ERD on their first and third visit. For evoked alpha, mTBI patients had lower parietal ERD/ERS at the second and third visits. These exploratory qEEG findings offer new and non-invasive candidate measures to characterize the evolution of injury over the first month, with potential to provide much-needed objective measures of brain dysfunction to diagnose and monitor the consequences of mTBI.

  15. Computed tomography vs magnetic resonance imaging for identifying acute lesions in pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttram, Sandra D W; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Miller, Jeffrey; Youssfi, Mostafa; Brown, S Danielle; Dalton, Heidi J; Adelson, P David

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Computed tomography (CT) is the modality of choice to screen for brain injuries. MRI may provide more clinically relevant information. The purpose of this study was to compare lesion detection between CT and MRI after TBI. Retrospective cohort of children (0-21 years) with TBI between 2008 and 2010 at a Level 1 pediatric trauma center with a head CT scan on day of injury and a brain MRI scan within 2 weeks of injury. Agreement between CT and MRI was determined by κ statistic and stratified by injury mechanism. One hundred five children were studied. Of these, 78% had mild TBI. The MRI scan was obtained a median of 1 day (interquartile range, 1-2) after CT. Overall, CT and MRI demonstrated poor agreement (κ=-0.083; P=.18). MRI detected a greater number of intraparenchymal lesions (n=36; 34%) compared with CT (n=16; 15%) (P<.001). Among patients with abusive head trauma, MRI detected intraparenchymal lesions in 16 (43%), compared with only 4 (11%) lesions with CT (P=.03). Of 8 subjects with a normal CT scan, 6 out of 8 had abnormal lesions on MRI. Compared with CT, MRI identified significantly more intraparenchymal lesions in pediatric TBI, particularly in children with abusive head trauma. The prognostic value of identification of intraparenchymal lesions by MRI is unknown but warrants additional inquiry. Risks and benefits from early MRI (including sedation, time, and lack of radiation exposure) compared with CT should be weighed by clinicians. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Traumatic brain injury and post-acute decline: what role does environmental enrichment play? A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eFrasca

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. While a number of studies provide evidence of neural and cognitive decline in traumatic brain injury (TBI survivors during the post-acute stages of injury, there is a dearth of research on the possible mechanisms underlying this decline. The purposes of this paper, therefore, are to (1 examine evidence that environmental enrichment (EE can influence long-term outcome following TBI, and (2 examine the nature of post-acute environments, whether they vary in degree of EE, and what impact these variations have on outcomes.Methods. We conducted a scoping review to identify studies on EE in animals and humans, and post-discharge experiences that relate to barriers to recovery.Results. Ninety-six articles that met inclusion criteria demonstrated the benefits of EE on brain and behaviour in healthy and brain-injured animals and humans. Nineteen papers on post-discharge experiences provided evidence that variables such as insurance coverage, financial and social support, home therapy, and transition from hospital to home, also play a vital role in regaining independence. Conclusion. There is evidence to suggest that lack of EE, whether from lack of resources or limited ability to engage in such environments, may play a role in post-recovery cognitive and neural decline. Maximizing EE in the post-acute stages of TBI may improve long-term outcomes for the individual, their family and society.

  17. Cardiac arrhythmias the first month after acute traumatic spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Kim; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Malmqvist, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    of this prospective observational study was to investigate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac arrests in patients with acute traumatic SCI. METHODS: As early as possible after SCI 24-hour Holter monitoring was performed. Additional Holter recordings were performed 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after SCI....... Furthermore, 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) were obtained shortly after SCI and at 4 weeks. RESULTS: Thirty patients were included. Bradycardia (heart rate (HR) ... both on 12-lead ECGs obtained shortly after SCI (P = 0.030) and at 4 weeks (P = 0.041). CONCLUSION: Many patients with cervical SCI experience arrhythmias such as bradycardia, sinus node arrest, supraventricular tachycardia, and more rarely cardiac arrest the first month after SCI. Apart from sinus...

  18. Maxillofacial injuries and traumatic brain injury--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajandram, Rama Krsna; Syed Omar, Syed Nabil; Rashdi, Muhd Fazly Nizam; Abdul Jabar, Mohd Nazimi

    2014-04-01

    Maxillofacial injuries comprising hard tissue as well as soft tissue injuries can be associated with traumatic brain injuries due to the impact of forces transmitted through the head and neck. To date, the role of maxillofacial injury on brain injury has not been properly documented with some saying it has a protective function on the brain while others opposing this idea. This cross-sectional retrospective study evaluated all patients with maxillofacial injuries. The aim of the study was to analyze the occurrence and relationship of maxillofacial injuries with traumatic brain injuries. We retrospectively studied the hospital charts of all trauma patients seen at the accident and emergency department of UKM Medical Centre from November 2010 until November 2011. A detail analysis was then carried out on all patients who satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 11294 patients were classified as trauma patients in which 176 patients had facial fractures and 292 did not have facial fractures. Middle face fractures was the most common pattern of facial fracture seen. Traumatic brain injury was present in 36.7% of maxillofacial cases. A significant association was found between facial fractures and traumatic brain injury (P maxillofacial injuries with or without facial fractures are at risk of acute or delayed traumatic brain injury. All patients should always have proper radiological investigations together with a proper observation and follow-up schedule. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effect of an integrated reality orientation programme in acute care on post-traumatic amnesia in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guise, E; Leblanc, J; Feyz, M; Thomas, H; Gosselin, N

    2005-04-01

    To assess the effect of an integrated reality orientation programme (North Star Project) in acute care on the duration of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI). It was hypothesized that those patients having participated in this programme would show a shorter PTA than those patients that did not. Duration of PTA for 12 patients with TBI who were part of the North Star Project was compared with that of 26 patients matched for initial GCS and age for whom this approach was not available (control group). Length of PTA was shorter by 5 days for the North Star patients. This result was not statistically significant (p = 0.19) but is clinically relevant. No between-group difference was found for Glasgow Coma Scale. Consequences of shorter PTA would include increased and more appropriate patient interaction and earlier transfer to rehabilitation. The North Star project also allows the family to become more actively involved in the treatment of their loved one. Further study is required to evaluate this intervention strategy to improve orientation for the patient with TBI.

  20. Is the contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries being underestimated in the acute hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, O

    2011-04-05

    Alcohol consumption in Ireland has nearly doubled during the period 1989-2001. To evaluate the relationship of alcohol to fatal head injuries in the acute hospital setting we created a data base of all fatal traumatic brain injuries in the Department of Neuropathology at Beaumont Hospital over a ten year period (1997-2006 inclusive). 498 cases were identified (351 males: 147 females). Fatalities were highest in males aged 19-25 years (N=101) and 51-70 years (N=109). Falls (N=210) and road traffic accidents (N=183) were the commonest modes of presentation. 36\\/210 (17%) falls had positive blood alcohol testing, 9\\/210 (4.3%) had documentation of alcohol in notes but no testing, 35\\/210 (16.7%) tested negative for alcohol and 130\\/210 (61.9%) were not tested. The RTA group (N=183) comprised drivers (n=79), passengers (n=47) and pedestrians (n=57). 65\\/79 (82.2%) of drivers were males aged 19-25 years. Blood alcohol was only available in 27\\/79 (34.1%) drivers and was positive in 13\\/27 (48.1%). 14\\/75 (18.7%) pedestrians were tested for alcohol, 4\\/14 (28.6%) were positive. Overall 142\\/183 (77.6%) of the RTA group were not tested. The contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries is probably being underestimated due to omission of blood alcohol concentration testing on admission to hospital. Absence of national guidelines on blood alcohol testing in the emergency department compounds the problem.

  1. The Effect of Paracetamol on Core Body Temperature in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomised, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Manoj K; Taylor, Colman; Billot, Laurent; Bompoint, Severine; Gowardman, John; Roberts, Jason A; Lipman, Jeffery; Myburgh, John

    2015-01-01

    Strategies to prevent pyrexia in patients with acute neurological injury may reduce secondary neuronal damage. The aim of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of the routine administration of 6 grams/day of intravenous paracetamol in reducing body temperature following severe traumatic brain injury, compared to placebo. A multicentre, randomised, blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in adult patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Patients were randomised to receive an intravenous infusion of either 1g of paracetamol or 0.9% sodium chloride (saline) every 4 hours for 72 hours. The primary outcome was the mean difference in core temperature during the study intervention period. Forty-one patients were included in this study: 21 were allocated to paracetamol and 20 to saline. The median (interquartile range) number of doses of study drug was 18 (17-18) in the paracetamol group and 18 (16-18) in the saline group (P = 0.85). From randomisation until 4 hours after the last dose of study treatment, there were 2798 temperature measurements (median 73 [67-76] per patient). The mean ± standard deviation temperature was 37.4±0.5°C in the paracetamol group and 37.7±0.4°C in the saline group (absolute difference -0.3°C; 95% confidence interval -0.6 to 0.0; P = 0.09). There were no significant differences in the use of physical cooling, or episodes of hypotension or hepatic abnormalities, between the two groups. The routine administration of 6g/day of intravenous paracetamol did not significantly reduce core body temperature in patients with TBI. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000444280.

  2. Moderate traumatic brain injury causes acute dendritic and synaptic degeneration in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Gao

    Full Text Available Hippocampal injury-associated learning and memory deficits are frequent hallmarks of brain trauma and are the most enduring and devastating consequences following traumatic brain injury (TBI. Several reports, including our recent paper, showed that TBI brought on by a moderate level of controlled cortical impact (CCI induces immature newborn neuron death in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In contrast, the majority of mature neurons are spared. Less research has been focused on these spared neurons, which may also be injured or compromised by TBI. Here we examined the dendrite morphologies, dendritic spines, and synaptic structures using a genetic approach in combination with immunohistochemistry and Golgi staining. We found that although most of the mature granular neurons were spared following TBI at a moderate level of impact, they exhibited dramatic dendritic beading and fragmentation, decreased number of dendritic branches, and a lower density of dendritic spines, particularly the mushroom-shaped mature spines. Further studies showed that the density of synapses in the molecular layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus was significantly reduced. The electrophysiological activity of neurons was impaired as well. These results indicate that TBI not only induces cell death in immature granular neurons, it also causes significant dendritic and synaptic degeneration in pathohistology. TBI also impairs the function of the spared mature granular neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. These observations point to a potential anatomic substrate to explain, in part, the development of posttraumatic memory deficits. They also indicate that dendritic damage in the hippocampal dentate gyrus may serve as a therapeutic target following TBI.

  3. Diagnosing dysautonomia after acute traumatic brain injury: evidence for overresponsiveness to afferent stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguley, Ian J; Nott, Melissa T; Slewa-Younan, Shameran; Heriseanu, Roxana E; Perkes, Iain E

    2009-04-01

    To differentiate between traumatic brain injury (TBI) subjects with normal and elevated autonomic activity by quantifying cardiac responsivity to nociceptive stimuli and to determine the utility of heart rate variability (HRV) and event-related heart rate changes in diagnosing dysautonomia. Prospective cohort study. Intensive care unit in a tertiary metropolitan trauma center. Adults (N=27) with TBI recruited from 79 consecutive TBI admissions comprising 16 autonomically aroused and 11 control subjects matched by age, sex, and injury severity. None. Immediate: pattern of autonomic changes indexed by HRV and event-related heart rate after nociceptive stimuli. Six months: length of stay, Glasgow Coma Scale, and Disability Rating Scale. Heart rate changes (for both HRV and event-related heart rate) were associated with the diagnostic group and 6-month outcome when evaluated pre- and poststimulus but not when evaluated at rest. When assessed on day 7 postinjury, the comparison of HRV and heart rate parameters suggested an overresponsivity to nociceptive stimuli in dysautonomic subjects. These subjects showed a 2-fold increase in mean heart rate relative to subjects with sympathetic arousal of short duration (16% vs 8%), and a 6-fold increase over nonaroused control subjects. Data suggest that post-TBI sympathetic arousal is a spectrum disorder comprising, at one end, a short-duration syndrome and, at the other end, a dramatic, severe sympathetic and motor overactivity syndrome that continued for many months postinjury and associated with a significantly worse 6-month outcome. These findings suggest that it is not the presence of reactivity per se but rather the failure of processes to control for overreactivity that contributes to dysautonomic storming. This study provides empirical evidence that dysautonomic subjects show overresponsiveness to afferent stimuli. Findings from this study suggest an evidence-driven revision of diagnostic criteria and a simple clinical

  4. BPSD following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Anghinah

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Annually, 700,000 people are hospitalized with brain injury acquired after traumatic brain injury (TBI in Brazil. Objective: We aim to review the basic concepts related to TBI, and the most common Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD findings in moderate and severe TBI survivors. We also discussed our strategies used to manage such patients in the post-acute period. Methods: Fifteen TBI outpatients followed at the Center for Cognitive Rehabilitation Post-TBI of the Clinicas Hospital of the University of São Paulo were submitted to a neurological, neuropsychological, speech and occupational therapy evaluation, including the Mini-Mental State Examination. Rehabilitation strategies will then be developed, together with the interdisciplinary team, for each patient individually. Where necessary, the pharmacological approach will be adopted. Results: Our study will discuss options of pharmacologic treatment choices for cognitive, behavioral, or affective disorders following TBI, providing relevant information related to a structured cognitive rehabilitation service and certainly will offer an alternative for patients and families afflicted by TBI. Conclusion: Traumatic brain injury can cause a variety of potentially disabling psychiatric symptoms and syndromes. Combined behavioral and pharmacological strategies, in the treatment of a set of highly challenging behavioral problems, appears to be essential for good patient recovery.

  5. BPSD following traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghinah, Renato; Freire, Fabio Rios; Coelho, Fernanda; Lacerda, Juliana Rhein; Schmidt, Magali Taino; Calado, Vanessa Tomé Gonçalves; Ianof, Jéssica Natuline; Machado, Sergio; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Basile, Luis Fernando Hindi; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Amorim, Robson Luis

    2013-01-01

    Annually, 700,000 people are hospitalized with brain injury acquired after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Brazil. OBJECTIVE We aim to review the basic concepts related to TBI, and the most common Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) findings in moderate and severe TBI survivors. We also discussed our strategies used to manage such patients in the post-acute period. METHODS Fifteen TBI outpatients followed at the Center for Cognitive Rehabilitation Post-TBI of the Clinicas Hospital of the University of São Paulo were submitted to a neurological, neuropsychological, speech and occupational therapy evaluation, including the Mini-Mental State Examination. Rehabilitation strategies will then be developed, together with the interdisciplinary team, for each patient individually. Where necessary, the pharmacological approach will be adopted. RESULTS Our study will discuss options of pharmacologic treatment choices for cognitive, behavioral, or affective disorders following TBI, providing relevant information related to a structured cognitive rehabilitation service and certainly will offer an alternative for patients and families afflicted by TBI. CONCLUSION Traumatic brain injury can cause a variety of potentially disabling psychiatric symptoms and syndromes. Combined behavioral and pharmacological strategies, in the treatment of a set of highly challenging behavioral problems, appears to be essential for good patient recovery. PMID:29213850

  6. Traumatic Brain Injury and Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence

    1994-01-01

    Persons who have suffered traumatic injury to the brain may subsequently display aggressive behavior. Three main syndromes of aggression following traumatic brain injury are described: (1) episodic dyscontrol; (2) frontal lobe disinhibition; and (3) exacerbation of premorbid antisociality. The neuropsychological substrates of these syndromes are…

  7. Traumatic Brain Injury - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Traumatic Brain Injury URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Traumatic Brain Injury - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  8. Cerebral hemodynamic changes of mild traumatic brain injury at the acute stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik Doshi

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL. We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively. We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both. mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation.

  9. [Therapeutic bloodletting at Jing-well points combine hypothermia attenuated acute cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiao-mei; Cheng, Shi-xiang; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Sai; Han, Wan-jun; Tu, Yue; Sun, Hong-tao

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the influence of therapeutic bloodletting at Jing-well points and hypothermia on acute cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. Seventy-five SD rats were randomly divided into sham-operation group (Sham), TBI group (TBI), bloodletting group (BL), mild-induced hypothermia group (MIH), and bloodletting plus MIH group (BL + MIH) (n = 15). The model of TBI was established by electric controlled cortical impactor (eCCI). The rats of BL group were bloodletting at Jing-well points immediately after injury, twice daily. While the MIH group was settled on a hypothermia blanket promptly after TBI for 6 hours, so that the temperature dropped to 32 degrees. Each of measurement was performed after 48 hours. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the dynamic impairment of cerebral edema after TBI (n = 3). In addition, mNSS score, measurements of wet and dry brain weight, and Evans Blue assay were performed to investigate the neurologic deficit, cerebral water content (n = 8), and blood-brain barrier permeability (BBB), (n = 4), respectively. MRI analysis showed that the cerebral edema, hematoma and midline shifting of rats in TBI group was more serious than other treatment group. Meanwhile compared with TBI group, the mNSS scores of every treatment group were meaningfully lower (all P cerebral edema and BBB dysfunction and exert neuroprotective effects after TBI. The results suggest that the combination of BL and MIH is more effective than other treatment being used alone.

  10. Investigating the acute and long-term effects of traumatic brain injury on the immune and fibrinolytic system

    OpenAIRE

    MARIA DAGLAS

    2018-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a serious condition that results in long-term disability in most patients. This thesis investigated the early and long-term effects of the immune and fibrinolytic response (blood clot breakdown), and the link between these two systems after brain injury in mice. A unique discovery was that the chronic immune response, over a period of 8 months, directly contributes to a worse outcome after brain injury. We also found gender-specific differences occurring at the early...

  11. Post-traumatic stress disorder in patients with acute burn injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibran, E.; Adil, S.E.R.; Rao, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the risk of PTSD in patients with acute burn incidents. Method: This was an observational prospective cross-sectional study conducted in admitted patients in Burns Ward of Civil Hospital, Karachi during a period of 6 months from January 1 to June 30, 2011. Data was collected through questionnaire having socio demographic variables and the Impact of Event-Scale (IES-R) was used to determine the risk of PTSD. Results: Out of 145 patients, 12 (77.3%) were at risk of PTSD with 75 (66.9%) males and 37 (33%) females. Out of these 112 cases, 50% belonged to age group 16-29 years. All burn patients with more than 60% total body surface area (TBSA) involved in injury were at risk. Conclusion: The study reports an astronomic number of burns patients with PTSD risk. PTSD drastically affects the quality of life. The earlier this disorder is diagnosed and assessed; better chances are there for enhanced treatment and better recovery. (author)

  12. Post-traumatic stress disorder in patients with acute burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmer-al-lbran; Memon, Akhtar Amin; Adil, Syeda Ezz-e-rukhshan; Rao, Masood Hussain; Dawani, Om

    2013-07-01

    To determine the risk of PTSD in patients with acute burn incidents. This was an observational prospective cross-sectional study conducted in admitted patients in Burns Ward of Civil Hospital, Karachi during a period of 6 months from January 1 to June 30, 2011. Data was collected through questionnaire having socio demographic variables and the Impact of Event-Scale (IES-R) was used to determine the risk of PTSD. Out of 145 patients, 12 (77.3%) were at risk of PTSD with 75 (66.9%) males and 37 (33%) females. Out of these 112 cases, 50% belonged to age group 16-29 years. All burn patients with more than 60% total body surface area (TBSA) involved in injury were at risk. The study reports an astronomic number of burns patients with PTSD risk. PTSD drastically affects the quality of life. The earlier this disorder is diagnosed and assessed; better chances are there for enhanced treatment and better recovery.

  13. Modeling the patient journey from injury to community reintegration for persons with acute traumatic spinal cord injury in a Canadian centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argelio Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A patient's journey through the health care system is influenced by clinical and system processes across the continuum of care. METHODS: To inform optimized access to care and patient flow for individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI, we developed a simulation model that can examine the full impact of therapeutic or systems interventions across the care continuum for patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries. The objective of this paper is to describe the detailed development of this simulation model for a major trauma and a rehabilitation centre in British Columbia (BC, Canada, as part of the Access to Care and Timing (ACT project and is referred to as the BC ACT Model V1.0. FINDINGS: To demonstrate the utility of the simulation model in clinical and administrative decision-making we present three typical scenarios that illustrate how an investigator can track the indirect impact(s of medical and administrative interventions, both upstream and downstream along the continuum of care. For example, the model was used to estimate the theoretical impact of a practice that reduced the incidence of pressure ulcers by 70%. This led to a decrease in acute and rehabilitation length of stay of 4 and 2 days, respectively and a decrease in bed utilization of 9% and 3% in acute and rehabilitation. CONCLUSION: The scenario analysis using the BC ACT Model V1.0 demonstrates the flexibility and value of the simulation model as a decision-making tool by providing estimates of the effects of different interventions and allowing them to be objectively compared. Future work will involve developing a generalizable national Canadian ACT Model to examine differences in care delivery and identify the ideal attributes of SCI care delivery.

  14. Risk factors and outcomes associated with post-traumatic headache after mild traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yilmaz, Tansel; Roks, Gerwin; de Koning, Myrthe; Scheenen, Myrthe; van der Horn, Harm; Plas, Gerben; Hageman, Gerard; Schoonman, Guus; Spikman, Jacoba; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and potential risk factors of acute and chronic post-traumatic headache (PTH) in patients with mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a prospective longitudinal observational multicentre study. Acute PTH (aPTH) is defined by new or worsening of

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury Registry (TBI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — As the number of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) patients has grown, so has the need to track and monitor...

  16. Peripheral Inflammatory Markers and Antioxidant Response during the post-acute and chronic phase after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Licastro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a mechanical insult to the brain caused by external forces and associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The patients may show different profiles of neurological recovery and a combination of oxidative damage and inflammatory processes can affect their courses. It is known that an over-expression of cytokines can be seen in peripheral blood in the early hours/days after the injury, but little is known about the weeks and months encompassing the post-acute and chronic phases. In addition, no information is available about the antioxidant responses mediated by the major enzymes that regulate ROS levels: superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, peroxidases, and GSH related enzymes. This study investigates the 6-month trends of inflammatory markers and antioxidant responses in 22 severe TBI patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness, consecutively recruited in a dedicated neuro-rehabilitation facility. Patients with a high degree of neurological impairment often show an uncertain outcome. In addition, the profiles of plasma activities were related to the neurological recovery after 12 months.Venous peripheral blood samples were taken blindly as soon as clinical signs and laboratory markers confirmed the absence of infections, 3 and 6 months later. The clinical and neuropsychological assessment continued up to 12 months. Nineteen patients completed the follow up. In the chronic phase, persistent high plasma levels of cytokines can interfere with cognitive functioning and higher post-acute levels of cytokines (IFN-g, TNF-a, IL1b, IL6 are associated with poorer cognitive recoveries 12 months later. Moreover, higher IFN- γ, higher TNF-α and lower glutathione peroxidase (GPx activity are associated with greater disability.The results add evidence of persistent inflammatory response, provide information about long-term imbalance of antioxidant activity and suggest that the over-production of cytokines and

  17. First Human Implantation of a Bioresorbable Polymer Scaffold for Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Clinical Pilot Study for Safety and Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Nicholas; Hlubek, Randall; Danielson, Jill; Neff, Kristin; Vaickus, Lou; Ulich, Thomas R; Ropper, Alexander E

    2016-08-01

    A porous bioresorbable polymer scaffold has previously been tested in preclinical animal models of spinal cord contusion injury to promote appositional healing, spare white matter, decrease posttraumatic cysts, and normalize intraparenchymal tissue pressure. This is the first report of its human implantation in a spinal cord injury patient during a pilot study testing the safety and feasibility of this technique (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02138110). A 25-year-old man had a T11-12 fracture dislocation sustained in a motocross accident that resulted in a T11 American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade A traumatic spinal cord injury. He was treated with acute surgical decompression and spinal fixation with fusion, and enrolled in the spinal scaffold study. A 2 × 10 mm bioresorbable scaffold was placed in the spinal cord parenchyma at T12. The scaffold was implanted directly into the traumatic cavity within the spinal cord through a dorsal root entry zone myelotomy at the caudal extent of the contused area. By 3 months, his neurological examination improved to an L1 AIS grade C incomplete injury. At 6-month postoperative follow-up, there were no procedural complications or apparent safety issues related to the scaffold implantation. Although longer-term follow-up and investigation are required, this case demonstrates that a polymer scaffold can be safely implanted into an acutely contused spinal cord. This is the first human surgical implantation, and future outcomes of other patients in this clinical trial will better elucidate the safety and possible efficacy profile of the scaffold. AIS, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment ScaleSCI, spinal cord injurytSCI, traumatic spinal cord injury.

  18. Clinically significant changes in the emotional condition of relatives of patients with severe traumatic brain injury during sub-acute rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Kristensen, Karin Spangsberg; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate clinically significant change in the emotional condition of relatives of patients with severe traumatic brain injury during sub-acute rehabilitation. Methods: Participants were 62 pairs of relatives and patients. Relatives completed the anxiety and depression scales from...... the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) when the patients were admitted to sub-acute rehabilitation and at discharge. Improvement in emotional condition was investigated using the following criteria: (i) statistically reliable improvement; and (ii) clinically significant change (CSC). Results: At admission, 53...

  19. Mild closed head injury promotes a selective trigeminal hypernociception: implications for the acute emergence of post-traumatic headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benromano, T; Defrin, R; Ahn, A H; Zhao, J; Pick, C G; Levy, D

    2015-05-01

    Headache is one of the most common symptoms following traumatic head injury. The mechanisms underlying the emergence of such post-traumatic headache (PTH) remain unknown but may be related to injury of deep cranial tissues or damage to central pain processing pathways, as a result of brain injury. A mild closed head injury in mice combined with the administration of cranial or hindpaw formalin tests was used to examine post-traumatic changes in the nociceptive processing from deep cranial tissues or the hindpaw. Histological analysis was used to examine post-traumatic pro-inflammatory changes in the calvarial periosteum, a deep cranial tissue. At 48 h after head injury, mice demonstrated enhanced nociceptive responses following injection of formalin into the calvarial periosteum, a deep cranial tissue, but no facilitation of the nociceptive responses following injection of formalin into an extracranial tissue, the hindpaw. Mice also showed an increase in the number of activated periosteal mast cells 48 h following mild head trauma, suggesting an inflammatory response. Our study demonstrates that mild closed head injury is associated with enhanced processing of nociceptive information emanating from trigeminal-innervated deep cranial tissues, but not from non-cranial tissues. Based on these finding as well as the demonstration of head injury-evoked degranulation of calvarial periosteal mast cells, we propose that inflammatory-evoked enhancement of peripheral cranial nociception, rather than changes in supraspinal pain mechanisms play a role in the initial emergence of PTH. Peripheral targeting of nociceptors that innervate the calvaria may be used to ameliorate PTH pain. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  20. The Impact of Surgical Timing in Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Spinal   cord  injury;  surgery;  delay;  recovery;   trauma ;  complications;  length  of  stay;  costs   16...rate  of   complications  such  as  pressure  ulcers  and  pneumonia.   2. KEYWORDS Spinal   cord ;   trauma ;  complications...care  of  patients  with  motor-­complete   spinal   cord   injury  (SCI)

  1. Profile of acute traumatic spine injuries in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eleven (14.7%) patients died in hospital; they all had cervical spine injury. The follow-up was poor. Conclusion: Young men in the productive stage of their lives are those most affected. The causes are preventable. A control strategy based on prevention and on creating a spine center could reduce the incidence of such ...

  2. Trajectories of sleep changes during the acute phase of traumatic brain injury: A 7-day actigraphy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Yean Chiu

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: Poor sleep efficiency and longer sleep duration are common symptoms in acute TBI patients. Both head injury severity and age predicted the trajectories of daytime and 24-hour sleep duration during the acute phase of TBI, whereas gender predicted the trajectories of 24-hour sleep duration in the mild TBI subgroup.

  3. Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views , opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should...have sustained repeated mild or concussive brain injury and now suffer from long- lasting cognitive and physical symptoms. We have developed a radically...Sham-TBI group performed consistently near the maximum 120 seconds per trial over the 28 day testing period. TBI caused impairment of performance in

  4. Using external lumbar CSF drainage to treat communicating external hydrocephalus in adult patients after acute traumatic or non-traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manet, Romain; Payen, Jean-François; Guerin, Romain; Martinez, Orianne; Hautefeuille, Serge; Francony, Gilles; Gergelé, Laurent

    2017-10-01

    Despite various treatments to control intracranial pressure (ICP) after brain injury, patients may present a late onset of high ICP or a poor response to medications. External lumbar drainage (ELD) can be considered a therapeutic option if high ICP is due to communicating external hydrocephalus. We aimed at describing the efficacy and safety of ELD used in a cohort of traumatic or non-traumatic brain-injured patients. In this multicentre retrospective analysis, patients had a delayed onset of high ICP after the initial injury and/or a poor response to ICP treatments. ELD was considered in the presence of radiological signs of communicating external hydrocephalus. Changes in ICP values and side effects following the ELD procedure were reported. Thirty-three patients with a median age of 51 years (25-75th percentile: 34-61 years) were admitted after traumatic (n = 22) or non-traumatic (n = 11) brain injuries. Their initial Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 (4-11). Eight patients underwent external ventricular drainage prior to ELD. Median time to ELD insertion was 5 days (4-8) after brain insult. In all patients, ELD was dramatically effective in lowering ICP: 25 mmHg (20-31) before versus 7 mmHg (3-10) after (p effects such as pupil changes or intracranial bleeding after the procedure. One patient developed an ELD-related infection. These findings indicate that ELD may be considered potentially effective in controlling ICP, remaining safe if a firm diagnosis of communicating external hydrocephalus has been made.

  5. Acute bone changes after lower limb amputation resulting from traumatic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemben, D A; Sherk, V D; Ertl, W J J; Bemben, M G

    2017-07-01

    Bone health is critical for lower limb amputees, affecting their ability to use a prosthesis and their risk of osteoporosis. We found large losses in hip bone mineral density (BMD) and in amputated bone strength in the first year of prosthesis use, suggesting a need for load bearing interventions early post-amputation. Large deficits in hip areal BMD (aBMD) and residual limb volumetric BMD (vBMD) occur after lower limb amputation; however, the time course of these bone quality changes is unknown. The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in the amputated bone that occur during the early stages post-amputation. Eight traumatic unilateral amputees (23-53 years) were enrolled prior to surgery. Changes in total body, hip, and spine aBMD (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry); in vBMD, stress-strain index (SSI), and muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) (peripheral QCT); and in bone turnover markers were assessed after amputation prior to prosthesis fitting (pre-ambulatory) and at 6 and 12 months walking with prosthesis. Hip aBMD of the amputated limb decreased 11-15%, which persisted through 12 months. The amputated bone had decreases (p 650 mg/cm 3 (58 to 43% of total area) or >480 mg/cm 3 (65% to 53%), suggesting an increase in cortical porosity after amputation. Bone alkaline phosphatase and sclerostin were elevated (p amputation and are not regained by 12 months of becoming ambulatory. Early post-amputation may be the most critical window for preventing bone loss.

  6. Organisation of traumatic head injury management in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollid, S; Sundstrøm, T; Ingebrigtsen, T

    2009-01-01

    with acute traumatic head injury. A substantial proportion of the operations are performed at local and central hospitals without neurosurgical expertise, despite an efficient pre and interhospital transport system. The Nordic adaption of the Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines recommends that this practice...... is a synthesis of two cross-sectional surveys. Questionnaires were used to collect data on the annual number of acute head injury operations, the infrastructure, the level of education, the use of trauma protocols and the management of traumatic head injury at Nordic hospitals. RESULTS: The proportion of acute...

  7. Evaluation of a Clinical Protocol to Assess and Diagnose Neuropathic Pain During Acute Hospital Admission: Results From Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Lise M A; Umedaly, Hamed S; Noonan, Vanessa K; Park, So Eyun; Prince, Jennifer; Thorogood, Nancy P; Shen, Tian; Townson, Andrea F; Street, John T; Dvorak, Marcel F; Negraeff, Michael

    2018-02-01

    A clinical protocol was developed for clinicians to routinely assess and initiate treatment for patients with neuropathic pain (NP) in an acute care setting. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine the incidence and onset of NP in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury during acute care and (2) describe how the implementation of a clinical protocol impacts the assessment and diagnosis of NP. The study was a cohort analysis with a pre-post-test utilizing a historical control. Data were retrospectively collected from a patient registry and charts. Participants were randomly selected in cohort 1 (control) and cohort 2 (NP clinical protocol). The incidence of NP was 56% without significant difference between the cohorts (P=0.3). Onset of NP was 8 days (SD=14) across the study and >85% of the participants with NP were diagnosed within 2 weeks. Participants with incomplete injuries had a significant earlier onset than participants with complete injuries (6.2±12.8, 10.9±15.8 d; P=0.003). The mean number of days from hospital admission to initial assessment decreased with use of the NP clinical protocol (3.7±5.7 d; P=0.02). This study demonstrates a high incidence and early onset of NP in traumatic spinal cord injury during acute hospital care, with an earlier emergence in participants with incomplete injury. The NP clinical protocol ensured continuous assessment and documentation of NP while decreasing the time to an initial screen, but did not impact diagnosis.

  8. The Association Between Ventriculo-Peritoneal Shunt and Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A 14-Year, Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sher-Wei; Ao, Kam-Hou; Ho, Chung-Han; Tseng, Chien-Jen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chio, Chung-Ching; Kuo, Jinn-Rung

    2017-07-01

    The association between preexisting ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt and the risk of new-onset acute appendicitis in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is not well established. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationships between VP shunt and acute appendicitis in patients with TBI. A longitudinal cohort study matched by a propensity score in patients with TBI with (4781 patients) or without (9562 patients) VP shunt was conducted using the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan between January 1993 and December 2013. The main outcome studied was diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The cumulative probability of acute appendicitis was not different between these 2 groups (P = 0.6244). A Cox model showed central nervous system (CNS) infection to be an independent predictor of acute appendicitis with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.98. Patients with TBI with both a VP shunt and a CNS infection had a greater risk of developing new-onset acute appendicitis (hazard ratio 4.25; 95% confidence interval 1.84-9.81) compared patients with TBI without a VP shunt or CNS infection. We concluded that VP shunt is not a risk factor in the development of appendicitis in patients with TBI. Patients with TBI with a shunt and a CNS infection may have a greater risk of developing acute appendicitis. Therefore, care in avoiding CNS infection is a key for the prevention acute appendicitis in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Al Thani, Hassan; Zarour, Ahmad; Latifi, Rifat

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI) are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory.

  10. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman El-Menyar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory.

  11. Hypopituitarism in Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    While hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was previously considered rare, it is now thought to be a major cause of treatable morbidity among TBI survivors. Consequently, recommendations for assessment of pituitary function and replacement in TBI were recently introduced. Given...

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of traumatic pancreatic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakawa, Akihiko; Isayama, Kenji; Nakatani, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of traumatic pancreatic injury in the acute stage is difficult to establish blood tests and abdominal findings alone. Moreover, to determine treatment strategies, it is important not only that a pancreatic injury is diagnosed but also whether a pancreatic ductal injury can be found. At our center, to diagnose isolated pancreatic injuries, we actively perform endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) in addition to abdominal CT at the time of admission. For cases with complications such as abdominal and other organ injuries, we perform a laparotomy to ascertain whether a pancreatic duct injury is present. In regard to treatment options, for grade III injuries to the pancreatic body and tail, we basically choose distal pancreatectomy, but we also consider the Bracy method depending on the case. As for grade III injuries to the pancreatic head, we primarily choose pancreaticoduodenectomy, but also apply drainage if the situation calls for it. However, pancreatic injuries are often complicated by injuries of other regions of the body. Thus, diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic injury should be based on a comprehensive decision regarding early prioritization of treatment, taking hemodynamics into consideration after admission, and how to minimize complications such as anastomotic leak and pancreatic fistulas. (author)

  13. The Use of Intravenous Lidocaine for the Management of Acute Pain Secondary to Traumatic Ankle Injury: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Billy; Gritsenko, Diana; Tam, Grace; Koop, Kimberly; Mok, Eva

    2018-02-01

    Sports-related injuries are a frequent cause of visits to the emergency department (ED) across the United States. A majority of these injuries affect the lower extremities with the ankle as the most frequently reported site. Most sports-related injuries are not severe enough to require inpatient hospitalization; however, they often lead to acute distress and pain which require prompt treatment with analgesics. Approximately 22% of patients who presented to the ED required pharmacotherapy for acute pain management. Opioids have been traditionally used for the management of severe acute pain in the ED; however, there are growing concerns for opioid overuse and misuse. As a result, there is growing controversy regarding the appropriate selection of analgesic agents, optimal dosing, and need for outpatient therapy which has contributed to changes in prescribing patterns of opioids in the ED. Lidocaine, a class 1b antiarrhythmic, has been utilized as an analgesic agent. Its use has been documented for the management of intractable chronic pain caused by cancer, stroke, neuropathies, or nephrolithiasis. However, literature describing the use of intravenous lidocaine for the management of acute pain secondary to trauma is limited to a single case series. This case report describes the use of intravenous lidocaine in a 17-year-old male who presented to the ED in acute distress secondary to ankle dislocation and fracture. This report serves to describe additional clinical experience with intravenous lidocaine for the management of acute pain secondary to ankle fracture in the emergency department.

  14. Management of severe traumatic brain injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome using pumped extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Tim; McGlone, Phillip; Chambers, Robert; Fennell, Jon

    2017-02-01

    The effects of a high carbon dioxide on cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure are well known. We report the case of a man who presented after with a severe traumatic brain injury including intracranial and extradural haemorrhage. Neuroprotective ventilation was impossible without supramaximal tidal volumes due to a combination of chest trauma and severe bronchospasm. A pump driven Novalung iLA active® system was inserted to achieve both ARDSnet ventilation and a lowering of intracranial pressure. To our knowledge, this is the first time this system has been used to this effect. The patient went on to make a good recovery.

  15. An audit of traumatic nerve injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, G

    2009-07-01

    The impact of trauma in the Irish healthcare setting is considerable. We present the results of a retrospective assessment of referrals to a Neurophysiology department for suspected traumatic nerve injury. A broad range of traumatic neuropathies was demonstrated on testing, from numerous causes. We demonstrate an increased liklihood of traumatic nerve injury after fracture \\/ dislocation (p = 0.007). Our series demonstrates the need for clinicians to be aware of the possibility of nerve injury post trauma, especially after bony injury.

  16. An exploratory study of the association of acute posttraumatic stress, depression, and pain to cognitive functioning in mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Jessica S; Meares, Susanne; Batchelor, Jennifer; Bryant, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    Few studies have examined whether psychological distress and pain affect cognitive functioning in the acute to subacute phase (up to 30 days postinjury) following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The current study explored whether acute posttraumatic stress, depression, and pain were associated with performance on a task of selective and sustained attention completed under conditions of increasing cognitive demands (standard, auditory distraction, and dual-task), and on tests of working memory, memory, processing speed, reaction time (RT), and verbal fluency. At a mean of 2.87 days (SD = 2.32) postinjury, 50 adult mTBI participants, consecutive admissions to a Level 1 trauma hospital, completed neuropsychological tests and self-report measures of acute posttraumatic stress, depression, and pain. A series of canonical correlation analyses was used to explore the relationships of a common set of psychological variables to various sets of neuropsychological variables. Significant results were found on the task of selective and sustained attention. Strong relationships were found between psychological variables and speed (r(c) = .56, p = .02) and psychological variables and accuracy (r(c) = .68, p = .002). Pain and acute posttraumatic stress were associated with higher speed scores (reflecting more correctly marked targets) under standard conditions. Acute posttraumatic stress was associated with lower accuracy scores across all task conditions. Moderate but nonsignificant associations were found between psychological variables and most cognitive tasks. Acute posttraumatic stress and pain show strong associations with selective and sustained attention following mTBI. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Traumatic bronchial injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Cheaito, MD

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: A high level of suspicion and the liberal use of bronchoscopy are important in the diagnosis of tracheobronchial injury. A tailored surgical approach is often necessary for definitive repair.

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats Induces Lung Injury and Systemic Immune Suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Aslami, Hamid; Fluiter, Kees; Roelofs, Joris J.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Van der Sluijs, Koen; van de Beek, Diederik; van Westerloo, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently complicated by acute lung injury, which is predictive for poor outcome. However, it is unclear whether lung injury develops independently or as a result of mechanical ventilation after TBI. Further, TBI is strongly associated with the development of

  19. Traumatic injuries of the hip.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marshall, Nina

    2009-11-01

    Traumatic lesions of the hip in athletes may be clinically challenging because of the overlap in clinical presentation due to differing pathologies and the presence of multiple injuries. Imaging of the hip in the athlete has undergone a recent resurgence of interest and understanding related to the increasing accessibility and use of hip arthroscopy, which expands the treatment options available for intra-articular pathology. MR imaging and MR arthrography have a unique role in diagnosis of these pathologies, guiding the surgeon, arthroscopist, and referring clinician in their management of bony and soft tissue injury.

  20. Plasma Anti-Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Autoantibody Levels during the Acute and Chronic Phases of Traumatic Brain Injury: A Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, K.K.W. (Kevin K. W.); Yang, Z. (Zhihui); J.K. Yue (John); Zhang, Z. (Zhiqun); E.A. Winkler (Ethan A.); A.M. Puccio (Ava); R. Diaz-Arrastia (Ramon); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); E.L. Yuh (Esther); P. Mukherjee (Pratik); Valadka, A.B. (Alex B.); W.A. Gordon (Wayne A.); D. Okonkwo (David); G. Manley (Geoffrey); S.R. Cooper (Shelly); K. Dams-O'connor (Kristen); A.J. Hricik (Allison); T. Inoue (Tomoo); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew); D.K. Menon (David ); D.M. Schnyer (David); T.K. Sinha (Tuhin); M.J. Vassar (Mary)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe described recently a subacute serum autoantibody response toward glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and its breakdown products 5-10 days after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we expanded our anti-GFAP autoantibody (AutoAb[GFAP]) investigation to the multicenter

  1. Changes in the health status and functional outcomes in acute traumatic hand injury patients, during physical therapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca John

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic hand injury causes chronic disability. A large number of studies have reported impairments in clinical parameters, but few studies have described their disability experience. Aims To examine the functional disability and quality of life in traumatic hand injured patients receiving physical therapy. Settings and Design: The physiotherapy department in a multi-specialty public sector hospital. Convenient sampling method was used. Materials and Methods: The 36-item short-form health survey-MOS (SF-36, v2 and disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand (DASH questionnaire were obtained and subjects were given physiotherapy, accordingly to their condition. Questionnaires were re-administered every month till discharge. Statistical Analysis Used: A One-way ANOVA test. Results: At end of 6 months, among eight subscales of SF-36, there is improvement in mean scores of physical functioning (39.1%. The bodily pain, general health, vitality, social function, and mental health had more than 100% improvement. DASH showed regression in disability (50.8%. Conclusions: Measuring quality of life (QOL can provide detailed assessment of physical disability and treatment effects as well as the global impact of those effects on the person′s daily life. Hence, the use of self-report questionnaires such as DASH and SF-36, combined with physical performance score, helps to achieve more comprehensive evaluation of outcome.

  2. Traumatic injuries: imaging of head injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besenski, N.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the forces of acceleration, linear translation, as well as rotational and angular acceleration, the brain undergoes deformation and distortion depending on the site of impact of traumatizing force direction, severity of the traumatizing force, and tissue resistance of the brain. Linear translation of accereration in a closed-head injury can run along the shorter diameter of the skull in latero-lateral direction causing mostly extra-axial lesions (subdural hematoma,epidural hematoma, subarachnoidal hemorrhage) or quite pronounced coup and countercoup contusions. Contusions are considerably less frequently present in medial or paramedial centroaxial blows (fronto-occipital or occipito-frontal). The centroaxial blows produce a different pattern of lesions mostly in the deep structures, causing in some cases a special category of the brain injury, the diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The brain stem can also be damaged, but it is damaged more often in patients who have suffered centroaxial traumatic force direction. Computed tomography and MRI are the most common techniques in patients who have suffered brain injury. Computed tomography is currently the first imaging technique to be used after head injury, in those settings where CT is available. Using CT, scalp, bone, extra-axial hematomas, and parenchymal injury can be demonstrated. Computed tomography is rapid and easily performed also in monitored patients. It is the most relevant imaging procedure for surgical lesions. Computed tomography is a suitable method to follow the dynamics of lesion development giving an insight into the corresponding pathological development of the brain injury. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive for all posttraumatic lesions except skull fractures and subarachnoidal hemorrhage, but scanning time is longer, and the problem with the monitoring of patients outside the MRI field is present. If CT does not demonstrate pathology as can adequately be explained to account for

  3. Traumatic injuries: imaging of head injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besenski, N

    2002-06-01

    Due to the forces of acceleration, linear translation, as well as rotational and angular acceleration, the brain undergoes deformation and distortion depending on the site of impact of traumatizing force direction, severity of the traumatizing force, and tissue resistance of the brain. Linear translation of accereration in a closed-head injury can run along the shorter diameter of the skull in latero-lateral direction causing mostly extra-axial lesions (subdural hematoma,epidural hematoma, subarachnoidal hemorrhage) or quite pronounced coup and countercoup contusions. Contusions are considerably less frequently present in medial or paramedial centroaxial blows (fronto-occipital or occipito-frontal). The centroaxial blows produce a different pattern of lesions mostly in the deep structures, causing in some cases a special category of the brain injury, the diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The brain stem can also be damaged, but it is damaged more often in patients who have suffered centroaxial traumatic force direction. Computed tomography and MRI are the most common techniques in patients who have suffered brain injury. Computed tomography is currently the first imaging technique to be used after head injury, in those settings where CT is available. Using CT, scalp, bone, extra-axial hematomas, and parenchymal injury can be demonstrated. Computed tomography is rapid and easily performed also in monitored patients. It is the most relevant imaging procedure for surgical lesions. Computed tomography is a suitable method to follow the dynamics of lesion development giving an insight into the corresponding pathological development of the brain injury. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive for all posttraumatic lesions except skull fractures and subarachnoidal hemorrhage, but scanning time is longer, and the problem with the monitoring of patients outside the MRI field is present. If CT does not demonstrate pathology as can adequately be explained to account for

  4. Traumatic injuries: imaging of head injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besenski, N. [Croatian Institute for Brain Research, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2002-06-01

    Due to the forces of acceleration, linear translation, as well as rotational and angular acceleration, the brain undergoes deformation and distortion depending on the site of impact of traumatizing force direction, severity of the traumatizing force, and tissue resistance of the brain. Linear translation of accereration in a closed-head injury can run along the shorter diameter of the skull in latero-lateral direction causing mostly extra-axial lesions (subdural hematoma,epidural hematoma, subarachnoidal hemorrhage) or quite pronounced coup and countercoup contusions. Contusions are considerably less frequently present in medial or paramedial centroaxial blows (fronto-occipital or occipito-frontal). The centroaxial blows produce a different pattern of lesions mostly in the deep structures, causing in some cases a special category of the brain injury, the diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The brain stem can also be damaged, but it is damaged more often in patients who have suffered centroaxial traumatic force direction. Computed tomography and MRI are the most common techniques in patients who have suffered brain injury. Computed tomography is currently the first imaging technique to be used after head injury, in those settings where CT is available. Using CT, scalp, bone, extra-axial hematomas, and parenchymal injury can be demonstrated. Computed tomography is rapid and easily performed also in monitored patients. It is the most relevant imaging procedure for surgical lesions. Computed tomography is a suitable method to follow the dynamics of lesion development giving an insight into the corresponding pathological development of the brain injury. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive for all posttraumatic lesions except skull fractures and subarachnoidal hemorrhage, but scanning time is longer, and the problem with the monitoring of patients outside the MRI field is present. If CT does not demonstrate pathology as can adequately be explained to account for

  5. Is the outcome in acute spinal cord ischaemia different from that in traumatic spinal cord injury? A cross-sectional analysis of the neurological and functional outcome in a cohort of 93 paraplegics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouw, M.H.; Hosman, A.J.F.; van Kampen, A.; Hirschfeld, S.; Thietje, R.; Meent, H. van de

    2011-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. OBJECTIVES: To compare the neurological outcome between paraplegic patients with acute spinal cord ischaemia syndrome (ASCIS) or traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) and to investigate the influence of SCI aetiology on the total Spinal Cord Independence

  6. Definition and drivers of acute traumatic coagulopathy: clinical and experimental investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Christopher Donald; Goslings, J C; Gaarder, C

    2010-01-01

    Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) is an impairment of hemostasis that occurs early after injury and is associated with a 4-fold higher mortality, increased transfusion requirements and organ failure.......Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) is an impairment of hemostasis that occurs early after injury and is associated with a 4-fold higher mortality, increased transfusion requirements and organ failure....

  7. Traumatic injuries of the diaphragm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokman Soyoral

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study, patient characteristics, diagnosisand treatment of patients with traumatic injury of thediaphragm, and the outcomes were evaluated.Materials and methods: Between 2002 and 2012, 19patients were treated for blunt and penetrating diaphragmaticinjury at the Thoracic Surgery Clinics of two teachinghospitals. The patients were evaluated retrospectively.Results: The etiology of trauma was traffic accidents in8 cases, falls from height in three, earthquake-relatedwounds in two, and stab wounds in six cases (SW. Themost frequent complaints and physical findings were dyspnea,chest pain, abdominal distension and the absenceof respiratory sounds. The most frequently encounteredfinding from the chest radiography was disappearance ofdiaphragmatic shadow, elevation of the diaphragm, andvisceral herniation to the thorax. All patients underwentsurgery. A left diaphragmatic rupture was diagnosed in13, and a right diaphragmatic rupture in 6 patients. Fourteenpatients had visceral herniation without strangulation.In fourteen patients, the diaphragmatic injury wasaccompanied by intra-abdominal organ injuries, lung injuriesand the other system injuries. In one case, cardiac injury,and in four cases, an isolated diaphragmatic rupturewas diagnosed. The most commonly associated organ indiaphragmatic injury was the stomach. In all cases, thediaphragm was repaired by two layers of non-absorbablesutures. The mortality was approximately 5.6%, dependingon associated injuries.Conclusion: The prognosis of the blunt and sharp diaphragmaticinjuries depends on the severity of the concomitantinjuries, and on the problems that may arise dueto delays.

  8. Diabetes Insipidus after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capatina, Cristina; Paluzzi, Alessandro; Mitchell, Rosalid; Karavitaki, Niki

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many age groups. Neuroendocrine dysfunction has been recognized as a consequence of TBI and consists of both anterior and posterior pituitary insufficiency; water and electrolyte abnormalities (diabetes insipidus (DI) and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH)) are amongst the most challenging sequelae. The acute head trauma can lead (directly or indirectly) to dysfunction of the hypothalamic neurons secreting antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or of the posterior pituitary gland causing post-traumatic DI (PTDI). PTDI is usually diagnosed in the first days after the trauma presenting with hypotonic polyuria. Frequently, the poor general status of most patients prevents adequate fluid intake to compensate the losses and severe dehydration and hypernatremia occur. Management consists of careful monitoring of fluid balance and hormonal replacement. PTDI is associated with high mortality, particularly when presenting very early following the injury. In many surviving patients, the PTDI is transient, lasting a few days to a few weeks and in a minority of cases, it is permanent requiring management similar to that offered to patients with non-traumatic central DI. PMID:26239685

  9. The bone scan in traumatic and sports injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, P.

    1987-01-01

    There are several types of injuries which are not diagnosable by routine radiographic methods but can be detected easily by nuclear medicine techniques. This chapter describes four primary categories of injury where nuclear medicine techniques may be of use: stress fracture and periosteal injury; covert fractures; joint abnormalities and injuries to connective tissues, especially where they attach to bone; and acute skeletal muscle injury and rhabdomyolysis. One of the most important features of the use of nuclear medicine techniques in the evaluation of sports and traumatic injury is the ability, in most cases, to be able to differentiate among these various categories. Other uses of nuclear medicine techniques are discussed in this chapter

  10. Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    support hospital. J Trauma 2007; 63:805 813. 16. Pidcoke HF, Aden JK, Mora AG, et al. Ten year analysis of transfusion in Operation Iraqi Freedom and...107:378 387. 47. Ostrowski SR , Sørensen AM, Larsen CF, Johansson PI. Thrombelastography and biomarker profiles in acute coagulopathy of trauma: a...preoperative coagulation screening assays. Curr Hematol Rep 2004; 3:324 330. 93. Johansson PI, Stissing T, Bochsen L, Ostrowski SR . Thrombelastography and

  11. Personality Disturbances Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigatano, George P.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews personality disturbances associated with traumatic brain injury. Attempts to clarify terms and review empirical findings. Notes that longitudinal prospective studies that use appropriate control groups are needed. Suggests future research may benefit by considering long-term effects of early agitation following traumatic brain injury and…

  12. Efficacy and safety assessment of acute sports-related traumatic soft tissue injuries using a new ibuprofen medicated plaster: results from a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, Hans-Georg; Connolly, Mark P; Bhatt, Aomesh; Giannetti, Bruno

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of a recently developed ibuprofen medicated plaster in the treatment of acute sports impact injuries/contusions. In this double-blind, multi-center, placebo-controlled, parallel group, phase 3 study (EudraCT Number: 2012-003257-2) patients (n = 132; ages 18 to 60 years) diagnosed with acute sports-related traumatic blunt soft tissue injury/contusion to the upper or lower limbs were randomized to receive either ibuprofen 200 mg plaster (n = 64) or placebo plaster (n = 68). Plasters were administered once daily for five consecutive days. The primary assessment was the area under the curve (AUC) of the visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain on movement (POM) over 0 to 72 h (VAS 0-72 ). The ibuprofen medicated plaster was associated with a reduction in pain on movement (POM) based on lower VAS AUC 0-72h (2399.4 mm*h) compared with placebo (4078.9 mm*h) (least squares mean difference: - 1679.5 mm*h; P ibuprofen medicated plaster compared with placebo at 12, 48, 24, and 120 h (P ibuprofen medicated plaster was associated with greater reduction in tenderness/pain than placebo at each timepoint (P values ibuprofen plaster, and n = 6 [8.8%] for placebo). All drug-related AEs were administration site reactions and were mild in intensity. The results of this study indicate that ibuprofen medicated plaster results in rapid and clinically relevant reduction of pain in patients suffering from blunt musculoskeletal injuries or recurrent pain. The ibuprofen medicated plaster was well tolerated.

  13. Functional resting-state fMRI connectivity correlates with serum levels of the S100B protein in the acute phase of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Hedley Thompson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The S100B protein is an intra-cellular calcium-binding protein that mainly resides in astrocytes in the central nervous system. The serum level of S100B is used as biomarker for the severity of brain damage in traumatic brain injury (TBI patients. In this study we investigated the relationship between intrinsic resting-state brain connectivity, measured 1–22 days (mean 8 days after trauma, and serum levels of S100B in a patient cohort with mild-to-severe TBI in need of neuro-intensive care in the acute phase. In line with previous investigations, our results show that the peak level of S100B acquired during the acute phase of TBI was negatively correlated with behavioral measures (Glasgow Outcome Score, GOS of functional outcome assessed 6 to 12 months post injury. Using a multi-variate pattern analysis-informed seed-based correlation analysis, we show that the strength of resting-state brain connectivity in multiple resting-state networks was negatively correlated with the peak of serum levels of S100B. A negative correspondence between S100B peak levels recorded 12–36 h after trauma and intrinsic connectivity was found for brain regions located in the default mode, fronto-parietal, visual and motor resting-state networks. Our results suggest that resting-state brain connectivity measures acquired during the acute phase of TBI is concordant with results obtained from molecular biomarkers and that it may hold a capacity to predict long-term cognitive outcome in TBI patients.

  14. Traumatic injuries: imaging of spinal injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Fuchsjaeger, M. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2002-06-01

    Severe (high-energy) spinal injuries are common sequelae of acute traumas. The task of radiology is to establish the radiological diagnosis, classify it, judge stability and instability and lead further radiological evaluation in cases of non-agreement between the radiological diagnosis and the clinical (neurological) findings. While skeletal abnormalities are best diagnosed with spiral CT and to a lesser degree with plain-film radiographs, soft tissue lesions, such as cord injuries or ligament ruptures, are best outlined with emergency MRI. The classification of fractures depends on fracture (trauma)-biomechanics and location. All these efforts are necessary to get the best clinical outcome for the patient. (orig.)

  15. Management of acute complex traumatic wound with a dermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of acute complex traumatic wound with a dermal regeneration template: Case report. ... Methods: A nine-year-old male patient presented to Kimberly Hospital with an extensive soft tissue injury of the leg associated with a tibia fracture caused by a high velocity pedestrian vehicle accident. Results: A ...

  16. Traumatic brain injury-induced sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola-Saltzman M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mari Viola-Saltzman, Camelia Musleh Department of Neurology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, USA Abstract: Sleep disturbances are frequently identified following traumatic brain injury, affecting 30%–70% of persons, and often occur after mild head injury. Insomnia, fatigue, and sleepiness are the most frequent sleep complaints after traumatic brain injury. Sleep apnea, narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias may also occur after a head injury. In addition, depression, anxiety, and pain are common brain injury comorbidities with significant influence on sleep quality. Two types of traumatic brain injury that may negatively impact sleep are acceleration/deceleration injuries causing generalized brain damage and contact injuries causing focal brain damage. Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency testing, and/or actigraphy may be utilized to diagnose sleep disorders after a head injury. Depending on the disorder, treatment may include the use of medications, positive airway pressure, and/or behavioral modifications. Unfortunately, the treatment of sleep disorders associated with traumatic brain injury may not improve neuropsychological function or sleepiness. Keywords: traumatic brain injury, insomnia, hypersomnia, sleep apnea, periodic limb movement disorder, fatigue

  17. Acute injuries of the axis vertebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J.T. (United General Hospital, Sedro Woolley, WA (USA)); Harris, J.H. (Texas Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Dept. of Radiology)

    1989-08-01

    A retrospective analysis of 165 patients admitted to Hermann Hospital with acute injuries of the axis vertebra revealed 68 (41%) dens fractures, 62 (38%) cases of traumatic spondylolisthesis ('hangman's' fracture), 21 (13%) extension teardrop fractures, 10 (6%) hyperextension dislocations, and 2 (1.0%) fractures each of the laminae and spinous processes. Of the axis injuries 31 (18%) were limited to the axis body alone. Of these, 21 (61%) were hyperextension teardrop fractures and 10 (32%) were hyperextension dislocations. Axis injuries were associated with acute injuries of other cervical vertebrae in 14 (8%) of the patients. (orig./GDG).

  18. World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of New-Onset Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and WTC-Related Acute Traumatic Injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-05

    The World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program conducted a review of published, peer-reviewed epidemiologic studies regarding potential evidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute traumatic injury among individuals who were responders to or survivors of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The Administrator of the WTC Health Program (Administrator) found that these studies provide substantial evidence to support a causal association between each of these health conditions and 9/11 exposures. As a result, the Administrator is publishing a final rule to add both new-onset COPD and WTC-related acute traumatic injury to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions eligible for treatment coverage in the WTC Health Program.

  19. The classic metaphyseal lesion and traumatic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thackeray, Jonathan D.; Wannemacher, Jacob; Adler, Brent H.; Lindberg, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the classic metaphyseal lesion (CML) is a traumatic lesion, strongly associated with abuse in infants. Nevertheless, various non-traumatic origins for CMLs continue to be suggested in medical and legal settings. No studies to date systematically describe the association of CMLs with other traumatic injuries. The primary objective of this study is to examine the association of CMLs with other traumatic injuries in a large data set of children evaluated for physical abuse. This was a retrospectively planned secondary analysis of data from a prospective, observational study of children <120 months of age who underwent evaluation by a child abuse physician. For this secondary analysis, we identified all children ≤12 months of age with an identified CML and determined the number and type of additional injuries identified. Descriptive analysis was used to report frequency of additional traumatic injuries. Among 2,890 subjects, 119 (4.1%) were identified as having a CML. Of these, 100 (84.0%) had at least one additional (non-CML) fracture. Thirty-three (27.7%) had traumatic brain injury. Nearly half (43.7%) of children had cutaneous injuries. Oropharyngeal injuries were found in 12 (10.1%) children. Abdominal/thoracic injuries were also found in 12 (10.1%) children. In all, 95.8% of children with a CML had at least one additional injury; one in four children had three or more categories of injury. CMLs identified in young children are strongly associated with traumatic injuries. Identification of a CML in a young child should prompt a thorough evaluation for physical abuse. (orig.)

  20. Illness representations in patients with traumatic injury: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bih-O; Chaboyer, Wendy; Wallis, Marianne

    2010-02-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the illness representations of patients with traumatic injury and to examine what extent their illness representations change over time. Traumatic injury has attracted global concern because it is the major reason for death and disability in people under 45 years old. One model, the Common Sense Model of Illness Representation (CSMIR), has the potential to help individuals adjust to changes in health status such as traumatic injury. Longitudinal study design. This study was conducted using a and collected data prior to hospital discharge and at three and six months after hospital discharge. One individual question form and the Chinese Illness Perception Questionnaire Revised (IPQ-R) (Trauma) were used to collect demographic data, clinical data and illness representations. A total of 114 participants completed the survey three times. The overall response rate was 79.7%. Six subscales of the Chinese (Trauma): identity, emotional representations, consequences, controllability, illness coherence and causes of the Chinese IPQ-R (Trauma) changed significantly over time. Two subscales, Timeline (acute/chronic) and Timeline Cyclical, did not change significantly. Based on these findings, there may be a window of opportunity to provide appropriate interventions to individuals with traumatic injury at each time point. The results of this study have implications for nursing practice and further nursing research. Understanding illness representation in patients with traumatic injury may help nurses to provide anticipatory guidance and to design nursing interventions before and after hospital discharge, ultimately to improve health outcomes of those patients.

  1. Efficacy and tolerability of a new ibuprofen 200mg plaster in patients with acute sports-related traumatic blunt soft tissue injury/contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predel, Hans-Georg; Giannetti, Bruno; Connolly, Mark P; Lewis, Fraser; Bhatt, Aomesh

    2018-01-01

    Ibuprofen is used for the treatment of non-serious pain. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of a new ibuprofen plaster for the treatment of pain associated with acute sports impact injuries/contusions. In this randomised, double-blind, multi-centre, placebo controlled, parallel group study, adults (n = 130; 18-58 years of age) diagnosed with acute sports-related blunt soft tissue injury/contusion were randomized to receive either ibuprofen 200 mg plaster or placebo plaster. Plasters were administered once daily for five consecutive days. The primary assessment was area under the visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain on movement (POM) over 0 to three days (VAS AUC 0-3d ). Other endpoints included algometry AUC from 0 to three days (AUC 0-3d ) and 0 to five days (AUC 0-5d ), to evaluate improvement of sensitivity at the injured site, and patient and investigator global assessment of efficacy. Safety was monitored throughout the study. The ibuprofen plaster resulted in superior reduction in AUC 0-3d compared with placebo; the Least Squares (LS) mean difference was 662.82 mm*h in favour of the ibuprofen 200mg plaster (P = 0.0011). The greater improvement in VAS AUC of POM was also observed after 12 h, 24 h, and five days of therapy. Tenderness also significantly improved with the ibuprofen plaster compared with placebo; LS mean difference in algometry/tenderness AUC 0-3d was 1.87 N/cm 2 *d and AUC 0-5d was 1.87 N/cm 2 *d (P values ≤0.0004). At all study timepoints, a greater percentage of patients and investigators rated the effectiveness of the ibuprofen 200 mg plaster as good/excellent than the placebo plaster. Treatment-emergent adverse events for the ibuprofen plaster were few (≤1.5%) and were mild in severity. The results of this study indicate 200 mg plaster is effective and safe for the treatment of pain due to acute sports-related traumatic blunt soft tissue injury/contusion in adults.

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Condition Information What is TBI? TBI ... external force that affects the functioning of the brain. It can be caused by a bump or ...

  3. Dysautonomia after severe traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendricks, H.T.; Heeren, J.H.M.; Vos, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dysautonomia after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by episodes of increased heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature, blood pressure, muscle tone, decorticate or decerebrate posturing, and profuse sweating. This study addresses the incidence of dysautonomia after severe

  4. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy-integration of canonical traumatic brain injury secondary injury mechanisms with tau pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbe, Jacqueline R; Hall, Edward D

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, a new neurodegenerative tauopathy labeled Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), has been identified that is believed to be primarily a sequela of repeated mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), often referred to as concussion, that occurs in athletes participating in contact sports (e.g. boxing, American football, Australian football, rugby, soccer, ice hockey) or in military combatants, especially after blast-induced injuries. Since the identification of CTE, and its neuropathological finding of deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, mechanistic attention has been on lumping the disorder together with various other non-traumatic neurodegenerative tauopathies. Indeed, brains from suspected CTE cases that have come to autopsy have been confirmed to have deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau in locations that make its anatomical distribution distinct for other tauopathies. The fact that these individuals experienced repetitive TBI episodes during their athletic or military careers suggests that the secondary injury mechanisms that have been extensively characterized in acute TBI preclinical models, and in TBI patients, including glutamate excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, free radical-induced oxidative damage and neuroinflammation, may contribute to the brain damage associated with CTE. Thus, the current review begins with an in depth analysis of what is known about the tau protein and its functions and dysfunctions followed by a discussion of the major TBI secondary injury mechanisms, and how the latter have been shown to contribute to tau pathology. The value of this review is that it might lead to improved neuroprotective strategies for either prophylactically attenuating the development of CTE or slowing its progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The scavenging chemokine receptor ACKR2 has a significant impact on acute mortality rate and early lesion development after traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Woodcock

    Full Text Available The atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 promotes resolution of acute inflammation by operating as a scavenger receptor for inflammatory CC chemokines in several experimental models of inflammatory disorders, however its role in the brain remains unclear. Based on our previous reports of increased expression of inflammatory chemokines and their corresponding receptors following traumatic brain injury (TBI, we hypothesised that ACKR2 modulates neuroinflammation following brain trauma and that its deletion exacerbates cellular inflammation and chemokine production. We demonstrate increased CCL2 and ACKR2 mRNA expression in post-mortem human brain, whereby ACKR2 mRNA levels correlated with later times post-TBI. This data is consistent with the transient upregulation of ACKR2 observed in mouse brain after closed head injury (CHI. As compared to WT animals, ACKR2-/- mice showed a higher mortality rate after CHI, while the neurological outcome in surviving mice was similar. At day 1 post-injury, ACKR2-/- mice displayed aggravated lesion volume and no differences in CCL2 expression and macrophage recruitment relative to WT mice. Reciprocal regulation of ACKR2 and CCL2 expression was explored in cultured astrocytes, which are recognized as the major source of CCL2 and also express ACKR2. ACKR2 mRNA increased as early as 2 hours after an inflammatory challenge in WT astrocytes. As expected, CCL2 expression also dramatically increased at 4 hours in WT astrocytes but was significantly lower in ACKR2-/- astrocytes, possibly indicating a co-regulation of CCL2 and ACKR2 in these cells. Conversely, in vivo, CCL2 mRNA/protein levels were increased similarly in ACKR2-/- and WT brains at 4 and 12 hours after CHI, in line with the lack of differences in cerebral macrophage recruitment and neurological recovery. In conclusion, ACKR2 is induced after TBI and has a significant impact on mortality and lesion development acutely following CHI, while its role in chemokine

  6. Pre-hospital and acute management of traumatic spinal cord injury in the Netherlands: survey results urge the need for standardisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, B.L.; Hosman, A.J.; Middendorp, J.J. van; Edwards, M.J.; Grunsven, P.M. van; Meent, H. van de

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Questionnaire survey. OBJECTIVES: Although a range of novel therapeutic approaches for traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) are being trialled in highly standardised, pre-clinical research models, little has been published about the extent of standardisation in health service delivery

  7. Design and rationale of a Prospective, Observational European Multicenter study on the efficacy of acute surgical decompression after traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: the SCI-POEM study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, J.J. van; Barbagallo, G.; Schuetz, M.; Hosman, A.J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives:Despite many years of research, there is currently no treatment available that results in major neurological or functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI). In particular, no conclusive data related to the role of the timing of decompressive surgery, and the impact of

  8. Gabapentin in the management of dysautonomia following severe traumatic brain injury: a case series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baguley, Ian J; Heriseanu, Roxana E; Gurka, Joseph A

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacological management of dysautonomia, otherwise known as autonomic storms, following acute neurological insults, is problematic and remains poorly researched. This paper presents six subjects with dysautonomia following extremely severe traumatic brain injury where gabapentin controlled...

  9. Patients with the most severe traumatic brain injury benefit from rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Ingrid; Norup, Anne; Liebach, Annette

    2014-01-01

    -acute inpatient rehabilitation during a 12-year period followed an intensive interdisciplinary rehabilitation programme. Severity of injury was defined by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score on rehabilitation admission and duration of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA). Patients were routinely measured...

  10. Pediatric acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlem, P.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Bos, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Among ventilated children, the incidence of acute lung injury (ALI) was 9%; of that latter group 80% developed the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The population-based prevalence of pediatric ARDS was 5.5 cases/100.000 inhabitants. Underlying diseases in children were septic shock (34%),

  11. Definition and drivers of acute traumatic coagulopathy: clinical and experimental investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Christopher Donald; Goslings, J C; Gaarder, C

    2010-01-01

    Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) is an impairment of hemostasis that occurs early after injury and is associated with a 4-fold higher mortality, increased transfusion requirements and organ failure....

  12. Invasive Fungal Infections Secondary to Traumatic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Kronen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infection (IFI is a rare but serious complication of traumatic injury. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology, natural history, mycology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes associated with post-traumatic IFI in military and civilian populations. The epidemiology of post-traumatic IFI is poorly characterized, but incidence appears to be rising. Patients often suffer from severe injuries and require extensive medical interventions. Fungi belonging to the order Mucorales are responsible for most post-traumatic IFI in both civilian and military populations. Risk factors differ between these cohorts but include specific injury patterns and comorbidities. Diagnosis of post-traumatic IFI typically follows positive laboratory results in the appropriate clinical context. The gold standard of treatment is surgical debridement in addition to systemic antifungal therapy. Patients with post-traumatic IFI may be at greater risk of amputation, delays in wound healing, hospital complications, and death as compared to trauma patients who do not develop IFI. More research is needed to understand the factors surrounding the development and management of post-traumatic IFI to reduce the significant morbidity and mortality associated with this disease.

  13. Central diabetes insipidus in pediatric severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharfi, Ibrahim M; Stewart, Tanya Charyk; Foster, Jennifer; Morrison, Gavin C; Fraser, Douglas D

    2013-02-01

    To determine the occurrence rate of central diabetes insipidus in pediatric patients with severe traumatic brain injury and to describe the clinical, injury, biochemical, imaging, and intervention variables associated with mortality. Retrospective chart and imaging review. Children's Hospital, level 1 trauma center. Severely injured (Injury Severity Score ≥ 12) pediatric trauma patients (>1 month and diabetes insipidus between January 2000 and December 2011. Of 818 severely injured trauma patients, 180 had severe traumatic brain injury with an overall mortality rate of 27.2%. Thirty-two of the severe traumatic brain injury patients developed acute central diabetes insipidus that responded to desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin and/or vasopressin infusion, providing an occurrence rate of 18%. At the time of central diabetes insipidus diagnosis, median urine output and serum sodium were 6.8 ml/kg/hr (interquartile range = 5-11) and 154 mmol/L (interquartile range = 149-159), respectively. The mortality rate of central diabetes insipidus patients was 87.5%, with 71.4% declared brain dead after central diabetes insipidus diagnosis. Early central diabetes insipidus onset, within the first 2 days of severe traumatic brain injury, was strongly associated with mortality (p diabetes insipidus were more likely to have intracranial pressure monitoring (p = 0.03), have thiopental administered to induce coma (p = 0.04) and have received a decompressive craniectomy for elevated intracranial pressure (p = 0.04). The incidence of central diabetes insipidus in pediatric patients with severe traumatic brain injury is 18%. Mortality was associated with early central diabetes insipidus onset and cerebral edema on head computed tomography. Central diabetes insipidus nonsurvivors were less likely to have received intracranial pressure monitoring, thiopental coma and decompressive craniectomy.

  14. The neuropathology and neurobiology of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2012-12-06

    The acute and long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received increased attention in recent years. In this Review, we discuss the neuropathology and neural mechanisms associated with TBI, drawing on findings from sports-induced TBI in athletes, in whom acute TBI damages axons and elicits both regenerative and degenerative tissue responses in the brain and in whom repeated concussions may initiate a long-term neurodegenerative process called dementia pugilistica or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We also consider how the neuropathology and neurobiology of CTE in many ways resembles other neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease, particularly with respect to mismetabolism and aggregation of tau, β-amyloid, and TDP-43. Finally, we explore how translational research in animal models of acceleration/deceleration types of injury relevant for concussion together with clinical studies employing imaging and biochemical markers may further elucidate the neurobiology of TBI and CTE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Triple Peripheral Nerve Injury Accompanying to Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižlknur Can

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary injuries especially extremity fractures may be seen concurrently with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Peripheral nerve damages may accompany to these fractures and may be missed out, especially in acute stage. In this case report; damage of radial, ulnar and median nerves which was developed secondarily to distal humerus fracture that could not be detected in acute stage, in a patient who had motor vehicle accident (MVA. 29-year-old male patient was admitted with weakness in the right upper extremity. 9 months ago, he had traumatic brain injury because of MVA, and fracture of distal humerus was detected in follow-ups. Upon the suspect of the peripheral nerve injury, the diagnosis was confirmed with ENMG. The patient responded well to the rehabilitation program treatment. In a TBI patient, it must be kept in mind that there might be a secondary trauma and therefore peripheral nerve lesions may accompany to TBI.

  16. Neuropsychological support to relatives of patients with severe traumatic brain injury in the sub-acute phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Kristensen, Karin Spangsberg; Siert, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have reported emotional distress in relatives of patients with brain injury, but few studies have investigated neuropsychological interventions for relatives. The present study assessed the amount of neuropsychological support as well as the actual number of sessions...... as characteristics related to the patient: Glasgow Coma Scale, Injury Severity Score, Early Functional Abilities, Functional Independence Measure, Rancho Los Amigos; and to the relative: symptoms of anxiety and depression (SCL-90-R), quality of life (SF-36) and amount and number of sessions of neuropsychological...

  17. MR imaging of acute cervical spine injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyu Hwa; Lee, Jung Hyung; Joo, Yang Goo [School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the patients with acute cervical spinal injury and to assess the usefulness of the MR imagings. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with acute cervical spinal injury. MR images were obtained with a 2.0 T superconductive MR imaging units (Spectro-20000, Gold-Star, Seoul), using spin-echo and gradient-echo technique. Most of patients were in their 3rd-4th decades and motor vehicle accident was the most frequent cause of acute cervical trauma. We assessed the MR findings with respect to the spinal cord, ligaments, paravertebral soft tissues, intervertebral disk, and bony spine. Spinal cord injury was the most common (65%), where cord swelling, edema, and/or hematoma were demonstrated most frequently at C5-6 level. Traumatic intervertebral disk herniations were the second most common (62.5%) and frequently occurred at the lower cervical levels, mostly at C5-6. Paravertebral soft tissue injury, vertebral body fracture, bone marrow edema and displacement were also well shown on MR images. MR imaging appears to be essential for the evaluation of traumatic disk herniations, spinal cord abnormalities, and injury of paravertebral soft tissue in the acute injury of the cervical spine.

  18. MR imaging of acute cervical spine injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu Hwa; Lee, Jung Hyung; Joo, Yang Goo

    1995-01-01

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the patients with acute cervical spinal injury and to assess the usefulness of the MR imagings. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with acute cervical spinal injury. MR images were obtained with a 2.0 T superconductive MR imaging units (Spectro-20000, Gold-Star, Seoul), using spin-echo and gradient-echo technique. Most of patients were in their 3rd-4th decades and motor vehicle accident was the most frequent cause of acute cervical trauma. We assessed the MR findings with respect to the spinal cord, ligaments, paravertebral soft tissues, intervertebral disk, and bony spine. Spinal cord injury was the most common (65%), where cord swelling, edema, and/or hematoma were demonstrated most frequently at C5-6 level. Traumatic intervertebral disk herniations were the second most common (62.5%) and frequently occurred at the lower cervical levels, mostly at C5-6. Paravertebral soft tissue injury, vertebral body fracture, bone marrow edema and displacement were also well shown on MR images. MR imaging appears to be essential for the evaluation of traumatic disk herniations, spinal cord abnormalities, and injury of paravertebral soft tissue in the acute injury of the cervical spine

  19. Design and testing of a controlled electromagnetic spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of acute traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petteys, Rory J; Spitz, Steven M; Syed, Hasan; Rice, R Andrew; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Goodwin, C Rory; Sciubba, Daniel M; Freedman, Brett A

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes debilitating neurological dysfunction and has been observed in warfighters injured in IED blasts. Clinical benefit of SCI treatment remains elusive and better large animal models are needed to assess treatment options. Here, we describe a controlled electromagnetic spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of SCI. A custom spinal cord impactor and platform were fabricated for large animals (e.g., pig, sheep, dog, etc.). Impacts were generated by a voice coil actuator; force and displacement were measured with a load cell and potentiometer respectively. Labview (National Instruments, Austin, TX) software was used to control the impact cycle and import force and displacement data. Software finite impulse response (FIR) filtering was employed for all input data. Silicon tubing was used a surrogate for spinal cord in order to test the device; repeated impacts were performed at 15, 25, and 40 Newtons. Repeated impacts demonstrated predictable results at each target force. The average duration of impact was 71.2 ±6.1ms. At a target force of 40N, the output force was 41.5 ±0.7N. With a target of 25N, the output force was 23.5 ±0.6N; a target of 15Newtons revealed an output force of 15.2 ±1.4N. The calculated acceleration range was 12.5-21.2m/s 2 . This custom spinal cord impactor reliably delivers precise impacts to the spinal cord and will be utilized in future research to study acute traumatic SCI in a large animal. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Early vasopressor use following traumatic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hylands, Mathieu; Toma, Augustin; Beaudoin, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Current guidelines suggest limiting the use of vasopressors following traumatic injury; however, wide variations in practice exist. Although excessive vasoconstriction may be harmful, these agents may help reduce administration of potentially harmful resuscitation fluids. This systema......OBJECTIVES: Current guidelines suggest limiting the use of vasopressors following traumatic injury; however, wide variations in practice exist. Although excessive vasoconstriction may be harmful, these agents may help reduce administration of potentially harmful resuscitation fluids...... trials are currently ongoing. No study measured long-term quality of life or cognitive function. CONCLUSIONS: Existing data on the effects of vasopressors following traumatic injury are of very low quality according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology...

  1. The Evolution of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder following Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alway, Yvette; Gould, Kate Rachel; McKay, Adam; Johnston, Lisa; Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may develop following traumatic brain injury (TBI), despite most patients having no conscious memory of their accident. This prospective study examined the frequency, timing of onset, symptom profile, and trajectory of PTSD and its psychiatric comorbidities during the first 4 years following moderate-to-severe TBI. Participants were 85 individuals (78.8% male) with moderate or severe TBI recruited following admission to acute rehabilitation between 2005 and 2010. Using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Disorders (SCID-I), participants were evaluated for pre- and post-injury PTSD soon after injury and reassessed at 6 months, 12 months, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years post-injury. Over the first 4 years post-injury, 17.6% developed injury-related PTSD, none of whom had PTSD prior to injury. PTSD onset peaked between 6 and 12 months post-injury. The majority of PTSD cases (66.7%) had a delayed-onset, which for a third was preceded by subsyndromal symptoms in the first 6 months post-injury. PTSD frequency increased over the first year post-injury, remained stable during the second year, and gradually declined thereafter. The majority of subjects with PTSD experienced a chronic symptom course and all developed one or more than one comorbid psychiatric disorder, with mood, other anxiety, and substance-use disorders being the most common. Despite event-related amnesia, post-traumatic stress symptoms, including vivid re-experiencing phenomena, may develop following moderate-to-severe TBI. Onset is typically delayed and symptoms may persist for several years post-injury.

  2. Dental Trauma 2- Acute Management of Fracture Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemal, Serpil; Singh, Parmjit; Polycarpou, Nectaria; Tomson, Rachel; Kelleher, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Fortunately, traumatic dental injuries are a relatively uncommon occurrence in general dental practice. However, when they do present, timely diagnosis and treatment of such injuries is essential to maximize the chance of a successful outcome. This is the second part of a two-part series on traumatic dental injuries that are commonly encountered in the clinical setting. Part one covered the management of acute luxation/displacement injuries affecting the supporting structures of the tooth, while part two will cover the management of fracture injuries associated with teeth and the alveolar bone. Clinical relevance: Traumatic dental injuries are uncommon occurrences in everyday general dental practice. This article aims to provide a simple, step-by-step approach in the diagnosis and clinical management of acute fracture injuries.

  3. Treating traumatic injuries of the diaphragm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwivedi Sankalp

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic diaphragmatic injury (DI is a unique clinical entity that is usually occult and can easily be missed. Their delayed presentation can be due to the delayed rupture of the diaphragm or delayed detection of diaphragmatic rupture, making the accurate diagnosis of DI challenging to the trauma surgeons. An emergency laparotomy and thorough exploration followed by the repair of the defect is the gold standard for the management of these cases. We report a case of blunt DI in an elderly gentleman and present a comprehensive overview for the management of traumatic injuries of the diaphragm.

  4. Perspective on Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury | Igun | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic brain injury is an important aspect of paediatric trauma because of its contribution to mortality ant post trauma seqeulae. Management of traumatic brain injury remains a challenge to surgeons, especially in developing countries. This study aims to determine the pattern of traumatic brain injury among ...

  5. Advances in Imaging and Management Trends of Traumatic Aortic Injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, Prashant, E-mail: drprashantnagpal@gmail.com, E-mail: Prashant-nagpal@uiowa.edu; Mullan, Brian F. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology (United States); Sen, Indrani [Mayo Clinic, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (United States); Saboo, Sachin S. [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Khandelwal, Ashish [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Acute traumatic aortic injury (ATAI) is a life-threatening injury. CT is the imaging tool of choice, and the knowledge of direct and indirect signs of injury, grading system, and current management protocol helps the emergency radiologist to better identify and classify the injury and provide additional details that can impact management options. Newer dual-source CT technology with ultrafast acquisition speed has also influenced the appropriate protocol for imaging in patients with suspected ATAI. This review highlights the imaging protocol in patients with blunt trauma, CT appearance and grading systems of ATAI, management options, and the role of the multidisciplinary team in the management of these patients. We also briefly review the current literature on the definition, treatment, and follow-up protocol in patients with minimal aortic injury.

  6. Advances in Imaging and Management Trends of Traumatic Aortic Injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagpal, Prashant; Mullan, Brian F.; Sen, Indrani; Saboo, Sachin S.; Khandelwal, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Acute traumatic aortic injury (ATAI) is a life-threatening injury. CT is the imaging tool of choice, and the knowledge of direct and indirect signs of injury, grading system, and current management protocol helps the emergency radiologist to better identify and classify the injury and provide additional details that can impact management options. Newer dual-source CT technology with ultrafast acquisition speed has also influenced the appropriate protocol for imaging in patients with suspected ATAI. This review highlights the imaging protocol in patients with blunt trauma, CT appearance and grading systems of ATAI, management options, and the role of the multidisciplinary team in the management of these patients. We also briefly review the current literature on the definition, treatment, and follow-up protocol in patients with minimal aortic injury.

  7. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-09-05

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury.

  8. Epidemiology and sociodemographic aspects of ocular traumatic injuries in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Alireza Keshtkar; Anvari, Faramarz; Ameri, Ahmad; Bozorgui, Shima; Shahverdi, Nooshin

    2010-12-01

    Although the incidence of ocular trauma has been clearly described in developed countries, few published data are available on the epidemiology and the effects of parameters that can influence the incidence and severity of ocular injuries in Iran. The present study tried to determine epidemiological aspects of ocular traumatic injuries and evaluate their effects on different types of ocular injury. The case series included 1950 consecutive patients with acute ophthalmic trauma presented to the emergency ward of Farabi Hospital in Tehran. Information was collected by interviewing patients and having them fill in a questionnaire. The final diagnosis was made by a medical resident. If there was a difficulty or doubt in diagnosis or classification, confirmation of diagnosis was made by senior faculty. Ocular injuries were classified into globe and non-globe injuries according to the site of injury. Mechanical globe injuries were classified according to Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology (BETT) into closed and open injuries. The mean age of patients was 28.8 ± 12.8 years; 87.6% were male. The most common causes of injury were work-related (49.0%) and chance events (42.0%). The most frequent ocular injury was globe injury (95.6%), including mechanical (77.6% closed and 5.9% open), chemical (7.6%), photic (2.3%) and thermal (2.2%) injuries. Non-globe injury also occurred in 10.8% of patients; both globe and non-globe injuries occurred in 6.5% of patients. The hospitalization rate in all patients was 8.8%. Previous history of eye trauma was significantly more common in the group with isolated globe injuries (P < 0.001). History of eye trauma is a risk factor for globe injuries and female gender is a risk factor only for non-globe injuries. These two factors may predict future eye injury and increase its risk by 5.2 and 1.6 times, respectively.

  9. Managing traumatic brain injury secondary to explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess Paula

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Explosions and bombings are the most common deliberate cause of disasters with large numbers of casualties. Despite this fact, disaster medical response training has traditionally focused on the management of injuries following natural disasters and terrorist attacks with biological, chemical, and nuclear agents. The following article is a clinical primer for physicians regarding traumatic brain injury (TBI caused by explosions and bombings. The history, physics, and treatment of TBI are outlined.

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury and Sleep Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Viola-Saltzman, Mari; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is common following traumatic brain injury (TBI), affecting 30–70% of individuals, many occurring after mild injuries. Insomnia, fatigue and sleepiness are the most frequent post-TBI sleep complaints with narcolepsy (with or without cataplexy), sleep apnea (obstructive and/or central), periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias occurring less commonly. In addition, depression, anxiety and pain are common TBI co-morbidities with substantial influence on sleep quality. T...

  11. Fatigue in adults with traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollayeva, Tatyana; Kendzerska, Tetyana; Mollayeva, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    , assess, and critically appraise studies that assessed predictors for fatigue and the consequences of fatigue on at least two separate time points following traumatic brain injury. METHODS/DESIGN: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, and PsycINFO will be systematically...

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury: Nuclear Medicine Neuroimaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Catasús, Carlos A; Vállez Garcia, David; Le Riverend Morales, Eloísa; Galvizu Sánchez, Reinaldo; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; de Vries, Erik FJ; van Waarde, Aren; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an up-to-date review of nuclear medicine neuroimaging in traumatic brain injury (TBI). 18F-FDG PET will remain a valuable tool in researching complex mechanisms associated with early metabolic dysfunction in TBI. Although evidence-based imaging studies are needed, 18F-FDG PET

  13. Fitness to drive after traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, WH; Withaar, FK

    This paper deals with the issue of fitness to drive in patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI). Guidelines for assessment are proposed and three types of studies are reviewed: studies about impairments of attention and information processing, studies of driving competence, and driver

  14. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present results from the first 3 years of centralized subacute rehabilitation after very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to compare results of centralized versus decentralized rehabilitation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospectively, the most severely injured group of adults fr...

  15. Anaesthetic and Intensive Care Management of Traumatic Cervical Spine Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Umamaheswara Rao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma to the cervical spine may have devastating consequences. Timely interventions are essential to prevent avoidable neurological deterioration. In the initial stabilization of patients with acute cervical spine injuries, physiological disturbances, especially those involving cardiac and respiratory function require careful attention. Early surgery, which facilitates rapid mobi-lization of the patient, is fraught with important management considerations in the intraopoerative period and the subsequent critical care. Airway management poses a crucial challenge at this stage. Those patients who survive the injury with quadriplegia or quadriparesis may present themselves for incidental surgical procedures. Chronic systemic manifestations in these patients require attention in providing anaesthesia and postoperative care at this stage. The current review provides an insight into the physiological disturbances and the management issues in both acute and chronic phases of traumatic cervical spine injury.

  16. Urinary calculi following traumatic spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Bølling; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Kristensen, Jørgen Kvist

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the time aspect of the development of renal and bladder calculi in individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and a possible relation between the development of calculi and the bladder-emptying method. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprised a retrospective data...... calculus was highest within the first 6 months post-injury. The cumulative proportion of calculi-free participants 45 years post-injury was 62% for renal calculi and 85% for bladder calculi. For participants who did not develop renal calculi within the first 2 years post-injury, the risk of having a renal...... calculi was higher in the SCI population compared to the normal population. Bladder calculi primarily occur early post-injury and renal calculi appear both early post-injury and years later. Therefore, it is important to follow individuals with SCI regularly by means of urological investigations from...

  17. Imaging Atlantooccipital and Atlantoaxial Traumatic Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrda, Jonathan B; Paterson, Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    Cervical spine injuries, specifically the atlantooccipital joint and atlantoaxial joint, often involve the spinal canal or large blood vessels that supply blood to the brain. Patient handling, transport, and positioning for imaging plays an important role in diagnosis, treatment, and patient prognosis. This article discusses cervical spine anatomy, specific traumatic spinal injuries, and radiography's role in treating these injuries. Treatment options and imaging before and after treatment also are discussed, and a description of dose reduction techniques is included. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  18. Posttraumatic rehabilitation and one year outcome following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): data from the well defined population based German Prospective Study 2000-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wild, K R H

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up examination to review the one-year outcome of patients after craniocerebral trauma with respect to health related quality of life (QoL) and social reintegration. The data are derived from the prospective controlled, well defined population based, multiple centre study that was performed in Germany for the first time in the years 2000-2001 with emphasis on quality management (structural, process, outcome) and regarding the patient's age, physical troubles, and impaired mental-cognitive, neurobehavioral functioning. TBI severity assessment is according to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score. Early outcome after rehabilitation is assessed by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score of patients following rehabilitation and of 63% of all TBI with the aid of follow-up examination (simplified questionnaire) after one year. Catchment areas are Hanover (industrial) and Münster (more rural) with 2,114 million inhabitants. TBI is diagnosed according to ICD 10 S-02, S-04, S-06, S-07, S-09 with at least two of the following symptoms: dizziness or vomiting; retrograde or anterograde amnesia, impaired consciousness, skull fracture, and/or focal neurological impairment. Within one year 6.783 patients (58% male) were examined in the regional hospitals after acute TBI. The regional TBI incidence regarding hospital admission was 321/100.000 TBI. 28% of patients were 65 years of age. GCS was only assessed in 55% of patients. They were 90.9% mild, 3.9% moderate, and 5.2% severe TBI. A total of 5.221 TBI (= 77%) was hospitalised; 1.4% of them died. Only 258 patients (= 4.9%) of the hospitalized TBI received in-hospital neurorehabilitation (73% male), 68% within one month after injury. They were 10.9% severe, 23.4% moderate, and 65.7 mild TBI. 5% were 65 years. One-year follow-up examinations of 4307 individuals (= 63.5% of all TBI) are discussed. A total of 883 patients (= 20.6%) reported posttraumatic troubles, one half were > 64 years. One hundred and sixty patients (= 3

  19. Update of Endocrine Dysfunction following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Reifschneider

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injuries (TBI are common occurrences in childhood, often resulting in long term, life altering consequences. Research into endocrine sequelae following injury has gained attention; however, there are few studies in children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology and current literature documenting risk for endocrine dysfunction in children suffering from TBI. Primary injury following TBI often results in disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and antidiuretic hormone production and release, with implications for both acute management and survival. Secondary injuries, occurring hours to weeks after TBI, result in both temporary and permanent alterations in pituitary function. At five years after moderate to severe TBI, nearly 30% of children suffer from hypopituitarism. Growth hormone deficiency and disturbances in puberty are the most common; however, any part of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis can be affected. In addition, endocrine abnormalities can improve or worsen with time, having a significant impact on children’s quality of life both acutely and chronically. Since primary and secondary injuries from TBI commonly result in transient or permanent hypopituitarism, we conclude that survivors should undergo serial screening for possible endocrine disturbances. High indices of suspicion for life threatening endocrine deficiencies should be maintained during acute care. Additionally, survivors of TBI should undergo endocrine surveillance by 6–12 months after injury, and then yearly, to ensure early detection of deficiencies in hormonal production that can substantially influence growth, puberty and quality of life.

  20. Acute traumatic abdominal wall hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. den Hartog (Dennis); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); P.P. Oprel (Pim); P. Patka (Peter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWH) are rare. We describe a large TAWH with associated intra-abdominal lesions that were caused by high-energy trauma. The diagnosis was missed by clinical examination but was subsequently revealed by a

  1. Acute spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Izunaga, H.; Sato, R.; Shinzato, I.; Korogi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on sequential MR images and neurologic findings that were correlated in 40 acute spinal cord injuries. Within 1 week after injury, frequent initial MR changes appeared isointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images and isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 2 months, hypointensity appeared on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity persisted or appeared on T2-weighted images. Clinical improvements were observed in patients with isointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images at the initial examination. A larger area of hyperintensity on subsequent T2-weighted images was correlated with no neurologic improvement. MR findings were good indicators of the spinal cord injury

  2. Traumatic Mitral Valve and Pericardial Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissar Shaikh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac injury after blunt trauma is common but underreported. Common cardiac trauma after the blunt chest injury (BCI is cardiac contusion; it is very rare to have cardiac valve injury. The mitral valve injury during chest trauma occurs when extreme pressure is applied at early systole during the isovolumic contraction between the closure of the mitral valve and the opening of the aortic valve. Traumatic mitral valve injury can involve valve leaflet, chordae tendineae, or papillary muscles. For the diagnosis of mitral valve injury, a high index of suspicion is required, as in polytrauma patients, other obvious severe injuries will divert the attention of the treating physician. Clinical picture of patients with mitral valve injury may vary from none to cardiogenic shock. The echocardiogram is the main diagnostic modality of mitral valve injuries. Patient’s clinical condition will dictate the timing and type of surgery or medical therapy. We report a case of mitral valve and pericardial injury in a polytrauma patient, successfully treated in our intensive care unit.

  3. TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY IN PEDIATRIC AGE GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayagriva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in children. The anatomical features, physiological response to injury, neuronal development, and low myelination in children cause different clinical features compared to the adult traumatic brain injury. Our aim is to study the incidence, predisposing factors, clinical presentations, and outcome in pediatric head injuries. The patients included in this retrospective study are under the age of 14 years admitted in the Neurosurgery Department of King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam, which is a tertiary care centre. The study period is two years’ duration from 1.1.2013 to 31.12.2014. Data collected on the basis of history, physical examination, base line investigations, and the plain CT scan is all cases. The pediatric patients were 226 in total 1643 case of head injury cases. There were 64.6% (n=146 males and 35.4% (n=80 females. The age ranged from 12 days to 14 years. Fall from height was the commonest cause of head injury found in 48.6% (n=110 cases, road traffic accidents (RTA in 34.5% (n=78 and other causes 16.8% (n=38; 49 (21.68% patients had associated injuries. At 55.75% (n=126 cases mild head injury with GCS 13-15 was present and severe head injury with GCS less than 8 in 29 (12.8% patients. The 188 patients are treated conservatively, 38 patients underwent different neurosurgical procedures in which 5 patients died. CONCLUSION: Head injury in pediatric age group carries high risk of morbidity and mortality. Good outcome achieved by early diagnosis and referral from primary care centers to tertiary care centers.

  4. [Prognosis in pediatric traumatic brain injury. A dynamic cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Solís, María G; Villa-Manzano, Alberto I; Sánchez-Mosco, Dalia I; Vargas-Lares, José de Jesús; Plascencia-Fernández, Irma

    2013-01-01

    traumatic brain injury is a main cause of hospital admission and death in children. Our objective was to identify prognostic factors of pediatric traumatic brain injury. this was a dynamic cohort study of traumatic brain injury with 6 months follow-up. The exposition was: mild or moderate/severe traumatic brain injury, searching for prognosis (morbidity-mortality and decreased Glasgow scale). Relative risk and logistic regression was estimated for prognostic factors. we evaluated 440 patients with mild traumatic brain injury and 98 with moderate/severe traumatic brain injury. Morbidity for mild traumatic brain injury was 1 %; for moderate/severe traumatic brain injury, 5 %. There were no deaths. Prognostic factors for moderate/severe traumatic brain injury were associated injuries (RR = 133), fractures (RR = 60), street accidents (RR = 17), night time accidents (RR = 2.3) and weekend accidents (RR = 2). Decreased Glasgow scale was found in 9 %, having as prognostic factors: visible injuries (RR = 3), grown-up supervision (RR = 2.5) and time of progress (RR = 1.6). there should be a prognosis established based on kinetic energy of the injury and not only with Glasgow Scale.

  5. Acute traumatic abdominal wall hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Hartog, Dennis; Tuinebreijer, Wim; Oprel, Pim; Patka, Peter

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWH) are rare. We describe a large TAWH with associated intra-abdominal lesions that were caused by high-energy trauma. The diagnosis was missed by clinical examination but was subsequently revealed by a computed tomography (CT) scan. Repair consisted of an open anatomical reconstruction of the abdominal wall layers with reinforcement by an intraperitoneal composite mesh. The patient recovered well and...

  6. Outcomes Following Traumatic Grain Elevator Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolefree, Sydnei; Truong, Anthony; Ward, Jeanette; Dong, Fanglong; Ablah, Elizabeth; Haan, James

    2017-01-01

    The absence of a comprehensive database of grain elevator-associated injuries hinders accurate evaluation of injury prevalence and may lead to discordant information about injury frequencies. The main purpose of this study was to identify the most common mechanisms of injury related to grain elevator events. Comparisons of hospital outcomes between patients who sustained traumatic injuries associated with grain elevators at Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)-regulated industrial sites versus those on OSHA-exempt farming operations were also made. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients' presenting with grain elevator-related injuries at a level-1 trauma center between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013. Data collected included demographics, mechanism of injury, injury severity, hospitalization details, and discharge disposition. Data were summarized, and comparisons were made between the groups. All patients (N = 18) in the study were male, with a mean age of 37 years. Falls and being caught in equipment each accounted for 27.8% of injuries. Among the 18 patients, there were a total of 37 injuries. The majority of injuries were either lower extremity (29.7%) or chest injuries (21.6%). The average hospital length of stay was 4 ± 4.5 days, and one patient required mechanical ventilation. There were no reported deaths. The literature reports entrapments as the leading cause of grain elevator-related injuries; however, this study found that falls and being caught in equipment were the most common mechanisms of injury. This suggests that a greater emphasis should be placed on fall prevention and equipment safety.

  7. Falls and traumatic brain injury among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filer, William; Harris, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    This commentary discusses traumatic brain injury (TBI) related to falls among elderly individuals, as well as common TBI sequelae and their treatment. It also discusses the current understanding of TBI-related dementia and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  8. secondary injury in traumatic brain injury patients - a prospective study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Secondary insults of hypotension and hypoxia significantly impact on outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). More than 4 hours' delay in evacuation of intracranial haematomas has been demonstrated to have an additional impact on outcome. The objective of this study was to document the ...

  9. Cognitive retraining in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diya Nangia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is often associated with cognitive impairments. The psychological sequelae of cognitive deficits and emotional problems contribute significantly to the disability in the patient and to the distress of the family. The study aimed to develop a cognitive retraining programme to enhance cognitive functioning in TBI. 25 years old male presenting with history of left temporal hemorrhagic contusion with cerebral edema underwent 2 months of a cognitive retaining programme, addressing executive functions impairment. A single case experimental design with pre- and post-assessment was adopted to evaluate changes in the patient in response to the intervention. Improvements were found in cognitive functioning, and in symptom reduction and behaviour. The 2 months hospital based cognitive retraining programme was found to be efficacious in ameliorating symptoms and improving cognitive, social and occupational functioning post traumatic brain injury.

  10. Blast-induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    directly to the brain after craniotomy 154 or 240 kPa Unknown 2.8 or 20 kPa 40 kPa 1 or 10 MPa Redistribution of phosphorylated neurofilament H...m a: 1𔃻) .... !l ~ Blast-induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury 767 colleagues55 compared neuropsychological test results in a group of primarily...patterns between blast and non-blast-injured subjects, thus providing no support at the neuropsychological level that blast is different. However

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury: Caregivers’ Problems and Needs

    OpenAIRE

    syed tajjudin syed hassan; WF Khaw; AR Rosna; J Husna

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an increasingly major world health problem. This short review using the most pertinent articles on TBI caregiving problems and needs highlights the pressing issues. Articles focusing on both TBI-caregivers’ problems and needs are rarely found, especially for developing countries. Most TBI-caregiving is done by family members, whose altered lives portend burden and stresses which add to the overwhelming demand of caring for the TBI-survivor. Lack of information,...

  12. Traumatic atlantooccipital dislocation injury in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J; West, J S

    1994-10-01

    The tragedy of trauma turns into triumph when the surgery team members' efforts result in victory for the patient. Nowhere is this more true than in successful pediatric trauma care. Giving a child a second chance at life and the family an opportunity for a new beginning is the highest reward for the trauma team's years of professional training and practice. Traumatic atlantoocipital dislocation injury usually results in death, but recent neurosurgery trauma advances are increasing pediatric survival rates.

  13. Traumatic brain injury and olfactory deficits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortin, Audrey; Lefebvre, Mathilde Beaulieu; Ptito, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: Olfactory functions are not systematically evaluated following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study aimed at comparing two smell tests that are used in a clinical setting. RESEARCH DESIGN: The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and the Alberta Smell....... RESULTS: The scores of the two smell tests were significantly correlated. Both tests indicated that patients with frontal lesion performed significantly worse than patients with other types of lesion. Mood and injury severity were not associated with olfactory impairment when age was taken into account...

  14. Surviving severe traumatic brain injury in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Poulsen, Ingrid; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify all hospitalized patients surviving severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Denmark and to compare these patients to TBI patients admitted to highly specialized rehabilitation (HS-rehabilitation). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients surviving severe TBI were identified from...... severe TBI were admitted to HS-rehabilitation. Female sex, older age, and non-working status pre-injury were independent predictors of no HS-rehabilitation among patients surviving severe TBI. CONCLUSION: The incidence rate of hospitalized patients surviving severe TBI was stable in Denmark...

  15. Traumatic brain injury and forensic neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Brooks, Michael

    2009-01-01

    As part of a special issue of The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, forensic neuropsychology is reviewed as it applies to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and other types of acquired brain injury in which clinical neuropsychologists and rehabilitation psychologists may be asked to render professional opinions about the neurobehavioral effects and outcome of a brain injury. The article introduces and overviews the topic focusing on the process of forensic neuropsychological consultation and practice as it applies to patients with TBI or other types of acquired brain injury. The emphasis is on the application of scientist-practitioner standards as they apply to legal questions about the status of a TBI patient and how best that may be achieved. This article introduces each topic area covered in this special edition.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic cervical injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhng, S. K.; Lee, K. S.; Sohn, K. J.; Choi, S. S.; Won, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cevical injuries. MRI studies of 34 patients with cervical spinal injuries were analyzed retrospectively. All MRI scans were obtained with an 1.0T superconductive MRI scanner (Siemens Magnetom 42SPE) and their findings were analyzed regarding the spinal cord, bony spine, ligaments, and intervertebral disks. A variety of abnormal findings were detected: 25 cord abnormalities including cord compression (15 cases), cord edema (4 cases), syringomyelia (4 cases), myelomalacia (1 case), and hemorrhagic contusion (1 case), 18 ligamentous injuries, 22 disk herniations (9 post-traumatic, 13 chronic degenerative), 11 spine fractures, and 4 subluxations. MRI is useful in evaluating the spinal cord itself, in depicting ligamentous injuries, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in assessing the alignment of cervical spine

  17. Dementia resulting from traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Ramalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Traumatic brain injury (TBI represents a significant public health problem in modern societies. It is primarily a consequence of traffic-related accidents and falls. Other recently recognized causes include sports injuries and indirect forces such as shock waves from battlefield explosions. TBI is an important cause of death and lifelong disability and represents the most well-established environmental risk factor for dementia. With the growing recognition that even mild head injury can lead to neurocognitive deficits, imaging of brain injury has assumed greater importance. However, there is no single imaging modality capable of characterizing TBI. Current advances, particularly in MR imaging, enable visualization and quantification of structural and functional brain changes not hitherto possible. In this review, we summarize data linking TBI with dementia, emphasizing the imaging techniques currently available in clinical practice along with some advances in medical knowledge.

  18. Advanced Neuromonitoring and Imaging in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart H. Friess

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While the cornerstone of monitoring following severe pediatric traumatic brain injury is serial neurologic examinations, vital signs, and intracranial pressure monitoring, additional techniques may provide useful insight into early detection of evolving brain injury. This paper provides an overview of recent advances in neuromonitoring, neuroimaging, and biomarker analysis of pediatric patients following traumatic brain injury.

  19. Resveratrol Neuroprotection in Stroke and Traumatic CNS injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mary; Dempsey, Robert J; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbene formed in many plants in response to various stressors, elicits multiple beneficial effects in vertebrates. Particularly, resveratrol was shown to have therapeutic properties in cancer, atherosclerosis and neurodegeneration. Resveratrol-induced benefits are modulated by multiple synergistic pathways that control oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death. Despite the lack of a definitive mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that resveratrol can induce a neuroprotective state when administered acutely or prior to experimental injury to the CNS. In this review, we discuss the neuroprotective potential of resveratrol in stroke, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, with a focus on the molecular pathways responsible for this protection. PMID:26277384

  20. Social functioning after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Nancy R; Corrigan, John D; Dikmen, Sureyya S; Machamer, Joan

    2009-01-01

    To determine the relationship between adult-onset traumatic brain injury (TBI) and social functioning including employment, social relationships, independent living, recreation, functional status, and quality of life 6 months or longer after injury. Not applicable. Systematic review of the published, peer-reviewed literature. Not applicable. Fourteen primary and 25 secondary studies were identified that allowed comparison to controls for adults who were at least 6 months post-TBI. TBI decreases the probability of employment after injury in those who were workers before their injury, lengthens the timing of their return if they do return to work, and decreases the likelihood that they will return to the same position. Those with moderate and severe TBI are clearly affected, but there was insufficient evidence of a relationship between unemployment and mild TBI. Penetrating head injury sustained in wartime is clearly associated with increased unemployment. TBI also adversely affects leisure and recreation, social relationships, functional status, quality of life, and independent living. Although there is a dose-response relationship between severity of injury and social outcomes, there is insufficient evidence to determine at what level of severity the adverse effects are demonstrated. TBI clearly has adverse effects on social functioning for adults. While some consequences might arise from injuries to other parts of the body, those with moderate to severe TBI have more impaired functioning than do those with other injuries alone.

  1. A retrospective evaluation of traumatic dental injury in children who ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic dental injury was observed more frequently in the 7.12 age groups: 52.5% in girls and 67.8% in boys. Falls are the major cause of traumatic dental injury in the age group 6.12 (51.4%). Sport activities are a common cause of traumatic dental injury in the 7.12 age group (34.2%). Patients visited a dentist within ...

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury: Are We Conducting Enough Resarch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-17

    FROM: 59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 7 APR 2017 1. Your paper, entitled Traumatic Brain Injury: Are We Conducting Enough...review and approval.) NA - Pubmed searches w ere the only source of data 6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Traumatic Brain Injury...Traumatic Brain Injury: Are We Conducting Enough Research? Capt Mariya Gusman MD, Lt Col Jonathan A Sosnov MD, Jeffrey T Howard PhD Background

  3. Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    inflammation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord , spontaneous recovery, functional recovery, inflammation, biomarkers, trauma 16...Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0614 TITLE: Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ona Bloom...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0614 W81XWH-15-1-0614 Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  4. A population-based study on epidemiology of intensive care unit treated traumatic brain injury in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, G M; Lund, S H; Snorradottir, B; Karason, S; Olafsson, I H; Reynisson, K; Mogensen, B; Sigvaldason, K

    2017-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a worldwide health issue and a significant cause of preventable deaths and disabilities. We aimed to describe population-based data on intensive care treated traumatic brain injury in Iceland over 15 years period. Retrospective review of all intensive care unit admissions due to traumatic brain injury at The National University Hospital of Iceland 1999-2013. Data were collected on demographics, mechanism of injury, alcohol consumption, glasgow come scale upon admission, Injury Severity Scoring, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score, length of stay, interventions and mortality (defined as glasgow outcome score one). All computerized tomography scans were reviewed for Marshall score classification. Intensive care unit admissions due to traumatic brain injury were 583. The incidence decreased significantly from 14/100.000/year to 12/100.000/year. Males were 72% and the mean age was 41 year. Majority of patients (42%) had severe traumatic brain injury. The most common mechanism of injury was a fall from low heights (36.3%). The mortality was 18.2%. Increasing age, injury severity score, Marshall score and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score are all independent risk factors for death. Glasgow coma scale was not an independent prognostic factor for outcome. Incidence decreased with a shift in injury mechanism from road traffic accidents to falls and an increased rate of traumatic brain injury in older patients following a fall from standing or low heights. Mortality was higher in older patients falling from low heights than in younger patients suffering multiple injuries in road traffic accidents. Age, injury severity score, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score and Marshall score are good prognostic factors for outcome. Traumatic brain injury continues to be a considerable problem and the increase in severe traumatic brain injury in the middle age and older age groups after a seemingly

  5. Acute assessment of brain injuries in ground-level falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöyry, Tiina; Luoto, Teemu M; Kataja, Anneli; Brander, Antti; Tenovuo, Olli; Iverson, Grant L; Öhman, Juha

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize traumatic brain injuries (TBI) sustained in ground-level falls (GLFs). The focus was on factors associated with acute computed tomographic (CT) findings. The sample included 575 subjects examined and treated at the Tampere University Hospital emergency department (ED). Retrospective data collection consisted of subject- and injury-related data and clinical information from the emergency department. All CT scans were analyzed and systematically coded. Ground-level falls were the mechanism of injury in 48.3% (n = 278) of the subjects. In the GLF group, independent risk factors for acute traumatic CT findings were long-term alcohol abuse, older age, being found on the ground, and left temporoparietal and occipital location of direct head impact. There were no significant differences in the incidence of any intracranial traumatic lesion type between those with GLFs and other causes of TBI. None of the classic clinical TBI severity markers studied were associated with acute traumatic CT findings in patients with GLFs. Older age and long-term alcohol abuse increase the likelihood of acute intracranial CT abnormalities. The pattern of intracranial traumatic CT findings does not differ from other causes of TBI. Clinical signs and indices of TBI severity did not predict traumatic CT findings.

  6. Astrocyte roles in traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, Joshua E.; Bernstein, Alexander M.; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes sense changes in neural activity and extracellular space composition. In response, they exert homeostatic mechanisms critical for maintaining neural circuit function, such as buffering neurotransmitters, modulating extracellular osmolarity and calibrating neurovascular coupling. In addition to upholding normal brain activities, astrocytes respond to diverse forms of brain injury with heterogeneous and progressive changes of gene expression, morphology, proliferative capacity and function that are collectively referred to as reactive astrogliosis. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) sets in motion complex events in which noxious mechanical forces cause tissue damage and disrupt central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis, which in turn trigger diverse multi-cellular responses that evolve over time and can lead either to neural repair or secondary cellular injury. In response to TBI, astrocytes in different cellular microenvironments tune their reactivity to varying degrees of axonal injury, vascular disruption, ischemia and inflammation. Here we review different forms of TBI-induced astrocyte reactivity and the functional consequences of these responses for TBI pathobiology. Evidence regarding astrocyte contribution to post-traumatic tissue repair and synaptic remodeling is examined, and the potential for targeting specific aspects of astrogliosis to ameliorate TBI sequelae is considered. PMID:25828533

  7. Molecular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory, and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review, we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury, and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration.

  8. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present results from the first 3 years of centralized subacute rehabilitation after very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to compare results of centralized versus decentralized rehabilitation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospectively, the most severely injured group of adults from...... an uptake area of 2.4 million in Denmark were included at admission to a regional brain injury unit (BIU), on average 19 days after injury. Patients in the retrospective study used for comparison were randomly chosen from the national hospital register. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Out of 117 patients...... post-trauma was 0.29, and at 1 year 0.055 per 100,000 population. By comparison of 39 patients from the centralized unit injured in 2000-2003 with 21 patients injured in 1982, 1987 or 1992 and with similar PTA- and age distributions and male/female ratio, Glasgow Outcome Scale score at discharge...

  9. Traumatic brain injury in modern war

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Hawley, Jason; Grimes, Jamie; Macedonia, Christian; Hancock, James; Jaffee, Michael; Dombroski, Todd; Ecklund, James M.

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common and especially with military service. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI has become prominent and is mainly from improvised explosive devices (IED). Civilian standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) were appropriate has been applied to the combat setting. When such CPGs do not exist or are not applicable, new practice standards for the military are created, as for TBI. Thus, CPGs for prehospital care of combat TBI CPG [1] and mild TBI/concussion [2] were introduced as was a DoD system-wide clinical care program, the first large scale system wide effort to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. As TBI remains incompletely understood, substantial research is underway. For the DoD, leading this effort are The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. This program is a beginning, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always with the intent of providing the best care to its military beneficiaries.

  10. Epidemiology of traumatic spinal cord injury in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Gwynedd E; Campos-Benitez, Mauricio; Keller, Jana L; Duggal, Neil

    2006-04-01

    Retrospective review. To describe the incidence, clinical features, and treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) treated at a Canadian tertiary care center. Understanding the current epidemiology of acute traumatic SCI is essential for public resource allocation and primary prevention. Recent reports suggest that the mean age of patients with SCI may be increasing. We retrospectively reviewed hospital records on all patients with traumatic SCI between January 1997 and June 2001 (n = 151). Variables assessed included age, gender, length of hospitalization, type and mechanism of injury, associated spinal fractures, neurologic deficit, and treatment. Annual age-adjusted incidence rates were 42.4 per million for adults aged 15-64 years, and 51.4 per million for those 65 years and older. Motor vehicle accidents accounted for 35% of SCI. Falls were responsible for 63% of SCI among patients older than 65 years and for 31% of injuries overall. Cervical SCI was most common, particularly in the elderly, and was associated with fracture in only 56% of cases. Thoracic and lumbar SCI were associated with spinal fractures in 100% and 85% of cases, respectively. In-hospital mortality was 8%. Mortality was significantly higher among the elderly. Treatment of thoracic and lumbar fractures associated with SCI was predominantly surgical, whereas cervical fractures were equally likely to be treated with external immobilization alone or with surgery. A large proportion of injuries was seen among older adults, predominantly as a result of falls. Prevention programs should expand their focus to include home safety and avoidance of falls in the elderly.

  11. Traumatic Penile Injury: From Circumcision Injury to Penile Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Heon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of external genitalia trauma is diverse according to the nature of trauma and injured anatomic site. The classification of trauma is important to establish a strategy of treatment; however, to date there has been less effort to make a classification for trauma of external genitalia. The classification of external trauma in male could be established by the nature of injury mechanism or anatomic site: accidental versus self-mutilation injury and penis versus penis plus scrotum or perineum. Accidental injury covers large portion of external genitalia trauma because of high prevalence and severity of this disease. The aim of this study is to summarize the mechanism and treatment of the traumatic injury of penis. This study is the first review describing the issue.

  12. Integrative Medicine in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, David F; Hudak, Anne M; Robbins, William

    2017-05-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered to be a part of conventional medicine. Integrative medicine combines treatment with conventional medical practices and elements of CAM in which there is strong evidence in efficacy and safety. Although there is growing interest in the integrative medical approach in treating the patient population with traumatic brain injury, there is a paucity in high-quality clinical trials supporting its use. This article reviews the background and current clinical data concerning some of the more common CAM interventions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Perioperative acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvert Stacey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI is a serious complication in the perioperative period, and is consistently associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity. Two major consensus definitions have been developed in the last decade that allow for easier comparison of trial evidence. Risk factors have been identified in both cardiac and general surgery and there is an evolving role for novel biomarkers. Despite this, there has been no real change in outcomes and the mainstay of treatment remains preventive with no clear evidence supporting any therapeutic intervention as yet. This review focuses on definition, risk factors, the emerging role of biomarkers and subsequent management of AKI in the perioperative period, taking into account new and emerging strategies.

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction Among Head ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    more common in males and young people. Keywords: Traumatic Brain Injury, Plasma Glucose, Cortisol, ... disability and death among young adults through a variety of mechanisms, and is now recognised as a .... such as ischaemic stroke, intracranial haemorrhage or traumatic brain injury and is associated with increased.

  15. Traumatic injuries to the anterior teeth of Nigerian urban public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic injuries to the anterior teeth of Nigerian urban public school children. ... International Journal of Medicine and Health Development ... Aims: To investigate the prevalence and pattern of occurrence of traumatic anterior dental injuries in the 6 to 12 year olds, attending public schools in the urban city of Enugu, South ...

  16. Post traumatic Headache and Psychological Health: Mindfulness Training for Mild TraumaticBrain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-1021 TITLE: Post-traumatic Headache and Psychological Health: Mindfulness Training for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury...traumatic Headache and Psychological Health: Mindfulness Training for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury” 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...negative psychological/mood states, and impair overall quality of life. Comorbid anxiety, depression, PTSD and other psychological, psychosocial

  17. Surgical management of traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Vidgeon, Steven; Strong, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECT: Mass lesions from traumatic brain injury (TBI) often require surgical evacuation as a life-saving measure and to improve outcomes, but optimal timing and surgical technique, including decompressive craniectomy, have not been fully defined. The authors compared neurosurgical approaches...... in the treatment of TBI at 2 academic medical centers to document variations in real-world practice and evaluate the efficacies of different approaches on postsurgical course and long-term outcome. METHODS: Patients 18 years of age or older who required neurosurgical lesion evacuation or decompression for TBI were...... enrolled in the Co-Operative Studies on Brain Injury Depolarizations (COSBID) at King's College Hospital (KCH, n = 27) and Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU, n = 24) from July 2004 to March 2010. Subdural electrode strips were placed at the time of surgery for subsequent electrocorticographic...

  18. Prehospital Care of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TVSP Murthy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI occurs when a sudden trauma causes brain damage. Depending on the severity, outcome can be anything from complete recovery to permanent disability or death. Emergency medical services play a dominant role in provision of primary care at the site of injury. Since little can be done to reverse the initial brain damage due to trauma, attempts to prevent further brain damage and stabilize the patient before he can be brought to a specialized trauma care centre play a pivotal role in the final outcome. Recognition and early treatment of hypoten-sion, hypoxemia, and hypoglycemia, objective neurological assessment based on GCS and pupils, and safe transport to an optimal care centre are the key elements of prehospital care of a TBI patient.

  19. Brain SPECT in severs traumatic head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, F.; Eder, V.; Pottier, J.M.; Baulieu, J.L.; Fournier, P.; Legros, B.; Chiaroni, P.; Dalonneau, M.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the results of the early brain scintigraphy in traumatic brain injury to the long term neuropsychological behavior. Twenty four patients had an ECD-Tc99m SPECT, within one month after the trauma; scintigraphic abnormalities were evaluated according to a semi-quantitative analysis. The neuropsychological clinical investigation was interpreted by a synthetic approach to evaluate abnormalities related to residual motor deficit, frontal behavior, memory and language disorders. Fourteen patients (58%) had sequela symptoms. SPECT revealed 80 abnormalities and CT scan only 31. Statistical analysis of uptake values showed significantly lower uptake in left basal ganglia and brain stem in patients with sequela memory disorders. We conclude that the brain perfusion scintigraphy is able to detect more lesions than CT and that it could really help to predict the neuropsychological behavior after severe head injury. Traumatology could become in the future a widely accepted indication of perfusion SPECT. (authors)

  20. 4: Rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fary; Baguley, Ian J; Cameron, Ian D

    2003-03-17

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) commonly affects younger people and causes life-long impairments in physical, cognitive, behavioural and social function. The cognitive, behavioural and personality deficits are usually more disabling than the residual physical deficits. Recovery from TBI can continue for at least 5 years after injury. Rehabilitation is effective using an interdisciplinary approach, and close liaison with the patient, family and carers. The focus is on issues such as retraining in activities of daily living, pain management, cognitive and behavioural therapies, and pharmacological management. The social burden of TBI is significant, and therefore family education and counselling, and support of patient and carers, is important. General practitioners play an important role in providing ongoing support in the community, monitoring for medical complications, behavioural and personality issues, social reintegration, carer coping skills and return-to-work issues.

  1. Traumatic brain injury among refugees and asylum seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Jacob I

    2017-12-28

    Refugees and asylum seekers face many challenges in their pursuit of a safe home. The journey for displaced individuals can be extremely dangerous and many do not survive or go missing. Survivors face significant risks of injury, abuse, and torture. Traumatic brain injury is one of the most common and disabling injuries sustained by these populations. This already complex condition can have profound implications on these groups and their families due to factors related to mental health, cultural perspectives, and their ability to navigate healthcare systems. A literature review was performed to investigate the incidence and prevalence of torture and traumatic brain injury in displaced and fleeing populations. Impacts of traumatic brain injury and residency status on outcomes in these individuals were also examined. The incidence and prevalence of torture and traumatic brain injury among refugees and asylum seekers is significant. These populations may access healthcare systems differently than other groups and as a result may experience a unique health-related outcomes following traumatic brain injury. This information should sensitize healthcare providers to a potential history of traumatic brain injury sustained by patients/clients who are refugees or asylum seekers and may serve to guide some clinical encounters. Implications for rehabilitation Traumatic brain injuries are commonly sustained by refugees and asylum seekers. Cultural factors may complicate how refugees and asylum seekers understand, report, and manage these injuries. The above may be worsened by cognitive, emotional, and behavioral changes following traumatic brain injury. Rehabilitation providers should be aware of potential traumatic brain injury history during encounters with refugee and asylum seeker populations, especially if a history of torture is suspected.

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury: Caregivers’ Problems and Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    syed tajjudin syed hassan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is an increasingly major world health problem. This short review using the most pertinent articles on TBI caregiving problems and needs highlights the pressing issues. Articles focusing on both TBI-caregivers’ problems and needs are rarely found, especially for developing countries. Most TBI-caregiving is done by family members, whose altered lives portend burden and stresses which add to the overwhelming demand of caring for the TBI-survivor. Lack of information, fi nancial inadequacy, anxiety, distress, coping defi cits, poor adaptability, inadequate knowledge and skills, and a poor support system comprise the major problems. Dysfunctional communication between caregivers and care-receivers has been little researched. The major needs are focused on health and rehabilitation information, fi nancial advice and assistance, emotional and social support, and positive psychological encouragement. In time, health information needs may be met, but not emotional support. Information on TBI caregiving problems and unmet needs is critical to all relevant healthcare stakeholders. Keywords: caregivers, rehabilitation, traumatic brain injury

  3. Psychiatric disorders and traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Schwarzbold

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Marcelo Schwarzbold1, Alexandre Diaz1, Evandro Tostes Martins2, Armanda Rufino1, Lúcia Nazareth Amante1,3, Maria Emília Thais1, João Quevedo4, Alexandre Hohl1, Marcelo Neves Linhares1,5,6, Roger Walz1,61Núcleo de Pesquisas em Neurologia Clínica e Experimental (NUPNEC, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Hospital Universitário, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 2Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 3Departamento de Enfermagem, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 4Laboratório de Neurociências, UNESC, Criciúma, SC, Brazil; 5Departamento de Cirurgia, Hospital Universitário, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 6Centro de Cirurgia de Epilepsia de Santa Catarina (CEPESC, Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, Florianópolis, SC, BrazilAbstract: Psychiatric disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI are frequent. Researches in this area are important for the patients’ care and they may provide hints for the comprehension of primary psychiatric disorders. Here we approach epidemiology, diagnosis, associated factors and treatment of the main psychiatric disorders after TBI. Finally, the present situation of the knowledge in this field is discussed.Keywords: psychiatric disorders, traumatic brain injury, neuropsychiatry, diagnostic, epidemiology, pathophysiology

  4. 45 CFR 1308.16 - Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... child is classified as having traumatic brain injury whose brain injuries are caused by an external... adversely affect educational performance. The term includes children with open or closed head injuries, but does not include children with brain injuries that are congenital or degenerative or caused by birth...

  5. Notch signaling inhibitor DAPT provides protection against acute craniocerebral injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Mei Zhang

    Full Text Available Notch signaling pathway is involved in many physiological and pathological processes. The γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT inhibits Notch signaling pathway and promotes nerve regeneration after cerebral ischemia. However, neuroprotective effects of DAPT against acute craniocerebral injury remain unclear. In this study, we established rat model of acute craniocerebral injury, and found that with the increase of damage grade, the expression of Notch and downstream protein Hes1 and Hes5 expression gradually increased. After the administration of DAPT, the expression of Notch, Hes1 and Hes5 was inhibited, apoptosis and oxidative stress decreased, neurological function and cognitive function improved. These results suggest that Notch signaling can be used as an indicator to assess the severity of post-traumatic brain injury. Notch inhibitor DAPT can reduce oxidative stress and apoptosis after acute craniocerebral injury, and is a potential drug for the treatment of acute craniocerebral injury.

  6. Priming the inflammatory pump of the CNS after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcher, Kristina G; Eiferman, Daniel S; Godbout, Jonathan P

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to secondary neuropsychiatric problems that develop and persist years after injury. Mounting evidence indicates that neuroinflammatory processes progress after the initial head injury and worsen with time. Microglia contribute to this inflammation by maintaining a primed profile long after the acute effects of the injury have dissipated. This may set the stage for glial dysfunction and hyperactivity to challenges including subsequent head injury, stress, or induction of a peripheral immune response. This review discusses the evidence that microglia become primed following TBI and how this corresponds with vulnerability to a 'second hit' and subsequent neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Emerging Therapies in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Patrick M.; Jackson, Travis C.; Ferguson, Nikki Miller; Carlson, Shaun W.; Simon, Dennis W.; Brockman, Erik C.; Ji, Jing; Bayir, Hülya; Poloyac, Samuel M.; Wagner, Amy K.; Kline, Anthony E.; Empey, Philip E.; Clark, Robert S.B.; Jackson, Edwin K.; Dixon, C. Edward

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of basic and clinical research, treatments to improve outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are limited. However, based on the recent recognition of the prevalence of mild TBI, and its potential link to neurodegenerative disease, many new and exciting secondary injury mechanisms have been identified and several new therapies are being evaluated targeting both classic and novel paradigms. This includes a robust increase in both preclinical and clinical investigations. Using a mechanism-based approach the authors define the targets and emerging therapies for TBI. They address putative new therapies for TBI across both the spectrum of injury severity and the continuum of care, from the field to rehabilitation. They discuss TBI therapy using 11 categories, namely, (1) excitotoxicity and neuronal death, (2) brain edema, (3) mitochondria and oxidative stress, (4) axonal injury, (5) inflammation, (6) ischemia and cerebral blood flow dysregulation, (7) cognitive enhancement, (8) augmentation of endogenous neuroprotection, (9) cellular therapies, (10) combination therapy, and (11) TBI resuscitation. The current golden age of TBI research represents a special opportunity for the development of breakthroughs in the field. PMID:25714870

  8. Endoscopic Surgery for Traumatic Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH is generally addressed by craniotomy under general anesthesia. We report a patient whose traumatic ASDH was treated under local anesthesia by one-burr-hole endoscopic surgery. This 87-year-old woman had undergone coil embolization for a ruptured right middle-cerebral artery aneurysm and placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for normal pressure hydrocephalus 5 years earlier. Upon admission, she manifested consciousness disturbance after suffering head trauma and right hemiplegia. Her Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 (E2V2M4. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a thick, left-frontotemporal ASDH. Due to her advanced age and poor condition, we performed endoscopic surgery rather than craniotomy to evacuate the ASDH. Under local anesthesia, we made a burr hole in her left forehead and increased its size to 15 mm in diameter. After introducing a transparent sheath into the hematoma cavity with a rigid endoscope, the clot was evacuated with a suction tube. The arterial bleeding point was electrically coagulated. A postoperative CT scan confirmed the reduction of the hematoma. There was neither brain compression nor brain swelling. Her consciousness disturbance and right hemiplegia improved immediately. Endoscopic surgery may represent a viable method to address traumatic intracranial hematomas in some patients.

  9. Increased vagal tone accounts for the observed immune paralysis in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, M.; Pompe, J.C.; Pickkers, P.; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.; Vugt, A.B. van; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability, especially in the younger population. In the acute phase after TBI, patients are more vulnerable to infection, associated with a decreased immune response in vitro. The cause of this immune paralysis is poorly understood. Apart

  10. Gabapentin in the management of dysautonomia following severe traumatic brain injury: a case series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baguley, Ian J; Heriseanu, Roxana E; Gurka, Joseph A

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacological management of dysautonomia, otherwise known as autonomic storms, following acute neurological insults, is problematic and remains poorly researched. This paper presents six subjects with dysautonomia following extremely severe traumatic brain injury where gabapentin controlled...... stimuli may represent a better option for dysautonomia management than drugs which increase inhibition of efferent pathways. Potential mechanisms for these effects are discussed....

  11. Mild traumatic brain injury: Graph-model characterization of brain networks for episodic memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsirka, V.; Simos, P.G.; Vakis, A.; Kanatsouli, K.; Vourkas, M.; Erimaki, S.; Pachou, E.; Stam, C.J.; Micheloyannis, S.

    2011-01-01

    Episodic memory is among the cognitive functions that can be affected in the acute phase following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). The present study used EEG recordings to evaluate global synchronization and network organization of rhythmic activity during the encoding and recognition phases of

  12. New Methods of Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Application to Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-15

    by up to an hour. Subdural hemorrhage (or hematoma ) is a form of traumatic brain injury, in which blood gathers between the dura and arachnoid mater...immediate, “point-of-care” detection and diagnosis of acute intracranial pathology which can be critical in patient management. For exam- ple, the

  13. Antioxidant therapies in traumatic brain injury: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Rivera Hector Rolando

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress constitute one of the commonest mechanism of the secondary injury contributing to neuronal death in traumatic brain injury cases. The oxidative stress induced secondary injury blockade may be considered as to be a good alternative to improve the outcome of traumatic brain injury (TBI treatment. Due to absence of definitive therapy of traumatic brain injury has forced researcher to utilize unconventional therapies and its roles investigated in the improvement of management and outcome in recent year. Antioxidant therapies are proven effective in many preclinical studies and encouraging results and the role of antioxidant mediaction may act as further advancement in the traumatic brain injury management it may represent aonr of newer moadlaity in neurosurgical aramamentorium, this kind of therapy could be a good alternative or adjuct to the previously established neuroprotection agents in TBI.

  14. The Economic Burden of Urinary Tract Infection and Pressure Ulceration in Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Admissions: Evidence for Comparative Economics and Decision Analytics from a Matched Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Barry A B; Dea, Nicolas; Street, John T; Cheng, Christiana L; Rivers, Carly S; Attabib, Najmedden; Kwon, Brian K; Fisher, Charles G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2017-10-15

    Secondary complications of spinal cord injury (SCI) are a burden to affected individuals and the rest of society. There is limited evidence of the economic burden or cost of complications in SCI populations in Canada, however, which is necessary for comparative economic analyses and decision analytic modeling of possible solutions to these common health problems. Comparative economic analyses can inform resource allocation decisions, but the outputs are only as good as the inputs. In this article, new evidence of the excess or incremental costs of urinary tract infection (UTI) and pressure ulceration (PU) in acute traumatic SCI from an exploratory case series analysis of admissions to a Level I specialized Canadian spine facility (2008-2013) is presented. Participants in a national SCI registry were case-control matched (1:1) on the predicted probability of experiencing UTI or PU during initial acute SCI admission. The excess costs of UTI and PU are estimated as the mean of the differences in total direct acute SCI admission costs (length of stay, accommodation, nursing, pharmacy) from the perspective of the admitting facility between participants matched or paired on demographic and SCI characteristics. Even relatively minor UTI and PU, respectively, added an average of $7,790 (standard deviation [SD] $6,267) and $18,758 (SD $27,574) to the direct cost of acute SCI admission in 2013 Canadian dollars (CAD). This case series analysis established evidence of the excess costs of UTI and PU in acute SCI admissions, which will support decision-informing analyses in SCI.

  15. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome: MRI-pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quencer, R.M.; Bunge, R.P.; Egnor, M.; Green, B.A.; Puckett, W.; Naidich, T.P.; Post, M.J.D.; Norenberg, M.

    1992-01-01

    The acute traumatic central cord syndrome (ATCCS) is commonly stated to result from an injury which affects primarily the center of the spinal cord and is frequently hemorrhagic. To test the validity of this widely disseminated hypothesis, the magnetic resonance images [MRI] of 11 consecutive cases of ATCCS caused by closed injury to the spine were analyzed and correlated with the gross pathological and histological features of 3 cervical spinal cords obtained at post mortem from patients with ATCCS, including 2 of patients studied by MRI. In this study, the MRI and pathological observations indicate that ATCCS is predominantly a white matter injury and that intramedullary hemorrhage is not a necessary feature of the syndrome; indeed, it is probably an uncommon event in ATCCS. We suggest that the most common mechanism of injury in ATCCS may be direct compression of the cervical spinal cord by buckling of the ligamenta flava into an already narrowed cervical spinal canal; this would explain the predominance of axonal injury in the white matter of the lateral columns. (orig./GDG)

  16. Anti-oxidative aspect of inhaled anesthetic gases against acute brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuo Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury is a critical and emergent condition in clinical settings, which needs to be addressed urgently. Commonly acute brain injuries include traumatic brain injury, ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Oxidative stress is a key contributor to the subsequent injuries and impedes the reparative process after acute brain injury; therefore, facilitating an anti-oxidative approach is important in the care of those diseases. Readiness to deliver and permeability to blood brain barrier are essential for the use of this purpose. Inhaled anesthetic gases are a group of such agents. In this article, we discuss the anti-oxidative roles of anesthetic gases against acute brain injury.

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paci, Michael; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Marcoux, Judith

    2017-09-01

    Work-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are not well documented in the literature. Published studies mostly rely on worker databases that fail to provide clinically relevant information. Our objective is to describe the characteristics of hospitalized patients and their work-related TBI. We used the Québec provincial trauma and TBI program databases to identify all patients with a diagnosis of work-related TBI admitted to the Montreal General Hospital, a level 1 trauma center, between 2000 and 2014. Data from their medical records were extracted using a predetermined information sheet. Simple descriptive statistics (means and percentages) were used to summarize the data. A total of 285 cases were analyzed. Workplace TBI patients were middle-aged (mean, 43.62 years), overwhelmingly male (male:female 18:1), mostly healthy, and had completed a high school level education. Most workers were from the construction industry; falling was the most common mechanism of injury. The majority of patients (76.8%) presented with a mild TBI; only a minority (14%) required neurosurgery. The most common finding on computed tomography was skull fracture. The median length of hospitalization was 7 days, after which most patients were discharged directly home. A total of 8.1% died of their injuries. Our study found that most hospitalized victims of work-related TBI had mild injury; however, some required neurosurgical intervention and a non-negligible proportion died of their injury. Improving fall prevention, accurately document helmet use and increasing the safety practice in the construction industry may help decrease work-related TBI burden.

  18. Multi-modal MRI of mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponnada A. Narayana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that included high resolution structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, magnetization transfer ratio (MTR imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI were performed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI patients with negative computed tomographic scans and in an orthopedic-injured (OI group without concomitant injury to the brain. The OI group served as a comparison group for mTBI. MRI scans were performed both in the acute phase of injury (~24 h and at follow-up (~90 days. DTI data was analyzed using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS. Global and regional atrophies were calculated using tensor-based morphometry (TBM. MTR values were calculated using the standard method. MRSI was analyzed using LC Model. At the initial scan, the mean diffusivity (MD was significantly higher in the mTBI cohort relative to the comparison group in several white matter (WM regions that included internal capsule, external capsule, superior corona radiata, anterior corona radiata, posterior corona radiata, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, forceps major and forceps minor of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract in the right hemisphere. TBSS analysis failed to detect significant differences in any DTI measures between the initial and follow-up scans either in the mTBI or OI group. No significant differences were found in MRSI, MTR or morphometry between the mTBI and OI cohorts either at the initial or follow-up scans with or without family wise error (FWE correction. Our study suggests that a number of WM tracts are affected in mTBI in the acute phase of injury and that these changes disappear by 90 days. This study also suggests that none of the MRI-modalities used in this study, with the exception of DTI, is sensitive in detecting changes in the acute phase of mTBI.

  19. Characteristics and correlates of rehabilitation charges during inpatient traumatic brain injury rehabilitation in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Karen Sui-Geok; Earnest, Arul; Chiong, Yi; Kong, Keng-He

    2010-01-01

    A prospective study of 91 consecutive traumatic brain injury admissions to rehabilitation over a 2-year period to determine factors impacting on rehabilitation charges. Discharge records of 91 adult traumatic brain injury patients comprising total unsubsidized billings for each completed inpatient rehabilitation episode were used to derive total charges. Co-variates analysed included demographic, acute traumatic brain injury and rehabilitation variables including the Modified Barthel Index score. The total median rehabilitation charge per episode was S$7845.50 (range: S$970.55-$44,817.20) [1 Euro=S$2.10]. The top 3 contributory median total charges/episode included bed, board and nursing (S$5616.00), occupational therapy (S$606.00), and physical therapy (S$526.00). Patients with lower admission Glasgow Coma Scale scores, longer post-traumatic amnesia duration, dysphagia and medical complications during rehabilitation, lower admission Modified Barthel Index scores, longer acute and rehabilitation length of stay had significantly higher rehabilitation charges (pcharges (pcharges. This study has potential implications for healthcare resource planning for traumatic brain injury rehabilitation.

  20. Traumatic spinal cord injury in the United States, 1993-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitin B; Ayers, Gregory D; Peterson, Emily N; Harris, Mitchel B; Morse, Leslie; O'Connor, Kevin C; Garshick, Eric

    2015-06-09

    Acute traumatic spinal cord injury results in disability and use of health care resources, yet data on contemporary national trends of traumatic spinal cord injury incidence and etiology are limited. To assess trends in acute traumatic spinal cord injury incidence, etiology, mortality, and associated surgical procedures in the United States from 1993 to 2012. Analysis of survey data from the US Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases for 1993-2012, including a total of 63,109 patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Age- and sex-stratified incidence of acute traumatic spinal cord injury; trends in etiology and in-hospital mortality of acute traumatic spinal cord injury. In 1993, the estimated incidence of acute spinal cord injury was 53 cases (95% CI, 52-54 cases) per 1 million persons based on 2659 actual cases. In 2012, the estimated incidence was 54 cases (95% CI, 53-55 cases) per 1 million population based on 3393 cases (average annual percentage change, 0.2%; 95% CI, -0.5% to 0.9%). Incidence rates among the younger male population declined from 1993 to 2012: for age 16 to 24 years, from 144 cases/million (2405 cases) to 87 cases/million (1770 cases) (average annual percentage change, -2.5%; 95% CI, -3.3% to -1.8%); for age 25 to 44 years, from 96 cases/million (3959 cases) to 71 cases/million persons (2930 cases), (average annual percentage change, -1.2%; 95% CI, -2.1% to -0.3%). A high rate of increase was observed in men aged 65 to 74 years (from 84 cases/million in 1993 [695 cases] to 131 cases/million [1465 cases]; average annual percentage change, 2.7%; 95% CI, 2.0%-3.5%). The percentage of spinal cord injury associated with falls increased significantly from 28% (95% CI, 26%-30%) in 1997-2000 to 66% (95% CI, 64%-68%) in 2010-2012 in those aged 65 years or older (P spinal cord injury remained relatively stable but, reflecting an increasing population, the total number of cases increased. The largest increase in incidence was observed in older

  1. Diagnostic confirmation of mild traumatic brain injury by diffusion tensor imaging: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Ranga

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Traumatic brain injury is a form of acquired brain injury that results from sudden trauma to the head. Specifically, mild traumatic brain injury is a clinical diagnosis that can have significant effects on an individual's life, yet is difficult to identify through traditional imaging techniques. Case presentation This is the case of a 68-year-old previously healthy African American woman who was involved in a motor vehicle accident that resulted in significant head trauma. After the accident, she experienced symptoms indicative of mild traumatic brain injury and sought a neurological consultation when her symptoms did not subside. She was initially evaluated with a neurological examination, psychological evaluation, acute concussion evaluation and a third-party memory test using software from CNS Vital Signs for neurocognitive function. A diagnosis of post-concussion syndrome was suggested. Diffusion tensor imaging revealed decreased fractional anisotropy in the region immediately adjacent to both lateral ventricles, which was used to confirm the diagnosis. Fractional anisotropy is a scalar value between zero and one that describes the degree of anisotropy of a diffusion process. These results are indicative of post-traumatic gliosis and are undetectable by magnetic resonance imaging. Our patient was treated with cognitive therapy. Conclusion Minor traumatic brain injury is a common injury with variable clinical presentation. The system of diagnosis used in this case found a significant relationship between the clinical assessment and imaging results. This would not have been possible using traditional imaging techniques and highlights the benefits of using diffusion tensor imaging in the sub-acute assessment of minor traumatic brain injury.

  2. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ITS PHARMACOLOGICAL CORRECTION by MEXIDOL IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Govorova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Examined and treated 114 patients with isolated severe head injury at the age of 18 to 55 years. Group I included 61 patients who survived, in group II — 53 patients who died on the 3–15th day post-traumatic period. Patients I and II groups had complex intensive therapy according to existing protocols. 15 patients (subgroup I1 was prepared in the complex therapy mexidol 1200 mg per day for 7–10 days. Against the background of mexidol decreased intensity of lipid peroxidation, maintained at a sufficient level power antioxidant defense system cells, there was an earlier resolution of post-traumatic encephalopathy and recovery of consciousness. The treatment mexidol noted more favorable during the early post-traumatic period, a reduction of complications (χ2 =55,4; p<0,0001 — syndrome of acute lung injury, disseminated intravascular coagulation, acute cardiovascular failure, and pneumonia.

  3. Amelioration of acute sequelae of blast induced mild traumatic brain injury by N-acetyl cysteine: a double-blind, placebo controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hoffer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI secondary to blast exposure is the most common battlefield injury in Southwest Asia. There has been little prospective work in the combat setting to test the efficacy of new countermeasures. The goal of this study was to compare the efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC versus placebo on the symptoms associated with blast exposure mTBI in a combat setting. METHODS: This study was a randomized double blind, placebo-controlled study that was conducted on active duty service members at a forward deployed field hospital in Iraq. All symptomatic U.S. service members who were exposed to significant ordnance blast and who met the criteria for mTBI were offered participation in the study and 81 individuals agreed to participate. Individuals underwent a baseline evaluation and then were randomly assigned to receive either N-acetyl cysteine (NAC or placebo for seven days. Each subject was re-evaluated at 3 and 7 days. Outcome measures were the presence of the following sequelae of mTBI: dizziness, hearing loss, headache, memory loss, sleep disturbances, and neurocognitive dysfunction. The resolution of these symptoms seven days after the blast exposure was the main outcome measure in this study. Logistic regression on the outcome of 'no day 7 symptoms' indicated that NAC treatment was significantly better than placebo (OR = 3.6, p = 0.006. Secondary analysis revealed subjects receiving NAC within 24 hours of blast had an 86% chance of symptom resolution with no reported side effects versus 42% for those seen early who received placebo. CONCLUSION: This study, conducted in an active theatre of war, demonstrates that NAC, a safe pharmaceutical countermeasure, has beneficial effects on the severity and resolution of sequelae of blast induced mTBI. This is the first demonstration of an effective short term countermeasure for mTBI. Further work on long term outcomes and the potential use of NAC in civilian m

  4. Nonsurgical interventions after mild traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygren-de Boussard, Catharina; Holm, Lena W; Cancelliere, Carol

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence regarding the impact of nonsurgical interventions on persistent symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and other databases were searched (2001-2012) with terms including "rehabilitation." Inclusion criteria were...... of 7 studies related to nonsurgical interventions were found to have a low risk of bias. One studied the effect of a scheduled telephone intervention offering counseling and education on outcome and found a significantly better outcome for symptoms (6.6 difference in adjusted mean symptom score; 95...... evidence suggests that early, reassuring educational information is beneficial after MTBI. Well-designed intervention studies are required to develop effective treatments and improve outcomes for adults and children at risk for persistent symptoms after MTBI....

  5. Traumatic brain injury: caregivers' problems and needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S T S; Khaw, W F; Rosna, A R; Husna, J

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an increasingly major world health problem. This short review using the most pertinent articles on TBI caregiving problems and needs highlights the pressing issues. Articles focusing on both TBI-caregivers' problems and needs are rarely found, especially for developing countries. Most TBI-caregiving is done by family members, whose altered lives portend burden and stresses which add to the overwhelming demand of caring for the TBI-survivor. Lack of information, financial inadequacy, anxiety, distress, coping deficits, poor adaptability, inadequate knowledge and skills, and a poor support system comprise the major problems. Dysfunctional communication between caregivers and care-receivers has been little researched. The major needs are focused on health and rehabilitation information, financial advice and assistance, emotional and social support, and positive psychological encouragement. In time, health information needs may be met, but not emotional support. Information on TBI caregiving problems and unmet needs is critical to all relevant healthcare stakeholders.

  6. Destination memory in traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wili Wilu, Amina; Coello, Yann; El Haj, Mohamad

    2018-03-17

    Destination memory, which is socially driven, refers to the ability to remember to whom one has sent information. Our study investigated destination memory in patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Patients and control participants were invited to tell proverbs (e.g., "the pen is mightier than the sword") to pictures of celebrities (e.g., Barack Obama). Then they were asked to indicate to which celebrity they had previously told the proverbs. Besides the assessment of destination memory, participants performed a binding task in which they were required to associate letters with their corresponding location. Analysis demonstrated less destination memory and binding in patients with TBIs than in controls. In both populations, significant correlations were observed between destination memory and performances on the binding task. These findings demonstrate difficulty in the ability to attribute information to its appropriate destination in TBI patients, perhaps owing to difficulties in binding separate information together to form a coherent representation of an event in memory.

  7. Neuroinflammatory responses to traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiva WS

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wellingson Silva Paiva,1 Angelica Duarte Correia,2 Suely Kazue Marie2 1Division of Neurological Surgery, 2Laboratory of Medical Investigation 15, Department of Neurology, University of São Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil We read with great interest the recent study by Lozano et al1 published in the Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. The recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI is related to severity of the initial injury (primary injury and the presence of secondary injury.2 Evidences suggest that inflammation, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis, and neuroendocrine responses play an important role in the development of secondary brain injury.3 Therefore, an important part in the management of patients with TBI is trying to minimize the occurrence of deleterious secondary lesions. Lozano et al’s1 paper focused on the role of neuroinflammation in brain injury.Although some studies have described experimental drugs which may eventually have neuroprotective effects in patients with TBI,2–4 there is currently no approved pharmacological treatment for neuroinflammatory effects of the acute phase of the injury. The dissociation between experimental data with positive results and consecutive clinical trials with negative results leads to a dilemma for the treatment of patients with TBI. And, we agree with Lozano et al1 that further clarification of the neuroinflammatory mechanisms could be the basis for addressing the gap between bench and clinical results to provide better treatment and reduce death and sequelae of TBI.View original paper by Lozano and colleagues.

  8. Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury in Amateur Boxers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rahmati

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & objective: Despite of young and adolescence intent to the boxing sport, because of dominant aggression and direct blows contact to head, face and central nervous system, it is continuously criticize by different groups. The groups of sporting and physician conventions are distinguished boxing with physical and neuropsychological disorders and some groups believe that side effects of this sport are not more than other sports. For this base the aim of this study was to determine the chronic traumatic brain injury in a group amateur boxers.Materials & Methods: In a case-control study, three groups of sport men were considered, each group contained 20 randomly selected cases. The first group were amateur boxers with 4 years minimal activity(directly has been presented to the head blows, second group were amateur soccer players with 4 years minimal activity(has been presented to the not very severe head blows, third group were non athlete subjects .The groups were matched in weight, height, age and education .To understand brain disorder interview by medicine method has been used, then Wiskancin, Bonardele, Bender geshtalt, Kim karad visual memory, Benton and wechler memory (Alef type tests has been performed and EEG has got in the same hour and condition.Results: The homogeneity of between group variances was gained by the statistical method. Also between structural–visual abilities neuropsychological aspect in groups, significant difference has been gained (p= 0.000. In Kim karad visual memory test at the mild and long term visual memory deficit, significant differences between three groups was observed (P= 0.000, P=0.009 that least score has been belonged to the boxers. Also in boxers 6 abnormal EEGs is observed.Conclusion: It can be said that of four years amateur boxing can affect on boxers visual and memory perception and their spatial orientation. Additionally our study have showed that amateur boxing has a significant

  9. Is the outcome in acute spinal cord ischaemia different from that in traumatic spinal cord injury? A cross-sectional analysis of the neurological and functional outcome in a cohort of 93 paraplegics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouw, M H; Hosman, A J F; van Kampen, A; Hirschfeld, S; Thietje, R; van de Meent, H

    2011-02-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To compare the neurological outcome between paraplegic patients with acute spinal cord ischaemia syndrome (ASCIS) or traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) and to investigate the influence of SCI aetiology on the total Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM)-II score. Level 1 trauma centre. Initial (0-40 days) and chronic-phase (6-12 months) American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) sensory scores, lower extremity motor score (LEMS) and chronic-phase total SCIM-II scores were analysed. Differences between ASCIS and tSCI patients were calculated using Student's t-tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. To assess which variables give rise to the prediction of total SCIM-II score, a multiple linear regression analysis was used. These predictor variables included complete (ASIA impairment scale A) or incomplete SCI (AIS B, C, and D), aetiology, age and gender. Out of 93 included patients, 20 ASCIS and 73 tSCI patients were identified. In the complete SCI group, the initial pinprick scores were higher (PSCIM-II scores were higher (Pindependent of the diagnosis ASCIS or tSCI. Furthermore, the diagnosis ASCIS or tSCI was not a significant predictor for total SCIM II scores after 12 months. This study was granted by the 'Internationale Stiftung für Forschung in Paraplegie' (IFP), Zürich, Switzerland.

  10. Isolated traumatic brain injury and venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gent, Jan-Michael; Bandle, Jesse; Calvo, Richard Y; Zander, Ashley L; Olson, Erik J; Shackford, Steven R; Peck, Kimberly A; Sise, C Beth; Sise, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is considered an independent risk factor of venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, the role of TBI severity in VTE risk has not been determined. We hypothesized that increased severity of brain injury in patients with isolated TBI (iTBI) is associated with an increased incidence of VTE. The records of patients admitted from June 2006 to December 2011 were reviewed for injury data, VTE risk factors, results of lower extremity surveillance ultrasound, and severity of TBI. Patients were identified by DRG International Classification of Diseases-9th Rev. codes for TBI, and only those with a nonhead Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of 1 or lower, indicating minimal associated injury, were included. The association of iTBI and VTE was determined using a case-control design. Among iTBI patients, those diagnosed with VTE (cases) were matched for age, sex, and admission year to those without VTE (controls). Data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression. There were 345 iTBI patients: 41 cases (12%) and 304 controls (88%). A total of 151 controls could not be matched to an appropriate case and were excluded. Of the remaining 153 controls, 1 to 16 controls were matched to each of the 41 VTE cases. Compared with the controls, the cases had a higher mean head-AIS score (4.4 vs. 3.9, p = 0.001) and overall Injury Severity Score (20.4 vs. 16.8, p = 0.001). Following adjustment for all factors found to be associated with VTE (ventilator days, central line placement, operative time > 2 hours, chemoprophylaxis, history of VTE, and history of cancer), the cases were significantly more likely to have a greater head injury severity (head-AIS score ≥ 5; odds ratio, 5.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-17.30; p = 0.006). The incidence of VTE in iTBI patients was significantly associated with the severity of TBI. VTE surveillance protocols may be warranted in these high-risk patients, as early detection of VTE could guide subsequent therapy

  11. Rehabilitation of persons with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this NIH Consensus Statement is to inform the biomedical research and clinical practice communities of the results of the NIH Consensus Development Conference on Rehabilitation of Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury. The statement provides state-of-the-art information regarding effective rehabilitation measures for persons who have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and presents the conclusions and recommendations of the consensus panel regarding these issues. In addition, the statement identifies those areas that deserve further investigation. Upon completion of this educational activity, the reader should possess a clear working clinical knowledge of the state of the art regarding this topic. The target audience for this statement includes, but is not limited to, pediatricians, family practitioners, internists, neurologists, physiatrists, psychologists, and behavioral medicine specialists. Participants were a non-Federal, nonadvocate, 16-member panel representing the fields of neuropsychology, neurology, psychiatry, behavioral medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, speech and hearing, occupational therapy, nursing, epidemiology, biostatistics and the public. In addition, 23 experts from these same fields presented data to the panel and a conference audience of 883. The literature was searched through Medline and an extensive bibliography of references was provided to the panel and the conference audience. Experts prepared abstracts with relevant citations from the literature. A compendium of evidence was prepared by the panel which included a contribution from a patient with TBI, a report from an Evidence Based Practice Center of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, and a report from the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Scientific evidence was given precedence over clinical anecdotal experience. The panel, answering predefined

  12. Secondary Damage after Traumatic Brain Injury: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology and Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Engel (Doortje Caroline)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a microscopic or macroscopic injury to the brain caused by external physical forces. Road traffic accidents, falls, sports injuries (i.e. boxing), recreational accidents (i.e. parachute jumping), the use of firearms, assault, child abuse,

  13. Aetiology and treatment outcome of severe traumatic brain injuries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major challenge to the patient, the relatives, the care givers, and the society in general. The primary and secondary injuries, and the high metabolism are formidable stages of the injury, each capable of taking the life of the patient. The objectives were to determine the ...

  14. Guillain Barre Syndrome Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirac Unal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS is an immune-mediated acute inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Infectious agents were usually accused of playing a role in the etiology of GBS. Guillain-Barre syndrome has rarely been reported following subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhage after head trauma. Case Presentation We report on a 63-year-old male patient presenting GBS following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI. Only five other similar cases are described in the literature. Conclusions Sudden onset of GBS symptoms following trauma may erroneously be assessed as secondary complications of the TBI and can lead to unnecessary procedures such as computerized tomography (CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for a definitive diagnosis and may be a waste of time.

  15. Iatrogenic traumatic brain injury during tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, Mark

    2015-01-01

    An 8 yr old spayed female Yorkshire terrier was referred for evaluation of progressive neurological signs after a routine dental prophylaxis with tooth extractions. The patient was circling to the left and blind in the right eye with right hemiparesis. Neurolocalization was to the left forebrain. MRI revealed a linear tract extending from the caudal oropharynx, through the left retrobulbar space and frontal lobe, into the left parietal lobe. A small skull fracture was identified in the frontal bone through which the linear tract passed. Those findings were consistent with iatrogenic trauma from slippage of a dental elevator during extraction of tooth 210. The dog was treated empirically with clindamycin. The patient regained most of its normal neurological function within the first 4 mo after the initial injury. Although still not normal, the dog has a good quality of life. Traumatic brain injury is a rarely reported complication of extraction. Care must be taken while performing dental cleaning and tooth extraction, especially of the maxillary premolar and molar teeth to avoid iatrogenic damage to surrounding structures.

  16. Dysautonomia after severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, H T; Heeren, A H; Vos, P E

    2010-09-01

    Dysautonomia after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by episodes of increased heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature, blood pressure, muscle tone, decorticate or decerebrate posturing, and profuse sweating. This study addresses the incidence of dysautonomia after severe TBI, the clinical variables that are associated with dysautonomia, and the functional outcome of patients with dysautonomia. A historic cohort study in patients with severe TBI [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) dysautonomia was 11.8%. Episodes of dysautonomia were prevalent during a mean period of 20.1 days (range 3-68) and were often initiated by discomfort. Patients with dysautonomia showed significant longer periods of coma (24.78 vs. 7.99 days) and mechanical ventilation (22.67 vs. 7.21 days). Dysautonomia was associated with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) [relative risk (RR) 20.83, CI 4.92-83.33] and the development of spasticity (RR 16.94, CI 3.96-71.42). Patients with dysautonomia experienced more secondary complications. They tended to have poorer outcome. Dysautonomia occurs in approximately 10% of patients surviving severe TBI and is associated with DAI and the development of spasticity at follow-up. The initiation of dysautonomia by discomfort supports the Excitatory: Inhibitory Ratio model as pathophysiological mechanism.

  17. Neuropsychological rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Chantsoulis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to discuss the basic forms of neuropsychological rehabilitation for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI. More broadly, we discussed cognitive rehabilitation therapy (CRT which constitutes a fundamental component in therapeutic interaction at many centres worldwide. Equally presented is a comprehensive model of rehabilitation, the fundamental component of which is CRT. It should be noted that the principles of this approach first arose in Poland in the 1970s, in other words, several decades before their appearance in other programmemes. Taken into consideration are four factors conditioning the effectiveness of such a process: comprehensiveness, earlier interaction, universality and its individualized character. A comprehensive programmeme of rehabilitation covers: cognitive rehabilitation, individual and group rehabilitation with the application of a therapeutic environment, specialist vocational rehabilitation, as well as family psychotherapy. These training programmemes are conducted within the scope of the ‘Academy of Life,’ which provides support for the patients in their efforts and shows them the means by which they can overcome existing difficulties. Equally emphasized is the close cooperation of the whole team of specialists, as well as the active participation of the family as an essential condition for the effectiveness of rehabilitation and, in effect, a return of the patient to a relatively normal life. Also presented are newly developing neurothechnologies and the neuromarkers of brain injuries. This enables a correct diagnosis to be made and, as a result, the selection of appropriate methods for neuropsychological rehabilitation, including neurotherapy.

  18. Traumatic abdominal wall hernia secondary to motorcycle handle bar injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Jamabo

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: We recommend a high level of clinical suspicion for traumatic abdominal wall herniation in all patients with traumatic abdominal wall injuries. It is instructive that the area be explored with primary repair of the hernia and other tissue planes of the abdominal wall.

  19. Nonsurgical acute traumatic subdural hematoma: what is the risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajsarowicz, Paul; Prakash, Ipshita; Lamoureux, Julie; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Feyz, Mitra; Maleki, Mohammad; Marcoux, Judith

    2015-11-01

    The Brain Trauma Foundation has published guidelines on the surgical management of traumatic subdural hematoma (SDH). However, no data exist on the proportion of patients with SDH that can be selected for conservative management and what is the outcome of these patients. The goals of this study were as follows: 1) to establish what proportion of patients are initially treated conservatively; 2) to determine what proportion of patients will deteriorate and require surgical evacuation; and 3) to identify risk factors associated with deterioration and delayed surgery. All cases of acute traumatic SDH (869 when inclusion criteria were met) presenting over a 4-year period were reviewed. For all conservatively treated SDH, the proportion of delayed surgical intervention and the Glasgow Outcome Scale score were taken as outcome measures. Multiple factors were compared between patients who required delayed surgery and patients without surgery. Of the 869 patients with acute traumatic SDH, 646 (74.3%) were initially treated conservatively. A good outcome was achieved in 76.7% of the patients. Only 6.5% eventually required delayed surgery, and the median delay for surgery was 9.5 days. Factors associated with deterioration were as follows: 1) thicker SDH (p<0.001); 2) greater midline shift (p<0.001); 3) location at the convexity (p=0.001); 4) alcohol abuse (p=0.0260); and 5) history of falls (p=0.018). There was no significant difference in regard to age, sex, Glasgow Coma Scale score, Injury Severity Score, abnormal coagulation, use of blood thinners, and presence of cerebral atrophy or white matter disease. The majority of patients with SDH are treated conservatively. Of those, only 6.5% later required surgery, for raised intracranial pressure or SDH progression. Patients at risk can be identified and followed more carefully.

  20. Post-concussive complaints after mild traumatic brain injury associated with altered brain networks during working memory performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horn, Harm J.; Liemburg, Edith J.; Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; Spikman, Jacoba M.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to investigate brain network function during working memory (WM) task performance in patients with uncomplicated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in the sub-acute phase post-injury. We were particularly interested in differences between patients with (PCC-present) and without

  1. Statistical analysis plan for the Erythropoietin in Traumatic Brain Injury trial: a randomised controlled trial of erythropoietin versus placebo in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Presneill, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The Erythropoietin in Traumatic Brain Injury (EPO-TBI) trial aims to determine whether the administration of erythropoietin to patients with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury improves patient-centred outcomes.

  2. Acute traumatic tear of latissimus dorsi muscle in an elite track athlete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Mesut Çelebi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue injuries constitute 30-50% of all sports related injuries; however, injury to the latissimus dorsi muscle is quite rare with only a few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we describe an acute traumatic tear of the latissimus dorsi muscle in an elite track athlete, which has not been reported in the track and field sports before. The injury was caused by forceful resisted arm adduction that took place at hurdling and starting from the block. A pseudotumor appearance in the axillary region was misdiagnosed as a mass. The diagnosis was made by ultrasound alone and the patient was managed conservatively.

  3. Spreading depolarisations and outcome after traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Bullock, M Ross; Okonkwo, David O

    2011-01-01

    Pathological waves of spreading mass neuronal depolarisation arise repeatedly in injured, but potentially salvageable, grey matter in 50-60% of patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We aimed to ascertain whether spreading depolarisations are independently associated with unfavourable...

  4. Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) Informatics System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) informatics system is an extensible, scalable informatics platform for TBI relevant imaging,...

  5. Preliminary questions before studying mild traumatic brain injury outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, P; Carrière, H; Habonimana, D; Dumond, J-J

    2009-07-01

    To point out from the literature the issues in mild traumatic brain injury outcome. METHODOLOGY-RESULTS: The literature review allows to point out several different factors involved in the difficulty to study mild traumatic brain injury: mild traumatic brain injury definition, postconcussional syndrome definition, diagnosis threshold, severity and functional symptoms outcome, neuropsychological tests, unspecific syndrome feature, individual factors, confounding factors and treatment interventions. The mild traumatic brain injury outcome study is complicated by the definitions issues and especially their practical use and by the multiplicity and the intricate interrelationships among involved factors. The individual outcome and social cost weight is widely emphasized for an event still considered as medically trivial. The well-ordered preventive interventions necessity and the targeted treatment programs need for the persisting postconcussive symptoms complete our critical review.

  6. Classroom Strategies for Teaching Veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinski, Jennifer Blevins

    2012-01-01

    Postsecondary institutions currently face the largest influx of veteran students since World War II. As the number of veteran students who may experience learning problems caused by Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and/or Traumatic Brain Injury continues to rise, the need for instructional strategies that address their needs increases. Educators may…

  7. A comparison of two assessments of high level cognitive communication disorders in mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Tanya; Scott, Amanda; Bond, Annabelle; Paul, Eldho

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently encounter cognitive communication disorders. Deficits can be subtle but can seriously influence an individual's ability to achieve life goals. Feedback from rehabilitation facilities indicated that high level cognitive communication disorders are not consistently identified in the acute setting. This study aimed to compare the cognitive communication results from two screening assessments, the Cognistat and the Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test (CLQT), in participants with a mild traumatic brain injury and to relate these findings to a range of prognostic indicators. Eighty-three adults post-TBI (16-81 years; 79.5% males) were recruited at an acute trauma centre. The language components of the two tests were analysed. The CLQT identified more participants with an impairment in language than the Cognistat, 19.3% compared to 1.2% (p communication deficits than the Cognistat in the acute setting.

  8. Traumatic brain injury and obesity induce persistent central insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelina, Kate; Sarac, Benjamin; Freeman, Lindsey M; Gaier, Kristopher R; Weil, Zachary M

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced impairments in cerebral energy metabolism impede tissue repair and contribute to delayed functional recovery. Moreover, the transient alteration in brain glucose utilization corresponds to a period of increased vulnerability to the negative effects of a subsequent TBI. In order to better understand the factors contributing to TBI-induced central metabolic dysfunction, we examined the effect of single and repeated TBIs on brain insulin signalling. Here we show that TBI induced acute brain insulin resistance, which resolved within 7 days following a single injury but persisted until 28 days following repeated injuries. Obesity, which causes brain insulin resistance and neuroinflammation, exacerbated the consequences of TBI. Obese mice that underwent a TBI exhibited a prolonged reduction of Akt (also known as protein kinase B) signalling, exacerbated neuroinflammation (microglial activation), learning and memory deficits, and anxiety-like behaviours. Taken together, the transient changes in brain insulin sensitivity following TBI suggest a reduced capacity of the injured brain to respond to the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory actions of insulin and Akt signalling, and thus may be a contributing factor for the damaging neuroinflammation and long-lasting deficits that occur following TBI. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Behavioral Outcomes Differ Between Rotational Acceleration and Blast Mechanisms of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. Stemper

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI can result from a number of mechanisms, including blunt impact, head rotational acceleration, exposure to blast, and penetration of projectiles. Mechanism is likely to influence the type, severity, and chronicity of outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine differences in the severity and time-course of behavioral outcomes following blast and rotational mTBI. The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW Rotational Injury model and a shock tube model of primary blast injury were used to induce mTBI in rats and behavioral assessments were conducted within the first week, as well as 30 and 60 days following injury. Acute recovery time demonstrated similar increases over protocol-matched shams, indicating acute injury severity equivalence between the two mechanisms. Post-injury behavior in the elevated plus maze demonstrated differing trends, with rotationally injured rats acutely demonstrating greater activity, whereas blast-injured rats had decreased activity that developed at chronic time points. Similarly, blast-injured rats demonstrated trends associated with cognitive deficits that were not apparent following rotational injuries. These findings demonstrate that rotational and blast injury result in behavioral changes with different qualitative and temporal manifestations. Whereas rotational injury was characterized by a rapidly emerging phenotype consistent with behavioral disinhibition, blast injury was associated with emotional and cognitive differences that were not evident acutely, but developed later, with an anxiety-like phenotype still present in injured animals at our most chronic measurements.

  10. Acute injury of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography could be performed. There is no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, particularly about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today MRI is not used for this indication, although it allows, with controlled positioning of the foot and with defined sections, visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In ankle injuries, plain radiographs form the established basis of diagnostic imaging and can provide definitive answers in most cases. CT is used in complex fractures for complete visualization. MRI is the method of choice for several diagnostic problem cases, including occult fractures and post-traumatic avascular necrosis. In tendon injuries, MRI is important if ultrasound is not diagnostic. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI is the most important second-step procedure when radiographs are nondiagnostic. (orig.) [de

  11. Rates of symptom reporting following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmen, Sureyya; Machamer, Joan; Fann, Jesse R; Temkin, Nancy R

    2010-05-01

    This study examines rates of reporting of new or worse post-traumatic symptoms for patients with a broad range of injury severity at 1 month and 1 year after traumatic brain injury (TBI), as compared with those whose injury spared the head, and assesses variables related to symptom reporting at 1 year post-injury. Seven hundred thirty two TBI subjects and 120 general trauma comparison (TC) subjects provided new or worse symptom information at 1 month and/or 1 year post-injury. Symptom reporting at 1 year post-injury was compared in subgroups based on basic demographics, preexisting conditions, and severity of brain injury. The TBI group reported significantly more symptoms at 1 month and 1 year after injury than TCs (each p < .001). Although symptom endorsement declined from 1 month to 1 year, 53% of people with TBI and 24% of TC continued to report 3 or more symptoms at 1 year post-injury. Symptom reporting in the TBI group was significantly related to age, gender, preinjury alcohol abuse, pre-injury psychiatric history, and severity of TBI. Symptom reporting is common following a traumatic injury and continues to be experienced by a substantial number of TBI subjects of all severity levels at 1 year post-injury.

  12. Sodium selenate reduces hyperphosphorylated tau and improves outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Sandy R; Wright, David K; Zheng, Ping; Stuchbery, Ryan; Liu, Shi-Jie; Sashindranath, Maithili; Medcalf, Robert L; Johnston, Leigh A; Hovens, Christopher M; Jones, Nigel C; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a common and serious neurodegenerative condition that lacks a pharmaceutical intervention to improve long-term outcome. Hyperphosphorylated tau is implicated in some of the consequences of traumatic brain injury and is a potential pharmacological target. Protein phosphatase 2A is a heterotrimeric protein that regulates key signalling pathways, and protein phosphatase 2A heterotrimers consisting of the PR55 B-subunit represent the major tau phosphatase in the brain. Here we investigated whether traumatic brain injury in rats and humans would induce changes in protein phosphatase 2A and phosphorylated tau, and whether treatment with sodium selenate-a potent PR55 activator-would reduce phosphorylated tau and improve traumatic brain injury outcomes in rats. Ninety young adult male Long-Evans rats were administered either a fluid percussion injury or sham-injury. A proportion of rats were killed at 2, 24, and 72 h post-injury to assess acute changes in protein phosphatase 2A and tau. Other rats were given either sodium selenate or saline-vehicle treatment that was continuously administered via subcutaneous osmotic pump for 12 weeks. Serial magnetic resonance imaging was acquired prior to, and at 1, 4, and 12 weeks post-injury to assess evolving structural brain damage and axonal injury. Behavioural impairments were assessed at 12 weeks post-injury. The results showed that traumatic brain injury in rats acutely reduced PR55 expression and protein phosphatase 2A activity, and increased the expression of phosphorylated tau and the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau. Similar findings were seen in post-mortem brain samples from acute human traumatic brain injury patients, although many did not reach statistical significance. Continuous sodium selenate treatment for 12 weeks after sham or fluid percussion injury in rats increased protein phosphatase 2A activity and PR55 expression, and reduced the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau

  13. Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid haemorrhage - in "Endocrine Management in the Intensive Care Unit".

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world. There is a large body of evidence that demonstrates that both conditions may adversely affect pituitary function in both the acute and chronic phases of recovery. Diagnosis of hypopituitarism and accurate treatment of pituitary disorders offers the opportunity to improve mortality and outcome in both traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In this article, we will review the history and pathophysiology of pituitary function in the acute phase following traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage, and we will discuss in detail three key aspects of pituitary dysfunction which occur in the early course of TBI; acute cortisol deficiency, diabetes insipidus and SIAD.

  14. Pediatric traumatic brain injury affects multisensory integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königs, Marsh; Weeda, Wouter D; van Heurn, L W Ernest; Vermeulen, R Jeroen; Goslings, J Carel; Luitse, Jan S K; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Beelen, Anita; van der Wees, Marleen; Kemps, Rachèl J J K; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the impact of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) on multisensory integration in relation to general neurocognitive functioning. Children with a hospital admission for TBI aged between 6 and 13 years (n = 94) were compared with children with trauma control (TC) injuries (n = 39), while differentiating between mild TBI without risk factors for complicated TBI (mild RF- ; n = 19), mild TBI with ≥1 risk factor (mild RF+ ; n = 45), and moderate/severe TBI (n = 30). We measured set-shifting performance based on visual information (visual shift condition) and set-shifting performance based on audiovisual information, requiring multisensory integration (audiovisual shift condition). Effects of TBI on set-shifting performance were traced back to task strategy (i.e., boundary separation), processing efficiency (i.e., drift rate), or extradecisional processes (i.e., nondecision time) using diffusion model analysis. General neurocognitive functioning was measured using estimated full-scale IQ (FSIQ). The TBI group showed selectively reduced performance in the audiovisual shift condition (p = .009, Cohen's d = -0.51). Follow-up analyses in the audiovisual shift condition revealed reduced performance in the mildRF+ TBI group and moderate/severe TBI group (ps ≤ .025, ds ≤ -0.61). These effects were traced back to lower drift rate (ps ≤ .048, ds ≤ -0.44), reflecting reduced multisensory integration efficiency. Notably, accuracy and drift rate in the audiovisual shift condition partially mediated the relation between TBI and FSIQ. Children with mildRF+ or moderate/severe TBI are at risk for reduced multisensory integration efficiency, possibly contributing to decreased general neurocognitive functioning. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Clinically significant changes in the emotional condition of relatives of patients with severe traumatic brain injury during sub-acute rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Kristensen, Karin Spangsberg; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    . On the depression scale the corresponding figures were 44.4% and 41.7%, respectively. When comparing relatives with and without CSC, we found that CSC in symptoms of anxiety was associated with significantly better functional improvement during rehabilitation and a shorter period of post-traumatic amnesia...

  16. Apathy following traumatic brain injury: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Andrew; Wood, Rodger Ll

    2018-04-13

    Apathy is a common problem after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and can have a major impact on cognitive function, psychosocial outcome and engagement in rehabilitation. For scientists and clinicians it remains one of the least understood aspects of brain-behaviour relationships encompassing disturbances of cognition, motivation, emotion and action, and is variously an indication of organic brain disease or psychiatric disorder. Apathy can be both sign and symptom and has been proposed as a diagnosis in its own right as well as a secondary feature of other conditions. This review considers previous approaches to apathy in terms of relevant psychological constructs and those neural counterparts most likely to be implicated after TBI. Neurobehavioural disorders of apathy are characterised chiefly by dysfunction of executive control of goal-oriented behaviour or the neural substrates of reward-based and emotional learning. We argue that it is possible to distinguish a primary disorder of apathy as an organic neurobehavioural state from secondary presentations due to an impoverished environment or psychological disturbance which has implications for treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Visual problems associated with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard A

    2018-02-28

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its associated concussion are major causes of disability and death. All ages can be affected but children, young adults and the elderly are particularly susceptible. A decline in mortality has resulted in many more individuals living with a disability caused by TBI including those affecting vision. This review describes: (1) the major clinical and pathological features of TBI; (2) the visual signs and symptoms associated with the disorder; and (3) discusses the assessment of quality of life and visual rehabilitation of the patient. Defects in primary vision such as visual acuity and visual fields, eye movement including vergence, saccadic and smooth pursuit movements, and in more complex aspects of vision involving visual perception, motion vision ('akinopsia'), and visuo-spatial function have all been reported in TBI. Eye movement dysfunction may be an early sign of TBI. Hence, TBI can result in a variety of visual problems, many patients exhibiting multiple visual defects in combination with a decline in overall health. Patients with chronic dysfunction following TBI may require occupational, vestibular, cognitive and other forms of physical therapy. Such patients may also benefit from visual rehabilitation, including reading-related oculomotor training and the prescribing of spectacles with a variety of tints and prism combinations. © 2018 Optometry Australia.

  18. Altered network topology in pediatric traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Emily L.; Rashid, Faisal; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Asarnow, Robert F.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2017-11-01

    Outcome after a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is quite variable, and this variability is not solely accounted for by severity or demographics. Identifying sub-groups of patients who recover faster or more fully will help researchers and clinicians understand sources of this variability, and hopefully lead to new therapies for patients with a more prolonged recovery profile. We have previously identified two subgroups within the pediatric TBI patient population with different recovery profiles based on an ERP-derived (event-related potential) measure of interhemispheric transfer time (IHTT). Here we examine structural network topology across both patient groups and healthy controls, focusing on the `rich-club' - the core of the network, marked by high degree nodes. These analyses were done at two points post-injury - 2-5 months (post-acute), and 13-19 months (chronic). In the post-acute time-point, we found that the TBI-slow group, those showing longitudinal degeneration, showed hyperconnectivity within the rich-club nodes relative to the healthy controls, at the expense of local connectivity. There were minimal differences between the healthy controls and the TBI-normal group (those patients who show signs of recovery). At the chronic phase, these disruptions were no longer significant, but closer analysis showed that this was likely due to the loss of power from a smaller sample size at the chronic time-point, rather than a sign of recovery. We have previously shown disruptions to white matter (WM) integrity that persist and progress over time in the TBI-slow group, and here we again find differences in the TBI-slow group that fail to resolve over the first year post-injury.

  19. Association between traumatic bone marrow abnormalities of the knee, the trauma mechanism and associated soft-tissue knee injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Nicole [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Radiology, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Andreisek, Gustav; Karer, Anissja T.; Manoliu, Andrei; Ulbrich, Erika J. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Bouaicha, Samy [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Trauma Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Naraghi, Ali [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Seifert, Burkhardt [University of Zurich, Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, Department of Biostatistics, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-01-15

    To determine the association between traumatic bone marrow abnormalities, the knee injury mechanism, and associated soft tissue injuries in a larger cohort than those in the published literature. Retrospective study including 220 patients with traumatic knee injuries. Knee MRIs were evaluated for trauma mechanism, soft tissue injury, and the location of bone marrow abnormalities. The locations of the abnormalities were correlated with trauma mechanisms and soft tissue injuries using the chi-square test with Bonferroni correction. One hundred and forty-four valgus injuries, 39 pivot shift injuries, 25 lateral patellar dislocations, 8 hyperextensions, and 4 dashboard injuries were included. Valgus and pivot shift injuries showed traumatic bone marrow abnormalities in the posterolateral regions of the tibia. Abnormalities after patellar dislocation were found in the anterolateral and centrolateral femur and patella. Hyperextension injuries were associated with abnormalities in almost all regions, and dashboard injuries were associated with changes in the anterior regions of the tibia and femur. Our study provides evidence of associations between traumatic bone marrow abnormality patterns and different trauma mechanisms in acute knee injury, and reveals some overlap, especially of the two most common trauma mechanisms (valgus and pivot shift), in a large patient cohort. (orig.)

  20. Association between traumatic bone marrow abnormalities of the knee, the trauma mechanism and associated soft-tissue knee injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Nicole; Andreisek, Gustav; Karer, Anissja T.; Manoliu, Andrei; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Bouaicha, Samy; Naraghi, Ali; Seifert, Burkhardt

    2017-01-01

    To determine the association between traumatic bone marrow abnormalities, the knee injury mechanism, and associated soft tissue injuries in a larger cohort than those in the published literature. Retrospective study including 220 patients with traumatic knee injuries. Knee MRIs were evaluated for trauma mechanism, soft tissue injury, and the location of bone marrow abnormalities. The locations of the abnormalities were correlated with trauma mechanisms and soft tissue injuries using the chi-square test with Bonferroni correction. One hundred and forty-four valgus injuries, 39 pivot shift injuries, 25 lateral patellar dislocations, 8 hyperextensions, and 4 dashboard injuries were included. Valgus and pivot shift injuries showed traumatic bone marrow abnormalities in the posterolateral regions of the tibia. Abnormalities after patellar dislocation were found in the anterolateral and centrolateral femur and patella. Hyperextension injuries were associated with abnormalities in almost all regions, and dashboard injuries were associated with changes in the anterior regions of the tibia and femur. Our study provides evidence of associations between traumatic bone marrow abnormality patterns and different trauma mechanisms in acute knee injury, and reveals some overlap, especially of the two most common trauma mechanisms (valgus and pivot shift), in a large patient cohort. (orig.)

  1. Simultaneous cesarean delivery and craniotomy in a term pregnant patient with traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Mohamed Mohamed; Badran, Basma Abed; Eisa, Ahmed Amin; Barakat, Rafik Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The management of pregnant patients with traumatic brain injury is challenging. A multidisciplinary team approach is mandatory, and management should be individualized according to the type and extent of injury, maternal status, gestational age, and fetal status. We report a 27-year-old term primigravida presenting after head injury with Glasgow coma scale score 11 and anisocoria. Depressed temporal bone fracture and acute epidural hematoma were diagnosed, necessitating an urgent neurosurgery. Her fetus was viable with no signs of distress and no detected placental abnormalities. Cesarean delivery was performed followed by craniotomy in the same setting under general anesthesia with good outcome of the patient and her baby. PMID:25829914

  2. Alpine ski and snowboarding traumatic injuries: incidence, injury patterns, and risk factors for 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeth, Paul B; Ball, Chad G; Mulloy, Robert H; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W

    2009-05-01

    Alpine skiing and snowboarding are popular winter sports in Canada. Every year participation in these activities results in traumatic injury. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and injury patterns, as well as risk factors associated with ski and snowboarding injuries. A comprehensive 10-year retrospective review of Alpine ski and snowboarding injuries from 1996 to 2006 was conducted. The Alberta Trauma Registry was used as the primary source of data. A total of 196 patients (56.6% skiers, 43.4% snowboarders) were identified as having major traumatic injuries (Injury Severity Score, >or=12). Forty-three patients required intensive care unit support. The majority of injuries were related to falls and collisions with natural objects. Head injuries were most common, followed by chest, spinal, and extremity trauma. Seventy-nine patients required emergency surgery. Skiing and snowboarding represent activities with high potential for traumatic injury. Safety initiatives should be developed to target this population.

  3. Development of an Ontology for Rehabilitation: Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) rehabilitation interventions are very heterogeneous due to injury characteristics and pathology, patient demographics, healthcare settings, caregiver variability, and individualized, multi-discipline treatment plans. Consequently, comparing and generalizing the effectiveness of interventions is limited largely due to…

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury in the Accident and Emergency Department of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic brain injury is a major public health problem in Nigeria, as it could be associated with long term and life long deficits. Unlike other parts of the world, in our country, motorcycles are possibly the main cause of this injury. Unfortunately, we do not have a national epidemiological data base yet. This study ...

  5. Prevalence of Traumatic Dental Injuries and Associated Factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... increased risk of dental injuries in permanent teeth were age, gender, having an incisal overjet .... to change the previously proposed methodology. .... Rate per thousand permanent incisors with traumatic dental injuries in a sample of schoolchildren,. Diyarbakır, Turkey (n = 23256 incisors). Type of tooth.

  6. Impact of additional extracranial injuries on outcome after mild traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, M.; Werf, S.P. van der; Jacobs, B.; Biert, J.; Vugt, A.B. van; Brauer, J.; Vos, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    Many patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) concurrently sustain extracranial injuries; however, little is known about the impact of these additional injuries on outcome. We assessed the impact of additional injuries on the severity of postconcussional symptoms (PCS) and functional outcome

  7. Acute Renal Failure due to Non-Traumatic Rhabdomyolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagehan Aslan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is a musculoskeletal clinical and biochemical syndrome which is seen associated with traumatic and non-traumatic causes and is known as muscular dystrophy. Rhabdomyolysis which develops following crush-type trauma (Crush syndrome is rarely seen but is a well-known clinical event in the etiology of acute renal failure. Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is rare. The case is here presented of a patient who was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis on presentation with acute renal failure and to whom repeated dialysis was applied.

  8. Diagnosis of Acute Groin Injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serner, Andreas; Tol, Johannes L; Jomaah, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    ; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS: A total of 110 male athletes (mean age, 25.6 ± 4.7 years) with sports-related acute groin pain were prospectively included within 7 days of injury from August 2012 to April 2014. Standardized history taking, a clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and...

  9. Internet and Social Media Use After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Sparr, Christina; Hart, Tessa; Bergquist, Thomas; Bogner, Jennifer; Dreer, Laura; Juengst, Shannon; Mellick, David; OʼNeil-Pirozzi, Therese M; Sander, Angelle M; Whiteneck, Gale G

    To characterize Internet and social media use among adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to compare demographic and socioeconomic factors associated with Internet use between those with and without TBI. Ten Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems centers. Persons with moderate to severe TBI (N = 337) enrolled in the TBI Model Systems National Database and eligible for follow-up from April 1, 2014, to March 31, 2015. Prospective cross-sectional observational cohort study. Internet usage survey. The proportion of Internet users with TBI was high (74%) but significantly lower than those in the general population (84%). Smartphones were the most prevalent means of Internet access for persons with TBI. The majority of Internet users with TBI had a profile account on a social networking site (79%), with more than half of the sample reporting multiplatform use of 2 or more social networking sites. Despite the prevalence of Internet use among persons with TBI, technological disparities remain in comparison with the general population. The extent of social media use among persons with TBI demonstrates the potential of these platforms for social engagement and other purposes. However, further research examining the quality of online activities and identifying potential risk factors of problematic use is recommended.

  10. The correlation of insulin resistance with the cerebral injury and stress reaction in patients with traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Lan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of insulin resistance with the cerebral injury and stress reaction in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Methods: 78 patients who were diagnosed with acute traumatic brain injury in our hospital between May 2014 and August 2016 were selected as the TBI group, and 90 healthy volunteers who received physical examination during the same period were selected as the control group. The peripheral blood was collected to detect glucose, insulin and nerve injury marker molecules, stress hormones as well as oxidative stress reaction products, and the insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR was calculated. Results: The HOMA-IR index of TBI group was significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.05; serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1, S100β, myelin basic protein (MBP, glucagon, growth hormone, cortisol, malondialdehyde (MDA and 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdGlevels of TBI group were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.05; serum NSE, UCH-L1, S100β, MBP, glucagon, growth hormone, cortisol, MDA and 8-OHdG levels of patients with high HOMA-IR were significantly higher than those of patients with low HOMA-IR (P<0.05. Conclusion: The insulin resistance increases significantly in patients with traumatic brain injury, and is closely related to the degree of cerebral injury and stress reaction.

  11. Finding effective biomarkers for pediatric traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Y Glushakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As traumatic brain injury (TBI continues to affect children and young adults worldwide, research on reliable biomarkers grows as a possible aid in determining the severity of injury. However, many studies have revealed that diverse biomarkers such as S100B and myelin basic protein (MBP have many limitations, such as their elevated normative concentrations in young children. Therefore, the results of these studies have yet to be translated to clinical applications. However, despite the setbacks of research into S100B and MBP, investigators continue to research viable biomarkers, notably glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1, as possible aids in medical decision making. Studies have revealed that GFAP and UCH-L1 actually are better predictors of injury progression than the before-mentioned biomarkers S100B and MBP. In addition, UCH-L1 has demonstrated an ability to detect injury while CT is negative, suggesting an ability to detect acute intracranial lesions. Here, we evaluate research testing levels of GFAP and UCH-L1 on children diagnosed with TBI and compare our results to those of other tested biomarkers. In a recent study done by Hayes et al., GFAP and UCH-L1 demonstrated the potential to recognize children with the possibility of poor outcome, allowing for more specialized treatments with clinical and laboratory applications. Although studies on GFAP and UCH-L1 have for the most part warranted positive results, further studies will be needed to confirm their role as reliable markers for pediatric TBI.

  12. Sleep disruption and the sequelae associated with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Smith, Kelly E; Nguyen, Linda; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Jackson, Garrett J; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L; Miller, Diane B

    2015-08-01

    Sleep disruption, which includes a loss of sleep as well as poor quality fragmented sleep, frequently follows traumatic brain injury (TBI) impacting a large number of patients each year in the United States. Fragmented and/or disrupted sleep can worsen neuropsychiatric, behavioral, and physical symptoms of TBI. Additionally, sleep disruption impairs recovery and can lead to cognitive decline. The most common sleep disruption following TBI is insomnia, which is difficulty staying asleep. The consequences of disrupted sleep following injury range from deranged metabolomics and blood brain barrier compromise to altered neuroplasticity and degeneration. There are several theories for why sleep is necessary (e.g., glymphatic clearance and metabolic regulation) and these may help explain how sleep disruption contributes to degeneration within the brain. Experimental data indicate disrupted sleep allows hyperphosphorylated tau and amyloid β plaques to accumulate. As sleep disruption may act as a cellular stressor, target areas warranting further scientific investigation include the increase in endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress following acute periods of sleep deprivation. Potential treatment options for restoring the normal sleep cycle include melatonin derivatives and cognitive behavioral therapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Predicting institutionalization after traumatic brain injury inpatient rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Regina S; Seel, Ronald T; Goldstein, Richard; Brown, Allen W; Watanabe, Thomas K; Zasler, Nathan D; Roth, Elliot J; Zafonte, Ross D; Glenn, Mel B

    2015-02-15

    Risk factors contributing to institutionalization after inpatient rehabilitation for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not been well studied and need to be better understood to guide clinicians during rehabilitation. We aimed to develop a prognostic model that could be used at admission to inpatient rehabilitation facilities to predict discharge disposition. The model could be used to provide the interdisciplinary team with information regarding aspects of patients' functioning and/or their living situation that need particular attention during inpatient rehabilitation if institutionalization is to be avoided. The study population included 7219 patients with moderate-severe TBI in the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) National Database enrolled from 2002-2012 who had not been institutionalized prior to injury. Based on institutionalization predictors in other populations, we hypothesized that among people who had lived at a private residence prior to injury, greater dependence in locomotion, bed-chair-wheelchair transfers, bladder and bowel continence, feeding, and comprehension at admission to inpatient rehabilitation programs would predict institutionalization at discharge. Logistic regression was used, with adjustment for demographic factors, proxy measures for TBI severity, and acute-care length-of-stay. C-statistic and predictiveness curves validated a five-variable model. Higher levels of independence in bladder management (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.88; 95% CI 0.83, 0.93), bed-chair-wheelchair transfers (OR, 0.81 [95% CI, 0.83-0.93]), and comprehension (OR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.68, 0.89]) at admission were associated with lower risks of institutionalization on discharge. For every 10-year increment in age was associated with a 1.38 times higher risk for institutionalization (95% CI, 1.29, 1.48) and living alone was associated with a 2.34 times higher risk (95% CI, 1.86, 2.94). The c-statistic was 0.780. We conclude that this simple model

  14. Predictive and associated factors of psychiatric disorders after traumatic brain injury: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Kate Rachel; Ponsford, Jennie Louise; Johnston, Lisa; Schönberger, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common and often debilitating following traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, there is little consensus within the literature regarding the risk factors for post-injury psychiatric disorders. A 1-year prospective study was conducted to examine which pre-injury, injury-related, and concurrent factors were associated with experiencing a psychiatric disorder, diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders, at 1 year post-injury. Participants were 122 adults with TBI and 88 proxy informants. Psychiatric disorders were common both pre-injury (54.1%) and at 12 months post-injury (45.9%). Results of regression analyses indicated individuals without a pre-injury psychiatric disorder or psychiatric symptomatology in the acute post-injury period were less likely to have a psychiatric disorder at 12 months post-injury. These findings confirm the importance of pre-injury history for the prediction of post-injury psychiatric disorders. Limb injury also emerged as a useful early indicator of later psychiatric disorder. Post-injury psychiatric disorders were associated with concurrent unemployment, pain, poor quality of life, and use of unproductive coping skills. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. [Nanostructured bioplastic material for traumatic corneal injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyukov, V N; Stadnikov, A A; Trubina, O M; Yakhina, O M

    2015-01-01

    To substantiate the use of nanostructured bioplastic material for the treatment of traumatic eye injuries. The study enrolled 96 eyes of 48 rabbits and was carried out in 3 series of experiments, different in the type of induced corneal trauma: mechanical erosion, alkaline or acid burn. The animals were clinically monitored and sacrificed for morphological investigation at days 3, 7, 14, 30, and 90. The size of mechanical corneal erosions was repeatedly evaluated with fluorescein eye stain test. In the experimental group, Hyamatrix biomaterial was topically administered according to an original technique. In the controls, soft contact lenses were inserted and sutured. Complete closure of the epithelial defect with no impact on corneal properties was achieved in 3 days in the experimental group and in4 days in the control group. As for alkaline and acid corneal burns, experimental and control groups received Hyamatrix biomaterial and Solcoseryl eye gel correspondingly. In the experimental group of alkaline burn the defect closed by day 7, in the controls--by day 10-11. Acid-induced corneal edema also resolved by day 7 in the experimental group and by day 14 in the control group. 1. The results of this experimental and morphological study prove the hyaluronic acid-derived nanostructured bioplastic material effective in accelerating corneal re-epithelialization after mechanical erosions as compared with the controls. 2. Topical application of the hyaluronic acid-derived nanostructured bioplastic material shortens the exudative phase of inflammation, promotes corneal defect closure with formation of a more subtle opacification, and stimulates corneal restoration after chemical burns.

  16. Persuasive discourse impairments in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayoumi, Zahra; Yadegari, Fariba; Mahmoodi-Bakhtiari, Behrooz; Fakharian, Esmaeil; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Rasouli, Maryam

    2015-03-01

    Considering the cognitive and linguistic complexity of discourse production, it is expected that individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) should face difficulties in this task. Therefore, clinical examination of discourse has become a useful tool for studying and assessment of communication skills of people suffering from TBI. Among different genres of discourse, persuasive discourse is considered as a more cognitively demanding task. However, little is known about persuasive discourse in individuals suffering from TBI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of adults with TBI on a task of spoken persuasive discourse to determine the impaired linguistic measures. Thirteen TBI nonaphasic Persian speaking individuals, ranged between 19 to 40 years (Mean = 25.64 years; SD = 6.10) and 59 healthy adults matched by age, were asked to perform the persuasive discourse task. The task included asking the participants to express their opinion on a topic, and after the analysis of the produced discourse, the two groups were compared on the basis of their language productivity, sentential complexity, maze ratio and cohesion ratio. The TBI group produced discourses with less productivity, sentential complexity, cohesion ratio and more maze ratio compared the control group. As it is important to consider acquired communication disorders particularly discourse impairment of brain injured patients along with their other clinical impairments and regarding the fact that persuasive discourse is crucial in academic and social situations, the persuasive discourse task presented in this study could be a useful tool for speech therapists, intending to evaluate communication disorders in patients with TBI.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoya, S.; Nakamura, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamamoto, I.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal cord injury is described. The traumatized cord segment was clearly shown as a hyperintensity in a T2-weighted image whereas it appeared as an isointensity in a moderately T1-weighted image. This different sensitivity may result from parenchymal hemorrhagic tissue and edematous changes due to direct trauma. Hyperintense tissue was also seen in the retro-pharyngeal and -tracheal spaces. (orig.)

  18. Role of Intravenous Levetiracetam in Seizure Prophylaxis of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BATOOL F. KIRMANI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI can cause seizures and the development of epilepsy. The incidence of seizures varies from 21% in patients with severe brain injuries to 50% in patients with war-related penetrating TBI. In the acute and sub-acute periods following injury, seizures can lead to increased intracranial pressure and cerebral edema, further complicating TBI management. Anticonvulsants should be used for seizure prophylaxis and treatment. Phenytoin is the most widely prescribed anticonvulsant in these patients. Intravenous levetiracetam, made available in 2006, is now being considered as an alternative to phenytoin in acute care settings. When compared with phenytoin, levetiracetam has fewer side-effects and drug-drug interactions. In the following, the role of levetiracetam in TBI care and the supporting evidence is discussed.

  19. Pharmacological Treatment of Glutamate Excitotoxicity Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-14

    In 1969, Olney found that subcutaneous injection of monosodium glutamate resulted in necrotic brain lesions in the hypothalamus of newborn mice...Thesis: "Pharmacological Treatment of Glutamate Excitotoxicity Following Traumatic Brain Injury" Name of Candidate: Michael Doh Molecular & Cell...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pharmacological Treatment Of Glutamate Excitotoxicity Following Traumatic

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for treating acute surgical and traumatic wounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, Anne; Vermeulen, Hester; Lucas, Cees; Ubbink, Dirk T.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is used as a treatment for acute wounds (such as those arising from surgery and trauma). However, the effects of HBOT on wound healing are unclear. To determine the effects of HBOT on the healing of acute surgical and traumatic wounds. We searched the Cochrane Wounds

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for treating acute surgical and traumatic wounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, Anne; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Lubbers, Maarten; Lucas, Cees; Vermeulen, Hester

    2010-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is used as a treatment for acute wounds (such as those arising from surgery and trauma) however the effects of HBOT on wound healing are unclear. To determine the effects of HBOT on the healing of acute surgical and traumatic wounds. We searched the Cochrane Wounds

  2. Acute Management of Hemostasis in Patients With Neurological Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baharoglu, M. Irem; Brand, Anneke; Koopman, Maria M.; Vermeulen, Marinus; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Neurological injuries can be divided into those with traumatic and nontraumatic causes. The largest groups are traumatic brain injury (TBI) and nontraumatic stroke. TBI patients may present with intracranial hemorrhages (contusions, or subdural or epidural hematomas). Strokes are ischemic or

  3. Sleep disturbances and internalizing behavior problems following pediatric traumatic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jesse T; Hannay, H Julia; Alfano, Candice A; Swank, Paul R; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda

    2018-02-01

    This prospective longitudinal study investigated sleep disturbance (SD) and internalizing problems after traumatic injury, including traumatic brain injury (TBI) or extracranial/bodily injury (EI) in children and adolescents, relative to typically developing (TD) children. We also examined longitudinal relations between SD and internalizing problems postinjury. Participants (N = 87) ages 8-15 included youth with TBI, EI, and TD children. Injury groups were recruited from a Level 1 trauma center after sustaining vehicle-related injuries. Parent-reported SD and internalizing problems were assessed at preinjury/baseline, and 6 and 12 months postinjury. Linear mixed models evaluated the relation of group and time of assessment on outcomes. Controlling for age, the combined traumatic injury group experienced significantly higher postinjury levels of SD (p = .042) and internalizing problems (p = .024) than TD children; however, TBI and EI injury groups did not differ from each other. Injury severity was positively associated with SD in the EI group only, but in both groups SD was associated with additional postinjury sequelae, including fatigue and externalizing behavior problems. Internalizing problems predicted subsequent development of SD but not vice versa. The relation between injury and SD 1 year later was consistent with mediation by internalizing problems at 6 months postinjury. Children with both types of traumatic injury demonstrated higher SD and internalizing problems than healthy children. Internalizing problems occurring either prior to or following pediatric injury may be a risk factor for posttraumatic SD. Consequently, internalizing problems may be a promising target of intervention to improve both SD and related adjustment concerns. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injury - bladder and urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  5. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging findings in traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in imaging technology, coupled with military personnel returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), have increased interest in the neuropsychology and neurobiology of these two conditions. There has been a particular focus on differential diagnosis. This paper provides an overviev of findings regarding the neuropsychological and neurobiological underpinnings of TBI andfor PTSD. A specific focus is on assessme...

  6. Longitudinal Examination of Resilience After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwitz, Jennifer H; Sima, Adam P; Kreutzer, Jeffrey S; Dreer, Laura E; Bergquist, Thomas F; Zafonte, Ross; Johnson-Greene, Douglas; Felix, Elizabeth R

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate (1) the trajectory of resilience during the first year after a moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); (2) factors associated with resilience at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury; and (3) changing relationships over time between resilience and other factors. Longitudinal analysis of an observational cohort. Five inpatient rehabilitation centers. Patients with TBI (N=195) enrolled in the resilience module of the TBI Model Systems study with data collected at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. Not applicable. Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Initially, resilience levels appeared to be stable during the first year postinjury. Individual growth curve models were used to examine resilience over time in relation to demographic, psychosocial, and injury characteristics. After adjusting for these characteristics, resilience actually declined over time. Higher levels of resilience were related to nonminority status, absence of preinjury substance abuse, lower anxiety and disability level, and greater life satisfaction. Resilience is a construct that is relevant to understanding brain injury outcomes and has potential value in planning clinical interventions. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. High frequency ultrasound evaluation of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Anne M; Simoncini, Alberto; Sciuk, Adam; Jordan, Jenee'

    2012-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and localization of peripheral nerve traumatic injury remains difficult. Early diagnosis and repair of nerve discontinuity lesions lead to better outcome than delayed repair. We used new high frequency ultrasound to evaluate 24 patients with 29 traumatic nerve injuries. There were a variety of causes including gunshot wounds, blunt injuries, burns, stabbings, and motor vehicle accidents. The patients were then either treated surgically with nerve status directly observed or followed clinically for recovery of nerve function. The ultrasound findings correspond with the clinical outcome of 28 of the 29 nerves. While this is a study limited by a small patient number, ultrasound evaluation should be considered in the evaluation of nerve injury and can lead to early diagnosis and treatment of surgical nerve injuries.

  8. The characteristics of falls in an inpatient traumatic brain injury rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Duncan; Fisher, Murray J; Pryor, Julie

    2016-01-01

    To describe the nature of falls in an inpatient traumatic brain injury rehabilitation setting. Falls are the most frequently recorded patient safety incident in the inpatient context. However, higher rates of falls are reported in rehabilitation settings compared to acute care settings. In the rehabilitation setting, patients with a traumatic brain injury have been identified as at a high risk of falling. However to date, research into the nature of falls involving this patient population is limited. Five-year retrospective cohort study design. Falls data from an inpatient traumatic brain injury rehabilitation unit were retrieved from the NSW Ministry of Health Incident Information Management System and patient clinical notes; nursing shift data were retrieved from the local rostering system. The fall rate was 5·18 per 1000 patient bed days. Over a 24-hour period falls (n = 103) occurred in a trimodal pattern. The median fall free period after admission was 14 days and 22% of traumatic brain injury patients had at least one fall. 53% of falls occurred in the patient's bedroom and 57% were attributed to loss of balance. At time of fall, 93% of fallers had impaired mobility and 85% required assistance for transfers. Falls within inpatient traumatic brain injury rehabilitation are a significant and complex clinical issue. While many patients continued to be at risk of falling several months after admission, a repeat faller's first fall occurred earlier in their admission than a single faller's. Generic falls prevention measures are insufficient for preventing falls in the brain injury rehabilitation population. Falls prevention initiatives should target times of high patient activity and situations where there is decreased nursing capacity to observe patients. Rehabilitation clinicians need to be mindful that a patient's risk of falling is not static and in fact, may increase over time. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Surgical Algorithm and Results of Isolated Traumatic Axillary Nerve Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wayne A; Schippert, David W; Daws, Snow B; Koman, L Andrew; Li, Zhongyu

    2016-03-01

    Axillary nerve injuries are common and typically occur during high-energy, traumatic events. The purpose of this study is to propose a treatment algorithm for acute isolated axillary nerve injuries and report the outcomes of surgically treated patients. A retrospective review identified 14 patients surgically treated for an isolated axillary nerve injury. Axillary nerve neurolysis was performed for all patients, and a triceps branch of the radial nerve was transferred to the axillary nerve in patients without evidence of deltoid function following intraoperative axillary nerve stimulation. Four patients were treated with neurolysis alone and 10 patients received a transfer. Pre- and postoperative deltoid strength, shoulder abduction, and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) outcome score were evaluated. At most recent follow-up, both the neurolysis and nerve transfer groups had significant improvement in deltoid strength, with 86% achieving M4 or greater. Shoulder abduction improved from a mean of 63 to 127 degrees. This difference was significant in the nerve transfer group and when all patients were analyzed together. DASH scores significantly improved from a mean of 47 to 34 when all patients were analyzed together. No patients experienced a decrease in elbow extension strength following nerve transfer. In patients with preserved triceps strength, a triceps branch of the radial nerve can be coapted directly to the axillary nerve in the absence of deltoid contraction following electrical stimulation. Functional improvements were seen in patients treated with neurolysis alone and in combination with nerve transfer, supporting the use of intraoperative axillary nerve stimulation to guide treatment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. A critical review of the literature on early rehabilitation of patients with post-traumatic amnesia in acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorn, Leanne; Sorensen, Jens C; Pedersen, Preben U

    2010-11-01

    To identify the effect of early rehabilitation of patients with post-traumatic amnesia in patients with traumatic brain injury, to review and critically assess evidence related to the timing of intervention and to identify the effect on outcome of a specific neurological rehabilitation in acute care. Up to 70% of patients with traumatic brain injury will experience post-traumatic amnesia. Although duration of post-traumatic amnesia is correlated negatively with outcome for patients with traumatic brain injury, there is limited evidence relating to what influence timing and effect may have on enhancing early rehabilitation patient outcomes. A critical literature review. Searches for systematic reviews were undertaken in Medline, CINAHL, Cochrane, PSYC INFO and Neurotraume databases. The efficacy of intervention and timing was classified based on a hierarchy of study designs for questions about health care interventions based on soundness of design. Six reviews and 11 original studies were included and comprised the review. Many studies used weak designs and small sample size, thus limiting their ability to control confusing variables and outcomes. Few studies included papers with the information about timing and effect of early post-traumatic amnesia intervention. Only one study showed an effect of a reality orientation programme in acute care. Although there was no significant detail reported on the possibility of reducing the post-traumatic amnesia period, the study showed clinical relevance. This review highlights the limited evidence of the effect of early rehabilitation of patients with post-traumatic amnesia. Future research should be conducted to identify the effectiveness of early intervention. Although nurses are treating patients with post-traumatic amnesia without systematic assessment, the limited evidence available does little to direct nurses as to the best approach to start early rehabilitation of post-traumatic amnesia to promote good outcomes.

  11. Pathophysiological links between traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic headaches [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Ruff

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews possible ways that traumatic brain injury (TBI can induce migraine-type post-traumatic headaches (PTHs in children, adults, civilians, and military personnel. Several cerebral alterations resulting from TBI can foster the development of PTH, including neuroinflammation that can activate neural systems associated with migraine. TBI can also compromise the intrinsic pain modulation system and this would increase the level of perceived pain associated with PTH. Depression and anxiety disorders, especially post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, are associated with TBI and these psychological conditions can directly intensify PTH. Additionally, depression and PTSD alter sleep and this will increase headache severity and foster the genesis of PTH. This article also reviews the anatomic loci of injury associated with TBI and notes the overlap between areas of injury associated with TBI and PTSD.

  12. Traumatic injuries: imaging of abdominal and pelvic injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weishaupt, Dominik; Grozaj, Ana M.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Roos, Justus E.; Hilfiker, Paul R.; Marincek, Borut

    2002-01-01

    The availability of new imaging modalities has altered the diagnostic approach to patients with abdominal and pelvic trauma. Computed tomography and ultrasound have largely replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage. Ultrasound is used in most trauma centers as the initial imaging technique for the detection of hemoperitoneum and helps to determine the need for emergency laparotomy. Computed tomography allows for an accurate diagnosis of a wide range of traumatic abdominal and pelvic conditions. The speed of single-detector helical and multi-detector row CT (MDCT) permits a rapid CT examination of the seriously ill patient in the emergency room. In particular, the technology of MDCT permits multiple, sequential CT scans to be quickly obtained in the same patient, which is a great advance in the rapid assessment of the multiple-injured patient. The evolving concepts in trauma care promoting non-operative management of liver and splenic injuries creates the need for follow-up cross-sectional imaging studies in these patients. Computed tomography and, less frequently, MR or ultrasound, are used for this purpose. (orig.)

  13. [Traumatic brain injuries--forensic and expertise aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuleković, Petar; Simić, Milan; Misić-Pavkov, Gordana; Cigić, Tomislav; Kojadinović, Zeljko; Dilvesi, Dula

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries have major socio-economic importance due to their frequency, high mortality and serious consequences. According to their nature the consequences of these injuries may be classified as neurological, psychiatric and esthetic. Various lesions of brain structures cause neurological consequences such as disturbance of motor functions, sensibility, coordination or involuntary movements, speech disturbances and other deviations, as well as epilepsy. Psychiatric consequences include cognitive deficit, emotional disturbances and behavior disturbances. CRIMINAL-LEGAL ASPECT OF TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURIES AND LITIGATION: Criminal-legal aspect of traumatic brain injuries expertise understands the qualification of these injuries as mild, serious and qualified serious body injuries as well as the expertise about the mechanisms of their occurrence. Litigation expertise includes the estimation of pain, fear, diminished, i.e. lost vital activity and disability, esthetic marring, and psychological suffer based on the diminished general vital activity and esthetic marring. Evaluation of consequences of traumatic brain injuries should be performed only when it can be positively confirmed that they are permanent, i.e. at least one year after the injury. Expertise of these injuries is interdisciplinary. Among clinical doctors the most competent medical expert is the one who is in charge for diagnostics and injury treatment, with the recommendation to avoid, if possible, the doctor who conducted treatment. For the estimation of general vital activity, the neurological consequences, pain and esthetic marring expertise, the most competent doctors are neurosurgeon and neurologist. Psychological psychiatric consequences and fear expertise have to be performed by the psychiatrist. Specialists of forensic medicine contribute with knowledge of criminal low and legal expertise.

  14. Perfusion Computed Tomography in the Acute Phase of Mild Head Injury : Regional Dysfunction and Prognostic Value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Zwany; Rodiger, Lars A.; Stewart, Roy E.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; De Keyser, Jacques; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Traumatic brain injury is a major Cause of disability and death. Most patients sustain a mild head injury with a subgroup that experiences disabling symptoms interfering with return to work. Brain imaging in the acute phase is not predictive of outcome, as 20% of noncontrast computed

  15. Socioeconomic indicators and traumatic dental injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhadem, Ahmed; Wanees, Suzan

    2015-12-01

    PubMed, ISI, LILACS, Cochrane Library and Embase databases were searched. Epidemiological studies (cross-sectional, case-control, cohort clinical trials) addressing possible associations between socioeconomic indicators (eg mother's schooling, household income, number of children, type of school) and traumatic dental injury in the primary dentition were considered. Two reviewers independently selected studies. with study quality being assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Data were extracted for categorical variables considered risk factors for TDI and recorded based on the distribution and frequency of TDI among children exposed to risk factors vs the frequency among children not exposed to risk factors. Meta-analysis was undertaken. Sixteen studies (15 cross-sectional studies and one cohort study) were included. A wide range of socioeconomic indicators were investigated including; parents' schooling, parents' employment status, home ownership, having changed address in the previous year, income, family structure, number of residents in the home, number of children in the family, type of school and socioeconomic status. Children from families with household income less than two times average salary (US$ 592) (OR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.66-0.90) or more than three times the average salary (US$ 888) (OR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.65-0.89) had a significantly lower chance of having TDI in the primary dentition. TDI was not associated with socioeconomic status (high vs low - OR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.43-1.36; high vs medium - OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.72-1.48; medium vs low - OR: 0.70; 95% CI: 0.42-1.19), house ownership (owned vs rented - OR: 1.28; 95% CI: 0.98-1.66), mother's schooling (OR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.74-1.08), or father's schooling (OR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.62-2.74). The scientific evidence demonstrates that socioeconomic indicators are not associated with TDI in the primary dentition. The evidence of an association between a low income and TDI is weak. In general, studies had low

  16. 77 FR 32397 - Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection Program-Genitourinary Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 9 RIN 2900-AO20 Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection... Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection (TSGLI) program by adding certain genitourinary... Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance Traumatic Injury Protection (TSGLI) program to add certain genitourinary (GU...

  17. Traumatic ileal perforation in post-traumatic ventral hernia: adding insult to injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rab, A.Z.U.; Fakir, S.B.; Peethambaran, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Rupture of abdominal wall with formation of ventral hernia is a rare complication following blunt abdominal trauma. Small intestinal rupture within such a hernial sac, resulting from a subsequent blunt trauma is rarer still. Ventral hernias often go untreated in developing countries because of their seemingly innocuous nature, ignorance and financial constraints. Blunt trauma in patients with hernia warrants a thorough clinical examination along with evaluation for intestinal injury, since even trivial trauma can cause potentially serious intra-peritoneal visceral injury. A case of fatal traumatic ileal perforation in pre-existing post-traumatic ventral hernia (from blunt trauma sustained 10 years earlier) is being reported. (author)

  18. Helical CT of traumatic injuries of the thoracic aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengozzi, E.; Burzi, M.; Miceli, M.; Lipparini, M.; Sartoni Galloni, S.

    2000-01-01

    Acute thoracic aortic injuries account for up to 10-20% of fatalities in high-speed deceleration road accidents and have an estimated immediate fatality rate of 80-90%. Untreated survivors to acute trauma (10-20%) have a dismal prognosis: 30% of them die within 6 hours, 40-50% die within 24 hours, and 90% within 4 months. It was investigated the diagnostic accuracy of Helical Computed Tomography (Helical CT) in acute traumatic injuries of the thoracic aorta, and the role of this technique in the diagnostic management of trauma patients with a strong suspicion of aortic rupture. It was compared retrospectively the chest Helical CT findings of 256 trauma patients examined June 1995 through August 1999. Chest Helical CT examinations were performed according to trauma score, to associated traumatic lesions and to plain chest radiographic findings. All the examinations were performed with no intravenous contrast agent administration and the pitch 2 technique. After a previous baseline study, contrast-enhanced scans were acquired with pitch 1 in 87 patients. Helical CT showed aortic lesions in 9 of 256 patients examined. In all the 9 cases it was found a mediastinal hematoma and all of them had positive plain chest radiographic findings of mediastinal enlargement. Moreover, in 6 cases aortic knob blurring was also evident on plain chest film and in 5 cases depressed left mainstem bronchus and trachea deviation rightwards were observed. All aortic lesions were identified on axial scans and located at the isthmus of level. Aortic rupture was always depicted as pseudo diverticulum of the proximal descending tract and intimal flap. It was also found that periaortic hematoma in 6 cases and intramural hematoma in 1 case. There were non false positive results in the series: 7 patients with Helical CT diagnosis of aortic rupture were submitted to conventional aortography that confirmed both type and extension of the lesions as detected by Helical CT, and all findings were

  19. Beyond the physical injuries: child and parent coping with medical traumatic stress after pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzucidlo, Susan E; Campbell, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Experiencing a traumatic event and then the required care for the physical injuries can elicit stress symptoms in the injured child and parents. Stress-related symptoms affect a significant number of injured children and can have an impact on emotional and physical health outcomes after injury. Yet the majority of children who suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder postinjury go undiagnosed and untreated. Medical traumatic stress symptoms that occur often as adaptive responses initially can persist. Acute stress disorder is diagnosed when the stress symptoms persist less than 1 month postinjury and affect normal functioning. Inclusion of screening for acute stress and the development of models and guidelines are needed to systematically incorporate the care for the emotional trauma as an integral part of pediatric trauma care. Pediatric trauma nurses with knowledge and resources are in a position to minimize potentially traumatic aspects of the care they deliver, recognize traumatic stress symptoms, and help parents to support their child's coping and promote appropriate help seeking.

  20. Impaired cognitive functions in mild traumatic brain injury patients with normal and pathologic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurca, E.; Sivak, S.; Kucera, P.

    2006-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common neurological (neurotraumatological) diagnosis. As well as different subjective symptoms, many patients develop neuropsychological dysfunction with objective impairment of attention, memory and certain executive functions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not routinely used in MTBI patients despite its proven greater sensitivity and specificity in comparison with computed tomography (CT). The patient group consisted of 30 persons with MTBI and the control group consisted of 30 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. Both groups underwent neurological examination, neuropsychological testing (including the Postconcussion Symptoms Scale questionnaire, PCSS) and brain MRI (the patient group within 96 h after injury). The analyzed groups did not differ significantly in terms of sex, age, or level or duration of education. MRI pathological findings (traumatic and nonspecific) were present in nine patients. Traumatic lesions were found in seven patients. Nonspecific white matter lesions were found in five healthy controls. There were significant differences between MTBI patients and controls in terms of subjective symptoms (PCSS) and selected neuropsychological tests. Statistically significant neuropsychological differences were found between MTBI patients with true traumatic lesions and MTBI patients with nonspecific lesions. There is evidence that MTBI patients with true traumatic MRI lesions are neuropsychologically different from MTBI patients with nonspecific MRI lesions or normal brain MRI. These results support the hypothesis that some acute MTBI signs and symptoms have a real organic basis which can be detected by selected new MRI modalities. (orig.)

  1. Treatment and outcome of traumatic biliary injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Elizabeth S; Russell, Katie W; Metzger, Ryan; Scaife, Eric R; Barnhart, Douglas C; Rollins, Michael D

    2014-02-01

    Traumatic biliary tract injuries in children are rare but may result in significant morbidity. The objective of this study was to review the occurrence of traumatic biliary tract injuries in children, management strategies, and outcome. We conducted a retrospective review of patients with biliary tract injury using the trauma registry at our level 1 pediatric trauma center from 2002-2012. Twelve out of 13,582 trauma patients were identified, representing 0.09% of all trauma patients. All were secondary to blunt trauma. Mean age was 9.7 years [range 4-15], and mean Injury Severity Score was 31 ± 14, with overall survival of 92%. Biliary injuries included major ductal injury (6), minor ductal injury with biloma (4), gallbladder injury (2), and intrahepatic ductal injury (1). Major ductal injuries were managed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and biliary stent (5) and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy (1). Associated gallbladder injury was managed by cholecystectomy. In addition, the associated biloma was managed with percutaneous drainage (7), laparoscopic drainage (2), or during laparotomy (3). Two patients with ductal injuries developed late strictures after initial management with ERCP and stent placement. One of the two patients ultimately required a left hepatectomy, and the other has been managed conservatively without evidence of cholangitis. Two patients required placement of additional drains and prolonged antibiotics for superinfection following biloma drainage. Biliary tract injuries are rare in children, and many are amenable to adjunctive therapy, including ERCP and biliary stent placement with or without placement of a peritoneal drain. Patients with a discrete ductal injury are at higher risk for stricture and require close follow up. Hepaticojejunostomy remains the definitive repair for large extrahepatic biliary tract injuries or transections. © 2014.

  2. Comparison of brain perfusion SPECT abnormalities with anatomical imaging in mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Asadi

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trauma is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries and also in Iran. Anatomical imaging (AI CT and MRI is helpful in the diagnosis of acute traumatic complications however it is not efficient in the diagnosis of disabling injury syndrome. In contrast, brain perfusion SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography can be more useful for evaluation of microvascular structure. This study was designed to compare these two diagnostic methods. Methods: A total of 50 patients who had been suffering from traumatic brain injury for more than 1 year, and were followed as mild traumatic brain injury group according to “the Brain Injury Interdisciplinary Special Interest Group of the Ameri can Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine” criteria, were examined by brain perfusion SPECT and AI. The common anatomical classification of the lobes of brain was used. Results: The male to female ratio was 3:2. The mean age was 32.32±11.8 years and mean post-traumatic time was 1.48±0.65 years. The most common symptoms were headache (60%, agusia (36% and anosmia (32%. Among 400 examined brain lobes in this study, brain perfusion SPECT revealed remarkable abnormality in 76 lobes (19%, but AI determined abnormalities in 38 lobes (9.5% therefore, SPECT was twice sensitive than AI in mild traumatic brain injury (P<0.001. The correlation between SPECT and AI findings was 84%. SPECT was more sensitive than AI in demonstrating brain abnormalities in frontal lobe it was more obvious in the male group however, there was no significant difference between more and less than 30 years old groups. Conclusion: According to the findings of this study, we recommend using brain perfusion SPECT for all patients with chronic complications of head trauma, particularly those who have signs and symptoms of hypofrontalism, even though with some abnormalities in AI.

  3. Pathophysiology of Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, David P.; Anderson, Melissa D.; Sutton, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the leading cause of nephrology consultation and is associated with high mortality rates. The primary causes of AKI include ischemia, hypoxia or nephrotoxicity. An underlying feature is a rapid decline in GFR usually associated with decreases in renal blood flow. Inflammation represents an important additional component of AKI leading to the extension phase of injury, which may be associated with insensitivity to vasodilator therapy. It is suggested that targeting the extension phase represents an area potential of treatment with the greatest possible impact. The underlying basis of renal injury appears to be impaired energetics of the highly metabolically active nephron segments (i.e., proximal tubules and thick ascending limb) in the renal outer medulla, which can trigger conversion from transient hypoxia to intrinsic renal failure. Injury to kidney cells can be lethal or sublethal. Sublethal injury represents an important component in AKI, as it may profoundly influence GFR and renal blood flow. The nature of the recovery response is mediated by the degree to which sublethal cells can restore normal function and promote regeneration. The successful recovery from AKI depends on the degree to which these repair processes ensue and these may be compromised in elderly or CKD patients. Recent data suggest that AKI represents a potential link to CKD in surviving patients. Finally, earlier diagnosis of AKI represents an important area in treating patients with AKI that has spawned increased awareness of the potential that biomarkers of AKI may play in the future. PMID:23798302

  4. Reliability of the NINDS common data elements cranial tomography (CT) rating variables for traumatic brain injury (TBI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harburg, Leah; McCormack, Erin; Kenney, Kimbra; Moore, Carol; Yang, Kelly; Vos, Pieter; Jacobs, Bram; Madden, Christopher J; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon R; Bogoslovsky, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-contrast head computer tomography (CT) is widely used to evaluate eligibility of patients after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) for clinical trials. The NINDS Common Data Elements (CDEs) TBI were developed to standardize collection of CT variables. The objectives of this study

  5. Incidence, aetiology and injury characteristics of traumatic spinal cord injury in Stockholm, Sweden: A prospective, population-based update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Conran; Andersson, Nina; Bjelak, Sapko; Giesecke, Kajsa; Hultling, Claes; Nilsson Wikmar, Lena; Phillips, Julie; Seiger, Åke; Stenimahitis, Vasilios; Trok, Katarzyna; Åkesson, Elisabet; Wahman, Kerstin

    2017-05-16

    To update the incidence rate, aetiology and injury characteristics of acutely-injured adults with traumatic spinal cord injury in Stockholm, Sweden, using international standards of reporting. Prospective, (regional) population-based observation. Forty-nine consecutively enrolled individuals. A surveillance system of newly-injured adults with traumatic spinal cord injury was implemented for an 18-month period. The International Spinal Cord Injury Core Data Set was used to collect data on those who survived the first 7 days post-injury. After an 18-month period, 49 incident cases were registered, of whom 45 were included in this study. The crude incidence rate was 19.0 per million, consisting mainly of men (60%), and the mean age of the cohort was 55 years (median 58). Causes of injury were almost exclusively limited to falls and transport-related events, accounting for 58% and 40% of cases, respectively. The incidence has remained stable when compared with the previous study; however, significant differences exist for injury aetiology (p = 0.004) and impairment level (p = 0.01) in that more fall- and transport-related spinal cord injury occurred, and a larger proportion of persons was left with resultant tetraplegia, in the current study, compared with more sport-related injuries and those left with paraplegia in the previous study. The incidence rate appeared to remain stable in Stockholm, Sweden. However, significant changes in injury aetiology and impairment-level post injury were found, compared with the previous study. There remains a need for developing fall-related prevention strategies in rehabilitation settings as well as in population-based programmes.

  6. Emergency traumatic Diaphragmatic injuries in Benin city | Iribhogbe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diaphragmatic injuries (DI) frequently accompany thoracoabdominal trauma. The diagnosis remains a challenge to surgeons and radiologists worldwide but missed injuries to the diaphragm is associated with great morbidity and mortality. We aimed to determine the prevalence of this injury in acute trauma and in general ...

  7. Traumatic ventricular septal defect in a 4-year-old boy after blunt chest injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Mi Kim

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic ventricular septal defect (VSD resulting from blunt chest injury is a very rare event. The mechanisms of traumatic VSD have been of little concern to dateuntil now, but two dominant theories have been described. In one, the rupture occurs due to acute compression of the heart; in the other, it is due to myocardial infarction of the septum. The clinical symptoms and timing of presentation are variable, so appropriate diagnosis can be difficult or delayed. Closure of traumatic VSD has been based on a combination of heart failure symptoms, hemodynamics, and defect size. Here, we present a case of a 4-year-old boy who presented with a traumatic VSD following a car accident. He showed normal cardiac structure at the time of injury, but after 8 days, his repeated echocardiography revealed a VSD. He was successfully treated by surgical closure of the VSD, and has been doing well up to the present. This report suggests that the clinician should pay great close attention to the patients injured by blunt chest trauma, keeping in mind the possibility of cardiac injury.

  8. Post-traumatic Raynaud's phenomenon following volar plate injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodakiewitz, Yosef G; Daniels, Alan H; Kamal, Robin N; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2014-04-01

    Post-traumatic Raynaud's phenomenon following non-penetrating or non-repetitive injury is rare. We report a case of Raynaud's phenomenon occurring in a single digit 3 months following volar plate avulsion injury. Daily episodes of painless pallor of the digit occurred for 1 month upon any exposure to cold, resolving with warm water therapy. Symptoms resolved after the initiation of hand therapy, splinting, and range-of- motion exercises.

  9. Assessment of traumatic dental injuries in patients with cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    A Dubey; P A Ghafoor; M Rafeeq

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebral palsy is an umbrella term for a group of conditions characterized essentially by motor dysfunctions that may be associated with sensory or cognitive impairment. Such children tend to have a higher incidence of traumatic dental injuries than the general population. This increased incidence is often attributed to poor muscular co-ordination that predisposes individuals with Cerebral palsy to trauma Aim: The study was conducted to assess different dental injuries and the ris...

  10. Dedifferentiation Does Not Account for Hyperconnectivity after Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bernier, Rachel Anne; Roy, Arnab; Venkatesan, Umesh Meyyappan; Grossner, Emily C.; Brenner, Einat K.; Hillary, Frank Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Objective Changes in functional network connectivity following traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received increasing attention in recent neuroimaging literature. This study sought to understand how disrupted systems adapt to injury during resting and goal-directed brain states. Hyperconnectivity has been a common finding, and dedifferentiation (or loss of segregation of networks) is one possible explanation for this finding. We hypothesized that individuals with TBI would show dedifferenti...

  11. Computational modelling of traumatic brain injury predicts the location of chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajari, Mazdak; Hellyer, Peter J; Sharp, David J

    2017-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury can lead to the neurodegenerative disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy. This condition has a clear neuropathological definition but the relationship between the initial head impact and the pattern of progressive brain pathology is poorly understood. We test the hypothesis that mechanical strain and strain rate are greatest in sulci, where neuropathology is prominently seen in chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and whether human neuroimaging observations converge with computational predictions. Three distinct types of injury were simulated. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy can occur after sporting injuries, so we studied a helmet-to-helmet impact in an American football game. In addition, we investigated an occipital head impact due to a fall from ground level and a helmeted head impact in a road traffic accident involving a motorcycle and a car. A high fidelity 3D computational model of brain injury biomechanics was developed and the contours of strain and strain rate at the grey matter-white matter boundary were mapped. Diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities in a cohort of 97 traumatic brain injury patients were also mapped at the grey matter-white matter boundary. Fifty-one healthy subjects served as controls. The computational models predicted large strain most prominent at the depths of sulci. The volume fraction of sulcal regions exceeding brain injury thresholds were significantly larger than that of gyral regions. Strain and strain rates were highest for the road traffic accident and sporting injury. Strain was greater in the sulci for all injury types, but strain rate was greater only in the road traffic and sporting injuries. Diffusion tensor imaging showed converging imaging abnormalities within sulcal regions with a significant decrease in fractional anisotropy in the patient group compared to controls within the sulci. Our results show that brain tissue deformation induced by head impact loading is greatest in sulcal locations

  12. [Traumatic lumbosacral dislocation - an underrated injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, S; Weise, K; Badke, A

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic lumbosacral dislocations are rare. We report two cases with initially missed posttraumatic lumbosacral dislocations. The reported cases and the review of the literature show that, especially, accident victims with multiple fractures of the lumbar transverses processes may require a CT scan to confirm fractures or dislocations of L5/S1. Follow-up examinations due to persisting pain after physiotherapy should include lateral X-rays of the lumbar spine of the patient standing. According to the literature and our experience, the treatment of traumatic lumbosacral dislocation usually consists of open reduction and postero-lateral or dorso-ventral fusion of the unstable segments.

  13. The effect of previous traumatic injury on homicide risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Russell L; Davis, Gregory G; Levitan, Emily B; MacLennan, Paul A; Redden, David T; McGwin, Gerald

    2014-07-01

    Research has reported that a strong risk factor for traumatic injury is having a previous injury (i.e., recidivism). To date, the only study examining the relationship between recidivism and homicide reported strong associations, but was limited by possible selection bias. The current matched case-control study utilized coroner's data from 2004 to 2008. Subjects were linked to trauma registry data to determine whether the person had a previous traumatic injury. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the association between homicide and recidivism. Homicide risk was increased for those having a previous traumatic injury (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.09-2.99) or a previous intentional injury (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.24-5.17). These results suggest an association between homicide and injury recidivism, and that trauma centers may be an effective setting for screening individuals for secondary prevention efforts of homicide through violence prevention programs. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. The Dens: Normal Development, Developmental Variants and Anomalies, and Traumatic Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T O′Brien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate interpretation of cervical spine imagining can be challenging, especially in children and the elderly. The biomechanics of the developing pediatric spine and age-related degenerative changes predispose these patient populations to injuries centered at the craniocervical junction. In addition, congenital anomalies are common in this region, especially those associated with the axis/dens, due to its complexity in terms of development compared to other vertebral levels. The most common congenital variations of the dens include the os odontoideum and a persistent ossiculum terminale. At times, it is necessary to distinguish normal development, developmental variants, and developmental anomalies from traumatic injuries in the setting of acute traumatic injury. Key imaging features are useful to differentiate between traumatic fractures and normal or variant anatomy acutely; however, the radiologist must first have a basic understanding of the spectrum of normal developmental anatomy and its anatomic variations in order to make an accurate assessment. This review article attempts to provide the basic framework required for accurate interpretation of cervical spine imaging with a focus on the dens, specifically covering the normal development and ossification of the dens, common congenital variants and their various imaging appearances, fracture classifications, imaging appearances, and treatment options.

  15. Cognitive Task Demands and Discourse Performance after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byom, Lindsey; Turkstra, Lyn S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Social communication problems are common in adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly problems in spoken discourse. Social communication problems are thought to reflect underlying cognitive impairments. Aims: To measure the contribution of two cognitive processes, executive functioning (EF) and theory of mind (ToM), to the…

  16. Headache in traumatic brain injuries from blunt head trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Chelse, Ana B.; Epstein, Leon G.

    2015-01-01

    Investigators from New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital examined whether having an isolated headache following minor blunt head trauma was suggestive of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among a large cohort of children 2-18 years of age.

  17. Brain Imaging and Behavioral Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1996-01-01

    This review explores the cellular pathology associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its relation to neurobehavioral outcomes, the relationship of brain imaging findings to underlying pathology, brain imaging techniques, various image analysis procedures and how they relate to neuropsychological testing, and the importance of brain imaging…

  18. Integration of Neuropsychology in Educational Planning Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavinoha, Peter L.

    2005-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) have the potential to significantly disrupt a student's cognitive, academic, social, emotional, behavioral, and physical functioning. It is important for educators to appreciate the array of difficulties students with TBI may experience in order to appropriately assess needs and create an educational plan that…

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury and Special Education: An Information Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Alice M.

    This resource guide of annotated references on traumatic brain injury (TBI) was created to help educators locate information from such disciplines as neurology, neuropsychology, rehabilitation, and pediatric medicine. Twenty-four resources published from 1990 to 1994 are listed, with annotations. The resources include research reports/reviews,…

  20. Neuropsychological Consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord-Maes, Janiece; Obrzut, John E.

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses recent findings concerning cognitive outcomes in traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children and adolescents, with a particular focus on age differences with TBI. It suggests a relationship between specific learning disorders and brain dysfunction, addresses differential hemispheric functioning with TBI, and outlines recent…

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction Among Head ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a common health problem which is one of the main causes of chronic disability and it is associated with hormonal and metabolic disorders. This work was carried out to investigate the relationship between some stress hormones (i.e. prolactin and cortisol) and plasma glucose level in TBI ...

  2. Traumatic dental injuries and associated factors in permanent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic dental injuries in children are increasingly becoming a serious dental public health problem worldwide. Despite this fact, less attention has been directed to this problem compared to other common oral problems like dental caries. Aims: To determine the prevalence, causes and correlates of ...

  3. Traumatic injuries to the teeth of children | Luukkonen | Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic injuries to the teeth of children. P Luukkonen. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  4. Opioid Abuse after Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    compulsive buying and the burden perceived by caregivers after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury. Psychopathology. 2011;44:158-164. Rochat L...well as the progression from abuse to compulsive drug taking and addiction (Coluzzi and Pappagallo, 2005; Koob and Volkow, 2010). Physical dependence

  5. Opioid Abuse After Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodet Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    impulsivity relates to compulsive buying and the burden perceived by caregivers after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury. Psychopathology...mechanism for the continued misuse/abuse of opioid drugs as well as the progression from abuse to compulsive drug taking and addiction (Coluzzi and

  6. Working with Parents of Students with Traumatic Brain Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Barbara; And Others

    Intended for educators working with children who have suffered traumatic brain injuries (TBI), this brief paper addresses parent issues, administrative issues, and programmatic issues. Noted are the five stages of adjustment typically experienced by parents: shock, elation, reality, crisis, and mourning. Professionals are encouraged to be informed…

  7. Pharmacologic resuscitation for hemorrhagic shock combined with traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Guang; Duggan, Michael; Imam, Ayesha

    2012-01-01

    [Hex]) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) decreases brain swelling, without affecting size of the lesion. This study was performed to determine whether addition of VPA to Hex would decrease the lesion size in a clinically relevant large animal model of TBI + HS....

  8. Traumatic injuries to the anterior teeth of Nigerian urban public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: To investigate the prevalence and pattern of occurrence of traumatic anterior dental injuries in the 6 to 12 year olds, attending public schools in the urban city of Enugu, South – Eastern Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: A total of 2000 subjects were selected from 8 primary schools in Enugu, through a 2 stage sampling ...

  9. Adolescents\\' experience of a parental traumatic brain injury | Harris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phenomenon of parental traumatic brain injury was characterised by denial, anger, grief, guilt, anxiety, over-protectiveness, social isolation, and change in many areas of the participants' lives. The adolescents coped using both approaches and avoidance styles of coping. Religion was a theme in the lives of all four ...

  10. Traumatic brain injury in children | Coughlan | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 45, No 5 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Traumatic brain injury in children. M Coughlan, G Fieggen ...

  11. Misconceptions on neuropsychological rehabilitation and traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto García- Molina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There are many misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries, their recovery and outcome; misconceptions that have their origin in a lack of information influenced by the image that the media show of the brain damage. Development. Based on clinical experience, the authors of this essay sets out his personal view on some of the most frequent misconceptions in the field of neuropsychological rehabilitation of traumatic brain injury: 1 All deficits are evident; 2 The recovery depends mainly on the involvement of the patient: more effort, more rapid recovery; 3 Two years after traumatic brain injury there is no possibility of improvement and recovery; and 4 The “miracle” of recovery will occur when is found the appropriate professional or treatment. These and other beliefs may influence directly or indirectly on the recovery process and the expectations placed on it by the families and patients. Conclusions. Provide accurate, clear and honest information, at the right time, helps patients and their families to better understand the deficits, the course of recovery and to adapt to the new reality resulting from a traumatic brain injury.

  12. Demographic profile of severe traumatic brain injury admissions to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This retrospective, descriptive, quantitative study included children admitted to the RCWMCH with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) between June 2006 and April 2011, who required intracranial monitoring. We used the Division of Paediatric Neurosurgery's TBI database to identify cases for inclusion in the study and to ...

  13. Clinimetrics and functional outcome one year after traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T.M. van Baalen (Bianca)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is based on the findings of the FuPro-TBI (Functional Prognosis in Traumatic Brain Injury) study, which was part of the national FuPro research programme which investigated the functional prognosis of four neurological disorders: multiple sclerosis (MS), stroke, amyotrofic

  14. Non-traumatic injury profile of amateur cyclists

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in respondents who experienced neck, back, hand/wrist, buttock/perineum and foot/ankle problems. Conclusion. Non-traumatic injuries in amateur cyclists are common, with back, hand/wrist and buttock/perineal symptoms the most frequent problems. Knee problems caused the greatest need to stop training and seek ...

  15. Traumatic physeal injuries Retrospective study on 113 cases at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic physeal injuries Retrospective study on 113 cases at Yopougon teaching hospital (Abidjan) ... Late complications (6.2%) included 3 growth disturbances, 2 stiff knees, 1 painful and 1 stiff ankle. Growth disturbance was statistically correlated to age of patients (p>0.05) but not to fracture site (p<0.05, Fischer exact ...

  16. Association between traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) and caries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the association between traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) and caries experience in a selected Nigerian population and the influence(s) of gender and location on this association. Method: The sample size included 799 school children proportionately selected through multistage sampling technique.

  17. The spectrum and outcome of paediatric traumatic brain injury in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. This retrospective review of a prospectively entered and maintained hybrid electronic trauma registry was intended to develop a comprehensive overview of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children and adolescents and to compare it with previous audits from our local environment and from other developing world ...

  18. Minor traumatic brain injuries – what is new? | Hollander ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Minor traumatic brain injuries – what is new? D Hollander, J Coventry, M Du Trevou. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  19. Oxidative stress following traumatic brain injury: enhancement of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Management of brain injury can pose enormous challenges to the health team. There are many studies aimed at discovering or developing pharmacotherapeutic agents targeted at improving outcome of head-injured patients. This paper reviews the role of oxidative stress in neuronal loss following traumatic ...

  20. Minor traumatic brain injuries – what is new?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research has concentrated on indications for neuroimaging, management guidelines for sports-related concussion and sequelae of minor traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs). Despite the emergence of several guidelines there is little agreement on several important issues, including the definition of mTBIs and concussion.

  1. Brain-derived neurotropic factor polymorphisms, traumatic stress, mild traumatic brain injury, and combat exposure contribute to postdeployment traumatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dretsch, Michael N; Williams, Kathy; Emmerich, Tanja; Crynen, Gogce; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Chaytow, Helena; Mathura, Venkat; Crawford, Fiona C; Iverson, Grant L

    2016-01-01

    In addition to experiencing traumatic events while deployed in a combat environment, there are other factors that contribute to the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in military service members. This study explored the contribution of genetics, childhood environment, prior trauma, psychological, cognitive, and deployment factors to the development of traumatic stress following deployment. Both pre- and postdeployment data on 231 of 458 soldiers were analyzed. Postdeployment assessments occurred within 30 days from returning stateside and included a battery of psychological health, medical history, and demographic questionnaires; neurocognitive tests; and blood serum for the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2), apolipoprotein E (APOE), and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) genes. Soldiers who screened positive for traumatic stress at postdeployment had significantly higher scores in depression (d = 1.91), anxiety (d = 1.61), poor sleep quality (d = 0.92), postconcussion symptoms (d = 2.21), alcohol use (d = 0.63), traumatic life events (d = 0.42), and combat exposure (d = 0.91). BDNF Val66 Met genotype was significantly associated with risk for sustaining a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and screening positive for traumatic stress. Predeployment traumatic stress, greater combat exposure and sustaining an mTBI while deployed, and the BDNF Met/Met genotype accounted for 22% of the variance of postdeployment PTSD scores (R (2)  = 0.22, P PTSD scores. These findings suggest predeployment traumatic stress, genetic, and environmental factors have unique contributions to the development of combat-related traumatic stress in military service members.

  2. Interleukin-1 Receptor in Seizure Susceptibility after Traumatic Injury to the Pediatric Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Bridgette D; O'Brien, Terence J; Gimlin, Kayleen; Wright, David K; Kim, Shi Eun; Casillas-Espinosa, Pablo M; Webster, Kyria M; Petrou, Steven; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2017-08-16

    Epilepsy after pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with poor quality of life. This study aimed to characterize post-traumatic epilepsy in a mouse model of pediatric brain injury, and to evaluate the role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling as a target for pharmacological intervention. Male mice received a controlled cortical impact or sham surgery at postnatal day 21, approximating a toddler-aged child. Mice were treated acutely with an IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra; 100 mg/kg, s.c.) or vehicle. Spontaneous and evoked seizures were evaluated from video-EEG recordings. Behavioral assays tested for functional outcomes, postmortem analyses assessed neuropathology, and brain atrophy was detected by ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging. At 2 weeks and 3 months post-injury, TBI mice showed an elevated seizure response to the convulsant pentylenetetrazol compared with sham mice, associated with abnormal hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting. A robust increase in IL-1β and IL-1 receptor were detected after TBI. IL-1Ra treatment reduced seizure susceptibility 2 weeks after TBI compared with vehicle, and a reduction in hippocampal astrogliosis. In a chronic study, IL-1Ra-TBI mice showed improved spatial memory at 4 months post-injury. At 5 months, most TBI mice exhibited spontaneous seizures during a 7 d video-EEG recording period. At 6 months, IL-1Ra-TBI mice had fewer evoked seizures compared with vehicle controls, coinciding with greater preservation of cortical tissue. Findings demonstrate this model's utility to delineate mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis after pediatric brain injury, and provide evidence of IL-1 signaling as a mediator of post-traumatic astrogliosis and seizure susceptibility. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Epilepsy is a common cause of morbidity after traumatic brain injury in early childhood. However, a limited understanding of how epilepsy develops, particularly in the immature brain, likely contributes to the lack of efficacious treatments

  3. The Cost of Treating Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    It is important that these individuals receive social support in order to help with the healing process. Comorbid Symptoms Comorbid symptoms...and may increase the risk for Alzheimer ‟s disease and Parkinson‟s disease as the person ages (Traumatic Brain Injury: Hope Through Research, 2002

  4. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    in the prospective study, six died, and 92 (1.27 per 100,000 population per year) survived after a post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) period of at least 28 days. All 19 patients with PTA 7-27 days and 48% of survivors with PTA at least 4 weeks were discharged directly home. The incidence of patients vegetative at 1 month...

  5. Aging, neurodegenerative disease, and traumatic brain injury: the role of neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esopenko, Carrie; Levine, Brian

    2015-02-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a highly prevalent condition with significant effects on cognition and behavior. While the acute and sub-acute effects of TBI recover over time, relatively little is known about the long-term effects of TBI in relation to neurodegenerative disease. This issue has recently garnered a great deal of attention due to publicity surrounding chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in professional athletes, although CTE is but one of several neurodegenerative disorders associated with a history of TBI. Here, we review the literative on neurodegenerative disorders linked to remote TBI. We also review the evidence for neuroimaging changes associated with unhealthy brain aging in the context of remote TBI. We conclude that neuroimaging biomarkers have significant potential to increase understanding of the mechanisms of unhealthy brain aging and neurodegeneration following TBI, with potential for identifying those at risk for unhealthy brain aging prior to the clinical manifestation of neurodegenerative disease.

  6. A retrospective study of ketamine administration and the development of acute or post-traumatic stress disorder in 274 war-wounded soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mion, G; Le Masson, J; Granier, C; Hoffmann, C

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether ketamine prevents or exacerbates acute or post-traumatic stress disorders in military trauma patients. We conducted a retrospective study of a database from the French Military Health Service, including all soldiers surviving a war injury in Afghanistan (2010-2012). The diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder was made by a psychiatrist and patients were analysed according to the presence or absence of this condition. Analysis included the following covariables: age; sex; acute stress disorder; blast injury; associated fatality; brain injury; traumatic amputation; Glasgow coma scale; injury severity score; administered drugs; number of surgical procedures; physical, neurosensory or aesthetic sequelae; and the development chronic pain. Covariables related to post-traumatic and acute stress disorders with a p ≤ 0.10 were included in a multivariable logistic regression model. The data from 450 soldiers were identified; 399 survived, of which 274 were analysed. Among these, 98 (36%) suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder and 89 (32%) had received ketamine. Fifty-four patients (55%) in the post-traumatic stress disorder group received ketamine vs. 35 (20%) in the no PTSD group (p development of post-traumatic stress disorder. In this retrospective study, ketamine administration was not a risk factor for the development of post-traumatic stress disorder in the military trauma setting. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Utility of the Validity-10 scale across the recovery trajectory following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippa, Sara M; Lange, Rael T; Bailie, Jason M; Kennedy, Jan E; Brickell, Tracey A; French, Louis M

    2016-01-01

    The Validity-10 scale was recently developed to screen for symptom exaggeration in patients following traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, it has only been validated on patients with TBI largely in the chronic phase of recovery. The influence of time since injury on the Validity-10 scale was investigated in 2,661 male servicemembers with TBI presenting to six U.S. Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Centers. Participants completed the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI). The Validity-10 scale and NSI total score were both weakly statistically significantly (1) positively correlated with time since injury, (2) negatively correlated with bodily injury severity, and (3) higher in participants undergoing medical board evaluations than in participants who returned to duty or were still hospitalized. Participants were statistically more likely to screen positive for possible symptom exaggeration on the Validity-10 scale as time since injury increased. However, the Validity-10 scale was only weakly related to time since injury, TBI severity, bodily injury severity, disposition, age, and return to duty status. That false positives are not increased in the acute phase of recovery and that the Validity-10 scale is not strongly related to clinical factors support the use of the Validity-10 scale in the acute recovery phase and across the TBI recovery trajectory.

  8. Hemorrhage Control for Major Traumatic Vascular Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Mechanism of Injury: a. □ Blunt Injury (Select all that apply) □ Fall □ MVC – Motorcycle □ MVC □ Industrial Accident □ MVC – Bicycle □ Struck by...against (assault) □ MVC – Pedestrian □ Bicycle □ Motorcycle □ Other, (Describe):___________ b. □ Penetrating Injury (Select all that apply) □ Gunshot...will be assigned to each eligible subject. A linking log will be kept at each site to track the study ID# with the medical record number of the

  9. Traumatic injury among drywall installers, 1992 to 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, S S; Pan, C S; Keane, P

    2000-11-01

    This study examined the traumatic-injury characteristics associated with one of the high-risk occupations in the construction industry--drywall installers--through an analysis of the traumatic-injury data obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. An additional objective was to demonstrate a feasible and economic approach to identify risk factors associated with a specific occupation by using an existing database. An analysis of nonfatal traumatic injuries with days away from work among wage-and-salary drywall installers was performed for 1992 through 1995 using the Occupational Injury and Illness Survey conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Results from this study indicate that drywall installers are at a high risk of overexertion and falls to a lower level. More than 40% of the injured drywall installers suffered sprains, strains, and/or tears. The most frequently injured body part was the trunk. More than one-third of the trunk injuries occurred while handling solid building materials, mainly drywall. In addition, the database analysis used in this study is valid in identifying overall risk factors for specific occupations.

  10. Assessment of traumatic dental injuries in patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dubey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy is an umbrella term for a group of conditions characterized essentially by motor dysfunctions that may be associated with sensory or cognitive impairment. Such children tend to have a higher incidence of traumatic dental injuries than the general population. This increased incidence is often attributed to poor muscular co-ordination that predisposes individuals with Cerebral palsy to trauma Aim: The study was conducted to assess different dental injuries and the risk factors for dental trauma to occur in patients with cerebral palsy. Materials and Methods: The study comprised 70 children and adolescents with cerebral palsy attending special school in Durg and Bhilai city between 7 and 18 years of age. Results: Dentinal fracture was seen in 40% of cases. Few cases had tooth displacement, discoloration, and pulpal involvement. Conclusion: Dentists should be well aware of the possible dental injuries in such patients. Preventive measure measures should be taken by health care provider to reduce traumatic exposure.

  11. Improved prediction of direction-dependent, acute axonal injury in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlan, Lorre S; Smith, Colin; Margulies, Susan S

    2018-04-01

    To guide development of safety equipment that reduces sports-related head injuries, we sought to enhance predictive relationships between head movement and acute axonal injury severity. The severity of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is influenced by the magnitude and direction of head kinematics. Previous studies have demonstrated correlation between rotational head kinematics and symptom severity in the adult. More recent studies have demonstrated brain injury age- and direction-dependence, relating head kinematics to white matter tract-oriented strains. We have recently developed and assessed novel rotational head kinematic parameters as predictors of white matter damage in the female immature piglet. We show that many previously published rotational kinematic injury predictor metrics poorly predict acute axonal pathology induced by rapid, non-impact head rotations and that inclusion of cerebral moments of inertia (MOI) in rotational head injury metrics refines prediction of diffuse axonal injury following rapid head rotations for two immature age groups. Rotational Work (RotWork) was the best significant predictor of traumatic axonal injury in both newborn and pre-adolescent piglets following head rotations in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes. An improvement over current metrics, we find that RotWork, which incorporates head rotation rate, direction, and brain shape, significantly enhanced acute traumatic axonal injury prediction. For similar injury extent, the RotWork threshold is lower for the newborn piglet than the pre-adolescent. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Dental Trauma Part 1- Acute Management of Luxation/Displacement Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemal, Serpil; Singh, Parmjit; Tomson, Rachel; Kelleher, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Fortunately, traumatic dental injuries are a relatively uncommon occurrence in general dental practice. However, when they do present, timely diagnosis and treatment of such injuries is essential to maximize the chance of a successful outcome. This is the first part of a two-part series on traumatic dental injuries that are commonly encountered in the clinical setting. Part one will cover acute management of luxation/displacement injuries that primarily affect the supporting structures of the tooth, while part two will cover the management of fracture injuries associated with teeth and the alveolar bone. Clinical relevance: A simple, step-by-step approach in the diagnosis and clinical management of acute luxation/displacement injuries should be part of a dental clinician's knowledge.

  13. Symptomatic heterotopic ossification after very severe traumatic brain injury in 114 patients: incidence and risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Louise Lau; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of heterotopic ossification (HO) among patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) varies in the literature from 11 to 73.3%. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of HO among patients with very severe TBI treated in a new established intensive rehabilitation Brain...... as well as data about trauma severity and hospital stay of these patients have been registered prospectively in a database (Danish National Head Injury database) at the Brain Injury Unit where the sub acute rehabilitation took place. The present study was based retrospectively on this database, combined...... with X-rays obtained for symptoms of HO and/or as fracture control. Clinically significant HO was found in 7.9% of the patients. Logistic regression showed an independent significant positive correlation between HO, the female gender and a high Injury Severity Score. The low incidence of HO might...

  14. Epidemiology of mild traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Raquel C; Yaffe, Kristine

    2015-05-01

    Every year an estimated 42 million people worldwide suffer a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) or concussion. More severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a well-established risk factor for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Recently, large epidemiological studies have additionally identified MTBI as a risk factor for dementia. The role of MTBI in risk of PD or ALS is less well established. Repetitive MTBI and repetitive sub-concussive head trauma have been linked to increased risk for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE is a unique neurodegenerative tauopathy first described in boxers but more recently described in a variety of contact sport athletes, military veterans, and civilians exposed to repetitive MTBI. Studies of repetitive MTBI and CTE have been limited by referral bias, lack of consensus clinical criteria for CTE, challenges of quantifying MTBI exposure, and potential for confounding. The prevalence of CTE is unknown and the amount of MTBI or sub-concussive trauma exposure necessary to produce CTE is unclear. This review will summarize the current literature regarding the epidemiology of MTBI, post-TBI dementia and Parkinson's disease, and CTE while highlighting methodological challenges and critical future directions of research in this field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Traumatic Brain Injury. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Traumatic brain injury and disturbed sleep and wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Christian R

    2012-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a frequent condition worldwide, and sleep-wake disturbances often complicate the course after the injuring event. Current evidence suggests that the most common sleep-wake disturbances following traumatic brain injury include excessive daytime sleepiness and posttraumatic hypersomnia, that is, increased sleep need per 24 h. The neuromolecular basis of posttraumatic sleep pressure enhancement is not entirely clear. First neuropathological and clinical studies suggest that impaired hypocretin (orexin) signalling might contribute to sleepiness, but direct or indirect traumatic injury also to other sleep-wake modulating systems in the brainstem and the mesencephalon is likely. Posttraumatic insomnia may be less common than posttraumatic sleepiness, but studies on its frequency revealed conflicting results. Furthermore, insomnia is often associated with psychiatric comorbidities, and some patients with posttraumatic disruption of their circadian rhythm may be misdiagnosed as insomnia patients. The pathophysiology of posttraumatic circadian sleep disorders remains elusive; however, there is some evidence that reduced evening melatonin production due to traumatic brain damage may cause disruption of circadian regulation of sleep and wakefulness.

  16. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome : Consensus Recommendations From the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jouvet, Philippe; Thomas, Neal J.; Willson, Douglas F.; Erickson, Simon; Khemani, Robinder; Smith, Lincoln; Zimmerman, Jerry; Dahmer, Mary; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael; Sapru, Anil; Cheifetz, Ira M.; Rimensberger, Peter C.; Kneyber, Martin; Tamburro, Robert F.; Curley, Martha A. Q.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Valentine, Stacey; Emeriaud, Guillaume; Newth, Christopher; Carroll, Christopher L.; Essouri, Sandrine; Dalton, Heidi; Macrae, Duncan; Lopez-Cruces, Yolanda; Quasney, Michael; Santschi, Miriam; Watson, R. Scott; Bembea, Melania

    Objective: To describe the final recommendations of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference. Design: Consensus conference of experts in pediatric acute lung injury. Setting: Not applicable. Subjects: PICU patients with evidence of acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress

  17. Haemodialysis for post-traumatic acute renal failure – factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Post-traumatic acute renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy in an intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with high mortality. Objective. To assess indicators of improved survival. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study of 64 consecutive trauma patients (penetrating and blunt trauma and burns) ...

  18. TRAUMATIC INJURIES TO THE TEETII OF CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    periodontal or root fracture;. 4. Direction: intrusion, extrusion or avulsion ... fall against an object, or a fall from a bicycle. The main aetiological ... where the injury occured? The place of acci- dent indicates if preventive measures against tetanus are required;. - how the injury occured? The direction of the blow may indicate a ...

  19. Patients "At Risk" of Suffering from Persistent Complaints after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: The Role of Coping, Mood Disorders, and Post-Traumatic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheenen, Myrthe E; Spikman, Jacoba M; de Koning, Myrthe E; van der Horn, Harm J; Roks, Gerwin; Hageman, Gerard; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2017-01-01

    Although most patients recover fully following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), a minority (15-25%) of all patients develop persistent post-traumatic complaints (PTC) that interfere with the resumption of previous activities. An early identification of patients who are at risk for PTC is currently performed by measuring the number of complaints in the acute phase. However, only part of this group will actually develop persisting complaints, stressing the need for studies on additional risk factors. This study aimed to compare this group of patients with many complaints with patients with few and no complaints to identify potential additional discriminating characteristics and to evaluate which of these factors have the most predictive value for being at risk. We evaluated coping style, presence of psychiatric history, injury characteristics, mood-related symptoms, and post-traumatic stress. We included 820 patients (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score 13-15) admitted to three level-1 trauma centers as part of the UPFRONT-study. At 2 weeks after injury, 60% reported three or more complaints (PTC-high), 25% reported few complaints (PTC-low), and 15% reported no complaints (PTC-zero). Results showed that PTC-high consisted of more females (78% vs. 73% and 52%, p traumatic stress (37% vs. 27% and 19%, p traumatic stress symptoms had the highest predictive value and should be taken into account in the identification of at-risk patients for future treatment studies.

  20. Suicide after traumatic brain injury: a population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teasdale, T W; Engberg, A W

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the rates of suicide among patients who have had a traumatic brain injury. METHODS: From a Danish population register of admissions to hospital covering the years 1979-93 patients were selected who had had either a concussion (n=126 114), a cranial fracture (n=7560...... in hospital. Cox regression analyses for proportional hazards confirmed that there was a significantly greater risk of suicide among patients with cerebral contusions or traumatic intracranial haemorrhages than among patients with concussion or cranial fractures (hazard ratios=1.42 and 1.50 respectively...

  1. Cerebral Infarction after Traumatic Brain Injury: Incidence and Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Dong-Hyeon; Choi, Kyu-Sun; Yi, Hyeong-Joong; Chun, Hyoung-Joon; Ko, Yong; Bak, Koang Hum

    2014-01-01

    Objective Post-traumatic cerebral infarction (PTCI) is one of the most severe secondary insults after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and is known to be associated with poor outcome and high mortality rate. We assessed the practical incidence and risk factors for the development of PTCI. Methods We conducted retrospective study on 986 consecutive patients with TBI from the period May 2005 to November 2012 at our institution. The definition of PTCI was made on non-enhanced CT scan based on a wel...

  2. The Incidence of Postconcussion Syndrome Remains Stable Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Karen M; Crawford, Susan; Brooks, Brian L; Turley, Brenda; Mikrogianakis, Angelo

    2015-12-01

    Improving our knowledge about the natural history and persistence of symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury is a vital step in improving the provision of health care to children with postconcussion syndrome. The purposes of this study were to (1) determine the incidence and persistence of symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury and (2) ascertain whether Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), symptom criteria for postconcussion syndrome in adults are appropriate for use in children. A tertiary care pediatric emergency department was the setting for this study. This was a prospective observational follow-up cohort study of children (ages 2 to 18 years) with mild traumatic brain injury. Data were collected in person during the acute presentation, and subsequent follow-up was performed by telephone at 7-10 days and 1, 2, and 3 months postinjury. Postconcussion Symptom Inventory for parents and children was used. The DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for postconcussion syndrome were explored using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. A total of 467 children (62.5% boys, median age 12.04, range 2.34-18.0) with mild traumatic brain injury participated. The median time until symptom resolution was 29.0 days (95% confidence intervals: 26.09-31.91). Three months after injury, 11.8% of children with mild traumatic brain injury remained symptomatic. Receiver operating curve characteristic analysis of the postconcussion syndrome criteria successfully classified symptomatic participants at three months postinjury; the adolescent receiver operating characteristic curve was excellent with the area under the curve being 0.928 (P children presenting to the emergency room with a mild traumatic brain injury remain symptomatic at 3 months postinjury. This is the first study to demonstrate stable incidence rates of postconcussion syndrome in children and that modified DSM-IV criteria can be used to successfully classify

  3. Mild traumatic brain injury does not produce post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbordone, R J; Liter, J C

    1995-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that patients who sustain mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) or post-concussive syndrome develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in response to their cognitive difficulties, diminished coping skills, or other losses. This study examined 70 patients who had previously been diagnosed as having either PTSD or MTBI. Each patient was asked to provide a highly detailed chronological history of the events which preceded, followed, and occurred during the traumatic event, to indicate whether they were rendered unconscious or had amnesia for the event, and to describe the various symptoms they developed. All (100.0%) of the PTSD patients were able to provide a highly detailed and emotionally charged recollection of the events which occurred within 15 minutes of the traumatic event in comparison to none (0.0%) of the MTBI patients. None of the MTBI patients reported symptoms such as intrusive recollections of the traumatic event, nightmares, hypervigilance, phobic or startle reactions, or became upset when they were asked to describe the traumatic event or were exposed to stimuli associated with it. These data suggest that PTSD and MTBI are two mutually exclusive disorders, and that it is highly unlikely that MTBI patients develop PTSD symptoms. Furthermore, these findings suggest that clinicians should exercise considerable caution in ruling out PTSD prior to making the diagnosis of MTBI.

  4. White matter and reading deficits after pediatric traumatic brain injury: A diffusion tensor imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Parker Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric traumatic brain injury often results in significant long-term deficits in mastery of reading ability. This study aimed to identify white matter pathways that, when damaged, predicted reading deficits in children. Based on the dual-route model of word reading, we predicted that integrity of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus would be related to performance in sight word identification while integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus would be related to performance in phonemic decoding. Reading fluency and comprehension were hypothesized to relate to the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and cingulum bundle. The connectivity of white matter pathways was used to predict reading deficits in children aged 6 to 16 years with traumatic brain injury (n = 29 and those with orthopedic injury (n = 27 using tract-based spatial statistics. Results showed that children with traumatic brain injury and reduced microstructural integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus demonstrated reduced word-reading ability on sight word and phonemic decoding tasks. Additionally, children with traumatic brain injury and microstructural changes involving the cingulum bundle demonstrated reduced reading fluency. Results support the association of a dorsal pathway via the superior longitudinal fasciculus with both sight word reading and phonemic decoding. No association was identified between the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and sight word reading or phonemic decoding. Reading fluency was associated with the integrity of the cingulum bundle. These findings support dissociable pathways predicting word reading and fluency using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and provide additional information for developing models of acquired reading deficits by specifying areas of brain damage which may predict reading deficits following recovery from the acute phase of TBI.

  5. White matter and reading deficits after pediatric traumatic brain injury: A diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chad Parker; Juranek, Jenifer; Swank, Paul R; Kramer, Larry; Cox, Charles S; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury often results in significant long-term deficits in mastery of reading ability. This study aimed to identify white matter pathways that, when damaged, predicted reading deficits in children. Based on the dual-route model of word reading, we predicted that integrity of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus would be related to performance in sight word identification while integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus would be related to performance in phonemic decoding. Reading fluency and comprehension were hypothesized to relate to the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and cingulum bundle. The connectivity of white matter pathways was used to predict reading deficits in children aged 6 to 16 years with traumatic brain injury (n = 29) and those with orthopedic injury (n = 27) using tract-based spatial statistics. Results showed that children with traumatic brain injury and reduced microstructural integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus demonstrated reduced word-reading ability on sight word and phonemic decoding tasks. Additionally, children with traumatic brain injury and microstructural changes involving the cingulum bundle demonstrated reduced reading fluency. Results support the association of a dorsal pathway via the superior longitudinal fasciculus with both sight word reading and phonemic decoding. No association was identified between the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and sight word reading or phonemic decoding. Reading fluency was associated with the integrity of the cingulum bundle. These findings support dissociable pathways predicting word reading and fluency using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and provide additional information for developing models of acquired reading deficits by specifying areas of brain damage which may predict reading deficits following recovery from the acute phase of TBI.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal-cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Iwata, Kinjiro; Okumura, Terufumi; Hoshino, Daisaku.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a noninvasive and very important method of investigating spinal-cord injuries. By means of MRI we examined 36 patients with spinal injuries, 34 of them in the acute stage. 19 cases had complete spinal-cord injury with paraplegia, while 17 cases had incomplete spinal-cord injury. MRI showed the injured spinal-cord in the acute stage to be partially swollen, with a high signal intensity in the T 2 -weighted images. In the chronic stage, the injured cord may show atrophic changes with a post-traumatic cavity or myelomalacia, which appears as a high-signal-intensity lesion in the T 2 -weighted images and as a low-signal intensity in the T 1 -weighted images. The cases with complete spinal injuries showed a high signal intensity at the wide level, and these prognoses were poor. The cases with incomplete injuries showed normal findings or a high-signal-intensity spot. In the Gd-DTPA enhanced images, the injured cords were enhanced very well in the subchronic stage. MRI is thus found to be useful in the diagnosis of spinal injuries; it also demonstrates a potential for predicting the neurological prognosis. (author)

  7. Prediction of Clinically Important Traumatic Brain Injury in Pediatric Minor Head Trauma; proposing Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury (PTBI Prognostic Rule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Nakhjavan-Shahraki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study assesses independent predictors of clinically important traumatic brain injury (ciTBI in order to design a prognostic rule for identification of high risk children with mild head injury. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective cross-sectional study, 3,199 children with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI brought to emergency ward of three hospitals in Tehran, Iran were gathered, from April 2014 to April 2016. The associations between probable predictors of ciTBI in children with mild TBI were assessed and a prediction rule for identification of high risk children in need of computed tomography (CT scan was designed based on a stepwise multivariate logistic regression. Results: 592 (18.5% children had ciTBI. History of loss of conciseness (odds ratio [OR]=3.0; p

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury service (TBI) Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This Service provides access to Tramatic Brain injury patient data consult notes. The service also provides one write service method writeNote. The Service supports...

  9. Traumatic dental injuries in Serbian children: Epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Ana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Comprehensive epidemiological data regarding factors associated with traumatic dental injuries are scarce. Objective. The aim of the present study was to assess the frequency and analyze the factors associated with traumatic dental injuries in Serbian children. Methods. Research included children and adolescents with traumatic dental injury aged 0-19 year during the period from 2003 to 2010, in four University Dental Centres in Serbia: Belgrade, Nis, Novi Sad and Kragujevac. Patient history, demographic, clinical and radiographic data were obtained from dental trauma forms. Results. Total of 2,194 patients (748 girls, 1,446 boys (χ2=222.1; p<0.01 with 3,077 injured teeth in permanent and 953 in primary dentition were observed. Most of patients were aged 7 to 12 years (n=1,191. The most frequent injuries in primary and permanent dentition were dislocations (87.4% and teeth fractures (50.8%, respectively (χ2=706.1; p<0.01. The most frequent mechanism of injury was fall in children aged 0 to 12 years, while the collisions were most frequent in adolescents (53.9%. The most frequent injuries in adolescents were inflicted outdoor (66.8%, while the injuries in children aged 0 to 3 years occurred at home (68.2%, (χ2=360.8; p<0.01. The most frequent injuries in girls were accidental (48.3%, and in boys these were sport injuries (20.4% and violence (10.4% (χ2=79.9; p<0.01. The most frequent cause of injury in children aged 0 to 3 years was accidental (75.6%, while in adolescents it was sport (34.1% (χ2=1102.7; p<0.01. Conclusion. Dental injuries in preschool children most frequently resulted from fall at home. Schoolchildren most frequently injured teeth outdoor during play. Violence and sport injuries were most frequent cause of injury in adolescents. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172026

  10. Incidence and functional evolution of traumatic injuries of the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Alberto Trinidad Ovalle

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and functional outcome of traumatic injuries of the spine in the period from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013, at the General Hospital "Dr. Rafael Pascacio Gamboa", state of Chiapas, México. METHODS: A retrospective, cross-sectional, descriptive, observational study, where all patients seeking medical and surgical care in the emergency department and inpatient unit for a traumatic spinal injury were included, regardless of age or sex. RESULTS: A sample of 60 patients, of whom 43 were male (71.7% and 17 females (28.3%, with an average age of 35 was obtained. As for the cause of the injury, falls were the leading cause (61.7% followed by motor vehicle accidents (35% and finally, assaults (3.3%. In this sample, 21% had associated injuries being the most common (7.3% the thoracic trauma. The most common site of injury was the thoracic spine, followed by the lower cervical and finally the thoracolumbar ones. We found that 70% of patients had partial or complete neurological injury, with complete spinal cord transection (Frankel A being the most frequent lesion in 53%. CONCLUSION: The incidence in our series is similar that the reported in developing countries which have sociocultural problems similar to ours. The same applies to the etiology of these lesions, which is closely linked to social and economic activity in each country or region.

  11. Volumetric analysis of day of injury computed tomography is associated with rehabilitation outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majercik, Sarah; Bledsoe, Joseph; Ryser, David; Hopkins, Ramona O; Fair, Joseph E; Brock Frost, R; MacDonald, Joel; Barrett, Ryan; Horn, Susan; Pisani, David; Bigler, Erin D; Gardner, Scott; Stevens, Mark; Larson, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Day-of-injury (DOI) brain lesion volumes in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients are rarely used to predict long-term outcomes in the acute setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between acute brain injury lesion volume and rehabilitation outcomes in patients with TBI at a level one trauma center. Patients with TBI who were admitted to our rehabilitation unit after the acute care trauma service from February 2009-July 2011 were eligible for the study. Demographic data and outcome variables including cognitive and motor Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores, length of stay (LOS) in the rehabilitation unit, and ability to return to home were obtained. The DOI quantitative injury lesion volumes and degree of midline shift were obtained from DOI brain computed tomography scans. A multiple stepwise regression model including 13 independent variables was created. This model was used to predict postrehabilitation outcomes, including FIM scores and ability to return to home. A p value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Ninety-six patients were enrolled in the study. Mean age was 43 ± 21 years, admission Glasgow Coma Score was 8.4 ± 4.8, Injury Severity Score was 24.7 ± 9.9, and head Abbreviated Injury Scale score was 3.73 ± 0.97. Acute hospital LOS was 12.3 ± 8.9 days, and rehabilitation LOS was 15.9 ± 9.3 days. Day-of-injury TBI lesion volumes were inversely associated with cognitive FIM scores at rehabilitation admission (p = 0.004) and discharge (p = 0.004) and inversely associated with ability to be discharged to home after rehabilitation (p = 0.006). In a cohort of patients with moderate to severe TBI requiring a rehabilitation unit stay after the acute care hospital stay, DOI brain injury lesion volumes are associated with worse cognitive FIM scores at the time of rehabilitation admission and discharge. Smaller-injury volumes were associated with eventual discharge to home. Volumetric neuroimaging in the acute

  12. Atypical Presentation of Traumatic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fu Wah Ho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blunt thoracic aorta injury (BAI is second only to head injury as cause of mortality in blunt trauma. While most patients do not survive till arrival at the hospital, for the remainder, prompt diagnosis and treatment greatly improve outcomes. We report an atypical presentation of BAI, highlighting the diagnostic challenges of this condition in the emergency department. Case Presentation. A previously well 25-year-old male presented 15 hours after injury hemodynamically stable with delirium. There were no signs or symptoms suggestive of BAI. Sonography showed small bilateral pleural effusions. Chest radiograph showed a normal mediastinum. Eventually, CT demonstrated a contained distal aortic arch disruption. The patient underwent percutaneous endovascular thoracic aortic repair and recovered well. Conclusion. This catastrophic lesion may present with few reliable signs and symptoms; hence, a high index of suspicion is crucial for early diagnosis and definitive surgical management. This paper discusses the diagnostic utility of clinical features, injury mechanism, and radiographic modalities. Consideration of mechanism of injury, clinical features, and chest radiograph findings should prompt advanced chest imaging.

  13. Primary traumatic patellar dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Chun-Hao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute traumatic patellar dislocation is a common injury in the active and young adult populations. MRI of the knee is recommended in all patients who present with acute patellar dislocation. Numerous operative and non-operative methods have been described to treat the injuries; however, the ideal management of the acute traumatic patellar dislocation in young adults is still in debate. This article is intended to review the studies to the subjects of epidemiology, initial examination and management.

  14. Sleep-wake disorders persist 18 months after traumatic brain injury but remain underrecognized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbach, Lukas L; Büchele, Fabian; Valko, Philipp O; Li, Tongzhou; Maric, Angelina; Stover, John F; Bassetti, Claudio L; Mica, Ladislav; Werth, Esther; Baumann, Christian R

    2016-05-24

    This study is a prospective, controlled clinical and electrophysiologic trial examining the chronic course of posttraumatic sleep-wake disturbances (SWD). We screened 140 patients with acute, first-ever traumatic brain injury of any severity and included 60 patients for prospective follow-up examinations. Patients with prior brain trauma, other neurologic or systemic disease, drug abuse, or psychiatric comorbidities were excluded. Eighteen months after trauma, we performed detailed sleep assessment in 31 participants. As a control group, we enrolled healthy individuals without prior brain trauma matched for age, sex, and sleep satiation. In the chronic state after traumatic brain injury, sleep need per 24 hours was persistently increased in trauma patients (8.1 ± 0.5 hours) as compared to healthy controls (7.1 ± 0.7 hours). The prevalence of chronic objective excessive daytime sleepiness was 67% in patients with brain trauma compared to 19% in controls. Patients significantly underestimated excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep need, emphasizing the unreliability of self-assessments on SWD in trauma patients. This study provides prospective, controlled, and objective evidence for chronic persistence of posttraumatic SWD, which remain underestimated by patients. These results have clinical and medicolegal implications given that SWD can exacerbate other outcomes of traumatic brain injury, impair quality of life, and are associated with public safety hazards. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury Increases Cortical Glutamate Network Activity by Compromising GABAergic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, David; Walker, Kendall; Andresen, Lauren; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Hampton, David; Tesco, Giuseppina; Dulla, Chris G

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor for developing pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Although disruptions in brain circuitry are associated with TBI, the precise mechanisms by which brain injury leads to epileptiform network activity is unknown. Using controlled cortical impact (CCI) as a model of TBI, we examined how cortical excitability and glutamatergic signaling was altered following injury. We optically mapped cortical glutamate signaling using FRET-based glutamate biosensors, while simultaneously recording cortical field potentials in acute brain slices 2-4 weeks following CCI. Cortical electrical stimulation evoked polyphasic, epileptiform field potentials and disrupted the input-output relationship in deep layers of CCI-injured cortex. High-speed glutamate biosensor imaging showed that glutamate signaling was significantly increased in the injured cortex. Elevated glutamate responses correlated with epileptiform activity, were highest directly adjacent to the injury, and spread via deep cortical layers. Immunoreactivity for markers of GABAergic interneurons were significantly decreased throughout CCI cortex. Lastly, spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency decreased and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current increased after CCI injury. Our results suggest that specific cortical neuronal microcircuits may initiate and facilitate the spread of epileptiform activity following TBI. Increased glutamatergic signaling due to loss of GABAergic control may provide a mechanism by which TBI can give rise to post-traumatic epilepsy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Occupational injury surveillance of traumatic injuries in Illinois, using the Illinois trauma registry: 1995-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lee S; Forst, Linda

    2007-04-01

    Trauma registries continue to be underutilized for surveillance, despite providing data on the most severe injuries with a level of detail not available in national data sets or workers' compensation files. We evaluate trends and patterns of traumatic occupational injuries from the Illinois Trauma Registry (ITR). Between 1995 and 2003, 44.4 of every 100,000 Illinois workers (age-adjusted) suffered work-related, nonfatal traumatic injuries. The majority of workers suffering traumatic injuries were white males younger than 55 years old. Falls were the most common cause of injury, and fracture of the extremities was the most common type of injury experienced by Illinois workers. Approximately 8% of all workers required either partial or total ambulatory assistance at time of discharge. The ITR provides detailed and complete data regarding the most severe occupational injuries. In contrast to reports from national surveillance data sets, we do not observe a significant decline in occupational injuries between 1995 and 2003. Trauma registries should be used more frequently for surveillance programs, because they provide detailed and reliable data regarding the most severe occupational injuries not available in other data sets.

  17. Diuretics in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigwekar, Sagar U; Waikar, Sushrut S

    2011-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The incidence of AKI is increasing and despite clinical advances there has been little change in the outcomes associated with AKI. A variety of interventions, including loop diuretics, have been tested for the prevention and treatment of AKI; however, none to date have shown convincing benefits in clinical studies, and the management of AKI remains largely supportive. In this article, we review the pharmacology and experimental and clinical evidence for loop diuretics in the management of AKI. In addition, we also review evidence for other agents with diuretic and/or natriuretic properties such as thiazide diuretics, mannitol, fenoldopam, and natriuretic peptides in both the prevention and treatment of AKI. Implications for current clinical practice are outlined to guide clinical decisions in this field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Wallerian degeneration in the optic nerve stretch-injury model of traumatic brain injury: a stereological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, William L; Bartlett, Emma; Morgan, Hanna

    2015-06-01

    Patients with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) show loss of central white matter, central gray matter, and cortical gray matter with increasing post-traumatic survival. The majority of experimental studies using animals have, however, discussed only the ultrastructural pathophysiology of injured central white matter leading to secondary axotomy and the formation of axonal terminal bulbs. Using the stretch-injured optic nerve model in adult guinea pigs, the present study provides novel quantitative data concerning Wallerian degeneration of disconnected axonal fragments following secondary axotomy out to 12 weeks after injury to an optic nerve. The time course of Wallerian degeneration at the level of an individual nerve fiber is comparable to that reported in earlier studies over 48 h to two weeks after secondary axotomy. But only a relatively small proportion of nerve fibers within the optic tract degenerate via Wallerian degeneration during the first two weeks. Rather, examples of each of the three stages of Wallerian degeneration-acute axonal degeneration, latency of the distal axonal segment, and granular fragmentation-occur within the optic tract across the entire experimental survival of 12 weeks used in the present study. This data suggests that some nerve fibers initiate Wallerian degeneration days and weeks after the initial time of mechanical injury to an optic nerve. The number of intact nerve fibers continues to fall over at least three months after injury in the stretch-injury model of traumatic axonal injury. It is suggested that these novel findings relate to the mechanism(s) whereby central white matter volume decreases over months and years in CTE patients.

  19. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as a potential treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder associated with traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eve, David J; Steele, Martin R; Sanberg, Paul R; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) describes the presence of physical damage to the brain as a consequence of an insult and frequently possesses psychological and neurological symptoms depending on the severity of the injury. The recent increased military presence of US troops in Iraq and Afghanistan has coincided with greater use of improvised exploding devices, resulting in many returning soldiers suffering from some degree of TBI. A biphasic response is observed which is first directly injury-related, and second due to hypoxia, increased oxidative stress, and inflammation. A proportion of the returning soldiers also suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and in some cases, this may be a consequence of TBI. Effective treatments are still being identified, and a possible therapeutic candidate is hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). Some clinical trials have been performed which suggest benefits with regard to survival and disease severity of TBI and/or PTSD, while several other studies do not see any improvement compared to a possibly poorly controlled sham. HBOT has been shown to reduce apoptosis, upregulate growth factors, promote antioxidant levels, and inhibit inflammatory cytokines in animal models, and hence, it is likely that HBOT could be advantageous in treating at least the secondary phase of TBI and PTSD. There is some evidence of a putative prophylactic or preconditioning benefit of HBOT exposure in animal models of brain injury, and the optimal time frame for treatment is yet to be determined. HBOT has potential side effects such as acute cerebral toxicity and more reactive oxygen species with long-term use, and therefore, optimizing exposure duration to maximize the reward and decrease the detrimental effects of HBOT is necessary. This review provides a summary of the current understanding of HBOT as well as suggests future directions including prophylactic use and chronic treatment. PMID:27799776

  20. Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury: lessons from lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, A.; Ohtani, K.; Armonda, R.; Tomita, H.; Sakuma, A.; Mugikura, S.; Takayama, K.; Kushimoto, S.; Tominaga, T.

    2017-11-01

    Traumatic injury caused by explosive or blast events is traditionally divided into four mechanisms: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injury. The mechanisms of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) are biomechanically distinct and can be modeled in both in vivo and in vitro systems. The primary bTBI injury mechanism is associated with the response of brain tissue to the initial blast wave. Among the four mechanisms of bTBI, there is a remarkable lack of information regarding the mechanism of primary bTBI. On the other hand, 30 years of research on the medical application of shock waves (SWs) has given us insight into the mechanisms of tissue and cellular damage in bTBI, including both air-mediated and underwater SW sources. From a basic physics perspective, the typical blast wave consists of a lead SW followed by shock-accelerated flow. The resultant tissue injury includes several features observed in primary bTBI, such as hemorrhage, edema, pseudo-aneurysm formation, vasoconstriction, and induction of apoptosis. These are well-described pathological findings within the SW literature. Acoustic impedance mismatch, penetration of tissue by shock/bubble interaction, geometry of the skull, shear stress, tensile stress, and subsequent cavitation formation are all important factors in determining the extent of SW-induced tissue and cellular injury. In addition, neuropsychiatric aspects of blast events need to be taken into account, as evidenced by reports of comorbidity and of some similar symptoms between physical injury resulting in bTBI and the psychiatric sequelae of post-traumatic stress. Research into blast injury biophysics is important to elucidate specific pathophysiologic mechanisms of blast injury, which enable accurate differential diagnosis, as well as development of effective treatments. Herein we describe the requirements for an adequate experimental setup when investigating blast-induced tissue and cellular injury; review SW physics

  1. Systems Biology, Neuroimaging, Neuropsychology, Neuroconnectivity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bigler, Erin D.

    2016-01-01

    The patient who sustains a traumatic brain injury (TBI) typically undergoes neuroimaging studies, usually in the form of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases the neuroimaging findings are clinically assessed with descriptive statements that provide qualitative information about the presence/absence of visually identifiable abnormalities; though little if any of the potential information in a scan is analyzed in any quantitative manner, except in researc...

  2. Traumatic brain injury: future assessment tools and treatment prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Flanagan, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Steven R Flanagan1, Joshua B Cantor2, Teresa A Ashman21New York University School of Medicine, The Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widespread and leads to death and disability in millions of individuals around the world each year. Overall incidence and prevalence of TBI are likely to increase in absolute terms in the future. Tackling the probl...

  3. Neuropsychology of Neuroendocrine Dysregulation after Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zihl, J.; Almeida, O.

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine dysfunction is a common effect of traumatic brain injury (TBI). In addition to affecting the regulation of important body functions, the disruption of endocrine physiology can significantly impair mental functions, such as attention, memory, executive function, and mood. This mini-review focuses on alterations in mental functioning that are associated with neuroendocrine disturbances in adults who suffered TBI. It summarizes the contribution of hormones to the regulation of mental f...

  4. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Dynamic Simulated Shooting Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    USAARL Report No. 2016-16 Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Dynamic Simulated Shooting Performance By Ben Lawson1, Bethany Ranes1, Amanda... Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 The public reporting burden for this...collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT

  5. Oligodendrogenesis after Cerebral Ischaemia and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gang Zhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI damage white and grey matter. Loss of oligodendrocytes and their myelin, impairs axonal function. Remyelination involves oligodendrogenesis during which new myelinating oligodendrocytes are generated by differentiated oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. This article briefly reviews the processes of oligodendrogenesis in adult rodent brains, and promising experimental therapies targeting the neurovascular unit that reduce oligodendrocyte damage and amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis after stroke and TBI.

  6. Longitudinal Locomotor and Postural Control Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fino, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Millions of people sustain a mild traumatic brain injury (concussion) each year. While most clinical signs and symptoms resolve within 7-10 days for the majority of typical concussions, some gait and balance tasks have shown abnormalities lasting beyond the resolution of clinical symptoms. These abnormalities can persist after athletes have been medically cleared for competition, yet the implications of such changes are unclear. Most prior research has examined straight gait and standard meas...

  7. Treatment for Depression after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Fann, Jesse R.; Hart, Tessa; Schomer, Katherine G.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to critically evaluate the evidence on interventions for depression following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and provide recommendations for clinical practice and future research. We reviewed pharmacological, other biological, psychotherapeutic, and rehabilitation interventions for depression following TBI from the following data sources: PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ProQuest, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. We included studies written in English published...

  8. [International multicenter studies of treatment of severe traumatic brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talypov, A E; Kordonsky, A Yu; Krylov, V V

    2016-01-01

    Despite the introduction of new diagnostic and therapeutic methods, traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains one of the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Standards and recommendations on conservative and surgical treatment of TBI patients should be based on concepts and methods with proven efficacy. The authors present a review of studies of the treatment and surgery of severe TBI: DECRA, RESCUEicp, STITCH(TRAUMA), CRASH, CRASH-2, CAPTAIN, NABIS: H ll, Eurotherm 3235. Important recommendations of the international group IMPACT are considered.

  9. Antifibrinolytic drugs for acute traumatic injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    methods for independent data screening and eligibility assessment, data extraction and risk ofbias evaluation were followed. Results. Three randomised controlled trials were inclu ded, of which two (n=20 451) assessed the effect of TXA. The Clinical Randomisation of an Antifibrinolytic in Significant Haemorrhage.

  10. Psychiatric sequelae of traumatic brain injury: Retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information obtained included the sociodemographic characteristics, type of injury, durations of unconsciousness (LOC) and posttraumatic amnesia (PTA), psychiatric and psychoactive substance use history. Psychiatric diagnosis was based on the criteria of the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases ...

  11. Traumatic spinal cord injury in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronarski, J.; Wozniak, E.

    1993-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries in tetraplegics were briefly discussed on the basis of MR imaging. It was found that severe cervical spine trauma usually results in concussion - the complete transection of the cord is rare. A case of 19 years old male with total cord transection confirmed by MR imaging is described. (author)

  12. TRAUMATIC INJURIES TO THE TEETII OF CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diagnos:s and treatment certain skills are required for the practitioner ... for children, and in particular as it relates to the dental injuries. This paper will be limited to the hard tissues and their traumata, and only a few aspects of soft tissue traumata will ... can be expected to sustain a trauma before leaving school at the age of ...

  13. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Pocket Guide (CONUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    gastrointestinal ( GERD /GI) dysfunction Assessment and Treatment Appetite Changes Nausea history `y Pre-injury causes of appetite issues `y Define triggers and...Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue (MAF) http://www.son.washington.edu/ research /maf Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) http...y The DVBIC Regional Care Coordinator (RCC) Program is a network of professionals ( nurses , social workers, counselors) specializing in TBI who

  14. The emergence of artistic ability following traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Midorikawa, Akira; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the case of a patient who developed artistic ability following a traumatic brain injury is reported. The subject was a 49-year-old male who suffered brain injury at the age of 44 due to an accidental fall. At age 48, he began drawing with great enthusiasm and quickly developed a personal style with his own biomorphic iconography. At first, his drawing was restricted to realistic reproductions of photographs of buildings, but his style of drawing changed and became more personal...

  15. Risk Adjustment In Neurocritical care (RAIN)--prospective validation of risk prediction models for adult patients with acute traumatic brain injury to use to evaluate the optimum location and comparative costs of neurocritical care: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D A; Prabhu, G; Grieve, R; Harvey, S E; Sadique, M Z; Gomes, M; Griggs, K A; Walmsley, E; Smith, M; Yeoman, P; Lecky, F E; Hutchinson, P J A; Menon, D K; Rowan, K M

    2013-06-01

    To validate risk prediction models for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to use the best model to evaluate the optimum location and comparative costs of neurocritical care in the NHS. Cohort study. Sixty-seven adult critical care units. Adult patients admitted to critical care following actual/suspected TBI with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of traffic accidents (RTAs) (33%), falls (47%) and assault (12%). Patients were predominantly young (mean age 45 years overall) and male (76% overall). Six-month mortality was 22% for RTAs, 32% for falls and 17% for assault. Of survivors at 6 months with a known GOSE category, 44% had severe disability, 30% moderate disability and 26% made a good recovery. Overall, 61% of patients with known outcome had an unfavourable outcome (death or severe disability) at 6 months. Between 35% and 70% of survivors reported problems across the five domains of the EQ-5D-3L. Of the 10 risk models selected for validation, the best discrimination overall was from the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI Lab model (IMPACT) (c-index 0.779 for mortality, 0.713 for unfavourable outcome). The model was well calibrated for 6-month mortality but substantially underpredicted the risk of unfavourable outcome at 6 months. Baseline patient characteristics were similar between dedicated neurocritical care units and combined neuro/general critical care units. In lifetime cost-effectiveness analysis, dedicated neurocritical care units had higher mean lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) at small additional mean costs with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of £14,000 per QALY and incremental net monetary benefit (INB) of £17,000. The cost-effectiveness acceptability curve suggested that the probability that dedicated compared with combined neurocritical care units are cost-effective is around 60%. There were substantial differences in case mix between the 'early' (within 18 hours of

  16. Executive dysfunction in psychosis following traumatic brain injury (PFTBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, Rachel; Francis, Andrew; Thomas, Neil; Hopwood, Malcolm; Ponsford, Jennie; Johnston, Lisa; Rossell, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Executive dysfunction is well established in patients with traumatic brain injury and in schizophrenia (SCZ). However, assessments of executive function in psychosis following traumatic brain injury (PFTBI) are limited and inconsistent, and often do not reflect the deficits demonstrated in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) or SCZ. We sought to determine the extent of executive dysfunction in PFTBI relative to three comparison cohorts. Measures of executive function were administered to dually diagnosed patients with PFTBI (n = 10) including tests of mental inhibition and switching, processing speed, and attention: the Stroop Task, Trail Making Test (TMT), and the Attention subtest of the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS). Demographically comparable patients with TBI (n = 10), SCZ (n = 23), and healthy controls (n = 23) underwent an identical battery. Significant executive dysfunction was evident in patients with PFTBI on all measures. Relative to all three comparison cohorts patients with PFTBI performed most poorly. These data present novel evidence of substantially impaired executive function across four task types in PFTBI and suggest that TBI and psychosis have an additive influence on executive function deficits. Treatment programs requiring substantial executive engagement are not suitable for patients dually diagnosed with PFTBI.

  17. Emerging pharmacological agents to improve survival from traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosevich, John J; Patanwala, Asad E; Erstad, Brian L

    2013-01-01

    To review emerging pharmacological agents for the treatment of traumatic brain injury with regard to survival outcomes and provide recommendations regarding their use. An Ovid MEDLINE (up to May 2013) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (up to May 2013) search was conducted to identify emerging pharmacological therapies for the treatment of traumatic brain injury. The search was limited to English language and humans. Pharmacological agents that were evaluated with respect to survival as an outcome were included. Based on the search, the investigators identified the following new therapies: beta-receptor antagonists, erythropoiesis stimulating agents, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and progesterone. With the exception of progesterone, which was studied in several small, randomized, controlled trials, the remaining agents were primarily studied in observational retrospective cohorts. For each of the agents identified, a potential increase in survival was noted. Emerging pharmacological agents represent promising treatment options for traumatic brain injury to improve survival. Most of these agents are commercially available for other indications. However, limitations in study design, sample size, duration of treatment, timing of treatment and inclusion of heterogeneous patient populations make it difficult to draw definitive conclusions from the literature.

  18. Sleep deprivation does not affect neuronal susceptibility to mild traumatic brain injury in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caron AM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aimee M Caron, Richard Stephenson Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Mild and moderate traumatic brain injuries (TBIs (and concussion occur frequently as a result of falls, automobile accidents, and sporting activities, and are a major cause of acute and chronic disability. Fatigue and excessive sleepiness are associated with increased risk of accidents, but it is unknown whether prior sleep debt also affects the pathophysiological outcome of concussive injury. Using the “dark neuron” (DN as a marker of reversible neuronal damage, we tested the hypothesis that acute (48 hours total sleep deprivation (TSD and chronic sleep restriction (CSR; 10 days, 6-hour sleep/day affect DN formation following mild TBI in the rat. TSD and CSR were administered using a walking wheel apparatus. Mild TBI was administered under anesthesia using a weight-drop impact model, and the acute neuronal response was observed without recovery. DNs were detected using standard bright-field microscopy with toluidine blue stain following appropriate tissue fixation. DN density was low under home cage and sleep deprivation control conditions (respective median DN densities, 0.14% and 0.22% of neurons, and this was unaffected by TSD alone (0.1%. Mild TBI caused significantly higher DN densities (0.76%, and this was unchanged by preexisting acute or chronic sleep debt (TSD, 0.23%; CSR, 0.7%. Thus, although sleep debt may be predicted to increase the incidence of concussive injury, the present data suggest that sleep debt does not exacerbate the resulting neuronal damage. Keywords: sleep deprivation, concussion, traumatic brain injury, dark neuron, neurodegeneration, rat cortex

  19. Isolated traumatic head injury in children: Analysis of 276 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahloul Mabrouk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : To determine predictive factors of mortality among children after isolated traumatic brain injury. Materials and Methods : In this retrospective study, we included all consecutive children with isolated traumatic brain injury admitted to the 22-bed intensive care unit (ICU of Habib Bourguiba University Hospital (Sfax, Tunisia. Basic demographic, clinical, biochemical, and radiological data were recorded on admission and during ICU stay. Results : There were 276 patients with 196 boys (71% and 80 girls, with a mean age of 6.7 ± 3.8 years. The main cause of trauma was road traffic accident (58.3%. Mean Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 ± 2, Mean Injury Severity Score (ISS was 23.3 ± 5.9, Mean Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS was 4.8 ± 2.3, and Mean Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM was 10.8 ± 8. A total of 259 children required mechanical ventilation. Forty-eight children (17.4% died. Multivariate analysis showed that factors associated with a poor prognosis were PRISM > 24 (OR: 10.98, neurovegetative disorder (OR: 7.1, meningeal hemorrhage (OR: 2.74, and lesion type VI according to Marshall tomographic grading (OR: 13.26. Conclusion : In Tunisia, head injury is a frequent cause of hospital admission and is most often due to road traffic injuries. Short-term prognosis is influenced by demographic, clinical, radiological, and biochemical factors. The need to put preventive measures in place is underscored.

  20. Minocycline Transiently Reduces Microglia/Macrophage Activation but Exacerbates Cognitive Deficits Following Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury in the Neonatal Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Lauren A.; Huh, Jimmy W.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated microglial/macrophage-associated biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of infant victims of abusive head trauma (AHT) suggest that these cells play a role in the pathophysiology of the injury. In a model of AHT in 11-day-old rats, 3 impacts (24 hours apart) resulted in spatial learning and memory deficits and increased brain microglial/macrophage reactivity, traumatic axonal injury, neuronal degeneration, and cortical and white-matter atrophy. The antibiotic minocycline has been effective in decreasing injury-induced microglial/macrophage activation while simultaneously attenuating cellular and functional deficits in models of neonatal hypoxic ischemia, but the potential for this compound to rescue deficits after impact-based trauma to the immature brain remains unexplored. Acute minocycline administration in this model of AHT decreased microglial/macrophage reactivity in the corpus callosum of brain-injured animals at 3 days postinjury, but this effect was lost by 7 days postinjury. Additionally, minocycline treatment had no effect on traumatic axonal injury, neurodegeneration, tissue atrophy, or spatial learning deficits. Interestingly, minocycline-treated animals demonstrated exacerbated injury-induced spatial memory deficits. These results contrast with previous findings in other models of brain injury and suggest that minocycline is ineffective in reducing microglial/macrophage activation and ameliorating injury-induced deficits following repetitive neonatal traumatic brain injury. PMID:26825312

  1. Side effects of steroid use in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Del Toro Aguayo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Indicate and identify potential complications in our unit associated with the use of steroids in patients over 16 years of age with traumatic acute spinal cord injury managed with NASCIS II, III scheme compared with patients with the same characteristics who did not receive this management. METHODS: To conduct a research study with reports of cases and controls in patients over 16 years of age and with an established diagnosis of acute spinal cord injury, treated definitively in our unit, performing the comparison of evolutionary process between those treated with steroids and those who were not, based on the development of a data collection sheet with several variables.. The results were encoded, tabulated and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 30 patients were analyzed from January to December 2012 and it was found that 16% of the patients managed with the steroid scheme required admission to the intensive care unit, 40% developed hospital-acquired pneumonia, 17% had urinary tract infection, 3% progressed to respiratory failure and 20% of this group had gastrointestinal bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that steroid management is not a risk-free therapy and the recommendation is to make a direct assessment of the potential benefit to its use in relation to the possible complications that can ensue before choosing this option in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury.

  2. The Community Integration Questionnaire: factor structure across racial/ethnic groups in persons with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequerica, Anthony H; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D; Sander, Angelle M; Pappadis, Monique R; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos; Hart, Tessa; Baños, James H; Marquez De La Plata, Carlos D; Hammond, Flora M; Sherman, Tanya E

    2013-01-01

    To examine the factor structure and construct validity of the Community Integration Questionnaire, a widely used measure of community participation among individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI), among 3 racial/ethnic groups. Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Enrollment in acute inpatient TBI rehabilitation with follow-up at 1 year after injury. A total of 1756 persons with TBI enrolled in the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) national Database. Community Integration Questionnaire at 1 year after injury. The goodness of fit for the factor structure of the Community Integration Questionnaire, separating items into Home Competency, Social Integration, and Productive Activity, was satisfactory for whites but not for blacks or Hispanics. Clinicians and researchers should take race/ethnicity into account when utilizing measures of community integration.

  3. [Childhood traumatization, dissociation and nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior in borderline personality disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merza, Katalin; Harmatta, János; Papp, Gábor; Kuritárné Szabó, Ildikó

    2017-05-01

    Childhood traumatization plays a significant role in the etiology of borderline personality disorder. Studies found a significant association between childhood traumatization, dissociation, and nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior. The aim of our study was to assess dissociation and nonsuicidal self-injury among borderline inpatients and to reveal the association between childhood traumatization, dissociation, and self-injurious behavior. The sample consisted of 80 borderline inpatients and 73 depressed control patients. Childhood traumatization, dissociation and self-injurious behavior were assessed by questionnaires. Borderline patients reported severe and multiplex childhood traumatization. Cumulative trauma score and sexual abuse were the strongest predictors of dissociation. Furthermore, we have found that cumulative trauma score and dissociation were highly predictive of self-injurious behavior. Our results suggest that self-injurious behavior and dissociation in borderline patients can be regarded as indicators of childhood traumatization. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(19): 740-747.

  4. Evaluation and Treatment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: The Role of Neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Carolyn; Bruhns, Maya E

    2017-08-17

    Awareness of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and persisting post-concussive syndrome (PCS) has increased substantially in the past few decades, with a corresponding increase in research on diagnosis, management, and treatment of patients with mTBI. The purpose of this article is to provide a narrative review of the current literature on behavioral assessment and management of patients presenting with mTBI/PCS, and to detail the potential role of neuropsychologists and rehabilitation psychologists in interdisciplinary care for this population during the acute, subacute, and chronic phases of recovery.

  5. The role of free radicals in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Karen M; Littleton-Kearney, Marguerite T

    2013-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of death and disability in both the civilian and the military populations. The primary impact causes initial tissue damage, which initiates biochemical cascades, known as secondary injury, that expand the damage. Free radicals are implicated as major contributors to the secondary injury. Our review of recent rodent and human research reveals the prominent role of the free radicals superoxide anion, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite in secondary brain injury. Much of our current knowledge is based on rodent studies, and the authors identified a gap in the translation of findings from rodent to human TBI. Rodent models are an effective method for elucidating specific mechanisms of free radical-induced injury at the cellular level in a well-controlled environment. However, human TBI does not occur in a vacuum, and variables controlled in the laboratory may affect the injury progression. Additionally, multiple experimental TBI models are accepted in rodent research, and no one model fully reproduces the heterogeneous injury seen in humans. Free radical levels are measured indirectly in human studies based on assumptions from the findings from rodent studies that use direct free radical measurements. Further study in humans should be directed toward large samples to validate the findings in rodent studies. Data obtained from these studies may lead to more targeted treatment to interrupt the secondary injury cascades.

  6. Reducing Secondary Insults in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 24 Jun 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Journal...transport, intracranial pressure, monitoring, hypoxia, hypotension 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF...of productivity8 Previous studies suggest that secondary insults such as hypoxia and hypotension may worsen a brain injury.9-’ 9 Recent recognition

  7. Cell Delivery System for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-21

    Injury Using Novel Matrices and Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells.” 4th Annual Los Angeles Tissue Engineering Meeting, UCLA Dec. 2006. (c) Presentations...Task 1). Task 1: Differentiate Adult Stem Cells into Neurons. Each of three different adult stem cell types (ADSCs, MSCs and amniotic -derived...gel properties. Evaluate gel material properties such as liquid to gel transition temperature, fiber and pore sizes, mechanical strength, resistance

  8. Integrating Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Data into the Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research Informatics Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Research Informatics Systems PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cynthia Harrison-Felix, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Craig Hospital Englewood, CO 80113...Traumatic Brain Injury Research Informatics Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0564 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Research (FITBIR) Informatics System. Local IRB approval and HRPO approval has been obtained for the TBI Model System (TBIMS) National Data and

  9. Specificity of Cognitive and Behavioral Complaints in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Pineau, H?l?ne; Marchand, Andr?; Guay, St?phane

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of cognitive and behavioral complaints is explored in Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) samples according to the severity of PTSD, depression and general anxiety conditions. Self-reported questionnaires on cognitive and behavioral changes are administered to PTSD, MTBI, MTBI/PTSD and control groups. Confounding variables are controlled. All groups report more complaints since the traumatic event. PTSD and MTBI/PTSD groups report more...

  10. Facet joint injuries in acute cervical spine trauma : evaluation with CT and MRI

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    Ha, Jeon Ju; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hwa; Lee, Keon; Kwon, Hyeok Po; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Yun, Seong Mun [Dongkang General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-05-01

    To evaluate injury patterns of facet joints and associated soft tissue injuries in patients with acute traumatic cervical facet joint injuries. From among patients with cervical spine trauma, 27 with facet joint injuries, as seen on CT and MRI, were chosen for this study. CT scans were analyzed with regard to the location of facet joint injury, the presence or absence of facet dislocation or fracture, and other associated fractures. MR images were analyzed with regard to ligament injury, intervertebral disc injury, intervertebral disc herniation, and spinal cord injury. The most common location of facet joint injury was C6-7 level(n=10), followed by C5-6(n=8). Among these 27 patients with facet joint injuries, 12(44%) had bilateral injuries and 15(56%) unilateral injuries. Facet fractures were present in 17 cases(63%) and the fracture of inferior facet was more frequent than superior. Patterns of fracture were vertical, transverse, or comminuted, but vertical fracture was the most common. Various degrees of dislocation were observed in patients with facet fractures. Fractures other than facet included pillar(n=11), lamina(n=6), transverse process(n=14), body(n=13), and spinous process(n=3). On MR images, anterior longitudinal ligament injury was found in 8 patients(30%), posterior longitudinal ligament injury in 4(15%), and interspinous ligament injury in 20(74%). Twelve patients(44%) had spinal cord injuries including edema(n=8) and hemorrhage(n=4). Among patients with disc abnormalities, 11(41%) had intervertebral disc injuries, and traumatic disc herniations were found in nine. Traumatic cervical facet joint injuries were manifested as various patterns and frequently associated with other fractures or soft tissue injuries. Analysis of CT and MR findings of these injury patterns helped formulate a therapeutic plan and determine of prognosis.

  11. Facet joint injuries in acute cervical spine trauma : evaluation with CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jeon Ju; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hwa; Lee, Keon; Kwon, Hyeok Po; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Yun, Seong Mun

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate injury patterns of facet joints and associated soft tissue injuries in patients with acute traumatic cervical facet joint injuries. From among patients with cervical spine trauma, 27 with facet joint injuries, as seen on CT and MRI, were chosen for this study. CT scans were analyzed with regard to the location of facet joint injury, the presence or absence of facet dislocation or fracture, and other associated fractures. MR images were analyzed with regard to ligament injury, intervertebral disc injury, intervertebral disc herniation, and spinal cord injury. The most common location of facet joint injury was C6-7 level(n=10), followed by C5-6(n=8). Among these 27 patients with facet joint injuries, 12(44%) had bilateral injuries and 15(56%) unilateral injuries. Facet fractures were present in 17 cases(63%) and the fracture of inferior facet was more frequent than superior. Patterns of fracture were vertical, transverse, or comminuted, but vertical fracture was the most common. Various degrees of dislocation were observed in patients with facet fractures. Fractures other than facet included pillar(n=11), lamina(n=6), transverse process(n=14), body(n=13), and spinous process(n=3). On MR images, anterior longitudinal ligament injury was found in 8 patients(30%), posterior longitudinal ligament injury in 4(15%), and interspinous ligament injury in 20(74%). Twelve patients(44%) had spinal cord injuries including edema(n=8) and hemorrhage(n=4). Among patients with disc abnormalities, 11(41%) had intervertebral disc injuries, and traumatic disc herniations were found in nine. Traumatic cervical facet joint injuries were manifested as various patterns and frequently associated with other fractures or soft tissue injuries. Analysis of CT and MR findings of these injury patterns helped formulate a therapeutic plan and determine of prognosis

  12. Pituitary insufficiency following traumatic thoracic injury in an adolescent male patient

    OpenAIRE

    Gilis-Januszewska, Aleksandra; Kluczyński, Łukasz; Wilusz, Małgorzata; Pantofliński, Jacek; Turek-Jabrocka, Renata; Pach, Dorota; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Traumatic thoracic injuries in adolescents are rare but could be connected with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and development of chronic hypopituitarism. Early recognition of these endocrine problems is a significant challenge to clinicians. We present difficulties in diagnosis of hypothalamic-pituitary insufficiency following traumatic thoracic injury in adolescence. We also review the literature of similar cases. Patient concerns: We present a case of a 24-years-old mal...

  13. Systematic review of depression in mild traumatic brain injury: study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Lepage, Chris; Yuan, Tina; Leon, Stephanie; Marshall, Shawn; Labelle, Patrick; Ferland, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Of the over 1 million reported cases of traumatic brain injuries reported annually in the USA, a sizeable proportion are characterized as mild. Although it is generally well-accepted that most people who suffer a mild traumatic brain injury recover within 1 to 3?months, a proportion of individuals continue to experience physiological, psychological, and emotional symptoms beyond the expected window of recovery. Depression is commonly reported following mild traumatic brain injury; ...

  14. Injury timing alters metabolic, inflammatory and functional outcomes following repeated mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Zachary M; Gaier, Kristopher R; Karelina, Kate

    2014-10-01

    Repeated head injuries are a major public health concern both for athletes, and members of the police and armed forces. There is ample experimental and clinical evidence that there is a period of enhanced vulnerability to subsequent injury following head trauma. Injuries that occur close together in time produce greater cognitive, histological, and behavioral impairments than do injuries separated by a longer period. Traumatic brain injuries alter cerebral glucose metabolism and the resolution of altered glucose metabolism may signal the end of the period of greater vulnerability. Here, we injured mice either once or twice separated by three or 20days. Repeated injuries that were separated by three days were associated with greater axonal degeneration, enhanced inflammatory responses, and poorer performance in a spatial learning and memory task. A single injury induced a transient but marked increase in local cerebral glucose utilization in the injured hippocampus and sensorimotor cortex, whereas a second injury, three days after the first, failed to induce an increase in glucose utilization at the same time point. In contrast, when the second injury occurred substantially later (20days after the first injury), an increase in glucose utilization occurred that paralleled the increase observed following a single injury. The increased glucose utilization observed after a single injury appears to be an adaptive component of recovery, while mice with 2 injuries separated by three days were not able to mount this response, thus this second injury may have produced a significant energetic crisis such that energetic demands outstripped the ability of the damaged cells to utilize energy. These data strongly reinforce the idea that too rapid return to activity after a traumatic brain injury can induce permanent damage and disability, and that monitoring cerebral energy utilization may be a tool to determine when it is safe to return to the activity that caused the initial

  15. Social Competence at Two Years after Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vicki; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Yeates, Keith Owen; Crossley, Louise; Ryan, Nicholas; Hearps, Stephen J C; Catroppa, Cathy

    2017-07-15

    Children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at risk for social impairment, but research has yet to document the trajectory of these skills post-injury and factors that may predict social problems. This study addressed these gaps in knowledge, reporting on findings from a prospective, longitudinal follow-up study that investigated social outcomes post-injury and explored factors contributing to these outcomes at two years post-injury. The sample included 113 children, 74 with TBI and 39 typically developing (TD) controls. TBI participants were recruited on presentation to the hospital. Parents rated pre-injury function at that time, and all children underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants were followed up at two years post-injury. Outcomes were social adjustment, social participation, social relationships, and social cognition. Predictors of social outcomes examined included brain lesion characteristics, child cognition (6 months post-TBI), and behavior and environmental factors (pre-injury and two years). Reduced social adjustment (p = 0.011) and social participation (p Poor social adjustment was predicted by externalizing behavior problems and younger age at injury. Reduced social participation was linked to internalizing behavior problems. Greater lesion volume, lower socioeconomic status, and family burden contributed to poorer social relationships, whereas age at injury predicted social cognition. Within the TBI group, 23% of children exhibited social impairments. Younger age at injury, greater pre-injury, and current behavior problems and family dysfunction, and poorer intelligence quotient (IQ), processing speed, and empathy were linked to impairment. Further follow-up is required to track social recovery and the influences of cognition, brain, and environment over time.

  16. Current pre-hospital traumatic brain injury management in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Kou; Hou, Xiang-yu; Sun, Jian-dong; Chu, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with most trauma-related deaths. Secondary brain injury is the leading cause of in-hospital deaths after traumatic brain injury. By early prevention and slowing of the initial pathophysiological mechanism of secondary brain injury, pre-hospital service can significantly reduce case-fatality rates of TBI. In China, the incidence of TBI is increasing and the proportion of severe TBI is much higher than that in other countries. The objective of this paper is to review the pre-hospital management of TBI in China. DATA SOURCES: A literature search was conducted in January 2014 using the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). Articles on the assessment and treatment of TBI in pre-hospital settings practiced by Chinese doctors were identified. The information on the assessment and treatment of hypoxemia, hypotension, and brain herniation was extracted from the identified articles. RESULTS: Of the 471 articles identified, 65 met the selection criteria. The existing literature indicated that current practices of pre-hospital TBI management in China were sub-optimal and varied considerably across different regions. CONCLUSION: Since pre-hospital care is the weakest part of Chinese emergency care, appropriate training programs on pre-hospital TBI management are urgently needed in China. PMID:25548596

  17. The Impact of Traumatic Brain Injury on the Aging Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacob S; Hobbs, Jonathan G; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has come to the forefront of both the scientific and popular culture. Specifically, sports-related concussions or mild TBI (mTBI) has become the center of scientific scrutiny with a large amount of research focusing on the long-term sequela of this type of injury. As the populace continues to age, the impact of TBI on the aging brain will become clearer. Currently, reports have come to light that link TBI to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as certain psychiatric diseases. Whether these associations are causations, however, is yet to be determined. Other long-term sequelae, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), appear to be associated with repetitive injuries. Going forward, as we gain better understanding of the pathophysiological process involved in TBI and subclinical head traumas, and individual traits that influence susceptibility to neurocognitive diseases, a clearer, more comprehensive understanding of the connection between brain injury and resultant disease processes in the aging brain will become evident.

  18. A review of glutamate's role in traumatic brain injury mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Cameron H.

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter used by the central nervous system (CNS) for synaptic communication, and its extracellular concentration is tightly regulated by glutamate transporters located on nearby astrocytes. Both animal models and human clinical studies have demonstrated elevated glutamate levels immediately following a traumatic brain event, with the duration and severity of the rise corresponding to prognosis. This rise in extracellular glutamate likely results from a combination of excessive neurotransmitter release from damaged neurons and down regulation of uptake mechanisms in local astrocytes. The immediate results of a traumatic event can lead to necrotic tissue in severely injured regions, while prolonged increases in excitatory transmission can cause secondary excitotoxic injury through activation of delayed apoptotic pathways. Initial TBI animal studies utilized a variety of broad glutamate receptor antagonists to successfully combat secondary injury mechanisms, but unfortunately this same strategy has proven inconclusive in subsequent human trials due to deleterious side effects and heterogeneity of injuries. More recent treatment strategies have utilized specific glutamate receptor subunit antagonists in an effort to minimize side effects and have shown promising results. Future challenges will be detecting the concentration and kinetics of the glutamate rise following injury, determining which patient populations could benefit from antagonist treatment based on their extracellular glutamate concentrations and when drugs should be administered to maximize efficacy.

  19. Sleep deprivation does not affect neuronal susceptibility to mild traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Aimee M; Stephenson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mild and moderate traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) (and concussion) occur frequently as a result of falls, automobile accidents, and sporting activities, and are a major cause of acute and chronic disability. Fatigue and excessive sleepiness are associated with increased risk of accidents, but it is unknown whether prior sleep debt also affects the pathophysiological outcome of concussive injury. Using the "dark neuron" (DN) as a marker of reversible neuronal damage, we tested the hypothesis that acute (48 hours) total sleep deprivation (TSD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR; 10 days, 6-hour sleep/day) affect DN formation following mild TBI in the rat. TSD and CSR were administered using a walking wheel apparatus. Mild TBI was administered under anesthesia using a weight-drop impact model, and the acute neuronal response was observed without recovery. DNs were detected using standard bright-field microscopy with toluidine blue stain following appropriate tissue fixation. DN density was low under home cage and sleep deprivation control conditions (respective median DN densities, 0.14% and 0.22% of neurons), and this was unaffected by TSD alone (0.1%). Mild TBI caused significantly higher DN densities (0.76%), and this was unchanged by preexisting acute or chronic sleep debt (TSD, 0.23%; CSR, 0.7%). Thus, although sleep debt may be predicted to increase the incidence of concussive injury, the present data suggest that sleep debt does not exacerbate the resulting neuronal damage.

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for treating acute surgical and traumatic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskes, Anne; Vermeulen, Hester; Lucas, Cees; Ubbink, Dirk T

    2013-12-16

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is used as a treatment for acute wounds (such as those arising from surgery and trauma). However, the effects of HBOT on wound healing are unclear.  To determine the effects of HBOT on the healing of acute surgical and traumatic wounds. We searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 9 August 2013); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 12); Ovid MEDLINE (2010 to July Week 5 2013); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, August 08, 2013); Ovid EMBASE (2010 to 2013 Week 31); EBSCO CINAHL (2010 to 8 August 2013). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing HBOT with other interventions such as dressings, steroids, or sham HOBT or comparisons between alternative HBOT regimens. Two review authors conducted selection of trials, risk of bias assessment, data extraction and data synthesis independently. Any disagreements were referred to a third review author.  Four trials involving 229 participants were included. The studies were clinically heterogeneous, which precluded a meta-analysis.One trial (48 participants with burn wounds undergoing split skin grafts) compared HBOT with usual care and reported a significantly higher complete graft survival associated with HBOT (95% healthy graft area risk ratio (RR) 3.50; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35 to 9.11). A second trial (10 participants in free flap surgery) reported no significant difference between graft survival (no data available). A third trial (36 participants with crush injuries) reported significantly more wounds healed (RR 1.70; 95% CI 1.11 to 2.61), and significantly less tissue necrosis (RR 0.13; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.90) with HBOT compared to sham HBOT. The fourth trial (135 people undergoing flap grafting) reported no significant differences in complete graft survival with HBOT compared with dexamethasone (RR 1.14; 95% CI 0.95 to 1.38) or heparin (RR 1.21; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.49).Many

  1. Repeat neuroimaging of mild traumatic brain-injured patients with acute traumatic intracranial hemorrhage: clinical outcomes and radiographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitzer, Natalie; Lyons, Michael S; Hart, Kim; Lindsell, Cristopher J; Chung, Sora; Yick, Andrew; Bonomo, Jordan

    2014-10-01

    Emergency department (ED) management of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with any form of traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is variable. Since 2000, our center's standard practice has been to obtain a repeat head computed tomography (CT) at least 6 hours after initial imaging. Patients are eligible for discharge if clinical and CT findings are stable. Whether this practice is safe is unknown. This study characterized clinical outcomes in mild TBI patients with acute traumatic ICH seen on initial ED neuroimaging. This retrospective cohort study included patients presenting to the ED with blunt mild TBI with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 14 or 15 and stable vital signs, during the period from January 2001 to January 2010. Patients with any ICH on initial head CT and repeat head CT within 24 hours were eligible. Cases were excluded for initial GCS 24 hours old, pregnancy, concomitant nonminor injuries, and coagulopathy. A single investigator abstracted data from records using a standardized case report form and data dictionary. Primary endpoints included death, neurosurgical procedures, and for discharged patients, return to the ED within 7 days. Differences in proportions were computed with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Of 1,011 patients who presented to the ED and had two head CTs within 24 hours, 323 (32%) met inclusion criteria. The median time between CT scans was 6 hours (interquartile range = 5 to 7 hours). A total of 153 (47%) patients had subarachnoid hemorrhage, 132 (41%) patients had subdural hemorrhage, 11 (3%) patients had epidural hemorrhage, 78 (24%) patients had cerebral contusions, and 59 (18%) patients had intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Four of 323 (1.2%, 95% CI = 0.3% to 3.2%) patients died within 2 weeks of injury. Three of the patients who died had been admitted from the ED on their initial visits, and one had been discharged home. There were 206 patients (64%) discharged from the ED, 28 (13.6%) of whom returned to the ED

  2. Blast-induced traumatic brain injury: a new trend of blast injury research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Wang, Zheng-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Blast injury has become the major life- and function-threatening injuries in recent warfares. There is increased research interest in the mental disorders caused by blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI), which has been proved as one of the "signature wounds" in modern battlefield. We reviewed the recent progresses in bTBI-related researches and concluded that the new era of blast injury research has shifted from the traditional physical impairments to cognitive dysfunctional/mental disorders that are proved to be more related to the outcome of combat casualty care.

  3. Laparoscopic treatment of acute non traumatic abdomen syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Tellechea, M.; Antunez, C.; Perdomo, M.; Gateno, N.

    2003-01-01

    Laparoscopic treatment of acute non traumatic abdomen syndrome may be safely performed in the majority of cases.Results obtained cover the treatment of 155 patients through video laparoscopic approach, between February 1997 and March 2001.Twenty two patients were excluded because the laparoscopic performed was solely for the purpose of diagnosis.Seventy two patients were women and 61 men.Average age was 45 years old, the youngest being 7 and the oldest 86.Surgery indicators were 67 acute appendicitis; 51 acute cholecystitis; 8 diffuse peritonitis (5 due to perforated gastroduodenal ulcus, 1 of appendicular origin, another of biliary origin and still another as perforative complication of diverticular colopathy); 5 acute pancreatitis of biliary origin; 1 peri diverticular abscess and 1 bilioma.Twelve patients had to be convert to open surgery (9%).Global morbidity was 6% (4 post appendicectomy abscesses; 1 sub hepatic biblio ma, a biliary peritonitis and two infections of parietal abscesses.Mortality was null

  4. Microparticles and acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Mark; Tabuchi, Arata; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2012-09-01

    The pathophysiology of acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), is characterized by increased vascular and epithelial permeability, hypercoagulation and hypofibrinolysis, inflammation, and immune modulation. These detrimental changes are orchestrated by cross talk between a complex network of cells, mediators, and signaling pathways. A rapidly growing number of studies have reported the appearance of distinct populations of microparticles (MPs) in both the vascular and alveolar compartments in animal models of ALI/ARDS or respective patient populations, where they may serve as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. MPs are small cytosolic vesicles with an intact lipid bilayer that can be released by a variety of vascular, parenchymal, or blood cells and that contain membrane and cytosolic proteins, organelles, lipids, and RNA supplied from and characteristic for their respective parental cells. Owing to this endowment, MPs can effectively interact with other cell types via fusion, receptor-mediated interaction, uptake, or mediator release, thereby acting as intrinsic stimulators, modulators, or even attenuators in a variety of disease processes. This review summarizes current knowledge on the formation and potential functional role of different MPs in inflammatory diseases with a specific focus on ALI/ARDS. ALI has been associated with the formation of MPs from such diverse cellular origins as platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, red blood cells, and endothelial and epithelial cells. Because of their considerable heterogeneity in terms of origin and functional properties, MPs may contribute via both harmful and beneficial effects to the characteristic pathological features of ALI/ARDS. A better understanding of the formation, function, and relevance of MPs may give rise to new promising therapeutic strategies to modulate coagulation, inflammation, endothelial function, and permeability either through

  5. Icam-1 and acute pancreatitis complicated by acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, XiPing; Wu, Dijiong; Jiang, Xinge

    2009-01-08

    One of the most common complications of acute pancreatitis is acute lung injury, during which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays an important role by participating in leukocyte adhesion and activation as well as by inducing the "cascade effect" of inflammatory mediators, pulmonary microcirculation dysfunction and even acute respiratory distress syndrome, multiple organ failure or death. Although it is generally believed that the modulatory mechanism of ICAM-1 during this process is associated with the activation of nuclear transcription factor kappa B which is mediated by IL-1, IL-6, IL-18 and oxygen free radical, etc., further studies are still required to clarify it. Since the upregulation of ICAM-1 expression in the lung during acute lung injury is one of main pathogeneses, the early detection of the ICAM-1 expression level may contribute to the prevention and treatment of acute lung injury. Moreover, reducing pulmonary ICAM-1 expression levels through treatment with anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody (aICAM-1) and antagonists of the neurokinin 1 receptor, etc., should have a positive effect on protecting the lungs during acute pancreatitis. This review aims to further clarify the relationship between ICAM-1 and acute pancreatitis complicated by acute lung injury, and therefore provides a theoretical basis for the formulation of corresponding therapeutic measures in clinical practice for acute pancreatitis.

  6. The use of antioxidants in the treatment of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegoni, Whitney; Shen, Qiuhua; Thimmesch, Amanda R; Bell, Meredith; Hiebert, John B; Pierce, Janet D

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to discuss secondary traumatic brain injury, the mitochondria and the use of antioxidants as a treatment. One of the leading causes of death globally is traumatic brain injury, affecting individuals in all demographics. Traumatic brain injury is produced by an external blunt force or penetration resulting in alterations in brain function or pathology. Often, with a traumatic brain injury, secondary injury causes additional damage to the brain tissue that can have further impact on recovery and the quality of life. Secondary injury occurs when metabolic and physiologic processes alter after initial injury and includes increased release of toxic free radicals that cause damage to adjacent tissues and can eventually lead to neuronal necrosis. Although antioxidants in the tissues can reduce free radical damage, the magnitude of increased free radicals overwhelms the body's reduced defence mechanisms. Supplementing the body's natural supply of antioxidants, such as coenzyme Q10, can attenuate oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species. Discussion paper. Research literature published from 2011-2016 in PubMed, CINAHL and Cochrane. Prompt and accurate assessment of patients with traumatic brain injury by nurses is important to ensure optimal recovery and reduced lasting disability. Thus, it is imperative that nurses be knowledgeable about the secondary injury that occurs after a traumatic brain injury and aware of possible antioxidant treatments. The use of antioxidants has potential to reduce the magnitude of secondary injury in patients who experience a traumatic brain injury. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Mild traumatic brain injury: Impairment and disability assessment caveats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasler, Nathan D; Martelli, Michael F

    2003-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) accounts for approximately 80% of all brain injuries, and persistent sequelae can impede physical, emotional, social, marital, vocational, and avocational functioning. Evaluation of impairment and disability following MTBI typically can involve such contexts as social security disability application, personal injury litigation, worker's compensation claims, disability insurance policy application, other health care insurance policy coverage issues, and the determination of vocational and occupational competencies and limitations. MTBI is still poorly understood and impairment and disability assessment in MTBI can present a significant diagnostic challenge. There are currently no ideal systems for rating impairment and disability for MTBI residua. As a result, medicolegal examiners and clinicians must necessarily familiarise themselves with the variety of disability and impairment evaluation protocols and understand their limitations. The current paper reviews recommended procedures and potential obstacles and confounding issues.

  8. "In my before life": relationships, coping and post-traumatic growth in adolescent survivors of a traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Battista, Ashley; Godfrey, Celia; Soo, Cheryl; Catroppa, Cathy; Anderson, Vicki

    2014-11-01

    Explore the individual, adolescent phenomeno-logy of quality of life after traumatic brain injury. Adolescent survivors of traumatic brain injury. Qualitative interviews with 10 adolescents, mean age at assessment 17.09 years (SD 1.81). Mean time since injury 4.62 years (SD 2.89). Data were analysed using a primarily interpretative phenomenological analysis approach. Two major findings: (1) perceived quality of life was not automatically impacted by a traumatic brain injury, but when it was, the directionality of impact (positive, negative) varied depending on the life-domain; (2) changes in ability post-traumatic brain injury were attributed to the injury (more often cognitive and physical changes) or to a sense of normal maturation processes (72% and 28%, respectively). Attribution processing permeated themes of personal and social discrepancies, which also yielded themes of: altered family and relationships, roles, responsibilities, independence, coping and post-traumatic growth. All participants reported a happy life at the time of interview. The adolescents' appraisal of their identity from pre- to post-injury life was related to their current sense of well-being. Most notably was the sense of balance; participants addressed the negative and positive consequences of brain injury to qualify their sense of wellbeing.

  9. The military's approach to traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Grimes, Jamie; Ecklund, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are common conditions. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI became prominent among US service members but the vast majority of TBI was still due to typical causes such as falls and sporting events. PTS has long been a focus of the US military mental health providers. Combat Stress Teams have been integral to forward deployed units since the beginning of the Global War on Terror. Military medical management of disease and injury follows standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) established by civilian counterparts. However, when civilian CPGs do not exist or are not applicable to the military environment, new practice standards are created. Such is the case for mild TBI. In 2009, the VA-DoD CPG for management of mild TBI/concussion was published and a system-wide clinical care program for mild TBI/concussion was introduced. This was the first large scale effort on an entire medical care system to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. In 2010, the VA-DoD CPG for management of PTSD was published. Nevertheless, both TBI and PTS are still incompletely understood. Investment in terms of money and effort has been committed by the DoD to their study. The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury are prominent examples of this effort. These are just beginnings, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always striving to provide the very best care to its military beneficiaries.

  10. Heterogeneity of brain lesions in pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Abildskov, Tracy J; Petrie, Joann; Farrer, Thomas J; Dennis, Maureen; Simic, Nevena; Taylor, H Gerry; Rubin, Kenneth H; Vannatta, Kathryn; Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Stancin, Terry; Owen Yeates, Keith

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a method to identify and quantify abnormalities resulting from traumatic brain injury (TBI). MRI abnormalities in children with TBI have not been fully characterized according to the frequency, location, and quantitative measurement of a range of pathologies critical for studies of neuropsychological outcome. Here, we report MRI findings from a large, multicenter study of childhood TBI, the Social Outcomes of Brain Injury in Kids (SOBIK) study, which compared qualitative and quantitative neuroimaging findings in 72 children with complicated mild-to-severe TBI to 52 children with orthopedic injury (OI). Qualitative analyses of MRI scans coded white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), hemosiderin deposits reflecting prior hemorrhagic lesions, regions of encephalomalacia and/or atrophy, and corpus callosum atrophy and traumatic shear lesions. Two automated quantitative analyses were conducted: (a) FreeSurfer methods computed volumes for total brain, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), corpus callosum, ventricles, amygdala, hippocampus, basal ganglia, and thalamus along with a ventricle-to-brain ratio (VBR); and (b) voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to identify WM, GM, and cerebrospinal fluid. We also examined performance on the Processing Speed Index (PSI) from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition, in relation to the above-mentioned neuroimaging variables. WMHs, hemosiderin deposits, and focal areas of encephalomalacia or atrophy were common in children with TBI, were related to injury severity, and were mostly observed within a frontotemporal distribution. Quantitative analyses showed volumetric changes related to injury severity, especially ventricular enlargement and reduced corpus callosum volume. VBM demonstrated similar findings, but, in addition, GM reductions in the inferior frontal, basal forebrain region, especially in the severe TBI group. The complicated mild TBI group showed few differences from

  11. Comorbidity of Headache and Depression After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Sylvia; Smith, Brendon M; Temkin, Nancy; Bell, Kathleen R; Dikmen, Sureyya; Hoffman, Jeanne M

    2016-02-01

    To examine headache and depression over time in individuals who sustained mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Prevalence of headache and depression early after mTBI and at 1 year postinjury as well as the relationship between the two are evaluated. Headache is the most common physical symptom and depression is among the most common psychiatric diagnosis after traumatic brain injury regardless of severity. Headache and depression have been found to be two independent factors related to poor outcome after mTBI, yet there appears to be a paucity of research exploring the comorbidity of these two conditions after injury. Longitudinal survey design over 1 year of 212 participants with mTBI who were admitted to a Level 1 trauma center for observation or other system injuries. Depression was based on a score ≥10 on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Headache was based on participant report of new or worse-than-preinjury headache since hospitalization (baseline) or within the previous 3 months at 1 year postinjury. The prevalence of headache and depression at baseline was 64% (135/212) and 15% (31/212), respectively. The prevalence of headache and depression at 1 year was 68% (127/187) and 27% (50/187), respectively. The co-occurrence of headache and depression increased from 11% (23/212) at baseline to 25% (46/187) at 1 year. At 1 year, the risk ratio of individuals who had headache to be depressed was 5.43 (95% CI 2.05-14.40) compared to those without headache (P headache is consistently high over the first year after injury, rate of depression increased over the first year for those who were followed. Given the high rate of comorbidity, those with headache may develop depression over time. Evaluation for possible depression in those with headache after mTBI should be conducted to address both conditions over the year following injury. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  12. Nurse specific intervention in first aid of serious traumatic injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Mata Escriche

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the serious traumatic injuries is accepted as the first cause of death in the young people of the 15 to 34 years and third in the general population, causing about the 55% of children died between the 5 to 14 years. According to a study performed in 2000, more than 25% of the deaths have been due to inadequate first aid.Recent studies show the initial evaluation and medical attention and transport inprove the survival in these patients. Is accepted the first 30 minutes as the main moment to take decision and in consequence it is necessary multidisciplinary equipment, as well as the emergency plan, in order to assist every patient, mainly in case of multiple victims.The goal of this study is to review the first aid to serious traumatic patient and to approach specifically the nursery assistance as important element in the daily work.

  13. Acute Management of the Traumatically Injured Pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skitch, Steven; Engels, Paul T

    2018-02-01

    Severe pelvic trauma is a challenging condition. The pelvis can create multifocal hemorrhage that is not easily compressible nor managed by traditional surgical methods such as tying off a blood vessel or removing an organ. Its treatment often requires reapproximation of bony structures, damage control resuscitation, assessment for associated injuries, and triage of investigations, as well as multimodality hemorrhage control (external fixation, preperitoneal packing, angioembolization, REBOA [resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta]) by multidisciplinary trauma specialists (general surgeons, orthopedic surgeons, endovascular surgeons/interventional radiologists). This article explores this complex clinical problem and provides a practical approach to its management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Vomiting With Head Trauma and Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Meredith L; Dalziel, Stuart R; Phillips, Natalie; Dalton, Sarah; Lyttle, Mark D; Bressan, Silvia; Oakley, Ed; Hearps, Stephen J C; Kochar, Amit; Furyk, Jeremy; Cheek, John A; Neutze, Jocelyn; Babl, Franz E

    2018-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of traumatic brain injuries in children who vomit after head injury and identify variables from published clinical decision rules (CDRs) that predict increased risk. Secondary analysis of the Australasian Paediatric Head Injury Rule Study. Vomiting characteristics were assessed and correlated with CDR predictors and the presence of clinically important traumatic brain injury (ciTBI) or traumatic brain injury on computed tomography (TBI-CT). Isolated vomiting was defined as vomiting without other CDR predictors. Of the 19 920 children enrolled, 3389 (17.0%) had any vomiting, with 2446 (72.2%) >2 years of age. In 172 patients with ciTBI, 76 had vomiting (44.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 36.9%-51.7%), and in 285 with TBI-CT, 123 had vomiting (43.2%; 95% CI 37.5%-49.0%). With isolated vomiting, only 1 (0.3%; 95% CI 0.0%-0.9%) had ciTBI and 2 (0.6%; 95% CI 0.0%-1.4%) had TBI-CT. Predictors of increased risk of ciTBI with vomiting by using multivariate regression were as follows: signs of skull fracture (odds ratio [OR] 80.1; 95% CI 43.4-148.0), altered mental status (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.0-5.5), headache (OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.3-4.1), and acting abnormally (OR 1.86; 95% CI 1.0-3.4). Additional features predicting TBI-CT were as follows: skull fracture (OR 112.96; 95% CI 66.76-191.14), nonaccidental injury concern (OR 6.75; 95% CI 1.54-29.69), headache (OR 2.55; 95% CI 1.52-4.27), and acting abnormally (OR 1.83; 95% CI 1.10-3.06). TBI-CT and ciTBI are uncommon in children presenting with head injury with isolated vomiting, and a management strategy of observation without immediate computed tomography appears appropriate. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Misconceptions about traumatic brain injury among probation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Conall; Linden, Mark A; Lohan, Maria

    2018-05-01

    The prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among offender populations is significantly higher than among the general population. Despite this, no study has yet assessed the knowledge of members of the probation service surrounding TBI. Knowledge was assessed among members of the Probation Board for Northern Ireland (PBNI) using a cross-sectional online version of the Common Misconceptions about TBI (CM-TBI) questionnaire. Mean total misconception scores, along with scores on four subdomains (recovery, sequelae, insight, and hidden injury) were calculated. Analysis of variance was used to explore differences in misconceptions based on the collected demographic information. The overall mean percentage of misconceptions for the group was 22.37%. The subdomain with the highest rate of misconceptions (38.21%) was insight into injury which covered misconceptions around offenders' self-awareness of injuries. Those who knew someone with a brain injury scored significantly higher in the CM-TBI total score, F(1,63) = 6.639, p = 0.012, the recovery subdomain, F(1,63) = 10.080, p = 0.002, and the insight subdomain, F(1,63) = 5.834, p = 0.019. Additionally, significant training deficits around TBI were observed among the probation service. This study is the first of its kind to examine the level of understanding around TBI within probation services. The findings reflect potential barriers to identification and rehabilitation of TBI for offenders coming into contact with the criminal justice system. A lack of identification coupled with misconceptions about TBI could lead to inaccurate court reporting with a subsequent impact on sentencing. Implications for Rehabilitation Despite being one of the first points of contact for offenders entering the criminal justice system, members of the probation service reported having no formal training on traumatic brain injury (TBI). The subdomain with the highest rate of misconceptions (insight into injury

  16. Invisible Injuries: The Experiences of College Students with Histories of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Carrie; Hux, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the college life phenomenon as experienced by students with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Previous research about such students has focused on topics including study strategy use, access of support services, and insights from caregivers or instructors. However, little attention has been paid to the perceptions…

  17. Impact of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Injury Severity on Recovery in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenardy, Justin; Le Brocque, Robyne; Hendrikz, Joan; Iselin, Greg; Anderson, Vicki; McKinlay, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    The adverse impact on recovery of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been demonstrated in returned veterans. The study assessed this effect in children's health outcomes following TBI and extended previous work by including a full range of TBI severity, and improved assessment of PTSD within a…

  18. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging findings in traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Lisa A

    2011-01-01

    Advances in imaging technology, coupled with military personnel returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), have increased interest in the neuropsychology and neurobiology of these two conditions. There has been a particular focus on differential diagnosis. This paper provides an overview of findings regarding the neuropsychological and neurobiological underpinnings of TBI and for PTSD. A specific focus is on assessment using neuropsychological measures and imaging techniques. Challenges associated with the assessment of individuals with one or both conditions are also discussed. Although use of neuropsychological and neuroimaging test results may assist with diagnosis and treatment planning, further work is needed to identify objective biomarkers for each condition. Such advances would be expected to facilitate differential diagnosis and implementation of best treatment practices.

  19. Response of the cerebral vasculature following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Arjang; Zhang, John H; Obenaus, Andre

    2017-07-01

    The critical role of the vasculature and its repair in neurological disease states is beginning to emerge particularly for stroke, dementia, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, tumors and others. However, little attention has been focused on how the cerebral vasculature responds following traumatic brain injury (TBI). TBI often results in significant injury to the vasculature in the brain with subsequent cerebral hypoperfusion, ischemia, hypoxia, hemorrhage, blood-brain barrier disruption and edema. The sequalae that follow TBI result in neurological dysfunction across a host of physiological and psychological domains. Given the importance of restoring vascular function after injury, emerging research has focused on understanding the vascular response after TBI and the key cellular and molecular components of vascular repair. A more complete understanding of vascular repair mechanisms are needed and could lead to development of new vasculogenic therapies, not only for TBI but potentially vascular-related brain injuries. In this review, we delineate the vascular effects of TBI, its temporal response to injury and putative biomarkers for arterial and venous repair in TBI. We highlight several molecular pathways that may play a significant role in vascular repair after brain injury.

  20. Factors contributing to outcome following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Jennie

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury results in some distinctive patterns of cognitive, behavioural and physical impairment which impact significantly on independent living skills and participation in work or study, social and leisure activities and interpersonal relationships. There is, however, still considerable variability in outcome across individuals in each of the reported domains. This has led to a significant body of research examining factors associated with outcome. A range of injury-related, personal and social factors have been shown to influence survival, as well as cognitive, functional and employment outcome. This paper reviews the factors associated with each of these aspects of outcome specifically injury-related factors, including neuroimaging findings, GCS and PTA, other injuries, and cognitive and behavioural impairments; demographic factors, including age, gender, genetic status, education, pre-injury IQ and employment status; and social factors including family and other social support, cultural factors, pre-injury psychiatric history and coping style. The paper identifies contributions and complex interrelationships of all of these factors to outcome following TBI. It concludes with a brief discussion of the implications of these factors for the rehabilitation process.

  1. MRI diagnosis of traumatic fornical injury. Investigation utilizing FLAIR Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, Toshiharu; Kataoka, Kazuo; Uejima, Toshifumi; Maruyama, Jiro; Sakata, Ikuhiro; Taneda, Mamoru

    1996-01-01

    We studied traumatic fornix injuries by using the fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) technique which provides T 2 -weighted images without the unwanted influence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) signals. 5-21 days (average: 10.3) after injury, we performed MRI on 14 patients (mean age: 22.6 years) who were clinically diagnosed as having diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The mid-sagittal FLAIR images in seven of the 14 patients clearly revealed T 2 -prolonged fornix lesions and the concurrent corpus callosum lesions. The same fornix lesions, as detected by the spin echo technique, were blurred by the partial volume effects and motion artifacts derived from the surrounding CSF signals. The accompanying callosal lesions were mainly in the splenium. Of the seven patients with fornix injuries, three had T 2 -prolonged lesions in the septum pellucidum. With respect to the outcome, there was no difference between patients with and without fornix injury. In conclusion, the FLAIR technique is appropriate for detecting fornix injuries adjacent to the CSF space. (author)

  2. MRI diagnosis of traumatic fornical injury. Investigation utilizing FLAIR Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, Toshiharu; Kataoka, Kazuo; Uejima, Toshifumi; Maruyama, Jiro; Sakata, Ikuhiro; Taneda, Mamoru [Kinki Univ., Sayama, Osaka (Japan) School of Medicine

    1996-06-01

    We studied traumatic fornix injuries by using the fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) technique which provides T{sub 2}-weighted images without the unwanted influence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) signals. 5-21 days (average: 10.3) after injury, we performed MRI on 14 patients (mean age: 22.6 years) who were clinically diagnosed as having diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The mid-sagittal FLAIR images in seven of the 14 patients clearly revealed T{sub 2}-prolonged fornix lesions and the concurrent corpus callosum lesions. The same fornix lesions, as detected by the spin echo technique, were blurred by the partial volume effects and motion artifacts derived from the surrounding CSF signals. The accompanying callosal lesions were mainly in the splenium. Of the seven patients with fornix injuries, three had T{sub 2}-prolonged lesions in the septum pellucidum. With respect to the outcome, there was no difference between patients with and without fornix injury. In conclusion, the FLAIR technique is appropriate for detecting fornix injuries adjacent to the CSF space. (author)

  3. Traumatic brain injury neuropsychology in Cali, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quijano María Cristina

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetive: comparative analysis between control group and patients with TBI to determine whetherthere neuropsychological differences at 6 months of evolution, to guide timely interventioncommensurate with the needs of this population. Materials and methods: a total of 79 patientswith a history of TBI with a minimum of 6 months of evolution and 79 control subjects were evaluated.Both groups with a mean age of 34 and without previous neurological or psychiatric disorders and an average schooling of 11 years for the control group and 9 years for the TBI group.The Glasgow Coma Scale in the TBI group was classified as moderate with 11 points. The BriefNeuropsychological Evaluation in Spanish Neuropsi was applied to both groups. Results: significantdifferences (p≤0.05 in the tasks of orientation, attention, memory, language, reading andwriting were found. Conclusions: TBI generates significant neuropsychological changes, even sixmonths after discharge from the health service. It suggests that patients with head injury requiretreatment after overcoming the initial stage.

  4. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as a potential treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder associated with traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve DJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available David J Eve,1 Martin R Steele,2 Paul R Sanberg,1 Cesar V Borlongan1 1Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair, Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, Morsani College of Medicine, 2Veterans Reintegration Steering Committee, Veterans Research, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA Abstract: Traumatic brain injury (TBI describes the presence of physical damage to the brain as a consequence of an insult and frequently possesses psychological and neurological symptoms depending on the severity of the injury. The recent increased military presence of US troops in Iraq and Afghanistan has coincided with greater use of improvised exploding devices, resulting in many returning soldiers suffering from some degree of TBI. A biphasic response is observed which is first directly injury-related, and second due to hypoxia, increased oxidative stress, and inflammation. A proportion of the returning soldiers also suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, and in some cases, this may be a consequence of TBI. Effective treatments are still being identified, and a possible therapeutic candidate is hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT. Some clinical trials have been performed which suggest benefits with regard to survival and disease severity of TBI and/or PTSD, while several other studies do not see any improvement compared to a possibly poorly controlled sham. HBOT has been shown to reduce apoptosis, upregulate growth factors, promote antioxidant levels, and inhibit inflammatory cytokines in animal models, and hence, it is likely that HBOT could be advantageous in treating at least the secondary phase of TBI and PTSD. There is some evidence of a putative prophylactic or preconditioning benefit of HBOT exposure in animal models of brain injury, and the optimal time frame for treatment is yet to be determined. HBOT has potential side effects such as acute cerebral toxicity and more reactive oxygen species with long-term use, and therefore

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury and Delayed Sequelae: A Review - Traumatic Brain Injury and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion are Precursors to Later-Onset Brain Disorders, Including Early-Onset Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Kiraly

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain injuries are too common. Most people are unaware of the incidence of and horrendous consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI. Research and the advent of sophisticated imaging have led to progression in the understanding of brain pathophysiology following TBI. Seminal evidence from animal and human experiments demonstrate links between TBI and the subsequent onset of premature, psychiatric syndromes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD. Objectives of this summary are, therefore, to instill appreciation regarding the importance of brain injury prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, and to increase awareness regarding the long-term delayed consequences following TBI.

  6. Changing Demographics and Injury Profile of New Traumatic Spinal Cord Injuries in the United States, 1972-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuying; He, Yin; DeVivo, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    To document trends in the demographic and injury profile of new spinal cord injury (SCI) over time. Cross-sectional analysis of longitudinal data by injury years (1972-1979, 1980-1989, 1990-1999, 2000-2009, 2010-2014). Twenty-eight Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems centers throughout the United States. Persons with traumatic SCI (N=30,881) enrolled in the National Spinal Cord Injury Database. Not applicable. Age, sex, race, education level, employment, marital status, etiology, and severity of injury. Age at injury has increased from 28.7 years in the 1970s to 42.2 years during 2010 to 2014. This aging phenomenon was noted for both sexes, all races, and all etiologies except acts of violence. The percentage of racial minorities expanded continuously over the last 5 decades. Virtually among all age groups, the average education levels and percentage of single/never married status have increased, which is similar to the trends noted in the general population. Although vehicular crashes continue to be the leading cause of SCI overall, the percentage has declined from 47.0% in the 1970s to 38.1% during 2010 to 2014. Injuries caused by falls have increased over time, particularly among those aged ≥46 years. Progressive increases in the percentages of high cervical and motor incomplete injuries were noted for various age, sex, race, and etiology groups. Study findings call for geriatrics expertise and intercultural competency of the clinical team in the acute and rehabilitation care for SCI. This study also highlights the need for a multidimensional risk assessment and multifactorial intervention, especially to reduce falls and SCI in older adults. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genomic responses in rat cerebral cortex after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathiesen Tiit

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI initiates a complex sequence of destructive and neuroprotective cellular responses. The initial mechanical injury is followed by an extended time period of secondary brain damage. Due to the complicated pathological picture a better understanding of the molecular events occurring during this secondary phase of injury is needed. This study was aimed at analysing gene expression patterns following cerebral cortical contusion in rat using high throughput microarray technology with the goal of identifying genes involved in an early and in a more delayed phase of trauma, as genomic responses behind secondary mechanisms likely are time-dependent. Results Among the upregulated genes 1 day post injury, were transcription factors and genes involved in metabolism, e.g. STAT-3, C/EBP-δ and cytochrome p450. At 4 days post injury we observed increased gene expression of inflammatory factors, proteases and their inhibitors, like cathepsins, α-2-macroglobulin and C1q. Notably, genes with biological function clustered to immune response were significantly upregulated 4 days after injury, which was not found following 1 day. Osteopontin and one of its receptors, CD-44, were both upregulated showing a local mRNA- and immunoreactivity pattern in and around the injury site. Fewer genes had decreased expression both 1 and 4 days post injury and included genes implicated in transport, metabolism, signalling, and extra cellular matrix formation, e.g. vitronectin, neuroserpin and angiotensinogen. Conclusion The different patterns of gene expression, with little overlap in genes, 1 and 4 days post injury showed time dependence in genomic responses to trauma. An early induction of factors involved in transcription could lead to the later inflammatory response with strongly upregulated CD-44 and osteopontin expression. An increased knowledge of genes regulating the pathological mechanisms in trauma will help to find future

  8. Chloroquine prevents acute kidney injury induced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Creatinine, Chloroquine, Inflammatory reactions, Kidney injury, Lipopolysaccharide. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is ... a reduction in oxygen uptake and myocardial contractility such as pathogen ..... evolution and outcome of acute kidney injury in critically ill adult patients. Br J Anaesth; 2015; 114: ...

  9. Misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries among South African university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisma Pretorius

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the incidence and type of misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries (TBIs harboured by university students.  Method. A convenience sample of 705 university students were recruited and data were collected using an electronic survey. The link to the survey was sent via e-mail to all registered students at Stellenbosch University. The participants had to complete the Common Misconceptions about Traumatic Brain Injury (CM-TBI questionnaire.  Results. The findings of this study suggest that the students subscribe to misconceptions from each of the 7 categories of misconceptions about TBIs. The mean percentages of misconceptions about TBIs were calculated and the amnesia (mean 49.7% and unconsciousness (mean 46.1% categories were identified as the categories about which the respondents had the most misconceptions, while the mean percentages of misconceptions were lower for the categories of recovery (mean 27.6%, rehabilitation (mean 26.56%, prevention (mean 20.8%, brain injury sequelae (mean 18.7% and brain damage (mean 8.4%.  Conclusion. Generally, these findings appear to be in keeping with previous literature, which suggests that misconceptions about TBIs are common among the general population. This study’s identification of these misconceptions could help create awareness, provide a focus for information provision, and contribute to the development of educational intervention programmes tailored for the South African context.

  10. Risk Factors for Institutionalization After Traumatic Brain Injury Inpatient Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Regina S; Brown, Allen W; Watanabe, Thomas K; Zasler, Nathan D; Goldstein, Richard; Seel, Ronald T; Roth, Elliot J; Zafonte, Ross D; Glenn, Mel B

    To create a profile of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) who received inpatient rehabilitation and were discharged to an institutional setting using characteristics measured at rehabilitation discharge. The Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database is a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal database for people with moderate to severe TBI. We analyzed data for participants enrolled from January 2002 to June 2012 who had lived in a private residence before TBI. This cross-sectional study used logistic regression analyses to identify sociodemographic factors, lengths of stay, and cognitive and physical functioning levels that differentiated patients discharged to institutional versus private settings. Older age, living alone before TBI, and lower levels of function at rehabilitation discharge (independence in locomotion, bladder management, comprehension, and social interaction) were significantly associated with higher institutionalization rates and provided the best models identifying factors associated with institutionalization. Institutionalization was also associated with decreased independence in bed-chair-wheelchair transfers and increased duration of posttraumatic amnesia. Individuals institutionalized after inpatient rehabilitation for TBI were older, lived alone before injury, had longer posttraumatic amnesia durations, and were less independent in specific functional characteristics. Research evaluating the effect of increasing postdischarge support and improving treatment effectiveness in these functional areas is recommended.

  11. Potential risk factors for developing heterotopic ossification in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, P.J. van; Martina, J.D.; Vos, P.E.; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.; Hendricks, H.T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a frequent complication after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The current preliminary study is intended to provide additional data on the potential roles that brain injury severity, concomitant orthopaedic trauma, and specific intensive care complicating

  12. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in U.S. Soldiers Returning from Iraq

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoge, Charles W; McGurk, Dennis; Thomas, Jeffrey L; Cox, Anthony L; Engel, Charles C; Castro, Carl A

    2008-01-01

    .... Validated clinical instruments were used to compare soldiers reporting mild traumatic brain injury, defined as an injury with loss of consciousness or altered mental status (e.g., dazed or confused...

  13. Is aggressive treatment of traumatic brain injury cost-effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Robert G; Thawani, Jayesh P; Grady, M Sean; Levine, Joshua M; Sanborn, Matthew R; Stein, Sherman C

    2012-05-01

    The object of this study was to determine whether aggressive treatment of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), including invasive intracranial monitoring and decompressive craniectomy, is cost-effective. A decision-analytical model was created to compare costs, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness of 3 strategies for treating a patient with severe TBI. The aggressive-care approach is compared with "routine care," in which Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines are not followed. A "comfort care" category, in which a single day in the ICU is followed by routine floor care, is included for comparison only. Probabilities of each treatment resulting in various Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores were obtained from the literature. The GOS scores were converted to quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), based on expected longevity and calculated quality of life associated with each GOS category. Estimated direct (acute and long-term medical care) and indirect (loss of productivity) costs were calculated from the perspective of society. Sensitivity analyses employed a 2D Monte Carlo simulation of 1000 trials, each with 1000 patients. The model was also used to estimate these values for patients 40, 60, and 80 years of age. For the average 20-year-old, aggressive care yields 11.7 (± 1.6 [SD]) QALYs, compared with routine care (10.0 ± 1.5 QALYs). This difference is highly significant (p care remains significantly better at all ages. When all costs are considered, aggressive care is also significantly less costly than routine care ($1,264,000 ± $118,000 vs $1,361,000 ± $107,000) for the average 20-year-old. Aggressive care remains significantly less costly until age 80, at which age it costs more than routine care. However, even in the 80-year-old, aggressive care is likely the more cost-effective approach. Comfort care is associated with poorer outcomes at all ages and with higher costs for all groups except 80-year-olds. When all the costs of severe TBI are considered, aggressive

  14. Occupational, Physical, and Speech Therapy Treatment Activities During Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Cynthia L; Dijkers, Marcel P; Barrett, Ryan S; Horn, Susan D; Giuffrida, Clare G; Timpson, Misti L; Carroll, Deborah M; Smout, Randy J; Hammond, Flora M

    2015-08-01

    To describe the use of occupational therapy (OT), physical therapy (PT), and speech therapy (ST) treatment activities throughout the acute rehabilitation stay of patients with traumatic brain injury. Multisite prospective observational cohort study. Inpatient rehabilitation settings. Patients (N=2130) admitted for initial acute rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury. Patients were categorized on the basis of admission FIM cognitive scores, resulting in 5 fairly homogeneous cognitive groups. Not applicable. Percentage of patients engaged in specific activities and mean time patients engaged in these activities for each 10-hour block of time for OT, PT, and ST combined. Therapy activities in OT, PT, and ST across all 5 cognitive groups had a primary focus on basic activities. Although advanced activities occurred in each discipline and within each cognitive group, these advanced activities occurred with fewer patients and usually only toward the end of the rehabilitation stay. The pattern of activities engaged in was both similar to and different from patterns seen in previous practice-based evidence studies with different rehabilitation diagnostic groups. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Secondary injury in traumatic brain injury patients - A prospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More than 4 hours' delay in evacuation of intracranial haematomas has been demonstrated to have an additional impact on outcome. The objective of this study ... All moderate and severe head injury patients admitted to Groote Schuur Hospital over a 3-month period were studied prospectively. Data were obtained from ...

  16. Pivotal role of anterior cingulate cortex in working memory after traumatic brain injury in youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne eCazalis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this fMRI study, the functions of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex were studied in a group of adolescents who had sustained a moderate to severe Traumatic Brain Injury. A spatial working memory task with varying working memory loads, representing experimental conditions of increasing difficulty, was administered.In a cross-sectional comparison between the patients and a matched control group, patients performed worse than Controls, showing longer reaction times and lower response accuracy on the spatial working memory task. Brain imaging findings suggest a possible double-dissociation: activity of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in the Traumatic Brain Injury group, but not in the Control group, was associated with task difficulty; conversely, activity of the left Sensorimotor Cortex in the Control group, but not in the TBI group, was correlated with task difficulty.In addition to the main cross-sectional study, a longitudinal study of a group of adolescent patients with moderate to severe Traumatic Brain Injury was done using fMRI and the same spatial working memory task. The patient group was studied at two time points: one time point during the post-acute phase and one time point 12 months later, during the chronic phase. Results indicated that patients' behavioral performance improved over time, suggesting cognitive recovery. Brain imaging findings suggest that, over this 12 month period, patients recruited less of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex and more of the left Sensorimotor Cortex in response to increasing task difficulty.The role of Anterior Cingulate Cortex in executive functions following a moderate to severe brain injury in adolescence is discussed within the context of conflicting models of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex functions in the existing literature.

  17. Cognitive sequelae in survivors of traumatic frontal lobe injury: comparison between mild and moderate injury effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjum, A.; Ahmad, W.; Tahir, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of cognitive deficits in the survivors of traumatic frontal lobe injury of mild to moderate severity. Study Design: Mix method study. Place and Duration of Study: Nishter Hospital Multan, Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur and Sheikh Zaid Hospital Rahim Yar Khan, from Sep 2010 to Jun 2011. Material and Methods: The sample consisted of 55 participants. Fifteen of these were taken from healthy population with the age range of 20-30 years (Mean = 25.7 ± SD = 4.6) and 40 participants were medically documented patients of frontal lobe injury of mild (20) to moderate (20) severity. The age range of mild traumatic frontal lobe injury patients was 20-32 years (Mean= 26.5 ± SD = 4.9). The age range of moderate severity patients was also 20-32 years (Mean= 26.4 ± SD = 5.0). Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale revised and case history interview were administered to determine cognitive deficits following traumatic frontal lobe injury. Results: Statistical test, one way analysis was used to compare the performance of all these three (control, mild and moderate) groups. Results of present study reflected that cognitive deficits like memory deficits, language problems, trouble in concentrating and difficulty in planning are the major consequences of traumatic frontal lobe injury. Conclusion: To conclude, frontal lobe injury patients not only showed poor performance in clinically-driven structured and comprehensive memory tests when they were compared with healthy people but their performance also varied according to the severity of injury. (author)

  18. Pathogenesis and outcomes of traumatic injuries of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhani, M; Midani, D; Goldberg, A; Friedenberg, F K

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic injury of the esophagus is extremely uncommon. The aims of this study were to use the Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study (PTOS) database to identify clinical factors predictive of esophageal trauma, and to report the morbidity and mortality of this injury. A cross-sectional review of patients presenting to 20 Level I trauma centers in Pennsylvania from 2004 to 2010 was performed. We compared clinical and demographic variables between patients with and without esophageal trauma both prior to and after arrival in the emergency room (ER). Primary mechanism of injury and clinical outcomes were analyzed. There were 231 694 patients and 327 (0.14%) had esophageal trauma. Patients with esophageal trauma were considerably younger than those without this injury. The risk of esophageal trauma was markedly increased in males (odds ratio [OR] = 2.62 [CI 1.98-3.47]). The risk was also increased in African Americans (OR = 4.61 [CI 3.65-5.82]). Most cases were from penetrating gunshot and stab wounds. Only 34 (10.4%) of esophageal trauma patients underwent an upper endoscopy; diagnosis was usually made by CT, surgery, or autopsy. Esophageal trauma patients were more likely to require surgery (35.8% vs. 12.5%; P trauma had a substantially higher mortality than those without the injury (20.5% vs. 1.4%; P trauma, there was an association between trauma severity and mortality (OR = 1.10 [1.07-1.12]) but not for undergoing surgery within the first 24 hours of hospitalization (OR = 0.84; 0.39-1.83). Our study on traumatic injury of the esophagus is in concordance with previous studies demonstrating that this injury is rare but carries considerable morbidity (∼46%) and mortality (∼20%). The injury has a higher morbidity and mortality when the thoracic esophagus is involved compared to the cervical esophagus alone. The injury most commonly occurs in younger, Black males suffering gunshot wounds. Efforts to control gun violence in Pennsylvania are of paramount importance.

  19. Platelet activation and dysfunction in a large-animal model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Johansson, Pär I; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhage are the leading causes of trauma-related mortality. Both TBI and hemorrhage are associated with coagulation disturbances, including platelet dysfunction. We hypothesized that platelet dysfunction could be detected early after injury, and that this dysfu......Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhage are the leading causes of trauma-related mortality. Both TBI and hemorrhage are associated with coagulation disturbances, including platelet dysfunction. We hypothesized that platelet dysfunction could be detected early after injury...

  20. ECONOMIC LOSSES CAUSED BY TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Valiulina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently, analyzing the economic losses caused by health problems in population is of particular importance since it stipulates calculations of the volumes invested in healthcare systems in order to improve population’s health. Objective: The aim of our study was to find out economic losses caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI in children. Methods: The given work has utilized governmental statistical reports for Russia, for federal regions as well as for individual subjects. Direct medical expenses (medical services and indirect expenses (losses due to a temporary disability of parents having a sick child were calculated both in general and per patient. Results: Among all the direct medical costs of treatment of children with TBI inpatient care costs account for 85%. In the Central and Volga Federal District accounted for half of nationwide spending in general, brain injury and to provide certain kinds of healthcare. The structure of Russian costs as a result of the incidence of TBI children Moscow accounts for 20%. In Moscow, the cost of treating cases of traumatic brain injury in children is 3.2 times higher than the average for Russia. The resulting calculations of the value of health care costs attributable to a case of child head injury, behind the cost of treatment of the case of a child with head trauma, calculated according to the standards of Russia and the territories. This difference in the whole RF is 23%. Conclusion: The obtained findings have shown that in 2010 in Russia the magnitude of losses caused by TBI incidence in children amounted to 3 billion roubles or 0.008% of the gross product 1.2 billion roubles of which were direct expenses. However, this figure is considerably lower of the real amount; it becomes evident after the analysis of direct medical expenses per one case of pediatric TBI. Our calculations have shown that in Russia and in its regions the amount of expenses per one TBI patient is a quarter less

  1. Psychotherapy following traumatic brain injury: integrating theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzer, Rudi

    2007-01-01

    Psychotherapy is now an approach used within several models of neurorehabilitation. However, a core theoretical model to guide psychotherapeutic practice is lacking. This article attempts to illustrate how the Generic Model of Psychotherapy of Orlinsky and Howard, which emphasizes the common factors shared by many psychotherapies, can be applied in neurorehabilitation settings. A case report is presented to illustrate how this model can potentially inform psychotherapeutic practice. The use of a theoretical model to underpin psychotherapeutic interventions in neurorehabilitation settings has the potential to facilitate our understanding of the psychotherapeutic process following traumatic brain injury in this evolving area of professional practice.

  2. HYPOPITUITARISM FOLLOWING TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: DETERMINING FACTORS FOR DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELIPE F eCASANUEVA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine dysfunction, long recognised as a consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI, is a major cause of disability that includes physical and psychological involvement with long-term cognitive, behavioural and social changes.There is no standard procedure regarding at what time after trauma the diagnosis should be made. Also there is uncertainty on defining the best methods for diagnosis and testing and what types of patients should be selected for screening. Common criteria for evaluating these patients are required on account of the high prevalence of TBI worldwide and the potential new cases of hypopituitarism.

  3. Aluminium phosphide induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaiser Saif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide is one of the most common agricultural poisons being consumed in north India. Consumption of a fresh tablet is lethal as no antidote is available. Acute intoxication primarily presents with cardiovascular collapse due to myocardial toxicity. We report here a case of acute severe poisoning along with cardiovascular collapse and oliguria. The patient developed acute kidney injury during the illness (a rare entity in aluminium phosphide poisoning, which completely resolved following prompt conservative treatment.

  4. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Longitudinal Study of Cognition, Functional Status, and Post-Traumatic Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmen, Sureyya; Machamer, Joan; Temkin, Nancy

    2017-04-15

    More than 75% of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) seeking medical attention are mild, and outcome in that group is heterogeneous. Until sensitive and valid biomarkers are identified, methods are needed to classify mild TBI into more homogeneous subgroups. Four hundred twenty-one adults with mild TBI were divided into groups based on Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 13-15 without computed tomography (CT) abnormalities, GCS 15 with CT abnormalities, and GCS 13-14 with CT abnormalities, and were compared with 120 trauma controls on 1-month and 1-year outcomes. At 1 month post-injury, almost all neuropsychological variables differed significantly among the groups. Compared with trauma controls, the GCS 13-15 CT normal group showed no significant differences on any neuropsychological measure or Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). The GCS 15 CT abnormal group performed significantly worse on only a measure of episodic memory and learning (Selective Reminding Recall [SRCL]) and GOS, and the GCS 13-14 CT abnormal group performed significantly worse on most neuropsychological measures and GOS. At 1 year post-injury, except for an isolated difficulty on SRCL in the GCS 13-14 CT abnormal group, no differences were observed on any neuropsychological measures nor on GOS. Mean percent of total post-traumatic symptoms endorsed as new or worse and percent endorsing three or more symptoms differed significantly (p < 0.001), with each TBI subgroup reporting significantly more symptoms than the trauma controls at both 1 month and 1 year. In conclusion, this subgrouping improves granularity within mild TBI. While most neuropsychological and functional differences abate by 1 year, reporting three or more post-traumatic symptoms remain for about half of individuals.

  5. Computed tomography and clinical outcome in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Maud; Koskinen, Lars-Owe D; Jonasson, Per; Levi, Richard; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie

    2017-01-01

    To study: (i) acute computed tomography (CT) characteristics and clinical outcome; (ii) clinical course and (iii) Corticosteroid Randomisation after Significant Head Injury acute calculator protocol (CRASH) model and clinical outcome in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). Initial CT (CT i ) and CT 24 hours post-trauma (CT 24 ) were evaluated according to Marshall and Rotterdam classifications. Rancho Los Amigos Cognitive Scale-Revised (RLAS-R) and Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) were assessed at three months and one year post-trauma. The prognostic value of the CRASH model was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients were included. Marshall CT i and CT 24 were significantly correlated with RLAS-R at three months. Rotterdam CT 24 was significantly correlated with GOSE at three months. RLAS-R and the GOSE improved significantly from three months to one year. CRASH predicted unfavourable outcome at six months for 81% of patients with bad outcome and for 85% of patients with favourable outcome according to GOSE at one year. Neither CT nor CRASH yielded clinically useful predictions of outcome at one year post-injury. The study showed encouragingly many instances of significant recovery in this population of sTBI. The combination of lack of reliable prognostic indicators and favourable outcomes supports the case for intensive acute management and rehabilitation as the default protocol in the cases of sTBI.

  6. Effects and outcomes in civilian and military traumatic brain injury: similarities, differences, and forensic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberty, Greg J; Nelson, Nathaniel W; Yamada, Torrii

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a prominent public health problem in both civilian and military settings. This article discusses similarities and differences in the assessment and treatment of TBI and the attendant forensic implications. Acute care and management of moderate/severe TBI tend to be similar across environments, as is the recognition of disability status in affected individuals. By contrast, an increased focus on mild TBI in recent years has resulted in a reliance on self-report and screening measures to validate the occurrence of events leading to injury. This has complicated assessment, treatment and subsequent medicolegal proceedings. The neuropsychological literature has provided significant guidance on these difficult issues, although the complexity of disability adjudication for active duty members of the military and veterans continues to pose challenges for clinicians in evaluative and treatment contexts. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Headache after pediatric traumatic brain injury: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Heidi K; Vavilala, Monica S; Jaffe, Kenneth M; Koepsell, Thomas D; Wang, Jin; Temkin, Nancy; Durbin, Dennis; Dorsch, Andrea; Rivara, Frederick P

    2012-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of headache 3 and 12 months after pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). This is a prospective cohort study of children ages 5 to 17 years in which we analyzed the prevalence of headache 3 and 12 months after mild TBI (mTBI; n = 402) and moderate/severe TBI (n = 60) compared with controls with arm injury (AI; n = 122). The prevalence of headache 3 months after injury was significantly higher after mTBI than after AI overall (43% vs 26%, relative risk [RR]: 1.7 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-2.3]), in adolescents (13-17 years; 46% vs 25%, RR: 1.8 [95% CI: 1.1-3.1]), and in girls (59% vs 24%, RR: 2.4 [95% CI: 1.4-4.2]). The prevalence of headache at 3 months was also higher after moderate/severe TBI than AI in younger children (5-12 years; 60% vs 27%; RR: 2.0 [95% CI: 1.2-3.4]). Twelve months after injury, TBI was not associated with a significantly increased frequency of headache. However, girls with mTBI reported serious headache (≥ 5 of 10 pain scale rating) more often than controls (27% vs 10%, RR: 2.2 [95% CI: 0.9-5.6]). Pediatric TBI is associated with headache. A substantial number of children suffer from headaches months after their head injury. The prevalence of headache during the year after injury is related to injury severity, time after injury, age, and gender. Girls and adolescents appear to be at highest risk of headache in the months after TBI.

  8. Risk factors related to dysautonomia after severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Li-Quan; Hou, Li-Jun; Yu, Ming-Kun; Qi, Xiang-Qian; Chen, Huai-Rui; Chen, Ju-Xiang; Hu, Guo-Han; Luo, Chun; Lu, Yi-Cheng

    2011-09-01

    Dysautonomia after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a clinical syndrome affecting a subgroup of survivors and is characterized by episodes of autonomic dysregulation and muscle overactivity. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of dysautonomia after severe TBI in an intensive care unit setting and analyze the risk factors for developing dysautonomia. A consecutive series of 101 patients with severe TBI admitted in a major trauma hospital during a 2-year period were prospectively observed to determine the effects of age, sex, mode of injury, hypertension history, admission systolic blood pressure, fracture, lung injury, admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, injury severity score, emergency craniotomy, sedation or analgesia, diffuse axonal injury (DAI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scales, and hydrocephalus on the development of dysautonomia. Risk factors for dysautonomia were evaluated by using logistic regression analysis. Seventy-nine of the 101 patients met inclusion criteria, and dysautonomia was observed in 16 (20.3%) of these patients. Univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between the occurrence of dysautonomia and patient age, admission GCS score, DAI, MRI scales, and hydrocephalus. Sex, mode of injury, hypertension history, admission systolic blood pressure, fracture, lung injury, injury severity score, sedation or analgesia, and emergency craniotomy did not influence the development of dysautonomia. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that patient age and DAI were two independent predictors of dysautonomia. There was no independent association between dysautonomia and admission GCS score, MRI scales, or hydrocephalus. Dysautonomia frequently occurs in patients with severe TBI. A younger age and DAI could be risk factors for facilitating the development of dysautonomia.

  9. Fatal traumatic brain injury with electrical weapon falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Mark W; Adamec, Jiri; Wetli, Charles V; Williams, Howard E

    2016-10-01

    While generally reducing morbidity and mortality, electrical weapons have risks associated with their usage, including eye injuries and falls. With sufficient probe spread, an uncontrolled fall to the ground typically occurs along with the possibility of a fatal brain injury. We analyzed possible risk factors including running and elevated surfaces with established head-injury criteria to estimate the risk of brain injury. We searched for cases of arrest-related or in-custody death, with TASER(®) electrical weapon usage where fall-induced injuries might have contributed to the death. We found 24 cases meeting our initial inclusion criteria of a fatal fall involving electronic control. We then excluded 5 cases as intentional jumps, leaving 19 cases of forced falls. Autopsy reports and other records were analyzed to determine which of these deaths were from brain injury caused by the fall. We found 16 probable cases of fatal brain injuries induced by electronic control from electrical weapons. Out of 3 million field uses, this gives a risk of 5.3 ± 2.6 PPM which is higher than the theoretical risk of electrocution. The mean age was 46 ± 14 years which is significantly greater that the age of the typical ARD (36 ± 10). Probe shots to the subject's back may present a higher risk of a fatal fall. The use of electronic control presents a small but real risk of death from fatal traumatic brain injury. Increased age represents an independent risk factor for such fatalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury: football , warfare, and long- term effects. N. Engl. J. Med. 363, 1293–1296. Elder, G. A., Dorr, N. P., De Gasperi, R., Gama Sosa, M. A...al. (2012). Intranasal administration of nerve growth fac - tor ameliorate beta-amyloid deposi- tion after traumatic brain injury in rats. Brain Res

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging for white matter degradation in fornix following mild traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Wang; Boreta, Lauren; Gauger, Grant

    2010-03-01

    The alterations of the fornix in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) were investigated using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and T1-weighetd anatomical imaging. The primary goal of this study was to test that hypothesis that the fornix might play a major role in the memory and learning dysfunctions in the post-concussion syndrome, which may related to the white matter (WM) degradations following mild traumatic brain injury. N=24 mTBI patients were longitudinally studied in two time points with 6-month intervals using a 4-Tesla MRI scanner to measure the WM integrity of fornix and the fornix-to-brain ratio (FBR), and compared with matched healthy controls. Our data show that the WM degradation in fornix onset in the acute stage after mild TBI when the post-injury time was less than 6 weeks, and that this WM degradation continued during the following 6-month period of recovery. In summary, using DTI and structural MRI together can effectively detect the fornix changes in both cross-sectional and longitudinal investigations. Further studies are warranted to exam the association between the fornix alterations and neurocognitive performance of TBI patients.

  12. Surgical Decompression for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... Background: There are controversies regarding the importance and timing of spinal cord decompression following trauma. Documented evidence shows that early decompression in the setting of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) improves neurologic outcomes. Our objective was to evaluate the outcome of ...

  13. Longitudinal changes in mathematical abilities and white matter following paediatric mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beek, Leen; Vanderauwera, Jolijn; Ghesquière, Pol; Lagae, Lieven; De Smedt, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Paediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been associated with acute and long-term mathematical difficulties. Little is known about the recovery of these impairments in children with mild TBI (mTBI) and their underlying pathophysiology, such as white matter abnormalities. A prospective longitudinal study followed the recovery of mathematical abilities and white matter in children with mTBI from the sub-acute (1 month post-injury) to chronic stage (6-8 months post-injury) of recovery. Twenty children with mTBI and 20 matched controls completed mathematics tests. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) metrics of white matter pathways corpus callosum (CC), superior and longitudinal fasciculi were examined with DTI-tractography. Mathematical difficulties and white matter abnormalities in the CC observed shortly after the injury resolved after 6-8 months of recovery. Children with mTBI continued to show working memory deficits. Longitudinal DTI data suggest continued maturation of the CC in controls, but little maturation of the damaged CC in children with mTBI. Children with mTBI recovered in terms of mathematical abilities and white matter. These children continued to show working memory deficits, which might interfere with learning at school.

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury as a Disorder of Brain Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Bigler, Erin D.; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Recent advances in neuroimaging methodologies sensitive to axonal injury have made it possible to assess in vivo the extent of traumatic brain injury (TBI) -related disruption in neural structures and their connections. The objective of this paper is to review studies examining connectivity in TBI with an emphasis on structural and functional MRI methods that have proven to be valuable in uncovering neural abnormalities associated with this condition. Methods We review studies that have examined white matter integrity in TBI of varying etiology and levels of severity, and consider how findings at different times post-injury may inform underlying mechanisms of post-injury progression and recovery. Moreover, in light of recent advances in neuroimaging methods to study the functional connectivity among brain regions that form integrated networks, we review TBI studies that use resting-state functional connectivity MRI methodology to examine neural networks disrupted by putative axonal injury. Results The findings suggest that TBI is associated with altered structural and functional connectivity, characterized by decreased integrity of white matter pathways and imbalance and inefficiency of functional networks. These structural and functional alterations are often associated with neurocognitive dysfunction and poor functional outcomes. Conclusions TBI has a negative impact on distributed brain networks that lead to behavioral disturbance. PMID:26888612

  15. Role of liberal primary fasciotomy in traumatic vascular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganie, Farooq Ahmad; Lone, Hafeezulla; Wani, Mohd Lateef; Ahmad Dar, Farooq; Wani, Nasir-U-Din; Wani, Shadab Nabi

    2012-01-01

    Vascular injury represents less than 1% of all injuries, but deserves special attention because of its severe complications. Amputation or retention of a painful functionless limb is the most untoward result of severe vascular injury or inadequate treatmet. Thus, vascular injury needs a judicious and multidimensional approach. This retrospective study was done to asess the outcome of minor modifications of the methodology of extremity fasciotomy by making it liberal with respect to incision and definition. Out of 55 patients in 2008, 45 patients (Group A) had either no fasciotomy or limited primary fasciotomy, 10 patients (Group B) had primary liberal fasciotomy. Another group from 2008 onwards had undergone primary liberal fasciotomy in all the 45 patients (Group C). In group A, we had 5 amputations and one death. In group B, there were no amputations or deaths and from group C, we had one amputation and no deaths. Blunt and distal traumatic vascular injury of the extremities and its repair should always combined with primary liberal fasciotomy, which although increases manageable morbidity, avoids disability (functional as well as anatomical).

  16. Caring for a family member with a traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R G; Devereux, R; Godfrey, H P

    1998-06-01

    The responses to a questionnaire on subjective burden are reported for 52 primary caregivers of a group of persons with traumatic brain injuries sustained an average of 6 years previously. The aim of the study was to examine satisfaction with social support, perception of coping skills, and appraisal of symptoms as predictors of strain in the carers. A range of responses, both positive and negative, to the work of caring for a relative with a head injury was reported. A high prevalence rate of emotional and behavioural changes in the persons with head injuries was found and the amount of distress caused by these symptoms was found to be predictive of burden. The other factor important in predicting burden was the carers' ratings of their satisfaction with their ability to cope with the work of caregiving. Social support, injury severity, and the demographic characteristics of the persons with head injury and their carers were not significant predictors. Depression in the carers was also investigated and the variable most predictive of elevated depression scores was coping satisfaction. These findings reinforce the importance of strengthening carers coping resources in rehabilitation work with head injured persons and their families.

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury. Fact Sheet = Lesion Cerebral Traumatica (TBI). Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet, written in both English and Spanish, offers general information about traumatic brain injury. Information includes a definition, incidence, individual characteristics, and educational implications. The signs of traumatic brain injury are listed and include physical disabilities, difficulties with thinking, and social, behavioral,…

  18. Non-traumatic injury profile of amateur cyclists | van der Walt | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Non-traumatic bicycle injuries are common. However, research available on non-traumatic injuries in amateur cyclists is more than a decade old, and most of the research on this topic has been done in Europe and America on professional cyclists in multi-day cycling events. An understanding of the common ...

  19. Art Therapy for Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comprehensive Neurorehabilitation-Informed Approach to Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Tori

    2016-01-01

    I describe an approach to art therapy treatment for survivors of traumatic brain injury developed at a rehabilitation facility for adults that serves inpatient, outpatient, and long-term residential clients. This approach is based on a review of the literature on traumatic brain injury, comprehensive neurorehabilitation, brain plasticity, and art…

  20. Outcome of severe traumatic brain injury at a critical care unit: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outcome of severe traumatic brain injury at a critical care unit: a review of 87 patients. ... OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcome of severe traumatic brain injury and to document the factors influencing mortality. DESIGN: A six months prospective study. ... intracerebral mass lesions and blood sugar greater than 10mmol / L.