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Sample records for acute subarachnoid haemorrhage

  1. Acute subarachnoid haemorrhage and the mysterious ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating neurological insult, and is increasingly understood as a multi-system condition initiated in the central nervous system. Perioperative investigation of patients presenting for aneurysm surgery often includes a routine electrocardiogram (ECG) which frequently reveals an ...

  2. Considerable delay in diagnosis and acute management of subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Carl Christian; Eskesen, Vagn; Hauerberg, John

    2010-01-01

    Rebleeding from subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) usually occurs within the first six hours after the initial bleeding. Rebleeding can be prevented effectively with tranexamic acid (TXA). Although a broad consensus has evolved that SAH should be treated as an emergency, it is likely that delays do e...... exist in the diagnosis and treatment of SAH patients. The aim of this study was to prospectively assess the interval between symptom onset, emergency room (ER) admission, initial diagnosis and treatment, and final closure of the aneurysm....

  3. Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa Nanji, Liliana; Melo, Teresa P; Canhão, Patrícia; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Ferro, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Some cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) have been associated with vigorous physical activity, including sports. Our research aimed to describe the association between SAH and sports and to identify the types of sports that were more frequently found as precipitating factors in a tertiary single-centre SAH register. We retrieved information from a prospectively collected SAH registry and reviewed discharge notes of acute SAH patients admitted to the Stroke Unit of Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, between 1995 and 2014. Out of 738 patients included in the analysis, 424 (57.5%) cases of SAH were preceded by physical activity. Nine cases (1.2%) were associated with sports, namely running (2 cases), aerobics (2 cases), cycling, body balance, dance, surf and windsurf. Patients with SAH while practicing sports were younger than controls (average age 43.1 vs. 57.0 years; p = 0.007). In 1 patient, there was a report of trauma to the neck. Patients in the sports group only had Hunt and Hess scale grades 1 (11.1%) or 2 (88.9%) at admission, while patients in the control group had a wider distribution in severity. Our findings indicate that SAH precipitated by sports is not very frequent and is uncommonly related to trauma. Patients who suffered SAH associated with sports were younger and apparently had a milder clinical presentation.

  4. MRI in acute subarachnoid haemorrhage; findings with a standardised stroke protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiebach, J.B.; Wilde, P.; Meyer, M.; Sartor, K.; Schellinger, P.D.; Hacke, W.; Geletneky, K.

    2004-01-01

    There is doubt as to whether acute haemorrhage is visible on MRI. We carried out MRI within 6 h of symptom onset on five patients with minor (low Hunt and Hess grades 1 or 2) subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) diagnosed by CT to search for any specific pattern. We used our standard stroke MRI protocol, including multiecho proton density (PD)- and T2-weighted images, echoplanar (EPI) diffusion- (DWI) and perfusion- (PWI) weighted imaging, and MRA. In all cases SAH was clearly visible on PD-weighted images with a short TE. In four patients it caused a low-signal rim on the T2*-weighted source images of PWI, and DWI revealed high signal in SAH. In the fifth patient SAH was perimesencephalic; susceptibility effects from the skull base made it impossible to detect SAH on EPI DWI and T2*-weighted images. Perfusion maps were normal in all cases. MRA and conventional angiography revealed an aneurysm in only one patient. Stroke MRI within 6 h of SAH thus shows a characteristic pattern. (orig.)

  5. Acute Retrobulbar Optic Neuropathy as the Sole Manifestation of Subarachnoid Haemorrhage from a Ruptured Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kook; Shin, Sun Young; Park, Shin Hae

    2013-01-01

    Anterior communicating artery aneurysm is the most common form of intracranial aneurysm and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is the common presenting feature of anterior communicating artery aneurysms. In general, patients with SAH from anterior communicating artery aneurysm present with neurological deficit. We report an interesting case of a 60-year-old man who presented with acute monocular vision loss accompanied by periorbital pain without any neurological deficit, finally diagnosed with S...

  6. Bilateral Wyburn-Mason Syndrome presenting as acute subarachnoid haemorrhage - a very rare congenital neurocutaneuos disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortnum, Søren Ole Stigaard; Sørensen, Preben; Andresen, J

    2008-01-01

    A 30 year old young male was admitted to our department after experiencing clincal symptoms of a subarachnoid haemorrhage. Imaging studies revealed large cerebral AVMs. Fundus examination of the left eye demonstrated a retinal racemose AVM almost completely covering the posterior pole of the eye....... patients in the literature since 1973. The finding of retinal AVMs should warrant cerebral imaging studies including CT- or MR-angiography....

  7. Cardiovascular manifestations of subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethuraman Manikandan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH is one of the devastating conditions, especially the aneurysmal bleed which has high mortality as well as morbidity. The mortality and morbidity caused by SAH have been recognised to be caused by both neurological and systemic causes. The alterations in systemic and other organ damage could cause death in up to 40% of SAH patients. Among the systemic manifestations, cardiovascular and respiratory complications increase hospitalisation and worsen the outcome. The main pathophysiological mechanism is the increased sympathetic activation causing myocardial necrosis. Various cardiovascular manifestations range from electrocardiogram changes to myocardial ischaemia, cardiac failure and arrhythmias. This review deals with the cardiac manifestations in SAH patients.

  8. Retrospective audit of the investigation of patients with suspected acute subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammed, O.; Teubnet, D.; Jones, D.N.; Slavotinek, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Recommended investigational care (RIC) of emergency department (ED) patients with suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage comprises lumbar puncture (LP) to detect xanthochromia if the preceding CT scan is negative. Retrospective audit of the investigational care of 100 consecutive ED patients presenting with possible subarachnoid haemorrhage. Of the 100 patients, 91 had negative CT, and 36 (39.6%) of these patients had an LP performed to detect xanthochromia (i.e. RIC). Fifty-five of 91 (60.4%) patients did not receive RIC. Of the 55 patients who did not receive RIC, 25 (45.5%) had a documented senior clinical decision not to perform an LP; 15 (27.3%) had no documented reason; five (9.1%) refused consent; two (3.6%) had an LP but no xanthochromia requested, one patient did not have an LP because of technical issues, six patients underwent CT angiography (CTA), and one patient underwent magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), in the absence of a LP, following a negative CT. Two patients underwent CTA following a negative xanthochromia result. Patients admitted to the emergency extended care unit had 6.85 times the odds of receiving RIC (95% CI 2.20-21.4). Fifty-five (55) of 91 (60%) ED patients did not receive RIC. Fifteen of the 55 did not have any documented justification for not performing an LP with xanthochromia testing. Admission to an emergency extended care unit was a predictor of receiving RIC. Inappropriate use of CTA and MRA was identified. These findings have important implications for patient safety. Multifaceted strategies are required to close this evidence-practice gap.

  9. Acute Retrobulbar Optic Neuropathy as the Sole Manifestation of Subarachnoid Haemorrhage from a Ruptured Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kook; Shin, Sun Young; Park, Shin Hae

    2013-01-01

    Anterior communicating artery aneurysm is the most common form of intracranial aneurysm and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is the common presenting feature of anterior communicating artery aneurysms. In general, patients with SAH from anterior communicating artery aneurysm present with neurological deficit. We report an interesting case of a 60-year-old man who presented with acute monocular vision loss accompanied by periorbital pain without any neurological deficit, finally diagnosed with SAH from ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Five months after immediate craniotomy with aneurysm neck clipping, his visual acuity was improved to 20/63 with a pale optic disc appearance. Acute retrobulbar optic neuropathy may be the sole manifestation of SAH from ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Unilateral decrease of visual acuity with periorbital pain, in the absence of other neurological change, may be the initial and isolated sign.

  10. Acute subarachnoid haemorrhage: 3D time-of-flight MR angiography versus intra-arterial digital angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzalone, N. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Scientific Inst. H. S. Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Triulzi, F. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Scientific Inst. H. S. Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Scotti, G. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Scientific Inst. H. S. Raffaele, Milan (Italy)

    1995-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and reliability of 3D time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF MRA) as a noninvasive procedure, 27 patients with acute subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) were studied with MRA immediately before or after intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA). 3DTOF MRA was performed with an axial slab of 60 mm centred on the circle of Willis and isotropic voxels. DSA showed 22 aneurysms and 1 dural arteriovenous fistula in 21 patients; the aneurysms ranged in size from 2 to 8 mm. MRA failed to show 2 small aneurysms, at the origin of the posterior and anterior communicating arteries. The 3D display of the intracranial vessels obtained with maximum intensity projection (MIP) or targetted MIP sometimes rendered the aneurysms better than DSA. However, due to its high spatial resolution, DSA more clearly defined the overall anatomy of the walls of the normal and abnormal vessels. (orig.)

  11. Calcium antagonists for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, S. M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Feigin, V. L.; Algra, A.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary ischaemia is a frequent cause of poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Its pathogenesis has been incompletely elucidated, but vasospasm probably is a contributing factor. Experimental studies have suggested that calcium antagonists can prevent or reverse

  12. Risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage in first degree relatives of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, D; Vaeth, M; Tsiropoulos, I

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of occurrence of subarachnoid haemorrhage in first degree relatives (parents, siblings, children) of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage. DESIGN: Population based cohort study using data from the Danish National Discharge Registry and the Central Person Registry......, standardised for age, sex, and calendar period. This process was repeated for patients discharged from neurosurgery units, as diagnoses from these wards had high validity (93%). RESULTS: 18 patients had a total of 19 first degree relatives with subarachnoid haemorrhage during the study period, corresponding...... to a standardised incidence ratio of 2.9 (95% confidence interval 1.9 to 4.6). Patients discharged from neurosurgery wards had a higher standardised incidence ratio (4.5, 2.7 to 7.3). CONCLUSIONS: First degree relatives of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage have a threefold to fivefold increased risk...

  13. Antithrombotic drugs and subarachnoid haemorrhage risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, A; García Rodríguez, L A; Poulsen, F R

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate the relationship between use of antithrombotic drugs and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We identified patients discharged from Danish neurosurgery units with a first-ever SAH diagnosis in 2000 to 2012 (n=5,834). For each case, we selected 40 age-, sex...

  14. Calcium antagonists for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, G. J. E.; Feigin, V. L.; Algra, A.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary ischaemia is a frequent cause of poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Its pathogenesis has not been elucidated yet, but may be related to vasospasm. Experimental studies have indicated that calcium antagonists can prevent or reverse vasospasm and have

  15. Trends in monitoring patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, J B; Frederiksen, H-J; Eskesen, V

    2005-01-01

    After aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), the clinical outcome depends upon the primary haemorrhage and a number of secondary insults in the acute post-haemorrhagic period. Some secondary insults are potentially preventable but prevention requires prompt recognition of cerebral or systemic...... implemented monitoring system provides answers but it also raises valuable new questions challenging our current understanding of the brain injury after SAH....... complications. Currently, several neuro-monitoring techniques are available; this review describes the most frequently used techniques and discusses indications for their use, and their value in diagnosis and prognosis. None of the techniques, when considered in isolation, has proved sufficient after SAH...... with the conventional monitoring systems, for example intracranial pressure measurements, transcranial Doppler ultrasound and modern neuro-imaging, direct assessment of biochemical markers by intracerebral microdialysis is promising in the advancement of neurointensive care of patients with SAH. A successfully...

  16. Subarachnoid Haemorrhage: epidemiological studies on aetiology and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Risselada (Roelof)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSubarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is bleeding into the subarachnoid space ‒ the area between the arachnoid membrane and the pia mater surrounding the brain. SAH occurs spontaneously or can be caused by traumatic injury of the head. Spontaneous SAH is caused by rupture of an intracranial

  17. Xanthochromia after subarachnoid haemorrhage needs no revisitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, M; Hasan, D; Blijenberg, B G; Hijdra, A; van Gijn, J

    1989-01-01

    Recently it was contended that it is bloodstained cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that is important in the diagnosis of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and not xanthochromia, and also that a normal CT scan and the absence of xanthochromia in the CSF do not exclude a ruptured intracranial aneurysm. The CSF findings were therefore reviewed of 111 patients with a proven SAH. All patients had xanthochromia of the CSF. Lumbar punctures were performed between 12 hours and one week after the ictus. Xanthochromia was still present in all (41) patients after 1 week, in all (32) patients after 2 weeks, in 20 of 22 patients after three weeks and in 10 of 14 patients after four weeks. In six years we identified only 12 patients with sudden headache, normal CT, bloodstained CSF, and no xanthochromia. Angiography was carried out in three and was negative. All 12 patients survived without disability and were not re-admitted with a SAH (mean follow up 4 years). It is concluded that it is still xanthochromia that is important in the diagnosis of SAH and not bloodstained CSF. Furthermore a normal CT scan and the absence of xanthochromia do exclude a ruptured aneurysm, provided xanthochromia is investigated by spectrophotometry and lumbar puncture is carried out between 12 hours and 2 weeks after the ictus. PMID:2769274

  18. Coping strategies in patients following subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomberg, T; Orasson, A; Linnamägi, U; Toomela, A; Pulver, A; Asser, T

    2001-09-01

    To assess psychological coping strategies and their relationship with outcome in patients after primary subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). In 51 unselected patients (24 males, 27 females; mean age 46 years) in an average 15.7+/-12.0 months after SAH usage of coping strategies were assessed by means of Estonian COPE-D test with 15 four-items scales and compared to those obtained from 51 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy persons. The data were analysed according to age, sex and education of the patients, initial severity of disease, localization of aneurysm and outcome characteristics. Patients after SAH reported using social support strategy less than control persons (Pcoping styles were less used (Pdisability and dependence in daily living. Healthy women used social support more than men; patients and control persons 50 years or older used task-oriented strategies less than younger persons (Pcoping strategies used by patients after SAH differs compared to healthy persons. The differences in using coping strategies are related to age of the patients, functional state and degree of adaptation after SAH.

  19. Evaluation of a metal artifact reduction algorithm applied to post-interventional flat detector CT in comparison to pre-treatment CT in patients with acute subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennecke, Angelika; Svergun, Stanislav; Doerfler, Arnd; Struffert, Tobias; Scholz, Bernhard; Royalty, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Metal artefacts can impair accurate diagnosis of haemorrhage using flat detector CT (FD-CT), especially after aneurysm coiling. Within this work we evaluate a prototype metal artefact reduction algorithm by comparison of the artefact-reduced and the non-artefact-reduced FD-CT images to pre-treatment FD-CT and multi-slice CT images. Twenty-five patients with acute aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) were selected retrospectively. FD-CT and multi-slice CT before endovascular treatment as well as FD-CT data sets after treatment were available for all patients. The algorithm was applied to post-treatment FD-CT. The effect of the algorithm was evaluated utilizing the pre-post concordance of a modified Fisher score, a subjective image quality assessment, the range of the Hounsfield units within three ROIs, and the pre-post slice-wise Pearson correlation. The pre-post concordance of the modified Fisher score, the subjective image quality, and the pre-post correlation of the ranges of the Hounsfield units were significantly higher for artefact-reduced than for non-artefact-reduced images. Within the metal-affected slices, the pre-post slice-wise Pearson correlation coefficient was higher for artefact-reduced than for non-artefact-reduced images. The overall diagnostic quality of the artefact-reduced images was improved and reached the level of the pre-interventional FD-CT images. The metal-unaffected parts of the image were not modified. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of a metal artifact reduction algorithm applied to post-interventional flat detector CT in comparison to pre-treatment CT in patients with acute subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mennecke, Angelika; Svergun, Stanislav; Doerfler, Arnd; Struffert, Tobias [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Erlangen (Germany); Scholz, Bernhard [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany); Royalty, Kevin [Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Hoffman Estates, IL (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Metal artefacts can impair accurate diagnosis of haemorrhage using flat detector CT (FD-CT), especially after aneurysm coiling. Within this work we evaluate a prototype metal artefact reduction algorithm by comparison of the artefact-reduced and the non-artefact-reduced FD-CT images to pre-treatment FD-CT and multi-slice CT images. Twenty-five patients with acute aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) were selected retrospectively. FD-CT and multi-slice CT before endovascular treatment as well as FD-CT data sets after treatment were available for all patients. The algorithm was applied to post-treatment FD-CT. The effect of the algorithm was evaluated utilizing the pre-post concordance of a modified Fisher score, a subjective image quality assessment, the range of the Hounsfield units within three ROIs, and the pre-post slice-wise Pearson correlation. The pre-post concordance of the modified Fisher score, the subjective image quality, and the pre-post correlation of the ranges of the Hounsfield units were significantly higher for artefact-reduced than for non-artefact-reduced images. Within the metal-affected slices, the pre-post slice-wise Pearson correlation coefficient was higher for artefact-reduced than for non-artefact-reduced images. The overall diagnostic quality of the artefact-reduced images was improved and reached the level of the pre-interventional FD-CT images. The metal-unaffected parts of the image were not modified. (orig.)

  1. Postinterventional subarachnoid haemorrhage after endovascular stroke treatment with stent retrievers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikoubashman, Omid; Reich, Arno; Jungbluth, Michael; Pjontek, Rastislav; Wiesmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the clinical significance of postinterventional subarachnoid hyperdensities (PSH) after endovascular mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke. We analysed clinical and radiological data of 113 consecutive patients who received postinterventional CT scans within 4.5 h after mechanical thrombectomy. PSH was present in 27 of 113 patients (24 %). Extravasation of contrast agent was observed during intervention in only 6 of 27 cases (22 %). There was consecutive haemorrhagic transformation in four patients with PSH (p = 0.209, Fisher's exact test). Preinterventional predictors for the occurrence of PSH in our series were a long interval between clinical onset and recanalization (p = 0.028), a long procedure time (p = 0.010), and a high number of recanalization attempts (p = 0.001). PSH had no significant impact on clinical outcome (modified Rankin Scale) at discharge (p = 0.419) or at 3 months (p = 0.396). There were no significant correlations between PSH and thrombectomy devices (Solitaire: p = 0.433, Trevo Pro: p = 0.124). PSH after endovascular mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke are likely to occur in complicated cases in which more than one revascularisation attempt is performed. PSH per se do not appear to be associated with an impaired clinical outcome or an elevated risk for consecutive haemorrhage. (orig.)

  2. Prospective study of sentinel headache in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linn, F.H.H.; Wijdicks, E.F.M.; Graaf, Y. van der; Weerdesteyn-van Vliet, F.A.C.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Gijn, J. van

    1994-01-01

    Retrospective surveys of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage suggest that minor episodes with sudden headache (warning leaks) may precede rupture of an aneurysm, and that early recognition and surgery might lead to improved outcome. We studied 148 patients with sudden and severe headache

  3. Intra-arterial nimodipine for cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Andresen, Morten; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Intra-arterial nimodipine (IAN) has shown a promising effect on cerebral vasospasm (CV) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. At our institution, Rigshospitalet, IAN treatment has been used since 2009, but the short- and long-term clinical efficacy of IAN has not yet been assessed. The purpo...

  4. Delayed Optochiasmal Arachnoiditis following Intervention for a Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Neoh, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Visual morbidity following a subarachnoid haemorrhage is common among survivors and it is usually the result of vascular ischaemia at the time of the initial insult. In this report, we present an unusual case of delayed, progressive visual loss following intervention for a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. We discuss the possible etiological factors and highlight potential diagnostic pitfalls.

  5. The need for repeat angiography in subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbach, H.; Solymosi, L.; Zentner, J.

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the necessity for a second angiogram study in patients in whom initial angiography after primary subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) was negative. During a 12-year period, 122 of 694 patients (17.5 %) had negative initial angiograms. CT, available for 98 patients, showed a preponderance of subarachnoid blood in the perimesencephalic cisterns in 50 of 73 patients (68.5 %) in whom blood was visible on CT. Angiography, repeated in 67 patients, revealed an aneurysm in 4 (6 %): 2 had an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, 1 of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and 1 of the P2 segment of the posterior cerebral artery. CT showed subarachnoid blood in the interpeduncular and ambient cisterns in this last case, and a preponderance of subarachnoid blood outside the perimesencephalic cisterns in the remaining 3 patients. (orig.)

  6. The need for repeat angiography in subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H.; Solymosi, L. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Zentner, J. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the necessity for a second angiogram study in patients in whom initial angiography after primary subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) was negative. During a 12-year period, 122 of 694 patients (17.5 %) had negative initial angiograms. CT, available for 98 patients, showed a preponderance of subarachnoid blood in the perimesencephalic cisterns in 50 of 73 patients (68.5 %) in whom blood was visible on CT. Angiography, repeated in 67 patients, revealed an aneurysm in 4 (6 %): 2 had an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, 1 of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and 1 of the P2 segment of the posterior cerebral artery. CT showed subarachnoid blood in the interpeduncular and ambient cisterns in this last case, and a preponderance of subarachnoid blood outside the perimesencephalic cisterns in the remaining 3 patients. (orig.) With 2 figs., 1 tab., 32 refs.

  7. Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid haemorrhage - in "Endocrine Management in the Intensive Care Unit".

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world. There is a large body of evidence that demonstrates that both conditions may adversely affect pituitary function in both the acute and chronic phases of recovery. Diagnosis of hypopituitarism and accurate treatment of pituitary disorders offers the opportunity to improve mortality and outcome in both traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In this article, we will review the history and pathophysiology of pituitary function in the acute phase following traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage, and we will discuss in detail three key aspects of pituitary dysfunction which occur in the early course of TBI; acute cortisol deficiency, diabetes insipidus and SIAD.

  8. Post eclamptic aneurysmal rupture subarachnoid haemorrhage diagnosed in the puerperium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coolen, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of subarachnoid and/or intracerebral haemorrhage in women during pregnancy is rare. The risk depends on the stage of pregnancy, but seems to be highest during the late third trimester, during delivery and in the puerperium. Headache can be a symptom of both preeclampsia, subarachnoid haemorrhage and other pathologies or conditions. It is essential for pregnant women with a suspected ruptured aneurysm to be investigated and treated without delay, irrespective of fear of harm to the foetus, to avoid complications from aneurysm rupture. This case study presents a 39-year-old woman who was 35 weeks and 3 days pregnant with known preeclampsia. She endured a headache for the three days leading up to the delivery with associated diplopia on the third day, but these symptoms were thought to be related to her preeclampsia. Over the three hours following childbirth, her headache became more severe and she suffered from vomiting, loss of vision, torticollis and seizures. Computed tomography (CT) of her head revealed a subarachnoid haemorrhage while CT angiography of the Circle of Willis failed to reveal an aneurysm and 4-vessel angiography only demonstrated an area slightly suspicious for the presence of an aneurysm. 3D rotational angiography clearly demonstrated a 1-2 mm aneurysm superior to the left terminal internal carotid artery. In this case, 3D rotational angiography proved to be a valuable additional technique. This patient underwent surgery for her ruptured aneurysm and has made an excellent recovery

  9. Clinical management guidelines for subarachnoid haemorrhage. Diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, J; Gilo, F; Frutos, R; Maestre, J; García-Pastor, A; Quintana, F; Roda, J M; Ximénez-Carrillo, A; Díez Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Alvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Casado, I; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Dávalos, A; Díaz-Otero, F; Egido, J A; Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; Gállego, J; Gil-Núñez, A; Irimia, P; Lago, A; Masjuan, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Martínez-Vila, E; Molina, C; Morales, A; Nombela, F; Purroy, F; Ribó, M; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Roquer, J; Rubio, F; Segura, T; Serena, J; Simal, P; Tejada, J

    2014-01-01

    To update the Spanish Society of Neurology's guidelines for subarachnoid haemorrhage diagnosis and treatment. A review and analysis of the existing literature. Recommendations are given based on the level of evidence for each study reviewed. The most common cause of spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is cerebral aneurysm rupture. Its estimated incidence in Spain is 9/100 000 inhabitants/year with a relative frequency of approximately 5% of all strokes. Hypertension and smoking are the main risk factors. Stroke patients require treatment in a specialised centre. Admission to a stroke unit should be considered for SAH patients whose initial clinical condition is good (Grades I or II on the Hunt and Hess scale). We recommend early exclusion of aneurysms from the circulation. The diagnostic study of choice for SAH is brain CT (computed tomography) without contrast. If the test is negative and SAH is still suspected, a lumbar puncture should then be performed. The diagnostic tests recommended in order to determine the source of the haemorrhage are MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and angiography. Doppler ultrasonography studies are very useful for diagnosing and monitoring vasospasm. Nimodipine is recommended for preventing delayed cerebral ischaemia. Blood pressure treatment and neurovascular intervention may be considered in treating refractory vasospasm. SAH is a severe and complex disease which must be managed in specialised centres by professionals with ample experience in relevant diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Rare anomalies of craniocerebral vessels with subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guhl, L.; Thron, A.

    1986-01-01

    Seven patients presenting rare vascular anomalies of the craniocerebral vessels are reported, six of whom suffered from subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Angiography demonstrated typically located saccular aneurysms as the cause of bleeding in three of these cases. An increased coincidence of rare vascular anomalies and aneurysms is known from the literature. Our findings suggest that in cases of SAH and rare cerebrovascular anomalies additional aneurysms can be demonstrated almost as often as in unselected cases of SAH (70%). Despite controversial aspects regarding the pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysms, abnormalities of the vessel walls of genetic or embryologic origin seem to be the most likely reason for this high coincidence. (orig.) [de

  11. MR of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.; Dion, J.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging was performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR images as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of MR of the basal cisterns results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR studies in many cases

  12. The genetics of primary haemorrhagic stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage and ruptured intracranial aneurysms in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Peck

    Full Text Available The genetic basis of haemorrhagic stroke has proved difficult to unravel, partly hampered by the small numbers of subjects in any single study. A meta-analysis of all candidate gene association studies of haemorrhagic stroke (including ruptured subarachnoid haemorrhage and amyloid angiopathy-related haemorrhage was performed, allowing more reliable estimates of risk.A systematic review and meta-analysis of all genetic studies in haemorrhagic stroke was conducted. Electronic databases were searched until and including March 2007 for any candidate gene in haemorrhagic stroke. Odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were determined for each gene disease association using fixed and random effect models.Our meta-analyses included 6,359 cases and 13,805 controls derived from 55 case-control studies, which included 12 genes (13 polymorphisms. Statistically significant associations with haemorrhagic stroke were identified for those homozygous for the ACE/I allele (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20-1.83; p = 0.0003 and for the 5G allele in the SERPINE1 4G/5G polymorphism (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.03-1.96; p = 0.03. In addition, both epsilon2 and epsilon4 alleles of APOE were significantly associated with lobar haemorrhage (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.26-2.62; p = 0.002 and OR, 1.49; 95% 1.08-2.05; p = 0.01 respectively. Furthermore, a significant protective association against haemorrhagic stroke was found for the factor V Leiden mutation (OR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.10-0.87; p = 0.03.Our data suggests a genetic contribution to some types of haemorrhagic stroke, with no overall responsible single gene but rather supporting a polygenic aetiology . However, the evidence base is smaller compared to ischaemic stroke. Importantly, for several alleles previously found to be associated with protection from ischaemic stroke, there was a trend towards an increased risk of haemorrhagic stroke.

  13. Decompressive craniectomy in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage for hematoma or oedema versus secondary infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedemans, Taco; Verbaan, Dagmar; Coert, Bert A.; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; van den Berg, René; Vandertop, W. Peter; van den Munckhof, Pepijn

    2017-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) has been proposed as lifesaving treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). However, data is sparse and controversy exists whether the underlying cause of elevated ICP influences neurological outcome. The

  14. Impaired endothelial function after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage correlates with arginine:asymmetric dimethylarginine ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, A; Staalsø, J M; Romner, B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endothelial dysfunction might be involved in the development of cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). METHODS: This prospective observational study of 48 SAH subjects and 23 control subjects examined associations between reactive hyperaemia index (RHI...

  15. Working capacity after a subarachnoid haemorrhage: A six-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlind, Emma; Persson, Hanna C; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S

    2017-11-21

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage can lead to long-term disabilities. It is a major health issue for the patient and can affect work capacity. The aim of this study was to investigate working capacity after subarachnoid haemorrhage from a long-term perspective, using data from national sick leave records. In addition, factors associated with working capacity were analysed. A retrospective cohort study. A consecutive total sample of 38 working-age participants with first-ever subarachnoid haemorrhage was included. Working capacity of the 30 participants not on early retirement prior to the subarachnoid haemorrhage was analysed. Working capacity was defined as no longer being registered on sick leave or early retirement in the Social Insurance Agency and not being age retired or deceased. Regain of working capacity continued until 2.5 years post-subarachnoid haemorrhage and 73% of the participants were deemed to have working capacity. Functional independence at discharge from hospital, and higher responsiveness at admittance were the main factors associated with an earlier regain of working capacity. Nearly three-quarters of subjects were deemed to have working capacity within 2.5 years post-subarachnoid haemorrhage with a non-self-reported outcome. This information will help to individualize rehabilitation for affected persons.

  16. Effect of magnesium treatment and glucose levels on delayed cerebral ischemia in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage : A substudy of the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage trial (MASH-II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijenaar, Jolien F.; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.; Algra, Ale; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnesium treatment did not improve outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage II trial. We hypothesized that high glucose levels may have offset a potential beneficial effect to prevent delayed cerebral ischemia.

  17. Hydroxyethyl starch for volume expansion after subarachnoid haemorrhage and renal function: Results of a retrospective analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Bercker

    Full Text Available Hydroxyethyl starch (HES was part of "triple-H" therapy for prophylaxis and therapy of vasospasm in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH. The European Medicines Agency restricted the use of HES in 2013 due to an increase of renal failure in critically ill patients receiving HES compared to crystalloid fluids. The occurrence of renal insufficiency in patients with SAH due to HES is still uncertain. The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether there was an association with renal impairment in patients receiving HES after subarachnoid haemorrhage.Medical records of all non-traumatic SAH patients treated at the Departments of Anaesthesiology and Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Leipzig, Germany, between January 2009 and December 2014 were analysed. Patients received either HES 6% and/or 10% (HES group, n = 183 or exclusively crystalloids for fluid therapy (Crystalloid group, n = 93. Primary outcome was the incidence of acute kidney injury.The study groups had similar characteristics except for initial SAPS scores, incidence of vasospasm and ICU length of stay. Patients receiving HES fulfilled significantly more often SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria. 24.6% (45/183 of the patients in the HES group had acute kidney injury (KDIGO 1-3 at any time during their ICU stay compared to 26.9% (25/93 in the crystalloid group (p = 0.679. Only few patients needed renal replacement therapy with no significant difference between groups (Crystalloid group: 4.3%; HES group: 2.2%; p = 0.322. The incidence of vasospasm was increased in the HES group when compared to the crystalloid group (33.9% vs. 17.2%; p = 0.004.In the presented series of patients with non-traumatic SAH we found no significant association between HES therapy and the incidence of acute kidney injury. Treatment without HES did not worsen patient outcome.

  18. Superior cerebellar aneurysm causing subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old with alagille syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, David

    2012-04-01

    Alagille syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterised by mutation in Jagged1 gene. Intracranial aneurysms may be seen in this condition and may present as subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe the first case of superior cerebellar aneurysm rupture causing WFNS grade 1 subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old girl. The clinical condition and management of this rare occurrence is discussed with a review of literature.

  19. Dose evaluation for long-term magnesium treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Norden, A. G. W.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnesium is a neuroprotective agent that might prevent or reverse delayed cerebral ischaemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We are presently running a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind trial with magnesium sulphate (64 mmol/day intravenously). We studied

  20. Magnesium therapy after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage a dose-finding study for long term treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, W. M.; Albrecht, K. W.; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, J. W.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnesium is a neuroprotective agent which might prevent or reverse delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Although the dosage for short-term magnesium therapy is well established, there is lack of knowledge on the dosage for extended use of

  1. Erythropoietin in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage originates from the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Sonne, Bjarne; Frederiksen, Hans Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Recent years' research has revealed a specific, neuroprotective erythropoietin (EPO) system in the central nervous system (CNS) that is upregulated by hypoxia. The presence and dynamics of EPO in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has not been investigated...

  2. Incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage : a systematic review with emphasis on region, age, gender and time trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, N. K.; Linn, F. H. H.; van der Plas, J. A.; Algra, A.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Background and aim: To update our 1996 review on the incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and assess the relation of incidence with region, age, gender and time period. Methods: We searched for studies on the incidence of SAH published until October 2005. The overall incidences with

  3. Improvement after treatment of hydrocephalus in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage : implications for grading and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Laan, M; Mooij, JJA

    Two patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and hydrocephalus are presented. On admission they scored E1M4V1 and E1M3Vtube on the Glasgow Coma Scale. The first patient recovered to E3M5Vtube after treatment of hydrocpehalus by extraventricular drainage. The second recovered to E2M5Vtube

  4. The effects of continuous prostacyclin infusion on regional blood flow and cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Wetterslev, Jørn; Stavngaard, Trine

    2012-01-01

    One of the main causes of mortality and morbidity following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is the development of cerebral vasospasm, a frequent complication arising in the weeks after the initial bleeding. Despite extensive research, to date no effective treatment of vasospasm exists. Prostacycli...

  5. Sudden headache, third nerve palsy and visual deficit: thinking outside the subarachnoid haemorrhage box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Chróinín, Danielle; Lambert, John

    2013-11-01

    A 75-year-old lady presented with sudden severe headache and vomiting. Examination was normal, and CT and lumbar puncture not convincing for subarachnoid haemorrhage. Shortly thereafter, she developed painless diplopia. Examination confirmed right third cranial nerve palsy plus homonymous left inferior quadrantanopia. Urgent cerebral MRI with angiography was requested to assess for a possible posterior communicating artery aneurysm, but revealed an unsuspected pituitary mass. Pituitary adenoma with pituitary apoplexy was diagnosed. Pituitary apopolexy is a syndrome comprising sudden headache, meningism, visual and/or oculomotor deficits, with an intrasellar mass. It is commonly due to haemorrhage or infarction within a pituitary adenoma. Treatment includes prompt steroid administration, and potentially surgical decompression. While subarachnoid haemorrhage is an important, well-recognised cause of sudden severe headache, other aetiologies, including pituitary apoplexy, should be considered and sought.

  6. MR imaging of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.B.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.R.; Dion, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging were performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of the basal cisterns on MR images results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR in many cases

  7. Classification of non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: CT correlation to the clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, S.; Kunz, A.B.; Kieslinger, K.; Ladurner, G.; Killer, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To propose a new computed tomography (CT)-based classification system for non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), which predicts patients' discharge clinical outcome and helps to prioritize appropriate patient management. Methods and materials: A 5-year, retrospective, two-centre study was carried out involving 1486 patients presenting with SAH. One hundred and ninety patients with non-aneurysmal SAH were included in the study. Initial cranial CT findings at admission were correlated with the patients' discharge outcomes measured using the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS). A CT-based classification system (type 1-4) was devised based on the topography of the initial haemorrhage pattern. Results: Seventy-five percent of the patients had type 1 haemorrhage and all these patients had a good clinical outcome with a discharge MRS of ≤1. Eight percent of the patients presented with type 2 haemorrhage, 62% of which were discharged with MRS of ≤1 and 12% of patients had MRS 3 or 4. Type 3 haemorrhage was found in 10%, of which 16% had good clinical outcome, but 53% had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4) and 5% were discharged with severe disability (MRS 5). Six percent of patients presented with type 4 haemorrhage of which 42% of the patients had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4), 42% had severe disability and one-sixth of the patients died. Highly significant differences were found between type 1(1a and 1b) and type 2 (p = 0.003); type 2 and type 3 (p = 0.002); type 3 and type 4 (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Haemorrhages of the type 1 category are usually benign and do not warrant an extensive battery of clinical and radiological investigations. Type 2 haemorrhages have a varying prognosis and need to be investigated and managed along similar lines as that of an aneurysmal haemorrhage with emphasis towards radiological investigation. Type 3 and type 4 haemorrhages need to be extensively investigated to find an underlying cause.

  8. Classification of non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: CT correlation to the clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, S., E-mail: sanjeevnayak@hotmail.co [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary, Princes Road, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST4 7LN (United Kingdom); Kunz, A.B.; Kieslinger, K. [University Clinic of Neurology, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg (Austria); Ladurner, G.; Killer, M. [University Clinic of Neurology, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg (Austria); Neuroscience Institute, Christian Doppler Clinic, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg (Austria)

    2010-08-15

    Aim: To propose a new computed tomography (CT)-based classification system for non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), which predicts patients' discharge clinical outcome and helps to prioritize appropriate patient management. Methods and materials: A 5-year, retrospective, two-centre study was carried out involving 1486 patients presenting with SAH. One hundred and ninety patients with non-aneurysmal SAH were included in the study. Initial cranial CT findings at admission were correlated with the patients' discharge outcomes measured using the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS). A CT-based classification system (type 1-4) was devised based on the topography of the initial haemorrhage pattern. Results: Seventy-five percent of the patients had type 1 haemorrhage and all these patients had a good clinical outcome with a discharge MRS of {<=}1. Eight percent of the patients presented with type 2 haemorrhage, 62% of which were discharged with MRS of {<=}1 and 12% of patients had MRS 3 or 4. Type 3 haemorrhage was found in 10%, of which 16% had good clinical outcome, but 53% had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4) and 5% were discharged with severe disability (MRS 5). Six percent of patients presented with type 4 haemorrhage of which 42% of the patients had moderate to severe disability (MRS 3 and 4), 42% had severe disability and one-sixth of the patients died. Highly significant differences were found between type 1(1a and 1b) and type 2 (p = 0.003); type 2 and type 3 (p = 0.002); type 3 and type 4 (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Haemorrhages of the type 1 category are usually benign and do not warrant an extensive battery of clinical and radiological investigations. Type 2 haemorrhages have a varying prognosis and need to be investigated and managed along similar lines as that of an aneurysmal haemorrhage with emphasis towards radiological investigation. Type 3 and type 4 haemorrhages need to be extensively investigated to find an underlying cause.

  9. Acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis epidemics and outbreaks of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An epidemic of acute conjunctivitis in Dar es Salaam in 2010 demonstrated the importance of a strong infectious diseases epidemiological surveillance network to minimise disease outbreaks. Misunderstanding of the causes and management of diseases explains the repetitive nature of acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis ...

  10. Preventive Antibiotics and Delayed Cerebral Ischaemia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, Celine S; Oostdijk, Evelien A; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; de Smet, Anne Marie G A; van de Beek, Diederik; Vandertop, W Peter; Verbaan, Dagmar; Algra, Ale; Bonten, Marc J M; van den Bergh, Walter M

    INTRODUCTION: Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is an important contributor to poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH). Development of DCI is multifactorial, and inflammation, with or without infection, is one of the factors independently associated with development of DCI and

  11. Preventive Antibiotics and Delayed Cerebral Ischaemia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, Celine S.; Oostdijk, Evelien A.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.; Vergouwen, Mervyn D. I.; de Smet, Anne Marie G. A.; van de Beek, Diederik; Vandertop, W. Peter; Verbaan, Dagmar; Algra, Ale; Bonten, Marc J. M.; van den Bergh, Walter M.

    2016-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is an important contributor to poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH). Development of DCI is multifactorial, and inflammation, with or without infection, is one of the factors independently associated with development of DCI and poor outcome. We

  12. Preventive Antibiotics and Delayed Cerebral Ischaemia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, Celine S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/345480392; Oostdijk, Evelien A.; Rinkel, Gabriel J E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/085712000; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818828; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/320630544; de Smet, Anne Marie G A; van de Beek, Diederik; Vandertop, W. Peter; Verbaan, Dagmar; Algra, Ale|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07483472X; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337; van den Bergh, Walter M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/272886157

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is an important contributor to poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH). Development of DCI is multifactorial, and inflammation, with or without infection, is one of the factors independently associated with development of DCI and

  13. Perimesencephalic subarachnoidal haemorrhage: Clinical and CT aspects; Die perimesenzephale Subarachnoidalblutung: Klinische und computertomographische Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaim, A. [Dept. fuer Medizinische Radiologie, Abt. Neuroradiologie, Univ. Basel (Switzerland); Mader, I. [Dept. fuer Medizinische Radiologie, Abt. Neuroradiologie, Univ. Basel (Switzerland); Kirsch, E. [Dept. fuer Medizinische Radiologie, Abt. Neuroradiologie, Univ. Basel (Switzerland); Radue, E.W. [Dept. fuer Medizinische Radiologie, Abt. Neuroradiologie, Univ. Basel (Switzerland); Steinbrich, W. [Dept. fuer Medizinische Radiologie, Abt. Neuroradiologie, Univ. Basel (Switzerland)

    1995-04-01

    The blood distribution on CCT (72 h after bleeding episode) of 26 patients with nonaneurysmal subarachnoidal haemorrhage confirmed by two normal cerebral angiograms was compared to the blood distribution of 76 patients with aneurysmal haemorrhage. The clinical condition of these patients was further analysed, 4-60 months after the bleeding episode. In 62% of patients with nonaneurysmal haemorrhage the blood distribution was perimesencephalic. The aneurysmal blood distribution pattern was more extended and only one patient showed a perimesencephalic pattern. 80% of the patients without aneurysms in angiography had no limitations in daily functional capacity. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Die Blutverteilung im CCT (72 h nach Blutungsereignis) von 26 Patienten mit spontaner SAB unklarer Aetiologie (zwei unauffaellige zerebrale Panangiographien) wurde mit der Blutverteilung von 76 Aneurysmablutungen verglichen. Weiter wurde das klinische Zustandsbild dieser Patienten 4-60 Monate nach Blutung ueberprueft. 62% der Patienten mit SAB unklarer Aetiologie zeigten eine rein perimesenzephale Blutverteilung. Die Blutverteilung bei Aneurysmablutungen war weit ausgedehnter, und nur eine Patientin hatte eine perimesenzephale Blutung. Die Patienten ohne Aneurysmanachweis erreichten in 80% eine uneingeschraenkte Lebensqualitaet. (orig./MG)

  14. Emergency percutaneous transcatheter embolisation of acute arterial haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, A N

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to review indications, source of haemorrhage, method of embolisation and clinical outcome in patients referred to Interventional Radiology for the emergency management of acute arterial haemorrhage.

  15. Convexity subarachnoid haemorrhage secondary to internal carotid stenosis: an indication for revascularisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrosa, Davinia; Ramon, Cesar; Benavente, Lorena; Calleja, Sergio

    2016-04-26

    With increasing prevalence due to an ageing population, carotid artery stenosis is a significant cause of stroke morbidity and mortality. The indication for revascularisation treatment in symptomatic carotid stenosis is widely documented and accepted in the scientific community. However, treatment of asymptomatic carotid stenosis remains controversial. We report a case of a 78-year-old woman who was admitted with a convexity subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH) secondary to an asymptomatic high-grade carotid artery stenosis. Two months later, she suffered an atherothrombotic ischaemic stroke and was referred to surgery. Transcranial Doppler studies showed impaired cerebral vasoreactivity and, after endarterectomy, the patient developed a reperfusion syndrome; both findings consisting of exhausted collaterals as the underlying mechanism. We propose that cSAH secondary to a high-grade internal carotid artery stenosis is a high risk marker for stroke, and revascularisation therapy should be considered. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Reversible Akinetic Mutism after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage in the Territory of the Anterior Cerebral Artery without Permanent Ischaemic Damage to Anterior Cingulate Gyri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-Xavier Sibille

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on two cases of transient akinetic mutism after massive subarachnoid haemorrhage due to the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA. In the two cases, vasospasm could not be demonstrated by imaging studies throughout the clinical course. Both patients shared common radiological features: a hydrocephalus due to haemorrhagic contamination of the ventricular system and a mass effect of a subpial hematoma on the borders of the corpus callosum. Patients were also investigated using auditory event-related evoked potentials at acute stage. In contrast to previous observations of akinetic mutism, P300 wave could not be recorded. Both patients had good recovery and we hypothesized that this unexpectedly favourable outcome was due to the absence of permanent structural damage to the ACA territory, with only transient dysfunction due to a reversible mass effect on cingulate gyri.

  17. [Patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage in poor grade neurological status: Study of prognostic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Pérez, Coralia; Morera-Molina, Jesús; Espino-Postigo, Carlos; Jiménez-O'Shanahan, Aruma

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and predict factors influencing prognosis and/or clinical outcome at 6 months in patients with spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grades iv and v. This was a retrospective study of a consecutive series of 394 patients admitted to our hospital with clinical and radiological diagnosis of spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage, from 1 January 1999 to 30 June 2009. We selected 121 patients who met the criteria of being in WFNS grades iv or v before treatment; 3 patients were excluded due to loss of tracking. The outcome variable was assessed 6 months after the event using the Glasgow Outcome Scale. A P value<.05 was considered statistically significant. One hundred and twenty-one patients were included in the statistical analysis. The average age of the patients in the series was 54 years (14-92). Patients who had a mean Glasgow Coma Scale lower than 7 points (P<.0001), those who were grade v (P<.0001) in the pre-treatment WFNS scale and those with pupillary disorder (P=.002) had a worse clinical outcome. Likewise, those with associated intraparenchymal hematoma (P=.020) and those not receiving any treatment (P=.020) were also associated with a poor clinical outcome. These results were statistically significant. Patients admitted with a WFNS grade v and/or presenting pupil disorder and/or intraparenchymal hematoma were associated with worse clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Prediction of delayed neurological deficit after subarachnoid haemorrhage: a CT blood load and Doppler velocity approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosset, D.G.; McDonald, I.; Cockburn, M.; Straiton, J.; Bullock, R.R.

    1994-01-01

    The predictive value of cranial computed tomography (CT) blood load and serial transcranial Doppler sonography for the development of delayed ischaemic neurological deficit was assessed in 121 patients following subarachnoid haemorrhage. Of the 121 patients, 81 (67 %) had thick layers of blood or haematoma, including intraventricular bleeding. The proportion of patients who developed delayed deficit was higher with increasing amounts of subarachnoid blood on the admission CT (51 % of 53 cases in Fisher grade 3; 35 % of 33 cases in grade 2; 28 % of 7 cases in grade 1, P < 0.01). Doppler velocities obtained from readings at least every 2 days following admission were higher in patients with delayed neurological deficit (peak velocity for grade 3 patients 176 ± 6 cm/s (mean ± SE), versus grade 2: 164 ± 7 cm/s; grade 4 149 ± 9, both P = 0.04, Mann-Whitney). Peak velocity and maximal 24-h rise tended to be higher within different CT grades in patients with a deficit than in those without; this difference was significant for grade 3 patients (P < 0.01). We conclude that a combined approach with CT and Doppler sonography provides greater predictive value for the development of delayed ischaemic neurological deficit than either test considered independently. The value of Doppler sonography may be greatest for patients with Fisher grade 3 blood, in whom the risk of delayed ischaemia is greatest. (orig.)

  19. Role of 123I-IMP SPET in the early diagnosis of borderline chronic hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkuma, Hiroki; Tanaka, Masahiko; Suzuki, Shigeharu; Kondoh, Izumi

    2000-01-01

    Chronic hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is easily diagnosed in most cases. However, the diagnosis is sometimes difficult in borderline cases, in which (a) pathognomonic clinical deterioration due to hydrocephalus is masked by the neurological deficits caused in the acute stage of SAH and (b) ventricular enlargement is not so marked on CT scan. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not iodine-123 labelled N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine ( 123 I-IMP) single-photon emission tomography (SPET) is of value for the early diagnosis of borderline chronic hydrocephalus after SAH. Fifteen patients who met the criteria of borderline chronic hydrocephalus were selected for the study, and underwent a shunt operation. The patients were divided into a shunt-effective group and a shunt-ineffective group according to neurological improvement after the shunt operation. 123 I-IMP SPET was performed in the acute stage of SAH, within 1 week before the shunt operation, and 2 weeks after the shunt operation. Regional cerebral blood flow was estimated by the 123 I-IMP autoradiographic method. Pre-shunting periventricular low-perfusion areas showed statistically significant differences between the two groups (P 123 I-IMP SPET can be used for both the early diagnosis of borderline chronic hydrocephalus after SAH and the prediction of shunt effectiveness. (orig.)

  20. Procedural complications of endovascular treatment in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage treated at a single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanen, Mikko; Pyysalo, Liisa; Jalava, Iiro; Snicker, Oona; Pienimäki, Juha-Pekka; Öhman, Juha; Ronkainen, Antti

    2018-03-01

    We present a single-centre experience of procedural complications suffered by patients undergoing endovascular treatment for a ruptured saccular intracranial aneurysm at Tampere University Hospital, Finland, between 2000 and 2014. From 2000 to 2014, we treated 1,253 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, 491 of whom received endovascular treatment. Clinical data were collected retrospectively from the hospital's aneurysm database. A procedural complication was defined as having occurred whenever there was a documented new event in the patient's medical records or a note of a technical complication written by an interventionist after endovascular treatment. Procedural complications could be with or without clinical symptoms. Nearly 40% (491/1253) of the patients were treated with the endovascular method. Procedural complications occurred in 11.4% (56/491) of cases. The morbidity rate was 4.5% (22/491) and the mortality rate was 0.2% (1/491). Of the 56 complications, ischaemic complications occurred in 52% (29/56), haemorrhagic complications occurred in 27% (15/56) and technical complications occurred in 21% (12/56) of cases. In 61% (34/56) of the cases, the procedural complication did not cause any clinical symptoms. The total risk for procedural complications leading to postoperative disability or death at our institute was 4.7%. The complication frequency is in accordance with previous reports. Endovascular treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms is a safe treatment method when patient selection is carefully performed.

  1. Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever presenting as Acute Abdomen

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Araimi, Hanaa; Al-Jabri, Amal; Mehmoud, Arshad; Al-Abri, Seif

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of a 38 year-old Sri Lankan female who was referred to the surgeon on call with a picture of acute abdomen. She presented with a three-day history of fever, headache, abdominal pain and diarrhoea; however, the physical examination was not consistent with acute abdomen. Her platelet count was 22 ×109/L. A diagnosis of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) was made and dengue serology was positive. Dengue epidemics have been associated with a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms an...

  2. Value of the quantity and distribution of subarachnoid haemorrhage on CT in the localization of ruptured cerebral aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karttunen, A.I.; Jartti, P.H.; Haapea, M.; Ukkola, V.A.; Sajanti, J.

    2003-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the 'gold standard' for detecting subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for visualising the vascular pathology. We studied retrospectively 180 patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) who underwent first non-enhanced computed tomography (CT), then digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and finally operative aneurysm clipping. Our aim was to assess if the location of the ruptured aneurysm could be predicted on the basis of the quantity and distribution of haemorrhage on the initial CT scan. 180 patients with SAH were retrospectively studied. All the CT and DSA examinations were performed at the same hospital. CT was performed within 24 hours after the initial haemorrhage. DSA was performed alter the CT, within 48 hours after the initial haemorrhage. Two neuroradiologists, blind to the DSA results, analysed and scored independently the quantity and distribution of the haemorrhage and predicted the site of the ruptured aneurysm on the basis of the non-enhanced CT. DSA provided the location of the ruptured aneurysm. All the patients were operated upon, and the location of the ruptured aneurysm was determined. The overall reliability value (r,-value) between the two neuroradiologists for locating all ruptured aneurysms was 0.780. The corresponding value for the right MCA was 0.911, that for the left MCA 0.877 and that for the AcoA 0.736. Not all of the rc-values were calculated, either because the location of the rupture was constant or because the number of ruptures in the vessel was too small. Subarachnoid haemorrhage with a parenchymal hematoma is an excellent predictor of the site of the ruptured aneurysm with a statistical significance of p = 0.003. The quantity and pattern of the blood clot an CT within the day of onset of SAH is a reliable and quick cool for locating a ruptured MCA or AcoA aneurysm. It is not, however, reliable for locating other ruptured aneurysms. Subarachnoid haemorrhage with a

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma cytokines after subarachnoid haemorrhage: CSF interleukin-6 may be an early marker of infection

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins Stephen J; McMahon Catherine J; Singh Navneet; Galea James; Hoadley Margaret; Scarth Sylvia; Patel Hiren; Vail Andy; Hulme Sharon; Rothwell Nancy J; King Andrew T; Tyrrell Pippa J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cytokines and cytokine receptor concentrations increase in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). The relationship between plasma and CSF cytokines, and factors affecting this, are not clear. Methods To help define the relationship, paired plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected from patients subject to ventriculostomy. Concentrations of key inflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-1 receptor an...

  4. Psychosocial outcomes at 18 months after good neurological recovery from aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J; Kitchen, N; Heslin, J; Greenwood, R

    2004-08-01

    To evaluate functioning, 18 months after surgery, of 49 patients with good neurological recovery following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), and to determine the extent of any improvements in disturbances of mood, cognitive functioning, and levels of activity and participation previously observed at 9 month follow up. SAH patients, matched for age, gender, and occupation with healthy control participants, completely quantitative measures of mood (HADS, FIES, BDI) and activity/participation (BICRO-39 scales), and a brief cognitive assessment battery (verbal fluency, digit span, prose recall). Controls completed the HADS and the BICRO-39. Patients showed some recovery of cognitive functioning, though impairments of prose recall persisted. Anxiety and depression symptoms were higher in patients than in controls, but fewer than 20% scored in the clinical range on any questionnaires except for RIES-Intrusive thoughts (22%); only three showed signs of full blown post-traumatic stress disorder. Almost half showed elevated dependence on others for domestic activities and organisation and abnormally low levels of employment. Very little variance in outcome was predicted by demographic variables, neurological or cognitive impairment, prior life stress, or mood. However, levels of social activity and self-organisation were related to persisting fatigue. The observed decline in intrusive thoughts and avoidance over time is consistent with that seen after life threatening illness or trauma. The persistent reductions in independence and levels of employment may in some cases reflect considered lifestyle adjustments rather than adverse and unwanted changes but in others indicate a need for focused rehabilitation.

  5. Non-traumatic cortical subarachnoid haemorrhage: diagnostic work-up and aetiological background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitzer, C.; Kosinski, C.M. [University Hospital of RWTH Aachen, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Mull, M. [University Hospital of RWTH Aachen, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Rohde, V. [University Hospital of RWTH Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Only 15% of all subarachnoid haemorrhages (SAHs) are not of aneurysmal origin. Among those, circumscribed SAHs along the cortical convexity are rare and have only been described in singular case reports so far. Here, we present a collection of 12 cases of SAH along the convexity, of non-traumatic origin. Over a period of 10 years, 12 cases of circumscribed SAH along the convexity were identified at our clinic. The clinical presentations, neuroradiological SAH characteristics, further diagnostic work-up to identify the underlying aetiologies, the therapy and clinical outcome were analysed. The patients' chief complaints were unspecific cephalgia, focal or generalised seizures and focal neurological deficits. Typical signs of basal SAH, such as nuchal rigidity, thunderclap-headache or alteration of consciousness, were rare. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed different aetiologies, namely postpartal posterior encephalopathy (three), cerebral vasculitis (two), dural sinus thrombosis (two), cortical venous thrombosis (one), intracerebral abscesses (one) and cerebral cavernoma (one). Two cases remained unresolved. Treatment of the underlying disease and symptomatic medication led to good clinical outcome in almost all cases. On the basis of these findings, we demonstrate that the clinical presentation, localisation and aetiology of cortical SAH differ clearly from other SAHs. A diagnostic work-up with MRI and eventually DSA is essential. Mostly, the causative disease can be identified, and specific treatment allows a favourable outcome. (orig.)

  6. Diagnosis of subarachnoid haemorrhage: a survey of Australasian emergency physicians and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Andrew; Furyk, Jeremy; Banks, Colin; Chu, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to establish current practice among Australasian emergency physicians and trainees on several aspects of the investigation of suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). An electronic questionnaire (SurveyMonkey™) was distributed to emergency physicians and trainees by email through the ACEM. Survey recipients were asked about demographics, followed by a series of questions relating to the investigation of SAH. There were 878 survey respondents (response rate 24%). Our data showed that 47.3% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that a CT brain within 6 h of headache onset is sufficient to exclude a diagnosis of SAH. For a CT performed within 12 h of ictus, 14.4% were satisfied that SAH could be excluded. After a negative CT scan, for further investigation of SAH, 88% of respondents preferred lumbar puncture to CT angiography. For detection of xanthochromia in the cerebrospinal fluid, 57.7% of respondents felt that spectrophotometry (vs visual inspection) is necessary to accurately diagnose SAH. A range of information was collected regarding the investigation of suspected SAH. We report significant differences in the diagnostic approach of Australasian emergency physicians and trainees to this condition, in particular the utility of CT within 6 h for exclusion of SAH. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  7. Cerebral haemodynamics in patients with hydrocephalus after subarachnoid haemorrhage due to ruptured aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chia-Cheng; Kuwana, Nobumasa; Ito, Susumu; Yokoyama, Takaakira [Department of Neurosurgery, Yokohama Minami Kyosai Hospital, 1-21-1 Mutsuurahigashi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Kanno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Isao [Department of Neurosurgery, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) may be reduced in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). However, little is known about brain circulation in asymptomatic patients with ventriculomegaly after SAH. This study investigated CBF and CVR in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with ventriculomegaly to clarify the mechanism of NPH. CBF and CVR were investigated in 48 patients with ventriculomegaly after SAH due to ruptured aneurysm. Mean CBF of the whole brain was measured by first-pass radionuclide angiography using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. CVR was measured as the percentage change from the baseline mean CBF value after administration of 500 mg acetazolamide. Thirty patients with NPH who responded to shunting had significantly (P<0.01) reduced mean CBF and CVR compared with normal controls. Fourteen asymptomatic patients with ventriculomegaly showed significant (P<0.01) reduction in CVR but no difference in mean CBF. Four symptomatic patients who did not respond to shunting showed significantly (P<0.01) reduced mean CBF but had preserved CVR. Postoperative mean CBF and CVR increased significantly (P<0.01) in 21 patients who responded to shunting, but showed no significant change in four symptomatic patients who did not respond to shunting. Reduction of CBF superimposed on pre-existing impairment of CVR may be an essential step in the mechanism responsible for the manifestation of symptoms of NPH. (orig.)

  8. Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH: Five consecutive years' experience of Fars province, Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolkarim Rahmanian

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH, caused by the rupture of intracranial aneurysms, is a devastating event with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH plays a critical role in the potential loss of life as its sufferers are usually of a young age. We aimed to investigate the incidence of aSAH along with the patients' characteristics over five consecutive years in Fars, a large province located in Southern Iran.In this prospective study, anonymous data of all patients diagnosed with aSAH in Fars province were collected after patient admission and surgery. Data from the last national census in 2011 were used to calculate the incidence. The data were analysed using SPSS software version 18 using independent sample t test, chi square test and ANOVA. The significance level was set at 0.05.The number of aSAH cases identified in Fars, Iran, each year varied between 78 (2011 and 98 (2015 for a total of 421 aSAH cases within the 5-year study period. The annual aSAH incidence estimates showed no differences and were 1.65 [95% confidence interval (CI: 1.58-1.72], 1.70 (95%CI: 1.68-1.72, 1.71 (95%CI: 1.63-1.78, 1.82 (95%CI: 1.74-1.9, and 2.05 (95%CI: 1.97-2.13 per 100,000 persons, respectively, for the five consecutive years from 21 March 2011 to 20 March 2016. Hypertension was the most common risk factor, and was found in 198 (48% aSAH patients. Ninety-four (22.5% patients had moderate hydrocephalus on admission. Middle cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery were the most common sites of aneurysms. On admission, 351 (83% patients had a Glasgow Coma Scale score >7, 197 (47% presented with Hunt and Hess score of 1, and 365 (87% had a Fisher score of ≤3. Multiple aneurysms were found in 59 (14% of the 421 cases and the most common risk factors in multiple aneurysms were hypertension in 30 (51% and smoking in 26 (44% cases. Survival data were available only on patients diagnosed in year 2015, and the six

  9. Cognitive domain deficits in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage at 1 year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, George Kwok Chu; Lam, Sandy Wai; Ngai, Karine; Wong, Adrian; Siu, Deyond; Poon, Wai Sang; Mok, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Background Cognitive domain deficits can occur after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) though few studies systemically evaluate its impact on 1-year outcomes. Objective We aimed to evaluate the pattern and functional outcome impact of cognitive domain deficits in aSAH patients at 1 year. Methods We carried out a prospective observational study in Hong Kong, during which, 168 aSAH patients (aged 21–75 years and had been admitted within 96 h of ictus) were recruited over a 26-month period. The cognitive function was assessed by a domain-specific neuropsychological assessment battery at 1 year after ictus. The current study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov of the US National Institutes of Health (NCT01038193). Results Prevalence of individual domain deficits varied between 7% to 15%, and 13% had two or more domain deficits. After adjusting for abbreviated National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and Geriatric Depressive Scale scores, unfavourable outcome (Modified Rankin Scale 3–5) and dependent instrumental activity of daily living (Lawton Instrumental Activity of Daily Living<15) were significantly associated with two or more domain deficits and number of cognitive domain deficits at 1 year. Two or more domain deficits was independently associated with age (OR, 1.1; 95% CI 1.1 to 1.2; p<0.001) and delayed cerebral infarction (OR, 6.1; 95% CI 1.1 to 33.5; p=0.036), after adjustment for years of school education. Interpretation In patients with aSAH, cognitive domain deficits worsened functional outcomes at 1 year. Delayed cerebral infarction was an independent risk factor for two or more domain deficits at 1 year. PMID:23606736

  10. Leukocyte count and incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderholm, Martin; Zia, Elisabet; Hedblad, Bo; Engström, Gunnar

    2014-04-03

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease, in the majority of cases caused by a rupture of an arterial intracranial aneurysm. The effect of systemic low-grade inflammation on incidence of SAH is not known. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between leukocyte count, a marker of systemic inflammation, and incidence of SAH in a large cohort study. Leukocyte count and other cardiovascular risk factors were measured in 19,794 individuals (17,083 men and 2,711 women, mean age 44 years) participating in a health screening program between 1974 and 1981. Incidence of SAH in relation to baseline leukocyte concentration was studied during a mean follow-up of 27 years in participants free from previous stroke. Ninety-five participants had a SAH, corresponding to an incidence of 22 per 100,000 in women and 17 per 100,000 in men. The hazard ratio for SAH per one standard deviation (2.01 × 10⁹ cells/L) increase of leukocyte concentration was 1.26 (95% CI 1.05-1.53, p = 0.014) after adjustment for several potential confounding factors including smoking. In sensitivity analysis, there was a significant association in smokers but not in non-smokers. High leukocyte count at baseline was associated with increased incidence of SAH, although this relationship might be restricted to smokers. The results support the view that low-grade systemic inflammation could be involved in the pathogenesis of SAH, or constitute an early risk marker for the disease.

  11. Burden of disease and costs of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Gray, Alastair; Wolstenholme, Jane

    2010-04-27

    To estimate life years and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) lost and the economic burden of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) in the United Kingdom including healthcare and non-healthcare costs from a societal perspective. All UK residents in 2005 with aSAH (International Classification of Diseases 10th revision (ICD-10) code I60). Sex and age-specific abridged life tables were generated for a general population and aSAH cohorts. QALYs in each cohort were calculated adjusting the life tables with health-related quality of life (HRQL) data. Healthcare costs included hospital expenditure, cerebrovascular rehabilitation, primary care and community health and social services. Non-healthcare costs included informal care and productivity losses arising from morbidity and premature death. A total of 80,356 life years and 74,807 quality-adjusted life years were estimated to be lost due to aSAH in the UK in 2005. aSAH costs the National Health Service (NHS) pound168.2 million annually with hospital inpatient admissions accounting for 59%, community health and social services for 18%, aSAH-related operations for 15% and cerebrovascular rehabilitation for 6% of the total NHS estimated costs. The average per patient cost for the NHS was estimated to be pound23,294. The total economic burden (including informal care and using the human capital method to estimate production losses) of a SAH in the United Kingdom was estimated to be pound510 million annually. The economic and disease burden of aSAH in the United Kingdom is reported in this study. Decision-makers can use these results to complement other information when informing prevention policies in this field and to relate health care expenditures to disease categories.

  12. Burden of disease and costs of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Alastair

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To estimate life years and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs lost and the economic burden of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH in the United Kingdom including healthcare and non-healthcare costs from a societal perspective. Methods All UK residents in 2005 with aSAH (International Classification of Diseases 10th revision (ICD-10 code I60. Sex and age-specific abridged life tables were generated for a general population and aSAH cohorts. QALYs in each cohort were calculated adjusting the life tables with health-related quality of life (HRQL data. Healthcare costs included hospital expenditure, cerebrovascular rehabilitation, primary care and community health and social services. Non-healthcare costs included informal care and productivity losses arising from morbidity and premature death. Results A total of 80,356 life years and 74,807 quality-adjusted life years were estimated to be lost due to aSAH in the UK in 2005. aSAH costs the National Health Service (NHS £168.2 million annually with hospital inpatient admissions accounting for 59%, community health and social services for 18%, aSAH-related operations for 15% and cerebrovascular rehabilitation for 6% of the total NHS estimated costs. The average per patient cost for the NHS was estimated to be £23,294. The total economic burden (including informal care and using the human capital method to estimate production losses of a SAH in the United Kingdom was estimated to be £510 million annually. Conclusion The economic and disease burden of aSAH in the United Kingdom is reported in this study. Decision-makers can use these results to complement other information when informing prevention policies in this field and to relate health care expenditures to disease categories.

  13. The Role of Nitric Oxide in Resolution of Vasospasam Corresponding with Cerebral Vasospasms after Subarachnoid Haemorrhage: Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Dizdarević

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial aneurysmal rupture is the common cause of spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH. This haemorrhage is typically diffuse and located in extracerebral subarachnoid space in which main cerebral arterial branches are situated. The intimate and long-term contact of arterial wall and blood products in the closed space causes the cerebral vasospasm as a serious and frequent complication of SAH. It is connected with significant morbidity and mortality due to developing of focal cerebral ischaemia and subsequently cerebral infarction. The aim of our experimental research was to create the animal model of vasospasm using the femoral artery due to examination of reduced basic dilator activity cause in arterial wall after SAH. The important characteristic of major cerebral arteries is their localization in the closed subarachnoid space which enables their to have long-term contact with blood products after haemorrhage. Thirty six femoral arteries (FA of eighteen female rats weighing about 300 g were used. In vivo, femoral arteries are microsurgically prepared in both inguinal regions in all rats. Eighteen arteries were encompassed by polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE material forming closed tube and autologous blood was injected in the tube around the arterial wall. Additional eighteen arteries, as a control group, were also put in PTFE tube but without exposing to the blood. All rats are left to live for eight days. Afterwards, rats were sacrificed and their arteries were in vitro examined including an isometric tension measurement and histological changes analysis. The tension was measured during application of vasoconstrictors and vasodilatators (nitric oxide, NO. FA exposed to periadventitial blood exhibit hyper reactivity to constrictors (KCl, phenylephrine, acetylcholine compared to control group. It was also found that NO donor (sodium nitroprusside diminished arterial spasm induced by blood and vasoconstrictors. In conclusion, FA can be

  14. Fulminant intravascular lymphomatosis mimicking acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, D; Sicurelli, F; Cerase, A; Tripodi, S; Cintorino, M; Lazzi, S; Federico, A

    2012-09-15

    Intravascular lymphomatosis (IVL) is a rare non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, usually of B cell lineage, characterized by massive angiotropic growth. The clinical presentation of IVL may include changes in mental status, non-localizing neurological deficits, seizures, fever of unknown origin and skin changes. Because of its rarity and the absence of specific diagnostic procedures except for cerebral biopsy, diagnosis is often postmortem. Brain MRI usually shows non-specific abnormalities. The purpose of this case report is to increase the knowledge of clinical and neuroimaging features of IVL by describing the findings observed in a 71-year-old patient. A 71-year-old male was admitted for right hemiparesis, acute cognitive impairment and febricula. A bone marrow biopsy resulted normal. He then developed a rapid progressive impairment of his mental status and left hemisoma motor seizures. Brain CT and MRI were interpreted as consistent with acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy (AHLE), including multiple areas of restricted diffusion without gadolinium enhancement and a small focal area of gadolinium enhancement in the left temporal lobe white matter. The patient died within a few days and the autopsy led to the diagnosis of IVL. IVL may present with a variety of clinical signs and symptoms, including stroke and hemiparesis. IVL may mimic AHLE at brain MRI. However, the evidence of multiple areas of restricted diffusion without gadolinium enhancement and of a small area of gadolinium enhancement could have led to the correct diagnosis. IVL should be added to the differential diagnosis of AHLE at brain MRI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Haemorrhagic pseudocyst of the pancreatic tail causing acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemorrhagic pseudocyst of the pancreatic tail causing acute abdominal pain in a 12-year-old girl ... Introduction. The acute abdomen in childhood has various aetiologies and represents a leading cause of hospitalization of children [1]. ... The decision was made to manage the patient surgically because of her progressive ...

  16. Effect of magnesium treatment and glucose levels on delayed cerebral ischemia in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a substudy of the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage trial (MASH-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijenaar, Jolien F; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M; Algra, Ale; van den Bergh, Walter M; Rinkel, Gabriel J E

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium treatment did not improve outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage II trial. We hypothesized that high glucose levels may have offset a potential beneficial effect to prevent delayed cerebral ischemia. We investigated if magnesium treatment led to less delayed cerebral ischemia and if glucose levels interacted with magnesium treatment in the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage II trial. To investigate the effect of magnesium treatment on occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia and the interaction between glucose levels and magnesium treatment in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. The Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage was a phase III randomized placebo-controlled trial assessing the effect of magnesium sulphate on clinical outcome in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. For the current study, we included only the patients admitted to the University Medical Centre-Utrecht. We calculated hazard ratios for occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia in patients treated with magnesium vs. placebo for the entire study population, and separately in the subgroups of patients with high and low mean fasting and mean daily glucose levels until onset of delayed cerebral ischemia. We used the cross-product of magnesium and glucose in the regression analysis to evaluate whether an interaction between magnesium and glucose existed. We included 616 patients: 307 received magnesium and 309 placebo; 156 patients had delayed cerebral ischemia. Hazard ratio for magnesium on occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia was 1·0 (95% confidence interval: 0·7-1·4). Results were similar in patients with low or high fasting or daily glucose levels. We found no interactions between magnesium treatment and high fasting (P = 0·54) and daily glucose (P = 0·60). Magnesium treatment did not reduce the risk of delayed cerebral ischemia in patients with aneurysmal

  17. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in cerebral vasospasm, and as a therapeutic approach to subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelios eKokkoris

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP is one of the most potent microvascular vasodilators identified to date. Vascular relaxation and vasodilation is mediated via activation of the CGRP receptor. This atypical receptor is made up of a G-protein-coupled receptor called calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR, a single transmembrane protein called receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP, and an additional protein that is required for Gas coupling, known as receptor component protein (RCP. Several mechanisms involved in CGRP mediated relaxation have been identified. These include nitric oxide (NO-dependent endothelium-dependent mechanisms or cAMP-mediated endothelium-independent pathways; the latter being more common. Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH is associated with cerebral vasoconstriction that occurs several days after the haemorrhage and is often fatal. The vasospasm occurs in 30–40% of patients and is the major cause of death from this condition. The vasoconstriction is associated with a decrease in CGRP levels in nerves and an increase in CGRP levels in draining blood, suggesting that CGRP is released from nerves to oppose the vasoconstriction. This evidence has led to the concept that exogenous CGRP may be beneficial in a condition that has proven hard to treat. The present article reviews: a the pathophysiology of delayed ischaemic neurologic deficit after SAH b the basics of the CGRP receptor structure, signal transduction and vasodilatation mechanisms and c the studies that have been conducted so far using CGRP in both animals and humans with SAH.

  18. Effects of continuous prostacyclin infusion on regional blood flow and cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Juhler, Marianne; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the main causes of mortality and morbidity following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is the development of cerebral vasospasm, a frequent complication arising in the weeks after the initial bleeding. Despite extensive research, no effective treatment of vasospasm exists to date. ...

  19. New angiographic measurement tool for analysis of small cerebral vessels: application to a subarachnoid haemorrhage model in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turowski, B.; Moedder, U. [Heinrich-Heine University, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Neuroradiology, Duesselorf (Germany); Haenggi, D.; Steiger, H.J. [Heinrich-Heine University, Department of Neurosurgery, Duesseldorf (Germany); Beck, A.; Aurich, V. [Heinrich-Heine University, Institute of Informatics, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    Exact quantification of vasospasm by angiography is known to be difficult especially in small vessels. The purpose of the study was to develop a new method for computerized analysis of small arteries and to demonstrate feasibility on cerebral angiographies of rats acquired on a clinical angiography unit. A new software tool analysing grey values and subtracting background noise was validated on a vessel model. It was tested in practice in animals with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). A total of 28 rats were divided into four groups: SAH untreated, SAH treated with local calcium antagonist, SAH treated with placebo, and sham-operated. The diameters of segments of the internal carotid, caudal cerebral, middle cerebral, rostral cerebral and the stapedial arteries were measured and compared to direct measurements of the diameters on magnified images. There was a direct correlation between the cross-sectional area of vessels measured in a phantom and the measurements acquired using the new image analysis method. The spread of repeated measurements with the new software was small compared to the spread of direct measurements of vessel diameters on magnified images. Application of the measurement tool to experimental SAH in rats showed a statistically significant reduction of vasospasm in the SAH groups treated with nimodipine-releasing pellets in comparison to all the other groups combined. The presented computerized method for analysis of small intracranial vessels is a new method allowing precise relative measurements. Nimodipine-releasing subarachnoidal pellets reduce vasospasm, but further testing with larger numbers is necessary. The tool can be applied to human angiography without modification and offers the promise of substantial progress in the diagnosis of vasospasm after SAH. (orig.)

  20. Prediction of two month modified Rankin Scale with an ordinal prediction model in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneade Mary

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH is a devastating event with a frequently disabling outcome. Our aim was to develop a prognostic model to predict an ordinal clinical outcome at two months in patients with aSAH. Methods We studied patients enrolled in the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT, a randomized multicentre trial to compare coiling and clipping in aSAH patients. Several models were explored to estimate a patient's outcome according to the modified Rankin Scale (mRS at two months after aSAH. Our final model was validated internally with bootstrapping techniques. Results The study population comprised of 2,128 patients of whom 159 patients died within 2 months (8%. Multivariable proportional odds analysis identified World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS grade as the most important predictor, followed by age, sex, lumen size of the aneurysm, Fisher grade, vasospasm on angiography, and treatment modality. The model discriminated moderately between those with poor and good mRS scores (c statistic = 0.65, with minor optimism according to bootstrap re-sampling (optimism corrected c statistic = 0.64. Conclusion We presented a calibrated and internally validated ordinal prognostic model to predict two month mRS in aSAH patients who survived the early stage up till a treatment decision. Although generalizability of the model is limited due to the selected population in which it was developed, this model could eventually be used to support clinical decision making after external validation. Trial Registration International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, Number ISRCTN49866681

  1. Comparison of Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Mini-Mental State Examination in Evaluating Cognitive Domain Deficit Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, George Kwok Chu; Lam, Sandy Wai; Wong, Adrian; Ngai, Karine; Poon, Wai Sang; Mok, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cognitive deficits are common after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH), and clinical evaluation is important for their management. Our hypothesis was that the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCa) is superior to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) in screening for cognitive domain deficit in aSAH patients. Methods We carried out a prospective observational and diagnostic accuracy study on Hong Kong aSAH patients aged 21 to 75 years who had been admitted within 96 hours of ictus. The domain-specific neuropsychological assessment battery, the MoCA and MMSE were administered 2–4 weeks and 1 year after ictus. A cognitive domain deficit was defined as a cognitive domain z score ictus, the MoCA produced higher area under the curve scores for cognitive impairment than the MMSE (MoCA, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.97 versus MMSE, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.66 to 0.83, p = 0.009). Interpretation Cognitive domain deficits and cognitive impairment in patients with aSAH can be screened with the MoCA in both the subacute and chronic phases. PMID:23573223

  2. Likelihood of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in patients with normal unenhanced CT, CSF xanthochromia on spectrophotometry and negative CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, A K; Turner, H E; Deans, K A

    2013-01-01

    Patients with suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage, a normal noncontrast computed tomography (CT) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) evidence of haemoglobin breakdown products often undergo CT angiography (CTA). If this is normal, then invasive catheter angiography may be offered. In current clinical practice, haemoglobin breakdown products are detected by spectrophotometry rather than visible xanthochromia, and CTA is performed on multidetector scanners. The aim of this study was to determine if such patients should still have a catheter angiography, given the associated risks. Patients positive for CSF spectrophotometry (n=26) were retrospectively identified from the clinical biochemistry information system and imaging data from the electronic radiology records were reviewed. Discharge letters were consulted to relate the biochemistry and radiology results to the final diagnosis. 15 patients with CT angiography were found. Nine patients had normal CT angiography. No causative aneurysms had been missed. One patient had small, coincidental aneurysms missed on initial reading of the CTA. The likelihood of a clinically significant aneurysm in a patient who is CT negative, lumbar puncture positive and CTA negative is low. Double reporting of negative CT angiograms may be advisable.

  3. Postoperative assessment of cerebral blood flow in subarachnoid haemorrhage by means of 99mTc-HMPAO tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranquart, F.; Groussin, P.; Baulieu, J.L.; Ades, P.E.; Rieant, J.F.; Jan, M.

    1993-01-01

    Regional hypoperfusion is a very frequent complication of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), being related to vasospasm in the majority of cases. Twenty-six patients who were admitted for SAH underwent follow-up with technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime single photon emission tomography (SPECT) 3 and 8 days after surgery. Fifteen patients of these had one more examination 15 days after surgery. The degree of hypoperfusion was quantified using an index of asymmetry which allow the comparison of two symmetrical regions of interet (ROIs) on the transaxial slice which presented the greatest perfusion defect. Comparison of CT data, transcranial Doppler data and clinical signs with the perfusion as quantified by 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT indicates that a difference in counts of less than 10% between the two symmetrical ROIs is of no diagnostic value. Follow-up of the brain perfusion clearly shows that the most pronounced hypoperfusion was observed just after surgery, with progressive normalization at 8 and 15 days after surgery. 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT performed 8 days after surgery allows prediction of the clinical outcome. For these reasons, 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT, which is the only method for follow-up of cerebral perfusion in routine clinical practice, should be the first examination to be performed after surgery in patients with SAH. (orig.)

  4. A single subcutaneous bolus of erythropoietin normalizes cerebral blood flow autoregulation after subarachnoid haemorrhage in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Ma, XiaoDong; Rochat, Per

    2002-01-01

    . SAH was induced by injection of 0.07 ml of autologous blood into the cisterna magna. EPO (400 iu kg(-1) s.c.) or vehicle was given immediately after the subarachnoid injection of blood or saline. Forty-eight hours after the induction of SAH, CBF autoregulatory function was evaluated using...... was best described by a single linear regression line. A subcutaneous injection of EPO given immediately after the induction of SAH normalized autoregulation of CBF (lower limit in group D: 93+/-4 mmHg, NS compared with groups A and B). Early activation of endothelial EPO receptors may represent...... a potential therapeutic strategy in the treatment of cerebrovascular perturbations after SAH....

  5. Risk of rebleeding after treatment of acute hydrocephalus in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellingman, Catharine A.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Beijer, Inge S.; van Dijk, Gert W.; Algra, Ale; van Gijn, Jan; Rinkel, Gabriël J. E.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cerebrospinal fluid drainage is often indicated in patients with acute hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage but is believed to increase the risk of rebleeding. We studied the risk of rebleeding in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage during treatment for

  6. Acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy with bullae and koebnerisation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Sazlly Lim, S; Shamsudin, N

    2014-01-01

    A 5-month-old Malay boy presented with purpuric papules and plaques on the face and extremities accompanied by fever, coryzal symptoms and bilateral lower limb oedema. There were also bullous linear purpuric lesions on the right upper limb. Blood and culture tests were normal. Histopathological tests showed leucocytoclastic vasculitis, confirming the diagnosis of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy. The patient achieved complete recovery after 2 weeks with no recurrence.

  7. Acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy with bullae and koebnerisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norashikin Shamsudin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A 5-month-old Malay boy presented with purpuric papules and plaques on the face and extremities accompanied by fever, coryzal symptoms and bilateral lower limb oedema. There were also bullous linear purpuric lesions on the right upper limb. Blood and culture tests were normal. Histopathological tests showed leucocytoclastic vasculitis, confirming the diagnosis of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy. The patient achieved complete recovery after 2 weeks with no recurrence.

  8. Prevalence of superficial siderosis following singular, acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummel, N.; Bochmann, K. [Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Bernau, C. [Leibniz-Rechenzentrum, Munich (Germany); Thon, N. [Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Linn, J. [Technical University, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Superficial siderosis is presumably a consequence of recurrent bleeding into the subarachnoid space. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of superficial siderosis after singular, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in the long term. We retrospectively identified all patients who presented with a singular, acute, aneurysmal SAH at our institution between 2010 and 2013 and in whom a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including T2*-weighted imaging was available at least 4 months after the acute bleeding event. MRI scans were judged concerning the presence and distribution of superficial siderosis. Influence of clinical data, Fisher grade, localization, and cause of SAH as well as the impact of neurosurgical interventions on the occurrence of superficial siderosis was tested. Seventy-two patients with a total of 117 MRIs were included. Mean delay between SAH and the last available MRI was 47.4 months (range 4-129). SAH was Fisher grade 1 in 2 cases, 2 in 4 cases, 3 in 10 cases, and 4 in 56 cases. Superficial siderosis was detected in 39 patients (54.2 %). In all patients with more than one MRI scan, localization and distribution of superficial siderosis did not change over time. Older age (p = 0.02) and higher degree of SAH (p = 0.03) were significantly associated with the development of superficial siderosis. Superficial siderosis develops in approximately half of patients after singular, aneurysmal SAH and might be more common in patients with an older age and a greater amount of blood. However, additional factors must play a role in whether a patient is prone to develop superficial siderosis or not. (orig.)

  9. Preventive Antibiotics and Delayed Cerebral Ischaemia in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathier, Celine S; Oostdijk, Evelien A; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; de Smet, Anne Marie G A; van de Beek, Diederik; Vandertop, W Peter; Verbaan, Dagmar; Algra, Ale; Bonten, Marc J M; van den Bergh, Walter M

    2016-02-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is an important contributor to poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH). Development of DCI is multifactorial, and inflammation, with or without infection, is one of the factors independently associated with development of DCI and poor outcome. We thus postulated that preventive antibiotics might be associated with a reduced risk of DCI and subsequent poor outcome in aSAH patients. We performed a retrospective cohort-study in intensive care units (ICU) of three university hospitals in The Netherlands. We included consecutive aSAH patients with minimal ICU stay of 72 h who received either preventive antibiotics (SDD: selective digestive tract decontamination including systemic cefotaxime or SOD: selective oropharyngeal decontamination) or no preventive antibiotics. DCI was defined as a new hypodensity on CT with no other explanation than DCI. Hazard ratio's (HR) for DCI and risk ratio's (RR) for 28-day case-fatality and poor outcome at 3 months were calculated, with adjustment (aHR/aRR) for clinical condition on admission, recurrent bleeding, aneurysm treatment modality and treatment site. Of 459 included patients, 274 received preventive antibiotics (SOD or SDD) and 185 did not. With preventive antibiotics, the aHR for DCI was 1.0 (95% CI 0.6-1.8), the aRR for 28-day case-fatality was 1.1 (95% CI 0.7-1.9) and the aRR for poor functional outcome 1.2 (95% CI 1.0-1.4). Preventive antibiotics were not associated with reduced risk of DCI or poor outcome in aSAH patients in the ICU.

  10. Trends in incidence and in short term survival following a subarachnoid haemorrhage in Scotland, 1986 - 2005: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walters Matthew

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine age and sex specific incidence and 30 day case fatality for subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH in Scotland over a 20 year period. Methods A retrospective cohort study using routine hospital discharge data linked to death records. Results Between 1986 and 2005, 12,056 individuals experienced an incident SAH. Of these 10,113 (84% survived to reach hospital. Overall age-standardised incidence rates were greater in women than men and remained relatively stable over the study period. In 2005, incidence in women was 12.8 (95% CI 11.5 to 14.2 and in men 7.9 (95% CI 6.9 to 9.1. 30 day case fatality in individuals hospitalised with SAH declined substantially, falling from 30.0% in men and 33.9% in women in 1986-1990 to 24.5% in men and 29.1% in women in 2001-2005. For both men and women, the largest reductions were observed in those aged between 40 to 59 years. After adjustment for age, socio-economic status and co-morbidity, the odds of death at 30 days in 2005 compared to odds of death in 1986 was 0.64 (0.54 to 0.76, p Conclusions Incidence rates for SAH remained stable between 1986 and 2005 suggesting that a better understanding of SAH risk factors and their reduction is needed. 30 day case fatality rates have declined substantially, particularly in middle-age. However, they remain high and it is important to ensure that this is not due to under-diagnosis or under-treatment.

  11. Trace minerals in experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage: zinc, copper and manganese levels in rat brain tissue, blood and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosan, T E; Demir, T A; Yayla, E; Cosan, D; Berber, A; Kaynak, Z

    2006-04-01

    Zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn) are involved in regulatory systems in the cell. Their role in neuromodulator activities and redox reactions has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. The aim of this study was to determine changes of Zn, Cu and Mn levels in brain tissue, blood and urine after experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). The possible importance of these trace minerals on the pathogenesis of SAH was also discussed. Rats were divided into three groups; namely a SAH group, a control group and a normal group. Blood samples in the SAH group and normal saline in the control group were injected into the cisterna magna. No surgical procedures were performed on the normal group. Brain tissue, blood and urine samples were measured for trace minerals by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Measurements were taken on days 3, 7 and 10 after the onset in the control and SAH groups, and on the first day in the normal group. The reduced blood Zn levels and increased Zn urine loss observed in the SAH group were conspicuously significant. Furthermore, significant changes in Mn levels were also seen at different stages of the trial in the SAH group. However, differences found in the Cu levels between the groups were not significant enough to explain the results. These results suggest that the low blood Zn levels seen throughout the stages, the low brain tissue Mn levels seen during the latter part of the trial, and the low blood Mn levels observed during the early stages, may all be related to an increased risk in experimental SAH in rats. These differences may have possible role in the pathogenesis of SAH, and further investigations into the reduced blood Mn levels observed during the study may lead to new insight into the treatment of SAH.

  12. Plasma acrolein levels and their association with delayed ischemic neurological deficits following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, M C; McCullough-Hicks, M E; Kim, G H; Komotar, R J; Kellner, C P; Hahn, D K; Otten, M L; Rynkowski, M A; Merkow, M B; Starke, R M; Connolly, E Sander

    2008-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) remain unclear. Acrolein, a reactive metabolite produced in many models of mechanical and ischemic injury, has been shown to cause vasospasm in coronary artery and aorta models. These traits suggest it may play a role in post-aSAH cerebral vasospasm. This pilot study was designed as a preliminary investigation to determine if acrolein levels could be used as a clinical tool to predict the presence of vasospasm. Eleven patients with aSAH and Hunt and Hess admission grades of III-V were prospectively enrolled. Patients were stratified according to the presence or absence of vasospasm, defined as a delayed ischaemic neurological deficit in which all other possible causes have been excluded. Soluble acrolein levels were determined at two times points: early (day 1-3 post-SAH) and late (day 8-12 post-SAH) and the change in acrolein levels over this period was computed using a Mann-Whitney test. The change in acrolein levels over this period between the vasospasm and non-vasospasm group trended toward but did not achieve statistical significance (means: 5.68 versus -5.54; medians: 5.27 versus -3.99; range: -8.067 to 22.904 versus -13.83 to 5.199 p=0.13). Five out of six vasospasm patients showed an increase in acrolein levels over the vasospasm period. Three out of four non-vasospasm patients showed a decrease over the vasospasm period. The results of this pilot study suggest that acrolein levels increase in patients undergoing vasospasm during the vasospasm window. This suggests that acrolein may play a role in the pathways leading up to or following vasospasm. There is a need for larger more definitive studies.

  13. Comparison of montreal cognitive assessment and mini-mental state examination in evaluating cognitive domain deficit following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kwok Chu Wong

    Full Text Available Cognitive deficits are common after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH, and clinical evaluation is important for their management. Our hypothesis was that the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCa is superior to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE in screening for cognitive domain deficit in aSAH patients.We carried out a prospective observational and diagnostic accuracy study on Hong Kong aSAH patients aged 21 to 75 years who had been admitted within 96 hours of ictus. The domain-specific neuropsychological assessment battery, the MoCA and MMSE were administered 2-4 weeks and 1 year after ictus. A cognitive domain deficit was defined as a cognitive domain z score <-1.65 (below the fifth percentile. Cognitive impairment was defined as two or more cognitive domain deficits. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov of the US National Institutes of Health (NCT01038193.Both the MoCA and the MMSE were successful in differentiating between patients with and without cognitive domain deficits and cognitive impairment at both assessment periods. At 1 year post-ictus, the MoCA produced higher area under the curve scores for cognitive impairment than the MMSE (MoCA, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.97 versus MMSE, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.66 to 0.83, p = 0.009.Cognitive domain deficits and cognitive impairment in patients with aSAH can be screened with the MoCA in both the subacute and chronic phases.

  14. Topiramate attenuates early brain injury following subarachnoid haemorrhage in rats via duplex protection against inflammation and neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yong; Guo, Song-Xue; Li, Jian-Ru; Du, Hang-Gen; Wang, Chao-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Min; Wu, Qun

    2015-10-05

    Early brain injury (EBI) following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) insults contributes to the poor prognosis and high mortality observed in SAH patients. Topiramate (TPM) is a novel, broad-spectrum, antiepileptic drug with a reported protective effect against several brain injuries. The current study aimed to investigate the potential of TPM for neuroprotection against EBI after SAH and the possible dose-dependency of this effect. An endovascular perforation SAH model was established in rats, and TPM was administered by intraperitoneal injection after surgery at three different doses (20mg/kg, 40mg/kg, and 80mg/kg). The animals' neurological scores and brain water content were evaluated, and ELISA, Western blotting and immunostaining assays were conducted to assess the effect of TPM. The results revealed that TPM lowers the elevated levels of myeloperoxidase and proinflammatory mediators observed after SAH in a dose-related fashion, and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway is the target of neuroinflammation regulation. In addition, TPM ameliorated SAH-induced cortical neuronal apoptosis by influencing Bax, Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression, and the effect of TPM was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Various dosages of TPM also upregulated the protein expression of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic signalling molecules, GABAA receptor (GABAAR) α1, GABAAR γ2, and K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 2 (KCC2) together and downregulated Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 1 (NKCC1) expression. Thus, TPM may be an effective neuroprotectant in EBI after SAH by regulating neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Benefit of cerebrospinal fluid spectrophotometry in the assessment of CT scan negative suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage: a diagnostic accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, Angus; Chu, Kevin; Greenslade, Jaimi; Williams, Julian; Brown, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if performing cerebrospinal fluid spectrophotometry in addition to visual inspection detects more ruptured cerebral aneurysms than performing cerebrospinal fluid visual inspection alone in patients with a normal head CT scan but suspected of suffering an aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We performed a single-centre retrospective study of patients presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary hospital who underwent both head CT scan and lumbar puncture to exclude SAH. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of an approach utilising both spectrophotometry and visual inspection (combined approach) was compared to visual inspection alone. A total of 409 patients (mean age 37.8 years, 56.2% female) were recruited and six (1.5%) had a cerebral aneurysm on angiography. The sensitivity of visual inspection was 50% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.4-82.6%), specificity was 99% (95% CI: 97.5-99.7%), PPV was 42.9% (95% CI: 10.4-81.3%) and NPV was 99.2% (95% CI: 97.8-99.8%). The combined approach had a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 54.1-100%), specificity of 79.7% (95% CI: 75.4-83.5%), PPV of 6.8% (95% CI: 2.6-14.3%) and a NPV of 100% (95% CI: 98.8-100%). The sensitivity of the combined approach was not significantly different to that of visual inspection alone (p=0.25). Visual inspection had a significantly higher specificity than the combined approach (p<0.01). The combined approach detected more cases of aneurysmal SAH than visual inspection alone, however the difference in sensitivity was not statistically significant. Visual xanthochromia should prompt angiography because of a superior specificity and PPV. Due to its reduced sensitivity, caution should be applied when using only visual inspection of the supernatant. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH): long-term cognitive outcome in patients treated with surgical clipping or endovascular coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Sophie F; Wilson, F Colin; McCusker, Chris G; Caldwell, Sheena B; Rennie, Ian

    2013-05-01

    To compare long-term cognitive outcomes of patients treated with surgical clipping or endovascular coiling after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Retrospective matched cohort study assessed neuropsychological functioning at least 12 months after aneurysmal SAH treatment. Fourteen patients treated by endovascular coiling and nine patients treated by surgical clipping participated. After gaining written consent, a comprehensive neuropsychological battery was completed. Standardised tests were employed to assess pre-morbid and current intellectual functioning (IQ), attention, speed of information processing, memory and executive function as well as psychosocial functioning and affect. Treatment groups were not significantly different in terms of age, pre-morbid IQ, time from injury to treatment or time since injury. A significant effect of treatment on full-scale IQ score (p = 0.025), performance IQ (p = 0.045) and verbal IQ score (p = 0.029), all favouring the coiled group was observed. A medium effect size between groups difference in immediate memory (p = 0.19, partial η(2) = 0.08) was also observed. No significant between group differences on attention, executive functioning and speed of information processing measures or mood and psychosocial functioning were noted. Both groups reported increased anxiety and memory, attention and speed of information processing deficits relative to normative data. Study findings indicate fewer cognitive deficits following endovascular coiling. Cognitive deficits in the clipped group may be due in part to the invasive nature of neurosurgical clipping. Further prospective research with regard to long-term cognitive and emotional outcomes is warranted. IMPLICATIONS OF REHABILITATION: • Treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms by either endovascualar coiling or neurosurgical clipping can result in significant long-term physical disability as well as cognitive impairment. • Observed cognitive impairment(s) tend to be less in

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma cytokines after subarachnoid haemorrhage: CSF interleukin-6 may be an early marker of infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopkins Stephen J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokines and cytokine receptor concentrations increase in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH. The relationship between plasma and CSF cytokines, and factors affecting this, are not clear. Methods To help define the relationship, paired plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples were collected from patients subject to ventriculostomy. Concentrations of key inflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL-1ß, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra, IL-1 receptor 2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α, and TNF receptors (TNF-R 1 and 2 were determined by immunoassay of CSF and plasma from 21 patients, where samples were available at three or more time points. Results Plasma concentrations of IL-1ß, IL-1Ra, IL-10, TNF-α and TNF-R1 were similar to those in CSF. Plasma TNF-R2 and IL-1R2 concentrations were higher than in CSF. Concentrations of IL-8 and IL-6 in CSF were approximately10 to 1,000-fold higher than in plasma. There was a weak correlation between CSF and plasma IL-8 concentrations (r = 0.26, but no correlation for IL-6. Differences between the central and peripheral pattern of IL-6 were associated with episodes of ventriculostomy-related infection (VRI. A VRI was associated with CSF IL-6 >10,000 pg/mL (P = 0.0002, although peripheral infection was not significantly associated with plasma IL-6. Conclusions These data suggest that plasma cytokine concentrations cannot be used to identify relative changes in the CSF, but that measurement of CSF IL-6 could provide a useful marker of VRI.

  18. Outcomes of CSF spectrophotometry in cases of suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage with negative CT: two years retrospective review in a Birmingham hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakr, A; Silva, D; Cramb, R; Flint, G; Foroughi, M

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adherence to current guidelines for the investigation of suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage and the prevalence and outcome of computed tomography (CT)-negative aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. A retrospective review in a single large tertiary referral centre. A total of 796 patients, aged 16-90 years, who underwent lumbar puncture (LP) for suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) following a negative or equivocal CT scan between January 2012 and November 2013 (23 months). Xanthochromia reports were obtained using the hospital's department of biochemistry database and clinical data for these patients were reviewed using patient notes. Of 796 CSF reports reviewed, 728 (91%) were negative for xanthochromia, 31 (4%) were positive and 37 (5%) were equivocal. Only 2 out of the 31 patients with positive spectrophotometry results were subsequently found to have an underlying aneurysm on CT angiography. A further 9 out of these 31 patients underwent digital subtraction angiography, with no cerebral aneurysms being detected. Amongst the 37 patients with equivocal xanthochromia reports, 13 underwent CT angiography and only 1 cerebral aneurysm was detected. In patients with clinically suspected SAH but who have negative or questionable CT findings, CSF analysis is likely to be negative in the vast majority of cases, which was 91% in our series. In patients yielding positive or equivocal CSF results the likelihood of an aneurysm being detected is low, amounting to three out of 68 or approximately one in 23 (approximately 4%). Overall in suspected SAH cases where CT scan has been negative, the rate for the detection of cerebral aneurysm is three out of 796 cases (0.4%).

  19. Acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome in dogs: 108 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, F; Strohmeyer, K; Hartmann, K; Unterer, S

    2015-06-13

    No prospective studies including large numbers of dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) are published so far. The aim of this case-control study was to describe signalment, history, clinical signs, laboratory values and course of disease in dogs with AHDS. Dogs (108) with idiopathic acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea (dogs served as control groups. Dogs with AHDS had a significantly lower body weight (median 9.8 kg) and age (median five years) than other dogs of the hospital population (20 kg; 10 years) (Pschnauzer and Maltese. The syndrome was more likely to occur during winter. Vomiting preceded the onset of bloody diarrhoea in 80 per cent of dogs and haematemesis was observed in half of those cases. Median AHDS index at presentation was 12 (range 3-17). Haematocrit was generally high (median 57.1 per cent; range 33-76 per cent), but exceeded 60 per cent only in 31.4 per cent of dogs. Haematocrit of 48.1 per cent of dogs was above reference range, as was monocyte (50.0 per cent), segmented (59.6 per cent) and band neutrophil count (45.2 per cent). A rapid clinical improvement occurred during the first 48 hours. British Veterinary Association.

  20. Social cognition impairments after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: Associations with deficits in interpersonal behaviour, apathy, and impaired self-awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buunk, Anne M; Spikman, Jacoba M; Veenstra, Wencke S; van Laar, Peter Jan; Metzemaekers, Jan D M; van Dijk, J Marc C; Meiners, Linda C; Groen, Rob J M

    2017-08-01

    Behavioural disturbances are frequently found after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH). Social cognition impairments have been suggested as a possible underlying mechanism for behavioural problems. Also, aSAH is likely to result in damage affecting frontal-subcortical circuits underlying social cognition. Therefore, we aimed to investigate social cognition after aSAH and its associations with behavioural problems (deficits in interpersonal behaviour, apathy, and impaired self-awareness) and focal as well as diffuse brain damage. 88 aSAH patients (in the subacute phase post-aSAH) and 60 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy controls participated. Tasks for emotion recognition, Theory of Mind (ToM), and empathy as well as questionnaires were used. Cortical infarctions in frontal and non-frontal areas on MRI, aneurysm circulation and aSAH-related events were taken into account. Compared to healthy controls, aSAH patients performed significantly worse on tasks for emotion recognition, ToM and empathy. Poor performance on ToM and emotion recognition was associated with proxy-ratings indicating impaired interpersonal behaviour and apathy and with indications of impaired self-awareness. No associations were found between deficits in social cognition and frontal or non-frontal cortical lesions on MRI. Also, aneurysm circulation and aSAH-related events such as hydrocephalus, vasospasm, and treatment method did not explain why and how social cognitive deficits did occur after aSAH. In conclusion, emotion recognition, ToM and empathy were clearly impaired in aSAH patients and these deficits were related to apathy and deficits in interpersonal behaviour as reported by proxies and to impaired self-awareness. This association strengthens the assumption of impaired social cognition as an underlying construct of behavioural problems after aSAH. Consequently, social cognition tests and proxy-ratings should be used in clinical practice, irrespective of lesion location on

  1. Role of canine circovirus in dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A; Hartmann, K; Leutenegger, C M; Proksch, A L; Mueller, R S; Unterer, S

    2017-06-03

    Canine circovirus (CanineCV) has been detected in some dogs with severe haemorrhagic diarrhoea, but its pathogenic role is unclear. This study evaluated a suspected association between the presence of CanineCV and acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) in dogs. The prevalence of CanineCV in dogs with AHDS was compared with that in healthy dogs and those infected with canine parvovirus (CPV). Additionally, time to recovery and mortality rate were compared between CanineCV-positive and CanineCV-negative dogs. Faecal samples of dogs with AHDS (n=55), healthy dogs (n=66) and dogs infected with CPV (n=54) were examined by two real-time TaqMan PCR assays targeting the replicase and capsid genes of CanineCV. CanineCV was detected in faecal samples of two dogs with AHDS, three healthy controls and seven dogs infected with CPV. Among the three groups, there was no significant difference in prevalence of CanineCV. CPV-infected animals that were coinfected with CanineCV had a significantly higher mortality rate compared with those negative for CanineCV. CanineCV does not appear to be the primary causative agent of AHDS in dogs, but might play a role as a negative co-factor in disease outcome in dogs with CPV infection. British Veterinary Association.

  2. Does Ramadan fasting increase acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, S; Durukan, P; Akdur, O; Vardar, A; Torun, E; Ikizceli, I

    2009-01-01

    The epidemiological characteristics and clinical results of patients who presented with acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage (AUGIH) during the month of Ramadan (October 2007) were compared with those who presented with AUGIH during another, non-Ramadan, month (December 2007). The following were evaluated: age, gender, symptoms, gastrointestinal disease history, risk factors, co-existing diseases, results of rectal, nasogastric and endoscopic examinations, treatment modalities and clinical outcomes. Significantly more patients were diagnosed with AUGIH during Ramadan compared with the non-Ramadan month (43 versus 28, respectively). Significantly more patients diagnosed during Ramadan had a history of previous haemorrhage compared with the non-Ramadan month (72.1% versus 42.9%, respectively). Peptic ulcer was the most common event in both groups and overall endoscopy findings differed between the groups. No other significant differences were found. In conclusion, the number of patients presenting with AUGIH during Ramadan was significantly higher than that of an ordinary month, which suggests that fasting during Ramadan reactivates and aggravates pre-existing gastrointestinal diseases.

  3. Diffuse, non-traumatic, non-aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage during bevacizumab treatment of high grade glioma: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arosha S. Dissanayake, MBBS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of various cancers including refractory high grade glioma. There are case reports of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH during bevacizumab treatment though the causative role of the drug in these cases has been obscured by the presence of alternative aetiologies or incomplete investigation. Furthermore, there is no consensus regarding the risk of Central Nervous System (CNS haemorrhage during bevacizumab treatment due to limited available study data. Case Description: A 53 year old female with recurrent gliosarcoma refractory to standard, temozolamide based chemo-radiotherapy presented to our facility in a post-ictal state 16 days after her second dose of intravenous bevacizumab. A Fisher grade III SAH was found on computerised tomography scanning with no causative vascular lesion found on two subsequent digital subtraction angiograms separated by a 10 day period and a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI scan 20 days post-bleed. Given the resolution of symptoms over an uncomplicated 13 day admission, she was discharged home with bevacizumab ceased prior to her scheduled third dose. Conclusion: We discuss here a case of diffuse, non-traumatic SAH during bevacizumab treatment of recurrent gliosarcoma in which alternative aetiologies of haemorrhage were excluded, to our knowledge the first such case in the English language literature. This adverse event is compatible with the known molecular mechanisms of bevacizumab and clinicians should be cognisant of the potential risk of CNS haemorrhage until larger studies are available to quantify this risk.

  4. Cerebral blood volume, blood flow, and oxygen metabolism in cerebral ischaemia and subarachnoid haemorrhage: An in-vivo study using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.R.W.; Baker, R.P.; Grubb, R.L.; Raichle, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    A characteristic sequence of metabolic and haemodynamic changes has been shown to occur in the brain as cerebral perfusion pressure is reduced in experimental animals. Increased cerebral blood volume (CBV) occurs initially, followed by a fall in blood flow (CBF) and, finally, a fall in oxygen metabolism (CMRO 2 ). By measuring CBV, CBF, and CMRO 2 with positron emission tomography in patients with vasospasm associated with subarachnoid haemorrhage and in patients with arteriosclerotic occlusion or stenosis of extraparenchymal cerebral arteries, we have demonstrated the presence of similar changes distal to such lesions in man. These findings suggest the presence of a local decrease in perfusion pressure. This study demonstrates the utility of positron emission tomography in the assessment of cerebral circulation and metabolism in man. Measurements of regional CBV must be included for a complete assessment of the dynamics of the cerebral circulation. (Author)

  5. The clinical value of MRA at 3.0 T for the diagnosis and therapeutic planning of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Chang; Sun, Zhen-Kui; Li, Ming-Hua; Li, Yong-Dong; Wang, Wu; Tan, Hua-Qiao; Gu, Bin-Xian; Chen, Shi-Wen

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the clinical value of unenhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 3.0 T for the diagnosis and therapeutic planning of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). A total of 165 patients with SAH were referred for three-dimensional time-of-flight MRA (3D-TOF-MRA) before digital subtraction angiography (DSA). For each aneurysm, 3D-TOF-MRA was used to determine whether the aneurysm was suitable for coil placement with or without balloon/stent-assisted coiling, surgical clipping or conservative treatment. Treatment planning with 3D-TOF-MRA was compared with actual treatment decisions or treatment that had been carried out in each aneurysm decided using DSA. The aneurysm-based evaluation yielded accuracy of 96.9%, sensitivity of 97.6%, specificity of 93.1%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 98.8% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 87.1%, in the detection of intracranial aneurysms. Treatment planning could be correctly made on the basis of aneurysm anatomy and working view by volume rendering (VR) 3D-TOF-MRA with accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 94.9%, 94.0%, 100%, 100% and 74.4%, respectively, on a per aneurysm-based evaluation. VR 3D-TOF-MRA offers high diagnostic accuracy in the detection of ruptured intracranial aneurysms, and appears to be an effective treatment planning tool for most patients with SAH. VR 3D-TOF-MRA offers high diagnostic accuracy for detecting ruptured intracranial aneurysms. • VR 3D-TOF-MRA helps treatment planning for patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage. • 3D-TOF-MRA is non-invasive and avoids using ionising radiation or contrast agents.

  6. Acute intracerebral haemorrhage: grounds for optimism in management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcourt, Candice; Anderson, Craig

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most devastating types of stroke, which has considerable disease burden in "non-white" ethnic groups where the population-attributable risks of elevated blood pressure are very high. Since the treatment of ICH remains largely supportive and expectant, nihilism and the early withdrawal of active therapy influence management decisions in clinical practice. However, approaches to management are now better defined on the basis of evidence that both survival and speed (and degree) of recovery are critically dependent on the location, size, and degree of expansion and extension into the intraventricular system of the haematoma of the ICH. Although no medical treatment has been shown to improve outcome in ICH, several promising avenues have emerged that include haemostatic therapy and intensive control of elevated blood pressure. Conversely, there is continued controversy over the role of evacuation of the haematoma of ICH via open craniotomy. Despite being an established practice for several decades, and having undergone evaluation in multiple randomised trials, there is uncertainty over which patients have the most to gain from an intervention with clear procedural risk. Minimally invasive surgery via local anaesthetic applied drill-puncture of the cranium and infusion of a thrombolytic agent is an attractive option for patients requiring critical management of the haematoma, not just in low resource settings but arguably also in specialist centres of western countries. With several ongoing clinical trials nearing completion, these treatments could enter routine practice within the next few years, further justifying the urgency of "time is brain" and that active management within well-organized, comprehensive acute stroke care units includes patients with ICH. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute Methanol Poisoning: Prevalence and Predisposing Factors of Haemorrhagic and Non-Haemorrhagic Brain Lesions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zakharov, S.; Kotíková, K.; Vaněčková, M.; Seidl, Z.; Nurieva, O.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Caganová, B.; Pelclová, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 2 (2016), s. 228-238 ISSN 1742-7835 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : ACUTE OPTIC NEUROPATHY * FORMATE CONCENTRATIONS * PROGNOSTIC-FACTORS Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.176, year: 2016

  8. Appreciation of CT-negative, lumbar puncture-positive subarachnoid haemorrhage: risk factors for presence of aneurysms and diagnostic yield of imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Nicolaas A; Groen, Rob J M; Foumani, Mahrouz; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Eshghi, Omid S; Metzemaekers, Jan D M; Luijckx, Gert Jan; Van Dijk, J Marc C

    2014-08-01

    Patients without a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) on brain CT scan (CT-negative), but a lumbar puncture (LP)-proven SAH, are a challenging patient category. The optimal diagnostic approach is still a matter of debate. Also, there is little knowledge on the probability of finding an underlying vascular lesion. In this observational study, a consecutive cohort of 94 patients with CT-negative, LP-positive SAH was prospectively collected between 1998 and 2013. The yield of diagnostic modalities as well as patient outcome was studied. In addition, risk factors for the presence of a vascular lesion were analysed. In 40 patients (43%), an intracranial vascular abnormality was detected: 37 aneurysms and three arterial dissections. Female gender was significantly associated with detection of a vascular lesion. Time between ictus and diagnosis of SAH was not associated with the presence of vascular pathology. Overall, 99% of patients had a modified Rankin Score of 0-2 after a median follow-up of 72 months. The yield of additional digital subtraction angiography in patients with a negative CT angiography was zero. In this study, the chance of finding a vascular lesion in a patient with CT-negative, LP-positive SAH was 43%, underlining the need for an adequate diagnostic workup. In general, the patient outcome was favourable. Female gender was found to be predictive for detecting a vascular lesion. In contrast with previous reports, the interval between ictus and LP was not associated with the presence of an aneurysm. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Hyponatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is due to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis and acute glucocorticoid deficiency

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2011-06-01

    Hyponatraemia is the most common electrolyte abnormality following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and contributes to increased morbidity and mortality. Retrospective data suggests that the syndrome of inappropriate diuresis (SIAD) is the most common cause of hyponatraemia in SAH, though cerebral salt wasting has been postulated by some workers to be the predominant abnormality. Data which has shown acute glucocorticoid deficiency following SAH has suggested that some cases of euvolaemic hyponatraemia may also be caused by this mechanism.We prospectively studied the hormonal and haemodynamic influences involved in the development of hyponatraemia in 100 patients (61% female, median age 53 (range 16-82)) with non-traumatic aneurysmal SAH. Each patient had plasma sodium (pNa), urea, osmolality, glucose and 0900h cortisol (PC), and urinary sodium and osmolality measured on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 following SAH. Fluid balance and haemodynamic parameters were recorded daily. Results were compared with 15 patients admitted to ITU following vascular surgery. A PC<300nmol\\/L in a patient in ITU was regarded clinically as inappropriately low.49% of patients developed hyponatraemia (pNa<135 mmol\\/L), including 14% who developed clinically significantly hyponatraemia (pNa<130 mmol\\/L). 36\\/49 (73.4%) developed hyponatraemia between days 1 and 3 post SAH. The median duration of hyponatraemia was 3 days (range 1–10 days).In 35\\/49 (71.4%), hyponatraemia was due to SIAD as defined by standard diagnostic criteria. 14% of SAH patients had at least one PC<300nmol\\/L; 5 of these (35.7%) developed hyponatraemia. In 4 patients hyponatraemia was preceded by acute cortisol deficiency and responded to hydrocortisone treatment. In contrast, all controls had PC>500 nmol\\/L on day 1, and >300 nmol on days 3–12. There were no cases of cerebral salt wasting. There was no relationship between the incidence of hyponatraemia and the defined anatomical territory or severity of

  10. Severe acute haemorrhagic liver failure in a neonate with a favourable spontaneous outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavet, Madeleine; Balu, Marie; Garel, Catherine; Ducou le Pointe, Hubert [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris VI, Service de Radiologie, Hopital d' enfants Armand-Trousseau, Paris (France); Mitanchez, Delphine; Alexandre, Marie [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris VI, Service de Neonatologie, Hopital d' enfants Armand-Trousseau, Paris (France); Renolleau, Sylvain [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris VI, Service de Reanimation, Hopital d' enfants Armand-Trousseau, Paris (France); Pariente, Daniele [Hopital de Bicetre, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Paris (France)

    2008-10-15

    Acute liver failure in neonates is rare and is frequently associated with an unfavourable outcome. There is no curative treatment other than liver transplantation. Screening for viral, metabolic, toxic or vascular disease is essential to assess the prognosis and to guide specific treatment. Hepatic haemorrhage in neonates is often associated with bacterial infection, trauma and coagulopathies. We present a unique case of neonatal acute liver failure and multifocal massive haemorrhagic intrahepatic lesions of traumatic origin, documented by US and MRI. The patient made a spontaneous recovery. Clinical, biological and imaging outcome was excellent despite the apparent severity of the initial features. The only possible aetiology was a difficult caesarean delivery for mild fetal macrosomia. (orig.)

  11. Severe acute haemorrhagic liver failure in a neonate with a favourable spontaneous outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavet, Madeleine; Balu, Marie; Garel, Catherine; Ducou le Pointe, Hubert; Mitanchez, Delphine; Alexandre, Marie; Renolleau, Sylvain; Pariente, Daniele

    2008-01-01

    Acute liver failure in neonates is rare and is frequently associated with an unfavourable outcome. There is no curative treatment other than liver transplantation. Screening for viral, metabolic, toxic or vascular disease is essential to assess the prognosis and to guide specific treatment. Hepatic haemorrhage in neonates is often associated with bacterial infection, trauma and coagulopathies. We present a unique case of neonatal acute liver failure and multifocal massive haemorrhagic intrahepatic lesions of traumatic origin, documented by US and MRI. The patient made a spontaneous recovery. Clinical, biological and imaging outcome was excellent despite the apparent severity of the initial features. The only possible aetiology was a difficult caesarean delivery for mild fetal macrosomia. (orig.)

  12. The hemodyafiltration in the acute renal failure at the patients’ haemorrhagic fever with the nephritic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Trusov, V.; Shaklein, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Udmurt Republic is the natural focus and the hot spot of the haemorrhagic fever with the nephritic syndrome (HFNS). The acute renal failure (ARF), by our data, is being developed from 24 up to 49 % of the HFNS diseased persons, at the severe forms of which, side by side with the medicamental therapy, the hemodialysis is being used. In the last years, the efferent therapy new methods such, as the hemofiltration, the hemodyafiltration (HDF) are being used for the ARF medical treatment.

  13. A case of acute spinal subdural hematoma with subarachnoid hemorrhage: Rapid spontaneous remission, relapse, and complete resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michito Namekawa

    2017-06-01

    In addition to rostrocaudal spreading of bloody components in the subdural space, rupture of the hematoma into the subarachnoid space must have released pressure, compressing the spinal cord. In this case report, we also describe the serial MRI studies and note the limitations of the resolution of spinal MRI in the acute phase.

  14. Pituitary apoplexy with optic tract oedema and haemorrhage in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenthall, R.; Jaspan, T. [Univ. Hospital Nottingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Gonugunta, V. [Department of Neurosurgery, Univ. Hospital Nottingham, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2001-02-01

    Bilateral optic tract oedema, left optic tract haemorrhage and subarachnoid haemorrhage occurred in a 70-year-old man with pituitary apoplexy associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Left optic tract haemorrhage was confirmed on MRI. (orig.)

  15. Multi-detector CT: review of its use in acute GI haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, S.; Milburn, S. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Uberoi, R. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: raman.uberoi@orh.nhs.uk

    2007-10-15

    The advent of multi-section computed tomography (CT) technology allows the non-invasive assessment of the arterial tree. Using current software, it is now possible to produce high-quality, angiographic-like images that can be used to plan and guide therapeutic procedures. One such clinical situation is the assessment of patients with acute gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage. Multi-section CT has a number of advantages over conventional angiography in this situation. The simplicity and non-invasive nature of the technique compared with conventional angiography make CT angiography possible in situations where conventional angiography is not available. Movement artefact from respiration and peristalsis is a common problem in the interpretation of conventional angiography; this is essentially abolished with rapid acquisition times and the use of multi-planar images to remove overlying bowel loops. Cross-sectional imaging with the ability for multi-planar reconstruction allows the accurate anatomical localization of the bleeding site, as well as an assessment of the underlying pathology: this can be used to plan therapy (embolization or surgery). The aim of this paper is to review the current use of CT in the investigation of patients with GI haemorrhage, illustrated with images from our Institution. For patients in whom GI endoscopy has failed to establish a diagnosis, we propose multi-section CT angiography as the initial imaging investigation in acute GI haemorrhage.

  16. Multi-detector CT: review of its use in acute GI haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, S.; Milburn, S.; Uberoi, R.

    2007-01-01

    The advent of multi-section computed tomography (CT) technology allows the non-invasive assessment of the arterial tree. Using current software, it is now possible to produce high-quality, angiographic-like images that can be used to plan and guide therapeutic procedures. One such clinical situation is the assessment of patients with acute gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage. Multi-section CT has a number of advantages over conventional angiography in this situation. The simplicity and non-invasive nature of the technique compared with conventional angiography make CT angiography possible in situations where conventional angiography is not available. Movement artefact from respiration and peristalsis is a common problem in the interpretation of conventional angiography; this is essentially abolished with rapid acquisition times and the use of multi-planar images to remove overlying bowel loops. Cross-sectional imaging with the ability for multi-planar reconstruction allows the accurate anatomical localization of the bleeding site, as well as an assessment of the underlying pathology: this can be used to plan therapy (embolization or surgery). The aim of this paper is to review the current use of CT in the investigation of patients with GI haemorrhage, illustrated with images from our Institution. For patients in whom GI endoscopy has failed to establish a diagnosis, we propose multi-section CT angiography as the initial imaging investigation in acute GI haemorrhage

  17. Depression remitted after subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Lise; Vinberg, Maj

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old man was seen in a specialized ambulatory for mood disorders because of treatment-resistant depression. He was treated throughout a period of three years with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, dual action, lithium, nortriptyline, reboxetine, aripiprazole, benzodiazepines...

  18. Superselective arterial embolisation with a liquid polyvinyl alcohol copolymer in patients with acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenhart, Markus; Schneider, Hans [Sozialstiftung Bamberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Bamberg (Germany); Paetzel, Christian [Klinikum Weiden, Department of Radiology, Weiden (Germany); Sackmann, Michael [Sozialstiftung Bamberg, Department of Gastroenterology, Bamberg (Germany); Jung, Ernst Michael; Schreyer, Andreas G.; Feuerbach, Stefan; Zorger, Niels [University of Regensburg, Department of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    To evaluate the results of emergency embolisation in acute arterial bleeding of the gastrointestinal tract with a liquid polyvinyl alcohol copolymer from two centres. We retrospectively analysed 16 cases (15 patients) of acute arterial bleeding of the gastrointestinal tract where emergency embolotherapy was performed by using the copolymer when acute haemorrhage was not treatable with endoscopic techniques alone. Cause of haemorrhage and technical and clinical success were documented. Arterial embolotherapy was successful in all 16 cases. The technical success rate was 100%. The cause of bleeding was pancreatitis in four, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) of the colon in three, malignancy in three, angiodysplasia in two, ulcer in two and panarteritis no dosa and trauma in one each. There were no procedure-related complications. No bowel necrosis occurred because of embolisation. In 13 cases, the patients were discharged in good condition (81%); the three patients with GVHD died because of the underlying disease. The copolymer seems to have great potential in embolotherapy of acute arterial gastrointestinal bleeding. In our series none of the patients had rebleeding at the site of embolisation and no clinically obvious bowel necrosis occurred. (orig.)

  19. Factors Associated with Acute and Chronic Hydrocephalus in Nonaneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter; Raya, Amanda; Zipfel, Gregory J; Dhar, Rajat

    2016-02-01

    Hydrocephalus requiring external ventricular drain (EVD) or shunt placement commonly complicates aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but its frequency is not as well known for nonaneurysmal SAH (NA-SAH). Those with diffuse bleeding may have greater risk of hydrocephalus compared to those with a perimesencephalic pattern. We evaluated the frequency of hydrocephalus in NA-SAH and whether imaging factors could predict the need for EVD and shunting. We collected admission clinical and imaging variables for 105 NA-SAH patients, including bicaudate index (BI), Hijdra sum score (HSS), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) score, modified Fisher scale (mFS), and bleeding pattern. Hydrocephalus was categorized as acute (need for EVD) or chronic (shunt). We applied logistic regression to determine whether hydrocephalus risk was independently related to bleeding pattern or mediated through blood volume or ventriculomegaly. Acute hydrocephalus was seen in 26 (25%) patients but was more common with diffuse (15/28, 54%) versus perimesencephalic (10/59, 17%, p hydrocephalus had worse clinical grade and higher BI, HSS, and IVH scores. Adjusting the relationship between hydrocephalus and diffuse bleeding for HSS (but not BI) nullified this association. Nine (35%) patients requiring EVD eventually required shunting for chronic hydrocephalus, which was associated with greater blood burden but not poor clinical grade. Acute hydrocephalus occurs in one-quarter of NA-SAH patients. The greater risk in diffuse bleeding appears to be mediated by greater cisternal blood volume but not by greater ventriculomegaly. Imaging characteristics may aid in anticipatory management of hydrocephalus in NA-SAH.

  20. The Effect of Gender on Acute Hydrocephalus after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, Hajime; Zhang, Haining; Okubo, Shuichi; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Xi, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Acute hydrocephalus is a common complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We investigated the effect of gender on acute hydrocephalus development in a rat SAH model. SAH was induced in adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats using endovascular perforation. Sham rats underwent the same procedure without perforation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed 24 h after SAH to determine ventricular volume. Hydrocephalus was defined as a ventricular volume that was more than 3 standard deviations from the mean value in sham-operated animals. After MRI, animals were euthanized and the extent of SAH was assessed using a modified grading system. No sham animals died. Mortality rates after SAH induction in male and female animals were 27 and 22 %, respectively. SAH induced significant ventricular enlargement compared with sham-operated rats (p hydrocephalus 24 h after SAH was greater in female (75 %) than in male animals (47 %, p hydrocephalus occurred even though SAH severity grade and ventricular T2* hypointensity volumes were not significantly different between male and female animals. Our data demonstrate that gender influences acute hydrocephalus development in a rat SAH model. Future studies should determine the role of estrogen in SAH-induced hydrocephalus.

  1. Functional independence: A comparison of the changes during neurorehabilitation between patients with non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracerebral hemorrhage or acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stabel, Henriette Holm; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the changes in functional independence measured by the FIM after specialized neurorehabilitation between patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) or acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Design Historical cohort study...

  2. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piironen, A.; Kivisaari, R.; Pitkaeranta, P.; Poutanen, V.P.; Laippala, P.; Laurila, P.; Kivisaari, L.

    1997-01-01

    Eleven piglets with haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis and nine piglets with oedematous pancreatitis were imaged using a multi-breath-hold TurboFLASH (TR 6.5 ms, TE 3 ms, TI 300 ms, flip angle 8 , three slices) pre-excited T1-weighted sequence with an IV bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA, 0.3 mmol/kg) as a contrast agent to show dynamic contrast enhancement of the pancreas by MRI. All piglets were imaged according to the same protocol before inducing the disease. Following the IV Gd-DTPA bolus, time-enhancement curve of the pancreas during haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis was significantly lower than during oedematous pancreatitis. The enhancement curves for the healthy piglets and piglets with oedematous pancreatitis did not differ significantly. Each piglet served as its own control. Because the results of this initial study are similar to those obtained with contrast-enhanced CT, we conclude that our results may encourage further clinical trials, and contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI may be an alternative to the established method of CT for diagnosing acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis. (orig.). With 3 figs

  3. Systolic Blood Pressure Variability is a Novel Risk Factor for Rebleeding in Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing-Song; Ping-Chen; Lin, Yuan-Xiang; Lin, Zhang-Ya; Yu, Liang-Hong; Dai, Lin-Sun; Kang, De-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rebleeding of an aneurysm is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whereas numerous studies have demonstrated predictors of rebleeding and effect of systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) on stroke, few data on the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Here, we sought to identify the effect of SBPV on rebleeding in acute aneurysmal SAH. Case–control study. From January 2010 to June 2015, 612 patients with aneurysmal SAH were enrolled in our tertiary care medical center. Main outcome measures: Consecutive patients with acute (ictus) aneurismal rebleeding or repair or death were retrospectively included. Antihypertensive therapy based on a predefined standardized protocol was prescribed to lower and maintain SBP between 120 and 160 mm Hg. SBP was measured hourly until a censoring event occurred. SBPV was determined as standard deviation (SD) and successive variation (SV). Binary logistic regression was used to assess the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Rebleeding occurred in 61 (10.0%) of the 612 patients. We identified 47 acute rebleeding as cases and 382 early repair or early death as controls. On binary logistic regression analysis, rebleeding was associated with the SD of SBP (odds ratio [OR], 1.254; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.131–1.391; P < 0.001) and the SV of SBP (OR, 1.131; 95% CI, 1.039–1.231; P = 0.004). No significant difference was seen between rebleeding and mean systolic blood pressure (MSBP). SBPV is associated with increased rates of acute aneurysmal rebleeding. Further prospective research is warranted to confirm that SBP stability prevents acute aneurysm rebleeding. PMID:26986118

  4. Experimental pancreatitis in the rat: role of bile reflux in sodium taurocholate-induced acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, J. F.; van Gool, J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1986-01-01

    Mortality of sodium taurocholate-induced acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis in the rat was prevented by biliary diversion. Bile reflux into the pancreas after the induction of pancreatitis is postulated to be a major factor affecting mortality of this popular model of acute pancreatitis. The reduction

  5. Isolated acute nontraumatic cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage: Etiologies based on MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Eun; Kang, Myung Jin; Kim, Sang Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify common underlying etiologies that may be responsible for isolated acute nontraumatic cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) by analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the brain. From August 2005 to February 2014, 15 cSAH patients were admitted to our institution. All patients with cSAH underwent brain MRI and magnetic resonance angiography as a part of their initial evaluation. An analysis of the patients' medical history, clinical presentations, and brain MRI findings was retrospectively performed. Among the combined pathologies that were suspected causes of cSAH, 11 patients showed acute or subacute cerebral infarctions at the ipsilateral hemisphere of cSAH on the diffusion-weighted images. Four of 11 patients had only cerebral infarction, but the other 7 had combined vasculopathy of extra- and intracranial arteries. Four of 15 patients who did not have cerebral infarction, had intracranial artery stenosis, or showed possible cerebral amyloid angiopathy, or no abnormal findings on the brain MRI. Ischemic stroke, such as cerebral infarction or vasculopathy of the extra and intracranial arteries is regarded as a common underlying etiology of the cSAH based on MRI findings

  6. Acute Compressive Myelopathy Caused by Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Combined Effect of Asymptomatic Cervical Spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Toshinari; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Handa, Akira; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen

    2016-11-01

    Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by hemorrhagic arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) usually presents with meningeal signs, including headache and nausea, and focal neurologic deficit is found in rare cases. In this article, we report a case of acute compressive cervical myelopathy caused by hemorrhagic AVF at the craniocervical junction. A 73-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital for sudden headache and subsequent left hemiparesis. Head computed tomography scan showed SAH exclusively in the posterior fossa, and catheter angiography revealed a perimedullary arteriovenous fistula at the craniocervical junction as a source of the SAH. Detailed neurologic examination showed the sensory disturbance of bilateral upper extremities and bladder and rectal disturbance, suggesting concurrent cervical myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed disk herniation at the C4-5 level, spinal SAH deposition above the C4-5 level, and accompanying myelomalacia. No intramedullary hemorrhage was found. Spinal SAH alone rarely causes focal neurologic deficit. However, this case suggests spinal SAH can cause acute compressive myelopathy when complicated with preexisting spinal canal stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hyperintense acute reperfusion marker on FLAIR is not associated with early haemorrhagic transformation in the elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanski, Michal; Ebinger, Martin; Schmidt, Wolf U.; Hotter, Benjamin; Pittl, Sandra; Heuschmann, Peter U.; Jungehuelsing, Jan G.; Fiebach, Jochen B.

    2010-01-01

    The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) has been described as a predictor for haemorrhagic transformation (HT) in acute ischaemic stroke. We hypothesised that this phenomenon is not present in the elderly. It was possible to assess 47/84 consecutive patients aged 80 and over with diagnosed ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). MRI was performed within 24 h of onset of symptoms with follow-up MRI within a further 48 h. Of 47 included patients, 19 showed HARM; it was only seen on follow-up examination. Ten of the 47 patients underwent thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA); 4 of them showed HARM, and 1 of those showed HT. HARM was found in three out of eight patients with haemorrhagic transformation on baseline and/or follow-up MRI. We did not observe an association between HARM and early HT either in the whole group or in the patients who received thrombolysis. HARM was not associated with HT in the elderly after ischaemic stroke, independent of treatment. While it may indicate dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), it does not necessarily amount to HT. (orig.)

  8. Endovascular Treatment for Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage with Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema in the Acute Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Toshinari; Tanabe, Tomoyuki; Muraoka, Kenichiro; Terada, Kinya; Hirotsune, Nobuyuki; Nishino, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Severe neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) can occur in a variety of brain insults, including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and severe case of NPE can cause devastating consequences. But the literature on the treatment strategy about aneurysmal SAH with NPE is very scant. We present that SAH patients with severe NPE, who were treated first by embolization of aneurysm followed by insertion of lumbar spinal drainage, had comparatively good outcome. We present 12 consecutive cases of aneurysmal SAH with NPE in the acute stage, which were treated by endovascular treatment between April 2002 and December 2012. We classified the patients according to the Hunt and Hess grading system as follows: grade-3 (1 patient), grade-4 (4 patients), and grade-5 (7 patients). All patients needed respiratory management, with the assistance of a ventilator, and underwent endovascular treatment for the ruptured aneurysms within 72 hours from onset. For all the patients, immediately after the endovascular treatment, we performed lumbar spinal drainage. The pulmonary edema disappeared rapidly after respiratory management and endovascular treatment. The outcomes were as follows: good recovery (GR; 3 patients), moderate disability (MD; 4 patients), severe disability (SD; 3 patients), and death (D; 2 patients). Five patients (42%) developed pneumonia, and we postponed extubation until recovery from pneumonia. The cause for severe disability and death was symptomatic vasospasm and primary brain damage. No patients had rebleeding from ruptured aneurysms. Endovascular treatment for ruptured aneurysm and placement of lumbar spinal drainage is an excellent treatment option for severe SAH with NPE.

  9. HIMALAIA (Hypertension Induction in the Management of AneurysmaL subArachnoid haemorrhage with secondary IschaemiA): a randomized single-blind controlled trial of induced hypertension vs. no induced hypertension in the treatment of delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathier, C S; van den Bergh, W M; Slooter, A J C

    2014-04-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a major complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). One option to treat delayed cerebral ischemia is to use induced hypertension, but its efficacy on the eventual outcome has not been proven in a randomized clinical trial. This article describes the design of the HIMALAIA trial (Hypertension Induction in the Management of AneurysmaL subArachnoid haemorrhage with secondary IschaemiA), designed to assess the effectiveness of induced hypertension on neurological outcome in patients with DCI after SAH. To investigate whether induced hypertension improves the functional outcome in patients with delayed cerebral ischemia after SAH. The HIMALAIA trial is a multicenter, singe-blinded, randomized controlled trial in patients with DCI after a recent SAH. Eligible patients will be randomized to either induced hypertension (n = 120) or to no induced hypertension (n = 120). In selected centers, the efficacy of induced hypertension in augmenting cerebral blood flow will be measured by means of cerebral perfusion computerized tomography scanning. Follow-up assessments will be performed at 3 and 12 months after randomization by trial nurses who are blinded to the treatment allocation and management. We will include patients during five years. The primary outcome is the proportion of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with delayed cerebral ischemia with poor outcome three-months after randomization, defined as a modified Rankin scale of more than 3. Secondary outcome measures are related to treatment failure, functional outcome, adverse events, and cerebral hemodynamics. The HIMALAIA trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov under identifier NCT01613235. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  10. Lumbosacral Subdural Hematoma and Concomitant Acute Lower Extremity Monoparesis After Intracranial Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Myeong Jin; Yoo, Chan Jong; Park, Cheol Wan

    2016-11-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurs rarely and can cause neurologic deficits. A 52-year-old man was diagnosed with SAH caused by rupture of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The aneurysm was treated by coil embolization on the day of admission. After embolization, the patient's left lower extremity strength had decreased and a spinal magnetic resonance imaging showed subarachnoid hematoma and SDH with severe thecal sac compression at L4-S2. On postbleed day 6, L4-S1 laminectomy was performed, and the strength in all muscle of the left leg improved. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm may cause symptomatic SDH in the lumbosacral spine as well as subarachnoid hematoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Case of Airway Obstruction Secondary to Acute Haemorrhage into a Benign Thyroid Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Vijapurapu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old female, with a history of progressive dyspnoea, was admitted to the critical care unit after successful resuscitation following a witnessed, out of hospital cardiorespiratory arrest. A presumptive diagnosis of cardiorespiratory arrest secondary to an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was made. However, on more detailed examination a large anterior, midline neck mass was noted. Following tracheal intubation, a computerised tomography scan of the patient’s neck and thorax revealed a seven-centimetre, well-defined, nonenhancing, rounded homogeneous opacity at the thoracic inlet, consistent with a large midline thyroid cyst. Needle aspiration of the cyst was performed and yielded approximately 50 mL of frank blood. After an uncomplicated tracheal extubation and recovery, an elective subtotal thyroidectomy was performed prior to hospital discharge. Histology of the specimen revealed a benign thyroid cyst within a multinodular goitre. Euthyroid multinodular goitres are more likely to be managed conservatively due to an asymptomatic clinical course in most patients. However, the risk of respiratory distress and acute airway obstruction from tracheal compression or acute haemorrhage should be kept in mind. Patients at risk of this life threatening complication should be managed with elective thyroidectomy to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  12. Acute Cholecystitis as a Cause of Fever in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Rae Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Fever is a very common complication that has been related to poor outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH. The incidence of acalculous cholecystitis is reportedly 0.5%–5% in critically ill patients, and cerebrovascular disease is a risk factor for acute cholecystitis (AC. However, abdominal evaluations are not typically performed for febrile patients who have recently undergone aSAH surgeries. In this study, we discuss our experiences with febrile aSAH patients who were eventually diagnosed with AC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 192 consecutive patients who underwent aSAH from January 2009 to December 2012. We evaluated their characteristics, vital signs, laboratory findings, radiologic images, and pathological data from hospitalization. We defined fever as a body temperature of >38.3°C, according to the Society of Critical Care Medicine guidelines. We categorized the causes of fever and compared them between patients with and without AC. Results Of the 192 enrolled patients, two had a history of cholecystectomy, and eight (4.2% were eventually diagnosed with AC. Among them, six patients had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In their pathological findings, two patients showed findings consistent with coexistent chronic cholecystitis, and two showed necrotic changes to the gall bladder. Patients with AC tended to have higher white blood cell counts, aspartame aminotransferase levels, and C-reactive protein levels than patients with fevers from other causes. Predictors of AC in the aSAH group were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR], 8.758; P = 0.033 and the initial consecutive fasting time (OR, 1.325; P = 0.024. Conclusions AC may cause fever in patients with aSAH. When patients with aSAH have a fever, diabetes mellitus and a long fasting time, AC should be suspected. A high degree of suspicion and a thorough abdominal examination of febrile aSAH patients allow for prompt diagnosis and treatment of this

  13. A composite neurobehavioral test to evaluate acute functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W; Nowrangi, Derek; Kaur, Harpreet; Wu, Guangyong; Huang, Lei; Lekic, Tim; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2018-03-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhage accounts for 5-10% of all intracerebral haemorrhages and leads to severe, long-lasting functional deficits. Currently, there is limited research on this stroke subtype, which may be due to the lack of a suitable composite neuroscoring system specific for cerebellar injury in rodents. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive composite neuroscore test for cerebellar injury using a rat model of cerebellar haemorrhage. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or cerebellar haemorrhage. Twenty-four hours post-injury, neurological behaviour was evaluated using 17 cost-effective and easy-to-perform tests, and a composite neuroscore was developed. The composite neuroscore was then used to assess functional recovery over seven days after cerebellar haemorrhage. Differences in the composite neuroscore deficits for the mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage models were observed for up to five days post-ictus. Until now, a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was not available for rodent studies. Herein, using mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage rat models a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was developed and used to assess functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage. This composite neuroscore may also be useful for other cerebellar injury models.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of guys Hospital stroke score (allen score) in acute supratentorial thrombotic/haemorrhagic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zulfiqar, A.; Toori, K. U.; Khan, S. S.; Hamza, M. I. M.; Zaman, S. U.

    2006-01-01

    A consecutive series of 103 patients, 58% male with mean age of 62 year (range 40-75 years), admitted with supratentorial stroke in our teaching hospital were studied. All patients had Computer Tomography scan brain done after clinical evaluation and application of Allen stroke score. Computer Tomography Scan confirmed thrombotic stroke in 55 (53%) patients and haemorrhagic stroke in 48 (47%) patients. Out of the 55 patients with definitive thrombotic stroke on Computer Tomography Scan, Allen stroke score suggested infarction in 67%, haemorrhage in 6% and remained inconclusive in 27% of cases. In 48 patients with definitive haemorrhagic stroke on Computer Tomography Scan, Allen stroke score suggested haemorrhage in 60%, infarction in 11% and remained inconclusive in 29% of cases. The overall accuracy of Allen stroke score was 66%. (author)

  15. Superselective embolisation in acute lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Ralib, Ahmad Razali; Zakaria, Rozman; Mohamad, Zahiah; Muda, Ahmad Sobri

    2009-10-01

    Superselective embolisation has been recognised as integral in the management of lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage. It has also reduced the need for emergency surgery. The objective of this case series was to describe the lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage cases seen in our centre, its diagnosis and the role of superselective embolisation in patient management. All patients who underwent superselective embolisation from January 2008 until April 2009 in our centre were analysed. Data were collected from the hospital electronic medical records. Four patients (three males) with a mean age of 81 years were analysed. Multidetector computerised tomography and digital subtraction angiography were positive in all patients. Superselective embolisation with platinum microcoils was performed in all patients (n = 4). Technical success was achieved in all patients (100%). Superselective embolisation in the treatment of lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage is safe and effective with a very high technical success rate.

  16. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Cerebrovascular disease/Stroke http: / / n. neurology. org/ / cgi/ collection/ all_ cerebrovascular_ disease_ stro ke Arteriovenous malformation http: / / n. neurology. org/ / cgi/ collection/ arteriovenous_ malformation Subarachnoid hemorrhage http: / / n. neurology. ...

  17. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common injury leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage is motor vehicle crashes. Risks include: Aneurysm in other blood vessels ... goals of treatment are to: Save your life Repair the cause of bleeding Relieve symptoms Prevent complications ...

  18. Remote acute subarachnoid hemorrhage after drainage of chronic subdural hematoma: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangming; Yu, Jinlu

    2018-03-03

    Chronic subdural hematoma(CSDH) can be treated by a relatively simple burr hole surgery. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurring after surgery for CSDH has been reported as a rare but severe complication. An 88-year-old female complained of progressive headache and dizziness for one month. A right fronto-temporo-parietal CSDH with a shift in the midline structures and lateral ventricle compression was shown by computed tomography (CT) scans. Closed-system drainage of the hematoma was performed via one burr hole under general anesthesia. Two hours after we began draining the hematoma at the patient's bedside, the patient complained of headache and exhibited impaired consciousness that progressively degenerated. The drainage bag collected 200 ml of bloody liquid overa short time. A subsequent CT scan revealed SAH and an acute subdural hematoma. A CT angiogram excluded the presence of intracranial aneurysms. The patient died of hypostatic pneumonia after 15 days despite conservative medical management. Relevant literature was reviewed, and we believe that the occurrence of a hematoma in the opposite hemisphere and the hyperperfusion resulted from the rapid drainage of the hematoma, which caused the rupture of weak bridging veins during drainage. Slow decompression with closed-system drainage is recommended to avoid rapid dynamic intracranial changes during drainage of a subdural hematoma, including brain shift or restoration of normal perfusion,to prevent devastating complications. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Not All Acute Abdomen Cases in Early Pregnancy Are Ectopic; Expect the Unexpected: Renal Angiomyolipoma Causing Massive Retroperitoneal Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asim Rana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Retroperitoneal haemorrhage (or retroperitoneal haematoma refers to an accumulation of blood found in the retroperitoneal space. It is a rare clinical entity with variable aetiology including anticoagulation, ruptured aortic aneurysm, acute pancreatitis, malignancy, and bleeding from renal aneurysm. Diagnosis of retroperitoneal bleed is sometimes missed or delayed as presentation is often nonspecific. Multislice CT and arteriography are important for diagnosis. There is no consensus about the best management plan for patients with retroperitoneal haematoma. Stable patients can be managed with fluid resuscitation, correction of coagulopathy if any, and blood transfusion. Endovascular options involving selective intra-arterial embolisation or stent-grafts are clearly getting more and more popularity. Open repair is usually reserved for cases when there is failure of conservative or endovascular measures to control the bleeding or expertise is unavailable and in cases where the patient is unstable. Mortality of patients with retroperitoneal haematoma remains high if appropriate and timely measures are not taken. Haemorrhage from a benign renal tumour is a rarer entity which is described in this case report which emphasizes that physicians should have a wide index of suspicion when dealing with patients presenting with significant groin, flank, abdominal, or back pain, or haemodynamic instability of unclear cause. Our patient presented with features of acute abdomen and, being pregnant, was thought of having a ruptured ectopic pregnancy.

  20. The role of dual energy CT in differentiating between brain haemorrhage and contrast medium after mechanical revascularisation in acute ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tijssen, M.P.M.; Stadler, A.A.R.; Zwam, W. van; Graaf, R. de; Postma, A.A.; Hofman, P.A.M.; Oostenbrugge, R.J. van; Klotz, E.; Wildberger, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of dual energy computed tomography (DE-CT) in intra-arterially treated acute ischaemic stroke patients to discriminate between contrast extravasation and intracerebral haemorrhage. Thirty consecutive acute ischaemic stroke patients following intra-arterial treatment were examined with DE-CT. Simultaneous imaging at 80 kV and 140 kV was employed with calculation of mixed images. Virtual unenhanced non-contrast (VNC) images and iodine overlay maps (IOM) were calculated using a dedicated brain haemorrhage algorithm. Mixed images alone, as ''conventional CT'', and DE-CT interpretations were evaluated and compared with follow-up CT. Eight patients were excluded owing to a lack of follow-up or loss of data. Mixed images showed intracerebral hyperdense areas in 19/22 patients. Both haemorrhage and residual contrast material were present in 1/22. IOM suggested contrast extravasation in 18/22 patients; in 16/18 patients this was confirmed at follow-up. The positive predictive value (PPV) of mixed imaging alone was 25 %, with a negative predictive value (NPV) of 91 % and accuracy of 63 %. The PPV for detection of haemorrhage with DE-CT was 100 %, with an NPV of 89 % and accuracy improved to 89 %. Dual energy computed tomography improves accuracy and diagnostic confidence in early differentiation between intracranial haemorrhage and contrast medium extravasation in acute stroke patients following intra-arterial revascularisation. (orig.)

  1. Acute post-stroke blood pressure relative to premorbid levels in intracerebral haemorrhage versus major ischaemic stroke: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Urs; Cooney, Marie Therese; Bull, Linda M; Silver, Louise E; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S; Mehta, Ziyah; Rothwell, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background It is often assumed that blood pressure increases acutely after major stroke, resulting in so-called post-stroke hypertension. In view of evidence that the risks and benefits of blood pressure-lowering treatment in acute stroke might differ between patients with major ischaemic stroke and those with primary intracerebral haemorrhage, we compared acute-phase and premorbid blood pressure levels in these two disorders. Methods In a population-based study in Oxfordshire, UK, we recruited all patients presenting with stroke between April 1, 2002, and March 31, 2012. We compared all acute-phase post-event blood pressure readings with premorbid readings from 10-year primary care records in all patients with acute major ischaemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale >3) versus those with acute intracerebral haemorrhage. Findings Of 653 consecutive eligible patients, premorbid and acute-phase blood pressure readings were available for 636 (97%) individuals. Premorbid blood pressure (total readings 13 244) had been measured on a median of 17 separate occasions per patient (IQR 8–31). In patients with ischaemic stroke, the first acute-phase systolic blood pressure was much lower than after intracerebral haemorrhage (158·5 mm Hg [SD 30·1] vs 189·8 mm Hg [38·5], pblood pressure after intracerebral haemorrhage was substantially higher than premorbid levels (mean increase of 40·7 mm Hg, pblood pressure also increased steeply in the days and weeks before intracerebral haemorrhage (regression pblood pressure reading after primary intracerebral haemorrhage was more likely than after ischaemic stroke to be the highest ever recorded (OR 3·4, 95% CI 2·3–5·2, pblood pressure within 3 h of onset was 50 mm Hg higher, on average, than the maximum premorbid level whereas that after ischaemic stroke was 5·2 mm Hg lower (pblood pressure is substantially raised compared with usual premorbid levels after intracerebral haemorrhage, whereas acute

  2. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage: using 64-slice multidetector CT angiography to ''triage'' patients' treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agid, R.; Lee, S.K.; Willinsky, R.A.; Farb, R.I.; TerBrugge, K.G. [Toronto Western Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-11-15

    To evaluate the clinical role of CT angiography (CTA) in patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for treatment decision-making. Consecutive patients with acute SAH had CTA using a 64-slice scanner for initial clinical decision-making. Image processing included multiplanar volume reformatted (MPVR) maximum intensity projections (MIP) and 3D volume-rendered reconstructions. CTAs were used for (1) evaluating the cause of SAH, and (2) triaging aneurysm-bearing patients to the more appropriate management, either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling. CTA findings were confirmed by neurosurgical exploration or catheter angiography (digital subtraction angiography, DSA). Successful coiling provided evidence that triaging to endovascular treatment was correct. Included in the study were 73 patients. CTA findings were confirmed by DSA or neurosurgical operation in 65 patients, and of these 65, 47 had aneurysmal SAH, 3 had vasculitis, 1 had arterial dissection and 14 had no underlying arterial abnormality. The cause of SAH was detected with CTA in 62 out of the 65 patients (95.4%, sensitivity 94%, specificity 100%). CTA revealed the aneurysm in 46 of 47 patients (98%, sensitivity 98%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 82.3%), 1 of 3 vasculitides and 1 of 1 dissection. Of the 46 patients with aneurysm, 44 (95.7%) were referred for treatment based on CTA. In 2 patients (2 of 46, 4.4%) CTA was not informative enough to choose treatment requiring DSA. Of the 44 patients, 27 (61.4%) were referred to endovascular treatment and successful coiling was achieved in 25 (25 of 27, 92.6%). CTA using a 64-slice scanner is an accurate tool for detecting and characterizing aneurysms in acute SAH. CTA is useful in the decision process whether to coil or clip an aneurysm. (orig.)

  3. Hydrogen-rich saline injection into the subarachnoid cavity within 2 weeks promotes recovery after acute spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-long Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen can relieve tissue-damaging oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. Injection of hydrogen-rich saline is an effective method for transporting molecular hydrogen. We hypothesized that hydrogen-rich saline would promote the repair of spinal cord injury induced by Allen′s method in rats. At 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours after injury, then once daily for 2 weeks, 0.25 mL/kg hydrogen-rich saline was infused into the subarachnoid space through a catheter. Results at 24 hours, 48 hours, 1 week and 2 weeks after injury showed that hydrogen-rich saline markedly reduced cell death, inflammatory cell infiltration, serum malondialdehyde content, and caspase-3 immunoreactivity, elevated serum superoxide dismutase activity and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity, and improved motor function in the hindlimb. The present study confirms that hydrogen-rich saline injected within 2 weeks of injury effectively contributes to the repair of spinal cord injury in the acute stage.

  4. Clinical implications of microvascular obstruction and intramyocardial haemorrhage in acute myocardial infarction using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkers, Sebastiaan C.A.M.; Smulders, Martijn W.; Waltenberger, Johannes; Gorgels, Anton P.M.; Schalla, Simon [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Passos, Valeria Lima [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Methodology and Statistics, Maastricht (Netherlands); Leiner, Tim [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2010-11-15

    To investigate the clinical implications of microvascular obstruction (MVO) and intramyocardial haemorrhage (IMH) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Ninety patients with a first AMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were studied. T2-weighted, cine and late gadolinium-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 5 {+-} 2 and 103 {+-} 11 days. Patients were categorised into three groups based on the presence or absence of MVO and IMH. MVO was observed in 54% and IMH in 43% of patients, and correlated significantly (r = 0.8, p < 0.001). Pre-PCI thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 3 flow was only observed in MVO(-)/IMH(-) patients. Infarct size and impairment of systolic function were largest in MVO(+)/IMH(+) patients (n = 39, 23 {+-} 9% and 47 {+-} 7%), smallest in MVO(-)/IMH(-) patients (n = 41, 8 {+-} 8% and 55 {+-} 8%) and intermediate in MVO(+)/IMH(-) patients (n = 10, 16 {+-} 7% and 51 {+-} 6%, p < 0.001). LVEF increased in all three subgroups at follow-up, but remained intermediate in MVO(+)/IMH(-) and was lowest in MVO(+)/IMH(+) patients. Using random intercept model analysis, only infarct size was an independent predictor for adverse LV remodelling. Intramyocardial haemorrhage and microvascular obstruction are strongly related. Pre-PCI TIMI 3 flow is less frequently observed in patients with MVO and IMH. Only infarct size was an independent predictor of LV remodelling. (orig.)

  5. Transcranial Doppler velocimetry in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsø, J M; Edsen, T; Romner, B

    2013-01-01

    -coded transcranial Doppler (TCCD), with the secondary aim of describing prediction of angiographic vasospasm and mortality. METHODS: /st>Sixty patients and 70 healthy controls were each examined in duplicate by alternating operators. A total of 939 measurements divided on 201 examination sets were conducted by four...

  6. Late cerebral ischaemia after subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L; Povlsen, G K

    2011-01-01

    the MEK-ERK1/2 pathway. Inhibition of MEK-ERK1/2 signalling has been shown to prevent cerebrovascular receptor upregulation and normalize CBF and neurological function after SAH in rats. At the same time, in rat SAH, certain cytokines and BBB-regulating proteins are upregulated in cerebral artery smooth...... muscles and treatment with MEK-ERK1/2 inhibitors prevents the induction of these proteins. Thus, inhibitors of MEK-ERK1/2 signalling exert multimodal beneficial effects in SAH....

  7. Acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage on board a cruise ship in the Antarctic Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Mathieu; Globokar, Peter; Sicard, Bruno A

    2016-01-01

    Antarctic tourism on board cruise ships has expanded since the 1990s, essentially in the Antarctic Peninsula. Due to remoteness, medical cases may evolve into life threatening conditions as emergency medical evacuations are challenging. We discuss the case of a young crew member who suddenly fainted with an epigastric pain and abundant rectal bleeding while on board a cruise ship heading to the Deception Island (62°57.6 South, 60°29.5 West), 44 h away from Ushuaia by sea. A medical evacuation was necessary to save the patient whose haemoglobin level rapidly decreased from 11 g/dL to 8.7 g/dL over an 8 h period due to uncontrolled gastrointestinal bleeding. Following discussions between the French, Chilean and Argentinean Medical Top Side Support and Maritime Rescue Authorities and despite poor weather conditions, an emergency medical evacuation by air to Chile was made possible. The evacuation, which was 2 days shorter compared to an evacuation by sea, allowed the patient to reach a hospital facility in time to save his life whereas he decompensated in haemorrhagic shock. As passengers on cruise ships are typically elderly and often following anticoagulant therapies, the risk of bleeding is most important. Facing a gastric haemorrhage, a transfusion is often required. In remote areas, transfusion of fresh whole blood to stabilize a critical patient until he reaches a hospital must be considered.

  8. Medida da diferença artério-venosa de oxigênio na monitorização de pacientes com hemorragia subaracnóidea por aneurisma cerebral Measurement of arteriovenous oxygen difference in the monitoring of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage due to cerebral aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Sérgio Santana Pereira

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A diferença artério-venosa de oxigênio (DAVO2, pelo fato de estar relacionada com o metabolismo cerebral, reflete alterações que ocorrem em determinadas situações patológicas, entre elas as causadas pela hemorragia subaracnóidea espontânea (HSAE. Com a finalidade de avaliar a relação entre alterações na DAVO2 com o quadro clínico e a evolução de pacientes com HSAE, devido à ruptura de aneurisma cerebral, este método foi utilizado em 30 pacientes portadores desta patologia, admitidos na Unidade de Neurocirurgia do HBDF. A HSAE foi confirmada por CT de crânio em 17 pacientes e por punção lombar em 13. Dezoito pacientes foram admitidos com Hunt & Hess (H&H I ou II, sete com H&H III e cinco com H&H IV ou V. A medida da DAVO2 baseou-se na equação de Fick e os resultados clínicos foram avaliados pela escala de seqüelas de Glasgow. Dezenove pacientes apresentaram DAVO2 normais (inicialmente e durante a evolução, sendo que três faleceram; cinco tiveram valores de DAVO2 sempre baixos e três faleceram; os restantes seis pacientes tiveram valores da DAVO2 sempre elevados e dois faleceram. Os pacientes com DAVO2 normais tiveram melhor evolução clínica e índice de mortalidade menor, quando comparados com os pacientes com valores anormais da DAVO2 (pThe arterious venous oxygen difference (AVDO2 due to the close relationship with cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen and cerebral blood flow shows metabolic alterations that occur in some pathological situations in the brain including subarachnoid haemorrhage. The AVDO2 was calculated by the Fick equation and the results evaluated by the Glasgow outcome scale. Measurements of arteriojugular oxygen difference were carried out in 30 patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage due to rupture of intracranial aneurysms, as an attempt to monitor the relationship between changes in AVDO2, clinical picture, and evolution of the patients. The subarachnoid haemorrhage was diagnosed by CT scan in

  9. Administration of human recombinant activated protein C is not associated with pancreatic parenchymal haemorrhage in L-arginine-induced experimental acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamdar, Saurabh; Babu, Benoy I; Nirmalan, Mahesh; Jeziorska, Maria; McMahon, Raymond F T; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2013-11-10

    Microvascular thrombosis is a critical event in severe acute pancreatitis. Human recombinant activated protein C (Xigris®, Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN, USA) modulates the interplay between pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant pathways and maintains microvascular patency. However, the anticoagulant properties of Xigris® may precipitate bleeding from the inflamed pancreas. This study tests the hypothesis that Xigris® can ameliorate experimental acute pancreatitis without causing pancreatic haemorrhage. Sprague Dawley rats were allocated as follows: Group 1: control (n=7); Group 2: acute pancreatitis (n=6); Group 3: administration of Xigris® 500 µg/kg body weight before induction of acute pancreatitis (n=6); and Group 4: Administration of Xigris® 500 µg/kg body weight 30 minutes after induction of acute pancreatitis (n=6). Acute pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal administration of L-arginine 300 mg/100 g body weight. Animals were sacrificed at 48 hours and biochemical, haematological, and histological markers of pancreatic haemorrhage and inflammation assessed. Median lipase in animals with acute pancreatitis was 10 U/mL (range: 7-16 U/mL) compared to 5.5 (range: 3-8 U/mL) in controls (P=0.028). Lipase was also elevated in animals given Xigris® both before (12 U/mL, range: 8-22 U/mL; P=0.031 vs. control group) and after (46 U/mL, range: 9-71 U/mL; P=0.015 vs. control group) induction of acute pancreatitis). Haemoglobin levels were similar among all groups (P=0.323). There was no histological evidence of pancreatic haemorrhage in animals treated with Xigris®. Pre-treatment with Xigris® was associated with a significant reduction in pancreatic injury. This effect was absent when Xigris® was administered after induction of acute pancreatitis. Xigris® did not lead to pancreatic haemorrhage in experimental acute pancreatitis. Administration of Xigris® prior to induction of acute pancreatitis was associated with amelioration of injury. This effect was

  10. Initial clinical experience with dual-layer detector spectral CT in patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage: A single-centre pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Buem Cho

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical feasibility of spectral analyses using dual-layer detector spectral computed tomography (CT in acute intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH.We retrospectively reviewed patients with acute ICH who underwent CT angiography on a dual-layer detector spectral CT scanner. A spectral data analysis was performed to detect contrast enhancement in or adjacent to acute ICH by using spectral image reconstructions including monoenergetic (MonoE, virtual noncontrast (VNC, and iodine overlay fusion images. We also acquired a spectral plot to assess material differentiation within lesions.Among the 30 patients, the most common cause of acute ICH was chronic hypertension (18/30, 60% followed by trauma (5/30, 16.7%, brain tumour (3/30, 10%, Moyamoya disease (2/30, 6.7%, and haemorrhagic diathesis from anticoagulation therapy (2/30, 6.7%. Of 30 patients, 13 showed suboptimal iodine suppression in the subcalvarial spaces on VNC images compared with true noncontrast images. The CT angiographic spot sign within the acute ICH was detected in four patients (4/30, 13.3%. All three tumours were metastatic and included lung cancer (n = 2 and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 1 which showed conspicuous delineation of an enhancing tumour portion in the spectral analysis. Spectral analyses allowed the discrimination of acute haemorrhage and iodine with enhanced lesion visualization on the MonoE images obtained at lower keVs (less than 70 keV and spectral plot.Even though the image quality of VNC is perceived to be inferior, it is feasible to evaluate acute ICH in clinical settings using dual-layer detector spectral CT. The MonoE images taken at lower keVs were useful for depicting contrast enhancing lesion, and spectral plot might be helpful for material differentiation in patients with acute ICH.

  11. Infrarenal aortic clamp reviving a patient from acute surgical haemorrhagic shock: a novel management technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ranjith; Satya Prakash, M V S; Das, Subhasree; Manikandan, Ramanitharan

    2016-10-19

    Surgical management of renal cell carcinoma extending into the inferior vena cava (IVC) is almost always accompanied by massive intraoperative blood loss and associated complications. It is a widely recognised problem, and its active management is essential in improving the perioperative morbidity and mortality. We share our experience with a similar case of open radical nephrectomy with massive blood loss of twice the circulating volume in a duration of management by replacing blood components, in the present case, despite the above-mentioned goals being fulfilled, we were unable to extricate the patient from haemorrhagic shock by conventional means and therefore resorted to desperate measures, namely the novel approach of infrarenal aortic clamping along with higher than recommended vasopressor support. We resorted to this in order to maintain the haemodynamic parameters and to prevent avoidable morbidity and mortality related to persistent intraoperative hypotension. With such an approach, we successfully managed the patient perioperatively, ultimately resulting in the patient being discharged after a week of intensive care unit stay without major complications. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. CT findings of fulminant subarachnoid hemorrhages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yukio; Isayama, Kazuo; Yajima, Kouzo; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yano, Masami; Otsuka, Toshibumi

    1985-01-01

    We studied the clinical features and CT findings of 20 cases with fulminant subarachonid hemorrhages in the acute stage. They were admitted to our hospital within 3 hours after the attack as DOA (dead on arrival) or near DOA. CT-visualized subarachnoid hemorrhages were located in the basal cisterns surrounding the brain stem in all cases. In 90 % of the cases, the subarachnoid hemorrhage formed a clot or a thick layer. Massive intracerebral hematomas were observed in 10 % of the cases. Acute intraventricular hemorrhages were seen in 80 % of the cases. The mechanism of intraventricular hemorrhage in 70 % of the cases was of the reflux type, which was characterized by a reflux of the severe subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cistern. Acute and diffuse brain swelling on CT scan was observed in several cases, which also showed initial increased intracranial pressures. The major mechanisms leading to acute death or a very severe state soon after subarachnoid hemorrhage might be caused by acute brain-stem failure due to severe subarachnoid hemorrhages in the basal cisterns surrounding the brain-stem and an acute increase in intracranial pressure by cerebral edema following subarachnoid hemorrhage and secondary cerebral ischemia due to cardiac and respiratory arrest. (author)

  13. Automated detection of acute haemorrhagic stroke in non-contrasted CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meetz, K.; Buelow, T.

    2007-01-01

    An efficient treatment of stroke patients implies a profound differential diagnosis that includes the detection of acute haematoma. The proposed approach provides an automated detection of acute haematoma, assisting the non-stroke expert in interpreting non-contrasted CT images. It consists of two steps: First, haematoma candidates are detected applying multilevel region growing approach based on a typical grey value characteristic. Second, true haematomas are differentiated from partial volume artefacts, relying on spatial features derived from distance-based histograms. This approach achieves a specificity of 77% and a sensitivity of 89.7% in detecting acute haematoma in non-contrasted CT images when applied to a set of 25 non-contrasted CT images. (orig.)

  14. HIMALAIA (Hypertension Induction in the Management of AneurysmaL subArachnoid haemorrhage with secondary IschaemiA) : a randomized single- blind controlled trial of induced hypertension vs. no induced hypertension in the treatment of delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, C. S.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Slooter, A. J. C.

    RationaleDelayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a major complication after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). One option to treat delayed cerebral ischemia is to use induced hypertension, but its efficacy on the eventual outcome has not been proven in a randomized clinical trial. This article

  15. NADH fluorescence imaging and the histological impact of cortical spreading depolarization during the acute phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tomohisa; Hishikawa, Tomohito; Nishihiro, Shingo; Shinji, Yukei; Takasugi, Yuji; Haruma, Jun; Hiramatsu, Masafumi; Kawase, Hirokazu; Sato, Sachiko; Mizoue, Ryoichi; Takeda, Yoshimasa; Sugiu, Kenji; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Date, Isao

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) has been observed during the early phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in clinical settings, the pathogenicity of CSD is unclear. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effects of loss of membrane potential on neuronal damage during the acute phase of SAH. METHODS Twenty-four rats were subjected to SAH by the perforation method. The propagation of depolarization in the brain cortex was examined by using electrodes to monitor 2 direct-current (DC) potentials and obtaining NADH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) fluorescence images while exposing the parietal-temporal cortex to ultraviolet light. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was monitored in the vicinity of the lateral electrode. Twenty-four hours after onset of SAH, histological damage was evaluated at the DC potential recording sites. RESULTS Changes in DC potentials (n = 48 in total) were sorted into 3 types according to the appearance of ischemic depolarization in the entire hemisphere following induction of SAH. In Type 1 changes (n = 21), ischemic depolarization was not observed during a 1-hour observation period. In Type 2 changes (n = 13), the DC potential demonstrated ischemic depolarization on initiation of SAH and recovered 80% from the maximal DC deflection during a 1-hour observation period (33.3 ± 15.8 minutes). In Type 3 changes (n = 14), the DC potential displayed ischemic depolarization and did not recover during a 1-hour observation period. Histological evaluations at DC potential recording sites showed intact tissue at all sites in the Type 1 group, whereas in the Type 2 and Type 3 groups neuronal damage of varying severity was observed depending on the duration of ischemic depolarization. The duration of depolarization that causes injury to 50% of neurons (P 50 ) was estimated to be 22.4 minutes (95% confidence intervals 17.0-30.3 minutes). CSD was observed in 3 rats at 6 sites in the Type 1 group 5.1 ± 2.2 minutes after

  16. Outcome of acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal haemorrhage after nontherapeutic arteriography compared with embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defreyne, Luc; Vanlangenhove, Peter; Decruyenaere, Johan; Van Maele, Georges; De Vos, Martine; Troisi, Roberto; Pattyn, Piet

    2003-01-01

    In acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, immediate arteriographic haemostasis is presently assumed to be a therapeutic advantage. This study assesses whether the risk of a delayed haemostasis, caused by arteriographic findings precluding embolization, might influence patient outcome. We performed a 5.5-year retrospective database search to find all patients referred for arteriography to arrest acute nonvariceal GI bleeding with embolization. The embolized and nonembolized patients were compared for differences in baseline characteristics and bleeding parameters. In both groups the outcome of all endoscopic or surgical interventions after catheterization was included in the follow-up. Clinical success (at 30 days, after all therapy) and in-hospital mortality in the embolized and nonembolized group were compared. We retrieved 63 nonembolized bleedings in 58 patients and 49 embolized bleedings in 49 patients. In the nonembolized group, transfusion need and haemodynamic instability were significantly less severe. Forty-two of 63 (66%) nonembolized bleedings persisted requiring haemostasis by surgery (n=23), endoscopy (n=13) or supportive transfusions. Thirteen of 49 (27%) embolized bleedings recurred and were managed by surgery (n=7), endoscopy (n=3) or transfusion. Overall clinical success rate was 88.9% (56 of 63) in the nonembolized and 87.8% (43 of 49) in the embolized group. Mortality rate was 17.2% (10 of 58) in the nonembolized vs 30.6% (15 of 49) in the embolized patients (P=0.115). Whether or not arteriographic findings afforded the opportunity to embolize, outcome of acute nonvariceal GI bleeding did not differ significantly; however, patients undergoing embolization were more critically bleeding and ill. (orig.)

  17. Correlative study between serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 values and neurologic deficit in acute, primary, supratentorial, intracerebral haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovska-Cvetkovska, Dragana; Dolnenec-Baneva, Natalija; Nikodijevik, Dijana; Chepreganova-Changovska, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    One of the essential characteristics of intracerebral haemorrhages (ICH) is the occurrence of brain oedema (BE). Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) belongs to the family of proteolytic enzymes connected with zinc, which in brain bleeding or a stroke can induce matrix proteolyse into the neurovascular unit, and increase the BE. The aim of the study was to determine the MMP-9 values in serum, and to assess the degree of correlation with neurological deficit in patients with acute, primary and supratentorial ICH. The study was prospective and included 62 patients with ICH. The neurological deficit of the patients was evaluated by the National Institute Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Serum MMP-9 level was determined by enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). Patients were evaluated in three phases: 1(st), 3(rd) and 7(th) day following the ICH. The mean age of the patients was 64.5 ± 9.4. Within the follow-up period, there was a significant rise of the NIHSS score in the first three days: 11.48 ± 3.7; 13.21 ± 3.78, and a significant rise of serum MMP-9, with greatest values in the third day: 134.7 ± 26.1 ng/ml (p = 0.000). There was a positive, significant correlation (r = 0.886, p = 0.000) between the serum MMP-9 concentration and the NIHSS score. Our study showed that in the first three days of ICH, serum MMP-9 values were rising as well as the neurological deficit and the BE. Determination and evaluation of the MMP-9 in serum is an easy, non-invasive, routine laboratory procedure for the detection and follow-up of BE, and also determines further therapeutic strategy as well as prognosis in these patients.

  18. Clinical course and rebleeding predictors of acute haemorrhagic rectal ulcer: 5-year experience and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T; Inokuma, T

    2013-07-01

    This study was carried out to clarify the clinical features of acute haemorrhagic rectal ulcer (AHRU) and to determine the risks and predictors of AHRU rebleeding. Forty patients with AHRU were retrospectively analysed. Patient characteristics, endoscopic features and clinical course were investigated and predictors of AHRU rebleeding were analysed. All patients were in a bedridden state as a result of various diseases, and many patients had atherosclerosis-related comorbidities such as hypertension (67.4%), diabetes mellitus (40.0%) and chronic kidney disease (42.5%). All patients had hypoalbuminaemia, 75% of patients were using antithrombotic drugs and 25% of patients were using systemic corticosteroids. Based on colonoscopy, all patients developed ulcers in the distal rectum just above the dentate line and 30% of patients developed whole circumferential ulcers. The median interval between the onset of the bedridden state and the first massive haematochezia was 16 days and 50% of all patients developed rebleeding regardless of the presence or absence of haemostatic therapy. The median time from initial haemostasis to rebleeding was 6 days. Univariate analysis and stepwise multivariate analysis revealed that whole circumferential ulcer (P = 0.036) was a significant independent predictor of AHRU rebleeding. In the present study, we elucidated the clinical features of AHRU in detail and reviewed previous reports of AHRU. Rebleeding of AHRU occurred at a high rate and whole circumferential ulcer was a significant independent predictor of AHRU rebleeding. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Prediction of escape red blood cell transfusion in expectantly managed women with acute anaemia after postpartum haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prick, B. W.; Schuit, E.; Mignini, L.; Jansen, A. J. G.; van Rhenen, D. J.; Steegers, E. A. P.; Mol, B. W.; Duvekot, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo determine clinical predictors of escape red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in postpartum anaemic women, initially managed expectantly, and the additional predictive value of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures. DesignSecondary analysis of women after postpartum haemorrhage,

  20. Prediction of escape red blood cell transfusion in expectantly managed women with acute anaemia after postpartum haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prick, B. W.; Schuit, E.; Mignini, L.; Jansen, A. J. G.; van Rhenen, D. J.; Steegers, E. A. P.; Mol, B. W.; Duvekot, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    To determine clinical predictors of escape red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in postpartum anaemic women, initially managed expectantly, and the additional predictive value of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures. Secondary analysis of women after postpartum haemorrhage, either randomly

  1. Intracranial pressure after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoerle, Tommaso; Lombardo, Alessandra; Colombo, Angelo; Longhi, Luca; Zanier, Elisa R; Rampini, Paolo; Stocchetti, Nino

    2015-01-01

    To describe mean intracranial pressure after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, to identify clinical factors associated with increased mean intracranial pressure, and to explore the relationship between mean intracranial pressure and outcome. Analysis of a prospectively collected observational database. Neuroscience ICU of an academic hospital. One hundred sixteen patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracranial pressure monitoring. None. Episodes of intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg lasting at least 5 minutes and the mean intracranial pressure for every 12-hour interval were analyzed. The highest mean intracranial pressure was analyzed in relation to demographic characteristics, acute neurologic status, initial radiological findings, aneurysm treatment, clinical vasospasm, and ischemic lesion. Mortality and 6-month outcome (evaluated using a dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale) were also introduced in multivariable logistic models. Eighty-one percent of patients had at least one episode of high intracranial pressure and 36% had a highest mean intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg. The number of patients with high intracranial pressure peaked 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage and declined after day 7. Highest mean intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg was significantly associated with initial neurologic status, aneurysmal rebleeding, amount of blood on CT scan, and ischemic lesion within 72 hours from subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patients with highest mean intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg had significantly higher mortality. When death, vegetative state, and severe disability at 6 months were pooled, however, intracranial pressure was not an independent predictor of unfavorable outcome. High intracranial pressure is a common complication in the first week after subarachnoid hemorrhage in severe cases admitted to ICU. Mean intracranial pressure is associated with the severity of early brain injury and with mortality.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of central nervous system haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, M.; Hennessy, O.

    1993-01-01

    The variable magnetic resonance imaging appearances of central nervous system haemorrhage, both intra- and extra-axial, are described. These will vary with the type of image contrast (T1 or T2 weighting), the nature of the imaging sequence (spin-echo or gradient-echo) and the time from onset of haemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful technique for imaging haemorrhage in the central nervous system as it yields temporal information about haematoma development, and it is the only non-invasive means of imaging intraspinal haemorrhage. However, in the imaging of haematomas within 24 h of onset and in subarachnoid haemorrhage computed tomography is the investigation of choice. 13 refs., 6 figs

  3. Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 Agonist Attenuates Acute Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema by Preventing Neutrophil Migration after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Mutsumi; Sherchan, Prativa; Soejima, Yoshiteru; Doycheva, Desislava; Zhao, Diana; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated whether JWH133, a selective cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB2R) agonist, prevented neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by attenuating inflammation. Adult male rats were assigned to six groups: sham-operated, SAH with vehicle, SAH with JWH133 (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg) treatment 1 h after surgery, and SAH with JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) at 1 h with a selective CB2R antagonist, SR144528 (3.0 mg/kg). The perforation model of SAH was performed and pulmonary wet-to-dry weight ratio was evaluated 24 and 72 h after surgery. Western blot analyses and immunohistochemistry were evaluated 24 h after surgery. JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) significantly and most strongly improved lung edema 24 h after SAH. SR144528 administration significantly reversed the effects of JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg). SAH-induced increasing levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and decreasing levels of a tight junction (TJ) protein, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-A, were ameliorated by JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) administration 24 h after SAH. Immunohistochemical assessment also confirmed substantial leukocyte infiltration in the outside of vessels in SAH, which were attenuated by JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) injection. CB2R agonist ameliorated lung permeability by inhibiting leukocyte trafficking and protecting tight junction proteins in the lung of NPE after SAH.

  4. Resveratrol Attenuates Acute Inflammatory Injury in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats via Inhibition of TLR4 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Sheng Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 has been proven to play a critical role in neuroinflammation and to represent an important therapeutic target following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Resveratrol (RSV, a natural occurring polyphenolic compound, has a powerful anti-inflammatory property. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of RSV in protecting against early brain injury (EBI after SAH remain obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RSV on the TLR4-related inflammatory signaling pathway and EBI in rats after SAH. A prechiasmatic cistern SAH model was used in our experiment. The expressions of TLR4, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Iba-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in brain cortex were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological function were further evaluated to investigate the development of EBI. We found that post-SAH treatment with RSV could markedly inhibit the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MyD88, and NF-κB. Meanwhile, RSV significantly reduced microglia activation, as well as inflammatory cytokines leading to the amelioration of neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological behavior impairment at 24 h after SAH. However, RSV treatment failed to alleviate brain edema and neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. These results indicated that RSV treatment could alleviate EBI after SAH, at least in part, via inhibition of TLR4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway.

  5. Stent-assisted coiling of wide-necked aneurysms in the setting of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage: experience in 65 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenta, Peter S; Dalyai, Richard T; Kung, David; Toporowski, Amy; Chandela, Sid; Hasan, David; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Dumont, Aaron S; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Jabbour, Pascal M

    2012-06-01

    Stent-assisted coiling in the setting of subarachnoid hemorrhage remains controversial. Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding the utility of this procedure and the risks of hemorrhagic and ischemic complications. To assess the utility of stent-assisted coil embolization and pretreatment with antiplatelet agents in the management of ruptured wide-necked aneurysms. A retrospective study of 65 patients with ruptured wide-necked aneurysms treated with stent-assisted coiling. Patients with hydrocephalus or a Hunt and Hess grade ≥ III received a ventriculostomy before endovascular intervention. Patients were treated intraoperatively with 600 mg of clopidogrel and maintained on daily doses of 75 mg of clopidogrel and 81 mg of aspirin. The Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) score was recorded at the time of discharge. We identified major bleeding complications secondary to antiplatelet therapy and cases of in-stent thrombosis that required periprocedural thrombolysis. Of the aneurysms, 66.2% arose within the anterior circulation; 69.2% of patients presented with hydrocephalus or a Hunt and Hess grade ≥ III and required a ventriculostomy. A good outcome (GOS of 4 or 5) was achieved in 63.1% of patients, and the overall mortality rate was 16.9%. There were 10 (15.38%) major complications associated with bleeding secondary to antiplatelet therapy (5 patients, 7.7%) or intraoperative in-stent thrombosis (5 patients, 7.7%). Three (4.6%) patients had a fatal hemorrhage. Our findings suggest that stent-assisted coiling and routine treatment with antiplatelet agents is a viable option in the management of ruptured wide-necked aneurysms.

  6. Effect of an evidence-based mobility intervention on the level of function in acute intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhagic stroke patients on a neurointensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Maxine L; Darbinian, Jeanne A

    2015-07-01

    To explore the effect of an evidence-based mobility intervention on the level of function (LOF) achieved by patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) stroke and to identify clinical characteristics and measures associated with walking distances >15.24m. Retrospective pre- and postintervention study. Regional neurointensive care unit. Adult patients with ICH and SAH (N=361). Daily mobility intervention based on patient's current LOF. Walking >15.24m (LOF 5) by neurointensive care unit discharge. Electronic health records for 361 patients (52.6% women; mean age, 62.1y; ICH stroke, 63.2%; aphasia, 35%; hemiplegia, 33%) were included. There was a 2.3-fold increase in patients with hemorrhagic stroke achieving a LOF of 5 by neurointensive care unit discharge after introduction of a mobility intervention. In the multivariable logistic regression model including neurointensive care unit length of stay (LOS) as a covariate, the intervention, LOF of 5 at admission, SAH stroke type, third (vs lowest) quartile of neurointensive care unit LOS, and absence of aphasia and/or hemiplegia were associated with higher likelihood of achieving a LOF of 5 (odds ratio [OR]=5.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.52-11.06; OR=6.02; 95% CI, 1.45-24.96; OR=3.78; 95% CI, 1.83-7.80; OR=2.94; 95% CI, 1.16-7.47; OR=17.77; 95% CI, 6.59-47.92, respectively). A mobility intervention was strongly associated with increased distance walked by neurointensive care unit patients with acute hemorrhage at discharge and can be applied in any intensive care unit setting to promote stroke recovery. Future studies directed at building predictive models for walking achievement in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke may provide insight into individualized treatment goal setting and discharge planning. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neurosarcoidosis-related intracranial haemorrhage: three new cases and a systematic review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, J P

    2012-06-09

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intracranial haemorrhage in neurosarcoidosis (NS-ICH) is rare, poorly understood and the diagnosis of NS may not be immediately apparent. METHODS: The clinical features of three new NS-ICH cases are described including new neuropathological findings and collated with cases from a systematic literature review. RESULTS: Cases: (i) A 41-year-old man with headaches, hypoandrogenism and encephalopathy developed a cerebellar haemorrhage. He had neuropathological confirmation of NS with biopsy-proven angiocentric granulomata and venous disruption. He responded to immunosuppressive therapy. (ii) A 41-year-old man with no history of hypertension was found unconscious. A subsequently fatal pontine haemorrhage was diagnosed. Liver biopsy revealed sarcoid granulomas. (iii) A 36-year-old man with raised intracranial pressure headaches presented with a seizure and a frontal haemorrhage. Hilar lymph node biopsy confirmed sarcoidosis, and he was treated successfully. Systematic Review: Twelve other published cases were identified and collated with our cases. Average age was 36 years and M:F = 2.3:1; 46% presented with neurological symptoms and 31% had CNS-isolated disease. Immediate symptoms of ICH were acute\\/worsening headache or seizures (60%). ICH was supratentorial (62%), infratentorial (31%) or subarachnoid (7%). 40% had definite NS, 53% probable NS and 7% possible NS (Zajicek criteria). Antigranulomatous\\/immunosuppressive therapy regimens varied and 31% died. CONCLUSIONS: This series expands our knowledge of the pathology of NS-ICH, which may be of arterial or venous origin. One-third have isolated NS. Clinicians should consider NS in young-onset ICH because early aggressive antigranulomatous therapy may improve outcome.

  8. Clinical practice guidelines in intracerebral haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Yáñez, M; Castellanos, M; Freijo, M M; López Fernández, J C; Martí-Fàbregas, J; Nombela, F; Simal, P; Castillo, J; Díez-Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Alvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Casado, I; Dávalos, A; Díaz-Otero, F; Egido, J A; Gállego, J; García Pastor, A; Gil-Núñez, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Lago, A; Maestre, J; Masjuan, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Martínez-Vila, E; Molina, C; Morales, A; Purroy, F; Ribó, M; Roquer, J; Rubio, F; Segura, T; Serena, J; Tejada, J; Vivancos, J

    2013-05-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage accounts for 10%-15% of all strokes; however it has a poor prognosis with higher rates of morbidity and mortality. Neurological deterioration is often observed during the first hours after onset and determines poor prognosis. Intracerebral haemorrhage, therefore, is a neurological emergency which must be diagnosed and treated properly as soon as possible. In this guide we review the diagnostic procedures and factors that influence the prognosis of patients with intracerebral haemorrhage and we establish recommendations for the therapeutic strategy, systematic diagnosis, acute treatment and secondary prevention for this condition. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. The relation between hypointense core, microvascular obstruction and intramyocardial haemorrhage in acute reperfused myocardial infarction assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandler, Diana; Luecke, Christian; Grothoff, Matthias; Andres, Claudia; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Nitzsche, Stefan; Riese, Franziska; Gutberlet, Matthias [University Leipzig - Heart Centre, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Mende, Meinhard [University Leipzig, Coordination Centre for Clinical Trials, Leipzig (Germany); Waha, Suzanne de; Desch, Steffen; Lurz, Philipp; Eitel, Ingo [University Leipzig - Heart Centre, Department of Internal Medicine/ Cardiology, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Intramyocardial haemorrhage (IMH) and microvascular obstruction (MVO) represent reperfusion injury after reperfused ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) with prognostic impact and ''hypointense core'' (HIC) appearance in T{sub 2}-weighted images. We aimed to distinguish between IMH and MVO by using T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and analysed influencing factors for IMH development. A total of 151 patients with acute STEMI underwent CMR after primary angioplasty. T{sub 2}-STIR sequences were used to identify HIC, late gadolinium enhancement to visualise MVO and T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted sequences to detect IMH. IMH{sup +}/IMH{sup -} patients were compared considering infarct size, myocardial salvage, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow, reperfusion time, ventricular volumes, function and pre-interventional medication. Seventy-six patients (50 %) were IMH{sup +}, 82 (54 %) demonstrated HIC and 100 (66 %) MVO. IMH was detectable without HIC in 16 %, without MVO in 5 % and HIC without MVO in 6 %. Multivariable analyses revealed that IMH was associated with significant lower left ventricular ejection fraction and myocardial salvage index, larger left ventricular volume and infarct size. Patients with TIMI flow grade ≤1 before angioplasty demonstrated IMH significantly more often. IMH is associated with impaired left ventricular function and higher infarct size. T{sub 2} and HIC imaging showed moderate agreement for IMH detection. T{sub 2}{sup *} imaging might be the preferred CMR imaging method for comprehensive IMH assessment. (orig.)

  10. Metastatic angiosarcoma: a vascular tumour or an intracranial haemorrhage?

    OpenAIRE

    Masih, Izhaq; McIlwaine, Werner

    2010-01-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with weakness of his right arm and leg. He had previously had mitral valve replacement, tricuspid annuloplasty, leg deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and femoral embolism. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed an acute left thalamic haemorrhage. Repeat CT brain showed resolution of the original haemorrhage, but the apparent development of new areas of haemorrhage. Warfarin continued due to high risk of thromboembolism. He was readmitted with the rapid developm...

  11. The value of MRI in angiogram-negative intracranial haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renowden, S.A. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Molyneux, A.J. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Anslow, P. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Byrne, J.V. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01

    In one year, cerebral angiograms were performed for intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) on 334 patients. No cause for haemorrhage could be identified in 41 (12 %), 30 of whom had predominantly subarachnoid (SAH) and 11 predominantly parenchymal haemorrhage (PH). These patients were prospectively examined by cranial MRI 1-6 weeks after the ictus. The MRI studies were positive in 7 patients (17 %). In the 30 patients examined after SAH, 2 studies were positive, showing an aneurysm in one case and a brain stem lesion of uncertain aetiology in the other. In those examined after PH, cavernous angiomas were shown in 2, a tumour in 1 and a vascular malformation in another; useful diagnostic information was thus obtained in 36 % of this group. (orig.)

  12. Magnesium in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergh, W.M. (Walter Marcel) van den

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to determine the role of serum magnesium in the pathophysiology after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to assess the effect of magnesium treatment in reducing cerebral ischemia in experimental SAH and in improving clinical outcome in patients with

  13. Cardiac arrhythmia as initial presentation of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kleij, FGH; Henselmans, JML; van de Loosdrecht, AA

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death are most frequently caused by preexisting heart disease. Rarely, cardiac arrhythmia is a first symptom of an acute neurological event. We describe a patient with asystole and other cardiac arrhythmias, as initial symptoms of acute aneurysmal subarachnoid

  14. A higher body temperature is associated with haemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute stroke untreated with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rtPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leira, Rogelio; Sobrino, Tomás; Blanco, Miguel; Campos, Francisco; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; Castellanos, Mar; Moldes, Octavio; Millán, Mónica; Dávalos, Antoni; Castillo, José

    2012-02-01

    Higher body temperature is a prognostic factor of poor outcome in acute stroke. Our aim was to study the relationship between body temperature, HT (haemorrhagic transformation) and biomarkers of BBB (blood-brain barrier) damage in patients with acute ischaemic stroke untreated with rtPA (recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator). We studied 229 patients with ischaemic stroke <12 h from symptom onset. Body temperature was determined at admission and every 6 h during the first 3 days. HT was evaluated according to ECASS II (second European Co-operative Acute Stroke Study) criteria in a multimodal MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) at 72 h. We found that 55 patients (34.1%) showed HT. HT was associated with cardioembolic stroke (64.2% against 23.0%; P<0.0001), higher body temperature during the first 24 h (36.9°C compared with 36.5°C; P<0.0001), more severe stroke [NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale) score, 14 (9-20) against 10 (7-15); P=0.002], and greater DWI (diffusion-weighted imaging) lesion volume at admission (23.2 cc compared with 13.2 cc; P<0.0001). Plasma MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase 9) (187.3 ng/ml compared with 44.2 ng/ml; P<0.0001) and cFn (cellular fibronectin) levels (16.3 μg/ml compared with 7.1 μg/ml; P=0.001) were higher in patients with HT. Body temperature within the first 24 h was independently associated with HT {OR (odds ratio), 7.3 [95% CI (confidence interval), 2.4-22.6]; P<0.0001} after adjustment for cardioembolic stroke subtype, baseline NIHSS score and DWI lesion volume. This effect remained unchanged after controlling for MMP-9 and cFn. In conclusion, high body temperature within the first 24 h after ischaemic stroke is a risk factor for HT in patients untreated with rtPA. This effect is independent of some biological signatures of BBB damage.

  15. Fulminant post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage caused by aberrant course of the external carotid artery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, R; Zeebregts, CJ; Dikkers, FG

    Haemorrhage, throat pain and otalgia are common complications following tonsillectomy. Haemorrhage is rarely life-threatening but in this paper we describe a fulminant secondary haemorrhage due to an aberrant external carotid artery in an eight-year-old boy. Acute surgical intervention with ligation

  16. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  17. Endovascular treatment of radiation-induced petrous internal carotid artery aneurysm presenting with acute haemorrhage. A report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, K.-M.; Chiu, H.-M.; Chan, C.-M.; Cheung, Y.-L.; Tang, K.-W.; Law, C.-K.

    2001-01-01

    Hemorrhage from rupture of petrous ICA aneurysm can be life threatening and emergency treatment is required. We report 2 cases of radiation-induced petrous internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm presenting with acute hemorrhage (epistaxis and otorrhagia) after radiotherapy (RT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Both patients had a history of RT treatment for NPC. The first patient, a 54-year-old man, presented with sudden severe epistaxis and hemorrhagic shock. The second patient, a 35-year-old man, presented with episodes of severe otorrhagia. The first patient was immediately resuscitated. Obliteration of the aneurysm was performed by endovascular occlusion of the ICA with Guglielmi detachable coils and fibered platinum coils. For the second patient, the aneurysm was treated by deploying a self-expandable stent across the aneurysm neck. In an emergency situation, ruptured petrous ICA aneurysm can be treated with endovascular occlusion of the ICA with micro-coils if there is a good collateral blood flow. Alternatively, the aneurysm can be treated by deployment of a stent, which can induce stasis and eventual thrombosis of the aneurysm. (author)

  18. Lethal subarachnoid bleeding under immunosuppressive therapy due to mycotic arteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigel, S.; Kloska, S.; Freund, M. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Kehl, H.G. [Dept. of Pediatric Cardiology, Univ. Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2003-12-01

    A subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) occurred 67 days after cardiac transplantation in 10-year-old girl with consecutive immunocompromising therapy. Neither digital subtraction angiography (DSA) nor computed tomographic angiography showed signs of intracranial vascular malformations. One month before the lethal SAH occurred, she had developed arterial hypertension and attacks of severe headache with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis while CT scans showed an infarct of the left thalamus. Pathologic findings established the rare diagnosis of SAH due to aspergillosis-related mycotic arteritis. Imaging characteristics are presented. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  20. Ebolavirus and Haemorrhagic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald A. Matua

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Ebola virus is a highly virulent, single-stranded ribonucleic acid virus which affects both humans and apes and has fast become one of the world’s most feared pathogens. The virus induces acute fever and death, with haemorrhagic syndrome occurring in up to 90% of patients. The known species within the genus Ebolavirus are Bundibugyo, Sudan, Zaïre, Reston and Taï Forest. Although endemic in Africa, Ebola has caused worldwide anxiety due to media hype and concerns about its international spread, including through bioterrorism. The high fatality rate is attributed to unavailability of a standard treatment regimen or vaccine. The disease is frightening since it is characterised by rapid immune suppression and systemic inflammatory response, causing multi-organ and system failure, shock and often death. Currently, disease management is largely supportive, with containment efforts geared towards mitigating the spread of the virus. This review describes the classification, morphology, infective process, natural ecology, transmission, epidemic patterns, diagnosis, clinical features and immunology of Ebola, including management and epidemic containment strategies.

  1. Characterizing amide proton transfer imaging in haemorrhage brain lesions using 3T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ha-Kyu [Philips Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea Basic Science Institute, Chungcheongbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyunghwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MRI Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhao, Yansong [Philips Healthcare, MR Clinical Science, Cleveland, OH (United States); Choi, Yoon Seong; Lee, Seung-Koo; Ahn, Sung Soo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to characterize amide proton transfer (APT)-weighted signals in acute and subacute haemorrhage brain lesions of various underlying aetiologies. Twenty-three patients with symptomatic haemorrhage brain lesions including tumorous (n = 16) and non-tumorous lesions (n = 7) were evaluated. APT imaging was performed and analyzed with magnetization transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR{sub asym}). Regions of interest were defined as the enhancing portion (when present), acute or subacute haemorrhage, and normal-appearing white matter based on anatomical MRI. MTR{sub asym} values were compared among groups and components using a linear mixed model. MTR{sub asym} values were 3.68 % in acute haemorrhage, 1.6 % in subacute haemorrhage, 2.65 % in the enhancing portion, and 0.38 % in normal white matter. According to the linear mixed model, the distribution of MTR{sub asym} values among components was not significantly different between tumour and non-tumour groups. MTR{sub asym} in acute haemorrhage was significantly higher than those in the other regions regardless of underlying pathology. Acute haemorrhages showed high MTR{sub asym} regardless of the underlying pathology, whereas subacute haemorrhages showed lower MTR{sub asym} than acute haemorrhages. These results can aid in the interpretation of APT imaging in haemorrhage brain lesions. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 concentration and values of global tests concerning the coagulation system of patients suffering from subarachnoid haemorrage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu-Sitta Al-Drawi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction. [/b]The term ‘subarachnoid haemorrhage’ (SAH stands for bleeding into the subarachnoid space, regardless of its source. It may be of primary character when the source of bleeding is situated within the subarachnoid space. Subarachnoid haemorrhage is often described as spontaneous bleeding, mainly in order to differentiate it from post-traumatic bleeding. [b]Objective.[/b] The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentration of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in the blood of patients in the early phase following subarachnoid haemorrhage in terms of searching for markers useful in subarachnoid bleeding diagnostics and monitoring a patient’s clinical state. [b]Materials and method. [/b]The study comprised 85 patients (47 women, 38 men, aged 29–81 (average 53±12 years, suffering from subarachnoid haemorrhage. The control group comprised 45 healthy people selected according to gender and age corresponding with the experimental group. [b]Results. [/b]The study revealed that the concentration of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 was significantly higher in patients suffering from subarachnoid haemorrhage. Additionally, the concentration of fibrinogen decreased, aPTT was shorter and the concentration of D-dimers increased. The studied parameters did not differ with respect to the age or gender of the patients. It was stated that according to the Hunt and Hess scale, the concentration of ICAM-1 was considerably higher in the group of patients in the most severe neurological state, compared to other patients. It was also observed that the concentration of fibrinogen was significantly higher, aPTT was shorter, and the concentration of D-dimers increased in the afore-mentioned group. [b]Conclusions[/b]. Evaluation of the concentration of adhesion molecules, as well as values of global tests concerning the coagulation system, may serve as a useful diagnostic tool for SAH.

  3. Circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schievink, W. I.; Karemaker, J. M.; Hageman, L. M.; van der Werf, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were investigated in a group of 500 consecutive patients admitted to a neurosurgical center. Subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred during stressful events in 42.8% of the patients, during nonstrenuous activities in 34.4%, and during rest or

  4. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fever, dengue, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur forest disease). Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015 All information on Ebola virus disease Ebola features map Dashboard - Progress update ...

  5. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Vase, P; Green, A

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by telangiectatic lesions. The disease manifestations are variable and include epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Early...

  6. Thalamic haemorrhage vs internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage: clinical profile and predictors of in-hospital mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Eroles Luis

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a paucity of clinical studies focused specifically on intracerebral haemorrhages of subcortical topography, a subject matter of interest to clinicians involved in stroke management. This single centre, retrospective study was conducted with the following objectives: a to describe the aetiological, clinical and prognostic characteristics of patients with thalamic haemorrhage as compared with that of patients with internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage, and b to identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with thalamic haemorrhage. Methods Forty-seven patients with thalamic haemorrhage were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 17 years. Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The region of the intracranial haemorrhage was identified on computerized tomographic (CT scans and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain. Results Thalamic haemorrhage accounted for 1.4% of all cases of stroke (n = 3420 and 13% of intracerebral haemorrhage (n = 364. Hypertension (53.2%, vascular malformations (6.4%, haematological conditions (4.3% and anticoagulation (2.1% were the main causes of thalamic haemorrhage. In-hospital mortality was 19% (n = 9. Sensory deficit, speech disturbances and lacunar syndrome were significantly associated with thalamic haemorrhage, whereas altered consciousness (odds ratio [OR] = 39.56, intraventricular involvement (OR = 24.74 and age (OR = 1.23, were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Conclusion One in 8 patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage had a thalamic hematoma. Altered consciousness, intraventricular extension of the hematoma and advanced age were determinants of a poor early outcome.

  7. Fahr′s disease Presenting with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam Al-Jehani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fahr′s disease is a rare disorder of slowly progressive cognitive, psychiatric, and motor decline associated with idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC and widespread calcification in the brain and cerebellum. Acute presentation of IBGC is most often as a seizure disorder; however, we present a case of an acute IBCG presentation in which the cause of the deterioration was an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  8. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  9. Hypomagnesemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, Walter M.; Algra, Ale; van der Sprenkel, Jan Willem Berkelbach; Tulleken, Cornelis A.F.; Rinkel, Gabriël J.E.

    OBJECTIVE: Hypomagnesemia frequently occurs in hospitalized patients, and it is associated with poor outcome. We assessed the frequency and time distribution of hypomagnesemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and its relationship to the severity of SAH, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI),

  10. Troponin elevation in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannis N. Mavridis; Maria Meliou; Efstratios-Stylianos Pyrgelis

    2015-01-01

    Troponin (tr) elevation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients is often difficult to be appropriately assessed by clinicians, causing even disagreements regarding its management between neurosurgeons and cardiologists. The purpose of this article was to review the literature regarding the clinical interpretation of tr elevation in SAH. We searched for articles in PubMed using the key words: “troponin elevation” and “subarachnoid hemorrhage”. All of them, as well as relative neur...

  11. Aspirin and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Bradley A; Rosalind Lai, Pui Man; Frerichs, Kai U; Du, Rose

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence has suggested a potential beneficial effect of aspirin on the risk of aneurysm rupture. This benefit must be weighed against its potential adverse effects as an antiplatelet agent in the setting of acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A total of 747 consecutive patients with cerebral aneurysms were reviewed, comparing demographics, aneurysm features, presenting clinical and radiographic grades, vasospasm, and outcome at 1 year between patients with aneurysmal SAH taking aspirin on presentation and those who were not. The rate of hemorrhagic presentation was significantly greater in patients not taking aspirin (40% vs. 28%; P = 0.016). Among 274 patients presenting with aneurysmal SAH, there was no significant difference in presenting clinical (Hunt and Hess) and radiographic (Fisher) grade between patients taking aspirin and those who were not. There was also no significant difference in the rate of subsequent angiographic and delayed cerebral ischemia. Multivariate analysis of outcome at 1 year found only increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.12), Hunt and Hess grade (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.81-5.03), and associated hypertension (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.39-7.81) to be statistically significant risk factors for poor outcome (death or dependence), whereas aspirin use was not associated with poor outcome (OR 1.19, 95% CI 0.35-4.09; P = 0.78). In the present study, patients taking aspirin had a lower rate of hemorrhagic presentation. In addition, taking aspirin did not adversely impact presenting clinical grade or radiographic grade, vasospasm, and outcome in the setting of aneurysmal SAH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage at Acute and Subacute/Chronic Stages: Comparison of Four Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences and Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Kang Yuan

    2005-03-01

    Conclusion: FLAIR and GE T2* MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are all statistically significant indicators of acute SAH. GE T2*-weighted images are statistically significant indicators of subacute-to-chronic SAH, whereas other MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are not.

  13. 2017-12-10T23:22:39Z https://www.ajol.info/index.php/all/oai oai:ojs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    article/62291 2017-12-10T23:22:39Z sajaa:ART Acute subarachnoid haemorrhage and the mysterious electrocardiogram Nevin, D Lines, D subarachnoid haemorrhage; electrocardiogram; cardiovascular dysfunction; myocardial injury ...

  14. Early maternal death due to acute encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vidanapathirana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maternal death in an unmarried woman poses a medico-legal challenge. A 24-year-old unmarried schoolteacher, residing at a boarding place, had been admitted to hospital in a state of cardiac arrest. At the autopsy, mild to moderate congestion of subarachnoid vessels and oedema of the brain was noted. An un-interfered foetus of 15 weeks with an intact sac and placental tissues were seen. Genital tract injuries were not present. Histopathological examination showed diffuse perivascular cuffing by mononuclear cells suggestive of viral encephalitis, considering the circumstances of death and the social stigma of pregnancy in this unmarried teacher, the possibility of attempted suicide by ingestion of a poison was considered. Abrus precatorius (olinda seeds commonly found in the area is known to produce acute encephalitis as well as haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and pulmonary congestion was also considered as a possible cause for this unusual presentation

  15. Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Ebola viruses are the causative agents of a severe form of viral haemorrhagic fever in man, designated Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and are endemic in regions of central Africa. The exception is the species Reston Ebola virus, which has not been associated with human disease and is found in the Philippines. Ebola virus constitutes an important local public health threat in Africa, with a worldwide effect through imported infections and through the fear of misuse for biological terrorism. Ebola virus is thought to also have a detrimental effect on the great ape population in Africa. Case-fatality rates of the African species in man are as high as 90%, with no prophylaxis or treatment available. Ebola virus infections are characterised by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that causes impairment of the vascular, coagulation, and immune systems, leading to multiorgan failure and shock, and thus, in some ways, resembling septic shock. PMID:21084112

  16. Haemorrhage from Pancreatic Pseudocysts Presenting as Upper Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Garcea

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhage is a rare but frequently fatal complication of pancreatic pseudocysts. The high mortality associated with pancreatic haemorrhage makes prompt and aggressive management essential. Occasionally, haemorrhage may present atypically, leading to delay in its diagnosis and management. This report details a case of pancreatic haemorrhage presenting as an upper gastrointestinal bleed and discusses the subsequent management. When managing patients with pancreatic pseudocysts who present with the stigmata of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the possibility that the bleeding originates from the pancreas must always be borne in mind.

  17. How often is haemosiderin not visible on routine MRI following traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardlaw, J.M.; Statham, P.F.X. [Dept. of Clinical Neurosciences, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage may be visible indefinitely on MRI, due to persistence of haemosiderin in macrophages around the lesion, but it is not clear whether all haemorrhages produce haemosiderin or, if not, what proportion cannot be identified as former haemorrhages on routine MRI. We performed routine MRI (spin-echo T2- and proton-density weighted images) in 116 survivors of moderate to severe head injury, 1-5 years after injury. We reviewed the images blindly and correlated them with CT in the acute stage, to determine how many haemorrhages from the acute stage were identifiable by virtue of haemosiderin deposition on late MRI. Of 106 haemorrhages in 78 patients on CT at the time of injury, 96 (90 %) were visible as haemosiderin on late MRI. Of the old haemorrhages without haemosiderin, seven of ten were in patients where another haemorrhage with haemosiderin was still visible elsewhere in the brain. No patient or haemorrhage features explained the formation or absence of haemosiderin. Thus about 10 % of definite haematomas show no trace of haemosiderin on routine spin-echo MRI. Radiologists should be alerted to supplement routine spin-echo with gradient-echo sequences if there is a reason to suspect, or specifically exclude, prior haemorrhage. (orig.)

  18. Respiratory arrest in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijdra, A.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.; van Crevel, H.

    1984-01-01

    Sudden loss of consciousness and cardiorespiratory disorders occurred in 43 of 254 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Two patients had ventricular fibrillation, 37 had one or more episodes with a disturbance of respiratory rhythm that required assisted ventilation, and 4 died suddenly without

  19. Rebleeding After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Carl Christian; Astrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the current knowledge of the mechanisms leading to rebleeding and the prevention of rebleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). METHODS: A literature search was performed to investigate factors associated with rebleeding after SAH. RESULTS: The review of the literature...

  20. [Neonatal subgaleal haemorrhage; a potential life-threatening extracranial haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuijkschot, J.; Antonius, T.A.J.; Meijers, P.W.; Vrancken, S.L.A.G.

    2008-01-01

    A female neonate delivered at term developed hypovolemic shock due to a subgaleal haemorrhage, i.e. extracranial bleeding between the galea aponeurotica and the cranial periosteum. The subgaleal haemorrhage was most likely the result of a traumatic vacuum extraction. The patient was treated with

  1. Neurosurgical management of L-asparaginase induced haemorrhagic stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ogbodo, Elisha

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe a case of L-asparaginase induced intracranial thrombosis and subsequent haemorrhage in a newly diagnosed 30-year-old man with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who was successfully managed by surgical intervention. At presentation, he had a Glasgow Coma Score of 7\\/15, was aphasic and had dense right hemiplegia. Neuroimaging revealed an acute anterior left middle cerebral artery infarct with parenchymal haemorrhagic conversion, mass effect and subfalcine herniation. He subsequently underwent left frontal craniotomy and evacuation of large frontal haematoma and decompressive craniectomy for cerebral oedema. Six months postoperatively he underwent titanium cranioplasty. He had made good clinical recovery and is currently mobilising independently with mild occasional episodes of expressive dysphasia, difficulty with fine motor movement on the right side, and has remained seizure free. This is the first documented case of L-asparaginase induced haemorrhagic stroke managed by neurosurgical intervention. The authors emphasise the possible role of surgery in managing chemotherapy induced intracranial complications.

  2. Spontaneous haemorrhage and rupture of third ventricular colloid cyst.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ogbodo, Elisha

    2012-01-01

    Acute bleeding within a colloid cyst of the third ventricle represents a rare event causing sudden increase in the cyst volume that may lead to acute hydrocephalus and rapid neurological deterioration. We report a case of spontaneous rupture of haemorrhagic third ventricular colloid cyst and its management. A 77-year-old ex-smoker presented with unsteady gait, incontinence and gradually worsening confusion over a 3-week period. Brain CT scan findings were highly suggestive of a third ventricular colloid cyst with intraventricular rupture. He underwent cyst excision and histopathology, which confirmed the radiological diagnosis with evidence of haemorrhage within the cyst. A ventriculo peritoneal shunt was performed for delayed hydrocephalus. Surgical management of these patients must include emergency ventriculostomy followed by prompt surgical removal of the haemorrhagic cyst.

  3. Postpartum haemorrhage: prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Chelmow, David

    2008-01-01

    Loss of more than 500 mL of blood is usually caused by failure of the uterus to contract fully after delivery of the placenta, and occurs in over 10% of deliveries with a 1% mortality rate worldwide. Other causes of postpartum haemorrhage include retained placental tissue, lacerations to the genital tract and coagulation disorders.Uterine atony is more likely in women who have had a general anaesthetic or oxytocin, an over-distended uterus, a prolonged or precipitous labour, or who are of ...

  4. Postpartum haemorrhage: prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Chelmow, David

    2011-01-01

    Loss of more than 500 mL of blood is usually caused by failure of the uterus to contract fully after delivery of the placenta, and occurs in over 10% of deliveries, with a 1% mortality worldwide. Other causes of postpartum haemorrhage include retained placental tissue, lacerations to the genital tract, and coagulation disorders.Uterine atony is more likely in women who have had a general anaesthetic or oxytocin, an over-distended uterus, a prolonged or precipitous labour, or who are of hig...

  5. Accidental Haemorrhage and Fetal Prognosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-17

    Apr 17, 1974 ... perinatal mortality associated with accidental haemorrhage. The importance of clinical signs in determining fetal ... presented with antepartum haemorrhage, and where a retroplacental clot was found postpartum. .... rupture of membranes and oxytocin infusion. This was done in spite of intra-uterine death in ...

  6. Methamphetamine-related brainstem haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Zelia K; Bennett, Iwan E; Chan, Patrick; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-10-01

    We report the case of an otherwise healthy 29-year-old woman who presented with a brainstem haemorrhage following intravenous methamphetamine use. Extensive investigation did not reveal an underlying pathology, and the development of symptoms was temporally related to methamphetamine injection. Although intracerebral haemorrhage secondary to methamphetamine use is well documented, this report describes a haemorrhage within the brainstem which is a rare location. While animal studies have demonstrated the potential of methamphetamines to produce brainstem haemorrhages, there has only been one previous report describing a haemorrhage in this location due to amphetamine use in humans. We conclude with a brief discussion of the clinical features and aetiology of methamphetamine-related stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of deferoxamine on brain lipid peroxide levels and Na-K ATPase activity following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, A; Türközkan, N; Aricioğlu, A; Aykol, S; Cevik, C; Göksel, M

    1994-05-01

    1. In the present study we have studied the effects of deferoxamine treatment on lipid peroxidation and Na-K ATPase activity after experimental induction of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) in guinea pigs. 2. We assessed the extent of lipid peroxidation by measuring the level of malondialdehyde and Na-K ATPase activity in 3 different groups (sham-operated, SAH, SAH + deferoxamine). 3. There was no significant difference in lipid peroxide content between sham-operated and haemorrhagic animals, but Na-K ATPase activity decreased after SAH. 4. Deferoxamine treatment reduced the malondialdehyde content and induced the recovery of Na-K ATPase activity, exerting a brain protective role against the detrimental effects of the haemorrhage.

  8. Non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Mikkelsen, Ronni; Sørensen, Leif

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Repeat imaging in patients with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (NASAH) remains controversial. We aim to report our experience with NASAH with different hemorrhage patterns, and to investigate the need for further diagnostic workup to determine the underlying cause of hemorrhage. M...... adequate with absence of hematoma and vasospasm. In contrast, a follow-up DSA should be mandatory for confirming or excluding vascular pathology in case of nPMSAH in order to prevent rebleeding....

  9. Postpartum haemorrhage: prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmow, David

    2011-04-04

    Loss of more than 500 mL of blood following childbirth is usually caused by failure of the uterus to contract fully after delivery of the placenta, and occurs in over 10% of deliveries, with a 1% mortality rate worldwide. Other causes of postpartum haemorrhage include retained placental tissue, lacerations to the genital tract, and coagulation disorders. Uterine atony is more likely in women who have had a general anaesthetic or oxytocin, an over-distended uterus, a prolonged or precipitous labour, or who are of high parity. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug interventions and of drug interventions to prevent primary postpartum haemorrhage? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 40 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: active management of the third stage of labour, carboprost injection, controlled cord traction, ergot compounds (ergometrine/methylergotamine), immediate breastfeeding, misoprostol (oral, rectal, sublingual, or vaginal), oxytocin, oxytocin plus ergometrine combinations, prostaglandin E2 compounds, and uterine massage.

  10. Vesical Artery Embolization in Haemorrhagic Cystitis in Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Gámez, Andrés, E-mail: agargamez@gmail.com; Bermúdez Bencerrey, Patricia, E-mail: PBERMUDE@clinic.ub.es [Hospital Clinic (Spain); Brio-Sanagustin, Sonia, E-mail: sbrio@santpau.cat [Hospital de la Santa Creu y Sant Pau (Spain); Guerrero Vara, Rubén, E-mail: rguerrerov@santpau.cat [Hospital Clinic (Spain); Sisinni, Luisa, E-mail: lsisinni@santpau.cat [Hospital de la Santa Creu y Sant Pau (Spain); Stuart, Sam, E-mail: sam.stuart@gosh.nhs.uk; Roebuck, Derek, E-mail: Derek.Roebuck@gosh.nhs.uk [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom); Gómez Muñoz, Fernando, E-mail: FEGOMEZ@clinic.ub.es [Hospital Clinic (Spain)

    2016-07-15

    Haemorrhagic cystitis is an uncommon and, in its severe form, potentially life-threatening complication of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation or cancer therapy in children. The severe form involves macroscopic haematuria with blood clots, urinary obstruction and/or renal impairment. There are many therapeutic options to treat acute haemorrhage, but only recombinant factor VII has a high level of clinical evidence in children. Supraselective vesical artery embolization (SVAE) is an increasingly used therapeutic procedure for controlling haemorrhage in adults, but is less commonly used in children. This might be due to several factors, such as the invasive nature of the procedure, lack of appropriate medical experience and possible long-term side effects. We present three cases of children successfully treated by means of effective SVAE.

  11. Metastatic angiosarcoma: a vascular tumour or an intracranial haemorrhage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masih, Izhaq; McIlwaine, Werner

    2010-04-29

    A 64-year-old man presented with weakness of his right arm and leg. He had previously had mitral valve replacement, tricuspid annuloplasty, leg deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and femoral embolism. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed an acute left thalamic haemorrhage. Repeat CT brain showed resolution of the original haemorrhage, but the apparent development of new areas of haemorrhage. Warfarin continued due to high risk of thromboembolism. He was readmitted with the rapid development of a visible swelling at the sternum and on the scalp. Ultrasound scan of the sternum revealed a vascular tumour. Suspected haemorrhages in the past were reported as the metastatic deposits. Biopsy and immunohistochemical staining confirmed angiosarcoma of the scalp. Being vascular tumours, angiosarcoma can mimic a brain haemorrhage. Our case illustrates a clinical conundrum. Diagnosing metastatic angiosarcoma of the brain proved difficult without visible primary and histology. The rapid clinical course of the disease and problems with anticoagulation therapy made treatment options limited and the prognosis worse.

  12. [Fatal alveolar haemorrhage following a "bang" of cannabis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassin, F; André, M; Rallec, B; Combes, E; Vinsonneau, U; Paleiron, N

    2011-09-01

    The new methods of cannabis consumption (home made water pipe or "bang") may be responsible for fatal respiratory complications. We present a case, with fatal outcome, of a man of 19 years with no previous history other than an addiction to cannabis using "bang". He was admitted to intensive care with acute dyspnoea. A CT scan showed bilateral, diffuse alveolar shadowing. He was anaemic with an Hb of 9.3g/l. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed massive alveolar haemorrhage. Investigations for infection and immunological disorder were negative and toxicology was negative except for cannabis. Antibiotic treatment was given and favourable progress allowed early discharge. Death occurred 15 days later due to alveolar haemorrhage following a further "bang" of cannabis. Autopsy showed toxic alveolar haemorrhage. The probable mechanism is pulmonary damage due to acid anhydrides released by the incomplete combustion of cannabis in contact with plastic. These acids have a double effect on the lungs: a direct toxicity with severe inflammation of the mucosa leading to alveolar haemorrhage and subsequently the acid anhydrides may lead to the syndrome of intra-alveolar haemorrhage and anaemia described in occupational lung diseases by Herbert in Oxford in 1979. It manifests itself by haemoptysis and intravascular haemolysis. We draw attention to the extremely serious potential consequences of new methods of using cannabis, particularly the use of "bang" in homemade plastic materials. Copyright © 2011 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Intravascular volume after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoff, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Intravascular volume after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage A subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm is a devastating disorder with an often poor prognosis. The occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is one of the most important factors determining outcome in

  14. The initial time-course of headache in patients with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Čomić, Hata; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/085712000; Vergouwen, Mervyn D.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/320630544

    2017-01-01

    Background If acute severe headache disappears early after its onset, the question arises whether subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) should still be ruled out. We studied the initial time-course and minimal duration of headache in a consecutive series of neurologically intact patients with spontaneous

  15. [Reangiography after perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringelstein, A; Mueller, O; Timochenko, O; Moenninghoff, C; Sure, U; Forsting, M; Schlamann, M

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the value of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the detection of causative vascular lesions in patients with perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) after initially negative noninvasive and invasive neurovascular imaging, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA), DSA and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). We analyzed the value of repeated DSA for the detection of causative vascular lesions in 750 patients presenting to our institution with SAH and including 30 with a purely perimesencephalic pattern of subarachnoidal hemorrhage and initially negative noninvasive and invasive neurovascular imaging over a 10-year period. Repeated DSA demonstrated a causative vascular lesion in 1 patient (3.3%) but no causative vascular lesions were detected in the other patients. Repeated DSA can be used to detect a source of hemorrhage after initially negative imaging diagnostics in some rare cases. Such a finding has a therapeutic and prognostic impact especially for aneurysms in the posterior circulation which bear a higher risk of renewed hemorrhaging. Therefore, we believe that repeated DSA should be recommended in patients with perimesencephalic SAH even under consideration of the risk of complications caused by a second invasive DSA.

  16. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm with fundal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashihara, Kengo; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Kida, Shinya; Nitta, Hisashi; Yamamoto, Shinjiro

    1985-01-01

    CT scan and fundus oculi of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm were investigated in 42 patients who were admitted between January, 1980, and August, 1984. Fundal hemorrhage (FH) was observed in 22 patients. The patients with FH showed a worse clinical grade (Hunt Kosnik) on admission than those without FH. The mortality rate of patients with FH was 64 %, much higher than the 5 % rate of those without FH. Moreover, the patients with FH showed more trouble in daily living than those without FH. CT scans of patients with FH usually showed severe subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), whereas those of patients without FH showed only mild hemorrhage. These findings suggest that fundal hemorrhage is caused by acute intracranial hypertension following subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. However, no significant correlation between the laterality of FH and the hemispheric dominancy of SAH could be demonstrated. (author)

  17. Troponin elevation in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis N. Mavridis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Troponin (tr elevation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients is often difficult to be appropriately assessed by clinicians, causing even disagreements regarding its management between neurosurgeons and cardiologists. The purpose of this article was to review the literature regarding the clinical interpretation of tr elevation in SAH. We searched for articles in PubMed using the key words: “troponin elevation” and “subarachnoid hemorrhage”. All of them, as well as relative neurosurgical books, were used for this review. Some type of cardiovascular abnormality develops in most SAH patients. Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a frequent SAH complication, due to catecholamine surge which induces cardiac injury, as evidenced by increased serum tr levels, electrocardiographic (ECG changes and cardiac wall motion abnormalities. Tr elevation, usually modest, is an early and specific marker for cardiac involvement after SAH and its levels peak about two days after SAH. Cardiac tr elevation predictors include poor clinical grade, intraventricular hemorrhage, loss of consciousness at ictus, global cerebral edema, female sex, large body surface area, lower systolic blood pressure, higher heart rate and prolonged Q-Tc interval. Elevated tr levels are associated with disability and death (especially tr >1 μg/L, worse neurological grade, systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction, pulmonary congestion, longer intensive care unit stay and incidence of vasospasm. Tr elevation is a common finding in SAH patients and constitutes a rightful cause of worry about the patients' cardiac function and prognosis. It should be therefore early detected, carefully monitored and appropriately managed by clinicians.

  18. Intracranial haemorrhage: an incidental finding at magnetic resonance imaging in a cohort of late preterm and term infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirgiovanni, Ida; Groppo, Michela; Bassi, Laura; Passera, Sofia; Schiavolin, Paola; Fumagalli, Monica; Mosca, Fabio [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Department of Clinical Science and Community Health, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan (Italy); Avignone, Sabrina; Cinnante, Claudia; Triulzi, Fabio [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan (Italy); Lista, Gianluca [V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital, ICP, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Milan (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in term newborns has been increasingly recognised but the occurrence in late preterm infants and the clinical presentation are still unclear. To investigate the appearance of intracranial haemorrhage at MRI in a cohort of infants born at 34 weeks' gestation or more and to correlate MRI findings with neonatal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed neonatal brain MRI scans performed during a 3-year period. We included neonates ≥34 weeks' gestation with intracranial haemorrhage and compared findings with those in babies without intracranial haemorrhage. Babies were classified into three groups according to haemorrhage location: (1) infratentorial, (2) infra- and supratentorial, (3) infra- and supratentorial + parenchymal involvement. Intracranial haemorrhage was observed in 36/240 babies (15%). All of these 36 had subdural haemorrhage. Sixteen babies were included in group 1; 16 in group 2; 4 in group 3. All infants in groups 1 and 2 were asymptomatic except one who was affected by intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3. Among the infants in group 3, who had intracranial haemorrhage with parenchymal involvement, three of the four (75%) presented with acute neurological symptoms. Uncomplicated spontaneous vaginal delivery was reported in 20/36 neonates (56%), vacuum extraction in 4 (11%) and caesarean section in 12 (33%). Babies with intracranial haemorrhage had significantly higher gestational age (38 ± 2 weeks vs. 37 ± 2 weeks) and birth weight (3,097 ± 485 g vs. 2,803 ± 741 g) compared to babies without intracranial haemorrhage and were more likely to be delivered vaginally than by caesarian section. Mild intracranial haemorrhage (groups 1 and 2) is relatively common in late preterm and term infants, although it mostly represents an incidental finding in clinically asymptomatic babies; early neurological symptoms appear to be related to parenchymal involvement. (orig.)

  19. Intracranial haemorrhage: an incidental finding at magnetic resonance imaging in a cohort of late preterm and term infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirgiovanni, Ida; Groppo, Michela; Bassi, Laura; Passera, Sofia; Schiavolin, Paola; Fumagalli, Monica; Mosca, Fabio; Avignone, Sabrina; Cinnante, Claudia; Triulzi, Fabio; Lista, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in term newborns has been increasingly recognised but the occurrence in late preterm infants and the clinical presentation are still unclear. To investigate the appearance of intracranial haemorrhage at MRI in a cohort of infants born at 34 weeks' gestation or more and to correlate MRI findings with neonatal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed neonatal brain MRI scans performed during a 3-year period. We included neonates ≥34 weeks' gestation with intracranial haemorrhage and compared findings with those in babies without intracranial haemorrhage. Babies were classified into three groups according to haemorrhage location: (1) infratentorial, (2) infra- and supratentorial, (3) infra- and supratentorial + parenchymal involvement. Intracranial haemorrhage was observed in 36/240 babies (15%). All of these 36 had subdural haemorrhage. Sixteen babies were included in group 1; 16 in group 2; 4 in group 3. All infants in groups 1 and 2 were asymptomatic except one who was affected by intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3. Among the infants in group 3, who had intracranial haemorrhage with parenchymal involvement, three of the four (75%) presented with acute neurological symptoms. Uncomplicated spontaneous vaginal delivery was reported in 20/36 neonates (56%), vacuum extraction in 4 (11%) and caesarean section in 12 (33%). Babies with intracranial haemorrhage had significantly higher gestational age (38 ± 2 weeks vs. 37 ± 2 weeks) and birth weight (3,097 ± 485 g vs. 2,803 ± 741 g) compared to babies without intracranial haemorrhage and were more likely to be delivered vaginally than by caesarian section. Mild intracranial haemorrhage (groups 1 and 2) is relatively common in late preterm and term infants, although it mostly represents an incidental finding in clinically asymptomatic babies; early neurological symptoms appear to be related to parenchymal involvement. (orig.)

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Acute haemorrhagic conjunctivitis epidemics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infection (usually viral but sometimes bacterial).2 The causes have been confused by health care personnel in .... are likely to be viral or bacterial, and not Nairobi red eye. Viral conjunctivitis, with bilateral involvement with ... Caribbean after 15 years of being dormant in south-east Asia. The genus enterovirus belongs to the ...

  1. Volemic Resuscitation in a Patient with Multiple Traumas and Haemorrhagic Shock. Anti-oxidative Therapy Management in Critical Patients. A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Bedreag Ovidiu Horea; Rogobete Alexandru Florin; Sarandan Mirela; Cradigati Alina Carmen; Nartita Radu; Sandesc Dorel; Papurica Marius

    2016-01-01

    A patient with multiple traumas is usually found in severe haemorrhagic shock. In 40% of the cases, the patient with multiple traumas and haemorrhagic shock cannot recover due to secondary injuries and complications associated with the shock. In this paper we present the case of a male patient 30 years old, who suffered a car accident. The patient is admitted in our hospital with haemorrhagic shock due to femur fracture, acute cranial-cerebral trauma and severe thoracic trauma with bleeding s...

  2. Prognostic significance of delayed intraventricular haemorrhage in the INTERACT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moullaali, Tom J; Sato, Shoichiro; Wang, Xia; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Arima, Hisatomi; Carcel, Cheryl; Chen, Guofang; Robinson, Thompson; Heeley, Emma; Chan, Edward; Delcourt, Candice; Stapf, Christian; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Lindley, Richard I; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S

    2017-01-01

    Intraventricular extension of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) predicts poor outcome, but the significance of delayed intraventricular haemorrhage (dIVH) is less well defined. We determined the prognostic significance of dIVH in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Haemorrhage Trials (INTERACT 1 and 2). Pooled analyses of the INTERACT CT substudies-international, multicentre, prospective, open, blinded end point, randomised controlled trials of patients with acute spontaneous ICH and elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP)-randomly assigned to intensive (<140 mm Hg) or guideline-based (<180 mm Hg) SBP management. Participants had blinded central analyses of baseline and 24 h CTs, with dIVH defined as new intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) on the latter scan. Outcomes of death and major disability were defined by modified Rankin Scale scores at 90 days. There were 349 (27%) of 1310 patients with baseline IVH, and 107 (11%) of 961 initially IVH-free patients who developed dIVH. Significant associations of dIVH were prior warfarin anticoagulation, high (≥15) baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, larger (≥15 mL) ICH volume, greater ICH growth and higher achieved SBP over 24 h. Compared with those who were IVH-free, dIVH had greater odds of 90-day death or major disability versus initial IVH (adjusted ORs 2.84 (95% CI 1.52 to 5.28) and 1.87 (1.36 to 2.56), respectively (p trend <0.0001)). Although linked to factors determining greater ICH growth including poor SBP control, dIVH is independently associated with poor outcome in acute small to moderate-size ICH. NCT00226096 and NCT00716079. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Intracerebral haemorrhage after carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Boesen, J

    1987-01-01

    Among 662 consecutive carotid endarterectomies eight cases of postoperative ipsilateral intracerebral haemorrhage were identified, occurring into brain areas which, preoperatively were without infarction. As blood pressures across the stenosis were routinely measured during surgery, the internal...... to their haemorrhage. All eight patients had a high grade of ICA stenosis and a marked reduction of ICA perfusion pressure (average of 40%) which was significantly greater than that observed (average of 6%) in the other patients undergoing carotid surgery (P less than 0.0001). Relative hyperperfusion...... of the ipsilateral hemisphere was seen in the four patients studied postoperatively. In at least two cases the haematoma was preceded by an asymptomatic postoperative ischaemic infarct. Histologic examination did not confirm previous findings of changes resembling those seen in malignant hypertensive encephalopathy...

  4. Lumbar puncture in acute admissions to an adult medical ward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suspected multiple sclerosis - very rare in. Africa. Methods. From January t6 June 1986, 1,908 patients were admitted to the adult medical wards,. Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe. Lumbar puncture was considered necessary in 15 I, patients because of a clinical suspicion' of meningitis or subarachnoid haemorrhage. A.

  5. Progressive DNA and RNA damage from oxidation after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Anders; Staalsoe, Jonatan M; Simonsen, Anja H

    2018-01-01

    ictus and 45 age-matched healthy control subjects. At baseline, both markers were significantly increased in patients compared to controls (p values 20-fold above control levels) from day 5-14. None of the markers predicted the occurrence...

  6. Erythropoietin in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: a double blind randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, J B; Møller, C; Gideon, P

    2007-01-01

    .e. transcranial Doppler (TCD) flow velocity, symptomatic vasospasm, cerebral metabolism (microdialysis) and jugular venous oximetry, biochemical markers of brain damage (S-100beta and neuron specific enolase) and blood-brain barrier integrity. FINDINGS: The limited sample size precluded our primary hypotheses...... being verified and refuted. However, data from this study are important for any other study of SAH and as much raw data as possible are presented and can be included in future meta analyses. On admission the proportion of patients in a poor condition was higher in the EPO group compared with the placebo...

  7. Erythropoietin in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage originates from the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Jacob Bertram; Sonne, Bjarne; Frederiksen, Hans Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    . We collected a total of 83 corresponding serum and CSF samples from 18 patients with aneurysmal SAH and compared the concentrations of EPO with those of blood-derived markers of blood-brain barrier function (albumin, transferrin, alpha(2)-macroglobulin) and with those of proteins with well-known CNS...... synthesis (prealbumin, apolipoprotein E). The EPO concentration in CSF was 0.93 (0.82) mU/ml (median and inter-quartile range). Nine patients presented CSF-EPO values above 1 mU/ml. CSF levels did not correlate with serum concentrations and were independent of blood-brain barrier integrity suggesting...

  8. The relationship between intracranial pressure and lactate/pyruvate ratio in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesak, T; Adamkov, J; Habalova, J; Poczos, P; Kanta, M; Bartos, M; Hosszu, T

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between intracranial pressure (intracranial pressure monitoring) and lactate pyruvate ratio (cerebral microdialysis) in patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms. In a group of fifteen patients, intracranial pressure and lactate/pyruvate ratios were measured and logged in hourly intervals. The relationship between these two variables was subsequently analysed in two ways. 1) Intracranial hypertension (ICP > 20 mmHg) in the presence of energy deprivation (L/P ratio > 30) was noted. 2) The dynamics of L/P ratio changes in relation to immediate ICP and CPP values was analysed. Out of a total of 1873 monitored hours we were able to record lactate/pyruvate ratios higher than 30 in 832 hours (44 %). Of those 832 hours during which lactate/pyruvate ratios were higher than 30, ICP was higher than 20 in 193 hours (23 %). Out of 219 hours of monitoring, in which ICP was higher than 20, a simultaneously increased L/P ratio higher than 30 was recorded in 193 hours (88 %). L/P ratio values above 30 were associated with decreased CPP values (p = 0.04), but not with increased ICP values (p = 0.79). Intracranial hypertension coincides with energetic imbalance in approximately one quarter of cases. This points to the shortcomings of the most common form of neuromonitoring in SAH patients - ICP monitoring. This method may not be reliable enough in detecting hypoxic damage, which is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in SAH patients (Fig. 5, Ref. 11).

  9. Prolonged Paroxysmal Sympathetic Storming Associated with Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal sympathetic storming (PSS is a rare disorder characterized by acute onset of nonstimulated tachycardia, hypertension, tachypnea, hyperthermia, external posturing, and diaphoresis. It is most frequently associated with severe traumatic brain injuries and has been reported in intracranial tumors, hydrocephalous, severe hypoxic brain injury, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Although excessive release of catecholamine and therefore increased sympathetic activities have been reported in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, there is no descriptive report of PSS primarily caused by spontaneous SAH up to date. Here, we report a case of prolonged PSS in a patient with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and consequent vasospasm. The sympathetic storming started shortly after patient was rewarmed from hypothermia protocol and symptoms responded to Labetalol, but intermittent recurrence did not resolve until 3 weeks later with treatment involving Midazolam, Fentanyl, Dexmedetomidine, Propofol, Bromocriptine, and minimizing frequency of neurological and vital checks. In conclusion, prolonged sympathetic storming can also be caused by spontaneous SAH. In this case, vasospasm might be a precipitating factor. Paralytics and hypothermia could mask the manifestations of PSS. The treatment of the refractory case will need both timely adjustment of medications and minimization of exogenous stressors or stimuli.

  10. A study about histopathological change of NBCA injected into subarachnoid space of the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Hak Jin; Choi, Kyung Un; Lee, Suk Hong; Choi, Kyung Un; Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Suk Hong

    2002-01-01

    To determine the histopathological changes occurring after the injection of NBCA (n-butyl cyanoacrylate) into the subarachnoid space of the cat. A 1:4 NBCA-Lipiodol mixture was injected into the subarachnoid space of ten cats by cervical spinal tap. Two weeks later all cats were sacrificed, and histopathological examination of the cerebrospinal leptomeninges, blood vessels and parenchyma was undertaken. 1. Changes in leptomeninges: Foreign body giant cells were noted in five cases, fibrosis in six and acute inflammation in all ten. Chronic inflammatory change accompanied 7 of 10 acute inflammations. 2. Changes in blood vessels: One case was excluded because blood vessels were not included in pathologic tissue. Acute vasculitis was noted in six cases, thrombosis in one, and one showed fibrotic change without necrosis in the media of the vessel wall. Among the six with acute vasculitis, severe change was noted in one and mild change in five. 3. Changes in parenchyma: Mild parenchymal inflammation was discovered in two cases and mild infarction in one. Parenchymal changes were limited to the outer cortex. The injection of NBCA into the subarachnoid space of the cat caused toxic histopathological changes in the cerebrospinal meninges, blood vessels, and parenchyma

  11. A study about histopathological change of NBCA injected into subarachnoid space of the cat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Hak Jin; Choi, Kyung Un; Lee, Suk Hong; Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Suk Hong [College of Medicine, Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-02-01

    To determine the histopathological changes occurring after the injection of NBCA (n-butyl cyanoacrylate) into the subarachnoid space of the cat. A 1:4 NBCA-Lipiodol mixture was injected into the subarachnoid space of ten cats by cervical spinal tap. Two weeks later all cats were sacrificed, and histopathological examination of the cerebrospinal leptomeninges, blood vessels and parenchyma was undertaken. 1. Changes in leptomeninges: Foreign body giant cells were noted in five cases, fibrosis in six and acute inflammation in all ten. Chronic inflammatory change accompanied 7 of 10 acute inflammations. 2. Changes in blood vessels: One case was excluded because blood vessels were not included in pathologic tissue. Acute vasculitis was noted in six cases, thrombosis in one, and one showed fibrotic change without necrosis in the media of the vessel wall. Among the six with acute vasculitis, severe change was noted in one and mild change in five. 3. Changes in parenchyma: Mild parenchymal inflammation was discovered in two cases and mild infarction in one. Parenchymal changes were limited to the outer cortex. The injection of NBCA into the subarachnoid space of the cat caused toxic histopathological changes in the cerebrospinal meninges, blood vessels, and parenchyma.

  12. Bedside transcranial sonography monitoring in a patient with hydrocephalus post subarachnoid hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Najjar, Ahmed; Denault, André Y.; Bojanowski, Michel W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Development of hydrocephalus can occur after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Typically, it is diagnosed with computed tomography, CT, scan. However, transcranial sonography (TCS) can be used particularly in patients with craniotomy which removes the acoustic interference of the skull and allows a closer up visualization of brain structures through the skin. Case presentation We report a 73-year-old woman who was hospitalized for SAH and developed acute hydrocephalus requiring an ext...

  13. MicroRNA Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Søren; Rasmussen, Rune; Rossing, Maria

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) accounts for a major part of the morbidity and mortality after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are pathophysiologically involved in acute cerebral ischemia. This study compared miRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid...... from neurologically healthy patients, as well as SAH patients with and without subsequent development of DCI. METHODS: In a prospective case-control study of SAH patients treated with external ventricular drainage and neurologically healthy patients, miRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid were screened...... passed quality control. In the validation, 66 miRNAs showed a relative increase in cerebrospinal fluid from SAH patients compared with neurologically healthy patients (P

  14. Pre-hospital ct diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hov, Maren Ranhoff; Ryen, Annette; Finsnes, Katrine; Storflor, Janne; Lindner, Thomas; Gleditsch, Jostein; Lund, Christian Georg

    2017-02-28

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with higher mortality in the acute phase than other stroke types. There is a particular risk of early and devastating re-bleeding. Patients therefore need urgent assessment in a neurosurgical department, and the shorter the time from symptom onset to diagnosis the better. The Norwegian Acute Stroke Pre-hospital Project (NASPP) has developed a Mobile Stroke Unit (MSU) model, which is staffed with anesthesiologists also trained in pre-hospital clinical assessment of acute stroke patients and interpretation of computerized tomography (CT). The MSU was operated on-call from the local dispatch center in a rural area 45-160 km away from a neurosurgical department. Two patients presented with clinical symptoms and signs compatible with SAH. In both cases, the CT examination confirmed the diagnosis of SAH. Both were transported directly from patient location to the regional neurosurgical department, saving at least 2-2.5 h of pre-neurosurgical time. The Norwegian MSU model staffed with anesthesiologists can rapidly establish an exact diagnosis of SAH, which in a rural area significantly reduces time to neurosurgical care. Study data are retrospectively registered in ClinicalTrail.gov. NCT03036020 Unique Protocol ID: NASPP-2 Brief Title: The Norwegian Acute Stroke Prehospital Project Overall Status: Completed Primary Completion Date: January 2016 [Actual] Verification Date: January 2017.

  15. Continuous EEG Monitoring in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Friberg, Christian Kærsmose; Wellwood, Ian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous EEG (cEEG) may allow monitoring of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and seizures, including non-convulsive seizures (NCSz), and non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). We aimed to evaluate: (a) the diagnostic...

  16. Genetic Epidemiology of Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korja, Miikka; Silventoinen, Karri; McCarron, Peter

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: It would be essential to clinicians, familial aneurysm study groups, and aneurysm families to understand the genetic basis of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but there are no large population-based heritability estimates assessing the relative contribution of genetic...

  17. Hepatitis C in haemorrhagic obstetrical emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaskheli, M.; Baloch, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the maternal health and fetal outcome in hepatitis C with obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Unit-I, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences Hospital, Hyderabad, Sindh, from January 2009 to December 2010. Methodology: All the women admitted during the study period with different obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies were included. On virology screening, hepatitis C screening was done on all. The women with non-haemorrhagic obstetrical emergencies were excluded. Studied variables included demographic characteristics, the nature of obstetrical emergency, haemorrhagic conditions and maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The data was analyzed on SPSS version 20. Results: More frequent obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies were observed with hepatitis C positive in comparison with hepatitis C negative cases including post-partum haemorrhage in 292 (80.88%) and ante-partum haemorrhage in 69 (19.11%) cases. Associated morbidities seen were disseminated intravascular coagulation in 43 (11.91%) and shock in 29 (8.03%) cases with hepatitis C positive. Fetal still birth rate was 37 (10.24%) in hepatitis C positive cases. Conclusion: Frequency of maternal morbidity and mortality and perinatal mortality was high in obstetrical haemorrhagic emergencies with hepatitis C positive cases. (author)

  18. Ultrasonically detectable cerebellar haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Lisa Kenyon

    2011-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) on routine cranial ultrasound (cUS) imaging in infants of ≤32 weeks gestation, and to investigate how extremely preterm infants with CBH differ from those with severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH).

  19. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kapapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N=4 or multiple (N=6 doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P≤0.05. Results. (1 Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2 The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3 There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients.

  20. Volumetric Integral Phase-shift Spectroscopy for Noninvasive Detection of Hemispheric Bioimpedance Asymmetry in Acute Brain Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-18

    Stroke; Stroke, Acute; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhage; Clot (Blood); Brain; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Hemorrhage; Cerebral Stroke; Intracerebral Hemorrhage; Intracerebral Injury

  1. Necrosis and haemorrhage of the putamen in methanol poisoning shown on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteifan, K.; Gutbub, A.M.; Laplatte, G.; Oesterle, H.; Tajahmady, T.

    1998-01-01

    Methanol, a highly toxic substance, is used as an industrial solvent and in automobile antifreeze. Acute methanol poisoning produces severe metabolic acidosis and serious neurologic sequelae. We describe a 50-year-old woman with accidental methanol intoxication who was in a vegetative state. MRI showed haemorrhagic necrosis of the putamina and oedema in the deep white matter. (orig.)

  2. The effect of increased intra-abdominal pressure on orbital subarachnoid space width and intraocular pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-meng Liu

    2018-01-01

    significant difference in the intraocular pressure before, during and after the intra-abdominal pressure elevation. These results verified that the increased intra-abdominal pressure widens the orbital subarachnoid space in this acute trial, but does not alter the intraocular pressure, indicating that intraocular pressure is not affected by rapid increased intra-abdominal pressure. This study was registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (registration number: ChiCTR-ONRC-14004947.

  3. The effect of increased intra-abdominal pressure on orbital subarachnoid space width and intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su-Meng; Wang, Ning-Li; Zuo, Zhen-Tao; Chen, Wei-Wei; Yang, Di-Ya; Li, Zhen; Cao, Yi-Wen

    2018-02-01

    intraocular pressure before, during and after the intra-abdominal pressure elevation. These results verified that the increased intra-abdominal pressure widens the orbital subarachnoid space in this acute trial, but does not alter the intraocular pressure, indicating that intraocular pressure is not affected by rapid increased intra-abdominal pressure. This study was registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (registration number: ChiCTR-ONRC-14004947).

  4. Renal Function Predicts Outcomes in Patients with Ischaemic Stroke and Haemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snarska, Katarzyna; Kapica-Topczewska, Katarzyna; Bachórzewska-Gajewska, Hanna; Małyszko, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated renal function and the impact of renal function on in-hospital outcomes in patients with ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. We collected data from 766 patients with stroke; 637 (83.2 %) with ischaemic and 129 with haemorrhagic one. The mean serum creatinine on admission in patients with both types of stroke, who died, was significantly higher than in those who survived. Multivariate analysis showed that independent predictors of mortality in patients with ischaemic stroke were: ischemic heart disease or prior myocardial infarction, diabetes, admission glucose and eGFR on admission. Also, multivariate analysis showed that independent predictors of mortality in patients with haemorrhagic stroke were: age and admission glucose. Patients with haemorrhagic stroke, in particular with acute kidney injury during hospitalisation had significantly worse outcomes than patients with ischaemic stroke. Assessment of kidney function is prerequisite to employ the necessary measures to decrease the risk of in-hospital mortality among patients with acute stroke. Appropriate approach to patients with renal dysfunction (adequate hydration, avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs, drug dose adjustment etc) should be considered as preventive and therapeutic strategies in the management of acute stroke. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. The Significance of Variceal Haemorrhage in Ghana: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archampong, T N A; Tachi, K; Agyei, A A; Nkrumah, K N

    2015-09-01

    This study describes the burden of bleeding oesophageal varices at the main tertiary referral centre in Accra. Retrospective design to describe the endoscopic spectrum and review mortality data following acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. Endoscopic data was reviewed in the Endoscopy Unit between 2007 and 2010. Mortality data was collated from the Department of Medicine between 2010 and 2013. The study questionnaire compiled clinical and demographic characteristics, endoscopic diagnoses, length of hospital admission and treatment regimens. Aetiology and time-trend analysis of mortality rates following acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding; variceal bleeding treatment modalities. On review of the endoscopic diagnoses, gastro-oesophageal varices were identified in 21.9% of cases followed by gastritis 21.7%, duodenal ulcer, 17.0%, and gastric ulcer, 13.2%. Gastro-oesophageal varices were the predominant cause of death from acute upper gastro-intestinal haemorrhage from 46% in 2010 to 76% in 2013. Outcomes following acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding were dismal with some 38% of fatalities occurring within the first 24 hours. Injection sclerotherapy was the dominant endoscopic modality for secondary prevention of variceal bleeding in comparison with band ligation, mainly as a result of cost and availability. At the tertiary centre in Accra, variceal bleeding is an increasingly common cause of acute upper gastro-intestinal haemorrhage in comparison with previous reviews in Ghana. Its significantly high in-hospital mortality reflects inadequate facilities to deal with this medical emergency. A strategic approach to care with endoscopic services equipped with all the necessary therapeutic interventions will be vital in improving the outcomes of variceal bleeding in Ghana.

  6. Early management and outcome of acute stroke in Auckland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, N.E.; Bonita, R.; Broad, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of acute stroke management in stroke units and tertiary referral hospitals may not accurately reflect practice within the population. Reliable information on the management of stroke within a population is sparse. The aims of this study was to compare clinical practice in acute stroke management in Auckland with guidelines for the management and treatment of stroke in other countries; to provide a baseline measure against which future changes in management can be evaluated. All new stroke events in Auckland residents in 12 months were traced through multiple case finding sources. For each patient, a record of investigations and treatment during the first week of hospital admission was kept. One thousand eight hundred and three stroke events (including subarachnoid haemorrhages) occurred in 1761 patients in one year. Twenty-seven per cent of all events were managed outside hospital and 73% of the stroke events were treated in an acute hospital. Of the 1242 stroke events admitted to an acute hospital in the first week, only 6% were managed on the neurology and neurosurgery ward, 83% were managed by a general physician or geriatrician and 42% had computed tomography (CT). Of 376 validated ischaemic strokes, 44% were treated with aspirin and 12% with intravenous heparin. Of the 690 unspecified strokes (no CT or autopsy), 38% received aspirin and 0.5% heparin. The 28 day in-hospital case fatality for all stroke events admitted to an acute hospital during the first week was 25%. It was concluded that in Auckland, management of acute stroke differed from clinical guidelines in the high proportion of patients managed in the community, the low rate of neurological consultation, and the low frequency of CT scanning. Despite these deficiencies in management, the 28 day hospital case fatality in Auckland was similar to other comparable studies which had a high proportion of cases evaluated by a neurologist and CT. (authors)

  7. Haemorrhage and hemicraniectomy: refining surgery for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösel, Julian; Zweckberger, Klaus; Hacke, Werner

    2015-02-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage is a devastating cerebrovascular disease with no established treatment. Its course is often complicated by secondary haematoma expansion and perihemorrhagic oedema. Decompressive hemicraniectomy is effective in the treatment of space-occupying hemispheric ischaemic stroke. The purpose of this review is to assess the role of decompressive hemicraniectomy in intracerebral haemorrhage. After few small previous studies had suggested advantages by the combination of decompressive hemicraniectomy with haematoma removal, decompression on its own has been investigated within the last 5 years. Two case series and one case-control study in altogether 40 patients with severe spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage have shown mortality rates ranging from 13 to 25% and favourable outcome from 40 to 65%. Decompressive hemicraniectomy appears to be a feasible and relatively well tolerated individual treatment option for selected patients with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage. Data are insufficient to judge potential benefits in outcome. A randomized trial is justified and mandatory.

  8. Nutritional management in Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamon Chaiyasit

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebola haemorrhagic fever is a viral infection causing a major health problem worldwide. In this short article, the authors briefly review and discuss on the nutritional management (energy, protein, fat and micronutrient in management of Ebola infection.

  9. Clinical features of Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosman, A.E.

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease (ROW), is an autosomal dominant disease with multi-systemic vascular dysplasia characterized by mucocutaneous telangiectasia, arteriovenous malformations and recurrent spontaneous epistaxis (nosebleeds). Most cases

  10. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time...... and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH....

  11. Diagnosis of ruptured intracranial aneurysm in acute stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiyama, Masataka; Nakagawa, Toshifumi

    1980-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage at an acute stage within one day from the onset to the first CT scan was classified into subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm, subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin and subarachnoid hemorrhage of which angiography could not be carried out, and the first CT findings, the severity, and the prognosis of these subarachnoid hemorrhage were compared and discussed. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm showed various changes according to progress in the severity with time, and intracranial hematoma, intraventricular clots and ventricular dilatation increased according to progress in the severity. Ruptured intracranial aneurysm in middle cerebral artery, anterior cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery could be found easily by CT, but that in internal carotid artery and vertabral basilar artery was difficult to be detected by CT. When cerebral angiography was carried out repeatedly for ruptured intracranial aneurysm of unknown origin, the time of performance must be consifered with attention to angiospasms or hematoma. (Tsunoda, M.)

  12. Intracranial haemorrhage among a population of haemophilic patients in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, S V; Vicari, P; Cavalheiro, S; Bordin, J O

    2003-09-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in haemophilic patients. The overall incidence of ICH has been reported to range from 2.2% to 7.5% in patients with haemophilia. From 1987 to 2001, 401 haemophilic patients from the Serviço de Hemofilia, Disciplina de Hematologia e Hemoterapia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo were evaluated. The episodes of ICH were documented by CT scan and the anatomic location, clinical presentation, relationship to trauma and clinical factors, including the presence of HIV infection and the presence of inhibitor, were reviewed. Among 401 haemophilic patients, 45 ICH episodes in 35 (8.7%) patients with age ranging from 4 days to 49 years (mean 10.6 years) were observed. A history of recent trauma was documented in 24 (53.3%) cases. Seventeen (37.8%) episodes occurred in more than one site of bleeding, 12 (26.7%) were subdural, seven (15.5%) subarachnoid, four (8.9%) epidural, two (4.4%) intracerebral and one (2.2%) intraventricular. The most frequent symptoms were headache and drowsiness. All patients were submitted to replacement therapy and neurosurgical intervention was performed in eight (17.8%) patients. Despite the treatment, three (8.6%) haemophilia A patients died due to the ICH event and three presented late sequelae. The most important aspect of ICH management is the early replacement therapy in haemophilic patients. This prompt treatment will increase the chances of a better prognosis. Another impact measure consists in the administration of the deficient coagulation factor after every head trauma, even when considered minor.

  13. Subarachnoid hemorrhage: Early evaluation and optimization of management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germans, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    A subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a life-threatening disease that was first described in the 18th century, but it took until the early 20th century until the term "spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage" was introduced by the English neurologist Sir Charles P. Symonds. Nowadays, the term spontaneous

  14. Frequency and appearance of hemosiderin depositions after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage treated by endovascular therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falter, Bernhard; Wiesmann, Martin; Freiherr, Jessica; Nikoubashman, Omid; Mull, Michael [University Hospital Aachen RWTH, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    It is still unclear how often subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) leads to chronic hemosiderin depositions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of chronic hemosiderin depositions after aneurysmal SAH in patients who did not undergo surgery. Furthermore, we analyzed typical MRI patterns of chronic SAH and sought to obtain information on the temporal course of MRI signal changes. We retrospectively analyzed 90 patients who had undergone endovascular treatment for acute aneurysmal SAH. In all patients, initial CT studies and at least one T2*-weighted MRI obtained 6 months or later after SAH were analyzed for the presence and anatomical distribution of SAH or chronic hemosiderin depositions. In total, 185 T2*-weighted MRI studies obtained between 2 days and 148 months after SAH were evaluated (mean follow-up 30.2 months). On MRI studies obtained later than 6 months after SAH, subpial hemosiderin depositions were found in 50 patients (55.5 %). Most frequent localizations were the parenchyma adjacent to the frontal and parietal sulci and the insular cisterns. While the appearance of hemosiderin depositions was dynamic within the first 3 months, no changes were found during subsequent follow-up. MR signal changes were not only conclusive with subarachnoid hemosiderin depositions but in many cases also resembled those that have been associated with cortical hemosiderosis. T2*-weighted MRI is an effective means of diagnosing prior SAH. Our study suggests that chronic hemosiderin depositions can be found in a considerable number of patients after a single event of subarachnoid hemorrhage. (orig.)

  15. Frequency and appearance of hemosiderin depositions after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage treated by endovascular therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falter, Bernhard; Wiesmann, Martin; Freiherr, Jessica; Nikoubashman, Omid; Mull, Michael

    2015-10-01

    It is still unclear how often subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) leads to chronic hemosiderin depositions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of chronic hemosiderin depositions after aneurysmal SAH in patients who did not undergo surgery. Furthermore, we analyzed typical MRI patterns of chronic SAH and sought to obtain information on the temporal course of MRI signal changes. We retrospectively analyzed 90 patients who had undergone endovascular treatment for acute aneurysmal SAH. In all patients, initial CT studies and at least one T2*-weighted MRI obtained 6 months or later after SAH were analyzed for the presence and anatomical distribution of SAH or chronic hemosiderin depositions. In total, 185 T2*-weighted MRI studies obtained between 2 days and 148 months after SAH were evaluated (mean follow-up 30.2 months). On MRI studies obtained later than 6 months after SAH, subpial hemosiderin depositions were found in 50 patients (55.5%). Most frequent localizations were the parenchyma adjacent to the frontal and parietal sulci and the insular cisterns. While the appearance of hemosiderin depositions was dynamic within the first 3 months, no changes were found during subsequent follow-up. MR signal changes were not only conclusive with subarachnoid hemosiderin depositions but in many cases also resembled those that have been associated with cortical hemosiderosis. T2*-weighted MRI is an effective means of diagnosing prior SAH. Our study suggests that chronic hemosiderin depositions can be found in a considerable number of patients after a single event of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  16. Arachnoid granulation affected by subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P. Chopard

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate using light microscopy the fibro-cellular components of arachnoid granulations affected by mild and severe subarachnoid hemorrage. The erythrocytes were in the channels delimitated by collagenous and elastic bundles and arachnoid cells, showing their tortuous and intercommunicating row from the pedicle to the fibrous capsule. The core portion of the pedicle and the center represented a principal route to the bulk outflow of cerebrospinal fluid and erythrocytes. In the severe hemorrhage, the fibrocellular components are desorganized, increasing the extracellular channels. We could see arachnoid granulations without erythrocytes, which cells showed big round nucleous suggesting their transformation into phagocytic cells.

  17. Crohns disease with central nervous system vasculitis causing subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysm and cerebral ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garge, Shaileshkumar S; Vyas, Pooja D; Modi, Pranav D; Ghatge, Sharad

    2014-10-01

    Cerebral vasculitis secondary to Crohn's disease (CD) seems to be a very rare phenomenon. We report a 39-year-old male who presented with headache, vomiting, and left-sided weakness in the known case of CD. Cross-sectional imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging,) showed right gangliocapsular acute infarct with supraclinoid cistern subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Cerebral digital substraction angiography (DSA) showed dilatation and narrowing of right distal internal carotid artery (ICA). Left ICA was chronically occluded. His inflammatory markers were significantly raised. Imaging features are suggestive of cerebral vasculitis. Arterial and venous infarcts due to thrombosis are known in CD. Our case presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in supraclinoid cistern due to rupture of tiny aneurysm of perforator arteries causing SAH and infarction in right basal ganglia. Patient was treated conservatively with immunosuppression along with medical management of SAH.

  18. Crohns disease with central nervous system vasculitis causing subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysm and cerebral ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaileshkumar S Garge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vasculitis secondary to Crohn′s disease (CD seems to be a very rare phenomenon. We report a 39-year-old male who presented with headache, vomiting, and left-sided weakness in the known case of CD. Cross-sectional imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, showed right gangliocapsular acute infarct with supraclinoid cistern subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Cerebral digital substraction angiography (DSA showed dilatation and narrowing of right distal internal carotid artery (ICA. Left ICA was chronically occluded. His inflammatory markers were significantly raised. Imaging features are suggestive of cerebral vasculitis. Arterial and venous infarcts due to thrombosis are known in CD. Our case presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in supraclinoid cistern due to rupture of tiny aneurysm of perforator arteries causing SAH and infarction in right basal ganglia. Patient was treated conservatively with immunosuppression along with medical management of SAH.

  19. Rabbit haemorrhagic disease: applying Occam's razor to competing hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, David; Mutze, Greg; Sinclair, Ron; Kovaliski, John; Cooke, Brian

    2012-03-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) is a highly virulent lagovirus endemic in Europe and Australasian populations of the European rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus. It has also caused several unexplained disease outbreaks in domestic European rabbits in North America. Non-pathogenic spread of RHDV leading to persistent infection which later reactivated has recently been proposed as the cause of overt disease and death of a pet rabbit in Canada, the first confirmed case of Rabbit haemorrhagic disease in that country. We suggest that there is little evidence to support non-pathogenic spread of virulent RHDV, some evidence that is contradictory, and evidence to support a simpler alternative hypothesis. RHDV can be spread over long distances between sparse rabbit populations by fomites or flying insects. Although highly pathogenic, RHDV can be limited in its spread within rabbit populations, or its presence masked by closely related but non-pathogenic lagoviruses which can provide protection against acute disease. In the absence of any evidence from clinical studies to support reactivation of persistent RHDV infection, the simpler explanation seems more likely to be correct. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Isolated Subarachnoidal Hemorrhage following Carotid Endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenant, Marie; Leys, Didier; Lucas, Christian

    2010-06-08

    Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is a rare but well-described complication following carotid endarterectomy or stenting. Clinical signs are ipsilateral, throbbing, unilateral headache with nausea or vomiting, seizures, and neurological deficits, with or without intracerebral abnormalities on CT scan, such as brain edema or intracerebral hemorrhage. Subarachnoidal hemorrhage is rarely described especially if it occurs isolated. We describe a 74-year-old man with a history of high blood pressure, hypercholesterolemia, atrioventricular block with pacemaker, and ischemic cardiopathy with coronary bypass. He underwent right carotid endarterectomy for a 90% NASCET asymptomatic stenosis. Four days after surgery, he complained of unusual headaches with right, throbbing hemicrania. Nine days after surgery, he presented with left hemiplegia and a partial motor seizure. He had fluctuant altered consciousness, left hemiplegia, and left visual and sensory neglect. Brain CT showed right frontal subarachnoidal hemorrhage without parenchymal bleeding. Cerebral angiography found no cerebral aneurysm, no vascular malformation, but a vasospasm of the left middle cerebral artery. Transcranial Doppler confirmed this vasospasm. Evolution was favorable with no recurrence of seizures but with an improvement of the neurological deficits and vasospasm. Physicians should bear in mind this very rare complication of endarterectomy and immediately perform neuroimaging in case of unusual headache following endarterectomy or angioplasty.

  1. Aetiology and treatment of severe postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen

    2017-01-01

    delivery. Occurrence and development of PPH are, however, unpredictable and can sometimes give rise to massive haemorrhage or even hysterectomy and maternal death. Severe haemorrhage can lead to coagulopathy causing further haemorrhage and requiring substitution with blood transfusions. The aim...... of this thesis was to investigate causes of severe PPH and investigate methods of early prevention. The first study was a randomised controlled double-blinded trial investigating the effect of treatment with pre-emptive fibrinogen on women with severe PPH. The primary outcome was the need for red blood cell...... had a cardiac arrest, and a total of 128 women (52%) required a hysterectomy. Hysterectomy was associated with increased blood loss, increased number of blood transfusions, a higher fresh frozen plasma to red blood cell ratio (p=0.010), and an increased number of red blood cells before first platelet...

  2. Intrapituitary fluid levels following haemorrhage: MRI appearances in 13 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenthall, R.K.; Dean, J.R.; Jeffree, M.A.; Bartlett, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Demonstration of fluid levels on MRI is well recognised in cerebral haematomas, tumours and cysts. The occurrence of fluid levels within haemorrhagic pituitary tumours has not previously been described in detail. Evidence of haemorrhage was identified in 27 of 125 pituitary tumours. Fluid levels occurred in 13 of these haemorrhagic tumours. No association with histological type was identified. Recognised risk factors for haemorrhage were identified in half of the cases. (orig.) (orig.)

  3. Haemorrhagic shock due to spontaneous splenic haemorrhage complicating antiplatelet therapy: endovascular management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garge S Shaileshkumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous splenic haemorrahge and rupture is a rare but life-threatening condition requiring urgent diagnosis and treatment. Splenic haemorrhage and rupture precipitated by thrombolytic or antiocoagulant therapy has been reported frequently in the literature, but only two cases due to ticlopidine and one case due to salicyclate have been reported. We report the case of a 54-year-old man with haemorrhagic shock due to spontaneous splenic haemorrhage and rupture following dual antiplatelet (aspirin and clopidogrel therapy. He was successfully treated with selective angioembolization of the bleeding branch of the splenic artery.

  4. Proteomic Expression Changes in Large Cerebral Arteries After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rat Are Regulated by the MEK-ERK1/2 Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anne H.; Edwards, Alistair V.G.; Larsen, Martin R.

    2017-01-01

    was induced in rats that were treated with the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 or vehicle. Neurological outcome was assessed using a battery of behavioral tests. Specific protein expression of large cerebral arteries was analyzed quantitatively with high-throughput tandem mass spectrometry. SAH resulted in a marked......Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious clinical condition where leakage of blood into the subarachnoid space causes an acute rise in intracranial pressure and reduces cerebral blood flow, which may lead to delayed cerebral ischemia and poor outcome. In experimental SAH, we have previously shown...

  5. Proteomic Expression Changes in Large Cerebral Arteries After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rat Are Regulated by the MEK-ERK1/2 Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anne H; Edwards, Alistair V G; Larsen, Martin R

    2017-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious clinical condition where leakage of blood into the subarachnoid space causes an acute rise in intracranial pressure and reduces cerebral blood flow, which may lead to delayed cerebral ischemia and poor outcome. In experimental SAH, we have previously shown...... that the outcome can be significantly improved by early inhibition of the MAPK/ERK kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/ERK1/2) pathway. The aim of this study was to apply mass spectrometry to investigate the overall late effects of experimental SAH on cerebrovascular protein expression. SAH...

  6. Pontine haemorrhage disguised as Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadan, Ummer; Manappallil, Robin George; Jayakrishnan, Chellenton; Supreeth, Ramesh Naga

    2018-02-05

    Isolated facial nerve palsy is a common presentation of Bell's palsy, but rarely seen in pontine lesions. The patient being reported is a middle-aged man who developed isolated facial nerve palsy and was initially treated as Bell's palsy. However, on MRI of the brain, he was found to have pontine haemorrhage. He was managed conservatively and improved. Pontine haemorrhage as an aetiology for isolated facial nerve palsy is a rare scenario, which often goes misdiagnosed and treated as Bell's palsy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Prostaglandins for preventing postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunçalp, Özge; Hofmeyr, G Justus; Gülmezoglu, A Metin

    2012-08-15

    Prostaglandins have mainly been used for postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) when other measures fail. Misoprostol, a new and inexpensive prostaglandin E1 analogue, has been suggested as an alternative for routine management of the third stage of labour. To assess the effects of prophylactic prostaglandin use in the third stage of labour. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (7 January 2011). We updated this search on 25 May 2012 and added the results to the awaiting classification section. Randomised trials comparing a prostaglandin agent with another uterotonic or no prophylactic uterotonic (nothing or placebo) as part of management of the third stage of labour. The primary outcomes were blood loss 1000 mL or more and the use of additional uterotonics. Two review authors independently assessed eligibility and trial quality and extracted data. We included 72 trials (52,678 women). Oral or sublingual misoprostol compared with placebo is effective in reducing severe PPH (oral: seven trials, 6225 women, not totalled due to significant heterogeneity; sublingual: risk ratio (RR) 0.66; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.45 to 0.98; one trial, 661 women) and blood transfusion (oral: RR 0.31; 95% CI 0.10 to 0.94; four trials, 3519 women).Compared with conventional injectable uterotonics, oral misoprostol was associated with higher risk of severe PPH (RR 1.33; 95% CI 1.16 to 1.52; 17 trials, 29,797 women) and use of additional uterotonics, but with a trend to fewer blood transfusions (RR 0.84; 95% CI 0.66 to 1.06; 15 trials; 28,213 women). Additional uterotonic data were not totalled due to heterogeneity. Misoprostol use is associated with significant increases in shivering and a temperature of 38º Celsius compared with both placebo and other uterotonics. Oral or sublingual misoprostol shows promising results when compared with placebo in reducing blood loss after delivery. The margin of benefit may be affected by whether other components of the

  8. Analysis of unknown cause subarachnoid hemorrhage with repeated negative angiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Mutsumi; Takasato, Yoshio; Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Yoshihisa; Hayakawa, Takanori; Honma, Masato

    2006-01-01

    Seven hundred and fifty five cases of acute non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were admitted to the department of neurosurgery of our hospital from July, 1995 to March, 2004. In 555 patients cerebral angiography was conducted but initial angiography was negative in 30 patients. Except 10 general condition poor patients, in 20 initial angiogram-negative patients were undergone repeated angiography. The cause of SAH could not be demonstrated in 13 cases. The SAH in perimesencephalic and non-perimesencephalic cisturns was seen in 7 and 6 cases, respectively. Occipital and/or neck pain on admission was statistically more common among patients with perimesencephalic SAH than those with non-perimesencephalic SAH (p=0.029), and the prognosis of perimesencephalic SAH was good. We conclude that repeat angiography should not be recommended in patients with perimesencephalic SAH. Patients with non-perimesencephalic SAH had a higher rate of complication. In the non-perimesencephalic group, 3 patients developed hydrocephalus and 3 patients had vasospasm, which were found by repeated angiography. Therefore, repeated angiography is recommended for better clinical outcome by early detection and management of serious complications in this group of patients. (author)

  9. Familial and idiopathic colonic varices: an unusual cause of lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    Iredale, J P; Ridings, P; McGinn, F P; Arthur, M J

    1992-01-01

    A patient is described presenting with an acute lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage as a result of extensive colonic varices. Further investigation revealed that there were no oesophageal varices or splenomegaly. Liver biopsy showed grade II fatty change only, with no other specific or significant pathological features. Transhepatic portography showed a raised portal pressure (20 mm/Hg) but the portal system was patent throughout. There was an abnormal leash of vessels in the caecum thought to...

  10. Nd:YAG laser hyaloidotomy for valsalva pre-macular haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kirwan, R P

    2012-02-01

    AIM: To report a case of successful drainage of a large pre-macular haemorrhage using laser photo-disruption of the posterior hyaloid membrane. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A case report. RESULTS: A 47-year-old man presented acutely to our emergency department complaining of a 24-h history of sudden onset, painless and persistent loss of vision in his left eye. Immediately before noticing this loss of vision, he had been vomiting violently from excessive alcohol intake. The left visual acuity was counting fingers. Dilated fundoscopy of the left eye revealed a large pre-macular haemorrhage which was 14 disc diametres in size. Clotting investigations were normal. A diagnosis of valsalva retinopathy was made and the patient elected to receive a prompt neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser posterior hyaloidotomy as an outpatient. At 1 week follow-up, the haemorrhage had drained completely into the vitreous space revealing a healthy macula and the visual acuity had improved to 6\\/12 unaided. At 6-month follow-up the left visual acuity stabilised at 6\\/9 unaided. CONCLUSION: Nd:YAG laser posterior hyaloidotomy is a useful outpatient procedure for successful clearance of large pre-macular haemorrhages that offers patients rapid recovery of visual acuity and the avoidance of more invasive intraocular surgery.

  11. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: Indian perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-10-15

    Oct 15, 2008 ... Vaccines or antiviral drugs are not available for dengue viruses; the only effective way to prevent epidemic degure fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DF/DHF) is to control the mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti and prevent its bite. This country has few virus laboratories and some of them have done excellent ...

  12. Necrotising haemorrhagic pancreatitis with intra-abdominal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Severe necrotising haemorrhagic pancreatitis is a challenging clinical condition that carries a high mortality especially in resource-limited settings. The management requires a multidisciplinary approach in a well-equipped critical care unit. The decision for operative versus conservative management is a close call and one ...

  13. Sanitation of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    A sanitation programme for stamping-out viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) was implemented in Denmark in 1965. The programme has resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of infected rainbow trout farms, from approximate to 400 to 26. The programme is carried out on a voluntary basis...

  14. Total Body Opacification 'Technique Neonatal Adrenal Haemorrhage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-12-11

    Dec 11, 1971 ... A case is reported illustrating the possible usefulness of total body opacification in the diagnosis of neonatal adrenal haemorrhage. To derive maximum benefit from this principle, the routine use of an early film coupled with high dosage is urged whenever an intravenous pyelogram is performed for ...

  15. Ebola haemorrhagic fever among hospitalised children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background : A unique feature of previous Ebola outbreaks has been the relative sparing of children. For the first time, an out break of an unusual illness-Ebola haemorrhagic fever occurred in Northern Uganda - Gulu district. Objectives : To describe the epidemiologic and clinical aspects of hospitalised children and ...

  16. The Prevalence of Intraventricular Haemorrhage and Associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Prevalence of Intraventricular Haemorrhage and Associated Risk Factors in Preterm Neonates in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the University Teaching ... any-IVH generated at the time of analysis was used in determining the prevalence of IVH and also as the dependent variable in multivariate logistic regression.

  17. Cyclophosphamide induced Haemorrhagic Cystitis; a review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyclophosphamide is an akylating agent widely used in the management of both malignant and non neoplastic disorders. We undertook this review to assess the advancement in knowledge regarding the aetiopathogenesis and current management approaches of haemorrhagic cystitis resulting from the use of ...

  18. Dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever: Indian perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Vaccines or antiviral drugs are not available for dengue viruses; the only effective way to prevent epidemic degure fever/dengue haemorrhagic .... After the World War II, rapid urbanization in Southeast Asia led to ... epidemic of the DHF occurred in 1953–1954 in Philippines followed by a quick global spread of epidemics of ...

  19. Anaplastic Medullary Ependymoma Presenting as Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Nicastro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A-41-year old man presented with violent thunderclap headache and a bilateral proprioceptive sensibility deficit of the upper limbs. Cerebral CT scan and MRI were negative. Lumbar puncture confirmed subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, but cerebral angiography was negative. Three months later, the patient presented with paraparesis, and a thorough work-up revealed a diffuse, anaplastic extramedullary C7-D10 ependymoma with meningeal carcinomatosis considered the source of hemorrhage. The patient went through a D5-D8 laminectomy, temozolomide chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. The situation remained stable for a few months. In this paper, we would like to emphasize that spinal masses should be considered in cases of SAH with negative diagnostic findings for aneurysms or arteriovenous malformation.

  20. Cerebral Artery Remodeling in Rodent Models of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guvenc Tuna, Bilge; Lachkar, Nadia; de Vos, Judith; Bakker, Erik N. T. P.; VanBavel, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm is known to contribute to delayed cerebral ischemia following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We hypothesized that vasospasm initiates structural changes within the vessel wall, possibly aggravating ischemia and leading to resistance to vasodilator treatment. We therefore investigated the

  1. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage following ischemia in vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokolov, Arseny A.; Husain, Shakir; Sztajzel, Roman; Croquelois, Alexandre; Lobrinus, Johannes A.; Thaler, David; Städler, Claudio; Hungerbühler, Hansjörg; Caso, Valeria; Rinkel, Gabriel J.; Michel, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is a chronic disorder with various cerebrovascular and compressive manifestations, involving subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Occurrence of SAH shortly after worsening of clinical VBD symptoms has occasionally been reported. The goal of the study was to examine

  2. Magnesium sulfate in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, Walter M.; Algra, A.; van Kooten, F.; Dirven, C. M. F.; van Gijn, J.; Vermeulen, M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Magnesium reverses cerebral vasospasm and reduces infarct volume after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in rats. We aimed to assess whether magnesium reduces the frequency of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in patients with aneurysmal SAH. METHODS: Patients were

  3. Cavernous sinus subarachnoid diverticulum and sixth nerve palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Negoro, Makoto; Awaya, Shinobu

    1987-05-01

    Metrizamide CT cisternography in a young woman with a chronic sixth nerve palsy demonstrated a cavernous sinus subarachnoid diverticulum originating from the cerebellopontine cistern. The possible etiologic role of this diverticulum in her palsy is discussed.

  4. Cavernous sinus subarachnoid diverticulum and sixth nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Negoro, Makoto; Awaya, Shinobu

    1987-01-01

    Metrizamide CT cisternography in a young woman with a chronic sixth nerve palsy demonstrated a cavernous sinus subarachnoid diverticulum originating from the cerebellopontine cistern. The possible etiologic role of this diverticulum in her palsy is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Bedside diagnosis of mitochondrial dysfunction in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, A.; Nielsen, T. H.; Nilsson, O.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives - Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is frequently associated with delayed neurological deterioration (DND). Several studies have shown that DND is not always related to vasospasm and ischemia. Experimental and clinical studies have recently documented that it is possible...

  6. Myocarditis in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage : A histopathologic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bilt, Ivo A C; Vendeville, Jean Paul; van de Hoef, Tim P.; Begieneman, Mark P V; Lagrand, Wim K.; Kros, Johan M.; Wilde, Arthur A M; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Niessen, Hans W M

    Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) such as electrocardiographic changes, echocardiographic wall motion abnormalities, and elevated troponin levels are independently associated with a poor prognosis. They are caused by catecholaminergic stress coinciding with influx of

  7. Life Satisfaction and Return to Work After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passier, Patricia E. C. A.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M. A. Anne; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Lindeman, Eline; Post, Marcel W. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate life satisfaction and employment status after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to explain the associations between life satisfaction and demographic, disease-related, psychological, and personality characteristics. Subjects with SAH (n = 141)

  8. Subarachnoid pneumocephalus: a rare complication of epidural catheter placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, Robert; Jan, Rehana

    2002-11-01

    Several potential complications may occur during identification of the epidural space. We present a case of subarachnoid pneumocephalus as a rare complication of epidural catheter placement. Copyright 2002 by Elsevier Science Inc.

  9. Brain Lactate Metabolism in Humans With Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Oddo M; Levine JM; Frangos S; Maloney-Wilensky E; Carrera E; Daniel RT; Levivier M; Magistretti PJ; LeRoux PD

    2012-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Lactate is central for the regulation of brain metabolism and is an alternative substrate to glucose after injury. Brain lactate metabolism in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been fully elucidated. METHODS: Thirty one subarachnoid hemorrhage patients monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain oxygen (PbtO(2)) were studied. Samples with elevated CMD lactate (>4 mmol/L) were matched to PbtO(2) and CMD pyruvate and categorized as hypoxi...

  10. Aneurysmal SubArachnoid Hemorrhage—Red Blood Cell Transfusion And Outcome (SAHaRA): a pilot randomised controlled trial protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Shane W; Fergusson, D; Chassé, M; Lauzier, F; Griesdale, D; Algird, A; Kramer, A; Tinmouth, A; Lum, C; Sinclair, J; Marshall, S; Dowlatshahi, D; Boutin, A; Pagliarello, G; McIntyre, L A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anaemia is common in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) and is a potential critical modifiable factor affecting secondary injury. Despite physiological evidence and management guidelines that support maintaining a higher haemoglobin level in patients with aSAH, current practice is one of a more restrictive approach to transfusion. The goal of this multicentre pilot trial is to determine the feasibility of successfully conducting a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion trial in adult patients with acute aSAH and anaemia (Hb ≤100 g/L), comparing a liberal transfusion strategy (Hb ≤100 g/L) with a restrictive strategy (Hb ≤80 g/L) on the combined rate of death and severe disability at 12 months. Methods Design This is a multicentre open-label randomised controlled pilot trial at 5 academic tertiary care centres. Population We are targeting adult aSAH patients within 14 days of their initial bleed and with anaemia (Hb ≤110 g/L). Randomisation Central computer-generated randomisation, stratified by centre, will be undertaken from the host centre. Randomisation into 1 of the 2 treatment arms will occur when the haemoglobin levels of eligible patients fall to ≤100 g/L. Intervention Patients will be randomly assigned to either a liberal (threshold: Hb ≤100 g/L) or a restrictive transfusion strategy (threshold: Hb ≤80 g/L). Outcome Primary: Centre randomisation rate over the study period. Secondary: (1) transfusion threshold adherence; (2) study RBC transfusion protocol adherence; and (3) outcome assessment including vital status at hospital discharge, modified Rankin Score at 6 and 12 months and Functional Independence Measure and EuroQOL Quality of Life Scale scores at 12 months. Outcome measures will be reported in aggregate. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol has been approved by the host centre (OHSN-REB 20150433-01H). This study will determine the feasibility of conducting the large pragmatic RCT comparing 2

  11. The management of low-risk primary upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in the community: a 5-year observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Cara; Vine, Louisa; Chapman, Luke; Deering, Paula; Whittaker, Sam; Beckly, John; Fortun, Paul; Murray, Iain A; Hussaini, S Hyder; Michell, Nick P; Stableforth, Bill; Thatcher, Peter; Hare, Nicola C; Palmer, Jo; Dalton, Harry R

    2012-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage is a common medical emergency, initially managed with inpatient care. Bleeding stops spontaneously in over 80% of cases, indicating that patients with low-risk upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage may be more optimally managed in the community, without the need for admission to hospital. To assess the safety of managing patients with low-risk upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage without admission to hospital. Prospective/retrospective study of all patients presenting to a UK teaching hospital with low-risk upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage who were managed without admission to hospital over 5 years. Low risk was defined as Glasgow Blatchford Score of 2 or less, age below 70 years, no other active medical problems, not taking warfarin and suspected nonvariceal bleed. Outcome measures were the need for intervention (blood transfusion, endoscopic therapy or surgery) and death. One hundred and forty-two patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and were managed without admission to hospital. No patients required endoscopic intervention, blood transfusion or surgery. The 28-day mortality was nil. Forty-one patients had normal endoscopic examination and 11 had significant endoscopic findings (peptic ulceration=10, oozing Mallory-Weiss tear=1) but did not require intervention. Patients presenting with a primary upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage aged below 70 years with a Glasgow Blatchford Score of 2 or less are at a low risk, and can be safely managed in the community.

  12. Congo/Crimean haemorrhagic fever in Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tikriti, S. K.; Al-Ani, F.; Jurji, F. J.; Tantawi, H.; Al-Moslih, M.; Al-Janabi, N.; Mahmud, M. I. A.; Al-Bana, A.; Habib, H.; Al-Munthri, H.; Al-Janabi, Sh.; Al-Jawahry, K.; Yonan, M.; Hassan, F.; Simpson, D. I. H.

    1981-01-01

    Congo/Crimean haemorrhagic fever was recognized for the first time in Iraq in 1979. The first case was reported on 3 September 1979 and since then a further 9 patients have been investigated. Eight patients gave a history of previous contact with sheep or cattle, while 2 patients, a resident doctor and an auxiliary nurse, acquired their infections in hospital by direct contact with patients. The causal virus was isolated from patients' blood and postmortem liver specimens. The virus isolates were found to be closely related if not identical serologically to members of the Congo/Crimean haemorrhagic fever virus group. Eight of the patients had no epidemiological relationship to one another and lived in widely separated areas around Baghdad and Ramadi (110 km to the west of Baghdad). ImagesFig. 1 PMID:6790183

  13. Congo/Crimean haemorrhagic fever in Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Tikriti, S. K.; Al-Ani, F.; Jurji, F. J.; Tantawi, H.; Al-Moslih, M.; Al-Janabi, N.; Mahmud, M. I. A.; Al-Bana, A.; Habib, H.; Al-Munthri, H.; Al-Janabi, Sh.; Al-Jawahry, K.; Yonan, M.; Hassan, F.; Simpson, D. I. H.

    1981-01-01

    Congo/Crimean haemorrhagic fever was recognized for the first time in Iraq in 1979. The first case was reported on 3 September 1979 and since then a further 9 patients have been investigated. Eight patients gave a history of previous contact with sheep or cattle, while 2 patients, a resident doctor and an auxiliary nurse, acquired their infections in hospital by direct contact with patients. The causal virus was isolated from patients' blood and postmortem liver specimens. The virus isolates ...

  14. A rare cause of fatal intracranial haemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neligan, A

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: We report the case of a 53-year-old farmer with a 5-day history of severe headache, photophobia and neck stiffness. Full blood count (platelets 173), coagulation screen were normal throughout. Liver function tests remained normal apart from an elevated gamma-GT (156). CT Brain was normal. CSF analysis showed a WCC of 454\\/mm(3) (60% lymphocytes), elevated CSF protein (1.42 g\\/l) and a normal CSF glucose. He was commenced on IV antibiotics and IV acyclivor and improved. On day 3 of admission, he complained of a sudden severe headache, became unresponsive (GCS 3\\/15). INVESTIGATIONS: CT Brain showed a massive left intraventricular haemorrhage. He died 4 days later. Subsequent serum serology for leptospirosis was positive. A repeat sample taken 4 days post-admission, showed a rising IgM indicating active leptospirosis. Detailed pathological examination confirmed intracerebral haemorrhage with normal cerebral vasculature. CONCLUSION: Leptospirosis is a rare cause of intracerebral haemorrhage even in the absence of coagulopathy.

  15. Retinal haemorrhage in infants with pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoof, Naz; Pereira, Susana; Dai, Shuan; Neutze, Jocelyn; Grant, Cameron Charles; Kelly, Patrick

    2017-12-01

    It has been hypothesised that paroxysmal coughing in infantile pertussis (whooping cough) could produce retinal haemorrhages identical to those seen in abusive head trauma. We aimed to test this hypothesis. This is a prospective study of infants hospitalised with pertussis in Auckland, New Zealand, from 2009 to 2014. The clinical severity of pertussis was categorised. All infants recruited had retinal examination through dilated pupils by the paediatric ophthalmology service using an indirect ophthalmoscope. Forty-eight infants with pertussis, aged 3 weeks to 7 months, were examined after a mean of 18 days of coughing. Thirty-nine had severe pertussis and nine had mild pertussis. All had paroxysmal cough, and all were still coughing at the time of examination. No retinal haemorrhages were seen. We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that pertussis may cause the pattern of retinal haemorrhages seen in abusive head trauma in infants. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Carbetocin versus oxytocin after caesarean section: similar efficacy but reduced pain perception in women with high risk of postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bonis, Maria; Torricelli, Michela; Leoni, Licia; Berti, Paolo; Ciani, Valentina; Puzzutiello, Rosa; Severi, Filiberto Maria; Petraglia, Felice

    2012-06-01

    To compare the effectiveness of carbetocin with oxytocin with respect to maintain adequate uterine tone and to reduce the incidence and severity of postpartum haemorrhage. Moreover safety, adverse effects and the need of additional medications were evaluated. Prospective controlled clinical trial. We compared the effect of a single dose of carbetocin (n = 55) with oxytocin infusion (n = 55) in a women population undergoing to elective caesarean section with regional subarachnoid anaesthesia with at least one risk factor for postpartum haemorrhage. The mean ± SD of postoperative pain in the day of surgery in carbetocin group was significantly lower than in oxytocin group and remained significant till the third day after caesarean section. In the day of surgery and the first day after surgery, women of carbetocin group who needed analgesic drugs were significantly lower than women of oxytocin group. The differences of diuresis and of diuretic drugs need were not statistically significant between the two groups. A single carbetocin injection is efficacious and safe on the maintenance of uterine tone and on the limitation of blood losses, in peri- and in postoperative period. In addition, carbetocin was able to reduce pain perception during postoperative days improving quality life of women.

  17. Cortical spreading ischaemia is a novel process involved in ischaemic damage in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Jens P; Major, Sebastian; Manning, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    -invasive detection of CSD. Low-frequency vascular fluctuations (LF-VF) (f detectable by functional imaging methods, are determined by the brain's resting neuronal activity. CSD provides a depolarization block of the resting activity, recorded electrophysiologically as spreading depression of high...... the differentiation of progressive ischaemia and repair phases in a fashion similar to that shown previously for spreading depressions of high-frequency-electrocorticography activity. In conclusion, it is suggested that (i) CSI is a novel human disease mechanism associated with lesion development and a potential...

  18. Spreading depolarizations increase delayed brain injury in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamming, Arend M.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; Rudrapatna, S. Umesh; Lanier, Christian; van Os, Hine J. A.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Ferrari, Michel D.; van der Toorn, Annette; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Stowe, Ann M.; Dijkhuizen, Rick M.

    Spreading depolarizations may contribute to delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, but the effect of spreading depolarizations on brain lesion progression after subarachnoid hemorrhage has not yet been assessed directly. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that

  19. Fever after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: relation with extent of hydrocephalus and amount of extravasated blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.; Luitse, Merel J. A.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Fever after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is associated with poor outcome. Because hydrocephalus and extravasated blood may influence thermoregulation, we determined whether these factors increase the risk for fever after subarachnoid hemorrhage. METHODS: Fever within 14

  20. Adult adrenal haemorrhage: an unrecognised complication of renal vein thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loke, T.K.L. E-mail: lokekl@ha.org.hk

    2001-07-01

    There are many predisposing factors for neonatal adrenal haemorrhage but the causative factors are different in adults. Several cases of neonatal adrenal haemorrhage have been reported in association with renal vein thrombosis. This complication has not been documented in the adults. The presence of an adrenal mass in the setting of renal vein thrombosis should raise the possibility of adrenal haemorrhage even though this is extremely uncommon in adults.

  1. ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC CHANGES OBSERVED IN HAEMORRHAGIC AND ISCHAEMIC CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channappa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Cardiac abnormalities are relatively common after acute neurologic injury. Disturbances can vary in severity from transient ECG abnormalities to profound myocardial injury and dysfunction. CNS is involved in the generation of cardiac arrhythmias and dysfunction even in an otherwise normal myocardium. AIM To find out proportion of ECG changes observed in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS The Electrocardiographs of 100 patients with acute stroke were studied to find out the types of ECG abnormalities among different types of stroke. RESULTS In our study, the most common ECG abnormalities associated with stroke were prolonged QTc interval, ST-T segment abnormalities, prominent U wave and arrhythmias. Trop-I was positive in 12.8% patients with ECG changes. Statistical significance was found in association with Trop-I positivity and ST depression. CONCLUSION Usually patients with heart disease present with arrhythmias and Ischaemic like ECG changes. But these changes are also seen most often in the patients with presenting with stroke who didn’t have any past history of heart disease. This shows that arrhythmias and ischaemic ECG abnormalities are primarily evolved due to central nervous system disorders.

  2. Intracranial extension of spinal subarachnoid hematoma causing severe cerebral vasospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kyoung Hyup; Lee, Jae Il; Choi, Byung Kwan; Han, In Ho

    2014-12-01

    Spinal subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAH) can extend into the intracranial subarachnoid space, but, severe cerebral vasospasm is rare complication of the extension of intracranial SAH from a spinal subarachnoid hematoma. A 67-year-old woman started anticoagulant therapy for unstable angina. The next day, she developed severe back pain and paraplegia. MRI showed intradural and extramedullar low signal intensity at the T2-3, consistent with intradural hematoma. High signal intensity was also noted in the spinal cord from C5 to T4. We removed subarachnoid hematoma compressing the spinal cord. The following day, the patient complained of severe headache. Brain CT revealed SAH around both parietal lobes. Three days later, her consciousness decreased and left hemiplegia also developed. Brain MRI demonstrated multiple cerebral infarctions, mainly in the right posterior cerebral artery territory, left parietal lobe and right watershed area. Conventional cerebral angiography confirmed diffuse severe vasospasm of the cerebral arteries. After intensive care for a month, the patient was transferred to the rehabilitation department. After 6 months, neurologic deterioration improved partially. We speculate that surgeons should anticipate possible delayed neurological complications due to cerebral vasospasm if intracranial SAH is detected after spinal subarachnoid hematoma.

  3. Bilateral eyelid ecchymosis and subconjunctival haemorrhage manifesting as presenting feature in a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sparshi; Goswami, Anup; Singh, Nidhi; Kaur, Savleen

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of bilateral eyelid ecchymosis and subconjunctival haemorrhage, a rare presenting feature of dengue haemorrhagic fever. A 17-year-old boy presented to the emergency department with complaints of redness in both eyes and vomiting. He had bilateral eyelid ecchymosis with subconjunctival haemorrhage. Complete blood count revealed a significantly reduced platelet count of 11000/µL suggestive of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Ocular manifestations were followed by other systemic haemorrhagic manifestations of dengue later on which violates the usual sequence of events of dengue fever. Bilateral eyelid ecchymosis is a rare clinical manifestation and a rare presenting feature of dengue fever and one has to keep high index of suspicion for presence of dengue whenever a case of fever presents with lid ecchymosis/haemorrhage. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Experience of 3D-TOF MR angiography for subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-ruptured aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Toshihiro; Uchida, Keita; Goto, Hideo; Sano, Mitsuhiko

    1995-01-01

    Three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (3D-TOF MRA) with 1.0 T MRI was performed on ten patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage or with non-ruptured cerebral aneurysms. 3D-TOF MRA was evaluated with respect to its efficiency in detecting aneurysms, circumferential vessels, vasospasms and combined vascular lesions. All seven cerebral aneurysms that were detected by cerebral angiography, were demonstrable by 3D-TOF MRA. The diameter of the smallest aneurysm was approximately 2.5 mm. A very small aneurysm that appeared suspicious by MRA, but could not be demonstrated by cerebral angiography was confirmed at surgery. The detection of circumferential arteries was satisfactory in one middle cerebral artery aneurysm, but small vessels could not be identified in other aneurysms. Vasospasms were detected in two cases. MRA was sensitive for detecting vasospasms, but the precise examination was difficult because of high intensity signal in subacute hematomas. MRA was excellent in detecting other combined vascular lesions. This study demonstrates that 3D-TOF MRA represents a valuable examination modality of detecting aneurysms, spasms and combined vascular lesions. We do believe that 3D TOF MRA should be considered as an efficient tool before cerebral angiography, even in the acute phase of subarachnoid hemorrhages. (author)

  5. Brown-Séquard syndrome and cervical post-traumatic subarachnoid hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascón-Ramírez, Fernando; Avecillas-Chasín, Josué M; Trondin, Albert; Arredondo, M Javier

    2017-10-20

    Cervical Traumatic SSH are very rare in literature. They are usually caused by cardiopulmonary diseases that increase vascular pressure causing spinal vessels rupture. In thoracolumbar spine, the spinal puncture is the most common cause. The ventrolateral position is even more unusual. In traumatic brain injury (TBI), an abrupt extension-flexion movement could have caused the rupture of subarachnoid vessels. This, accompanied by the slowed blood "wash out" (probably due to the previous osteoarthrosis and spinal canal stenosis), led to the formation of an organized clot, which caused an acute spinal cord compression syndrome. Cervical subarachnoid spinal hematoma can present as Brown-Séquard syndrome. The treatment is prompt surgical removal and decompression. The posterior approach (partial hemilaminectomy with or without laminoplasty) with microsurgical technique is feasible, fast and simple to evacuate the hematoma with good results. Surgical nuances in posterior approach are: small spinal canal, difficulty in mobilizing the cervical cord, these haematomas are wrapped and attached to the spinal cord or nerve roots by multiple arachnoid bands, requiring techniques of Microdissection for its evacuation unlike the epidural and subdural haematomas that are easily aspirated. Here, we report a unique case of a ventrolateral SSH due to TBI. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Cerebral vasospasm following traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Aminmansour

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    • Background: Cerebral vasospasm is a preventable cause of death and disability in patients who experience aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence of cerebral vasospasm following traumatic SAH and its relationship with different brain injuries and severity of trauma.
    • Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2006 to March 2007 in department of Neurosurgery in Al-Zahra Hospital. Consecutive head-injured patients who had SAH on the basis of an admission CT scan were prospectively evaluated. The severity of the trauma was evaluated by determining Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score on admission. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography evaluations were performed at least 48 hours after admission and one week thereafter. Vasospasm in the MCA and ACA was defined by mean flow velocity (FV of more than 120 cm/sec with a Lindegaard index (MVA/ICA FV ratio higher than 3. Basilar artery vasospasm was defined by FV higher than 85 cm/sec.
    • Results: Seventy seven patients with tSAH were enrolled from whom 13 were excluded. The remaining were 52 (81.2% men and 12 (18.7% women, with a mean age of 37.89 years. Trauma was severe in 11 (17.2%, moderate in 13 (20.3%, and mild in 40 (62.5% patients. From all, 27 patients (42.1% experienced at least one vasospasm during the study period and MCA vasospasm was the most common in the first and second weeks (55.5%.
    • Conclusions: Traumatic SAH is associated with a high incidence of cerebral vasospasm with a higher probability in patients with severe TBI.
    • Keywords: Cerebral Vasospasm, Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Trauma, Traumatic Brain Injury.
  1. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection in a Woman with a Past Medical History of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardon, Jean; Picard, Fabien; Barbou, Franck; Varenne, Olivier; Vivien, Benoît

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an uncommon disease. We report the case of a 50 year-old woman with a past medical history of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, presenting with acute chest pain and diffuse ST segment elevation on ECG. Coronary angiogram revealed a SCAD of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The association between cerebral aneurysms and SCAD should trigger providers concern for fibromuscular dysplasia. We hereby report on a rare and atypical case involving the relationship between fibromuscular dysplasia and SCAD.

  2. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan) Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Hasuo, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Uchida, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Matsumoto, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Tsukamoto, Y. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Ohno, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)); Masuda, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1993-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of seven patients with olivary degeneration caused by cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhages were reviewed. In four patients with cerebellar haemorrhage, old haematomas were identified as being located in the dentate nucleus; the contralateral inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense on proton-density- and T2-weighted images. In two patients with pontine haemorrhages, the old haematomas were in the tegmentum and the ipsilateral inferior olivary nuclei, which were hyperintense. In one case of midbrain haemorrhage, the inferior olivary nuclei were hyperintense bilaterally. The briefest interval from the ictus to MRI was 2 months. Hypertrophic olivary nuclei were observed only at least 4 months after the ictus. Olivary degeneration after cerebellar or brain stem haemorrhage should not be confused with ischaemic, neoplastic, or other primary pathological conditions of the medulla. (orig.)

  3. Late haemorrhagic disease of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Emine; Sarper, Nazan; Türker, Gülcan; Corapçioğlu, Funda; Etuş, Volkan

    2006-09-01

    Late haemorrhagic disease of the newborn (HDN) can occur owing to a lack of vitamin K prophylaxis, as a manifestation of an underlying disorder or idiopatically from the 8th day to 12 weeks after birth. Eight infants admitted to Kocaeli University Hospital with nine episodes of late HDN between January 2002 and April 2005 were evaluated retrospectively from hospital records. The median age at presentation was 46 (26-111) days. All the infants were born at full-term to healthy mothers and were exclusively breast-fed. All had an uneventful perinatal history, except one who had meconium aspiration. Four patients had received no vitamin K prophylaxis and another three had uncertain histories. At presentation, six had intracranial bleeding and the remainder had bleeding either from the venepuncture site or the gastro-intestinal tract. The presenting signs and symptoms were irritability, vomiting, bulging or full fontanelle, convulsions and diminished or absent neonatal reflexes. Galactosaemia was detected in a 2-month-old infant with prolonged jaundice. There was no surgery-related mortality or complications but one survived for only 2 days on ventilatory support following surgery. Only one of the six survivors had severe neurological sequelae. Late HDN frequently presents with intracranial haemorrhage, leading to high morbidity and mortality. HDN can be the manifestation of an underlying metabolic disorder. Vitamin K prophylaxis of the newborn should be routine in developing countries.

  4. Molecular diagnosis of Haemorrhagic Septicaemia - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Rajeev

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida is associated with hemorrhagic septicaemia in cattle and buffaloes, pneumonic pasteurellosis in sheep and goats, fowl cholera in poultry, atrophic rhinitis in pigs and snuffles in rabbits. Haemorrhagic septicaemia is caused by Pasteurella multocida type B:2, B:2,5 and B:5 in Asian countries and type E:2 in African countries. Pasteurella multocida have five types of capsular serotype i.e. type A, B, D, E and F. Diagnosis of the disease is mainly based on the clinical sign and symptom, post mortem findings. Confirmatory diagnosis is done by isolation and identification of causative agent. A variety of laboratory diagnostic techniques have been developed over the years for pasteurellosis and used routinely in the laboratory. Among these techniques molecular techniques of diagnosis is most important. This technique not only gives diagnosis but it also provides information regarding capsular type of Pasteurella multocida. Techniques which are used for molecular diagnosis of haemorrhagic septicaemia are PCR based diagnosis, Restriction endonuclease analysis (REA, Ribotyping, Colony hybridization assay, Filled alternation gel electrophoresis (FAGE, Detection of Pasteurella multocida by Real Time PCR. Among these techniques real time PCR is most sensitive and specific. [Vet. World 2011; 4(4.000: 189-192

  5. Early quantitative CT perfusion parameters variation for prediction of delayed cerebral ischemia following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Regent, Christine; Hafsa, Monia; Ben Hassen, Wagih; Edjlali, Myriam; Trystram, Denis; Al-Shareef, Fawaz; Meder, Jean-Francois; Oppenheim, Catherine; Naggara, Olivier; Turc, Guillaume; Sermet, Alain; Laquay, Nathalie; Devaux, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the predictive value of cerebral perfusion-computerized tomography (CTP) parameters variation between day0 and day4 after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH). Mean transit time (MTT) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) values were compared between patients with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI+ group) and patients without DCI (DCI- group) for previously published optimal cutoff values and for variations of MTT (ΔMTT) and of CBF (ΔCBF) values between day0 and day4. DCI+ was defined as a cerebral infarction on 3-months follow-up MRI. Among 47 included patients, 10 suffered DCI+. Published optimal cutoff values did not predict DCI, either at day0 or at day4. Conversely, ΔMTT and ΔCBF significantly differed between the DCI+ and DCI- groups, with optimal ΔMTT and ΔCBF values of 0.91 seconds (83.9 % sensitivity, 79.5 % specificity, AUC 0.84) and -7.6 mL/100 g/min (100 % sensitivity, 71.4 % specificity, AUC 0.86), respectively. In multivariate analysis, ΔCBF (OR = 1.91, IC95% 1.13-3.23 per each 20 % decrease of ΔCBF) and ΔMTT values (OR = 14.70, IC95% 4.85-44.52 per each 20 % increase of ΔMTT) were independent predictors of DCI. Assessment of MTT and CBF value variations between day0 and day4 may serve as an early imaging surrogate for prediction of DCI in aSAH. (orig.)

  6. Subarachnoid hemorrhage: risks of aneurysm rupture and delayed cerebral ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    Three percent of the population harbors an intracranial aneurysm. A minority of these aneurysms will rupture and cause a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). SAH is a devastating disease with high case fatality and morbidity. A major contributor to the poor outcome after SAH is delayed cerebral ischemia

  7. Subarachnoid hemorrhage: long-term consequences & stem cell treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, E.

    2014-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) represents a considerable health problem that strikes patients at a relatively young age. At present, limited options are available to treat the devastating consequences of SAH. The endovascular puncture model is a suitable animal model to study the pathophysiological

  8. MRI demonstration of subarachnoid neurocysticercosis simulating metastatic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, K.Y.; Roebuck, D.J.; Metreweli, C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin NT (Hong Kong); Mok, V.; Kay, R. [Dept. of Neurology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong); Ng, H.K.; Teo, J.G.C. [Dept. of Anatomical and Cellular Pathology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong); Lam, J.; Poon, W. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong)

    1998-11-01

    We present a patient with neurocysticercosis with spinal subarachnoid spread who presented with lower back pain and progressive numbness and weakness of the left leg. MRI of the spine simulated metastasis. MRI of the brain demonstrated a ``bunch of grapes`` appearance in the basal cisterns, characteristic of cysticercosis. (orig.) With 2 figs., 17 refs.

  9. Spinal vascular malformations in non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germans, M. R.; Pennings, F. A.; Sprengers, M. E. S.; Vandertop, W. P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In patients with non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and no evidence for a cerebral aneurysm on angiography, a frequent cause of the hemorrhage is perimesencephalic hemorrhage or other cerebral vascular pathology. In some patients no cause is found. The exact incidence of a spinal

  10. Recovery from a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Days 1 through 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Alejandro E.; Brice, Roanne G.; Wallace, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAHs) are a serious medical emergency, as 30% to 50% of all SAHs can result in death. Personal accounts and case studies are an important aspect of evidence-based practice. This first article of two presents a review of AB's (patient) condition immediately following an SAH in the intensive care and immediately post…

  11. Recovery from a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Patient and Spouse Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Roanne G.; Brice, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    This second article of a two-part case study focuses on the experiences of a patient and his spouse (caregiver) when a neurological trauma occurs. It is the personal account when A.B. survived a vertebral artery aneurysm and hemorrhage resulting in a subarachnoid hemorrhage. It is also an in-depth post-trauma account from two speech-language…

  12. Perimesencephalic hemorrhage: a nonaneurysmal and benign form of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gijn, J.; van Dongen, K. J.; Vermeulen, M.; Hijdra, A.

    1985-01-01

    We studied 28 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and normal angiograms. On early CT (within 5 days) in 13 cases, blood was seen mainly or only in the cisterns around the midbrain. This pattern of hemorrhage was found in only 1 of 92 patients with a ruptured aneurysm. None of the unexplained

  13. Plasticity of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars; Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Maddahi, Aida

    2014-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is most often followed by a delayed phase of cerebral ischemia which is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The causes underlying this delayed phase are still unsettled, but are believed to include cerebral vasospasm, cortical spreading depression...

  14. The Worst Headache of Life: Evaluation of Nontraumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-06

    include autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, hypertension, aortic coarctation , alpha-1 -antitrypsin deficiency, connective tissue diseases...which is highest immediately after the initial subarachnoid hemorrhage, is through early surgical or endovascular treatment of the ruptured aneurysm...Endovascular treatment is particularly useful in posterior circulation aneurysms, such as a basilar tip aneurysm, in which the surgical approach is

  15. Clinical relevance of cortical spreading depression in neurological disorders: migraine, malignant stroke, subarachnoid and intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Martin; Dreier, Jens Peter; Fabricius, Martin

    2011-01-01

    to suggest that CSD is involved in the mechanism of migraine, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. The implications of these findings are widespread and suggest that intrinsic brain mechanisms have the potential to worsen the outcome of cerebrovascular episodes or brain trauma...... as a pathophysiological mechanism for this group of acute neurological disorders. The findings have implications for monitoring and treatment of patients with acute brain disorders in the intensive care unit. Drawing on the large body of experimental findings from animal studies of CSD obtained during decades we suggest...... treatment strategies, which may be used to prevent or attenuate secondary neuronal damage in acutely injured human brain cortex caused by depolarization waves....

  16. Dural sinus thrombosis presenting as unilateral lobar haematomas with mass effect: an easily misdiagnosed cause of cerebral haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, T.; Chakera, T.

    2002-01-01

    Dural sinus thrombosis has protean clinical and radiological manifestations ranging from minimal effacement of sulci with no symptoms to severe haemorrhagic infarcts associated with focal deficits, coma and even death. An uncommon form of presentation is characterized by unilateral lobar haemorrhage associated with extensive oedema and parenchyma! distortion. In an acute presentation, this might resemble haemorrhage into a tumour. In delayed presentations, the haematoma, being iso- or hypodense and showing peripheral ring-like enhancement, can mimic aggressive tumours or infective processes. As this is an uncommon condition, misdiagnosis is common with the potential for mismanagement and adverse outcomes. We present five such consecutive cases that were initially misdiagnosed as other entities. Each of these cases on closer inspection show features observed on CT and MRI that should have suggested a diagnosis of dural venous sinus thrombosis. One of these cases progressed to not only extensively involve the superficial sinuses but also the deep veins, with a significant adverse outcome. The imaging features of this interesting variant of dural sinus thrombosis are reviewed. The haemodynamic basis for haemorrhage and anatonaical basis for the lateralization of the lesions are discussed. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  17. Factors affecting the occurrence of symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis depending on the haemorrhage definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledzińska-Dźwigał, M; Sobolewski, Piotr; Szczuchniak, W

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage (sICH) remains the most feared complication of systemic thrombolysis in patients with ischaemic stroke. The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of different factors on the occurrence of sICH, depending on definition used. We retrospectively evaluated the influence of several factors on the occurrence of sICH (according to definitions used in ECASS2, SITS-MOST and NINDS studies) in 200 patients treated with systemic thrombolysis from 2006 to 2011. Multivariate analysis of impact of individual variables on the occurrence of haemorrhagic transformation (HT) and parenchymal haemorrhage type 2 (PH2) were performed. Haemorrhagic transformation occurred in 35 cases (17.5%). SICH was found in 10 cases according to ECASS2, in 7 cases according to SITS and in 13 cases according to NINDS. Older age was related to higher risk of sICH, regardless which definition was used (ECASS2: p = 0.014, SITS-MOST: p = 0.048, NINDS: p = 0.008), and female sex was related to higher risk of sICH according to NINDS and ECASS2 definition (p = 0.002 and p = 0.04, respectively). Blood glucose level and high NIHSS score (> 14 pts) were found as risk factor of sICH in ECASS2 definition (p = 0.044 and p = 0.03, respectively). In multivariate logistic regression higher NIHSS scores were associated with HT independent of age, gender and glucose level (p = 0.012). Multivariate analysis showed no impact of age, gender, severity of stroke and glucose level on presence of PH2. Definition of sICH can determine variables that are related to a high risk of this complication. In our study most factors correlated with sICH using the ECASS2 definition.

  18. Haemorrhagic necrosis of the grey matter of the spinal cord due to accidental injection of iopamidol in a patient with multiple neurofibromas; a clinico-pathological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, R.A.C.; Wintzen, A.R.; Voormolen, J.H.C.; Vielvoye, G.J.; Bots, G.T.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Cervical laminectomy was performed in a 34-year old man with multiple spinal neurofibromas because of a slowly progressive medullary compression. Four weeks later a rapid deterioration necessitated iopamidol myelography by left lateral cervical puncture at C2 level. Despite the establishment of adequate spinal fluid contact, resulting in imaging of the subarachnoid space, part of the contrast medium entered the spinal cord, thus delineating a syrinx from the upper cervical extending to the upper thoracic level. After the puncture the patient developed triplegia, involving the left arm and both legs and a paresis of the right arm. He died from aspiration pneumonia. Autopsy revealed haemorrhagic necrosis of the spinal grey matter. This adverse effect of myelography is argued to have been conditioned by the extreme immobility and displacement of the spinal cord due to the presence of multiple neurofibromas. The deterioration four weeks after the operation was probably caused by a further compression of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  19. [Massive alveolar haemorrhage in Wegener's granulomatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Roldán, J; Nuñez-Castillo, D; Fernández-Fígares, C; López-Leiva, I

    2014-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a systemic vasculitis with involvement of primary granulomatous upper and lower respiratory tract, glomerulonephritis and vasculitis of small vessels. The lung disease ranges from asymptomatic pulmonary nodules to pulmonary infiltrates and fulminant alveolar haemorrhage. The prognosis is poor due to kidney and respiratory failure, although the data are changing due to new treatments with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide. We report a case with severe lung disease, which after appropriate anamnesis, multiple tests, and optimal sequential action, the patient was diagnosed with Wegener's granulomatosis. This disease has a low incidence in the Emergency Department, where the patient history supported by the appropriate additional provides a diagnostic suspicion. It is important that the Emergency Department has the skills to manage the stability in these patients in order to resolve their symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Pulmonary vascular complications of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circo, Sebastian; Gossage, James R

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the latest advances and recommendations in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary vascular complications associated with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT): pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), pulmonary hypertension associated with high output cardiac failure or liver vascular malformations, haemoptysis, haemothorax and thromboembolic disease. Transthoracic contrast echocardiography has been validated as a screening tool for PAVM in patients with suspected HHT. Advancements in genetic testing support its use in family members at risk as a cost-effective measure. Therapy with bevacizumab in patients with high output cardiac failure and severe liver AVMs showed promising results. PAH tends to be more aggressive in HHT type 2 patients. Patients suffering from this elusive disease should be referred to HHT specialized centres to ensure a standardized and timely approach to diagnosis and management.

  1. Filoviral haemorrhagic fevers: A threat to Zambia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katendi Changula

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Filoviral haemorrhagic fevers (FVHF are caused by agents belonging to Filoviridae family, Ebola and Marburg viruses. They are amongst the most lethal pathogens known to infect humans. Incidence of FVHF outbreaks are increasing, with affected number of patients on the rise. Whilst there has been no report yet of FVHF in Zambia, its proximity to Angola and Democratic Republic of Congo, which have recorded major outbreaks, as well as the open borders, increased trade and annual migration of bats between these countries, puts Zambia at present and increased risk. Previous studies have indicated bats as potential reservoir hosts for filoviruses. An increasing population with an increasing demand for resources has forced incursion into previously uninhabited land, potentially bringing them into contact with unknown pathogens, reservoir hosts and/or amplifying hosts. The recent discovery of a novel arenavirus, Lujo, highlights the potential that every region, including Zambia, has for being the epicentre or primary focus for emerging and re-emerging infections. It is therefore imperative that surveillance for potential emerging infections, such as viral haemorrhagic fevers be instituted. In order to accomplish this surveillance, rapid detection, identification and monitoring of agents in patients and potential reservoirs is needed. International co-operation is the strategy of choice for the surveillance and fight against emerging infections. Due to the extensive area in which filoviral infections can occur, a regional approach to surveillance activities is required, with regional referral centres. There is a need to adopt shared policies for the prevention and control of infectious diseases. There is also need for optimisation of currently available tests and development of new diagnostic tests, in order to have robust, highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tests that can be used even where there are inadequate laboratories and diagnostic services.

  2. Subduralt haematom fra aneurisme uden samtidig subaraknoidalblødning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Preben; Jørgensen, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    A case of acute subdural haematoma from an intracranial aneurysm is presented. Although the patient presented with isolated subdural haematoma, the clinical signs were consistent with the classical signs of subarachnoid haemorrhage including thunderclap headache. An aneurysm of the anterior...

  3. Validity of Diagnostic Codes for Acute Stroke in Administrative Databases: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie McCormick

    Full Text Available To conduct a systematic review of studies reporting on the validity of International Classification of Diseases (ICD codes for identifying stroke in administrative data.MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched (inception to February 2015 for studies: (a Using administrative data to identify stroke; or (b Evaluating the validity of stroke codes in administrative data; and (c Reporting validation statistics (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV, or Kappa scores for stroke, or data sufficient for their calculation. Additional articles were located by hand search (up to February 2015 of original papers. Studies solely evaluating codes for transient ischaemic attack were excluded. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers; article quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool.Seventy-seven studies published from 1976-2015 were included. The sensitivity of ICD-9 430-438/ICD-10 I60-I69 for any cerebrovascular disease was ≥ 82% in most [≥ 50%] studies, and specificity and NPV were both ≥ 95%. The PPV of these codes for any cerebrovascular disease was ≥ 81% in most studies, while the PPV specifically for acute stroke was ≤ 68%. In at least 50% of studies, PPVs were ≥ 93% for subarachnoid haemorrhage (ICD-9 430/ICD-10 I60, 89% for intracerebral haemorrhage (ICD-9 431/ICD-10 I61, and 82% for ischaemic stroke (ICD-9 434/ICD-10 I63 or ICD-9 434&436. For in-hospital deaths, sensitivity was 55%. For cerebrovascular disease or acute stroke as a cause-of-death on death certificates, sensitivity was ≤ 71% in most studies while PPV was ≥ 87%.While most cases of prevalent cerebrovascular disease can be detected using 430-438/I60-I69 collectively, acute stroke must be defined using more specific codes. Most in-hospital deaths and death certificates with stroke as a cause-of-death correspond to true stroke deaths. Linking vital statistics and hospitalization

  4. Neonatal bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis caused by brain stem haemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    Blazer, S; Hemli, J A; Sujov, P O; Braun, J

    1989-01-01

    We describe a neonate with severe bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis caused by haemorrhage in the lower brain stem. To our knowledge this association has not been previously reported in the English medical literature.

  5. Spontaneous soft tissue haemorrhage in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Abdulla

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diversity in clinical presentations and complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE make the diagnosis and management challenging. The mechanisms of haemorrhagic manifestations in SLE have not been well elucidated. A 47-year-old woman with no comorbidities was admitted after suffering fatigue and low grade fever for six months. She had bilateral soft tissue haemorrhage over the forearm and intra retinal haemorrhages. She was assessed and diagnosed as having SLE based on positive antinuclear antibody, strongly positive anti double stranded DNA, thrombocytopenia and low C3 and C4 levels. We describe a case of spontaneous bilateral soft tissue haemorrhage in SLE and discuss the various mechanisms causing bleeding in lupus.

  6. Does Ondansetron Modify Sympathectomy Due to Subarachnoid Anesthesia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkawi, Abdullah S; Mavridis, Dimitris; Flood, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disagreement among many underpowered studies has led to an equivocal understanding of the efficacy of the 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron in preventing the consequences of sympathectomy after subarachnoid anesthesia. The authors assessed the efficacy of ondansetron with respect to the ov......BACKGROUND: Disagreement among many underpowered studies has led to an equivocal understanding of the efficacy of the 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron in preventing the consequences of sympathectomy after subarachnoid anesthesia. The authors assessed the efficacy of ondansetron with respect.......12; I = 60%, P = 0.002) and bradycardia (relative risk = 0.44 [95% CI, 0.26 to 0.73], P = 0.001; TSA-adjusted CI, 0.05 to 3.85; I = 0%, P = 0.84). However, the authors found indications of bias among these trials. TSAs demonstrated that the meta-analysis lacked adequate information size and did...

  7. Spinal myelopathy induced by subarachnoid batrachotoxin: ultrastructure and electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J H; Deshpande, S S; Pence, R S; Albuquerque, E X

    1978-01-20

    A combined structural and electrophysiologic analysis on the effects of subarachnoid injections of batrachotoxin was conducted in rats. Swelling of neuronal perikarya, accompanied by areas of clearing, satellitosis, fatty metamorphosis and central chromatolysis were demonstrated in the spinal anterior horns. Studies on isolated extensor digitorum longus (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles showed membrane depolarization in the extensor 24 h after injection, with progressive augmentation of this phenomenon in animals given multiple injections of the toxin. Differential sensitivity of fast and slow muscles was evident: soleus was only slightly affected. Subarachnoid injections of batrachotoxin, which induced swelling of neuronal perikarya and axonal processes, also caused signs of denervation in the extensor muscle 7 days after injection, while spontaneous transmitter release was still present. Some structural and and most electrophysiologic alterations after batrachotoxin injections were reversible.

  8. [Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia diagnosed in connection with a traffic accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Demény, Ann Kathrin; Almind, Merete; Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse

    2014-02-17

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by vascular dysplasia and haemorrhage. It is manifested by mucocutaneous telangiec-tases and arteriovenous malformations in organs such as lungs, liver and brain. We present a case of HHT. A 16-year-old patient with a history of recurrent epistaxis was admitted to the local hospital with chest pain and desaturation. A CT scan revealed pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

  9. Management of Agitation Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Is There a Role for Beta-Blockers?

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Fayaz; Viswanathan, Ramaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. About 20% of the stroke is hemorrhagic and about 50% of these is due to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A troublesome neuropsychiatric complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage is agitation/aggression. Case Presentation. A 45-year-old man with no prior psychiatric history, sustained subarachnoid hemorrhage. After initial stabilization for 2 days, he underwent craniotomy and clipping of anterior cerebral...

  10. Delayed Rebleeding of Cerebral Aneurysm Misdiagnosed as Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Seung-Yoon; Kim, Dae-Won; Park, Jong-Tae; Kang, Sung-Don

    2016-01-01

    An intracranial saccular aneurysm is uncommonly diagnosed in a patient with closed head trauma. We herein present a patient with delayed rebleeding of a cerebral aneurysm misdiagnosed as traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 26-year-old female visited our emergency department because of headache after a motorcycle accident. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed a right-side dominant SAH in Sylvian fissure. Although traumatic SAH was strongly suggested because of the history of head traum...

  11. Intracranial vertebral artery dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage following child abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Pamela H.; Burrowes, Delilah M.; Ali, Saad; Shaibani, Ali [Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bowman, Robin M. [Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Child abuse is often suspected based on particular patterns of injury. We report a case of intracranial vertebral artery dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a 3-month-old boy following child abuse. The mechanisms of injury and the clinical and imaging findings are discussed. This particular pattern of injury has rarely been reported in association with child abuse. We hope to raise physician awareness of child abuse when faced with these imaging findings. (orig.)

  12. Intracranial vertebral artery dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage following child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Pamela H.; Burrowes, Delilah M.; Ali, Saad; Shaibani, Ali; Bowman, Robin M.

    2007-01-01

    Child abuse is often suspected based on particular patterns of injury. We report a case of intracranial vertebral artery dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a 3-month-old boy following child abuse. The mechanisms of injury and the clinical and imaging findings are discussed. This particular pattern of injury has rarely been reported in association with child abuse. We hope to raise physician awareness of child abuse when faced with these imaging findings. (orig.)

  13. Postpartum haemorrhage: a preventable cause of maternal mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaheen, B.; Hassan, L.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the preventable predictors of severe postpartum haemorrhage and the adverse outcome associated with it. All the admitted patients who developed severe postpartum haemorrhage (>1500 ml) were included in the study. Clinical and sociodemographic data was obtained along with results of investigations to categorize the complications encountered. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were determined. During the study period, 75 out of 4683 obstetrical admissions, developed severe postpartum haemorrhage (1.6 %). About 65% of the patients were admitted with some other complications including obstructed labour, antepartum haemorrhage and eclampsia. The risk factors were grand multiparity (OR=3.4), pre-eclampsia (OR=2.75), antepartum haemorrhage (OR=13.35), active labour of more than 10 hours (OR=46.92), twin delivery (OR=3.25), instrumental delivery (OR=8.62) and caesarean section (OR=9.74). Maternal mortality in these cases was 2.66% and residual morbidity being 40%. Birth attendant other than doctor and delivery outside the study unit were significantly associated with the adverse outcome in these patients. Maternal outcome associated with postpartum haemorrhage is a function of care given during labour and postnatal period with early diagnosis and management of the complication and its risk factors, being the key of good maternal outcome. (author)

  14. Evidence-based management of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, I; Sunkaraneni, V S

    2015-05-01

    There are currently no guidelines in the UK for the specific management of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia related epistaxis. The authors aimed to review the literature and provide an algorithm for the management of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia related epistaxis. The Medline and Embase databases were interrogated on 15 November 2013 using the search items 'hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia' (title), 'epistaxis' (title) and 'treatment' (title and abstract), and limiting the search to articles published in English. A total of 46 publications were identified, comprising 1 systematic review, 2 randomised, controlled trials, 27 case series, 9 case reports, 4 questionnaire studies and 3 in vitro studies. There is a lack of high-level evidence for the use of many of the available treatments for the specific management of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. Current management should be based on a multidisciplinary team approach involving both a hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia physician and an ENT surgeon, especially when systemic therapy is being considered. The suggested treatment algorithm considers that the severity of epistaxis merits intervention at different levels of the treatment ladder. The patient should be assessed using a reproducible validated assessment tool, for example an epistaxis severity score, to guide treatment. More research is required, particularly in the investigation of topical agents targeting the development and fragility of telangiectasiae in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

  15. Intrathecal gadodiamide for identifying subarachnoid and ventricular neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera-Calleja, Jesús; Góngora-Rivera, Fernando; Soto-Hernández, José Luis; Del-Brutto, Oscar H; Moreno-Andrade, Talía; Gutiérrez-Alvarado, Ramón; Rodríguez-Carbajal, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    Some neurocysticercosis cysts may remain hidden despite novel MRI sequences. This study evaluates the diagnostic value of gadodiamide (GDD)-contrasted MRI cisternography in selected cases of neurocysticercosis. We included patients aged 18-65 years with a probable diagnosis of subarachnoid cysticercosis in whom previous neuroimaging studies failed to demonstrate the presence of cysts. One millilitre of GDD was administered intrathecally as a contrast agent with subsequent performance of MRI. Fourteen patients were included. Optimal contrast diffusion was achieved in nine patients, and partial diffusion was achieved in 4. Intracranial vesicles were identified in 10 patients, with the presence of more than 60 basal subarachnoid vesicles being revealed in all, with five cysts in the fourth ventricle in four patients and a floating cyst in the lateral ventricle in one. In one case, intrathecal GDD demonstrated spinal cysticercosis. No adverse events were reported after intrathecal GDD administration. Intrathecal GDD administration is useful for the diagnosis of subarachnoid and intraventricular neurocysticercosis and can be used to improve diagnostic accuracy in selected cases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Radiological analysis of subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Doo; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik

    1988-01-01

    The CT findings of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysmal rupture were analyzed and compared with cerebral angiography for the purpose of preangiographic prediction of aneurysmal location as well as evaluation of the CT features corresponding to the vasospasm or ischemic neurologic dysfunctions. The results were as follows: 1.Aneurysms could be identified on initial cerebral angiography in 82 out of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and anterior communicating artery aneurysms were most common (42 cases), followed by MCA, posterior communicating artery, ICA, basilar artery in order of frequency. 2.The CT findings of those patients were hemorrhage in subarachnoid space (69%), localized hematoma (47%), ventricular dilatation (31%), enhancing nodule (23%), cisternal enhancement (20%), cerebral infarction (15%), ventricular hemorrhage (14%), and epidural hemorrhage (3%). 3.Localized hematoma was more prevalent in anterior communicating artery aneurysm rupture (54%), and less frequently in MCA, posterior communicating artery and ICA aneurysms. 4.Most of aneurysmal sac could be identified as enhancing nodule on CT when the real size were over 1 cm. 5.The size of ruptured aneurysm could be predicted in many patients with ACA and MCA aneurysm according to the CT features such as hemorrhagic patterns, location of hematomas or enhancing nodules. 6.Localized hematoma or blood clots and cerebral infarction are considered to be the CT features corresponding to the angiographic vasospasm

  17. Radiological analysis of subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-02-15

    The CT findings of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysmal rupture were analyzed and compared with cerebral angiography for the purpose of preangiographic prediction of aneurysmal location as well as evaluation of the CT features corresponding to the vasospasm or ischemic neurologic dysfunctions. The results were as follows: 1.Aneurysms could be identified on initial cerebral angiography in 82 out of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and anterior communicating artery aneurysms were most common (42 cases), followed by MCA, posterior communicating artery, ICA, basilar artery in order of frequency. 2.The CT findings of those patients were hemorrhage in subarachnoid space (69%), localized hematoma (47%), ventricular dilatation (31%), enhancing nodule (23%), cisternal enhancement (20%), cerebral infarction (15%), ventricular hemorrhage (14%), and epidural hemorrhage (3%). 3.Localized hematoma was more prevalent in anterior communicating artery aneurysm rupture (54%), and less frequently in MCA, posterior communicating artery and ICA aneurysms. 4.Most of aneurysmal sac could be identified as enhancing nodule on CT when the real size were over 1 cm. 5.The size of ruptured aneurysm could be predicted in many patients with ACA and MCA aneurysm according to the CT features such as hemorrhagic patterns, location of hematomas or enhancing nodules. 6.Localized hematoma or blood clots and cerebral infarction are considered to be the CT features corresponding to the angiographic vasospasm.

  18. Different drugs for prevention of post subarachnoid block shivering. Randomized, controlled, double blind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Zein Elabdein Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Preoperative administration of granisetron, dexmedetomidine, and tramadol was effective in decreasing the incidence and intensity of post subarachnoid shivering without increasing the incidence of the side effects.

  19. Giant arachnoid granulation: differential diagnosis of acute headache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, S.A.; Heyer, C.M.; Frombach, E.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: We present a case of intense, rapidly evolving headache clinically mimicking meningitis, subarachnoid haemorrhage or venous sinus thrombosis. Clinical examination, standard blood work and central nervous system studies were non-contributory and effectively ruled out these diagnoses. Cranial multidetector CT studies before and after application of intravenous contrast medium performed prior to lumbar tap disclosed a non-enhancing ovoid mass filling the superior sagittal sinus. This lesion posed a differential to venous sinus thrombosis, but ultimately fulfilled the criteria of a giant arachnoid granulation. The imaging characteristics and differential diagnosis of giant arachnoid granulations are discussed

  20. Dabigatran ameliorates post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus development after germinal matrix haemorrhage in neonatal rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebe, Damon; Flores, Jerry J; McBride, Devin W; Krafft, Paul R; Rolland, William B; Lekic, Tim; Zhang, John H

    2017-09-01

    We aim to determine if direct thrombin inhibition by dabigatran will improve long-term brain morphological and neurofunctional outcomes and if potential therapeutic effects are dependent upon reduced PAR-1 stimulation and consequent mTOR activation. Germinal matrix haemorrhage was induced by stereotaxically injecting 0.3 U type VII-S collagenase into the germinal matrix of P7 rat pups. Animals were divided into five groups: sham, vehicle (5% DMSO), dabigatran intraperitoneal, dabigatran intraperitoneal + TFLLR-NH 2 (PAR-1 agonist) intranasal, SCH79797 (PAR-1 antagonist) intraperitoneal, and dabigatran intranasal. Neurofunctional outcomes were determined by Morris water maze, rotarod, and foot fault evaluations at three weeks. Brain morphological outcomes were determined by histological Nissl staining at four weeks. Expression levels of p-mTOR/p-p70s6k at three days and vitronectin/fibronectin at 28 days were quantified. Intranasal and intraperitoneal dabigatran promoted long-term neurofunctional recovery, improved brain morphological outcomes, and reduced intracranial pressure at four weeks after GMH. PAR-1 stimulation tended to reverse dabigatran's effects on post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus development. Dabigatran also reduced expression of short-term p-mTOR and long-term extracellular matrix proteins, which tended to be reversed by PAR-1 agonist co-administration. PAR-1 inhibition alone, however, did not achieve the same therapeutic effects as dabigatran administration.

  1. Time-related changes in cerebral blood flow in subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Tadaharu; Hasue, Masamichi; Ko, Meishyu; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Nakamura, Tatsuya (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan). Hachiouji Medical Center); Miwa, Tetsurou

    1992-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined by the {sup 123}I-IMP SPECT reference sample method in 39 patients with subarachnoid hemorrahge (SAH) due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm, who were referred to a medical center within 36 hours after the onset. SAH and ruptured aneurysm were diagnosed by CT scan and angiography, respectively. By regarding the day of onset as day 0, SAH was divided into three stages: the acute stage during day 0-4, the subacute stage during day 5-20, and the chronic stage during day 21 or more. The prognosis was evaluated with the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS). Average CBFs were 33.39, 29.44, and 33.15 in the acute, subacute, and chronic stages, respectively. The values were all lower than the reference sample value, 43.39. Only a small number of cases, however, had vasospasm on angiography conducted in the acute stage. There was correlation between CT severity in the acute stage and decreased CBF. When low denisty area was seen on CT in the subacute stage, average CBFs were 28.28 and 23.95 in the acute and subacute stages, respectively, in contrast to 35.97 and 32.45 without evidence of low density in the subacute stage. CBF decreased by 0.79 in a group of cisternal drainage from the acute stage to the subacute stage, being smaller than the value (7.15) in a group without drainage. When ventricular-peritoneal shunt was conducted for hydrocepharus in the chronic stage, CBF was increased after surgery. CBF associated with an improvement of the GOS was higher in both the acute and the subacute stages than in severely disabled or death cases. Prognosis was better in a group with acute CBF of 30 or more than a group of less than 30. Serial determination of CBF in SAH was useful for evaluating the condition of SAH, selecting therapeutic methods, and estimating the prognosis. (N.K.).

  2. Flair MR imaging in the Detection of subarachnoid hemorrhage : comparison with CT and T1-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Soo Hyun; Kim, Soo Youn; Lee, Ghi Jai; Shim, Jae Chan; Oh, Tae Kyung; Kim, Ho Kyun [College of Medicine, Jnje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    To compare the findings of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging in the detection of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), with those of precontrast CT and T1-weighted MR imaging. In 13 patients (14 cases) with SAH, FLAIR MR images were retrospectively analyzed and compared with CT (10 patients, 11 cases) and T1-weighted MR images (9 cases). SAH was confirmed on the basis of high density along the subarachnoid space, as seen on precontrast CT, or lumbar puncture. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0T unit. FLAIR MR and CT images were obtained during the acute stage(less than 3 days after ictus) in 10 and 9 cases, respectively, during the subacute stage (4-14 days after ictus) in two cases and one, respectively, and during the chronic stage (more than 15 days after ictus) in two cases and one, respectively. CT was performed before FLAIR MR imaging, and the interval between CT and FLAIR ranged from 24 hours (6 cases) to 2-3 (2 cases) or 4-7 days (3 cases). In each study, the conspicuity of visualization of SAH was graded as excellent, good, fair, or negative at five locations (sylvian fissure, cortical sulci, anterior basal cistern, posterior basal cistern, and perimesencephalic cistern). In all cases, subarachnoid hemorrhages were demonstrated as high signal intensity areas on FLAIR images. The detection rates for SAH on CT and T1-weighted MR images were 100% (11/11) and 89% (8/9), respectively. FLAIR was superior to T1-weighted imaging in the detection of SAH at all sites except the anterior basal cistern (p less than 0.05) and superior to CT in the detection of SAH at the cortical sulci (p less than 0.05). On FLAIR MR images, subarachnoid hemorrhages at all stages are demonstrated as high signal intensity areas; the FLAIR MR sequence is thus considered useful in the detection of SAH. In particular FLAIR is more sensitive than CT for the detection of SAH in the cortical sulci. (author)

  3. Direct costs of modern treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the first year after diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.; Albrecht, K. W.; Beenen, L. F. M.; Groen, R. J. M.; de Haan, R. J.; Vermeulen, M.

    2002-01-01

    Background and Purpose-The purpose of this study was to investigate the current direct costs of modern management of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the first year after diagnosis. Methods-During a 1-year period, we studied all admitted patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from

  4. Direct costs of modern treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the first year after diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Y B W E M; Dijkgraaf, M G W; Albrecht, K W; Beenen, L F M; Groen, R J M; de Haan, R. J.; Vermeulen, M

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the current direct costs of modern management of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the first year after diagnosis. METHODS: During a 1-year period, we studied all admitted patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage

  5. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage secondary to intra-abdominal sepsis: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Egan, Aoife M

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of adrenal failure. Clinical features are non-specific and therefore a high index of suspicion must be maintained in patients at risk. Predisposing factors include infection, malignancy and the post-operative state. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a patient who underwent a left hemicolectomy with primary anastomosis and formation of a defunctioning loop ileostomy for an obstructing colon carcinoma at the splenic flexure. En-bloc splenectomy was performed to ensure an oncologic resection. The patient developed a purulent abdominal collection post-operatively and became septic with hypotension and pyrexia. This precipitated acute bilateral adrenal haemorrhage with consequent adrenal insufficiency. Clinical suspicion was confirmed by radiological findings and a co-syntropin test. Following drainage of the collection, antibiotic therapy and corticosteroid replacement, the patient made an excellent recovery. CONCLUSION: This case highlights the importance of prompt diagnosis and treatment of adrenal failure. In their absence, this condition can rapidly lead to death of the patient.

  6. The protective effect and diagnostic performance of NOX-5 in Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyüktuna, Seyit Ali; Doğan, Halef Okan; Bakir, Mehmet; Elaldi, Nazif; Gözel, Mustafa Gökhan; Engin, Aynur

    2018-04-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute viral haemorrhagic disease. Reactive oxygen species that are mainly generated by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX) enzyme family have a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of many diseases. The serum levels of NOX isoforms in patients with CCHF have yet to be assessed. This prospective study was conducted at Cumhuriyet University, Turkey. Only patients with CCHF confirmed by the National Reference Virology Laboratory were enrolled in the study. The study subjects comprised 67 CCHF patients and 70 healthy control subjects. The quantitative sandwich ELISA technique was used for the determination of serum NOX 1, 2, 4 and 5. Higher median median NOX-1 (P=0.001) and NOX-5 (PNOX-5 levels were found in the low-grade disease group compared to the intermediate-high disease group according to two different severity scores (P=0.003). Negative correlations were also found between the serum NOX-5 levels and the severity scores [(PNOX-1 and NOX-5 were 0.67 (confidence interval: 0.58-0.75) and 0.99 (confidence interval: 0.95-1.00), respectively. Lower NOX-5 levels were found in patients receiving thrombocyte suspension (P=0.004)Conclusions. NOX-5 may have a protective effect on CCHF patients and the measurement of serum NOX-5 levels may be used as a novel biochemical test in the diagnosis of CCHF.

  7. Brain lactate metabolism in humans with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Mauro; Levine, Joshua M; Frangos, Suzanne; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Carrera, Emmanuel; Daniel, Roy T; Levivier, Marc; Magistretti, Pierre J; LeRoux, Peter D

    2012-05-01

    Lactate is central for the regulation of brain metabolism and is an alternative substrate to glucose after injury. Brain lactate metabolism in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been fully elucidated. Thirty-one subarachnoid hemorrhage patients monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain oxygen (PbtO(2)) were studied. Samples with elevated CMD lactate (>4 mmol/L) were matched to PbtO(2) and CMD pyruvate and categorized as hypoxic (PbtO(2) 119 μmol/L) versus nonhyperglycolytic. Median per patient samples with elevated CMD lactate was 54% (interquartile range, 11%-80%). Lactate elevations were more often attributable to cerebral hyperglycolysis (78%; interquartile range, 5%-98%) than brain hypoxia (11%; interquartile range, 4%-75%). Mortality was associated with increased percentage of samples with elevated lactate and brain hypoxia (28% [interquartile range 9%-95%] in nonsurvivors versus 9% [interquartile range 3%-17%] in survivors; P=0.02) and lower percentage of elevated lactate and cerebral hyperglycolysis (13% [interquartile range, 1%-87%] versus 88% [interquartile range, 27%-99%]; P=0.07). Cerebral hyperglycolytic lactate production predicted good 6-month outcome (odds ratio for modified Rankin Scale score, 0-3 1.49; CI, 1.08-2.05; P=0.016), whereas increased lactate with brain hypoxia was associated with a reduced likelihood of good outcome (OR, 0.78; CI, 0.59-1.03; P=0.08). Brain lactate is frequently elevated in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, predominantly because of hyperglycolysis rather than hypoxia. A pattern of increased cerebral hyperglycolytic lactate was associated with good long-term recovery. Our data suggest that lactate may be used as an aerobic substrate by the injured human brain.

  8. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Cerebral Vasospasm following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed cerebral vasospasm is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. While the cellular mechanisms underlying vasospasm remain unclear, it is believed that inflammation may play a critical role in vasospasm. Matrix metalloproteinasees (MMPs are a family of extracellular and membrane-bound proteases capable of degrading the blood-rain barrier (BBB. As such, MMP upregulation following SAH may result in a proinflammatory extravascular environment capable of inciting delayed cerebral vasospasm. This paper presents an overview of MMPs and describes existing data pertinent to delayed cerebral vasospasm.

  9. Epidural anesthesia as a cause of acquired spinal subarachnoid cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklar, E.M.L.; Quencer, R.M.; Green, B.A.; Post, M.J.D.; Montalvo, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Six patients with acquired spinal subarachnoid cysts secondary to epidural anesthesia were evaluated with MR imaging (seven patients) and intraoperative US (three patients). The cysts were located in the lower cervical and thoracic spine. Adhesions and irregularity of the cord surface were frequently noted. Associated intramedullary lesions, including intramedullary cysts and myelomalacia, were seen in two of the patients. Arachnoiditis was unsuspected clinically in three patients, and MR imaging proved to be the diagnostic examination that first suggested the cause of the patients symptoms. The underlying mechanism for the formation of these cysts is a chemically induced arachnoiditis

  10. Presentation of Significant Subarachnoid Hemorrhage without Loss of Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Taylor

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 68-year-old female with history of hypertension presented to the emergency department one hour after the sudden onset of 10/10 headache. The patient had a history of headaches, but described this episode as the “worst of her life” with associated vomiting, mild neck pain with movement, increased light sensitivity, and generalized weakness. The patient denied focal weakness or changes in vision. On exam, the patient was awake and alert with no slurred speech. Gait was intact and strength was 5/5 bilaterally in the upper and lower extremities. She had no facial asymmetry. Significant findings: A non-contrast head CT demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage occupying both cerebral convexities, the anterior interhemispheric fissure, the sylvian fissures, and the basal cisterns. Later CTA would show an 8 mm by 7 mm by 8mm MCA aneurysm near the M1/M2 junction and two pericallosal artery aneurysms, 7 by 6 mm and 8 by 5 mm respectively. The patient underwent external ventricular drain (EVD placement by neurosurgery, followed by coiling of the three aneurysms by interventional radiology. Discussion: Subarachnoid hemorrhages account for 10 percent of cerebrovascular accidents, with mortality rates approaching 50 percent. Most subarachnoid hemorrhages are due to ruptured saccular aneurysms located at bifurcations of arteries within the circle of Willis. Other causes include trauma or AV malformations. Common complications of SAH include vasospasms, cerebral tissue infarction, seizure, and cardiac complications.1 In addition to the sudden severe headache seen in 97 percent of cases, 50 percent of patients experience transient loss of consciousness, and many experience vomiting, meningeal irritation, nuchal rigidity, and photosensitivity.2 One retrospective series evaluating proven non-traumatic, spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhages found nausea or vomiting in 77 percent of patients, loss of consciousness in 53 percent

  11. A case report on subarachnoid and intraventricular neurocysticercosis

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    Chen Shang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is the most common central nervous system helminthic infection in humans. We hereby present a case combining two rare manifestations of neurocysticercosis: the subarachnoid and intraventricular forms. The patient presented with hydrocephalus and neurologic deficits and although endoscopic removal of the cysts and two cycles of postoperative cysticidal drugs resulted in resolution of symptoms, they later recurred. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement and a further cycle of albendazole plus dexamethasone led to substantial clinical improvement. Extraparenchymal neurocysticercosis may be challenging to diagnose and treat and is usually associated with a poorer prognosis. Clinicians should be aware of this condition.

  12. International prospective observational study of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage: Does weekend admission affect outcome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Iain A.; Dalton, Harry R.; Stanley, Adrian J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Out of hours admissions have higher mortality for many conditions but upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage studies have produced variable outcomes. Methods Prospective study of 12 months consecutive admissions of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage from four international high volume ce...

  13. Haemorrhagic cholecystitis: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Natalie

    2014-01-17

    Haemorrhagic cholecystitis is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is a difficult diagnosis to make. This case report describes an orthopaedic patient, who developed deranged liver function tests and anaemia after a hemiarthroplasty of the hip. The patient had upper abdominal pain and black stools which clinically appeared to be melaena. An ultrasound scan of the abdomen was inconclusive, and therefore a CT was performed and the potential diagnosis of haemorrhagic cholecystitis was raised. An endoscopic evaluation of the upper gastrointestinal tract showed no evidence of other causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Following an emergency laparotomy and cholecystectomy, she recovered well. This report aims to increase awareness about the uncommon condition of haemorrhagic cholecystitis, and to educate regarding clinical and radiological signs which lead to this diagnosis.

  14. Regulatory T cells ameliorate tissue plasminogen activator-induced brain haemorrhage after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Leilei; Li, Peiying; Zhu, Wen; Cai, Wei; Liu, Zongjian; Wang, Yanling; Luo, Wenli; Stetler, Ruth A; Leak, Rehana K; Yu, Weifeng; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun; Chen, Gang; Hu, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    Delayed thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) may exacerbate blood-brain barrier breakdown after ischaemic stroke and lead to lethal haemorrhagic transformation. The immune system is a dynamic modulator of stroke response, and excessive immune cell accumulation in the cerebral vasculature is associated with compromised integrity of the blood-brain barrier. We previously reported that regulatory T cells, which function to suppress excessive immune responses, ameliorated blood-brain barrier damage after cerebral ischaemia. This study assessed the impact of regulatory T cells in the context of tPA-induced brain haemorrhage and investigated the underlying mechanisms of action. The number of circulating regulatory T cells in stroke patients was dramatically reduced soon after stroke onset (84 acute ischaemic stroke patients with or without intravenous tPA treatment, compared to 115 age and gender-matched healthy controls). Although stroke patients without tPA treatment gradually repopulated the numbers of circulating regulatory T cells within the first 7 days after stroke, post-ischaemic tPA treatment led to sustained suppression of regulatory T cells in the blood. We then used the murine suture and embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion models of stroke to investigate the therapeutic potential of adoptive regulatory T cell transfer against tPA-induced haemorrhagic transformation. Delayed administration of tPA (10 mg/kg) resulted in haemorrhagic transformation in the ischaemic territory 1 day after ischaemia. When regulatory T cells (2 × 106/mouse) were intravenously administered immediately after delayed tPA treatment in ischaemic mice, haemorrhagic transformation was significantly decreased, and this was associated with improved sensorimotor functions. Blood-brain barrier disruption and tight junction damages were observed in the presence of delayed tPA after stroke, but were mitigated by regulatory T cell transfer. Mechanistic

  15. Genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snow, M.; Bain, N.; Black, J.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of a specific region of the nucleoprotein gene were compared in order to investigate the genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Analysis of the sequence from 128 isolates of diverse geographic and host origin renders this the m......The nucleotide sequences of a specific region of the nucleoprotein gene were compared in order to investigate the genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Analysis of the sequence from 128 isolates of diverse geographic and host origin renders...... importance to disease management issues highlighted....

  16. Giant cystic thymoma with haemorrhage and necrosis: an unusual case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Radha R; Sahu, Kausalya; Shetty, A B; Goel, Garima; Prasad, H V Krishna

    2009-01-01

    Extreme degree of cystic, haemorrhagic and necrotic changes in a thymoma is rare. A 22-year-old male presented with cough, grade 2 dyspnoea, and occasional chest pain for the past six months. Radiological investigations revealed a large cystic lesion in the anterior mediastinum. A benign cystic tumour was suspected. Surgical resection of the tumour was done. Grossly, the almost entirely cystic and haemorrhagic dumb-bell shaped encapsulated tumour showed a subcapsular residual nodule. Histopathological examination was suggestive diagnosis of benign thymoma (World Health Organization [WHO] Type A, medullary type) associated with the rare features of cells with dendritic processes containing melanin pigment seen singly scattered throughout the tumour.

  17. Whole brain CT perfusion combined with CT angiography in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral vasospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He; Zhang, Bo; Li, Shu; Liang, Chuansheng; Xu, Ke; Li, Songbai

    2013-12-01

    To assess cerebral vasospasm (CVS) and monitor cerebral microcirculatory changes in patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) via CT angiography (CTA) combined with whole-brain CT perfusion (CTP) techniques. Sixty patients with SAH (SAH group) and 10 patients without SAH (control group) were selected for a prospective study. CTP combined with CTA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) studies were performed on patients with initial onset of SAH less than three days. CTA and DSA as well as the CTP parameters such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and time-to-peak (TTP) were acquired and analyzed. The relationship of CTA and CTP measurements was assessed in these acute SAH patients. CTP techniques were used to achieve the perfusion maps of the whole brain in patients with acute SAH. Compared to the control group, mean CBF value was significantly lower while both MTT and TTP values were significantly higher in SAH group (all p<0.05). Further analysis revealed that mean CBF in patients with CVS, sCVS, Fisher III-IV and Hunt-Hess III-V significantly decreased when compared to patients with nCVS, asCVS, Fisher I-II and Hunt-Hess I-II (p<0.05). Furthermore both MTT and TTP values were also significantly reduced in patient with CVS, sCVS, Fisher III-IV and Hunt-Hess III-V (p<0.05). The study demonstrated that changes of microcirculation in patients with SAH could be assessed by whole-brain CTP. CTP combined with CTA could detect both macroscopic evident vasospasm on CTA and alterations of microcirculation on CTP. Mean CBF was significantly lower in patients with SAH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Proximity to the treating centre and outcomes following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Cian J; Spears, Julian; Urbach, David; Wallace, M Christopher

    2011-01-01

    In the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), the potential for early complications and the centralization of limited resources often challenge the delivery of timely neurosurgical care. We sought to determine the impact of proximity to the accepting neurosurgical centre on outcomes following aneurysmal SAH. Using administrative data, we analyzed patients undergoing treatment for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage at neurosurgical centres in Ontario between 1995 and 2004. We compared mortality for patients receiving treatment at a centre in their county (in-county) versus those treated from outside counties (out-of-county). We also examined the impact of distance from the patient's residence to the treating centre. The mortality rates were significantly lower for in-county versus out-of-county patients (23.5% vs. 27.6%, p=0.009). This advantage remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders (HR=0.84, p=0.01). The relationship between distance from the treating centre and mortality was biphasic. Under 300 km, mortality increased with increasing distance. Over 300 km, a survival benefit was observed. Proximity to the treating neurosurgical centre impacts survival after aneurysmal SAH. These results have significant implications for the triage of these critically ill patients.

  19. Global cerebral edema and brain metabolism after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbok, Raimund; Ko, Sang-Bae; Schmidt, J Michael; Kurtz, Pedro; Fernandez, Luis; Choi, H Alex; Connolly, E Sander; Lee, Kiwon; Badjatia, Neeraj; Mayer, Stephan A; Claassen, Jan

    2011-06-01

    Global cerebral edema is common among patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with poor outcome. Currently no targeted therapy exists largely due to an incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. This is a prospective observational study including 39 consecutive patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage with multimodal neuromonitoring. Levels of microdialysate lactate-pyruvate ratio, episodes of cerebral metabolic crisis (lactate-pyruvate ratio >40 and brain glucose cerebral perfusion pressure, and transcranial Doppler sonography flow velocities were analyzed. Median age was 54 years (range, 45 to 61 years) and 62% were female. Patients with global cerebral edema on admission (n=24 [62%]) had a higher incidence of metabolic crisis in the first 12 hours of monitoring (n=15 [15% versus 2%], Pcerebral edema. There was no difference in brain tissue oxygen tension or cerebral perfusion pressure between the groups; however, in patients with global cerebral edema, a higher cerebral perfusion pressure was associated with lower lactate-pyruvate ratio (Pcerebral edema is associated with early brain metabolic distress.

  20. Cerebral Vasospasm with Ischemia following a Spontaneous Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia F. Shakur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vasospasm is a well-known consequence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH triggered by blood breakdown products. Here, we present the first case of cerebral vasospasm with ischemia following a spontaneous spinal SAH. A 67-year-old woman, who was on Coumadin for atrial fibrillation, presented with chest pain radiating to the back accompanied by headache and leg paresthesias. The international normalized ratio (INR was 4.5. Ten hours after presentation, she developed loss of movement in both legs and lack of sensation below the umbilicus. Spine MRI showed intradural hemorrhage. Her coagulopathy was reversed, and she underwent T2 to T12 laminectomies. A large subarachnoid hematoma was evacuated. Given her complaint of headache preoperatively and the intraoperative finding of spinal SAH, a head CT was done postoperatively that displayed SAH in peripheral sulci. On postoperative day 5, she became obtunded. Brain MRI demonstrated focal restricted diffusion in the left frontoparietal area. Formal angiography revealed vasospasm in anterior cerebral arteries bilaterally and right middle cerebral artery. Vasospasm was treated, and she returned to baseline within 48 hours. Spontaneous spinal SAH can result in the same sequelae typically associated with aneurysmal SAH, and the clinician must have a degree of suspicion in such patients. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying cerebral vasospasm may explain this unique case.

  1. The Successful Use of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Induced Diffuse Alveolar Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faye Pais

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage (DAH is a catastrophic pulmonary complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. It can result in refractory hypoxaemia despite mechanical ventilation. Increasing lung compliance and worsening pulmonary hypertension can potentiate cardiogenic shock from acute right ventricular failure. In such patients with cardiopulmonary collapse, veno-arterial (V-A ECMO maybe a viable option that can provide the required haemodynamic support. However, the use of V-A ECMO in such patients is limited due to an associated increased risk of bleeding. Our case report describes the successful use of V-A ECMO without the use of systemic anticoagulation in a patient with DAH. Despite the absence of systemic anticoagulation, no thrombotic complications within the circuit were noted.

  2. Familial and idiopathic colonic varices: an unusual cause of lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iredale, J P; Ridings, P; McGinn, F P; Arthur, M J

    1992-09-01

    A patient is described presenting with an acute lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage as a result of extensive colonic varices. Further investigation revealed that there were no oesophageal varices or splenomegaly. Liver biopsy showed grade II fatty change only, with no other specific or significant pathological features. Transhepatic portography showed a raised portal pressure (20 mm/Hg) but the portal system was patent throughout. There was an abnormal leash of vessels in the caecum thought to represent a variceal plexus. This patient was diagnosed as having idiopathic colonic varices. This case is discussed together with nine other reports of idiopathic colonic varices from the published literature. Four of these reports describe idiopathic colonic varices in more than one member of the same family. Possible modes of inheritance, aetiology of variceal change, natural history, and prognosis are discussed.

  3. Reducing Haemorrhagic Transformation after Thrombolysis for Stroke: A Strategy Utilising Minocycline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Blacker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic transformation (HT of recently ischaemic brain is a feared complication of thrombolytic therapy that may be caused or compounded by ischaemia-induced activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. The tetracycline antibiotic minocycline inhibits matrix MMPs and reduces macroscopic HT in rodents with stroke treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA. The West Australian Intravenous Minocycline and TPA Stroke Study (WAIMATSS aims to determine the safety and efficacy of adding minocycline to tPA in acute ischaemic stroke. The WAIMATSS is a multicentre, prospective, and randomised pilot study of intravenous minocycline, 200 mg 12 hourly for 5 doses, compared with standard care, in patients with ischaemic stroke treated with intravenous tPA. The primary endpoint is HT diagnosed by brain CT and MRI. Secondary endpoints include clinical outcome measures. Some illustrative cases from the early recruitment phase of this study will be presented, and future perspectives will be discussed.

  4. Showing no spot sign is a strong predictor of independent living after intracerebral haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havsteen, Inger; Ovesen, Christian; Christensen, Anders F

    2014-01-01

    on the ability to identify patients with a spontaneous, acceptable outcome. METHODS: In a prospective, consecutive single-centre registry of acute stroke patients, we investigated patients with spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) admitted within 4.5 h after symptom onset from April 2009 to January 2013....... RESULTS: Of the 128 patients, 37 (28.9%) had a spot sign on admission CTA. The presence of a spot sign was associated with larger median admission haematoma volume [38.0 ml (IQR 18.0-78.0) vs. 12.0 ml (5.0-24.0); pStroke Scale score [19 (IQR 12......-23) vs. 12 (6-16); pstroke, the median functional outcome was considerably better in patients without spot sign [mRS score 3 (IQR 2-4) vs. 6 (4-6); p

  5. Possible Role of Inflammation and Galectin-3 in Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2018-02-07

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is known as one of the most devastating diseases in the central nervous system. In the past few decades, research on SAH has focused on cerebral vasospasm to prevent post-SAH delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and to improve outcomes. However, increasing evidence has suggested that early brain injury (EBI) is an important mechanism contributing to DCI, cerebral vasospasm as well as poor outcomes. Though the mechanism of EBI is very complex, inflammation is thought to play a pivotal role in EBI. Galectin-3 is a unique chimera type in the galectin family characterized by its β-galactoside-binding lectin, which mediates various pathologies, such as fibrosis, cell adhesion, and inflammation. Recently, two clinical studies revealed galectin-3 to be a possible prognostic biomarker in SAH patients. In addition, our recent report suggested that higher acute-stage plasma galectin-3 levels correlated with subsequent development of delayed cerebral infarction that was not associated with vasospasm in SAH patients. We review the possible role and molecular mechanisms of inflammation as well as galectin-3 in brain injuries, especially focusing on EBI after SAH, and discuss galectin-3 as a potential new therapeutic or research target in post-SAH brain injuries.

  6. Accuracy of Daily Lung Ultrasound for the Detection of Pulmonary Edema Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Craig A; Co, Ivan; Pandey, Aditya S; Gregory Thompson, B; Rajajee, Venkatakrishna

    2016-04-01

    Early detection of pulmonary edema is vital to appropriate fluid management following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Lung ultrasound (LUS) has been shown to accurately identify pulmonary edema in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Our objective was to determine the accuracy of daily screening LUS for the detection of pulmonary edema following SAH. Screening LUS was performed in conjunction with daily transcranial doppler for SAH patients within the delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) risk period in our neuroICU. We reviewed records of SAH patients admitted 7/2012-5/2014 who underwent bilateral LUS on at least 5 consecutive days. Ultrasound videos were reviewed by an investigator blinded to the final diagnosis. "B+ lines" were defined as ≥3 B-lines on LUS. Two other investigators blinded to ultrasound results determined whether pulmonary edema with ARF (PE-ARF) was present during the period of evaluation on the basis of independent chart review, with a fourth investigator performing adjudication in the event of disagreement. The diagnostic accuracy of B+ lines for the detection of PE-ARF and RPE was determined. Of 59 patients meeting criteria for inclusion, 21 (36%) had PE-ARF and 26 (44%) had B+ lines. Kappa for inter-rater agreement was 0.821 (p pulmonary edema following SAH and may assist with fluid titration during the risk period for DCI.

  7. The initial time-course of headache in patients with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čomić, Hata; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2017-08-15

    If acute severe headache disappears early after its onset, the question arises whether subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) should still be ruled out. We studied the initial time-course and minimal duration of headache in a consecutive series of neurologically intact patients with spontaneous SAH. We included patients admitted between 2012 and 2015 within 48h after spontaneous SAH with a normal level of consciousness and no focal deficits. We retrieved data on headache severity, measured with a Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), ictus. We analyzed the proportion of patients with a first NRS 0 and NRS ictus and minimal headache duration. Patients were censored in case of a decrease in level of consciousness, aneurysm treatment, or early discharge. We included 106 patients (62 aneurysmal SAH, 33 perimesencephalic hemorrhage, 11 other spontaneous SAH). All patients were treated with analgesics. Within 48h after ictus, a first NRS 0 was reported by 9 patients (8%;95%CI:3%-14%) and a first NRS ictus. In a cohort of SAH patients with a normal level of consciousness and no focal deficits who all used analgetics, headache disappeared in around 10% within 48h after ictus. Our data indicate that a diagnostic work-up for SAH is also needed in patients using analgesics in whom headache has disappeared after 10h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Inversion of neurovascular coupling after subarachnoid hemorrhage in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbi, Matilde; Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2017-11-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) induces acute changes in the cerebral microcirculation. Recent findings ex vivo suggest neurovascular coupling (NVC), the process that increases cerebral blood flow upon neuronal activity, is also impaired after SAH. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether this occurs also in vivo. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to either sham surgery or SAH by filament perforation. Twenty-four hours later NVC was tested by forepaw stimulation and CO 2 reactivity by inhalation of 10% CO 2 . Vessel diameter was assessed in vivo by two-photon microscopy. NVC was also investigated ex vivo using brain slices. Cerebral arterioles of sham-operated mice dilated to 130% of baseline upon CO 2 inhalation or forepaw stimulation and cerebral blood flow (CBF) increased. Following SAH, however, CO 2 reactivity was completely lost and the majority of cerebral arterioles showed paradoxical constriction in vivo and ex vivo resulting in a reduced CBF response. As previous results showed intact NVC 3 h after SAH, the current findings indicate that impairment of NVC after cerebral hemorrhage occurs secondarily and is progressive. Since neuronal activity-induced vasoconstriction (inverse NVC) is likely to further aggravate SAH-induced cerebral ischemia and subsequent brain damage, inverse NVC may represent a novel therapeutic target after SAH.

  9. Role of P2X purinoceptor 7 in neurogenic pulmonary edema after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Chen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE is an acute and serious complication after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH with high mortality. The present study aimed to test the therapeutic potential of brilliant blue G (BBG, a selective P2X purinoceptor 7 (P2X7R antagonist, on NPE in a rat SAH model. METHODS: SAH was induced by endovascular perforation. 86 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham, vehicle-, or BBG-treatment groups. Mortality, body weight, SAH grading, neurological deficits, NPE clinical symptoms, and pulmonary index were measured at 24 hours following SAH. Western blot, gelatin zymography, lung histopathology, and immunofluorescence staining were performed in the left lung lobe to explore the underlying mechanisms at 24 hours post-surgery. RESULTS: The incidence of clinical symptoms was correlated with pulmonary index. P2X7R and the marker of alveolar type I epithelial cells (the mucin-type glycoprotein T1-α immunoreactivities were generally co-localized. BBG administration decreased mature interleukin-1β, myeloperoxidase, and matrix metallopeptidase-9 activation, but increased tight junction proteins, such as ZO-1 and occludin, which ameliorated pulmonary edema via anti-inflammation and improved neurological deficits. CONCLUSION: P2X7R inhibition prevented NPE after SAH by attenuating inflammation. Thus, BBG is a potential therapeutic application for NPE after SAH and warrants further research.

  10. Prenatal MR imaging features of isolated cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino, Francesca; Malova, Mariya; Ramenghi, Luca A.; Cesaretti, Claudia; Parazzini, Cecilia; Doneda, Chiara; Righini, Andrea; Rossi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal features of isolated cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions have not been sufficiently characterised. We aimed to better define their MR imaging characteristics, documenting the location, extension, evolution stage and anatomic sequelae, and to better understand cerebellar haemorrhage pathophysiology. We screened our foetal MR imaging database (3200 cases) for reports of haemorrhagic lesions affecting only the cerebellum (without any supratentorial bleeding or other clastic lesions), defined as one of the following: T2-weighted hypointense or mixed hypo-/hyperintense signal; rim of T2-weighted hypointense signal covering the surface of volume-reduced parenchyma; T1-weighted hyperintense signal; increased DWI signal. Seventeen cases corresponded to the selection criteria. All lesions occurred before the 26th week of gestation, with prevalent origin from the peripheral-caudal portion of the hemispheres and equal frequency of unilateral/bilateral involvement. The caudal vermis appeared affected in 2/3 of cases, not in all cases confirmed postnatally. Lesions evolved towards malformed cerebellar foliation. The aetiology and pathophysiology were unknown, although in a subset of cases intra- and extracranial venous engorgement seemed to play a key role. Onset from the peripheral and caudal portion of the hemispheres seems characteristic of prenatal cerebellar haemorrhagic lesions. Elective involvement of the peripheral germinal matrix is hypothesised. (orig.)

  11. Accuracy in diagnosis of postpartum haemorrhage using visual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postpartum haemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal death in the developing country and yet is poorly diagnosed due to inaccurate measurement of blood loss following delivery. A study was carried out at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH) Tanzania between 14th October 2005 and 31st January 2006 to determine ...

  12. Review article: Helicobacter pylori infection in peptic ulcer haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leerdam, M. E.; Tytgat, G. N. J.

    2002-01-01

    In this overview, medical advice for routine clinical practice regarding peptic ulcer haemorrhage (PUH) is given, based on the extensive literature about Helicobacter pylori and the controversial results about the interaction of H. pylori infection and nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)

  13. Haemorrhagic Vaginal Discharge Following Ovariectomy in a Three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemorrhagic Vaginal Discharge Following Ovariectomy in a Three Year Old Domestic Short-haired Cat. RA Ajadi, OO Adebayo, TA Ajadi. Abstract. Nigerian Veterinary Journal, VOL:33 (1) 403-406. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  14. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callonnec, F.; Gerardin, E.; Thiebot, J. [Department of Radiology, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, F-76031 Rouen cedex (France); Marie, J.P.; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J. [Department of Otolaryngology, Rouen University Hospital (France); Marsot-Dupuch, K. [Department of Radiology, St. Antoine, Paris University Hospital (France)

    1999-06-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan`s disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 11 refs.

  15. Expression of VP60 gene from rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The VP60 gene from rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) YL strain in Northeast of China, under control of the ats1A promoter from Rubisco small subunit genes of Arabidopsis thaliana, was introduced into the transfer deoxyribonucleic acid (T-DNA) region of plant transfer vector pCAMBIA1300 and transferred to ...

  16. Marburg haemorrhagic fever: A rare but fatal disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pain, nausea and vomiting. Most patients deteriorate rapidly with severe haemorrhages between days 5 and 7, from multiple sites including the nose, gums, intestines and ... tests as they may continue to bleed from the puncture sites despite efforts to control such bleeding. In addition, this may expose the practitioner to the.

  17. Uterine artery embolization: an effective treatment for intractable obstetric haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, T.-M.; Tseng, H.-S.; Lee, R.-C.; Wang, J.-H.; Chang, C.-Y.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To present the findings of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in the management of obstetric haemorrhage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From October 1999 to February 2003, 10 women with postpartum haemorrhage (n=7) and post-abortion haemorrhage with placenta accreta (n=3), were referred to our department for pelvic angiography and possible arterial embolization. RESULTS: Angiography revealed engorged and tortuous uterine arteries in all patients; and contrast medium extravasation in three patients. Eight patients (three with and five without detectable active bleeding) then underwent bilateral UAE. Medium-sized (250-355 μm) polyvinyl alcohol particles were injected via a coaxial catheter into the uterine arteries, followed by gelatin sponge pieces via a 4 F Cobra catheter. Microcoil devascularization was also performed in the two patients with visible, active bleeding. The vaginal bleeding resolved in all patients, without any ischaemic complications. At follow-up, all patients who underwent UAE had normal menstruation; three of them subsequently gave birth to full-term healthy babies. CONCLUSION: Selective UAE by the coaxial method is safe and effective to control obstetric haemorrhage, with the potential to preserve fertility

  18. Pattern of Antepartum Haemorrhage at the Lagos University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Errata: Note that the original file was found to have errors. The erroneous file was removed and only the corrected file is now available for download (errata). The incidence of Antepartum Haemorrhage (APH) was 3.5%. Placenta praevia with an incidence of 2.0% constituted 58.4% of the cause of APH, followed by placental ...

  19. Uterine artery embolization: an effective treatment for intractable obstetric haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, T.-M.; Tseng, H.-S. E-mail: hstseng@vghtpe.gov.tw; Lee, R.-C.; Wang, J.-H.; Chang, C.-Y

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To present the findings of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in the management of obstetric haemorrhage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From October 1999 to February 2003, 10 women with postpartum haemorrhage (n=7) and post-abortion haemorrhage with placenta accreta (n=3), were referred to our department for pelvic angiography and possible arterial embolization. RESULTS: Angiography revealed engorged and tortuous uterine arteries in all patients; and contrast medium extravasation in three patients. Eight patients (three with and five without detectable active bleeding) then underwent bilateral UAE. Medium-sized (250-355 {mu}m) polyvinyl alcohol particles were injected via a coaxial catheter into the uterine arteries, followed by gelatin sponge pieces via a 4 F Cobra catheter. Microcoil devascularization was also performed in the two patients with visible, active bleeding. The vaginal bleeding resolved in all patients, without any ischaemic complications. At follow-up, all patients who underwent UAE had normal menstruation; three of them subsequently gave birth to full-term healthy babies. CONCLUSION: Selective UAE by the coaxial method is safe and effective to control obstetric haemorrhage, with the potential to preserve fertility.

  20. Periventricular-intraventricular haemorrhage in low-birth-weight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of periventricular-intraventricular haemorrhage (PV-IVH) aInong very-low-birthweight infants at Baragwanath Hospital has not been well docwnented. In this prospective study, a total of 282 live-born infants with birth weights of 1 000 - 1 749 g were studied over a 41/2-month period. Every infant had at least ...

  1. Surveillance of viral haemorrhagic fevers in Ghana: entomological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: A total of 2804 households were surveyed to estimate larval indices and man-vector contacts of potential vectors of viral haemorrhagic fevers such as Yellow fever and Dengue. Over 56% households in each study site were positive for Aedes larvae. Relatively higher Breteaux index (BI) and Container index (CI) ...

  2. Post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage following traditional uvulectomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    routinely performed in children due to the traditional belief that an elongated uvula is responsible for all throat problems, including suffocation during sleep in the neonatal period. Occasionally, it is done during ethnic identification ritual practices.2 The commonest complications following this procedure include haemorrhage,.

  3. Management of haemorrhage secondary to a pseudoaneurysm of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (CT) scan revealed multiple pancreatic body calcifications and a dilated biliary tree. In the region of the pancreatic head, a 6 cm pseudoan- eurysm with contained contrast enhancement was identified (Fig. 1). Management of haemorrhage secondary to a pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery. Affes Nejmeddine ...

  4. Life threatening vaginal haemorrhage from coital laceration in a post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case report: A 55-year-old woman who presented as an emergency with haemorrhagic shock following vaginal bleeding from consensual coitus is presented. She was resuscitated with intravenous fluids and blood transfusions. The vaginal laceration of about 5 cm on the right side of the posterior fornix was sutured ...

  5. Massive pulmonary haemorrhage as a cause of death in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obstetric information revealed that 29 mothers (93.5%) experienced obstetric complications, viz. preeclampsia/ eclampsia syndrome 21 (64.5%), abruptio placentae 5 (16.1 %) and previous pregnancy losses 9 ... The majority of babies suffering pulmonary haemorrhage were not associated with intensive care management.

  6. Functional recovery differs between ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, V.P.; Ketelaar, M.; Visser-Meily, A.J.; de Groot, V.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Lindeman, E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is a difference between patients with a cerebral infarction and those with an intracerebral haemorrhage with respect to the development of independence in activities of daily living over the first year post-stroke. Methods: Patients after first-ever stroke who

  7. Functional recovery differs between ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Vera P. M.; Ketelaar, Marjoliin; Visser-Meily, Anne J. M.; de Groot, Vincent; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Lindeman, Eline

    Objective: To determine whether there is a difference between patients with a cerebral infarction and those with an intracerebral haemorrhage with respect to the development of independence in activities of daily living over the first year post-stroke. Methods: Patients after first-ever stroke who

  8. Review of Primary Postpartum Haemorrhage in Sagamu, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Out of these deliveries, 76 had primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), giving a prevalence of 3.1%. Uterine atony and genital tract trauma were the main causes of the primary PPH. Associated factors were prolonged second and third stages of labour, induction and augmentation of labour with oxytocin and instrumental ...

  9. New trends in the management of postpartum haemorrhage | Dyer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New trends in the management of postpartum haemorrhage. ... Africa is poor access to basic obstetric care, blood products and basic commodities, such as electricity, for the refrigeration of blood and drugs such as oxytocin.1 Nevertheless, there are many areas where management, and hence outcomes, could be improved.

  10. Newborn haemorrhagic disorders: about 30 cases | El Hasbaoui ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We conducted a descriptive study from December 2015 to April 2016, about newborns admitted to medical emergencies for haemorrhagic syndrome defined by ... in most of cases with exception (nine babies had pallor with hypotonia, three babies suffered from hypovolemic shock, respiratory distress(10%), drowsiness, ...

  11. Rainbow trout offspring with different resistance to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slierendrecht, W.J.; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Juul-Madsen, H.R.

    2001-01-01

    To study immunological and immunogenetical parameters related to resistance against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS), attempts to make gynogenetic strains of rainbow trout selected for high and low resistance to VHS were initiated in 1988. The first gynogenetic generation of inbreeding resulted...

  12. Comparison of serum lipid profile in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, A.; Sharif, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    To compare serum lipid profile between patients of ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes. Study Design: Cross sectional, comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from August 2004 to February 2005. Methodology: Patients with diagnosis of stroke comprising 100 consecutive patients each of ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes were included in the study while patients on lipid lowering therapy were excluded from study. To determine the subtype of stroke, clinical examination followed by CT scan of brain was done. A serum sample after 8 hours of overnight fasting was taken on the next day of admission for both groups of patients. Total serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol was determined, using enzymatic colorimetric method. Statistical analysis was done by comparison of lipid profile in two subgroups, using proportion test for any significant difference. Results: The mean age at presentation of patients with stroke was 64.2+-12 years with a male to female ratio of 3.6:1. In 100 ischaemic stroke patients, raised serum total cholesterol was seen in 42, triglyceride in 04, LDL-cholesterol in 05 and VLDL-cholesterol in 07 patients. Serum HDL-cholesterol was below the normal reference in 31 cases. On the other hand, serum total cholesterol and triglycerides was raised in 05 patients each, LDL-cholesterol in 09 and VLDL-cholesterol in 03 patients of haemorrhagic stroke. Serum HDL-cholesterol was below normal in 04 patients of haemorrhagic stroke. On comparison, there were significantly greater number of patients with raised serum cholesterol and low HDL-cholesterol in ischaemic stroke than haemorrhagic stroke (p < 0.05). No statistical significance was found on comparing serum values of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke for triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol and VLDL-cholesterol. Conclusion: Ischaemic stroke patients had high serum total cholesterol and lower HDL-cholesterol levels as compared to

  13. Cardiac tamponade in acute rheumatic carditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, A T; Mah, P K; Chia, B L

    1983-01-01

    In patients with valvular heart disease, fever, and cardiomegaly echocardiography is an invaluable noninvasive tool. In this report we describe a young female presenting with cardiac tamponade due to acute rheumatic carditis. Echocardiography showed an exudative pericardial effusion which was haemorrhagic on pericardiocentesis. She responded to steroid therapy with resolution of carditis and pericardial effusion.

  14. Time-dependent test characteristics of head computed tomography in patients suspected of nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Daan; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Kemperman, Hans; Linn, Francisca H H; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2012-08-01

    A recent study suggested that in patients with acute headache suspicious of nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis is not needed to rule out SAH if head CT performed ≤6 hours after ictus is negative. Before implementation in daily practice, these results need replication. Therefore, we investigated test characteristics of head CT in patients with a clinical suspicion of SAH. Patients suspicious of SAH and a normal level of consciousness presenting to our tertiary care hospital between 2005 and 2012 were included. All patients had a head CT interpreted by experienced neuroradiologists and CSF spectrophotometry if head CT was negative or inconclusive. We determined test characteristics with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for nontraumatic SAH of head CT performed ≤6 or >6 hours after onset of headache. Sensitivity of head CT ≤6 hours after ictus (n=137) was 98.5% (95% CI, 92.1%-100%), diagnosing all patients with aneurysmal and perimesencephalic SAH, but not with a cervical arteriovenous malformation. Sensitivity of head CT performed >6 hours after ictus (n=113) was 90.0% (95% CI, 76.3-97.2). After exclusion of patients with an atypical presentation without headache, sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of head CT ≤6 hours were all 100%. In patients presenting with acute headache and a normal head CT ≤6 hours after ictus, as interpreted by experienced neuroradiologists, there is no added value of CSF analysis. In patients with an atypical presentation without headache and in patients presenting >6 hours after ictus, CSF analysis is still indicated.

  15. Importance of accessory outflow pathways in hydrocephalus after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griebel, R.W.; Black, P.M.; Pile-Spellman, J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    This study evaluated the changes in pathways of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow that accompanied acute and compensated hydrocephalus in the rabbit. Intraventricularly injected 99mTc antimony sulfide was used as a tracer of outflow pathways, and specified structures were counted 12 to 24 hours after injection. Fifteen rabbits were divided into three groups: 1) an acutely hydrocephalic group in which 3 cisternal injections of blood were followed by a study of CSF pressure, ventricular size, and CSF outflow pathways 1 week after the last injection; 2) a control group treated according to the same protocol, except that sterile saline was injected instead of blood; and 3) a chronic group also treated according to the same protocol but in which the animals were maintained an average of 4 weeks after the last blood injection. Ventricular size was measured by computed digitation and expressed as an area ratio of ventricle to brain (VBR). In control animals, 11.8% of the injected colloid dosage was found in cranial perineural lymphatic channels, and 4.8% appeared in the spinal cord. The mean CSF pressure was 149 +/- 20.2 mm H20 (mean +/- SE) and the mean VBR was 0.040 +/- 0.003. In animals evaluated 1 week after subarachnoid injection, accessory cranial perineural lymphatic outflow decreased significantly to 3.4%, and spinal cord activity increased to 9.8% (P less than 0.05, two-tailed t-test). These animals were hydrocephalic and had CSF pressure of 247 +/- 25.1 mm H20 (mean +/- SE) and VBR of 0.083 +/- 0.009

  16. Natural course of subarachnoid hemorrhage is worse in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Hendrik Pahl

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a major risk factor for poor outcome in patients with ruptured or unruptured intracranial aneurysms (IA submitted to treatment. It impairs several physiologic patterns related to cerebrovascular hemodynamics and homeostasis. Objective Evaluate clinical, radiological patterns and prognostic factors of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients according to age. Method Three hundred and eighty nine patients with aneurismal SAH from a Brazilian tertiary institution (Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo were consecutively evaluated from 2002 to 2012 according to Fisher and Hunt Hess classifications and Glasgow Outcome Scale. Results There was statistically significant association of age with impaired clinical, radiological presentation and outcomes in cases of SAH. Conclusion Natural course of SAH is worse in elderly patients and thus, proper recognition of the profile of such patients and their outcome is necessary to propose standard treatment.

  17. [Giant racemose subarachnoid and intraventricular neurocysticercosis: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Larsen, Alvaro; Monteagudo, Maria; Lozano-Setien, Elena; Garcia-Garcia, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the most frequent parasitic disease of the central nervous system. It is caused by the larvae of Taenia solium, which can affect different anatomical sites. In Spain there is an increasing prevalence mainly due to immigration from endemic areas. The extraparenchymal forms are less common, but more serious because they usually develop complications. Neuroimaging plays a major role in the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease, supported by serology and a compatible clinical and epidemiological context. First-line treatments are cysticidal drugs such as albendazole and praziquantel, usually coadministered with corticosteroids, and in some cases surgery is indicated. We here report a case of neurocysticercosis with simultaneous intraventricular and giant racemose subarachnoid involvement. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Recurrent craniospinal subarachnoid hemorrhage in cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA usually manifests as cerebral hemorrhage, especially as nontraumatic hemorrhages in normotensive elderly patients. Other manifestations are subarachnoid (SAH, subdural, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH and superficial hemosiderosis. A 52-year-old hypertensive woman presented with recurrent neurological deficits over a period of 2 years. Her serial brain magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans showed recurrent SAH hemorrhage, and also intracerebral, IVH and spinal hemorrhage, with superficial siderosis. Cerebral angiograms were normal. Right frontal lobe biopsy showed features of CAA. CAA can present with unexplained recurrent SAH hemorrhage, and may be the initial and prominent finding in the course of disease in addition to superficial cortical siderosis and intracerebal and spinal hemorrhages.

  19. Hydrocephalus after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocephalus (HCP is a common complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this review, we summarize the advanced research on HCP and discuss the understanding of the molecular originators of HCP and the development of diagnoses and remedies of HCP after SAH. It has been reported that inflammation, apoptosis, autophagy, and oxidative stress are the important causes of HCP, and well-known molecules including transforming growth factor, matrix metalloproteinases, and iron terminally lead to fibrosis and blockage of HCP. Potential medicines for HCP are still in preclinical status, and surgery is the most prevalent and efficient therapy, despite respective risks of different surgical methods, including lamina terminalis fenestration, ventricle-peritoneal shunting, and lumbar-peritoneal shunting. HCP remains an ailment that cannot be ignored and even with various solutions the medical community is still trying to understand and settle why and how it develops and accordingly improve the prognosis of these patients with HCP.

  20. Nimodipine in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a randomized study of intravenous or peroral administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronvall, Erik; Undrén, Per; Rommer, Bertil Roland

    2009-01-01

    OBJECT: The calcium antagonist nimodipine has been shown to reduce the incidence of ischemic complications following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although most randomized studies have been focused on the effect of the peroral administration of nimodipine, intravenous infusion...

  1. Role of unphosphorylated transcription factor STAT3 in late cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samraj, Ajoy K; Müller, Anne H; Grell, Anne-Sofie

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms behind increased cerebral vasospasm and local inflammation in late cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are poorly elucidated. Using system biology tools and experimental SAH models, we have identified signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3...

  2. Effects of prostacyclin on cerebral blood flow and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Wetterslev, Jørn; Stavngaard, Trine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DINDs) are a major contributing factor for poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this trial, we investigated the therapeutic potential of prostacyclin, an endogen substance with known effect on vascular tone...... was initiated day 5 after subarachnoid hemorrhage and discontinued day 10. Primary outcome was the difference in change from baseline in global cerebral blood flow. Secondary outcome measures were occurrence of DIND, angiographic vasospasm, and clinical outcome at 3 months. RESULTS: No statistically significant...... parameters or clinical outcome were found between the 3 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Administration of prostacyclin to patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage may be safe and feasible. Global cerebral blood flow after subarachnoid hemorrhage is not markedly affected by administration of prostacyclin in the tested dose...

  3. Uterine massage for preventing postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeyr, G Justus; Abdel-Aleem, Hany; Abdel-Aleem, Mahmoud A

    2013-07-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) (bleeding from the genital tract after childbirth) is a major cause of maternal mortality and disability, particularly in under-resourced areas. In these settings, uterotonics are often not accessible. There is a need for simple, inexpensive techniques which can be applied in low-resourced settings to prevent and treat PPH. Uterine massage is recommended as part of the routine active management of the third stage of labour. However, it is not known whether it is effective. If shown to be effective, uterine massage would represent a simple intervention with the potential to have a major effect on PPH and maternal mortality in under-resourced settings. To determine the effectiveness of uterine massage after birth and before or after delivery of the placenta, or both, to reduce postpartum blood loss and associated morbidity and mortality. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 April 2013). All published, unpublished and ongoing randomised controlled trials comparing uterine massage alone or in addition to uterotonics before or after delivery of the placenta, or both, with non-massage. Two researchers independently considered trials for eligibility, assessed risk of bias and extracted the data using the agreed form. Data were checked for accuracy. The effect of uterine massage commenced before or after placental delivery were first assessed separately, and then the combined for an overall result. This review included two randomised controlled trials. The first trial included 200 women who were randomised to receive uterine massage or no massage following delivery of the placenta, after active management of the third stage of labour including use of oxytocin. The numbers of women with blood loss more than 500 mL was small, with no statistically significant difference (risk ratio (RR) 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16 to 1.67). There were no cases of retained placenta in either group. The mean

  4. Clinical Outcome Prediction in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Bayesian Neural Networks with Fuzzy Logic Inferences

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Benjamin W. Y.; Macdonald, R. Loch; Baker, Andrew; Levine, Mitchell A. H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The novel clinical prediction approach of Bayesian neural networks with fuzzy logic inferences is created and applied to derive prognostic decision rules in cerebral aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Methods. The approach of Bayesian neural networks with fuzzy logic inferences was applied to data from five trials of Tirilazad for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (3551 patients). Results. Bayesian meta-analyses of observational studies on aSAH prognostic factors gave gene...

  5. Severe cerebral hypovolemia on perfusion CT and lower body weight are associated with parenchymal haemorrhage after thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsetsou, S.; Eskandari, A.; Michel, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne CHUV, Department of Neurology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Amiguet, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, R.; Maeder, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Jiang, B.; Wintermark, M. [Stanford University and Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Division, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Haemorrhagic transformation of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and particularly parenchymal haemorrhage (PH) remains a feared complication of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). We aimed to identify clinical and perfusion CT (PCT) variables which are independently associated with PHs. In this observational cohort study, based on the Acute Stroke Registry Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL) from 2003 to December 2013, we selected patients with AIS involving the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory who were thrombolysed within 4.5 h of symptoms' onset and who had a good quality baseline PCT at the beginning of IVT. In addition to demographic, clinical, laboratory and non-contrast CT data, volumes of salvageable tissue and ischemic core on PCT, as well as absolute CBF and CBV values within the ischemic regions were compared in patients with and without PH in multivariate analysis. Of the 190 included patients, 24 (12.6%) presented a PH (11 had PH1 and 13 had PH2). In multivariate analysis of the clinical and radiological variables, the lowest CBV in the core and lower body weight was both significantly associated with PH (p = 0.009 and p = 0.024, respectively). In thrombolysed MCA strokes, maximal hypoperfusion severity depicted by lowest CBV values in the core region and lower body weight are independently correlated with PH. This information, if confirmed in other case series, may add to the stratification of revascularisation decisions in patients with a perceived high PH risk. (orig.)

  6. Innovative approach for prevention and treatment of post subarachnoid hemorrhage vasospasm: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramana, Neelam K; Rao, Shailesh A V; Naik, Arun L; Shetty, Kishore; Murthy, Paparaja; Bansal, Abhilash; Panotopoulos, Christos

    2012-04-01

    More than one third of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) develop clinically significant vasospasm, as a leading morbidity and mortality factor for these patients. It is widely accepted that a) Degradation products of blood are the causative factors of vasospasm b) The amount of subarachnoid blood seen on admission CT is correlated to the risk of vasospasm c) Reducing the subarachnoid clot burden at the time of surgery reduces the risk of vasospasm. But there is no existing method to clear the blood from subarachnoid spaces satisfactorily. We have evaluated safety and feasibility of fluid exchange catheter system in SAH, to achieve this goal. We were successful in clearing cisternal blood in three patients with aneurysmal rupture with fluid exchange catheter system. Baseline CT scan of brain was performed immediately after the surgery and then at the end of irrigation. The amount of subarachnoid blood was evaluated. This innovative, fluid exchange catheter system infuses and aspirates micro volumes of drug solution in a cyclic mode, ensuring isobaric exchange of fluids. The result is good clearance of blood in subarachnoid spaces were seen in all the patients. Also, significant improvement in neurological deficits secondary to vasospasm was seen. We conclude that the fluid exchange catheter system is safe and adoptable in neurosurgical practice.

  7. Subarachnoid space diameter in chromosomally abnormal fetuses at 11-13 weeks' gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Carolina; Rouxinol-Dias, Ana Lidia; Loureiro, Teresa; Nicolaides, Kypros

    2018-01-16

    To examine the subarachnoid space diameters in chromosomally abnormal fetuses at 11-13 weeks' gestation. Stored three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes of the fetal head at 11-13 weeks' gestation from 407 euploid and 88 chromosomally abnormal fetuses (trisomy 21, n = 40; trisomy 18, n = 19; trisomy 13, n = 7; triploidy, n = 14; Turner syndrome, n = 8) were analyzed. The subarachnoid space diameters, measured in the sagittal and transverse planes of the fetal head, in relation to biparietal diameter (BPD) in each group of aneuploidies was compared to that in euploid fetuses. A total of 20 head volumes were randomly selected and all the measurements were recorded by two different observers to examine the interobserver variability in measurements. In euploid fetuses, the anteroposterior, transverse and sagittal diameters of the subarachnoid space increased with BPD. The median of the observed to expected diameters for BPD were significantly increased in triploidy and trisomy 13 but were not significantly altered in trisomies 21 and 18 or Turner syndrome. In triploidy, the subarachnoid space diameters for BPD were above the 95th centile of euploid fetuses in 92.9% (13 of 14) cases. The intraclass reliability or agreement was excellent for all three subarachnoid space diameters. Most fetuses with triploidy at 11-13 weeks' gestation demonstrate increased subarachnoid space diameters.

  8. Equal contribution of increased intracranial pressure and subarachnoid blood to cerebral blood flow reduction and receptor upregulation after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Laboratory investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    OBJECT: Cerebral ischemia remains the key cause of disability and death in the late phase after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and its pathogenesis is still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the change in intracranial pressure or the extravasated blood causes....... The effects in all parameters were more pronounced for SAH than for saline injection. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed that both the elevation of intracranial pressure and subarachnoid blood per se contribute approximately equally to the late CBF reductions and receptor upregulation following SAH....

  9. Rehabilitation following intracerebral haemorrhage secondary to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilsby, Amanda; Buddha, Sandeep

    2013-05-24

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was first used in adults with severe respiratory failure in the 1970s. Its use has been steadily increasing since the 1990s after a trial demonstrated improved survival. There are currently seven centres in the UK offering ECMO to adults. Neurological complications are often picked up within the first few days of initiating ECMO. Intracerebral haemorrhage is a well recognised complication and it is the leading cause of death in infants on ECMO and rates of 9-18.9% in adults have been reported. We report a 52-year-old woman admitted in severe type 1 respiratory failure in January 2012. She was transferred to a tertiary centre and suffered bitemporal and right parietal haemorrhages on ECMO in late February. She was repatriated to our unit for rehabilitation in April 2012. Her rehabilitation needs represent the complexity of this patient group with multiple medical, behavioural and physical challenges.

  10. Eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia in Danish aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank; Jensen, Britt Bang

    Aquaculture Association, Silkeborg, Denmark 4Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, Glostrup, Denmark 5Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, Vejle, Denmark Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) virus was first isolated in Denmark in 1962, when more than half of the approximately 800 Danish fish farms......Eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia in Danish aquaculture Olesen N.J.1, Skall H.F.1, Jensen B.B.2, Henriksen N.H.3, Mellergård S.4, H. Korsholm H.5 1National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Aarhus, Denmark 2Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway 3Danish...... all affected areas that the country managed to free itself totally from VHS. Molecular tracing of the origin of VHSV isolates revealed that despite strict trade regulations and ban on introduction of live salmonids into the country VHSV seemed to have crossed the boarders into Denmark in a couple...

  11. Therapeutic management of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Calle-Prieto, Fernando; Martín-Quirós, Alejandro; Trigo, Elena; Mora-Rillo, Marta; Arsuaga, Marta; Díaz-Menéndez, Marta; Arribas, José Ramón

    2017-06-29

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever has been reported in more than 30 countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Eastern Europe, with an increasing incidence in recent years, especially in Europe. Because no specific treatments have demonstrated efficacy, supportive treatment is essential, as well as the provision of a centre with the appropriate means to guarantee the safety of its healthcare professionals. Laboratory monitoring of thrombocytopenia, severe coagulopathy or liver failure is of critical importance. Patients with Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever should be admitted to High Level Isolation Units where appropriate biocontainment procedures can prevent nosocomial transmission through infected fluids or accidents with contaminated material. In case of high-risk exposures, early administration of ribavirin should be considered. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  12. Surgical Trial in Lobar Intracerebral Haemorrhage (STICH II Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowan Elise N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the spectrum of spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage there are some patients with large or space occupying haemorrhage who require surgery for neurological deterioration and others with small haematomas who should be managed conservatively. There is equipoise about the management of patients between these two extremes. In particular there is some evidence that patients with lobar haematomas and no intraventricular haemorrhage might benefit from haematoma evacuation. The STICH II study will establish whether a policy of earlier surgical evacuation of the haematoma in selected patients will improve outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. Methods/Design an international multicentre randomised parallel group trial. Only patients for whom the treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise about the benefits of early craniotomy compared to initial conservative treatment are eligible. All patients must have a CT scan confirming spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (≤1 cm from the cortex surface of the brain and 10-100 ml in volume. Any clotting or coagulation problems must be corrected and randomisation must take place within 48 hours of ictus. With 600 patients, the study will be able to demonstrate a 12% benefit from surgery (2p Stratified randomisation is undertaken using a central 24 hour randomisation service accessed by telephone or web. Patients randomised to early surgery should have the operation within 12 hours. Information about the status (Glasgow Coma Score and focal signs of all patients through the first five days of their trial progress is also collected in addition to another CT scan at about five days (+/- 2 days. Outcome is measured at six months via a postal questionnaire to the patient. Primary outcome is death or severe disability defined using a prognosis based 8 point Glasgow Outcome Scale. Secondary outcomes include: Mortality, Rankin, Barthel, EuroQol, and Survival. Trial

  13. Cerebral haemorrhage as the presenting feature of myeloproliferative disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kondlapudi, Jyothi; O’Connor, Rory J; Mawer, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    Myeloproliferative disorders predispose individuals to bleeding and thrombosis, often with devastating consequences. We report a 41-year-old man who presented with headache, amnesia and dysphagia due to cerebral haemorrhage. Extensive investigation revealed the cause of the neurological syndrome as an underlying essential thrombocytosis. The patient made a full recovery following extensive inpatient and community rehabilitation, returning to work after 6 months. We discuss the diagnosis and m...

  14. A Q fever case mimicking crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Karabay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is the bacterium that causes Q fever. Human infection is mainly transmitted from cattle, goats and sheep. The disease is usually self-limited. Pneumonia and hepatitis are the most common clinical manifestations. In this study, we present a case of Q fever from the western part of Turkey mimicking Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF in terms of clinical and laboratory findings.

  15. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever among children in north-eastern Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilber, E; Cakir, M; Acar, E A; Orhan, F; Yaris, N; Bahat, E; Okten, A; Erduran, E

    2009-03-01

    To analyse the epidemiological and clinical features of children with Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) in north-eastern Turkey. A retrospective study of demographic features and physical and laboratory findings in 21 children with CCHF is described. Clinical course, treatment modalities and outcome were analysed. Most patients were admitted in June and July 2008; most were from the Gumushane and Kelkit valleys and half of them lived in rural areas. Mean (SD) age was 10.3 (3.9) years and the disease was more common in males (71.4%). Approximately 70% had a history of tick bite. The main symptoms were fever (17, 80.9%), nausea (11, 52.3%), malaise (10, 47.6%) and headache (7, 33.3%). At initial examination, approximately 70% of patients had leukopenia and 65% had thrombocytopenia. Anaemia developed during follow-up in six patients. Liver involvement was seen in 12 patients and one patient had acute tubular necrosis. Six patients had haemophagocytosis. Patients were hospitalised for a median 8 days (range 3-22) and nine patients had bleeding from various sites approximately 3-5 days after hospitalisation. Subcutaneous haematoma (6), especially epistaxis and at venepuncture sites (6) were the most common sites of bleeding. Pulmonary haemorrhage developed in two patients and they required ventilatory support. Overall mortality related to CCHF was 4.7% (one patient). Early diagnosis of CCHF and early referral to specialised centres are important for outcome. Exceptional epidemics may be seen in future owing to ecological and environmental changes.

  16. [Carbetocin versus Oxytocin during caesarean section for preventing postpartum haemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzagalli, F; Agasse, J; Marpeau, L

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of Carbetocin versus Oxyotcin during caesarean section for preventing postpartum haemorrhage. Prospective observational study (before/after design). Five hundred and forty patients who received an injection of Oxytocin were compared to 262 patients with single injection of 100 micrograms of Carbetocin. The primary outcome was to compare the differential hematocrit level between pre- and postoperative blood samples. The secondary outcome was to compare differential hemoglobin level and the use of complementary therapies for postpartum haemorrhage. We did not find any difference between the Oxytocin and Carbetocin groups on differential hematocrit level. There was no difference between the groups regarding the use of additionnal therapies (Sulproston injections, blood transfusions and surgery methods). The rate of postpartum haemorrhage was similar in the two groups (18.7% vs 21.6%; P=0.33). We found a lower percentage of patients with differential of hemoglobin level between 2 g/dL and 4 g/dL in the Carbetocin group (6.5% vs 15.6%, Poxytocin. Carbetocin seems to reduce the need for postoperative intravenous iron injection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Dec 2011 NJS for Prof Anyanwu

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was predominant. There were no cerebro-vascular spasms postoperatively. Greek -- -- ANEURYSMA (Ana= up or across, eurys = wide or broad). Key Words: Subarachnoid Haemorrhage, Cerebro-Vascular Spasms. rupture spontaneously into the subarachnoid space, causing subarachnoid haemorrhage. Rupture could.

  18. New sites of localisation of Pasteurella multocida B:2 in buffalo surviving experimental haemorrhagic septicaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annas, Salleh; Zamri-Saad, Mohammad; Jesse, Faez Firdaus Abdullah; Zunita, Zakaria

    2014-04-11

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is an acute septicaemic disease of buffalo and cattle caused by Pasteurella multocida B:2 and E:2. Field outbreaks of HS are known to result in localisation of bacteria in the tonsils of surviving buffalo, confirming that animals can become carriers and the role of respiratory tract in the transmission of the disease. This report describes additional sites of localisation of P. multocida B:2 in surviving buffalo following experimental induction of HS. Following P. multocida B:2 infection, all calves in group 1 and one calf in group 2 that was allowed to commingle with infected calves from group 1 were euthanised within 48 h. Pasteurella multocida B:2 was detected from the nasal and rectal swab samples on days 5 and 6 from the remaining calves in group 2. The first injection of dexamethasone into the carrier animals resulted in reemergence in samples from the nose, rectum and vagina. However, subsequent dexamethasone injections failed to re-activate P. multocida B:2. When surviving carrier calves in group 2 were euthanised at the end of the experiment, P. multocida B:2 was detected in the lungs and various organs of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tracts. Commingling naive buffalo calves with calves acutely infected with P. multocida B:2 resulted in carriers among surviving buffalo. Pasteurella was found in various organs of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, suggesting their role in the pathogenesis of HS.

  19. Prediction and Observation of Post-Admission Hematoma Expansion in Patients with Intracerebral Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eOvesen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-admission hematoma expansion in patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH comprises a simultaneous major clinical problem and a possible target for medical intervention. In any case, the ability to predict and observe hematoma expansion is of great clinical importance. We review radiological concepts in predicting and observing post-admission hematoma expansion. Hematoma expansion can be observed within the first 24 hours after symptom onset, but predominantly occurs in the early hours. Thus capturing markers of on-going bleeding on imaging techniques could predict hematoma expansion. The spot sign observed on CTA is believed to represent on-going bleeding and is to date the most well investigated and reliable radiological predictor of hematoma expansion as well as functional outcome and mortality. On non-contrast CT, the presence of foci of hypoattenuation within the hematoma along with the hematoma-size is reported to be predictive of hematoma expansion and outcome. Because patients tend to arrive earlier to the hospital, a larger fraction of acute ICH-patients must be expected to undergo hematoma expansion. This renders observation and radiological follow-up investigations increasingly relevant. Transcranial duplex sonography has in recent years proven to be able to estimate hematoma volume with good precision and could be a valuable tool in bedside serial observation of acute ICH patients. Future studies will elucidate, if better prediction and observation of post-admission hematoma expansion can help select patients, who will benefit from haemostatic treatment.

  20. Acute Compressive Ulnar Neuropathy in a Patient of Dengue Fever: An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Mehtani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dengue haemorrhagic fever is known for its haemorrhagic and neurologic complications. Neurologic complications are caused by three mechanism namely neurotropism, systemic complications causing encephalopathy and postinfectious immune-mediated mechanisms. However acute compressive neuropathy due to haemorrhage is not frequent and we could find no literature describing this Case Report: We report a case of acute compressive ulnar neuropathy due to peri neural hematoma, following an attempt at intravenous cannulation in the cubital fossa in a patient of dengue haemorrhagic fever with thrombocytopenia. Immediate fasciotomy and removal of haematoma was performed to relieve the symptoms. Conclusion: Compression neuropathies can be seen in dengue hemorrhagic fever and removal of compressing hematoma relieves symptoms. Keywords: Dengue haemmorrhagic fever; coagulopathy; peri neural haematoma.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of adult medulloblastoma seeding in the intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-wei WANG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical diagnosis and treatment of adult medulloblastoma seeding in the intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space. Methods Eleven cases of adult medulloblastoma seeding in the intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space were retrospectively analyzed on the clinical features, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cytology, radiological characteristics and treatments. Results All patients underment neurosurgical procedures to remove medulloblastomas. In 10 patients, tumor was removed through suboccipital posterior midline approach and in one patient through post-sigmoid sinus approach. In 7 patients tumor cell seeding was found in the intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space before postoperative radiotherapy and disappeared after radiological and chemical treatment, while in other 4 patients tumor cell seeding was found in the intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space at 3 months to 3 years follow-up period (average 20 months after radiotherapy. In 2 of all the patients tumor cells were found by CSF cytology before operation. All the patients were treated with radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Two patients were still alive, while 9 patients were dead. Conclusions Patients with adult medulloblastoma seeding in intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space have a poor prognosis. In the diagnosis of adult medulloblastomas seeding in the intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space, MRI is more sensitive than CSF cytology. Once the seeding in intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space was found, the patients should be treated with radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, which can prolong the survival time and improve the quality of life. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.10.012 

  2. Statins and subarachnoid hemorrhage in Medicare patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Smith, Jeremy; Zhou, Weiping; MacKenzie, Todd A; Roberts, David W; Skinner, Jonathan; Morden, Nancy E

    2015-10-01

    Statins have been shown to decrease aneurysm progression and rupture in two experimental settings: animals with cerebral aneurysm and humans with abdominal aortic aneurysms. To investigate statin use and outcomes in humans with unruptured cerebral aneurysms through Medicare administrative data. We used a 40% random sample Medicare denominator file and corresponding inpatient, outpatient (2003-2011), and prescription (2006-2011) claims to conduct a retrospective cohort study of patients diagnosed with unruptured cerebral aneurysms, between 2003 and 2011. We used propensity score-adjusted models to investigate the association between statin use and risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Secondary analyses repeated the main models stratified on tobacco use status and separately assessed other composite outcomes. We identified 28 931 patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms (average age 72·0 years, 72·6% female); mean follow-up was 30·0 months; 41·3% used statins. Overall, 593 patients developed subarachnoid hemorrhage, and 703 underwent treatment before subarachnoid hemorrhage. Current or recent statin use was not associated with a difference in subarachnoid hemorrhage risk (odds ratio, 1·03; 95% conflict of interest 0·86-1·23); models stratified on tobacco use status were nearly identical. No association was observed between statin use and the composite outcome of subarachnoid hemorrhage or aneurysm treatment (odds ratio, 0·94; 95% conflict of interest, 0·84-1·06). The risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage or out-of-hospital death was lower among statin users (odds ratio, 0·69; 95% conflict of interest, 0·64-0·74). Statin use by patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms was not associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage risk. Given the prior animal experimental studies demonstrating a protective effect, further prospective studies are needed to investigate the potential relationship. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  3. Equal contribution of increased intracranial pressure and subarachnoid blood to cerebral blood flow reduction and receptor upregulation after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Laboratory investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    OBJECT: Cerebral ischemia remains the key cause of disability and death in the late phase after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and its pathogenesis is still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the change in intracranial pressure or the extravasated blood causes the...

  4. Agitation After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Frequent Omen of Hospital Complications Associated with Worse Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, Michael E; Schmidt, J Michael; Mahta, Ali; Agarwal, Sachin; Roh, David J; Park, Soojin; Frey, Hans Peter; Claassen, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Agitated delirium is frequent following acute brain injury, but data are limited in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We examined incidence, risk factors, and consequences of agitation in these patients in a single-center retrospective study. We identified all patients treated with antipsychotics or dexmedetomidine from a prospective observational cohort of patients with spontaneous SAH. Agitation was confirmed by chart review. Outcomes were assessed at 12 months using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS), and Lawton IADL (Instrumental Activities of Daily Living) scores. Independent predictors were identified using logistic regression. From 309 SAH patients admitted between January 2011 and December 2015, 52 (17 %) developed agitation, frequently in the first 72 h (50 %) and in patients with Hunt-Hess grades 3-4 (12 % of grades 1-2, 28 % of grades 3-4, 8 % of grade 5). There was also a significant association between agitation and a history of cocaine use or prior psychiatric diagnosis. Agitated patients were more likely to develop multiple hospital complications; and in half of these patients, complications were diagnosed within 24 h of agitation onset. Agitation was associated with IADL impairment at 12 months (Lawton >8; p = 0.03, OR 2.7, 95 % CI, 1.1-6.8) in non-comatose patients (Hunt-Hess 1-4), but not with functional outcome (mRS >3), cognitive impairment (TICS ≤30), or ICU/hospital length of stay after controlling for other predictors. Agitation occurs frequently after SAH, especially in non-comatose patients with higher clinical grades. It is associated with the development of multiple hospital complications and may have an independent impact on long-term outcomes.

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Microdialysis Cytokines in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Scoping Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick A. Zeiler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo perform two scoping systematic reviews of the literature on cytokine measurement in cerebral microdialysis (CMD and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients, aiming to summarize the evidence relating cytokine levels to pathophysiology, disease progression, and outcome.MethodsTwo separate systematic reviews were conducted: one for CMD cytokines and the second for CSF cytokines.Data sourcesArticles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library (inception to October 2016, reference lists of relevant articles, and gray literature were searched.Study selectionTwo reviewers independently identified all manuscripts utilizing predefined inclusion/exclusion criteria. A two-tier filter of references was conducted.Data extractionPatient demographic and study data were extracted to tables.ResultsThere were 9 studies identified describing the analysis of cytokines via CMD in 246 aneurysmal SAH patients. Similarly, 20 studies were identified describing the analysis of CSF cytokines in 630 patients. The two scoping systematic reviews demonstrated the following: (1 limited literature available on CMD cytokine measurement in aneurysmal SAH with some preliminary data supporting feasibility of measurement and potential association between interleukin (IL-6 and patient outcome. (2 Various CSF measured cytokines may be associated with patient outcome at 3–6 months, including IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. (3 There is a small literature body supporting an association between acute/subacute CSF transforming growth factor levels and the development of chronic hydrocephalus at 2–3 months.ConclusionThe evaluation of CMD and CSF cytokines is an emerging area of the literature in aneurysmal SAH. Further large prospective multicenter studies on cytokines in CMD and CSF need to be conducted.

  6. Serum magnesium levels and clinical outcome of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a study in 60 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibi Z

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypomagnesemia is commonly encountered in patients with a wide variety of diseases including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, cardiovascular emergencies, head trauma, migraine attacks, seizure and preeclampsia. It seems to be associated with a poor clinical outcome. This study considers the prevalence and temporal distribution of hypomagnesemia after aneurysmal SAH and its correlation with the severity of SAH, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI as well as the neurological outcome after a period of three months.Methods: Between 2003 and 2008, 60 patients were admitted to the emergency ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital with acute SAH. Serum magnesium levels were measured during the first 72 hours, days 4-7, and second and third weeks after SAH. The three-month outcome was assessed according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS. Clinical SAH grading was performed according to the criteria of the World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS and the patients were allocated to "Good" (GOS = 4, 5 and "Poor" (GOS= 1-3 outcome groups. The prevalence of hypomagnesemia was assessed in both patient groups. Fisher exact test was used to analyze data.Results: Hypomagnesemia occurred in 22% of patients during the first 72 hours after SAH. It was associated with more prevalent DCI (p<0.05, whereas low serum magnesium levels during days 4-7 17% of patients and the second week (22% of patients after SAH were correlated with poor clinical outcome (p<0.05. No correlation was found between first 72 hour-hypomagnesemia and poor clinical outcome at three months.Conclusion: Hypomagnesemia occurs after aneurysmal SAH and it may predict the occurrence of DCI, while low serum magnesium levels during days 4-7 and within the second week of event predict poor clinical outcome at three months. Treatment of this electrolyte disturbance may have a favourable effect on the clinical outcome of patients with aneurysmal SAH.

  7. Protein kinase C inhibition prevents upregulation of vascular ET(B) and 5-HT(1B) receptors and reverses cerebral blood flow reduction after subarachnoid haemorrhage in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beg, Saema S; Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob A; Vikman, Petter J

    2007-01-01

    type 1B (5-HT(1B)) receptor upregulation and prevent the associated cerebral blood flow (CBF) reduction. The PKC inhibitor RO-31-7549 or vehicle was injected intracisternally after the induced SAH in rats (n=3 to 10 in each groups for each method). The involvement of the PKC isoforms was investigated...

  8. Super selective transcatheter angiographic embolization: an effective and prophylactic treatment for massive obstetric haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yiming; Zhai Renyou; Qian Xiaojun; Wei Baojie; Gao Kun; Zhang Shilong; Liu Jinmei; Zhang Qiuhong; Jiang Lei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the effect and safety of transcatheter angiographic embolization (TAE)for managing massive obstetric haemorrhage. Methods: 17 cases of obstetric massive haemorrhage or with haemorrhage tendency were treated with TAE. Among them 14 cases had haemorrhage already, including 10 cases after abortion, caesarean section or normal labor and other 4 of hydatidiform mole. 3 cases with obstetric haemorrhage tendency included 2 cases of placenta praevia and 1 case of cervical pregnancy. Selective catheterization into bilateral uterine arteries or internal iliac arteries for DSA, showed the cause and location of the haemorrhage and then embolized with gelfoam sponge chips (1-3 mm) or Polyvinyl Alcohol(PVA); and part of the cases with MTX through uterine arterial perfusion. Results: The successful rate of catheterization was 100%. The achievement in 14 cases showed no active haemorrhage immediately after the procedure and no vaginal bleeding after 1-5 days. In 3 prophylactic cases before abortion or uterine curettage, obstetric massive haemorrhage occurred in 1 case, but not so in other 2 cases. Conclusions: TAE is an effective treatment for obstetric massive haemorrhage, with the advantages of minimal trauma, fast and definite treating effect and less complications. Prophylactical application for high risk patients can reduce the bleeding and mortality. (authors)

  9. The prevalence of peripheral arteriopathy is higher in ischaemic stroke as compared with transient ischaemic attack and intracerebral haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttner, Hagen B; Köhrmann, Martin; Mauer, Christoph; Lücking, Hannes; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd; Schwab, Stefan; Schellinger, Peter D

    2010-08-01

    There is little data on the association of peripheral arterial disease and stroke. We aimed to assess the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in acute stroke and to identify the predisposing factors for peripheral arterial disease in a stroke cohort. We enrolled all consecutive patients who were admitted to our stroke- and neurocritical care units with the diagnosis of a transient ischaemic attack, ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke over a period of 5 months. As controls, we analysed 50 nonvascular neurological patients who were matched to age. Upon admission, assessment of the ankle brachial index was performed in all patients. The only exclusion criteria was decompensated congestive heart failure. Altogether, we compared 374 stroke patients (95 transient ischaemic attack, 231 ischaemic, and 48 haemorrhagic strokes) and 50 nonstroke controls. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in the control group was 14%. There was a trend towards a higher prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in stroke patients (chi(2)-test: P=0.051; prevalence peripheral arterial disease in transient ischaemic attack: 16.8%, ischaemic stroke: 32%, and haemorrhagic stroke: 20.8%). A higher proportion of ischaemic stroke patients were peripheral arterial disease-positive, compared with transient ischaemic attack patients (P=0.005) and controls (P=0.011), respectively. Multivariate regression analyses identified the parameters age, arterial hypertension, current or former smokers and a history of cardiovascular events to be predisposing factors of peripheral arterial disease. This study represents the first systematic investigation of the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in stroke. By now, it is clear that: * peripheral arterial disease is more commonly found in stroke than in nonstroke patients * ischaemic stroke patients show the highest prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, and * peripheral arterial disease in stroke is related to common vascular risk factors.

  10. Upregulation of Relaxin after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Kikkawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although relaxin causes vasodilatation in systemic arteries, little is known about its role in cerebral arteries. We investigated the expression and role of relaxin in basilar arteries after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in rabbits. Methods. Microarray analysis with rabbit basilar artery RNA was performed. Messenger RNA expression of relaxin-1 and relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1 was investigated with quantitative RT-PCR. RXFP1 expression in the basilar artery was investigated with immunohistochemistry. Relaxin concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and serum were investigated with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Using human brain vascular smooth muscle cells (HBVSMC preincubated with relaxin, myosin light chain phosphorylation (MLC was investigated with immunoblotting after endothelin-1 stimulation. Results. After SAH, RXFP1 mRNA and protein were significantly downregulated on day 3, whereas relaxin-1 mRNA was significantly upregulated on day 7. The relaxin concentration in CSF was significantly elevated on days 5 and 7. Pretreatment with relaxin reduced sustained MLC phosphorylation induced by endothelin-1 in HBVSMC. Conclusion. Upregulation of relaxin and downregulation of RXFP1 after SAH may participate in development of cerebral vasospasm. Downregulation of RXFP1 may induce a functional decrease in relaxin activity during vasospasm. Understanding the role of relaxin may provide further insight into the mechanisms of cerebral vasospasm.

  11. The role of spreading depolarization in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Porras, R; Zheng, Z; Santos, E; Schöll, M; Unterberg, A W; Sakowitz, O W

    2013-08-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease associated with death and poor functional outcome. Despite decades of intense research and improvements in clinical management, delayed cerebral ischaemia (DCI) remains the most important cause of morbidity and mortality after SAH. The key role of angiographic cerebral vasospasm, thought to be the main cause of DCI, has been questioned. Emerging evidence suggests that DCI is likely to have a multifactorial etiology. Over the last few years, spreading depolarization (SD) has been identified as a potential pathophysiological mechanism contributing to DCI. The presence of cortical spreading ischaemia, due to an inverse hemodynamic response to SD, offers a possible explanation for DCI and requires more intensive research. Understanding the role of SD as another mechanism inducing DCI and its relationship with other pathological factors could instigate the development of new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of DCI in order to improve the clinical outcome. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  12. Controversies and Evolving New Mechanisms in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Feng, Hua; Sherchan, Prativa; Klebe, Damon; Zhao, Gang; Sun, Xiaochuan; Zhang, Jianmin; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite decades of study, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) continues to be a serious and significant health problem in the United States and worldwide. The mechanisms contributing to brain injury after SAH remain unclear. Traditionally, most in vivo research has heavily emphasized the basic mechanisms of SAH over the pathophysiological or morphological changes of delayed cerebral vasospasm after SAH. Unfortunately, the results of clinical trials based on this premise have mostly been disappointing, implicating some other pathophysiological factors, independent of vasospasm, as contributors to poor clinical outcomes. Delayed cerebral vasospasm is no longer the only culprit. In this review, we summarize recent data from both experimental and clinical studies of SAH and discuss the vast array of physiological dysfunctions following SAH that ultimately lead to cell death. Based on the progress in neurobiological understanding of SAH, the terms “early brain injury” and “delayed brain injury” are used according to the temporal progression of SAH-induced brain injury. Additionally, a new concept of the vasculo-neuronal-glia triad model for SAH study is highlighted and presents the challenges and opportunities of this model for future SAH applications. PMID:24076160

  13. Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines for Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Sang; Park, Sukh Que; Ko, Jun Kyeung; Kim, Dae-Won; Park, Jung Cheol; Yeon, Je Young; Chung, Seung Young; Chung, Joonho; Joo, Sung-Pil; Hwang, Gyojun; Kim, Deog Young; Chang, Won Hyuk; Choi, Kyu-Sun; Lee, Sung Ho; Sheen, Seung Hun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Byung Moon; Bae, Hee-Joon; Oh, Chang Wan; Park, Hyeon Seon

    2018-01-01

    Despite advancements in treating ruptured cerebral aneurysms, an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is still a grave cerebrovascular disease associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. Based on the literature published to date, worldwide academic and governmental committees have developed clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) to propose standards for disease management in order to achieve the best treatment outcomes for aSAHs. In 2013, the Korean Society of Cerebrovascular Surgeons issued a Korean version of the CPGs for aSAHs. The group researched all articles and major foreign CPGs published in English until December 2015 using several search engines. Based on these articles, levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were determined by our society as well as by other related Quality Control Committees from neurointervention, neurology and rehabilitation medicine. The Korean version of the CPGs for aSAHs includes risk factors, diagnosis, initial management, medical and surgical management to prevent rebleeding, management of delayed cerebral ischemia and vasospasm, treatment of hydrocephalus, treatment of medical complications and early rehabilitation. The CPGs are not the absolute standard but are the present reference as the evidence is still incomplete, each environment of clinical practice is different, and there is a high probability of variation in the current recommendations. The CPGs will be useful in the fields of clinical practice and research. PMID:29526058

  14. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Pyo Nyun; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Byoung Ho; Kim, Ki Jung

    1990-01-01

    CT scans were analysed retrospectively in 130 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm to evaluate the relationship of the locations of aneurysms and the patterns of hemorrhage. Hemorrhage corresponded to the site of aneurysmal origin in a general way and in more specific ways to anterior communicating and middle cerebral artery aneurysms when there was parenchymal or cisternal hemorrhage. In anterior communicating artery aneurysm, SAH in the interhemispheric fissure, both sylvian fissures, and basal cistern was usually noted and intracerebral hemorrhage in anteroinferior frontal lobe was sometimes associated. In cases of middle cerebral artery aneurysm, hemorrhage in the ipsilateral sylvian fissure, interhemispheric fissure, and ipsilateral basal cistern was usual. Intracerebral hemorrhage in lateral temporal lobe was sometimes associated. Posterior communicating artery aneurysm demonstrated SAH in the ipsilateral basal cistern or in entire cisternal spaces specifically, so with higher incidence of involvement of the quadrigeminal and superior cerebellar cistern than anterior cerebral or middle cerebral artery aneurysm. We suggest the locations of aneurysm might be predicted with patterns of SAH and / or associated intracerebral hemorrhage with CT

  15. Neutrophil depletion after subarachnoid hemorrhage improves memory via NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencio, Jose Javier; Swank, Valerie; Lu, Haiyan; Brunet, Sylvain; Baltan, Selva; Khapre, Rohini V; Seerapu, Himabindu; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Lamb, Bruce T; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive deficits after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are common and disabling. Patients who experience delayed deterioration associated with vasospasm are likely to have cognitive deficits, particularly problems with executive function, verbal and spatial memory. Here, we report neurophysiological and pathological mechanisms underlying behavioral deficits in a murine model of SAH. On tests of spatial memory, animals with SAH performed worse than sham animals in the first week and one month after SAH suggesting a prolonged injury. Between three and six days after experimental hemorrhage, mice demonstrated loss of late long-term potentiation (L-LTP) due to dysfunction of the NMDA receptor. Suppression of innate immune cell activation prevents delayed vasospasm after murine SAH. We therefore explored the role of neutrophil-mediated innate inflammation on memory deficits after SAH. Depletion of neutrophils three days after SAH mitigates tissue inflammation, reverses cerebral vasoconstriction in the middle cerebral artery, and rescues L-LTP dysfunction at day 6. Spatial memory deficits in both the short and long-term are improved and associated with a shift of NMDA receptor subunit composition toward a memory sparing phenotype. This work supports further investigating suppression of innate immunity after SAH as a target for preventative therapies in SAH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure Determination in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noraky, James; Verghese, George C; Searls, David E; Lioutas, Vasileios A; Sonni, Shruti; Thomas, Ajith; Heldt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) should ideally be measured in many conditions affecting the brain. The invasiveness and associated risks of the measurement modalities in current clinical practice restrict ICP monitoring to a small subset of patients whose diagnosis and treatment could benefit from ICP measurement. To expand validation of a previously proposed model-based approach to continuous, noninvasive, calibration-free, and patient-specific estimation of ICP to patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), we made waveform recordings of cerebral blood flow velocity in several major cerebral arteries during routine, clinically indicated transcranial Doppler examinations for vasospasm, along with time-locked waveform recordings of radial artery blood pressure (APB), and ICP was measured via an intraventricular drain catheter. We also recorded the locations to which ICP and ABP were calibrated, to account for a possible hydrostatic pressure difference between measured ABP and the ABP value at a major cerebral vessel. We analyzed 21 data records from five patients and were able to identify 28 data windows from the middle cerebral artery that were of sufficient data quality for the ICP estimation approach. Across these windows, we obtained a mean estimation error of -0.7 mmHg and a standard deviation of the error of 4.0 mmHg. Our estimates show a low bias and reduced variability compared with those we have reported before.

  17. Association of Recreational Marijuana Use with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumalla, Kavelin; Reddy, Adithi Y; Mittal, Manoj K

    2016-02-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effect of cannabis use on hospitalizations for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2004-2011) was used to identify all patients (age 15-54) with a primary diagnosis of aSAH (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification 430). We identified patients testing positive for cannabis use using all available diagnosis fields. The incidence and characteristics of aSAH hospitalizations among cannabis users were examined. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the effect of cannabis use on aSAH and in-hospital outcomes. Prior to adjustment, the incidence of aSAH in the cannabis cohort was slightly increased relative to the noncannabis cohort (relative risk: 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.11). Cannabis use in aSAH was more frequent among younger patients (40.44 ± 10.17 versus 43.74 ± 8.68, P recreational marijuana use is independently associated with an 18% increased likelihood of aSAH. Further case-control studies may analyze inpatient outcomes and other understudied mechanisms behind cannabis-associated stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage on Word Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Ladowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH survivors commonly exhibit impairment on phonemic and semantic fluency tests; however, it is unclear which of the contributing cognitive processes are compromised in aSAH patients. One method of disentangling these processes is to compare initial word production, which is a rapid, semiautomatic, frontal-executive process, and late phase word production, which is dependent on more effortful retrieval and lexical size and requires a more distributed neural network. Methods. Seventy-two individuals with aSAH and twenty-five control subjects were tested on a cognitive battery including the phonemic and semantic fluency task. Demographic and clinical information was also collected. Results. Compared to control subjects, patients with aSAH were treated by clipping and those with multiple aneurysms were impaired across the duration of the phonemic test. Among patients treated by coiling, those with anterior communicating artery aneurysms or a neurological complication (intraventricular hemorrhage, vasospasm, and edema showed worse output only in the last 45 seconds of the phonemic test. Patients performed comparably to control subjects on the semantic test. Conclusions. These results support a “diffuse damage” hypothesis of aSAH, indicated by late phase phonemic fluency impairment. Overall, the phonemic and semantic tests represent a viable, rapid clinical screening tool in the postoperative assessment of patients with aSAH.

  19. Experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage: subarachnoid blood volume, mortality rate, neuronal death, cerebral blood flow, and perfusion pressure in three different rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunell, Giselle Fabiana; Mathiesen, Tiit; Diemer, Nils Henrik; Svendgaard, Niels-Aage

    2003-01-01

    To investigate which of three subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) models is the most suitable for studies of pathological and pathophysiological processes after SAH. SAH was induced in rats via intracranial endovascular perforation (perforation model), blood injection into the cisterna magna (300 microl), or blood injection into the prechiasmatic cistern (200 microl). The subarachnoid blood volume was quantitatively measured. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) (as assessed with laser Doppler flowmetry), intracranial pressure, and mean arterial blood pressure were recorded for 90 minutes after SAH. Mortality was recorded, and neuronal death was assessed in animals that survived 7 days after SAH. The subarachnoid blood volume was close to the injected amount after prechiasmatic SAH. In the other models, the volume varied between 40 and 480 microl. The mortality rates were 44% in the perforation SAH group, 25% in the prechiasmatic SAH group, and 0% in the cisterna magna SAH group; the corresponding values for neuronal death were 11, 44, and 28%. Cerebral perfusion pressure approached baseline values within 5 minutes after SAH in all three models. CBF decreased to approximately 35% of baseline values immediately after SAH in all groups; it gradually increased to normal values 15 minutes after SAH in the cisterna magna SAH group and to 60 and 89% of baseline values 90 minutes post-SAH in the perforation and prechiasmatic SAH groups. CBF was significantly correlated with the subarachnoid blood volume. The prechiasmatic SAH model seems to be the most suitable for study of the sequelae after SAH; it produces a significant decrease in CBF, an acceptable mortality rate, and substantial pathological lesions, with high reproducibility. The CBF reduction is predominantly dependent on the amount of subarachnoid blood.

  20. Clinico-radiological features of subarachnoid hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images in patients with meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, T., E-mail: madarafuebuki@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Sakurai, K.; Hara, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Muto, M. [Department of Radiology, Okazaki City Hospital, Okazaki, Aichi (Japan); Nakagawa, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Tohyama, J. [Department of Radiology, Toyota-kai Medical Corporation Kariya Toyota General Hospital, Kariya, Aichi (Japan); Oguri, T. [Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Mitake, S. [Department of Neurology, Tosei General Hospital, Seto-shi, Aichi (Japan); Maeda, M. [Department of Radiology, Mie University School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie (Japan); Matsukawa, N.; Ojika, K. [Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Shibamoto, Y. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    Aim: To investigate the clinical and radiological features of meningitis with subarachnoid diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensity. Materials and methods: The clinical features, laboratory data, and radiological findings, including the number and distribution of subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions and other radiological abnormalities, of 18 patients seen at five institutions were evaluated. Results: The patients consisted of eight males and 10 females, whose ages ranged from 4 months to 82 years (median 65 years). Causative organisms were bacteria in 15 patients, including Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Listeria monocytogenes. The remaining three were fungal meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions were multiple in 16 of the 18 cases (89%) and predominantly distributed around the frontal lobe in 16 of the 18 cases (89%). In addition to subarachnoid abnormality, subdural empyema, cerebral infarction, and intraventricular empyema were found in 50, 39, and 39%, respectively. Compared with paediatric patients, adult patients with bacterial meningitis tended to have poor prognoses (7/10 versus 1/5; p = 0.1). Conclusion: Both bacterial and fungal meningitis could cause subarachnoid hyperintensity on DWI, predominantly around the frontal lobe. This finding is often associated with poor prognosis in adult bacterial meningitis.

  1. Clinico-radiological features of subarachnoid hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images in patients with meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, T.; Sakurai, K.; Hara, M.; Muto, M.; Nakagawa, M.; Tohyama, J.; Oguri, T.; Mitake, S.; Maeda, M.; Matsukawa, N.; Ojika, K.; Shibamoto, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the clinical and radiological features of meningitis with subarachnoid diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensity. Materials and methods: The clinical features, laboratory data, and radiological findings, including the number and distribution of subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions and other radiological abnormalities, of 18 patients seen at five institutions were evaluated. Results: The patients consisted of eight males and 10 females, whose ages ranged from 4 months to 82 years (median 65 years). Causative organisms were bacteria in 15 patients, including Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Listeria monocytogenes. The remaining three were fungal meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions were multiple in 16 of the 18 cases (89%) and predominantly distributed around the frontal lobe in 16 of the 18 cases (89%). In addition to subarachnoid abnormality, subdural empyema, cerebral infarction, and intraventricular empyema were found in 50, 39, and 39%, respectively. Compared with paediatric patients, adult patients with bacterial meningitis tended to have poor prognoses (7/10 versus 1/5; p = 0.1). Conclusion: Both bacterial and fungal meningitis could cause subarachnoid hyperintensity on DWI, predominantly around the frontal lobe. This finding is often associated with poor prognosis in adult bacterial meningitis.

  2. Pre-eclampsia increases the risk of postpartum haemorrhage: a nationwide cohort study in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost F von Schmidt auf Altenstadt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postpartum haemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Identifying risk indicators for postpartum haemorrhage is crucial to predict this life threatening condition. Another major contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality is pre-eclampsia. Previous studies show conflicting results in the association between pre-eclampsia and postpartum haemorrhage. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the association between pre-eclampsia and postpartum haemorrhage. Our secondary objective was to identify other risk indicators for postpartum haemorrhage in the Netherlands. METHODS: A nationwide cohort was used, containing prospectively collected data of women giving birth after 19 completed weeks of gestation from January 2000 until January 2008 (n =  1,457,576. Data were extracted from the Netherlands Perinatal Registry, covering 96% of all deliveries in the Netherlands. The main outcome measure, postpartum haemorrhage, was defined as blood loss of ≥1000 ml in the 24 hours following delivery. The association between pre-eclampsia and postpartum haemorrhage was investigated with uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Overall prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage was 4.3% and of pre-eclampsia 2.2%. From the 31 560 women with pre-eclampsia 2 347 (7.4% developed postpartum haemorrhage, compared to 60 517 (4.2% from the 1 426 016 women without pre-eclampsia (odds ratio 1.81; 95% CI 1.74 to 1.89. Risk of postpartum haemorrhage in women with pre-eclampsia remained increased after adjusting for confounders (adjusted odds ratio 1.53; 95% CI 1.46 to 1.60. CONCLUSION: Women with pre-eclampsia have a 1.53 fold increased risk for postpartum haemorrhage. Clinicians should be aware of this and use this knowledge in the management of pre-eclampsia and the third stage of labour in order to reach the fifth Millenium Developmental Goal of reducing maternal mortality ratios with 75% by

  3. Intracranial pressure (ICP) and optic nerve subarachnoid space pressure (ONSP) correlation in the optic nerve chamber: the Beijing Intracranial and Intraocular Pressure (iCOP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruowu; Zhang, Zheng; Yang, Diya; Wang, Huaizhou; Chen, Weiwei; Li, Zhen; Sang, Jinghong; Liu, Sumeng; Cao, Yiwen; Xie, Xiaobin; Ren, Ruojin; Zhang, Yazhuo; Sabel, Bernhard A; Wang, Ningli

    2016-03-15

    Because a lowered intracranial pressure (ICP) is a possible mechanism of optic neuropathy, we wished to study the CSF dynamics in the optic nerve chamber by recording possible changes in the optic nerve subarachnoid space pressure (ONSP) and the impact on it when acutely lowering ICP. In eight normal dogs pressure probes were implanted in the left brain ventricle, lumbar cistern, optic nerve subarachnoid space and in the anterior eye chamber. Following CSF shunting from the brain ventricle we monitored changes of ICP, lumbar cistern pressure (LCP), ONSP and intraocular pressure (IOP). At baseline, the pressures were different with ICP>LCP>ONSP but correlated with each other (PICP (PICP gradually decreased in a linear fashion together with the ONSP ("ICP-depended zone"). But when the ICP fell below a critical breakpoint, ICP and ONSP became uncoupled and ONSP remained constant despite further ICP decline ("ICP-independent zone"). Because the parallel decline of ICP and ONSP breaks down when ICP decreases below a critical breakpoint, we interpret this as a sign of CSF communication arrest between the intracranial and optic nerve SAS. This may be caused by obstructions of either CSF inflow through the optic canal or outflow into the intra-orbital cavity. This CSF exchange arrest may be a contributing factor to optic nerve damage and the optic nerve chamber syndrome which may influence the loss of vision or its restoration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Abnormal hyperintensity within the subarachnoid space evaluated by fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery MR imaging: a spectrum of central nervous system diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, M.; Sakuma, H.; Takeda, K.; Yagishita, A.; Yamamoto, T.

    2003-01-01

    A variety of central nervous system (CNS) diseases are associated with abnormal hyperintensity within the subarachnoid space (SAS) by fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging. Careful attention to the SAS can provide additional useful information that may not be available with conventional MR sequences. The purpose of this article is to provide a pictorial essay about CNS diseases and FLAIR images with abnormal hyperintensity within the SAS. We present several CNS diseases including subarachnoid hemorrhage, meningitis, leptomeningeal metastases, acute infarction, and severe arterial occlusive diseases such as moya-moya disease. We also review miscellaneous diseases or normal conditions that may exhibit cerebrospinal fluid hyperintensity on FLAIR images. Although the detection of abnormal hyperintensity suggests the underlying CNS diseases and narrows differential diagnoses, FLAIR imaging sometimes presents artifactual hyperintensity within the SAS that can cause the misinterpretation of normal SAS as pathologic conditions; therefore, radiologists should be familiar with such artifactual conditions as well as pathologic conditions shown as hyperintensity by FLAIR images. This knowledge is helpful in establishing the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Effects of Induced Hypertension on Cerebral Perfusion in Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage : A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, Celine S|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/345480392; Dankbaar, Jan Willem|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314079408; van der Jagt, Mathieu; Verweij, Bon H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311491774; Oldenbeuving, Annemarie W; Rinkel, Gabriel J E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/085712000; van den Bergh, Walter M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/272886157; Slooter, Arjen J C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/173059740; Kesecioglu, J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/124832792

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The presumed effectiveness of induced hypertension for treating delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is based on uncontrolled case-series only. We assessed the effect of induced hypertension on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in aneurysmal subarachnoid

  6. Gas accumulation in the subarachnoid space resulting from blunt trauma to the occipital region of a horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.S.; Wisner, E.R.; Kuesis, B.S.; Smith, S.G.; O'Brien, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    A 2-year-old Arabian filly was presented for evaluation after falling backwards. The injury was manifest radiographically by the presence of air within the subarachnoid space of the calvarium and the cervical spinal canal. Radiographic findings resulted from communication of the sphenopalatine sinus with the subarachnoid space as a sequela to a fracture involving the presphenoid bone

  7. Subarachnoid hyperattenuation on flat panel detector-based conebeam CT immediately after uneventful coil embolization of unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Y; Sakamoto, M; Takeuchi, H; Uno, T; Watanabe, T; Kaminou, T; Ogawa, T

    2013-03-01

    Flat panel detector-based CBCT can provide CT-like images of the brain without transferring patients from the angiography suite to a conventional CT facility. Conventional brain CT after uneventful endovascular treatment sometimes shows focal subarachnoid hyperattenuation with contrast leakage, mimicking SAH. Differentiating this finding from SAH is important for immediate postprocedural medical management. We investigated CBCT for detecting subarachnoid hyperattenuation immediately after coil embolization of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Thirty-six patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms undergoing CBCT immediately after uncomplicated coil embolization were included. The relationship between the presence of subarachnoid hyperattenuation and total volume of contrast medium injected, aneurysm size and location, and balloon and stent assistance during embolization was investigated. Statistical analyses were performed with the χ(2) test (P < .05). Nine of the 36 patients (25.0%) showed focal subarachnoid hyperattenuation within the relevant parent artery territory harboring the aneurysm. Subarachnoid hyperattenuation locations included the ipsilateral superior frontal sulcus (n = 5), the bilateral superior frontal sulcus (n = 1), and the ipsilateral superior frontal and precentral sulci (n = 3). Statistically significant differences were observed between the presence of a subarachnoid hyperattenuation and the total volume of contrast medium injected (P < .001) and aneurysm size (P < .05). Subarachnoid hyperattenuation can be detected by CBCT immediately after coil embolization for unruptured aneurysms. The increased amounts of contrast medium to be given before CBCT and the specific location of the hyperattenuation may help differentiate benign subarachnoid contrast leakage from SAH.

  8. The role of fibrinogen and haemostatic assessment in postpartum haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne Juul

    2015-01-01

    subpopulation. Viscoelastic haemostatic assay guided transfusion algorithm reduced blood loss and the proportion of patients exposed to fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or platelets. In both studies, we were unable to make firm conclusion on our primary outcome, "all cause mortality" due to lack of adequate data...... describes the protocol for a RCT of early fibrinogen supplementation in women with severe postpartum haemorrhage. Several practical, ethical and trial management challenges need to be addressed when conducting independent clinical research involving parturients with severe bleeding, placebo...

  9. A Case of Haemorrhagic Constrictive Pericarditis with Bilateral Pleural Effusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans A. Reyes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentation of pericardial disease is diverse, with the viral aetiology being the most common cause; however, when haemorrhagic pericardial effusion is present, these causes are narrowed to few aetiologies. We present a case of a young female of African descent who presented with diffuse abdominal pain and vomiting. Initial work-up showed pericardial effusion with impending echocardiographic findings of cardiac tamponade and bilateral pleural effusions. Procedures included a left video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS with pericardial window. We consider that it is important for all physicians to be aware of not only typical presentation but also atypical and unusual clinical picture of pericardial disease.

  10. Spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage in children with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, Z; Ibrahim, H; Abdulrahman, E J; Mahfuzah, M; Othman, I S; Asohan, T; Menon, B S

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a rare complication of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in children. We report four patients with cITP who developed ICH. The latency between onset of ITP and ICH varied from 1-8 years. All our patients were profoundly thrombocytopenic (platelet count of <10 x 109/l) at the time of their intracranial bleed. The presenting features and management are discussed. All patients survived, three had complete neurological recovery while one had a minimal residual neurological deficit.

  11. Management of symptomatic thrombocytopenia associated with dengue haemorrhagic fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameel, T.; Saleem, I.U.; Mehmood, K.; Tanvir, I.; Saadia, A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Immune - mediated destruction of platelets is thought to be the mechanism of thrombocytopenia seen after the viraemic phase of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Immuno - suppressants such as steroids, immune globulin and Anti D immune globulin are effective in the treatment of this type of immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of oral Prednisolone in the rate of resolution of thrombocytopenia and monitoring of complications in patients recovering from Dengue haemorrhagic fever. Method: A controlled study was carried out on diagnosed cases Dengue haemorrhagic patients presenting with sever thrombocytopenia and symptoms like confluent ecchymosis, epistaxis and purpuric rashes. In study was conducted in Ittefaq hospital (trust) Lahore, during the period of October to December 2008. Treatment group received steroids in two forms i.e. first line therapy prednisolone (1 mg / kg) orally or as second line therapy of initial I/V high dose (prednisolone) in pulse doses i.e. 40 mg / bd for four days and later oral prednisolone as in first line therapy with omeprazole 20 mg / bd in addition to standard treatment. Control group received standard supportive care only. Results: A total of 341 suspected patients were admitted in hospital. Serological diagnosis was confirmed in 166 patients. CBC revealed platelet count . 100 x 109 / l in 106 patients. A group of symptomatic febrile patients have platelet count < 20 x 109 / l was selected for therapeutic intervention. first line therapy (oral prednisolone was stated in 43 patients. In Fourteen patients second line therapy (high dose dexamethasone pulse) therapy was instituted. Seven of them attained complete response whereas two patients achieved partial response. Four patients were shifted to Anti D therapy. Three deaths occurred during our study. Rest of all the patients improved and were discharged in due course of time. Conclusion: This small scale preliminary study shows promising

  12. Prevention of postpartum haemorrhage with the oxytocin analogue carbetocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Werner

    2009-11-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide: 67-80% of cases are caused by uterine atony. Preventive measures include prophylactic drug use to aid uterine contraction after delivery, thus avoiding severe blood loss and reducing maternal morbidity and mortality. Carbetocin is a synthetic analogue of oxytocin with a half-life approximately 4-10 times longer than that reported for oxytocin. It combines the safety and tolerability profile of oxytocin with the sustained uterotonic activity of injectable ergot alkaloids. Furthermore, carbetocin can be administered as a single dose injection either intravenously or intramuscularly rather than as an infusion over several hours as is the case with oxytocin. Carbetocin is currently indicated for prevention of uterine atony after delivery by caesarean section in spinal or epidural anaesthesia. Data from three randomised controlled trials in caesarean delivery and a meta-analysis indicate that carbetocin significantly reduces the need for additional uterotonic agents or uterine massage to prevent excessive bleeding compared with placebo or oxytocin. The risk of headache, tremor, hypotension, flushing, nausea, abdominal pain, pruritus and feeling of warmth was similar in women who received carbetocin or oxytocin. The findings from two more recent double-blind randomised trials and one retrospective study suggest that carbetocin may also represent a good alternative to conventional uterotonic agents for prevention of postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal deliveries. A reduced need for additional uterotonics was observed with carbetocin vs. oxytocin in high-risk women and carbetocin was at least as effective as syntometrine in low-risk women. In these studies of vaginal deliveries, carbetocin was associated with a low incidence of adverse effects and demonstrated a better tolerability profile than syntometrine. Carbetocin had a long duration of action compared with intravenous oxytocin alone and a

  13. Intracerebral haemorrhage in primary and metastatic brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaggi, Andrea; Erbetta, Alessandra; Silvani, Antonio; Maderna, Emanuela; Pollo, Bianca

    2008-09-01

    Intracerebral haemorrhage may both be a presenting manifestation in unrecognised brain tumour or--more frequently--take place in the disease course of known/suspected brain tumour due to diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, including biopsy, locoregional treatments and anti-angiogenic therapies. Apart from the difficulties inherent to accurate neuroradiological diagnosis in selected cases with small tumour volume, the main clinical problem that neurologists face is represented by decision making in prophylaxis/treatment of venous thromboembolism in these patients. These points are briefly discussed and available evidence on the last point is commented on.

  14. Reações inflamatórias leptomeníngeas em neurocirurgia Acute inflammatory leptomeningeal reactions in neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gama da Rocha

    1971-03-01

    divided in three groups: probably aseptic RIL (72 cases, probably septic RIL (26 cases and septic RIL (7 cases. Only in the last group the bacteriological examination of the CSF sample was positive. In 59 cases there occurred the association of RIL and sub-arachnoid haemorrhage. The severity of this association was pointed out based upon the incidence of deaths among the patients studied. Twenty four patients have died; in 20 the RIL and subarachnoid haemorrhage association has occurred.

  15. Therapeutic indications for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in aged people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Hisao; Kawasoe, Takuma; Miyata, Shiro; Nakano, Shinichi; Wakisaka, Shinichiro; Fujime, Kenichi; Ohta, Hajime; Arikawa, Shoji

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the therapeutic indications for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in aged people. Between April 1999 and March 2002, 142 patients with aneurysmal SAH were treated and enrolled in this study. They were divided into 3 groups: 33 patients 75 years old and older (Group A, 23.2%), 37 between 65 and 74 years old (Group B, 26.1%), and 72 64 years old and younger (Group C, 47.4). Hunt and Kosnik grades, Fisher's CT classifications and clinical outcome were evaluated in each group. Clinical outcome was measured by Glasgow Outcome Scale, and good recovery and moderately disabled were defined as favorable outcome. Group A had a significantly higher incidence of serious Hunt and Kosnik grades of patients compared with the other 2 groups (p<0.05, <0.01). Fisher's CT classification was also more severe in Group A than Group C (p<0.05). Therefore the rate of radical treatments was significantly lower in Group A (45.5%) compared with Group B (73.0%) and C (86.1%). Only 4 of the 33 patients (12.1%) with favorable outcome were in Group A, whereas the rates of favorable outcome in Group B and C were 54.1 and 62.5%, respectively. Group A had a significantly poor outcome compared with the other 2 groups. Particularly, none of the patients in Group A with Hunt and Kosnik Grades 4-5 and Fisher's Classification 4 had favorable outcome. Since there were no significant differences in the rate of radical treatments and clinical outcome between Group B and C, aged people 74 years old and younger should be actively treated in the same manner as the young. In aged people 75 years old and older, however, radical treatment should be restricted to those with Hunt and Kosnik Grade 1-3 and Fisher's CT Classification 2-3. (author)

  16. Circadian variation in ictus of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temes, Richard E; Bleck, Thomas; Dugar, Siddharth; Ouyang, Bichun; Mohammad, Yousef; John, Sayona; Patel, Pratik; Lee, Vivien; Prabhakaran, Shyam; Quigg, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Temporal patterns in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) may provide insight into modulation, and therefore, prevention of hemorrhage. We investigated the time of hemorrhage and its relationship to traditional risk factors among patients admitted with aSAH. Admitted patients with aSAH were prospectively followed through outcomes and baseline demographics were abstracted through chart review. The group temporal distribution by hour of onset was summarized with cosinor nonlinear least squares. aSAH onset was gathered into night (2300-0500), morning (0500-1100), afternoon (1100-1700), and evening (0500-2300) daily phases. The odds ratio (OR) with 95% CI was calculated for having an aSAH during the morning, afternoon, and evening hours using night as a reference. Multinomial logit models were fitted using aSAH cases across time blocks to determine their associations with different risk factors. 202 patients had the hour of hemorrhage available, and 49 had phase identifiable [total 251: 38 (15%) night, 98 (39%) morning, 58 (23%) afternoon, 57 (23%) evening]. The peak hours of aSAH were between 0700 and 0800 representing 13% of the sample, with a significant cosinor-fitted phase of 7.33(95% CI 5.30, 9.36). For all aSAH cases, morning onset was significantly more common than night onset (OR = 2.58, 95% CI = 1.77-3.75). Nonsmokers were more likely to have aSAH in the morning than smokers (P = 0.043, OR = 3.10, 95% CI = 1.33-7.23). aSAH occur in a diurnal, morning prevalent pattern regardless of traditional aSAH risk factors. The association of these risk factors with existing onset patterns should be investigated in future studies.

  17. [Wegener granulomatosis and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: an insignificant association?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnet, D; Ginguené, C; Marcos, A; Cahen, R; Mac Gregor, B; Turjman, F; Vallée, B

    2010-08-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is an uncommon systemic necrotizing vasculitis that demonstrates renal and respiratory tropism. While the pathogenesis of WG remains controversial, autoimmune and inflammatory mechanisms are likely to be involved. The nervous system could be affected in up to 54% of cases. Although central nervous system involvement has been reported in 7-11% of cases, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurrence is exceptional. We describe the third reported case of WG-related aneurysmal SAH and then discuss the diagnosis and pathogenesis of WG along with the physiopathology of intracranial aneurysm in light of recent data reported in the literature. A 63-year-old woman with WG was referred to our neurosurgical department for aneurysmal SAH. The vasculitis diagnosis had been established 4 years earlier when she presented with chronic sinusitis, recurrent cystitis, and renal failure. The cerebral angiography revealed an anterior communicating artery dysplastic aneurysm. The neurosurgical management of the aneurysm was scheduled but delayed because the patient was experiencing a vasculitis flare-up. Immunosuppressive therapy and intravenous corticotherapy were given, with the patient's improvement, allowing neurosurgical clipping of the aneurysm. Wegener granulomatosis-related aneurysmal SAH is an exceptional condition in neurovascular pathology. As inflammatory mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of aneurysm, the vasculitis flare-up could account for this SAH. The management of WG could benefit from anti-inflammatory therapy, as could the vasculitis-related SAH. SAH occurrence in patients with systemic vasculitis could indicate a vasculitis flare-up. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. The Importance of Early Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Hou, Jack; Pluta, Ryszard M.; Zhang, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a medical emergency that accounts for 5% of all stroke cases. Individuals affected are typically in the prime of their lives (mean age 50 years). Approximately 12% of patients die before receiving medical attention, 33% within 48 hours and 50% within 30 days of aSAH. Of the survivors 50% suffer from permanent disability with an estimated lifetime cost more than double that of an ischemic stroke. Traditionally, spasm that develops in large cerebral arteries 3-7 days after aneurysm rupture is considered the most important determinant of brain injury and outcome after aSAH. However, recent studies show that prevention of delayed vasospasm does not improve outcome in aSAH patients. This finding has finally brought in focus the influence of early brain injury on outcome of aSAH. A substantial amount of evidence indicates that brain injury begins at the aneurysm rupture, evolves with time and plays an important role in patients’ outcome. In this manuscript we review early brain injury after aSAH. Due to the early nature, most of the information on this injury comes from animals and few only from autopsy of patients who died within days after aSAH. Consequently, we began with a review of animal models of early brain injury, next we review the mechanisms of brain injury according to the sequence of their temporal appearance and finally we discuss the failure of clinical translation of therapies successful in animal models of aSAH. PMID:22414893

  19. Animal Models of Focal Cerebral Ischaemia and Haemorrhagic Transformation: Considerations in Experimental Stroke Study Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Jennifer A; Douglas, Andrew S; Kirby, Brian P; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Doyle, Karen M

    2017-09-05

    Ischaemic stroke is often complicated with haemorrhage within the infarct zone or in a remote location especially when treated with intravenous thrombolysis and/or thrombectomy. While these early recanalisation treatments are highly effective, some of the benefit is lost because of haemorrhagic complications and consequential neurological deterioration of the patients. A number of mechanisms have been described that mediate the haemorrhagic changes and several agents have been tested in experimental models for inhibiting post stroke haemorrhage. Here, we review and discuss the small animal models of focal cerebral ischaemia and post ischaemic stroke haemorrhagic transformation and how these models can best be utilised for developing further insights as well as potential treatment approaches for this serious clinical complication. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Valved or valveless ventriculoperitoneal shunting in the treatment of post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Trine Hjorslev; Holst, Anders Vedel; Lilja, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implant infection and obstruction are major complications for ventriculoperitoneal shunts in patients with post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus. In an effort to (1) reduce the incidence of these complications, (2) reduce the rate of shunt failure and (3) shorten the duration of neurosurgical...... hospitalisation, we have implemented valveless ventriculoperitoneal shunts at our department for adult patients with post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus and haemorrhagic cerebrospinal fluid at the time of shunt insertion. METHODS: All adult patients (>18 years old) treated for post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus.......3 %, p = 0.02), but a higher rate of overdrainage (10.3 % vs 2.6 %, p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: The use of a valveless shunting for patients with post-haemorrhagic hydrocephalus results in shorter duration of neurosurgical hospitalisation and lower rate of shunt infection, although these advantages should...

  1. Condom Tamponade in the Management of Primary Postpartum Haemorrhage: A Report of three cases in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Ernest T; Buntugu, Kennedy A; Aki, Lovelace; Srofenyoh, Emmanuel K

    2015-09-01

    Postpartum haemorrhage is one of the major causes of maternal mortality worldwide. The leading cause of primary postpartum haemorrhage is uterine atony and active management of the third stage of labour with oxytocin is recommended for preventing primary postpartum haemorrhage. Parenteral oxytocin is also the drug of choice for medical management of postpartum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony. Condom uterine balloon tamponade is .a low cost technique that can be used as a second-line option for treatment. We report retrospectively three cases of primary PPH secondary to uterine atony which were managed successfully with condom tamponade. Condom tamponade is effective in managing post partum haemorrhage secondary to uterine atony and we advocate for the training of all skilled attendants on how to insert the condom tamponade.

  2. Neurokinin-1 receptor antagonism in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Svendgaard, Niels-Aage; Edvinsson, Lars

    2007-01-01

    OBJECT: Cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) leads to reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF) and to cerebral ischemia, in some cases even producing infarction and long-term disability. The goal of the present study was to investigate the hypothesis that inhibition of neurokinin-1...... receptors (NK1Rs) by administration of L-822429 blunts the decrease in CBF as well as cerebrovascular receptor upregulation in an animal model of SAH. METHODS: Subarachnoid hemorrhage was induced in rats by injection of 250 microl of blood into the prechiasmatic cistern. The NK1R inhibitor L-822429...

  3. Subarachnoid hemorrhage enhances endothelin receptor expression and function in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Hoel, Natalie Løvland; Zhou, Mingfang

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Inspired by organ culture-induced changes in the vascular endothelin (ET) receptor population, we investigated whether such changes occur in cerebral arteries in a rat subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model. METHODS: SAH was induced with injection of 250 microl of blood into the prechiasm......OBJECTIVE: Inspired by organ culture-induced changes in the vascular endothelin (ET) receptor population, we investigated whether such changes occur in cerebral arteries in a rat subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model. METHODS: SAH was induced with injection of 250 microl of blood...

  4. Genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snow, M.; Bain, N.; Black, J.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of a specific region of the nucleoprotein gene were compared in order to investigate the genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Analysis of the sequence from 128 isolates of diverse geographic and host origin renders this the m......The nucleotide sequences of a specific region of the nucleoprotein gene were compared in order to investigate the genetic population structure of marine viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Analysis of the sequence from 128 isolates of diverse geographic and host origin renders...... this the most comprehensive molecular epidemiological study of marine VHSV conducted to date. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleoprotein gene sequences confirmed the existence of the 4 major genotypes previously identified based on N- and subsequent G-gene based analyses. The range of Genotype I included subgroups...... of isolates associated with rainbow trout aquaculture (Genotype la) and those from the Baltic marine environment (Genotype Ib) to emphasise the relatively close genetic relationship between these isolates. The existence of an additional genotype circulating within the Baltic Sea (Genotype II) was also...

  5. A multicenter prospective cohort study of volume management after subarachnoid hemorrhage: circulatory characteristics of pulmonary edema after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Yoshiki; Takeda, Junichi; Sato, Yohei; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Matsui, Toru; Isotani, Eiji

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by pulmonary complications, which may lead to poor outcomes and death. This study investigated the incidence and cause of pulmonary edema in patients with SAH by using hemodynamic monitoring with PiCCO-plus pulse contour analysis. METHODS A total of 204 patients with SAH were included in a multicenter prospective cohort study to investigate hemodynamic changes after surgical clipping or coil embolization of ruptured cerebral aneurysms by using a PiCCO-plus device. Changes in various hemodynamic parameters after SAH were analyzed statistically. RESULTS Fifty-two patients (25.5%) developed pulmonary edema. Patients with pulmonary edema (PE group) were significantly older than those without pulmonary edema (non-PE group) (p = 0.017). The mean extravascular lung water index was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group throughout the study period. The pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group on Day 6 (p = 0.029) and Day 10 (p = 0.011). The cardiac index of the PE group was significantly decreased biphasically on Days 2 and 10 compared with that of the non-PE group. In the early phase (Days 1-5 after SAH), the daily water balance of the PE group was slightly positive. In the delayed phase (Days 6-14 after SAH), the serum C-reactive protein level and the global end-diastolic volume index were significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group, whereas the PVPI tended to be higher in the PE group. CONCLUSIONS Pulmonary edema that occurs in the early and delayed phases after SAH is caused by cardiac failure and inflammatory (i.e., noncardiogenic) conditions, respectively. Measurement of the extravascular lung water index, cardiac index, and PVPI by PiCCO-plus monitoring is useful for identifying pulmonary edema in patients with SAH.

  6. Clinical efficacy and safety of edaravone therapy in acute cerebral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of edaravone in the treatment of acute cerebral haemorrhage (ACH). Methods: This study recruited 120 patients who developed ACH. The patients were divided into control and treatment groups with 60 patients per group. The control group underwent conventional ...

  7. Real-time imaging and detection of intracranial haemorrhage by electrical impedance tomography in a piglet model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C H; Wang, L; Shi, X T; You, F S; Fu, F; Liu, R G; Dai, M; Zhao, Z W; Gao, G D; Dong, X Z

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to detect and image acute intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in an animal model. Blood was infused into the frontal lobe of the brains of anaesthetized piglets and impedance was measured using 16 electrodes placed in a circle on the scalp. The EIT images were constructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm. The mean of all the pixel intensities within a region of interest--the mean resistivity value (MRV)--was used to evaluate the relative impedance changes in the target region. A symmetrical index (SI), reflecting the relative impedance on both sides of the brain, was also calculated. Changes in MRV and SI were associated with the injection of blood, demonstrating that EIT can successfully detect ICH in this animal model. The unique features of EIT may be beneficial for diagnosing ICH early in patients after cranial surgery, thereby reducing the risk of complications and mortality.

  8. Estimation of Skin to Subarachnoid Space Depth: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Rajib; Choudhury, Dipika; Nath, Sangeeta; Parua, Samit

    2016-10-01

    In a patient, the skin to Subarachnoid Space Depth (SSD) varies considerably at different levels of the spinal cord. It also varies from patient to patient at the same vertebral level as per age, sex and Body Mass Index (BMI). Estimation of the skin to SSD reduces complications related to spinal anaesthesia. To measure the skin to SSD in the Indian population and to find a formula for predicting this depth. Three hundred adult patients belonging to American Society of Anaesthesiologist class I and II, undergoing surgery using spinal anaesthesia in various surgical specialities of Gauhati Medical College were selected by systemic sampling for this prospective, observational study. Patients were divided into three groups: Group M containing male patients, Group F containing non-pregnant female patients, and Group PF containing pregnant female's patients. SSD was measured after performing lumbar puncture. The relationship between SSD and patient characteristics were studied, correlated and statistical analysis was used to find a formula for predicting the skin to SSD. Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 21.0, Chicago, IL, USA). One-way ANOVA with post-hoc(Bonferroni correction factor) analysis was applied to compare the three groups. Multivariate analysis was done for the covariates followed by a multivariate regression analysis to evaluate the covariates influencing SSD for each group separately. Mean SSD was 4.37±0.31cm in the overall population. SSD in adult males was 4.49±0.19cm which was significantly longer than that observed in female's 4.18±0.39cm which was comparable with SSD in parturient 4.43±0.19 cm. The formula for predicting the skin to SSD in the male population was 1.718+0.077×BMI+0.632×Height, in nonpregnant female population was 1.828+0.077×BMI+0.018×Height+0.007×Age and 0.748+0.209×BMI+4.703×Height-0.054×weight in parturient females, respectively. Skin to SSD correlated with the BMI in all

  9. Evaluation of the toxicity of onyx compared with n-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate in the subarachnoid space of a rabbit model: an experimental research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakar, Bulent [Kirikkale University, School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Kirikkale (Turkey); Kirikkale University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Kirikkale (Turkey); Oruckaptan, Hakan H.; Hazer, Burcu D. [Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Ankara (Turkey); Saatci, Isil [Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Atilla, Pergin; Muftuoglu, Sevda F. [Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, Department of Histology and Embriology, Ankara (Turkey); Kilic, Kamer [Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-02-15

    The toxic effects of onyx, its solvent dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), and n-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) were evaluated after infusion into the subaracnoid space of a rabbit model. Each of the two various concentrations of onyx, pure DMSO, NBCA, and normal saline solution were percutaneously infused into the pontocerebellar cisternae of 39 domestic male albino rabbits, after which, the brain stems and medial cerebellar tissues were harvested for biochemical and histopathological studies. The specimens infused in various concentration of onyx, DMSO, and NBCA showed neural tissue necrosis and edema with inflammatory cell infiltration in the acute stage. Although the mean values of the lipid peroxidase in the control, saline, and NBCA groups were found to be almost similar, they were found to be low in the onyx and DMSO groups. This experimental study suggests that NBCA, and various concentrations of onyx and DMSO have toxic effects on the neural tissues of rabbits when infused into the subarachnoid space. (orig.)

  10. Clinical Trials in Cardiac Arrest and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Lessons from the Past and Ideas for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Frontera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Elevated intracranial pressure that occurs at the time of cerebral aneurysm rupture can lead to inadequate cerebral blood flow, which may mimic the brain injury cascade that occurs after cardiac arrest. Insights from clinical trials in cardiac arrest may provide direction for future early brain injury research after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Methods. A search of PubMed from 1980 to 2012 and clinicaltrials.gov was conducted to identify published and ongoing randomized clinical trials in aneurysmal SAH and cardiac arrest patients. Only English, adult, human studies with primary or secondary mortality or neurological outcomes were included. Results. A total of 142 trials (82 SAH, 60 cardiac arrest met the review criteria (103 published, 39 ongoing. The majority of both published and ongoing SAH trials focus on delayed secondary insults after SAH (70%, while 100% of cardiac arrest trials tested interventions within the first few hours of ictus. No SAH trials addressing treatment of early brain injury were identified. Twenty-nine percent of SAH and 13% of cardiac arrest trials showed outcome benefit, though there is no overlap mechanistically. Conclusions. Clinical trials in SAH assessing acute brain injury are warranted and successful interventions identified by the cardiac arrest literature may be reasonable targets of the study.

  11. Long-term assessment of motor and cognitive behaviours in the intraluminal perforation model of subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silasi, Gergely; Colbourne, Frederick

    2009-03-17

    The endovascular perforation model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a commonly used model in rats as it is performed without a craniotomy and accurately mimics the physiological effects of SAH in humans. The long-term behavioural profile of the model, however, has not been characterized. Given that humans often have cognitive deficits following SAH, we set out to characterize the behavioural profile as well as the spontaneous temperature changes of rats following intraluminal perforation. Rats were pre-trained on three motor tasks (tapered beam, limb-use asymmetry and the horizontal ladder tasks) prior to receiving a SAH. The animals were then assessed on post-surgical days 3, 7, 14 and 21 on these tasks. At the completion of motor testing, the rats were assessed on a moving platform version of the Morris water task. Despite significant mortality (33%), SAH did not result in lasting motor deficits on any of the tasks examined. However, the SAH group did show a minor cognitive impairment in the Morris water task. In addition, SAH produced a slight, but significant elevation in body temperature (vs. sham operated rats) despite an acute decrease in general home cage activity. The majority of the animals did not have any observable infarcts and the SAH did not significantly affect cortical thickness. In summary, the endovascular perforation model of SAH results in no lasting motor deficits and only minor cognitive impairment in survivors, which alone would be difficult to evaluate in neuroprotection or rehabilitation studies.

  12. Accumulation of intimal platelets in cerebral arteries following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haining, J.L.; Clower, B.R.; Honma, Y.; Smith, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    From 2 hours to 23 days following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage, the accumulation of indium-111-labeled platelets on the intimal surface of the middle cerebral artery was studied in 23 cats. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced by transorbital rupture of the right middle cerebral artery. Of the 23 cats, 17 exhibited right middle cerebral artery/left middle cerebral artery radioactivity ratios of greater than 1.25. When these results were compared with those of 12 control cats, 0.001 less than p less than 0.005 (chi2 test). Thus, the results from the control and experimental groups are significantly different and indicate early (after 2 hours) preferential accumulation of intimal platelets in the ruptured right middle cerebral artery compared with the unruptured left middle cerebral artery and new platelet deposition continuing for up to 23 days. However, the experimental group did not reveal a clear pattern for platelet accumulation following subarachnoid hemorrhage. There was no simple correlation between the magnitude of the radioactivity ratios and the time after hemorrhage when the cats were killed although the ratios for 2 hours to 7 days seemed greater than those for 8 to 23 days. Assuming the pivotal role of platelets in the angiopathy of subarachnoid hemorrhage, the administration of antiplatelet agents as soon as possible following its occurrence may be of value

  13. Long-term recurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage after adequate coiling versus clipping of ruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Joanna D.; Sprengers, Marieke E.; van Rooij, Willem Jan; Sluzewski, Menno; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Coiling is increasingly used as treatment for intracranial aneurysms. Despite its favorable short-term outcome, concerns exist about long-term reopening and inherent risk of recurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We hypothesized a higher risk for recurrent SAH after

  14. Long-Term Recurrent Subarachnoid Hemorrhage After Adequate Coiling Versus Clipping of Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Joanna D.; Sprengers, Marieke E.; van Rooij, Willem Jan; Sluzewski, Menno; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    Background and Purpose-Coiling is increasingly used as treatment for intracranial aneurysms. Despite its favorable short-term outcome, concerns exist about long-term reopening and inherent risk of recurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We hypothesized a higher risk for recurrent SAH after adequate

  15. Subarachnoid hematoma of the craniocervical junction and upper cervical spine after traumatic cerebral contusion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, Alessandro; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Colasanti, Roberto; Moriconi, Elisa; Gladi, Maurizio; Nocchi, Niccolò; Scerrati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Spinal subarachnoid hematoma (SSH) is a rare condition, more commonly occurring after lumbar puncture for diagnostic or anesthesiological procedures. It has also been observed after traumatic events, in patients under anticoagulation therapy or in case of arteriovenous malformation rupture. In a very small number of cases no causative agent can be identified and a diagnosis of spontaneous SSH is established. The lumbar and thoracic spine are the most frequently involved segments and only seven cases of cervical spine SSH have been described until now. Differential diagnosis between subdural and subarachnoid hematoma is complex because the common neuroradiological investigations, including a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are not enough sensitive to exactly define clot location. Actually, confirmation of the subarachnoid location of bleeding is obtained at surgery, which is necessary to resolve the fast and sometimes dramatic evolution of clinical symptoms. Nonetheless, there are occasional reports on successful conservative treatment of these lesions. We present a peculiar case of subarachnoid hematoma of the craniocervical junction, developing after the rupture of a right temporal lobe contusion within the adjacent arachnoidal spaces and the following clot migration along the right lateral aspect of the foramen magnum and the upper cervical spine, causing severe neurological impairment. After surgical removal of the hematoma, significant symptom improvement was observed.

  16. Influence of ABO blood type on the outcome after non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinski, Daniel; Won, Sae-Yeon; Behmanesh, Bedjan; Kashefiolasl, Sepide; Geisen, Christof; Seifert, Volker; Senft, Christian; Konczalla, Juergen

    2018-04-01

    In patients with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (NA-SAH), the etiology is unknown and the bleeding source remains unidentified. However, the ABO blood type system has a profound role in patient's hemostasis and thrombosis. To date, the aspect of ABO blood type in incidence, clinical course, and outcome after NA-SAH has not been investigated. In this retrospective analysis, 81 patients with non-traumatic and non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage treated between 2010 and 2014 at the author's institution were included. WFNS admission status, cerebral vasospasm, delayed infarction, ventriculoperitoneal shunt necessity, the Fisher grade, and the modified Rankin Scale were analyzed for their association with ABO blood type. Four hundred seventy patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage served as a control group. The AB blood type is more frequent in NA-SAH compared to aneurysmal patients and the German population (OR 2.45, p ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, NA-SAH with AB blood type showed a similar sequelae compared to aneurysmal patients in terms of shunt necessity (OR 2.00, p ≥ 0.05), cerebral vasospasm (OR 1.66, p ≥ 0.05), and delayed infarctions (OR 1.07, p ≥ 0.05). The clinical course of NA-SAH AB blood type patients shows similar severity as of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Therefore, patients with AB blood type should be under intensified observation.

  17. Cognitive deficits after aneurysmal and angiographically negative subarachnoid hemorrhage : Memory, attention, executive functioning, and emotion recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Anne M; Groen, Rob J M; Veenstra, Wencke S; Metzemaekers, Joannes; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; van Dijk, J Marc C; Spikman, Jacoba M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors' aim was to investigate cognitive outcome in patients with aneurysmal and angiographically negative subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH and anSAH), by comparing them to healthy controls and to each other. Besides investigating cognitive functions as memory and attention, they

  18. Headache as a crucial symptom in the etiology of convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, María; Benavente, Lorena; Para, Marta; Santamarta, Elena; Pascual, Julio; Calleja, Sergio

    2014-03-01

    Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been associated with different diseases, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and cerebral amyloid angiopathy being the 2 main causes. To investigate whether headache at onset is determinant in identifying the underlying etiology for convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage. After searching in the database of our hospital, 24 patients were found with convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the last 10 years. The mean age of the sample was 69.5 years. We recorded data referring to demographics, symptoms and neuroimaging. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy patients accounted for 46% of the sample, 13% were diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, 16% with several other etiologies, and in 25%, the cause remained unknown. Mild headache was present only in 1 (9%) of the 11 cerebral amyloid angiopathy patients, while severe headache was the dominant feature in 86% of cases of the remaining etiologies. Headache is a key symptom allowing a presumptive etiological diagnosis of convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage. While the absence of headache suggests cerebral amyloid angiopathy as the more probable cause, severe headache obliges us to rule out other etiologies, such as reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  19. Methods of evaluation of smell in victims of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Sandro Júnior Henrique; Azevedo Filho, Hildo Rocha Cirne de; Silva, Hilton Justino da

    2016-01-01

    To systematically review the methods for evaluation of smell in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage victims and to identify the changes found with the use of these methods. The literature search was performed in PubMed search platform and in the databases Web of Science, Scopus, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and ScienceDirect in August and September 2014. Original articles published in any language, which addressed smell changes in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and addressed to evaluate this function through specific methods were included. Review studies, case studies, book chapters, editorial, and studies that address the nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were excluded. The following variables were considered in data analysis: author/year, country, sample/age, treatment, method, the moment of smell evaluation, and results. The search for articles resulted in 1,763 articles, of which, 9 original articles were selected for this review. It was observed that all articles were from European and Asian countries. Standardized and nonstandardized tests and questionnaires were used in olfactory assessment, and the goals ranged from assessing the smell before and/or after surgery in this population. Heterogeneity was observed in the methods used to evaluate the smell in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and in the methods selected for application of evaluations. In addition, studies have demonstrated the existence of olfactory deficits in patients and the relationship between surgery and olfactory dysfunction.

  20. Magnesium sulfate for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: the end of the road or more trials?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergouwen, Mervyn D. I.

    2011-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a feared complication and an important cause of poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In the current study, Wong and colleagues performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that investigated the efficacy of