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Sample records for acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

  1. MR of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.; Dion, J.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging was performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR images as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of MR of the basal cisterns results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR studies in many cases

  2. MR imaging of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.B.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.R.; Dion, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging were performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of the basal cisterns on MR images results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR in many cases

  3. Risk of rebleeding after treatment of acute hydrocephalus in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellingman, Catharine A.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Beijer, Inge S.; van Dijk, Gert W.; Algra, Ale; van Gijn, Jan; Rinkel, Gabriël J. E.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cerebrospinal fluid drainage is often indicated in patients with acute hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage but is believed to increase the risk of rebleeding. We studied the risk of rebleeding in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage during treatment for

  4. Nonaneurysmal "Pseudo-Subarachnoid Hemorrhage" Computed Tomography Patterns: Challenges in an Acute Decision-Making Heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Tasneem F; Duarte, Walter; Akinduro, Oluwaseun O; Goldstein, Eric D; Hurst, Rebecca; Haranhalli, Neil; Miller, David A; Wharen, Robert E; Tawk, Rabih G; Freeman, William D

    2018-06-05

    Acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a medical and neurosurgical emergency from ruptured brain aneurysm. Aneurysmal SAH is identified on brain computed tomography (CT) as increased density of basal cisterns and subarachnoid spaces from acute blood products. Aneurysmal SAH-like pattern on CT appears as an optical illusion effect of hypodense brain parenchyma and/or hyperdense surrounding cerebral cisterns and blood vessels termed as "pseudo-subarachnoid hemorrhage" (pseudo-SAH). We reviewed clinical, laboratory, and radiographic data of all SAH diagnoses between January 2013 and January 2018, and found subsets of nonaneurysmal SAH, originally suspected to be aneurysmal in origin. We performed a National Library of Medicine search methodology using terms "subarachnoid hemorrhage," "pseudo," and "non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage" singly and in combination to understand the sensitivity, specificity, and precision of pseudo-SAH. Over 5 years, 230 SAH cases were referred to our tertiary academic center and only 7 (3%) met the definition of pseudo-SAH. Searching the National Library of Medicine using subarachnoid hemorrhage yielded 27,402 results. When subarachnoid hemorrhage and pseudo were combined, this yielded 70 results and sensitivity was 50% (n = 35). Similarly, search precision was relatively low (26%) as only 18 results fit the clinical description similar to the 7 cases discussed in our series. Aneurysmal SAH pattern on CT is distinct from nonaneurysmal and pseudo-SAH patterns. The origin of pseudo-SAH terminology appears mostly tied to comatose cardiac arrest patients with diffuse dark brain Hounsfield units and cerebral edema, and is a potential imaging pitfall in acute medical decision-making. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. CT findings of fulminant subarachnoid hemorrhages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yukio; Isayama, Kazuo; Yajima, Kouzo; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yano, Masami; Otsuka, Toshibumi

    1985-01-01

    We studied the clinical features and CT findings of 20 cases with fulminant subarachonid hemorrhages in the acute stage. They were admitted to our hospital within 3 hours after the attack as DOA (dead on arrival) or near DOA. CT-visualized subarachnoid hemorrhages were located in the basal cisterns surrounding the brain stem in all cases. In 90 % of the cases, the subarachnoid hemorrhage formed a clot or a thick layer. Massive intracerebral hematomas were observed in 10 % of the cases. Acute intraventricular hemorrhages were seen in 80 % of the cases. The mechanism of intraventricular hemorrhage in 70 % of the cases was of the reflux type, which was characterized by a reflux of the severe subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cistern. Acute and diffuse brain swelling on CT scan was observed in several cases, which also showed initial increased intracranial pressures. The major mechanisms leading to acute death or a very severe state soon after subarachnoid hemorrhage might be caused by acute brain-stem failure due to severe subarachnoid hemorrhages in the basal cisterns surrounding the brain-stem and an acute increase in intracranial pressure by cerebral edema following subarachnoid hemorrhage and secondary cerebral ischemia due to cardiac and respiratory arrest. (author)

  6. Subarachnoid mesencephalic hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oviedo, Soledad; De Luca, Silvina; Ceciliano, Alejandro; Mondello, Eduardo; Oviedo, Jorge D.; Lopardo Villarino, Guzman; Eyheremendy, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    The case of a 57 y.o. male who has had severe headache of sudden onset without neck stiffness or other signs of neurological foci was reported. Initial CT scan showed perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain MRI and digital angiography were performed later and bleeding was interpreted as a result of an abnormal hemodynamic status developed by cerebral venous thrombosis. (author)

  7. FLAIR images of subarachnoid hemorrhage

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    Mikami, Takeshi; Saito, Koji; Okuyama, Tohru; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Akira; Shibata, Kazunori [Kushiro Neurosurgical Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    We studied MR fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequences in 37 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by aneurysmal rupture. FLAIR sequence suppressed the CSF signal and produced very heavy T{sub 2} weighted images. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was able to be demonstrated as high signal intensity on FLAIR sequences in all patients clear visualization of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage was able to be obtained by MR FLAIR sequences in not only Fisher`s group 3 or 4, but also Fisher`s group 2. Moreover it was suited for the detection of intraaxial hematoma, Sylvian hematoma, subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the posterior fossa and interhemispheric fissure. Especially, it was useful for detecting intraventricular hemorrhage. Therefore, if patients suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage present slight headache or atypical symptoms, sometimes it may be more suitable to perform MRI FLAIR pulse sequences first. Aneurysms were found in 21 cases (56.8%). When the aneurysmal size is more than 7 mm, the rate of detection becomes 100%. Aneurysms present various MR appearances because of flow characteristics. Aneurysms were demonstrated as low signal intensity except in 3 cases. In one out of 3 cases, aneurysms were revealed as high signal intensity and in the other two cases, it was revealed as mixed signal intensity. According to the previous studies, rapid flow was demonstrated as low signal intensity by vascular flow void, and delayed flow was demonstrated as high or mixed signal intensity by flow related enhancement and even echo rephasing. MR clearly delineates the size, the lumen, the flow, and the extraaxial location of aneurysms. (K.H.)

  8. Evaluation and Treatment of the Acute Cerebral Infarction with Convexal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Hyung; Kim, Sang Uk; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Young Il; Cho, Chul Bum; Yang, Seung Ho; Kim, Il Sup; Hong, Jae Taek; Sung, Jae Hoon; Lee, Sang Won

    2016-09-01

    Non-traumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (CSAH) is a comparatively infrequent with various vascular and nonvascular causes, it rarely occurs concomitant to acute ischemic stroke. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman, visited emergency room with right side subjective weakness spontaneously. Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted images revealed an acute infarction of anterior cerebral arterial territory. Computed tomographic angiography showed a left frontal CSAH without any vascular lesions. And other laboratory studies were non-specific. We treated with dual antiplatelet drugs (cilostazole [Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. tokyo, Japan] and Aspirin [Bayer Pharma AG., Leverkusen, Germany]). She has done well for a follow-up period. (5 months) This case demonstrates the CSAH with acute infarction is rare but need to work up to identify the etiology and antiplatelet dugs are taken into account for treatments.

  9. Hydrocephalus secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Nobunori; Nakamura, Saburo; Kushi, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Takamitsu; Tsubokawa, Takashi; Moriyasu, Nobuo

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between the extension and severity of subarachnoid hemorrhage, as demonstrated by computed tomography (CT), and hydrocephalus secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage was studied. In 94 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage, as analyzed by CT scan performed within 7 days after onset, high-density areas in the subarachnoid space were recognized in 61 cases (64%) and secondary hydrocephalus occurred in 22 cases (23%). 17 cases died within 2 weeks, before the occurrence of the hydrocephalus. The CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage was classified into 5 types, according to its severity and extension; especially the degree of high density in the basal cistern and/or cisterns around the brain stem was remarked. Secondary hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage was observed in 90% of the cases; they had a density higher than a CT number of 60 in the basal cistern and/or cisterns around the brain stem (Type V). The mean interval between the onset of subarachnoid hemorrhage and the appearance of hydrocephalus was 20.6 days. We conclude that a significantly high density of extravasated blood in the subarachnoid space, especially in the basal cistern and/or the cisterns around the brain stem, can be predictive of secondary hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage. (author)

  10. Systemic lupus erythematosus flare up as acute spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage with bilateral lower limb paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Yang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is an uncommon complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Solitary association of fatal spinal SAH as a complication of SLE, has not been encountered much in literature although coexisting acute cerebral and spinal SAH have been associated with SLE. We present a 39-year old female with initial diagnosis of SLE eight years ago who suddenly developed a productive cough, acute abdomen and paralysis of the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed thoracic spinal SAH with varying degrees of thoracic spinal cord compression. The hemorrhage was total evacuated via surgery. She regained normal function of her lower limbers after the operation with no further neurological complications. One of the rare but fatal complications of SLE is solitary spinal SAH without cranial involvement. The best and most appropriate management of this kind of presentation is surgical decompression of the hematoma with total hemostasis. The cause of hemorrhage should be identified intra-operatively and treated appropriately.

  11. Circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schievink, W. I.; Karemaker, J. M.; Hageman, L. M.; van der Werf, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were investigated in a group of 500 consecutive patients admitted to a neurosurgical center. Subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred during stressful events in 42.8% of the patients, during nonstrenuous activities in 34.4%, and during rest or

  12. Factors Associated with Acute and Chronic Hydrocephalus in Nonaneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter; Raya, Amanda; Zipfel, Gregory J; Dhar, Rajat

    2016-02-01

    Hydrocephalus requiring external ventricular drain (EVD) or shunt placement commonly complicates aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but its frequency is not as well known for nonaneurysmal SAH (NA-SAH). Those with diffuse bleeding may have greater risk of hydrocephalus compared to those with a perimesencephalic pattern. We evaluated the frequency of hydrocephalus in NA-SAH and whether imaging factors could predict the need for EVD and shunting. We collected admission clinical and imaging variables for 105 NA-SAH patients, including bicaudate index (BI), Hijdra sum score (HSS), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) score, modified Fisher scale (mFS), and bleeding pattern. Hydrocephalus was categorized as acute (need for EVD) or chronic (shunt). We applied logistic regression to determine whether hydrocephalus risk was independently related to bleeding pattern or mediated through blood volume or ventriculomegaly. Acute hydrocephalus was seen in 26 (25%) patients but was more common with diffuse (15/28, 54%) versus perimesencephalic (10/59, 17%, p hydrocephalus had worse clinical grade and higher BI, HSS, and IVH scores. Adjusting the relationship between hydrocephalus and diffuse bleeding for HSS (but not BI) nullified this association. Nine (35%) patients requiring EVD eventually required shunting for chronic hydrocephalus, which was associated with greater blood burden but not poor clinical grade. Acute hydrocephalus occurs in one-quarter of NA-SAH patients. The greater risk in diffuse bleeding appears to be mediated by greater cisternal blood volume but not by greater ventriculomegaly. Imaging characteristics may aid in anticipatory management of hydrocephalus in NA-SAH.

  13. Diagnosis of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage at 1.5 Tesla using proton-density weighted FSE and FLAIR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesmann, M.; Mayer, T.E.; Brueckmann, H.; Medele, R.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate MR imaging at 1.5 Tesla in patients suffering from acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) using proton-density weighted (PDW) fast spin echo (FSE) and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences. Methods: 19 patients suffering from acute SAH as diagnosed by CT were studied 6 h to 3 days after hemorrhage. 10 patients without SAH were studied as a control group. The presence of subarachnoid blood as well as possible artifacts was recorded. Results: In all 19 patients subarachnoid hemorrhage was detected on both FLAIR and PDW images (100%). On the FLAIR images, the cerebral ventricles were partially obscured by flow artifacts in 7 of 19 patients, the basal cisterns in 6 of 19 patients. In 4 of these 13 regions blood was diagnosed on both PDW and CT images, while in the other 9 regions both PDW and CT were unremarkable. Conclusion: The sensitivity of MRI at 1.5 Tesla in the diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage is comparable to CT. The combination of FLAIR and PDW FSE sequences helps to avoid false-positive results caused by flow artifacts. (orig.) [de

  14. Management of severe subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with diffusion-weighted imaging in acute stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamoto, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Fujiwara, Satoru; Tominaga, Teiji

    2007-01-01

    Determining the treatment strategy of severe subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) (Hunt and Kosnik Grade 4 and 5) requires objective evaluation to represent severity. In the present study, we investigated the role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the acute stage as an objective tool. DWI was performed within 48 hours after the onset and preoperatively in 36 patients who fulfilled following the inclusion criteria: admission Hunt and Kosnik Grade 4 or 5, and Fischer Group 3. Twelve of 14 patients without abnormal findings in DWI underwent surgery in the acute stage. Although 2 of 14 patients with high age were supposed to undergo surgery in the chronic stage, 1 patient died in aneurysmal re-rupture. Glasgow outcome scales (GOS) were good recovery (GR) in 5, moderate disability (MD) in 6, standard deviation (SD) in 1 and D in 2 patients. Thirteen of 22 patients with DWI abnormality had small lesions less than 10 mm in diameter. Twelve of 13 patients underwent surgery in the acute stage, and 1 died of aneurysmal re-rupture while waiting for surgery in the chronic stage. GOS were GR in 3, MD in 4, SD in 3 and D in 3 patients. Although 5 patients with diffuse DWI lesions underwent surgery in the acute stage, 2 were SD and 3 were D. Four patients were supposed to undergo delayed surgery. However, 2 of them died of recurrent hemorrhage while waiting. GOS were SD in 2 and D in 2 patients. The present study indicates that DWI may provide objective evaluation of brain damage in severe SAH. However, since there were varieties of DWI findings and clinical courses, careful decisions must be taken in management of severe SAH patients. (author)

  15. Prevalence of electrocardiographic changes in patients with acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and their relationship with outcome

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    Saktheeswaran Mahesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electrocardiographic (ECG alterations occurring after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH have been described frequently, but the prognostic significance of these changes has not been well characterized. Aim and Objectives: To report the prevalence and patterns of ECG alterations in patients with acute aneurysmal SAH and to study the relationship between ECG alterations and the neurological outcome, if any. Materials and Methods: Records of consecutive patients admitted to the neurosurgical intensive care unit of the SCTIMST, Trivandrum between January 1999 and January 2011 with acute aneurysmal SAH were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of the 321 patients with SAH, 190 (59.2% had abnormal ECGs. Repolarization abnormalities were the most common, with T wave inversion in the anterolateral leads occurring in 155 (48.3% patients. By univariate analysis, female sex, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS at admission of I, ST segment depression or T inversion in anterolateral leads, prolonged corrected QT interval, and sinus bradycardia were associated with increased risk of death. By multivariate analysis, only GCS and WFNS grade independently predicted mortality and none of the ECG changes predicted the same. Presence of tall T waves in anterior leads, T inversion in anterolateral leads, sinus bradycardia, and WFNS grade >1 were independently associated with GCS <15 and poor outcome at discharge. Conclusions: In patients with acute aneurysmal SAH, repolarization abnormalities are the commonest ECG alterations. ECG alterations do not independently predict death, but independently predict poor discharge neurological status.

  16. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  17. Endovascular Treatment for Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage with Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema in the Acute Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Toshinari; Tanabe, Tomoyuki; Muraoka, Kenichiro; Terada, Kinya; Hirotsune, Nobuyuki; Nishino, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Severe neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) can occur in a variety of brain insults, including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and severe case of NPE can cause devastating consequences. But the literature on the treatment strategy about aneurysmal SAH with NPE is very scant. We present that SAH patients with severe NPE, who were treated first by embolization of aneurysm followed by insertion of lumbar spinal drainage, had comparatively good outcome. We present 12 consecutive cases of aneurysmal SAH with NPE in the acute stage, which were treated by endovascular treatment between April 2002 and December 2012. We classified the patients according to the Hunt and Hess grading system as follows: grade-3 (1 patient), grade-4 (4 patients), and grade-5 (7 patients). All patients needed respiratory management, with the assistance of a ventilator, and underwent endovascular treatment for the ruptured aneurysms within 72 hours from onset. For all the patients, immediately after the endovascular treatment, we performed lumbar spinal drainage. The pulmonary edema disappeared rapidly after respiratory management and endovascular treatment. The outcomes were as follows: good recovery (GR; 3 patients), moderate disability (MD; 4 patients), severe disability (SD; 3 patients), and death (D; 2 patients). Five patients (42%) developed pneumonia, and we postponed extubation until recovery from pneumonia. The cause for severe disability and death was symptomatic vasospasm and primary brain damage. No patients had rebleeding from ruptured aneurysms. Endovascular treatment for ruptured aneurysm and placement of lumbar spinal drainage is an excellent treatment option for severe SAH with NPE.

  18. Non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Mikkelsen, Ronni; Sørensen, Leif

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Repeat imaging in patients with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (NASAH) remains controversial. We aim to report our experience with NASAH with different hemorrhage patterns, and to investigate the need for further diagnostic workup to determine the underlying cause of hemorrhage. M...... adequate with absence of hematoma and vasospasm. In contrast, a follow-up DSA should be mandatory for confirming or excluding vascular pathology in case of nPMSAH in order to prevent rebleeding....

  19. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wajnberg, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy corresponds to a syndrome characterized by a transient myocardial dysfunction affecting the left ventricular apex that classically occurs after major physical or emotional stress (also called 'broken heart syndrome' or 'stress-induced cardiomyopathy'). The author describes the case of a patient with takotsubo cardiomyopathy induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage. (author)

  20. Antifibrinolytic treatment in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, M.; Lindsay, K. W.; Murray, G. D.; Cheah, F.; Hijdra, A.; Muizelaar, J. P.; Schannong, M.; Teasdale, G. M.; van Crevel, H.; van Gijn, J.

    1984-01-01

    We enrolled 479 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine whether treatment with the antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid improves outcome by preventing rebleeding. At three months there was no statistical difference

  1. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart

  2. Rebleeding After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Carl Christian; Astrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the current knowledge of the mechanisms leading to rebleeding and the prevention of rebleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). METHODS: A literature search was performed to investigate factors associated with rebleeding after SAH. RESULTS: The review of the literature...

  3. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in pituitary tumor

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    Ashis Patnaik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is the bleeding into the subarachnoid space containing cerebrospinal fluid. The most common cause of SAH is trauma. Rupture of aneurysms, vascular anomalies, tumor bleeds and hypertension are other important etiologies. SAH in the setting of pituitary tumor can result from various causes. It can be due to intrinsic tumor related pathology, injury to surrounding the vessel during the operative procedure or due to an associated aneurysm. We discuss the pathological mechanisms and review relevant literature related to this interesting phenomenon. Early and accurate diagnosis of the cause of the SAH in pituitary tumors is important, as this influences the management.

  4. Acute Cholecystitis as a Cause of Fever in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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    Na Rae Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Fever is a very common complication that has been related to poor outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH. The incidence of acalculous cholecystitis is reportedly 0.5%–5% in critically ill patients, and cerebrovascular disease is a risk factor for acute cholecystitis (AC. However, abdominal evaluations are not typically performed for febrile patients who have recently undergone aSAH surgeries. In this study, we discuss our experiences with febrile aSAH patients who were eventually diagnosed with AC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 192 consecutive patients who underwent aSAH from January 2009 to December 2012. We evaluated their characteristics, vital signs, laboratory findings, radiologic images, and pathological data from hospitalization. We defined fever as a body temperature of >38.3°C, according to the Society of Critical Care Medicine guidelines. We categorized the causes of fever and compared them between patients with and without AC. Results Of the 192 enrolled patients, two had a history of cholecystectomy, and eight (4.2% were eventually diagnosed with AC. Among them, six patients had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In their pathological findings, two patients showed findings consistent with coexistent chronic cholecystitis, and two showed necrotic changes to the gall bladder. Patients with AC tended to have higher white blood cell counts, aspartame aminotransferase levels, and C-reactive protein levels than patients with fevers from other causes. Predictors of AC in the aSAH group were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR], 8.758; P = 0.033 and the initial consecutive fasting time (OR, 1.325; P = 0.024. Conclusions AC may cause fever in patients with aSAH. When patients with aSAH have a fever, diabetes mellitus and a long fasting time, AC should be suspected. A high degree of suspicion and a thorough abdominal examination of febrile aSAH patients allow for prompt diagnosis and treatment of this

  5. Computed tomography in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Ro; Chang, Kee Hyun; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Man Chung; Sim, Bo Sung

    1981-01-01

    Computed Tomography has become increasingly important diagnostic method as the initial examination in the diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage with direct detection of extravasated blood in basal cistern and cortical sulci. Furthermore, CT provides better and exact visualization of the presence, localization, extent and degree of intracerebral, intraventricular and subdural hemorrhage, infarction, hydrocephalus and rebleeding which may be associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, and also could detect the causative lesions with contrast enhancement in many cases. The purpose of the paper is to describe the CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to various causes and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CT in subarachnoid hemorrhage. Authors analysed a total of 153 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage confirmed by lumbar puncture at Seoul National University Hospital from March 1979 to April 1981, with special emphasis on CT findings. All of the cases took CT scan and 125 cases of them angiography. The results are as follows: 1. Most prevalent age group was 4th to 6th decades (78%). The ratio of male to female was 1.1: 1. 2. Of 125 cases with angiography, aneurysm was a major cause (68%). Others were arterio-venous malformation (9.6%), Moya-moya disease (4%) and unknown (18.4%). 3. Of all 153 cases with CT scan, hemorrhage was demonstrated in 98 cases (64.1%); SAH in 72 cases (47.1%), ICH in 65 cases (42.5%), IVH in 34 cases (22.2%) and SDH in 1 case (0.7%). SAH combined with ICH was a major group (34.7%) in SAH. Detection rate of SAH was 68.3% within the first 7 days and 5.8% after 7 dyas. 4. In aneurysms, SAH was detected in 60 of 85 cases (70.6%); 88.1% within the first 7 dyas and 5.6% after 7 dyas. Anterior communicating artery was the most common site of the aneurysms (40%), in which detection rate of SAH was 100% within the first 7 days. SAH was combined with ICH in 38.3%. 5. On CT, SAH of unilateral Sylvian fissure was pathognomonic for ruptured MCA

  6. MR imaging at 0.5 Tesla with FLAIR sequence in the diagnosis of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsa, W.; Leitner, H.; Tscholakoff, D.; Perneczky, G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of MR imaging in patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) at 0.5 Tesla using the FLAIR (Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) sequenze. Additionally, the value of MR angiographie (MRA) in the diagnosis of intracranial aneurysms was assessed. Materials and Methods: 19 patients with suspected acute SAH were included in this study. MR imaging was performed using an axial FLAIR sequence and axial T 1 , T 2 and PD weighted sequences. In 16 patients an additional MRA (3D-TOF) was performed. 10 patients without SAH were examined as a control group. At the end of the study the 29 MR examinations were randomised and the images were read by two experienced radiologists; subsequently a consensus interpretation was made. Results: In 16 patients an acute SAH was verified with the FLAIR sequence, in 13 cases the origin of hemorrhage was found during surgery. In the consensus interpretation of the MR images all cases were diagnosed properly. 12 of the 16 MRA studies were of diagnostic quality, but only 6 cases were interpreted correctly. Conclusion: The FLAIR sequence at 0.5 Tesla proved effective in the diagnosis of acute SAH. MRA at 0.5 Tesla failed in the detection of intracranial aneurysms. (orig.) [de

  7. Spontaneous non aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian Jieyong; Wang Zhong; Zhou Dai

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the etiology and the treatment of spontaneous non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods: Twenty five cases of cerebral vessel angiography negative patients were analysed retrospectively, the majority of them had been undergone CT, DSA, MRI examination in order to define the etiological factor. Results: Among them, there was 1 case of spinal arteria-vena malformation, 1 case of hemorrhagic blood and 2 cases according to the revealing of MRI could be explained as bled vascular-occult malformation or cavernous angioma. Conclusion: The management and prognosis of patients in whom non-aneurysm is founded on the initial angiogram depends on the pattern of hemorrhage of the initial CT scanning, repeated angiography should be avoided for the case of premise encephalic non-aneurysmal SAH and MRI examination may be indicated to defining of etiological factors

  8. Acute Subdural Hematoma and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Caused by Ruptured Cortical Artery Aneurysm: Case Report and Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekarchizadeh, Ahmad; Masih, Saburi; Reza, Pourkhalili; Seif, Bahram

    2017-01-01

    The present report describes an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), due to ruptured cortical aneurysm. To our knowledge, extremely rare cases of this sort have been reported so far. A 23-year-old male patient without previous trauma presented with severe headache and rapidly decreasing level of consciousness to decerebrate status. Computed tomography (CT) scan has demonstrated an ASDH together with SAH. Hematoma has immediately been evacuated without any evaluation by angiography. After evacuation of the thick subdural clot, a 10-mm aneurysm was revealed on a precentral artery of frontal cortex, which was ligated. However, after 35 days the patient discharged with left side hemiparesis and dysphasia, and just after several months of admission he got symptom free. Ruptured cortical aneurysm should be considered as one of the causes of spontaneous ASDH. Vascular anomaly investigations are suggested for these cases, thus CT angiography or digital subtraction angiography has to be considered if clinical condition allows. PMID:28503501

  9. Neurocardiac protection with milrinone for restoring acute cerebral hypoperfusion and delayed ischemic injury after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutoh, Tomoko; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Sasaki, Kazumasu; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Tatewaki, Yasuko; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Taki, Yasuyuki

    2017-02-15

    Acute cerebral hypoperfusion following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is highly related to the pathogenesis of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), but the therapeutic option is poorly available. This study aimed to clarify the effect of milrinone (MIL) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and related outcomes after experimental SAH. Twenty-seven male C57BL/6 mice were assigned to either sham surgery (SAH-sham; n=6), SAH induced by endovascular perforation (control; n=10), or SAH followed by cardiac support with intravenous MIL (n=11) performed 1.5-h after SAH induction. CBF, neurobehavioral function, occurrence of DCI were assessed by MR-continuous arterial spin labeling, daily neurological score testing, and diffusion- and T2-weighted MR images on days 1 and 3, respectively. Initial global CBF depression was notable in mice of control and MIL groups as compared to the SAH-sham group (Pprotective agent against EBI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Intravascular volume after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoff, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Intravascular volume after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage A subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm is a devastating disorder with an often poor prognosis. The occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is one of the most important factors determining outcome in

  11. Multivariable and Bayesian Network Analysis of Outcome Predictors in Acute Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Review of a Pure Surgical Series in the Post-International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zador, Zsolt; Huang, Wendy; Sperrin, Matthew; Lawton, Michael T

    2018-06-01

    Following the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT), evolving treatment modalities for acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) has changed the case mix of patients undergoing urgent surgical clipping. To update our knowledge on outcome predictors by analyzing admission parameters in a pure surgical series using variable importance ranking and machine learning. We reviewed a single surgeon's case series of 226 patients suffering from aSAH treated with urgent surgical clipping. Predictions were made using logistic regression models, and predictive performance was assessed using areas under the receiver operating curve (AUC). We established variable importance ranking using partial Nagelkerke R2 scores. Probabilistic associations between variables were depicted using Bayesian networks, a method of machine learning. Importance ranking showed that World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grade and age were the most influential outcome prognosticators. Inclusion of only these 2 predictors was sufficient to maintain model performance compared to when all variables were considered (AUC = 0.8222, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7646-0.88 vs 0.8218, 95% CI: 0.7616-0.8821, respectively, DeLong's P = .992). Bayesian networks showed that age and WFNS grade were associated with several variables such as laboratory results and cardiorespiratory parameters. Our study is the first to report early outcomes and formal predictor importance ranking following aSAH in a post-ISAT surgical case series. Models showed good predictive power with fewer relevant predictors than in similar size series. Bayesian networks proved to be a powerful tool in visualizing the widespread association of the 2 key predictors with admission variables, explaining their importance and demonstrating the potential for hypothesis generation.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  14. Hydrocephalus associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosaka, Yoshiki

    1981-01-01

    Thirteen patients exhibited a communicating hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to ruptured intracranial aneurysms and were treated with shunt procedures. The interval between subarachnoid hemorrhage and surgery averaged 9 weeks. Seven of the patients showed improvement. The prognostic value for surgical management was evaluated on the basis of three different diagnostic examinations (computed tomography (CT), cisternography and constant infusion test). A correct diagnosis was obtained in 78 per cent in cisternography, and 63 per cent in infusion test and CT. All patients responding to surgery showed a typical pattern in cisternography, consisting of ventricular retention of radiopharmaceutical tracer for 48 h or longer in association with no radioactivity over the cerebral hemispheres. The constant infusion test correlated well with typical cisternographic patterns. CT is useful in demonstrating pathophysiological changes in hydrocephalus. Periventricular hypodensity was visible in patients with normal or slightly elevated intracranial pressure, accompanied by fairly rapid deterioration. All of them responded well to shunting. In most cases which benefited from the shunt, the postoperative CT showed not only normal-sized ventricles but also marked regression of the hypodensity over a short period. (author)

  15. Management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etminan, N; Macdonald, R L

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) affects people with a mean age of 55 years. Although there are about 9/100 000 cases per year worldwide, the young age and high morbidity and mortality lead to loss of many years of productive life. Intracranial aneurysms account for 85% of cases. Despite this, the majority of survivors of aneurysmal SAH have cognitive deficits, mood disorders, fatigue, inability to return to work, and executive dysfunction and are often unable to return to their premorbid level of functioning. The main proven interventions to improve outcome are aneurysm repair in a timely fashion by endovascular coiling rather than neurosurgical clipping when feasible and administration of nimodipine. Management also probably is optimized by neurologic intensive care units and multidisciplinary teams. Improved diagnosis, early aneurysm repair, administration of nimodipine, and advanced neurointensive care support may be responsible for improvement in survival from SAH in the last few decades. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Troponin elevation in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis N. Mavridis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Troponin (tr elevation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients is often difficult to be appropriately assessed by clinicians, causing even disagreements regarding its management between neurosurgeons and cardiologists. The purpose of this article was to review the literature regarding the clinical interpretation of tr elevation in SAH. We searched for articles in PubMed using the key words: “troponin elevation” and “subarachnoid hemorrhage”. All of them, as well as relative neurosurgical books, were used for this review. Some type of cardiovascular abnormality develops in most SAH patients. Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a frequent SAH complication, due to catecholamine surge which induces cardiac injury, as evidenced by increased serum tr levels, electrocardiographic (ECG changes and cardiac wall motion abnormalities. Tr elevation, usually modest, is an early and specific marker for cardiac involvement after SAH and its levels peak about two days after SAH. Cardiac tr elevation predictors include poor clinical grade, intraventricular hemorrhage, loss of consciousness at ictus, global cerebral edema, female sex, large body surface area, lower systolic blood pressure, higher heart rate and prolonged Q-Tc interval. Elevated tr levels are associated with disability and death (especially tr >1 μg/L, worse neurological grade, systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction, pulmonary congestion, longer intensive care unit stay and incidence of vasospasm. Tr elevation is a common finding in SAH patients and constitutes a rightful cause of worry about the patients' cardiac function and prognosis. It should be therefore early detected, carefully monitored and appropriately managed by clinicians.

  17. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Garbossa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is one of the major cause of mortality for stroke. The leading cause is the rupture of an intracrnial aneurym. Acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is a complex multifaceted disorder that plays out over days to weeks. The development of aneurysms is mainly due to a hemodynamic stress. Considerableadvances have been made in endovascular techniques, diagnostic methods, and surgical and perioperative management guidelines. Rebleeding remains the most imminent danger until the aneurysm is excluded from cerebral circulation. The only effective prevention of rebleeding is repair the aneurysm; choosing the right way with surgical or an endovascular approach. Outcome for patients with SAH remains poor, with population-based mortality rates as high as 45% and significant morbidity among survivors. In this work we analyzed the diagnostic-therapeutic course of patients presenting SAH. We analyzed the types and the occurrence of complications. We present two cases report to better demonstrate that treatments for specific patients need to be individualized.

  18. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm with fundal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashihara, Kengo; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Kida, Shinya; Nitta, Hisashi; Yamamoto, Shinjiro

    1985-01-01

    CT scan and fundus oculi of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm were investigated in 42 patients who were admitted between January, 1980, and August, 1984. Fundal hemorrhage (FH) was observed in 22 patients. The patients with FH showed a worse clinical grade (Hunt Kosnik) on admission than those without FH. The mortality rate of patients with FH was 64 %, much higher than the 5 % rate of those without FH. Moreover, the patients with FH showed more trouble in daily living than those without FH. CT scans of patients with FH usually showed severe subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), whereas those of patients without FH showed only mild hemorrhage. These findings suggest that fundal hemorrhage is caused by acute intracranial hypertension following subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. However, no significant correlation between the laterality of FH and the hemispheric dominancy of SAH could be demonstrated. (author)

  19. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage: using 64-slice multidetector CT angiography to ''triage'' patients' treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agid, R.; Lee, S.K.; Willinsky, R.A.; Farb, R.I.; TerBrugge, K.G. [Toronto Western Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-11-15

    To evaluate the clinical role of CT angiography (CTA) in patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for treatment decision-making. Consecutive patients with acute SAH had CTA using a 64-slice scanner for initial clinical decision-making. Image processing included multiplanar volume reformatted (MPVR) maximum intensity projections (MIP) and 3D volume-rendered reconstructions. CTAs were used for (1) evaluating the cause of SAH, and (2) triaging aneurysm-bearing patients to the more appropriate management, either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling. CTA findings were confirmed by neurosurgical exploration or catheter angiography (digital subtraction angiography, DSA). Successful coiling provided evidence that triaging to endovascular treatment was correct. Included in the study were 73 patients. CTA findings were confirmed by DSA or neurosurgical operation in 65 patients, and of these 65, 47 had aneurysmal SAH, 3 had vasculitis, 1 had arterial dissection and 14 had no underlying arterial abnormality. The cause of SAH was detected with CTA in 62 out of the 65 patients (95.4%, sensitivity 94%, specificity 100%). CTA revealed the aneurysm in 46 of 47 patients (98%, sensitivity 98%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 82.3%), 1 of 3 vasculitides and 1 of 1 dissection. Of the 46 patients with aneurysm, 44 (95.7%) were referred for treatment based on CTA. In 2 patients (2 of 46, 4.4%) CTA was not informative enough to choose treatment requiring DSA. Of the 44 patients, 27 (61.4%) were referred to endovascular treatment and successful coiling was achieved in 25 (25 of 27, 92.6%). CTA using a 64-slice scanner is an accurate tool for detecting and characterizing aneurysms in acute SAH. CTA is useful in the decision process whether to coil or clip an aneurysm. (orig.)

  20. MicroRNA Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Søren; Rasmussen, Rune; Rossing, Maria

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) accounts for a major part of the morbidity and mortality after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are pathophysiologically involved in acute cerebral ischemia. This study compared miRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid...

  1. A case of acute spinal subdural hematoma with subarachnoid hemorrhage: Rapid spontaneous remission, relapse, and complete resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michito Namekawa

    2017-06-01

    In addition to rostrocaudal spreading of bloody components in the subdural space, rupture of the hematoma into the subarachnoid space must have released pressure, compressing the spinal cord. In this case report, we also describe the serial MRI studies and note the limitations of the resolution of spinal MRI in the acute phase.

  2. Selective Toll-Like Receptor 4 Antagonists Prevent Acute Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takeshi; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Nishikawa, Hirofumi; Nakano, Fumi; Liu, Lei; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2018-05-31

    There are no direct evidences showing the linkage between Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The purpose of this study was to examine if selective blockage of TLR4 prevents BBB disruption after SAH in mice and if the TLR4 signaling involves mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). One hundred and fifty-one C57BL/6 male mice underwent sham or endovascular perforation SAH operation, randomly followed by an intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle or two dosages (117 or 585 ng) of a selective TLR4 antagonist IAXO-102 at 30 min post-operation. The effects were evaluated by survival rates, neurological scores, and brain water content at 24-72 h and immunoglobulin G immunostaining and Western blotting at 24 h post-SAH. IAXO-102 significantly prevented post-SAH neurological impairments, brain edema, and BBB disruption, resulting in improved survival rates. IAXO-102 also significantly suppressed post-SAH activation of a major isoform of MAPK p46 c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 as well as periostin induction and preserved tight junction protein zona occludens-1. Another selective TLR4 antagonist TAK-242, which has a different binding site from IAXO-102, also showed similar effects to IAXO-102. This study first provided the evidence that TLR4 signaling is involved in post-SAH acute BBB disruption and that the signaling is mediated at least partly by JNK activation. TLR4-targeted therapy may be promising to reduce post-SAH morbidities and mortalities.

  3. Perimesencephalic hemorrhage: a nonaneurysmal and benign form of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gijn, J.; van Dongen, K. J.; Vermeulen, M.; Hijdra, A.

    1985-01-01

    We studied 28 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and normal angiograms. On early CT (within 5 days) in 13 cases, blood was seen mainly or only in the cisterns around the midbrain. This pattern of hemorrhage was found in only 1 of 92 patients with a ruptured aneurysm. None of the unexplained

  4. Continuous EEG Monitoring in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Friberg, Christian Kærsmose; Wellwood, Ian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous EEG (cEEG) may allow monitoring of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and seizures, including non-convulsive seizures (NCSz), and non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). We aimed to evaluate: (a) the diagnostic...

  5. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage as manifestation of an acoustic neurinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, A.; Voigt, K.; Peiffer, J.; Rios Nogales Carces, L.

    1986-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAH) due to intracranial tumors are very rare. We report the clinical, neuroradiological and histological findings of an acoustic neurinoma, the initial and manifestating symptom of which was an acute SAH. In the literature we found only eight further cases of acoustic neurinomas with spontaneous SAH. The causes of the SAH are discussed; and we compare our findings to those in the literature. (orig.) [de

  6. Intracranial drug delivery for subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Robert Loch; Leung, Ming; Tice, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Tice and colleagues pioneered site-specific, sustained-release drug delivery to the brain almost 30 years ago. Currently there is one drug approved for use in this manner. Clinical trials in subarachnoid hemorrhage have led to approval of nimodipine for oral and intravenous use, but other drugs, such as clazosentan, hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and magnesium, have not shown consistent clinical efficacy. We propose that intracranial delivery of drugs such as nimodipine, formulated in sustained-release preparations, are good candidates for improving outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage because they can be administered to patients that are already undergoing surgery and who have a self-limited condition from which full recovery is possible.

  7. CT findings of fundal hemorrhage in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munemoto, Shigeru; Ishiguro, Shuzo; Kimura, Akira; Futami, Kazuya; Kogure, Yuzaburo; Wakamatsu, Koichi; Demachi, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    The patient was a 66-year-old man. He lost consciousness as a result of a third subarachnoid hemorrhage attack. On neurological examination, he was found to be comatose and to have no spontaneous respiration. A mydriasis was noticed on both eyes. Bilateral retinal bleeding was also observed, with the bleeding of the left side more severe than that of the right side. After his death, his brain and eyes were examined by means of a CT scan. The CT films showed a severe subarachnoid hemorrhage and ventricular hematoma. The thin-sliced CT films showed left retinal bleeding. Retinal bleeding may be caused by a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Usually we make a sketch of the retinal bleeding on the basis of a doctor's report. A photo of an optic fundus is a good record; however, taking a photo is troublesome for severely ill patients. The CT finding of retinal bleeding is gross, but a CT image is one good way to record retinal bleeding. (author)

  8. Subarachnoid hemorrhage: Early evaluation and optimization of management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germans, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    A subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a life-threatening disease that was first described in the 18th century, but it took until the early 20th century until the term "spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage" was introduced by the English neurologist Sir Charles P. Symonds. Nowadays, the term spontaneous

  9. Arachnoid granulation affected by subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P. Chopard

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate using light microscopy the fibro-cellular components of arachnoid granulations affected by mild and severe subarachnoid hemorrage. The erythrocytes were in the channels delimitated by collagenous and elastic bundles and arachnoid cells, showing their tortuous and intercommunicating row from the pedicle to the fibrous capsule. The core portion of the pedicle and the center represented a principal route to the bulk outflow of cerebrospinal fluid and erythrocytes. In the severe hemorrhage, the fibrocellular components are desorganized, increasing the extracellular channels. We could see arachnoid granulations without erythrocytes, which cells showed big round nucleous suggesting their transformation into phagocytic cells.

  10. Hyponatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is due to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis and acute glucocorticoid deficiency

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2011-06-01

    Hyponatraemia is the most common electrolyte abnormality following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and contributes to increased morbidity and mortality. Retrospective data suggests that the syndrome of inappropriate diuresis (SIAD) is the most common cause of hyponatraemia in SAH, though cerebral salt wasting has been postulated by some workers to be the predominant abnormality. Data which has shown acute glucocorticoid deficiency following SAH has suggested that some cases of euvolaemic hyponatraemia may also be caused by this mechanism.We prospectively studied the hormonal and haemodynamic influences involved in the development of hyponatraemia in 100 patients (61% female, median age 53 (range 16-82)) with non-traumatic aneurysmal SAH. Each patient had plasma sodium (pNa), urea, osmolality, glucose and 0900h cortisol (PC), and urinary sodium and osmolality measured on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 following SAH. Fluid balance and haemodynamic parameters were recorded daily. Results were compared with 15 patients admitted to ITU following vascular surgery. A PC<300nmol\\/L in a patient in ITU was regarded clinically as inappropriately low.49% of patients developed hyponatraemia (pNa<135 mmol\\/L), including 14% who developed clinically significantly hyponatraemia (pNa<130 mmol\\/L). 36\\/49 (73.4%) developed hyponatraemia between days 1 and 3 post SAH. The median duration of hyponatraemia was 3 days (range 1–10 days).In 35\\/49 (71.4%), hyponatraemia was due to SIAD as defined by standard diagnostic criteria. 14% of SAH patients had at least one PC<300nmol\\/L; 5 of these (35.7%) developed hyponatraemia. In 4 patients hyponatraemia was preceded by acute cortisol deficiency and responded to hydrocortisone treatment. In contrast, all controls had PC>500 nmol\\/L on day 1, and >300 nmol on days 3–12. There were no cases of cerebral salt wasting. There was no relationship between the incidence of hyponatraemia and the defined anatomical territory or severity of

  11. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage with concomitant posterior communicating artery fenestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Gregory M; Grandhi, Ramesh; Zwagerman, Nathan T; Agarwal, Nitin; Friedlander, Robert M

    2015-02-01

    Fenestrations of the posterior communicating artery (PCoA) are extremely rare. Associated aneurysms have only been documented three times in the literature, and none associated with a subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe a 52-year-old female who presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to a ruptured saccular aneurysm at the proximal limb of a fenestrated right PCoA. The patient was also found to have bilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms. Surgical management included surmising the etiology of the subarachnoid hemorrhage with subsequent clipping of both the right PCoA and MCA aneurysm. The potential embryological mechanisms leading to a PCoA fenestration are discussed.

  12. Spinal vascular malformations in non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germans, M. R.; Pennings, F. A.; Sprengers, M. E. S.; Vandertop, W. P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In patients with non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and no evidence for a cerebral aneurysm on angiography, a frequent cause of the hemorrhage is perimesencephalic hemorrhage or other cerebral vascular pathology. In some patients no cause is found. The exact incidence of a spinal

  13. Impaired Work Productivity After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crago, Elizabeth A; Price, Thomas J; Bender, Catherine M; Ren, Dianxu; Poloyac, Samuel M; Sherwood, Paula R

    2016-10-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a sudden debilitating condition affecting individuals during the most productive times of their lives. Treatment advances have reduced mortality rates but increased the number of survivors facing deficits in physical and neuropsychological function. This study examined associations between neuropsychological function and work productivity after aSAH. Fifty-two patients with aSAH, employed before hemorrhage, were recruited from an ongoing National Institutes of Health study. Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ), neuropsychological tests (executive function, psychomotor speed, attention and mental flexibility, memory), and Patient Assessment of Own Function were completed at 3 and 12 months after aSAH. Subjects in this analysis reported some level of difficulty in work productivity at 3 and 12 months (35% and 30%, respectively) after hemorrhage. Lower WLQ scores in time management and mental/interpersonal subscales were associated with poorer performance in psychomotor function (r = .5, p = .04 and r = .42, p = .09). Poorer mental flexibility and working memory correlated with time management difficulty at 3 months (r = -.4, p = .09 and r = .54, p = .02). Patients performing poorly on story recall tests were more likely to report difficulty with job physical performance (r = -.42, p = .09) and completing work effectively (r = .61, p = .009). Poorer working memory performance was associated with lower scores on mental/interpersonal WLQ subscales (r = .45, p = .05) and overall health-related work productivity loss (r = .47, p = .04). WLQ areas also correlated with participants' perception of their neuropsychological function after aSAH. These results suggest that neuropsychological deficits impact work quality after hemorrhage and provide strong impetus for future studies so that domain-specific interventions can be implemented to improve outcomes that affect quality of life including work productivity.

  14. Life Satisfaction and Return to Work After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passier, Patricia E. C. A.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M. A. Anne; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Lindeman, Eline; Post, Marcel W. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate life satisfaction and employment status after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to explain the associations between life satisfaction and demographic, disease-related, psychological, and personality characteristics. Subjects with SAH (n = 141)

  15. Managing aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: It takes a team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Turkel-Parrella, David; Duggal, Abhijit; Murphy, Amanda; McCredie, Victoria; Marotta, Thomas R

    2015-03-01

    Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage are at high risk of complications, including rebleeding, delayed cerebral ischemia, cerebral infarction, and death. This review presents a practical approach for managing this condition and its complications. Copyright © 2015 Cleveland Clinic.

  16. Bedside diagnosis of mitochondrial dysfunction in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, A.; Nielsen, T. H.; Nilsson, O.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives - Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is frequently associated with delayed neurological deterioration (DND). Several studies have shown that DND is not always related to vasospasm and ischemia. Experimental and clinical studies have recently documented that it is possible...

  17. Efficacy of Early Rehabilitation After Surgical Repair of Acute Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Outcomes After Verticalization on Days 2-5 Versus Day 12 Post-Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, Andjela; Grujicic, Danica; Bogosavljevic, Vojislav; Jokovic, Milos; Mujovic, Natasa; Markovic, Ivana Petronic

    2017-01-01

    To develop a specific rehabilitation protocol for patients who have undergone surgical repair of acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), and to determine the time at which verticalization should be initiated after aSAH. Sixty-five patients who underwent acute-term surgery for aSAH and early rehabilitation were evaluated in groups: Group 1 (n=34) started verticalization on days 2-5 post-bleeding whereas Group 2 (n=31) started verticalization approximately day 12 post-bleeding. All patients were monitored for early complications, vasospasm and ischemia. Assessments of motor status, depression and anxiety (using Zung scales), and cognitive status (using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE)) were conducted at discharge and at 1 and 3 months post-surgery. At discharge, Group 1 had a significantly higher proportion of patients with ischemia than Group 2 (p=0.004). Group 1 had a higher proportion of patients with hemiparesis than Group 2 three months post-surgery (p=0.015). Group 1 patients scored significantly higher on the Zung depression scale than Group 2 patients at 1 month (p=0.005) and 3 months post-surgery (p=0.001; the same applies to the Zung anxiety scale (p=0.006 and p=0.000, respectively). Group 2 patients scored significantly higher on the MMSE than those in Group 1 at discharge (p=0.040) and 1 month post-surgery (p=0.025). Early verticalization had no effect with respect to preventing early postoperative complications in this patient group. Once a patient has undergone acute surgical repair of aSAH, it is safe and preferred that rehabilitation be initiated immediately postsurgery. However, verticalization should not start prior to day 12 post-bleeding.

  18. Brain Lactate Metabolism in Humans With Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Oddo M; Levine JM; Frangos S; Maloney-Wilensky E; Carrera E; Daniel RT; Levivier M; Magistretti PJ; LeRoux PD

    2012-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Lactate is central for the regulation of brain metabolism and is an alternative substrate to glucose after injury. Brain lactate metabolism in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been fully elucidated. METHODS: Thirty one subarachnoid hemorrhage patients monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain oxygen (PbtO(2)) were studied. Samples with elevated CMD lactate (>4 mmol/L) were matched to PbtO(2) and CMD pyruvate and categorized as hypoxi...

  19. Lethal Ultra-Early Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Due to Rupture of De Novo Aneurysm 5 Months After Primary Aneurysmatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Johannes; Unterberg, Andreas W; Zweckberger, Klaus

    2018-05-01

    Approximately 1% of all patients surviving rupture of a cerebral aneurysm suffer from a second aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage later in their lives, 61% of which are caused by rupture of a de novo aneurysm. Latency between bleedings is usually many years, and younger patients tend to achieve better outcomes from a second subarachnoid hemorrhage. We report an unusual case of lethal ultra-early rupture of a de novo aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery only 5 months after the initial subarachnoid hemorrhage and complete coiling in a young, healthy male patient. Despite complete aneurysm obliteration, young age, and good recovery, patients may be subjected to secondary subarachnoid hemorrhages from de novo aneurysms after only a few months of the initial bleeding. Early-control magnetic resonance angiography might hence be advisable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human Albumin Improves Long-Term Behavioral Sequelae After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Through Neurovascular Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Liu, Wenhua; Zhang, Xiaohao; Wang, Liumin; Xu, Lili; Xiong, Yunyun; Yang, Lian; Sang, Hongfei; Ye, Ruidong; Liu, Xinfeng

    2015-10-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage results in significant long-lasting neurologic sequelae. Here, we investigated whether human albumin improves long-term outcomes in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage and whether neurovascular remodeling is involved in the protection of albumin. Laboratory investigation. Hospital research laboratory. Male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage by endovascular perforation. Albumin of either 0.63 or 1.25 g/kg was injected IV immediately after the surgery. Modified Garcia test, beam-walking test, novel object recognition, and Morris water maze were employed to determine the behavioral deficits. The effects of albumin on early neurovascular dysfunction and chronic synaptic plasticity were also studied. Both doses of albumin significantly improved the sensorimotor scores (F = 31.277; p = 0.001) and cognitive performance (F = 7.982; p = 0.001 in novel object recognition test; and F = 3.431; p = 0.026 in the latency analysis of Morris water maze test) for at least 40 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage. There were remarkable microvasculature hypoperfusion, intracranial pressure rise, early vasoconstriction, neural apoptosis, and degeneration in subarachnoid hemorrhage rats, with albumin significantly attenuating such neurovascular dysfunction. Furthermore, albumin markedly prevented blood-brain barrier disruption, as indicated by less blood-brain barrier leakage, preserved blood-brain barrier-related proteins, and dampened gelatinase activities. The expressions of key synaptic elements were up-regulated with albumin supplementation in both acute and chronic phases. Accordingly, a higher dendritic spine density was observed in the prefrontal and hippocampal areas of albumin-treated subarachnoid hemorrhage animals. Albumin at low-to-moderate doses markedly improves long-term neurobehavioral sequelae after subarachnoid hemorrhage, which may involve an integrated process of neurovascular remodeling.

  1. Heparin: The Silver Bullet of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas K. Khattar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Various neurological diseases have recently been associated with neuroinflammation and worsening outcomes. Subarachnoid hemorrhage has been shown to generate a potent neuroinflammatory response. Heparin is a potential effective anti-inflammatory agent to prevent initial injury as well as delayed neurological decline. Different mechanisms of action for heparin have been proposed including, but not limited to the binding and neutralization of oxyhemoglobin, decreased transcription and signal transduction of endothelin-1, inhibition of binding to vessel wall selectins and vascular leakage into the subarachnoid space as well as direct binding and neutralization of inflammatory molecules. With a reasonably safe side-effect profile, heparin has shown significant promise in small series in human studies of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in decreasing both initial and delayed neurological injury. Further studies are needed to validate various neuroprotective features of heparin in subarachnoid hemorrhage as well as other disease states.

  2. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as a psychological trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütter, Bernd-Otto; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka

    2014-04-01

    Despite the progress made in the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), many patients complain of persistent psychosocial and cognitive problems. The present study was performed to explore the significance of psychological traumatization by the bleeding with respect to psychosocial results after SAH. A series of 45 patients were examined in a cross-sectional study an average of 49.4 months after SAH by means of a quality-of-life questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, the German version of the Impact of Event Scale (IES), and a clinical interview (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders) to make the diagnosis of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Twenty-nine patients underwent surgery for treatment of a ruptured aneurysm; the remaining 16 patients had SAH of unknown origin. Twelve patients (27%) exhibited PTSD, and almost two-thirds of the 45 patients in the study reported substantial fear of recurrent hemorrhage. Not only the presence of PTSD but the severity of psychological traumatization as assessed by the IES explained up to 40% of the variance of the self- and proxy-rated impairments. Multivariate analyses revealed psychological traumatization (IES) and neurological state on admission (Hunt and Hess grade) as substantial predictors of the self- and proxy-rated quality of life, explaining 31% and 42% of the variance, respectively. Even several years after SAH, the severity of psychological traumatization by the bleeding substantially determines the degree of psychosocial impairment. In the future, this issue should be addressed in the care of these patients. Furthermore, the development of psychological interventions is called for to prevent the emergence of PTSD after SAH.

  3. Recovery from a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Patient and Spouse Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Roanne G.; Brice, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    This second article of a two-part case study focuses on the experiences of a patient and his spouse (caregiver) when a neurological trauma occurs. It is the personal account when A.B. survived a vertebral artery aneurysm and hemorrhage resulting in a subarachnoid hemorrhage. It is also an in-depth post-trauma account from two speech-language…

  4. The initial time-course of headache in patients with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Čomić, Hata; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.; Vergouwen, Mervyn D.I.

    2017-01-01

    Background If acute severe headache disappears early after its onset, the question arises whether subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) should still be ruled out. We studied the initial time-course and minimal duration of headache in a consecutive series of neurologically intact patients with spontaneous

  5. Effect of Hydroxyethyl Starch Solution on Incidence of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Suffering from Cerebral Vasospasm Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieninger, Martin; Unbekannt, Daniel; Schneiker, André; Sinner, Barbara; Bele, Sylvia; Prasser, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    The application of third-generation hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions in critically ill patients suffering from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) was often part of the treatment of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). However, there is increasing evidence showing a correlation between the application of HES and the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI). In a single-center retrospective analysis including 81 patients without a preexisting renal disorder suffering from aSAH who had received higher volumes of 6 % HES 130/0.4 due to standard treatment of DCI, the incidence of AKI during intensive care unit (ICU) stay was recorded using AKIN criteria. Furthermore, the course of serum creatinine after discharge from ICU was observed. 6 % HES 130/0.4 was given over a period of 12.9 ± 7.1 days resulting in a cumulative dose of 12543.2 ± 7743.6 mL. Four patients (4.9 %) fulfilled AKIN criteria stage 1 during ICU stay. In two of these patients, serum creatinine was within normal range again on day of discharge. Five patients showed elevated levels of serum creatinine within 1 to 22 months after hospitalization. A correlation between the amount of HES given and the incidence of AKI could not be found. The application of 6 % HES 130/0.4 did not lead to an elevated incidence of AKI in patients without an elevated baseline serum creatinine. However, there is still a lack of high-level evidence as prospective randomized trials are missing yet.

  6. Hyperglycemia and Clinical Outcome in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage A Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Nyika D.; Biessels, Geert Jan; de Haan, Rob J.; Vermeulen, Marinus; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Coert, Bert; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Hyperglycemia may worsen outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. We performed a systematic review to investigate the relation between admission hyperglycemia and outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods-We included cohort studies or clinical trials

  7. Spreading depolarizations increase delayed brain injury in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamming, Arend M.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; Rudrapatna, S. Umesh; Lanier, Christian; van Os, Hine J. A.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Ferrari, Michel D.; van der Toorn, Annette; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Stowe, Ann M.; Dijkhuizen, Rick M.

    Spreading depolarizations may contribute to delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, but the effect of spreading depolarizations on brain lesion progression after subarachnoid hemorrhage has not yet been assessed directly. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that

  8. Differences in Neuropeptide Y Secretion Between Intracerebral Hemorrhage and Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebesch, Karl-M; Bründl, Elisabeth; Schödel, Petra; Hochreiter, Andreas; Scheitzach, Judith; Bele, Sylvia; Brawanski, Alexander; Störr, Eva-M; Lohmeier, Anette; Proescholdt, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most potent endogenous vasoconstrictors, and its contribution to the multifactorial cascade of cerebral vasospasm due to nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is not yet fully understood. This experimental study compared the hemorrhage-specific course of NPY secretion into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and into plasma between 2 groups: patients with SAH and patients with basal ganglia hemorrhage (BGH) or cerebellar hemorrhage (CH) over the first 10 days after hemorrhage. Seventy-nine patients were prospectively included: SAH patients (n=66) (historic population) and intracerebral hemorrhage patients (n=13). All patients received an external ventricular drain within 24 hours of the onset of bleeding. CSF and plasma were drawn daily from day 1 to day 10. The levels of NPY were determined by means of competitive enzyme immunoassay. The CSF samples of 29 patients (historic population) who had undergone spinal anesthesia due to orthopedic surgery served as the control group. NPY levels in CSF were significantly higher in the 2 hemorrhage groups than in the control group. However, the 2 hemorrhage groups showed significant differences in NPY levels in CSF (SAH mean, 0.842 ng/mL vs. BGH/CH mean, 0.250 ng/mL; P<0.001) as well as in the course of NPY secretion into CSF over the 10-day period. NPY levels in plasma did not differ significantly among SAH, BGH/CH, and controls. Our findings support the hypothesis that excessive release of NPY into CSF but not into plasma is specific to aneurysmal SAH in the acute period of 10 days after hemorrhage. In BGH/CH, CSF levels of NPY were also increased, but the range was much lower.

  9. Rescue Therapy for Refractory Vasospasm after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, Julia C.; Hinson, Holly E.

    2014-01-01

    Vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia remain to be the common causes of increased morbidity and mortality after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. The majority of clinical vasospasm responds to hemodynamic augmentation and direct vascular intervention; however, a percentage of patients continue to have symptoms and neurological decline. Despite suboptimal evidence, clinicians have several options in treating refractory vasospasm in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), including cerebral blood flow enhancement, intra-arterial manipulations, and intra-arterial and intrathecal infusions. This review addresses standard treatments as well as emerging novel therapies aimed at improving cerebral perfusion and ameliorating the neurologic deterioration associated with vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia. PMID:25501582

  10. [A case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Miiko; Kato, Naoki; Su, Ching-Chan; Kayama, Takamasa

    2014-03-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a vasculitis syndromes and is only rarely complicated by subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the current report, we describe a case of CSS with subarachnoid hemorrhage, which showed a favorable outcome following conservative treatment. A 68-year-old man with CSS on maintenance steroid therapy underwent MRI/A during tinnitus aggravation, and showed dilation of the left middle cerebral artery and stenosis of the peripheral area of the right vertebral artery. After 2 months, he presented sudden pain in the occipitocervical area, and CT revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Intracranial 3D CT-A and MRI/A showed the development of a protrusion at the base of the left anterior cerebral artery. Although both findings suggested cerebral artery dissection, the source of hemorrhage could not be identified. The 2009 Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke recommends early diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhagic cerebral artery dissection because of the high risk of re-bleeding. However, considering the risks of vasculitis aggravation, development of systemic complications, and recurrence, conservative treatment was selected. In addition, owing to the risk of complications associated with the frequent use of iodinated contrast agents and angiography procedures, patient was followed up using MRI. His course was favorable, and he was discharged despite mild right abducens paralysis. When patients with hemorrhagic cerebral artery dissection have a history of allergic diseases, CCS should be considered; conservative treatment consisting of rest, strict blood pressure control, and steroid therapy may be the most appropriate option for certain patients.

  11. Radiological analysis of subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Doo; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik

    1988-01-01

    The CT findings of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysmal rupture were analyzed and compared with cerebral angiography for the purpose of preangiographic prediction of aneurysmal location as well as evaluation of the CT features corresponding to the vasospasm or ischemic neurologic dysfunctions. The results were as follows: 1.Aneurysms could be identified on initial cerebral angiography in 82 out of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and anterior communicating artery aneurysms were most common (42 cases), followed by MCA, posterior communicating artery, ICA, basilar artery in order of frequency. 2.The CT findings of those patients were hemorrhage in subarachnoid space (69%), localized hematoma (47%), ventricular dilatation (31%), enhancing nodule (23%), cisternal enhancement (20%), cerebral infarction (15%), ventricular hemorrhage (14%), and epidural hemorrhage (3%). 3.Localized hematoma was more prevalent in anterior communicating artery aneurysm rupture (54%), and less frequently in MCA, posterior communicating artery and ICA aneurysms. 4.Most of aneurysmal sac could be identified as enhancing nodule on CT when the real size were over 1 cm. 5.The size of ruptured aneurysm could be predicted in many patients with ACA and MCA aneurysm according to the CT features such as hemorrhagic patterns, location of hematomas or enhancing nodules. 6.Localized hematoma or blood clots and cerebral infarction are considered to be the CT features corresponding to the angiographic vasospasm

  12. Delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: clinicoanatomic correlations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijdra, A.; van Gijn, J.; Stefanko, S.; van Dongen, K. J.; Vermeulen, M.; van Crevel, H.

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-seven of 176 prospectively studied patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) developed delayed cerebral ischemia. Clinical features included hemispheric focal signs (13), decrease in level of consciousness (14), or both (30), and mutism (15). Forty-seven patients showed hypodense

  13. Subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by pregnancy induced hypertension: A rare occurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrashekhar Anil Sohoni

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the case of a young primigravida with pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) presenting with seizure in the post-partum period. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of isolated convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH). The absence of any other demonstrable vascular anomaly or coagulopathy on further investigation suggested PIH as the cause of cSAH.

  14. Subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by pregnancy induced hypertension: A rare occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekhar Anil Sohoni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the case of a young primigravida with pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH presenting with seizure in the post-partum period. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of isolated convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH. The absence of any other demonstrable vascular anomaly or coagulopathy on further investigation suggested PIH as the cause of cSAH.

  15. Recovery from a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Days 1 through 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Alejandro E.; Brice, Roanne G.; Wallace, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAHs) are a serious medical emergency, as 30% to 50% of all SAHs can result in death. Personal accounts and case studies are an important aspect of evidence-based practice. This first article of two presents a review of AB's (patient) condition immediately following an SAH in the intensive care and immediately post…

  16. Plasticity of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars; Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Maddahi, Aida

    2014-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is most often followed by a delayed phase of cerebral ischemia which is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The causes underlying this delayed phase are still unsettled, but are believed to include cerebral vasospasm, cortical spreading depression...

  17. Management of Agitation Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Is There a Role for Beta-Blockers?

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Fayaz; Viswanathan, Ramaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. About 20% of the stroke is hemorrhagic and about 50% of these is due to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A troublesome neuropsychiatric complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage is agitation/aggression. Case Presentation. A 45-year-old man with no prior psychiatric history, sustained subarachnoid hemorrhage. After initial stabilization for 2 days, he underwent craniotomy and clipping of anterior cerebral...

  18. Ethnic Disparities in Ischemic Stroke, Intracerebral Hemorrhage, and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Incidence in The Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agyemang, Charles; van Oeffelen, Aloysia A M; Nørredam, Marie Louise

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Data on the incidence of stroke subtypes among ethnic minority groups are limited. We assessed ethnic differences in the incidence of stroke subtypes in the Netherlands. METHODS: A Dutch nationwide register-based cohort study (n=7 423 174) was conducted between 1998 and 2010....... We studied the following stroke subtypes: ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate incidence differences between first-generation ethnic minorities and the Dutch majority population (ethnic Dutch). RESULTS: Compared.......16-0.72), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (0.42; 0.20-0.88 and 0.34; 0.17-0.68) compared with ethnic Dutch counterparts. The results varied by stroke subtype and sex for the other minority groups. For example, Turkish women had a reduced incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage, whereas Turkish men had an increased incidence...

  19. Cardiac arrhythmia as initial presentation of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kleij, FGH; Henselmans, JML; van de Loosdrecht, AA

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death are most frequently caused by preexisting heart disease. Rarely, cardiac arrhythmia is a first symptom of an acute neurological event. We describe a patient with asystole and other cardiac arrhythmias, as initial symptoms of acute aneurysmal subarachnoid

  20. Analysis of unknown cause subarachnoid hemorrhage with repeated negative angiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Mutsumi; Takasato, Yoshio; Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Yoshihisa; Hayakawa, Takanori; Honma, Masato

    2006-01-01

    Seven hundred and fifty five cases of acute non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were admitted to the department of neurosurgery of our hospital from July, 1995 to March, 2004. In 555 patients cerebral angiography was conducted but initial angiography was negative in 30 patients. Except 10 general condition poor patients, in 20 initial angiogram-negative patients were undergone repeated angiography. The cause of SAH could not be demonstrated in 13 cases. The SAH in perimesencephalic and non-perimesencephalic cisturns was seen in 7 and 6 cases, respectively. Occipital and/or neck pain on admission was statistically more common among patients with perimesencephalic SAH than those with non-perimesencephalic SAH (p=0.029), and the prognosis of perimesencephalic SAH was good. We conclude that repeat angiography should not be recommended in patients with perimesencephalic SAH. Patients with non-perimesencephalic SAH had a higher rate of complication. In the non-perimesencephalic group, 3 patients developed hydrocephalus and 3 patients had vasospasm, which were found by repeated angiography. Therefore, repeated angiography is recommended for better clinical outcome by early detection and management of serious complications in this group of patients. (author)

  1. Role of levosimendan in the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvarousi, Giolanda; Xanthos, Theodoros; Sarafidou, Pavlina; Katsioula, Ellisavet; Georgiadou, Marianthi; Eforakopoulou, Maria; Pavlou, Hlias

    2016-02-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is one of the leading causes of neurologic disability accounting for dismal long term survival rates. aSAH leads to a sudden increase in intracranial pressure and a massive sympathetic discharge. Excessive sympathetic stimulation leads to catecholamine mediated myocardial dysfunction and hemodynamic instability which may critically hamper brain perfusion and oxygenation. In the setting of acute aSAH, administration of vasoactive drugs aims at stabilizing impaired hemodynamics. However, studies have shown that conventional treatment with vasoactive drugs that lead to Ca(+2) overload and increase myocardial oxygen consumption, fail to restore hemodynamics and decrease cerebral blood flow. Levosimendan is a non-adrenergic inotropic Ca(+2) sensitizer with not only beneficial hemodynamic properties but also pleiotropic effects, contributing to its cardioprotective and neuroprotective role. Although there have been limited data available regarding the use of levosimendan in patients with aSAH, current evidence suggests that levosimendan may have a role in the setting of post-aSAH cardiomyopathy and decreased cerebral blood flow both in the emergency departments and in intensive care units. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of studies of levosimendan therapy for aSAH, and describe current knowledge about the effects of levosimendan in the management of aSAH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as complication of phenylephrine injection for the treatment of ischemic priapism in a sickle cell disease patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Hugo H; Parker, Justin; Webster, J Christopher; Lockhart, Jorge L; Carrion, Rafael E

    2008-04-01

    Ischemic priapism (IP) is a urologic condition, which necessitates prompt management. Intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine is a usual treatment modality utilized for the management of these patients. Aim. We present a case of subarachnoid hemorrhage following intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine for IP in a patient with sickle cell disease. We analyzed the degree of subarachnoid hemorrhage in our patient after intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine. The patient had an acute rise in blood pressure during corporal irrigation. This was followed by the onset of severe headache. Computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the diagnosis of a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine. Result. A 23-year-old African American male with a history of sickle cell disease presented with a painful penile erection. The patient was started on intravenous fluids, oxygen by nasal canula, and analgesic medication. After this, a blood gas was obtained from his left corpora cavernosa. This was followed by normal saline irrigation and injection of phenylephrine. The patient complained of a sudden, severe "terrible headache" immediately following the last injection, and noncontrast CT scan of the head was obtained and a subarachnoid hemorrhage was noted. The patient was admitted for observation and no significant changes were noted. Intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine for the management of IP can be associated with several possible complications. We present our single case complicated with the formation of a subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient was treated conservatively and had no long-term neurologic sequelae. Davila HH, Parker J, Webster JC, Lockhart JL, and Carrion RE. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as complication of phenylephrine injection for the treatment of ischemic priapism in a sickle cell disease patient.

  3. MR imaging findings of spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Park, Eui Dong; Kim, Hyung Jin; Ha, Choong Kun [College of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Chinju(Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-15

    We report magnetic resonance imaging findings of massive spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by repeated lumbar punctures during spinal anesthesia in a 36-year-old man. The signal intensities of spinal SAH were similar to those of the conus medullaris on both T1-and T2-weighted spin-echo images. Although spinal SAH is hardly recognized on MR, spinal SAH of sufficient amount may cause alteration of the cerebrospinal fluid signal.

  4. Polyuria and cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Robert J.; Epling, Brian P.; Staff, Ilene; Fortunato, Gilbert; Grady, James J.; McCullough, Louise D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Natriuresis with polyuria is common after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Previous studies have shown an increased risk of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm or delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in patients with hyponatremia and/or the cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW). However, natriuresis may occur in the absence of hyponatremia or hypovolemia and it is not known whether the increase in DCI in patients with CSW is secondary to a concomitant hypovolemia or because the phys...

  5. Intracranial vertebral artery dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage following child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Pamela H.; Burrowes, Delilah M.; Ali, Saad; Shaibani, Ali; Bowman, Robin M.

    2007-01-01

    Child abuse is often suspected based on particular patterns of injury. We report a case of intracranial vertebral artery dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a 3-month-old boy following child abuse. The mechanisms of injury and the clinical and imaging findings are discussed. This particular pattern of injury has rarely been reported in association with child abuse. We hope to raise physician awareness of child abuse when faced with these imaging findings. (orig.)

  6. Delayed Rebleeding of Cerebral Aneurysm Misdiagnosed as Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Seung-Yoon; Kim, Dae-Won; Park, Jong-Tae; Kang, Sung-Don

    2016-01-01

    An intracranial saccular aneurysm is uncommonly diagnosed in a patient with closed head trauma. We herein present a patient with delayed rebleeding of a cerebral aneurysm misdiagnosed as traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 26-year-old female visited our emergency department because of headache after a motorcycle accident. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed a right-side dominant SAH in Sylvian fissure. Although traumatic SAH was strongly suggested because of the history of head traum...

  7. Cerebral autoregulation after subarachnoid hemorrhage: comparison of three methods

    OpenAIRE

    Budohoski, Karol P; Czosnyka, Marek; Smielewski, Peter; Varsos, Georgios V; Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Brady, Ken M; Pickard, John D; Kirkpatrick, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    In patients after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) failure of cerebral autoregulation is associated with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Various methods of assessing autoregulation are available, but their predictive values remain unknown. We characterize the relationship between different indices of autoregulation. Patients with SAH within 5 days were included in a prospective study. The relationship between three indices of autoregulation was analyzed: two indices calculated using spontaneous...

  8. Intracranial vertebral artery dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage following child abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Pamela H.; Burrowes, Delilah M.; Ali, Saad; Shaibani, Ali [Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bowman, Robin M. [Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Child abuse is often suspected based on particular patterns of injury. We report a case of intracranial vertebral artery dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a 3-month-old boy following child abuse. The mechanisms of injury and the clinical and imaging findings are discussed. This particular pattern of injury has rarely been reported in association with child abuse. We hope to raise physician awareness of child abuse when faced with these imaging findings. (orig.)

  9. Pseudarthrosis due to galvanic corrosion presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Noel Beavers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two unlike metals near one another can break down as they move toward electrochemical equilibrium resulting in galvanic corrosion. We describe a case of electrochemical corrosion resulting in pseudarthrosis, followed by instrumentation failure leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 53-year-old female with a history of cervical instability and two separate prior cervical fusion surgery with sublaminar cables presented with new onset severe neck pain. Restricted range of motion in her neck and bilateral Hoffman's was noted. X-ray of her cervical spine was negative. A noncontrast CT scan of her head and neck showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the prepontine and cervicomedullary cisterns. Neurosurgical intervention involved removal of prior stainless steel and titanium cables, repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak, and nonsegmental C1–C3 instrumented fusion. She tolerated the surgery well and followed up without complication. Galvanic corrosion of the Brook's fusion secondary to current flow between dissimilar metal alloys resulted in catastrophic instrumentation failure and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  10. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Pyo Nyun; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Byoung Ho; Kim, Ki Jung

    1990-01-01

    CT scans were analysed retrospectively in 130 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm to evaluate the relationship of the locations of aneurysms and the patterns of hemorrhage. Hemorrhage corresponded to the site of aneurysmal origin in a general way and in more specific ways to anterior communicating and middle cerebral artery aneurysms when there was parenchymal or cisternal hemorrhage. In anterior communicating artery aneurysm, SAH in the interhemispheric fissure, both sylvian fissures, and basal cistern was usually noted and intracerebral hemorrhage in anteroinferior frontal lobe was sometimes associated. In cases of middle cerebral artery aneurysm, hemorrhage in the ipsilateral sylvian fissure, interhemispheric fissure, and ipsilateral basal cistern was usual. Intracerebral hemorrhage in lateral temporal lobe was sometimes associated. Posterior communicating artery aneurysm demonstrated SAH in the ipsilateral basal cistern or in entire cisternal spaces specifically, so with higher incidence of involvement of the quadrigeminal and superior cerebellar cistern than anterior cerebral or middle cerebral artery aneurysm. We suggest the locations of aneurysm might be predicted with patterns of SAH and / or associated intracerebral hemorrhage with CT

  11. Polyuria and cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert J; Epling, Brian P; Staff, Ilene; Fortunato, Gilbert; Grady, James J; McCullough, Louise D

    2015-10-13

    Natriuresis with polyuria is common after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Previous studies have shown an increased risk of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm or delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in patients with hyponatremia and/or the cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW). However, natriuresis may occur in the absence of hyponatremia or hypovolemia and it is not known whether the increase in DCI in patients with CSW is secondary to a concomitant hypovolemia or because the physiology that predisposes to natriuretic peptide release also predisposes to cerebral vasospasm. Therefore, we investigated whether polyuria per se was associated with vasospasm and whether a temporal relationship existed. A retrospective review of patients with aSAH was performed. Exclusion criteria were admission more than 48 h after aneurysmal rupture, death within 5 days, and the development of diabetes insipidus or acute renal failure. Polyuria was defined as > 6 liters of urine in a 24 h period. Vasospasm was defined as a mean velocity > 120 m/s on Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TCDs) or by evidence of vasospasm on computerized tomography (CT) or catheter angiography. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to assess the relationship between polyuria and vasospasm. 95 patients were included in the study. 51 had cerebral vasospasm and 63 met the definition of polyuria. Patients with polyuria were significantly more likely to have vasospasm (OR 4.301, 95% CI 1.378-13.419) in multivariate analysis. Polyuria was more common in younger patients (52 vs 68, p polyuria was clustered around the diagnosis of vasospasm and patients with polyuria developed vasospasm faster than those without polyuria. Polyuria is common after aSAH and is significantly associated with cerebral vasospasm. The development of polyuria may be temporally related to the development of vasospasm. An increase in urine volume may be a useful clinical predictor of patients at risk for vasospasm.

  12. Brain lactate metabolism in humans with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Mauro; Levine, Joshua M; Frangos, Suzanne; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Carrera, Emmanuel; Daniel, Roy T; Levivier, Marc; Magistretti, Pierre J; LeRoux, Peter D

    2012-05-01

    Lactate is central for the regulation of brain metabolism and is an alternative substrate to glucose after injury. Brain lactate metabolism in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been fully elucidated. Thirty-one subarachnoid hemorrhage patients monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain oxygen (PbtO(2)) were studied. Samples with elevated CMD lactate (>4 mmol/L) were matched to PbtO(2) and CMD pyruvate and categorized as hypoxic (PbtO(2) 119 μmol/L) versus nonhyperglycolytic. Median per patient samples with elevated CMD lactate was 54% (interquartile range, 11%-80%). Lactate elevations were more often attributable to cerebral hyperglycolysis (78%; interquartile range, 5%-98%) than brain hypoxia (11%; interquartile range, 4%-75%). Mortality was associated with increased percentage of samples with elevated lactate and brain hypoxia (28% [interquartile range 9%-95%] in nonsurvivors versus 9% [interquartile range 3%-17%] in survivors; P=0.02) and lower percentage of elevated lactate and cerebral hyperglycolysis (13% [interquartile range, 1%-87%] versus 88% [interquartile range, 27%-99%]; P=0.07). Cerebral hyperglycolytic lactate production predicted good 6-month outcome (odds ratio for modified Rankin Scale score, 0-3 1.49; CI, 1.08-2.05; P=0.016), whereas increased lactate with brain hypoxia was associated with a reduced likelihood of good outcome (OR, 0.78; CI, 0.59-1.03; P=0.08). Brain lactate is frequently elevated in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, predominantly because of hyperglycolysis rather than hypoxia. A pattern of increased cerebral hyperglycolytic lactate was associated with good long-term recovery. Our data suggest that lactate may be used as an aerobic substrate by the injured human brain.

  13. Direct costs of modern treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the first year after diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Y B W E M; Dijkgraaf, M G W; Albrecht, K W; Beenen, L F M; Groen, R J M; de Haan, R. J.; Vermeulen, M

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the current direct costs of modern management of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the first year after diagnosis. METHODS: During a 1-year period, we studied all admitted patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage

  14. Encephalic hemodynamic phases in subarachnoid hemorrhage: how to improve the protective effect in patient prognoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Lima Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage is frequently associated with poor prognoses. Three different hemodynamic phases were identified during subarachnoid hemorrhage: oligemia, hyperemia, and vasospasm. Each phase is associated with brain metabolic changes. In this review, we correlated the hemodynamic phases with brain metabolism and potential treatment options in the hopes of improving patient prognoses.

  15. Ruptured cervical arteriovenous fistulas presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage and quadriplegia: an uncommon case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Liang; Su, Yung-Cheng; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chong, Chee-Fah; Wang, Tzong-Luen

    2008-02-01

    Nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage is a neurologic emergency, and prompt treatment is necessary to avoid catastrophic result. We present a patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by ruptured cervical intradural extramedullary arteriovenous fistulas, which rapidly progressed to quadriplegia. Because of the timely management, the patient had a good recovery. This is a rare but important case that emergency physicians should be aware of.

  16. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hidemichi; Sakurai, Takashi; Hayashi, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Takuo

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of reduction of cerebral circulation in the early phase of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has not yet been clarified. Previous studies have variously indicated that cerebral blood flow (CBF) reduction may be due to cerebral vasospasm, an elevation in intracranial pressure (ICP), constriction of intraparenchymal arterioles, or metabolic reduction. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism. In 36 patients with aneurysmal SAH, the values of mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (GMRO 2 ) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were measured by using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with arterial blood drawing and oxygen saturation of internal jugular bulb blood (SjO 2 ) in the acute stage (1-3 days after onset) and the spasm stage (7-10 days after onset). The patients in our study were selected by using the following criteria: no history of cerebrovascular or cardiopulmonary diseases; under the age of 70; the ruptured aneurysm was treated by clipping or coil embolization within 72 hours after onset; no symptoms of cerebral vasospasm; no signs of cerebral ischemic change on CT scans. These patients were divided into 2 groups according to the World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) grading classification; the mild group (Grades I and II) consisted of 27 cases and the severe group (Grade IV) consisted of 9 cases. We studied differences in mCBF CMRO 2 , and OEF between the mild group and severe group. In the mild group, mCBF, CMRO 2 , and OEF were significantly higher than in the severe group during both the acute and the spasm stage. Also mCBF showed a direct correlation with CMRO 2 . All the patients were kept under the following conditions: the bed was positioned so that the upper body was raised at an angle at 30 deg; blood pressure was maintained at 130-150 mmHg and PaCO 2 of arterial blood was maintained at 35-40 mmHg; ICP

  17. Milrinone via lumbar subarachnoid catheter for vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadamasa, Nobutake; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Narumi, Osamu; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen

    2014-12-01

    Delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) due to symptomatic vasospasm is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). The aim of this study was to elucidate the safety and feasibility of intrathecal milrinone infusion via lumber subarachnoid catheter for prevention of DIND after aSAH. We diagnosed 425 consecutive patients with aSAH who received clipping or coil embolization within 48 h after arrival. Patients with the evidence of vasospasm on CT angiography (CTA) received the milrinone therapy via lumbar subarachnoid catheter. DIND, delayed cerebral infarction (DCI), and modified Rankin scale at 3 months after SAH were used for the assessment of outcome. Of 425 patients, 170 patients (40.0 %) with CTA-proven vasospasm received the milrinone therapy. DIND was observed in 68 patients (16.0 %), DCI in 30 patients (7.1 %), and the overall mortality was 7.2 %. In patients with WFNS grade IV and V aSAH, 26 out of 145 patients (17.9 %) were presented with DIND, 12 (8.3 %) with DCI, and the mortality was 16.0 %. No major complication related to the milrinone injection was observed. Intrathecal milrinone injection via lumbar catheter was safe and feasible, and further randomized prospective studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of this regimen in the patients with SAH.

  18. Proximity to the treating centre and outcomes following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Cian J; Spears, Julian; Urbach, David; Wallace, M Christopher

    2011-01-01

    In the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), the potential for early complications and the centralization of limited resources often challenge the delivery of timely neurosurgical care. We sought to determine the impact of proximity to the accepting neurosurgical centre on outcomes following aneurysmal SAH. Using administrative data, we analyzed patients undergoing treatment for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage at neurosurgical centres in Ontario between 1995 and 2004. We compared mortality for patients receiving treatment at a centre in their county (in-county) versus those treated from outside counties (out-of-county). We also examined the impact of distance from the patient's residence to the treating centre. The mortality rates were significantly lower for in-county versus out-of-county patients (23.5% vs. 27.6%, p=0.009). This advantage remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders (HR=0.84, p=0.01). The relationship between distance from the treating centre and mortality was biphasic. Under 300 km, mortality increased with increasing distance. Over 300 km, a survival benefit was observed. Proximity to the treating neurosurgical centre impacts survival after aneurysmal SAH. These results have significant implications for the triage of these critically ill patients.

  19. Cerebral Vasospasm with Ischemia following a Spontaneous Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia F. Shakur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vasospasm is a well-known consequence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH triggered by blood breakdown products. Here, we present the first case of cerebral vasospasm with ischemia following a spontaneous spinal SAH. A 67-year-old woman, who was on Coumadin for atrial fibrillation, presented with chest pain radiating to the back accompanied by headache and leg paresthesias. The international normalized ratio (INR was 4.5. Ten hours after presentation, she developed loss of movement in both legs and lack of sensation below the umbilicus. Spine MRI showed intradural hemorrhage. Her coagulopathy was reversed, and she underwent T2 to T12 laminectomies. A large subarachnoid hematoma was evacuated. Given her complaint of headache preoperatively and the intraoperative finding of spinal SAH, a head CT was done postoperatively that displayed SAH in peripheral sulci. On postoperative day 5, she became obtunded. Brain MRI demonstrated focal restricted diffusion in the left frontoparietal area. Formal angiography revealed vasospasm in anterior cerebral arteries bilaterally and right middle cerebral artery. Vasospasm was treated, and she returned to baseline within 48 hours. Spontaneous spinal SAH can result in the same sequelae typically associated with aneurysmal SAH, and the clinician must have a degree of suspicion in such patients. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying cerebral vasospasm may explain this unique case.

  20. Frequency and appearance of hemosiderin depositions after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage treated by endovascular therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falter, Bernhard; Wiesmann, Martin; Freiherr, Jessica; Nikoubashman, Omid; Mull, Michael [University Hospital Aachen RWTH, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    It is still unclear how often subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) leads to chronic hemosiderin depositions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of chronic hemosiderin depositions after aneurysmal SAH in patients who did not undergo surgery. Furthermore, we analyzed typical MRI patterns of chronic SAH and sought to obtain information on the temporal course of MRI signal changes. We retrospectively analyzed 90 patients who had undergone endovascular treatment for acute aneurysmal SAH. In all patients, initial CT studies and at least one T2*-weighted MRI obtained 6 months or later after SAH were analyzed for the presence and anatomical distribution of SAH or chronic hemosiderin depositions. In total, 185 T2*-weighted MRI studies obtained between 2 days and 148 months after SAH were evaluated (mean follow-up 30.2 months). On MRI studies obtained later than 6 months after SAH, subpial hemosiderin depositions were found in 50 patients (55.5 %). Most frequent localizations were the parenchyma adjacent to the frontal and parietal sulci and the insular cisterns. While the appearance of hemosiderin depositions was dynamic within the first 3 months, no changes were found during subsequent follow-up. MR signal changes were not only conclusive with subarachnoid hemosiderin depositions but in many cases also resembled those that have been associated with cortical hemosiderosis. T2*-weighted MRI is an effective means of diagnosing prior SAH. Our study suggests that chronic hemosiderin depositions can be found in a considerable number of patients after a single event of subarachnoid hemorrhage. (orig.)

  1. Detecting subarachnoid hemorrhage: Comparison of combined FLAIR/SWI versus CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Rajeev Kumar, E-mail: rajeev.verma@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Kottke, Raimund, E-mail: raimund.kottke@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Andereggen, Lukas, E-mail: lukas.andereggen@insel.ch [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Weisstanner, Christian, E-mail: christian.weisstanner@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Zubler, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.zubler@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Gralla, Jan, E-mail: jan.gralla@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Kiefer, Claus, E-mail: claus.kiefer@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Slotboom, Johannes, E-mail: johannes.slotboom@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging, University of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 4, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); and others

    2013-09-15

    Objectives: Aim of this study was to compare the utility of susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) with the established diagnostic techniques CT and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) in their detecting capacity of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and further to compare the combined SWI/FLAIR MRI data with CT to evaluate whether MRI is more accurate than CT. Methods: Twenty-five patients with acute SAH underwent CT and MRI within 6 days after symptom onset. Underlying pathology for SAH was head trauma (n = 9), ruptured aneurysm (n = 6), ruptured arteriovenous malformation (n = 2), and spontaneous bleeding (n = 8). SWI, FLAIR, and CT data were analyzed. The anatomical distribution of SAH was subdivided into 8 subarachnoid regions with three peripheral cisterns (frontal-parietal, temporal-occipital, sylvian), two central cisterns and spaces (interhemispheric, intraventricular), and the perimesencephalic, posterior fossa, superior cerebellar cisterns. Results: SAH was detected in a total of 146 subarachnoid regions. CT identified 110 (75.3%), FLAIR 127 (87%), and SWI 129 (88.4%) involved regions. Combined FLAIR and SWI identified all 146 detectable regions (100%). FLAIR was sensitive for frontal-parietal, temporal-occipital and Sylvian cistern SAH, while SWI was particularly sensitive for interhemispheric and intraventricular hemorrhage. Conclusions: By combining SWI and FLAIR, MRI yields a distinctly higher detection rate for SAH than CT alone, particularly due to their complementary detection characteristics in different anatomical regions. Detection strength of SWI is high in central areas, whereas FLAIR shows a better detection rate in peripheral areas.

  2. Prognostic Value of the Amount of Bleeding After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Quantitative Volumetric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagares, Alfonso; Jiménez-Roldán, Luis; Gomez, Pedro A; Munarriz, Pablo M; Castaño-León, Ana M; Cepeda, Santiago; Alén, José F

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative estimation of the hemorrhage volume associated with aneurysm rupture is a new tool of assessing prognosis. To determine the prognostic value of the quantitative estimation of the amount of bleeding after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well the relative importance of this factor related to other prognostic indicators, and to establish a possible cut-off value of volume of bleeding related to poor outcome. A prospective cohort of 206 patients consecutively admitted with the diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage to Hospital 12 de Octubre were included in the study. Subarachnoid, intraventricular, intracerebral, and total bleeding volumes were calculated using analytic software. For assessing factors related to prognosis, univariate and multivariate analysis (logistic regression) were performed. The relative importance of factors in determining prognosis was established by calculating their proportion of explained variation. Maximum Youden index was calculated to determine the optimal cut point for subarachnoid and total bleeding volume. Variables independently related to prognosis were clinical grade at admission, age, and the different bleeding volumes. The proportion of variance explained is higher for subarachnoid bleeding. The optimal cut point related to poor prognosis is a volume of 20 mL both for subarachnoid and total bleeding. Volumetric measurement of subarachnoid or total bleeding volume are both independent prognostic factors in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A volume of more than 20 mL of blood in the initial noncontrast computed tomography is related to a clear increase in poor outcome risk. : aSAH, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  3. Natural course of subarachnoid hemorrhage is worse in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Hendrik Pahl

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a major risk factor for poor outcome in patients with ruptured or unruptured intracranial aneurysms (IA submitted to treatment. It impairs several physiologic patterns related to cerebrovascular hemodynamics and homeostasis. Objective Evaluate clinical, radiological patterns and prognostic factors of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients according to age. Method Three hundred and eighty nine patients with aneurismal SAH from a Brazilian tertiary institution (Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo were consecutively evaluated from 2002 to 2012 according to Fisher and Hunt Hess classifications and Glasgow Outcome Scale. Results There was statistically significant association of age with impaired clinical, radiological presentation and outcomes in cases of SAH. Conclusion Natural course of SAH is worse in elderly patients and thus, proper recognition of the profile of such patients and their outcome is necessary to propose standard treatment.

  4. Hydrocephalus after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocephalus (HCP is a common complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this review, we summarize the advanced research on HCP and discuss the understanding of the molecular originators of HCP and the development of diagnoses and remedies of HCP after SAH. It has been reported that inflammation, apoptosis, autophagy, and oxidative stress are the important causes of HCP, and well-known molecules including transforming growth factor, matrix metalloproteinases, and iron terminally lead to fibrosis and blockage of HCP. Potential medicines for HCP are still in preclinical status, and surgery is the most prevalent and efficient therapy, despite respective risks of different surgical methods, including lamina terminalis fenestration, ventricle-peritoneal shunting, and lumbar-peritoneal shunting. HCP remains an ailment that cannot be ignored and even with various solutions the medical community is still trying to understand and settle why and how it develops and accordingly improve the prognosis of these patients with HCP.

  5. Early Brain Injury Associated with Systemic Inflammation After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarraj, Jude; Parsha, Kaushik; Hergenroeder, Georgene; Ahn, Sungho; Chang, Tiffany R; Kim, Dong H; Choi, H Alex

    2018-04-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is defined as brain injury occurring within 72 h of aneurysmal rupture. Although EBI is the most significant predictor of outcomes after aSAH, its underlying pathophysiology is not well understood. We hypothesize that EBI after aSAH is associated with an increase in peripheral inflammation measured by cytokine expression levels and changes in associations between cytokines. aSAH patients were enrolled into a prospective observational study and were assessed for markers of EBI: global cerebral edema (GCE), subarachnoid hemorrhage early brain edema score (SEBES), and Hunt-Hess grade. Serum samples collected at ≤ 48 h of admission were analyzed using multiplex bead-based assays to determine levels of 13 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Pairwise correlation coefficients between cytokines were represented as networks. Cytokine levels and differences in correlation networks were compared between EBI groups. Of the 71 patients enrolled in the study, 17 (24%) subjects had GCE, 31 (44%) subjects had SEBES ≥ 3, and 21 (29%) had HH ≥ 4. IL-6 was elevated in groups with GCE, SEBES ≥ 3, and HH ≥ 4. MIP1β was independently associated with high-grade SEBES. Correlation network analysis suggests higher systematic inflammation in subjects with SEBES ≥ 3. EBI after SAH is associated with increased levels of specific cytokines. Peripheral levels of IL-10, IL-6, and MIP1β may be important markers of EBI. Investigating systematic correlations in addition to expression levels of individual cytokines may offer deeper insight into the underlying mechanisms related to EBI.

  6. Role of unphosphorylated transcription factor STAT3 in late cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samraj, Ajoy K; Müller, Anne H; Grell, Anne-Sofie

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms behind increased cerebral vasospasm and local inflammation in late cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are poorly elucidated. Using system biology tools and experimental SAH models, we have identified signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3...

  7. Progranulin Reduced Neuronal Cell Death by Activation of Sortilin 1 Signaling Pathways After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; He, Yue; Xu, Liang; Hu, Qin; Tang, Junjia; Chen, Yujie; Tang, Jiping; Feng, Hua; Zhang, John H

    2015-08-01

    Progranulin has been reported to have neuroprotective actions in cultured neurons. This study investigated the effect of recombinant rat progranulin on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Controlled in vivo laboratory study. Animal research laboratory. Two hundred thirty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 280-320 g. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was induced in rats by endovascular perforation. Rat recombinant progranulin (1 and 3 ng) was administrated intracerebroventricularly at 1.5 hours after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Progranulin small interfering RNA was administrated by intracerebroventricularly at 1 day before subarachnoid hemorrhage induction. Subarachnoid hemorrhage grade, neurologic score, and brain water content were measured at 24 and 72 hours after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neural apoptosis was evaluated by double immunofluorescence staining using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine 5'-triphosphate-biotin nick-end labeling and neuronal nuclei. For mechanistic study, the expression of progranulin, phosphorylated Akt, Akt, p-Erk, Erk, Bcl-2, and cleaved caspase-3 were analyzed by Western blot at 24 hours after subarachnoid hemorrhage. siRNA for sortilin 1 (a progranulin receptor) was used to intervene the downstream pathway. The expression of progranulin decreased and reached the lowest point at 24 hours after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Administration of rat recombinant progranulin decreased brain water content and improved neurologic functions at both 24 and 72 hours after subarachnoid hemorrhage, while knockdown of endogenous progranulin aggravated neurologic deficits after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Rat recombinant progranulin treatment reduced neuronal apoptosis, while progranulin deficiency promoted neuronal apoptosis at 24 hours after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Rat recombinant progranulin promoted Akt activation, increased Bcl-2 level, but reduced caspase-3 level. Knockdown of progranulin binding factor sortilin 1

  8. Neutrophil depletion after subarachnoid hemorrhage improves memory via NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencio, Jose Javier; Swank, Valerie; Lu, Haiyan; Brunet, Sylvain; Baltan, Selva; Khapre, Rohini V; Seerapu, Himabindu; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Lamb, Bruce T; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive deficits after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are common and disabling. Patients who experience delayed deterioration associated with vasospasm are likely to have cognitive deficits, particularly problems with executive function, verbal and spatial memory. Here, we report neurophysiological and pathological mechanisms underlying behavioral deficits in a murine model of SAH. On tests of spatial memory, animals with SAH performed worse than sham animals in the first week and one month after SAH suggesting a prolonged injury. Between three and six days after experimental hemorrhage, mice demonstrated loss of late long-term potentiation (L-LTP) due to dysfunction of the NMDA receptor. Suppression of innate immune cell activation prevents delayed vasospasm after murine SAH. We therefore explored the role of neutrophil-mediated innate inflammation on memory deficits after SAH. Depletion of neutrophils three days after SAH mitigates tissue inflammation, reverses cerebral vasoconstriction in the middle cerebral artery, and rescues L-LTP dysfunction at day 6. Spatial memory deficits in both the short and long-term are improved and associated with a shift of NMDA receptor subunit composition toward a memory sparing phenotype. This work supports further investigating suppression of innate immunity after SAH as a target for preventative therapies in SAH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage on Word Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Ladowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH survivors commonly exhibit impairment on phonemic and semantic fluency tests; however, it is unclear which of the contributing cognitive processes are compromised in aSAH patients. One method of disentangling these processes is to compare initial word production, which is a rapid, semiautomatic, frontal-executive process, and late phase word production, which is dependent on more effortful retrieval and lexical size and requires a more distributed neural network. Methods. Seventy-two individuals with aSAH and twenty-five control subjects were tested on a cognitive battery including the phonemic and semantic fluency task. Demographic and clinical information was also collected. Results. Compared to control subjects, patients with aSAH were treated by clipping and those with multiple aneurysms were impaired across the duration of the phonemic test. Among patients treated by coiling, those with anterior communicating artery aneurysms or a neurological complication (intraventricular hemorrhage, vasospasm, and edema showed worse output only in the last 45 seconds of the phonemic test. Patients performed comparably to control subjects on the semantic test. Conclusions. These results support a “diffuse damage” hypothesis of aSAH, indicated by late phase phonemic fluency impairment. Overall, the phonemic and semantic tests represent a viable, rapid clinical screening tool in the postoperative assessment of patients with aSAH.

  10. Volumetric Integral Phase-shift Spectroscopy for Noninvasive Detection of Hemispheric Bioimpedance Asymmetry in Acute Brain Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-10

    Stroke; Stroke, Acute; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhage; Clot (Blood); Brain; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Hemorrhage; Cerebral Stroke; Intracerebral Hemorrhage; Intracerebral Injury

  11. Predictors of In-Hospital Death After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Analysis of a Nationwide Database (Swiss SOS [Swiss Study on Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienen, Martin Nikolaus; Germans, Menno; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Neidert, Marian C; Fung, Christian; Bervini, David; Zumofen, Daniel; Röthlisberger, Michel; Marbacher, Serge; Maduri, Rodolfo; Robert, Thomas; Seule, Martin A; Bijlenga, Philippe; Schaller, Karl; Fandino, Javier; Smoll, Nicolas R; Maldaner, Nicolai; Finkenstädt, Sina; Esposito, Giuseppe; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Keller, Emanuela; Bozinov, Oliver; Regli, Luca

    2018-02-01

    To identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and to estimate their impact. Retrospective analysis of prospective data from a nationwide multicenter registry on all aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage cases admitted to a tertiary neurosurgical department in Switzerland (Swiss SOS [Swiss Study on Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage]; 2009-2015). Both clinical and radiological independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were identified, and their effect size was determined by calculating adjusted odds ratios (aORs) using multivariate logistic regression. Survival was displayed using Kaplan-Meier curves. Data of n=1866 aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients in the Swiss SOS database were available. In-hospital mortality was 20% (n=373). In n=197 patients (10.6%), active treatment was discontinued after hospital admission (no aneurysm occlusion attempted), and this cohort was excluded from analysis of the main statistical model. In the remaining n=1669 patients, the rate of in-hospital mortality was 13.9% (n=232). Strong independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were rebleeding (aOR, 7.69; 95% confidence interval, 3.00-19.71; P <0.001), cerebral infarction attributable to delayed cerebral ischemia (aOR, 3.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.94-6.89; P <0.001), intraventricular hemorrhage (aOR, 2.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.38-5.09; P =0.003), and new infarction post-treatment (aOR, 2.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.43-4.62; P =0.002). Several-and among them modifiable-factors seem to be associated with in-hospital mortality after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Our data suggest that strategies aiming to reduce the risk of rebleeding are most promising in patients where active treatment is initially pursued. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT03245866. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Ultra-early tranexamic acid after subarachnoid hemorrhage (ULTRA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germans, Menno R.; Post, René; Coert, Bert A.; Rinkel, Gabriël J. E.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Verbaan, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    A frequent complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is recurrent bleeding from the aneurysm. The risk is highest within the first 6 hours after the initial hemorrhage. Securing the aneurysm within this timeframe is difficult owing to logistical delays. The rate of recurrent

  13. Delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage : the role of coagulation and fibrinolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergouwen, M.D.I.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are at risk to develop complications, especially within the first two weeks after the hemorrhage. Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a complication which occurs in about 30% of SAH patients, leading to symptoms such as aphasia, hemiparesis, or

  14. Reappraisal of CT-grading of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Yoshihiko; Kanaya, Haruyuki; Sasaki, Tomio

    1992-01-01

    Delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) after the rupture of cerebral aneurysm remains of the most difficult problems encountered by neurosurgeons. Since the introduction of CT scanning, its clinical application has clarified a close relationship between DIND and the features of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on CT images. Fisher et al proposed a grading system for SAH based on CT equipment used in the 1980s. Using third-generation CT equipment, we developed a new SAH-grading system to predict the incidence and severity of DIND more precisely. SAH in 109 patients were retrospectively classified according to the CT findings regarding location and density as THIN, THICK, and PACKED (or DENSE). In the THIN group, no DIND appeared. In 44% of patients with THICK group, DIND developed although it was reversible in 75%. On the other hand, DIND was irreversible in 70% of the 56% of PACKEND (or DENSE) group in whom it developed. Moreover, if sequential CT scan demonstrated decrease of the size and density of the SAH, DIND may rarely developed. We therefore conclude that, in order to assess the risk of DIND more precisely, it is very important to obtain repeat CT scans before operation. (author)

  15. Free recall memory performance after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Signy; Macdonald, R Loch; Schweizer, Tom A

    2012-03-01

    Memory deficits for survivors of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are common, however, the nature of these deficits is not well understood. In this study, 24 patients with SAH and matched control participants were asked to study six lists containing words from four different categories. For half the lists, the categories were presented together (organized lists). For the remaining lists, the related words were presented randomly to maximize the use of executive processes such as strategy and organization (unorganized lists). Across adjoining lists, there was overlap in the types of categories given, done to promote intrusions. Compared to control participants, SAH patients recalled a similar number of words for the organized lists, but significantly fewer words for the unorganized lists. SAH patients also reported more intrusions than their matched counterparts. Separating patients into anterior communicating artery ruptures (ACoA) and ruptures in other regions, there was a recall deficit only for the unorganized list for those with ACoA ruptures and deficits across both list types for other rupture locations. These results suggest that memory impairment following SAH is likely driven by impairment in the executive components of memory, particularly for those with ACoA ruptures. Such findings may help direct future cognitive-therapeutic programs.

  16. Upregulation of Relaxin after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Kikkawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although relaxin causes vasodilatation in systemic arteries, little is known about its role in cerebral arteries. We investigated the expression and role of relaxin in basilar arteries after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in rabbits. Methods. Microarray analysis with rabbit basilar artery RNA was performed. Messenger RNA expression of relaxin-1 and relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1 was investigated with quantitative RT-PCR. RXFP1 expression in the basilar artery was investigated with immunohistochemistry. Relaxin concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and serum were investigated with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Using human brain vascular smooth muscle cells (HBVSMC preincubated with relaxin, myosin light chain phosphorylation (MLC was investigated with immunoblotting after endothelin-1 stimulation. Results. After SAH, RXFP1 mRNA and protein were significantly downregulated on day 3, whereas relaxin-1 mRNA was significantly upregulated on day 7. The relaxin concentration in CSF was significantly elevated on days 5 and 7. Pretreatment with relaxin reduced sustained MLC phosphorylation induced by endothelin-1 in HBVSMC. Conclusion. Upregulation of relaxin and downregulation of RXFP1 after SAH may participate in development of cerebral vasospasm. Downregulation of RXFP1 may induce a functional decrease in relaxin activity during vasospasm. Understanding the role of relaxin may provide further insight into the mechanisms of cerebral vasospasm.

  17. Epileptiform abnormalities predict delayed cerebral ischemia in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J A; Rosenthal, E S; Biswal, S; Zafar, S; Shenoy, A V; O'Connor, K L; Bechek, S C; Valdery Moura, J; Shafi, M M; Patel, A B; Cash, S S; Westover, M B

    2017-06-01

    To identify whether abnormal neural activity, in the form of epileptiform discharges and rhythmic or periodic activity, which we term here ictal-interictal continuum abnormalities (IICAs), are associated with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Retrospective analysis of continuous electroencephalography (cEEG) reports and medical records from 124 patients with moderate to severe grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We identified daily occurrence of seizures and IICAs. Using survival analysis methods, we estimated the cumulative probability of IICA onset time for patients with and without delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Our data suggest the presence of IICAs indeed increases the risk of developing DCI, especially when they begin several days after the onset of SAH. We found that all IICA types except generalized rhythmic delta activity occur more commonly in patients who develop DCI. In particular, IICAs that begin later in hospitalization correlate with increased risk of DCI. IICAs represent a new marker for identifying early patients at increased risk for DCI. Moreover, IICAs might contribute mechanistically to DCI and therefore represent a new potential target for intervention to prevent secondary cerebral injury following SAH. These findings imply that IICAs may be a novel marker for predicting those at higher risk for DCI development. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Association of Recreational Marijuana Use with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumalla, Kavelin; Reddy, Adithi Y; Mittal, Manoj K

    2016-02-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effect of cannabis use on hospitalizations for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2004-2011) was used to identify all patients (age 15-54) with a primary diagnosis of aSAH (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification 430). We identified patients testing positive for cannabis use using all available diagnosis fields. The incidence and characteristics of aSAH hospitalizations among cannabis users were examined. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the effect of cannabis use on aSAH and in-hospital outcomes. Prior to adjustment, the incidence of aSAH in the cannabis cohort was slightly increased relative to the noncannabis cohort (relative risk: 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.11). Cannabis use in aSAH was more frequent among younger patients (40.44 ± 10.17 versus 43.74 ± 8.68, P recreational marijuana use is independently associated with an 18% increased likelihood of aSAH. Further case-control studies may analyze inpatient outcomes and other understudied mechanisms behind cannabis-associated stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Controversies and Evolving New Mechanisms in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Feng, Hua; Sherchan, Prativa; Klebe, Damon; Zhao, Gang; Sun, Xiaochuan; Zhang, Jianmin; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite decades of study, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) continues to be a serious and significant health problem in the United States and worldwide. The mechanisms contributing to brain injury after SAH remain unclear. Traditionally, most in vivo research has heavily emphasized the basic mechanisms of SAH over the pathophysiological or morphological changes of delayed cerebral vasospasm after SAH. Unfortunately, the results of clinical trials based on this premise have mostly been disappointing, implicating some other pathophysiological factors, independent of vasospasm, as contributors to poor clinical outcomes. Delayed cerebral vasospasm is no longer the only culprit. In this review, we summarize recent data from both experimental and clinical studies of SAH and discuss the vast array of physiological dysfunctions following SAH that ultimately lead to cell death. Based on the progress in neurobiological understanding of SAH, the terms “early brain injury” and “delayed brain injury” are used according to the temporal progression of SAH-induced brain injury. Additionally, a new concept of the vasculo-neuronal-glia triad model for SAH study is highlighted and presents the challenges and opportunities of this model for future SAH applications. PMID:24076160

  20. Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines for Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Sang; Park, Sukh Que; Ko, Jun Kyeung; Kim, Dae-Won; Park, Jung Cheol; Yeon, Je Young; Chung, Seung Young; Chung, Joonho; Joo, Sung-Pil; Hwang, Gyojun; Kim, Deog Young; Chang, Won Hyuk; Choi, Kyu-Sun; Lee, Sung Ho; Sheen, Seung Hun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Byung Moon; Bae, Hee-Joon; Oh, Chang Wan; Park, Hyeon Seon

    2018-01-01

    Despite advancements in treating ruptured cerebral aneurysms, an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is still a grave cerebrovascular disease associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. Based on the literature published to date, worldwide academic and governmental committees have developed clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) to propose standards for disease management in order to achieve the best treatment outcomes for aSAHs. In 2013, the Korean Society of Cerebrovascular Surgeons issued a Korean version of the CPGs for aSAHs. The group researched all articles and major foreign CPGs published in English until December 2015 using several search engines. Based on these articles, levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were determined by our society as well as by other related Quality Control Committees from neurointervention, neurology and rehabilitation medicine. The Korean version of the CPGs for aSAHs includes risk factors, diagnosis, initial management, medical and surgical management to prevent rebleeding, management of delayed cerebral ischemia and vasospasm, treatment of hydrocephalus, treatment of medical complications and early rehabilitation. The CPGs are not the absolute standard but are the present reference as the evidence is still incomplete, each environment of clinical practice is different, and there is a high probability of variation in the current recommendations. The CPGs will be useful in the fields of clinical practice and research. PMID:29526058

  1. Subarachnoid and Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Patients with Churg-Strauss Syndrome: Two Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Myeong Hoon; Park, Jeong Un; Kang, Jae Gyu

    2012-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis of the small and medium vessels, associated with extravascular eosinophilic granulomas, peripheral eosinophilia, and asthma. The exact etiology of CSS is unknown. This syndrome commonly affects the lungs, peripheral nerves, skin, heart, and gastrointestinal tract, but rarely the central nervous system. Subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage in CSS patients is extremely rare; however, clinicians should consider that CSS may be a cause of intracranial hemorrhage and its high rate of mortality and morbidity. The authors report on two cases of subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage with CSS and discuss a brief review of CSS. PMID:23210058

  2. Perimesencephalic nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by transverse sinus thrombosis: A case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Fang-Wang; Rao, Jie; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Liang; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Qi-Hui; Yang, Jian-Guang; Ke, Jiang-Qiong; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2017-08-01

    Perimesencephalic nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (PNSAH) is characterized by a pattern of extravasated blood restricted to the perimesencephalic cisterns, normal angiographic findings, and an excellent prognosis with an uneventful course and low risks of complication. The precise etiology of bleeding in patients with PNSAH has not yet been established. The most common hypothesis is that PNSAH is venous in origin. Intracranial venous hypertension has been considered as the pivotal factor in the pathogenesis of PNSAH. The underlying venous pathology such as straight sinus stenosis, jugular vein occlusion may contribute to PNSAH. We describe a patient in whom transverse sinus thrombosis preceded intracranial venous hypertension and PNSAH. These findings supported that the source of the subarachnoid hemorrhage is venous in origin. A 45-year-old right-handed man was admitted to the hospital with a sudden onset of severe headache associated with nausea, vomiting, and mild photophobia for 6 hours. The patient was fully conscious and totally alert. An emergency brain computed tomography (CT) revealed an acute subarachnoid hemorrhage restricted to the perimesencephalic cisterns. CT angiography revealed no evidence of an intracranial aneurysm or underlying vascular malformation. Digital subtraction angiography of arterial and capillary phases confirmed the CT angiographic findings. Assessment of the venous phase demonstrated right transverse sinus thrombosis. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Lumbar puncture revealed an opening pressure of 360 mmH2O, suggestive of intracranial venous hypertension. Grave disease was diagnosed by endocrinological investigation. Low-molecular-weight heparin, followed by oral warfarin, was initiated immediately as the treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and PNSAH. The patient discharged without any neurologic defect after 3 weeks of hospital stay. MR venography

  3. Paravascular pathways contribute to vasculitis and neuroinflammation after subarachnoid hemorrhage independently of glymphatic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, C; Yao, X; Li, J; He, B; Liu, Q; Ren, H; Liang, F; Li, M; Lin, H; Peng, J; Yuan, T F; Pei, Z; Su, H

    2016-03-31

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease with high mortality. The mechanisms underlying its pathological complications have not been fully identified. Here, we investigate the potential involvement of the glymphatic system in the neuropathology of SAH. We demonstrate that blood components rapidly enter the paravascular space following SAH and penetrate into the perivascular parenchyma throughout the brain, causing disastrous events such as cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, microcirculation dysfunction and widespread perivascular neuroinflammation. Clearance of the paravascular pathway with tissue-type plasminogen activator ameliorates the behavioral deficits and alleviates histological injury of SAH. Interestingly, AQP4(-/-) mice showed no improvements in neurological deficits and neuroinflammation at day 7 after SAH compared with WT control mice. In conclusion, our study proves that the paravascular pathway dynamically mediates the pathological complications following acute SAH independently of glymphatic control.

  4. Detection of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage at Acute and Subacute/Chronic Stages: Comparison of Four Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences and Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Kang Yuan

    2005-03-01

    Conclusion: FLAIR and GE T2* MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are all statistically significant indicators of acute SAH. GE T2*-weighted images are statistically significant indicators of subacute-to-chronic SAH, whereas other MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are not.

  5. Therapeutic indications for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in aged people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Hisao; Kawasoe, Takuma; Miyata, Shiro; Nakano, Shinichi; Wakisaka, Shinichiro; Fujime, Kenichi; Ohta, Hajime; Arikawa, Shoji

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the therapeutic indications for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in aged people. Between April 1999 and March 2002, 142 patients with aneurysmal SAH were treated and enrolled in this study. They were divided into 3 groups: 33 patients 75 years old and older (Group A, 23.2%), 37 between 65 and 74 years old (Group B, 26.1%), and 72 64 years old and younger (Group C, 47.4). Hunt and Kosnik grades, Fisher's CT classifications and clinical outcome were evaluated in each group. Clinical outcome was measured by Glasgow Outcome Scale, and good recovery and moderately disabled were defined as favorable outcome. Group A had a significantly higher incidence of serious Hunt and Kosnik grades of patients compared with the other 2 groups (p<0.05, <0.01). Fisher's CT classification was also more severe in Group A than Group C (p<0.05). Therefore the rate of radical treatments was significantly lower in Group A (45.5%) compared with Group B (73.0%) and C (86.1%). Only 4 of the 33 patients (12.1%) with favorable outcome were in Group A, whereas the rates of favorable outcome in Group B and C were 54.1 and 62.5%, respectively. Group A had a significantly poor outcome compared with the other 2 groups. Particularly, none of the patients in Group A with Hunt and Kosnik Grades 4-5 and Fisher's Classification 4 had favorable outcome. Since there were no significant differences in the rate of radical treatments and clinical outcome between Group B and C, aged people 74 years old and younger should be actively treated in the same manner as the young. In aged people 75 years old and older, however, radical treatment should be restricted to those with Hunt and Kosnik Grade 1-3 and Fisher's CT Classification 2-3. (author)

  6. Cannabis Use and Outcomes in Patients With Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrouz, Réza; Birnbaum, Lee; Grandhi, Ramesh; Johnson, Jeremiah; Misra, Vivek; Palacio, Santiago; Seifi, Ali; Topel, Christopher; Garvin, Rachel; Caron, Jean-Louis

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of cannabis use in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and its impact on morbidity, mortality, and outcomes are unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between cannabis use and outcomes in patients with aSAH. Records of consecutive patients admitted with aSAH between 2010 and 2015 were reviewed. Clinical features and outcomes of aSAH patients with negative urine drug screen and cannabinoids-positive (CB+) were compared. Regression analyses were used to assess for associations. The study group consisted of 108 patients; 25.9% with CB+. Delayed cerebral ischemia was diagnosed in 50% of CB+ and 23.8% of urine drug screen negative patients (P=0.01). CB+ was independently associated with development of delayed cerebral ischemia (odds ratio, 2.68; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-6.99; P=0.01). A significantly higher number of CB+ than urine drug screen negative patients had poor outcome (35.7% versus 13.8%; P=0.01). In univariate analysis, CB+ was associated with the composite end point of hospital mortality/severe disability (odds ratio, 2.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-8.01; P=0.04). However, after adjusting for other predictors, this effect was no longer significant. We offer preliminary data that CB+ is independently associated with delayed cerebral ischemia and possibly poor outcome in patients with aSAH. Our findings add to the growing evidence on the association of cannabis with cerebrovascular risk. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. The possible role of neuropeptide Y after spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebesch, Karl-Michael; Brawanski, Alexander; Kagerbauer, Simone Maria; Martin, Jan; Bele, Sylvia; Herbst, Andreas; Feigl, Günther; Stoerr, Eva-Maria; Lohmeier, Anette; Proescholdt, Martin

    2011-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a highly potent vasoconstrictive neuropeptide, is widely expressed in the human brain, regulating vessel diameter and cerebral blood flow. Earlier studies focusing on the possible role of NPY in the context of aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and vasospasm have produced conflicting results. However, despite extensive research efforts, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the SAH-related vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) have not been clarified. We, therefore, attempted to investigate the role of NPY in SAH-induced vasospasm in a larger, well documented patient population utilizing modern analytical tools. We focused on the release of the potent vasoconstrictor NPY in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood, and its correlation to vasospasm and stroke in the early clinical stage. Thirty-seven patients with SAH and a control group consisting of 29 patients were included. Eighteen patients developed stroke, 21 patients met the Doppler sonographical criteria for vasospasm. Twenty-nine patients had aneurysms of the anterior circulation and four patients of the posterior circulation. All patients had ventricular drainage inserted and an arterial catheter. Blood and CSF were drawn daily for NPY analysis during a 10-day interval. The levels of NPY in CSF and plasma were significantly higher after SAH than in the control group (p = 0.001). The vasospasm group showed NPY levels in CSF which continuously ranged above the NPY levels of the non-vasospasm group (p = 0.001). Patients with stroke caused by vasospasm had significantly higher levels of NPY (p = 0.001). NPY is released excessively into blood and CSF following SAH. Patients with cerebral infarction caused by vasospasm had significantly higher levels of NPY. Our results indicate a certain role for NPY in the pathophysiology of vasospasm due to SAH and justify further studies in this area of research.

  8. Timing of deep vein thrombosis formation after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Conrad W.; Su, Kimmy; Liu, Jesse J.; Dogan, Aclan; Hinson, Holly E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). The time period of greatest risk for developing DVT after aSAH is not currently known. aSAH induces a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to DVT formation. Using repeated ultrasound screening, the hypothesis that patients would be at greatest risk for developing DVT in the subacute post-rupture period was tested. METHODS One hundred ninety-eight patients with aSAH admitted to the Oregon Health & Science University Neurosciences Intensive Care Unit between April 2008 and March 2012 were included in a retrospective analysis. Ultrasound screening was performed every 5.2 ± 3.3 days between admission and discharge. The chi-square test was used to compare DVT incidence during different time periods of interest. Patient baseline characteristics as well as stroke severity and hospital complications were evaluated in univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS Forty-two (21%) of 198 patients were diagnosed with DVT, and 3 (2%) of 198 patients were symptomatic. Twenty-nine (69%) of the 42 cases of DVT were first detected between Days 3 and 14, compared with 3 cases (7%) detected between Days 0 and 3 and 10 cases (24%) detected after Day 14 (p < 0.05). The postrupture 5-day window of highest risk for DVT development was between Days 5 and 9 (40%, p < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, length of hospital stay and use of mechanical prophylaxis alone were significantly associated with DVT formation. CONCLUSIONS DVT formation most commonly occurs in the first 2 weeks following aSAH, with detection in this cohort peaking between Days 5 and 9. Chemoprophylaxis is associated with a significantly lower incidence of DVT. PMID:26162047

  9. The Importance of Early Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Hou, Jack; Pluta, Ryszard M.; Zhang, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a medical emergency that accounts for 5% of all stroke cases. Individuals affected are typically in the prime of their lives (mean age 50 years). Approximately 12% of patients die before receiving medical attention, 33% within 48 hours and 50% within 30 days of aSAH. Of the survivors 50% suffer from permanent disability with an estimated lifetime cost more than double that of an ischemic stroke. Traditionally, spasm that develops in large cerebral arteries 3-7 days after aneurysm rupture is considered the most important determinant of brain injury and outcome after aSAH. However, recent studies show that prevention of delayed vasospasm does not improve outcome in aSAH patients. This finding has finally brought in focus the influence of early brain injury on outcome of aSAH. A substantial amount of evidence indicates that brain injury begins at the aneurysm rupture, evolves with time and plays an important role in patients’ outcome. In this manuscript we review early brain injury after aSAH. Due to the early nature, most of the information on this injury comes from animals and few only from autopsy of patients who died within days after aSAH. Consequently, we began with a review of animal models of early brain injury, next we review the mechanisms of brain injury according to the sequence of their temporal appearance and finally we discuss the failure of clinical translation of therapies successful in animal models of aSAH. PMID:22414893

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging and brain injury in the chronic phase after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stehouwer, Bertine L.; van der Kleij, Lisa A.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.; De Vis, Jill B.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Case-fatality rates after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage have decreased over the past decades. However, many patients who survive an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage have long-term functional and cognitive impairments. Aims: We sought to review all data on conventional brain MRI

  11. The CHESS score: a simple tool for early prediction of shunt dependency after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbarli, R; Bohrer, A-M; Pierscianek, D; Müller, D; Wrede, K H; Dammann, P; El Hindy, N; Özkan, N; Sure, U; Müller, O

    2016-05-01

    Acute hydrocephalus is an early and common complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, considerably fewer patients develop chronic hydrocephalus requiring shunt placement. Our aim was to develop a risk score for early identification of patients with shunt dependency after SAH. Two hundred and forty-two SAH individuals who were treated in our institution between January 2008 and December 2013 and survived the initial impact were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical parameters within 72 h after the ictus were correlated with shunt dependency. Independent predictors were summarized into a new risk score which was validated in a subsequent SAH cohort treated between January and December 2014. Seventy-five patients (31%) underwent shunt placement. Of 23 evaluated variables, only the following five showed independent associations with shunt dependency and were subsequently used to establish the Chronic Hydrocephalus Ensuing from SAH Score (CHESS, 0-8 points): Hunt and Hess grade ≥IV (1 point), location of the ruptured aneurysm in the posterior circulation (1 point), acute hydrocephalus (4 points), the presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (1 point) and early cerebral infarction on follow-up computed tomography scan (1 point). The CHESS showed strong correlation with shunt dependency (P = 0.0007) and could be successfully validated in both internal SAH cohorts tested. Patients scoring ≥6 CHESS points had significantly higher risk of shunt dependency (P CHESS may become a valuable diagnostic tool for early estimation of shunt dependency after SAH. Further evaluation and external validation will be required in prospective studies. © 2016 EAN.

  12. A multicenter prospective cohort study of volume management after subarachnoid hemorrhage: circulatory characteristics of pulmonary edema after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Yoshiki; Takeda, Junichi; Sato, Yohei; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Matsui, Toru; Isotani, Eiji

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by pulmonary complications, which may lead to poor outcomes and death. This study investigated the incidence and cause of pulmonary edema in patients with SAH by using hemodynamic monitoring with PiCCO-plus pulse contour analysis. METHODS A total of 204 patients with SAH were included in a multicenter prospective cohort study to investigate hemodynamic changes after surgical clipping or coil embolization of ruptured cerebral aneurysms by using a PiCCO-plus device. Changes in various hemodynamic parameters after SAH were analyzed statistically. RESULTS Fifty-two patients (25.5%) developed pulmonary edema. Patients with pulmonary edema (PE group) were significantly older than those without pulmonary edema (non-PE group) (p = 0.017). The mean extravascular lung water index was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group throughout the study period. The pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group on Day 6 (p = 0.029) and Day 10 (p = 0.011). The cardiac index of the PE group was significantly decreased biphasically on Days 2 and 10 compared with that of the non-PE group. In the early phase (Days 1-5 after SAH), the daily water balance of the PE group was slightly positive. In the delayed phase (Days 6-14 after SAH), the serum C-reactive protein level and the global end-diastolic volume index were significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group, whereas the PVPI tended to be higher in the PE group. CONCLUSIONS Pulmonary edema that occurs in the early and delayed phases after SAH is caused by cardiac failure and inflammatory (i.e., noncardiogenic) conditions, respectively. Measurement of the extravascular lung water index, cardiac index, and PVPI by PiCCO-plus monitoring is useful for identifying pulmonary edema in patients with SAH.

  13. Effects of prostacyclin on cerebral blood flow and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Wetterslev, Jørn; Stavngaard, Trine

    2015-01-01

    and blood flow regulation, on factors related to DIND. METHODS: This trial is a single-center, randomized, blinded, clinical, pilot trial with 3 arms. Ninety patients were randomized to continuous infusion of prostacyclin 1 ng/kg per minute, prostacyclin 2 ng/kg per minute, or placebo. The intervention...... parameters or clinical outcome were found between the 3 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Administration of prostacyclin to patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage may be safe and feasible. Global cerebral blood flow after subarachnoid hemorrhage is not markedly affected by administration of prostacyclin in the tested dose...

  14. An uncommon initial presentation of snake bite-subarachnoid hemorrhage: A case report with literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Roy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake bites are very common in India, particularly in West Bengal. Snake bite can cause various hematological, neuromyopathical complications. It can be very fatal if not detected and treated early. Timely intervention can save the patient. We are reporting a case of hematotoxic Russell viper snake bite presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patient was successfully treated with antivenom serum (AVS along with other conservative management. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as an initial presentation in viper bite is very rare and we discuss the case with proper literature review.

  15. Neurokinin-1 receptor antagonism in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Svendgaard, Niels-Aage; Edvinsson, Lars

    2007-01-01

    OBJECT: Cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) leads to reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF) and to cerebral ischemia, in some cases even producing infarction and long-term disability. The goal of the present study was to investigate the hypothesis that inhibition of neurokinin-1...... receptors (NK1Rs) by administration of L-822429 blunts the decrease in CBF as well as cerebrovascular receptor upregulation in an animal model of SAH. METHODS: Subarachnoid hemorrhage was induced in rats by injection of 250 microl of blood into the prechiasmatic cistern. The NK1R inhibitor L-822429...

  16. Dose-Dependent Effects of Statins for Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Meta-Regression Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Minh-Son; Prakash, Shivesh; Poonnoose, Santosh I; Bihari, Shailesh

    2018-05-01

    The study uses meta-regression analysis to quantify the dose-dependent effects of statin pharmacotherapy on vasospasm, delayed ischemic neurologic deficits (DIND), and mortality in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Prospective, retrospective observational studies, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were retrieved by a systematic database search. Summary estimates were expressed as absolute risk (AR) for a given statin dose or control (placebo). Meta-regression using inverse variance weighting and robust variance estimation was performed to assess the effect of statin dose on transformed AR in a random effects model. Dose-dependence of predicted AR with 95% confidence interval (CI) was recovered by using Miller's Freeman-Tukey inverse. The database search and study selection criteria yielded 18 studies (2594 patients) for analysis. These included 12 RCTs, 4 retrospective observational studies, and 2 prospective observational studies. Twelve studies investigated simvastatin, whereas the remaining studies investigated atorvastatin, pravastatin, or pitavastatin, with simvastatin-equivalent doses ranging from 20 to 80 mg. Meta-regression revealed dose-dependent reductions in Freeman-Tukey-transformed AR of vasospasm (slope coefficient -0.00404, 95% CI -0.00720 to -0.00087; P = 0.0321), DIND (slope coefficient -0.00316, 95% CI -0.00586 to -0.00047; P = 0.0392), and mortality (slope coefficient -0.00345, 95% CI -0.00623 to -0.00067; P = 0.0352). The present meta-regression provides weak evidence for dose-dependent reductions in vasospasm, DIND and mortality associated with acute statin use after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, the analysis was limited by substantial heterogeneity among individual studies. Greater dosing strategies are a potential consideration for future RCTs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Management of subarachnoid hemorrhage classified grade V. Possibility of intravascular treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzura, Masahiko; Oshima, Kousuke; Morishima, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Homare; Tanaka, Katsuyuki; Sekino, Hiroaki; Akashi, Katsuya [St. Marianna Univ., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-10-01

    Management outcomes in poor-grade patients (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons Committee on a Universal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Grading Scale Grade V) with ruptured cerebral aneurysms have historically been unsatisfactory. In the present study, we examined the possibility of intravascular treatment for ruptured aneurysm detected by 3-Dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA) in poor-grade SAH patients. From April 1997 to July 2000, 3D-CTA was performed on 54 of 73 patients admitted with Grade V subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Excluding 3 patients who underwent emergency surgery for ruptured aneurysms and intracerebral hematomas, CT findings from the remaining 51 patients were analyzed. The study included 23 men and 28 women, ranging in age from 28 to 91 with an average age of 63.6. The patients' initial scores on the Glasgow Coma Scale upon admission were 3 in 36 patients (including 19 patients who had undergone cardio-pulmonary arrest), 4 in 11 patients, 5 in 2 patients, and 6 in 2 patients. Ruptured aneurysms responsible for SAH were clearly delineated in 41 aneurysms from 39 patients, with 32 aneurysms in the anterior circulation and 9 in the posterior circulation. Patients with Glasgow Coma Scale of 4 or higher whose score did not progressively decrease for 12 hours after symptom onset were considered for intravascular treatment. In our study, 4 of 39 patients (10.3%) met these criteria. Glasgow Outcome Scale results were good recovery in 1 case, moderate disability in 1 case, severe disability in 1 case, and death in the remaining 48 cases. These results suggest that the management course for poor-grade (WFNS Grade V) SAH patients who retain brain stem reflexes contain the following: identification of aneurysms by 3D-CTA, maintenance of adequate sedation and external drainage to treat acute hydrocephalus, continued minimum 12-hour observation, monitoring levels of consciousness where possible, and consideration of aggressive therapy including

  18. Intracranial hemorrhage complicating thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uglietta, J.P.; Boyko, O.B.; O'Connor, C.M.; Aldrich, H.; Massey, E.W.; Heinz, E.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the incidence and types of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in 1,696 patients treated with thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Thirteen of 1,696 patients experienced ICH, and their nonenhanced brain CT scans were reviewed. Their mean age was 62 years (range, 53-74 years), and nine of 13 were male. Six patients received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), four streptokinase, two urokinase, and one tPA and urokinase. The hemorrhages were classified according to CT location: intraparenchymal (IPH), subarachnoid (SAH), subdural (SDH), and intraventricular (IVH). The incidence of ICH was 0.76%. There were 31 hemorrhages in 13 patients. Twelve hemorrhages were IPH, 10 were SDH, seven were SAH, and two were IVH. Excluding IVH, 24 of 29 hemorrhages (83%) were supratentorial

  19. Headache-like Subarachnoid Hemorrhage After Digital Subtraction Angiography: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fettah Eren

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is a clinical condition with acute-onset, sudden, and severe headache. In addition to headache, severe nausea, vomiting, dizziness, confusion, agitation, focal neurologic deficits, and hypertension can be detected. Findings of meningeal irritation may accompany to these clinical features, 6-24 hours after the hemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA is used for surgical or endovascular treatment planning in order to identify vascular abnormalities, in addition to other imaging studies. After DSA, the frequency of all neurologic complications is between 0.2% and 4.5%. Headache may occur after DSA in an average 50% of patients. This rate is especially higher in female patients. Headache types are usually classified as migraine, tension or postoperative atypical headaches The incidence of severe headache after DSA is low. Vascular wall rupture should be considered first in severe headache after the procedure. It should also be kept in mind that after all other secondary causes are excluded; SAH-like headaches after DSA can be detected

  20. Cognitive deficits after aneurysmal and angiographically negative subarachnoid hemorrhage : Memory, attention, executive functioning, and emotion recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Anne M; Groen, Rob J M; Veenstra, Wencke S; Metzemaekers, Joannes; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; van Dijk, J Marc C; Spikman, Jacoba M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors' aim was to investigate cognitive outcome in patients with aneurysmal and angiographically negative subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH and anSAH), by comparing them to healthy controls and to each other. Besides investigating cognitive functions as memory and attention, they

  1. Influence of ABO blood type on the outcome after non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinski, Daniel; Won, Sae-Yeon; Behmanesh, Bedjan; Kashefiolasl, Sepide; Geisen, Christof; Seifert, Volker; Senft, Christian; Konczalla, Juergen

    2018-04-01

    In patients with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (NA-SAH), the etiology is unknown and the bleeding source remains unidentified. However, the ABO blood type system has a profound role in patient's hemostasis and thrombosis. To date, the aspect of ABO blood type in incidence, clinical course, and outcome after NA-SAH has not been investigated. In this retrospective analysis, 81 patients with non-traumatic and non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage treated between 2010 and 2014 at the author's institution were included. WFNS admission status, cerebral vasospasm, delayed infarction, ventriculoperitoneal shunt necessity, the Fisher grade, and the modified Rankin Scale were analyzed for their association with ABO blood type. Four hundred seventy patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage served as a control group. The AB blood type is more frequent in NA-SAH compared to aneurysmal patients and the German population (OR 2.45, p ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, NA-SAH with AB blood type showed a similar sequelae compared to aneurysmal patients in terms of shunt necessity (OR 2.00, p ≥ 0.05), cerebral vasospasm (OR 1.66, p ≥ 0.05), and delayed infarctions (OR 1.07, p ≥ 0.05). The clinical course of NA-SAH AB blood type patients shows similar severity as of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Therefore, patients with AB blood type should be under intensified observation.

  2. Association of Automatically Quantified Total Blood Volume after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage with Delayed Cerebral Ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, I. A.; Gathier, C. S.; Boers, A. M.; Marquering, H. A.; Slooter, A. J.; Velthuis, B. K.; Coert, B. A.; Verbaan, D.; van den Berg, R.; Rinkel, G. J.; Majoie, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    The total amount of extravasated blood after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, assessed with semiquantitative methods such as the modified Fisher and Hijdra scales, is known to be a predictor of delayed cerebral ischemia. However, prediction rates of delayed cerebral ischemia are moderate, which

  3. PRINCIPLES OF INTENSIVE CARE OF PATIENTS WITH SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGES AFTER CEREBRAL ANEURYSMS RUPTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Krylov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. The paper presents the modern principles of intensive care of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage after cerebral aneurysms ruptures focusing on neuromonitoring, mechanical ventilation, intracranial pressure and hemodynamic correction, calcium antagonists prescription, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, nutritional support, thromboembolic complications prevention and infection complications management. 

  4. Prediction of delayed cerebral ischemia, rebleeding, and outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijdra, A.; van Gijn, J.; Nagelkerke, N. J.; Vermeulen, M.; van Crevel, H.

    1988-01-01

    Using logistic regression, we analyzed the predictive value of a number of entry variables with respect to the outcome variables delayed cerebral ischemia, rebleeding, and poor outcome (death or severe disability) in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. The entry variables were clinical

  5. Predictors of outcome in World Federation of Neurologic Surgeons grade V aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, René; Foumani, Mahrouz; Schröder, Rosalie D.; Peerdeman, Saskia M.; Horn, Janneke; Bipat, Shandra; Vandertop, W. Peter

    2011-01-01

    Only a small percentage of World Federation of Neurologic Surgeons grade V aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients have a favorable outcome. The influence of clinical parameters on outcome was assessed. Retrospective evaluation of consecutive patients admitted from 2000-2007 with grade V

  6. Source of fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products in the CSF after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, M.; van Vliet, H. H.; Lindsay, K. W.; Hijdra, A.; van Gijn, J.

    1985-01-01

    In 48 patients with a subarachnoid hemorrhage, levels of fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products (FDP's), total protein, and plasminogen were measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) between Days 9 and 15 after the bleed. Of these 48 patients, 22 received tranexamic acid. Despite a significant

  7. Long-term recurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage after adequate coiling versus clipping of ruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Joanna D.; Sprengers, Marieke E.; van Rooij, Willem Jan; Sluzewski, Menno; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Coiling is increasingly used as treatment for intracranial aneurysms. Despite its favorable short-term outcome, concerns exist about long-term reopening and inherent risk of recurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We hypothesized a higher risk for recurrent SAH after

  8. Long-Term Recurrent Subarachnoid Hemorrhage After Adequate Coiling Versus Clipping of Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Joanna D.; Sprengers, Marieke E.; van Rooij, Willem Jan; Sluzewski, Menno; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    Background and Purpose-Coiling is increasingly used as treatment for intracranial aneurysms. Despite its favorable short-term outcome, concerns exist about long-term reopening and inherent risk of recurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We hypothesized a higher risk for recurrent SAH after adequate

  9. Association of the NOS3 intron-4 VNTR polymorphism with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsø, Jonatan Myrup; Edsen, Troels; Kotinis, Alexandros

    2014-01-01

    OBJECT: The nitric oxide system has been linked to the pathogenesis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The authors performed a case-control study to investigate the association between SAH and common genetic variants within the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3). METHODS: Thr...

  10. Headache as a crucial symptom in the etiology of convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, María; Benavente, Lorena; Para, Marta; Santamarta, Elena; Pascual, Julio; Calleja, Sergio

    2014-03-01

    Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been associated with different diseases, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and cerebral amyloid angiopathy being the 2 main causes. To investigate whether headache at onset is determinant in identifying the underlying etiology for convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage. After searching in the database of our hospital, 24 patients were found with convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the last 10 years. The mean age of the sample was 69.5 years. We recorded data referring to demographics, symptoms and neuroimaging. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy patients accounted for 46% of the sample, 13% were diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, 16% with several other etiologies, and in 25%, the cause remained unknown. Mild headache was present only in 1 (9%) of the 11 cerebral amyloid angiopathy patients, while severe headache was the dominant feature in 86% of cases of the remaining etiologies. Headache is a key symptom allowing a presumptive etiological diagnosis of convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage. While the absence of headache suggests cerebral amyloid angiopathy as the more probable cause, severe headache obliges us to rule out other etiologies, such as reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  11. Early Magnesium Treatment After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, Sanne M. Dorhout; Algra, Ale; Wong, George K. C.; Poon, Wai S.; Bradford, Celia M.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; van den Bergh, Walter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose—Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is an important cause of poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Trials of magnesium treatment starting <4 days after symptom onset found no effect on poor outcome or DCI in SAH. Earlier installment of treatment might be

  12. Early Magnesium Treatment After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.; Algra, Ale; Wong, George K. C.; Poon, Wai S.; Bradford, Celia M.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; van Kooten, F.; Dirven, C. M.; van Gijn, J.; Vermeulen, M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Boet, R.; Chan, M. T. V.; Gin, T.; Ng, S. C. P.; Zee, B. C. Y.; Al-Shahi Salman, R.; Boiten, J.; Kuijsten, H.; Lavados, P. M.; van Oostenbrugge, R. J.; Vandertop, W. P.; Finfer, S.; O'Connor, A.; Yarad, E.; Firth, R.; McCallister, R.; Harrington, T.; Steinfort, B.; Faulder, K.; Assaad, N.; Morgan, M.; Starkman, S.; Eckstein, M.; Stratton, S. J.; Pratt, F. D.; Hamilton, S.; Conwit, R.; Liebeskind, D. S.; Sung, G.; Kramer, I.; Moreau, G.; Goldweber, R.; Sanossian, N.

    2015-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is an important cause of poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Trials of magnesium treatment starting <4 days after symptom onset found no effect on poor outcome or DCI in SAH. Earlier installment of treatment might be more effective, but

  13. Early Magnesium Treatment after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage : Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.; Algra, Ale; Wong, George K C; Poon, Wai S.; Bradford, Celia M.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Starkman, Sidney; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Van Den Bergh, Walter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is an important cause of poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Trials of magnesium treatment starting <4 days after symptom onset found no effect on poor outcome or DCI in SAH. Earlier installment of treatment might be

  14. Gene expression and molecular changes in cerebral arteries following subarachnoid hemorrhage in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikman, Petter; Beg, Saema; Khurana, Tejvir S

    2006-01-01

    OBJECT: The authors investigated early changes in the cerebral arteries of rats that occur after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). METHODS: Messenger RNA was investigated by performing microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses, and protein expression was shown...

  15. Subarachnoid hemorrhage induces enhanced expression of thromboxane A2 receptors in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Larsen, Carl; Maddahi, Aida

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains the key cause of morbidity and mortality after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with a pathogenesis that is still poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the involvement of thromboxane A(2) receptors (TP) in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia...

  16. Risk factors and short-term outcome in patients with angiographically negative subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbjerg, Sara Maria; Larsen, Carl Christian; Romner, Bertil

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify prognostic factors for clinical outcome in patients with non-traumatic, angiographically negative subarachnoid hemorrhage. Furthermore, the aim was to investigate if patients on anticoagulant therapy may have a more unfavorable outcome than patients...

  17. Effect of delayed onset prostacyclin on markers of endothelial function and damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gybel-Brask, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Rune; Stensballe, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a neurological emergency. Delayed ischemic neurological deficit is one of the main causes of poor outcome after SAH and is probably caused, at least in part, by cerebral vasospasm. The pathophysiology of this is multifaceted, but endothelial damage...

  18. Nosocomial infections after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage : time course and causative pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laban, Kamil G.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Vergouwen, Mervyn D. I.

    BackgroundNosocomial infections after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) are associated with prolonged length of stay and poor functional outcome. It remains unclear if infections result in prolonged length of stay or, vice versa, if prolonged length of stay results in more infections. Before

  19. Lumbar drainage of cerebrospinal fluid after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a prospective, randomized, controlled trial (LUMAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tamimi, Yahia Z; Bhargava, Deepti; Feltbower, Richard G; Hall, Gregory; Goddard, Anthony J P; Quinn, Audrey C; Ross, Stuart A

    2012-03-01

    A single-center prospective randomized controlled trial has been conducted to determine if lumbar drainage of cerebrospinal fluid after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage reduces the prevalence of delayed ischemic neurological deficit and improves clinical outcome. Patients with World Federation of Neurological Surgeons Grade 1 to 3 aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and modified Fisher Grades 2, 3, 4, and 3+4 were randomized to either the study group of standard therapy plus insertion of a lumbar drain or the control group of standard therapy alone. The primary outcome measure was the prevalence of delayed ischemic neurological deficit. Two hundred ten patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (166 female, 44 male; median age, 54 years; interquartile range, 45-62 years) were recruited into the control (n=105) and study (n=105) groups of the trial. World Federation of Neurological Surgeons grade was: 1 (n=139), 2 (n=60), and 3 (n=11); Fisher grade was: 2 (n=87), 3 (n=85), and 4 (n=38). The prevalence of delayed ischemic neurological deficit was 35.2% and 21.0% in the control and study groups, respectively (P=0.021). The prevalence of a modified Rankin Scale score of 4, 5, or 6 at Day 10 and 6 months, respectively, was 62.5% and 18.6% in the control group and 44.8% and 19.8% in the study group (P=0.009 and 0.83, respectively). Lumbar drainage of cerebrospinal fluid after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been shown to reduce the prevalence of delayed ischemic neurological deficit and improve early clinical outcome but failed to improve outcome at 6 months after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00842049.

  20. The Effects of Vasospasm and Re-Bleeding on the Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipce, Venko; Caparoski, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm and re-bleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm are devastating complication that can severely affect the outcome of the patients. We are presenting a series of total number of 224 patients treated and operated at our Department due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, out of which certain number developed vasospasm and re-bleeding. We are evaluating the effect of these complications on the outcome of the patients according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at the day of discharge. In our experience both vasospasm and ReSAH can significantly influence the outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

  1. Atrial natriuretic peptide secretion following subarachnoid hemorrhage in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josko, J.; Hendryk, S.; Jedrzejowska-Szypulka, H.; Gwozdz, B.; Herman, Z.S.; Latka, D.; Kopec, N.

    1996-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is released excessively in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), and vasodepressin is its main effect on the blood vessels. The aim of the study was to investigate the changes in ANP secretion in the cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in SHRs. The SAH was induced by the injection of 100 microliters of unheparinized, autologous blood into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), via a canule formerly inserted into the cisterna magna (CM). In the sham SAH group the SAH was imitated with 0.9% saline injection. The concentrations of ANP in the blood samples obtained in the acute and chronic stages of vasospasm were radioimmunoassayed with commercial RIA kits (Peninsula RIK 9103). It was found that both SAH and sham SAH induced a significant increase in plasma ANP in the chronic phase of vasospasm. No such changes were observed in the acute phase. This shows that the chronic cerebral vasospasm following SAH considerably enhances the ANP secretion in SHRs, probably through the increased endothelin release. These compensatory and regulatory mechanisms help prevent the development of brain oedema and the progression of vasospasm through secondary vasodilation. (author)

  2. Paradoxical undressing associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage in a non-hypothermia case?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, Emilienne; Ducrot, Kewin; Scarpelli, Maria Pia; Lobrinus, Alexander; Palmiere, Cristian

    2017-09-01

    Paradoxical undressing is a phenomenon characterizing some fatal hypothermia cases. The victims, despite low environmental temperatures, paradoxically remove their clothes due to a sudden feeling of warmth. In this report, we describe a case of suspected paradoxical undressing in a non-hypothermia case. The victim, a 51-year-old Caucasian man, was found dead wearing only sneakers and socks. All other clothing was found in his car. Postmortem investigations allowed the hypothesis of hypothermia to be ruled out and revealed the presence of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm that caused a subarachnoid hemorrhage, the latter responsible for the death. The absence of any elements suggesting a voluntary undressing or any third party's DNA profile or involvement along with the possibility that the subarachnoid hemorrhage might have determined a hypothalamic injury, somehow rendered conceivable the hypothesis of an inappropriate feeling of warmth due to hemorrhage-induced dysregulation of the hypothalamic temperature-regulating centers.

  3. Innovative approach for prevention and treatment of post subarachnoid hemorrhage vasospasm: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramana, Neelam K; Rao, Shailesh A V; Naik, Arun L; Shetty, Kishore; Murthy, Paparaja; Bansal, Abhilash; Panotopoulos, Christos

    2012-04-01

    More than one third of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) develop clinically significant vasospasm, as a leading morbidity and mortality factor for these patients. It is widely accepted that a) Degradation products of blood are the causative factors of vasospasm b) The amount of subarachnoid blood seen on admission CT is correlated to the risk of vasospasm c) Reducing the subarachnoid clot burden at the time of surgery reduces the risk of vasospasm. But there is no existing method to clear the blood from subarachnoid spaces satisfactorily. We have evaluated safety and feasibility of fluid exchange catheter system in SAH, to achieve this goal. We were successful in clearing cisternal blood in three patients with aneurysmal rupture with fluid exchange catheter system. Baseline CT scan of brain was performed immediately after the surgery and then at the end of irrigation. The amount of subarachnoid blood was evaluated. This innovative, fluid exchange catheter system infuses and aspirates micro volumes of drug solution in a cyclic mode, ensuring isobaric exchange of fluids. The result is good clearance of blood in subarachnoid spaces were seen in all the patients. Also, significant improvement in neurological deficits secondary to vasospasm was seen. We conclude that the fluid exchange catheter system is safe and adoptable in neurosurgical practice.

  4. Predictors of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a pilot study in a single Egyptian institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Ela, Hashem M; Salah El-Din, Ahmed M; Zaater, Ahmed A; Shehab, Mohamed; El Shahawy, Ossama A

    2018-01-01

    Acute hydrocephalus can cause neurological deterioration after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Predicting which patient would require shunting is challenging. This prospective study was conducted upon twenty patients who suffered acute hydrocephalus due to subarachnoid hemorrhage of ruptured aneurysms. Surgical or non-surgical management of hydrocephalus was conducted. Glasgow Coma scale (GCS) was assessed, and hydrocephalus was graded by bicaudate index. Fisher grade was determined from CT scan. Aneurysm site was determined by conventional or CT angiography. Either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling of aneurysms was performed. Initially, 3 (15%) patients had emergency CSF diversion on admission due to poor GCS on arrival. Initially, the remaining 17 patients were managed conservatively. Five patients did not require any intervention. Twelve patients had external ventricular drainage placement, 4 were weaned, and 8 failed weaning. High bicaudate index (> 0.2) correlated with shunting. Aneurysm site correlated well with shunting (ACoA or PCoA). Patients with fair GCS can be managed conservatively. Any deterioration warrants shifting to CSF diversion. Higher bicaudate index will usually need CSF diversion. The value of Fisher carries no significant value. Aneurysm location (ACoA or PCoA) correlates with an increased incidence of ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement.

  5. Pre-hemorrhage statin use and the risk of vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Shaye I.; Ahrens, Christine; Provencio, J Javier; Chow, Michael; Rasmussen, Peter A

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often followed by delayed ischemic deficits attributable to cerebral vasospasm. Recent studies suggest a positive impact of statin therapy on the incidence of vasospasm. This study was designed to assess whether a history of prior use of statin therapy was associated with a lower risk of vasospasm in patients with SAH. Methods We performed a comprehensive retrospective review of patients with aneurysmal SAH between 1997 and 2004. Clinical demographics and imaging data for all patients were reviewed and a logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the predictors of cerebral vasospasm, defined as a combination of clinical signs with radiographic confirmation. Results 308 patients were included. Mean age was higher in the group receiving statins (64 +/- 12 versus 54+/- 12 years). Hunt and Hess scores and treatment modality were not significantly different between the groups. Vasospasm was observed in 31% of patients not taking a statin (n=282) versus 23% taking a statin (n=26), without achieving statistical significance. Discontinuation of the statin did not affect risk of vasospasm. Conclusions Use of a statin prior to an aneurysmal SAH trended to reduce the incidence of subsequent vasospasm, without achieving statistical significance. PMID:18423529

  6. Hippocampal Atrophy Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Correlates with Disruption of Astrocyte Morphology and Capillary Coverage by AQP4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anzabi, Maryam; Ardalan, Maryam; Iversen, Nina Kerting

    2018-01-01

    Despite successful management of ruptured intracranial aneurysm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) remains the main cause of high mortality and morbidity in patients who survive the initial bleeding. Astrocytes play a key role in neurovascular coupling...

  7. Clinical Outcome Prediction in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Bayesian Neural Networks with Fuzzy Logic Inferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin W. Y. Lo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The novel clinical prediction approach of Bayesian neural networks with fuzzy logic inferences is created and applied to derive prognostic decision rules in cerebral aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH. Methods. The approach of Bayesian neural networks with fuzzy logic inferences was applied to data from five trials of Tirilazad for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (3551 patients. Results. Bayesian meta-analyses of observational studies on aSAH prognostic factors gave generalizable posterior distributions of population mean log odd ratios (ORs. Similar trends were noted in Bayesian and linear regression ORs. Significant outcome predictors include normal motor response, cerebral infarction, history of myocardial infarction, cerebral edema, history of diabetes mellitus, fever on day 8, prior subarachnoid hemorrhage, admission angiographic vasospasm, neurological grade, intraventricular hemorrhage, ruptured aneurysm size, history of hypertension, vasospasm day, age and mean arterial pressure. Heteroscedasticity was present in the nontransformed dataset. Artificial neural networks found nonlinear relationships with 11 hidden variables in 1 layer, using the multilayer perceptron model. Fuzzy logic decision rules (centroid defuzzification technique denoted cut-off points for poor prognosis at greater than 2.5 clusters. Discussion. This aSAH prognostic system makes use of existing knowledge, recognizes unknown areas, incorporates one's clinical reasoning, and compensates for uncertainty in prognostication.

  8. Management of Agitation Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Is There a Role for Beta-Blockers?

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    Fayaz Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. About 20% of the stroke is hemorrhagic and about 50% of these is due to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A troublesome neuropsychiatric complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage is agitation/aggression. Case Presentation. A 45-year-old man with no prior psychiatric history, sustained subarachnoid hemorrhage. After initial stabilization for 2 days, he underwent craniotomy and clipping of anterior cerebral communicating artery aneurysm. Treatment was continued with labetalol, nimodipine, and levetiracetam. Beginning postoperative day 4, patient developed episodes of confusion and agitation/aggression. Switching of Levetiracetam to valproate did not show any improvement. Psychiatry team tried to manage him with intense nursing intervention and different medications like olanzapine, valproate, lorazepam, and haloperidol. However, patient continued to be agitated and aggressive. Switching from labetalol to metoprolol resulted in dramatic improvement within 3 days. Discussion. Antipsychotics and benzodiazepines are often not sufficiently effective in the control of agitation/aggression in patients with traumatic brain injury and similar conditions. Our case report and the literature review including a cochrane review suggests that beta-blockers may be helpful in this situation.

  9. Accuracy of Daily Lung Ultrasound for the Detection of Pulmonary Edema Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Craig A; Co, Ivan; Pandey, Aditya S; Gregory Thompson, B; Rajajee, Venkatakrishna

    2016-04-01

    Early detection of pulmonary edema is vital to appropriate fluid management following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Lung ultrasound (LUS) has been shown to accurately identify pulmonary edema in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Our objective was to determine the accuracy of daily screening LUS for the detection of pulmonary edema following SAH. Screening LUS was performed in conjunction with daily transcranial doppler for SAH patients within the delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) risk period in our neuroICU. We reviewed records of SAH patients admitted 7/2012-5/2014 who underwent bilateral LUS on at least 5 consecutive days. Ultrasound videos were reviewed by an investigator blinded to the final diagnosis. "B+ lines" were defined as ≥3 B-lines on LUS. Two other investigators blinded to ultrasound results determined whether pulmonary edema with ARF (PE-ARF) was present during the period of evaluation on the basis of independent chart review, with a fourth investigator performing adjudication in the event of disagreement. The diagnostic accuracy of B+ lines for the detection of PE-ARF and RPE was determined. Of 59 patients meeting criteria for inclusion, 21 (36%) had PE-ARF and 26 (44%) had B+ lines. Kappa for inter-rater agreement was 0.821 (p pulmonary edema following SAH and may assist with fluid titration during the risk period for DCI.

  10. Enteral nutrition increases interstitial brain glucose levels in poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Mario; Schiefecker, Alois J; Beer, Ronny; Gaasch, Maxime; Rhomberg, Paul; Stover, John; Pfausler, Bettina; Thomé, Claudius; Schmutzhard, Erich; Helbok, Raimund

    2018-03-01

    Low brain tissue glucose levels after acute brain injury are associated with poor outcome. Whether enteral nutrition (EN) reliably increases cerebral glucose levels remains unclear. In this retrospective analysis of prospectively collected observational data, we investigate the effect of EN on brain metabolism in 17 poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients undergoing cerebral microdialysis (CMD) monitoring. CMD-values were obtained hourly. A nutritional intervention was defined as the clinical routine administration of EN without supplemental parenteral nutrition. Sixty-three interventions were analyzed. The mean amount of EN per intervention was 472.4 ± 10.7 kcal. CMD-glucose levels significantly increased from 1.59 ± 0.13 mmol/l at baseline to a maximum of 2.03 ± 0.2 mmol/l after 5 h (p  40) and the microdialysis probe location. The increase in CMD-glucose was directly dependent on the magnitude of increase of serum glucose levels (p = 0.007). No change in CMD-lactate, CMD-pyruvate, CMD-LPR, or CMD-glutamate (p > 0.4) was observed. Routine EN also increased CMD-glucose even if baseline concentrations were critically low ( < 0.7 mmol/l, neuroglucopenia; p < 0.001). These results may have treatment implications regarding glucose management of poor-grade aneurysmal SAH patients.

  11. Purinergic signaling triggers endfoot high-amplitude Ca2+ signals and causes inversion of neurovascular coupling after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Anthony C; Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C

    2016-11-01

    Neurovascular coupling supports brain metabolism by matching focal increases in neuronal activity with local arteriolar dilation. Previously, we demonstrated that an emergence of spontaneous endfoot high-amplitude Ca 2+ signals (eHACSs) caused a pathologic shift in neurovascular coupling from vasodilation to vasoconstriction in brain slices obtained from subarachnoid hemorrhage model animals. Extracellular purine nucleotides (e.g., ATP) can trigger astrocyte Ca 2+ oscillations and may be elevated following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Here, the role of purinergic signaling in subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced eHACSs and inversion of neurovascular coupling was examined by imaging parenchymal arteriolar diameter and astrocyte Ca 2+ signals in rat brain slices using two-photon fluorescent and infrared-differential interference contrast microscopy. We report that broad-spectrum inhibition of purinergic (P2) receptors using suramin blocked eHACSs and restored vasodilatory neurovascular coupling after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Importantly, eHACSs were also abolished using a cocktail of inhibitors targeting G q -coupled P2Y receptors. Further, activation of P2Y receptors in brain slices from un-operated animals triggered high-amplitude Ca 2+ events resembling eHACSs and disrupted neurovascular coupling. Neither tetrodotoxin nor bafilomycin A1 affected eHACSs suggesting that purine nucleotides are not released by ongoing neurotransmission and/or vesicular release after subarachnoid hemorrhage. These results indicate that purinergic signaling via P2Y receptors contributes to subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced eHACSs and inversion of neurovascular coupling. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Clinical features of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage arriving through a referral from a local primary hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Takaaki; Kubota, Tsukasa; Shimazaki, Mitsunori

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the current state of and problems in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage initially diagnosed and treated by general physicians at a local referring hospital and subsequently transferred to our hospital for neurosurgical treatment. We studied 37 consecutive patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage over a 7-year period from April 2001 to March 2008. A total of 7 men and 30 women aged 50 to 89 years (average: 71.2±9.5 years) were included in this study. Thirteen patients (35.1%) were referred to our hospital with diagnoses other than subarachnoid hemorrhage. Twenty-three of 27 patients who had CT scans were diagnosed correctly in the referring hospital, while only 1 of 10 patients was correctly diagnosed without CT. Time from the onset to admission to our hospital ranged from 85 minutes to 144 hours (average: 15.3±29 hours). The reasons of delay in patients who took more than 12 hours to reach us were patients' delay in visiting the referring hospital in 3 cases and uncertain initial diagnosis in 6. All 6 cases complained of sudden headache, but did not undergo CT. All patients were transferred by an ambulance car, and the duration of transfer ranged from 60 to 120 minutes (average: 85.4±15.7 minutes). None of the patients experienced rebleeding during transfer. Subarachnoid hemorrhage can be diagnosed correctly at the local primary hospital with CT, allowing appropriate primary treatments. Initial misdiagnosis is the major cause of delay in transferring patients to neurosurgical facilities. (author)

  13. Can S100B predict cerebral vasospasms in patients suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage?

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    Moshgan eAmiri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Protein S100B has proven to be a useful biomarker for cerebral damages. Increased levels of serum and CSF S100B have been shown in patients suffering subarachnoid hemorrhage, severe head injury and stroke. In patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, the course of S100B levels has been correlated with neurological deficits and outcome. Cerebral vasospasm is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the potential of S100B protein as a predictor of cerebral vasospasm in patients with severe subarachnoid hemorrhage.Methods: Patients with SAH, Fisher grade 3 and 4, were included in the study. Five samples of CSF and serum S100B were collected from each patient. The first sample (baseline sample was drawn within the first three days following ictus and the following four samples, once a day on days 5 to 8, with day of ictus defined as day 1. Clinical suspicion of cerebral vasospasm confirmed by computed tomography angiography was used to diagnose cerebral vasospasm.Results: A total of 18 patients were included. Five patients (28 % developed cerebral vasospasm, two (11 % developed ventriculitis. There were no significant differences between S100B for those with and without vasospasm. Serum S100B levels in patients with vasospasm were slightly lower within the first 5 days following ictus, compared to patients without vasospasm. Two out of 5 patients had elevated and increasing serum S100B prior to vasospasm. Only one showed a peak level of S100B one day before vasospasm could be diagnosed. Due to the low number of patients in the study, statistical significance could not be reached. Conclusion: Neither serum nor CSF S100B can be used as predictor of cerebral vasospasm in patients suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  14. Flair MR imaging in the Detection of subarachnoid hemorrhage : comparison with CT and T1-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Soo Hyun; Kim, Soo Youn; Lee, Ghi Jai; Shim, Jae Chan; Oh, Tae Kyung; Kim, Ho Kyun [College of Medicine, Jnje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    To compare the findings of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging in the detection of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), with those of precontrast CT and T1-weighted MR imaging. In 13 patients (14 cases) with SAH, FLAIR MR images were retrospectively analyzed and compared with CT (10 patients, 11 cases) and T1-weighted MR images (9 cases). SAH was confirmed on the basis of high density along the subarachnoid space, as seen on precontrast CT, or lumbar puncture. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0T unit. FLAIR MR and CT images were obtained during the acute stage(less than 3 days after ictus) in 10 and 9 cases, respectively, during the subacute stage (4-14 days after ictus) in two cases and one, respectively, and during the chronic stage (more than 15 days after ictus) in two cases and one, respectively. CT was performed before FLAIR MR imaging, and the interval between CT and FLAIR ranged from 24 hours (6 cases) to 2-3 (2 cases) or 4-7 days (3 cases). In each study, the conspicuity of visualization of SAH was graded as excellent, good, fair, or negative at five locations (sylvian fissure, cortical sulci, anterior basal cistern, posterior basal cistern, and perimesencephalic cistern). In all cases, subarachnoid hemorrhages were demonstrated as high signal intensity areas on FLAIR images. The detection rates for SAH on CT and T1-weighted MR images were 100% (11/11) and 89% (8/9), respectively. FLAIR was superior to T1-weighted imaging in the detection of SAH at all sites except the anterior basal cistern (p less than 0.05) and superior to CT in the detection of SAH at the cortical sulci (p less than 0.05). On FLAIR MR images, subarachnoid hemorrhages at all stages are demonstrated as high signal intensity areas; the FLAIR MR sequence is thus considered useful in the detection of SAH. In particular FLAIR is more sensitive than CT for the detection of SAH in the cortical sulci. (author)

  15. Automatic quantification of subarachnoid hemorrhage on noncontrast CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, Anna Maria Merel; Zijlstra, I.A.; Gathier, C.S.; van den Berg, R.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Marquering, H.A.; Majoie, C.B.

    2014-01-01

    Quantification of blood after SAH on initial NCCT is an important radiologic measure to predict patient outcome and guide treatment decisions. In current scales, hemorrhage volume and density are not accounted for. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a fully automatic method for

  16. In vitro study of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in a shaken basal cistern after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

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    Ulrich Kertzscher

    Full Text Available Cerebral arterial vasospasm leads to delayed cerebral ischemia and constitutes the major delayed complication following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Cerebral vasospasm can be reduced by increased blood clearance from the subarachnoid space. Clinical pilot studies allow the hypothesis that the clearance of subarachnoid blood is facilitated by means of head shaking. A major obstacle for meaningful clinical studies is the lack of data on appropriate parameters of head shaking. Our in vitro study aims to provide these essential parameters.A model of the basal cerebral cistern was derived from human magnetic resonance imaging data. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was simulated by addition of dyed experimental blood to transparent experimental cerebrospinal fluid (CSF filling the model of the basal cerebral cistern. Effects of various head positions and head motion settings (shaking angle amplitudes and shaking frequencies on blood clearance were investigated using the quantitative dye washout method. Blood washout can be divided into two phases: Blood/CSF mixing and clearance. The major effect of shaking consists in better mixing of blood and CSF thereby increasing clearance rate. Without shaking, blood/CSF mixing and blood clearance in the basal cerebral cistern are hampered by differences in density and viscosity of blood and CSF. Blood clearance increases with decreased shaking frequency and with increased shaking angle amplitude. Head shaking facilitates clearance by varying the direction of gravitational force.From this in vitro study can be inferred that patient or head shaking with large shaking angles at low frequency is a promising therapeutic strategy to increase blood clearance from the subarachnoid space.

  17. Gender influences the initial impact of subarachnoid hemorrhage: an experimental investigation.

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    Victor Friedrich

    Full Text Available Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH carries high early patient mortality. More women than men suffer from SAH and the average age of female SAH survivors is greater than that of male survivors; however, the overall mortality and neurological outcomes are not better in males despite their younger age. This pattern suggests the possibility of gender differences in the severity of initial impact and/or in subsequent pathophysiology. We explored gender differences in survival and pathophysiology following subarachnoid hemorrhage induced in age-matched male and female rats by endovascular puncture. Intracranial pressure (ICP, cerebral blood flow (CBF, blood pressure (BP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP were recorded at and after induction of SAH. Animals were sacrificed 3 hours after lesion and studied for subarachnoid hematoma size, vascular pathology (collagen and endothelium immunostaining, inflammation (platelet and neutrophil immunostaining, and cell death (TUNEL assay. In a second cohort, 24-hour survival was determined. Subarachnoid hematoma, post-hemorrhage ICP peak, BP elevation, reduction in CPP, intraluminal platelet aggregation and neutrophil accumulation, loss of vascular collagen, and neuronal and non-neuronal cell death were greater in male than in female rats. Hematoma size did not correlate with the number of apoptotic cells, platelet aggregates or neutrophil. The ICP peak correlated with hematoma size and with number of apoptotic cells but not with platelet aggregates and neutrophil number. This suggests that the intensity of ICP rise at SAH influences the severity of apoptosis but not of inflammation. Mortality was markedly greater in males than females. Our data demonstrate that in rats gender influences the initial impact of SAH causing greater bleed and early injury in males as compared to females.

  18. Equal contribution of increased intracranial pressure and subarachnoid blood to cerebral blood flow reduction and receptor upregulation after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Laboratory investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    OBJECT: Cerebral ischemia remains the key cause of disability and death in the late phase after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and its pathogenesis is still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the change in intracranial pressure or the extravasated blood causes the...

  19. Nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in intramural hematoma of the basilar artery - a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedevska, A.; Nakov, V.; Hristov, H.

    2012-01-01

    Pretruncal (perimesencephalic) nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a benign variant of SAH. Although angiography fails to show a source of the hemorrhage, mild basilar artery narrowing may be observed. The cause of pretruncal nonaneurysmal SAH has not been established. Recent imaging studies have demonstrated that the center of this type of SAH is not around the mesencephalon but is in the prepontine or interpeduncular cistern with the hemorrhage closely associated with the basilar artery. We review the possible sources of hemorrhage in these cisterns and hypothesize that pretruncal nonaneurysmal SAH is caused by a primary intramural hematoma of the basilar artery. Such an intramural hematoma would explain bleeding under low pressure, the location of the hemorrhage anterior to the brainstem, and the typical findings of hemorrhage adjacent to the basilar artery lumen on magnetic resonance imaging and mild basilar artery narrowing on angiography. Hemorrhage in such location is easily found in native computed tomography (CT) images. Crescent, hyperdense thickening of the basilar artery wall is also observed. We have presented this unusual case to highlight the possible mechanism of hematoma formation and underline the importance of MDCT examination in the diagnosis confirmation and also excluding other potentially serious underlying condition that could also lead to non traumatic SAH. (authors)

  20. Intracerebral Hemorrhage

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    ... Home » Patients & Families » About Stroke » Intracerebral Hemorrhage Intracerebral Hemorrhage What is a Stroke? Ischemic Stroke Intracerebral Hemorrhage Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Pediatric Stroke Warning Signs Stroke Statistics ...

  1. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the Yaeyama islands, Japan, from 1989 to 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumihara, Akifumi; Shimoji, Takashi; Uesugi, Masashi; Fujisawa, Hirosuke; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Ie, Tomoji

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze epidemiological and clinical data of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in the Yaeyama islands, an isolated subtropical region of Japan. A total of 94 patients (31 men and 63 women, mean age 57.3 years) were diagnosed as having non-traumatic SAH during a 13-year period from 1989 to 2002. The age-and sex-adjusted annual incidence rate of SAH was 17.4 per 100,000 population. The incidence of SAH was the highest in August. Seventy-nine patients were hospitalized within 24 hours after onset of SAH. Seventeen patients were transferred by helicopter. The Hunt and Kosnik grade was I in 29 patients (30.9%). The CT Fisher group was 3 in 42 patients (44.7%). Ruptured aneurysm was detected in 78 patients (saccular type in 70 patients, small size in 49 patients, and internal carotid artery in 28 patients). Rebleeding occurred in 20 patients (21.3%). Symptomatic vasospasm occurred in 26 patients (27.7%). Acute and chronic hydrocephalus occurred in 25 (26.6%) and 22 (23.4%) patients respectively. A total of 120 neurosurgical operations were performed in 70 patients (operation for ruptured aneurysm in 62, early operation in 39). A total of 42 operative complications occurred in 29 patients. Fifty-one patients (54.3%) had a good outcome. The number of full-time neurosurgeons did not influence the performance of neurosurgical operation and outcome. In conclusion, epidemiologically, the high incidence of SAH in August is unusual. Patients with aneurysmal SAH in the Yaeyama islands have common clinical characteristics and undergo standard neurosurgical treatment. (author)

  2. Serum magnesium levels and clinical outcome of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a study in 60 patients

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    Habibi Z

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypomagnesemia is commonly encountered in patients with a wide variety of diseases including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, cardiovascular emergencies, head trauma, migraine attacks, seizure and preeclampsia. It seems to be associated with a poor clinical outcome. This study considers the prevalence and temporal distribution of hypomagnesemia after aneurysmal SAH and its correlation with the severity of SAH, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI as well as the neurological outcome after a period of three months.Methods: Between 2003 and 2008, 60 patients were admitted to the emergency ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital with acute SAH. Serum magnesium levels were measured during the first 72 hours, days 4-7, and second and third weeks after SAH. The three-month outcome was assessed according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS. Clinical SAH grading was performed according to the criteria of the World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS and the patients were allocated to "Good" (GOS = 4, 5 and "Poor" (GOS= 1-3 outcome groups. The prevalence of hypomagnesemia was assessed in both patient groups. Fisher exact test was used to analyze data.Results: Hypomagnesemia occurred in 22% of patients during the first 72 hours after SAH. It was associated with more prevalent DCI (p<0.05, whereas low serum magnesium levels during days 4-7 17% of patients and the second week (22% of patients after SAH were correlated with poor clinical outcome (p<0.05. No correlation was found between first 72 hour-hypomagnesemia and poor clinical outcome at three months.Conclusion: Hypomagnesemia occurs after aneurysmal SAH and it may predict the occurrence of DCI, while low serum magnesium levels during days 4-7 and within the second week of event predict poor clinical outcome at three months. Treatment of this electrolyte disturbance may have a favourable effect on the clinical outcome of patients with aneurysmal SAH.

  3. Blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter prevents iron accumulation in a model of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Huiying [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Hao, Shuangying; Sun, Xiaoyan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular Medicine, Medical School of Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Dingding; Gao, Xin; Yu, Zhuang [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, Kuanyu, E-mail: likuanyu@nju.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular Medicine, Medical School of Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093, Jiangsu Province (China); Hang, Chun-Hua, E-mail: hang_neurosurgery@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Iron accumulation was involved in the acute phase following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could attenuate cellular iron accumulation following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could decrease ROS generation and improve cell energy supply following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could alleviate apoptosis and brain injury following SAH. - Abstract: Previous studies have shown that iron accumulation is involved in the pathogenesis of brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and chelation of iron reduced mortality and oxidative DNA damage. We previously reported that blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) provided benefit in the early brain injury after experimental SAH. This study was undertaken to identify whether blockage of MCU could ameliorate iron accumulation-associated brain injury following SAH. Therefore, we used two reagents ruthenium red (RR) and spermine (Sper) to inhibit MCU. Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups including sham, SAH, SAH + RR, and SAH + Sper. Biochemical analysis and histological assays were performed. The results confirmed the iron accumulation in temporal lobe after SAH. Interestingly, blockage of MCU dramatically reduced the iron accumulation in this area. The mechanism was revealed that inhibition of MCU reversed the down-regulation of iron regulatory protein (IRP) 1/2 and increase of ferritin. Iron–sulfur cluster dependent-aconitase activity was partially conserved when MCU was blocked. In consistence with this and previous report, ROS levels were notably reduced and ATP supply was rescued; levels of cleaved caspase-3 dropped; and integrity of neurons in temporal lobe was protected. Taken together, our results indicated that blockage of MCU could alleviate iron accumulation and the associated injury following SAH. These findings suggest that the alteration of calcium and iron homeostasis be coupled and MCU be considered to be a therapeutic target for patients suffering from SAH.

  4. Agitation After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Frequent Omen of Hospital Complications Associated with Worse Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, Michael E; Schmidt, J Michael; Mahta, Ali; Agarwal, Sachin; Roh, David J; Park, Soojin; Frey, Hans Peter; Claassen, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Agitated delirium is frequent following acute brain injury, but data are limited in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We examined incidence, risk factors, and consequences of agitation in these patients in a single-center retrospective study. We identified all patients treated with antipsychotics or dexmedetomidine from a prospective observational cohort of patients with spontaneous SAH. Agitation was confirmed by chart review. Outcomes were assessed at 12 months using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS), and Lawton IADL (Instrumental Activities of Daily Living) scores. Independent predictors were identified using logistic regression. From 309 SAH patients admitted between January 2011 and December 2015, 52 (17 %) developed agitation, frequently in the first 72 h (50 %) and in patients with Hunt-Hess grades 3-4 (12 % of grades 1-2, 28 % of grades 3-4, 8 % of grade 5). There was also a significant association between agitation and a history of cocaine use or prior psychiatric diagnosis. Agitated patients were more likely to develop multiple hospital complications; and in half of these patients, complications were diagnosed within 24 h of agitation onset. Agitation was associated with IADL impairment at 12 months (Lawton >8; p = 0.03, OR 2.7, 95 % CI, 1.1-6.8) in non-comatose patients (Hunt-Hess 1-4), but not with functional outcome (mRS >3), cognitive impairment (TICS ≤30), or ICU/hospital length of stay after controlling for other predictors. Agitation occurs frequently after SAH, especially in non-comatose patients with higher clinical grades. It is associated with the development of multiple hospital complications and may have an independent impact on long-term outcomes.

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Microdialysis Cytokines in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Scoping Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick A. Zeiler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo perform two scoping systematic reviews of the literature on cytokine measurement in cerebral microdialysis (CMD and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients, aiming to summarize the evidence relating cytokine levels to pathophysiology, disease progression, and outcome.MethodsTwo separate systematic reviews were conducted: one for CMD cytokines and the second for CSF cytokines.Data sourcesArticles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library (inception to October 2016, reference lists of relevant articles, and gray literature were searched.Study selectionTwo reviewers independently identified all manuscripts utilizing predefined inclusion/exclusion criteria. A two-tier filter of references was conducted.Data extractionPatient demographic and study data were extracted to tables.ResultsThere were 9 studies identified describing the analysis of cytokines via CMD in 246 aneurysmal SAH patients. Similarly, 20 studies were identified describing the analysis of CSF cytokines in 630 patients. The two scoping systematic reviews demonstrated the following: (1 limited literature available on CMD cytokine measurement in aneurysmal SAH with some preliminary data supporting feasibility of measurement and potential association between interleukin (IL-6 and patient outcome. (2 Various CSF measured cytokines may be associated with patient outcome at 3–6 months, including IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. (3 There is a small literature body supporting an association between acute/subacute CSF transforming growth factor levels and the development of chronic hydrocephalus at 2–3 months.ConclusionThe evaluation of CMD and CSF cytokines is an emerging area of the literature in aneurysmal SAH. Further large prospective multicenter studies on cytokines in CMD and CSF need to be conducted.

  6. Identification of blood-brain barrier function following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats at different stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongyi Xie; Weiwei Shen; Ying Ma; Yuan Cheng

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have indicated that blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) significantly correlates with the development of brain injury and poor prognosis of patients subjected to SAH. OBJECTIVE: To investigate both functional and structural changes related to BBB in various phases after SAH in rats through quantitative and qualitative methods.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This experiment, a completely randomized design and controlled experiment, was performed at the Department of Neurosurgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences from June 2006 to March 2007.MATERIALS: A total of 128 female, healthy, Sprague-Dawley rats were selected for this study. Main reagents and instruments: Evans Blue dye (Sigma Company, USA), fluorescence spectrophotometer (Shimadzu Company, Japan), and transmission electron microscope (Olympus Company, Japan). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Brain tissue water content was determined by the wet-dry method. BBB permeability in the cerebral cortex was determined by Evans Blue dye and fluorescent spectrophotometer. The ultrastructural changes in BBB were observed with transmission electron microscope.RESULTS: Compared with the sham-operated group, SAH induced a significant increase in brain water content between 24 and 60 hours (F = 888.32, P 0.05). Electron microscopy demonstrated only a mild perivascular edema at 24 hours after SAH. By 36 hours, a notable perivascular edema was associated with a collapse of the capillary. Astrocytic endfeet surrounding the capillary were prominently swollen in the edematous areas. The above-mentioned abnormal ultrastructural changes in the BBB were reversed by 72 hours after SAH. No obvious morphological changes in the BBB were detected in the sham-operated rats.CONCLUSION: These results directly suggest that SAH could induce rapid changes in BBB function and structure during the acute phases of BBB breakdown. Moreover, these dynamic

  7. Rapid MRI evaluation of acute intracranial hemorrhage in pediatric head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Maura E.; Jaju, Alok [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Ciolino, Jody D. [Northwestern University, Biostatistics Collaboration Center, Department of Preventive Medicine Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Alden, Tord [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Neurosurgery, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Rapid MRI with ultrafast T2 sequences can be performed without sedation and is often used in place of computed tomography (CT) to evaluate pediatric patients for indications such as hydrocephalus. This study investigated the sensitivity of rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and follow-up of acute intracranial hemorrhage in comparison to CT, which is commonly the first-line imaging. Patients presenting to a pediatric hospital with acute intracranial hemorrhage on CT and follow-up rapid MRI within 48 h were included. Rapid MRI studies consisted of three plane ultrafast T2 sequences either with or without axial gradient echo (GRE) sequences. Identification of hemorrhage on rapid MRI was assessed by readers both blinded and unblinded to prior CT results. One hundred two acute hemorrhages in 61 patients were identified by CT. Rapid MRI detection of subdural and epidural hemorrhages was modest in the absence of prior CT for comparison (sensitivity 61-74 %), but increased with review of the prior CT (sensitivity 80-86 %). Hemorrhage size was a significant predictor of detection (p < 0.0001). Three plane fast T2 images alone without GRE sequences were poor at detecting subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 10-25 %); rapid MRI with GRE sequences identified the majority of subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 71-93 %). GRE modestly increased detection of other extra-axial hemorrhages. Rapid MRI with GRE sequences is sensitive for most acute intracranial hemorrhages only when a prior CT is available for review. Rapid MRI is not adequate to replace CT in initial evaluation of intracranial hemorrhages but may be helpful in follow-up of known hemorrhages. (orig.)

  8. Rapid MRI evaluation of acute intracranial hemorrhage in pediatric head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, Maura E.; Jaju, Alok; Ciolino, Jody D.; Alden, Tord

    2016-01-01

    Rapid MRI with ultrafast T2 sequences can be performed without sedation and is often used in place of computed tomography (CT) to evaluate pediatric patients for indications such as hydrocephalus. This study investigated the sensitivity of rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and follow-up of acute intracranial hemorrhage in comparison to CT, which is commonly the first-line imaging. Patients presenting to a pediatric hospital with acute intracranial hemorrhage on CT and follow-up rapid MRI within 48 h were included. Rapid MRI studies consisted of three plane ultrafast T2 sequences either with or without axial gradient echo (GRE) sequences. Identification of hemorrhage on rapid MRI was assessed by readers both blinded and unblinded to prior CT results. One hundred two acute hemorrhages in 61 patients were identified by CT. Rapid MRI detection of subdural and epidural hemorrhages was modest in the absence of prior CT for comparison (sensitivity 61-74 %), but increased with review of the prior CT (sensitivity 80-86 %). Hemorrhage size was a significant predictor of detection (p < 0.0001). Three plane fast T2 images alone without GRE sequences were poor at detecting subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 10-25 %); rapid MRI with GRE sequences identified the majority of subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 71-93 %). GRE modestly increased detection of other extra-axial hemorrhages. Rapid MRI with GRE sequences is sensitive for most acute intracranial hemorrhages only when a prior CT is available for review. Rapid MRI is not adequate to replace CT in initial evaluation of intracranial hemorrhages but may be helpful in follow-up of known hemorrhages. (orig.)

  9. Electroencephalographic Response to Sodium Nitrite May Predict Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, Payashi S; Rowland, Matthew J; Ezra, Martyn; Herigstad, Mari; Hayen, Anja; Sleigh, Jamie W; Westbrook, Jon; Warnaby, Catherine E; Pattinson, Kyle T S

    2016-11-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage often leads to death and poor clinical outcome. Injury occurring during the first 72 hours is termed "early brain injury," with disruption of the nitric oxide pathway playing an important pathophysiologic role in its development. Quantitative electroencephalographic variables, such as α/δ frequency ratio, are surrogate markers of cerebral ischemia. This study assessed the quantitative electroencephalographic response to a cerebral nitric oxide donor (intravenous sodium nitrite) to explore whether this correlates with the eventual development of delayed cerebral ischemia. Unblinded pilot study testing response to drug intervention. Neuroscience ICU, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom. Fourteen World Federation of Neurosurgeons grades 3, 4, and 5 patients (mean age, 52.8 yr [range, 41-69 yr]; 11 women). IV sodium nitrite (10 μg/kg/min) for 1 hour. Continuous electroencephalographic recording for 2 hours. The alpha/delta frequency ratio was measured before and during IV sodium nitrite infusion. Seven of 14 patients developed delayed cerebral ischemia. There was a +30% to +118% (range) increase in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in patients who did not develop delayed cerebral ischemia (p frequency ratio in those patients who did develop delayed cerebral ischemia (range, +11% to -31%) (p = 0.006, multivariate analysis accounting for major confounds). Administration of sodium nitrite after severe subarachnoid hemorrhage differentially influences quantitative electroencephalographic variables depending on the patient's susceptibility to development of delayed cerebral ischemia. With further validation in a larger sample size, this response may be developed as a tool for risk stratification after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  10. Spectrophotometry or visual inspection to most reliably detect xanthochromia in subarachnoid hemorrhage: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kevin; Hann, Angus; Greenslade, Jaimi; Williams, Julian; Brown, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    We assess the sensitivity and specificity of xanthochromia as adjudicated by visual inspection and spectrophotometry at predicting the presence of cerebral aneurysm in patients with suspected subarachnoid hemorrhage who have a normal computed tomography (CT) head scan result. A systematic review was performed. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched. Relevant studies with clinical data on the diagnostic accuracy of visual inspection or spectrophotometry were considered. Patients who had a normal CT head scan result followed by a lumbar puncture were included in this review. Sensitivities, specificities, and heterogeneity (I(2)) were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed to explore reasons for the heterogeneity. There were major methodological limitations in the studies found. Twenty-two relevant articles were heterogeneous in regard to time to lumbar puncture, spectrophotometry methods, and follow-up of patients not undergoing cerebral angiography. Twelve of the 22 studies selected patients on the basis of a cerebral aneurysm or subarachnoid hemorrhage on imaging, or a positive lumbar puncture result. These studies were excluded from our initial analysis, which included only patients with clinically suspected subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this initial analysis, pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity for spectrophotometry were 87% (95% confidence interval [CI] 71% to 96%; I(2)=26%) and 86% (95% CI 84% to 88%; I(2)=96%), respectively. For visual inspection, pooled sensitivity and specificity were 83% (95% CI 59% to 96%; I(2)=52%) and 96% (95% CI 93% to 97%; I(2)=76%), respectively. Sensitivity estimates are difficult to interpret without knowing time to lumbar puncture. The heterogeneity in the underlying studies, combined with significant overlap in pooled confidence limits, makes it impossible to provide a definite conclusion about the diagnostic accuracy of spectrophotometry versus visual inspection. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency

  11. Socioeconomic Disadvantage Is Associated with a Higher Incidence of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Linda; Stirling, Christine; Otahal, Petr; Stankovich, Jim; Gall, Seana

    2018-03-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) incidence is not well studied. Varied definitions of "subarachnoid hemorrhage" have led to a lack of clarity regarding aSAH incidence. The impact of area-level socioeconomic disadvantage and geographical location on the incidence of aSAH also remains unclear. Using a population-based statewide study, we examined the incidence of aSAH in relation to socioeconomic disadvantage and geographical location. A retrospective cohort study of nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhages from 2010 to 2014 was undertaken. Researchers manually collected data from multiple overlapping sources including statewide administrative databases, individual digital medical records, and death registers. Age-standardized rates (ASRs) per 100,000 person years were calculated using the 2001 Australian population. Differences in incidence rate ratios were calculated by age, sex, area-level socioeconomic status, and geographical location using Poisson regression. The cohort of 237 cases (mean age, 61.0 years) with a female predominance of 166 (70.04%) included 159 confirmed aSAH, 52 community-based deaths, and 26 probable cases. The ASR for aSAH was 9.99 (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.69-11.29). A significant association between area-level socioeconomic disadvantage and incidence was observed, with the rate of aSAH in disadvantaged geographical areas being 1.40 times higher than that in advantaged areas (95% CI, 1.11-1.82; P = .012). This study uses a comprehensive search of multiple data sources to define a new baseline of aSAH within an Australian population. This study presents a higher incidence rate of aSAH with socioeconomic variations. As a key risk factor that may explain this paradox, addressing socioeconomic inequalities is important for effective prevention and management interventions. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Indicators of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage as a Cause of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Zachariah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH may present with cardiac arrest (SAH-CA. We report a case of SAH-CA to assist providers in distinguishing SAH as an etiology of cardiac arrest despite electrocardiogram findings that may be suggestive of a cardiac etiology. SAH-CA is associated with high rates of return of spontaneous circulation, but overall poor outcome. An initially non-shockable cardiac rhythm and the absence of brain stem reflexes are important clues in indentifying SAH-CA.

  13. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in patients taking direct oral anticoagulants: A case series and discussion of management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph H. McMordie, MD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct oral anticoagulants are becoming more commonplace for the treatment of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and deep vein thrombosis. Unfortunately, effective reversal agents are not widely available limiting options for neurosurgical intervention during active anticoagulation. We report a case series of 3 patients treated for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage while taking direct oral anticoagulants. All three underwent open surgical clipping after adequate time was allowed for drug metabolism. Decision-making must take into account timing of intervention, drug half-life, and currently available reversal agents.

  14. Melatonin mitigate cerebral vasospasm after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage: a study of synchrotron radiation angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, J.; He, C.; Chen, L.; Han, T.; Huang, S.; Huang, Y.; Bai, Y.; Bao, Y.; Zhang, H.; Ling, F.

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating and unsolved clinical issue. In this study, the rat models, which had been induced SAH by prechiasmatic cistern injection, were treated with melatonin. Synchrotron radiation angiography (SRA) was employed to detect and evaluate CV of animal models. Neurological scoring and histological examinations were used to assess the neurological deficits and CV as well. Using SRA techniques and histological analyses, the anterior cerebral artery diameters of SAH rats with melatonin administration were larger than those without melatonin treatment (p melatonin were less than those without melatonin treatment (p melatonin could mitigate CV after experimental SAH.

  15. Spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by scleroderma-induced aneurysm: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.; Neidl, K.; Contier-Dippel, B.; Huber, G.; Ernst, E.

    1995-01-01

    We introduce a 58-year-old woman who suffered from progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS) associated with trigeminal sensory neuropathy for approximately 10 years. She then had a stroke from spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SSAH). Spinal digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed two aneurysms and smaller dilations of the afferent vessel that could also be seen by MRI. Three asymptomatic brain infarctions in different vascular regions could be revealed by CCT. The SSAH, ischemic lesions and aneurysms were probably caused by vasculitic affections induced by PSS. (orig.)

  16. Spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by scleroderma-induced aneurysm: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, J. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie der Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Neidl, K. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie der Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Contier-Dippel, B. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie der Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Huber, G. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie der Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ernst, E. [Neurologische Abt., Caritas Krankenhaus, Dillingen (Germany)

    1995-11-01

    We introduce a 58-year-old woman who suffered from progressive systemic scleroderma (PSS) associated with trigeminal sensory neuropathy for approximately 10 years. She then had a stroke from spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SSAH). Spinal digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed two aneurysms and smaller dilations of the afferent vessel that could also be seen by MRI. Three asymptomatic brain infarctions in different vascular regions could be revealed by CCT. The SSAH, ischemic lesions and aneurysms were probably caused by vasculitic affections induced by PSS. (orig.)

  17. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Ecer Menteş

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy is a rare form of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Mostly it appears under three years of age and is characterized by purpuric skin lesions, fever and edema. A three years-old boy, who has cough and coryzea was admitted to our clinic for fever and red spots on legs and arms. In physical examination; ecimotic skin lesions on right ear, face, arms, dorsal of the hands, buttocks, legs and dorsal of the feet were found. In the laboratory tests acute phase reactants were elevated and blood coagulation tests were in normal range. Hepatit A,B,C and TORCH markers were negative. Punch biopsy obtained from gluteal area showed leukositoclastic vasculity. Focal fibrinogen accumulation was detected by immun fluorescent microscopy. Regression on lesions was not observed despite supportive therapy, so prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day therapy was started. On the third day of the steroid therapy, complete recovery was achived.

  18. Radiological findings in cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage: a series of 22 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukobza, Monique; Crassard, Isabelle; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Chabriat, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of the present study are to assess the incidence of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) presenting as isolated subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to determine the occurrence of cortical venous thrombosis (CoVT). Among 332 patients with CVT, investigated with the same CT and MR standardized protocol, 33 (10 %) presented with SAH, associated in 11 cases with hemorrhagic infarct or intracerebral hemorrhage. This study is based on 22 cases of CVT presenting as SAH in the absence of hemorrhagic brain lesion. Diagnosis of sinus thrombosis was established on T2* and magnetic resonance venography and that of CoVT on T2* sequence. Diagnostic of SAH was based on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence. CVT involved lateral sinus in 18 patients, superior sagittal sinus in 16, and straight sinus in 1. Cortical veins were involved in all patients, in continuity with dural sinus thrombosis when present. SAH was circumscribed to few sulci in all cases and mainly localized at the convexity (21 cases). CoVT implied different areas on the same side in four patients and was bilateral in seven. There was no perimesencephalic or basal cisterns hemorrhage. Cortical swelling was present in 12 cases, associated with localized edema. All patients except one had a favorable outcome. This report shows that the incidence of CVT presenting as isolated SAH is evaluated to 6.4 % and that SAH is, in all cases, in the vicinity of CoVT and when dural thrombosis is present in continuity with it.

  19. Methemoglobin Is an Endogenous Toll-Like Receptor 4 Ligand—Relevance to Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Seong Kwon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation is a well-recognized consequence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, and may be responsible for important complications of SAH. Signaling by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4-mediated nuclear factor κB (NFκB in microglia plays a critical role in neuronal damage after SAH. Three molecules derived from erythrocyte breakdown have been postulated to be endogenous TLR4 ligands: methemoglobin (metHgb, heme and hemin. However, poor water solubility of heme and hemin, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS contamination have confounded our understanding of these molecules as endogenous TLR4 ligands. We used a 5-step process to obtain highly purified LPS-free metHgb, as confirmed by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry and by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Using this preparation, we show that metHgb is a TLR4 ligand at physiologically relevant concentrations. metHgb caused time- and dose-dependent secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, from microglial and macrophage cell lines, with secretion inhibited by siRNA directed against TLR4, by the TLR4-specific inhibitors, Rs-LPS and TAK-242, and by anti-CD14 antibodies. Injection of purified LPS-free metHgb into the rat subarachnoid space induced microglial activation and TNFα upregulation. Together, our findings support the hypothesis that, following SAH, metHgb in the subarachnoid space can promote widespread TLR4-mediated neuroinflammation.

  20. Proteomic Expression Changes in Large Cerebral Arteries After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rat Are Regulated by the MEK-ERK1/2 Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anne H; Edwards, Alistair V G; Larsen, Martin R

    2017-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious clinical condition where leakage of blood into the subarachnoid space causes an acute rise in intracranial pressure and reduces cerebral blood flow, which may lead to delayed cerebral ischemia and poor outcome. In experimental SAH, we have previously shown...... was induced in rats that were treated with the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 or vehicle. Neurological outcome was assessed using a battery of behavioral tests. Specific protein expression of large cerebral arteries was analyzed quantitatively with high-throughput tandem mass spectrometry. SAH resulted in a marked...... reduction of neurological scores, which was counteracted by U0126 treatment. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated regulation of 184 proteins after SAH, regulations that were in part prevented by U0126 treatment. Network analysis identified several protein networks including a strong structural network...

  1. Crossed Wernicke's aphasia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seçkin, Hakan; Yiğitkanli, Kazim; Kapucu, Ozlem; Bavbek, Murad

    2009-01-01

    Crossed aphasia (CA) refers to aphasia occurring after right brain damage in right handers. In the literature, numerous CA cases following cerebral ischemia have been reported, but few met the criteria for a prompt diagnosis. The authors present the case of a 52-year-old woman with SAH caused by a right middle cerebral artery (MCA) saccular aneurysm who developed non-fluent aphasia characterized by reduced verbal output, word-finding disturbances and phonemic paraphasias in both oral and written language. 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT was also consistent with right parieto-temporal and frontoparietal ischemia with crossed cerebellar diaschisis on the right cerebellum. A diagnosis of CA was made. One year follow-up showed improvement in communication skills but persistent right fronto-temporo-parietal ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH symptomatology may vary from motor and sensory disturbances to cognitive disabilities. Aphasia developing after cerebral ischemia of the right hemisphere in a right-hand dominant patient following vasospasm may be a misleading symptom for the localization of the insult. Keeping a high index of suspicion may help in making the correct diagnosis. The changes in the perfusion patterns of cerebellum as assessed by SPECT study during the acute and recovery phases suggests the involvement of cerebellum in language functions.

  2. Fisher Grading Scale Associated with Language Disorders in Patients with Anterior Circulation Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Moysés Loiola Ponte; Vieira, Ana Cláudia C; Andrade, Gustavo; Quinino, Saul; de Fátima Leal Griz, Maria; Azevedo-Filho, Hildo R C

    2015-08-01

    To associate the presence of language deficits with varying scores of the Fisher grading scale in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage in the period preceding the treatment of aneurysm in the anterior circulation, as well as to compare the scores of this scale, identifying the grades more associated with the decline of language. Database analysis of 185 preoperative evaluations of language, through the Montreal Toulouse Protocol Alpha version and verbal fluency through CERAD battery, of patients from "Hospital da Restauração" with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, divided according to the Fisher grading scale (Fisher I, II, III, or IV) and compared with a control group of individuals considered normal. The various scores of the Fisher grading scale have different levels of language deficits, more pronounced as the amount of blood increases. Fisher III and IV scores are most associated with the decline of language. Our study made it possible to obtain information not yet available in the literature, by correlating the various scores of the Fisher grading scale with language yet in the period preceding treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Use of Milrinone in Patients with Delayed Cerebral Ischemia Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannes, Marcelo; Zeiler, Frederick; Guichon, Céline; Teitelbaum, Jeanne

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a systematic review of the evidence supporting the use of milrinone for the management of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Primary outcomes were functional neurological status and the incidence of cerebral infarction. Search strategies adapted to the different databases were developed by a professional librarian. Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library database, Web of Science, SCOPUS, BIOSIS, Global Health, Health Star, Open SIGLE, Google Scholar and the New York Academy of Medicine Gray Literature were searched as well as clinical trials databases and the proceedings of several scientific meetings. Quality of the evidence for these outcomes across studies was adjudicated using the GRADE Working Group criteria. The search resulted in 284 citations after elimination of duplicates. Of those 9 conference proceedings and 15 studies met inclusion criteria and consisted of case reports, case series and two comparative studies: one non-randomized study with physiological outcomes only and a case series with historical controls. There was considerable variation in dosing and in co-interventions and no case control or randomized controlled studies were found. There is currently only very low quality evidence to support the use of milrinone to improve important outcomes in patients with delayed cerebral ischemia secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Further research is needed to clarify the value and risks of this medication in patients with SAH.

  4. Risk factors for rebleeding of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rebleeding is a serious complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhaging. To date, there are conflicting data regarding the factors contributing to rebleeding and their significance. METHODS: A systematic review of PubMed and Embase databases was conducted for studies pertaining to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH and rebleeding in order to assess the associated risk factors. Odds ratios (ORs and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs were estimated from fourteen studies comprised of a total of 5693 patients that met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Higher rebleeding rates were observed 10 mm in size (OR  = 1.70, 95% CI  = 1.35-2.14. CONCLUSIONS: Aneurysmal rebleeding occurs more frequently within the first 6 hours after the initial aSAH. Risk factors associated with rebleeding include high systolic pressure, the presence of an intracerebral or intraventricular hematoma, poor Hunt-Hess grade (III-IV, aneurysms in the posterior circulation, and an aneurysm >10 mm in size.

  5. Subpial Hematoma and Extravasation in the Interhemispheric Fissure with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Go; Abe, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshikazu; Sakai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    A recent report on computed tomography (CT) findings of contrast extravasation in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with Sylvian hematoma suggests that the occurrence of the hematoma is secondary to bleeding in the subpial space. Our patient was in his sixties and was admitted to the hospital because of loss of consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale E4V1M4). SAH was diagnosed in plain head CT, and growing hematomas were observed in the Sylvian and interhemispheric fissures following a subarachnoid hemorrhage. CT angiography (CTA) using a dual-phase scan protocol revealed contrast extravasation in both the fissures in the latter phase, and hematoma in the interhemispheric fissure contained multiple bleeding points. This case indicates that the occurrence of subpial hematoma such as Sylvian hematoma can be a secondary event following subpial bleeding from damaged small vessels elsewhere in the cranium. Instead of four-dimensional (4D) CT, the dual-phase CTA technique may help detect minor extravasations with usual helical CT scanner. PMID:25963159

  6. Subarachnoid hemorrhage enhances endothelin receptor expression and function in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Hoel, Natalie Løvland; Zhou, Mingfang

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Inspired by organ culture-induced changes in the vascular endothelin (ET) receptor population, we investigated whether such changes occur in cerebral arteries in a rat subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model. METHODS: SAH was induced with injection of 250 microl of blood into the prechiasm......OBJECTIVE: Inspired by organ culture-induced changes in the vascular endothelin (ET) receptor population, we investigated whether such changes occur in cerebral arteries in a rat subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model. METHODS: SAH was induced with injection of 250 microl of blood...... into the prechiasmatic cistern. After 2 days, the middle cerebral artery, basilar artery, and posterior communicating artery were harvested. Pharmacological studies were performed in vitro, and levels of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) were quantified in real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assays....... RESULTS: In the middle cerebral artery and basilar artery from rats with induced SAH, enhanced biphasic responses to ET-1 were observed. The -log(50% effective concentration) value for the high-affinity phase was approximately 12, compared with approximately 8.5 for sham-operated animals...

  7. Impact of early surgical evacuation of sylvian hematoma on clinical course and outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutoh, Tatsushi; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Moroi, Junta; Suzuki, Akifumi; Yasui, Nobuyuki

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the impact of early surgical evacuation of sylvian hematoma caused by ruptured middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm on clinical outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Hospital records and computed tomography scans for 26 patients with MCA aneurysm who underwent surgical clipping between June 2001 and January 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients presented with sylvian hematoma associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage and received surgery at 7.9±3.6 (mean±standard deviation) hours of ictus. They were divided postoperatively into two groups, achievement (n=16) and non-achievement (n=10) of extensive hematoma evacuation, and their clinical course and functional outcomes were compared. The frequencies of delayed ischemic neurological deficit and vasospasm-related cerebral infarction were significantly less (p<0.05) in the achievement group. Better functional outcomes were obtained in patients with successful evacuation (p<0.05), as assessed by improvement of hemiparesis on manual muscle testing scale at postoperative 1-month follow up and by the modified Rankin scale at postoperative 3 and 6 months. Clinical outcomes were also better in the achievement group. These results suggest that better clinical course and outcome can be expected in patients who undergo early successful hematoma evacuation with surgical clipping of a ruptured MCA aneurysm. (author)

  8. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Study for Medical Decision-Making Heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dredla, Brynn; Freeman, William D

    2016-04-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient's medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis.

  9. Effect of continuous cisternal cerebrospinal fluid drainage for patients with thin subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunari Otawara

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Yasunari Otawara, Kuniaki Ogasawara, Yoshitaka Kubo, Masayuki Sasoh, Akira OgawaDepartment of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505, JapanAbstract: External cerebrospinal fluid (CSF drainage is an effective method to remove massive subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, but carries the risk of meningitis and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus. This study investigated whether postoperative cisternal CSF drainage affects the incidence of cerebral vasospasm and clinical outcome in patients with thin SAH. Seventy-eight patients with thin SAH, 22 men and 56 women aged from 17 to 73 years (mean 51.2 years, underwent surgical repair for ruptured anterior circulation aneurysm. Patients were divided into groups with (38 patients and without (40 patients postoperative cisternal CSF drainage, and the incidences of angiographical and symptomatic vasospasm, shunt-dependent hydrocephalus, meningitis, and the clinical outcome were compared. The incidences of angiographical vasospasm (31.6% vs 50.0%, symptomatic vasospasm (7.9% vs 12.5%, shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (5.3% vs 0%, and meningitis (2.6% vs 0% did not differ between patients with and without cisternal CSF drainage. All patients in both groups resulted in good recovery. Postoperative cisternal CSF drainage does not affect the incidence of cerebral vasospasm or the clinical outcome in patients with thin SAH.Keywords: subarachnoid hemorrhage; cerebrospinal fluid drainage; cerebral vasospasm; meningitis; hydrocephalus; ruptured intracranial aneurysm

  10. Impact of Hyponatremia on Morbidity, Mortality, and Complications After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapa, Ben; Taylor, Blake E S; Appelboom, Geoffrey; Bruce, Eliza M; Claassen, Jan; Connolly, E Sander

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a common metabolic disturbance after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and it may worsen outcomes. This review aims to characterize the effect of hyponatremia on morbidity and mortality after SAH. We sought to determine the prevalence of hyponatremia after SAH, including in subgroups, as well as its effect on mortality and certain outcome measures, including degree of disability and duration of hospitalization. A search of terms "hyponatremia" and "subarachnoid hemorrhage" was performed on PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and EMBASE. Studies were included if they reported prevalence of hyponatremia and if they discussed outcomes such as mortality, duration of stay, functional outcomes (e.g., Glasgow Outcomes Scale), or incidence of complications in patients with aneurysmal SAH. Two independent researchers assessed the titles and abstracts and reviewed articles for inclusion. Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of at least mild hyponatremia was 859 of 2387 (36%) of patients. Hyponatremia was associated with vasospasm and duration of hospitalization, but it did not influence mortality. Hyponatremia is common after SAH, and there is evidence that it is associated with certain poorer outcomes. Larger, prospective studies are needed to assess these findings and provide further evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pattern not volume of bleeding predicts angiographic vasospasm in nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, Amanda; Zipfel, Gregory J; Diringer, Michael N; Dacey, Ralph G; Derdeyn, Colin P; Rich, Keith M; Chicoine, Michael R; Dhar, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous idiopathic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern is usually associated with a benign course, whereas a diffuse bleeding pattern has been associated with a higher risk of vasospasm and disability. We evaluated whether volume of bleeding explains this disparity. Pattern and amount of bleeding (by Hijdra and intraventricular hemorrhage scores) were assessed in 89 patients with nonaneurysmal SAH. Outcomes included angiographic vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, and functional outcome at 1 year. Diffuse bleeding was associated with significantly higher Hijdra and intraventricular hemorrhage scores than perimesencephalic SAH, P≤0.003. Angiographic vasospasm was more likely in diffuse versus perimesencephalic SAH (45% versus 27%; odds ratio, 2.9; P=0.08), but adjustment for greater blood burden only partially attenuated this trend (adjusted odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.69-7.2; P=0.18); delayed cerebral ischemia was only seen in those with diffuse bleeding. Patients with diffuse bleeding were less likely to be discharged home (68% versus 90%; P=0.01) and tended to have more residual disability (modified Rankin scale, 3-6; 20% versus 6%; P=0.18). Nonaneurysmal SAH can still result in vasospasm and residual disability, especially in those with diffuse bleeding. This disparity is only partially accounted for by greater cisternal or intraventricular blood, suggesting that the mechanism and distribution of bleeding may be as important as the amount of hemorrhage in patients with idiopathic SAH.

  12. Hemorrhagic Lacrimation and Epistaxis in Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shireen Mreish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy is an uncommon benign cutaneous vasculitis. Despite its worrisome presentation, it carries good prognosis with rarely reported systemic involvement. Management of these cases has been an area of debate with majority of physicians adopting conservative modalities. We report a case that presented with classic triad of rash, low grade fever, and peripheral edema along with two rarely reported manifestations in literature: hemorrhagic lacrimation and epistaxis.

  13. Hypothesis on the Role of Cryptochromes in Inflammation and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Adriano Barreto; Nogueira, Ariel Barreto; Veiga, José Carlos Esteves; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2017-01-01

    We have recently found that the temperature variability (TV) in the day-night cycle may predict the mean intracranial pressure in the following 24 h (ICP 24 ) in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients under multimodality monitoring, sedation, and hypothermia (<35°C). Specifically, we found that ICP 24  = 6 (4 - TV) mmHg. TV is the ratio between the coefficient of variation of temperature during the nocturnal and the preceding diurnal periods. This result suggests that the circadian clock reflects brain plasticity mechanisms and its malfunctioning leads to deterioration of the neurologic status. The sleep-wake cycle is absent in these patients and their circadian clock can function properly only by environment light-independent mechanisms. One mechanism involves the circadian clock proteins named cryptochromes (CRYs). CRYs are highly preserved and widespread in the evolutionary tree, are expressed in different cell types in humans [type II CRYs, in two forms: human cryptochrome 1 and 2 (hCRY1 and hCRY2)], and in certain species, respond to blue light and play role in magnetoreception. Interestingly, SAH outcome seems to correlate with inflammation, and CRYs decrease inflammatory activity. Our hypothesis derived from these observations is that CRYs modulate the circadian oscillation of temperature even during therapeutic hypothermia and improve outcome in SAH through decrease in inflammation. A strategy to test this hypothesis is to measure periodically during the acute phase of high-grade SAH the level of CRYs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and circulating white blood cells, and to correlate these levels with outcome, TV, ICP 24 , and pro- and anti-inflammatory markers in CSF and blood. If this hypothesis is true, the development of therapies targeting inflammation in SAH could take advantage of cryptochrome properties. It has been shown that blue light phototherapy increases the expression of CRYs in blood mononuclear cells in jaundiced neonates. Likewise

  14. Ventilation practices in subarachnoid hemorrhage: a cohort study exploring the use of lung protective ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhong, Jonathan D; Ferguson, Niall D; Singh, Jeffrey M

    2014-10-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is common following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but the influence of mechanical ventilator settings on its development is unclear. We sought to determine adherence to lung protective thresholds in ventilated patients with SAH and describe the association between ventilator settings and subsequent development of ARDS. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients receiving mechanical ventilation within 72 h of SAH at a single academic center. Ventilator settings and blood gas data were collected twice daily for the first 7 days of ventilation along with ICU and hospital outcomes. Lung protective ventilation was defined as follows: tidal volume ≤8 mL/kg of predicted body weight, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) ≥5 cm H(2)O, and peak or plateau pressure ≤30 cm H(2)O. The development of ARDS was ascertained retrospectively by PaO(2)/FiO(2) ≤300 with new bilateral lung opacities on chest X-ray within one day of hypoxemia. We identified 62 patients who underwent early mechanical ventilation following SAH. PS and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure were common ventilator modes with a median tidal volume of 7.8 mL/kg [interquartile range 6.8-8.8], median peak pressure of 14 cm H(2)O [IQR 12-17], and median PEEP of 5 cm H(2)O [IQR 5-6]. Adherence to tidal volumes ≤8 mL/kg was seen in 64 % of all observations and peak pressures protective criteria were seen in 58 % of all observations. Thirty-one patients (50 %) were determined to have ARDS. ARDS patients were more frequently ventilated with a peak pressure >30 cm H(2)O (11.3 % of ARDS ventilation days vs. 0 % of non-ARDS ventilation days; p mechanical ventilation frequently breathe spontaneously, generating tidal volumes above usual protective thresholds regardless of meeting ARDS criteria. In patients with SAH, the presence of an additional ARDS risk factor should prompt close screening for the development of ARDS and

  15. Long-term impact of perfusion CT data after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathys, Christian; Martens, Daniel; Reichelt, Dorothea C.; Caspers, Julian; Aissa, Joel; May, Rebecca; Antoch, Gerald; Turowski, Bernd [University Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Haenggi, Daniel [University Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Neurosurgery, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Dynamic perfusion computed tomography (PCT) has been established as a diagnostic instrument for the detection of vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic impact of PCT parameters after SAH on the long-term outcome of patients. Three hundred twelve patients were retrospectively interrogated with a questionnaire 23.06 {+-} 14.33 months after spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. The modified Rankin scale (mRS) was determined, respectively. Scheduled PCT data sets from the first days after ictus were available for all patients. The maximum mean transit time over several examinations per hemisphere (MTT{sub PEAK}) values were significantly correlated (p {<=} 0.001, r = 0.422) with the clinical long-term outcome (mRS). Corresponding to our linear regression analysis, MTT{sub PEAK} is the second most important regressor (behind clinical severity of the initial hemorrhage) for the prediction of long-term mRS. An MTT{sub PEAK} threshold of 3.98 s (identified by receiver operating characteristic analysis, area under the curve = 0.75) predicted an unfavorable long-term outcome (mRS {>=} 2) with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy of 67.3, 74.3, 84.5, 52.1, and 69.6 %, respectively. The presented data corroborate the relevance of PCT data for the clinical long-term outcome of SAH patients. By identification of patients who are at risk for a bad outcome and may need escalation of therapy, risk-benefit analysis is supported. (orig.)

  16. Effect of graded hyperventilation on cerebral metabolism in a cisterna magna blood injection model of subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Xiaodong; Bay-Hansen, Rikke; Hauerberg, John

    2006-01-01

    In subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with cerebrovascular instability, hyperventilation may induce a risk of inducing or aggravating cerebral ischemia. We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen (CMRO2), glucose (CMRglc), and lactate (CMRlac) at different PaCO2 level...

  17. Loss of Consciousness at Onset of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage is Associated with Functional Outcomes in Good-Grade Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Justin; Alotaibi, Naif M.; Akbar, Muhammad Ali; Ayling, Oliver G S; Ibrahim, George M.; Macdonald, R. Loch; Noble, Adam; Molyneux, Andrew; Quinn, Audrey; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Lo, Benjamin; Jaja, Blessing N R; Johnston, Clay; Hanggi, Daniel; Hasan, David; Wong, George K C; Lantigua, Hector; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Torner, James; Singh, Jeff; Spears, Julian; Schaller, Karl; Stienen, Martin N.; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Cusimano, Michael D.; Todd, Michael; Tseng, Ming; Le Roux, Peter; Macdonald, R. Loch; Yamagata, Sen; Mayer, Stephan; Schenk, Thomas; Schweizer, Tom A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Transient loss of consciousness (LOC) is one of the most common presentations of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and may be an indicator of early brain injury. In this study, we examined the association of LOC and functional outcomes in patients with good-grade SAH. Methods We

  18. Spreading depolarization-modulating drugs and delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage : A hypothesis-generating retrospective clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamming, Arend M.; Mulder, Inge A.; Gathier, Celine S.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Hoff, Reinier G.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Verbaan, Dagmar; Ferrari, Michel D.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Algra, Ale; Wermer, Marieke J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) occurs in approximately one-third of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). A proposed underlying mechanism for DCI is spreading depolarization (SD). Our aim was to, retrospectively, investigate the influence of the use of SD-modulating

  19. Cerebrovascular ETB, 5-HT1B, and AT1 receptor upregulation correlates with reduction in regional CBF after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Vikman, Petter; Nielsen, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    with the reduction in regional and global cerebral blood flow (CBF) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). SAH was induced by injecting 250 microl blood into the prechiasmatic cistern in rats. The cerebral arteries were removed 0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after the SAH for functional and molecular studies...

  20. MR imaging of acute hemorrhagic brain infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Akira; Ohnari, Norihiro; Ohno, Masato

    1989-01-01

    Six patients with acute hemorrhagic brain infarct were imaged using spin-echo (SE) pulse sequences on a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner. Including two patients with repeated MR imaging, a total of eight examinations, all performed within 15 days after stroke, were analyzed retrospectively. Four patients revealed massive hemorrhages in the basal ganglia or cerebellum and three cases demonstrated multiple linear hemorrhages in the cerebral cortex. On T1-weighted images, hemorrhages were either mildly or definitely hyperintense relative to gray matter, while varied from mildly hypointense to hyperintense on T2-weighted images. T1-weighted images were superior to T2-weighted images in detection of hemorrhgage. CT failed to detect hemorrhage in two of five cases: indicative of MR superiority to CT in the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic infarcts. (author)

  1. Decision tree analysis in subarachnoid hemorrhage: prediction of outcome parameters during the course of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage using decision tree analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostettler, Isabel Charlotte; Muroi, Carl; Richter, Johannes Konstantin; Schmid, Josef; Neidert, Marian Christoph; Seule, Martin; Boss, Oliver; Pangalu, Athina; Germans, Menno Robbert; Keller, Emanuela

    2018-01-19

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to create prediction models for outcome parameters by decision tree analysis based on clinical and laboratory data in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). METHODS The database consisted of clinical and laboratory parameters of 548 patients with aSAH who were admitted to the Neurocritical Care Unit, University Hospital Zurich. To examine the model performance, the cohort was randomly divided into a derivation cohort (60% [n = 329]; training data set) and a validation cohort (40% [n = 219]; test data set). The classification and regression tree prediction algorithm was applied to predict death, functional outcome, and ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt dependency. Chi-square automatic interaction detection was applied to predict delayed cerebral infarction on days 1, 3, and 7. RESULTS The overall mortality was 18.4%. The accuracy of the decision tree models was good for survival on day 1 and favorable functional outcome at all time points, with a difference between the training and test data sets of decision trees enables exploration of dependent variables in the context of multiple changing influences over the course of an illness. The decision tree currently generated increases awareness of the early systemic stress response, which is seemingly pertinent for prognostication.

  2. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Susco Chair of Research North Shore University Hospital, Brain Aneurysm Center Chair of Research The Christopher C. Getch, MD Chair of Research Carol W. Harvey Memorial Chair of Research Kristen’s Legacy of Love Chair of Research TeamCindy Alcatraz Chair of Research ...

  3. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... interactive tutorial on cerebral aneurysms from the Toronto Brain Vascular Malformation Study Group . Who gets it? Surgical treatment ... Find a Trial Professionals Assessment Scales Stroke Syndromes Events & ... Diagnosis Anatomy of the Brain Imaging Tests We comply with the "Health on ...

  4. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control blood pressure Medicine to prevent artery spasms Painkillers and anti-anxiety medicines to relieve headache and ... Other complications include: Complications of surgery Medicine side effects Seizures Stroke When to Contact a Medical Professional ...

  5. Sex-related differences in patients treated surgically for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Sex-related differences were examined in the clinical course of patients treated surgically for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Retrospective analyses were carried out to evaluate sex-related differences in aneurysm location, aneurysm size, preoperative neurological condition, preoperative computed tomography findings, and outcome among 2577 patients who underwent surgical repair of ruptured aneurysms. The internal carotid artery was most frequently affected in women and the anterior cerebral artery in men. Intracerebral or intraventricular hematoma was more common in men than in women. Some differences may be related to the location of the aneurysm. Sex-related differences were prominent in the 5th decade of life. These findings might be related to the menopause. Sex hormones may be involved in aneurysm formation. (author)

  6. Toward understanding non-coding RNA roles in intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Fengzhen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is a common and frequently life-threatening cerebrovascular disease, which is mostly related with a ruptured intracranial aneurysm. Its complications include rebleeding, early brain injury, cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, chronic hydrocephalus, and also non neurological problems. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, comprising of microRNAs (miRNAs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, play an important role in intracranial aneurysms and SAH. Here, we review the non-coding RNAs expression profile and their related mechanisms in intracranial aneurysms and SAH. Moreover, we suggest that these non-coding RNAs function as novel molecular biomarkers to predict intracranial aneurysms and SAH, and may yield new therapies after SAH in the future.

  7. Concentration of plasma haptoglobin and symptomatic cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN Yi-mu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The relation of plasma haptoglobin concentration to symptomatic cerebral vasospasm (SCVS after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH was investigated. The plasma concentration of haptoglobin was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. SCVS was determined by aggravated headache, deteriorated conscious state a few days after ictus or by new neurologic impairment and new ischemic injuries on repeated CT scans. The mean concentration of plasma haptoglobin in 19 patients with SCVS was (0.29 ± 0.14 g/L, whereas it was (0.78 ± 0.48 g/L in 24 patients without SCVS. These findings may suggest that plasma haptoglobin concentration seems to be associated with the development of SCVS after SAH.

  8. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage due to Spinal Cord Schwannoma Presenting Findings Mimicking Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Yin-Xi; Zhang, Qing; Song, Shui-Jiang; Liu, Zhi-Rong

    2016-08-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) of spinal origin is uncommon in clinical practice, and spinal schwannomas associated with SAH are even more rarely reported. We report an unusual case of spinal SAH mimicking meningitis with normal brain computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and negative CT angiography. Cerebrospinal fluid examination results were consistent with the manifestation of SAH. Spinal MRI performed subsequently showed an intradural extramedullary mass. The patient received surgery and was finally diagnosed with spinal cord schwannoma. A retrospective chart review of the patient was performed. We describe a case of SAH due to spinal cord schwannoma. Our case highlights the importance of careful history taking and complete evaluation. We emphasize that spinal causes should always be ruled out in patients with angionegative SAH and that schwannoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of SAH etiologies even though rare. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ficolin-3-mediated lectin complement pathway activation in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanier, Elisa R; Zangari, Rosalia; Munthe-Fog, Lea

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the involvement of ficolin-3, the main initiator of the lectin complement pathway (LCP), in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) pathology and outcome. METHODS: In this preliminary exploratory study, plasma concentration of ficolin-3 and of ficolin-3-mediated functional LCP activity...... the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grading scale; vasospasm, defined as neuro-worsening with angiographic confirmation of vessel narrowing; cerebral ischemia, defined as hypodense lesion on CT scan performed before discharge; and 6-month outcome, assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale....... RESULTS: In patients, no changes were detected for ficolin-3 compared with controls. Notably, however, ficolin-3-mediated functional LCP activity was reduced. Low levels of plasma ficolin-3 and ficolin-3-mediated functional LCP activity were related to SAH severity, vasospasm, and cerebral ischemia...

  10. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Nanba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is rarely associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, to our knowledge, rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm following PRES has not been reported. We describe a patient with atypical PRES involving the brainstem, thalamus, and periventricular white matter without cortical or subcortical edema of the parietooccipital lobe on magnetic resonance imaging, with rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm. Preexisting extremely high blood pressure may trigger atypical PRES, and failure to lower blood pressure may lead to a concomitant aneurysm rupture. In the future treatment of hypertensive urgency with a recurrence of symptoms and mean arterial blood pressure >150 mmHg, it is advisable to immediately hospitalize the patient for aggressive blood pressure management, especially if PRES is suspected based on clinical and radiological features.

  11. Risk factors for re-bleeding of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfotih, Gobran Taha Ahmed; Li, FangCheng; Xu, XinKe; Zhang, ShangYi

    2014-01-01

    The mortality of re-bleeding following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is high, and surviving patients often have poor clinical condition and worse outcome than patients with a single bleed. In this study, we performed an updated systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the most common risk factors for re-bleeding in this patient population, with the goal of providing neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuro-interventionalists with a simple and fast method to evaluate the re-bleeding risk for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. We conducted a thorough meta-analysis of the risk factors associated with re-bleeding or re-rupture of intracranial aneurysms in cases published between 2000 and 2013. Pooled mean difference was calculated for the continuous variables (age), and pooled odds ratio (OR) was calculated for categorical factors. If heterogeneity was significant (pbleeding, resulting in a weighted average rate of re-bleeding of 11.3% with 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.1-12.6. In this population, sex (OR 1.46; 95% CI: 1.11-1.92), high systolic blood pressure [SBP] (OR 2.52; 95% CI: 1.40-4.53), aneurysm size (OR 3.00; 95% CI: 2.06-4.37), clinical condition (Hunt & Hess) (OR 4.94; 95% CI: 2.29,10.68), and Fisher grade (OR 2.29; 95% CI: 1.45, 3.61) were statistically significant risk factors for re-bleeding. Sex, high SBP, high Fisher grade, aneurysm size larger than 10mm, and poor clinical condition were independent risk factors for aneurysmal re-bleeding. The importance of early aneurysm intervention and careful consideration of patient risk factors should be emphasized to eliminate the risk of re-bleeding and poor outcome. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Sensitivity of a Clinical Decision Rule and Early Computed Tomography in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin G. Mark

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Application of a clinical decision rule for subarachnoid hemorrhage, in combination with cranial computed tomography (CT performed within six hours of ictus (early cranial CT, may be able to reasonably exclude a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH. This study’s objective was to examine the sensitivity of both early cranial CT and a previously validated clinical decision rule among emergency department (ED patients with aSAH and a normal mental status. Methods: Patients were evaluated in the 21 EDs of an integrated health delivery system between January 2007 and June 2013. We identified by chart review a retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with aSAH in the setting of a normal mental status and performance of early cranial CT. Variables comprising the SAH clinical decision rule (age >40, presence of neck pain or stiffness, headache onset with exertion, loss of consciousness at headache onset were abstracted from the chart and assessed for inter-rater reliability. Results: One hundred fifty-five patients with aSAH met study inclusion criteria. The sensitivity of early cranial CT was 95.5% (95% CI [90.9-98.2]. The sensitivity of the SAH clinical decision rule was also 95.5% (95% CI [90.9-98.2]. Since all false negative cases for each diagnostic modality were mutually independent, the combined use of both early cranial CT and the clinical decision rule improved sensitivity to 100% (95% CI [97.6-100.0]. Conclusion: Neither early cranial CT nor the SAH clinical decision rule demonstrated ideal sensitivity for aSAH in this retrospective cohort. However, the combination of both strategies might optimize sensitivity for this life-threatening disease.

  13. A Preliminary Observational Study of Anovulatory Uterine Bleeding After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Suzanne M; Fifield, Susan W; Pizzi, Michael A; Alejos, David; Richie, Alexa N; Dinh, Tri A; Cheshire, William P; Meek, Shon E; Freeman, William D

    2017-12-01

    It was observed that women with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) tended to have earlier menses than a typical 21- to 28-day cycle. The goal was to determine whether there is an association between aSAH and early onset of menses. All cases of aSAH in women aged 18 to 55 years who were admitted to our facility's neuroscience intensive care unit from June 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, were reviewed. The electronic healthcare record for each of these patients was examined for documentation of menses onset, computed tomography of the head, brain aneurysm characteristics, modified Fisher score and Glasgow Coma Scale on admission, presence/absence of vasospasm, medical/surgical history, and use of medications that affect the menstrual cycle. The mean onset of menses in this study population was compared with the mean of 21 to 28 days with the 1-sample t test. During the study period, 103 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage were admitted. Sixty-one were women, and 15 were aged 18 to 55 years. Nine of the 15 (60%) had documentation of menses occurring during their initial week of hospitalization; 1 patient had documentation of menses on hospital day 12. There is a significant difference when the mean onset of menses in our patient population is compared with the approximate normal menstrual cycle of 21 to 28 days (P abnormal uterine bleeding after SAH may occur in women with aSAH and typically within the first 7 to 10 days after intracranial aneurysm rupture. The physiologic cause of early onset of menses after aSAH, whether primary or secondary, remains unknown.

  14. Mortality after Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Causality and Validation of a Prediction Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulhasan, Yasser B; Alabdulraheem, Najayeb; Simoneau, Gabrielle; Angle, Mark R; Teitelbaum, Jeanne

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate primary causes of death after spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and externally validate the HAIR score, a prognostication tool, in a single academic institution. We reviewed all patients with SAH admitted to our neuro-intensive care unit between 2010 and 2016. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed to identify predictors of in-hospital mortality. The HAIR score predictors were Hunt and Hess grade at treatment decision, age, intraventricular hemorrhage, and rebleeding within 24 hours. Validation of the HAIR score was characterized with the receiver operating curve, the area under the curve, and a calibration plot. Among 434 patients with SAH, in-hospital mortality was 14.1%. Of the 61 mortalities, 54 (88.5%) had a neurologic cause of death or withdrawal of care and 7 (11.5%) had cardiac death. Median time from SAH to death was 6 days. The main causes of death were effect of the initial hemorrhage (26.2%), rebleeding (23%) and refractory cerebral edema (19.7%). Factors significantly associated with in-hospital mortality in the multivariate analysis were age, Hunt and Hess grade, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Maximum lumen size was also a significant risk factor after aneurysmal SAH. The HAIR score had a satisfactory discriminative ability, with an area under the curve of 0.89. The in-hospital mortality is lower than in previous reports, attesting to the continuing improvement of our institutional SAH care. The major causes are the same as in previous reports. Despite a different therapeutic protocol, the HAIR score showed good discrimination and could be a useful tool for predicting mortality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Predictors and outcomes of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients with aneurysmal sub-arachnoid hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Hydrocephalus following spontaneous aneurysmal sub-arachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often associated with unfavorable outcome. This study aimed to determine the potential risk factors and outcomes of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in aneurysmal SAH patients but without hydrocephalus upon arrival at the hospital. Methods One hundred and sixty-eight aneurysmal SAH patients were evaluated. Using functional scores, those without hydrocephalus upon arrival at the hospital were compared to those already with hydrocephalus on admission, those who developed it during hospitalization, and those who did not develop it throughout their hospital stay. The Glasgow Coma Score, modified Fisher SAH grade, and World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade were determined at the emergency room. Therapeutic outcomes immediately after discharge and 18 months after were assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Score. Results Hydrocephalus accounted for 61.9% (104/168) of all episodes, including 82 with initial hydrocephalus on admission and 22 with subsequent hydrocephalus. Both the presence of intra-ventricular hemorrhage on admission and post-operative intra-cerebral hemorrhage were independently associated with shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients without hydrocephalus on admission. After a minimum 1.5 years of follow-up, the mean Glasgow outcome score was 3.33 ± 1.40 for patients with shunt-dependent hydrocephalus and 4.21 ± 1.19 for those without. Conclusions The presence of intra-ventricular hemorrhage, lower mean Glasgow Coma Scale score, and higher mean scores of the modified Fisher SAH and World Federation of Neurosurgical grading on admission imply risk of shunt-dependent hydrocephalus in patients without initial hydrocephalus. These patients have worse short- and long-term outcomes and longer hospitalization. PMID:22765765

  16. Major risk factors for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the young are modifiable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Joseph P; Viscoli, Catherine M; Brott, Thomas; Kernan, Walter N; Brass, Lawrence M; Feldmann, Edward; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Wilterdink, Janet Lee; Horwitz, Ralph I

    2003-06-01

    To identify risk factors for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and intracerebral hemorrhage, we designed a case-control study of men and women 18 to 49 years of age (the Hemorrhagic Stroke Project [HSP]). This report focuses on SAH. Patients were recruited from 44 hospitals in the United States. Cases with SAH must have had a ruptured aneurysm documented by angiography or surgery. Two controls, identified by random digit dialing and matched to each patient for age, sex, race, and telephone exchange, were sought for each case subject. Between 1994 and 1999, 425 patients with SAH were enrolled in HSP, and 312 cases met the criteria for aneurysmal SAH. The present analyses also included 618 matched controls. Of the 312 cases, 66% were current cigarette smokers compared with 30% of controls (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 3.73; 95% CI, 2.67 to 5.21). Cocaine use within the previous 3-day period was reported by 3% of cases and no controls (bivariate exact OR, 24.97; 95% exact CI, 3.95 to infinity; adjusted estimate not calculable). Other independent risk factors in the multivariable model included hypertension (adjusted OR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.48 to 3.29), low body mass index (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.08 to 2.35), primary family history of hemorrhagic stroke (OR, 3.83; 95% CI, 1.73 to 8.46), caffeine in pharmaceutical products (OR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.19 to 5.20), lower educational achievement (OR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.44 to 3.87), and nicotine in pharmaceutical products (adjusted estimate not calculable). Aneurysmal SAH may be largely a preventable disease among the young and middle-aged because several prevalent risk factors can be modified by medication (eg, hypertension) or behavioral change (eg, cigarette smoking, cocaine use). The association of caffeine and nicotine in pharmaceutical products and aneurysmal SAH warrants further study.

  17. Isolated abducens nerve palsy associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a localizing sign of ruptured posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Winkler, Ethan A; Lasker, George F; Yue, John K; Lawton, Michael T

    2018-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Compressive cranial nerve syndromes can be useful bedside clues to the diagnosis of an enlarging intracranial aneurysm and can also guide subsequent evaluation, as with an acute oculomotor nerve (cranial nerve [CN] III) palsy that is presumed to be a posterior communicating artery aneurysm and a surgical emergency until proven otherwise. The CN VI has a short cisternal segment from the pontomedullary sulcus to Dorello's canal, remote from most PICA aneurysms but in the hemodynamic pathway of a rupturing PICA aneurysm that projects toward Dorello's canal. The authors describe a cranial nerve syndrome for posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms that associates subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and an isolated abducens nerve (CN VI) palsy. METHODS Clinical and radiological data from 106 surgical patients with PICA aneurysms (66 ruptured and 40 unruptured) were retrospectively reviewed. Data from a group of 174 patients with other aneurysmal SAH (aSAH) were analyzed in a similar manner to control for nonspecific effects of SAH. Univariate statistical analysis compared incidence and risk factors associated with CN VI palsy in subarachnoid hemorrhage. RESULTS Overall, 13 (4.6%) of 280 patients had CN VI palsy at presentation, and all of them had ruptured aneurysms (representing 13 [5.4%] of the 240 cases of ruptured aneurysms). CN VI palsies were observed in 12 patients with ruptured PICA aneurysms (12/66 [18.1%]) and 1 patient with other aSAH (1/174 [0.1%], p < 0.0001). PICA aneurysm location in ruptured aneurysms was an independent predictor for CN VI palsy on multivariate analysis (p = 0.001). PICA aneurysm size was not significantly different in patients with or without CN VI palsy (average size 4.4 mm and 5.2 mm, respectively). Within the PICA aneurysm cohort, modified Fisher grade (p = 0.011) and presence of a thick cisternal SAH (modified Fisher Grades 3 and 4) (p = 0.003) were predictors of CN VI palsy. In all patients with ruptured PICA

  18. Deaths from cerebrovascular diseases correlated to month of birth: elevated risk of death from subarachnoid hemorrhage among summer-born

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, K.; Imaizumi, Y.

    It has been suggested that maternal nutrition, and fetal and infant growth have an important effect on the risk of cardiovascular disease in adult life. We investigated the population-based distribution of deaths from cerebrovascular diseases (ICD9 codes 430, 431, or 434) in Japan in 1986-1994 as a function of birth month, by examining death-certificate records. For a total of 853 981 people born in the years 1900-1959, the distribution of the number of deaths according to the month of birth was compared with the distribution expected from the monthly numbers of all births for each sex and for the corresponding birth decade. For those born between 1920 and 1949, there were significant discrepancies between the actual numbers of deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage (ICD9 430) and the numbers expected, and these differences were related to the month of birth. Those born in summer, June-September, consistently had an elevated risk of death, particularly men, where the excess risk was 8%-23%. This tendency was also observed, less distinctly but significantly, for deaths from intracerebral hemorrhage (ICD9 431), but was not observed for those dying from occlusion of the cerebral arteries (ICD9 434). The observation that the risk of dying from subarachnoid hemorrhage was more than 10% higher among those born in the summer implies that at least one in ten deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage has its origin at a perinatal stage. Although variations in hypertension in later life, which could possibly be ''programmed'' during the intra-uterine stages, could be an explanation for this observation, the disease-specific nature of the observation suggests the involvement of aneurysm formation, which is a predominant cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  19. Traumatic midline subarachnoid hemorrhage on initial computed tomography as a marker of severe diffuse axonal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Mbemba, Daddy; Mugikura, Shunji; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Murata, Takaki; Ishii, Kiyoshi; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Tominaga, Teiji; Takahashi, Shoki; Takase, Kei

    2018-01-05

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that midline (interhemispheric or perimesencephalic) traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (tSAH) on initial CT may implicate the same shearing mechanism that underlies severe diffuse axonal injury (DAI). METHODS The authors enrolled 270 consecutive patients (mean age [± SD] 43 ± 23.3 years) with a history of head trauma who had undergone initial CT within 24 hours and brain MRI within 30 days. Six initial CT findings, including intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and tSAH, were used as candidate predictors of DAI. The presence of tSAH was determined at the cerebral convexities, sylvian fissures, sylvian vallecula, cerebellar folia, interhemispheric fissure, and perimesencephalic cisterns. Following MRI, patients were divided into negative and positive DAI groups, and were assigned to a DAI stage: 1) stage 0, negative DAI; 2) stage 1, DAI in lobar white matter or cerebellum; 3) stage 2, DAI involving the corpus callosum; and 4) stage 3, DAI involving the brainstem. Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) scores were obtained in 232 patients. RESULTS Of 270 patients, 77 (28.5%) had DAI; tSAH and IVH were independently associated with DAI (p GOSE score at both hospital discharge and after 6 months. CONCLUSIONS Midline tSAH could implicate the same shearing mechanism that underlies severe DAI, for which midline tSAH on initial CT is a probable surrogate.

  20. Utility of intraoperative diagnostic C-arm angiography for management of high grade subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhikui Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The accurate and efficient localization of underlying vascular lesions is crucial for prompt and definitive treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. To demonstrate the utility and feasibility of intraoperative C-arm angiography in cerebrovascular emergencies, we report five cases of high grade SAH and/or intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH where intraoperative diagnostic C-arm angiography was safely and effectively utilized. Initial evaluations of all patients included a non-contrast head CT scan, which was followed by urgent decompressive hemicraniectomy as a life-saving measure in the presence of markedly elevated intracranial pressure. Further diagnostic evaluations were performed intraoperatively using a multi-purpose C-arm angiography system. The C-arm angiography findings greatly aided the intraoperative planning and led to definitive treatments in four cases of SAH by elucidating the underlying neurovascular lesions. With this treatment strategy, two of the patients made moderately good recoveries from their SAH and/or ICH with a Glasgow outcome score (GOS of 4. Three of the patients expired despite maximal therapy mostly due to unfavorable presenting grade. These results suggest that C-arm angiography is a reasonable diagnostic and surgical planning tool for selected patients with high grade diffuse SAH who require immediate decompression.

  1. Reducing length of stay in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: A three year institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaraj, Ali; Hussein, Ahmed E; Esfahani, Darian R; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Aletich, Victor A; Charbel, Fady T

    2017-08-01

    Hospital length of stay is a common metric of excellence in health care. With limited data evaluating hospital length of stay (LOS) and cost in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), in this study we explore multiple prognostic factors and present our institutional experience in shortening LOS. 345 SAH patients were reviewed over a three year period. Patient demographics, hemorrhage grade, hospital course, hospital costs, and LOS were reviewed. Angiogram-negative SAH, Hunt and Hess (HH) Grade 5, and early mortalities were excluded. During this period a physician-led daily multidisciplinary huddle was established to identify and expedite patient discharge needs. 174 patients met inclusion criteria. Significant predictors of increased hospital LOS on univariate analysis included higher HH grade, hydrocephalus, need for ventriculostomy or ventriculoperitoneal shunt, clinical vasospasm, pneumonia, respiratory failure, deep venous thrombosis, and urinary tract infection. Need for shunt, clinical vasospasm, and pneumonia remained significant on multivariate analysis. Mean LOS times decreased to less than those cited in earlier studies, with mean hospital LOS dropping from 21.6days to 14.1. Total hospital costs per SAH patient decreased from $328K to $269K. Readmission rate and breakdown by patient discharge site remained unchanged. Need for ventriculoperitoneal shunt, clinical vasospasm, and pneumonia were found predictive of longer LOS in SAH patients. A physician-led daily multidisciplinary huddle is a potentially valuable tool to identify patient discharge needs and lower LOS and cost in SAH patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Computed tomography angiography spot sign predicts intraprocedural aneurysm rupture in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Neidert, Marian Christoph; Stienen, Martin Nikolaus; Schöni, Daniel; Fung, Christian; Roethlisberger, Michel; Corniola, Marco Vincenzo; Bervini, David; Maduri, Rodolfo; Valsecchi, Daniele; Tok, Sina; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Bijlenga, Philippe; Schaller, Karl; Bozinov, Oliver; Regli, Luca

    2017-07-01

    To analyze whether the computed tomography angiography (CTA) spot sign predicts the intraprocedural rupture rate and outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). From a prospective nationwide multicenter registry database, 1023 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) were analyzed retrospectively. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis were used to compare spot sign-positive and -negative patients with aneurysmal intracerebral hemorrhage (aICH) for baseline characteristics, aneurysmal and ICH imaging characteristics, treatment and admission status as well as outcome at discharge and 1-year follow-up (1YFU) using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). A total of 218 out of 1023 aSAH patients (21%) presented with aICH including 23/218 (11%) patients with spot sign. Baseline characteristics were comparable between spot sign-positive and -negative patients. There was a higher clip-to-coil ratio in patients with than without aICH (both spot sign positive and negative). Median aICH volume was significantly higher in the spot sign-positive group (50 ml, 13-223 ml) than in the spot sign-negative group (18 ml, 1-416; p spot sign-positive aICH thus were three times as likely as those with spot sign-negative aICH to show an intraoperative aneurysm rupture [odds ratio (OR) 3.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-8.92, p = 0.046]. Spot sign-positive aICH patients showed a significantly worse mRS at discharge (p = 0.039) than patients with spot sign-negative aICH (median mRS 5 vs. 4). Logistic regression analysis showed that the spot sign was an aICH volume-dependent predictor for outcome. Both spot sign-positive and -negative aICH patients showed comparable rates of hospital death, death at 1YFU and mRS at 1YFU. In this multicenter data analysis, patients with spot sign-positive aICH showed higher aICH volumes and a higher rate of intraprocedural aneurysm rupture, but comparable long-term outcome to spot sign

  3. Clinical Trials in Cardiac Arrest and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Lessons from the Past and Ideas for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Frontera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Elevated intracranial pressure that occurs at the time of cerebral aneurysm rupture can lead to inadequate cerebral blood flow, which may mimic the brain injury cascade that occurs after cardiac arrest. Insights from clinical trials in cardiac arrest may provide direction for future early brain injury research after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Methods. A search of PubMed from 1980 to 2012 and clinicaltrials.gov was conducted to identify published and ongoing randomized clinical trials in aneurysmal SAH and cardiac arrest patients. Only English, adult, human studies with primary or secondary mortality or neurological outcomes were included. Results. A total of 142 trials (82 SAH, 60 cardiac arrest met the review criteria (103 published, 39 ongoing. The majority of both published and ongoing SAH trials focus on delayed secondary insults after SAH (70%, while 100% of cardiac arrest trials tested interventions within the first few hours of ictus. No SAH trials addressing treatment of early brain injury were identified. Twenty-nine percent of SAH and 13% of cardiac arrest trials showed outcome benefit, though there is no overlap mechanistically. Conclusions. Clinical trials in SAH assessing acute brain injury are warranted and successful interventions identified by the cardiac arrest literature may be reasonable targets of the study.

  4. Predictors of Shunt-dependent Hydrocephalus After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhiyi; Hu, Xin; Zan, Xin; Lin, Sen; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2017-10-01

    Hydrocephalus is a well-recognized complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). This study aimed to identify predictors for shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (SDHC) after aSAH via a systematic review and meta-analysis. A systematic search was conducted using the Embase, MEDLINE, and Web of Science databases for studies pertaining to aSAH and SDHC. Risk factors were assessed by meta-analysis when they were reported by at least 2 studies. The results were presented as odd ratios or risk ratios according to the study design with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). Twenty-five studies were included. In primary analysis of 14 potential risk factors, 12 were identified as predictors of SDHC after aSAH including age ≥50 years, female gender, high Hunt-Hess grade, Glasgow Coma Scale ≤8, Fisher grade ≥3, acute hydrocephalus, external ventricular drainage insertion, intraventricular hemorrhage, postcirculation aneurysm, anterior communicating artery aneurysm, meningitis, and rebleeding. The meta-analysis based on cohort studies found a significantly increased risk for SDHC in patients with aSAH treated by coiling (risk ratio, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.05-1.29), while the meta-analysis based on case-controlled studies failed to replicate this finding (odds ratio, 1.27; 95% CI, 0.95-1.71). Several new predictors of SDHC after aSAH were identified that may assist with the early recognition and prevention of SDHC. The controversial evidence found in this study was insufficient to support the potential of neurosurgical clipping for reducing the risk of shunt dependency. Further well-designed studies are warranted to explore the effect of treatment modality on SDHC risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Establishment of artery smooth muscle cell proliferation model after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

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    Yu-jie CHEN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The current paper aims to simulate the effects of hemolytic products on intracranial vascular smooth muscle cell after subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH,and probe into the molecular mechanism and strategy for the prevention and cure of vascular proliferation after SAH.Methods Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups,including sham-operated,24 h after SAH,and 72 h after SAH groups.The artificial hemorrhage model around the common carotid artery was established for the latter two groups.The animals were put to death after 24 h and 72 h to take the common carotid artery,and to measure the expression level of PCNA,SM-α-actin protein,and mRNA in the smooth muscle cell.Results The PCNA mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated in the 24-h group(P < 0.01.The expression in the 72-h group was lower than that of the 24-h group(P < 0.01,whereas it was still remarkably higher than that of the sham group(P < 0.01.The SM-α-actin mRNA expression in the smooth muscle cell in the 24-h and 72-h groups decreased compared with that of the Sham group(P < 0.05,whereas the 72-h group was significantly lower than that of the 24-h group(P < 0.05.The protein expression of PCNA and SM-α-actin showed a similar trend.Conclusion The current experiment simulates better effects of the hemolytic products on vascular smooth muscle cell after SAH.It also shows that artificial hemorrhage around the common carotid artery could stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell to change from contractile phenotype into synthetic phenotype,and improve it to proliferate.

  6. Usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage due to Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, C. W.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kwark, C. E.; Lee, D. S.; Chung, J. K.; Lee, M. C.; Han, D. H.; Koh, C. S. [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    We evaluated the usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT in 21 Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm and in 3 patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysm. SPECT study could detect the bilaterally hypoperfused cases in 10 patients(48%), but CT/MRI showed the bilateral abnormalities in only 3 patients(14%). The number of abnormal lesions were 56 in SPECT and 25 in CT/MRI. The lesions found in SPECT were well correlated with the neurological signs of the patients such as aphasia or hemiplegia. SPECT study during Matas test was helpful in evaluating the risk for carotid artery occlusion therapy. We thought that {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT is helpful in evaluating the functional changes in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  7. Electrocardiographic findings in acute cerebrovascular hemorrhage a prospective study of 70 patients

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    Walter Oleschko Arruda

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Seventy patients with hemorrhagic stroke were prospectively evaluated regarding the electrocardiographic abnormalities observed within the first 48 hours of the ictus. Group I comprised 55 patients with spontaneous cerebral hemorrhage, and group II 15 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patients taking cardiac drugs (beta blockers, calcium-channel blockers, inotropic drugs or with severe metabolic/electrolyte disturbances were excluded. The most common ECG abnormality was a prolonged Q-Tc interval: group I, 37 (67.2%; group II, 8 (53.3%. Only 4 (7.2% patients of group I and no patient of group II had a normal ECG. No relation was found between the site of the intracerebral hematoma and the occurrence of any particular ECG change. A prolonged Q-Tc may be related to the development of severe cardiac arrhythmias observed in some patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage.

  8. Cerebral Blood Flow Changes after Shunt in Hydrocephalus after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Analysis by statistical Parametric Mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, I. Y.; Choi, W. S.; Pak, H. S.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) after shunt operation in patients with hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage ba statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Seven patients (4 male, mean age 54 years) with hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage underwent a shunt operation. Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT was performed within I week before, and 2 weeks after the shunt operation. All of the SPECT images were spatially transformed to standard space, smoothed, and globally normalized. After spatial and count normalization, rCBF of pre- and post- shunting Tc- 99m HMPAO SPECT was estimated at every voxel using t statistics. The voxels with a P value of less than 0.001 were considered to be significantly different. The shunt operation was effective in all patients. Pre-shunting Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT showed hypoperfusion, predominantly in the periventricular area. After shunt operation, periventricular low perfusion was disappeared. The results of this study show that periventricular CBF is impaired in hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Significant increase of periventricular CBF after shunt operation suggests the evaluation of periventricular CBF by SPM might be of value for the prediction of shunt effectiveness in hydrocephalus

  9. Cerebral Blood Flow Changes after Shunt in Hydrocephalus after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Analysis by statistical Parametric Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, I. Y.; Choi, W. S.; Pak, H. S. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Inhwa, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) after shunt operation in patients with hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage ba statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Seven patients (4 male, mean age 54 years) with hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage underwent a shunt operation. Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT was performed within I week before, and 2 weeks after the shunt operation. All of the SPECT images were spatially transformed to standard space, smoothed, and globally normalized. After spatial and count normalization, rCBF of pre- and post- shunting Tc- 99m HMPAO SPECT was estimated at every voxel using t statistics. The voxels with a P value of less than 0.001 were considered to be significantly different. The shunt operation was effective in all patients. Pre-shunting Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT showed hypoperfusion, predominantly in the periventricular area. After shunt operation, periventricular low perfusion was disappeared. The results of this study show that periventricular CBF is impaired in hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Significant increase of periventricular CBF after shunt operation suggests the evaluation of periventricular CBF by SPM might be of value for the prediction of shunt effectiveness in hydrocephalus.

  10. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with internal carotid artery dissection resulting from whiplash trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Freeman, Michael D; Webb, Alexandra L; Pedersen, Michael; Boel, Lene Warner Thorup

    2015-12-01

    Spinal injury following inertial loading of the head and neck (whiplash) is a common sequel of low speed traffic crashes. A variety of non-musculoskeletal injuries have been described in association with injury to the spine following whiplash trauma, including traumatic brain injury, vestibular derangement, and cranial nerve injury, among others. Vascular injuries in the head and neck have, however, only rarely been described. We present the case of a middle-aged male who sustained an ultimately fatal injury that resulted from injury to the internal carotid artery (ICA) and intracerebral vascular structures following a hard braking maneuver, with no direct head- or neck contact with the vehicular interior. Based on this unusual mechanism of injury we reviewed hospital data from the United States nationwide inpatient database (NIS) to assess the frequency of similar injuries reportedly resulting from traffic crashes. The post-mortem examination revealed a left internal carotid artery dissection associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Based on the close temporal association, the absent prior history, and the plausibility of the injury mechanism, the injury was attributed to the braking maneuver. An analysis of NIS data demonstrated that the prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage is significantly higher when there is a traumatic etiology, and higher yet when the trauma is a traffic crash (odds ratio 3.3 and 4.3, respectively). The presented case, together with the hospital inpatient data analysis, indicate that although SAH in combination with ICA dissection is relatively rare, it is substantially more probable following a traffic crash. In a clinical or forensic setting the inference that magnitude of a trauma was low should not serve as a basis for either excluding a cervical artery dissection from a differential diagnosis, or for excluding the trauma as a cause of a diagnosed dissection. This case report illustrates a rare fatal outcome of inertial load to

  11. Flat-panel detector volumetric CT for visualization of subarachnoid hemorrhage and ventricles: preliminary results compared to conventional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doelken, M.; Struffert, T.; Richter, G.; Engelhorn, T.; Doerfler, A.; Nimsky, C.; Ganslandt, O.; Hammen, T.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare flat-panel volumetric CT (VCT) to conventional CT (cCT) in the visualization of the extent of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and the width of the ventricles in patients with acute SAH. Included in the study were 22 patients with an acutely ruptured cerebral aneurysm who received VCT during coil embolization. VCT image quality, the extent of SAH (using a modified Fisher score and total slice number with SAH visible) and the width of the ventricles (Evans index) were evaluated by two experienced neuroradiologists (RAD1 and RAD2) and compared to the findings on cCT. Ten patients undergoing VCT for reasons other than SAH served as negative controls. Interobserver agreement in rating image quality was excellent for cCT (Kendall W value 0.94) and good for VCT (0.74). SAH was identified by RAD1 and RAD2 on VCT images in all patients. The modified Fisher scores underestimated the extent of SAH on VCT images in comparison with cCT images. Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) regarding the number of image slices with SAH visible on cCT images compared with the number on VCT images was 0.85 for RAD1 and 0.84 for RAD2. The r value for the degree of interobserver agreement for the number of slices with SAH visible was 0.99 for cCT, and 0.95 for VCT images (n 19), respectively. The width of the ventricles measured in terms of the Evans Index showed excellent concordance between the modalities (r = 0.81 vs. 0.82). Our preliminary results indicate that VCT is helpful in evaluating SAH in the angiography suite. Additionally, reliable evaluation of ventricle width is feasible. However, there are limitations with regard to the visibility of SAH on VCT images in comparison to cCT images. (orig.)

  12. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin in an experimental rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chang-Po; Lu, Chueng-He; Wen, Li-Li; Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Wong, Chih-Shung; Borel, Cecil O; Ju, Da-Tong; Chen, Chun-Mei; Wu, Ching-Tang

    2011-12-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) causes a high mortality rate and morbidity. It was suggested that oxidant stress plays an important role in neuronal injury after SAH. Therefore, we assessed the effect of curcumin on reducing cerebral vasospasm and neurologic injury in a SAH model in rat. A double-hemorrhage model was used to induce SAH in rats. Groups of animals were treated with intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg curcumin (curcumin group, n = 24) or dimethyl sulfoxide (vehicle group, n = 33), normal saline (SAH group, n = 34) or normal saline (sham group, n = 22), 3 h after SAH induction and daily for 6 days. Glutamate was measured before SAH induction and once daily for 7 days. Glutamate transporter-1, wall thickness and the perimeter of the basilar artery, neurologic scores, neuronal degeneration, malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities were assessed. Changes of glutamate levels were lower in the curcumin group versus the SAH and vehicle groups, especially on day 1 (56 folds attenuation vs. vehicle). Correspondingly, glutamate transporter-1 was preserved after SAH in curcumin-treated rats. In the hippocampus and the cortex, malondialdehyde was attenuated (30% and 50%, respectively). Superoxide dismutase (35% and 64%) and catalase (34% and 38%) activities were increased in the curcumin rats compared with the SAH rats. Mortality rate (relative risk: 0.59), wall thickness (30%) and perimeter (31%) of the basilar artery, neuron degeneration scores (39%), and neurologic scores (31%) were improved in curcumin-treated rats. Curcumin in multiple doses is effective against glutamate neurotoxicity and oxidative stress and improves the mortality rate in rats with SAH.

  13. CT angiography versus 3D rotational angiography in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage

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    Bechan, R.S.; Peluso, J.P.; Sluzewski, M.; Rooij, W.J. van [Sint Elisabeth Ziekenhuis Tilburg, Department of Radiology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Rooij, S.B. van [Medisch Centrum Alkmaar, Department of Radiology, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Sprengers, M.E.; Majoie, C.B. [Academisch Medisch Centrum, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-12-15

    CT angiography (CTA) is increasingly used as primary diagnostic tool to replace digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, 3D rotational angiography (3DRA) has substituted DSA as a reference standard. In this prospective observational study, we compare CTA with 3DRA of all cerebral vessels in a large cohort of patients with SAH. Of 179 consecutive patients with SAH admitted between March 2013 and July 2014, 139 underwent 64- to 256-detector row CTA followed by complete cerebral 3DRA within 24 h. In 86 patients (62 %), 3DRA was performed under general anesthesia. Two observers from outside hospitals reviewed CTA data. In 118 of 139 patients (85 %), 3DRA diagnosed the cause of hemorrhage: 113 ruptured aneurysms, three arterial dissections, one micro-arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and one reversible vasoconstriction syndrome. On CTA, both observers missed all five non-aneurysmal causes of SAH. Sensitivity of CTA in depicting ruptured aneurysms was 0.88-0.91, and accuracy was 0.88-0.92. Of 113 ruptured aneurysms, 28 were ≤3 mm (25 %) and of 95 additional aneurysms, 71 were ≤3 mm (75 %). Sensitivity of depicting aneurysms ≤3 mm was 0.28-0.43. Of 95 additional aneurysms, the two raters missed 65 (68 %) and 58 (61 %). Sensitivity in detection was lower in aneurysms of the internal carotid artery than in other locations. CTA had some limitations as primary diagnostic tool in patients with SAH. All non-aneurysmal causes for SAH and one in ten ruptured aneurysms were missed. Performance of CTA was poor in aneurysms ≤3 mm. The majority of additional aneurysms were not depicted on CTA. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Current Evidence and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Sarah E; Sair, Haris I; Stevens, Robert D

    2018-04-09

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is associated with an unacceptably high mortality and chronic disability in survivors, underscoring a need to validate new approaches for treatment and prognosis. The use of advanced imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular, could help address this gap given its versatile capacity to quantitatively evaluate and map changes in brain anatomy, physiology and functional activation. Yet there is uncertainty about the real value of brain MRI in the clinical setting of aSAH. In this review, we discuss current and emerging MRI research in aSAH. PubMed was searched from inception to June 2017, and additional studies were then chosen on the basis of relevance to the topics covered in this review. Available studies suggest that brain MRI is a feasible, safe, and valuable testing modality. MRI detects brain abnormalities associated with neurologic examination, outcomes, and aneurysm treatment and thus has the potential to increase knowledge of aSAH pathophysiology as well as to guide management and outcome prediction. Newer pulse sequences have the potential to reveal structural and physiological changes that could also improve management of aSAH. Research is needed to confirm the value of MRI-based biomarkers in clinical practice and as endpoints in clinical trials, with the goal of improving outcome for patients with aSAH.

  15. Preventive Role of Hilar Parasympathetic Ganglia on Pulmonary Artery Vasospasm in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araz, Omer; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Gundogdu, Betul; Altas, Ender; Cakir, Murteza; Calikoglu, Cagatay; Atalay, Canan; Gundogdu, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arteries are mainly innervated by sympathetic vasoconstrictor and parasympathetic vasodilatory fibers. We examined whether there is a relationship between the neuron densities of hilar parasympathetic ganglia and pulmonary vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Twenty-four rabbits were divided into two groups: control (n=8) and SAH (n=16). The animals were observed for 20 days following experimental SAH. The number of hilar parasympathetic ganglia and their neuron densities were determined. Proportion of pulmonary artery ring surface to lumen surface values was accepted as vasospasm index (VSI). Neuron densities of the hilar ganglia and VSI values were compared statistically. Animals in the SAH group experienced either mild (n=6) or severe (n=10) pulmonary artery vasospasm. In the control group, the mean VSI of pulmonary arteries was 0.777±0.048 and the hilar ganglion neuron density was estimated as 12.100±2.010/mm 3 . In SAH animals with mild vasospasm, VSI=1.148±0.090 and neuron density was estimated as 10.110±1.430/mm 3 ; in animals with severe vasospasm, VSI=1.500±0.120 and neuron density was estimated as 7.340±990/mm 3 . There was an inverse correlation between quantity and neuron density of hilar ganglia and vasospasm index value. The low numbers and low density of hilar parasympathetic ganglia may be responsible for the more severe artery vasospasm in SAH.

  16. Effects of deferoxamine on blood-brain barrier disruption after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjiang Li

    Full Text Available Blood brain barrier (BBB disruption is a key mechanism of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH-induced brain injury. This study examined the mechanism of iron-induced BBB disruption after SAH and investigated the potential therapeutic effect of iron chelation on SAH. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats had an endovascular perforation of left internal carotid artery bifurcation or sham operation. The rats were treated with deferoxamine (DFX or vehicle (100mg/kg for a maximum of 7 days. Brain edema, BBB leakage, behavioral and cognitive impairment were examined. In SAH rat, the peak time of brain edema and BBB impairment in the cortex was at day 3 after SAH. SAH resulted in a significant increase in ferritin expression in the cortex. The ferritin positive cells were colocalized with endothelial cells, pericytes, astrocytes, microglia and neurons. Compared with vehicle, DFX caused less ferritin upregulation, brain water content, BBB impairment, behavioral and cognitive deficits in SAH rats. The results suggest iron overload could be a therapeutic target for SAH induced BBB damage.

  17. Impact of Clipping versus Coiling on Postoperative Hemodynamics and Pulmonary Edema after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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    Nobutaka Horie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Volume management is critical for assessment of cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. This multicenter prospective cohort study compared the impact of surgical clipping versus endovascular coiling on postoperative hemodynamics and pulmonary edema in patients with SAH. Hemodynamic parameters were measured for 14 days using a transpulmonary thermodilution system. The study included 202 patients, including 160 who underwent clipping and 42 who underwent coiling. There were no differences in global ejection fraction (GEF, cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance index, or global end-diastolic volume index between the clipping and coiling groups in the early period. However, extravascular lung water index (EVLWI and pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI were significantly higher in the clipping group in the vasospasm period. Postoperative C-reactive protein (CRP level was higher in the clipping group and was significantly correlated with postoperative brain natriuretic peptide level. Multivariate analysis found that PVPI and GEF were independently associated with high EVLWI in the early period, suggesting cardiogenic edema, and that CRP and PVPI, but not GEF, were independently associated with high EVLWI in the vasospasm period, suggesting noncardiogenic edema. In conclusion, clipping affects postoperative CRP level and may thereby increase noncardiogenic pulmonary edema in the vasospasm period. His trial is registered with University Hospital Medical Information Network UMIN000003794.

  18. Aspirin and Risk of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Moore, Justin M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Thomas, Ajith J

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the use of low-dose aspirin may reduce the risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). We aimed to evaluate any association between aspirin use and risk of aSAH based on the literature, and whether this is influenced by duration or frequency of aspirin use. A search of electronic databases was done from inception to September 2016. For each study, data on risk of aSAH in aspirin versus nonaspirin users were used to generate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, and combined using inverse variance-weighted averages of logarithmic odds ratios in a random-effects models. From 7 included studies, no significant difference was noted between aspirin use of any duration or frequency and nonaspirin users (odds ratio, 1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.24; P =0.99). We found a significant association between short-term use of aspirin (3 years of durations of use. No significant association was found between infrequent aspirin use (≤2× per week) or frequent use (≥3× per week) with risk of aSAH. Current evidence suggests that short-term (aspirin is associated with increased risk of aSAH. Limitations include substantial heterogenity of the included studies. The role of long-term aspirin in reducing risk of aSAH remains unclear and ideally should be addressed by an appropriately designed randomized controlled trial. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Precision medicine of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Christian; Avalon, Nicole E; Siegel, Jason; Pizzi, Michael; Dutta, Tumpa; Charlesworth, M Cristine; Freeman, William D

    2016-11-01

    Precision medicine provides individualized treatment of diseases through leveraging patient-to-patient variation. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage carries tremendous morbidity and mortality with cerebral vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia proving devastating and unpredictable. Lack of treatment measures for these conditions could be improved through precision medicine. Areas covered: Discussed are the pathophysiology of CV and DCI, treatment guidelines, and evidence for precision medicine used for prediction and prevention of poor outcomes following aSAH. A PubMed search was performed using keywords cerebral vasospasm or delayed cerebral ischemia and either biomarkers, precision medicine, metabolomics, proteomics, or genomics. Over 200 peer-reviewed articles were evaluated. The studies presented cover biomarkers identified as predictive markers or therapeutic targets following aSAH. Expert commentary: The biomarkers reviewed here correlate with CV, DCI, and neurologic outcomes after aSAH. Though practical use in clinical management of aSAH is not well established, using these biomarkers as predictive tools or therapeutic targets demonstrates the potential of precision medicine.

  20. Milrinone and homeostasis to treat cerebral vasospasm associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage: the Montreal Neurological Hospital protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannes, Marcelo; Teitelbaum, Jeanne; del Pilar Cortés, Maria; Cardoso, Mauro; Angle, Mark

    2012-06-01

    For the treatment of cerebral vasospasm, current therapies have focused on increasing blood flow through blood pressure augmentation, hypervolemia, the use of intra-arterial vasodilators, and angioplasty of proximal cerebral vessels. Through a large case series, we present our experience of treating cerebral vasospasm with a protocol based on maintenance of homeostasis (correction of electrolyte and glucose disturbances, prevention and treatment of hyperthermia, replacement of fluid losses), and the use of intravenous milrinone to improve microcirculation (the Montreal Neurological Hospital protocol). Our objective is to describe the use milrinone in our practice and the neurological outcomes associated with this approach. Large case series based on the review of all patients diagnosed with delayed ischemic neurologic deficits after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage between April 1999 and April 2006. 88 patients were followed for a mean time of 44.6 months. An intravenous milrinone infusion was used for a mean of 9.8 days without any significant side effects. No medical complications associated with this protocol were observed. There were five deaths; of the surviving patients, 48.9 % were able to go back to their previous baseline and 75 % had a good functional outcome (modified Rankin scale ≤ 2). A protocol using intravenous milrinone, and the maintenance of homeostasis is simple to use and requires less intensive monitoring and resources than the standard triple H therapy. Despite the obvious limitations of this study's design, we believe that it would be now appropriate to proceed with formal prospective studies of this protocol.

  1. Real-time imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage in piglets with electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Meng; Wang, Liang; Xu, Canhua; Li, Lianfeng; Gao, Guodong; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2010-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is one of the most severe medical emergencies in neurosurgery. Early detection or diagnosis would significantly reduce the rate of disability and mortality, and improve the prognosis of the patients. Although the present medical imaging techniques generally have high sensitivity to identify bleeding, the use of an additional, non-invasive imaging technique capable of continuously monitoring SAH is required to prevent contingent bleeding or re-bleeding. In this study, electrical impedance tomography (EIT) was applied to detect the onset of SAH modeled on eight piglets in real time, with the subsequent process being monitored continuously. The experimental SAH model was introduced by one-time injection of 5 ml fresh autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magna. Results showed that resistivity variations within the brain caused by the added blood could be detected using the EIT method and may be associated not only with the resistivity difference among brain tissues, but also with variations of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. In conclusion, EIT has unique potential for use in clinical practice to provide invaluable real-time neuroimaging data for SAH after the improvement of electrode design, anisotropic realistic modeling and instrumentation.

  2. Regional cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in normal pressure hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage

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    Ishikawa, Masatsune; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Taki, Waro; Kobayashi, Akira; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Konishi, Junji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1989-05-01

    To clarify the pathophysiology of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) after subarachnoid hemorrhage, the authors measured cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral oxygen metabolic rates (CMRO{sub 2}), the cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV) in eight normal volunteers, six SAH patients with NPH, and seven patients without NPH by {sup 15}O-labeled gas and positron emission tomography (PET). In the NPH group, PET revealed a decrease in CBF in the lower regions of the cerebral cortex and a diffuse decrease in CMRO{sub 2}. The decrease in CBF in the lower frontal, temporal, and occipital cortices was significantly greater in the NPH than in the non-NPH group. Reduction of CMRO{sub 2} was also more extensive in the NPH group, and both CBF and CMRO{sub 2} were more markedly decreased in the lower frontal region. OEF was increased in all areas in both of the patient groups, but the increase was not significant in most areas. CBF, CMRO{sub 2} and OEF did not significantly differ between the non-NPH group and the normal volunteers. There was no significant difference in CBV among the three groups. These results indicate that NPH involves impairment of cerebral oxygen metabolism in the lower regions of the cerebral cortex, particularly in the lower frontal region. (author).

  3. Subarachnoid hemorrhage: tests of association with apolipoprotein E and elastin genes

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    Sauerbeck Laura

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein E (APOE and elastin (ELN are plausible candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of stroke. We tested for association of variants in APOE and ELN with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in a population-based study. We genotyped 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on APOE and 10 SNPs on ELN in a sample of 309 Caucasian individuals, of whom 107 are SAH cases and 202 are age-, race-, and gender-matched controls from the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky region. Associations were tested at genotype, allele, and haplotype levels. A genomic control analysis was performed to check for spurious associations resulting from population substructure. Results At the APOE locus, no individual SNP was associated with SAH after correction for multiple comparisons. Haplotype analysis revealed significant association of the major haplotype (Hap1 in APOE with SAH (p = 0.001. The association stemmed from both the 5' promoter and the 3' region of the APOE gene. APOE ε2 and ε 4 were not significantly associated with SAH. No association was observed for ELN at genotype, allele, or haplotype level and our study failed to confirm previous reports of ELN association with aneurysmal SAH. Conclusion This study suggests a role of the APOE gene in the etiology of aneurysmal SAH.

  4. Embolic Signals during Routine Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, Fernando Mendes; de Almeida Lins Ronconi, Karla; de Lima Oliveira, Marcelo; Nogueira, Ricardo de Carvalho; Paschoal, Eric Homero Albuquerque; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Cerebral emboli may occur in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and intracranial aneurysm surgery. Although embolic signs (ES) have been reported in SAH, their origin remains unclear. The aim of this study was to report the detection of ES during routine TCD monitoring in patients with aneurysmal SAH. Methods. A total of 105 patients with aneurysmal SAH were submitted to TCD evaluation. Patients were monitored almost daily (5 times per week). In each monitoring session, one experienced operator performed TCD to detect or assess vasospasm and ES in arteries of the Willis polygon. Results. Four patients out of a total of 105 patients with aneurysmal SAH were found to present spontaneous cerebral embolization during routine TCD monitoring. The average age of the 4 patients (mean ± standard deviation) was 59.5 ± 8.34 years (range 49–68 ys); female patients predominated representing 75% (3/4) of subjects. Conclusion. Although detection of ES was relatively rare in this study, rates of emboli occurrence may be higher under systematic monitoring. The detection of ES after SAH surgery reinforces the need to study the role of embolus in this condition and may be an indicator for prophylactic antithrombotic treatment. PMID:25893190

  5. Estimation of prognosis for severe subarachnoid hemorrhage by initial CT perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumitsu, Ryu; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    While poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is generally associated with high mortality and morbidity, some patients make an unexpected dramatic recovery. To estimate prognosis for severe SAH, we assessed cerebral blood circulation by computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging on admission. CTP studies were performed for 25 of 49 SAH patients with World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) Grade V between March 2006 and July 2008. Four patients were excluded due to rerupture of aneurysm after CTP images were obtained. We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT) in the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia. Outcomes were assessed using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), and patients were classified into 3 groups (n=7 each): Group A, mRS 0-3; Group B, mRS 4, 5; and Group C, mRS 6. All patients of Groups A and B underwent surgery, while 6 patients in Group C with mydriasis on admission were treated conservatively. CBF of the cerebral cortex was significantly lower in Group C than in Groups A or B. No significant differences were seen in CBV among the 3 groups. MTTs of cerebral cortex were significantly longer in Group C than in Groups A or B, with a cutoff value of 6.6 s. CTP is a potential modality for poor-grade SAH, in that discrimination between 'false' and 'true' Grade V patients could be made rapidly and less invasively. (author)

  6. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage prognostic decision-making algorithm using classification and regression tree analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Benjamin W Y; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Angle, Mark; Teitelbaum, Jeanne; Macdonald, R Loch; Farrokhyar, Forough; Thabane, Lehana; Levine, Mitchell A H

    2016-01-01

    Classification and regression tree analysis involves the creation of a decision tree by recursive partitioning of a dataset into more homogeneous subgroups. Thus far, there is scarce literature on using this technique to create clinical prediction tools for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The classification and regression tree analysis technique was applied to the multicenter Tirilazad database (3551 patients) in order to create the decision-making algorithm. In order to elucidate prognostic subgroups in aneurysmal SAH, neurologic, systemic, and demographic factors were taken into account. The dependent variable used for analysis was the dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Score at 3 months. Classification and regression tree analysis revealed seven prognostic subgroups. Neurological grade, occurrence of post-admission stroke, occurrence of post-admission fever, and age represented the explanatory nodes of this decision tree. Split sample validation revealed classification accuracy of 79% for the training dataset and 77% for the testing dataset. In addition, the occurrence of fever at 1-week post-aneurysmal SAH is associated with increased odds of post-admission stroke (odds ratio: 1.83, 95% confidence interval: 1.56-2.45, P tree was generated, which serves as a prediction tool to guide bedside prognostication and clinical treatment decision making. This prognostic decision-making algorithm also shed light on the complex interactions between a number of risk factors in determining outcome after aneurysmal SAH.

  7. Imatinib preserves blood-brain barrier integrity following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yan; Krafft, Paul R; Lekic, Tim; Ma, Qingyi; Souvenir, Rhonda; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and consequent edema formation contribute to the development of early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Various cerebrovascular insults result in increased platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-α stimulation, which has been linked to BBB breakdown and edema formation. This study examines whether imatinib, a PDGFR inhibitor, can preserve BBB integrity in a rat endovascular perforation SAH model. Imatinib (40 or 120 mg/kg) or a vehicle was administered intraperitoneally at 1 hr after SAH induction. BBB leakage, brain edema, and neurological deficits were evaluated. Total and phosphorylated protein expressions of PDGFR-α, c-Src, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and c-Jun were measured, and enzymatic activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were determined in the injured brain. Imatinib treatment significantly ameliorated BBB leakage and edema formation 24 hr after SAH, which was paralleled by improved neurological functions. Decreased brain expressions of phosphorylated PDGFR-α, c-Src, JNK, and c-Jun as well as reduced MMP-9 activities were found in treated animals. PDGFR-α inhibition preserved BBB integrity following experimental SAH; however, the protective mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Targeting PDGFR-α signaling might be advantageous to ameliorate early brain injury following SAH. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Neuroprotective Effect of Tea Polyphenols on Oxyhemoglobin Induced Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Mice

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    Haizhen Mo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tea polyphenols are of great benefit to the treatment of several neurodegenerative diseases. In order to explore the neuroprotective effects of tea polyphenols and their potential mechanisms, an established in vivo subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH model was used and alterations of mitochondrial function, ATP content, and cytochrome c (cyt c in cerebral cortex were detected. This study showed that the alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential was an early event in SAH progression. The trend of ATP production was similar to that of mitochondrial membrane potential, indicating that the lower the mitochondrial membrane potential, lesser the ATP produced. Due to mitochondrial dysfunction, more cyt c was released in the SAH group. Interestingly, the preadministration of tea polyphenols significantly rescued the mitochondrial membrane potential to basal level, as well as the ATP content and the cyt c level in the brain cortex 12 h after SAH. After pretreatment with tea polyphenols, the neurological outcome was also improved. The results provide strong evidence that tea polyphenols enhance neuroprotective effects by inhibiting polarization of mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing ATP content, and blocking cyt c release.

  9. Curcumin attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption after subarachnoid hemorrhage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jichao; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Haitao; Zhang, Xuan; Feng, Yang; Chen, Yaxing; Feng, Hua; Lin, Jiangkai

    2017-01-01

    Early brain injury, one of the most important mechanisms underlying subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), comprises edema formation and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Curcumin, an active extract from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa, alleviates neuroinflammation by as yet unknown neuroprotective mechanisms. In this study, we examined whether curcumin treatment ameliorates SAH-induced brain edema and BBB permeability changes, as well as the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. We induced SAH in mice via endovascular perforation, administered curcumin 15 min after surgery and evaluated neurologic scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, Western blot assay results, and immunohistochemical analysis results 24 h after surgery. Curcumin significantly improved neurologic scores and reduced brain water content in treated mice compared with SAH mice. Furthermore, curcumin decreased Evans blue extravasation, matrix metallopeptidase-9 expression, and the number of Iba-1-positive microglia in treated mice compared with SAH mice. At last, curcumin treatment increased the expression of the tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 and occludin in treated mice compared with vehicle-treated and sample SAH mice. We demonstrated that curcumin inhibits microglial activation and matrix metallopeptidase-9 expression, thereby reducing brain edema and attenuating post-SAH BBB disruption in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Severely Impairs Brain Parenchymal Cerebrospinal Fluid Circulation in Nonhuman Primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulay, Romain; Flament, Julien; Gauberti, Maxime; Naveau, Michael; Pasquet, Nolwenn; Gakuba, Clement; Emery, Evelyne; Hantraye, Philippe; Vivien, Denis; Aron-Badin, Romina; Gaberel, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating form of stroke with neurological outcomes dependent on the occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia. It has been shown in rodents that some of the mechanisms leading to delayed cerebral ischemia are related to a decreased circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain parenchyma. Here, we evaluated the cerebral circulation of the CSF in a nonhuman primate in physiological condition and after SAH. We first evaluated in physiological condition the circulation of the brain CSF in Macaca facicularis , using magnetic resonance imaging of the temporal DOTA-Gd distribution after its injection into the CSF. Then, animals were subjected to a minimally invasive SAH before an MRI evaluation of the impact of SAH on the brain parenchymal CSF circulation. We first demonstrate that the CSF actively penetrates the brain parenchyma. Two hours after injection, almost the entire brain is labeled by DOTA-Gd. We also show that our model of SAH in nonhuman primate displays the characteristics of SAH in humans and leads to a dramatic impairment of the brain parenchymal circulation of the CSF. The CSF actively penetrates within the brain parenchyma in the gyrencephalic brain, as described for the glymphatic system in rodent. This parenchymal CSF circulation is severely impaired by SAH. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Detection of aneurysms in subarachnoidal hemorrhage - CT-angiography versus digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehnert, W.; Haenig, V.; Hietschold, V.; Abolmaali, N.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The value of CT-angiography (CT-A) for the visualization of intracranial aneurysms was more closely defined by comparison with digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Methods: Over a period of 18 months a total of 106 patients in whom a subarachnoidal hemorrhage had been detected on native CT were examined in parallel by spiral CT and DSA. CT-angiography was performed under standardized parameters and included processing with 3D surface reconstructions. Results: In 64 patients (60.4%) at total of 72 aneurysms were detected. In four cases (6.2%) there were two and in two cases (3.1%) even three aneurysms. The findings of DSA and CTA agreed in 98 cases (92.5%). In four patients (3.8%) a false negative results was obtained in CTA and the initial DSA. Conclusions: Digital subtraction angiography must still be considered as the gold standard in the diagnosis of cerebral aneurysms. On account of its excellent spatial delineation of aneurysms and possibilities for exact measurements, CT-angiography represents a valuable, supplementary method - in some cases also an alternative method - to digital subtraction angiography. (orig.) [de

  12. Incidence, epidemiology, and treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in 12 midwest communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba-Davis, Mary; Bohnstedt, Bradley N; Payner, Troy D; Leipzig, Thomas J; Palmer, Erin; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-01-01

    Only 8 studies have investigated the incidence and epidemiology of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) in the United States. This is the first investigation in Indiana, which has some of the highest rates of tobacco smoking and obesity in the nation. The authors prospectively identified 441 consecutive patients with aSAH from 2005 to 2010 at 2 hospitals where the majority of cases are treated. Incidence calculations were based on US Census populations. Epidemiologic variables included demography; risk factors; Hunt and Hess scale; Fisher grade; number, location, and size of aneurysms; treatment type; and complications. Overall incidence was 21.8 per 100,000 population. Incidence was higher in women, increased with age, and did not vary by race. One third to half of patients were hypertensive and/or smoked cigarettes at the time of ictus. Variations by count were partially explained by Health Factor and Morbidity Rankings. Complications varied by treatment. These findings deviate from estimates that 6-16 per 100,000 people in the United States will develop aSAH and are double the incidence in a Minnesota population between 1945 and 1974. The results also deviate from the worldwide estimate of 9.0 aSAHs per 100,000 person-years. The predictive value of variations in Health Factor and Morbidity Rankings implicates the importance of future research on multivariate biopsychosocial causation of aSAH. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic change in cerebral microcirculation and focal cerebral metabolism in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jin-Ning; Chen, Hu; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Yong-Lin; Ma, Xu-Dong

    2013-03-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the cerebral metabolism and energy metabolism measurements can be used to assess blood flow of brain cells and to detect cell activity. Changes of rCBF in the cerebral microcirculation and energy metabolism were determined in an experimental model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model in 56 large-eared Japanese rabbits about 12 to 16-month old. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to detect the blood supply to brain cells. Internal carotid artery and vein blood samples were used for duplicate blood gas analysis to assess the energy metabolism of brain cells. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was detected by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion imaging using Tc-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (Tc-99m ECD) as an imaging reagent. The percentage of injected dose per gram of brain tissue was calculated and analyzed. There were positive correlations between the percentage of radionuclide injected per gram of brain tissue and rCBF supply and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (P brain cells after SAH, and also found that deterioration of energy metabolism of brain cells played a significant role in the development of SAH. There are matched reductions in CBF and metabolism. Thus, SPECT imaging could be used as a noninvasive method to detect CBF.

  14. Relationship between weather conditions and admissions for ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnoki, Adam D; Turker, Acar; Tarnoki, David L; Iyisoy, Mehmet S; Szilagyi, Blanka K; Duong, Hoang; Miskolczi, Laszlo

    2017-02-28

    To assess impacts of different weather conditions on hospitalizations of patients with ischemic strokes and subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAH) in South Florida. Diagnostic data of patients with spontaneous SAH and strokes were recorded between June 2010 and July 2013. Daily synchronous forecast charts were collected from the National Weather Service and the whole data were matched prospectively. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) was calculated. Increased incidence rate of ischemic stroke was consistent with the daily lowest and highest air pressure (IRR 1.03, P=0.128 and IRR 0.98, P=0.380, respectively), highest air temperature (IRR 0.99, P=0.375), and presence of hurricanes or storms (IRR 0.65, P=0.054). Increased incidence of SAH cases was consistent with daily lowest and highest air pressure (IRR 0.87, P<0.001 and IRR 1.08, P=0.019, respectively) and highest air temperature (IRR 0.98, P<0.001). Presence of hurricanes and/or tropical storms did not influence the frequency of SAH. We found no relationship between the presence of fronts and the admissions for ischemic stroke or SAH. Higher number of ischemic stroke and SAH cases can be expected with the daily lowest and highest air pressure, highest air temperature. Presence of hurricanes or tropical storms increased the risk of ischemic stroke but not the SAH. These findings can help to develop preventive health plans for cerebrovascular diseases.

  15. A clinical study of cerebral vaso paralysis during a period of cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Toshiichi; Sasaki, Takehiko; Nakagawara, Jyoji

    2011-01-01

    We employ the 123 I-infinitum (Imp) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) dual table autoradiography (Arg) method and stereotactic extraction estimation (SEE) analysis 7 or 8 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) onset to predict cerebral vasospasm. We report new findings of cerebral vasoparalysis during a period of cerebral vasospasm after SAH. From January 1, 2005 to April 30, 2008, we encountered 330 cases of aneurysmal SAH, and treated 285 cases. Of these, 65 were excluded as unsuitable for this study, for reasons such as lack of SPECT data, external decompression, admission over 7 days from SAH onset. We studied 220 cases treated by microsurgical clipping (n=178) or endovascular coil embolization (n=42). Vasoparalysis was defined as a rise in resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and a loss of vascular reserve on SEE analysis of CBF-SPECT. Vasoparalysis occurred in 15 cases (6.8%). Of these, 9 cases (60.0%) had cerebral hematoma, temporary clips had been used in the operation for 8 cases (53.3%), 9 cases (60.0%) experienced postoperative cerebral infarction, and 3 cases (20.0%) had postoperative convulsions. Vasoparalysis occurs in relation to perioperative cerebral damage. In terms of the loss of vascular reserve following SAH, vasoparalysis resembles hemodynamic cerebral ischemia, although the conditions are quite different. Differentiating between these 2 conditions is important, as different forms of management are required. Dual table ARG and SEE analysis are very useful for the evaluating these 2 conditions. (author)

  16. Predicting delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage using physiological time series data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soojin; Megjhani, Murad; Frey, Hans-Peter; Grave, Edouard; Wiggins, Chris; Terilli, Kalijah L; Roh, David J; Velazquez, Angela; Agarwal, Sachin; Connolly, E Sander; Schmidt, J Michael; Claassen, Jan; Elhadad, Noemie

    2018-03-20

    To develop and validate a prediction model for delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) using a temporal unsupervised feature engineering approach, demonstrating improved precision over standard features. 488 consecutive SAH admissions from 2006 to 2014 to a tertiary care hospital were included. Models were trained on 80%, while 20% were set aside for validation testing. Baseline information and standard grading scales were evaluated: age, sex, Hunt Hess grade, modified Fisher Scale (mFS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). An unsupervised approach applying random kernels was used to extract features from physiological time series (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation). Classifiers (Partial Least Squares, linear and kernel Support Vector Machines) were trained on feature subsets of the derivation dataset. Models were applied to the validation dataset. The performances of the best classifiers on the validation dataset are reported by feature subset. Standard grading scale (mFS): AUC 0.58. Combined demographics and grading scales: AUC 0.60. Random kernel derived physiologic features: AUC 0.74. Combined baseline and physiologic features with redundant feature reduction: AUC 0.77. Current DCI prediction tools rely on admission imaging and are advantageously simple to employ. However, using an agnostic and computationally inexpensive learning approach for high-frequency physiologic time series data, we demonstrated that our models achieve higher classification accuracy.

  17. CSF and Serum Biomarkers Focusing on Cerebral Vasospasm and Ischemia after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla S. Jung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed cerebral vasospasm (CVS and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI remain severe complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Although focal changes in cerebral metabolism indicating ischemia are detectable by microdialysis, routinely used biomarkers are missing. We therefore sought to evaluate a panel of possible global markers in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients after SAH. CSF and serum of SAH patients were analyzed retrospectively. In CSF, levels of inhibitory, excitatory, and structural amino acids were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. In serum, neuron-specific enolase (NSE and S100B level were measured and examined in conjunction with CVS and DCI. CVS was detected by arteriography, and ischemic lesions were assessed by computed tomography (CT scans. All CSF amino acids were altered after SAH. CSF glutamate, glutamine, glycine, and histidine were significantly correlated with arteriographic CVS. CSF glutamate and serum S100B were significantly correlated with ischemic events after SAH; however, NSE did not correlate neither with ischemia nor with vasospasm. Glutamate, glutamine, glycine, and histidine might be used in CSF as markers for CVS. Glutamate also indicates ischemia. Serum S100B, but not NSE, is a suitable marker for ischemia. These results need to be validated in larger prospective cohorts.

  18. Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α, a possible prognostic marker in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, De-Sheng; Yan, Min; Hassan, Muhammad; Fang, Ze-Bin; Chen, Man-Tao

    2017-06-01

    8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α) is a potential biomarker of oxidative stress. This study clarified whether plasma 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations were affected and its underlying relevance to prognosis in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). In this prospective, observational study, a total of 170 controls and 170 aSAH patients were enrolled. Plasma 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations were detected using an ELISA. Severity was assessed by World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) scale and modified Fisher grading scale. Clinical outcomes included 6-month mortality and poor outcome referred to as Glasgow outcome scale score of 1-3. As compared to controls, admission plasma 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations were significantly enhanced. Increased concentrations of plasma 8-iso-PGF2α correlated with WFNS scores and modified Fisher scores. 8-iso-PGF2α in plasma was an independent predictor for clinical outcomes. Under ROC curve, the predictive values of 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations resembled those of WFNS scores and modified Fisher scores for clinical outcomes. An elevation in plasma 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations is associated with the severity and poor outcome after aSAH, substantializing 8-iso-PGF2α as a potential prognostic biomarker of aSAH. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. The Role of Bone Subtraction Computed Tomographic Angiography in Determining Intracranial Aneurysms in Non-Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayhan, Aysegul; Koc, Osman; Keskin, Suat; Keskin, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    The presence of blood in the subarachnoid space is an acute pathology with a serious risk of death and complications. The most common etiology (approximately 80%) is intracranial aneurysm. The aim of this study was to assess the role of bone subtracted computed tomographic angiography (BSCTA), a novel and noninvasive method for determining and characterizing intracranial aneurysms. Sixty consecutive patients with clinically suspected non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were considered to enter the study. The subtraction quality was inadequate in ten patients; thus, they were excluded, leaving 50 patients (84.4%) in the study. Bone subtracted and non-subtracted 3D images were obtained from the BSCTA raw data sets. All images obtained by digital subtraction angiography (DSA), BSCTA, and computed tomographic angiography (CTA) were evaluated for the presence or absence of an aneurysm and the location, minimal sac diameter, and neck size ratio of the aneurysm. DSA was considered as the gold standard during the evaluation of the data. Of the 50 patients who participated in this study, 11 had no aneurysms as determined by both CTA and DSA. Examination of the remaining 39 patients revealed the presence of 51 aneurysms. While 3D-CTA could not detect six aneurysms that were located in the base of the skull, 3D-BSCTA easily detected them. Moreover, five aneurysms were only partially detected by 3D-CTA. According to this data, the sensitivity of 3D-BSCTA and 3D-CTA was calculated as 98% and 86.3%, respectively; the specificity was calculated as 100% and 90.9%, respectively, per aneurysm; and the sensitivity of 100% for 3D-BSCTA and 98% for 3D-CTA was achieved by using combined images with multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) and maximum intensity projection (MIP). BSCTA detected and characterized the aneurysms as well as DSA, and BSCTA and DSA gave concordant results in detecting aneurysms. BSCTA is easily accessible, less time consuming, and most importantly, a non

  20. The Role of Bone Subtraction Computed Tomographic Angiography in Determining Intracranial Aneurysms in Non-Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Aysegul; Koc, Osman; Keskin, Suat; Keskin, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Background: The presence of blood in the subarachnoid space is an acute pathology with a serious risk of death and complications. The most common etiology (approximately 80%) is intracranial aneurysm. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the role of bone subtracted computed tomographic angiography (BSCTA), a novel and noninvasive method for determining and characterizing intracranial aneurysms. Patients and Methods: Sixty consecutive patients with clinically suspected non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were considered to enter the study. The subtraction quality was inadequate in ten patients; thus, they were excluded, leaving 50 patients (84.4%) in the study. Bone subtracted and non-subtracted 3D images were obtained from the BSCTA raw data sets. All images obtained by digital subtraction angiography (DSA), BSCTA, and computed tomographic angiography (CTA) were evaluated for the presence or absence of an aneurysm and the location, minimal sac diameter, and neck size ratio of the aneurysm. DSA was considered as the gold standard during the evaluation of the data. Results: Of the 50 patients who participated in this study, 11 had no aneurysms as determined by both CTA and DSA. Examination of the remaining 39 patients revealed the presence of 51 aneurysms. While 3D-CTA could not detect six aneurysms that were located in the base of the skull, 3D-BSCTA easily detected them. Moreover, five aneurysms were only partially detected by 3D-CTA. According to this data, the sensitivity of 3D-BSCTA and 3D-CTA was calculated as 98% and 86.3%, respectively; the specificity was calculated as 100% and 90.9%, respectively, per aneurysm; and the sensitivity of 100% for 3D-BSCTA and 98% for 3D-CTA was achieved by using combined images with multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) and maximum intensity projection (MIP). BSCTA detected and characterized the aneurysms as well as DSA, and BSCTA and DSA gave concordant results in detecting aneurysms. Conclusions: BSCTA is

  1. [in-hospital mortality in patient with acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadamasa, Nobutake; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Narumi, Osamu; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen

    2011-09-01

    There is a lack of evidence to compare in-hospital mortality with different types of stroke. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the in-hospital mortality after acute ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke and compare the factors associated with the mortality among stroke subtypes. All patients admitted to Kurashiki Central Hospital in Japan between January 2009 and December 2009, and diagnosed with acute ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke were included in this study. Demographics and clinical data pertaining to the patients were obtained from their medical records. Out of 738 patients who had an acute stroke, 53 (7.2%) died in the hospital. The in-hospital mortality was significantly lower in the cerebral infarction group than in the intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage group (3.5%, 15.1%, and 17.9%, respectively; Phemorrhage group than in the other 2 groups. With regard to past history, diabetes mellitus was significantly found to be a complication in mortality cases of intracranial hemorrhage. Further investigation is needed to clarify the effect of diabetes on mortality after intracranial hemorrhage.

  2. Acute subarachnoid haemorrhage: Is a negative CT angiogram enough?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, A.D.; Clifton, A.G.; Rich, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine the negative predictive value of 16 channel multisection computed tomography angiography (CTA) for detecting aneurysms in spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the reference standard. Materials and methods: The prospectively collected cerebral angiogram database of Department of Neuroradiology, Atkinson Morley Regional Neuroscience Centre was used to identify 200 consecutive patients who had undergone DSA for SAH. Of these, 176 had undergone CTA prior to DSA. Clinical details and radiology reports were correlated and images of positive investigations reviewed. Results: DSA showed one or more cerebral aneurysms in 105 (60%) patients. These were correctly reported on CTA in 100. CTA was reported negative for aneurysms in 74 patients. Of these five were false negative and had aneurysms detected on DSA. In the CTA/DSA negative group, 11 (16%) patients had classical perimesencephalic clinical syndrome and blood distribution. There were two false positives at CTA. For ruptured cerebral aneurysms, CTA had 95.2% sensitivity, 97.2% specificity, 98.1% positive predictive value, and 93.2% negative predictive value. Conclusion: The sensitivity and negative predictive value of CTA for ruptured aneurysms remains imperfect. Continued use of DSA is recommended in most patients with a negative CTA after acute SAH. Confirmation of a negative CTA result with DSA may not be routinely required in patients with perimesencephalic syndrome

  3. Sudden headache, lumbar puncture, and the diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage in patients with a normal computed tomography scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Alonso, Joaquín; Fonseca Del Pozo, Francisco Javier; Vaquero Álvarez, Manuel; De la Fuente Carillo, Juan José; Llamas, José Carlos; Hernández Montes, Yelda

    2018-02-01

    To assess the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) to identify subarachnoid bleeding in patients with neurologic deficits seeking emergency care for sudden headache within 6 hours of onset of symptoms. Retrospective observational study of patients presenting with sudden nontraumatic headache peaking during the previous hour in the absence of neurologic deficits. We ordered CT scans for all patients, and if the scan was normal we performed a lumbar puncture. All patients were then followed for 6 months. Eighty-five patients were included. Subarachnoid bleeding was identified in 10 (10.2%) patients by CT. Seventy- four lumbar punctures were performed in patients with negative CTs; the lumbar puncture was positive in 1 patient and inconclusive in 2 patients. In all 3 patients, bleeding was ruled out with later images; thus, no cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage were confirmed in the 74 patients who underwent lumbar puncture. Nor were any cases found in any of these patients during follow-up. A CT scan taken within 6 hours of onset of sudden headache is sufficient for confirming or ruling out subarachnoid bleeding in patients with sudden headache who have no neurologic deficits.

  4. A study of acute expired cases with intraventricular hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yukio; Higuchi, Hiroshi; Ueda, Kenji; Kobayashi, Shiro; Yajima, Kouzo

    1981-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of the CT scan, the diagnosis of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) was very difficult. The CT scan has, though, been recognized to be extremely informative in the evaluation of IVH. During the first three years we have had experience with 91 cases of IVH diagnosed by the CT scan. Acute death within seven days occurred in 42 of these cases. Hypertension was the most common Acute death within seven days occurred in 42 of these cases. Hypertension was the most common etiological factor, accounting for 18 cases. Cerebral aneurysm was the second most common cause, accounting for 10 cases. Head injury was seen in 8 cases, while the causes of 4 deaths were unknown. 31 cases were distributed over all ventricles. 30 cases revealed over two cast formations. The presence of IVH in the third and/or the fourth ventricle, which can easily affect the function of the hypothalamus and the brain stem anatomically, was closely correlated with the high mortality rate. The analysis of the CT findings regarding the mechanisms of IVH reveals three types: the direct type, which bleeds directly into ventricles without forming definite intracerebral hematomas; the extension type, which is characterized by extension and rupture from massive intracerebral hematoma, and the reflux type, which is characterized by a reflux of the subarachnoid blood. The prognosis depends on the differences in these mechanisms. (author)

  5. The Comparative Study of ECG Findings in the Patients Suffered from Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Control Group in Northeastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Nikkhah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (SAH which accounts for (5% to 10% of cerebrovascular accidents is an important cause of mortality and disability. It can be complicated by many neurological and medical conditions including cardiovascular complications. During the course of SAH morphologic Electrocardiography (ECG changes, arrhythmias, myocardial injury and elevation of cardiac enzymes, subendocardial hemorrhage and necrosis may be observed. Materials and Methods:102 SAH patients, without any history of Ischemic heart Disease (IHD, admitted in Ghaem Hospital were studied. Their clinical and radiological parameters were evaluated. Three serial ECGs were performed within the first 72 hours for each patient and the ECG findings were analyzed. The control group consisted of 102 elective patients of Ghaem hospital without any expected heart disease. Results: ECG changes were observed in 60.8% of SAH patients with average age of (53.4±14.2 years and in (2.9% of control group. The ECG findings were as follows: chamber abnormalities (6.9%, conduction abnormalities (7.8%, repolarization abnormalities (49%, rhythm abnormalities (22.5% and pathologic Q wave (6.9%. According to this study, ECG changes are related to subarachnoid hemorrhage (p

  6. Infundibular dilations of the posterior communicating arteries: pathogenesis, anatomical variants, aneurysm formation, and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Jen; Moosa, Shayan; Ding, Dale; Raper, Daniel M; Burke, Rebecca M; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Chivukula, Srinivas; Wang, Tony R; Starke, Robert M; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C

    2016-08-01

    Cerebrovascular infundibular dilations (IDs) are triangular-shaped widenings less than 3 mm in diameter, which are most commonly found at the posterior communicating artery (PCoA). The aims of this systematic review are to elucidate the natural histories of IDs, determine their risk of progression to significant pathology, and discuss potential management options. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed was used to find all case reports and series relating to cerebral IDs. IDs were classified into three types: type I IDs do not exhibit morphological change over a long follow-up period, type II IDs evolve into saccular aneurysms, while type III IDs are those that result in subarachnoid hemorrhage without prior aneurysmal progression. Data were extracted from studies that demonstrated type II or III IDs. We reviewed 16 cases of type II and seven cases of type III IDs. For type II IDs, 81.3% of patients were female with a median age at diagnosis of 38. All type II IDs were located at the PCoA without a clear predilection for sidedness. Median time to aneurysm progression was 7.5 years. For type III IDs there was no clear gender preponderance and the median age at diagnosis was 51. The PCoA was involved in 85.7% of cases, with 57.1% of IDs occurring on the left. Most patients were treated with clipping. Risk factors for aneurysm formation appear to be female gender, young age, left-sided localization, coexisting aneurysms, and hypertension. IDs can rarely progress to aneurysms or rupture. Young patients with type II or III IDs with coexisting aneurysms or hypertension may benefit from long-term imaging surveillance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Risk factors and outcome in 100 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

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    Bonilha Leonardo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Clinical and surgical outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH due to ruptured aneurysm were assessed in comparison to pre-operative data and risk factors such as previous medical history, clinical presenting condition, CT findings and site of bleeding. METHODS: We evaluated 100 consecutive patients with aneurysmal SAH. Gender, color, history of hypertension, smoking habit, site and size of aneurysm, admittance and before surgery Hunt Hess scale, need for cerebro-spinal fluid shunt, presence of complications during the surgical procedure, Glasgow Outcome Scale, presence of vasospasm and of rebleeding were assessed and these data matched to outcome. For statistical analysis, we applied the chi-squared test or Fisher's test using the pondered kappa coeficient. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison of continue variables. Tendency of proportion was analyzed through Cochran-Armitage test. Significance level adopted was 5%. RESULTS: Patients studied were mainly white, female, without previous history of hypertension and non-smokers. Upon hospital admittance, grade 2 of Hunt-Hess scale was most frequently observed (34%, while grade 3 of Fisher scale was the most prevalent. Single aneurysms were most frequent at anterior circulation, between 12 and 24 mm. The most frequent Glasgow Outcome Scale observed was 5 (60%. Hunt Hess upon the moment of surgery and presence of complications during surgical procedure showed positive correlation with clinical outcome (p=0.00002 and p=0.001, respectively. Other variables were not significantly correlated to prognosis. Tendency of proportion was observed between Hunt-Hess scale and Fisher scale. CONCLUSION: Among variables such as epidemiological data, previous medical history and presenting conditions of patients with ruptured aneurysms, the Hunt-Hess scale upon the moment of surgery and the presence of surgical adversities are statistically related to degree of disability.

  8. Resumption of work after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in middle-aged Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, A; Sakurai, Y; Tsuji, I; Arai, H; Uenohara, H; Suzuki, S; Li, J H

    1999-01-01

    Previous reports on the results of treatment for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have been based only on activities of daily living after discharge, whereas resumption of work has received insufficient attention. Most Japanese work under a lifetime employment system, and it is best for those who have recovered from SAH to return to work for their previous employer. The present study was conducted to determine the extent to which discharged patients who have suffered an SAH resume their former occupations in Japan, focusing on those between 40 and 49 years of age, who usually have a strong desire to return to work. The participants consisted of 193 patients with SAH. Based on the results of telephone interviews or written questionnaires, their work status at 1 year after onset was analyzed. The work resumption rates for patients with Hunt and Kosnik neurological Grades 1 or 2 on admission were higher than for those with Grades 3 or 4 (p = 0.015) and lower for patients with basilar artery aneurysms than for those with aneurysms at other sites (p = 0.028). With regard to premorbid occupation, the work resumption rates were high (80%) for professionals and engineers, many of whom were public servants, or teachers at junior or senior high schools. The resumption rates were also high for primary industry workers (80%), but lowest (20%) for professional drivers (p = 0.04-0.001). The work resumption rate was lower for women than for men (p = 0.01). These findings indicate that resumption of work is determined not only by medical factors, but also by social factors including gender, type of occupation, employment system, and socioeconomic background.

  9. Brown-Séquard syndrome following intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced spinal arachnoid cyst

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    Yew-Weng Fong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Arachnoid cyst associated with spinal arachnoiditis following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is a rare complication. Correctly diagnosing this condition and providing an effective treatment are extremely important. Case report: A 60-year-old women had a history of SAH due to an intradural vertebral artery dissecting aneurysm post-coil embolization, without neurologic deficits on discharge from our institution. She experienced left hemiparesis with muscle power graded at 4/5 eight months later due to a right middle cerebral artery territory infarct. Nine months after stroke rehabilitation, there was a progression of left-side weakness and right-side numbness down below the nipple level. On neurological examination, there were right sensory deficits below T6, and left hemiparesis with muscle power of the left upper extremity graded at 4/5 and that of the left lower extremity graded at 3/5. Deep tendon reflex was symmetrically increased at the bilateral lower extremities. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a cervicothoracic multiseptated arachnoid cyst with a major compression effect at T6. Eight months after T5–6 hemilaminectomy and fenestration of the cyst wall, the neurologic deficits had not improved. The patient then underwent a cysto-peritoneal shunt. A follow-up MRI documented a complete resolution of the arachnoid cyst. The patient's Brown-Séquard syndrome showed clinical improvement. Conclusion: Prompt investigation revealed a spinal arachnoid cyst in a patient with a history of intracranial SAH presenting with unexplained progressive Brown-Séquard syndrome. For cases of multiseptated and long arachnoid cyst, as in our patient, a shunting procedure is a better choice than fenestration alone.

  10. Atmospheric Pressure Variation is a Delayed Trigger for Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Donkelaar, Carlina E; Potgieser, Adriaan R E; Groen, Henk; Foumani, Mahrouz; Abdulrahman, Herrer; Sluijter, Rob; van Dijk, J Marc C; Groen, Rob J M

    2018-04-01

    There is an ongoing search for conditions that induce spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The seasonal pattern of SAH is shown in a large meta-analysis of the literature, but its explanation remains undecided. There is a clear need for sound meteorologic data to further elucidate the seasonal influence on SAH. Because of the stable and densely monitored atmospheric situation in the north of the Netherlands, we reviewed our unique cohort on the seasonal incidence of SAH and the association between SAH and local atmospheric changes. Our observational cohort study included 1535 patients with spontaneous SAH admitted to our neurovascular center in the north of the Netherlands between 2000 and 2015. Meteorologic data could be linked to the day of the ictus. To compare SAH incidences over the year and to test the association with meteorologic conditions, incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used, calculated by Poisson regression analyses. Atmospheric pressure variations were significantly associated with aneurysmal SAH. In particular, the pressure change on the second and third day before the ictus was independently correlated to a higher incidence of aneurysmal SAH (IRR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.00-1.23). The IRR for aneurysmal SAH in July was calculated 0.67 (95% CI, 0.49-0.92) after adjustment for temperature and atmospheric pressure changes. Atmospheric pressure variations are a delayed trigger for aneurysmal SAH. Also, a significantly decreased incidence of aneurysmal SAH was noted in July. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Infarction of the entire corpus callosum as a complication in subarachnoid hemorrhage: A case report

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    Satoru Takahashi, M.D.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The corpus callosum is the major commissural pathway connecting the cerebral hemispheres. This pathway receives its blood supply from anterior communicating artery, pericallosal artery, and posterior pericallosal artery. However, in some cases, the entire corpus callosum is supplied by median callosal artery; thus, occlusion of this artery can lead to infarction of the entire corpus callosum. Few reports have described this type of infarction, and no reports after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH exist. Here, we report on a 42-year-old female who was diagnosed with SAH after two aneurysms were discovered in bifurcation of left anterior cerebral artery (A1-A2. After successful clipping was performed, the patient was alert and had no neurological deficits; moreover, the computed tomography images that were acquired after the operation showed no evidence of infarction. Nine days after admittance to the hospital, drowsiness and weakness of the left limbs with brain swelling appeared and decompressive hemi-craniectomy was performed. Diagnostic cerebral angiography revealed vasospasms in both anterior and middle cerebral arteries, thus fasudil hydrochloride was administered intra-arterially. While blood flow in all arteries improved, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging detected infarction along the entire length of the corpus callosum and in the medial region of the right frontal lobe. We believe this infarction was due to secondary ischemia of median callosal artery. This case reminded us of the anatomical variation wherein median callosal artery is the sole blood supply line for the corpus callosum and demonstrated that infarction of the entire corpus callosum is possible.

  12. Identification of clinical and paraclinical findings predictive for headache occurrence during spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan; Milosevic, Vuk; Stojanov, Aleksandar; Ljubisavljevic, Marina; Dunjic, Olivera; Zivkovic, Miroslava

    2017-07-01

    Headache is recognized as the main but unwarranted symptom of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). There are no enough findings identified as predictive for headache occurrence in SAH. We evaluated the clinical and paraclinical factors predictive for headache occurrence in SAH. We retrospectively analyzed medical records of 431 consecutive non traumatic SAH patients (264 females and 167 males), ages from 19 to 91 years, presenting with headache (70.3%) and without headache (29.7%) during period of 11years. Among all tested parameters, as negative predictors for headache occurrence were recognized: patients' ages (OR 0.97 [95%CI: 0.96-0.99], p=0.025), persistence of coagulation abnormality (OR 0.23 [95%CI: 0.08-0.67], p=0.006), atrial fibrilation (OR 0.23 [95%CI: 0.09-0.59], p=0.002), chronic renal failure (OR 0.26 [95%CI: 0.09-0.76], p=0.014) and more diseases (OR 0.11 [95%CI: 0.04-0.32], p<0.0001), as higher clinical score (OR 0.94 [95%CI: 0.90-0.99], p=0.018) including positive neurological findings (OR 0.34 [95%CI: 0.21-0.55], p<0.001) and loss of consciousness (OR 0.22 [95%CI: 0.12-0.39], p<0.001) at the SAH onset, while the complaint of neck stiffness was identified as its positive predictor (OR 1.93 [95%CI: 1.19-3.10], p=0.007). Although diagnosis based solely on clinical presentation is not reliable and speculative, our findings could provide physicians with evidence to consider SAH not only in conditions of its headache occurrence but also in those with headache absence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Surgical Clipping versus Endovascular Intervention for the Treatment of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patients in New York State.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimon Bekelis

    Full Text Available Randomized trials have demonstrated a survival benefit for endovascular treatment of ruptured cerebral aneurysms. We investigated the association of surgical clipping and endovascular coiling with outcomes in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients in a real-world regional cohort.We performed a cohort study involving patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms, who underwent surgical clipping, or endovascular coiling from 2009-2013 and were registered in the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS database. An instrumental variable analysis was used to investigate the association of treatment technique with outcomes.Of the 4,098 patients undergoing treatment, 2,585 (63.1% underwent coiling, and 1,513 (36.9% underwent clipping. Using an instrumental variable analysis, we did not identify a difference in inpatient mortality [marginal effect (ME, -0.56; 95% CI, -1.03 to 0.02], length of stay (LOS (ME, 1.72; 95% CI, -3.39 to 6.84, or the rate of 30-day readmissions (ME, -0.30; 95% CI, -0.82 to 0.22 between the two treatment techniques for patients with SAH. Clipping was associated with a higher rate of discharge to rehabilitation (ME, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.24 to 1.01. In sensitivity analysis, mixed effect regression, and propensity score adjusted regression models demonstrated identical results.Using a comprehensive all-payer cohort of patients in New York State presenting with aneurysmal SAH we did not identify an association of treatment method with mortality, LOS or 30-day readmission. Clipping was associated with a higher rate of discharge to rehabilitation.

  14. Continuous electroencephalography predicts delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage: A prospective study of diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Eric S; Biswal, Siddharth; Zafar, Sahar F; O'Connor, Kathryn L; Bechek, Sophia; Shenoy, Apeksha V; Boyle, Emily J; Shafi, Mouhsin M; Gilmore, Emily J; Foreman, Brandon P; Gaspard, Nicolas; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Rosand, Jonathan; Hoch, Daniel B; Ayata, Cenk; Cash, Sydney S; Cole, Andrew J; Patel, Aman B; Westover, M Brandon

    2018-04-16

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a common, disabling complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Preventing DCI is a key focus of neurocritical care, but interventions carry risk and cannot be applied indiscriminately. Although retrospective studies have identified continuous electroencephalographic (cEEG) measures associated with DCI, no study has characterized the accuracy of cEEG with sufficient rigor to justify using it to triage patients to interventions or clinical trials. We therefore prospectively assessed the accuracy of cEEG for predicting DCI, following the Standards for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy Studies. We prospectively performed cEEG in nontraumatic, high-grade SAH patients at a single institution. The index test consisted of clinical neurophysiologists prospectively reporting prespecified EEG alarms: (1) decreasing relative alpha variability, (2) decreasing alpha-delta ratio, (3) worsening focal slowing, or (4) late appearing epileptiform abnormalities. The diagnostic reference standard was DCI determined by blinded, adjudicated review. Primary outcome measures were sensitivity and specificity of cEEG for subsequent DCI, determined by multistate survival analysis, adjusted for baseline risk. One hundred three of 227 consecutive patients were eligible and underwent cEEG monitoring (7.7-day mean duration). EEG alarms occurred in 96.2% of patients with and 19.6% without subsequent DCI (1.9-day median latency, interquartile range = 0.9-4.1). Among alarm subtypes, late onset epileptiform abnormalities had the highest predictive value. Prespecified EEG findings predicted DCI among patients with low (91% sensitivity, 83% specificity) and high (95% sensitivity, 77% specificity) baseline risk. cEEG accurately predicts DCI following SAH and may help target therapies to patients at highest risk of secondary brain injury. Ann Neurol 2018. © 2018 American Neurological Association.

  15. Subarachnoid Aneurysmal Hemorrhage Associated with Coarctation of the Aorta: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Ryuta; Fujiki, Yu; Yokobori, Shoji; Naoe, Yasutaka; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) that undergo rupture causing subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), are common in young patients with coarctation of the aorta (CoA), but rarer in middle-aged and elderly patients. The pathogenesis of IAs associated with CoA remains unclear. We report the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with SAH. On evaluation, six IAs were distributed among the anterior communicating artery (ACoA) (ruptured), distal segments of both anterior cerebral arteries (ACA), the left internal carotid artery (ICA), the bifurcation of the left middle cerebral artery (MCA)/MCA early branch, and the inferior trunk of the left MCA. CoA was also diagnosed. The ruptured ACoA IA, and two other unruptured IAs, were successfully clipped during emergency surgery. Postoperative intensive care was instituted to avoid cerebral vasospasm and renal or spinal cord ischemia. During the same hospitalization, the remaining three IAs were clipped at a second surgery. She was discharged with slight cognitive impairment eighty days after admission. Subsequently, she underwent elective treatment for the CoA. According to the literature, IAs associated with CoA have a higher tendency to involve the ACoA than IAs without CoA. Moreover, adult CoA patients tend to have multiple IAs, considered to be due to hypertension associated with CoA, as well as genetic predisposition. In CoA patients, ruptured IAs should be treated as early as possible before correction of the CoA. Close postoperative observation with management of cerebral vasospasm, renal or spinal cord ischemia, and respiratory compromise in the perioperative period is vital.

  16. Psychosocial Comorbidities Related to Return to Work Rates Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turi, Eleanor R; Conley, Yvette; Crago, Elizabeth; Sherwood, Paula; Poloyac, Samuel M; Ren, Dianxu; Stanfill, Ansley G

    2018-05-21

    Purpose Ability to return to work (RTW) after stroke has been shown to have positive psychosocial benefits on survivors. Although one-fifth of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) survivors suffer from poor psychosocial outcomes, the relationship between such outcomes and RTW post-stroke is not clear. This project explores the relationship between age, gender, race, marital status, anxiety and depression and RTW 3 and 12 months post-aSAH. Methods Demographic and clinical variables were collected from the electronic medical record at the time of aSAH admission. Anxiety and depression were assessed at 3 and 12 months post-aSAH using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Beck's Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) in 121 subjects. RTW for previously employed patients was dichotomized into yes/no at their 3 or 12 month follow-up appointment. Results Older age was significantly associated with failure to RTW at 3 and 12 months post-aSAH (p = 0.003 and 0.011, respectively). Female gender showed a trending but nonsignificant relationship with RTW at 12 months (p = 0.081). High scores of depression, State anxiety, and Trait anxiety all had significant associations with failure to RTW 12 months post-aSAH (0.007 ≤ p ≤ 0.048). At 3 months, there was a significant interaction between older age and high State or Trait anxiety with failure to RTW 12 months post-aSAH (p = 0.025, 0.042 respectively). Conclusions Patients who are older and suffer from poor psychological outcomes are at an increased risk of failing to RTW 1-year post-aSAH. Our interactive results give us information about which patients should be streamlined for therapy to target their psychosocial needs.

  17. Duration of Agitation, Fluctuations of Consciousness, and Associations with Outcome in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, Michael E; Mahta, Ali; Schmidt, J Michael; Frey, Hans-Peter; Park, Soojin; Roh, David J; Agarwal, Sachin; Claassen, Jan

    2018-01-08

    Agitation is common after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and may be independently associated with outcomes. We sought to determine whether the duration of agitation and fluctuating consciousness were also associated with outcomes in patients with SAH. We identified all patients with positive Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) scores from a prospective observational cohort of patients with SAH from 2011 to 2015. Total duration of agitation was extrapolated for each patient using available RASS scores, and 24-h mean and standard deviation (SD) of RASS scores were calculated for each patient. We also calculated each patient's duration of substantial fluctuation of consciousness, defined as the number of days with 24-h RASS SD > 1. Patients were stratified by 3-month outcome using the modified Rankin scale, and associations with outcome were assessed via logistic regression. There were 98 patients with at least one positive RASS score, with median total duration of agitation 8 h (interquartile range [IQR] 4-18), and median duration of substantially fluctuating consciousness 2 days (IQR 1-3). Unfavorable 3-month outcome was significantly associated with a longer duration of fluctuating consciousness (odds ratio [OR] per day, 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-2.20; p = 0.031), but a briefer duration of agitation (OR per hour, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.89-0.99; p = 0.031). Though a longer duration of fluctuating consciousness was associated with worse outcomes in our cohort, total duration of agitation was not, and may have had the opposite effect. Our findings should therefore challenge the intensity with which agitation is often treated in SAH patients.

  18. Carbon Monoxide Preserves Circadian Rhythm to Reduce the Severity of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallner, Nils; Lieberum, Judith-Lisa; Gallo, David; LeBlanc, Robert H; Fuller, Patrick M; Hanafy, Khalid A; Otterbein, Leo E

    2017-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with a temporal pattern of stroke incidence. We hypothesized that natural oscillations in gene expression controlling circadian rhythm affect the severity of neuronal injury. We moreover predict that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1/ Hmox1 ) and its product carbon monoxide (CO) contribute to the restoration of rhythm and neuroprotection. Murine SAH model was used where blood was injected at various time points of the circadian cycle. Readouts included circadian clock gene expression, locomotor activity, vasospasm, neuroinflammatory markers, and apoptosis. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood leukocytes from SAH patients and controls were analyzed for clock gene expression. Significant elevations in the clock genes Per-1 , Per-2 , and NPAS-2 were observed in the hippocampus, cortex, and suprachiasmatic nucleus in mice subjected to SAH at zeitgeber time (ZT) 12 when compared with ZT2. Clock gene expression amplitude correlated with basal expression of HO-1, which was also significantly greater at ZT12. SAH animals showed a significant reduction in cerebral vasospasm, neuronal apoptosis, and microglial activation at ZT12 compared with ZT2. In animals with myeloid-specific HO-1 deletion ( Lyz-Cre-Hmox1 fl/fl ), Per-1, Per-2 , and NPAS-2 expression was reduced in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, which correlated with increased injury. Treatment with low-dose CO rescued Lyz-Cre-Hmox1 fl/fl mice, restored Per-1, Per-2 , and NPAS-2 expression, and reduced neuronal apoptosis. Clock gene expression regulates, in part, the severity of SAH and requires myeloid HO-1 activity to clear the erythrocyte burden and inhibit neuronal apoptosis. Exposure to CO rescues the loss of HO-1 and thus merits further investigation in patients with SAH. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Marriage and Partnership Integrity After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Small Alterations in Neurologic Status Matter Most.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöni, Daniel; Lauber, Lara; Fung, Christian; Goldberg, Johannes; Müri, René; Raabe, Andreas; Nyffeler, Thomas; Beck, Jürgen

    2018-05-01

    Common sequelae of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) include somatic and/or cognitive impairment. This can cause emotional stress, social tensions, and difficulties in relationships. To test our hypothesis that more severe somatic and cognitive impairments increased the likelihood of disruption of a relationship after SAH, we assessed the integrity of marriage or partnership status in a well-evaluated subset of SAH patients. Our sample comprised 50 SAH patients who were discharged to a neurologic, in-house rehabilitation center between 2005 and 2010. Deficits on admission to the rehabilitation center were divided into 18 categories and grouped into minor and major somatic deficits, as well as cognitive deficits. Clinical outcome scores, marital/partnership status, and duration of partnership before ictus were recorded. A follow-up questionnaire after 4.3 (2012) and 8.8 (2017) years was used to assess changes in marital/partnership status. Possible predictor parameters were estimated and included in a stepdown regression analysis. In 2012, after a mean follow-up of 4.3 years, 8 of the 50 SAH patients were divorced or separated, whereas after 8.8 years only 1 additional relationship had ended. In our regression model analysis, a "short duration of relationship" before SAH and the presence of a "few minor somatic deficits" were associated with a higher likelihood of divorce or separation in the near future and remained unchanged at long-term follow-up. Contrary to our hypothesis, neither the presence of severe somatic or cognitive deficits nor clinical evaluation scores reliably predicted divorce or separation after SAH. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Epilepsy-associated long-term mortality after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, Jukka; Lindgren, Antti; Kurki, Mitja I; Huttunen, Terhi; Frösen, Juhana; Koivisto, Timo; von Und Zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Immonen, Arto; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Kälviäinen, Reetta

    2017-07-18

    To elucidate the epilepsy-associated causes of death and subsequent excess long-term mortality among 12-month survivors of subarachnoid hemorrhage from saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA-SAH). The Kuopio SIA Database (kuopioneurosurgery.fi) includes all SIA-SAH patients admitted to the Kuopio University Hospital from its defined catchment population in Eastern Finland. The study cohort consists of 779 patients, admitted from 1995 to 2007, who were alive at 12 months after SIA-SAH. Their use of reimbursable antiepileptic drugs and the causes of death (ICD-10) were fused from the Finnish national registries from 1994 to 2014. The 779 12-month survivors were followed up until death (n = 197) or December 31, 2014, a median of 12.0 years after SIA-SAH. Epilepsy had been diagnosed in 121 (15%) patients after SIA-SAH, and 34/121 (28%) had died at the end of follow-up, with epilepsy as the immediate cause of death in 7/34 (21%). In the 779 patients alive at 12 months after SIA-SAH, epilepsy was an independent risk factor for mortality (hazard ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.1-3.0). Comorbid epilepsy in 12-month survivors of SIA-SAH is associated with increased risk of death in long-term follow-up. Survivors of SIA-SAH require long-term dedicated follow-up, including identification and effective treatment of comorbid epilepsy to prevent avoidable deaths. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Predicting Outcome in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (SAH) Utilizing the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, F A; Lo, B W Y; Akoth, E; Silvaggio, J; Kaufmann, A M; Teitelbaum, J; West, M

    2017-12-01

    Existing scoring systems for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients fail to accurately predict patient outcome. Our goal was to prospectively study the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) score as applied to newly admitted aneurysmal SAH patients. All adult patients presenting to Health Sciences Center in Winnipeg from January 2013 to July 2015 (2.5 year period) with aneurysmal SAH were prospectively enrolled in this study. All patients were followed up to 6 months. FOUR score was calculated upon admission, with repeat calculation at 7 and 14 days. The primary outcomes were: mortality, as well as dichotomized 1- and 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) values. Sixty-four patients were included, with a mean age of 54.2 years (range 26-85 years). The mean FOUR score upon admission pre- and post-external ventricular drain (EVD) was 10.3 (range 0-16) and 11.1 (range 3-16), respectively. There was a statistically significant association between pre-EVD FOUR score (total, eye, respiratory and motor sub-scores) with mortality, 1-month GOS, and 6-month GOS/mRS (p FOUR scores were associated with mortality, 1-month GOS/mRS, and 6-month GOS/mRS (p FOUR scores were associated with 6-month GOS (p FOUR score was associated with the development of clinical vasospasm (p FOUR score at admission and day 7 post-SAH is associated with mortality, 1-month GOS/mRS, and 6-month GOS/mRS. The FOUR score at day 14 post-SAH is associated with 6-month GOS. The brainstem sub-score was not associated with 1- or 6-month primary outcomes.

  2. An experimental study of the neurophysical mechanisms of photophobia induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Nazan; Kotan, Dilcan; Keles, Sadullah; Ondas, Osman; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Baykal, Orhan; Gundogdu, Betul

    2016-09-06

    Photophobia is defined as a painful psychosomatic discomfort triggered by intense light flow through the pupils to the brain, but the exact mechanism through which photophobia is induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is not well understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether there was any relationship between the mydriasis induced by the degeneration of the ciliary ganglion (CG) and photophobia in instances of SAH. Five of a total of 25 rabbits were used as the intact control group; five were used in the sham-operated control group; and the remaining 15 were used as the SAH group, which was created by injecting autologous blood into their cisterna magna. All animals were examined daily for 20days to evaluate their level of photophobia, after which their brains, CGs and superior cervical ganglia (SCGs) were extracted bilaterally. The densities of normal and degenerated neurons in these ganglia were examined by stereological methods. In SAH animals with a high photophobia score, the mean pupil diameter and density of degenerated neurons density in the CG were greater than in cases with a low photophobia score (p<0.05). Further analysis revealed that the increase in the density of degenerated neurons in the CG following SAH resulted in the paralysis of the parasympathetic pathway of the pupillary muscles and mydriasis, which facilitates the excessive transfer of light to the brain and photophobia. Our findings indicate that SAH results in a high density of degenerated neurons in the CG, which induces mydriasis and is an important factor in the onset of photophobia. This phenomenon is likely due to more light energy being transferred through mydriatic pupils to the brain, resulting in vasospasm of the supplying arteries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical outcome after endovascular coil embolization in elderly patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, M.; Cesarini, K.G.; Ronne-Engstroem, E.; Enblad, P.; Norbaeck, O.; Gal, G.; Tovi, M.; Solander, S.; Contant, C.F.

    2004-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is not an unusual disease in an elderly population. The clinical outcome has improved over time. It has been suggested that elderly SAH patients would benefit from endovascular aneurysm treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate technical results and clinical outcome in a series of elderly SAH-patients treated with endovascular coil embolization. Sixty-two patients (≥ 65 years) presenting with aneurysmal SAH underwent early endovascular coil embolization at Uppsala University Hospital between September 1996 and December 2000. In all 62 cases included in the study, endovascular coil embolization was considered the first line of treatment. Admission variables, specific information on technical success, degree of occlusion and procedural complications, and outcome figures were recorded. Clinical grade on admission was Hunt and Hess (H and H) I-II in 39%, H and H III in 27% and H and H IV-V in 34% of the patients. The proportion of posterior circulation aneurysms was 24%. Coil embolization was successfully completed in 94%. The degree of occlusion of the treated aneurysm was complete occlusion in 56%, neck remnant in 21%, residual filling in 11%, other remnant in 5% and not treated in 6%. The rate of procedural complications was 11%. Outcome after 6 months was favorable in 41%, severe disability in 36% and poor in 22%. Favorable outcome was achieved in 57% of the H and H I-II patients, 47% of the H and H III patients and 17% of the H and H IV-V patients. Endovascular aneurysm treatment can be performed in elderly patients with SAH with a high level of technical success, acceptable aneurysm occlusion results, an acceptable rate of procedural complications and fair outcome results. (orig.)

  4. Different CT perfusion algorithms in the detection of delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Charlotte H P; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Vos, Pieter C; Bennink, Edwin; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Velthuis, Birgitta K; van der Schaaf, Irene C

    2015-05-01

    Tracer delay-sensitive perfusion algorithms in CT perfusion (CTP) result in an overestimation of the extent of ischemia in thromboembolic stroke. In diagnosing delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), delayed arrival of contrast due to vasospasm may also overestimate the extent of ischemia. We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of tracer delay-sensitive and tracer delay-insensitive algorithms for detecting DCI. From a prospectively collected series of aSAH patients admitted between 2007-2011, we included patients with any clinical deterioration other than rebleeding within 21 days after SAH who underwent NCCT/CTP/CTA imaging. Causes of clinical deterioration were categorized into DCI and no DCI. CTP maps were calculated with tracer delay-sensitive and tracer delay-insensitive algorithms and were visually assessed for the presence of perfusion deficits by two independent observers with different levels of experience. The diagnostic value of both algorithms was calculated for both observers. Seventy-one patients were included. For the experienced observer, the positive predictive values (PPVs) were 0.67 for the delay-sensitive and 0.66 for the delay-insensitive algorithm, and the negative predictive values (NPVs) were 0.73 and 0.74. For the less experienced observer, PPVs were 0.60 for both algorithms, and NPVs were 0.66 for the delay-sensitive and 0.63 for the delay-insensitive algorithm. Test characteristics are comparable for tracer delay-sensitive and tracer delay-insensitive algorithms for the visual assessment of CTP in diagnosing DCI. This indicates that both algorithms can be used for this purpose.

  5. Treatment strategy, management and clinical outcome of patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Hiroki; Sato, Eishi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    The medical charts of 801 consecutive patients transferred to our critical care center over a 14-year interval (1994-2007) in poor neurological condition (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons; WFNS grade IV or V) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were treated following a strict protocol. After initial neurological evaluation, patients were sedated, paralyzed, and underwent strict blood pressure control. For patients with WFNS grade IV and selected patients with grade V, aggressive ultra-early repair (mainly clipping for anterior circulation aneurysm, coiling for posterior circulation aneurysm) was initiated. In grade V patients with poor brainstem function or destruction of vital brain areas on CT, only comfort measures were offered. Compared to the former period (1994-2000), coiling was more frequently indicated in elderly patients and bypass surgery was more often applied in complex aneurysm cases in the latter period (2001-2007). Compared to the former period, the number of aggressively treated patients significantly increased (37.6% versus 28.8%) in the latter period. Outcome assessments performed at 3 months revealed a significant increase of favorable outcomes (Glasgow Outcome Scale; good recovery (GR) or moderately disabled (MD)) and a decreased mortality rate in those patients (34% versus 28%, and 43% versus 47%; respectively). The ratio of favorable outcome and morbidity in all admitted patients were also improved (12% versus 8%, and 79% versus 85%; respectively). Outcome was largely determined by the initial hemorrhage and subsequent development of intractable intracranial hypertension or cerebral infraction. Age was also found to be significantly correlated with outcome. There was no significant difference in outcomes by treatment modality (clip or coil). In the latter period, aneurismal location was not the predictor, but delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) remained an important factor. In

  6. Treatment strategy, management and clinical outcome of patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage

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    Kurita, Hiroki; Sato, Eishi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki [Kyorin Univ., Faculty of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    The medical charts of 801 consecutive patients transferred to our critical care center over a 14-year interval (1994-2007) in poor neurological condition (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons; WFNS grade IV or V) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were treated following a strict protocol. After initial neurological evaluation, patients were sedated, paralyzed, and underwent strict blood pressure control. For patients with WFNS grade IV and selected patients with grade V, aggressive ultra-early repair (mainly clipping for anterior circulation aneurysm, coiling for posterior circulation aneurysm) was initiated. In grade V patients with poor brainstem function or destruction of vital brain areas on CT, only comfort measures were offered. Compared to the former period (1994-2000), coiling was more frequently indicated in elderly patients and bypass surgery was more often applied in complex aneurysm cases in the latter period (2001-2007). Compared to the former period, the number of aggressively treated patients significantly increased (37.6% versus 28.8%) in the latter period. Outcome assessments performed at 3 months revealed a significant increase of favorable outcomes (Glasgow Outcome Scale; good recovery (GR) or moderately disabled (MD)) and a decreased mortality rate in those patients (34% versus 28%, and 43% versus 47%; respectively). The ratio of favorable outcome and morbidity in all admitted patients were also improved (12% versus 8%, and 79% versus 85%; respectively). Outcome was largely determined by the initial hemorrhage and subsequent development of intractable intracranial hypertension or cerebral infraction. Age was also found to be significantly correlated with outcome. There was no significant difference in outcomes by treatment modality (clip or coil). In the latter period, aneurismal location was not the predictor, but delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) remained an important factor. In

  7. Tonic-clonic activity at subarachnoid hemorrhage onset: impact on complications and outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Marco De Marchis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Tonic-clonic activity (TCA at onset complicates 3% to 21% of cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. The impact of onset TCA on in-hospital complications, including seizures, remains unclear. One study associated onset TCA with poor clinical outcome at 6 weeks after SAH, but to our knowledge no other studies have confirmed this relationship. This study aims to assess the impact of onset TCA on in-hospital complications, poor functional outcome, mortality, and epilepsy at 3 months. METHODS: Analysis of a prospective study cohort of 1479 SAH patients admitted to Columbia University Medical Center between 1996 and 2012. TCA within 6 hours of hemorrhage onset was identified based on accounts of emergency care providers or family witnesses. RESULTS: TCA at onset was described in 170 patients (11%. Patients with onset TCA were younger (P = 0.002, presented more often with poor clinical grade (55% vs. 26%, P<0.001 and had larger amounts of cisternal, intraventricular, and intracerebral blood than those without onset TCA (all, P<0.001. After adjusting for known confounders, onset TCA was significantly associated with in-hospital seizures (OR 3.80, 95%-CI: 2.43-5.96, P<0.001, in-hospital pneumonia (OR 1.56, 95%-CI: 1.06-2.31, p = 0.02, and delayed cerebral ischemia (OR 1.77, 95%-CI: 1.21-2.58, P = 0.003. At 3 months, however, onset TCA was not associated with poor functional outcome, mortality, and epilepsy after adjusting for age, admission clinical grade, and cisternal blood volume. CONCLUSIONS: Onset TCA is not a rare event as it complicates 11% of cases of SAH. New and clinically relevant findings are the association of onset TCA with in-hospital seizures, pneumonia and delayed cerebral ischemia. Despite the increased risk of in-hospital complications, onset TCA is not associated with disability, mortality, and epilepsy at 3 months.

  8. EARLYDRAIN- outcome after early lumbar CSF-drainage in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardutzky, Jürgen; Witsch, Jens; Jüttler, Eric; Schwab, Stefan; Vajkoczy, Peter; Wolf, Stefan

    2011-09-14

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may be complicated by delayed cerebral ischemia, which is a major cause of unfavorable clinical outcome and death in SAH-patients. Delayed cerebral ischemia is presumably related to the development of vasospasm triggered by the presence of blood in the basal cisterns. To date, oral application of the calcium antagonist nimodipine is the only prophylactic treatment for vasospasm recognized under international guidelines.In retrospective trials lumbar drainage of cerebrospinal fluid has been shown to be a safe and feasible measure to remove the blood from the basal cisterns and decrease the incidence of delayed cerebral ischemia and vasospasm in the respective study populations. However, the efficacy of lumbar drainage has not been evaluated prospectively in a randomized controlled trial yet. This is a protocol for a 2-arm randomized controlled trial to compare an intervention group receiving early continuous lumbar CSF-drainage and standard neurointensive care to a control group receiving standard neurointensive care only. Adults suffering from a first aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage whose aneurysm has been secured by means of coiling or clipping are eligible for trial participation. The effect of early CSF drainage (starting measured in the following ways: the primary endpoint will be disability after 6 months, assessed by a blinded investigator during a personal visit or standardized telephone interview using the modified Rankin Scale. Secondary endpoints include mortality after 6 months, angiographic vasospasm, transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) mean flow velocity in both middle cerebral arteries and rate of shunt insertion at 6 months after hospital discharge. Here, we present the study design of a multicenter prospective randomized controlled trial to investigate whether early application of a lumbar drainage improves clinical outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  9. [Case report: Aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage -- complicated course due to coincidental manifestation of an inverted Tako-Tsubo-cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Nina; Kieninger, Martin; Seemann, Milena; Künzig, Holger; Bele, Sylvia; Dietl, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    We report the case of a patient who suffered a serious subarachnoid hemorrhage with a cardialaffection and development of an inverted Tako-Tsubo-cardiomyopathy. To avoid apparent cerebral ischemia due to severe cerebral vasospasm after exhaustion of conservative therapeutic options a temporarily endovascular therapy with continuous intra-arterial application of Nimodipine was necessary. In the overall protracted and complicated course the special challenge were the therapeutic efforts to avoid apparent cerebral ischemia in context to the significant cardial affection. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  10. [A case of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to infective endocarditis by methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococcus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Shunsuke; Oeda, Tomoko; Park, Kwiyoung; Yamamoto, Kenji; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideyuki

    2017-12-27

    A 77-year-old man visited our hospital with unstable gait following 2 months of anorexia. Brain MRI showed multiple infarcts; cardiac echocardiography revealed mitral-valve vegetation; and blood culture revealed methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci. The patient was diagnosed with infective endocarditis (IE). Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) developed ten days after antibiotic treatment. Intracranial aneurysm was not found. We speculated that chronic inflammation of the cerebral arterial walls by bacteria of low virulence was associated with SAH complication. The vegetation disappeared following additional gentamicin administration and the patient recovered to walk.

  11. Acute atrial fibrillation during dengue hemorrhagic fever

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    Henrique Horta Veloso

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted by the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Cardiac rhythm disorders, such as atrioventricular blocks and ventricular ectopic beats, appear during infection and are attributed to viral myocarditis. However, supraventricular arrhythmias have not been reported. We present a case of acute atrial fibrillation, with a rapid ventricular rate, successfully treated with intravenous amiodarone, in a 62-year-old man with dengue hemorrhagic fever, who had no structural heart disease.

  12. Acute atrial fibrillation during dengue hemorrhagic fever

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    Veloso Henrique Horta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted by the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Cardiac rhythm disorders, such as atrioventricular blocks and ventricular ectopic beats, appear during infection and are attributed to viral myocarditis. However, supraventricular arrhythmias have not been reported. We present a case of acute atrial fibrillation, with a rapid ventricular rate, successfully treated with intravenous amiodarone, in a 62-year-old man with dengue hemorrhagic fever, who had no structural heart disease.

  13. Dual-energy bone removal computed tomography (BRCT): preliminary report of efficacy of acute intracranial hemorrhage detection.

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    Naruto, Norihito; Tannai, Hidenori; Nishikawa, Kazuma; Yamagishi, Kentaro; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Kawabe, Hideto; Kamisaki, Yuichi; Sumiya, Hisashi; Kuroda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Kyo

    2018-02-01

    One of the major applications of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is automated bone removal (BR). We hypothesized that the visualization of acute intracranial hemorrhage could be improved on BRCT by removing bone as it has the highest density tissue in the head. This preliminary study evaluated the efficacy of a DE BR algorithm for the head CT of trauma patients. Sixteen patients with acute intracranial hemorrhage within 1 day after head trauma were enrolled in this study. All CT examinations were performed on a dual-source dual-energy CT scanner. BRCT images were generated using the Bone Removal Application. Simulated standard CT and BRCT images were visually reviewed in terms of detectability (presence or absence) of acute hemorrhagic lesions. DECT depicted 28 epidural/subdural hemorrhages, 17 contusional hemorrhages, and 7 subarachnoid hemorrhages. In detecting epidural/subdural hemorrhage, BRCT [28/28 (100%)] was significantly superior to simulated standard CT [17/28 (61%)] (p = .001). In detecting contusional hemorrhage, BRCT [17/17 (100%)] was also significantly superior to simulated standard CT [11/17 (65%)] (p = .0092). BRCT was superior to simulated standard CT in detecting acute intracranial hemorrhage. BRCT could improve the detection of small intracranial hemorrhages, particularly those adjacent to bone, by removing bone that can interfere with the visualization of small acute hemorrhage. In an emergency such as head trauma, BRCT can be used as support imaging in combination with simulated standard CT and bone scale CT, although BRCT cannot replace a simulated standard CT.

  14. Considerable delay in diagnosis and acute management of subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Carl Christian; Eskesen, Vagn; Hauerberg, John

    2010-01-01

    Rebleeding from subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) usually occurs within the first six hours after the initial bleeding. Rebleeding can be prevented effectively with tranexamic acid (TXA). Although a broad consensus has evolved that SAH should be treated as an emergency, it is likely that delays do...

  15. Cerebral Taurine Levels are Associated with Brain Edema and Delayed Cerebral Infarction in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

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    Kofler, Mario; Schiefecker, Alois; Ferger, Boris; Beer, Ronny; Sohm, Florian; Broessner, Gregor; Hackl, Werner; Rhomberg, Paul; Lackner, Peter; Pfausler, Bettina; Thomé, Claudius; Schmutzhard, Erich; Helbok, Raimund

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral edema and delayed cerebral infarction (DCI) are common complications after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and associated with poor functional outcome. Experimental data suggest that the amino acid taurine is released into the brain extracellular space secondary to cytotoxic edema and brain tissue hypoxia, and therefore may serve as a biomarker for secondary brain injury after aSAH. On the other hand, neuroprotective mechanisms of taurine treatment have been described in the experimental setting. We analyzed cerebral taurine levels using high-performance liquid chromatography in the brain extracellular fluid of 25 consecutive aSAH patients with multimodal neuromonitoring including cerebral microdialysis (CMD). Patient characteristics and clinical course were prospectively recorded. Associations with CMD-taurine levels were analyzed using generalized estimating equations with an autoregressive process to handle repeated observations within subjects. CMD-taurine levels were highest in the first days after aSAH (11.2 ± 3.2 µM/l) and significantly decreased over time (p taurine levels compared to those without (Wald = 7.3, df = 1, p taurine supplementation and brain extracellular taurine (p = 0.6). Moreover, a significant correlation with brain extracellular glutamate (r = 0.82, p taurine levels were found in patients with brain edema or DCI after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Its value as a potential biomarker deserves further investigation.

  16. Utility of Indocyanine Green Video Angiography for Sylvian Fissure Dissection in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patients - Sylvian ICG Technique.

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    Toi, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Nobuhisa; Ogawa, Yukari; Kinoshita, Keita; Satoh, Kohei; Takai, Hiroki; Hirai, Satoshi; Hara, Keijiro; Matsubara, Shunji; Uno, Masaaki

    2018-02-15

    Indocyanine green (ICG) emits fluorescence in the far-red domain under light excitation. ICG video angiography (ICG-VA) has been established as a useful method to evaluate blood flow in the operative field. We report the usefulness of ICG-VA for Sylvian fissure dissection in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subjects comprised 7 patients who underwent ICG-VA before opening the Sylvian fissure during neck clipping for ruptured cerebral aneurysm. We observed contrasted Sylvian veins before opening the Sylvian fissure using surgical microscopes. This procedure was termed "Sylvian ICG". We observed ICG fluorescence quickly in all cases. Sylvian veins that appeared unclear in the standard microscopic operative field covered with subarachnoid hemorrhage were extremely clearly depicted. These Sylvian ICG findings were helpful in identifying entry points and the dissecting course of the Sylvian fissure. At the time of clipping, no residual fluorescence from Sylvian ICG was present, and aneurysm clipping was not impeded. Sylvian ICG for SAH patients is a novel technique to facilitate dissection of the Sylvian fissure. We believe that this technique will contribute to improved safety of clipping surgery for ruptured aneurysms.

  17. Predictors of 30-day readmission after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a case-control study.

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    Greenberg, Jacob K; Guniganti, Ridhima; Arias, Eric J; Desai, Kshitij; Washington, Chad W; Yan, Yan; Weng, Hua; Xiong, Chengjie; Fondahn, Emily; Cross, DeWitte T; Moran, Christopher J; Rich, Keith M; Chicoine, Michael R; Dhar, Rajat; Dacey, Ralph G; Derdeyn, Colin P; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Despite persisting questions regarding its appropriateness, 30-day readmission is an increasingly common quality metric used to influence hospital compensation in the United States. However, there is currently insufficient evidence to identify which patients are at highest risk for readmission after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The objective of this study was to identify predictors of 30-day readmission after SAH, to focus preventative efforts, and to provide guidance to funding agencies seeking to risk-adjust comparisons among hospitals. METHODS The authors performed a case-control study of 30-day readmission among aneurysmal SAH patients treated at a single center between 2003 and 2013. To control for geographic distance from the hospital and year of treatment, the authors randomly matched each case (30-day readmission) with approximately 2 SAH controls (no readmission) based on home ZIP code and treatment year. They evaluated variables related to patient demographics, socioeconomic characteristics, comorbidities, presentation severity (e.g., Hunt and Hess grade), and clinical course (e.g., need for gastrostomy or tracheostomy, length of stay). Conditional logistic regression was used to identify significant predictors, accounting for the matched design of the study. RESULTS Among 82 SAH patients with unplanned 30-day readmission, the authors matched 78 patients with 153 nonreadmitted controls. Age, demographics, and socioeconomic factors were not associated with readmission. In univariate analysis, multiple variables were significantly associated with readmission, including Hunt and Hess grade (OR 3.0 for Grade IV/V vs I/II), need for gastrostomy placement (OR 2.0), length of hospital stay (OR 1.03 per day), discharge disposition (OR 3.2 for skilled nursing vs other disposition), and Charlson Comorbidity Index (OR 2.3 for score ≥ 2 vs 0). However, the only significant predictor in the multivariate analysis was discharge to a skilled

  18. Treatment Modality and Quality Benchmarks of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage at a Comprehensive Stroke Center

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    Wengui Yu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH is the most severe type of stroke. In 2012, the Joint Commission, in collaboration with the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA, launched the Advanced Certification for Comprehensive Stroke Centers (CSCs. This new level of certification was designed to promote higher standard of care for patients with complex stroke.ObjectiveThe goal of this study was to examine the treatment modality and quality benchmarks of aSAH at one of the first five certified CSCs in the United States.MethodsConsecutive patients with aSAH at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center between April 1, 2012 and May 30, 2014 were included for this retrospective study. The ruptured aneurysm was treated with coiling or clipping within 24 h. All patients were managed per AHA guidelines. Discharge outcomes were assessed using modified Rankin Scale (mRS. The rate of aneurysm treatment, door-to-treatment time, rate of posttreatment rebleed, hospital length of stay (LOS, discharge outcome, and mortality rates were evaluated as quality indicators.ResultsThe median age (interquartile range of the 118 patients with aSAH was 55 (19. Among them, 84 (71.2% were females, 94 (79.7% were transfers from outside hospitals, and 74 (62.7% had Hunt and Hess grades 1–3. Sixty patients (50.8% were treated with coiling, 52 (44.1% with clipping, and 6 (5.1% untreated due to ictal cardiac arrest or severe comorbidities. The rate of aneurysm treatment was 95% (112/118 with median door-to-treatment time at 12.5 (8.5 h and 0.9% (1/112 posttreatment rebleed. The median ICU and hospital LOS were 12.5 (7 and 17.0 (14.5 days, respectively. Coiling was associated with significantly shorter LOS than clipping. There were 59 patients (50% with favorable outcome and 19 deaths (16.1% at hospital discharge. There was no significant difference in discharge outcome between coiling and clipping.ConclusionCare of aSAH at one of the early CSCs in the

  19. Femoral access in 100 consecutive subarachnoid hemorrhage patients: the "craniotomy" of endovascular neurosurgery

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    Huang Judy

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Femoral access is a fundamental element of catheter-based cerebral angiography. Knowledge of location of the common femoral artery (CFA bifurcation is important as the risk of retroperitoneal bleeding is increased if the puncture is superior to the inguinal ligament and there is an increased risk of thrombosis and arteriovenous fistula formation if the puncture is distal into branch vessels. We sought to characterize the location of the CFA bifurcation along with the presence of significant atherosclerosis or iliac tortuosity in a contemporary series of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients. Findings The records of a prospective single-center aneurysm database were reviewed to identify 100 consecutive SAH patients. Using an oblique femoral arteriogram, the presence of significant atherosclerosis, iliac tortuosity, and the CFA bifurcation were assessed. The CFA bifurcation was graded according to its position with respect to the femoral head: below (grade 1, lower half (grade 2, and above the upper half (grade 3. We found a CFA bifurcation grade 1 in 50 patients (50%, mean age 51.2 years, grade 2 in 40 patients (40%, mean age 55.5 years, and grade 3 in 10 patients (10%, mean age 58.2 years. Whereas 30 of 90 patients with CFA grades I or II were male (33%, only 10% with grade 3 were male (1 of 10, p = 0.12. Mean age for significant atherosclerosis was 65.5 +/- 2.6 years versus 50.9 +/- 1.6 years (p Conclusions Although a requisite element of endovascular treatment in SAH patients, femoral access can be complicated by a high common femoral artery bifurcation and the presence of atherosclerotic disease and/or iliac artery tortuosity. In this study, we found a grade 3 (above the femoral head CFA bifurcation in 10% patients, with 90% of these patients being female. We also found the presence of atherosclerotic disease and iliac tortuosity to be significantly more likely in patients older than 65 years of age.

  20. Variations in the cerebrospinal fluid proteome following traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, David E; Chaitanya, Ganta V; Chittiboina, Prashant; McCarthy, Paul; Scott, L Keith; Schrott, Lisa; Minagar, Alireza; Nanda, Anil; Alexander, J Steven

    2017-09-01

    Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has shown great promise in identifying potential markers of injury in neurodegenerative diseases [1-13]. Here we compared CSF proteomes in healthy individuals, with patients diagnosed with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in order to characterize molecular biomarkers which might identify these different clinical states and describe different molecular mechanisms active in each disease state. Patients presenting to the Neurosurgery service at the Louisiana State University Hospital-Shreveport with an admitting diagnosis of TBI or SAH were prospectively enrolled. Patients undergoing CSF sampling for diagnostic procedures were also enrolled as controls. CSF aliquots were subjected to 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D GE) and spot percentage densities analyzed. Increased or decreased spot expression (compared to controls) was defined in terms of in spot percentages, with spots showing consistent expression change across TBI or SAH specimens being followed up by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Polypeptide masses generated were matched to known standards using a search of the NCBI and/or GenPept databases for protein matches. Eight hundred fifteen separately identifiable polypeptide migration spots were identified on 2D GE gels. MALDI-MS successfully identified 13 of 22 selected 2D GE spots as recognizable polypeptides. Statistically significant changes were noted in the expression of fibrinogen, carbonic anhydrase-I (CA-I), peroxiredoxin-2 (Prx-2), both α and β chains of hemoglobin, serotransferrin (Tf) and N-terminal haptoglobin (Hp) in TBI and SAH specimens, as compared to controls. The greatest mean fold change among all specimens was seen in CA-I and Hp at 30.7 and -25.7, respectively. TBI specimens trended toward greater mean increases in CA-I and Prx-2 and greater mean decreases in Hp and Tf. Consistent CSF elevation of CA-I and Prx-2 with

  1. Impaired muscle strength may contribute to fatigue in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

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    Harmsen, Wouter J; Ribbers, Gerard M; Zegers, Bart; Sneekes, Emiel M; Praet, Stephan F E; Heijenbrok-Kal, Majanka H; Khajeh, Ladbon; van Kooten, Fop; Neggers, Sebastiaan J C M M; van den Berg-Emons, Rita J

    2017-03-01

    Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (a-SAH) show long-term fatigue and face difficulties in resuming daily physical activities. Impaired muscle strength, especially of the lower extremity, impacts the performance of daily activities and may trigger the onset of fatigue complaints. The present study evaluated knee muscle strength and fatigue in patients with a-SAH. This study included 33 patients, 6 months after a-SAH, and 33 sex-matched and age-matched healthy controls. Isokinetic muscle strength of the knee extensors and flexors was measured at 60 and 180°/s. Maximal voluntary muscle strength was defined as peak torque and measured in Newton-meter. Fatigue was examined using the Fatigue Severity Scale. In patients with a-SAH, the maximal knee extension was 22% (60°/s) and 25% (180°/s) lower and maximal knee flexion was 33% (60°/s) and 36% (180°/s) lower compared with that of matched controls (P≤0.001). The Fatigue Severity Scale score was related to maximal knee extension (60°/s: r=-0.426, P=0.015; 180°/s: r=-0.376, P=0.034) and flexion (60°/s: r=-0.482, P=0.005; 180°/s: r=-0.344, P=0.083). The knee muscle strength was 28-47% lower in fatigued (n=13) and 11-32% lower in nonfatigued (n=20) patients; deficits were larger in fatigued patients (P<0.05), particularly when the muscle strength (peak torque) was measured at 60°/s. The present results indicate that patients with a-SAH have considerably impaired knee muscle strength, which is related to more severe fatigue. The present findings are exploratory, but showed that knee muscle strength may play a role in the severity of fatigue complaints, or vice versa. Interventions targeting fatigue after a-SAH seem necessary and may consider strengthening exercise training in order to treat a debilitating condition.

  2. A Case–Control Study Investigating Simulated Driving Errors in Ischemic Stroke and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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    Megan A. Hird

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundStroke can affect a variety of cognitive, perceptual, and motor abilities that are important for safe driving. Results of studies assessing post-stroke driving ability are quite variable in the areas and degree of driving impairment among patients. This highlights the need to consider clinical characteristics, including stroke subtype, when assessing driving performance.MethodsWe compared the simulated driving performance of 30 chronic stroke patients (>3 months, including 15 patients with ischemic stroke (IS and 15 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, and 20 age-matched controls. A preliminary analysis was performed, subdividing IS patients into right (n = 8 and left (n = 6 hemispheric lesions and SAH patients into middle cerebral artery (MCA, n = 5 and anterior communicating artery (n = 6 territory. A secondary analysis was conducted to investigate the cognitive correlates of driving.ResultsNine patients (30% exhibited impaired simulated driving performance, including four patients with IS (26.7% and five patients with SAH (33.3%. Both patients with IS (2.3 vs. 0.3, U = 76, p < 0.05 and SAH (1.5 vs. 0.3, U = 45, p < 0.001 exhibited difficulty with lane maintenance (% distance out of lane compared to controls. In addition, patients with IS exhibited difficulty with speed maintenance (% distance over speed limit; 8.9 vs. 4.1, U = 81, p < 0.05, whereas SAH patients exhibited difficulty with turning performance (total turning errors; 5.4 vs. 1.6, U = 39.5, p < 0.001. The Trail Making Test (TMT and Useful Field of View test were significantly associated with lane maintenance among patients with IS (rs > 0.6, p < 0.05. No cognitive tests showed utility among patients with SAH.ConclusionBoth IS and SAH exhibited difficulty with lane maintenance. Patients with IS additionally exhibited difficulty with speed maintenance, whereas SAH patients exhibited difficulty with turning

  3. Neuropeptide Y - an early biomarker for cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

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    Schebesch, Karl-Michael; Brawanski, Alexander; Bele, Sylvia; Schödel, Petra; Herbst, Andreas; Bründl, Elisabeth; Kagerbauer, Simone Maria; Martin, Jan; Lohmeier, Anette; Stoerr, Eva-Maria; Proescholdt, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In the human brain, the potent vasoconstrictive neuropeptide Y (NPY) is abundantly expressed. Neuropeptide Y, which is stored in perivascular nerve fibers of the cerebral arteries, regulates the cerebral vascular diameter as well as cerebral blood flow. However, the role of NPY in the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm (CV) related to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is unclear. We prospectively analyzed and compared the release of endogenous NPY in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 66 patients with SAH to NPY release in a control group. Additionally, we correlated the levels of NPY with CV and consecutive ischemic stroke. Sixty-six consecutive patients (40 women, 26 men; mean age 53·1 years) with aneurysmal SAH were included. In the SAH group, CSF was drawn daily from day 1 to day 10 after the onset of SAH. The CSF of 29 patients undergoing spinal anesthesia for orthopedic surgery served as control samples. The NPY levels were determined in duplicate CSF samples by means of a competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The levels of NPY in CSF were correlated with the development of CV over the 10-day period after the onset of SAH and to the occurrence of consecutive ischemic stroke. To evaluate CSF NPY levels as a predictive biomarker for vasospasm, we calculated the sensitivity and specificity as well as the positive and negative predictive values. The NPY levels were significantly higher in the SAH group than in the control group (p 0·05). Patients with CV showed significantly higher NPY levels than patients without CV during the entire observation period. The NPY levels of the non-CV group dissipated over time, whereas the CV group showed continuously increasing values. The NPY levels from day 4 to 10 were significantly higher in patients with CV-related stroke than in non-stroke patients. Using 0·3 ng/ml as a cut-off value, NPY levels on day 3 predicted the occurrence of CV with a sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 72%, respectively. High NPY levels, starting on

  4. Functional response of cerebral blood flow induced by somatosensory stimulation in rats with subarachnoid hemorrhage

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    Li, Zhiguo; Huang, Qin; Liu, Peng; Li, Pengcheng; Ma, Lianting; Lu, Jinling

    2015-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by cerebral vasospasm (CVS), which is the phenomenon of narrowing of large cerebral arteries, and then can produce delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) such as lateralized sensory dysfunction. CVS was regarded as a major contributor to DIND in patients with SAH. However, therapy for preventing vasospasm after SAH to improve the outcomes may not work all the time. It is important to find answers to the relationship between CVS and DIND after SAH. How local cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated during functional activation after SAH still remains poorly understood, whereas, the regulation of CBF may play an important role in weakening the impact of CVS on cortex function. Therefore, it is worthwhile to evaluate the functional response of CBF in the activated cortex in an SAH animal model. Most evaluation of the effect of SAH is presently carried out by neurological behavioral scales. The functional imaging of cortical activation during sensory stimulation may help to reflect the function of the somatosensory cortex more locally than the behavioral scales do. We investigated the functional response of CBF in the somatosensory cortex induced by an electrical stimulation to contralateral forepaw via laser speckle imaging in a rat SAH model. Nineteen Sprague-Dawley rats from two groups (control group, n=10 and SAH group, n=9) were studied. SAH was induced in rats by double injection of autologous blood into the cisterna magna after CSF aspiration. The same surgical procedure was applied in the control group without CSF aspiration or blood injection. Significant CVS was found in the SAH group. Meanwhile, we observed a delayed peak of CBF response in rats with SAH compared with those in the control group, whereas no significant difference was found in magnitude, duration, and areas under curve of relative CBF changes between the two groups. The results suggest that the regulation function of local CBF during

  5. Screening for hypopituitarism in 509 patients with traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopczak, Anna; Kilimann, Ingo; von Rosen, Friedrich; Krewer, Carmen; Schneider, Harald Jörn; Stalla, Günter Karl; Schneider, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    We performed a screening on patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) to determine the prevalence of post-traumatic hypopituitarism in neurorehabilitation in a cross-sectional, observational single-center study. In addition, the therapeutic consequences of our screening were analyzed retrospectively. From February 2006 to August 2009, patients between 18 and 65 years (n=509) with the diagnosis of TBI (n=340) or SAH (n=169) were screened within two weeks of admittance to neurorehabilitation as clinical routine. Blood was drawn to determine fasting cortisol, free thyroxine (fT4), prolactin, testosterone or estradiol, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Patients with abnormalities in the screening or clinical signs of hypopituitarism received further stimulation tests: growth hormone releasing hormone -L-arginine-test and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-test (n=36); ACTH-test alone (n=26); or insulin tolerance test (n=56). In our screening of 509 patients, 28.5% showed lowered values in at least one hormone of the hypothalamus-pituitary axis and 4.5% in two or more axes. The most common disturbance was a decrease of testosterone in 40.7% of all men (in the following 13/131 men were given substitution therapy). Low fT4 was detected in 5.9% (n=3 were given substitution therapy). Low IGF-I was detected in 5.8%, low cortisol in 1.4%, and low prolactin in 0.2%; none were given substitution therapy. Further stimulation tests revealed growth hormone deficiency in 20.7% (n=19/92) and hypocortisolism in 23.7% (n=28/118). Laboratory values possibly indicating hypopituitarism (33%) were common but did not always implicate post-traumatic hypopituitarism. Laboratory values possibly indicating hypopituitarism were common in our screening but most patients were clinically not diagnosed as pituitary insufficient and did not receive hormone replacement therapy. A routine screening of all patients in neurorehabilitation without considering

  6. Consequences and coping strategies six years after a subarachnoid hemorrhage - A qualitative study.

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    Hanna C Persson

    Full Text Available After a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH, continuing impairment is common and may impact the person's life. There is a lack of knowledge regarding long-term consequences experienced.To explore experiences of the care and rehabilitation as well as the consequences and strategies used to cope with everyday life six years post SAH.An explorative interview study with a qualitative design. Individual interviews, with open ended questions, using an interview guide were performed with sixteen participants (mean age 63, 8 men, 8 women six years post SAH. Data was analyzed according to a descriptive thematic analysis, and themes were discovered inductively.Two major themes from the analysis, both including four sub-themes, were identified; these themes were consequences of the SAH and coping strategies. Participants were grateful to have survived the SAH and most were satisfied with their acute medical care. If discharged directly from the neurosurgical unit participants can feel abandoned. In contrast, participants who were referred to a rehabilitation clinic felt supported and informed. Cognitive problems, such as impaired memory and mental fatigue, were reported as still present six years post SAH. Coping strategies were; receiving support from family, society, employers, or technical equipment. At work, talking to colleagues and to taking breaks were common. Participants described hiding their symptoms from employers and friends, as well as trying to continue doing tasks in the same manner as prior to the SAH. If this was not possible, some refrained from doing these tasks. They went through a mourning process, fear, and worries.Participants reported several long-term consequences which impacted on their daily lives post SAH, and different coping strategies were used to cope with these problems. Participants reported lack of awareness regarding the consequences of SAH and stressed the importance of structured multidisciplinary follow-ups, which mostly

  7. Effect of magnesium treatment and glucose levels on delayed cerebral ischemia in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a substudy of the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage trial (MASH-II).

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    Leijenaar, Jolien F; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M; Algra, Ale; van den Bergh, Walter M; Rinkel, Gabriel J E

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium treatment did not improve outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage II trial. We hypothesized that high glucose levels may have offset a potential beneficial effect to prevent delayed cerebral ischemia. We investigated if magnesium treatment led to less delayed cerebral ischemia and if glucose levels interacted with magnesium treatment in the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage II trial. To investigate the effect of magnesium treatment on occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia and the interaction between glucose levels and magnesium treatment in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. The Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage was a phase III randomized placebo-controlled trial assessing the effect of magnesium sulphate on clinical outcome in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. For the current study, we included only the patients admitted to the University Medical Centre-Utrecht. We calculated hazard ratios for occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia in patients treated with magnesium vs. placebo for the entire study population, and separately in the subgroups of patients with high and low mean fasting and mean daily glucose levels until onset of delayed cerebral ischemia. We used the cross-product of magnesium and glucose in the regression analysis to evaluate whether an interaction between magnesium and glucose existed. We included 616 patients: 307 received magnesium and 309 placebo; 156 patients had delayed cerebral ischemia. Hazard ratio for magnesium on occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia was 1·0 (95% confidence interval: 0·7-1·4). Results were similar in patients with low or high fasting or daily glucose levels. We found no interactions between magnesium treatment and high fasting (P = 0·54) and daily glucose (P = 0·60). Magnesium treatment did not reduce the risk of delayed cerebral ischemia in patients with aneurysmal

  8. Acute viral hemorrhage disease: A summary on new viruses

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    Somsri Wiwanitkit

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic disease is an important problem in medicine that can be seen in many countries, especially those in tropical world. There are many causes of acute hemorrhagic disease and the viral infection seems to be the common cause. The well-known infection is dengue, however, there are many new identified viruses that can cause acute hemorrhagic diseases. In this specific short review, the authors present and discuss on those new virus diseases that present as “acute hemorrhagic fever”.

  9. Risk factors for meningitis after craniotomy in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to anterior circulation aneurysms rupture.

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    Inoue, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Fujimura, Miki; Sato, Kenichi; Endo, Hidenori; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative meningitis is a serious complication occurring after neurosurgical interventions. However, few investigations have focused specifically on the risk factors that predispose patients to meningitis after major craniotomy. This study identified the risk factors for postoperative meningitis after neurovascular surgery, and investigated the relationship between postoperative meningitis and clinical outcome. A total of 148 consecutive patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) who underwent clipping surgery through a pterional approach within 72 h between January 2007 and September 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. The treatment strategy of our hospital for patients with SAH was based on the findings of digital subtraction angiography in the acute phase. Coil embolization was firstly considered, and clipping through craniotomy if indicated was performed as soon as possible. Prophylactic antibiotics were administered before beginning craniotomy and for at least 3 days after. Hydrocortisone was used to prevent hyponatremia if allowed by the medical condition of the patient. Intrathecal administration of nicardipine hydrochloride was given if required for vasospasm treatment. Meningitis was clinically diagnosed from the blood samplings and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations. Data were collected from the electronic and paper charts. The status of modified Rankin scale (mRS) 0-2 at discharge was defined as favorable outcome. A total of 14 patients (9.5%) had meningitis during this study period. Symptomatic vasospasm was detected in 33 patients (22.3%), and 12 patients (8.1%) had permanent neurological deficits caused by vasospasm. Overall, 109 patients (73.6%) had favorable outcome. The longer duration of drainage placement, presence of CSF leakage, and intrathecal administration of vasodilatory agent showed significantly higher incidence of postoperative meningitis in univariate analysis (p=0.0093, 0.0017, and 0.0090, respectively). The proportion of

  10. Definition of Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage as an Outcome Event in Clinical Trials and Observational Studies Proposal of a Multidisciplinary Research Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergouwen, Mervyn D. I.; Vermeulen, Marinus; van Gijn, Jan; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Wijdicks, Eelco F.; Muizelaar, J. Paul; Mendelow, A. David; Juvela, Seppo; Yonas, Howard; Terbrugge, Karel G.; Macdonald, R. Loch; Diringer, Michael N.; Broderick, Joseph P.; Dreier, Jens P.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose-In clinical trials and observational studies there is considerable inconsistency in the use of definitions to describe delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A major cause for this inconsistency is the combining of radiographic evidence of

  11. Decorin alleviated chronic hydrocephalus via inhibiting TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF pathway after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hui; Chen, Yujie; Li, Lingyong; Jiang, Jiaode; Wu, Guangyong; Zuo, Yuchun; Zhang, John H; Feng, Hua; Yan, Xiaoxin; Liu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hydrocephalus is one of the severe complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, there is no efficient treatment for the prevention of chronic hydrocephalus, partially due to poor understanding of underlying pathogenesis, subarachnoid fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) is a potent fibrogenic factor implicated in wide range of fibrotic diseases. To investigate whether decorin, a natural antagonist for TGF-β1, protects against subarachnoid fibrosis and chronic hydrocephalus after SAH, two-hemorrhage-injection SAH model was conducted in 6-week-old rats. Recombinant human decorin(rhDecorin) (30ug/2ul) was administered before blood injection and on the 10th day after SAH. TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide were assessed via western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunoassay and immunofluorescence. And neurobehavioral tests and Morris water maze were employed to evaluate long-term neurological functions after SAH. We found that SAH induced heightened activation of TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF axis, presenting as a two peak response of TGF-β1 in cerebrospinal fluid, elevation of TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, CTGF, collagen I in brain parenchyma and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide in cerebrospinal fluid, and increased lateral ventricle index. rhDecorin treatment effectively inhibited up-regulation of TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, CTGF, collagen I and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide after SAH. Moreover, rhDecorin treatment significantly reduced lateral ventricular index and incidence of chronic hydrocephalus after SAH. Importantly, rhDecorin improved neurocognitive deficits after SAH. In conclusion, rhDecorin suppresses extracellular matrix accumulation and following subarachnoid fibrosis via inhibiting TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF pathway, preventing development of hydrocephalus and attenuating long-term neurocognitive defects after SAH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  12. Retrospective review of previous minor leak before major subarachnoid hemorrhage diagnosed by MRI as a predictor of occurrence of symptomatic delayed cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Shinri; Shimoda, Masami; Hirayama, Akihiro; Imai, Masaaki; Komatsu, Fuminari; Shigematsu, Hideaki; Nishiyama, Jun; Hotta, Kazuko; Matsumae, Mitsunori

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE This study attempted to determine whether a previous minor leak correlated with the occurrence of symptomatic delayed cerebral ischemia (sDCI). METHODS The authors retrospectively evaluated sDCI-related clinical features and findings from MRI, including T1-weighted imaging (T1WI)-FLAIR mismatch at the time of admission, in 151 patients admitted with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) within 48 hours of ictus. RESULTS The overall incidence of sDCI was 23% (35 of 151 patients). In all subjects, multivariate analysis revealed that World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies Grades II-V, age 70 years or older, presence of rebleeding after admission, a previous minor leak before the major SAH attack as diagnosed by T1WI-FLAIR mismatch, acute infarction on diffusion-weighted imaging, and CT SAH score were significantly associated with occurrence of sDCI. In patients with no previous minor leak before major SAH as diagnosed by T1WI-FLAIR mismatch, the incidence of sDCI was only 7% (7 of 97 patients). CONCLUSIONS A previous minor leak before major SAH as diagnosed by T1WI-FLAIR mismatch represents an important sDCI-related factor. When the analysis was restricted to patients with true acute SAH without a previous minor leak diagnosed by T1WI-FLAIR mismatch, the incidence of sDCI was extremely low.

  13. Functional analysis of Pro-inflammatory properties within the cerebrospinal fluid after subarachnoid hemorrhage in vivo and in vitro

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    Schneider Ulf C

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To functionally characterize pro-inflammatory and vasoconstrictive properties of cerebrospinal fluid after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in vivo and in vitro. Methods The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 10 patients suffering from SAH was applied to the transparent skinfold chamber model in male NMRI mice which allows for in vivo analysis of the microcirculatory response to a superfusat. Microvascular diameter changes were quantified and the numbers of rolling and sticking leukocytes were documented using intravital multifluorescence imaging techniques. Furthermore, the pro-inflammatory properties of CSF were assessed in vitro using a monocyte transendothelial migration assay. Results CSF superfusion started to induce significant vasoconstriction on days 4 and 6 after SAH. In parallel, CSF superfusion induced a microvascular leukocyte recruitment, with a significant number of leukocytes rolling (day 6 and sticking (days 2-4 to the endothelium. CSF of patients presenting with cerebral edema induced breakdown of blood vessel integrity in our assay as evidenced by fluorescent marker extravasation. In accordance with leukocyte activation in vivo, significantly higher in vitro monocyte migration rates were found after SAH. Conclusion We functionally characterized inflammatory and vasoactive properties of patients' CSF after SAH in vivo and in vitro. This pro-inflammatory milieu in the subarachnoid space might play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of early and delayed brain injury as well as vasospasm development following SAH.

  14. The comparative study on diagnostic validity of cerebral aneurysm by computed tomography angiography versus digital subtraction angiography after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masih Saboori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to declare the preoperative diagnostic value of brain aneurysms, two radiological modalities, computed tomographic angiography and digital subtraction angiography were compared. Methods: In this descriptive analytic study, diagnostic value of computed tomographic angiography (CTA was com-pared with digital subtraction angiography (DSA. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated and compared between the two modalities. All data were analyzed with SPSS software, version 16. Results: Mean age of patients was 49.5 ± 9.13 years. 57.9 % of subjects were female. CTA showed 89% sensitivity and 100% specificity whereas DSA demonstrated 74% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Positive predictive value of both methods was 100%, but negative predictive value of CTA and DSA was 85% and 69%, respectively. Conclusions: Based on our data, CTA is a valuable diagnostic modality for detection of brain aneurysm and su-barachnoid hemorrhage.

  15. Intrathecal application of the nimodipine slow-release microparticle system eg-1962 for prevention of delayed cerebral ischemia and improvement of outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etminan, Nima; Macdonald, R Loch; Davis, Cara; Burton, Kevin; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Hänggi, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The effective reduction of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), a main contributor for poor outcome following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), remains challenging. Previous clinical trials on systemic pharmaceutical treatment of SAH mostly failed to improve outcome, probably because of insensitive pharmaceutical targets and outcome measures, small sample size, insufficient subarachnoid drug concentrations and also detrimental, systemic effects of the experimental treatment per se. Interestingly, in studies that are more recent, intrathecal administration of nicardipine pellets following surgical aneurysm repair was suggested to have a beneficial effect on DCI and neurological outcome. However, this positive effect remained restricted to patients who were treated surgically for a ruptured aneurysm. Because of the favorable results of the preclinical data on DCI and neurological outcome in the absence of neurotoxicity or systemic side effects, we are initiating clinical trials. The PROMISE (Prolonged Release nimOdipine MIcro particles after Subarachnoid hemorrhage) trial is designed as an unblinded, nonrandomized, single-center, single-dose, dose-escalation safety and tolerability phase 1 study in patients surgically treated for aSAH and will investigate the effect of intracisternal EG-1962 administration. The NEWTON (Nimodipine microparticles to Enhance recovery While reducing TOxicity after subarachNoid hemorrhage) trial is a phase 1/2a multicenter, controlled, randomized, open-label, dose-escalation, safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic study comparing EG-1962 and nimodipine in patients with aneurysmal SAH.

  16. Clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of CT-angiography in the diagnosis of nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbarli, Ramazan; Shah, Mukesch; Hippchen, Beate; Velthoven, Vera van [University Hospital of Freiburg, Department of Neurosurgery, Freiburg/Breisgau (Germany); Taschner, Christian [University Hospital of Freiburg, Department of Neuroradiology, Freiburg (Germany); Kaier, Klaus [University Hospital of Freiburg, Institute for Medical Biometry and Medical Informatics, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    CT-angiography gains an increasing role in the initial diagnosis of patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, the implementation of CT-angiography does not always exclude the necessity of conventional angiography. Our objective was to determine the practical utility and cost-effectiveness of CT-angiography. All patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage admitted to our university hospital after implementation of CT-angiography between June 1, 2011 and June 30, 2012 were retrospectively analyzed in regard to factors of treatment flow, radiation exposure, harms of contrast medium loading, and diagnostic costs. A control group of the same size was assembled from previously admitted SAH patients, who did not undergo pretreatment CT-angiography. Furthermore, cost-effectiveness analysis was performed. The final analysis consisted of 93 patients in each group. Of 93 patients with pretreatment CT-angiography, 74 had to undergo conventional angiography for diagnostic and/or therapeutic purposes. CT-angiography had significant impact on the reduction of collective effective radiation dose by 4.419 mSv per person (p = 0.0002) and was not associated with additional harms. Despite the significantly earlier detection of aneurysms with CT-angiography (p < 0.0001), there were no significant differences in the timing of aneurysm repair and duration of ICU and general hospital stay. There was an increase of diagnostic costs - the cost-effectiveness analysis showed, however, that benefits of CT-angiography in respect to radiation exposure and risk of conventional angiography-related complications justify the additional costs of CT-angiography. Although the implementation of CT-angiography in SAH diagnosis cannot completely replace conventional angiography, it can be approved in regard to radiation hygiene and cost-effectiveness. (orig.)

  17. A Phase I proof-of-concept and safety trial of sildenafil to treat cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Chad W; Derdeyn, Colin P; Dhar, Rajat; Arias, Eric J; Chicoine, Michael R; Cross, DeWitte T; Dacey, Ralph G; Han, Byung Hee; Moran, Christopher J; Rich, Keith M; Vellimana, Ananth K; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2016-02-01

    Studies show that phosphodiesterase-V (PDE-V) inhibition reduces cerebral vasospasm (CVS) and improves outcomes after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This study was performed to investigate the safety and effect of sildenafil (an FDA-approved PDE-V inhibitor) on angiographic CVS in SAH patients. A2-phase, prospective, nonrandomized, human trial was implemented. Subarachnoid hemorrhage patients underwent angiography on Day 7 to assess for CVS. Those with CVS were given 10 mg of intravenous sildenafil in the first phase of the study and 30 mg in the second phase. In both, angiography was repeated 30 minutes after infusion. Safety was assessed by monitoring neurological examination findings and vital signs and for the development of adverse reactions. For angiographic assessment, in a blinded fashion, pre- and post-sildenafil images were graded as "improvement" or "no improvement" in CVS. Unblinded measurements were made between pre- and post-sildenafil angiograms. Twelve patients received sildenafil; 5 patients received 10 mg and 7 received 30 mg. There were no adverse reactions. There was no adverse effect on heart rate or intracranial pressure. Sildenafil resulted in a transient decline in mean arterial pressure, an average of 17% with a return to baseline in an average of 18 minutes. Eight patients (67%) were found to have a positive angiographic response to sildenafil, 3 (60%) in the low-dose group and 5 (71%) in the high-dose group. The largest degree of vessel dilation was an average of 0.8 mm (range 0-2.1 mm). This corresponded to an average percentage increase in vessel diameter of 62% (range 0%-200%). The results from this Phase I safety and proof-of-concept trial assessing the use of intravenous sildenafil in patients with CVS show that sildenafil is safe and well tolerated in the setting of SAH. Furthermore, the angiographic data suggest that sildenafil has a positive impact on human CVS.

  18. Dynamic study on digital cineangiography of acute digestive tract hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jianming; Feng Gansheng; Zeng Jun; Xu Caiyuan

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study dynamically acute gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage with digital cine angiography. Methods: Fifty patients with acute gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage were performed with digital cineangiography and observed dynamically during arterial, capillary and venous phases. Results: Among 50 cases, there were positive results in 44 ones including gastrointestinal hemorrhage in 14, biliary hemorrhage in 2, splenic arterial bleeding in 3, left gastric arterial bleeding in 4, right gastroepiploic arterial bleeding in 5, SMA bleeding in 7 and IMA bleeding in 9.17 cases underwent a permanent embolization through artery and 11 with temporary embolization as well as 9 with infusion of hemostatic agent via artery. Conclusions: Serial digital cineangiogram can dynamically show acute digestive tract hemorrhage within different phase. It is helpful to detect the location and cause of hemorrhage

  19. [Enteroviruses responsible for acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévêque, N; Huguet, P; Norder, H; Chomel, J-J

    2010-04-01

    Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) is an epidemic form of highly contagious conjunctivitis, characterized by conjunctival hemorrhages. The first AHC outbreak was described in 1969 in Ghana, West Africa, and was called Apollo disease, from the Apollo landing on the moon. This outbreak was caused by Enterovirus 70 (EV70) together with a Coxsackievirus A24 (CVA24v) variant, which are the major etiological agents involved in AHC outbreaks worldwide. AHC is known to be directly transmitted by close person-to-person contact or indirectly through soiled ophthalmological materials or unsafe recreational water. Recently, a possible airborne virus spread was suggested which could explain the high transmission rate of the disease. In the absence of a specific antiviral therapy, a rapid diagnosis of the causative agent is required to distinguish AHC due to enteroviruses from other ocular infectious diseases, for there are active drugs, or to quickly implement proper public health measures to limit the extension of the outbreak. However, virus identification remains difficult and time-consuming. Moreover, virological diagnosis is difficult to implement in developing countries where AHC has recently become a major problem for public health. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of actuator-driven pulsed water jet in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage surgery: its effectiveness for dissection around ruptured aneurysmal walls and subarachnoid clot removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hidenori; Endo, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Fujimura, Miki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-07-01

    In clipping surgery for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), critical steps include clot removal and dissection of aneurysms without premature rupture or brain injuries. To pursue this goal, a piezo actuator-driven pulsed water jet (ADPJ) system was introduced in this study. This study included 42 patients, who suffered aSAH and underwent clipping surgery. Eleven patients underwent surgery with the assistance of the ADPJ system (ADPJ group). In the other 31 patients, surgery was performed without the ADPJ system (Control group). The ADPJ system was used for clot removal and aneurysmal dissection. The clinical impact of the ADPJ system was judged by comparing the rate of premature rupture, degree of clot removal, and clinical outcomes. Intraoperatively, a premature rupture was encountered in 18.2 and 25.8% of cases in the ADPJ and control groups, respectively. Although the differences were not statistically significant, intraoperative observation suggested that the ADPJ system was effective in clot removal and dissection of aneurysms in a safe manner. Computed tomography scans indicated the achievement of higher degrees of clot removal, especially when the ADPJ system was used for cases with preoperative clot volumes of more than 25 ml (p = 0.047, Mann-Whitney U test). Clinical outcomes, including incidence of postoperative brain injury or symptomatic vasospasm, were similar in both groups. We described our preliminary surgical results using the ADPJ system for aSAH. Although further study is needed, the ADPJ system was considered a safe and effective tool for clot removal and dissection of aneurysms.

  1. Local delivery of nimodipine by prolonged-release microparticles-feasibility, effectiveness and dose-finding in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hänggi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of locally applied nimodipine prolonged-release microparticles on angiographic vasospasm and secondary brain injury after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. METHODS: 70 male Wistar rats were categorized into three groups: 1 sham operated animals (control, 2 animals with SAH only (control and the 3 treatment group. SAH was induced using the double hemorrhage model. The treatment group received different concentrations (20%, 30% or 40% of nimodipine microparticles. Angiographic vasospasm was assessed 5 days later using digital subtraction angiography (DSA. Histological analysis of frozen sections was performed using H&E-staining as well as Iba1 and MAP2 immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: DSA images were sufficient for assessment in 42 animals. Severe angiographic vasospasm was present in group 2 (SAH only, as compared to the sham operated group (p<0.001. Only animals within group 3 and the highest nimodipine microparticles concentration (40% as well as group 1 (sham demonstrated the largest intracranial artery diameters. Variation in vessel calibers, however, did not result in differences in Iba-1 or MAP2 expression, i.e. in histological findings for secondary brain injury. CONCLUSIONS: Local delivery of high-dose nimodipine prolonged-release microparticles at high concentration resulted in significant reduction in angiographic vasospasm after experimental SAH and with no histological signs for matrix toxicity.

  2. Simulation of spreading depolarization trajectories in cerebral cortex: Correlation of velocity and susceptibility in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denny Milakara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In many cerebral grey matter structures including the neocortex, spreading depolarization (SD is the principal mechanism of the near-complete breakdown of the transcellular ion gradients with abrupt water influx into neurons. Accordingly, SDs are abundantly recorded in patients with traumatic brain injury, spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH and malignant hemispheric stroke using subdural electrode strips. SD is observed as a large slow potential change, spreading in the cortex at velocities between 2 and 9 mm/min. Velocity and SD susceptibility typically correlate positively in various animal models. In patients monitored in neurocritical care, the Co-Operative Studies on Brain Injury Depolarizations (COSBID recommends several variables to quantify SD occurrence and susceptibility, although accurate measures of SD velocity have not been possible. Therefore, we developed an algorithm to estimate SD velocities based on reconstructing SD trajectories of the wave-front's curvature center from magnetic resonance imaging scans and time-of-SD-arrival-differences between subdural electrode pairs. We then correlated variables indicating SD susceptibility with algorithm-estimated SD velocities in twelve aSAH patients. Highly significant correlations supported the algorithm's validity. The trajectory search failed significantly more often for SDs recorded directly over emerging focal brain lesions suggesting in humans similar to animals that the complexity of SD propagation paths increase in tissue undergoing injury.

  3. Heparin and Heparin-Derivatives in Post-Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Brain Injury: A Multimodal Therapy for a Multimodal Disease

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    Erik G. Hayman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacologic efforts to improve outcomes following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH remain disappointing, likely owing to the complex nature of post-hemorrhage brain injury. Previous work suggests that heparin, due to the multimodal nature of its actions, reduces the incidence of clinical vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia that accompany the disease. This narrative review examines how heparin may mitigate the non-vasospastic pathological aspects of aSAH, particularly those related to neuroinflammation. Following a brief review of early brain injury in aSAH and heparin’s general pharmacology, we discuss potential mechanistic roles of heparin therapy in treating post-aSAH inflammatory injury. These roles include reducing ischemia-reperfusion injury, preventing leukocyte extravasation, modulating phagocyte activation, countering oxidative stress, and correcting blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Following a discussion of evidence to support these mechanistic roles, we provide a brief discussion of potential complications of heparin usage in aSAH. Our review suggests that heparin’s use in aSAH is not only safe, but effectively addresses a number of pathologies initiated by aSAH.

  4. Purpurogallin, a Natural Phenol, Attenuates High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Induced Vasospasm in a Rat Model

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    Chih-Zen Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 was shown to be an important extracellular mediator involved in vascular inflammation of animals following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. This study is of interest to examine the efficacy of purpurogallin, a natural phenol, on the alternation of cytokines and HMGB1 in a SAH model. A rodent double hemorrhage SAH model was employed. Basilar arteries (BAs were harvested to examine HMGB1 mRNA and protein expression (Western blot. CSF samples were to examine IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α (rt-PCR. Deformed endothelial wall, tortuous elastic lamina, and necrotic smooth muscle were observed in the vessels of SAH groups but were absent in the purpurogallin group. IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the SAH only and SAH plus vehicle groups were significantly elevated (P<0.01. Purpurgallin dose-dependently reduced HMGB1 protein expression. Likewise, high dose purpurogallin reduced TNF-α and HMGB1 mRNA levels. In conclusion, purpurogallin exerts its neuroinflammation effect through the dual effect of inhibiting IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression and reducing HMGB1 protein and mRNA expression. This study supports purpurogallin could attenuate both proinflammatory cytokines and late-onset inflammasome in SAH induced vasospasm.

  5. Clinical problems of the patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage which had not been diagnosed until they suffered ischemic neurological deficits and/or rebleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Issei; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Moroi, Junta

    2011-01-01

    A small part of the patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are not properly diagnosed until they suffer ischemic neurological deficits and/or rebleeding during vasospasm. We therefore investigated the clinical profile of such patients. We retrospectively analyzed 581 patients with aneurysmal SAH experienced in our institute between 2001 and 2009. Patient's characteristics, presence and severity of headache before final diagnosis, imaging investigations they received, their World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) grades at admission, the location of aneurysm, treatment, and outcome at discharge were investigated. Five patients were not correctly diagnosed until they presented neurological deficits due to vasospasm or experienced simultaneous rebleeding. Their mean age was 69.4, and all were female. Although all patients had a bad headache, they did not undergo any imaging examinations. Immediate coil embolization was performed for 2 patients, 1 died due to rupturing during embolization procedure. The other 3 were treated by open clipping surgery (2 delayed and 1 immediate). Four patients had some disability as a sequel, and their outcomes were significantly worse compared with 53 patients with SAH in WFNS Grade II. The patients with SAH who had not been properly diagnosed in the acute stage had a poor outcome. We should be very careful when we see patients complaining of severe headache. (author)

  6. Diagnosis of ruptured intracranial aneurysm in acute stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiyama, Masataka; Nakagawa, Toshifumi

    1980-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage at an acute stage within one day from the onset to the first CT scan was classified into subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm, subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin and subarachnoid hemorrhage of which angiography could not be carried out, and the first CT findings, the severity, and the prognosis of these subarachnoid hemorrhage were compared and discussed. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm showed various changes according to progress in the severity with time, and intracranial hematoma, intraventricular clots and ventricular dilatation increased according to progress in the severity. Ruptured intracranial aneurysm in middle cerebral artery, anterior cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery could be found easily by CT, but that in internal carotid artery and vertabral basilar artery was difficult to be detected by CT. When cerebral angiography was carried out repeatedly for ruptured intracranial aneurysm of unknown origin, the time of performance must be consifered with attention to angiospasms or hematoma. (Tsunoda, M.)

  7. The relationship between contrast enhancement on CT and cerebral vasospasm in patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazawa, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Masahiro; Kawase, Takeshi; Usami, Takashi; Togashi, Osamu

    1982-01-01

    Sixty patients with a single rupture of an aneurysm were subjected to study. Contrast enhanced CT (CECT) was performed by intravenous infusion of 100 ml of 60% meglumine iothalamate in 10 minutes. Post-contrast CT scans were repeated serially just after infusion, 15 minutes and 30 minutes later. Prominent increase in density in the region of the circle of Willis and its branches 30 minutes after infusion was considered as remarkable enhancement. In 17 (46%) out of 37 patients who underwent CECT within day 3, the contrast enhancement was remarkable. Transient or permanent symptomatic vasospasm occurred in 13 (76.5%) out of these 17 patients and the remaining 4 patients who underwent the operation with successful removal of subarachnoid clot within day 3 did not develop symptomatic vasospasm. Eight (67%) out of 12 patients operated within day 3, in whom post-operative CT showed incomplete removal of subarachnoid clot, developed transient or permanent symptomatic vasospasm. In only one (5%) out of 20 patients without remarkable enhancement, transient symptomatic vasospasm occurred. The abnormal contrast enhancement in the region of the circle of Willis and its branches within day 3 was closely related to the subsequent occurrence of vasospasm. Contrast enhanced CT was performed in 41 patients after day 3. There was no patient with remarkable enhancement on CECT. There was no relationship between the findings on CECT after day 3 and the occurrence of vasospasm. CECT within day 3 allows prediction of that patient destined for vasospasm and early removal of subarachnoid clot within day 3 may minimize the future development of vasospasm.(J.P.N.)

  8. Predictors of acute symptomatic seizures after intracranial hemorrhage in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Seema; Kebede, Tewodros; Dean, Nathan P; Carpenter, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of acute symptomatic seizures in infants with supratentorial intracranial hemorrhage, to identify potential risk factors, and to determine the effect of acute seizures on long-term morbidity and mortality. Children less than 24 months with intracranial hemorrhage were identified from a neurocritical care database. All patients who received seizure prophylaxis beginning at admission were included in the study. Risk factors studied were gender, etiology, location of hemorrhage, seizure(s) on presentation, and the presence of parenchymal injury. Acute clinical and electrographic seizures were identified from hospital medical records. Subsequent development of late seizures was determined based on clinical information from patients' latest follow-up. Patients with idiopathic neonatal intracranial hemorrhage, premature infants, and those with prior history of seizures were excluded from analysis. Seventy-two infants met inclusion criteria. None. Forty percent of infants had acute symptomatic seizures. The prevalence was similar regardless of whether etiology of hemorrhage was traumatic or nontraumatic. Seizures on presentation and parenchymal injury were independent risk factors of acute seizures (p = 0.001 and p = 0.006, respectively). Younger children and women were also at higher risk (p Acute seizures were not predictive of mortality, but nearly twice as many patients with acute seizures developed late seizures when compared with those without. Electrographic seizures and parenchymal injury were also predictive of development of late seizures (p hemorrhage are at high risk for acute symptomatic seizures. This is regardless of the etiology of hemorrhage. Younger patients, women, patients with parenchymal injury, and patients presenting with seizure are most likely to develop acute seizures. Although the benefits of seizure prophylaxis have not been studied in this specific population, these results suggest that it is an important component

  9. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerich, Paulo Sergio; Prebianchi, Patricia Almeida; Motta, Luciene Lage da; Lucas, Elton Almeida; Ferreira, Leonardo Mello

    2011-01-01

    Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy is an infrequent leukocytoclastic vasculitis which occurs almost exclusively in children between 4 months and 2 years of age. It is clinically characterized by the triad fever, purpuric lesions on the face, auricular pinna and extremities, and edema. Although the cutaneous findings are dramatic and of rapid onset, the prognosis is favorable, with spontaneous resolution within 1 to 3 weeks. Three cases are described in which clinical and histopathological findings are characteristic of acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy.

  10. Anti-TNF-alpha antibody attenuates subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced apoptosis in the hypothalamus by inhibiting the activation of Erk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma L

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ling Ma,1 Yong Jiang,2 Yanan Dong,2 Jun Gao,2 Bin Du,2 Dianwei Liu2 1Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH can induce apoptosis in many regions of the brain including the cortex and hippocampus. However, few studies have focused on apoptosis in the hypothalamus after SAH. Although some antiapoptotic strategies have been developed for SAH, such as anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α antibody, the molecular mechanisms underlying this condition have yet to be elucidated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether SAH could induce apoptosis in the hypothalamus and identify the potential molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of anti-TNF-α antibody, as a therapeutic regimen, upon apoptosis. Materials and methods: SAH was induced in a rat model. Thirty minutes prior to SAH, anti-TNF-α antibody or U0126, an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk inhibitor, was microinjected into the left lateral cerebral ventricle. In addition, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate was injected intraperitoneally immediately after the anti-TNF-α antibody microinjection. Then, real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression of caspase-3, bax, bcl-2, phosphorylated Erk (p-Erk and Erk. Finally, anxiety-like behavior was identified by using open field. Results: Levels of caspase-3, bax and bcl-2, all showed a temporary rise after SAH in the hypothalamus, indicating the induction of apoptosis in this brain region. Interestingly, we found that the microinjection of anti-TNF-α antibody could selectively block the elevated levels of bax, suggesting the potential role of anti-TNF-α antibody in the inhibition of SAH

  11. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in a Three-year-old-boy with Left Middle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of three-year-old boy, who presented with a history of sudden onset of headache and vomiting. Neurologically he was conscious, oriented, and with no neurological deficits (Hunt and Hess grade-2) at the time of admission. Computed Tomography (CT) scan of the brain revealed intracerebral hemorrhage [ ...

  12. National socioeconomic indicators are associated with outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a hierarchical mixed-effects analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Daipayan; Ibrahim, George M; Kertzer, Joshua D; Macdonald, R Loch

    2014-11-01

    Although heterogeneity exists in patient outcomes following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) across different centers and countries, it is unclear which factors contribute to such disparities. In this study, the authors performed a post hoc analysis of a large international database to evaluate the association between a country's socioeconomic indicators and patient outcome following aneurysmal SAH. An analysis was performed on a database of 3552 patients enrolled in studies of tirilazad mesylate for aneurysmal SAH from 1991 to 1997, which included 162 neurosurgical centers in North and Central America, Australia, Europe, and Africa. Two primary outcomes were assessed at 3 months after SAH: mortality and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score. The association between these outcomes, nation-level socioeconomic indicators (percapita gross domestic product [GDP], population-to-neurosurgeon ratio, and health care funding model), and patientlevel covariates were assessed using a hierarchical mixed-effects logistic regression analysis. Multiple previously identified patient-level covariates were significantly associated with increased mortality and worse neurological outcome, including age, intraventricular hemorrhage, and initial neurological grade. Among national-level covariates, higher per-capita GDP (p funding model was not a significant predictor of either primary outcome. Higher per-capita gross GDP and population-to-neurosurgeon ratio were associated with improved outcome after aneurysmal SAH. The former result may speak to the availability of resources, while the latter may be a reflection of better outcomes with centralized care. Although patient clinical and radiographic phenotypes remain the primary predictors of outcome, this study shows that national socioeconomic disparities also explain heterogeneity in outcomes following SAH.

  13. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage mimicking an acute scrotum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorisio, O; Mattei, R; Ciardini, E; Centonze, N; Noccioli, B

    2007-02-01

    Twenty-two cases of scrotal hematoma caused by neonatal adrenal hemorrhage are reported in the literature and unnecessary surgical exploration was performed in nine (41%), suspecting testicular torsion. In this paper, we present a newborn male with right adrenal gland hemorrhage causing right scrotal swelling and discoloration of groin managed conservatively.

  14. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting as acute scrotum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. In newborns, adrenal hemorrhage is not an uncommon event. The large size of the adrenal cortex contributes to an increased vulnerability to trauma during a difficult delivery [1]. However, the neonatal adrenal hemorrhage may rarely present as inguinoscrotal swelling [2,3]. This condition can simulate torsion of ...

  15. Value of Perfusion CT, Transcranial Doppler Sonography, and Neurological Examination to Detect Delayed Vasospasm after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, E.; Raslan, F.; Stetter, Ch.; Lee, J.Y.; Solymosi, L.; Ernestus, R.I.; Vince, G.H.; Westermaier, Th.; Pham, M.; Solymosi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background. If detected in time, delayed cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may be treated by balloon angioplasty or chemical vasospasmolysis in order to enhance cerebral blood flow (CBF) and protect the brain from ischemic damage. This study was conceived to compare the diagnostic accuracy of detailed neurological examination, Transcranial Doppler Sonography (TCD), and Perfusion-CT (PCT) to detect angiographic vasospasm. Methods. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of delayed ischemic neurological deterioration (DIND), pathological findings on PCT-maps, and accelerations of the mean flow velocity (MVF) were calculated. Results. The accuracy of DIND to predict angiographic vasospasm was 0.88. An acceleration of MFV in TCD (>140 cm/s) had an accuracy of 0.64, positive PCT-findings of 0.69 with a higher sensitivity, and negative predictive value than TCD. Interpretation. Neurological assessment at close intervals is the most sensitive and specific parameter for cerebral vasospasm. PCT has a higher accuracy, sensitivity and negative predictive value than TCD. If detailed neurological evaluation is possible, it should be the leading parameter in the management and treatment decisions. If patients are not amenable to detailed neurological examination, PCT at regular intervals is a helpful tool to diagnose secondary vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH

  16. Intraoperative Vascular Neuromonitoring in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Pilot Study Using Combined Laser-Doppler Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Emilija; Bischoff, Barbara; Wolf, Dennis; Schmitt, Hubert J; Eyupoglu, Ilker Y; Roessler, Karl; Buchfelder, Michael; Sommer, Björn

    2017-11-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral microcirculation in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may predict the postoperative neurologic outcome. In this pilot study, we examined the value of a novel noninvasive real-time measurement technique for detecting changes in local microcirculation. We used the O2C (Oxygen to see) laser-Doppler spectrophotometry system in 14 patients with Hunt & Hess grade 2-5 SAH who underwent microsurgical cerebral aneurysm clipping. A subdural probe recorded capillary venous oxygenation (SO 2 ), relative hemoglobin concentration, blood cell velocity, and blood flow at a tissue depth of 7 mm. Data were recorded immediately before dural closure. We also recorded somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) with median and tibial nerve stimulation. Results were compared with neurologic performance, as measured on the modified Rankin Scale, at the day of discharge from the hospital and 12 months thereafter. Patient functional outcomes after discharge and 12 months were correlated with pathological decreased flow and increased SO 2 values. In 6 of 8 patients, microcirculatory monitoring parameters indicated ischemia during surgery, as shown by electrophysiological SEP changes and infarction detected on the postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan. Pathological SEP results correlated closely with infarct demarcation as seen on CT. Our results indicate the potential benefit of intraoperative combined laser-Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry for predicting postoperative clinical outcomes in this small patient sample. Larger-cohort testing is needed to verify our findings and show the possible merits of this novel method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Perioperative Management of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in a Patient with Alagille Syndrome and Unrepaired Tetralogy of Fallot: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fiorda-Diaz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alagille syndrome (ALGS is a genetic disorder associated with multisystem dysfunction involving the hepatic, cardiovascular, and neurologic systems. Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF, a congenital cardiac anomaly, is commonly found in these patients. Patients with ALGS may also have an increased risk of cerebrovascular abnormalities and bleeding. Ruptured cerebral aneurysm and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH may be developed, increasing the incidence of morbidity and mortality. Advances in neuroimaging and neurosurgery have allowed early identification and treatment of such vascular abnormalities, improving patients’ outcomes and reducing life-threatening complications such as intracranial bleeding. Authors describe the perioperative management of a patient with ALGS and TOF who was admitted to the emergency department due a ruptured intracranial aneurysm with concomitant SAH. Surgical treatment included diagnostic cerebral arteriography with coil embolization of a left posterior communicating artery aneurysm, and placement of right external ventricular drain (EVD. The combination of neuroprotective anesthetic techniques, fast emergence from anesthesia, and maintenance of intraoperative hemodynamic stability led to a successful perioperative management. A multidisciplinary approach in specialized centers is essential for the treatment of patients with SAH, especially in patients with ALGS and complex congenital heart disease such as TOF.

  18. Angiographic evaluation of the effect of intra-arterial milrinone therapy in patients with vasospasm from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Jai Jai Shiva; dos Santos, Marlise P; Deus-Silva, Leonardo; Lum, Cheemun

    2011-02-01

    Several methods have been used to treat cerebral vasospasm, which is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Here, we examined the effectiveness and safety of intra-arterial injection of milrinone for the treatment of vasospasm. Consecutive patients with angiographically confirmed vasospasm received intra-arterial milrinone between January 2006 and December 2007. The improvement in diameter of vessel (in millimeters) following treatment was assessed by paired t test for statistical significance. The angiographic improvement of supraclinoid internal carotid artery, M1 segment of middle cerebral artery, and A1 and A2 segment of anterior cerebral artery was compared with the modified Rankin score of the patients at discharge. A total of 15 milrinone treatments were performed in 14 patients (11 females and 3 males) with mean age of 52.7 years (31-68 years). There was significant angiographic improvement after milrinone therapy (p milrinone was a safe and effective treatment of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal SAH.

  19. Effect of intra arterial nimodipine infusion for the treatment of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm following an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Young; Shin, Hwa Seon; Choi, Hye Young; Chung, Sung Hoon; You, Jin Jong; Choi, Dae Seob; Son, Seung Nam; Ryu, Jae Wook

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic cerebral vasospasm following an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is one of the major factors which cause morbidity and mortality of patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intra-arterial nimodipine (IAN) infusion therapy in patients with symptomatic cerebral vasospasm. Between February 2005 and April 2011, fifty patients with symptomatic cerebral vasospasm following an aneurysmal SAH were treated with IAN infusion. After selective arterial catheterization, nimodipine was infused at a rate of 0.1 mg/min and a total of 2-3 mg per vessel was infused. We retrospectively reviewed the immediate angiographic results and clinical outcome at discharge. A grade of 5 and 4 in the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) were considered favorable outcomes. In 50 patients, 117 procedures of IAN infusion (1-7; mean, 2.3)were done. After the treatment, immediate angiographic improvement was achieved in 113 (96.6%) of 117 procedures. No major complications occurred. At discharge, 38 (76%) patients showed a favorable clinical outcome in the GOS. IAN infusion therapy is safe and effective for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following an aneurysmal SAH. However, the limitation is that repeated treatment is needed

  20. Efficacy and safety of fasudil in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Final results of a randomized trial of fasudil versus nimodipine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jizong; Zhou Dingbiao; Guo Jing

    2011-01-01

    Fasudil is believed to be at least equally effective as nimodipine for the prevention of cerebral vasospasm and subsequent ischemic injury in patients undergoing surgery for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We report the final results of a randomized, open trial to compare the efficacy and safety of fasudil with nimodipine. A total of 63 patients undergoing surgery for SAH received fasudil and 66 received nimodipine between 1998 and 2004. Symptomatic vasospasm, low density areas on computed tomography (CT), clinical outcomes, and adverse events were all recorded, and the results were compared between the fasudil and nimodipine groups. Absence of symptomatic vasospasm, occurrence of low density areas associated with vasospasm on CT, and occurrence of adverse events were similar between the two groups. The clinical outcomes were more favorable in the fasudil group than in the nimodipine group (p=0.040). The proportion of patients with good clinical outcome was 74.5% (41/55) in the fasudil group and 61.7% (37/60) in the nimodipine group. There were no serious adverse events reported in the fasudil group. The present results suggest that fasudil is equally or more effective than nimodipine for the prevention of cerebral vasospasm and subsequent ischemic injury in patients undergoing surgery for SAH. (author)

  1. Packed red blood cell transfusion causes greater hemoglobin rise at a lower starting hemoglobin in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidech, Andrew M; Kahn, Marc J; Soong, Wayne; Green, David; Batjer, H Hunt; Bleck, Thomas P

    2008-01-01

    Each unit of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) is expected to raise circulating hemoglobin (HGB) by approximately 1 g/dL. There are few data on modifiers of this relationship other than gender and body mass index (BMI). We recorded HGB before and after PRBC transfusion in a retrospective cohort of 103 patients and a prospective cohort of 93 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In the retrospective cohort, 48 of 103 patients were transfused, and in the prospective cohort, 56 of 93 patients were transfused. In both groups, lower pre-transfusion HGB was associated with a larger increase in HGB (P rise in HGB (P < 0.001) after correction for number of units of PRBCs given, gender, and BMI in repeated measures analysis. Pre-transfusion HGB explained an additional 12% of variance in the data (P < 0.001). In both cohorts, the magnitude of the effect was similar. In patients with SAH, transfusion at lower HGB leads to a greater increase in HGB. Transfusion at lower HGB may be relatively more cost-effective, and this should be balanced against any potential benefit from higher HGB in SAH. One rather than 2 units of PRBCs are likely to be sufficient for most HGB targets after SAH, especially in patients with more severe anemia.

  2. Predicting symptomatic cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage with an artificial neural network in a pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoch, Jesse; Tahir, Rizwan; Abruzzo, Todd; Taylor, John M; Zuccarello, Mario; Vadivelu, Sudhakar

    2017-12-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANN) are increasingly applied to complex medical problem solving algorithms because their outcome prediction performance is superior to existing multiple regression models. ANN can successfully identify symptomatic cerebral vasospasm (SCV) in adults presenting after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Although SCV is unusual in children with aSAH, the clinical consequences are severe. Consequently, reliable tools to predict patients at greatest risk for SCV may have significant value. We applied ANN modeling to a consecutive cohort of pediatric aSAH cases to assess its ability to predict SCV. A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify patients met study inclusion criteria. The median age for aSAH patients was 15 years. Ten underwent surgical clipping and 6 underwent endovascular coiling for definitive treatment. One patient experienced SCV and 15 did not. The ANN applied here was able to accurately predict all 16 outcomes. The mean strength of prediction for those who did not exhibit SCV was - 0.86. The strength for the one patient who did exhibit SCV was 0.93. Adult-derived aneurysmal SAH value nodes can be applied to a simple AAN model to accurately predict SCV in children presenting with aSAH. Further work is needed to determine if ANN models can prospectively predict SCV in the pediatric aSAH population in toto; adapted to include mycotic, traumatic, and flow-related origins as well.

  3. Role of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Polymorphisms in Predicting Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in South Indian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Koshy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS gene polymorphisms have been implicated as predisposing genetic factors that can predict aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH, but with controversial results from different populations. Using a case-control study design, we tested the hypothesis whether variants in eNOS gene can increase risk of aSAH among South Indian patients, either independently, or by interacting with other risk factors of the disease. We enrolled 122 patients, along with 224 ethnically matched controls. We screened the intron-4 27-bp VNTR, the promoter T-786C and the exon-7 G894T SNPs in the eNOS gene. We found marked interethnic differences in the genotype distribution of eNOS variants when comparing the South Indian population with the reported frequencies from Caucasian and Japanese populations. Genotype distributions in control and patient populations were found to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. In patients, the allele, genotype and estimated haplotype frequencies did not differ significantly from the controls. Multiple logistic regression indicated hypertension and smoking as risk factors for the disease, however the risk alleles did not have any interaction with these risk factors. Although the eNOS polymorphisms were not found to be a likely risk factor for aSAH, the role of factors such as ethnicity, gender, smoking and hypertension should be evaluated cautiously to understand the genotype to phenotype conversion.

  4. Indications for CSF shunting in normal pressure hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage with lateral ventricular size change on cine-MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujitsuka, Mitsuyuki [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-09-01

    To clarify the indications for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), the author investigated changes in the pulsatile brain motions during a cardiac cycle in 17 cases with ventriculomegaly following SAH on cardiac gated cine MR images comparing with those in 50 normal adults. In 15 of these seventeen cases, the lateral ventricles not only constricted immediately following the R-wave related to brain expansion but also expanded paradoxically over the initial size during a cardiac diastole. These patterns were different from those of normal adults, and eleven of them showed excellent response to CSF shunting. Theses findings in ventricular motion during a cardiac cycle indicate that the forceful intraventricular CSF flows and stagnancy expand the ventricular walls causing compression of the surrounding brain against the skull. In the remaining two, the lateral ventricles only constricted immediately following the R-wave and the ventricular size change was similar to those of normal adults, and they were diagnosed as not requiring CSF shunting. Assessing ventricular size change on cine-MR enables non-invasive differentiation of NPH from other form of ventriculomegaly, and evaluation of the benefit of CSF shunting is also possible by this technique preoperatively. (author)

  5. Severe Dextran-Induced Anaphylactic Shock during Induction of Hypertension-Hypervolemia-Hemodilution Therapy following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Shiratori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dextran is a colloid effective for volume expansion; however, a possible side effect of its use is anaphylaxis. Dextran-induced anaphylactoid reaction (DIAR is a rare but severe complication, with a small dose of dextran solution sufficient to induce anaphylaxis. An 86-year-old female who underwent clipping for a ruptured cerebral aneurysm was admitted to the intensive care unit. Prophylactic hypertension-hypervolemia-hemodilution therapy was induced for cerebral vasospasm following a subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient went into severe shock after administration of dextran for volume expansion, and dextran administration was immediately discontinued. The volume administered at that time was only 0.8 mL at the most. After fluid resuscitation with a crystalloid solution, circulatory status began to recover. However, cerebral vasospasm occurred and the patient’s neurological condition deteriorated. Five weeks after the shock, she was diagnosed with hypersensitivity to dextran by a skin test. When severe hypotension occurs after dextran administration, appropriate treatments for shock should be performed immediately with discontinuation of dextran solution. Although colloid administration is recommended in some guidelines and researches, it is necessary to consider concerning the indication for volume expansion as well as the risk of colloid administration.

  6. Asymmetric and Symmetric Dimethylarginines are Markers of Delayed Cerebral Ischemia and Neurological Outcome in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Daniel; Seeberger, Miriam; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Czorlich, Patrick; Goetz, Alwin E; Böger, Rainer H; Hannemann, Juliane

    2018-03-20

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is the major cause of lethality and neuronal damage in patients who survived the primary subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginines (ADMA and SDMA) inhibit nitric oxide production from L-arginine via distinct mechanisms. Elevated ADMA levels are associated with vasospasm after SAH. We aimed to study the time course of ADMA and SDMA in plasma and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and their associations with DCI and outcome. We measured ADMA and SDMA in 34 SAH patients with an external ventricular drain at admission and on days 3, 6, 8, 12, and 15 and followed them up for clinical status and neurological outcome until 30 days post-discharge. DCI was defined as the appearance of new infarctions on cerebral computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. ADMA and SDMA plasma concentrations did not differ significantly at baseline between patients who suffered DCI (N = 14; 41%) and not; however, plasma ADMA reached a peak on days 8 and 15 after hemorrhage in patients with DCI (0.81-0.91 µmol/l). Baseline plasma L-arginine/ADMA ratio was significantly lower in patients with DCI (57.1 [34.3; 70.8] vs. 68.7 [55.7; 96.2]; p < 0.05). ADMA and SDMA concentrations in CSF were significantly higher in patients with DCI than without. In multivariable-adjusted linear regression models, CSF ADMA was negatively associated with the incidence of DCI (OR 0.03 [0.02-0.70]; p = 0.04), whereas CSF SDMA on the day of hemorrhage predicted poor neurological outcome until 30 days after discharge (OR 22.4 [1.21-416.02]; p = 0.04). Our study shows that ADMA and the L-arginine/ADMA ratio are associated with the incidence of DCI after SAH. By contrast, SDMA was associated with initial neuronal damage and poor neurological outcome after SAH. These data support the hypothesis that ADMA and L-arginine affect the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia after SAH, while SDMA is a biomarker of neurological outcome after SAH.

  7. Inter-observer variability in diagnosing radiological features of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage; a preliminary single centre study comparing observers from different specialties and levels of training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Usman T; Khan, Anjum F; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad; Hamid, Rana Shoaib; Alam, Muhammad Mehboob; Emaduddin, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    A noncontrast computed tomography (CT) scan remains the initial radiological investigation of choice for a patient with suspected aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). This initial scan may be used to derive key information about the underlying aneurysm which may aid in further management. The interpretation, however, is subject to the skill and experience of the interpreting individual. The authors here evaluate the interpretation of such CT scans by different individuals at different levels of training, and in two different specialties (Radiology and Neurosurgery). Initial nonontrast CT scan of 35 patients with aSAH was evaluated independently by four different observers. The observers selected for the study included two from Radiology and two from Neurosurgery at different levels of training; a resident currently in mid training and a resident who had recently graduated from training of each specialty. Measured variables included interpreter's suspicion of presence of subarachnoid blood, side of the subarachnoid hemorrhage, location of the aneurysm, the aneurysm's proximity to vessel bifurcation, number of aneurysm(s), contour of aneurysm(s), presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), infarction, hydrocephalus and midline shift. To determine the inter-observer variability (IOV), weighted kappa values were calculated. There was moderate agreement on most of the CT scan findings among all observers. Substantial agreement was found amongst all observers for hydrocephalus, IVH, and ICH. Lowest agreement rates were seen in the location of aneurysm being supra or infra tentorial. There were, however, some noteworthy exceptions. There was substantial to almost perfect agreement between the radiology graduate and radiology resident on most CT findings. The lowest agreement was found between the neurosurgery graduate and the radiology graduate. Our study suggests that although agreements were seen in the interpretation of some of

  8. [Angiopoietins predict long-term outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage during an early period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Dong; Wei, Huijie; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Rongcai; Yue, Shuyuan; Zhang, Jianning

    2015-05-19

    To evaluate the association between serum levels of angiopoietins (Ang) during an early period (within 72 h) and clinical outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH). This prospective study was conducted at Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital. Blood samples from 37 aSAH patients were collected at 8 h (or GOSE). Those with GOSE > 5 were counted as a good outcome while those with GOSE ≤ 5 had a poor outcome. A total of 37 patients with aSAH and 39 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled. The aSAH patients showed a significant rise of Ang-1 within 8 h as compared with HC. The outcomes were good (n = 15) and poor (n = 22). Serum Ang-1 at 8 h (or < 8 h), 24 h and 72 h in good outcomers showed significantly higher than that in poor outcomers [(52 ± 24) vs (37 ± 17) mg/L, (62 ± 26) vs (45 ± 17) mg/L, (107 ± 27) vs (72 ± 18) mg/L]. The serum level of Ang-1 at 8 h and 24 h was one of independent risk factors for aSAH patients by multiariable Logistic regression analysis [adjected OR (95% CI) 1.095 (1.015-1.181) and 1.109 (1.016-1.211)] (P < 0.05). High serum level of Ang-1 during an early period (within 72 h) was associated with good outcomers (r = 0.627, P < 0.001). The serum levels of angiopoietins are significantly altered in aSAH patients, especially higher in good outcomers. And abnormal levels of angiopoietins may affect early brain injury (EBI) after SAH, structural integrity and recovery of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and long-term outcomes in aSAH patients.

  9. Health Care Costs of Spontaneous Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage for Rehabilitation, Home Care, and In-Hospital Treatment for the First Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridwan, Sami; Urbach, Horst; Greschus, Susanne; von Hagen, Johanna; Esche, Jonas; Boström, Azize

    2017-01-01

    Given the young age of onset and high probability of long-term disability after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), the financial impact is expected to be substantial. Our primary objective was to highlight subsequent treatment costs after the acute in-hospital stay, including rehabilitation and home care, compared with costs for ischemic stroke. The study included 101 patients (median age 52 years, 70 women) with aneurysmal SAH treated from July 2007 to April 2009. In-hospital costs were calculated using German diagnosis related groups. Rehabilitation costs depended on rehabilitation phase/grade and daily rate. Level of severity of care requirements determined the costs for home care. Of patients, 54% received coiling and 46% received clipping. The clipping group included more poor-grade patients than the coiling group (P = 0.039); 23 patients died. Of 78 surviving patients, 70 received rehabilitation treatment (68 in Germany). Mean rehabilitation costs were €16,030 per patient. Patients in the clipping group generated higher rehabilitation costs and longer treatment periods in rehabilitation facilities (P = 0.001 for costs [€20,290 vs. €11,771] and P = 0.011 for duration (54.4 days vs. 40.5 days). Of surviving patients, 32% needed home care, of whom 52% required constant care. Multivariate regression analysis identified longer intensive care unit stay and poor Hunt and Hess grade as independent predictors of higher costs. Aneurysmal SAH prevalently affects working individuals with long-term occupational disability necessitating long-term medical rehabilitation for most patients and subsequent nursing care in one third of survivors. Overall, SAH treatment generates far higher costs than reported for ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prolonged Cerebral Circulation Time Is the Best Parameter for Predicting Vasospasm during Initial CT Perfusion in Subarachnoid Hemorrhagic Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Fu Lin

    Full Text Available We sought to imitate angiographic cerebral circulation time (CCT and create a similar index from baseline CT perfusion (CTP to better predict vasospasm in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH.Forty-one SAH patients with available DSA and CTP were retrospectively included. The vasospasm group was comprised of patients with deterioration in conscious functioning and newly developed luminal narrowing; remaining cases were classified as the control group. The angiography CCT (XA-CCT was defined as the difference in TTP (time to peak between the selected arterial ROIs and the superior sagittal sinus (SSS. Four arterial ROIs were selected to generate four corresponding XA-CCTs: the right and left anterior cerebral arteries (XA-CCTRA2 and XA-CCTLA2 and right- and left-middle cerebral arteries (XA-CCTRM2 and XA-CCTLM2. The CCTs from CTP (CT-CCT were defined as the differences in TTP from the corresponding arterial ROIs and the SSS. Correlations of the different CCTs were calculated and diagnostic accuracy in predicting vasospasm was evaluated.Intra-class correlations ranged from 0.96 to 0.98. The correlations of XA-CCTRA2, XA-CCTRM2, XA-CCTLA2, and XA-CCTLM2 with the corresponding CT-CCTs were 0.64, 0.65, 0.53, and 0.68, respectively. All CCTs were significantly prolonged in the vasospasm group (5.8-6.4 s except for XA-CCTLA2. CT-CCTA2 of 5.62 was the optimal cut-off value for detecting vasospasm with a sensitivity of 84.2% and specificity 82.4.CT-CCTs can be used to interpret cerebral flow without deconvolution algorithms, and outperform both MTT and TTP in predicting vasospasm risk. This finding may help facilitate management of patients with SAH.

  11. Quantification of subarachnoid hemorrhage by three-dimensional computed tomography. Correlation between hematoma volume and symptomatic vasospasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Taku; Sakuma, Jun; Sasaki, Tatsuya

    2011-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) volume was measured by three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) and the correlation examined between the SAH volume and the occurrence of symptomatic vasospasm (SVS). Experimental (in vitro) hematomas were made with blood obtained from 10 volunteers. The hematoma volume was determined by actual measurements and by 3D-CT using a CT number in the range of 40-80 Hounsfield units (HU) on days 1, 4, 7, 11, and 14. The coefficients on days 1 and 4 were relatively high and the correlation between measured and estimated volumes was significant on days 7, 11, and 14. 3D-CT was also performed in 50 patients with SAH at onset (day 0) and on days 1, 4, 7, and 14. The hematoma volume including the volume of normal structures was automatically calculated (V1). The volume of normal structures (V2) with CT numbers of 40-80 HU was calculated in another 50 patients without intracranial lesions as 12 ml. The total hematoma volume was defined as V1 minus mean V2. The mean SAH volume was 44, 36, 21, 11, and 8 ml on days 0, 1, 4, 7, and 14, respectively. The hematoma volumes were significantly larger in patients with SVS than in patients without SVS at all time points. The minimum hematoma volume in patients with SVS was 92, 76, 42, 24, and 12 ml on days 0, 1, 4, 7, and 14, respectively. This method allows the quantitative determination of SAH volume based on 3D-CT, and may be useful in clinical studies of cerebral vasospasm. (author)

  12. CT perfusion during delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage: distinction between reversible ischemia and ischemia progressing to infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremers, Charlotte H.P. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, PO Box 85500, Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vos, Pieter C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaaf, Irene C. van der; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vergouwen, Mervyn D.I.; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, PO Box 85500, Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-09-15

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) can be reversible or progress to cerebral infarction. In patients with a deterioration clinically diagnosed as DCI, we investigated whether CT perfusion (CTP) can distinguish between reversible ischemia and ischemia progressing to cerebral infarction. From a prospectively collected series of aSAH patients, we included those with DCI, CTP on the day of clinical deterioration, and follow-up imaging. In qualitative CTP analyses (visual assessment), we calculated positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV) with 95 % confidence intervals (95%CI) of a perfusion deficit for infarction on follow-up imaging. In quantitative analyses, we compared perfusion values of the least perfused brain tissue between patients with and without infarction by using receiver-operator characteristic curves and calculated a threshold value with PPV and NPV for the perfusion parameter with the highest area under the curve. In qualitative analyses of 33 included patients, 15 of 17 patients (88 %) with and 6 of 16 patients (38 %) without infarction on follow-up imaging had a perfusion deficit during clinical deterioration (p = 0.002). Presence of a perfusion deficit had a PPV of 71 % (95%CI: 48-89 %) and NPV of 83 % (95%CI: 52-98 %) for infarction on follow-up. Quantitative analyses showed that an absolute minimal cerebral blood flow (CBF) threshold of 17.7 mL/100 g/min had a PPV of 63 % (95%CI: 41-81 %) and a NPV of 78 % (95%CI: 40-97 %) for infarction. CTP may differ between patients with DCI who develop infarction and those who do not. For this purpose, qualitative evaluation may perform marginally better than quantitative evaluation. (orig.)

  13. Quantification of structural cerebral abnormalities on MRI 18 months after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in patients who received endovascular treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresser, Jeroen de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaafsma, Joanna D.; Luitse, Merel J.A.; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.; Biessels, Geert Jan [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Viergever, Max A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-03-01

    Volume measurements performed on brain MRI after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) may provide insight into the structural abnormalities that underlie the commonly occurring and persistent long-term functional deficits after aSAH. We examined the pattern of long-term cerebral structural changes on MRI in relation to known risk factors for poor functional outcome. We studied MRI scans from 38 patients who received endovascular treatment and were not dependent for activities of daily life at 18 months after aSAH. Risk factors for poor functional outcome (clinical condition, Hijdra score, and bicaudate index on admission; occurrence of hydrocephalus or delayed cerebral infarction during hospitalization) were related to supratentorial cerebral parenchymal and lateral ventricular volumes on MRI with linear regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, and intracranial volume. Clinical condition, Hijdra score, and bicaudate index on admission were not related to cerebral parenchymal volume at 18 months. A higher bicaudate index on admission was related to lateral ventricular enlargement at 18 months after aSAH (Beta; 95%CI: 0.51; 0.14<->0.88). Delayed cerebral infarction was related to smaller cerebral parenchymal volumes (-0.14; -0.25<->-0.04) and to lateral ventricular enlargement (0.49; 0.16<->0.83) at 18 months. Volume measurements of the brain are able to quantify patterns of long-term cerebral damage in relation to different risk factors after aSAH. Application of volumetric techniques may provide more insight into the heterogeneous underlying pathophysiological processes. After confirmation of these results in larger studies, volumetric measures might even be used as outcome measures in future treatment studies. (orig.)

  14. Quantitative Computed Tomography Ventriculography for Assessment and Monitoring of Hydrocephalus: A Pilot Study and Description of Method in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multani, Jasjit Singh; Oermann, Eric Karl; Titano, Joseph; Mascitelli, Justin; Nicol, Kelly; Feng, Rui; Skovrlj, Branko; Pain, Margaret; Mocco, J D; Bederson, Joshua B; Costa, Anthony; Shrivastava, Raj

    2017-08-01

    There is no facile quantitative method for monitoring hydrocephalus (HCP). We propose quantitative computed tomography (CT) ventriculography (qCTV) as a novel computer vision tool for empirically assessing HCP in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Twenty patients with SAH who were evaluated for ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) placement were selected for inclusion. Ten patients with normal head computed tomography (CTH) findings were analyzed as negative controls. CTH scans were segmented both manually and automatically (by qCTV) to generate measures of ventricular volume. The median manually calculated ventricular volume was 36.1 cm 3 (interquartile range [IQR], 30-115 cm 3 ), which was similar to the median qCTV measured volume of 37.5 cm 3 (IQR, 32-118 cm 3 ) (P = 0.796). Patients undergoing VPS placement demonstrated an increase in median ventricular volume on qCTV from 21 cm 3 to 40 cm 3 on day T-2 and to 51 cm 3 by day 0, a change of 144%. This is in contrast to patients who did not require shunting, in whom median ventricular volume decreased from 16 cm 3 to 14 cm 3 on day T-2 and to 13 cm 3 by day 0, with an average overall volume decrease 19% (P = 0.001). The average change in ventricular volume predicted which patients would require VPS placement, successfully identifying 7 of 10 patients (P = 0.004). Using an optimized cutoff of a change in ventricular volume of 2.5 cm 3 identified all patients who went on to require VPS placement (10 of 10; P = 0.011). qCTV is a reliable means of quantifying ventricular volume and hydrocephalus. This technique offers a new tool for monitoring neurosurgical patients for hydrocephalus, and may be beneficial for use in future research studies, as well as in the routine care of patients with hydrocephalus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Terson syndrome in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage-its relation to intracranial pressure, admission factors, and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joswig, Holger; Epprecht, Lorenz; Valmaggia, Christophe; Leschka, Sebastian; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Fournier, Jean-Yves; Stienen, Martin Nikolaus

    2016-06-01

    A large number of reports have not been able to clarify the pathophysiology of Terson syndrome (TS) in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Prospective single-center study on aSAH patients. Fundoscopic and radiological signs of TS were assessed. The opening intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients who required a ventriculostomy was recorded with a manometer. Six out of 36 included patients had TS (16.7 %), which was associated with unfavorable admission scores. Twenty-nine patients (80.5 %) required ventriculostomy; TS was associated with higher ICP (median, 40 vs. 15 cm cmH2O, p = .003); all patients with TS had pathological ICP values of >20 cmH2O. Patients with a ruptured aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery complex were ten times as likely to suffer from TS (OR 10.0, 95 % CI 1.03-97.50). Detection of TS on CT had a sensitivity of 50 %, a specificity of 98.4 %, a positive predictive value of 83.3 %, and a negative predictive value of 92.4 %. Mortality was 45 times as high in patients with TS (OR 45.0, 95 % CI 3.86-524.7) and neurologic morbidity up until 3 months post-aSAH was significantly higher in patients with TS (mRS 4-6; 100 vs. 17 %; p = .001). Our findings demonstrate an association between raised ICP and the incidence of TS. TS should be ruled out in aSAH patients presenting comatose or with raised ICP to ensure upfront ophthalmological follow-up. In alert patients without visual complaints and a TS-negative CT scan, the likelihood for the presence of TS is very low.

  16. Using CT perfusion during the early baseline period in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage to assess for development of vasospasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanelli, Pina C.; Jou, Austin; Reichman, Melissa; Greenberg, Edward; Cayci, Zuzan; Gold, Rachel; John, Majnu; Ugorec, Igor; Rosengart, Axel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate computed tomography perfusion (CTP) during admission baseline period (days 0-3) in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (A-SAH) for development of vasospasm. Retrospective analysis was performed on A-SAH patients from Dec 2004 to Feb 2007 with CTP on days 0-3. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT) maps were analyzed for qualitative perfusion deficits. Quantitative analysis was performed using region-of-interest placement to obtain mean CTP values. Development of vasospasm was determined by a multistage hierarchical reference standard incorporating both imaging and clinical criteria. Student's t test and threshold analysis were performed. Seventy-five patients were included, 37% (28/75) were classified as vasospasm. Mean CTP values in vasospasm compared to no vasospasm groups were: CBF 31.90 ml/100 g/min vs. 39.88 ml/100 g/min (P < 0.05), MTT 7.12 s vs. 5.03 s (P < 0.01), and CBV 1.86 ml/100 g vs. 2.02 ml/100 g (P = 0.058). Fifteen patients had qualitative perfusion deficits with 73% (11/15) developed vasospasm. Optimal threshold for CBF is 24-25 mL/100 g/min with 91% specificity and 50% sensitivity, MTT is 5.5 s with 70% specificity and 61% sensitivity and CBV is 1.7 mL/100 g with 89% specificity and 36% sensitivity. These initial results support our hypothesis that A-SAH patients who develop vasospasm may demonstrate early alterations in cerebral perfusion, with statistically significant CBF reduction and MTT prolongation. Overall, CTP has high specificity for development of vasospasm. Future clinical implications include using CTP during the baseline period for early identification of A-SAH patients at high risk for vasospasm to prompt robust preventative measures and treatment. (orig.)

  17. Restrictions and satisfaction with participation in patients who are ADL-independent after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huenges Wajer, Irene M C; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Greebe, Paut; Post, Marcel W M; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; van Zandvoort, Martine J E

    2017-03-01

    Most survivors of an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) are ADL-independent, but they often experience restrictions in (social) activities and, therefore, cannot regain their pre-morbid level of participation. In this study, participation restrictions and participation satisfaction experienced after aSAH were assessed. Moreover, possible predictors of participation after aSAH were examined to identify goals for rehabilitation. Participation restrictions experienced by a series of 67 patients visiting our SAH outpatient clinic were assessed as part of standard clinical care using the Participation Restrictions and Satisfaction sections of the Utrecht Scale for Evaluation of Rehabilitation Participation (USER-Participation) 6 months after aSAH. Cognitive impairments, cognitive and emotional complaints, and symptoms of depression and anxiety, assessed 10 weeks after aSAH, were examined as possible predictors of participation by means of linear regression analysis. Although patients were ADL-independent, 64% reported one or more participation restrictions and 60% were dissatisfied in one or more participation domains. Most commonly experienced restrictions concerned housekeeping, chores in and around the house, and physical exercise. Dissatisfaction was most often reported about outdoor activities, mobility, and work/housekeeping. The main predictors of participation restrictions as well as satisfaction with participation were cognitive complaints (subjective) (β = -.30, p = .03 and β = -.40, p = .002, respectively) and anxiety (β = .32, p = .02 and β = -.34, p = .007, respectively). Almost two-thirds of the ADL-independent patients experienced problems of participation 6 months after aSAH. Cognitive complaints (subjective) and anxiety symptoms showed the strongest association with participation restrictions and satisfaction. Cognitive rehabilitation and anxiety-reducing interventions may help to optimize rehabilitation and increase

  18. Effects of ischemic phrenic nerve root ganglion injury on respiratory disturbances in subarachnoid hemorrhage: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvi, Hızır; Demir, Recep; Aygül, Recep; Kotan, Dilcan; Calik, Muhammet; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu

    2013-12-30

    Phrenic nerves have important roles on the management of respiration rhythm. Diaphragm paralysis is possible in phrenic nerve roots ischemia in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We examined whether there is a relationship between phrenic nerve root ischemia and respiratory disturbances in SAH. This study was conducted on 5 healthy control and 14 rabbits with experimentally induced SAH by injecting autologous blood into their cisterna magna. Animals were followed up via monitors for detecting the heart and respiration rhythms for 20 days and then decapitaed by humanely. Normal and degenerated neuron densities of phrenic nerve root at the level of C4 dorsal root ganglia (C4DRG) were estimated by Stereological methods. Between the mean numerical density of degenerated neurons of C4DRG and respiratory rate/minute of groups were compared statistically. Phrenic nerve roots, artery and diaphragm muscles degeneration was detected in respiratory arrest developed animals. The mean neuronal density of C4DRG was 13272 ±1201/mm3 with a mean respiration rate of 23 ±4/min in the control group. The mean degenerated neuron density was 2.240 ±450/mm(3) and respiration rhythm was 31 ±6/min in survivors. But, the mean degenerated neuron density was 5850 ±650/mm(3) and mean respiration rhythm was 34 ±7/min in respiratory arrest developed animals (n = 7). A linear relationship was noticed between the degenerated neuron density of C4DRG and respiraton rate (r = -0.758; p Phrenic nerve root ischemia may be an important factor in respiration rhythms deteriorations in SAH which has not been mentioned in the literature.

  19. Important casual association of carotid body and glossopharyngeal nerve and lung following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rabbits. First report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolas, Coskun; Kanat, Ayhan; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Turkmenoglu, Osman Nuri; Gundogdu, Cemal

    2014-01-15

    The glossopharyngeal nerves (GPNs) and carotid bodies (CBs) have an important role in the continuation of the cerebral autoregulation and cardiorespiratory functions. The relationship between degenerative injury of CB and the GPN in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was studied. Twenty rabbits were included in this study. Five of them (n=5) were used as control group. The remaining animals (n=15) were exposed to experimental SAH. In the six animals of the SAH group, severe signs of illness were observed, and these six animals were killed in the first week after SAH. Others animals (n=9) were followed for 20 days and then sacrificed. GPNs and CBs were examined and, the live and degenerated GPN axon number, and of CB neuron numbers were stereologically estimated. The mean number of live neurons in CBs was 4206.67±148.35 and live axons of GPNs were 1211.66±14.29 in the animals of the control group. The number of degenerated neurons of CBs was 2065±110.27 and the number of degenerated axons of GPNs was 530.83±43.48 in early killed animals with SAH. The number of degenerated neurons of CBs and the number of degenerated axons of GPNs were found as 1013.89±4184 and 2270.5±134.38 in the living animals with SAH, respectively. High number of degenerated axons of GPN and neurons of CBs of the early killed animals suggest that the mortality in early SAH might be due to GPNs injury secondary to compression of their axons or supplying vessels by the probably herniated brainstem, and secondary denervation injury of CBs, and lung. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Uncovering the Forgotten Effect of Superior Cervical Ganglia on Pupil Diameter in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onen, Mehmet Resid; Yilmaz, Ilhan; Ramazanoglu, Leyla; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Keles, Sadullah; Baykal, Orhan; Aydin, Nazan; Gundogdu, Cemal

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between neuron density of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglia and pupil diameter in subarachnoid hemorrhage. This study was conducted on 22 rabbits; 5 for the baseline control group, 5 for the SHAM group and 12 for the study group. Pupil diameters were measured via sunlight and ocular tomography on day 1 as the control values. Pupil diameters were re-measured after injecting 0.5 cc saline to the SHAM group, and autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magna of the study group. After 3 weeks, the brain, superior cervical sympathetic ganglia and ciliary ganglia were extracted with peripheral tissues bilaterally and examined histopathologically. Pupil diameters were compared with neuron densities of the sympathetic ganglia and ciliary ganglia which were examined using stereological methods. Baseline values were; normal pupil diameter 7.180±620 ?m and mean neuron density of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglia 6.321±510/mm3, degenerated neuron density of ciliary ganglia was 5±2/mm3 after histopathological examination in the control group. These values were measured as 6.850±578 ?m, 5.950±340/mm3 and 123±39/mm3 in the SHAM group and 9.910±840 ?m, 7.950±764/mm3 and 650±98/mm3 in the study group. A linear relationship was determined between neuron density of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglia and pupil diameters (p < 0.005). Degenerated ciliary ganglia neuron density had an inverse effect on pupil diameters in all groups (p < 0.0001). Highly degenerated neuron density of the ciliary ganglion is not responsible for pupil dilatation owing to parasympathetic pupilloconstrictor palsy, but high neuron density of the pupillodilatatory superior cervical sympathetic ganglia should be considered an important factor for pupil dilatation.

  1. Multi-wavelength spectrophotometric analysis for detection of xanthochromia in cerebrospinal fluid and accuracy for the diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Wu, Alan H B; Lynch, Kara L; Ko, Nerissa; Grenache, David G

    2013-09-23

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was examined for bilirubin, an important indicator for diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A multi-wavelength (340, 415, and 460 nm) spectrophotometric assay was developed for the quantitative measurement of bilirubin in CSF, enabling the mathematical correction for absorbance of hemoglobin and proteins. Bilirubin and hemoglobin results were correlated to HPLC and a standard colorimetric assay, respectively. A subset of samples was sent for an absorbance reading at 450 nm following baseline correction. The multi-wavelength bilirubin assay was validated on 70 patients with confirmed SAH and 70 patients with neurologic symptoms who ruled out for SAH. The multi-wavelength spectrophometric assay demonstrated no interferences due to proteins (albumin) up to 30 g/l or oxyhemoglobin up to 260 mg/l. The assay limit of detection was 0.2 mg/l, linear to 20 mg/l, and CVs ranged from 1 to 6% at bilirubin concentrations of 0.84 and 2.1mg/l. The spectrophotometric assay correlated to HPLC and the colorimetric assay for bilirubin and hemoglobin, respectively. Results also correlated to the absorbance method (with removal of samples with high hemoglobin and proteins). The area under the ROC curve for diagnosis of SAH was 0.971 and 0.954 for the HPLC and spectrophotometric assay, respectively. At a cutoff of 0.2mg/l, the clinical specificity was 100% for both assays, and the clinical sensitivity was 94.3% and 88.6% for SAH for the HPLC and spectrophotometric asays, respectively. The multi-wavelength spectrophotometric assay is an objective alternative to visual inspection, HPLC, and absorbance for CSF bilirubin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Development of Neuroendocrine Disturbances over Time: Longitudinal Findings in Patients after Traumatic Brain Injury and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kopczak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports suggest that neuroendocrine disturbances in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI or aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH may still develop or resolve months or even years after the trauma. We investigated a cohort of n = 168 patients (81 patients after TBI and 87 patients after SAH in whom hormone levels had been determined at various time points to assess the course and pattern of hormonal insufficiencies. Data were analyzed using three different criteria: (1 patients with lowered basal laboratory values; (2 patients with lowered basal laboratory values or the need for hormone replacement therapy; (3 diagnosis of the treating physician. The first hormonal assessment after a median time of three months after the injury showed lowered hormone laboratory test results in 35% of cases. Lowered testosterone (23.1% of male patients, lowered estradiol (14.3% of female patients and lowered insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I values (12.1% were most common. Using Criterion 2, a higher prevalence rate of 55.6% of cases was determined, which correlated well with the prevalence rate of 54% of cases using the physicians’ diagnosis as the criterion. Intraindividual changes (new onset insufficiency or recovery were predominantly observed for the somatotropic axis (12.5%, the gonadotropic axis in women (11.1% and the corticotropic axis (10.6%. Patients after TBI showed more often lowered IGF-I values at first testing, but normal values at follow-up (p < 0.0004. In general, most patients remained stable. Stable hormone results at follow-up were obtained in 78% (free thyroxine (fT4 values to 94.6% (prolactin values.

  3. [Curcumin alleviates early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats by inhibiting JNK/c-Jun signal pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Zhu, Ji

    2018-03-01

    Objective To investigate the inhibitory effect of curcumin on early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by inhibiting JNK/ c-Jun signal pathway. Methods Sixty adult male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operation group (sham group), SAH group, SAH group treated with 100 mg/(kg.d) curcumin and SAH group treated with 200 mg/(kg.d) curcumin, with 15 rats in each group. Endovascular puncture was used to induce SAH model. Nissl staining was used to test whether neurons were broken. TUNEL staining was used to detect apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expression of caspase-3. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expressions of p-JNK, JNK, p-c-Jun, c-Jun, and caspase-3. Results Nissl staining indicated the decrease of Nissl bodies in SAH group, but increase of Nissl bodies in SAH group treated with curcumin. TUNEL staining showed that there were more apoptotic neurons in SAH group compared with sham group, while apoptotic neurons decreased after the treatment with curcumin, more obviously in the group treated with 200 mg/(kg.d) curcumin. The expressions of p-JNK, JNK, p-c-Jun, c-Jun, and caspase-3 were up-regulated in SAH group compared with sham group. However, the expressions of those proteins were down-regulated after the treatment with curcumin, especially by higher-dose curcumin treatment. Conclusion Curcumin might suppress early brain injury after SAH by inhibiting JNK/c-Jun signal pathway and neuron apoptosis.

  4. Increasing numbers of nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the last 15 years: antithrombotic medication as reason and prognostic factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konczalla, Juergen; Kashefiolasl, Sepide; Brawanski, Nina; Senft, Christian; Seifert, Volker; Platz, Johannes

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is usually caused by a ruptured intracranial aneurysm, but in some patients no source of hemorrhage can be detected. More recent data showed increasing numbers of cases of spontaneous nonaneurysmal SAH (NASAH). The aim of this study was to analyze factors, especially the use of antithrombotic medications such as systemic anticoagulation or antiplatelet agents (aCPs), influencing the increasing numbers of cases of NASAH and the clinical outcome. METHODS Between 1999 and 2013, 214 patients who were admitted to the authors' institution suffered from NASAH, 14% of all patients with SAH. Outcome was assessed according to the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 6 months. Risk factors were identified based on the outcome. RESULTS The number of patients with NASAH increased significantly in the last 15 years of the study period. There was a statistically significant increase in the rate of nonperimesencephalic (NPM)-SAH occurrence and aCP use, while the proportion of elderly patients remained stable. Favorable outcome (mRS 0-2) was achieved in 85% of cases, but patients treated with aCPs had a significantly higher risk for an unfavorable outcome. Further analysis showed that elderly patients, and especially the subgroup with a Fisher Grade 3 bleeding pattern, had a high risk for an unfavorable outcome, whereas the subgroup of NPM-SAH without a Fisher Grade 3 bleeding pattern had a favorable outcome, similar to perimesencephalic (PM)-SAH. CONCLUSIONS Over the years, a significant increase in the number of patients with NASAH has been observed. Also, the rate of aCP use has increased significantly. Risk factors for an unfavorable outcome were age > 65 years, Fisher Grade 3 bleeding pattern, and aCP use. Both "PM-SAH" and "NPM-SAH without a Fisher Grade 3 bleeding pattern" had excellent outcomes. Patients with NASAH and a Fisher Grade 3 bleeding pattern had a significantly higher risk for an unfavorable outcome and death. Therefore, for further

  5. Regulation of microRNAs miR-30a and miR-143 in cerebral vasculature after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anne Holt; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Edvinsson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: microRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of translation and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, and suggested as possible prognostic biomarkers. Our aim was to identify miRNAs that are differentially regulated in cerebral...... arteries after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), using a rat injection model of SAH and a qPCR-based screen of 728 rat miRNAs. Additionally, serum was analyzed for a possible spill-over to the circulation of regulated miRNAs from the vessel walls. RESULTS: We identified 482 different miRNAs expressed...

  6. Acute hydrocephalus in nonaneurysmal perimesencephalic hemorrhage: evidence of CSF block at the tentorial hiatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, G. J.; Wijdicks, E. F.; Vermeulen, M.; Tans, J. T.; Hasan, D.; van Gijn, J.

    1992-01-01

    The acute hydrocephalus in patients with nonaneurysmal perimesencephalic hemorrhage suggests an extraventricular obstruction of CSF flow. We studied the occurrence of acute hydrocephalus and the site of cisternal blood in 40 consecutive patients with perimesencephalic hemorrhage. In all 11 patients

  7. Traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage due to motor vehicle crash versus fall from height: a 4-year epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchani, Ashok; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Thani, Hassan; El-Faramawy, Ahmed; Zarour, Ahmad; Asim, Mohammad; Latifi, Rifat

    2014-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is difficult to estimate the real incidence of traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (TSAH). Although TSAH after trauma is associated with poor prognoses, the impact of mechanism of injury (MOI) and the pathophysiology remains unknown. We hypothesized that outcome of TSAH caused by motor vehicle crash (MVC) or fall from height (FFH) varies based on the MOI. Data were collected retrospectively from a prospectively created database registry in the section of Trauma Surgery at Hamad General Hospital between January 2008 and July 2012. All patients presented with head trauma and TSAH were included. Patient data included age, gender, nationality, mechanism of injury, injury severity score (ISS), types of head injuries, and associated injuries. Ventilator days, intensive care unit length of stay, pneumonia, and mortality were also studied. A total of 1665 patients with TBI were identified, of them 403 had TSAH with a mean age of 35 ± 15 years. Of them 93% were male patients and 86% were expatriates. MVC (53%) and FFH (35%) were the major mechanisms of injury. The overall mean ISS and head abbreviated injury score were 19 ± 10.6 and 3.4 ± 0.96, respectively. Patients in MVC group sustained severe TSAH, had significantly greater head abbreviated injury score (3.5 ± 0.9 vs. 3.2 ± 0.9; P = 0.009) and ISS (21.6 ± 10.6 vs. 15.9 ± 9.5; P = 0.001), and lower scene Glasgow coma scale (10.8 ± 4.8 vs. 13.2 ± 3.4; P = 0.001) compared with the FFH group. In addition, the MVC group sustained more intraventricular hemorrhage (4.7 vs. 0.7; P = 0.001) and diffuse axonal injury (4.2 vs. 2.9; P = 0.001). In contrast, extradural hemorrhage (14.3% vs. 11.6%; P = 0.008) was higher in the FFH group. Lower extremities (14% vs. 4.3%; P = 0.004) injury was mainly associated with the MVC group. The overall mortality was 19 % among patients with TSAH. The mortality rate was higher in the MVC group when

  8. The SAFARI Score to Assess the Risk of Convulsive Seizure During Admission for Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaja, Blessing N R; Schweizer, Tom A; Claassen, Jan; Le Roux, Peter; Mayer, Stephan A; Macdonald, R Loch

    2018-06-01

    Seizure is a significant complication in patients under acute admission for aneurysmal SAH and could result in poor outcomes. Treatment strategies to optimize management will benefit from methods to better identify at-risk patients. To develop and validate a risk score for convulsive seizure during acute admission for SAH. A risk score was developed in 1500 patients from a single tertiary hospital and externally validated in 852 patients. Candidate predictors were identified by systematic review of the literature and were included in a backward stepwise logistic regression model with in-hospital seizure as a dependent variable. The risk score was assessed for discrimination using the area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC) and for calibration using a goodness-of-fit test. The SAFARI score, based on 4 items (age ≥ 60 yr, seizure occurrence before hospitalization, ruptured aneurysm in the anterior circulation, and hydrocephalus requiring cerebrospinal fluid diversion), had AUC = 0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73-0.82 in the development cohort. The validation cohort had AUC = 0.65, 95% CI 0.56-0.73. A calibrated increase in the risk of seizure was noted with increasing SAFARI score points. The SAFARI score is a simple tool that adequately stratified SAH patients according to their risk for seizure using a few readily derived predictor items. It may contribute to a more individualized management of seizure following SAH.

  9. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  10. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Hughes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  11. A case of acute liver failure in dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Biswas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is an arboviral disease endemic in many parts of the world. The clinical presentation of dengue viral infection ranges from asymptomatic illness to fatal dengue shock syndrome. Although, it is known to cause hepatic involvement, it occasionally results in acute hepatic failure. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever presenting with acute liver failure. The case recovered completely after treatment. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2013; 7(2: 41-42

  12. Methylprednisolone therapy in acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risikesan, Jeyanthini; Koppelhus, Uffe; Steiniche, Torben

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of an 18-month-old boy who showed severe clinical signs indicative of acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) with painful purpuric skin affection primarily of the face and marked edema of the ears. The histological findings were diagnostic for leukocytoclastic vasculitis...

  13. Minocycline Protects Against NLRP3 Inflammasome-Induced Inflammation and P53-Associated Apoptosis in Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianru; Chen, Jingsen; Mo, Hangbo; Chen, Jingyin; Qian, Cong; Yan, Feng; Gu, Chi; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao

    2016-05-01

    Minocycline has beneficial effects in early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH); however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects have not been clearly identified. This study was undertaken to determine the influence of minocycline on inflammation and neural apoptosis and the possible mechanisms of these effects in early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage. SAH was induced by the filament perforation model of SAH in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Minocycline or vehicle was given via an intraperitoneal injection 1 h after SAH induction. Minocycline treatment markedly attenuated brain edema secondary to blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation, which controls the maturation and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, especially interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Minocycline treatment also markedly reduced the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells. To further identify the potential mechanisms, we demonstrated that minocycline increased Bcl2 expression and reduced the protein expression of P53, Bax, and cleaved caspase-3. In addition, minocycline reduced the cortical levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are closely related to both NLRP3 inflammasome and P53 expression. Minocycline protects against NLRP3 inflammasome-induced inflammation and P53-associated apoptosis in early brain injury following SAH. Minocycline's anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effect may involve the reduction of ROS. Minocycline treatment may exhibit important clinical potentials in the management of SAH.

  14. Definition of delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage as an outcome event in clinical trials and observational studies: proposal of a multidisciplinary research group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Vermeulen, Marinus; van Gijn, Jan; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Wijdicks, Eelco F; Muizelaar, J Paul; Mendelow, A David; Juvela, Seppo; Yonas, Howard; Terbrugge, Karel G; Macdonald, R Loch; Diringer, Michael N; Broderick, Joseph P; Dreier, Jens P; Roos, Yvo B W E M

    2010-10-01

    In clinical trials and observational studies there is considerable inconsistency in the use of definitions to describe delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A major cause for this inconsistency is the combining of radiographic evidence of vasospasm with clinical features of cerebral ischemia, although multiple factors may contribute to DCI. The second issue is the variability and overlap of terms used to describe each phenomenon. This makes comparisons among studies difficult. An international ad hoc panel of experts involved in subarachnoid hemorrhage research developed and proposed a definition of DCI to be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials and observational studies. We used a consensus-building approach. It is proposed that in observational studies and clinical trials aiming to investigate strategies to prevent DCI, the 2 main outcome measures should be: (1) cerebral infarction identified on CT or MRI or proven at autopsy, after exclusion of procedure-related infarctions; and (2) functional outcome. Secondary outcome measure should be clinical deterioration caused by DCI, after exclusion of other potential causes of clinical deterioration. Vasospasm on angiography or transcranial Doppler can also be used as an outcome measure to investigate proof of concept but should be interpreted in conjunction with DCI or functional outcome. The proposed measures reflect the most relevant morphological and clinical features of DCI without regard to pathogenesis to be used as an outcome measure in clinical trials and observational studies.

  15. Acute hemorrhagic encephalitis: An unusual presentation of dengue viral infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Vikram, Naval Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a common viral infection worldwide with presentation varying from clinically silent infection to dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and severe fulminant dengue shock syndrome. Neurological manifestation usually results from multisystem dysfunction secondary to vascular leak. Presentation as hemorrhagic encephalitis is very rare. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old female admitted with generalized tonic clonic seizures. Plain computed tomography (CT) scan of head revealed hypodensities in bilateral deep gray matter nuclei and right posterior parietal lobe without any hemorrhage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serology were positive for IgM and IgG antibodies to dengue viral antigen. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multifocal T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral parenchyma including basal ganglia. No hemorrhage was seen. She was managed with steroids. As her clinical condition deteriorated, after being stable for 2 days, repeat MRI was done which revealed development of hemorrhage within the lesions, and diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis of dengue viral etiology was made

  16. The safety of vasopressor-induced hypertension in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with coexisting unruptured, unprotected intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Buckley, Robert T; Indrakanti, Santoshi S; Turkmani, Ali H; Oh, Gerald; Crobeddu, Emanuela; Fargen, Kyle M; El Ahmadieh, Tarek Y; Naidech, Andrew M; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Hoh, Brian L; Bendok, Bernard R; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2015-10-01

    Vasopressor-induced hypertension (VIH) is an established treatment for patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) who develop vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). However, the safety of VIH in patients with coincident, unruptured, unprotected intracranial aneurysms is uncertain. This retrospective multiinstitutional study identified 1) patients with aneurysmal SAH and 1 or more unruptured, unprotected aneurysms who required VIH therapy (VIH group), and 2) patients with aneurysmal SAH and 1 or more unruptured, unprotected aneurysms who did not require VIH therapy (non-VIH group). All patients had previously undergone surgical or endovascular treatment for the presumed ruptured aneurysm. Comparisons between the VIH and non-VIH patients were made in terms of the patient characteristics, clinical and radiographic severity of SAH, total number of aneurysms, number of ruptured/unruptured aneurysms, aneurysm location/size, number of unruptured and unprotected aneurysms during VIH, severity of vasospasm, degree of hypervolemia, and degree and duration of VIH therapy. For the VIH group (n = 176), 484 aneurysms were diagnosed, 231 aneurysms were treated, and 253 unruptured aneurysms were left unprotected during 1293 total days of VIH therapy (5.12 total years of VIH therapy for unruptured, unprotected aneurysms). For the non-VIH group (n = 73), 207 aneurysms were diagnosed, 93 aneurysms were treated, and 114 unruptured aneurysms were left unprotected. For the VIH and non-VIH groups, the mean sizes of the ruptured (7.2 ± 0.3 vs 7.8 ± 0.6 mm, respectively; p = 0.27) and unruptured (3.4 ± 0.2 vs 3.2 ± 0.2 mm, respectively; p = 0.40) aneurysms did not differ. The authors observed 1 new SAH from a previously unruptured, unprotected aneurysm in each group (1 of 176 vs 1 of 73 patients; p = 0.50). Baseline patient characteristics and comorbidities were similar between groups. While the degree of hypervolemia was similar between the VIH and non-VIH patients

  17. Temporal evolution of vasospasm and clinical outcome after intra-arterial vasodilator therapy in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Daftari Besheli

    Full Text Available Intra-arterial (IA vasodilator therapy is one of the recommended treatments to minimize the impact of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced cerebral vasospasm refractory to standard management. However, its usefulness and efficacy is not well established. We evaluated the effect IA vasodilator therapy on middle cerebral artery blood flow and on discharge outcome. We reviewed records for 115 adults admitted to Neurointensive Care Unit to test whether there was a difference in clinical outcome (discharge mRS in those who received IA infusions. In a subset of 19 patients (33 vessels treated using IA therapy, we tested whether therapy was effective in reversing the trends in blood flow. All measures of MCA blood flow increased from day -2 to -1 before infusion (maximum Peak Systolic Velocity (PSV 232.2±9.4 to 262.4±12.5 cm/s [p = 0.02]; average PSV 202.1±8.5 to 229.9±10.9 [p = 0.02]; highest Mean Flow Velocity (MFV 154.3±8.3 to 172.9±10.5 [p = 0.10]; average MFV 125.5±6.3 to 147.8±9.5 cm/s, [p = 0.02] but not post-infusion (maximum PSV 261.2±14.6 cm/s [p = .89]; average PSV 223.4±11.4 [p = 0.56]; highest MFV 182.9±12.4 cm/s [p = 0.38]; average MFV 153.0±10.2 cm/s [p = 0.54]. After IA therapy, flow velocities were consistently reduced (day X infusion interaction p<0.01 for all measures. However, discharge mRS was higher in IA infusion group, even after adjusting for sex, age, and admission grades. Thus, while IA vasodilator therapy was effective in reversing the vasospasm-mediated deterioration in blood flow, clinical outcomes in the treated group were worse than the untreated group. There is need for a prospective randomized controlled trial to avoid potential confounding effect of selection bias.

  18. Neurodegenerative cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers tau and amyloid beta predict functional, quality of life, and neuropsychological outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joswig, Holger; Korte, Wolfgang; Früh, Severin; Epprecht, Lorenz; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Fournier, Jean-Yves; Stienen, Martin Nikolaus

    2018-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers might be useful in predicting outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). It was the aim to determine whether tau and amyloid beta CSF concentrations predict functional, health-related quality of life (hrQoL), and neuropsychological outcomes after aSAH. Ventricular CSF was obtained from n = 24 aSAH patients at admission (D0), day 2 (D2), and day 6 (D6). CSF total (t)Tau, phosphorylated (p)Tau (181P) , and amyloid beta (1-40 and 1-42) (Aβ40/Aβ42) levels were compared between patients with favorable and unfavorable functional (modified Rankin Scale (mRS)), hrQoL (Euro-Qol (EQ-5D)), and neuropsychological outcomes at 3 (3 m) and 12 months (12 m). Patients with unfavorable functional (mRS 4-6) and hrQoL outcome (EQ-5D z-score ≤ - 1.0) at 3 and 12 m had higher CSF tTau/pTau and lower Aβ40/Aβ42 at D0, D2, and D6 with varying degrees of statistical significance. In terms of predicting neuropsychological outcome, CSF pTau showed a statistically significant correlation with the z-scores of executive function (r = - 0.7486, p = 0.008), verbal memory (r = - 0.8101, p = 0.002), attention (r = - 0.6498, p = 0.030), and visuospatial functioning (r = - 0.6944, p = 0.017) at 3 m. At 12 m, CSF pTau had statistically significant correlations with the z-scores of verbal memory (r = - 0.7473, p = 0.008) and visuospatial functioning (r = - 0.6678, p = 0.024). In conclusion, higher tTau/pTau and lower Aβ40/Aβ42 CSF levels predict unfavorable long-term functional and hrQoL outcomes. Neuropsychological deficits correlate with increased CSF tTau and pTau concentrations.

  19. Neuropsychological function after endovascular and neurosurgical treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeto, Peter; Loch Macdonald, R; Ornstein, Tisha J; Schweizer, Tom A

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is treated with either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling, though the latter is the preferred treatment method given its more favorable functional outcomes. However, neuropsychological functioning after treatment is rarely taken into account. In this meta-analysis, the authors synthesized relevant data from the literature and compared neuropsychological functioning in patients after coiling and clipping of SAH. They hypothesized that the coiled patients would outperform the clipped patients; that group differences would be greater with higher posterior circulation rupture rates, in older patients, and in more recent publications; that group differences would be smaller with greater rates of middle cerebral artery (MCA) rupture; and that anterior communicating artery (ACoA) rupture rates would not influence effect sizes. METHODS The MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO databases were searched for clinical studies that compared neuropsychological functioning after either endovascular coiling or surgical clipping for SAH. Hedge's g and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using random effects models. Patients who had undergone coiling or clipping were compared on test performance in 8 neuropsychological domains: executive functions, language, attention/processing speed, verbal memory, visual memory, spatial memory, visuospatial functions, and intelligence. Patients were also compared with healthy controls, and meta-regressions were used to explore the relation between effect sizes and publication year, delay between treatment and neuropsychological testing, mean patient age, and rates of posterior circulation, ACoA, and MCA ruptures. RESULTS Thirteen studies with 396 clipped cases, 314 coiled cases, and 169 healthy controls were included in the study. The coil-treated patients outperformed the clip-treated patients on executive function (g = 0.17, 95% CI 0.08-0.25) and language tests (g = 0.23, 95% CI 0.07-0.39), and all

  20. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and acute hepatitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paula Gomes Mourão

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is the world's most important viral hemorrhagic fever disease, the most geographically wide-spread of the arthropod-born viruses, and it causes a wide clinical spectrum of disease. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by acute hepatitis. The initial picture of classical dengue fever was followed by painful liver enlargement, vomiting, hematemesis, epistaxis and diarrhea. Severe liver injury was detected by laboratory investigation, according to a syndromic surveillance protocol, expressed in a self-limiting pattern and the patient had a complete recovery. The serological tests for hepatitis and yellow fever viruses were negative. MAC-ELISA for dengue was positive.

  1. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and acute hepatitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, Maria Paula Gomes; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães de; Bastos, Michele de Souza; Albuquerque, Bernardino Cláudio de; Alecrim, Wilson Duarte

    2004-12-01

    Dengue fever is the world's most important viral hemorrhagic fever disease, the most geographically wide-spread of the arthropod-born viruses, and it causes a wide clinical spectrum of disease. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by acute hepatitis. The initial picture of classical dengue fever was followed by painful liver enlargement, vomiting, hematemesis, epistaxis and diarrhea. Severe liver injury was detected by laboratory investigation, according to a syndromic surveillance protocol, expressed in a self-limiting pattern and the patient had a complete recovery. The serological tests for hepatitis and yellow fever viruses were negative. MAC-ELISA for dengue was positive.

  2. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui [Pudong New Area People' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai (China)

    2011-05-15

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  3. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  4. Glyceryl Trinitrate for Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnan, Kailash; Scutt, Polly; Woodhouse, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    if patients were randomized within 6 hours of stroke onset. METHODS: In this prespecified subgroup analysis, the effect of GTN (5 mg/d for 7 days) versus no GTN was studied in 629 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage presenting within 48 hours and with systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg. The primary outcome...... was the modified Rankin Scale at 90 days. RESULTS: Mean blood pressure at baseline was 172/93 mm Hg and significantly lower (difference -7.5/-4.2 mm Hg; both P≤0.05) on day 1 in 310 patients allocated to GTN when compared with 319 randomized to no GTN. No difference in the modified Rankin Scale was observed...

  5. HIMALAIA (Hypertension Induction in the Management of AneurysmaL subArachnoid haemorrhage with secondary IschaemiA) : a randomized single- blind controlled trial of induced hypertension vs. no induced hypertension in the treatment of delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, C. S.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Slooter, A. J. C.

    RationaleDelayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a major complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). One option to treat delayed cerebral ischemia is to use induced hypertension, but its efficacy on the eventual outcome has not been proven in a randomized clinical trial. This article

  6. HIMALAIA (Hypertension Induction in the Management of AneurysmaL subArachnoid haemorrhage with secondary IschaemiA): a randomized single-blind controlled trial of induced hypertension vs. no induced hypertension in the treatment of delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, C. S.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Slooter, A. J. C.; Algra, Ale; Beute, Gus N.; Coert, Bert A.; Dankbaar, Jan-Willem; Dippel, Diederik; Dirven, Clemens M. F.; Gathier, Celine S.; Horn, Janneke; van der Jagt, Mathieu; Kesecioglu, Jozef; van Kooten, Fop; van der Lugt, Aad; Muller, Marcella C. A.; Oldenbeuving, Annemarie W.; van der Pol, Bram; Regli, Luca; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Roks, Gerwin; van der Schaaf, Irene C.; Slooter, Arjen J. C.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Verweij, Bon H.

    2014-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a major complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). One option to treat delayed cerebral ischemia is to use induced hypertension, but its efficacy on the eventual outcome has not been proven in a randomized clinical trial. This article describes

  7. Continued bleeding following acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, H.B.

    2014-01-01

    In this Ph.D. thesis, ‘Continued bleeding following acute intracerebral hemorrhage’, we have discussed the background literature, risk factors, and underlying biology of hematoma expansion, as well as the clinical applicability of the CT angiography (CTA) 'spot sign' as an imaging marker of this

  8. Hematoma Expansion Following Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, H. Bart; Greenberg, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage, the most devastating form of stroke, has no specific therapy proven to improve outcome by randomized controlled trial. Location and baseline hematoma volume are strong predictors of mortality, but are non-modifiable by the time of diagnosis. Expansion of the initial hematoma is a further marker of poor prognosis that may be at least partly preventable. Several risk factors for hematoma expansion have been identified, including baseline ICH volume, early presentation after symptom onset, anticoagulation, and the CT angiography spot sign. Although the biological mechanisms of hematoma expansion remain unclear, accumulating evidence supports a model of ongoing secondary bleeding from ruptured adjacent vessels surrounding the initial bleeding site. Several large clinical trials testing therapies aimed at preventing hematoma expansion are in progress, including aggressive blood pressure reduction, treatment with recombinant factor VIIa guided by CT angiography findings, and surgical intervention for superficial hematomas without intraventricular extension. Hematoma expansion is so far the only marker of outcome that is amenable to treatment and thus a potentially important therapeutic target. PMID:23466430

  9. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongre, Atul; Adhe, Vijay; Kothari, Dimple; Kardekar, Suchitra; Khopkar, Uday

    2012-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy is one of the clinical forms of leukocytoclastic vasculitis seen in children. The condition runs a benign course. We report two male children who presented with upper respiratory tract infection followed by limb swelling and purpuric and ecchymotic lesions on the skin. Skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis in both patients. In both cases, the lesions resolved completely without any sequelae.

  10. Decreasing Risk of Fatal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Other Epidemiological Trends in the Era of Coiling Implementation in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Mark Worthington

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and purposeSubarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is associated with a high risk of mortality and disability in survivors. We examined the epidemiology and burden of SAH in our population during a time services were re-organized to facilitate access to evidence-based endovascular coiling and neurosurgical care.MethodsSAH hospitalizations from 2001 to 2009, in New South Wales, Australia, were linked to death registrations to June 30, 2010. We assessed the variability of admission rates, fatal SAH rates and case fatality over time and according to patient demographic characteristics.ResultsThere were 4,945 eligible patients admitted to hospital with SAH. The risk of fatal SAH significantly decreased by 2.7% on average per year (95% CI = 0.3–4.9%. Case fatality at 2, 30, 90, and 365 days significantly declined over time. The average annual percentage reduction in mortality ranged from 4.4% for 30-day mortality (95% CI −6.1 to −2.7 (P < 0.001 to 4.7% for mortality within 2 days (−7.1 to −2.2 (P < 0.001 (Table 3. Three percent of patients received coiling at the start of the study period, increasing to 28% at the end (P-value for trend <0.001. Females were significantly more likely to be hospitalized for a SAH compared to males [incident rate ratio (IRR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.23–1.44] (P < 0.001 and to die from SAH (IRR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.24–1.59 (P < 0.001. People born in South-East Asia and the Oceania region had a significantly increased risk of SAH, while the risk of fatal SAH was greater in South-East and North-East Asian born residents. People residing in areas of least disadvantage had the lowest risk of hospitalization (IRR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.74–0.92 and also the lowest risk of fatal SAH (0.81, 95% CI = 0.66–1.00 (P < 0.001 and P = 0.003, respectively. For every 100 SAH admissions, 20 and 15 might be avoided in males and females, respectively, if the risk of SAH in our

  11. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage due to Acute Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Creticus P. Marak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH can be caused by several etiologies including vasculitis, drug exposure, anticoagulants, infections, mitral valve stenosis, and regurgitation. Chronic mitral valve regurgitation (MR has been well documented as an etiological factor for DAH, but there have been only a few cases which have reported acute mitral valve regurgitation as an etiology of DAH. Acute mitral valve regurgitation can be a life-threatening condition and often requires urgent intervention. In rare cases, acute mitral regurgitation may result in a regurgitant jet which is directed towards the right upper pulmonary vein and may specifically cause right-sided pulmonary edema and right-sided DAH. Surgical repair of the mitral valve results in rapid resolution of DAH. Acute MR should be considered as a possible etiology in patients presenting with unilateral pulmonary edema, hemoptysis, and DAH.

  12. Simultaneous occurrence of subarachnoid hemorrhage and epistaxis due to ruptured petrous internal carotid artery aneurysm. Association with transsphenoidal surgery and radiation therapy. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Hidenori; Fujimura, Miki; Inoue, Takashi; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Ogawa, Yoshikazu; Kawagishi, Jun; Jokura, Hidefumi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2011-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman presented with simultaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and massive epistaxis. The patient had been treated for pituitary prolactinoma by two transsphenoidal surgeries, gamma knife radiosurgery, and conventional radiation therapy since age 43 years. Cerebral angiography showed left petrous internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm with slight stenosis on the adjacent left petrous ICA. She underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) double anastomosis with endovascular internal trapping without complication the day after onset. Postoperative course was uneventful; the patient did not develop symptomatic vasospasm, recurrent epistaxis, or cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea. Postoperative angiography demonstrated complete disappearance of the aneurysm with patent STA-MCA anastomosis. The patient was discharged 2 months after surgery without neurological deficit. The present case is extremely rare with simultaneous onset of SAH and epistaxis caused by ruptured petrous ICA aneurysm. The transsphenoidal surgeries and radiation therapies might have been critical in the formation of the petrous ICA aneurysm. (author)

  13. The Hijdra scale has significant prognostic value for the functional outcome of Fisher grade 3 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz, Julia S; Von Dincklage, Falk; Woitzik, Johannes; Winkler, Maren K L; Major, Sebastian; Dreier, Jens P; Bohner, Georg; Scheel, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Despite its high prevalence among patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and high risk of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), the Fisher grade 3 category remains a poorly studied subgroup. The aim of this cohort study has been to investigate the prognostic value of the Hijdra sum scoring system for the functional outcome in patients with Fisher grade 3 aSAH, in order to improve the risk stratification within this Fisher category. Initial CT scans of 72 prospectively enrolled patients with Fisher grade 3 aSAH were analyzed, and cisternal, ventricular, and total amount of blood were graded according to the Hijdra scale. Additionally, space-occupying subarachnoid blood clots were assessed. Outcome was evaluated after 6 months. Within the subgroup of Fisher grade 3, aSAH patients with an unfavorable outcome showed a significantly larger cisternal Hijdra sum score (HSS: 21.1 ± 5.2) than patients with a favorable outcome (HSS: 17.6 ± 5.9; p = 0.009). However, both the amount of ventricular blood (p = 0.165) and space-occupying blood clots (p = 0.206) appeared to have no prognostic relevance. After adjusting for the patient's age, gender, tobacco use, clinical status at admission, and presence of intracerebral hemorrhage, the cisternal and total HSS remained the only independent parameters included in multivariate logistic regression models to predict functional outcome (p Fisher 3 category. We suggest that the Hijdra scale is a practically useful prognostic instrument for the risk evaluation after aSAH and should be applied more often in the clinical setting.

  14. The impact of L5 dorsal root ganglion degeneration and Adamkiewicz artery vasospasm on descending colon dilatation following spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage: An experimental study; first report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Cengiz; Kanat, Ayhan; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Yolas, Coskun; Kabalar, Mehmet Esref; Gundogdu, Betul; Duman, Aslihan; Kanat, Ilyas Ferit; Gundogdu, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Context: Somato-sensitive innervation of bowels are maintained by lower segments of spinal cord and the blood supply of the lower spinal cord is heavily dependent on Adamkiewicz artery. Although bowel problems are sometimes seen in subarachnoid hemorrhage neither Adamkiewicz artery spasm nor spinal cord ischemia has not been elucidated as a cause of bowel dilatation so far. Aims: The goal of this study was to study the effects Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) vasospasm in lumbar subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on bowel dilatation severity. Settings and Design: An experimental rabbit study. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 25 rabbits, which were randomly divided into three groups: Spinal SAH (N = 13), serum saline (SS) (SS; N = 7) and control (N = 5) groups. Experimental spinal SAH was performed. After 21 days, volume values of descending parts of large bowels and degenerated neuron density of L5DRG were analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the PASW Statistics 18.0 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois). Two-tailed t-test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The mean volume of imaginary descending colons was estimated as 93 ± 12 cm3 in the control group and 121 ± 26 cm3 in the SS group and 176 ± 49 cm3 in SAH group. Volume augmentations of the descending colons and degenerated neuron density L5DRG were significantly different between the SAH and other two groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: An inverse relationship between the living neuronal density of the L5DRG and the volume of imaginary descending colon values was occurred. Our findings will aid in the planning of future experimental studies and determining the clinical relevance on such studies. PMID:25972712

  15. The impact of L5 dorsal root ganglion degeneration and Adamkiewicz artery vasospasm on descending colon dilatation following spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage: An experimental study; first report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Ozturk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Somato-sensitive innervation of bowels are maintained by lower segments of spinal cord and the blood supply of the lower spinal cord is heavily dependent on Adamkiewicz artery. Although bowel problems are sometimes seen in subarachnoid hemorrhage neither Adamkiewicz artery spasm nor spinal cord ischemia has not been elucidated as a cause of bowel dilatation so far. Aims: The goal of this study was to study the effects Adamkiewicz artery (AKA vasospasm in lumbar subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH on bowel dilatation severity. Settings and Design: An experimental rabbit study. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 25 rabbits, which were randomly divided into three groups: Spinal SAH (N = 13, serum saline (SS (SS; N = 7 and control (N = 5 groups. Experimental spinal SAH was performed. After 21 days, volume values of descending parts of large bowels and degenerated neuron density of L5DRG were analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the PASW Statistics 18.0 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois. Two-tailed t-test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The mean volume of imaginary descending colons was estimated as 93 ± 12 cm 3 in the control group and 121 ± 26 cm 3 in the SS group and 176 ± 49 cm 3 in SAH group. Volume augmentations of the descending colons and degenerated neuron density L5DRG were significantly different between the SAH and other two groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: An inverse relationship between the living neuronal density of the L5DRG and the volume of imaginary descending colon values was occurred. Our findings will aid in the planning of future experimental studies and determining the clinical relevance on such studies.

  16. The impact of L5 dorsal root ganglion degeneration and Adamkiewicz artery vasospasm on descending colon dilatation following spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage: An experimental study; first report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Cengiz; Kanat, Ayhan; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Yolas, Coskun; Kabalar, Mehmet Esref; Gundogdu, Betul; Duman, Aslihan; Kanat, Ilyas Ferit; Gundogdu, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Somato-sensitive innervation of bowels are maintained by lower segments of spinal cord and the blood supply of the lower spinal cord is heavily dependent on Adamkiewicz artery. Although bowel problems are sometimes seen in subarachnoid hemorrhage neither Adamkiewicz artery spasm nor spinal cord ischemia has not been elucidated as a cause of bowel dilatation so far. The goal of this study was to study the effects Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) vasospasm in lumbar subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on bowel dilatation severity. An experimental rabbit study. The study was conducted on 25 rabbits, which were randomly divided into three groups: Spinal SAH (N = 13), serum saline (SS) (SS; N = 7) and control (N = 5) groups. Experimental spinal SAH was performed. After 21 days, volume values of descending parts of large bowels and degenerated neuron density of L5DRG were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed using the PASW Statistics 18.0 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois). Two-tailed t-test and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The mean volume of imaginary descending colons was estimated as 93 ± 12 cm(3) in the control group and 121 ± 26 cm(3) in the SS group and 176 ± 49 cm(3) in SAH group. Volume augmentations of the descending colons and degenerated neuron density L5DRG were significantly different between the SAH and other two groups (P < 0.05). An inverse relationship between the living neuronal density of the L5DRG and the volume of imaginary descending colon values was occurred. Our findings will aid in the planning of future experimental studies and determining the clinical relevance on such studies.

  17. Effect of magnesium treatment and glucose levels on delayed cerebral ischemia in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage : A substudy of the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage trial (MASH-II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijenaar, Jolien F.; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.; Algra, Ale; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnesium treatment did not improve outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage II trial. We hypothesized that high glucose levels may have offset a potential beneficial effect to prevent delayed cerebral ischemia.

  18. Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Describing the Diagnostic Accuracy of History, Physical Examination, Imaging, and Lumbar Puncture With an Exploration of Test Thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Hussain, Adnan M; Ward, Michael J; Zipfel, Gregory J; Fowler, Susan; Pines, Jesse M; Sivilotti, Marco L A

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a rare, but serious etiology of headache. The diagnosis of SAH is especially challenging in alert, neurologically intact patients, as missed or delayed diagnosis can be catastrophic. The objective was to perform a diagnostic accuracy systematic review and meta-analysis of history, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests, computed tomography (CT), and clinical decision rules for spontaneous SAH. A secondary objective was to delineate probability of disease thresholds for imaging and lumbar puncture (LP). PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and research meeting abstracts were searched up to June 2015 for studies of emergency department patients with acute headache clinically concerning for spontaneous SAH. QUADAS-2 was used to assess study quality and, when appropriate, meta-analysis was conducted using random effects models. Outcomes were sensitivity, specificity, and positive (LR+) and negative (LR-) likelihood ratios. To identify test and treatment thresholds, we employed the Pauker-Kassirer method with Bernstein test indication curves using the summary estimates of diagnostic accuracy. A total of 5,022 publications were identified, of which 122 underwent full-text review; 22 studies were included (average SAH prevalence = 7.5%). Diagnostic studies differed in assessment of history and physical examination findings, CT technology, analytical techniques used to identify xanthochromia, and criterion standards for SAH. Study quality by QUADAS-2 was variable; however, most had a relatively low risk of biases. A history of neck pain (LR+ = 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.2 to 7.6) and neck stiffness on physical examination (LR+ = 6.6; 95% CI = 4.0 to 11.0) were the individual findings most strongly associated with SAH. Combinations of findings may rule out SAH, yet promising clinical decision rules await external validation. Noncontrast cranial CT within 6 hours of headache onset accurately ruled in (LR+ = 230; 95

  19. Side Effects of Long-Term Continuous Intra-arterial Nimodipine Infusion in Patients with Severe Refractory Cerebral Vasospasm after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieninger, Martin; Flessa, Julia; Lindenberg, Nicole; Bele, Sylvia; Redel, Andreas; Schneiker, André; Schuierer, Gerhard; Wendl, Christina; Graf, Bernhard; Silbereisen, Vera

    2018-02-01

    Long-term continuous intra-arterial nimodipine infusion (CIAN) is a rescue therapy option in cases of severe refractory cerebral vasospasm (CV) following acute non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, CIAN therapy can be associated with relevant side effects. Available studies focus on intracerebral complications, whereas extracerebral side effects are rarely examined. Aim of the present study was to generate descriptive data on the clinical course during CIAN therapy and expectable extracerebral side effects. All patients treated with CIAN therapy for at least 5 days between May 2011 and December 2015 were included. We retrospectively extracted data from the patient data management system regarding the period between 2 days before the beginning and 5 days after the termination of CIAN therapy to analyze the course of ventilation parameters and pulmonary gas exchange, hemodynamic support, renal and liver function, integrity of the gastrointestinal tract, and the occurrence of infectious complications. In addition, we recorded the mean daily values of intracranial pressure (ICP) and intracerebral problems associated with CIAN therapy. Data from 28 patients meeting inclusion criteria were analyzed. The mean duration of long-term CIAN therapy was 10.5 ± 4.5 days. Seventeen patients (60.7%) reached a good outcome level (Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS] 4-5) 6 months after SAH. An impairment of the pulmonary gas exchange occurred only at the very beginning of CIAN therapy. The required vasopressor support with norepinephrine was significantly higher on all days during and the first day after CIAN therapy compared to the situation before starting CIAN therapy. Two patients required short-time resuscitation due to cardiac arrest during CIAN therapy. Acute kidney injury was observed in four patients, and one of them required renal replacement therapy with sustained low-efficiency daily dialysis. During CIAN therapy, 23 patients (82.1%) needed the escalation

  20. Acute visual loss and intraretinal hemorrhages associated to energy drink consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Christina W; Wu, Max; Wu, Lihteh

    2017-12-01

    To report the association of acute visual loss secondary to intraretinal hemorrhages and energy drink consumption. Case report and literature review. A 48-year-old hypertensive man developed an elevation in systemic blood pressure, tachycardia, and acute visual loss secondary to intraretinal hemorrhages shortly after drinking several cans of energy drinks. High consumption of energy drinks may lead to intraretinal hemorrhages and acute visual loss.

  1. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is mosquito borne disease caused by dengue virus (DENV of Flaviviridae family. The clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock and death. Here, we report a case of 20-year-old male patient undergoing orthodontic treatment presenting with acute gingival bleeding with a history of fever, weakness, backache, retro orbital pain and ecchymosis over his right arm. The hematological investigations revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia and positive dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen and also positive immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies for DENV. Patient was diagnosed as a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever and was immediately referred for appropriate management. This case report emphasizes the importance of taking correct and thorough medical history.

  2. MRI in acute subarachnoid haemorrhage; findings with a standardised stroke protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiebach, J.B.; Wilde, P.; Meyer, M.; Sartor, K.; Schellinger, P.D.; Hacke, W.; Geletneky, K.

    2004-01-01

    There is doubt as to whether acute haemorrhage is visible on MRI. We carried out MRI within 6 h of symptom onset on five patients with minor (low Hunt and Hess grades 1 or 2) subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) diagnosed by CT to search for any specific pattern. We used our standard stroke MRI protocol, including multiecho proton density (PD)- and T2-weighted images, echoplanar (EPI) diffusion- (DWI) and perfusion- (PWI) weighted imaging, and MRA. In all cases SAH was clearly visible on PD-weighted images with a short TE. In four patients it caused a low-signal rim on the T2*-weighted source images of PWI, and DWI revealed high signal in SAH. In the fifth patient SAH was perimesencephalic; susceptibility effects from the skull base made it impossible to detect SAH on EPI DWI and T2*-weighted images. Perfusion maps were normal in all cases. MRA and conventional angiography revealed an aneurysm in only one patient. Stroke MRI within 6 h of SAH thus shows a characteristic pattern. (orig.)

  3. Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelets, Severe Fetal Growth Restriction, Postpartum Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, and Craniotomy: A Rare Case Report and Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Rezai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP syndrome is a relatively uncommon but traumatic condition occurring in the later stage of pregnancy as a complication of severe preeclampsia or eclampsia. Prompt brain computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and a multidisciplinary management approach are required to improve perinatal outcome. Case. A 37-year-old, Gravida 6, Para 1-0-4-1, Hispanic female with a history of chronic hypertension presented at 26 weeks and 6 days of gestational age. She was noted to have hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP syndrome accompanied by fetal growth restriction (FGR, during ultrasound evaluation, warranting premature delivery. The infant was delivered in stable condition suffering no permanent neurological deficit. Conclusion. HELLP syndrome is an uncommon and traumatic obstetric event which can lead to neurological deficits if not managed in a responsive and rapid manner. The central aggravating factor seems to be hypertension induced preeclamptic or eclamptic episode and complications thereof. The syndrome itself is manifested by hemolytic anemia, increased liver enzymes, and decreasing platelet counts with a majority of neurological defects resulting from hemorrhagic stroke or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. To minimize adverse perinatal outcomes, obstetric management of this medical complication must include rapid clinical assessment, diagnostic examination, and neurosurgery consultation.

  4. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Ruptured due to Acute Intracystic Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunishige Okamura

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of pancreatic pseudocyst is one of the rare complications and usually results in high mortality. The present case was a rupture of pancreatic pseudocyst that could be treated by surgical intervention. A 74-year-old man developed abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea, and he was diagnosed with cholecystitis and pneumonia. Three days later, acute pancreatitis occurred and computed tomography (CT showed slight hemorrhage in the cyst of the pancreatic tail. After another 10 days, CT showed pancreatic cyst ruptured due to intracystic hemorrhage. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed leakage of contrast agent from pancreatic tail cyst to enclosed abdominal cavity. His left hypochondrial pain was increasing, and CT showed rupture of the cyst of the pancreatic tail into the peritoneal cavity was increased in 10 days. CT showed also two left renal tumors. Therefore we performed distal pancreatectomy with concomitant resection of transverse colon and left kidney. We histopathologically diagnosed pancreatic pseudocyst ruptured due to intracystic hemorrhage and renal cell carcinoma. Despite postoperative paralytic ileus and fluid collection at pancreatic stump, they improved by conservative management and he could be discharged on postoperative day 29. He has achieved relapse-free survival for 6 months postoperatively. The mortality of pancreatic pseudocyst rupture is very high if some effective medical interventions cannot be performed. It should be necessary to plan appropriate treatment strategy depending on each patient.

  5. Continuing versus Stopping Prestroke Antihypertensive Therapy in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnan, Kailash; Scutt, Polly; Woodhouse, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: More than 50% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are taking antihypertensive drugs before ictus. Although antihypertensive therapy should be given long term for secondary prevention, whether to continue or stop such treatment during the acute phase of ICH...... remains unclear, a question that was addressed in the Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke (ENOS) trial. METHODS: ENOS was an international multicenter, prospective, randomized, blinded endpoint trial. Among 629 patients with ICH and systolic blood pressure between 140 and 220 mmHg, 246 patients who were...... taking antihypertensive drugs were assigned to continue (n = 119) or to stop (n = 127) taking drugs temporarily for 7 days. The primary outcome was the modified Rankin Score at 90 days. Secondary outcomes included death, length of stay in hospital, discharge destination, activities of daily living, mood...

  6. Acute Hemorrhagic Leukoencephalitis in Children: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Khademi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (AHLE is a rare demyelinating disease characterized by an acute rapidly progressive fulminant inflammation of the white matter. In this case report, we introduce a case of AHLE in children with an interesting and lengthy process and successful treatment. A previously healthy 13-year-old girl was admitted to the hospital because of fever and loss of consciousness. After 4 days, she was referred to our pediatric intensive care unit in Mashhad, Iran. On admission, she had right-sided parotiditis. With a diagnosis of AHLE, our patient was treated with methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, acyclovir, and plasmapheresis. AHLE is a rare and severe demyelinating disease, the mortality and morbidity of which can be decreased by early detection and treatment with steroid therapy, intravenous immunoglobulin, acyclovir, and plasmapheresis.

  7. Acute Hemorrhagic Flexor Tenosynovitis due to Vincula Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Rory

    2015-01-01

    Summary: A 20-year-old previously well woman presented to the emergency department with classical signs of acute flexor tenosynovitis, 4 hours after a minor puncture wound over the volar aspect of her right middle finger distal interphalangeal joint. Exploration of the flexor sheath in theatre revealed frank blood within the sheath and extension of the puncture wound through the profundus tendon into the short vincula beneath. The blood was irrigated from the sheath, and the patient made a complete recovery by 2 weeks postoperatively. Although rare, irritation and distension of the flexor sheath caused by vincular hemorrhage can be an alternative mechanism for the development of acute flexor tenosynovitis, and as with pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis, prompt surgical treatment can minimize the risk of long-term functional impairment. PMID:26301147

  8. Superselective embolization with microcoil in acute gastronitestinal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Eun Hye; Kim, Jae Kyu; Jang, Nam Kyu

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of superselective arterial embolization using the microcoil in acute gastrointerstinal hemorrhage. We evaluated 11 of 42 patients who had undergone diagnostic angiography and transcatheter arterial embolization due to acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage and subsequently underwent superselective arterial embolization using the microcoil. Nine were males and two were females, and their age ranged from 33 to 70 (mean, 51) years. The etiologies were bleeding ulcer (n=3D5), pseudoaneurysm from pancreatitis (n=3D3), and postoperative bleeding (n=3D3). The symptoms were melena, hematemesis, and hematochzia, and the critical signs were cecreased hemoglobin and worsening of vital signs. All patients underwent superselective embolization using the microcatheter and microcoil. Bleeding occurred in the gastroduodenal artery (n=3D5), inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (n=3D2), left gastric artery (n=3D2), right hepatic artery (n=3D1), and ileal branch of the superior mesenteric artery (n=3D1). All cases were treated succesfully, without complications. In one case in which there was bleeding in the right hepatic artery, reembolization with a microcoil was needed because of persistent melena. During follow up, three patients died from complications arising underlying diseases, namely disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, chronic renal failure, and adult resiratory distress syndrome. (author)=20

  9. Blood-filled cerebrospinal fluid-enhanced pericyte microvasculature contraction in rat retina: A novel in vitro study of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Li, Qiang; Cui, Gaoyu; Zhu, Gang; Tang, Weihua; Zhao, Hengli; Zhang, John H.; Chen, Yujie; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Previously, it was widely accepted that the delayed ischemic injury and poor clinical outcome following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was caused by cerebral vasospasm. This classical theory was challenged by a clazosentan clinical trial, which failed to improve patient outcome, despite reversing angiographic vasospasm. One possible explanation for the results of this trial is the changes in microcirculation following SAH, particularly in pericytes, which are the primary cell type controlling microcirculation in the brain parenchyma. However, as a result of technical limitations and the lack of suitable models, there was no direct evidence of microvessel dysfunction following SAH. In the present study, whole-mount retinal microvasculature has been introduced to study microcirculation in the brain following experimental SAH in vitro. Artificial blood-filled cerebrospinal fluid (BSCF) was applied to the retinal microvasculature to test the hypothesis that the presence of subarachnoid blood affects the contractile properties of the pericytes containing cerebral microcirculation during the early phase of SAH. It was observed that BCSF induced retina microvessel contraction and that this contraction could be resolved by BCSF wash-out. Furthermore, BCSF application accelerated pericyte-populated collagen gel contraction and increased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin. In addition, BCSF induced an influx of calcium in cultured retinal pericytes. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates increased contractility of retinal microvessels and pericytes in the presence of BCSF in vitro. These findings suggest that pericyte contraction and microvascular dysfunction is induced following SAH, which could lead to greater susceptibility to SAH-induced ischemia. PMID:27698742

  10. Tranexamic acid for acute intracerebral hemorrhage growth predicted by spot sign trial: Rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liping; Wang, Yilong; Meng, Xia; Li, Na; Tan, Ying; Nie, Ximing; Liu, Dacheng; Zhao, Xingquan

    2017-04-01

    Rationale Acute intracerebral hemorrhage inflicts a high-economic and -health burden. Computed tomography angiography spot sign is a predictor of hematoma expansion, is associated with poor clinical outcome and is an important stratifying variable for patients treated with haemostatic therapy. Aims We aim to compare the effect of treatment with tranexamic acid to placebo for the prevention of hemorrhage growth in patients with high-risk acute intracerebral hemorrhage with a positive spot sign. Design The tranexamic acid for acute intracerebral hemorrhage growth predicted by spot sign (TRAIGE) is a prospective, multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind, investigator-led, randomized clinical trial that will include an estimated 240 participants. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage demonstrating symptom onset within 8 h and with the spot sign as a biomarker for ongoing hemorrhage, and no contraindications for antifibrinolytic therapy, will be enrolled to receive either tranexamic acid or placebo. The primary outcome measure is the presence of hemorrhage growth defined as an increase in intracerebral hemorrhage volume >33% or >6 ml from baseline to 24 ± 2 h. The secondary outcomes include safety and clinical outcomes. Conclusion The TRAIGE trial evaluates the efficacy of haemostatic therapy with tranexamic acid in the prevention of hemorrhage growth among high-risk patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

  11. The effect of deferoxamine on brain lipid peroxide levels and Na-K ATPase activity following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, A; Türközkan, N; Aricioğlu, A; Aykol, S; Cevik, C; Göksel, M

    1994-05-01

    1. In the present study we have studied the effects of deferoxamine treatment on lipid peroxidation and Na-K ATPase activity after experimental induction of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) in guinea pigs. 2. We assessed the extent of lipid peroxidation by measuring the level of malondialdehyde and Na-K ATPase activity in 3 different groups (sham-operated, SAH, SAH + deferoxamine). 3. There was no significant difference in lipid peroxide content between sham-operated and haemorrhagic animals, but Na-K ATPase activity decreased after SAH. 4. Deferoxamine treatment reduced the malondialdehyde content and induced the recovery of Na-K ATPase activity, exerting a brain protective role against the detrimental effects of the haemorrhage.

  12. Sonographic findings of ovarian hemorrhage presenting acute abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Joo Sung; Lee, Eun Ju; Kang, Hae Jin; Suh, Jung Ho

    2000-01-01

    To obtain the characteristic sonographic findings of ovarian hemorrhage and investigate the usefulness of ultrasonography in the diagnosis. Forty-nine cases presenting acute abdomen diagnosed as ovarian hemorrhage by ultrasonography or surgicopathological confirmation. We observed the size and margin of the ovary, size, pattern, shape, wall and internal echogenecity of the masses and the amount of hemoperitoneum. We also performed a color Doppler study to evaluate the blood flow pattern and resistive index (RI). The age of patients were between 21-41. Most symptoms occurred from days 14 to 30 of her menstrual cycle and were presented for less than 24 hours. Twenty patients had a history of intercourse shortly before the onset of the symptom. Thirty two cases involved the right ovary while the other 17 cases involved the left. All patients had a negative urine or serum hCG test except for 4 pregnant women. The size of the ovary was measured as mean 5.1 cm and marginal irregularly was noted in 36 cases. Mixed echoic solid masses were observed in 6 cases and variable echogenecity of cystic masses were seen in 43 cases. Maximal diameter of adnexal masses were measured as mean 3.95 cm. Internal echogenecity of cystic masses appeared as mainly heterogeneous (21). Twenty two cystic masses had a thick irregular wall and 17 had a thin smooth wall. Hypoechoic rim like halo surrounding was noted in 17 cystic masses. 17 cases seemed to have a small amount of hemoperitoneum, a moderate amount in 22 cases and a large amount in 9 cases. The blood flow pattern of cystic masses showed a rim (29) and spotty (8) pattern in the color Doppler study. Measured RI was 0.41 (mean). Fertile women with the complaint of acute abdominal pain, who has the laboratory data of negative hCG test, ultrasonographic findings of enlargement of ovary with irregular margin, heterogeneous echoic cystic mass, peripheral halo surrounding the mass, hemoperitoneum and low resistance index of peripheral blood

  13. Effect of magnesium treatment and glucose levels on delayed cerebral ischemia in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage : a substudy of the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage trial (MASH-II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijenaar, Jolien F.; Mees, Sanne M. Dorhout; Algra, Ale; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundMagnesium treatment did not improve outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage II trial. We hypothesized that high glucose levels may have offset a potential beneficial effect to prevent delayed cerebral ischemia. We

  14. Pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage: acute symptomatic seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beslow, Lauren A; Abend, Nicholas S; Gindville, Melissa C; Bastian, Rachel A; Licht, Daniel J; Smith, Sabrina E; Hillis, Argye E; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2013-04-01

    Seizures are believed to be common presenting symptoms in neonates and children with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, few data are available on the epidemiology of acute symptomatic seizures or the risk for later epilepsy. To define the incidence of and explore risk factors for seizures and epilepsy in children with spontaneous ICH. Our a priori hypotheses were that younger age at presentation, cortical involvement of ICH, acute symptomatic seizures after presentation, ICH due to vascular malformation, and elevated intracranial pressure requiring urgent intervention would predict remote symptomatic seizures and epilepsy. Prospective cohort study conducted between March 1, 2007, and January 1, 2012. Three tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Seventy-three pediatric subjects with spontaneous ICH including 20 perinatal (≥37 weeks' gestation to 28 days) and 53 childhood subjects (>28 days to Acute symptomatic seizures (clinically evident and electrographic-only seizures within 7 days), remote symptomatic seizures, and epilepsy. Acute symptomatic seizures occurred in 35 subjects (48%). Acute symptomatic seizures as a presenting symptom of ICH occurred in 12 perinatal (60%) and 19 childhood (36%) subjects (P = .07). Acute symptomatic seizures after presentation occurred in 7 children. Electrographic-only seizures were present in 9 of 32 subjects (28%) with continuous electroencephalogram monitoring. One-year and 2-year remote symptomatic seizure-free survival rates were 82% (95% CI, 68-90) and 67% (95% CI, 46-82), respectively. One-year and 2-year epilepsy-free survival rates were 96% (95% CI, 83-99) and 87% (95% CI, 65-95), respectively. Elevated intracranial pressure requiring acute intervention was a risk factor for seizures after presentation (P = .01; Fisher exact test), remote symptomatic seizures, and epilepsy (P = .03, and P = .04, respectively; log-rank test). Presenting seizures are common in perinatal and childhood ICH. Continuous

  15. Prediction of Mortality in Patients with Isolated Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using a Decision Tree Classifier: A Retrospective Analysis Based on a Trauma Registry System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chien, Peng-Chen; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2017-11-22

    Background: In contrast to patients with traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (tSAH) in the presence of other types of intracranial hemorrhage, the prognosis of patients with isolated tSAH is good. The incidence of mortality in these patients ranges from 0-2.5%. However, few data or predictive models are available for the identification of patients with a high mortality risk. In this study, we aimed to construct a model for mortality prediction using a decision tree (DT) algorithm, along with data obtained from a population-based trauma registry, in a Level 1 trauma center. Methods: Five hundred and forty-five patients with isolated tSAH, including 533 patients who survived and 12 who died, between January 2009 and December 2016, were allocated to training ( n = 377) or test ( n = 168) sets. Using the data on demographics and injury characteristics, as well as laboratory data of the patients, classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was performed based on the Gini impurity index, using the rpart function in the rpart package in R. Results: In this established DT model, three nodes (head Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score ≤4, creatinine (Cr) 4 died, as did the 57% of those with an AIS score ≤4, but Cr ≥1.4 and age ≥76 years. All patients who did not meet the above-mentioned criteria survived. With all the variables in the model, the DT achieved an accuracy of 97.9% (sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 98.1%) and 97.7% (sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 97.7%), for the training set and test set, respectively. Conclusions: The study established a DT model with three nodes (head AIS score ≤4, Cr decision-making algorithm may help identify patients with a high risk of mortality.

  16. Continuous intra-arterial nimodipine infusion in patients with severe refractory cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a feasibility study and outcome results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bele, Sylvia; Proescholdt, Martin A; Hochreiter, Andreas; Schuierer, Gerhard; Scheitzach, Judith; Wendl, Christina; Kieninger, Martin; Schneiker, Andre; Bründl, Elisabeth; Schödel, Petra; Schebesch, Karl-Michael; Brawanski, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Severe cerebral vasospasm is a major cause of death and disability in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. No causative treatment is yet available and hypertensive hypervolemic therapy (HHT) is often insufficient to avoid delayed cerebral ischemia and neurological deficits. We compared patients receiving continuous intra-arterial infusion of the calcium-antagonist nimodipine with a historical group treated with HHT and oral nimodipine alone. Between 0.5 and 1.2 mg/h of nimodipine were continuously administered by intra-arterial infusion via microcatheters either into the internal carotid or vertebral artery or both, depending on the areas of vasospasm. The effect was controlled via multimodal neuromonitoring and transcranial Doppler sonography. Outcome was determined by means of the Glasgow Outcome Scale at discharge and 6 months after the hemorrhage and compared to a historical control group. Twenty-one patients received 28 intra-arterial nimodipine infusions. Six months after discharge, the occurrence of cerebral infarctions was significantly lower (42.6 %) in the nimodipine group than in the control group (75.0 %). This result was reflected by a significantly higher proportion (76.0 %) of patients with good outcome in the nimodipine-treated group, when compared to 10.0 % good outcome in the control group. Median GOS was 4 in the nimodipine group and 2 in the control group (p = 0.001). Continuous intra-arterial nimodipine infusion is an effective treatment for patients with severe cerebral vasospasm who fail to respond to HHT and oral nimodipine alone. Key to the effective administration of continuous intra-arterial nimodipine is multimodal neuromonitoring and the individual adaptation of dosage and time of infusion for each patient.

  17. Treatment of Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Self-Reported Neuropsychological Performance at 6 Months - Results of a Prospective Clinical Pilot Study on Good-Grade Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bründl, Elisabeth; Schödel, Petra; Bele, Sylvia; Proescholdt, Martin; Scheitzach, Judith; Zeman, Florian; Brawanski, Alexander; Schebesch, Karl-Michael

    2018-01-01

    Limited focus has been placed on neuropsychological patient profiles after spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (sSAH). We conducted a prospective controlled study in good-grade sSAH patients to evaluate the time course of treatment-specific differences in cognitive processing after sSAH. Twenty-six consecutive sSAH patients were enrolled (drop out n=5). Nine patients received endovascular aneurysm occlusion (EV), 6 patients were treated microsurgically (MS), and 6 patients with perimesencephalic SAH (pSAH) underwent standardized intensive medical care. No patient experienced serious vasospasm-related ischemic or hemorrhagic complications. All patients were subjected to neuropsychological self-report assessment (36-Item Short Form Health Survey and ICD-10-Symptom-Rating questionnaire) subacutely (day 11 - 35) after the onset of bleeding (t1) and at the 6-month follow-up (FU; t 2 ). From t1 to t 2 , MS and EV patients significantly improved in physical functioning (Pfi; p=.001 each) and the physical component summary (p=.010 vs. p=.015). Bodily pain (Pain; MS p=.034) and general health perceptions (EV p=.014) significantly improved, and nutrition disorder (EV p=.008) worsened. At FU, MS patients reported significantly better Pfi (vs. EV p=.046), less Pain (vs. EV p=.040), and more depression (vs. pSAH p=.035). Group-rate analyses of test differences showed a significant alleviation in nutrition disorder in MS (vs. EV p=.009). All sSAH groups reported a significant deterioration in health. Though both MS and EV patients, improved in several physical items over time, our data suggest a better short-term Pfi, less Pain and improved nutrition disorder in surgically treated patients. pSAH patients performed significantly better in various aspects of physical and psychological functioning than patients with aneurysmal SAH.

  18. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting as "Acute Scrotum"-looking beyond the obvious: a sonographic insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Shuchi; Ahmad, Mohammad; Batra, Prerna; Tandon, Anupama; Roy, Satarupa; Mandal, Samrat

    2017-09-01

    Acute swelling and discoloration of scrotum in new born can have many localized causes like testicular torsion, inguinal hernia, scrotal or testicular edema, hydrocele, or even remote causes like adrenal hemorrhage. We report a neonate of adrenal hemorrhage presenting clinically as acute scrotum misguiding the clinician to rule out a local scrotal pathology. As the local clinical examination is not reliable in a newborn, it definitely requires an imaging evaluation to establish the diagnosis. This case report emphasizes being aware of the clinical association of acute adrenal hemorrhage and an acute scrotum and the role of ultrasonography in the evaluation of the various differential diagnoses leading to an acute scrotum. An optimum sonographic examination helps in suspecting an abdominal pathology as a cause of acute scrotum and in establishing the specific diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage to avoid an unnecessary surgical exploration.

  19. Clinical Course Score (CCS): a new clinical score to evaluate efficacy of neurotrauma treatment in traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandner, Sebastian; Kellermann, Isabel; Hore, Nirjhar; Bozhkov, Yavor; Buchfelder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrauma continues to represent a challenging public health issue requiring continual improvement in therapeutic approaches. As no such current system exists, we present in this study the Clinical Course Score (CCS) as a new clinical score to evaluate the efficacy of neurotrauma treatment. The CCS was calculated in neurotrauma patients to be the difference between the grade of the Glasgow Outcome Scale 6 months after discharge from our department and the grade of a 1 to 5 point reduced Glasgow Coma Scale on admission. We assessed the CCS in a total of 248 patients (196 traumatic brain injury [TBI] patients and 52 subarachnoid hemorrhage [SAH] patients) who were treated in our Department of Neurosurgery between January 2011 and December 2012. We found negative CCS grades both in mild TBI and in mild SAH patients. In patients with severe TBI or SAH, we found positive CCS grades. In SAH patients, we found higher CCS scores in younger patients compared with elderly subjects in both mild and severe cases. The CCS can be useful in evaluating different therapeutic approaches during neurotrauma therapy. This new score might improve assessment of beneficial effects of therapeutic procedures.

  20. [Curcumin improves learning and memory function through decreasing hippocampal TNF-α and iNOS levels after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhenwei; Yue, Shuangzhu

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effect of curcumin on learning and memory function of rats with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and the possible mechanism. A total of 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: Sham group, SAH group and curcumin (Cur) therapy group. Experimental SAH rat models were established by injecting autologous blood into the cisterna magna. Neurological deficits of rats were examined at different time points. Spatial learning and memory abilities were tested by Morris water maze test. The hippocampal tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were detected by ELISA. RESULTS Experimental SAH rat models were established successfully. Neurological scores of the SAH rats were significantly lower than those of the sham group. Curcumin therapy obviously improved the neurological deficits of rats compared with the SAH rats. Morris water maze test showed that SAH caused significant cognitive impairment with longer escape latency compared with the sham group. After treatment with curcumin for 4 weeks, the escape latency decreased significantly. The levels of TNF-α and iNOS in the curcumin-treated group were significantly lower than those of the SAH group. SAH can cause learning and memory impairment in rats. Curcumin can recover learning and memory function through down-regulating hippocampal TNF-α and iNOS levels.

  1. Enhanced Therapeutic Potential of Nano-Curcumin Against Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Through Inhibition of Inflammatory Response and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zong-Yong; Jiang, Ming; Fang, Jie; Yang, Ming-Feng; Zhang, Shuai; Yin, Yan-Xin; Li, Da-Wei; Mao, Lei-Lei; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Hou, Ya-Jun; Fu, Xiao-Ting; Fan, Cun-Dong; Sun, Bao-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Curcumin and nano-curcumin both exhibit neuroprotective effects in early brain injury (EBI) after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, the mechanism that whether curcumin and its nanoparticles affect the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following SAH remains unclear. This study investigated the effect of curcumin and the poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles (Cur-NPs) on BBB disruption and evaluated the possible mechanism underlying BBB dysfunction in EBI using the endovascular perforation rat SAH model. The results indicated that Cur-NPs showed enhanced therapeutic effects than that of curcumin in improving neurological function, reducing brain water content, and Evans blue dye extravasation after SAH. Mechanically, Cur-NPs attenuated BBB dysfunction after SAH by preventing the disruption of tight junction protein (ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5). Cur-NPs also up-regulated glutamate transporter-1 and attenuated glutamate concentration of cerebrospinal fluid following SAH. Moreover, inhibition of inflammatory response and microglia activation both contributed to Cur-NPs' protective effects. Additionally, Cur-NPs markedly suppressed SAH-mediated oxidative stress and eventually reversed SAH-induced cell apoptosis in rats. Our findings revealed that the strategy of using Cur-NPs could be a promising way in improving neurological function in EBI after experimental rat SAH.

  2. Apolipoprotein E-Mimetic Peptide COG1410 Promotes Autophagy by Phosphorylating GSK-3β in Early Brain Injury Following Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinshen Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available COG1410, a mimetic peptide derived from the apolipoprotein E (apoE receptor binding region, exerts positive effect on neurological deficits in early brain injury (EBI after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Currently the neuroprotective effect of COG1410 includes inhibiting BBB disruption, reducing neuronal apoptosis, and neuroinflammation. However, the effect and mechanism of COG1410 to subcellular organelles disorder have not been fully investigated. As the main pathway for recycling long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, neuronal autophagy is activated in SAH and exhibits neuroprotective effects by reducing the insults of EBI. Pharmacologically elevated autophagy usually contributes to alleviated brain injury, while few of the agents achieved clinical transformation. In this study, we explored the activation of autophagy during EBI by measuring the Beclin-1 and LC3B-II protein levels. Administration of COG1410 notably elevated the autophagic markers expression in neurons, simultaneously reversed the neurological deficits. Furthermore, the up-regulated autophagy by COG1410 was further promoted by p-GSK-3β agonist, whereas decreased by p-GSK-3β inhibitor. Taken together, these data suggest that the COG1410 might be a promising therapeutic strategy for EBI via promoting autophagy in SAH.

  3. Phosphorylation of Akt by SC79 Prevents Iron Accumulation and Ameliorates Early Brain Injury in a Model of Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangying Hao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that activation of Akt may alleviate early brain injury (EBI following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. This study is undertaken to determine whether iron metabolism is involved in the beneficial effect of Akt activation after SAH. Therefore, we used a novel molecule, SC79, to activate Akt in an experimental Sprague–Dawley rat model of SAH. Rats were randomly divided into four groups as follows: sham, SAH, SAH + vehicle, SAH + SC79. The results confirmed that SC79 effectively enhanced the defense against oxidative stress and alleviated EBI in the temporal lobe after SAH. Interestingly, we found that phosphorylation of Akt by SC79 reduced cell surface transferrin receptor-mediated iron uptake and promoted ferroportin-mediated iron transport after SAH. As a result, SC79 administration diminished the iron content in the brain tissue. Moreover, the impaired Fe-S cluster biogenesis was recovered and loss of the activities of the Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes were regained, indicating that injured mitochondrial functions are restored to healthy levels. These findings suggest that disrupted iron homeostasis could contribute to EBI and Akt activation may regulate iron metabolism to relieve iron toxicity, further protecting neurons from EBI after SAH.

  4. Clinical and diagnostic approach to patients with hypopituitarism due to traumatic brain injury (TBI), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and ischemic stroke (IS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamouzis, Ioannis; Pagano, Loredana; Prodam, Flavia; Mele, Chiara; Zavattaro, Marco; Busti, Arianna; Marzullo, Paolo; Aimaretti, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction attributable to traumatic brain injury (TBI), aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and ischemic stroke (IS) has been lately highlighted. The diagnosis of TBI-induced-hypopituitarism, defined as a deficient secretion of one or more pituitary hormones, is made similarly to the diagnosis of classical hypopituitarism because of hypothalamic/pituitary diseases. Hypopituitarism is believed to contribute to TBI-associated morbidity and to functional and cognitive final outcome, and quality-of-life impairment. Each pituitary hormone must be tested separately, since there is a variable pattern of hormone deficiency among patients with TBI-induced-hypopituitarism. Similarly, the SAH and IS may lead to pituitary dysfunction although the literature in this field is limited. The drive to diagnose hypopituitarism is the suspect that the secretion of one/more pituitary hormone may be subnormal. This suspicion can be based upon the knowledge that the patient has an appropriate clinical context in which hypopituitarism can be present, or a symptom known as caused by hypopituitarism. Hypopituitarism should be diagnosed as a combination of low peripheral and inappropriately normal/low pituitary hormones although their basal evaluation may be not distinctive due to pulsatile, circadian, or situational secretion of some hormones. Evaluation of the somatotroph and corticotroph axes require dynamic stimulation test (ITT for both axes, GHRH + arginine test for somatotroph axis) in order to clearly separate normal from deficient responses.

  5. SIRT3 Expression Decreases with Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Rat Cortical Neurons during Early Brain Injury Induced by Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuin3 (SIRT3 is an important protein deacetylase which predominantly presents in mitochondria and exhibits broad bioactivities including regulating energy metabolism and counteracting inflammatory effect. Since inflammatory cascade was proved to be critical for pathological damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, we investigated the overall expression and cell-specific distribution of SIRT3 in the cerebral cortex of Sprague-Dawley rats with experimental SAH induced by internal carotid perforation. Results suggested that SIRT3 was expressed abundantly in neurons and endothelia but rarely in gliocytes in normal cerebral cortex. After experimental SAH, mRNA and protein expressions of SIRT3 decreased significantly as early as 8 hours and dropped to the minimum value at 24 h after SAH. By contrast, SOD2 expression increased slowly as early as 12 hours after experimental SAH, rose up sharply at the following 12 hours, and then was maintained at a higher level. In conclusion, attenuated SIRT3 expression in cortical neurons was associated closely with enhanced reactive oxygen species generation and cellular apoptosis, implying that SIRT3 might play an important neuroprotective role during early brain injury following SAH.

  6. Bilateral Wyburn-Mason Syndrome presenting as acute subarachnoid haemorrhage - a very rare congenital neurocutaneuos disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortnum, Søren Ole Stigaard; Sørensen, Preben; Andresen, J

    2008-01-01

    . Wyburn-Mason syndrome is a very rare congenital neurocutaneuos disorder comprising of vascular malformations of the retina, ipsilateral cerebral AVMs and occasionally lesions in the oronasopharyngeal area. Subarachnoid haemorrhage associated with Wyburn-Mason syndrome has been described in only 5...

  7. Experimental acute intracerebral hemorrhage: Value of MR sequences for a safe diagnosis at 1.5 and 0.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueker, W.; Thron, A.; Thiex, R.; Rohde, I.; Rohde, V.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the detectability of intracerebral hematomas with MR imaging at 1.5 T and 0.5 T with fluid attenuated inversion recovery turbo spin-echo (FLAIR) and gradient-echo sequences. Material and Methods: Twenty-seven intracerebral hematomas were created in 25 piglets by injection of venous blood into the brain through a burr hole. All were imaged with T2*-weighted gradient echo sequences (fast field echo, FFE), T2-weighted fluid attenuated inversion recovery turbo spin-echo sequences (FLAIR), T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) and T1-weighted spin-echo sequences. Follow-up was performed on the 2nd, 4th and 10th postoperative days. Ten animals were additionally investigated with similar sequences at 0.5 T. Histologic correlation was obtained in all cases. Results: T2* FFE sequences detected all acute intracerebral hematomas and demonstrated the size correctly at 1.5 T and 0.5 T. The conspicuity was better at 1.5 T. FLAIR sequences were unreliable in the hyperacute phase at 1.5 T. However, subarachnoid and intraventricular extension was best appreciated with FLAIR images. T2 TSE images were incapable of detecting para ventricular and subarachnoid hemorrhages, but clearly demonstrated intracerebral blood in other locations. T1-weighted images were insensitive to hemorrhage in the acute state but very useful in subacute and chronic hematomas. Conclusion: The safe and reliable diagnosis of intracerebral hemorrhage is probably possible with MR imaging at 1.5 T and 0.5 T even of hematomas less than 90 min old, but requires the application of at least FLAIR, T2* FFE and T1 sequences and is therefore time consuming

  8. Neurosurgical outcomes after intracerebral hemorrhage: results of the Factor Seven for Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke Trial (FAST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Thorsten; Vincent, Catherine; Morris, Stephen; Davis, Stephen; Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Christensen, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    The value of neurosurgical interventions after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) is uncertain. We evaluated clinical outcomes in patients diagnosed with SICH within 3 hours of symptom onset who underwent hematoma evacuation or external ventricular drainage (EVD) of the hematoma in the Factor Seven for Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke Trial (FAST). FAST was a randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted between May 2005 and February 2007 at 122 sites in 22 countries. Neurosurgical procedures (hematoma evacuation and external ventricular drainage) performed at any point after hospital admission were prospectively recorded. Clinical outcomes evaluated were post-SICH disability, as assessed by the modified Rankin Scale; neurologic impairment, as assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale; and mortality at 90 days after SICH onset. The impact of neurosurgical procedures on clinical outcomes was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis, controlling for relevant baseline characteristics. Fifty-five of 821 patients underwent neurosurgery. Patients who underwent hematoma evacuation or EVD were on average younger, had greater baseline neurologic impairment, and lower levels of consciousness compared with patients who did not undergo neurosurgery. After adjusting for these differences and other relevant baseline characteristics, we found that neurosurgery was generally associated with unfavorable outcomes at day 90. Among the patients who underwent hematoma evacuation, those with lobar ICH had less ICH expansion than those with deep gray matter ICH, and the smaller expansion was associated with lower mortality. ICH volume was substantially decreased in patients who underwent hematoma evacuation between 24 and 72 hours after hospital admission, and this was associated with better clinical outcome. In conclusion, a small number of patients who underwent neurosurgery in FAST exhibited no overall clinical benefit

  9. Acute and Chronic Fetal Anemia as a Result of Fetomaternal Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Paul; Swanson, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Fetomaternal hemorrhage represents a transfer of fetal blood to the maternal circulation. Although many etiologies have been described, most causes of fetomaternal hemorrhage remain unidentified. The differentiation between acute and chronic fetomaternal hemorrhage may be accomplished antenatally and may influence perinatal management. Case. A 36-year-old gravida 6 para 3 presented at 37 and 5/7 completed gestational weeks with ultrasound findings suggestive of chronic fetal ane...

  10. Herpes simplex encephalitis with onset of acute headache simulating subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oana, Katsumaro; Tomita, Yukio; Kubo, Naohiko; Kanaya, Haruyuki.

    1983-01-01

    On examination in our clinic, he showed alert consciousness, with nuchal rigidity and left weakness. A lumbar puncture showed an opening pressure of 125 mm H 2 O, xanthochromic in nature, and the cerebrospinal fluid contained 40 white cells per cubic millimeter, mostly lymphocytes, though the total protein and glucose contents were normal. Blood, general, and chemical examinations showed a normal white-cell count and increasing titers of GPT (420), GOT (203), and LDH (723). A computed-tomographic scan of the brain on the day of admission revealed bilateral frontal and right temporal abnormal low-density areas, greater on the right side, and contrast enhancement in the bilateral frontal and right paraventricular regions. Cerebral angiography demonstrated a marked hypervascularity in the bilateral frontal regions in the arterial phase. A diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis was made on the basis of the clinical course and the angiographic and computed-tomographicscan findings. On the day of admission, the patient vomited once. On the third hospital day, he complained of a headache and became somnolent. After that, a mild fever continued for two weeks. On the eleventh hospital day, he occasionally vomited after a headache. On the fifteenth hospital day, a repeat spinal tap was performed with an opening pressure of 150 mm H 2 O. The total white blood cell count was 25/cu mm. On the twenty-fourth hospital day, the headache and vomiting disappeared, and the fever also subsided. He was discharged about two months later with minimal mental abnormality. (J.P.N)

  11. Optimal achieved blood pressure in acute intracerebral hemorrhage: INTERACT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Hisatomi; Heeley, Emma; Delcourt, Candice; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Wang, Xia; Woodward, Mark; Robinson, Thompson; Stapf, Christian; Parsons, Mark; Lavados, Pablo M; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S

    2015-02-03

    To investigate the effects of intensive blood pressure (BP) lowering according to baseline BP levels and optimal achieved BP levels in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). INTERACT2 was an open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial in 2,839 patients with ICH within 6 hours of onset and elevated systolic BP (SBP) (150-220 mm Hg) who were allocated to receive intensive (target SBP <140 mm Hg within 1 hour, with lower limit of 130 mm Hg for treatment cessation) or guideline-recommended (target SBP <180 mm Hg) BP-lowering treatment. Outcome was physical function across all 7 levels of the modified Rankin Scale at 90 days. Analysis of the randomized comparisons showed that intensive BP lowering produced comparable benefits on physical function at 90 days in 5 subgroups defined by baseline SBP of <160, 160-169, 170-179, 180-189, and ≥190 mm Hg (p homogeneity = 0.790). Analyses of achieved BP showed linear increases in the risk of physical dysfunction for achieved SBP above 130 mm Hg for both hyperacute (1-24 hours) and acute (2-7 days) phases while modest increases were also observed for achieved SBP below 130 mm Hg. Intensive BP lowering appears beneficial across a wide range of baseline SBP levels, and target SBP level of 130-139 mm Hg is likely to provide maximum benefit in acute ICH. This study provides Class I evidence that the effect of intensive BP lowering on physical function is not influenced by baseline BP. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. Curative effect of surgery combined with nerve growth factor preparation treatment of acute cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Luo

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Surgery combined with nerve growth factor preparation treatment of acute cerebral hemorrhage can improve neural nutritional status and reduce nerve injury degree, and it is beneficial to the recovery of neural function.

  13. Enterprise stent-assisted coiling for wide-necked intracranial aneurysms during ultra-early (48hours) subarachnoid hemorrhage: a single-center experience in 59 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aihua; Peng, Tangming; Qian, Zenghui; Li, Youxiang; Jiang, Chuhan; Wu, Zhongxue; Yang, Xinjian

    2015-10-01

    Accumulated experience and improvement of stents dedicated to intracranial use have significantly widened the applicability of stent-assisted coiling (SAC) to ruptured wide-necked aneurysms. This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of SAC using the Enterprise stent for ruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms during ultra-early subarachnoid hemorrhage. We reviewed data from 59 consecutive patients with ruptured wide-necked aneurysms who had SAC using the Enterprise stent performed within 48hours of onset. Data collected and analyzed included: patient demographics; morphologic features of the aneurysm; treatment results and follow-up results. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by modified Rankin Scale (mRS). In all 59 cases, SAC using the Enterprise stent was performed successfully, with no significant technical difficulties. Initial angiographic results were: complete occlusion in 38 cases; near occlusion in 17; and partial occlusion in four. Angiographic follow-up of 48 patients showed that 46 (95.8%) remained stable or improved, without regrowth, while regrowth was imaged in two patients. Medium-term clinical follow-up of 54 patients (mean, 26.9months) showed that 88.9% had a good outcome (mRS: 0 in 34; 1 in eight; and 2 in six), and 11.1% poor outcomes (mRS: 3 in four; and 4 in two). Enterprise SAC is a safe and viable option for treatment of ruptured wide-necked aneurysms within 48hours of ictus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Tert-butylhydroquinone alleviates early brain injury and cognitive dysfunction after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage: role of Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway.

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    Zhong Wang

    Full Text Available Tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ, an Nrf2 activator, has demonstrated neuroprotection against brain trauma and ischemic stroke in vivo. However, little work has been done with respect to its effect on early brain injury (EBI after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. At the same time, as an oral medication, it may have extensive clinical applications for the treatment of SAH-induced cognitive dysfunction. This study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of tBHQ on EBI, secondary deficits of learning and memory, and the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway in a rat SAH model. SD rats were divided into four groups: (1 Control group (n=40; (2 SAH group (n=40; (3 SAH+vehicle group (n=40; and (4 SAH+tBHQ group (n=40. All SAH animals were subjected to injection of autologous blood into the prechiasmatic cistern once in 20 s. In SAH+tBHQ group, tBHQ was administered via oral gavage at a dose of 12.5 mg/kg at 2 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 36 h after SAH. In the first set of experiments, brain samples were extracted and evaluated 48 h after SAH. In the second set of experiments, changes in cognition and memory were investigated in a Morris water maze. Results shows that administration of tBHQ after SAH significantly ameliorated EBI-related problems, such as brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB impairment, clinical behavior deficits, cortical apoptosis, and neurodegeneration. Learning deficits induced by SAH was markedly alleviated after tBHQ therapy. Treatment with tBHQ markedly up-regulated the expression of Keap1, Nrf2, HO-1, NQO1, and GSTα1 after SAH. In conclusion, the administration of tBHQ abated the development of EBI and cognitive dysfunction in this SAH model. Its action was probably mediated by activation of the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway.

  15. The dilemma of complicated shunt valves: How to identify patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage who will benefit from a simple valve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian von der Brelie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sophisticated shunt valves provide the possibility of pressure adjustment and antisiphon control but have a higher probability of valve dysfunction especially in a posthemorrhagic setting. The aim of the present study is to analyze the clinical outcome of patients with shunt dependent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in order to identify patients who would benefit from a simple differential pressure valve. Methods: From 2000 to 2013, 547 patients with aneurysmatic SAH were treated at our institution, 114 underwent ventricular shunt placement (21.1%. 47 patients with available pre- and post-operative computed tomography scans, and an available follow-up of minimum 6 months were included. In order to measure the survival time which a nonprogrammable differential pressure valve would have had in an individual patient we defined the initial equalized shunt survival time (IESS. IESS is the time until surgical revisions of fixed differential pressure or flow-regulated valves for the treatment of over- or under-drainage as well as re-programming of adjustable valves due to over- or under-drainage. Results: Twenty patients were treated with fixed differential pressure valves, 15 patients were treated with flow-regulated valves, and 12 underwent ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt placement with differential pressure valves assisted by a gravitational unit. Patients who reacted with remarkable changes of the ventricular width after the insertion of external ventricular drainage (EVD, before shunt placement, showed a significantly longer IESS. Conclusions: Decline of the ventricular width after EVD placement was a predictor for successful VP shunt therapy in the later course of disease. Possibly, this could allow identifying patients who benefit from a simple differential pressure valve or a flow-regulated valve, and thus could possibly avoid valve-associated complications of a programmable valve in the

  16. Hemorragia subaracnoídea com tomografia de crânio sem sinais de sangramento Subarachnoidal hemorrhage with cranial tomography without bleeding signals

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    Silvio Francisco

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Foram observados 23 casos de pacientes com suspeita clínica de hemorragia subaracnoídea (HSA, com tomografia de crânio (CT sem sinais de sangramento, com diagnóstico definitivo realizado por exame de líquido cefalorraquiano(LCR. Desses, 20 casos foram submetidos a angiografia cerebral. Estabeleceu-se a classificação clínica de Hunt & Hess. Os principais achados neste estudo foram:1 um terço dos pacientes apresentou intervalo de tempo entre o ictus e a realização da CT e do LCR entre 24 e 48 horas, período de maior sensiblidade da CT; 2 dos pacientes estudados com angiografia cerebral, 55% tiveram o diagnóstico de aneurisma com predomínio no território de carótida e cerebral anterior; 3 o grau clínico dominante foi Hunt & Hess I e II. Todos os achados encontrados demonstraram a necessidade da realização de LCR em suspeita de HSA sem sinais de sangramento na CT.We observed 23 pacients with clinical hypothesis of subarachnoidal hemorrhage (SAH having cranial tomography (CT without bleeding signals. The final diagnosis of SAH was made upon the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF results. Twenty cases were submitted to brain angiography. They were focused under the clinical classification of Hunt & Hess. The main results were: 1 1/3 of patients had interval time between 24 and 48 hours after ictus and before CT and CSF making; this was the most sensitive CT time; 2 55% of patients with brain angiography had aneurysm predominantly in the carotid and anterior cerebral artery territory; 3 the dominant clinical degree was Hunt & Hess I e II. Conclusion: the results demonstrate the need of CSF test in case of SAH clinical diagnosis with CT showing no bleeding signals.

  17. Effect of treatment modality on in-hospital outcome in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a nationwide study in Japan (J-ASPECT Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurogi, Ryota; Kada, Akiko; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Kamitani, Satoru; Nishimura, Ataru; Sayama, Tetsuro; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Toyoda, Kazunori; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ono, Junichi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Aruga, Toru; Miyachi, Shigeru; Nagata, Izumi; Matsuda, Shinya; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Okuchi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Akifumi; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito; Iihara, Koji

    2018-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Although heterogeneity in patient outcomes following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has been observed across different centers, the relative merits of clipping and coiling for SAH remain unknown. The authors sought to compare the patient outcomes between these therapeutic modalities using a large nationwide discharge database encompassing hospitals with different comprehensive stroke center (CSC) capabilities. METHODS They analyzed data from 5214 patients with SAH (clipping 3624, coiling 1590) who had been urgently hospitalized at 393 institutions in Japan in the period from April 2012 to March 2013. In-hospital mortality, modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score, cerebral infarction, complications, hospital length of stay, and medical costs were compared between the clipping and coiling groups after adjustment for patient-level and hospital-level characteristics by using mixed-model analysis. RESULTS Patients who had undergone coiling had significantly higher in-hospital mortality (12.4% vs 8.7%, OR 1.3) and a shorter median hospital stay (32.0 vs 37.0 days, p < 0.001) than those who had undergone clipping. The respective proportions of patients discharged with mRS scores of 3-6 (46.4% and 42.9%) and median medical costs (thousands US$, 35.7 and 36.7) were not significantly different between the groups. These results remained robust after further adjustment for CSC capabilities as a hospital-related covariate. CONCLUSIONS Despite the increasing use of coiling, clipping remains the mainstay treatment for SAH. Regardless of CSC capabilities, clipping was associated with reduced in-hospital mortality, similar unfavorable functional outcomes and medical costs, and a longer hospital stay as compared with coiling in 2012 in Japan. Further study is required to determine the influence of unmeasured confounders.

  18. Estimating the Global Incidence of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Systematic Review for Central Nervous System Vascular Lesions and Meta-Analysis of Ruptured Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joshua D; Bond, Kamila M; Mekary, Rania A; Dewan, Michael C; Rattani, Abbas; Baticulon, Ronnie; Kato, Yoko; Azevedo-Filho, Hildo; Morcos, Jacques J; Park, Kee B

    2018-04-09

    There is increasing acknowledgement that surgical care is important in global health initiatives. In particular, neurosurgical care is as limited as 1 per 10 million people in parts of the world. We performed a systematic literature review to examine the worldwide incidence of central nervous system vascular lesions and a meta-analysis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) to define the disease burden and inform neurosurgical global health efforts. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines to estimate the global epidemiology of central nervous system vascular lesions, including unruptured and ruptured aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, cavernous malformations, dural arteriovenous fistulas, developmental venous anomalies, and vein of Galen malformations. Results were organized by World Health Organization regions. After literature review, because of a lack of data from particular World Health Organization regions, we determined we could only provide an estimate of aSAH. Using data from studies with aSAH and 12 high-quality stroke studies from regions lacking data, we meta-analyzed the yearly crude incidence of aSAH per 100,000 persons. Estimates were generated via random-effects models. From an initial yield of 1492 studies, 46 manuscripts on aSAH incidence were included. The final meta-analysis included 58 studies from 31 different countries. We estimated the global crude incidence for aSAH to be 6.67 per 100,000 persons with a wide variation across WHO regions from 0.71 to 12.38 per 100,000 persons. Worldwide, almost 500,000 individuals will suffer from aSAH each year, with almost two-thirds in low- and middle-income countries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fisetin alleviates early brain injury following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats possibly by suppressing TLR 4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chen-hui; Wang, Chun-xi; Xie, Guang-bin; Wu, Ling-yun; Wei, Yong-xiang; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Hua-sheng; Hang, Chun-hua; Zhou, Meng-liang; Shi, Ji-xin

    2015-12-10

    Early brain injury (EBI) determines the unfavorable outcomes after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Fisetin, a natural flavonoid, has anti-inflammatory and neuroprotection properties in several brain injury models, but the role of fisetin on EBI following SAH remains unknown. Our study aimed to explore the effects of fisetin on EBI after SAH in rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the sham and SAH groups, fisetin (25mg/kg or 50mg/kg) or equal volume of vehicle was given at 30min after SAH. Neurological scores and brain edema were assayed. The protein expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR 4), p65, ZO-1 and bcl-2 was examined by Western blot. TLR 4 and p65 were also assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to detect the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine 5'-triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) was perform to assess neural cell apoptosis. High-dose (50mg/kg) fisetin significantly improved neurological function and reduced brain edema at both 24h and 72h after SAH. Remarkable reductions of TLR 4 expression and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) translocation to nucleus were detected after fisetin treatment. In addition, fisetin significantly reduced the productions of pro-inflammatory cytokines, decreased neural cell apoptosis and increased the protein expression of ZO-1 and bcl-2. Our data provides the evidence for the first time that fisetin plays a protective role in EBI following SAH possibly by suppressing TLR 4/NF-κB mediated inflammatory pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Punica granatum L. Juice Attenuates Experimental Cerebral Vasospasm in the Rabbit Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Model: A Basilar Artery Morphometric Study and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvenc, Yahya; Demirci, Adnan; Billur, Deniz; Aydin, Sevim; Ozeren, Ersin; Bayram, Pinar; Dilli, Alper; Gokce, Emre Cemal; Yaman, Onur; Celik, Haydar; Karatay, Mete; Alagoz, Fatih; Kaptanoglu, Erkan

    2017-03-01

    Background This study investigated the effect of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) juice on the rabbit basilar artery in an experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model. Methods  Eighteen adult male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: a control group ( n  = 6), SAH group ( n  = 6), and SAH + treatment group ( n  = 6). Basilar artery diameter was measured with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in all groups at the beginning of the study. Experimental SAH was created by injecting autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magna. In the treatment group, the subjects were administered a daily dose of 30 ml/kg pomegranate juice via gastric gavage for 4 days after the SAH. The SAH group and SAH + treatment group underwent cerebral MRA after 72 hours. After a neurologic score assessment, all the animals were killed. The wall thickness and lumen area of the basilar artery were measured histometrically in all groups, and the apoptotic cell percentage in the artery was identified. The mean diameter of the basilar artery during MRA was measured. Results  Pomegranate improved neurologic functions compared with the SAH group ( p   0.05). The apoptotic cell rate in the SAH + treatment group was significantly lower than in the SAH group ( p   0.05). Discussion  Pomegranate was shown to have a vasospasm- attenuating effect on the basilar artery in the rabbit SAH model for the first time in our study. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Sudden death and cervical spine: A new contribution to pathogenesis for sudden death in critical care unit from subarachnoid hemorrhage; first report - An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdal, Hizir; Kanat, Ayhan; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Yazar, Ugur; Guvercin, Ali Riza; Calik, Muhammet; Gundogdu, Betul

    2017-01-01

    Sudden death from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is not uncommon. The goal of this study is to elucidate the effect of the cervical spinal roots and the related dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) on cardiorespiratory arrest following SAH. This was an experimental study conducted on rabbits. This study was conducted on 22 rabbits which were randomly divided into three groups: control ( n = 5), physiologic serum saline (SS; n = 6), SAH groups ( n = 11). Experimental SAH was performed. Seven of 11 rabbits with SAH died within the first 2 weeks. After 20 days, other animals were sacrificed. The anterior spinal arteries, arteriae nervorum of cervical nerve roots (C6-C8), DRGs, and lungs were histopathologically examined and estimated stereologically. Statistical analysis was performed using the PASW Statistics 18.0 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA). Intergroup differences were assessed using a one-way ANOVA. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. In the SAH group, histopathologically, severe anterior spinal artery (ASA) and arteriae nervorum vasospasm, axonal and neuronal degeneration, and neuronal apoptosis were observed. Vasospasm of ASA did not occur in the SS and control groups. There was a statistically significant increase in the degenerated neuron density in the SAH group as compared to the control and SS groups ( P < 0.05). Cardiorespiratory disturbances, arrest, and lung edema more commonly developed in animals in the SAH group. We noticed interestingly that C6-C8 DRG degenerations were secondary to the vasospasm of ASA, following SAH. Cardiorespiratory disturbances or arrest can be explained with these mechanisms.

  2. Sudden death and cervical spine: A new contribution to pathogenesis for sudden death in critical care unit from subarachnoid hemorrhage; first report – An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdal, Hizir; Kanat, Ayhan; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Yazar, Ugur; Guvercin, Ali Riza; Calik, Muhammet; Gundogdu, Betul

    2017-01-01

    Context: Sudden death from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is not uncommon. Aims: The goal of this study is to elucidate the effect of the cervical spinal roots and the related dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) on cardiorespiratory arrest following SAH. Settings and Design: This was an experimental study conducted on rabbits. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 22 rabbits which were randomly divided into three groups: control (n = 5), physiologic serum saline (SS; n = 6), SAH groups (n = 11). Experimental SAH was performed. Seven of 11 rabbits with SAH died within the first 2 weeks. After 20 days, other animals were sacrificed. The anterior spinal arteries, arteriae nervorum of cervical nerve roots (C6–C8), DRGs, and lungs were histopathologically examined and estimated stereologically. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the PASW Statistics 18.0 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA). Intergroup differences were assessed using a one-way ANOVA. The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: In the SAH group, histopathologically, severe anterior spinal artery (ASA) and arteriae nervorum vasospasm, axonal and neuronal degeneration, and neuronal apoptosis were observed. Vasospasm of ASA did not occur in the SS and control groups. There was a statistically significant increase in the degenerated neuron density in the SAH group as compared to the control and SS groups (P < 0.05). Cardiorespiratory disturbances, arrest, and lung edema more commonly developed in animals in the SAH group. Conclusion: We noticed interestingly that C6–C8 DRG degenerations were secondary to the vasospasm of ASA, following SAH. Cardiorespiratory disturbances or arrest can be explained with these mechanisms. PMID:28250634

  3. First report of important causal relationship between the Adamkiewicz artery vasospasm and dorsal root ganglion cell degeneration in spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage: An experimental study using a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmenoglu, Osman N; Kanat, Ayhan; Yolas, Coskun; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Ezirmik, Naci; Gundogdu, Cemal

    2017-01-01

    The blood supply of the lower spinal cord is heavily dependent on the artery of Adamkiewicz. The goal of this study was to elucidate the effects of lumbar subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on the lumbar 4 dorsal root ganglion (L4DRG) cells secondary to Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) vasospasm. This study was conducted on 20 rabbits, which were randomly divided into three groups: Spinal SAH ( n = 8), serum saline (SS) (SS; n = 6) and control ( n = 6) groups. Experimental spinal SAH was performed. After 20 days, volume values of AKA and neuron density of L4DRG were analyzed. The mean alive neuron density of the L4DRG was 15420 ± 1240/mm 3 and degenerated neuron density was 1045 ± 260/mm 3 in the control group. Whereas, the density of living and degenerated neurons density were 12930 ± 1060/mm 3 and 1365 ± 480/mm 3 in serum saline (SS), 9845 ± 1028/mm 3 and 4560 ± 1340/mm 3 in the SAH group. The mean volume of imaginary AKAs was estimated as 1,250 ± 0,310 mm 3 in the control group and 1,030 ± 0,240 mm 3 in the SF group and 0,910 ± 0,170 mm 3 in SAH group. Volume reduction of the AKAs and neuron density L4DRG were significantly different between the SAH and other two groups ( P < 0.05). Decreased volume of the lumen of the artery of Adamkiewicz was observed in animals with SAH compared with controls. Increased degeneration the L4 dorsal root ganglion in animals with SAH was also noted. Our findings will aid in the planning of future experimental studies and determining the clinical relevance on such studies.

  4. Regional cerebral blood flow levels as measured by xenon-CT in vascular territorial low-density areas after subarachnoid hemorrhage are not always ischemic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainardi, E.; Tagliaferri, M.F.; Compagnone, C.; Tanfani, A.; Cocciolo, F.; Targa, L.; Chieregato, A.; Battaglia, R.; Frattarelli, M.; Pascarella, R.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess regional cerebral blood flow (rCBV) in areas of CT hypoattenuation appearing in the postoperative period in patients treated for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) using xenon-enhanced CT scanning (Xe-CT). We analyzed 15 patients (5 male and 10 female; mean age 49.7±12.1 years) with SAH on CT performed on admission to hospital and who showed a low-density area within a well-defined vascular territory on CT scans after clipping or coiling of a saccular aneurysm. All zones of hypoattenuation were larger than 1 cm 2 and showed signs of a mass effect suggesting a subacute phase of evolution. Two aneurysms were detected in two patients. Aneurysms were located in the middle cerebral artery (n=7), in the anterior communicating artery (n=6), in the internal carotid artery (n=3), and in the posterior communicating artery (n=1). Treatments were surgical (n=8), endovascular (n=2) or both (n=1). A total of 36 Xe-CT studies were performed and rCBF values were measured in two different regions of interest (ROI): the low-density area, and an area of normal-appearing brain tissue located symmetrically in the contralateral hemisphere. rCBF levels were significantly lower in the low-density area than in the contralateral normal-appearing area (P 55 ml/100 g per minute) in 2/36 lesions (5.6%). Our study confirmed that rCBF is reduced in new low-density lesions related to specific vascular territories. However, only about one-third of the lesions showed rCBF levels consistent with irreversible ischemia and in a relatively high proportion of lesions, rCBF levels indicated penumbral, oligemic and hyperemic areas. (orig.)

  5. Neuroendocrine Disturbances One to Five or More Years after Traumatic Brain Injury and Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Data from the German Database on Hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewer, Carmen; Schneider, Manfred; Schneider, Harald Jörn; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Buchfelder, Michael; Faust, Michael; Berg, Christian; Wallaschofski, Henri; Renner, Caroline; Uhl, Eberhard; Koenig, Eberhard; Jordan, Martina; Stalla, Günter Karl; Kopczak, Anna

    2016-08-15

    Neuroendocrine disturbances are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but only a few data exist on long-term anterior pituitary deficiencies after brain injury. We present data from the Structured Data Assessment of Hypopituitarism after TBI and SAH, a multi-center study including 1242 patients. We studied a subgroup of 351 patients, who had sustained a TBI (245) or SAH (106) at least 1 year before endocrine assessment (range 1-55 years) in a separate analysis. The highest prevalence of neuroendocrine disorders was observed 1-2 years post-injury, and it decreased over time only to show another maximum in the long-term phase in patients with brain injury occurring ≥5 years prior to assessment. Gonadotropic and somatotropic insufficiencies were most common. In the subgroup from 1 to 2 years after brain injury (n = 126), gonadotropic insufficiency was the most common hormonal disturbance (19%, 12/63 men) followed by somatotropic insufficiency (11.5%, 7/61), corticotropic insufficiency (9.2%, 11/119), and thyrotropic insufficiency (3.3%, 4/122). In patients observed ≥ 5 years after brain injury, the prevalence of somatotropic insufficiency increased over time to 24.1%, whereas corticotropic and thyrotrophic insufficiency became less frequent (2.5% and 0%, respectively). The prevalence differed regarding the diagnostic criteria (laboratory values vs. physician`s diagnosis vs. stimulation tests). Our data showed that neuroendocrine disturbances are frequent even years after TBI or SAH, in a cohort of patients who are still on medical treatment.

  6. MR-angiography allows defining severity grades of cerebral vasospasm in an experimental double blood injection subarachnoid hemorrhage model in rats.

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    Vesna Malinova

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance (MR imaging has been used for the detection of cerebral vasospasm (VSP related infarction in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (eSAH in rats. Conventional angiography is generally used to visualize VSP, which is an invasive technique with a possible increase in morbidity and mortality. In this study we evaluated the validity of MR-angiography (MRA in detecting VSP and its feasibility to define VSP severity grades after eSAH in rats.SAH was induced using the double-hemorrhage model in 12 rats. In two rats, saline solution was injected instead of blood (sham group. MR was performed on day 1, 2 and on day 5. T1-, T2-, T2*-weighted and time-of-flight MR sequences were applied, which were analyzed by two blinded neuroradiologists. Vessel narrowing of 25-50% was defined as mild, 50-75% as moderate and >75% as severe VSP.We performed a total of 34 MRAs in 14 rats. In 14 rats, MRA was performed on day 2 and day 5. In six rats MRA was additionally performed on day1 before the blood injection. A good visualization of cerebral vessels was possible in all cases. No VSP was seen in the sham group neither on day 2 nor on day 5. We found vasospasm on day 2 in 7 of the 14 rats (50% whereas all 7 rats had mild and one rat had additionally moderate and severe vasospasm in one vessel, respectively. On day 5 we found vasospasm in 8 of the 14 rats (60% whereas 4 rats had severe vasospasm, 1 rat had moderate vasospasm and 3 rats demonstrated mild vasospasm. In 4 of the 14 rats (30% an ischemic lesion was detected on day 5. Three of these rats had severe vasospasm and one rat had mild vasospasm. Severe vasospasm on day 5 was statistically significant correlated with the occurrence of ischemic lesions (Fisher's Exact test, OR 19.5, p = 0.03.MRA is a noninvasive diagnostic tool, which allows a good visualization of the cerebral vasculature and provides reproducible results concerning the detection of VSP and the differentiation into three severity

  7. Pressor and hemodilution responses compensate for acute hemorrhage in bluefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvy, C S; Tremml, P G; DuBois, A B

    1988-01-01

    1. After hemorrhage of 21% blood volume (0.9% body weight) blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (H.R.) of unanesthetized bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) recovered within 5 min. 2. Phentolamine blocked this recovery. 3. Atropine increased control H.R. from 48 to 87 per min, and to 108 after hemorrhage, with delay of BP recovery to 10 min. 4. With small, repeated hemorrhages every 20 min, hemodilution and recovery of BP occurred between hemorrhages. Removal of 27% blood volume resulted in only temporary recovery. 5. Thirty min after hemorrhage, plasma epinephrine was 5 x and norepinephrine 8 x control. 6. Thus, bluefish tolerate hemorrhage with initial vasoconstriction via alpha-adrenergic pathways, and hemodilution.

  8. Intranasal administration of vitamin D attenuates blood-brain barrier disruption through endogenous upregulation of osteopontin and activation of CD44/P-gp glycosylation signaling after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhjargal, Budbazar; McBride, Devin W; Manaenko, Anatol; Reis, Cesar; Sakai, Yasushi; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of vitamin D3 (VitD3) on endogenous osteopontin (OPN), a neuroprotective glycoprotein, after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The endovascular perforation SAH model in Sprague-Dawley rats was used to study the effect of intranasal VitD3 (30 ng/kg) before (Pre-SAH + VitD3) and after (Post-SAH + VitD3) subarachnoid hemorrhage. Vitamin D3 (30, 60, 120 ng/kg/day) increased more than one fold endogenous OPN expression in astrocytes and endothelial cells of rat brain. Vitamin D3 significantly decreased brain edema and Evans blue extravasation. In addition, neurobehavioral scores were significantly higher in Pre-SAH + VitD3, but partly higher in Post-SAH + VitD3, group compared with SAH group. These protective effects of vitamin D3 were completely attenuated by intracerebroventricular injection of transcription inhibitor Actinomycin D and significantly inhibited by small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) for vitamin D receptor and OPN in Pre-SAH + VitD3 rats. OPN expression was significantly higher in Pre-SAH + VitD3 rats, specifically A and C, but not B, isomers were upregulated in the astrocytes, leading to CD44 splicing, and P-gp glycosylation in brain endothelial cells. The results show that intranasal vitamin D3 attenuates blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption through endogenous upregulation of OPN and subsequent CD44 and P-gp glycosylation signals in brain endothelial cells. Furthermore, this study identifies a novel strategy for the cost-effective management of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  9. Relation between reperfusion and hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsch, Alexander D. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rijnstate Hospital, Department of Radiology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Niesten, Joris M.; Seeters, Tom van; Schaaf, Irene C. van der; Velthuis, Birgitta K. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Graaf, Yolanda van der [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kappelle, L.J. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Utrecht Stroke Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Collaboration: DUST investigators

    2015-12-15

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) is given in acute ischemic stroke patients to achieve reperfusion. Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is a serious complication of IV-rtPA treatment and related to blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury. It is unclear whether HT occurs secondary to reperfusion in combination with ischemic BBB injury or is caused by the negative effect of IV-rtPA on BBB integrity. The aim of this study was to establish the association between reperfusion and the occurrence of HT. From the DUST study, patients were selected with admission and follow-up non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CT perfusion (CTP) imaging, and a perfusion deficit in the middle cerebral artery territory on admission. Reperfusion was categorized qualitatively as reperfusion or no-reperfusion by visual comparison of admission and follow-up CTP. Occurrence of HT was assessed on follow-up NCCT. The association between reperfusion and occurrence of HT on follow-up was estimated by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) with additional stratification for IV-rtPA treatment. Inclusion criteria were met in 299 patients. There was no significant association between reperfusion and HT (OR 1.2 95%CI 0.5-3.1). In patients treated with IV-rtPA (n = 203), the OR was 1.3 (95%CI 0.4-4.0), and in patients not treated with IV-rtPA (n = 96), the OR was 0.8 (95%CI 0.1-4.5). HT occurred in 14 % of the IV-rtPA patients and in 7 % of patients without IV-rtPA (95%CI of difference -1 to 14 %). Our results suggest that the increased risk of HT after acute ischemic stroke treatment is not dependent on the reperfusion status. (orig.)

  10. Detection of acute cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits by magnetic induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J.; Jin, G.; Qin, M.X.; Wan, Z.B.; Wang, J.B.; Wang, C.; Guo, W.Y.; Xu, L.; Ning, X.; Xu, J.; Pu, X.J.; Chen, M.S.; Zhao, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute cerebral hemorrhage (ACH) is an important clinical problem that is often monitored and studied with expensive devices such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. These devices are not readily available in economically underdeveloped regions of the world, emergency departments, and emergency zones. We have developed a less expensive tool for non-contact monitoring of ACH. The system measures the magnetic induction phase shift (MIPS) between the electromagnetic signals on two coils. ACH was induced in 6 experimental rabbits and edema was induced in 4 control rabbits by stereotactic methods, and their intracranial pressure and heart rate were monitored for 1 h. Signals were continuously monitored for up to 1 h at an exciting frequency of 10.7 MHz. Autologous blood was administered to the experimental group, and saline to the control group (1 to 3 mL) by injection of 1-mL every 5 min. The results showed a significant increase in MIPS as a function of the injection volume, but the heart rate was stable. In the experimental (ACH) group, there was a statistically significant positive correlation of the intracranial pressure and MIPS. The change of MIPS was greater in the ACH group than in the control group. This high-sensitivity system could detect a 1-mL change in blood volume. The MIPS was significantly related to the intracranial pressure. This observation suggests that the method could be valuable for detecting early warning signs in emergency medicine and critical care units

  11. Detection of acute cerebral hemorrhage in rabbits by magnetic induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, J.; Jin, G.; Qin, M.X. [College of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China, College of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Imaging, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wan, Z.B. [Experimental Animal Center, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China, Experimental Animal Center, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wang, J.B.; Wang, C.; Guo, W.Y. [College of Electronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an, China, College of Electronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi' an (China); Xu, L.; Nin