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Sample records for acute stroke magnetic

  1. Acute stroke magnetic resonance imaging: current status and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloska, Stephan P; Wintermark, Max; Engelhorn, Tobias; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2010-03-01

    Cerebral stroke is one of the most frequent causes of permanent disability or death in the western world and a major burden in healthcare system. The major portion is caused by acute ischemia due to cerebral artery occlusion by a clot. The minority of strokes is related to intracerebral hemorrhage or other sources. To limit the permanent disability in ischemic stroke patients resulting from irreversible infarction of ischemic brain tissue, major efforts were made in the last decade. To extend the time window for thrombolysis, which is the only approved therapy, several imaging parameters in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been investigated. However, the current guidelines neglect the fact that the portion of potentially salvageable ischemic tissue (penumbra) is not dependent on the time window but the individual collateral blood flow. Within the last years, the differentiation of infarct core and penumbra with MRI using diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and perfusion imaging (PI) with parameter maps was established. Current trials transform these technical advances to a redefined patient selection based on physiological parameters determined by MRI. This review article presents the current status of MRI for acute stroke imaging. A special focus is the ischemic stroke. In dependence on the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, the basic principle and diagnostic value of different MRI sequences are illustrated. MRI techniques for imaging of the main differential diagnoses of ischemic stroke are mentioned. Moreover, perspectives of MRI for imaging-based acute stroke treatment as well as monitoring of restorative stroke therapy from recent trials are discussed.

  2. Acute stroke magnetic resonance imaging: current status and future perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloska, Stephan P. [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Erlangen (Germany); University of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Wintermark, Max [University of Virginia, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Division, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Engelhorn, Tobias [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Erlangen (Germany); Fiebach, Jochen B. [Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB), Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Cerebral stroke is one of the most frequent causes of permanent disability or death in the western world and a major burden in healthcare system. The major portion is caused by acute ischemia due to cerebral artery occlusion by a clot. The minority of strokes is related to intracerebral hemorrhage or other sources. To limit the permanent disability in ischemic stroke patients resulting from irreversible infarction of ischemic brain tissue, major efforts were made in the last decade. To extend the time window for thrombolysis, which is the only approved therapy, several imaging parameters in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been investigated. However, the current guidelines neglect the fact that the portion of potentially salvageable ischemic tissue (penumbra) is not dependent on the time window but the individual collateral blood flow. Within the last years, the differentiation of infarct core and penumbra with MRI using diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and perfusion imaging (PI) with parameter maps was established. Current trials transform these technical advances to a redefined patient selection based on physiological parameters determined by MRI. This review article presents the current status of MRI for acute stroke imaging. A special focus is the ischemic stroke. In dependence on the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, the basic principle and diagnostic value of different MRI sequences are illustrated. MRI techniques for imaging of the main differential diagnoses of ischemic stroke are mentioned. Moreover, perspectives of MRI for imaging-based acute stroke treatment as well as monitoring of restorative stroke therapy from recent trials are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Feasibility and Diagnostic Value of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Acute Ischemic Stroke of Undetermined Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, Karl Georg; Wollboldt, Christian; Bentheim, Laura Zu; Herm, Juliane; Jäger, Sebastian; Kunze, Claudia; Eberle, Holger-Carsten; Deluigi, Claudia Christina; Bruder, Oliver; Malsch, Carolin; Heuschmann, Peter U; Endres, Matthias; Audebert, Heinrich J; Morguet, Andreas J; Jensen, Christoph; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2017-05-01

    Etiology of acute ischemic stroke remains undetermined (cryptogenic) in about 25% of patients after state-of-the-art diagnostic work-up. One-hundred and three patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-proven acute ischemic stroke of undetermined origin were prospectively enrolled and underwent 3-T cardiac MRI and magnetic resonance angiography of the aortic arch in addition to state-of-the-art diagnostic work-up, including transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). We analyzed the feasibility, diagnostic accuracy, and added value of cardiovascular MRI (cvMRI) compared with TEE for detecting sources of stroke. Overall, 102 (99.0%) ischemic stroke patients (median 63 years [interquartile range, 53-72], 24% female, median NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale) score on admission 2 [interquartile range, 1-4]) underwent cvMRI and TEE in hospital; 89 (86.4%) patients completed the cvMRI examination. In 93 cryptogenic stroke patients, a high-risk embolic source was found in 9 (8.7%) patients by cvMRI and in 11 (11.8%) patients by echocardiography, respectively. cvMRI and echocardiography findings were consistent in 80 (86.0%) patients, resulting in a degree of agreement of κ=0.24. In 82 patients with cryptogenic stroke according to routine work-up, including TEE, cvMRI identified stroke etiology in additional 5 (6.1%) patients. Late gadolinium enhancement consistent with previous myocardial infarction was found in 13 (14.6%) out of 89 stroke patients completing cvMRI. Only 2 of these 13 patients had known coronary artery disease. Our study demonstrated that cvMRI was feasible in the vast majority of included patients with acute ischemic stroke. The diagnostic information of cvMRI seems to be complementary to TEE but is not replacing echocardiography after acute ischemic stroke. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01917955. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Leukocytosis in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Leukocytosis is a common finding in the acute phase of stroke. A detrimental effect of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has been suggested, and trials aiming at reducing the leukocyte response in acute stroke are currently being conducted. However, the influence of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has...

  6. Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Performed in Acute Perinatal Stroke Reveals Hyperperfusion Associated With Ischemic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Christopher G; Dehaes, Mathieu; Gagoski, Borjan A; Grant, P Ellen; Rivkin, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Perfusion-weighted imaging in adults with acute stroke often reveals hypoperfusion in the ischemic core and in a surrounding area of nondiffusion-restricted penumbral tissue. Perinatal stroke is common, but the perfusion pattern is rarely documented. We aimed to describe the perfusion pattern in newborns with perinatal stroke. Neonates with clinical features of acute stroke underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Perfusion data were obtained using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling. Strokes were classified as arterial, venous, or both. Core infarction was determined by the presence of restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted imaging. Perfusion-weighted imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging signal in the ischemic area were visually compared with the homologous region in the contralesional hemisphere. Electroencephalogram data were evaluated for seizure activity. In 25 neonates with acute stroke, 8 of 11 (73%) with arterial ischemic stroke demonstrated hyperperfusion, 1 of 9 (11%) with venous stroke, and 4 of 5 (80%) with both. Hypoperfusion was observed in 3 of 9 (33%) with venous and none with arterial ischemic stroke. Perfusion was normal in 4 of 9 (45%) with venous and 1 of 5 (20%) with both. Twenty-one of 24 patients (88%) with electroencephalogram data had either electrographic seizures or focal sharp waves in the ipsilesional hemisphere (11/11 arterial ischemic stroke, 6/9 venous, and 4/5 both). Perfusion-weighted imaging can be obtained in neonates with acute stroke and often reveals hyperperfusion in the infarct core. Penumbra in arterial ischemic stroke is seldom found. Hyperperfusion may be caused by poststroke reperfusion or to neuronal hyperexcitability of stroke-associated seizure. Its identification may be useful for consideration of therapy for acute neonatal stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Magnetic stimulation and movement-related cortical activity for acute stroke with hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, A; Onoda, K; Oguro, H; Yamaguchi, S

    2015-12-01

    This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study investigated the beneficial effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to patients with motor paresis in acute subcortical stroke on functional recovery and electrophysiological measures. Twenty patients with acute stroke were randomized into real rTMS (n = 10) or sham (n = 10) groups. Patients received five daily sessions of rTMS with 1200 pulses at 1 Hz for 20 min or sham stimulation over the contralesional motor cortex. Movement-related cortical potential MRCP, consisting of the Bereitschaftpotential, negative slope (NS') and motor potential (MP), was recorded during self-paced wrist extension of the affected limb associated with assessment of the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) of the upper extremity, the pegboard test and the grip strength before and after the rTMS session. Real rTMS improved the FMA and pegboard test scores compared to the sham group in the affected hand. This improvement was associated with increases in the MP and NS' over the front-central sites in the ipsilesional hemisphere, whereas the sham group did not show significant changes in MRCP components by rTMS. Our findings suggest that low-frequency rTMS to the contralesional motor cortex facilitates functional recovery of paretic limbs in acute stroke patients through enhancing the the neuronal activity of ipsilesional motor and pre-motor areas. © 2015 EAN.

  8. Identifying the perfusion deficit in acute stroke with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yating; Margulies, Daniel S; Cameron Craddock, R; Long, Xiangyu; Winter, Benjamin; Gierhake, Daniel; Endres, Matthias; Villringer, Kersten; Fiebach, Jochen; Villringer, Arno

    2013-01-01

    Temporal delay in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals may be sensitive to perfusion deficits in acute stroke. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) was added to a standard stroke MRI protocol. We calculated the time delay between the BOLD signal at each voxel and the whole-brain signal using time-lagged correlation and compared the results to mean transit time derived using bolus tracking. In all 11 patients, areas exhibiting significant delay in BOLD signal corresponded to areas of hypoperfusion identified by contrast-based perfusion MRI. Time delay analysis of rsfMRI provides information comparable to that of conventional perfusion MRI without the need for contrast agents. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  9. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Prediction of Parenchymal Hemorrhage in Acute Ischemic Stroke After Reperfusion Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nael, Kambiz; Knitter, James R; Jahan, Reza; Gornbein, Jeffery; Ajani, Zahra; Feng, Lei; Meyer, Brett C; Schwamm, Lee H; Yoo, Albert J; Marshall, Randolph S; Meyers, Philip M; Yavagal, Dileep R; Wintermark, Max; Liebeskind, David S; Guzy, Judy; Starkman, Sidney; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2017-03-01

    Patients with acute ischemic stroke are at increased risk of developing parenchymal hemorrhage (PH), particularly in the setting of reperfusion therapies. We have developed a predictive model to examine the risk of PH using combined magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion parameters, including cerebral blood volume (CBV), apparent diffusion coefficient, and microvascular permeability (K2). Voxel-based values of CBV, K2, and apparent diffusion coefficient from the ischemic core were obtained using pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging data from patients enrolled in the MR RESCUE clinical trial (Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy). The associations between PH and extreme values of imaging parameters were assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal parameter(s) and threshold for predicting PH. In 83 patients included in this analysis, 20 developed PH. Univariate analysis showed significantly lower 10th percentile CBV and 10th percentile apparent diffusion coefficient values and significantly higher 90th percentile K2 values within the infarction core of patients with PH. Using classification tree analysis, the 10th percentile CBV at threshold of 0.47 and 90th percentile K2 at threshold of 0.28 resulted in overall predictive accuracy of 88.7%, sensitivity of 90.0%, and specificity of 87.3%, which was superior to any individual or combination of other classifiers. Our results suggest that combined 10th percentile CBV and 90th percentile K2 is an independent predictor of PH in patients with acute ischemic stroke with diagnostic accuracy superior to individual classifiers alone. This approach may allow risk stratification for patients undergoing reperfusion therapies. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00389467. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. Use of diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging as a tool in acute stroke clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warach Steven

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In light of the slow progress in developing effective therapies for ischemic stroke, magnetic resonance imaging techniques have emerged as new tools in stroke clinical trials. Rapid imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion weighted imaging, perfusion imaging and angiography are being incorporated into phase II and phase III stroke trials to optimize patient selection based on positive imaging diagnosis of the ischemic pathophysiology specifically related to a drug's mechanism of action and as a direct biomarker of the effect of a treatment's effect on the brain.

  11. Motor network changes associated with successful motor skill relearning after acute ischemic stroke: a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askim, Torunn; Indredavik, Bent; Vangberg, Torgil; Håberg, Asta

    2009-01-01

    . Motor learning mechanisms may be operative in stroke recovery and possibly reinforced by rehabilitative training. . To assess early motor network changes after acute ischemic stroke in patients treated with very early mobilization and task-oriented physical therapy in a comprehensive stroke unit, to investigate the association between neuronal activity and improvements in hand function, and to qualitatively explore the changes in neuronal activity in relation to motor learning. . Patients were assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging and by clinical tests within the first week after stroke and 3 months later. After discharge, all participants were offered functional training of the affected arm according to individual needs. . A total of 359 patients were screened, with 12 patients experiencing first-ever stroke, excluding primary sensorimotor cortex (MISI), with severe to moderately impaired hand function fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Laterality indexes (LIs) for MISI increase significantly during follow-up. There is increased cerebellar and striatal activation acutely, replaced by increased activation of ipsilesional MISI in the chronic phase. Bilateral somatosensory association areas and contralesional secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) area are also more active in the chronic phase. Activation of the latter region also correlates positively with improved hand function. . Restoration of hand function is associated with highly lateralized MISI. Activity in bilateral somatosensory association area and contralesional SII may represent cortical plasticity involved in successful motor recovery. The changes in motor activity between acute and chronic phases seem to correspond to a motor learning process.

  12. Acute stroke imaging research roadmap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Koehrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Warach, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The recent "Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment" meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (

  13. Diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke based on time-to-peak and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Keisuke; Eguchi, Tsuneyoshi; Sora, Shigeo; Izumi, Masafumi; Hiyama, Hirofumi [Kameda General Hospital, Kamogawa, Chiba (Japan); Ueki, Keisuke [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    2002-07-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of the hemodynamics of the brain is essential for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. This study investigated whether time-to-peak and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are useful for predicting the course of stroke. Fourteen patients with non-lacunar acute ischemic stroke underwent emergent MR imaging within 24 hours from the onset followed by cerebral angiography and xenon-enhanced computed tomography (CT). Serial CT was obtained to monitor changes in the size and nature of the infarct. Volumes of the abnormal lesions demonstrated on time-to-peak (V{sub T}) or diffusion-weighted (V{sub D}) images were measured, and the ratio of V{sub T} to V{sub D} was calculated. Based on this ratio, patients were classified into three groups: Group 1 (V{sub T}/V{sub D} 0.5-1.5, n=9), Group 2 (V{sub T}/V{sub D}>1.5, n=3), and Group 3 (V{sub T}/V{sub D}<0.5, n=2). The size of the infarct detected as a low-density area on serial CT scans did not change significantly throughout the course in Group 1 patients, but showed enlargement in all three patients in Group 2. Two patients in Group 3 had major trunk occlusion followed by spontaneous reperfusion, and both developed hemorrhagic transformation. Our study showed that classification of ischemic stroke based on the V{sub T}/V{sub D} ratio was predictive of the time course of the infarct, and may be useful in selecting the initial therapeutic procedure immediately after the onset of stroke. (author)

  14. Role of Genetic Variation in Collateral Circulation in the Evolution of Acute Stroke: A Multimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Chieh Jill; Oyarzabal, Esteban A; Zhang, Hua; Faber, James E; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2017-03-01

    No studies have determined the effect of differences in pial collateral extent (number and diameter), independent of differences in environmental factors and unknown genetic factors, on severity of stroke. We examined ischemic tissue evolution during acute stroke, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging and histology, by comparing 2 congenic mouse strains with otherwise identical genetic backgrounds but with different alleles of the Determinant of collateral extent-1 (Dce1) genetic locus. We also optimized magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion-deficit thresholds by using histological measures of ischemic tissue. Perfusion, diffusion, and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging were performed on collateral-poor (congenic-Bc) and collateral-rich (congenic-B6) mice at 1, 5, and 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Magnetic resonance imaging-derived penumbra and ischemic core volumes were confirmed by histology in a subset of mice at 5 and 24 hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Although perfusion-deficit volumes were similar between strains 1 hour after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, diffusion-deficit volumes were 32% smaller in collateral-rich mice. At 5 hours, collateral-rich mice had markedly restored perfusion patterns showing reduced perfusion-deficit volumes, smaller infarct volumes, and smaller perfusion-diffusion mismatch volumes compared with the collateral-poor mice (Pstroke onset. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Early time course of N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine, and compounds containing choline in the brain after acute stroke. A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Henriksen, O; Sperling, B

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The early time course after acute stroke of cerebral N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine, and compounds containing choline was studied in vivo by means of localized water-suppressed proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. METHODS: Eight patients with acute stroke...... were studied serially in the acute phase, 1 week after, and 2-4 weeks after the onset of clinical symptoms. Ten healthy volunteers served as controls. A stimulated echo (STEAM) sequence was used for measurement of the brain metabolites in a volume of interest located within the infarcted area...

  16. Comparison of computed tomographic and magnetic resonance perfusion measurements in acute ischemic stroke: back-to-back quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Longting; Bivard, Andrew; Levi, Christopher R; Parsons, Mark W

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP) and computed tomographic perfusion (CTP) are being increasingly applied in acute stroke trials and clinical practice, yet the comparability of their perfusion values is not well validated. The aim of this study was to validate the comparability of CTP and MRP measures. A 3-step approach was used. Step 1 was a derivation step, where we analyzed 45 patients with acute ischemic stroke who had both CTP and MRP performed within 2 hours of each other and within 9 hours of stroke onset. In this step, we derived the optimal perfusion map with the least difference between MRP and CTP. In step 2, the optimal map was validated on whole-brain perfusion data of 15 patients. Step 3 was to apply the optimal perfusion map to define cross-modality reperfusion from acute CTP to 24-hour MRP in 45 patients and, in turn, to assess how accurately this predicted 3-month clinical outcome. Among 8 different perfusion maps included in this study, time to peak of the residual function (T(max)) was the only one with a nonsignificant difference between CTP and MRP in delineating perfusion defects. This was validated on whole-brain perfusion data, showing high concordance of T(max) between the 2 modalities (concordance correlation coefficient of Lin, >0.91); the best concordance was at 6 s. At T(max)>6 s threshold, MRP and CTP reached substantial agreement in mismatch classification (κ >0.61). Cross-modality reperfusion calculated by T(max)>6 s strongly predicted good functional outcome at 3 months (area under the curve, 0.979; P<0.05). MRP and CTP can be used interchangeably if one uses T(max) measurement. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Sex and acute stroke presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labiche, Lise A; Chan, Wenyaw; Saldin, Kamaldeen R; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2002-11-01

    We determine whether a sex difference exists for acute stroke emergency department presentation. The TLL Temple Foundation Stroke Project is a prospective observational study of acute stroke management that identified 1,189 validated strokes in nonurban community EDs from February 1998 to March 2000. Structured interview of the patient and the person with the patient at symptom onset identified the symptom or symptoms that prompted the patient to seek medical attention. Interview data were available for 1,124 (94%) patients. A physician blinded to sex classified the reported symptoms into 14 categories. Nontraditional stroke symptoms were reported by 28% of women and 19% of men (odds ratio 1.62; 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 2.2). Nontraditional stroke symptoms, pain (men 8%, women 12%) and change in level of consciousness (men 12%, women 17%), were more often reported by women. Traditional stroke symptoms, imbalance (men 20%, women 15%) and hemiparesis (men 24%, women 19%), were reported more frequently by men. Trends were also found for women to present with nonneurologic symptoms (men 17%, women 21%) and men to present with gait abnormalities (men 11%, women 8%). There was no sex difference in the mean number of symptoms reported by an individual patient. This study suggests that a sex difference exists in reporting of acute stroke symptoms. Women with validated strokes present more frequently with nontraditional stroke symptoms than men. Recognition of this difference might yield faster evaluation and management of female patients with acute stroke eligible for acute therapies.

  18. Cerebrogenic tachyarrhythmia in acute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Praveen Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiac abnormalities following acute stroke are frequent and seen in both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. The changes seen in electrocardiogram (ECG consist of repolarization abnormalities such as ST elevation, ST depression, negative T waves, and QT prolongation. Among tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation is the most common and occurrence of focal atrial tachycardia is very rare though any cardiac arrhythmias can follow acute stroke. We report a case of focal atrial tachycardia following acute ischemic stroke in 50-year-old female without structural heart disease, and their mechanisms and clinical implications.

  19. Neuroprotection In Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Amini Harandi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability and remains the third most common cause of death in industrialized nations. The concept of neuroprotection mainly came from the studies of the pathology and pathophysiology of ischemic brain injury. Greater understanding of the pathophysiology of neuronal damage in ischemic stroke has generated interest in neuroprotection as a management strategy. Neuroprotective agents in stroke treatment, have generated long-term interest that have the potential to preserve brain tissue and improve overall outcome. One arm of neuroprotective agents limits acute injury to neurons in the ischemic penumbra. Many of these agents modulate neuronal receptors to reduce release of excitatory neurotransmitters, which contribute to early neuronal injury. Other neuroprotective agents prevent potentially detrimental events associated with return of blood flow. Returning blood contains leukocytes that may occlude small vessels and release toxic products. In fact they should act targeting excitotoxicity, oxidative and nitrosative stress, and inflammation. The past few decades have produced a plethora of negative neuroprotective trial results. The questions of feasibility and practicability cannot be resolved simultaneously. In the future, optimal therapy may be achieved by combining neuroprotective agents with complementary mechanisms. Relevant areas of interest include the search for safe and effective treatment strategies that combine neuroprotection reperfusion, better use of advanced brain imaging for patient selection, and wider implementation of prehospital conducted clinical trials.

  20. Systematic review of perfusion imaging with computed tomography and magnetic resonance in acute ischemic stroke: heterogeneity of acquisition and postprocessing parameters: a translational medicine research collaboration multicentre acute stroke imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Krishna A; Thomas, Ralph G R; Chappell, Francesca M; Shuler, Kirsten; Muir, Keith W; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2012-02-01

    Heterogeneity of acquisition and postprocessing parameters for magnetic resonance- and computed tomography-based perfusion imaging in acute stroke may limit comparisons between studies, but the current degree of heterogeneity in the literature has not been precisely defined. We examined articles published before August 30, 2009 that reported perfusion thresholds, average lesion perfusion values, or correlations of perfusion deficit volumes from acute stroke patients computed tomography perfusion and 49 perfusion-weighted imaging studies were included from 7152 articles. Although certain parameters were reported frequently, consistently, and in line with the Roadmap proposals, we found substantial heterogeneity in other parameters, and there was considerable variation and underreporting of postprocessing methodology. There is substantial scope to increase homogeneity in future studies, eg, through reporting standards.

  1. Plasma cytokines in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Krarup; Boysen, Gudrun; Christensen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    GOALS: The aim of this study was to test the relations between plasma cytokines and the clinical characteristics, course, and risk factors in acute stroke. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The analysis was based on 179 patients with acute stroke included within 24 hours of stroke onset. On inclusion and 3...... measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). FINDINGS: The levels of most cytokines were significantly different in acute stroke from the levels 3 months later; but only IL-10 was positively associated with stroke severity. C-reactive protein and white blood cell count were positively associated...... with the cytokine response. CONCLUSIONS: We found a substantial overall cytokine reaction that reflected the stroke incident. However, these results do not, at present, suggest a potential for clinical use, as they do not seem to add to the information obtained from the clinical workup of the individual patient....

  2. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature...... is directly related to stroke severity and outcome, and fever after stroke is associated with substantial increases in morbidity and mortality. Normalisation of temperature in acute stroke by antipyretics is generally recommended, although there is no direct evidence to support this treatment. Despite its...... obvious therapeutic potential, hypothermia as a form of neuroprotection for stroke has been investigated in only a few very small studies. Therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in acute stroke but owing to serious side-effects--such as hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, and pneumonia--it is still thought...

  3. Quantitative evaluation of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging hyper-acute ischemic stroke patients comparison with 1.5T and 3.0T units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Eun Hoe [Dept. of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Il Bong; Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Perfusion magnetic resonance image of biological mechanism are independent of magnetic field strength in hyper acute ischemic stroke. 3.0 T magnetic field, however, does affect the SNRs (signal to noise ratio) and artifacts of PMRI (perfusion magnetic resonance image), which basically will influence the quantitative of PMRI. In this study, the effects of field strength on PMRI are analyzed. The effects of the diseases also are discussed. PMRI in WM (white matter), GM (gray matter), hyper acute ischemic stroke were companied with 1.5 T and 3.0 T on SNR. PMRI also was compared to the SI difference after setting ROI (region of interest) in left and right b side of the brain. In conclusion, the SNRs and SI of the 3.0 T PMRI showed higher than those at 1.5 T. In summary, PMRI studies at 3.0 T is provided significantly improved perfusion evaluation when comparing with 1.5 T.

  4. [Pregnancy and acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereczki, Dániel

    2016-05-15

    Pregnancy-related ischemic strokes play an important role in both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Changes in hemostaseology and hemodynamics as well as risk factors related to or independent from pregnancy contribute to the increased stroke-risk during gestation and the puerperium. Potential teratogenic effects make diagnostics, acute therapy and prevention challenging. Because randomized, controlled trials are not available, a multicenter registry of patients with gestational stroke would be desirable. Until definite guidelines emerge, management of acute ischemic stroke during pregnancy remains individual, involving experts and weighing the risks and benefits.

  5. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke.

  6. Acute Stroke Imaging Research Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Köhrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wu, Ona; Warach, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The recent “Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment” meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), industry representatives, and members of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to discuss the role of advanced neuroimaging in acute stroke treatment. The goals of the meeting were to assess state-of-the-art practice in terms of acute stroke imaging research and to propose specific recommendations regarding: (1) the standardization of perfusion and penumbral imaging techniques, (2) the validation of the accuracy and clinical utility of imaging markers of the ischemic penumbra, (3) the validation of imaging biomarkers relevant to clinical outcomes, and (4) the creation of a central repository to achieve these goals. The present article summarizes these recommendations and examines practical steps to achieve them. PMID:18477656

  7. Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; De Keyser, J.; Luijckx, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    In the last decennium, thrombolytic therapy has changed the management of acute ischemic stroke. Randomized clinical studies have demonstrated that intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator improves functional outcomes. Recently the time window for intravenous thrombolysis has been

  8. Observation of activation status of motor-related cortex of patients with acute ischemic stroke through functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziqian Chen; Hui Xiao; Ping Ni; Gennian Qian; Shangwen Xu; Xizhang Yang; Youqiang Ye; Jinhua Chen; Biyun Zhang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About more than three fourth of patients with stroke have motor dysfunction at different degrees, especially hand motor dysfunction. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides very reliable visible evidence for studying central mechanism of motor dysfunction after stroke, and has guiding and applicable value for clinical therapy.OBJECTIVE: To observe the activation of motor-related cortex of patients with acute ischemic stroke with functional magnetic resonance imaging, and analyze the relationship between brain function reconstruction and motor restoration after stroke.DESIGN: A contrast observation.SETTING: Medical Imaging Center, Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: Nine patients with acute ischemic stroke who suffered from motor dysfunction and received the treatment in the Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA between August and December 2005 were recruited, serving as experimental group. The involved patients including 5 male and 4 female, aged 16 to 87 years, all met the diagnostic criteria of cerebrovascular disease revised by The Fourth National Conference on Cerebrovascular Disease, mainly presenting paralysis in clinic, and underwent fMRI. Another 9 right handed persons matched in age and gender who simultaneously received healthy body examination were recruited, serving as control group. All the subjects were informed of the detected items.METHODS: ①Muscular strength of patients of the experimental group was evaluated according to Brunnstrom grading muscular strength (Grade Ⅰ -Ⅵ). ② Passive finger to finger motion was used as the mission (alternate style of quiescence, left hand motion and quiescence, right hand motion was repeated 3 times, serving as 1 sequence, 20 s per block and 20 s time interval. The whole process of scanning was 260 s), and subjects of 2 groups were given Bold-fMRI examination with GE1.5T double gradient 16-channel

  9. Registration of acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Cathrine; Mehnert, Frank; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The validity of the registration of patients in stroke-specific registries has seldom been investigated, nor compared with administrative hospital discharge registries. The objective of this study was to examine the validity of the registration of patients in a stroke-specific registry...... (The Danish Stroke Registry [DSR]) and a hospital discharge registry (The Danish National Patient Registry [DNRP]). METHODS: Assuming that all patients with stroke were registered in either the DSR, DNRP or both, we first identified a sample of 75 patients registered with stroke in 2009; 25 patients...... in the DSR, 25 patients in the DNRP, and 25 patients registered in both data sources. Using the medical record as a gold standard, we then estimated the sensitivity and positive predictive value of a stroke diagnosis in the DSR and the DNRP. Secondly, we reviewed 160 medical records for all potential stroke...

  10. Diffusion and Perfusion MR Imaging in Acute Stroke: Clinical Utility and Potential Limitations for Treatment Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, Mathew; Slater, Lee-Anne; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) offer unique insight into acute ischemic stroke pathophysiology. These techniques may offer the ability to apply pathophysiology to accurately individualize acute stroke reperfusion treatment, including ...

  11. The role of neuroimaging in acute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhamija Rajinder

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a need for early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy in patients with acute stroke. The most important therapies are thrombolysis or aspirin in hyperacute ischemic stroke and, for secondary prevention, antiplatelet agents, statins, ACE inhibitors (for lowering blood pressure, warfarin, and carotid endarterectomy or stenting. Imaging technology has a crucial role to play in the diagnosis and treatment of stroke. In recent years, significant advances have been made due to the availability of physiological imaging using a variety of techniques, ranging from computerized tomography (CT to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which enable clinicians to define brain anatomy and physiology in greater detail than ever before. Objective: In this article we discuss the imaging techniques currently available for patients with acute stroke, with an emphasis on the utility of these techniques for diagnosis and refining patient selection for early interventions. This is placed in the context of the needs of developing countries . Discussion: Although noncontrast CT (NCCT remains the most commonly used imaging modality to differentiate between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, to identify early CT changes, and to rule out stroke mimics, it is not sensitive enough to identify the infarct core or the mechanism of ischemic stroke. MRI, including magnetic resonance angiography (MRA, is the most useful imaging modality for the evaluation of acute stroke; it provides information about the mechanism as well as the vascular territory of the stroke. MRI also provides complete information about the status of tissue through diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and about arterial patency by means of MRA. DWI shows acute lesions within minutes of onset of ischemia, while MRA can evaluate extracranial as well as intracranial vessels Evaluation of the proportion of penumbra vs infarcted tissue is another issue to be considered when instituting thrombolysis, and

  12. Blood glucose in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose is often elevated in acute stroke, and higher admission glucose levels are associated with larger lesions, greater mortality and poorer functional outcome. In patients treated with thrombolysis, hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation...... of infarcts. For a number of years, tight glycemic control has been regarded as beneficial in critically illness, but recent research has been unable to support this notion. The only completed randomized study on glucose-lowering therapy in stroke has failed to demonstrate effect, and concerns relating...... to the risk of inducing potentially harmful hypoglycemia has been raised. Still, basic and observational research is overwhelmingly in support of a causal relationship between blood glucose and stroke outcome and further research on glucose-lowering therapy in acute stroke is highly warranted....

  13. Auditory Hallucinations in Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Lampl

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory hallucinations are uncommon phenomena which can be directly caused by acute stroke, mostly described after lesions of the brain stem, very rarely reported after cortical strokes. The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency of this phenomenon. In a cross sectional study, 641 stroke patients were followed in the period between 1996–2000. Each patient underwent comprehensive investigation and follow-up. Four patients were found to have post cortical stroke auditory hallucinations. All of them occurred after an ischemic lesion of the right temporal lobe. After no more than four months, all patients were symptom-free and without therapy. The fact the auditory hallucinations may be of cortical origin must be taken into consideration in the treatment of stroke patients. The phenomenon may be completely reversible after a couple of months.

  14. Radiological strategy in acute stroke in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paonessa, Amalia [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University Hospital ' S. Salvatore' , L' Aquila (Italy)], E-mail: apaonessa7@hotmail.com; Limbucci, Nicola [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University Hospital ' S. Salvatore' , L' Aquila (Italy); Tozzi, Elisabetta [Dept. of Pediatrics, University Hospital ' S. Salvatore' , L' Aquila (Italy); Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University Hospital ' S. Salvatore' , L' Aquila (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    The aim of the study was to estimate the preponderance of patterns of pediatric stroke, ischemic or hemorrhagic, their etiologies and the correct diagnostic protocol for acute management. Forty-one consecutive pediatric patients (age range 5-16 years) with an acute stroke observed in acute phase during a 10-year period, were retrospectively evaluated. Twenty-three patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 3 cases were studied by computed tomography (CT) without MRI, and 15 underwent both CT and MRI studies. In 9 cases, intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IADSA) was performed after non-invasive preliminary assessment. Seventeen hemorrhagic (41%) and 24 ischemic (59%) strokes were found. Among hemorrhagic forms, 5 cases were due to arteriovenous malformation (AVM), 7 to cavernoma, and 2 to aneurysm. Among ischemic forms, 2 were due to sickle-cell disease, 1 to hyperomocysteinemia, 1 to moyamoya syndrome, 1 to pseudoxantoma elasticum, 3 to prothrombotic state, 1 to Fabry's disease, 1 concomitant with CO intoxication, 5 to venous sinus thrombosis, and 4 to cardio-embolic state. Etiology remains unknown in 8 cases (20.5%). This study shows a moderate prevalence of ischemic over hemorrhagic strokes. Moreover, personal experience suggests that MRI is always more informative than CT and in selected cases should be the first-choice examination in the acute phase.

  15. Neuroprotection in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, Jacques; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Koch, Marcus W; Elting, Jan Willem; Sulter, Geert; Vroomen, Patrick C; Luijckx, Gert Jan

    2005-01-01

    Neuroprotection of patients with acute ischemic stroke should start at the scene and continue in the ambulance with the assessment and treatment of the airway, breathing, circulation, body temperature, and blood glucose. The key goal in eligible patients should be fast vessel recanalization with int

  16. Early infection and prognosis after acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Reith, J;

    2001-01-01

    Infection is a frequent complication in the early course of acute stroke and may adversely affect stroke outcome. In the present study, we investigate early infection developing in patients within 3 days of admission to the hospital and its independent relation to recovery and stroke outcome....... In addition, we identify predictors for early infections, infection subtypes, and their relation to initial stroke severity....

  17. Association of carotid atherosclerotic plaque features with acute ischemic stroke: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Huilin [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Zhao, Xihai [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Xiaosheng; Cao, Ye [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Hippe, Daniel S.; Sun, Jie [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Li, Feiyu [Department of Radiology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Xu, Jianrong, E-mail: renjixjr@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Yuan, Chun [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Background and purpose: It remains unclear whether direct vessel wall imaging can identify carotid high-risk lesions in symptomatic subjects and whether carotid plaque characteristics are more effective indicators for cerebral infarct severity than stenosis. This study sought to determine the associations of carotid plaque characteristics by MR imaging with stenosis and acute cerebral infarct (ACI) sizes on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Materials and methods: One hundred and fourteen symptomatic patients underwent carotid and brain MRI. ACI volume was determined from symptomatic internal carotid artery territory on DWI images. Ipsilateral carotid plaque morphological and compositional characteristics, and stenosis were also determined. The relationships between carotid plaque characteristics, stenosis and ACIs size were then evaluated. Results: In carotid arteries with 30–49% stenosis, 86.7% and 26.7% were found to have lipid-rich necrotic core (LRNC) and intraplaque hemorrhage, respectively. Furthermore, 45.8% of carotid arteries with 0–29% stenosis developed LRNCs. Carotid morphological measurements, such as % wall volume, and the LRNC size were significantly associated with ipsilateral ACIs volume before and after adjustment for significant demographic factors (age and LDL) or stenosis in patients with carotid plaque (all p < 0.05). Conclusions: A substantial number of high-risk plaques characterized by vessel wall imaging exist in carotid arteries with lower grade stenosis. In addition, carotid plaque characteristics, particularly the % wall volume and LRNC size, are independently associated with cerebral infarction as measured by DWI lesions. Our findings indicate that characterizing atherosclerotic plaque by MR vessel wall imaging might be useful for stratification of plaque risk and infarction severity.

  18. Piracetam for acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Stefano; Celani, Maria Grazia; Cantisani, Teresa Anna; Righetti, Enrico

    2012-09-12

    Piracetam has neuroprotective and antithrombotic effects that may help to reduce death and disability in people with acute stroke. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 1999, and previously updated in 2006 and 2009. To assess the effects of piracetam in acute, presumed ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 15 May 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2011), EMBASE (1980 to May 2011), and ISI Science Citation Index (1981 to May 2011). We also contacted the manufacturer of piracetam to identify further published and unpublished studies. Randomised trials comparing piracetam with control, with at least mortality reported and entry to the trial within three days of stroke onset. Two review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality and this was checked by the other two review authors. We contacted study authors for missing information. We included three trials involving 1002 patients, with one trial contributing 93% of the data. Participants' ages ranged from 40 to 85 years, and both sexes were equally represented. Piracetam was associated with a statistically non-significant increase in death at one month (approximately 31% increase, 95% confidence interval 81% increase to 5% reduction). This trend was no longer apparent in the large trial after correction for imbalance in stroke severity. Limited data showed no difference between the treatment and control groups for functional outcome, dependence or proportion of patients dead or dependent. Adverse effects were not reported. There is some suggestion (but no statistically significant result) of an unfavourable effect of piracetam on early death, but this may have been caused by baseline differences in stroke severity in the trials. There is not enough evidence to assess the effect of piracetam on dependence.

  19. Bacterial pneumonia following acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Fu Chen

    2013-02-01

    Conclusion: Pneumonia after acute ischemic stroke is a severe complication. Once stroke-related pneumonia develops, neurologic assessment, CURB-65 score, and shock can be used to predict the ultimate prognosis.

  20. Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    OpenAIRE

    Staykov, Dimitre; Schwab, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This short review focuses on recent practically relevant studies in stroke treatment and prevention and discusses their implications on clinical practice and future research, including 3 shortly published randomized controlled trials investigating interventional treatment in acute ischemic stroke (The Interventional Management of Stroke phase III trial [IMS III], Synthesis Expansion: A Randomized Controlled Trial on Intra-Arterial Versus Intravenous Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke, and ...

  1. The Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke (DIAS) clinical trial program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kummer, Rüdiger; Albers, Gregory W; Mori, Etsuro

    2012-10-01

    Desmoteplase is a novel, highly fibrin-specific thrombolytic agent in phase III of clinical development. In comparison to alteplase, it has high fibrin selectivity, is associated with minimal or no neurotoxicity, and has no apparent negative effect on the blood-brain barrier. The safety and efficacy of desmoteplase is being studied in the Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke clinical trial program. Three studies (Dose Escalation Study of Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke, Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke, and Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-2) have been completed, two large randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III trials are ongoing at >200 sites worldwide (Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-3 and Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-4, n = 800; DIAS-3 and DIAS-4), and a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation phase II trial is ongoing in Japan (Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke-Japan, n = 48; DIAS-J). The objective of DIAS-3 and DIAS-4 is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single IV bolus injection of 90 μg/kg desmoteplase given three- to nine-hours after onset of ischemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 4-24, age 18-85 years). The objective of DIAS-J is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of desmoteplase 70 and 90 μg/kg three- to nine-hours after ischemic stroke onset in Japanese patients. Patients are included with occlusion or high-grade stenosis (thrombolysis in myocardial infarction 0-1) in proximal cerebral arteries on magnetic resonance or computed tomography angiography but excluded with extended ischemic edema on computed tomography or diffusion-weighted imaging. Desmoteplase is the only thrombolytic agent in late-stage development for acute ischemic stroke that is now tested in patients with proven stroke pathology. The results of the Desmoteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke clinical trial program will show whether patients with major artery occlusions

  2. Multimodal MR examination in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezzapesa, D.M.; Petruzzellis, M.; Lucivero, V.; Prontera, M.; Tinelli, A.; Sancilio, M.; Carella, A.; Federico, F. [University of Bari, Department of Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences, Bari (Italy)

    2006-04-15

    In recent years, combined diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with perfusion imaging (PI) has become an important investigational tool in the acute phase of ischemic stroke, as it may differentiate reversible from irreversible brain tissue damage. We consecutively examined 20 subjects within 12 h of stroke onset using a multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) examination consisting of DWI, mean transit time (MTT) as PI parameter, and MR angiography (MRA). T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) on day 7 were also acquired in order to obtain final infarct volume. The following MR parameters were considered: volumetric measures of lesion growth and MTT abnormalities, quantification of regional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and visual inspection of MRA findings. Our results showed: (1) an acute DWI lesion was not predictive of lesion growth and the DWI abnormality did not represent the irreversibly infarcted tissue; (2) ADC values in the ischemic penumbra could not predict tissue at risk; (3) the DWI-PI mismatch did not predict lesion growth, and the PI abnormality overestimated the amount of tissue at risk; and (4) patients with proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion had greater initial and final infarct volumes. This study did not demonstrate the prognostic value of a multimodal MR approach in early ischemic stroke; MRA alone provided predictive information about the volumetric evolution of the lesion. (orig.)

  3. Stroke intervention: catheter-based therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher J; Abou-Chebl, Alex; Cates, Christopher U; Levy, Elad I; McMullan, Paul W; Rocha-Singh, Krishna; Weinberger, Jesse M; Wholey, Mark H

    2011-07-05

    The majority (>80%) of the three-quarters of a million strokes that will occur in the United States this year are ischemic in nature. The treatment of acute ischemic stroke is very similar to acute myocardial infarction, which requires timely reperfusion therapy for optimal results. The majority of patients with acute ischemic stroke do not receive any form of reperfusion therapy, unlike patients with acute myocardial infarction. Improving outcomes for acute stroke will require patient education to encourage early presentation, an aggressive expansion of qualified hospitals, and willing providers and early imaging strategies to match patients with their best options for reperfusion therapy to minimize complications. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Endovascular therapy for acute stroke: Quo vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh S Madhugiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular therapy (EVT has gained vogue in the management of patients with acute stroke. Newer stent-retriever devices have led to better recanalization rates. In many centers, EVT is slowly being used as an add on to or in some instances, even as an alternative to intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA. The publication of the results of the SYNTHESIS expansion, Interventional Management of Stroke III and Mechanical Retrieval Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy trials in 2013 has questioned the enthusiastic use of EVT in acute stroke. They demonstrate that EVT (using a variety of devices is no superior to IV tPA in the management of acute stroke. In the light of these controversial findings, we review the current status of EVT in the management of acute stroke.

  5. Nontraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage concomitant with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Makoto; Inatomi, Yuichiro; Yonehara, Toshiro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Ando, Yukio

    2014-07-01

    Nontraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) rarely occurs subsequent to acute ischemic stroke. The incidence, clinical background characteristics, and outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients with cSAH were investigated. Our stroke center database was reviewed to identify patients with acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) who demonstrated acute cSAH within 14 days of admission between 2005 and 2011. Background characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes at discharge and 3 months after onset were investigated in these patients. Of 4953 acute stroke/TIA patients, cSAH was observed in 8 (.14%) patients (7 men, mean age 71 years): 7 were detected incidentally, and the other was found immediately after a convulsion. Two patients died during their hospital stay, 1 died after discharge, and 3 were dependent at 3 months. Major artery occlusion or severe stenosis was observed in 5 patients. Two patients subsequently developed subcortical hemorrhage. On gradient echo imaging, lobar cerebral microbleeds were observed in 2 patients, and chronic superficial siderosis was observed in 2 patients. In this retrospective review of cases with ischemic stroke and cSAH, over half of patients had occlusion of major arteries. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy was suggested by magnetic resonance imaging findings and subsequent events in 3 patients. The overall outcome was unfavorable although the causal relationship with cSAH was unclear. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Guidelines for acute ischemic stroke treatment: part II: stroke treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Ouriques Martins

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The second part of these Guidelines covers the topics of antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke, reperfusion therapy, and classification of Stroke Centers. Information on the classes and levels of evidence used in this guideline is provided in Part I. A translated version of the Guidelines is available from the Brazilian Stroke Society website (www.sbdcv.com.br.

  7. Acute antithrombotic treatment of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderazi, Yazan J; Grotta, James C

    2014-05-01

    Antithrombotic medication is a cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke treatment and secondary prevention. The efficacy of thrombolysis with alteplase in acute stroke has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. This safe and costeffective therapy has transformed the practice of stroke care and has led to subsequent trials of other antithrombotic medications for treatment of ischemic stroke in the acute phase. These antithrombotics include thrombolytic, antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents. While, no other medication has yet demonstrated adequate efficacy, our current and evolving understanding of infarct expansion, ischemic penumbra, collateral circulation and the blood brain barrier is allowing testing of antithrombotic medications tailored to individual patient pathophysiology in clinical trials. This understanding accompanies developments in neuroimaging and organization of stroke care that allow for wide-spread recruitment in these trials. Alteplase remains the mainstay treatment of arterial acute ischemic stroke; however, anticoagulation is the standard therapy for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Antithrombotic use in acute stroke, arterial and venous, has demonstrated efficacy but leaves many questions unanswered. This patient population is a fertile ground for novel research, especially as it relates to; combination antithrombotic therapy, combination of pharmacological and mechanical thrombolysis, and the transition to secondary prevention. Here we review the current antithrombotics in the acute phase of ischemic stroke highlighting the evidence-base and areas of uncertainty.

  8. Value of measuring serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels in diagnosing acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassan, Pooja; Keir, Geoffrey; Jäger, Hans Rolf; Brown, Martin M

    2012-08-01

    It has previously been reported that serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor are raised after acute ischemic stroke compared to healthy controls. The aim of this prospective study was to ascertain whether serum vascular endothelial growth factor measurements could be used to distinguish between acute ischemic stroke and common stroke mimics in the emergency room. Blood samples were taken on arrival to hospital and daily for six-days, in 44 patients with suspected ischemic stroke (29 acute infarcts and 15 stroke mimics), arriving within 24 h of symptom onset. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. The neurological deficit was recorded daily using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Evaluation of infarct volumes was based on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels were significantly raised in acute ischemic stroke patients on the day of symptom onset and at all other time points, compared to healthy controls (P acute ischemic stroke on admission to hospital were only 69% and 73%, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels were also elevated in four out of 15 stroke mimics, including three patients presenting with postictal paresis. Vascular endothelial growth factor has limited clinical utility in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke in the emergency room because levels are also raised in common stroke mimics. Further studies are required to establish the mechanism of vascular endothelial growth factor elevation in postictal paresis. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2011 World Stroke Organization.

  9. [Nutrition for elderly acute stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Lisa; Iversen, Per Ole; Hauge, Truls

    2008-09-11

    Elderly people have an increased risk of malnutrition due to biological and physiological changes and underlying disease. Almost 90% of the stroke patients are older than 65 years, and the consequences of acute stroke may lead to additional nutritional problems. This paper reviews nutritional therapy for stroke patients. PubMed was searched (non-systematically) for prospective cohort studies of occurrence, diagnostics and consequences of undernutrition in stroke patients. Randomized trials were examined to identify clinical effects of oral protein and energy supplements or tube feeding on nutritional status and intake, functional status, infections, length of stay, quality of life and mortality. 8-35% of stroke patients are undernourished. Body weight is one of the most important parameters for assessment of nutritional status. Dysphagia occurs in up to 80% of patients with acute stroke and increases the risk of undernutrition, which again leads to prolonged length of stay, reduced functional status and poorer survival. Early nasogastric tube feeding does not increase the risk of pneumonia and may improve survival after six months. Oral supplements lead to a significantly improved nutritional intake in undernourished stroke patients, as well as improved nutritional status and survival in undernourished elderly. Nutritional treatment can improve the clinical outcome after an acute stroke, provided that there are good procedures for follow-up and monitoring of the treatment.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging to visualize stroke and characterize stroke recovery: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J MacIntosh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The global burden of stroke continues to grow. Although stroke prevention strategies (eg. medications, diet and exercise can contribute to risk reduction, options for acute interventions (eg. thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke are limited to the minority of patients. The remaining patients are often left with profound neurological disabilities that substantially impact quality of life, economic productivity, and increase caregiver burden. In the last decade, however, the future outlook for such patients has been tempered by movement away from the view that the brain is incapable of reorganizing after injury. Many now view brain recovery after stroke as an area of scientific research with large potential for therapeutic advances, far into the future [1]. As a probe of brain anatomy, function and physiology, magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and highly versatile modality that promises to play a particularly important role in such research, towards improving stroke rehabilitation methods and stroke recovery.

  11. Computed tomography in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevblad, Karl-Olof [HUG-Geneva University Hospital, Geneva University Medical School, Department of Neuroradiology, Department of Imaging and Medical Informatics, Geneva (Switzerland); Baird, Alison E. [SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Cerebrovascular Disease and Stroke, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Box 1213, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Stroke remains the third most important cause of mortality in industrialized countries; this has prompted research for improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with signs of acute cerebral ischemia. Over the last decade, there has been a parallel in progress in techniques in both diagnostic and therapeutic options. While previously only used for excluding hemorrhage, imaging now has the possibility to detect ischemia, vascular occlusion, as well as detect tissue at risk in one setting. It should also allow to monitor treatment and predict/exclude therapeutic complications. Parallel to advances in magnetic resonance imaging of stroke, computed tomography has improved immensely over the last decade due to the development of CT scanners that are faster and that allow to acquire studies such as CT perfusion or CT angiography in a reliable way. CT can detect many signs that might help us detect impending signs of massive infarction, but we still lack the experience to use these alone to prevent a patient from benefitting from possible therapy. (orig.)

  12. Blood Pressure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is present in up to 84% of patients presenting with acute stroke, and a smaller proportion of patients have blood pressures that are below typical values in the context of cerebral ischemia. Outcomes are generally worse in those who present with either low or severely elevated blood pressure. Several studies have provided valuable information about malignant trends in blood pressure during the transition from the acute to the subacute phase of stroke. It is not uncommon for practitioners in clinical practice to identify what appear to be pressure-dependent neurologic deficits. Despite physiologic and clinical data suggesting the importance of blood pressure modulation to support cerebral blood flow to ischemic tissue, randomized controlled trials have not yielded robust evidence for this in acute ischemic stroke. We highlight previous studies involving acute-stroke patients that have defined trends in blood pressure and that have evaluated the safety and efficacy of blood-pressure modulation in acute ischemic stroke. This overview reports the current status of this topic from the perspective of a stroke neurologist and provides a framework for future research. PMID:26833984

  13. Acute ischemic stroke in low-voltage electrical injury: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Huan-Jui, Yeh; Chih-Yang, Liu; Huei-Yu, Lo; Po-Chih, Chen

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute stroke is not a common complication of electrical injury, and only a few cases of acute stroke have been reported for lightning or high-voltage injuries. Case Report: We present the case of a man who suffered from a low-voltage electrical injury followed by ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance angiography showed segmental narrowing of the right internal carotid artery and right middle cerebral artery. The patient underwent thrombolytic therapy and catheter-assisted angioplast...

  14. Modern Imaging Modalities in the Assessment of Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatareva Dora K.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The AIM of this review was to present the modern concepts of diagnostic imaging in acute stroke. Neuroimaging in acute stroke aims at diagnosing the condition as early as possible and assessing the extent of parenchymal perfusion and the intracranial vessels patency. A modern approach would involve a combination of various imaging modalities as multidetector computed tomography and high field magnetic resonance imaging. A non-enhanced computed tomography (CT is used to detect hemorrhage or to identify early signs of ischemic stroke. CT angiography finds evidence of intravascular thrombi or significant stenoses, and CT perfusion displays brain tissue at risk of irreversible alterations that can be salvaged therapeutically. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a more sensitive modality than CT in diagnosing acute brain ischemia. MR diffusion-weighted imaging is more sensitive than conventional MR sequences in hyperacute stage. MR angiography as a non-invasive and non-ionizing imaging method is used as an alternative modality to CT angiography. To find brain tissue at risk diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging modalities are used. The authors present briefly the modern neuroimaging modalities used in patients with transient ischemic attack, minor stroke and venous infarction. By combining different imaging techniques in a multimodal approach we can acquire the information necessary for therapeutic planning and differentiate patients who need thrombolysis.

  15. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature i...

  16. Studies on the emergency care of acute stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Nolte, Christian Hans

    2012-01-01

    This work reports on factors contributing to pre- and intrahospital delay in the emergency management of acute stroke patients. Further, data on level of knowledge on stroke risk factors, stroke signs and appropriate behaviour is reported.

  17. Autonomic dysfunction in acute ischemic stroke : An underexplored therapeutic area?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, Sylvie; De Vos, Aurelie; De Keyser, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Impaired autonomic function, characterized by a predominance of sympathetic activity, is common in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This review describes methods to measure autonomic dysfunction in stroke patients. It summarizes a potential relationship between ischemic stroke-associated

  18. S-100AND#946; protein as a biomarker in acute hemorrhagic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omkar Prasad Baidya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic stroke, a subtype of acute stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability throughout the world. At present, the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic stroke is mainly based on Computer Tomography (CT or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI but till now no biomarkers are routinely used in acute hemorrhagic stroke management. This article is a critical and descriptive review on the role of S100β protein as a biomarker in acute hemorrhagic stroke. Plasma S-100β level increases significantly in acute hemorrhagic stroke patients when compared to the normal subjects. Beside, the plasma S-100β can be correlated to the volume of hemorrhage in brain measured by plane CT scan. Plasma S-100β is an useful biomarker in acute hemorrhagic stroke and can be used for estimation of volume of hemorrhage in brain in acute hemorrhagic stroke patients. Thus, S-100β can be useful as an alternative to CT scan/MRI in diagnosis and in taking therapeutic decision in acute hemorrhagic stroke management. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(1.000: 13-15

  19. EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS IN ACUTE STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebrovascular disease is the third most common cause of death in the developed world after cancer and ischemic heart disease. In India, community surveys have shown a crude prevalence rate of 200 per 100000 population for hemiplegia. Aims and objectives: Identification of risk factors for c erebrovascular disease. Materials and Methods: Inclusion Criteria: Cases of acute stroke admitted in S.V.R.R.G.G.H, Tirupati were taken for the study. Exclusion Criteria: Head injury cases, neoplasm cases producing cerebrovascular disease were excluded. Re sults: Stroke was more common in male, 54% patients were male 46% were female. It was more common in 6 th and 7 th decade. More common risk factors were hypertension followed by smoking, diabetes mellitus. More common pathology was infarction. Conclusion: Com mon risk factors for acute stroke are hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, obesity, cardiac disease. Stroke was confirmed by CT scan of brain.

  20. estimated glomerular filtration rate and risk of survival in acute stroke

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-03

    Mar 3, 2014 ... Subjects: Eighty three acute stroke patients had GFR calculated within 48 hours of admission after basic ... in terms of survival and functional disability (7,8). ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as either cerebral infarct or ...

  1. Association between pneumonia in acute stroke stage and 3-year mortality in patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi-Jing; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Su, Feng-Chieh; Peng, Tsung-I; Chien, Yu-Yi; Wu, Chia-Lun; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Wei, Yi-Chia; Lin, Shun-Wen; Zhu, Jun-Xiao; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2016-11-01

    The influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the clinical presentation and long-term outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. We investigate the influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the 3-year outcomes of patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. Nine-hundred and thirty-four patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke were enrolled and had been followed for 3years. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether pneumonia occurred during acute stroke stage or not. Clinical presentations, risk factors for stroke, laboratory data, co-morbidities, and outcomes were recorded. The result showed that a total of 100 patients (10.7%) had pneumonia in acute stroke stage. The prevalence of older age, atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage. Total anterior circulation syndrome and posterior circulation syndrome occurred more frequently among patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage (Ppneumonia in acute stroke stage is a significant predictor of 3-year mortality (hazard ratio=6.39, 95% confidence interval=4.03-10.11, Ppneumonia during the acute stroke stage is associated with increased risk of 3-year mortality. Interventions to prevent pneumonia in acute stroke stage might improve ischemic stroke outcome.

  2. Development of Computerized Scheme for Adjustment of Display Grayscale in Brain Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Harakawa, Tetsumi; Doi, Kunio

    We developed a computerized scheme for proper adjustment of display grayscale in brain diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI) with acute ischemic stroke by using thalamic signal intensity on concurrent images (b0 image). In our computerized scheme, the gray level of b0 image was first normalized, and the brain region was segmented using thresholding and labeling techniques. The lateral inclination in b0 image was then corrected semi-automatically by rotating and shifting. Each of the thalamic positions was determined by using the coordinate information in the brain region. The average signal intensity of the thalamus was measured on the region of interest (ROI) selected, and the thalamus in one side with the low signal intensity was selected. The display grayscale in DWI was finally adjusted by using the signal intensity of the selected thalamus. The thalamus positions in all cases were confirmed to be included in the thalamic outline. In 30 training cases, the average error between the thalamic signal intensity obtained from the manual selection and the computerized scheme were 1.8%±1.5, and in 30 testing cases, 1.3%±1.2. Our computerized scheme has a potential in the determination of the display grayscale of brain DWI, and would be useful to radiologists in decision-making for radiological diagnosis.

  3. Critical care in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, M; Jacobs, T; Morgenstern, L

    2017-01-01

    Most ischemic strokes are managed on the ward or on designated stroke units. A significant proportion of patients with ischemic stroke require more specialized care. Several studies have shown improved outcomes for patients with acute ischemic stroke when neurocritical care services are available. Features of acute ischemic stroke patients requiring intensive care unit-level care include airway or respiratory compromise; large cerebral or cerebellar hemisphere infarction with swelling; infarction with symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation; infarction complicated by seizures; and a large proportion of patients require close management of blood pressure after thrombolytics. In this chapter, we discuss aspects of acute ischemic stroke care that are of particular relevance to a neurointensivist, covering neuropathology, neurodiagnostics and imaging, blood pressure management, glycemic control, temperature management, and the selection and timing of antithrombotics. We also focus on the care of patients who have received intravenous thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy. Complex clinical decision making in decompressive hemicraniectomy for hemispheric infarction and urgent management of basilar artery thrombosis are specifically addressed. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute ischemic stroke. Imaging and intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, R.G.; Lev, M.H. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Neuroradiology Div.; Hirsch, J.A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Interventional Neuroradiology and Endovascular Neurosugery Service; Koroshetz, W.J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Acute Stroke Service; Schaefer, P. (eds.) [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Neuroradiology

    2006-07-01

    This timely book provides basic, practical and up-to-date information on how to use imaging to diagnose and treat patients with acute ischemic stroke. Written by physicians from the Massachusetts General Hospital and faculty from the Harvard Medical School, the book distills years of experience in the day-to-day management of acute stroke patients, as well as leading-edge basic and clinical research, into a practical guide. With the growing awareness that modern CT and MR imaging can meaningfully improve the outcome of the acute stroke patient, this book provides the practical information to advance the capacities of providers in delivering the most advanced care for this disease. (orig.)

  5. D-dimer levels and stroke progression in patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, L-H; Sandset, E C; Sandset, P M

    2011-01-01

    Krarup L-H, Sandset EC, Sandset PM, Berge E. D-dimer levels and stroke progression in patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation. Acta Neurol Scand: 2011: 124: 40-44. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Background -  Patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation...... in patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation....... are at increased risk of stroke progression and recurrence. We sought to assess whether D-dimer and other markers of hemostatic activation could predict these adverse events in such patients. Method -  Blood samples were obtained from patients included in the Heparin in Acute Embolic Stroke Trial. Stroke...

  6. Cryoglobulins in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukyan, L. A.; Ayvazyan, V. A.; Boyajyan, A. S.

    Cryoglobulins (Cgs) are pathogenic immune complexes, non specific markers of the inflammatory and autoimmune responses. In this study we for the first time, revealed Cgs in the blood of ischemic stroke patients and analyze their composition.

  7. Flow Augmentation in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadollahikhales, Golnaz; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Edgell, Randall; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for additional therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke considering the major pitfalls of the options available. Herein, we briefly review the role of cerebral blood flow, collaterals, vasoreactivity, and reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke. Then, we reviewed pharmacological and interventional measures such as volume expansion and induced hypertension, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, partial aortic occlusion, extracranial-intracranial carotid bypass surgery, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation, and transcranial laser therapy with regard to their effects on flow augmentation and neuroprotection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Limb apraxia in acute ischemic stroke: a neglected clinical challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Caroline; Suchan, Julia; Himmelbach, Marc; Haarmeier, Thomas; Borchers, Svenja

    2014-04-01

    Symptoms of limb apraxia and executive dysfunctions are currently not explicitly considered by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and, thus, not routinely tested by clinicians in the acute care of patients with suspected stroke. Neuropsychological testing, clinical examination, MRI, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were performed in a right-handed patient with acute onset of left-sided sensorimotor hemiparesis due to a right hemisphere ischemic stroke. Deficits in the execution of meaningless and meaningful gestures were not detected properly on initial clinical examination but were revealed later on through neuropsychological testing. Instead, the patient's inability to respond to specific instructions in the acute care setting was mistaken to reflect severe deficits in auditory comprehension. fMRI revealed right-hemispheric localization of language in the right-handed patient. We suggest including a bedside test for limb apraxia symptoms in acute clinical care of stroke patients. The distinction between deficits in limb praxis and impairments of language can be complicated owing to the common hemispheric co-localization of the two functions.

  9. Evolving Treatments for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerna, Charlotte; Hegedus, Janka; Hill, Michael D

    2016-04-29

    The purpose of this article is to review advances in stroke treatment in the hyperacute period. With recent evolutions of technology in the fields of imaging, thrombectomy devices, and emergency room workflow management, as well as improvement in statistical methods and study design, there have been ground breaking changes in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. We describe how stroke presents as a clinical syndrome and how imaging as the most important biomarker will help differentiate between stroke subtypes and treatment eligibility. The evolution of hyperacute treatment has led to the current standard of care: intravenous thrombolysis with tissue-type plasminogen activator and endovascular treatment for proximal vessel occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation. All patients with acute ischemic stroke are in need of hyperacute secondary prevention because the risk of recurrence is highest closest to the index event. The dominant themes of modern stroke care are the use of neurovascular imaging and speed of diagnosis and treatment. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Malnutrition in Patients with Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella D. Bouziana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a devastating event that carries a potential for long-term disability. Malnutrition is frequently observed in patients with stroke, and dysphagia contributes to malnutrition risk. During both the acute phase of stroke and rehabilitation, specific nutritional interventions in the context of a multidisciplinary team effort can enhance the recovery of neurocognitive function. Early identification and management of malnutrition with dietary modifications or specific therapeutic strategies to ensure adequate nutritional intake should receive more attention, since poor nutritional status appears to exacerbate brain damage and to contribute to adverse outcome. The main purpose of nutritional intervention should be the prevention or treatment of complications resulting from energy-protein deficit. This paper reviews the evaluation and management of malnutrition and the use of specialized nutrition support in patients with stroke. Emphasis is given to enteral tube and oral feeding and to strategies to wean from tube feeding.

  11. Malnutrition in Patients with Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouziana, Stella D.; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating event that carries a potential for long-term disability. Malnutrition is frequently observed in patients with stroke, and dysphagia contributes to malnutrition risk. During both the acute phase of stroke and rehabilitation, specific nutritional interventions in the context of a multidisciplinary team effort can enhance the recovery of neurocognitive function. Early identification and management of malnutrition with dietary modifications or specific therapeutic strategies to ensure adequate nutritional intake should receive more attention, since poor nutritional status appears to exacerbate brain damage and to contribute to adverse outcome. The main purpose of nutritional intervention should be the prevention or treatment of complications resulting from energy-protein deficit. This paper reviews the evaluation and management of malnutrition and the use of specialized nutrition support in patients with stroke. Emphasis is given to enteral tube and oral feeding and to strategies to wean from tube feeding. PMID:22254136

  12. CT imaging in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, J.

    2016-01-01

    Time is of the essence when treating acute ischemic stroke, to limit the damage caused. One form of intra-arterial treatment (IAT) used in such cases is the mechanical removal of the blood clot using stent-retrievers. It is thought that patient selection for IAT requires improvement and that CT

  13. Continuous pulse oximetry in acute hemiparetic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elting, JW; Stewart, R; den Arend, A; De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    2000-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypoxemia can adversely affect ischemic brain tissue in laboratory animals. The aim of this study was to assess the Value of early continuous monitoring with pulse oximetry in detecting arterial oxygen desaturations in patients with acute hemiparetic stroke, and the effects

  14. Acute ischemic stroke prognostication, comparison between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ossama Y. Mansour

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... patients with acute ischemic stroke in comparison with the NIHSS and the GCS. ... comes; In-hospital or 30 days mortality and Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 3 ..... 8. Bamford J, Sandercock P, Dennis M, Burn J, Warlow C.

  15. Acute Stroke Management in Patients Taking Dabigatran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Raf; Van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; De Smedt, Ann; Moens, Maarten; De Raedt, Sylvie; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; Jochmans, Kristin; De Keyser, Jacques

    Dabigatran etexilate is emerging as an alternative for vitamin K antagonists, but evidence-based guidelines for management of intracerebral hemorrhage and acute ischemic stroke in patients taking this drug are nonexistent. This review summarizes current knowledge on key pharmacological features and

  16. Promoting thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Maaike; Niessen, Louis W; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; Koudstaal, Peter J; Franke, Cees L; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Huijsman, Robbert; Lingsma, Hester F; Minkman, Mirella M N; Dippel, Diederik W J

    2011-05-01

    Thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is an effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but the number of treatable patients is limited. The PRomoting ACute Thrombolysis in Ischemic StrokE (PRACTISE) trial evaluated the effectiveness of a multidimensional implementation strategy for thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic stroke. The PRACTISE trial was a national multicenter cluster-randomized controlled trial with randomization after pairwise matching. Twelve hospitals, both urban and community, academic and nonacademic, in the Netherlands participated. All patients admitted with stroke within 24 hours from onset of symptoms were registered. The intervention included 5 implementation meetings based on the Breakthrough Series model. The primary outcome was treatment with thrombolysis. Secondary outcomes were admission within 4 hours after onset of symptoms, death or disability at 3 months, and quality of life. Overall 5515 patients were included in the study' 308 patients (12.2%) in the control centers and 393 patients (13.1%) in the intervention centers were treated with thrombolysis (adjusted OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.68). Among the 1657 patients with ischemic stroke admitted within 4 hours from onset, 391 (44.5%) of 880 in the intervention centers were treated with thrombolysis and 305 (39.3%) of 777 in the control centers; the adjusted OR for treatment with thrombolysis was 1.58 (95% CI, 1.11 to 2.27). An intensive implementation strategy increases the proportion of patients with acute stroke treated with thrombolysis in real-life settings. An apparently pivotal factor in the improvement of the treatment rate is better application of contraindications for thrombolysis.

  17. Role of Acute Lesion Topography in Initial Ischemic Stroke Severity and Long-Term Functional Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ona; Cloonan, Lisa; Mocking, Steven J T; Bouts, Mark J R J; Copen, William A; Cougo-Pinto, Pedro T; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin; Kanakis, Allison; Schaefer, Pamela W; Rosand, Jonathan; Furie, Karen L; Rost, Natalia S

    2015-09-01

    Acute infarct volume, often proposed as a biomarker for evaluating novel interventions for acute ischemic stroke, correlates only moderately with traditional clinical end points, such as the modified Rankin Scale. We hypothesized that the topography of acute stroke lesions on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging may provide further information with regard to presenting stroke severity and long-term functional outcomes. Data from a prospective stroke repository were limited to acute ischemic stroke subjects with magnetic resonance imaging completed within 48 hours from last known well, admission NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and 3-to-6 months modified Rankin Scale scores. Using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping techniques, including age, sex, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging lesion volume as covariates, statistical maps were calculated to determine the significance of lesion location for clinical outcome and admission stroke severity. Four hundred ninety subjects were analyzed. Acute stroke lesions in the left hemisphere were associated with more severe NIHSS at admission and poor modified Rankin Scale at 3 to 6 months. Specifically, injury to white matter (corona radiata, internal and external capsules, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and uncinate fasciculus), postcentral gyrus, putamen, and operculum were implicated in poor modified Rankin Scale. More severe NIHSS involved these regions, as well as the amygdala, caudate, pallidum, inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and precentral gyrus. Acute lesion topography provides important insights into anatomic correlates of admission stroke severity and poststroke outcomes. Future models that account for infarct location in addition to diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging volume may improve stroke outcome prediction and identify patients likely to benefit from aggressive acute intervention and personalized rehabilitation strategies. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Acute ischemic stroke treatment: State of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajan Ag; White, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    Stroke is among the leading causes of death and serious disability in the United States. Treatment of the acute ischemic stroke patient requires a multidisciplinary approach involving first-responders, emergency department personnel, neurologists, advanced imaging experts and endovascular specialists with neurosurgical support. Contemporary stroke treatment is a rapidly advancing field. New developments in pharmacologic and endovascular stroke therapy require thoughtful trial design and expeditious trial implementation to assess clinical outcomes. This manuscript reviews the state of the art in acute stroke therapy.

  19. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in stroke: Ready for clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marie-Claire; Stinear, Cathy M

    2016-09-01

    The use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in stroke research has increased dramatically over the last decade with two emerging and potentially useful functions identified. Firstly, the use of single pulse TMS as a tool for predicting recovery of motor function after stroke, and secondly, the use of repetitive TMS (rTMS) as a treatment adjunct aimed at modifying the excitability of the motor cortex in preparation for rehabilitation. This review discusses recent advances in the use of TMS in both prediction and treatment after stroke. Prediction of recovery after stroke is a complex process and the use of TMS alone is not sufficient to provide accurate prediction for an individual after stroke. However, when applied in conjunction with other tools such as clinical assessment and MRI, accuracy of prediction using TMS is increased. rTMS temporarily modulates cortical excitability after stroke. Very few rTMS studies are completed in the acute or sub-acute stages after stroke and the translation of altered cortical excitability into gains in motor function are modest, with little evidence of long term effects. Although gains have been made in both of these areas, further investigation is needed before these techniques can be applied in routine clinical care.

  20. Plasma biomarkers in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong Hee; Kang, So Young; Kim, Myung Chun; Lee, Woo In

    2010-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis and timely treatment improves the outcome in patients with ischemic stroke, but a rapid and sensitive blood test for ischemic stroke does not exist. This study tested whether a panel of biomarkers might be useful in the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Consecutive patients with suspected stroke presenting to the emergency department of a university hospital in Korea were enrolled. Plasma specimens were assayed for brain natriuretic peptide, D-dimer, matrix metalloproteinase-9, S100β, and a proprietary composite multimarker index (MMX). There were 139 patients in this study, 89 of whom were diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke, 11 with acute cerebral hemorrhage, and 39 with other brain disorders. The MMX value was significantly higher in the patients with acute ischemic stroke in comparison to 57 healthy controls (p acute ischemic stroke vs those with acute cerebral hemorrhage (p = 0.884). The discriminatory capacity of MMX was modest, with an area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve of 0.714 for acute stroke. Ischemic stroke was not diagnosed by any of the biochemical markers individually. Although the data suggest that MMX may be helpful to diagnose an acute stroke, it does not discriminate between acute ischemic stroke and acute hemorrhagic stroke.

  1. Oral antiplatelet therapy for acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandercock, Peter A G; Counsell, Carl; Tseng, Mei-Chiun; Cecconi, Emanuela

    2014-03-26

    In people with acute ischaemic stroke, platelets become activated and can cause blood clots to form and block an artery in the brain, resulting in damage to part of the brain. Such damage gives rise to the symptoms of stroke. Antiplatelet therapy might reduce the volume of brain damaged by ischaemia and also reduce the risk of early recurrent ischaemic stroke, thereby reducing the risk of early death and improving long-term outcomes in survivors. However, antiplatelet therapy might also increase the risk of fatal or disabling intracranial haemorrhage. To assess the efficacy and safety of immediate oral antiplatelet therapy (that is started as soon as possible and no later than two weeks after stroke onset) in people with acute presumed ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 16 October 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2013), MEDLINE (June 1998 to May 2013), and EMBASE (June 1998 to May 2013). In 1998, for a previous version of this review, we searched the register of the Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration, MedStrategy and contacted relevant drug companies. Randomised trials comparing oral antiplatelet therapy (started within 14 days of the stroke) with control in people with definite or presumed ischaemic stroke. Two review authors independently applied the inclusion criteria and assessed trial quality. For the included trials, they extracted and cross-checked the data. We included eight trials involving 41,483 participants. No new trials have been added since the last update.Two trials testing aspirin 160 mg to 300 mg once daily, started within 48 hours of onset, contributed 98% of the data. The risk of bias was low. The maximum follow-up was six months. With treatment, there was a significant decrease in death or dependency at the end of follow-up (odds ratio (OR) 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91 to 0.99). For every 1000 people treated with

  2. Mechanical interventions to treat acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussell, David; Schumacher, H Christian; Meyers, Philip M; Higashida, Randall T

    2007-01-01

    The approach to stroke therapy has historically been limited due to the existence of relatively few treatment options and the necessity for action within 3 hours of symptom onset. As neuroimaging technology advances, fertile new ground is revealed for novel therapies. Recently, a number of exciting mechanical systems have been developed with potential efficacy even hours after cerebrovascular occlusion: endovascular clot disruption, endovascular clot extraction, and angioplasty with stenting are currently under study, with promising initial results. With more options, each with greater effectiveness in a particular clinical scenario, the physician is now better equipped than ever to treat acute ischemic stroke successfully.

  3. Relationship between plasma glutamate levels and post-stroke depression in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱方媛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the association between the plasma glutamate levels during acute ischemic stroke andpost-stroke depression(PSD)initially.Methods Seventy-four ischemic stroke patients admitted to the hospital within the first day of stroke onset were evaluated at a follow-up of 2 weeks.The Beck Depression Inventory(BDI,21-item)and DSM-Ⅳcriteria was used to diagnose post-stroke depression(PSD)at 2 weeks after stroke.

  4. Acute cerebral paragonimiasis presenting as hemorrhagic stroke in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Zhu, Gang; Lin, Jiangkai; Wu, Nan; Feng, Hua

    2008-08-01

    A hemorrhagic stroke in children is rarely secondary to cerebral paragonimiasis. We describe a 9-year-old boy in whom an intracerebral hemorrhage was the leading clinical indication of acute cerebral paragonimiasis. He was hospitalized because of a sudden onset of headache, right hemiparesis, and dysarthria. A computed tomography scan revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage in the left parietal lobe. Magnetic resonance angiography did not confirm any vascular abnormalities at the location of the hematoma. Four weeks later, he presented with right hemiparesis again, and fever. A diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis was based on repeated magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for paragonimiasis. The patient gradually recovered with praziquantel treatment. Cerebral paragonimiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemorrhagic strokes in children in areas where paragonimiasis is epidemic.

  5. Pneumonia in acute stroke patients fed by nasogastric tube

    OpenAIRE

    Dziewas, R. (Rainer); Ritter, M.; Schilling, M; Konrad, C.; Oelenberg, S; Nabavi, D; Stogbauer, F; Ringelstein, E; Ludemann, P

    2004-01-01

    Background: Aspiration pneumonia is the most important acute complication of stroke related dysphagia. Tube feeding is usually recommended as an effective and safe way to supply nutrition in dysphagic stroke patients.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Visualize Stroke and Characterize Stroke Recovery: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntosh, Bradley J.; Graham, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    The global burden of stroke continues to grow. Although stroke prevention strategies (e.g., medications, diet, and exercise) can contribute to risk reduction, options for acute interventions (e.g., thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke) are limited to the minority of patients. The remaining patients are often left with profound neurological disabilities that substantially impact quality of life, economic productivity, and increase caregiver burden. In the last decade, however, the future outlook for such patients has been tempered by movement toward the view that the brain is capable of reorganizing after injury. Many now view brain recovery after stroke as an area of scientific research with large potential for therapeutic advances, far into the future (Broderick and William, 2004). As a probe of brain anatomy, function and physiology, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive and highly versatile modality that promises to play a particularly important role in such research. Here we provide a basic review of MRI physical principles and applications for assessing stroke, looking toward the future role MRI may play in improving stroke rehabilitation methods and stroke recovery. PMID:23750149

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging to visualize stroke and characterize stroke recovery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintosh, Bradley J; Graham, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    The global burden of stroke continues to grow. Although stroke prevention strategies (e.g., medications, diet, and exercise) can contribute to risk reduction, options for acute interventions (e.g., thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke) are limited to the minority of patients. The remaining patients are often left with profound neurological disabilities that substantially impact quality of life, economic productivity, and increase caregiver burden. In the last decade, however, the future outlook for such patients has been tempered by movement toward the view that the brain is capable of reorganizing after injury. Many now view brain recovery after stroke as an area of scientific research with large potential for therapeutic advances, far into the future (Broderick and William, 2004). As a probe of brain anatomy, function and physiology, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive and highly versatile modality that promises to play a particularly important role in such research. Here we provide a basic review of MRI physical principles and applications for assessing stroke, looking toward the future role MRI may play in improving stroke rehabilitation methods and stroke recovery.

  8. Gerstmann'S syndrome in acute stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukic, Sanela; Mrkonjic, Zamir; Sinanovic, Osman; Vidovic, Mirjana; Kojic, Biljana

    2012-12-01

    Gerstmann in 1924. observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe. Since than, Gerstmann`s syndrome (GS) was enigma for neuropsychologists. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency and clinical features of GS among acute stroke patients. We prospectively analyzed 194 acute stroke patients (average age 65±11.06 years, male 113 (58.2%), female 81 (41.8%) hospitalized at department of Neurology, University Clinical Center tuzla, during the six mounths in 2010. For clinical assessment of agraphia, alexia and acalculia we used Minessota test for differential diagnosis of aphasia's. Among these acute stroke patients, 59 (30.40%) had alexia, agraphia and acalculia or different combinations of these disorders. two patients (3.4%) had agraphia and acalculia associated with other part of tetrad of GS: fi nger agnosia and left-right disorientation. they both where men, right handed, and cranial computed tomography scan showed ischemic lesion in the left parietal and left temporoparietal lobe. Gerstmann`s syndrome is rare clinical entity, and has the high value in localization and the lesion is mainly localized to angular gyrus of the dominant hemisphere.

  9. Towards best practice in acute stroke care in Ghana: a survey of hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baatiema, Leonard; Otim, Michael; Mnatzaganian, George; Aikins, Ama De-Graft; Coombes, Judith; Somerset, Shawn

    2017-02-02

    Stroke and other non-communicable diseases are important emerging public health concerns in sub-Saharan Africa where stroke-related mortality and morbidity are higher compared to other parts of the world. Despite the availability of evidence-based acute stroke interventions globally, uptake in low-middle income countries (LMIC) such as Ghana is uncertain. This study aimed to identify and evaluate available acute stroke services in Ghana and the extent to which these services align with global best practice. A multi-site, hospital-based survey was conducted in 11 major referral hospitals (regional and tertiary - teaching hospitals) in Ghana from November 2015 to April 2016. Respondents included neurologists, physician specialists and medical officers (general physicians). A pre-tested, structured questionnaire was used to gather data on available hospital-based acute stroke services in the study sites, using The World Stroke Organisation Global Stroke Services Guideline as a reference for global standards. Availability of evidence-based services for acute stroke care in the study hospitals were varied and limited. The results showed one tertiary-teaching hospital had a stroke unit. However, thrombolytic therapy (thrombolysis) using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke care was not available in any of the study hospitals. Aspirin therapy was administered in all the 11 study hospitals. Although eight study sites reported having a brain computed tomographic (CT) scan, only 7 (63.6%) were functional at the time of the study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan) services were also limited to only 4 (36.4%) hospitals (only functional in three). Acute stroke care by specialists, especially neurologists, was found in 36.4% (4) of the study hospitals whilst none of the study hospitals had an occupational or a speech pathologist to support in the provision of acute stroke care. This study confirms previous reports of limited and variable

  10. Acute Ischemic Stroke and Acute on Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Ahsan Aftab

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is due to either local thrombus formation or emboli that occlude a cerebral artery, together with chronic kidney disease represent major mortality and morbidity. Here wer present a case of 53 years old Malay man, admitted to a hospital in Malaysia complaining of sudden onset of weakness on right sided upper and lower limb associated with slurred speech. Patient was also suffering from uncontrolled hypertension, hyperlipidemia, chronic kidney disease stage 4, and diabetes mellitus(un controlled. He was diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke with cranial nerve 7 palsy (with right hemiparesis, acute on chronic kidney disease precipitated by dehydration and ACE inhibitor, and hyperkalemia. Patients with ischemic disease and chronic kidney disaese require constant monitering and carefull selected pharmacotherapy. Patient was placed under observation and was prescribed multiple pharamacotherpay to stabalise detoriating condition. Keywords: ischemic disease; chronic kidney disease; uncontrolled hypertension. | PubMed

  11. Diabetes and poor outcomes within 6 months after acute ischemic stroke: the China National Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qian; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Yilong; Yan, Yu; Li, Hao; Zhong, Liyong; Liu, Liping; Zheng, Huaguang; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Yongjun

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, controversy exists with regard to the impact of DM on prognosis after ischemic stroke in the Chinese population. We investigated the associations between DM and death, dependency, and stroke recurrence in patients after ischemic stroke onset in a nationwide, prospective registry, the China National Stroke Registry. The China National Stroke Registry consecutively recruited patients hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke in 2007 to 2008 and who were prospectively followed up for clinical and functional outcomes (death, dependency, and stroke recurrence) at 3 and 6 months after disease onset. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to analyze the association between DM and stroke outcomes after adjusting for potential confounding including age, sex, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, glucose level at admission, hypertension, coronary heart disease, smoking, urinary tract infection, and other factors. DM was identified in 3483 (27.0%) of stroke patients. Compared with stroke patients without DM, patients with DM had a significantly higher incidence of death or dependency and of recurrent stroke at 3 and 6 months after stroke onset. DM was an independent risk factor for death or dependency (adjusted odds ratio=1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 1.37) in patients with ischemic stroke at 6 months after onset. DM independently predicted poor outcomes in Chinese patients after acute ischemic stroke.

  12. Radiologic manifestations of focal cerebral hyperemia in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Skriver, E B; Herning, M

    1991-01-01

    In 16 acute stroke patients with focal cerebral hyperemia angiography and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were studied 1 to 4 days post stroke. CT was performed twice with and without contrast enhancement 3 +/- 1 days and 16 +/- 4 days post stroke. Angiographic evidence of focal cerebral hype...

  13. Acute MRI Changes in Progressive Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalowska, Elizabeth; Rostrup, Egill; Rosenbaum, S

    2008-01-01

    as a permanent decrease of >/=3 Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) points for speech or >/=2 SSS points for consciousness or >/=2 SSS points for limb strength, when assessed at baseline compared to the day after admission and daily during the following week. Patients were followed up on day 90 and assessed using......-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance angiography were performed 3 times, immediately after clinical evaluation, on day 7 and after 3 months. Clinical neurological assessments were performed every 2 h during the first 24 h and once daily from day 2 to 7. SIP was defined...... the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index and SSS score. Patients with and without SIP were compared using both clinical and MRI data obtained on admission, on day 7 and after 3 months. Results: Fifteen patients (37%) developed SIP. Increased DWI lesion volume on day 7 in all strokes was associated with SIP...

  14. Acute MRI changes in progressive ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalowska, E.; Rostrup, E.; Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    as a permanent decrease of >or=3 Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) points for speech or >or=2 SSS points for consciousness or >or=2 SSS points for limb strength, when assessed at baseline compared to the day after admission and daily during the following week. Patients were followed up on day 90 and assessed using......-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance angiography were performed 3 times, immediately after clinical evaluation, on day 7 and after 3 months. Clinical neurological assessments were performed every 2 h during the first 24 h and once daily from day 2 to 7. SIP was defined...... the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index and SSS score. Patients with and without SIP were compared using both clinical and MRI data obtained on admission, on day 7 and after 3 months. RESULTS: Fifteen patients (37%) developed SIP. Increased DWI lesion volume on day 7 in all strokes was associated with SIP...

  15. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  16. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction.

  17. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke.

  18. Endovascular reperfusion therapies for acute ischemic stroke: dissecting the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Safouris, Apostolos; Krogias, Christos; Arthur, Adam S; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2016-05-01

    Ischemic stroke is a major cause of death and disability and intravenous thrombolysis has been the only approved acute reperfusion therapy (RT) for many years. Seven randomized-controlled clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating the safety and efficacy of endovascular therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) due to emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) have been recently published. These studies have changed the treatment paradigm by establishing mechanical thrombectomy (MT) as the most effective acute stroke therapy for improving functional outcome in anterior circulation ELVO with a NNT of 6. The present review will critically evaluate the results of these RCTs and of the existing meta-analyses investigating the safety and efficacy of endovascular therapy for AIS. Points of debate such as acute stroke imaging, posterior circulation stroke and general anesthesia will be addressed. We will also discuss health policies aiming to increase the availability of endovascular treatment for stroke patients.

  19. Acute stroke | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute stroke E.1.1.1Medical condi...tion in easily understood language Acute stroke MedDRA Classification E.1.3Condition being studied is a rare

  20. Intra‐arterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhemer, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with current issues in the field of acute ischemic stroke. The main objective has been to proof the effectiveness and safety of intra-arterial treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. MR CLEAN was the first study to proof the safety and effectiveness of intra-arterial

  1. Relationship between subtypes of MRI-confirmed acute ischemic stroke based on OCSP and TOAST classifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Qiu; Xiaokun Qi; Jianguo Liu; Wenluo Zhang; Qi Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Two classification systems exist for subtypes of acute cerebral infarction.One was developed for the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment(TOAST),based primarily on etiology.The other is the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project(OCSP),based on clinical features.OBJECTIVE:Tb evaluate the relationship between OCSP and TOAST classifications ifl terms of stroke location and etiology in 126 patients with acute ischemic stroke confirmed by transcranial magnetic resonance imaging(MRI).DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:Retrospective case analysis.Transcranial MRI,diffusion weighted imaging,and magnetic resonance angiography were performed in 126 patients with acute stroke during the first 48 hours following admission to the Department of Neurology,Navy Gene ral Hospital of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS:A total of 126 patients with acute stroke,comprised of 71 males and 55 females,admitted to the Navy General Hospital of Chinese PLA between December 2005 and April 2006 were included.METHODS:Of 126 patients with acute stroke,13 exhibited total anterior circulation infarcts(TACI),51 had partial anterior circulation infarcts(PACI),28 sufiered posterior circulation infarcts(POCI),and 34 had lacunar infarcts(LACI)based on OCSP classification.However,according to TOAST classification,19 cases were a result of large-artery atherosclerosis,32 by cardioembolism,36 by small-vessel occlusion,1 by stroke of other determined etiology,and 38 by stroke of undetermined etiology.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The corresponding relationship of the subtypes of acute stroke based on OCSP and TOAST.RESULTS:Of patients with TACI,8(61.5%)were caused by cardioembolism.Of patients with PACI,16 (31.4%) were caused by large-artery atherosclerosis and 17(33.3%)by cardioembolism.Of patients with POCI,12(42.8%)were a result of small-vessel occlusion.Of patients with LACI,17(50.O%)were caused by hypertension and arteriolar sclerosis.CONCLUSION:(1)The OCSP system is related to anatomical and pathophysiological

  2. Dyslipidemia and Outcome in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tian; ZHANG Jin Tao; YANG Mei; ZHANG Huan; LIU Wen Qing; KONG Yan; XU Tan; ZHANG Yong Hong

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo study the relationship between dyslipidemia and outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. MethodsData about 1 568 patients with acute ischemic stroke werecollected from 4 hospitals in Shandong Province from January 2006 to December 2008. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) >10 at discharge or death was defined as the outcome. Effect of dyslipidemia on outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke was analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score-adjusted analysis, respectively. ResultsThe serum levels of TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C were significantly associated with the outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score-adjusted analysis showed that the ORs and 95% CIs were 3.013 (1.259, 7.214)/2.655 (1.298, 5.43), 3.157(1.306, 7.631)/3.405(1.621, 7.154), and 0.482 (0.245, 0.946)/0.51 (0.282, 0.921), respectively, for patients with acute ischemic stroke. Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test showed no significant difference in observed and predicted risk in patients with acute ischemic stroke (chi-square=8.235, P=0.411). ConclusionSerum levels of TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C are positively related with the outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  3. Management of acute stroke: impact of registration studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Harold P

    2010-09-01

    Stroke is a life-threatening or life-changing disease that is expensive in health care costs and lost productivity. Stroke also is a leading cause of human suffering. While the risk of stroke may be reduced with advances in prevention, recent advances in acute care can limit the consequences of stroke. In particular, the success of reperfusion therapies including intra-arterial interventions and intravenous administration of thrombolytic agents means that some patients with stroke may be cured. Still, the time window for effective treatment of stroke is relatively short. As a result, modern stroke management requires the close collaboration of the public, health care providers, administrators, insurance companies, and the government. Potential strategies to extend modern stroke care to as many patients as possible include 1) educational programs to train community emergency medical service personnel and physicians, 2) development of stroke care plans at community hospitals, 3) an integrated community-comprehensive stroke center program based on consultation, and telemedicine. The goal is to have a highly integrated approach to provide emergency treatment of the stroke that provides key emergency treatment, including intravenous administration of thrombolytic medications, at a community hospital (primary stroke center) with evacuation to a comprehensive stroke center that has resources and expertise that are not available in the primary stroke center. Taiwan is an ideal location for the development of such regional stroke programs.

  4. Acute Diagnosis and Management of Stroke Presenting Dizziness or Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2015-08-01

    Stroke involving the brainstem and cerebellum frequently presents acute vestibular syndrome. Although vascular vertigo is known to usually accompany other neurologic symptoms and signs, isolated vertigo from small infarcts involving the cerebellum or brainstem has been increasingly recognized. Bedside neuro-otologic examination can reliably differentiate acute vestibular syndrome due to stroke from more benign inner ear disease. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss may herald impending infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Accurate identification of isolated vascular vertigo is very important because misdiagnosis of acute stroke may result in significant morbidity and mortality.

  5. Laryngeal Elevation Velocity and Aspiration in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Yun; Wei, Na; Yang, Bo; Wang, Anxin; Zhou, Hai; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Ouyoung, Melody; Villegas, Brenda; Groher, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Aspiration after stroke has been associated with aspiration pneumonia, which contributes to increased mortality of stroke. Laryngeal elevation is a core mechanism for protection from aspiration. Few studies have explored the predictive value of laryngeal elevation velocity for aspiration after stroke. This study aimed to explore the ability of laryngeal elevation velocity to predict aspiration in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods This was a prospective cohort study that included consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated at a teaching hospital during a 10-month period. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Patients who were at risk of aspiration and could swallow 5 ml of diluted barium (40%, w/v) for a videofluoroscopic swallowing (VFS) study were included. The association between abnormal indices in the oral and pharyngeal phase of the VFS study and aspiration was examined using univariate analyses. These indices included the lip closure, tongue movement and control, laryngeal elevation velocity and range, the latency of pharyngeal swallowing, pharyngeal transit time (PTT), abnormal epiglottis tilt, residual barium in the pharynx, and the duration of upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening. The laryngeal elevation velocity (%/s) was calculated as the range of laryngeal elevation (%) from the resting position to the maximum superior position or to the position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the corresponding duration of laryngeal elevation. The range of laryngeal elevation (%) was the percentage calculated as the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the maximum superior excursion position or position where the laryngeal vestibule is fully closed divided by the distance between the resting laryngeal position and the lowest edge of the mandible. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive value for aspiration

  6. Selected acute phase CSF factors in ischemic stroke: findings and prognostic value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intskirveli Nino

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Study aimed at investigation of pathogenic role and prognostic value of several selected cerebrospinal fluid acute phase factors that can reflect the severity of ischemic brain damage. Methods Ninety five acute ischemic stroke patients were investigated. Ischemic region visualized at the twenty fourth hour by conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Stroke severity evaluated by National Institute Health Stroke Scale. One month outcome of disease was assessed by Barthel Index. Cerebrospinal fluid was taken at the sixth hour of stroke onset. CSF pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were studied by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Nitric Oxide and Lipoperoxide radical were measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. CSF Nitrate levels were detected using the Griess reagent. Statistics performed by SPSS-11.0. Results At the sixth hour of stroke onset, cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels were elevated in patients against controls. Severe stroke patients had increased interleukin-6 content compared to less severe strokes (P Conclusion According to present study the cerebrospinal fluid contents of interleukin-6 and nitrates seem to be the most reliable prognostic factors in acute phase of ischemic stroke.

  7. Role of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Michaela M; Brainin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, efforts have focused on investigating the neurophysiological changes that occur in the brain after stroke, and on developing novel strategies such as additional brain stimulation to enhance sensorimotor and cognitive recovery. In the 1990s, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was introduced as a therapeutic tool for improving the efficacy of rehabilitation for recovery after stroke. It is evident that disturbances of interhemispheric processes after stroke result in a pathological hyperactivity of the intact hemisphere. The rationale of using rTMS as a complementary therapy is mainly to decrease the cortical excitability in regions that are presumed to hinder optimal recovery by low-frequency rTMS delivered to the unaffected hemisphere, while high-frequency rTMS delivered to the affected hemisphere facilitates cortical excitability. However, the exact mechanisms of how rTMS works are still under investigation. There is a growing body of research in stroke patients investigating the effect of rTMS on facilitating recovery by modifying cortical and subcortical networks. Clinical trials applying rTMS already yielded promising results in improving recovery of sensorimotor and cognitive functions. Altogether, in combination with conventional therapeutic approaches, rTMS has a potential to become a complementary strategy to enhance stroke recovery by modulating the excitability of targeted brain areas. In future studies, emphasis should be placed on selecting patient populations to determine whether treatment response depends on age, lesion acuteness, or stroke severity. Furthermore, it is important to identify parameters optimizing the beneficial effects of rTMS on stroke recovery, and to monitor their long-term effects.

  8. Nutritional status in acute stroke: undernutrition versus overnutrition in different stroke subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi-Kwon, S; Yang, Y H; Kim, E K; Jeon, M Y; Kim, J S

    1998-09-01

    Nutritional status in the acute stage of stroke has not been properly evaluated in different stroke subtypes. The objective of this study was to investigate the nutritional status of different subtypes of stroke patients. We studied 88 female patients with first-ever strokes. Strokes were divided into cerebral infarction (CI, n=67) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, n=21). We measured the nutritional status of the patients in the acute stage of stroke with the use of 8 parameters including 3 biochemical and 5 anthropometric ones. These variables were assessed in stroke patients and 120 age-matched controls, and were compared with each other. In the acute stage of stroke, undernourishment was significantly (P=0.000) more prevalent in the ICH group (62%) than in the CI group (25%) or controls (13%). On the other hand obesity was present in 10%, 24% and 17% in patients with ICH, those with CI, and controls, respectively, which was not significantly different (P=0.461). Only abdominal skinfold thickness was significantly greater in patients with CI than in those with ICH or controls. Conclusions - Our results illustrate that undernourishment is prevalent in acute stroke patients, significantly more so in patients with ICH than in those with CI. Stroke patients, especially those with ICH, should receive special nutritional intervention starting immediately after admission.

  9. Physical Activity Patterns of Acute Stroke Patients Managed in a Rehabilitation Focused Stroke Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya West

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Comprehensive stroke unit care, incorporating acute care and rehabilitation, may promote early physical activity after stroke. However, previous information regarding physical activity specific to the acute phase of stroke and the comprehensive stroke unit setting is limited to one stroke unit. This study describes the physical activity undertaken by patients within 14 days after stroke admitted to a comprehensive stroke unit. Methods. This study was a prospective observational study. Behavioural mapping was used to determine the proportion of the day spent in different activities. Therapist reports were used to determine the amount of formal therapy received on the day of observation. The timing of commencement of activity out of bed was obtained from the medical records. Results. On average, patients spent 45% (SD 25 of the day in some form of physical activity and received 58 (SD 34 minutes per day of physiotherapy and occupational therapy combined. Mean time to first mobilisation out of bed was 46 (SD 32 hours post-stroke. Conclusions. This study suggests that commencement of physical activity occurs earlier and physical activity is at a higher level early after stroke in this comprehensive stroke unit, when compared to studies of other acute stroke models of care.

  10. Impact of implementing evidence-based acute stroke interventions on survival: the South London Stroke Register.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet Addo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies examining the impact of organised acute stroke care interventions on survival in subgroups of stroke patients remain limited. AIMS: This study examined the effects of a range of evidence-based interventions of acute stroke care on one year survival post-stroke and determined the size of the effect across different socio-demographic and clinical subgroups of patients. METHODS: Data on 4026 patients with a first-ever stroke recruited to the population-based South London Stroke Register between 1995 and 2010 were used. In uni-variable analyses, one year cumulative survival rates in socio-demographic groups and by care received was determined. Survival functions were compared using Log-rank tests. Multivariable Cox models were used to test for interactions between components of care and age group, sex, ethnic group, social class, stroke subtype and level of consciousness. RESULTS: 1949 (56.4% patients were admitted to a stroke unit. Patients managed on a stroke unit, those with deficits receiving specific rehabilitation therapies and those with ischaemic stroke subtype receiving aspirin in the acute phase had better one year survival compared to those who did not receive these interventions. The greatest reduction in the hazards of death among patients treated on a stroke unit were in the youngest patients aged <65 years, (HR 0.39; 95% CI: 0.25-0.62, and those with reduced levels of consciousness, GCS <9, (HR: 0.44; CI: 0.33-0.58. CONCLUSIONS: There was evidence of better one year survival in patients receiving specific acute interventions after stroke with a significantly greater effect in stroke subgroups, suggesting the possibility of re-organising stroke services to ensure that the most appropriate care is made accessible to patients likely to derive the most benefits from such interventions.

  11. Acute stroke-like presentation of acquired hepatocerebral degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Smita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological manifestations in liver diseases have been well-described. Parkinsonism developing in cirrhotic patients is a unique clinical, neuroradiological, and biological entity. The symptoms are often insidious in onset and occur after liver disease has made its presentation. Acute dysarthria as the presenting manifestation of cirrhosis is rare. Here we report three cases where liver disease made an unusual presentation as acute dysarthria. In all cases the abruptness of the onset prompted the treating physicians to make a diagnosis of stroke. The computed tomography (CT scans of all these patients did not show any evidence of stroke. This was followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI which showed the characteristic symmetric high-signal intensities in globus pallidus and substantia nigra in T1-weighted images, a reflection of increased tissue concentrations of manganese that helped in making a retrospective diagnosis of liver disease, confirmed later by altered serum albumin to globulin ratios and altered liver echo texture in ultra sonogram.

  12. RAAS and stress markers in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Back, C.; Thiesen, K L; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade has neuroprotective effects in animal stroke models, but no effects in clinical stroke trials. We evaluated cerebral and peripheral changes in the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) and stress responses in acute ischemic stroke patients....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood from a jugular and cubital vein was collected within 48 h of stroke onset, after 24 and 48 h, and renin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, aldosterone, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and cortisol were measured. Post-stroke cubital vein samples were collected after 8 (4.7-10) months......-stroke. No differences in RAAS were detected between jugular and cubital plasma levels. Jugular venous plasma levels of epinephrine and cortisol were elevated in the acute phase compared to cubital levels (P cortisol levels in the jugular vein blood may reflect a higher...

  13. European Stroke Organisation (ESO) guidelines for the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntaios, George; Dziedzic, Tomasz; Michel, Patrik; Papavasileiou, Vasileios; Petersson, Jesper; Staykov, Dimitre; Thomas, Brenda; Steiner, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    Hyperthermia is a frequent complication in patients with acute ischemic stroke. On the other hand, therapeutically induced hypothermia has shown promising potential in animal models of focal cerebral ischemia. This Guideline Document presents the European Stroke Organisation guidelines for the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke. A multidisciplinary group identified related questions and developed its recommendations based on evidence from randomized controlled trials elaborating the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. This Guideline Document was reviewed within the European Stroke Organisation and externally and was approved by the European Stroke Organisation Guidelines Committee and the European Stroke Organisation Executive Committee. We found low-quality evidence, and therefore, we cannot make any recommendation for treating hyperthermia as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke and hyperthermia; moderate evidence to suggest against routine prevention of hyperthermia with antipyretics as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke and normothermia; very low-quality evidence to suggest against routine induction of hypothermia as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The currently available data about the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke are limited, and the strengths of the recommendations are therefore weak. We call for new randomized controlled trials as well as recruitment of eligible patients to ongoing randomized controlled trials to allow for better-informed recommendations in the future. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  14. Myelin basic protein and ischemia modified albumin levels in acute ischemic stroke cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Serdar; Akdur, Okhan; Yildirim, Ahmet; Adam, Gurhan; Cakir, Dilek Ulker; Karaman, Handan Isin Ozisik

    2015-01-01

    To investigate early diagnostic effects of serum myelin basic protein (MBP) and ischemic modified albumin (IMA) levels in patients with ischemic stroke. Fifty patients who presented to an emergency service with acute ischemic stroke between June 2013 to March 2014 were evaluated with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty four healthy cases were included as control group. All patients' serum IMA and MBP level were assessed. Mean IMA value was 0.52±0.25 cases with acute ischemic stroke and serum IMA levels were significantly higher than the control group (pacute ischemic stroke group and control group related to the MBP serum levels (P>0.05). Statistically significant correlation was detected between the volumes of diffusion restriction on MRI and NIHSS score (P=0.002, r=0.43) and IMA (P=0.015, r=0.344) levels. We have found that serum IMA levels are elevated in acute ischemic stroke cases and these levels are correlated with the ischemic tissue volume. MBP levels do not increase in early period of stroke cases.

  15. Clot composition and treatment approach to acute ischemic stroke: The road so far

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramdeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent histological studies of thrombi retrieved from patients with an acute ischemic stroke using the endovascular thrombectomy devices and correlation with early vessel computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI characteristics have given relevant insights into the pathophysiology of thrombotic lesions and may facilitate the development of improved reperfusion treatment approaches. We present a review of recent studies on the histopathologic analysis of thrombi, studies of MRI, and CT imaging correlation with thrombus histology, and detailed structural analysis of thromboemboli retrieved by thrombectomy devices during an acute ischemic stroke.

  16. Predictors and Outcomes of Dysphagia Screening After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joundi, Raed A; Martino, Rosemary; Saposnik, Gustavo; Giannakeas, Vasily; Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K

    2017-04-01

    Guidelines advocate screening all acute stroke patients for dysphagia. However, limited data are available regarding how many and which patients are screened and how failing a swallowing screen affects patient outcomes. We sought to evaluate predictors of receiving dysphagia screening after acute ischemic stroke and outcomes after failing a screening test. We used the Ontario Stroke Registry from April 1, 2010, to March 31, 2013, to identify patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke and determine predictors of documented dysphagia screening and outcomes after failing the screening test, including pneumonia, disability, and death. Among 7171 patients, 6677 patients were eligible to receive dysphagia screening within 72 hours, yet 1280 (19.2%) patients did not undergo documented screening. Patients with mild strokes were significantly less likely than those with more severe strokes to have documented screening (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-0.64). Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio, 4.71; 95% CI, 3.43-6.47), severe disability (adjusted odds ratio, 5.19; 95% CI, 4.48-6.02), discharge to long-term care (adjusted odds ratio, 2.79; 95% CI, 2.11-3.79), and 1-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 2.09-2.80). Associations were maintained in patients with mild strokes. One in 5 patients with acute ischemic stroke did not have documented dysphagia screening, and patients with mild strokes were substantially less likely to have documented screening. Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including in patients with mild strokes, highlighting the importance of dysphagia screening for all patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Hepatitis C and recurrent treatment-resistant acute ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Saxsena, Aneeta; Tarsia, Joseph; Dunn, Casey; Aysenne, Aimee; Shah, Basil; Moore, David F.

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and thrombolysis, acute ischemic stroke has become a treatable disorder if the patient presents within the 4.5-hour time window. Typically, sporadic stroke is caused by atherosclerotic disease involving large or small cerebral arteries or secondary to a cardioembolic source often associated with atrial fibrillation. In the over-65-year age group, more rare causes of stroke, such as antiphospholipid syndromes, are unusual; such...

  18. Update on acute endovascular and surgical stroke treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, D; Cortsen, M; Eskesen, V

    2013-01-01

    the penumbra. Moreover, decompressive craniectomy is now a well-established treatment option for malignant middle cerebral artery infarction and cerebellar stroke. Using a case-based approach, this article reviews recent achievements in advanced treatment options for patients with acute ischemic stroke.......Emergency stroke care has become a natural part of the emerging discipline of neurocritical care and demands close cooperation between the neurologist and neurointerventionists, neurosurgeons, and anesthesiologists. Endovascular treatment (EVT), including intra-arterial thrombolysis, mechanical...

  19. Elevated admission blood pressure and stroke severity in acute ischemic stroke: the Bergen NORSTROKE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvistad, Christopher Elnan; Logallo, Nicola; Oygarden, Halvor; Thomassen, Lars; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Naess, Halvor

    2013-01-01

    Transient elevated blood pressure (BP) is frequent in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke. The pathophysiology of this response is not clear and its effect on clinical outcome has shown contradictory results. Some studies have suggested that BP elevation may represent a protective response to enhance perfusion in ischemic brain tissue. In this study, we aimed to explore the association between elevated admission BP and stroke severity in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. If it is true that elevated BP represents a protective response in acute ischemia, we expected an inverse association between elevated BP and admission stroke severity, and a positive association between elevated BP and complete neurological recovery within 24 h and/or favorable short-term outcome. Patients with ischemic stroke with hospital admission stroke registry (Bergen NORSTROKE Registry). BP was measured immediately after admission in all patients. Elevated BP was defined as systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg or diastolic BP ≥90 mm Hg. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was used to assess stroke severity upon admission. Mild stroke was defined as NIHSS score stroke as NIHSS score 8-14, and severe stroke as NIHSS score ≥15. Complete neurological recovery (CNR) was defined as no persistent ischemic stroke symptoms at 24 h after admission. Favorable short-term outcome was defined as a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1 at day 7. A total of 749 patients with ischemic stroke were included, of which 621 patients (82.9%) presented with elevated BP. Elevated BP was independently associated with mild stroke (odds ratio, OR: 2.12; 95% CI: 1.39-3.24; p stroke (OR: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.25-0.68; p stroke severity on admission, where elevated BP was associated with mild stroke and lack of elevated BP was associated with severe stroke. This could be explained by a protective effect of elevated BP in the acute phase of ischemic stroke, although the absence of association between

  20. STUDY OF RISK FACTORS AND CLINICAL PROFILE OF ACUTE STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available `INTRODUCTION: Stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed countries after cardiovascular disease and cancer. In India Community Surveys have shown a crude prevalence rate for hemiplegia 200 per 1, 00, 000 population. It accounts for nearly 1.5% of all urban admissions, 4.5 % of all medical and about 20% of neurological cases. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: Identification of risk factors and evaluation of clinical profile of acute stroke. MATERIAL AND METHOD: INCLUSION CRITERIA: Cases of acute stoke admitted in SGMH hospital were selected for the study. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Brain injury cases, infective, neoplastic cases producing stroke were excluded. RESULTS: Stroke was more common in male, 58 % patients were male and 42% patients were female. It was more common in 5th and 6th decade. Most common etiology was infarction. Most common risk factor was hypertension followed by smoking. In addition to limb weakness, headache and vomiting were most common presenting symptoms followed by convulsion. These symptoms were more common in hemorrhagic stroke. Right sided hemiplegia was more common than left sided. Middle cerebral artery was involved in majority of cases in atherothrombotic stroke whereas basal ganglion was most common site of bleed in hemorrhagic stroke. Coma and mortality were more in hemorrhagic stroke. CONCLUSION: The risk factors and clinical profile of acute stroke in India are similar to that of Western countries. Common risk factors are hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia

  1. An associative Brain-Computer-Interface for acute stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Aliakbaryhosseinabadi, Susan

    2016-01-01

    An efficient innovative Brain-Computer-Interface system that empowers chronic stroke patients to control an artificial activation of their lower limb muscle through task specific motor intent has been tested in the past. In the current study it was applied to acute stroke patients. The system...

  2. Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke: The North American Experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Justin Zivin

    2000-01-01

    @@It has been understood for well over a century that clots in cerebral arteries are the usual cause of strokes, but it was only in 1995 that the techniques necessary to reduce neurologic damage were identified. A lengthy and difficult effort was required to prove the value of acute stroke thrombolysis and this has become controversial topic.

  3. CT angiography and CT perfusion in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seeters, T. van

    2016-01-01

    CT angiography and CT perfusion are used in patients with acute ischemic stroke for diagnostic purposes and to select patients for treatment. In this thesis, the reproducibility of CT angiography and CT perfusion is examined, the additional value of CT angiography and CT perfusion for stroke outcome

  4. Acute Stroke | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n(s) being investigated Acute Stroke MedDRA Classification E.1.3Condition being s... General Information on the Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical conditio

  5. Acute stroke: postprocedural care and management of complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Flávio Augusto; de Figueiredo, Marcelo Marinho; Silva, Gisele Sampaio

    2012-03-01

    Endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke is an important alternative to thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) for patients who present beyond the thrombolysis time window, those who are ineligible for rt-PA, or those who do not improve after intravenous rt-PA. These patients generally require special attention in the postprocedural period because, although not frequent, complications of endovascular procedures in acute ischemic stroke have the potential to be devastating. Neurocritical care is essential to reduce and appropriately treat complications after endovascular procedures. Neurointensivists and neurocritical care nurses are experts in both critical care and neurologic disorders and have special training to recognize early physiological derangements in patients presenting with acute stroke. Close attention to the serial neurological examination, blood pressure control, adequate management of glucose, temperature, and immediate identification of complications such as reocclusion and hemorrhagic transformation are key elements that exemplify the importance of postprocedural neurocritical care in acute ischemic stroke.

  6. Developing practice recommendations for endovascular revascularization for acute ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, Marc A.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Darkhabani, Ziad; Edgell, Randall C.; English, Joey; Frei, Donald; Jamieson, Dara G.; Janardhan, Vallabh; Janjua, Nazli; Janjua, Rashid M.; Katzan, Irene; Khatri, Pooja; Kirmani, Jawad F.; Liebeskind, David S.; Linfante, Italo; Nguyen, Thanh N.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Shutter, Lori; Xavier, Andrew; Yavagal, Dileep; Zaidat, Osama O.

    2012-01-01

    Guidelines have been established for the management of acute ischemic stroke; however, specific recommendations for endovascular revascularization therapy are lacking. Burgeoning investigation of endovascular revascularization therapies for acute ischemic stroke, rapid device development, and a diverse training background of the providers performing the procedures underscore the need for practice recommendations. This review provides a concise summary of the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology endovascular acute ischemic stroke roundtable meeting. This document was developed to review current clinical efficacy of pharmacologic and mechanical revascularization therapy, selection criteria, periprocedure management, and endovascular time metrics and to highlight current practice patterns. It therefore provides an outline for the future development of multisociety guidelines and recommendations to improve patient selection, procedural management, and organizational strategies for revascularization therapies in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23008406

  7. Statins in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-01-01

    Statins have pleiotropic effects of potential neuroprotection. However, because of lack of large randomized clinical trials, current guidelines do not provide specific recommendations on statin initiation in acute ischemic stroke (AIS...

  8. Prognosis and outcome of acute stroke in the University College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-02

    Mar 2, 2011 ... and ischemic heart disease), accounting for approximately ... Background: Many factors influence the outcome of acute stroke, the third ..... review. West Afr J Med 2000;19:304-7. 11. Adetuyibi A, Akisanya JB, Onadeko BO.

  9. Admitting acute ischemic stroke patients to a stroke care monitoring unit versus a conventional stroke unit : a randomized pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulter, Geert; Elting, Jan Willem; Langedijk, Marc; Maurits, Natasha M; De Keyser, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Pathophysiological considerations and observational studies indicate that elevated body temperature, hypoxia, hypotension, and cardiac arrhythmias in the acute phase of ischemic stroke may aggravate brain damage and worsen outcome. METHODS: Both units were organized with the

  10. Admitting acute ischemic stroke patients to a stroke care monitoring unit versus a conventional stroke unit : a randomized pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulter, Geert; Elting, Jan Willem; Langedijk, Marc; Maurits, Natasha M; De Keyser, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Pathophysiological considerations and observational studies indicate that elevated body temperature, hypoxia, hypotension, and cardiac arrhythmias in the acute phase of ischemic stroke may aggravate brain damage and worsen outcome. METHODS: Both units were organized with the

  11. Current status of acute stroke management in Korea: a report on a multicenter, comprehensive acute stroke registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Park, Tai Hwan; Park, Sang-Soon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Cha, Jae Kwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Jun; Lee, Soo Joo; Ko, Youngchai; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Cho, Yong-Jin; Hong, Keun-Sik; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Joon-Tae; Kim, Dong-Eog; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Ji Sung; Jang, Myung Suk; Broderick, Joseph P; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2014-06-01

    There are limited data on the utilization of diagnostics and the variation of treatments at the national level in acute stroke care. Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division stroke registry aimed to describe stroke statistics and quality of care in Korea and to implement quality indicators. Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division registry was established in April 2008 and covers pretreatment demographics, medical and stroke severity measures, diagnostic evaluation, hyperacute revascularization, in-hospital management, discharge disposition, quality indicators, and long-term functional outcomes. Consecutive stroke cases from 12 participating centers are registered to a web-based database. Meticulous data management and auditing policy were applied. A total of 14,792 ischemic stroke cases were enrolled from April 2008 to January 2012. The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 4 at admission, with median delay of onset to arrival of 14 h. Rate of risk factor management before stroke exceeds more than 80% for hypertension and diabetes. Revascularization procedures were performed in 1736 subjects (12%), and 34% were endovascular (n = 598). Substantial variability was noted in the preferred modality of hyperacute revascularization (range of endovascular recanalization = 6-60%), use of computed tomography (30-93%), and perfusion imaging (2-96%). The Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division registry documented that the current practice of acute stroke care in South Korea largely met the standard of guidelines, but variability of practice still remains. The registry would provide an opportunity to evaluate the quality of stroke care across South Korea and compare it with that of other countries. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  12. Efficacy of Stent-Retriever Thrombectomy in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus Computed Tomographic Perfusion-Selected Patients in SWIFT PRIME Trial (Solitaire FR With the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Saver, Jeffrey L; Goyal, Mayank; Jahan, Reza; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Bonafe, Alain; Levy, Elad I; Pereira, Vitor M; Cognard, Christophe; Yavagal, Dileep R; Albers, Gregory W

    2017-06-01

    The majority of patients enrolled in SWIFT PRIME trial (Solitaire FR With the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke) had computed tomographic perfusion (CTP) imaging before randomization; 34 patients were randomized after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with middle cerebral artery and distal carotid occlusions were randomized to treatment with tPA (tissue-type plasminogen activator) alone or tPA+stentriever thrombectomy. The primary outcome was the distribution of the modified Rankin Scale score at 90 days. Patients with the target mismatch profile for enrollment were identified on MRI and CTP. MRI selection was performed in 34 patients; CTP in 139 patients. Baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 17 in both groups. Target mismatch profile was present in 95% (MRI) versus 83% (CTP). A higher percentage of the MRI group was transferred from an outside hospital (P=0.02), and therefore, the time from stroke onset to randomization was longer in the MRI group (P=0.003). Time from emergency room arrival to randomization did not differ in CTP versus MRI-selected patients. Baseline ischemic core volumes were similar in both groups. Reperfusion rates (>90%/TICI [Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction] score 3) did not differ in the stentriever-treated patients in the MRI versus CTP groups. The primary efficacy analysis (90-day mRS score) demonstrated a statistically significant benefit in both subgroups (MRI, P=0.02; CTP, P=0.01). Infarct growth was reduced in the stentriever-treated group in both MRI and CTP groups. Time to randomization was significantly longer in MRI-selected patients; however, site arrival to randomization times were not prolonged, and the benefits of endovascular therapy were similar. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01657461. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Outcomes After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongchao; Lin, Yanlin; Liu, Yuxiu; Chen, Ying; Wang, Bin; Li, Changgui; Yan, Shengli; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Wenjuan

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies assessing the association between serum uric acid levels and neurological outcome after acute ischemic stroke reported conflicting results. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to assess the impact of serum uric acid levels on outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, and Google scholar were searched through September 26, 2014 to identify eligible published or unpublished studies on the association between serum uric acid levels and outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Hazard ratio (HR) for poor outcome or mean differences of serum uric acid levels with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were pooled using meta-analysis. The primary outcome was occurrence of poor outcomes, while the secondary outcome was the mean differences of serum uric acid levels in patients with good or poor outcomes. Ten eligible studies with a total of 8131 acute ischemic stroke patients were included into the meta-analysis. Compared with low serum uric acid level, high serum uric acid level was associated better outcome after acute ischemic stroke (HR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.68-0.88, P = 0.0001). Sensitivity analysis further identified the prognostic role of serum uric acid levels on outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Patients with good outcomes had a higher serum uric acid level compared with those with poor outcome (mean difference = 30.61 μmol/L, 95% CI 20.13-41.08, P acute ischemic stroke. High uric acid level at the onset is a biomarker of better prognosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  14. Pharmaceutical Sponsorship Bias Influences Thrombolytic Literature in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Radecki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains controversial in Emergency Medicine and has not been fully endorsed by either the American College of Emergency Physicians or the American Academy of emergency medicine. A growing recognition exists of the influence of pharmaceutical sponsorship on the reported findings of published clinical trials. Sponsorship bias has been suggested as a potential criticism of the literature and guidelines favoring thrombolytic therapy. Objective: The objective of this study is to review the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke and document the presence or absence of pharmaceutical sponsorship. Methods: A publication-citation analysis was performed to identify the most frequently cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Identified articles were reviewed for disclosures of pharmaceutical funding. Results: Of the 20 most-cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute stroke, 17 (85% disclosed pharmaceutical sponsorship. These disclosures range from general sponsorship to direct employment of authors by pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion: An overwhelming predominance of the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is susceptible to sponsorship bias. This potential bias may provide a basis for physician concern regarding the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy. Further, large, independent, placebo-controlled studies may be required to guide therapy and professional guidelines definitively for acute ischemic stroke. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:435–441.

  15. Effects of iodinated contrast on various magnetic resonance imaging sequences and field strength: Implications for characterization of hemorrhagic transformation in acute stroke therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Humberto Morales; Lisa Lemen; Ranasinghage Samaratunga; Peter Nguyen; Thomas Tomsick

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the effects of iodinated contrast material(ICM) on magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) comparing different sequences and magnetic fields, with emphasis to similarities/differences with well-known signal characteristics of hemorrhage in the brain. METHODS: Aliquots of iopamidol and iodixanol mixed with normal saline were scanned at 1.5T and 3T. Signal intensity(SI) was measured using similar spin-echo(SE)-T1, SE-T2, gradient-echo(GRE) and fluid-attenuationinversion-recovery(FLAIR) sequences at both magnets. Contrast to noise ratio(CNR)(SI contrast-SI saline/SD noise) for each aliquot were calculated and Kruskall-wallis test and graphic analysis was used to compare different pulse sequences and ICMs. RESULTS: Both ICM showed increased SI on SE-T1 and decreased SI on SE-T2, GRE and FLAIR at both 1.5T and 3T, as the concentration was increased. By CNR measurements, SE-T2 had the greatest conspicuity at 3T with undiluted iopamidol(92.6 ± 0.3, P < 0.00) followed by iodixanol(77.5 ± 0.9, P < 0.00) as compared with other sequences(CNR range: 15-40). While SE-T2 had greatest conspicuity at 1.5T with iopamidol(49.3 ± 1, P < 0.01), SE-T1 showed similar or slightly better conspicuity(20.8 ± 4) than SE-T2 with iodixanol(23 ± 1.7). In all cases, hypo-intensity on GRE was less conspicuous than on SE-T2.CONCLUSION: Iodixanol and iopamidol shorten T1 and T2 relaxation times at both 1.5T and 3T. Hypo-intensity due to shortened T2 relaxation time is significantly more conspicuous than signal changes on T1-WI, FLAIR or GRE. Variations in signal conspicuity according to pulse sequence and to type of ICM are exaggerated at 3T. We postulate T2 hypointensity with less GRE conspicuity differentiates ICM from hemorrhage; given the wellknown GRE hypointensity of hemorrhage. Described signal changes may be relevant in the setting of recent intra-arterial or intravenous ICM administration in translational research and/or human stroke therapy.

  16. Patients' and carers' experiences of gaining access to acute stroke care: A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, M; Ryan, T.; Gardiner, C.; Jones, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid access to acute stroke care is essential to improve stroke patient outcomes. Policy recommendations for the emergency management of stroke have resulted in signi ficant changes to stroke services, including the introduction of hyper-acute care. Objective: To explore patients' and carers' experiences of gaining access to acute stroke care and identify the factors that enabled or prevented stroke from being treated as a medical emergency. Methods: Qualitative semi-structured i...

  17. Risk of stroke after acute myocardial infarction among Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Following an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), patients have an increased risk of stroke. Estimates of risk are mainly derived from AMI treatment trials or secondary prevention studies. The reported incidence of stroke in Caucasians in the early phase after AMI ranged from 0.5% to 2.5%.1-3 Similar assessment of risk in the Chinese population is lacking. As thrombolytic therapy becomes standard treatment for AMI, there is concern that there may be an increase in haemorrhagic stroke complicating AMI treatment, especially since haemorrhagic stroke is more common in Asian populations.

  18. Role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rong; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Shihao; Nanda, Anil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory response is a double-edged sword, as it not only exacerbates secondary brain injury in the acute stage of stroke but also beneficially contributes to brain recovery after stroke. In this article, we provide an overview on the role of inflammation and its mediators in acute ischemic stroke. We discuss various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in different phases after ischemic stroke and the possible reasons for their failures in clinical trials. Undoubtedly, there is still much to be done in order to translate promising pre-clinical findings into clinical practice. A better understanding of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses and identifying the discrepancies between pre-clinical studies and clinical trials may serve as a basis for designing effective therapies. PMID:24006091

  19. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Bhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke’s encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT including a CT perfusion (CTP scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report.

  20. Collateral lessons from recent acute ischemic stroke trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebeskind, David S

    2014-05-01

    Numerous acute ischemic stroke trials have recently published detailed results, providing an opportunity to consider the role of collaterals in stroke pathophysiology and their influential effect on patient outcomes. Safety and Efficacy of NeuroFlo Technology in Ischemic Stroke (SENTIS), the largest randomized controlled trial of device therapy to date, tested the potential augmentation of collateral perfusion. SYNTHESIS Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy (MR RESCUE), and Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) III chronicled the saga of endovascular therapy trialed against medical treatment for acute ischemic stroke. These recent randomized studies, however, largely neglect current device technology available for endovascular therapy as advanced by the TREVO2 and SOLITAIRE™(TM) FR With the Intention For Thrombectomy (SWIFT) studies. Such exhaustive efforts in recent trials have failed to introduce a new treatment for stroke that unequivocally improves patient outcomes. Collateral perfusion is widely recognized to vary across individuals in any population and exerts a dramatic effect on baseline variables including the time course of ischemic injury, stroke severity, imaging findings, and therapeutic opportunities. Similarly, collaterals have been recognized to influence recanalization, reperfusion, hemorrhagic transformation, and subsequent neurological outcomes after stroke. Collateral lessons may be gleaned from these trials, to expand consideration of overall study results and perhaps most importantly, alter ongoing and new trials in development. Detailed analyses of available information on collaterals from these trials demonstrate that collaterals may be more influential than the choice of treatment modality or intervention.

  1. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Scalzo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF and cerebral blood volume (CBV, mean transit time (MTT, time-to-peak (TTP, and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely.

  2. Altered resting-state FMRI signals in acute stroke patients with ischemic penumbra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hsiung Tsai

    Full Text Available Identifying the ischemic penumbra in acute stroke subjects is important for the clinical decision making process. The aim of this study was to use resting-state functional magnetic resonance singal (fMRI to investigate the change in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF of these subjects in three different subsections of acute stroke regions: the infarct core tissue, the penumbra tissue, and the normal brain tissue. Another aim of this study was to test the feasilbility of consistently detecting the penumbra region of the brain through ALFF analysis.Sixteen subjects with first-ever acute ischemic stroke were scanned within 27 hours of the onset of stroke using magnetic resonance imaging. The core of infarct regions and penumbra regions were determined by diffusion and perfusion-weighted imaging respectively. The ALFF were measured from resting-state blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD fMRI scans. The averaged relative ALFF value of each regions were correlated with the time after the onset of stroke.Relative ALFF values were significantly different in the infarct core tissue, penumbra tissue and normal brain tissue. The locations of lesions in the ALFF maps did not match perfectly with diffusion and perfusion-weighted imagings; however, these maps provide a contrast that can be used to differentiate between penumbra brain tissue and normal brain tissue. Significant correlations between time after stroke onset and the relative ALFF values were present in the penumbra tissue but not in the infarct core and normal brain tissue.Preliminary results from this study suggest that the ALFF reflects the underlying neurovascular activity and has a great potential to estimate the brain tissue viability after ischemia. Results also show that the ALFF may contribute to acute stroke imaging for thrombolytic or neuroprotective therapies.

  3. Computed tomography angiography in acute stroke (revisiting the 4Ps of imaging).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, Shriram; Saini, Jitender; Acharya, Ullas V; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Imaging in acute stroke has traditionally focussed on the 4Ps-parenchyma, pipes, perfusion, and penumbra-and has increasingly relied upon advanced techniques including magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate such patients. However, as per European Magnetic Resonance Forum estimates, the availability of magnetic resonance imaging scanners for the general population in India (0.5 per million inhabitants) is quite low as compared to Europe (11 per million) and United States (35 per million), with most of them only present in urban cities. On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) is more widely available and has reduced scanning duration. Computed tomography angiography of cervical and intracranial vessels is relatively simpler to perform with extended coverage and can provide all pertinent information required in such patients. This imaging review will discuss relevant imaging findings on CT angiography in patients with acute ischemic stroke through illustrated cases.

  4. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. No other neuroprotective agent had any beneficial effect in confirmative clinical trials or had any positive effect in the subgroup analysis. Citicoline is the only drug that in a number of different clinical stroke trials continuously had some neuroprotective benefit.

  5. Role of magnesium sulfate in neuroprotection in acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To study the effect of intravenous magnesium sulfate infusion on clinical outcome of patients of acute stroke. Materials and Methods: Sixty consecutive cases of acute ischemic stroke hospitalised within 24 h of an episode of stroke were taken as subjects. All subjects underwent a computed tomography head, and those found to have evidence of bleed/space-occupying lesions were excluded from the study. The subjects taken up for the study were divided into two groups of 30 subjects each. Both the groups received the standard protocol management for acute ischemic stroke. Subjects of Group 1 additionally received intravenous magnesium sulfate as initial 4 g bolus dose over 15 min followed by 16 g as slow infusion over the next 24 h. In all the subjects of the two study groups, serum magnesium levels were estimated at the time of admission (Day 0, Day 1 and Day 2 of hospitalization using an atomic absorption spectrometer. Statistical Analysis Used: Scandinavian stroke scores were calculated on Day 3, day of discharge and Day 28. Paired t-test was employed for comparison of stroke scores on Day 3, day of discharge and Day 28 within the same group and the unpaired t-test was used for the intergroup comparison, i.e. comparison of stroke scores of control group with corresponding stroke scores of magnesium group. Results: Comparison of stroke scores on Day 3 and day of discharge, on the day of discharge and Day 28 and on Day 3 and Day 28 in the magnesium group produced a t-value of 5.000 and P 0.05, which was not significant. Conclusions: The study failed to document a statistical significant stroke recovery in spite of achieving a significant rise in serum magnesium level, more than that necessary for neuroprotection, with an intravenous magnesium sulfate regime.

  6. [Technical standards for the interventional treatment of acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhlenbruch, M A; Bendszus, M

    2015-10-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is the leading cause of acquired disability and its treatment is still a major challenge. For more than a decade, various mechanical devices have been developed for the recanalization of proximal artery occlusions in acute ischemic stroke but most of them have been approved for clinical use, only on the basis of uncontrolled case series. Intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-specific plasminogen activator administered (iv rtPA) within 4.5 h of symptom onset is so far the only approved medicinal treatment in the acute phase of cerebral infarction. With the introduction of stent retrievers, mechanical thrombectomy has demonstrated substantial rates of partial or complete arterial recanalization and improved outcomes compared with iv rtPA and best medical treatment alone in multiple randomized clinical trials in select patients with acute ischemic stroke and proximal artery occlusions. This review discusses the evolution of endovascular stroke therapy followed by a discussion of the current technical standards of mechanical thrombectomy that have to be considered during endovascular stroke therapy and the updated treatment recommendations of the ESO Karolinska stroke update.

  7. Imaging biomarkers in acute ischemic stroke trials: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harston, G W J; Rane, N; Shaya, G; Thandeswaran, S; Cellerini, M; Sheerin, F; Kennedy, J

    2015-05-01

    Imaging biomarkers are increasingly used to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of acute ischemic stroke. However, this approach of routinely using imaging biomarkers to inform treatment decisions has yet to be translated into successful randomized trials. The aim of this study was to systematically review the use of imaging biomarkers in randomized controlled trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke, exploring the purposes for which the imaging biomarkers were used. We performed a systematic review of imaging biomarkers used in randomized controlled trials of acute ischemic stroke, in which a therapeutic intervention was trialed within 48 hours of symptom onset. Data bases searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, strokecenter.org, and the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (1995-2014). Eighty-four studies met the criteria, of which 49 used imaging to select patients; 31, for subgroup analysis; and 49, as an outcome measure. Imaging biomarkers were broadly used for 8 purposes. There was marked heterogeneity in the definitions and uses of imaging biomarkers and significant publication bias among post hoc analyses. Imaging biomarkers offer the opportunity to refine the trial cohort by minimizing participant variation, to decrease sample size, and to personalize treatment approaches for those who stand to benefit most. However, within imaging modalities, there has been little consistency between stroke trials. Greater effort to prospectively use consistent imaging biomarkers should help improve the development of novel treatment strategies in acute stroke and improve comparison between studies. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  8. Maintenance of normoglycemia may improve outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sruthi S Nair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several studies have shown that high admission glucose is associated with poor outcomes after stroke, but the impact of maintenance of normoglycemia on functional outcome during hospitalization for acute ischemic stroke is less well established. Aims: The aim of this study was to examine the independent association of postadmission glycemic status in the 1st week with 3-month functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: Patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted within 48 h of symptom onset with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS of ≥4 were selected from a prospectively maintained database by chart review. Demographic data, risk factors, NIHSS, and blood glucose values in the 1st week were collected. The primary outcome was Modified Rankin Scale (mRS score at 3 months (good outcome-mRS ≤2. Results: Over 3 years, 342 patients were enrolled with 220 (64.32% males. Mean age was 60.5 ± 13.4 years, and median admission score on NIHSS was 10 (interquartile range: 6–16. Blood glucose values persistently <140 mg/dl in the 1st week were associated with a good 3-month functional outcome in univariate analysis (P = 0.036. Hypoglycemic episodes occurred only in 11 (3.22% patients. Conclusions: Blood glucose values persistently below 140 mg/dl in the 1st week after acute ischemic stroke were associated with a favorable outcome in our study. Future clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  9. Endovascular vs medical management of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Jen; Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C; Southerland, Andrew M; Worrall, Bradford B

    2015-12-01

    To compare the outcomes between endovascular and medical management of acute ischemic stroke in recent randomized controlled trials (RCT). A systematic literature review was performed, and multicenter, prospective RCTs published from January 1, 2013, to May 1, 2015, directly comparing endovascular therapy to medical management for patients with acute ischemic stroke were included. Meta-analyses of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) for endovascular therapy and medical management were performed. Eight multicenter, prospective RCTs (Interventional Management of Stroke [IMS] III, Local Versus Systemic Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke [SYNTHESIS] Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy [MR RESCUE], Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands [MR CLEAN], Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness [ESCAPE], Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits-Intra-Arterial [EXTEND-IA], Solitaire With the Intention For Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment [SWIFT PRIME], and Endovascular Revascularization With Solitaire Device Versus Best Medical Therapy in Anterior Circulation Stroke Within 8 Hours [REVASCAT]) comprising 2,423 patients were included. Meta-analysis of pooled data demonstrated functional independence (mRS 0-2) at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71; p = 0.005). Subgroup analysis of the 6 trials with large vessel occlusion (LVO) criteria also demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.23; p acute ischemic stroke in the setting of LVO. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. The Role of Vascular Imaging in the Initial Assessment of Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Emmad; Al-Ajlan, Fahad S; Najm, Mohamed; Menon, Bijoy K

    2016-04-01

    Over the last few years, improvement in radiological imaging and treatment has changed the management of acute ischemic stroke. We have made significant advances in not only the imaging modalities themselves but also in identifying imaging parameters that can help us predict patient outcomes with both intravascular thrombolysis and endovascular thrombectomy. In this review, we describe the added utility of baseline vascular imaging including computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography in the diagnosis and management of patients with acute ischemic stroke. We focus on information these imaging modalities provide on clot characteristics, tissue state, collateral status, and endovascular planning. We also highlight the benefits of newer imaging modalities like dynamic computed tomography angiography (CTA) and multi-phase CTA. Lastly, we also describe some of the disadvantages of vascular imaging in ischemic stroke.

  11. MR-visible brain water content in human acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Rosenbaum, S; Sperling, B

    1999-01-01

    Quantification of metabolite concentrations by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in the human brain using water as an internal standard is based on the assumption that water content does not change significantly in pathologic brain tissue. To test this, we used 1H-MRS to estimate...... brain water content during the course of cerebral infarction. Measurements were performed serially in the acute, subacute, and chronic phase of infarction. Fourteen patients with acute cerebral infarction were examined as well as 9 healthy controls. To correlate with regional cerebral blood flow (r......CBF from Day 0-3 to Day 4-7 (p = 0.050) and from Day 0-3 to Day 8-21 (p = 0.028). No correlation between rCBF and water content was found. Water content in ischemic brain tissue increased significantly between Day 4-7 after stroke. This should be considered when performing quantitative 1H-MRS using water...

  12. MR-visible brain water content in human acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Rosenbaum, S; Sperling, B;

    1999-01-01

    Quantification of metabolite concentrations by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in the human brain using water as an internal standard is based on the assumption that water content does not change significantly in pathologic brain tissue. To test this, we used 1H-MRS to estimate...... brain water content during the course of cerebral infarction. Measurements were performed serially in the acute, subacute, and chronic phase of infarction. Fourteen patients with acute cerebral infarction were examined as well as 9 healthy controls. To correlate with regional cerebral blood flow (r......CBF from Day 0-3 to Day 4-7 (p = 0.050) and from Day 0-3 to Day 8-21 (p = 0.028). No correlation between rCBF and water content was found. Water content in ischemic brain tissue increased significantly between Day 4-7 after stroke. This should be considered when performing quantitative 1H-MRS using water...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-based cerebral tissue classification reveals distinct spatiotemporal patterns of changes after stroke in non-human primates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Westmoreland, Susan. V.; de Crespigny, Alex J.; Liu, Yutong; Vangel, Mark; Dijkhuizen, Rick M.; Wu, Ona; D'Arceuil, Helen E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spatial and temporal changes in brain tissue after acute ischemic stroke are still poorly understood. Aims of this study were three-fold: (1) to determine unique temporal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns at the acute, subacute and chronic stages after stroke in macaques by combi

  14. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11......,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator....... No other neuroprotective agent had any beneficial effect in confirmative clinical trials or had any positive effect in the subgroup analysis. Citicoline is the only drug that in a number of different clinical stroke trials continuously had some neuroprotective benefit....

  15. Clinical Scales Do Not Reliably Identify Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients With Large-Artery Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turc, Guillaume; Maïer, Benjamin; Naggara, Olivier; Seners, Pierre; Isabel, Clothilde; Tisserand, Marie; Raynouard, Igor; Edjlali, Myriam; Calvet, David; Baron, Jean-Claude; Mas, Jean-Louis; Oppenheim, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    It remains debated whether clinical scores can help identify acute ischemic stroke patients with large-artery occlusion and hence improve triage in the era of thrombectomy. We aimed to determine the accuracy of published clinical scores to predict large-artery occlusion. We assessed the performance of 13 clinical scores to predict large-artery occlusion in consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke undergoing clinical examination and magnetic resonance or computed tomographic angiography ≤6 hours of symptom onset. When no cutoff was published, we used the cutoff maximizing the sum of sensitivity and specificity in our cohort. We also determined, for each score, the cutoff associated with a false-negative rate ≤10%. Of 1004 patients (median National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score, 7; range, 0-40), 328 (32.7%) had an occlusion of the internal carotid artery, M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery, or basilar artery. The highest accuracy (79%; 95% confidence interval, 77-82) was observed for National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score ≥11 and Rapid Arterial Occlusion Evaluation Scale score ≥5. However, these cutoffs were associated with false-negative rates >25%. Cutoffs associated with an false-negative rate ≤10% were 5, 1, and 0 for National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, Rapid Arterial Occlusion Evaluation Scale, and Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Severity Scale, respectively. Using published cutoffs for triage would result in a loss of opportunity for ≥20% of patients with large-artery occlusion who would be inappropriately sent to a center lacking neurointerventional facilities. Conversely, using cutoffs reducing the false-negative rate to 10% would result in sending almost every patient to a comprehensive stroke center. Our findings, therefore, suggest that intracranial arterial imaging should be performed in all patients with acute ischemic stroke presenting within 6 hours of symptom onset. © 2016 American Heart Association

  16. Assessment of relationship between acute ischemic stroke and heart disease--protocol of a prospective observational trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Michal; Skoloudik, David; Sanak, Daniel; Veverka, Tomas; Bartkova, Andrea; Dornak, Tomas; Hutyra, Martin; Vindis, David; Ulehlova, Jana; Slavik, Ludek; Svabova, Marija; Kubickova, Veronika; Herzig, Roman; Kanovsky, Petr

    2012-09-01

    Stroke and acute myocardial infarction are the leading causes of death and disability in industrialized countries. Multiple interactions exist between the various forms of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, and risk factors for development of stroke and major cardiovascular events are similar. There is currently no clear link between acute coronary syndrome and stroke, although it has been repeatedly described. In addition, there are currently no clear recommendations for how to proceed in the case of signs of myocardial damage in patients with acute stroke and how to manage the next follow-up. METHODS-DESIGN: In this prospective observational trial, 500 consecutive ischemic stroke patients admitted at the Comprehensive Stroke Center will be enrolled within 12 h from stroke onset. The set of examinations will consist of: 1) Acute brain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging 2) Laboratory tests: A) within 12 h from stroke onset: NT pro B-type of natriuretic peptide, pro-atrial natriuretic peptide, creatinekinase MB, troponin T (cTnT), interleukin 6, procalcitonin, high sensitive C-reactive protein and D-dimers. B) control level of cTnT after 4 h from admission C) non-acute laboratory samples within 60 h from stroke onset: glycated haemoglobine, serum lipids; 3) Electrocardiogram (ECG) on admission and 4 h from stroke onset; 4) Transesophageal or transthoracal echocardiography and 24-h ECG-Holter within 15 days from stroke onset; 5) Neurosonological examination within 60 h from stroke onset; 6) Thirty patients with a positive finding of acute myocardial ischemia (ECG, cTnT) will be examined by coronary angiography (CAG); 7) Epidemiological data will be acquired. The epidemiological characteristics of the whole sample of patients; correlation between differences between group of cardioembolic ischemic stroke patients and group of patients with ischemic stroke of another etiology; correlation of infarction volume on DWI-MRI with the level of c

  17. Therapeutically Targeting Neuroinflammation and Microglia after Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjeon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, and recent studies posit that inflammation acts as a double-edged sword, not only detrimentally augmenting secondary injury, but also potentially promoting recovery. An initial event of inflammation in ischemic stroke is the activation of microglia, leading to production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators acting through multiple receptor signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the role of microglial mediators in acute ischemic stroke and elaborate on preclinical and clinical studies focused on microglia in stroke models. Understanding how microglia can lead to both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses may be essential to implement therapeutic strategies using immunomodulatory interventions in ischemic stroke.

  18. Efficacy of minocycline in acute ischemic stroke: A single-blinded, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Padma Srivastava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minocycline is a semisynthetic derivative of the tetracycline group of antibiotics, which have neuroprotective effects. In animal stroke models, minocycline had shown promising evidence to improve clinical and functional outcomes. Objective: To analyze the effect of oral minocycline in acute ischemic stroke patients. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized single-blinded open-label study. The study group received oral minocycline 200 mg/day for 5 days and the control group received oral vitamin B capsules. Baseline assessment included the following: National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score, modified Barthel Index (mBI, modified Rankin Scale (mRS score, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of brain including Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI, chest X-ray, and routine laboratory investigations. The clinical scales were repeated at days 1, 7, and 30. The end point was outcomes at 3 months (90 days. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS 11.5 (P<0.05. Paired t-test and multiple-measures Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA were used. Results: Fifty patients with acute ischemic stroke were included in the study. Of these, 23 patients received minocycline and 27 patients received placebo i.e., vitamin B capsules. NIHSS score in patients receiving minocycline had shown statistically significant improvement at day 30 and 90 as compared with the controls. Similarly, mRS scores and BI showed significant improvement in patients receiving minocycline at three months as compared to the control group. No mortality, myocardial infarctions, recurrent strokes, and hemorrhagic transformations were noted in both groups. Conclusions: Patients with acute ischemic stroke had significantly better outcome with minocycline treatment as compared with those administered placebo. The above findings suggest that minocycline can be helpful in reducing the clinical deficits after acute ischemic stroke.

  19. Neuronal functionality assessed by magnetoencephalography is related to oxidative stress system in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenza, Giovanni; Zappasodi, Filippo; Squitti, Rosanna; Altamura, Claudia; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Ercolani, Matilde; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Lupoi, Domenico; Passarelli, Francesco; Vernieri, Fabrizio; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Tecchio, Franca

    2009-02-15

    The hypoxic brain damage induced by stroke is followed by an ischemia-reperfusion injury modulated by oxidative stress. Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recording of rest and evoked cortical activities is a sensitive method to analyse functional changes following the acute ischemic damage. We aimed at investigating whether MEG signals are related to oxidative stress compounds in acute stroke. Eighteen stroke patients and 20 controls were enrolled. All subjects underwent MEG assessment to record background activity and somatosensory evoked responses (M20 and M30) of rolandic regions, neurological examination assessed by National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and plasmatic measurement of copper, iron, zinc, ceruloplasmin, transferrin, total peroxides and Total Anti-Oxidant Status. Magnetic Resonance was performed to estimate the lesion site and volume. Delta power and M20 equivalent current dipole (ECD) strength in the affected hemisphere (AH) correlated with NIHSS scores (respectively, rho=.692, p=.006 and rho=-.627, p=.012) and taken together explained 67% of NIHSS variability (p=.004). Higher transferrin and lower peroxides levels correlated with better clinical status (respectively, rho=-.600, p=.014 and rho=.599, p=.011). Transferrin also correlated with AH M20 ECD strength (rho=.638 p=.014) and inversely with AH delta power (rho=-.646 p=.023) and the lesion volume, especially in cortico-subcortical stroke (p=.037). Our findings strengthen MEG reliability in honing the evaluation of neuronal damage in acute ischemic stroke also demonstrating an association between the MEG parameters most representing the clinical status and the oxidative stress compounds. Our results meet at a possible protective role of transferrin in limiting the oxidative damage in acute stroke.

  20. Paediatric arterial ischemic stroke: acute management, recent advances and remaining issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Margherita; De Lucia, Silvana; Rinaldi, Victoria Elisa; Le Gal, Julie; Desmarest, Marie; Veropalumbo, Claudio; Romanello, Silvia; Titomanlio, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a rare disease in childhood with an estimated incidence of 1-6/100.000. It has an increasingly recognised impact on child mortality along with its outcomes and effects on quality of life of patients and their families. Clinical presentation and risk factors of paediatric stroke are different to those of adults therefore it can be considered as an independent nosological entity. The relative rarity, the age-related peculiarities and the variety of manifested symptoms makes the diagnosis of paediatric stroke extremely difficult and often delayed. History and clinical examination should investigate underlying diseases or predisposing factors and should take into account the potential territoriality of neurological deficits and the spectrum of differential diagnosis of acute neurological accidents in childhood. Neuroimaging (in particular diffusion weighted magnetic resonance) is the keystone for diagnosis of paediatric stroke and other investigations might be considered according to the clinical condition. Despite substantial advances in paediatric stroke research and clinical care, many unanswered questions remain concerning both its acute treatment and its secondary prevention and rehabilitation so that treatment recommendations are mainly extrapolated from studies on adult population. We have tried to summarize the pathophysiological and clinical characteristics of arterial ischemic stroke in children and the most recent international guidelines and practical directions on how to recognise and manage it in paediatric emergency.

  1. General Anesthesia Versus Conscious Sedation for Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke: The AnStroke Trial (Anesthesia During Stroke).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwhagen Hendén, Pia; Rentzos, Alexandros; Karlsson, Jan-Erik; Rosengren, Lars; Leiram, Birgitta; Sundeman, Henrik; Dunker, Dennis; Schnabel, Kunigunde; Wikholm, Gunnar; Hellström, Mikael; Ricksten, Sven-Erik

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective studies have found that patients receiving general anesthesia for endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke have worse neurological outcome compared with patients receiving conscious sedation. In this prospective randomized single-center study, we investigated the impact of anesthesia technique on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients. Ninety patients receiving endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke in 2013 to 2016 were included and randomized to general anesthesia or conscious sedation. Difference in neurological outcome at 3 months, measured as modified Rankin Scale score, was analyzed (primary outcome) and early neurological improvement of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and cerebral infarction volume. Age, sex, comorbidities, admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, intraprocedural blood pressure, blood glucose, Paco2 and Pco2 modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia score, and relevant time intervals were recorded. In the general anesthesia group 19 of 45 patients (42.2%) and in the conscious sedation group 18 of 45 patients (40.0%) achieved a modified Rankin Scale score ≤2 (P=1.00) at 3 months, with no differences in intraoperative blood pressure decline from baseline (P=0.57); blood glucose (P=0.94); PaCO2 (P=0.68); time intervals (P=0.78); degree of successful recanalization, 91.1% versus 88.9% (P=1.00); National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at 24 hours 8 (3-5) versus 9 (2-15; P=0.60); infarction volume, 20 (10-100) versus 20(10-54) mL (P=0.53); and hospital mortality (13.3% in both groups; P=1.00). In endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke, no difference was found between general anesthesia and conscious sedation in neurological outcome 3 months after stroke. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01872884. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Acute Phase Reactants and Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Sahan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases which called as stroke causes severe mortality and morbidity. Stoke is the third cause of death and first cause of the sequela among in its disorder group. Stroke with a 80-85% has the most frequency and the most cause of death in among the neurological disorders. Besides its lethal effects, sequela of stroke also cause physiological problems on individuals, families and social groups, it also brings some economic problems. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(2.000: 85-140

  3. Stress hyperglycemia and acute ischemic stroke in-hospital outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Dimitriou, Panagiotis; Bouziana, Stella D; Spanou, Marianna; Kostaki, Stavroula; Angelopoulou, Stella-Maria; Papadopoulou, Maria; Giampatzis, Vasilios; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2017-02-01

    Stress hyperglycemia is frequent in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, it is unclear whether stress hyperglycemia only reflects stroke severity or if it is directly associated with adverse outcome. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of stress hyperglycemia in acute ischemic stroke. We prospectively studied 790 consecutive patients who were admitted with acute ischemic stroke (41.0% males, age 79.4±6.8years). The severity of stroke was assessed at admission with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Stress hyperglycemia was defined as fasting serum glucose levels at the second day after admission ≥126mg/dl in patients without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The outcome was assessed with adverse outcome rates at discharge (modified Rankin scale between 2 and 6) and with in-hospital mortality. In the total study population, 8.6% had stress hyperglycemia. Patients with stress hyperglycemia had more severe stroke. Independent predictors of adverse outcome at discharge were age, prior ischemic stroke and NIHSS at admission whereas treatment with statins prior to stroke was associated with favorable outcome. When the NIHSS was removed from the multivariate model, independent predictors of adverse outcome were age, heart rate at admission, prior ischemic stroke, log-triglyceride (TG) levels and stress hyperglycemia, whereas treatment with statins prior to stroke was associated with favorable outcome. Independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were atrial fibrillation (AF), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), serum log-TG levels and NIHSS at admission. When the NIHSS was removed from the multivariate model, independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were age, AF, DBP, log-TG levels and stress hyperglycemia. Stress hyperglycemia does not appear to be directly associated with the outcome of acute ischemic stroke. However, given that patients with stress hyperglycemia had higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors than

  4. Cerebral blood volume affects blood–brain barrier integrity in an acute transient stroke model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuning; Kim, Jeong Kon; Atochin, Dmitriy N; Farrar, Christian T; Huang, Paul L; Suh, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Seon Joo; Shim, Woo Hyun; Cho, Hyungjoon; Cho, Gyunggoo; Kim, Young Ro

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient vascular reserve after an ischemic stroke may induce biochemical cascades that subsequently deteriorate the blood–brain barrier (BBB) function. However, the direct relationship between poor cerebral blood volume (CBV) restoration and BBB disruption has not been examined in acute stroke. To quantify BBB integrity at acute stages of transient stroke, in particular for cases in which extravasation of the standard contrast agent (Gd-DTPA) is not observed, we adopted the water exchange index (WEI), a novel magnetic resonance image-derived parameter to estimate the water permeability across the BBB. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and R2 relaxation rate constant were also measured for outlining the tissue abnormality, while fractional CBV and WEI were quantified for assessing vascular alterations. The significantly decreased ADC and R2 in the ischemic cortices did not correlate with the changes in CBV or WEI. In contrast, a strong negative correlation between the ipsilesional WEI and CBV was found, in which stroke mice were clustered into two groups: (1) high WEI and low CBV and (2) normal WEI and CBV. The low CBV observed for mice with a disrupted BBB, characterized by a high WEI, indicates the importance of CBV restoration for maintaining BBB stability in acute stroke. PMID:23462571

  5. Highly sensitive troponin T in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J K; Ueland, T; Aukrust, P;

    2012-01-01

    in decedents than in survivors. After adjustment for stroke severity, C-reactive protein, age, NT-proBNP and prior heart and/or renal failure, hsTnT levels were not a significant predictor of long-term all-cause or cardiovascular mortality. Conclusion: Elevated levels of hsTnT are frequently present......Background: Newly developed troponin assays have superior diagnostic and prognostic performance in acute coronary syndrome (ACS), when compared to conventional troponin assays; however, highly sensitive troponin has not been evaluated in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: Highly...... sensitive troponin T (hsTnT) was measured daily during the first 4 days in 193 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke without overt ACS or atrial fibrillation. The patients were previously tested normal with a fourth-generation TnT assay. The patients were followed for 47 months, with all...

  6. Carotid artery stenting for acute stroke; Karotisstent beim akuten Schlaganfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Roth, C.; Grunwald, I.Q.; Ahlhelm, F.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ernst, N.; Haass, A. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Neurologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    For patients with acute ischemic stroke due to total occlusion of the internal carotid artery (ICA), an effective intervention to improve neurologic symptoms and clinical outcome has not yet been established. Some authors have reported successful revascularization for patients with acute stroke symptoms secondary to ICA occlusion only in isolated series and case reports. Emergency recanalization and carotid artery stent placement can improve neurologic outcome in selected patients with acute ischemic stroke and total occlusion of the ICA. (orig.) [German] Bei Patienten mit akutem ischaemischem Schlaganfall, die sich aufgrund einer Okklusion der A. carotis interna (ACI) mit einer schwerwiegenden klinischen Symptomatik praesentieren, hat sich noch keine interventionelle Therapie etabliert. In der Literatur existieren nur einzelne Studien und Fallberichte ueber die Revaskularisierung eines akuten ACI-Verschlusses. Rekanalisierung und Stentimplantation eines akut aufgetretenen ACI-Verschlusses bei selektierten Patienten koennen zu einer deutlichen Besserung der klinischen Symptomatik fuehren. (orig.)

  7. Intensive treadmill training in the acute phase after ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to (a) assess the feasibility of intensive treadmill training in patients with acute ischemic stroke, (b) test whether physical activity of the legs during training increases with time, and (c) evaluate to what extent training sessions contribute toward the overall physical...... activity of these patients. Twenty hospitalized patients with acute ischemic stroke trained on a treadmill twice daily for 30 min for 5 days and on day 30. Physical activity was measured as activity counts (AC) from accelerometers. A total of 196 of 224 initiated training sessions were completed. Training...... with increasing number of days, with the median AC being 133% higher on day 5 than on day 1. AC in the paretic leg during 60 min of training constituted median 53% of the daytime AC. Early intensive treadmill training in acute ischemic stroke patients is thus feasible and contributes considerably toward...

  8. Stroke awareness decreases prehospital delay after acute ischemic stroke in korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Su-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed arrival at hospital is one of the major obstacles in enhancing the rate of thrombolysis therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Our study aimed to investigate factors associated with prehospital delay after acute ischemic stroke in Korea. Methods A prospective, multicenter study was conducted at 14 tertiary hospitals in Korea from March 2009 to July 2009. We interviewed 500 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke who arrived within 48 hours. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors influencing prehospital delay. Results Among the 500 patients (median 67 years, 62% men, the median time interval from symptom onset to arrival was 474 minutes (interquartile range, 170-1313. Early arrival within 3 hours of symptom onset was significantly associated with the following factors: high National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score, previous stroke, atrial fibrillation, use of ambulance, knowledge about thrombolysis and awareness of the patient/bystander that the initial symptom was a stroke. Multivariable logistic regression analysis indicated that awareness of the patient/bystander that the initial symptom was a stroke (OR 4.438, 95% CI 2.669-7.381, knowledge about thrombolysis (OR 2.002, 95% CI 1.104-3.633 and use of ambulance (OR 1.961, 95% CI 1.176-3.270 were significantly associated with early arrival. Conclusions In Korea, stroke awareness not only on the part of patients, but also of bystanders, had a great impact on early arrival at hospital. To increase the rate of thrombolysis therapy and the incidence of favorable outcomes, extensive general public education including how to recognize stroke symptoms would be important.

  9. Improving delivery of acute stroke therapy: The TLL Temple Foundation Stroke Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Lewis B; Staub, Lara; Chan, Wenyaw; Wein, Theodore H; Bartholomew, L Kay; King, Mary; Felberg, Robert A; Burgin, W Scott; Groff, Janet; Hickenbottom, Susan L; Saldin, Kamaldeen; Demchuk, Andrew M; Kalra, Anjali; Dhingra, Anupma; Grotta, James C

    2002-01-01

    Only a small minority of acute stroke patients receive approved acute stroke therapy. We performed a community and professional behavioral intervention project to increase the proportion of stroke patients treated with approved acute stroke therapy. This study used a quasi-experimental design. Intervention and comparison communities were compared at baseline and during educational intervention. The communities were based in 5 nonurban East Texas counties. The multilevel intervention worked with hospitals and community physicians while changing the stroke identification skills, outcome expectations, and social norms of community residents. The primary goal was to increase the proportion of patients treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) from 1% to 6% of all cerebrovascular events in the intervention community. We prospectively evaluated 1733 patients and validated 1189 cerebrovascular events. Intravenous rTPA treatment increased from 1.38% to 5.75% among all cerebrovascular event patients in the intervention community (P=0.01) compared with a change from 0.49% to 0.55% in the comparison community (P=1.00). Among the ischemic stroke patients, an increase from 2.21% to 8.65% was noted in the intervention community (P=0.02). The comparison group did not appreciably change (0.71% to 0.86%, P=1.00). Of eligible intravenous rTPA candidates, treatment increased in the intervention community from 14% to 52% (P=0.003) and was unchanged in the comparison community (7% to 6%, P=1.00). An aggressive, multilevel stroke educational intervention program can increase delivery of acute stroke therapy. This may have important public health implications for reducing disability on a national level.

  10. Unifying acute stroke treatment guidelines for a Bayesian belief network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Alexa; Arnold, Corey W; El-Saden, Suzie; Liebeskind, David S; Andrada, Lewellyn; Saver, Jeffrey; Bui, Alex A T

    2013-01-01

    With the large number of clinical practice guidelines available, there is an increasing need for a comprehensive unified model for acute ischemic stroke treatment to assist in clinical decision making. We present a unified treatment model derived through review of existing clinical practice guidelines, meta-analyses, and clinical trials. Using logic from the treatment model, a Bayesian belief network was defined and fitted to data from our institution's observational quality improvement database for acute stroke patients. The resulting network validates known relationships between variables, treatment decisions and outcomes, and enables the exploration of new correlative relationships not defined in current guidelines.

  11. Effects of different classes of antihypertensive agents on the outcome of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Giampatzis, Vasilios; Bouziana, Stella D; Spanou, Marianna; Papadopoulou, Maria; Kazantzidou, Pavlina; Kostaki, Stavroula; Kouparanis, Antonios; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2015-04-01

    It is unclear whether antihypertensive treatment before stroke affects acute ischemic stroke severity and outcome. To evaluate this association, the authors studied 482 consecutive patients (age 78.8±6.7 years) admitted with acute ischemic stroke. Stroke severity was assessed at admission with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The outcome was assessed with rates of adverse outcome (modified Rankin scale at discharge ≥2). Independent predictors of severe stroke (NIHSS ≥16) were female sex and atrial fibrillation. Treatment with diuretics before stroke was associated with nonsevere stroke. At discharge, patients with adverse outcome were less likely to be treated before stroke with β-blockers or with diuretics. Independent predictors of adverse outcome were older age, higher NIHSS at admission, and history of ischemic stroke. Treatment with diuretics before stroke appears to be associated with less severe neurologic deficit in patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Deviation of eyes and head in acute cerebral stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilg UJ

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a well-known phenomenon that some patients with acute left or right hemisphere stroke show a deviation of the eyes (Prévost's sign and head to one side. Here we investigated whether both right- and left-sided brain lesions may cause this deviation. Moreover, we studied the relationship between this phenomenon and spatial neglect. In contrast to previous studies, we determined not only the discrete presence or absence of eye deviation with the naked eye through clinical inspection, but actually measured the extent of horizontal eye-in-head and head-on-trunk deviation. In further contrast, measurements were performed early after stroke onset (1.5 days on average. Methods Eye-in-head and head-on-trunk positions were measured at the bedside in 33 patients with acute unilateral left or right cerebral stroke consecutively admitted to our stroke unit. Results Each single patient with spatial neglect and right hemisphere lesion showed a marked deviation of the eyes and the head to the ipsilesional, right side. The average spontaneous gaze position in this group was 46° right, while it was close to the saggital body midline (0° in the groups with acute left- or right-sided stroke but no spatial neglect as well as in healthy subjects. Conclusion A marked horizontal eye and head deviation observed ~1.5 days post-stroke is not a symptom associated with acute cerebral lesions per se, nor is a general symptom of right hemisphere lesions, but rather is specific for stroke patients with spatial neglect. The evaluation of the patient's horizontal eye and head position thus could serve as a brief and easy way helping to diagnose spatial neglect, in addition to the traditional paper-and-pencil tests.

  13. Brain perfusion-CT in acute stroke patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintermark, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of California, San Francisco (UCSF), CA (United States)

    2005-11-15

    The role of neuro-imaging in the evaluation of acute stroke has changed dramatically in the past decade. Previously, neuro-imaging was used in this setting to provide anatomic imaging that indicated the presence or absence of acute cerebral ischemia and excluded lesions that produce symptoms or signs mimicking those of stroke, such as hemorrhage and neoplasms. More recently, the introduction of thrombolysis has changed the goals of neuro-imaging from providing solely anatomic information to providing physiologic information that could help to determine which patients might benefit from therapy. In particular, significant emphasis has been placed on the delineation of the ischemic penumbra, also called tissue at risk. Modern CT survey, consisting of three indissociable elements: noncontrast CT (NCT) of course, perfusion-CT (PCT) and CT-angiography (CTA), fulfill all the requirements for hyper-acute stroke imaging. CTA can define the occlusion site, depict arterial dissection, grade collateral blood flow, and characterize atherosclerotic disease, whereas PCT accurately delineates the infarct core and the ischemic penumbra. CT offers a number of practical advantages over other cerebral perfusion imaging methods, including its wide availability. Using PCT and CTA to define new individualized strategies for acute reperfusion will allow more acute stroke patients to benefit from thrombolytic therapy. (orig.)

  14. NOR-SASS (Norwegian Sonothrombolysis in Acute Stroke Study): Randomized Controlled Contrast-Enhanced Sonothrombolysis in an Unselected Acute Ischemic Stroke Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Aliona; Kvistad, Christopher E; Naess, Halvor; Øygarden, Halvor; Logallo, Nicola; Assmus, Jörg; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Kurz, Kathinka D; Neckelmann, Gesche; Thomassen, Lars

    2017-02-01

    The NOR-SASS (Norwegian Sonothrombolysis in Acute Stroke Study) aimed to assess effect and safety of contrast-enhanced ultrasound treatment in an unselected acute ischemic stroke population. Patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis within 4.5 hours after symptom onset were randomized 1:1 to either contrast-enhanced sonothrombolysis (CEST) or sham CEST. A visible arterial occlusion on baseline computed tomography angiography was not a prerequisite for inclusion. Pulse-wave 2 MHz ultrasound was given for 1 hour and contrast (SonoVue) as an infusion for ≈30 minutes. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography were performed after 24 to 36 hours. Primary study end points were neurological improvement at 24 hours defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score 0 or reduction of ≥4 National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale points compared with baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and favorable functional outcome at 90 days defined as modified Rankin scale score 0 to 1. A total of 183 patients were randomly assigned to either CEST (93 patient) or sham CEST (90 patients). The rates of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, asymptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, or mortality were not increased in the CEST group. Neurological improvement at 24 hours and functional outcome at 90 days was similar in the 2 groups both in the intention-to-treat analysis and in the per-protocol analysis. CEST is safe among unselected ischemic stroke patients with or without a visible occlusion on computed tomography angiography and with varying grades of clinical severity. There was, however, statistically no significant clinical effect of sonothrombolysis in this prematurely stopped trial. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01949961. © 2016 The Authors.

  15. Safety and efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation in acute experimental ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Cambiaghi, Marco; Bacigaluppi, Marco; Gallizioli, Mattia; Gaude, Edoardo; Mari, Silvia; Sandrone, Stefano; Cursi, Marco; Teneud, Luis; Comi, Giancarlo; Musco, Giovanna; Martino, Gianvito; Leocani, Letizia

    2013-11-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation is emerging as a promising tool for the treatment of several neurological conditions, including cerebral ischemia. The therapeutic role of this noninvasive treatment is, however, limited to chronic phases of stroke. We thus ought to investigate whether different stimulation protocols could also be beneficial in the acute phase of experimental brain ischemia. The influence of both cathodal and anodal transcranial direct current stimulation in modifying brain metabolism of healthy mice was first tested by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Then, mice undergoing transient proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion were randomized and treated acutely with anodal, cathodal, or sham transcranial direct current stimulation. Brain metabolism, functional outcomes, and ischemic lesion volume, as well as the inflammatory reaction and blood brain barrier functionality, were analyzed. Cathodal stimulation was able, if applied in the acute phase of stroke, to preserve cortical neurons from the ischemic damage, to reduce inflammation, and to promote a better clinical recovery compared with sham and anodal treatments. This finding was attributable to the significant decrease of cortical glutamate, as indicated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Conversely, anodal stimulation induced an increase in the postischemic lesion volume and augmented blood brain barrier derangement. Our data indicate that transcranial direct current stimulation exerts a measurable neuroprotective effect in the acute phase of stroke. However, its timing and polarity should be carefully identified on the base of the pathophysiological context to avoid potential harmful side effects.

  16. Effect of Right Insular Involvement on Death and Functional Outcome After Acute Ischemic Stroke in the IST-3 Trial (Third International Stroke Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposato, Luciano A; Cohen, Geoffrey; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Sandercock, Peter; Lindley, Richard I; Hachinski, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    In patients with acute ischemic stroke, whether involvement of the insular cortex influences outcome is controversial. Much of the apparent adverse outcome may relate to such strokes usually being severe. We examined the influence of right and left insular involvement on stroke outcomes among patients from the IST-3 study (Third International Stroke Trial) who had visible ischemic stroke on neuroimaging. We used multiple logistic regression to compare outcomes of left versus right insular and noninsular strokes across strata of stroke severity, on death, proportion dead or dependent, and level of disability (ordinalized Oxford Handicap Score) at 6 months, with adjustment for the effects of age, lesion size, and presence of atrial fibrillation. Of 3035 patients recruited, 2099 had visible ischemic strokes limited to a single hemisphere on computed tomography/magnetic resonance scans. Of these, 566 and 714 had infarction of right and left insula. Six months after randomization, right insular involvement was associated with increased odds of death when compared with noninsular strokes on the left side (adjusted odds ratio, 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-2.52), whereas the adjusted odds ratio comparing mortality after insular versus noninsular strokes on the left side was not significant. Among mild/moderate strokes, outcomes for right insular involvement were worse than for left insular, but among more severe strokes, the difference in outcomes was less substantial. We found an association between right insular involvement and higher odds of death and worse functional outcome. The difference between right- and left-sided insular lesions on outcomes seemed to be most evident for mild/moderate strokes. URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN25765518. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Acute stroke unit improves stroke management-four years on from INASC.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, E

    2015-02-01

    The Irish Heart Foundation carried out the Irish National Audit of Stroke Care (INASC) in 2008. Management practices were significantly poorer than those in the UK Sentinel audits. Since then an acute stroke unit has been established in University Hospital Limerick. A stroke database was established. 12 key indicators of stroke management audited by INASC were identified. Results were compared to those in INASC. 89 stroke patients were admitted. 8 of the 12 key indicators scored significantly better than in INASC. 92.5% had a brain scan within 24hrs (INASC-40%, p = < 0.001). 100% of ischaemic strokes received anti-thrombotics (INASC-85%, p = 0.001). 94% had rehab goals agreed by MDT (22% in INASC p = 0.0000). 55% were treated in stroke unit (2% in INASC, p = 0.0000). MDT input improved with regard to physiotherapy (87% vs 43% in INASC, p = < 0.02) and SALT (74% vs 26%, p = < 0.02). Stroke management has significantly improved from 2008, however some deficiencies remain.

  18. Thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke: where and when?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Micieli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The therapy of acute ischemic stroke remains an open challenge for the clinicians and is closely connected to the ready acknowledgment of symptoms, to the promptness of the instrumental diagnosis and consequently to the rapidity of the pharmacological intervention. Although several studies have validated the effectiveness and the safety profileof the intravenous fibrinolytic treatment, the number of patients who benefit of such therapeutic opportunity is still too little. This data is partially due to the delay within patients arrive to the hospital and to the doubts of the physicians on the possible collateral effects, but it is also related to logistic and organizational-managerial problematic of the patient with acute stroke.These last ones mainly derive from the deficiency on the national territory of dedicated structures (Stroke Unit, from the absence of operative connections between the 118-service and the Stroke Unit, from the delay of the neurologist calling in the emergency room that does not allow an adapted diagnostic evaluation of the ischemic event. The spread of the intravenous fibrinolysis must therefore necessarily pass through the creation of participation protocols between hospitals with stroke unit and primary aid, and between department of emergency/ urgency and staff of the stroke unit also previewing the creation of professional figures like those of the urgency neurologist that could have the full right of the management and the treatment of cerebral ischemic pathology.

  19. The Association of Lesion Location and Sleep Related Breathing Disorder in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuber, Anja; Wersching, Heike; Young, Peter; Dittrich, Ralf; Ritter, Martin; Dziewas, Rainer; Minnerup, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Sleep related breathing disorders (SRBD) are common in patients with ischemic stroke and are associated with poor outcome. SRBD after stroke were assumed to be a direct consequence of injury of specific central nervous system structures. However, whether specific locations of ischemic infarcts cause SRBD is yet unknown. We therefore investigated the association of ischemic lesion location with SRBD. Methods Patients with acute ischemic stroke treated on our stroke unit were included in a prospective observational study. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and polygraphy in the acute phase after stroke. SRBD was defined by an apnea—hypopnea index (AHI) ≥10. MRI were evaluated using standardized maps to depict voxel-wise probability distribution of infarction for patients with and without SRBD. Groups were compared using logistic regression analysis. Results Of 142 patients included, 86 (59%) had a SRBD. Age, body mass index and prevalence of arterial hypertension were significantly higher in patients with SRBD. There was no statistically significant association between any lesion location and SRBD. Conclusion We found no association of lesion location and SRBD in stroke patients, whereas established risk factors for SRBD, known from general population, were significantly associated with SRBD. Given the high prevalence of SRBD in stroke patients, these findings suggest that cerebral ischemia facilitates the occurrence of SRBD in patients with pre-existing risk factors rather than causing it by damaging specific central nervous system structures. Our findings can be used to identify stroke patients who might benefit from polygraphy screening. PMID:28135315

  20. Clinical implications of sulcal enhancement on postcontrast fluid attenuated inversion recovery images in patients with acute stroke symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyuk Joon; Kim, Eun Hee; Lee, Kyung Mi; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Bae, Yun Jung; Choi, Byoung Se; Jung, Cheol Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) without diffusion abnormalities is occasionally found in patients with an acute stroke. This study was to determine the prevalence and clinical implications of HARM without diffusion abnormalities. There was a retrospective review of magnetic resonance images 578 patients with acute strokes and identified those who did not have acute infarction lesions, as mapped by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). These patients were classified into an imaging-negative stroke and HARM without diffusion abnormalities groups, based on the DWI findings and postcontrast fluid attenuated inversion recovery images. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores at admission, 1 day, and 7 days after the event, as well as clinical data and risk factors, were compared between the imaging-negative stroke and HARM without diffusion abnormalities groups. Seventy-seven acute stroke patients without any DWI abnormalities were found. There were 63 patients with an imaging-negative stroke (accounting for 10.9% of 578) and 13 patients with HARM without diffusion abnormalities (accounting for 2.4% of 578). The NIHSS scores at admission were higher in HARM without diffusion abnormalities group than in the imaging-negative stroke group (median, 4.5 vs. 1.0; p < 0.001), but the scores at 7 days after the event were not significantly different between the two groups (median, 0 vs. 0; p = 1). The patients with HARM without diffusion abnormalities were significantly older, compared with patients with an imaging-negative stroke (mean, 73.1 years vs. 55.9 years; p < 0.001). Patients with HARM without diffusion abnormalities are older and have similarly favorable short-term neurological outcomes, compared with the patients with imaging-negative stroke.

  1. Off-Hours Admission and Acute Stroke Care Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Nina Sahlertz; Mainz, Jan; Nørgård, Bente Mertz;

    2014-01-01

    stroke care processes, including the effect of a systematic quality improvement program, and to examine 30 days case-fatality. Methods-A population-based historical cohort study, including patients admitted to Danish hospitals with a first ever acute stroke (January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2011; N=64...... characteristics (in particular, stroke severity) decreased the odds ratio to 1.03 (95% confidence interval, 0.97-1.10). Additional adjustment for hospital characteristics and compliance with performance measures had no effect on the odds ratio. Conclusion-Patients admitted off-hours received a poorer quality...... of care. However, the admission time-related differences in care were substantially reduced over time, and the differences in 30 days case-fatality appeared primarily to be explained by differences in stroke severity....

  2. Pseudoradial Nerve Palsy Caused by Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Tahir MD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoperipheral palsy has been used to characterize isolated monoparesis secondary to stroke. Isolated hand nerve palsy is a rare presentation for acute cerebral stroke. Our patient presented with clinical features of typical peripheral radial nerve palsy and a normal computed tomography scan of the head, which, without a detailed history and neurological examination, could have been easily misdiagnosed as a peripheral nerve lesion deferring further investigation for a stroke. We stress the importance of including cerebral infarction as a critical differential diagnosis in patients presenting with sensory-motor deficit in an isolated peripheral nerve pattern. A good history and physical exam can differentiate stroke from peripheral neuropathy as the cause of radial nerve palsy.

  3. STUDY OF C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available : Ischemic stroke is the 3rd leading cause of death after AMI and cancer. Stroke is also the leading cause of hospital admission causing disability. The study was based on 100 patients with ischemic stroke admitted to the JJM Medical College, Davangere. This study was done to estimate the role of C-reactive protein as a marker of acute inflammation following ischemic stroke and also to determine, its prognostic role, by assessing the functional outcome of patient using modified Barthel index scoring (ADL. Patients with CRP 6 mg/dl suffered severe disease with poor functional outcome. P value <0.05, significant, suggests CRP is a good tool for prognostic indicator

  4. Osteoprotegerin concentrations and prognosis in acute ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Khédri; Ueland, T; Gullestad, L;

    2010-01-01

    .1365-2796.2009.02163.x.Aim. Concentrations of osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been associated with the presence of vascular and cardiovascular diseases, but the knowledge of this marker in the setting of ischaemic stroke is limited. Methods and results. In 244 patients with acute ischaemic stroke (age: 69......Abstract. Jensen JK, Ueland T, Atar D, Gullestad L, Mickley H, Aukrust P, Januzzi JL (Odense University Hospital, Denmark; Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway; Massachusetts General Hospital, USA). Osteoprotegerin concentrations and prognosis in acute ischaemic stroke. J Intern Med 2009; doi: 10.1111/j...... at presentation included haemoglobin (T = -2.82; P = 0.005), creatinine (T = 4.56; P age (T = 9.66; P

  5. Guidelines for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Egido, J A; Casado, I; Ribó, M; Dávalos, A; Masjuan, J; Caniego, J L; Martínez Vila, E; Díez Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B; Álvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Díaz-Otero, F; López-Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; Gállego, J; García-Pastor, A; Gil-Núñez, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Lago, A; Maestre, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Molina, C; Morales, A; Nombela, F; Purroy, F; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Roquer, J; Rubio, F; Segura, T; Serena, J; Simal, P; Tejada, J; Vivancos, J

    2014-03-01

    Update of Acute Ischaemic Stroke Treatment Guidelines of the Spanish Neurological Society based on a critical review of the literature. Recommendations are made based on levels of evidence from published data and studies. Organized systems of care should be implemented to ensure access to the optimal management of all acute stroke patients in stroke units. Standard of care should include treatment of blood pressure (should only be treated if values are over 185/105 mmHg), treatment of hyperglycaemia over 155 mg/dl, and treatment of body temperature with antipyretic drugs if it rises above 37.5 °C. Neurological and systemic complications must be prevented and promptly treated. Decompressive hemicraniectomy should be considered in cases of malignant cerebral oedema. Intravenous thrombolysis with rtPA should be administered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset, except when there are contraindications. Intra-arterial pharmacological thrombolysis can be considered within 6 hours, and mechanical thrombectomy within 8 hours from onset, for anterior circulation strokes, while a wider window of opportunity up to 12-24 hours is feasible for posterior strokes. There is not enough evidence to recommend routine use of the so called neuroprotective drugs. Anticoagulation should be administered to patients with cerebral vein thrombosis. Rehabilitation should be started as early as possible. Treatment of acute ischaemic stroke includes management of patients in stroke units. Systemic thrombolysis should be considered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset. Intra-arterial approaches with a wider window of opportunity can be an option in certain cases. Protective and restorative therapies are being investigated. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Delayed Surgery for Aortic Dissection after Intravenous Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nari; Yoon, Jee-Eun; Park, Byoung-Won; Chang, Won-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Jo; Lee, Kyung Bok

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of aortic dissection masquerading as acute ischemic stroke followed by intravenous thrombolysis. A 59-year-old man presented with dizziness. After examination, the patient had a seizure with bilateral Babinski signs. Soon after identifying multiple acute infarctions in both hemispheres on diffusion-weighted brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) was administered. Both common carotid arteries were invisible on MR angiography, and subsequent chest computed tomography revealed an aortic dissection. The emergency operation was delayed for 13 hours due to t-PA administration. The patient died of massive bleeding. PMID:27734002

  7. A STUDY ON INTRACRANIAL STENOSIS IN ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerrin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Acute ischemic stroke is very common cause of significant morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The causes of acute ischemic stroke could be intracranial or extra cranial. Prevention of the acute episode could be decreased by surgically treating ex tra - cranial vascular disease but the prevention of intracranial cause is only medical. Various risk factors are also associated with development of ischemic stroke. However, the association between these and the pattern of vascular involvement is not clear . AIM: The aim of the study was to 1. Identify the location of the vessel involved in different cases of ischemic stroke 2. To study the various risk factors associated with the development of ischemic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: This was a prospective study conducted between the years 2010 and 2012. All adult patients with acute ischemic stroke which was confirmed by MRI and less than two weeks duration were included in the study. Parameters recorded were presence of pre - existing comorbid conditions, n eurological examination findings, Cardiovascular system examination findings, Blood pressures, blood sugar levels and pattern of vascular involvement. This was assessed using MR angiography or four vessel Doppler. Statistical analysis was done using the SP SS software. RESULTS: Two hundred patients were enrolled in the study. Pure extracranial stenosis was present in 21.5%, extracranial with intracranial stenosis in 34%, and pure intracranial stenosis in 44.5%, which was predominant and resembled other Indi an studies. 15.5% of patients had significant carotid stenosis based on Doppler study and were suitable candidates for carotid endarterectomy. Middle cerebral artery was commonly involved (55%. Hypertension (63.5%, diabetes mellitus (48%, alcoholism (20 .5% and smoking (18.5% were the common risk factors. Prevalence of these risk factors was more in those with intracranial stenosis in our study, elevated total

  8. Continuous Hemodynamic Monitoring in Acute Stroke: An Exploratory Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayan Sen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-invasive, continuous hemodynamic monitoring is entering the clinical arena. The primary objective of this study was to test the feasibility of such monitoring in a pilot sample of Emergency Department (ED stroke patients. Secondary objectives included analysis of hemodynamic variability and correlation of continuous blood pressure measurements with standard measurements. Methods: This study was a secondary analysis of 7 stroke patients from a prospectively collected data set of patients that received 2 hours of hemodynamic monitoring in the ED. Stroke patients were included if hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke was confirmed by neuroimaging, and symptom onset was within 24 hours. They were excluded for the presence of a stroke mimic or transient ischemic attack. Monitoring was performed using the Nexfin device (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine CA. Results: The mean age of the cohort was 71 ± 17 years, 43% were male, and the mean National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS was 6.9 ± 5.5. Two patients had hemorrhagic stroke. We obtained 42,456 hemodynamic data points, including beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements with variability of 18 mmHg and cardiac indices ranging from 1.8 to 3.6 l/min/m2. The correlation coefficient between continuous blood pressure measurements with the Nexfin device and standard ED readings was 0.83. Conclusion: This exploratory investigation revealed that continuous, noninvasive monitoring in the ED is feasible in acute stroke. Further research is currently underway to determine how such monitoring may impact outcomes in stroke or replace the need for invasive monitoring. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(4:–0.

  9. Prediction of acute stroke progression by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vinh Phuong; Tran Van Huy

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the occurrence of neurological changes during the first 48 hours after acute stroke as it relates to the initial stroke severity assessment. Methods The assessment with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was performed serially for the first 48 hours on 68 consecutive ischemic stroke patients admitted to the Department of Geriatric Cardiology at the Khanh Hoa Hospital, Nha Trang, Vietnam. Incidence of stroke progression (a ≥ 3-point increase on the NIHSS) was recorded and analysis performed to determine its association with initial stroke severity and other demographic and physiological variables. Deficit resolution by 48 hours, defined as an NIHSS score of 0 or 1, measured the frequency of functional recovery predicted by the initial deficit.Results Overall progression was noted in 28% of events (19/68). Applying Bayes' solution to the observed frequency of worsening, the greatest likelihood of predicting future patient progression occurred with NIHSS score of =7 and >7. Patients with an initial NIHSS score of =7 experienced a 13% (6/47) worsening rate versus those of an initial score of>7 with a 62% (13/21) worsening rate (P<0.01). 42.5%(20/47) of those with an initial score of =7 were functionally normal at 48 hours, whereas only 4.7% (1/21) of those with scores of >7 retnrned to a normal examination within this period (x2, P<0.05). Conclusions This study suggests that the early clinical course of neurological deficit after acute stroke be dependent on the initial stroke severity and that a dichotomy in early outcome exist surrounding an initial NIHSS score of 7. These findings may have significant implications for the design and patient stratification in treatment protocols with respect to primary clinical outcome.

  10. Predictors of Outcome in Patients Presenting with Acute Ischemic Stroke and Mild Stroke Scale Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmuir, Cynthia L; Hammer, Maxim; Jovin, Tudor; Reddy, Vivek; Wechsler, Lawrence; Jadhav, Ashutosh

    2015-07-01

    Although National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is a known predictor of outcome in acute ischemic stroke, there are other factors like age, ambulatory status, and ability to swallow that may be predictors of outcome but are not assessed by the traditional NIHSS. The aim of this retrospective review was to identify predictors of outcome in mild ischemic stroke. Discharge outcomes from patients who presented to our large academic stroke center with acute ischemic stroke from 2005 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Of 7189 patients reviewed, 2597 had initial NIHSS less than 5. Outcome measures were modified Rankin Scale (MRS) score 0-1 and discharge to home. In all, 65% of patients with NIHSS 0-4 were discharged directly home independent of treatment. Of those patients discharged to home, 74% were able to ambulate independently and 98% passed their dysphagia screen. Of patients not discharged directly home, 66% were unable to ambulate independently and 21% did not pass their dysphagia screen. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a significant effect of dysphagia screen (P = .001), ability to ambulate independently (P = .002), age (P = .016), and NIHSS (P = .005) on discharge to home but not MRS of 0-1 (P = .564). In patients with mild stroke scale scores defined as NIHSS 0-4, several factors including age, NIHSS, ambulatory status, and ability to swallow may be independent predictors of functional outcome and discharge home. These data support the development of a modified grading system for assessing functional outcome in mild stroke that considers these factors. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Elevated troponin T after acute ischemic stroke: Association with severity and location of infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Abdi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Serum troponin elevation, characteristic of ischemic myocardial injury, has been observed in some acute ischemic stroke (AIS patients. Its cause and significance are still controversial. The purpose of this study is to find determinants of troponin elevation and its relationship with stroke severity and location.Between January 2013 and August 2013, 114 consecutive AIS patients confirmed by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging were recruited in this study. Serum troponin T level was measured as part of routine laboratory testing on admission. Ten lead standard electrocardiogram (ECG was performed and stoke severity was assessed based on National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS.Troponin T was elevated in 20 (17.6% of 114 patients. Patients with elevated troponin were more likely to have higher age, higher serum creatinine and ischemic ECG changes. Troponin levels were higher in patients with more severe stroke measured by NIHSS [7.96 (6.49-9.78 vs. 13.59 (10.28-18.00]. There was no association between troponin and locations of stroke and atrial fibrillation. There were 6 (5% patients with elevated troponin in the presence of normal creatinine and ECG.Stroke severity, not its location, was associated with higher troponin levels. Abnormal troponin levels are more likely, but not exclusively, to be due to cardiac and renal causes than cerebral ones.

  12. Human Motor Cortex Functional Changes in Acute Stroke: Gender Effects

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    Vincenzo eDi Lazzaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The acute phase of stroke is accompanied by functional changes in the activity and interplay of both hemispheres. In healthy subjects, gender is known to impact the functional brain organization.We investigated whether gender influences also acute stroke functional changes. In thirty-five ischemic stroke patients, we evaluated the excitability of the affected (AH and unaffected hemisphere (UH by measuring resting and active motor threshold and motor-evoked potential amplitude under baseline conditions and after intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS of AH. We also computed an index of the excitability balance between the hemispheres, laterality indexes (LI, to evidence hemispheric asymmetry. Active motor threshold differed significantly between AH and UH only in the male group (p=0.004, not in females (p>0.200, and both LIAMT and LIRMT were significantly higher in males than in females (respectively p=0.033 and p=0.042. LTP-like activity induced by iTBS in AH was more frequent in females. Gender influences the functional excitability changes that take place after human stroke and the level of LTP that can be induced by repetitive stimulation. This knowledge is of high value in the attempt of individualizing to different genders any non-invasive stimulation strategy designed to foster stroke recovery.

  13. Do nasogastric tubes worsen dysphagia in patients with acute stroke?

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    Ringelstein Erich B

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early feeding via a nasogastric tube (NGT is recommended as safe way of supplying nutrition in patients with acute dysphagic stroke. However, preliminary evidence suggests that NGTs themselves may interfere with swallowing physiology. In the present study we therefore investigated the impact of NGTs on swallowing function in acute stroke patients. Methods In the first part of the study the incidence and consequences of pharyngeal misplacement of NGTs were examined in 100 stroke patients by fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES. In the second part, the effect of correctly placed NGTs on swallowing function was evaluated by serially examining 25 individual patients with and without a NGT in place. Results A correctly placed NGT did not cause a worsening of stroke-related dysphagia. Except for two cases, in which swallowing material got stuck to the NGT and penetrated into the laryngeal vestibule after the swallow, no changes of the amount of penetration and aspiration were noted with the NGT in place as compared to the no-tube condition. Pharyngeal misplacement of the NGT was identified in 5 of 100 patients. All these patients showed worsening of dysphagia caused by the malpositioned NGT with an increase of pre-, intra-, and postdeglutitive penetration. Conclusion Based on these findings, there are no principle obstacles to start limited and supervised oral feeding in stroke patients with a NGT in place.

  14. Recurrent Ischemic Lesions After Acute Atherothrombotic Stroke: Clopidogrel Plus Aspirin Versus Aspirin Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Eung Gyu; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Chang, Dae Il; Rha, Joung-Ho; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Kim, Dong Eog; Park, Jong-Moo; Kim, Hahn-Young; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Yong-Seok; Lee, Soo Joo; Choi, Jay Chol; Cho, Yong-Jin; Kwon, Sun U; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Sohn, Sung-Il; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Kang, Dong-Wha; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Lee, Jun; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-09-01

    In patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large artery atherosclerosis, clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone might be more effective to prevent recurrent cerebral ischemia. However, there is no clear evidence. In this multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomized 358 patients with acute ischemic stroke of presumed large artery atherosclerosis origin within 48 hours of onset to clopidogrel (75 mg/d without loading dose) plus aspirin (300-mg loading followed by 100 mg/d) or to aspirin alone (300-mg loading followed by 100 mg/d) for 30 days. The primary outcome was new symptomatic or asymptomatic ischemic lesion on magnetic resonance imaging within 30 days. Secondary outcomes were 30-day functional disability, clinical stroke recurrence, and composite of major vascular events. Safety outcome was any bleeding. Of 358 patients enrolled, 334 (167 in each group) completed follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. The 30-day new ischemic lesion recurrence rate was comparable between the clopidogrel plus aspirin and the aspirin monotherapy groups (36.5% versus 35.9%; relative risk, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-1.35; P=0.91). Of the recurrent ischemic lesions, 94.2% were clinically asymptomatic. There were no differences in secondary outcomes between the 2 groups. Any bleeding were more frequent in the combination group than in the aspirin monotherapy group, but the difference was not significant (16.7% versus 10.7%; P=0.11). One hemorrhagic stroke occurred in the clopidogrel plus aspirin group. Clopidogrel plus aspirin might not be superior to aspirin alone for preventing new ischemic lesion and clinical vascular events in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large artery atherosclerosis. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00814268. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. [Operations on carotid arteries in an acute stage of ischaemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat'ev, I M

    2011-01-01

    The present study was aimed at specifying the indications for operations performed on carotid arteries in an acute period of ischaemic stroke and assessing the results thus obtained. Between January 2008 and July 2010, we carried out a total of 372 operations on carotid arteries in three hundred and sixty patients. Of these, thirty-two subjects were operated on in an acute period of stroke. Neurovisualization was performed by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). The condition of the carotid arteries was assessed by means of duplex scanning (DS). The operations performed on the carotid arteries were as follows: thrombembolectomy (n=4), carotid thrombendarterectomy (n 5), carotid endarterectomy (CEAE, n=21), and stent grafting of the internal carotid arteries (1СA, n 2). Five CEAE operations were carried out after thrombolysis. The interventions on the carotid arteries were performed within 6 hours to 12 days from the onset of the first symptoms of ischaemic stroke. Neurologists were actively engaged in both determining the indications for the operations and monitoring of neurological functions. There were no perioperative complications encountered. Regression of the neurological deficit during 7 days of in-hospital follow up occurred in sixteen patients (50%) (neurological deficit scoring 1-2 by the Rankin scale). One patient (3%) developed ischaemic stroke on postoperative day 3 after CEAE. Two patients were diagnosed as having transitory ischaemic attacks. Stenting turned out successful in the both patients. The remote results at terms ranging from 12 months to 2 years were followed up in fifteen patients. Of these, twelve patients (80%) showed complete restoration of neurological functions (Rankin scale scoring 0). Neither lethal outcomes nor relapsing strokes were observed over the follow-up period. The obtained outcomes strongly suggest certain advantages and advisability of active surgical policy of treating patients

  16. Reperfusion Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mònica; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 4.5 hours of symptoms onset significantly improves clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This narrow window for treatment leads to a small proportion of eligible patients to be treated. Intravenous or intra-arterial trials, combined intravenous/intra-arterial trials, and newer devices to mechanically remove the clot from intracranial arteries have been investigated or are currently being explored to increase patient eligibility and to improve arterial recanalization and clinical outcome. New retrievable stent-based devices offer higher revascularization rates with shorter time to recanalization and are now generally preferred to first generation thrombectomy devices such as Merci Retriever or Penumbra System. These devices have been shown to be effective for opening up occluded vessels in the brain but its efficacy for improving outcomes in patients with acute stroke has not yet been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. We summarize the results of the major systemic thrombolytic trials and the latest trials employing different endovascular approaches to ischemic stroke. PMID:24646159

  17. EFFICACY OF MELDONIUM IN ACUTE PERIOD OF ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As long as systemic thrombolysis is indicated to not more than 10% of patients with ischemic stroke, the search for medical agents for basic treatment of stroke is an important problem of today’s neurology.Aim: To evaluate efficacy of meldonium in patients with acute ischemic stroke.Materials and methods: One hundred and fourteen patients were assessed in the acute period of strokes in the internal carotid artery system. The main group included 70 patients who were given meldonium (Mildronate in addition to their basic treatment regimen. The drug was administered intravenously in daily drop infusions at dose of 10 ml of 10% solution for 10 days, thereafter they were switched to oral treatment at 250 mg daily for 2 to 3 weeks. The control group consisted of 40 patients who received only basic treatment regimen. Both groups were compatible for their age, gender distribution, severity of stroke and degree of neurologic dysfunction.Results: In the patients who were given meldonium in addition to basic treatment of ischemic stroke, neurological deficiency, assessed by NIHSS, scored significantly better than in those from the control group (3.1 ± 0.1 vs. 2.6 ± 0.17, p < 0.05. Also, they had significantly less disability on modified Rankin scale (1.3 ± 0.03 vs. 1.07 ± 0.07, p < 0.01 and more improvement in mobility as per Rivermead mobility index (3.6 ± 0.17 vs. 2.9 ± 0.25, p < 0.05.Conclusion: The addition of meldonium to the set of medical treatment in ischemic stroke patients gives positive results reflecting a decreased neurological deficiency, increased levels of mobility and daily activities.

  18. Intravenous tenecteplase in acute ischemic stroke: an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrouz, Réza

    2014-06-01

    Tenecteplase in a genetically engineered variant of alteplase. Although the two have the same mechanism of action, tenecteplase has properties that makes it a seemingly more advantageous thrombolytic. Because of its rapid single-bolus administration, its use is favored over alteplase in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Over the past few years, several clinical studies have been conducted to assess the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of tenecteplase in ischemic stroke. In spite of the mixed results of these studies, experimentation with tenecteplase continues in from of clinical trials. In this article, the utility of tenecteplase in ischemic stroke will be discussed.

  19. Evaluation of stroke services in Anglia stroke clinical network to examine the variation in acute services and stroke outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Abraham

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed countries and the leading cause of long-term disability worldwide. A series of national stroke audits in the UK highlighted the differences in stroke care between hospitals. The study aims to describe variation in outcomes following stroke and to identify the characteristics of services that are associated with better outcomes, after accounting for case mix differences and individual prognostic factors. Methods/Design We will conduct a cohort study in eight acute NHS trusts within East of England, with at least one year of follow-up after stroke. The study population will be a systematically selected representative sample of patients admitted with stroke during the study period, recruited within each hospital. We will collect individual patient data on prognostic characteristics, health care received, outcomes and costs of care and we will also record relevant characteristics of each provider organisation. The determinants of one year outcome including patient reported outcome will be assessed statistically with proportional hazards regression models. Self (or proxy completed EuroQol (EQ-5D questionnaires will measure quality of life at baseline and follow-up for cost utility analyses. Discussion This study will provide observational data about health service factors associated with variations in patient outcomes and health care costs following hospital admission for acute stroke. This will form the basis for future RCTs by identifying promising health service interventions, assessing the feasibility of recruiting and following up trial patients, and provide evidence about frequency and variances in outcomes, and intra-cluster correlation of outcomes, for sample size calculations. The results will inform clinicians, public, service providers, commissioners and policy makers to drive further improvement in health services which will bring direct benefit to the patients.

  20. Acute childhood arterial ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yock-Corrales, Adriana; Mackay, Mark T; Mosley, Ian; Maixner, Wirginia; Babl, Franz E

    2011-08-01

    Little is known about the presenting features of acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in children presenting to the emergency department (ED). Yet, initial clinical assessment is a key step in the management pathway of stroke. We describe the presentation in the ED of children with confirmed acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke subtypes. We conducted a retrospective descriptive case series of consecutive patients aged 1 month to younger than 18 years and presenting to a single-center tertiary ED with radiologically confirmed acute ischemic stroke or hemorrhagic stroke during a 5-year period. Patients were identified by medical record search with International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes for hemorrhagic stroke and through the hospital stroke registry for acute ischemic stroke. Signs, symptoms, and initial management were described. Fifty patients with acute ischemic stroke and 31 with hemorrhagic stroke were identified. Mean age was 8.7 years (SD 5.2), and 51% were male. Fifty-six percent were previously healthy. Median time from onset of symptoms to ED presentation was 21 hours (interquartile range 6 to 48 hours) for acute ischemic stroke and 12 hours (interquartile range 4 to 72 hours) for hemorrhagic stroke. Acute ischemic stroke presented with symptoms of focal limb weakness (64%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 49% to 77%), facial weakness (60%; 95% CI 45% to 73%), and speech disturbance (46%; 95% CI 31% to 60%). Few patients with acute ischemic stroke presented with vomiting and altered mental status. Most patients with acute ischemic stroke had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 14 or greater (86%; 95% CI 73% to 94%) and presented with at least 1 focal neurologic sign (88%; 95% CI 73% to 98%). Hemorrhagic stroke presented with headache (73%; 95% CI 54% to 87%), vomiting (58%; 95% CI 40% to 75%), and altered mental status (48%; 95% CI 30% to 67%). GCS score in hemorrhagic stroke was less than 14 in 38% and less than 8 in 19% (95% CI 7% to

  1. Effect of hyperthermia on prognosis after acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Monica; Saqqur, Maher; Kamruzzaman, Anmmd; Lees, Kennedy R; Shuaib, Ashfaq

    2009-09-01

    Experimental studies have shown that hyperthermia is a determinant of poor outcome after ischemic stroke. Clinical studies evaluating the effect of temperature on poststroke outcome have, however, been limited by small sample sizes. We sought to evaluate the effect of temperature and timing of hyperthermia on outcome after ischemic stroke. Data of 5305 patients in acute stroke trials from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA) data set were analyzed. Data for temperatures at baseline, eighth, 24th, 48th, and 72nd hours, and seventh day were assessed in relation to outcome (poor versus good) based on the modified Rankin Scale at 3 months. Hyperthermia was defined as temperature >37.2 degrees C and poor outcome as 90-day modified Rankin Scale >2. Hazard ratios with 95% CIs were reported for hyperthermia in relation to the outcome. Logistic regression models, in relation to hyperthermia, were fitted for a set of preselected covariates at different time points to identify predictors/determinants of hyperthermia. The average age of patients was 68.0+/-11.9 years, 2380 (44.9%) were females, and 42.3% (2233) received thrombolysis using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. After adjustment, hyperthermia was a statistically significant predictor of poor outcome. The hazard ratios (95% CI) for poor outcome in relation to hyperthermia at different time points were: baseline 1.2 (1.0 to 1.4), eighth hour 1.7 (1.2 to 2.2), 24th hour 1.5 (1.2 to 1.9), 48th hour 2.0 (1.5 to 2.6), 72nd hour 2.2 (1.7 to 2.9), and seventh day 2.7 (2.0 to 3.8). Gender, stroke severity (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score >16), white blood cell count, and antibiotic use were significantly associated with hyperthermia (Pacute ischemic stroke, is associated with a poor clinical outcome. The later the hyperthermia occurs within the first week, the worse the prognosis. Severity of stroke and inflammation are important determinants of hyperthermia after ischemic stroke

  2. Differences in Acute Ischemic Stroke Quality of Care and Outcomes by Primary Stroke Center Certification Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Shumei; Cox, Margueritte; Patel, Puja; Smith, Eric E; Reeves, Mathew J; Saver, Jeffrey L; Bhatt, Deepak L; Xian, Ying; Schwamm, Lee H; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2017-02-01

    Primary stroke center (PSC) certification was established to identify hospitals providing evidence-based care for stroke patients. The numbers of PSCs certified by Joint Commission (JC), Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, Det Norske Veritas, and State-based agencies have significantly increased in the past decade. This study aimed to evaluate whether PSCs certified by different organizations have similar quality of care and in-hospital outcomes. The study population consisted of acute ischemic stroke patients who were admitted to PSCs participating in Get With The Guidelines-Stroke between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012. Measures of care quality and outcomes were compared among the 4 different PSC certifications. A total of 477 297 acute ischemic stroke admissions were identified from 977 certified PSCs (73.8% JC, 3.7% Det Norske Veritas, 1.2% Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, and 21.3% State-based). Composite care quality was generally similar among the 4 groups of hospitals, although State-based PSCs underperformed JC PSCs in a few key measures, including intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator use. The rates of tissue-type plasminogen activator use were higher in JC and Det Norske Veritas (9.0% and 9.8%) and lower in State and Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program certified hospitals (7.1% and 5.9%) (PStroke hospitals with PSC certification, acute ischemic stroke quality of care and outcomes may differ according to which organization provided certification. These findings may have important implications for further improving systems of care. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Medical dispatchers recognise substantial amount of acute stroke during emergency calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Christensen, Hanne Krarup

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immediate recognition of stroke symptoms is crucial to ensure timely access to revascularisation therapy. Medical dispatchers ensure fast admission to stroke facilities by prioritising the appropriate medical response. Data on medical dispatchers' ability to recognise symptoms of acute...... step in ensuring fast-track stroke treatment, which would promote timely acute therapy. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Unique identifier: NCT02191514 ....

  4. Lack of association between serum uric acid levels and outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Irene; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Koch, Marcus; Kremer, Berry; de Keyser, Jacques; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prognostic value of serum uric acid (UA) in acute ischemic stroke is controversial. The aim of this study is to further analyse the relation between UA and outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Methods: We analysed UA levels in blood samples collected within 6 h of stroke onset from p

  5. Lack of association between serum uric acid levels and outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Irene; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Koch, Marcus; Kremer, Berry; de Keyser, Jacques; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prognostic value of serum uric acid (UA) in acute ischemic stroke is controversial. The aim of this study is to further analyse the relation between UA and outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Methods: We analysed UA levels in blood samples collected within 6 h of stroke onset from

  6. Sex Differences in Stroke Subtypes, Severity, Risk Factors, and Outcomes Among Elderly Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changshen eYu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the age-specific incidence and mortality of stroke is higher among men, stroke has a greater clinical effect on women. However, the sex differences in stroke among elderly patients are unknown. Therefore, we aimed to assess the sex differences in stroke among elderly stroke patients.Methods: Between 2005 and 2013, we recruited 1,484 consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients (≥75 years old from a specialized neurology hospital in Tianjin, China. Information regarding their stroke subtypes, severity, risk factors, and outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke were recorded.Results: Comparing with men, women had a significantly higher prevalence of severe stroke (17.20% vs. 12.54%, hypertension (76.42% vs. 66.39%, dyslipidemias (30.35% vs. 22.76%, and obesity (18.40% vs. 9.32%, P < 0.05. Comparing with women, men had a significantly higher prevalence of intracranial artery stenosis (23.11% vs. 17.45%, current smoking (29.60% vs. 13.05%, and alcohol consumption (12.15% vs. 0.47%, P < 0.05. Moreover, dependency was more common among women at 3 and 12 months after stroke, although the sex difference disappeared after adjusting for stroke subtypes, severity, and risk factors. Conclusions: Elderly women with acute ischemic stroke had more severe stroke status and worse outcomes at 3 and 12 months after stroke. Thus, elderly female post-acute ischemic stroke patients are a crucial population that should be assisted with controlling their risk factors for stroke and changing their lifestyle.

  7. Dizziness in stroke

    OpenAIRE

    M V Zamergrad

    2015-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of new-onset acute vestibular vertigo is chiefly made between vestibular neuronitis and stroke. Dizziness in stroke is usually accompanied by other focal neurological symptoms of brainstem and cerebellar involvement. However, stroke may appear as isolated vestibular vertigo in some cases. An analysis of history data and the results of neurovestibular examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging allows stroke to be diagnosed in patients with acute isolated dizziness....

  8. Therapeutic hypothermia after recanalization in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Man; Lee, Jin Soo; Song, Hee-Jung; Jeong, Hye Seon; Jung, Hae-Sun; Choi, Huimahn Alex; Lee, Kiwon

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia improves outcomes in experimental stroke models, especially after ischemia-reperfusion injury. We investigated the clinical and radiological effects of therapeutic hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke patients after recanalization. A prospective cohort study at 2 stroke centers was performed. We enrolled patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation with an initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale≥10 who had successful recanalization (≥thrombolysis in cerebral ischemia, 2b). Patients at center A underwent a mild hypothermia (34.5°C) protocol, which included mechanical ventilation, and 48-hour hypothermia and 48-hour rewarming. Patients at center B were treated according to the guidelines without hypothermia. Cerebral edema, hemorrhagic transformation, good outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale, ≤2), mortality, and safety profiles were compared. Potential variables at baseline and during the therapy were analyzed to evaluate for independent predictors of good outcome. The hypothermia group (n=39) had less cerebral edema (P=0.001), hemorrhagic transformation (P=0.016), and better outcome (P=0.017) compared with the normothermia group (n=36). Mortality, hemicraniectomy rate, and medical complications were not statistically different. After adjustment for potential confounders, therapeutic hypothermia (odds ratio, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-8.9; P=0.047) and distal occlusion (odds ratio, 7.3; 95% confidence interval; 1.3-40.3; P=0.022) were the independent predictors for good outcome. Absence of cerebral edema (odds ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-18.2; P=0.006) and no medical complications (odds ratio, 9.3; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-39.9; P=0.003) were also independent predictors for good outcome during the therapy. In patients with ischemic stroke, after successful recanalization, therapeutic hypothermia may reduce risk of cerebral edema and hemorrhagic transformation, and lead to improved

  9. One-year outcomes and secondary prevention in patients after acute minor stroke: results from the China National Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ying; Pan, Yuesong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-06-01

    Limited data are available on secondary preventive therapy use and patient outcomes after acute minor ischemic stroke in China. This study investigated secondary prevention strategies and outcomes up to 1 year after minor ischemic stroke. Patients from the China National Stroke Registry experienced a minor ischemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score ≤5) and admitted to hospital within 24 hours of symptom onset were included. One-year rates of recurrent stroke, stroke-related disability, and all-cause death were evaluated. Risk factors associated with 1-year stroke recurrence were examined in a multivariate model. The secondary prevention strategies in the acute phase were evaluated as combination of secondary prevention medication classes and the medications used in 1 year follow-up were examined. The study included 1913 patients who had experienced acute minor ischemic stroke (mean age: 65.1 years; 67.3% men; mean NIHSS score: 2.5). Rates of recurrent stroke, disability, and death were 13.2, 17.0, and 6.3% at 1 year, respectively. History of hypertension, ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, and atrial fibrillation were independent predictors of one-year stroke recurrence. Rate of 1 year all-cause death in patients with triple combined therapy in acute phase was 4.1%, whereas in patients with none was 14.5%. At 1 year, only half patients continued the secondary prevention medications. Outcomes in individuals in China who had experienced acute minor stroke were unfavorable, underscoring the importance of early, sustained preventive therapy in this patient population. Combination of secondary prevention medication classes was associated with a lower risk of death.

  10. Basics of acute stroke treatment; Grundzuege der akuten Schlaganfalltherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haass, A. [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Acute stroke presents an emergency that requires immediate referral to a specialized hospital, preferably with a stroke unit. Disability and mortality are reduced by 30% in patients treated in stroke units compared to those treated on regular wards, even if a specialized team is present on the ward. Systolic blood pressure may remain high at 200-220 mmHg in the acute phase and should not be lowered too quickly. Further guidelines for basic care include: optimal O{sub 2} delivery, blood sugar levels below 100-150 mg%, and lowering body temperature below 37.5 C using physical means or drugs. Increased intracranial pressure should be treated by raising the upper body of the patient, administration of glycerol, mannitol, and/or sorbitol, artificial respiration, and special monitoring of Tris buffer. Decompressive craniectomy may be considered in cases of ''malignant'' media stroke and expansive cerebellar infarction. Fibrinolysis is the most effective stroke treatment and is twice as effective in the treatment of stroke than myocardial infarction. Fibrinolysis may be initiated within 3 h of a stroke in the anterior circulation. If a penumbra is detectable by ''PWI-DWI mismatch MRI,'' specialized hospitals may perform fibrinolysis up to 6 h after symptom onset. In cases of stroke in the basilar artery, fibrinolysis may be performed even later after symptom onset. Intra-arterial fibrinolysis is performed in these cases using rt-PA or urokinase. Follow-up treatment of stroke patients should not only address post-stroke depression and neuropsychological deficits, but also include patient education about risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and cardiac arrhythmias. (orig.) [German] Jeder akute Schlaganfall ist ein Notfall und muss sofort in einer spezialisierten Klinik, am besten einer Stroke Unit, behandelt werden. Die Stroke-Unit-Behandlung senkt den Behinderungsgrad und die Letalitaet um 30% staerker als die

  11. Early warning score predicts acute mortality in stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liljehult, J; Christensen, T

    2016-01-01

    was to investigate whether the aggregate weighted track and trigger system early warning score (EWS) can be used as a simple observational tool to identify patients at risk and predict mortality in a population of patients with acute stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients admitted with acute stroke...... at the Copenhagen University Hospital, Nordsjaellands Hospital, Denmark, from May to September 2012 were enrolled in a retrospective cohort study (n = 274). Vital signs were measured immediately after admission and consistently during the hospitalization period. Based on the vital signs, a single composite EWS...... the EWS at admission (AUROC 0.856; 95% CI 0.760-0.951; P-value score is a simple and valid...

  12. Endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke: The standard of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh P Jadhav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute ischemic stroke continues to be a major cause of permanent disability and death worldwide. Outcomes are particularly poor in patients presenting with large vessel occlusive disease with resultant ischemia and tissue injury in large and eloquent territories. Intravenous thrombolysis has been the mainstay of medical therapy, however treatment is limited to a subset of patients and many patients continue to have poor outcomes. Three trials in 2013 investigating the benefit of intra-arterial therapy failed to demonstrate benefit over medical therapy alone. More recently, five trials in 2015 were completed demonstrating superior outcomes with intra-arterial therapy with improved results attributed to higher and faster rates of recanalization in a select patient population. These trials have introduced a new standard of care in the management of acute ischemic stroke patients.

  13. [Current registry studies of acute ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltkamp, R; Jüttler, E; Pfefferkorn, T; Purrucker, J; Ringleb, P

    2012-10-01

    Study registries offer the opportunity to evaluate the effects of new therapies or to observe the consequences of new treatments in clinical practice. The SITS-MOST registry confirmed the validity of findings from randomized trials on intravenous thrombolysis concerning safety and efficacy in the clinical routine. Current study registries concerning new interventional thrombectomy techniques suggest a high recanalization rate; however, the clinical benefit can only be evaluated in randomized, controlled trials. Similarly, the experiences of the BASICS registry on basilar artery occlusion have led to the initiation of a controlled trial. The benefit of hemicraniectomy in malignant middle cerebral artery infarction has been demonstrated by the pooled analysis of three randomized trials. Numerous relevant aspects are currently documented in the DESTINY-R registry. Finally, the recently started RASUNOA registry examines diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke occurring during therapy with new oral anticoagulants.

  14. Intravenous thrombolysis plus hypothermia for acute treatment of ischemic stroke (ICTuS-L): final results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hemmen, Thomas M; Raman, Rema; Guluma, Kama Z; Meyer, Brett C; Gomes, Joao A; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Wijman, Christine A; Rapp, Karen S; Grotta, James C; Lyden, Patrick D

    2010-01-01

    .... Intravenous Thrombolysis Plus Hypothermia for Acute Treatment of Ischemic Stroke (ICTuS-L) was a randomized, multicenter trial of hypothermia and intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in patients treated within 6 hours after ischemic stroke...

  15. Trial design and reporting standards for intra-arterial cerebral thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Higashida, Randall T; Furlan, Anthony J; Roberts, Heidi; Tomsick, Thomas; Connors, Buddy; Barr, John; Dillon, William; Warach, Steven; Broderick, Joseph; Tilley, Barbara; Sacks, David

    2003-01-01

    .... A number of well-designed randomized stroke trials and case series have now been reported in the literature to evaluate the safety and efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke...

  16. GERSTMANN’S SYNDROME IN ACUTE STROKE PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Zukic, Sanela; MRKONJIC Zamir; Sinanovic, Osman; Vidovic, Mirjana; Kojic, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Gerstmann in 1924. observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe. Since than, Gerstmann`s syndrome (GS) was enigma for neuropsychologists. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency and clinical features of GS among acute stroke patient...

  17. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrinos, Anna; Schaink, Alexis K; Dhalla, Irfan; Krings, Timo; Casaubon, Leanne K; Sikich, Nancy; Lum, Cheemun; Bharatha, Aditya; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Stotts, Grant; Saposnik, Gustavo; Kelloway, Linda; Xie, Xuanqian; Hill, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    Although intravenous thrombolysis increases the probability of a good functional outcome in carefully selected patients with acute ischemic stroke, a substantial proportion of patients who receive thrombolysis do not have a good outcome. Several recent trials of mechanical thrombectomy appear to indicate that this treatment may be superior to thrombolysis. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) compared with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion. We systematically searched seven databases for randomized controlled trials published between January 2005 and March 2015 comparing stent retrievers or thromboaspiration devices with best medical therapy (with or without intravenous thrombolysis) in adults with acute ischemic stroke. We assessed risk of bias and overall quality of the included trials. We combined the data using a fixed or random effects meta-analysis, where appropriate. We identified 1579 studies; of these, we evaluated 122 full-text papers and included five randomized control trials (n=1287). Compared with patients treated medically, patients who received mechanical thrombectomy were more likely to be functionally independent as measured by a modified Rankin score of 0-2 (odds ratio, 2.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-3.04; I2=0%). This finding was robust to subgroup analysis. Mortality and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage were not significantly different between the two groups. Mechanical thrombectomy significantly improves functional independence in appropriately selected patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  18. Mechanism of troponin elevations in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K.; Atar, Dan; Mickley, Hans

    2007-01-01

    the introduction of troponin in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, this marker has been measured in a number of other conditions as well. One of these conditions is acute ischemic stroke, causing diagnostic dilemmas for clinicians. Because various electrocardiographic alterations have also been reported......Ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases frequently co-exist in the same patient, and similar risk factors are shared. For 60 years, experimental, observational, and clinical trial data have incessantly indicated that neurologically induced myocardial injury exists. Since...

  19. Aortic atheromas in acute ischemic stroke patients in northern Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telman, Gregory; Kouperberg, Efim; Sprecher, Elliot; Agmon, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    There are currently no data on ethnic differences in aortic atherosclerosis in Arab and Jewish patients from northern Israel with acute ischemic stroke. Data on demographic and risk factors alongside transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) data and treatment details for 509 patients with acute ischemic stroke were included in the study. The patients with aortic atheromas were older and had significantly more frequent vascular risk factors (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and smoking), as well as vascular disease (ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and carotid plaques). They were also treated with statins more often than those without aortic atheroma. Logistic regression analysis showed that age, smoking, ethnicity, and the presence of carotid plaques were independent predictors for aortic atheromas. Aortic plaques were found more frequently in Jewish patients than Arab patients (160 (41.9%) vs. 35 (27.3%); p= 0.003). This finding did not change after adjustment for age, sex, all vascular risk factors, and type of antithrombotic treatment. We did not find any difference between Arab and Jewish patients in the distribution of plaques by location or complexity before and after adjustment for age, sex, all vascular risk factors, or type of antithrombotic or lipid-lowering treatment. Our findings emphasize the influence of ethnicity on the prevalence of aortic atheromas in acute ischemic stroke patients in northern Israel. The search for genetic, cultural, socioeconomic, and other factors explaining these ethnic differences should be the topic of future studies.

  20. Serum inflammatory cytokines combined with NIHSS to evaluate the condition of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Heng; LONG Chong-rong; Wang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the changes of serum inflammatory cytokines and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score in acute ischemic stroke patients and their clinical significances on patients' condition assessment. Methods The serum levels of three cytokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), were measured and compared between 90 acute ischemic stroke patients (ischemic stroke group) and 50 healthy ...

  1. Expanding the treatment window with mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, Kennith F.; Cloft, Harry J.; Kallmes, David F. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); White, J. Bradley [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurosurgery, Rochester, MN, (United States); Manno, Edward M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurology, Rochester, MN, (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Acute ischemic stroke is a common disease associated with high mortality and significant long-term disability. Treatment options for acute ischemic stroke continue to evolve and include pharmaceutical and mechanical therapies. With the recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of a new device for mechanical thrombectomy, the options available for treatment of acute ischemic stroke have been expanded. Thrombolytic therapy is generally given intravenously in the first 3 h and up to 6 h via the intraarterial route for pharmacological clot disruption. The maximum time-frame for mechanical thrombectomy devices has yet to be determined. A 78-year-old female presented to the emergency room with a dense right hemiparesis, leftward gaze preference and dense global aphasia. Eight hours after symptom onset, left carotid angiography confirmed a left internal carotid artery terminus occlusion. A single pass was made through the clot with an X6 Merci Retriever device. After a single pass, the vessel was reopened and normal flow in the left internal carotid artery was demonstrated. At the time of discharge, her neurological deficits had improved significantly. Furthermore, the final infarct area, as demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging, was probably much smaller than it would have been if the vessel had not been recanalized. (orig.)

  2. Serum cardiac troponin I in acute stroke is related to serum cortisol and TNF-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Krarup; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Christensen, Anders Fogh

    2004-01-01

    Serum cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is a specific marker of myocardial injury related to in-patient fatality and cardiac injury in acute stroke. We investigated whether cTnI in acute stroke is related to serum cortisol, acute inflammatory response, and insular damage. We also investigated whether c...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain angiogenesis after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Seevinck, Peter R.; Deddens, Lisette H; Dijkhuizen, Rick M.

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of mortality and long-term disability worldwide. The initial changes in local perfusion and tissue status underlying loss of brain function are increasingly investigated with noninvasive imaging methods. In addition, there is a growing interest in imaging of processes that contribute to post-stroke recovery. In this review, we discuss the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the formation of new vessels by angiogenesis, which is hypothesized to par...

  4. Quantification of diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient maps (ADC) in the detection of acute stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulipano, P. Karina; Millar, William S.; Imielinska, Celina; Liu, Xin; Rosiene, Joel; D'Ambrosio, Anthony L.

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an imaging modality that is used in the management and diagnosis of acute stroke. Common MR imaging techniques such as diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient maps (ADC) are used routinely in the diagnosis of acute infarcts. However, advances in radiology information systems and imaging protocols have led to an overload of image information that can be difficult to manage and time consuming. Automated techniques to assist in the identification of acute ischemic stroke can prove beneficial to 1) the physician by providing a mechanism for early detection and 2) the patient by providing effective stroke therapy at an early stage. We have processed DW images and ADC maps using a novel automated Relative Difference Map (RDM) method that was tailored to the identification and delineation of the stroke region. Results indicate that the technique can delineate regions of acute infarctions on DW images and ADC maps. A formal evaluation of the RDM algorithm was performed by comparing accuracy measurements between 1) expert generated ground truths with the RDM delineated DWI infarcts and 2) RDM delineated DWI infarcts with RDM delineated ADC infarcts. The accuracy measurements indicate that the RDM delineated DWI infarcts are comparable to the expert generated ground truths. The true positive volume fraction value (TPVF), between RDM delineated DWI and ADC infarcts, is nonzero for all cases with an acute infarct while the value for non-acute cases remains zero.

  5. Retrosternal Mass: An Interesting Allergic Reaction to Intravenous Thrombolytic Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Mehrpour

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause of disability and death worldwide, with the majority of strokes occurring in older people. Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA is the approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. A major concern of physicians, who treat acute ischemic stroke with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA, is the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. However, other adverse reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema, can also occur. Here we report an interesting soft tissue reaction to intravenous r-TPA in an 80 year-old male who was treated for acute ischemic stroke.

  6. [Endovascular treatment in acute ischaemic stroke. A stroke care plan for the region of Madrid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Díaz-Guzmán, J; Egido, J A; García Pastor, A; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Vivancos, J; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2013-09-01

    Endovascular therapies (intra-arterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy) after acute ischaemic stroke are being implemented in the clinical setting even as they are still being researched. Since we lack sufficient data to establish accurate evidence-based recommendations for use of these treatments, we must develop clinical protocols based on current knowledge and carefully monitor all procedures. After review of the literature and holding work sessions to reach a consensus among experts, we developed a clinical protocol including indications and contraindications for endovascular therapies use in acute ischaemic stroke. The protocol includes methodology recommendations for diagnosing and selecting patients, performing revascularisation procedures, and for subsequent patient management. Its objective is to increase the likelihood of efficacy and treatment benefit and minimise risk of complications and ineffective recanalisation. Based on an analysis of healthcare needs and available resources, a cooperative inter-hospital care system has been developed. This helps to ensure availability of endovascular therapies to all patients, a fast response time, and a good cost-to-efficacy ratio. It includes also a prospective register which serves to monitor procedures in order to identify any opportunities for improvement. Implementation of endovascular techniques for treating acute ischaemic stroke requires the elaboration of evidence-based clinical protocols and the establishment of appropriate cooperative healthcare networks guaranteeing both the availability and the quality of these actions. Such procedures must be monitored in order to improve methodology. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. The Acute STroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL): design and baseline analysis of an ischemic stroke registry including acute multimodal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrik; Odier, Céline; Rutgers, Matthieu; Reichhart, Marc; Maeder, Philippe; Meuli, Reto; Wintermark, Max; Maghraoui, Ali; Faouzi, Mohamed; Croquelois, Alexandre; Ntaios, George

    2010-11-01

    Stroke registries are valuable tools for obtaining information about stroke epidemiology and management. The Acute STroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL) prospectively collects epidemiological, clinical, laboratory and multimodal brain imaging data of acute ischemic stroke patients in the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV). Here, we provide design and methods used to create ASTRAL and present baseline data of our patients (2003 to 2008). All consecutive patients admitted to CHUV between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2008 with acute ischemic stroke within 24 hours of symptom onset were included in ASTRAL. Patients arriving beyond 24 hours, with transient ischemic attack, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoidal hemorrhage, or cerebral sinus venous thrombosis, were excluded. Recurrent ischemic strokes were registered as new events. Between 2003 and 2008, 1633 patients and 1742 events were registered in ASTRAL. There was a preponderance of males, even in the elderly. Cardioembolic stroke was the most frequent type of stroke. Most strokes were of minor severity (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score ≤ 4 in 40.8% of patients). Cardioembolic stroke and dissections presented with the most severe clinical picture. There was a significant number of patients with unknown onset stroke, including wake-up stroke (n=568, 33.1%). Median time from last-well time to hospital arrival was 142 minutes for known onset and 759 minutes for unknown-onset stroke. The rate of intravenous or intraarterial thrombolysis between 2003 and 2008 increased from 10.8% to 20.8% in patients admitted within 24 hours of last-well time. Acute brain imaging was performed in 1695 patients (97.3%) within 24 hours. In 1358 patients (78%) who underwent acute computed tomography angiography, 717 patients (52.8%) had significant abnormalities. Of the 1068 supratentorial stroke patients who underwent acute perfusion computed tomography (61.3%), focal hypoperfusion

  8. Is acute reperfusion therapy safe in acute ischemic stroke patients who harbor unruptured intracranial aneurysm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowla, Ashkan; Singh, Karanbir; Mehla, Sandhya; Ahmed, Mohammad K; Shirani, Peyman; Kamal, Haris; Krishna, Chandan; Sawyer, Robert N; Ching, Marilou; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Snyder, Kenneth V; Crumlish, Annemarie; Hopkins, L N

    2015-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are currently considered as contraindication for intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke, very likely due to a possible increase in the risk of bleeding from aneurysm rupture; however, there is limited data available on whether intravenous thrombolysis is safe for acute ischemic stroke patients with pre-existing intracranial aneurysms. To find out the safety of intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke patients who harbor unruptured intracranial aneurysms. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and cerebrovascular images of all the patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke in our center from the beginning of 2006 till the end of April 2014. Those with unruptured intracranial aneurysm present on cerebrovascular images prior to acute reperfusion therapy were identified. Post-thrombolysis brain imaging was reviewed to evaluate for any intraparenchymal or subarachnoid hemorrhage related or unrelated to the aneurysm. A total of 637 patients received intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke in our center during an 8·3-year period. Thirty-three (5·2%) were found to have at least one intracranial aneurysms. Twenty-three (70%) of those received only intravenous thrombolysis, and 10 patients received combination of intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis. The size of the largest aneurysm was 10 mm in maximum diameter (range: 2-10 mm). The mean size of aneurysms was 4·8 mm. No symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred among the 23 patients receiving only intravenous thrombolysis. Out of those who received a combination of intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis, one developed symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in the location of acute infarct, distant to the aneurysm location. Our findings suggest that neither intravenous thrombolysis nor combination of intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis increases the risk of aneurysmal hemorrhage in acute ischemic stroke

  9. Mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke with cerebral microbleeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhong-Song; Duckwiler, Gary R; Jahan, Reza; Tateshima, Satoshi; Gonzalez, Nestor R; Szeder, Viktor; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kim, Doojin; Ali, Latisha K; Starkman, Sidney; Vespa, Paul M; Salamon, Noriko; Villablanca, J Pablo; Viñuela, Fernando; Feng, Lei; Loh, Yince; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-06-01

    The influence of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) on post-thrombolytic hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke remains controversial. To investigate the association of CMBs with HT and clinical outcomes among patients with large-vessel occlusion strokes treated with mechanical thrombectomy. We analyzed patients with acute stroke treated with Merci Retriever, Penumbra system or stent-retriever devices. CMBs were identified on pretreatment T2-weighted, gradient-recall echo MRI. We analyzed the association of the presence, burden, and distribution of CMBs with HT, procedural complications, in-hospital mortality, and clinical outcome. CMBs were detected in 37 (18.0%) of 206 patients. Seventy-three foci of microbleeds were identified. Fourteen patients (6.8%) had ≥2 CMBs, only 1 patient had ≥5 CMBs. Strictly lobar CMBs were found in 12 patients, strictly deep CMBs in 12 patients, strictly infratentorial CMBs in 2 patients, and mixed CMBs in 11 patients. There were no significant differences between patients with CMBs and those without CMBs in the rates of overall HT (37.8% vs 45.6%), parenchymal hematoma (16.2% vs 19.5%), procedure-related vessel perforation (5.4% vs 7.1%), in-hospital mortality (16.2% vs 18.3%), and modified Rankin Scale score 0-3 at discharge. CMBs were not independently associated with HT or in-hospital mortality in patients treated with either thrombectomy or intravenous thrombolysis followed by thrombectomy. Patients with CMBs are not at increased risk for HT and mortality following mechanical thrombectomy for acute stroke. Excluding such patients from mechanical thrombectomy is unwarranted. The risk of HT in patients with ≥5 CMBs requires further study. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Acute Ischaemic Stroke | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available der investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Ischaemic Stroke E.1.1.1Medical conditi...on in easily understood language Acute stroke caused by blockage in a blood vesse....6.1Details of subjects incapable of giving consent Acute stroke F.3.3.7Others No F.4 Planned number of subj

  11. Diagnostic approach to functional recovery: functional magnetic resonance imaging after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havsteen, Inger; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Christensen, Hanne; Christensen, Anders; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2013-01-01

    Stroke remains the most frequent cause of handicap in adult life and according to the WHO the second cause of death in the Western world. In the peracute phase, intravenous thrombolysis and in some cases endovascular therapy may induce early revascularization and hereby improve prognosis. However, only up to 20-25% of patients are eligible to causal treatment. Further, care in a specialized stroke unit improves prognosis in all patients independent of age and stroke severity. Even when it is not possible to prevent tissue loss, the surviving brain areas of functional brain networks have a substantial capacity to reorganize after a focal ischemic (or hemorrhagic) brain lesion. This functional reorganization contributes to functional recovery after stroke. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a valuable tool to capture the spatial and temporal activity changes in response to an acute ischemic lesion. Task-related as well as resting-state fMRI have been successfully applied to elucidate post-stroke remodeling of functional brain networks. This includes regional changes in neuronal activation as well as distributed changes in functional brain connectivity. Since fMRI is readily available and does not pose any adverse effects, repeated fMRI measurements provide unprecedented possibilities to prospectively assess the time course of reorganization in functional neural networks after stroke and relate the temporospatial dynamics of reorganization at the systems level to functional recovery. Here we review the current status and future perspectives of fMRI as a means of studying functional brain reorganization after stroke. We summarize (a) how fMRI has advanced our knowledge regarding the recovery mechanisms after stroke, and (b) how fMRI has been applied to document the effects of therapeutical interventions on post-stroke functional reorganization. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. NIHSS and acute complications after anterior and posterior circulation strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godefroy O

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mathieu Boone1, Jean-Marc Chillon2, Pierre-Yves Garcia1, Sandrine Canaple1, Chantal Lamy1, Olivier Godefroy1,3, Jean-Marc Bugnicourt1,2,31Department of Neurology, Amiens University Hospital, Amiens, France, 2INSERM ERI-12, and University of Picardie, 3Laboratory of Functional Neurosciences and Pathology (EA 4559, Amiens, FranceBackground: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score was associated with inhospital neurological and medical complications (NMC in patients with posterior circulation infarction.Methods: This retrospective study included all patients admitted to our stroke unit during a one-year period (n = 289. NMC included neurological deterioration (ie, worsening by 4 points or more of the NIHSS score during the hospital stay and all other medical complications based on what was recorded in the patients' charts.Results: Seventy-nine patients (27% experienced NMC. In posterior circulation infarction patients (n = 90, patients with NMC had a higher baseline NIHSS score (10.9 versus 2.2, P = 0.004 and a baseline NIHSS score >2 (78% versus 36%, P = 0.003. In stepwise logistic regression, an NIHSS score >2 (odds ratio: 8.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.64–41.0; P = 0.01 was associated with NMC. Similar results were observed for anterior circulation infarction patients but with a higher cutoff value for NIHSS score.Conclusion: In ischemic stroke patients, an increased baseline NIHSS score was associated with an increased risk of NMC. This association applied to anterior-circulation as well as posterior circulation stroke, although zero on the NIHSS for posterior circulation stroke does not mean the absence of NMC during hospitalization. The clinical significance of these findings requires further evaluation in larger prospective studies.Keywords: acute, stroke, rating scales, complications

  13. Current trends in the management of acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Paramasivam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of disability and most of the cases are those of ischemic stroke. Management strategies especially for large vessel occlusive stroke have undergone a significant change in the recent years that include widespread use of thrombolytic medications followed by endovascular clot removal. For successful treatment by endovascular thrombectomy, the important factors are patient selection based on clinical criterion including age, time of onset, premorbid clinical condition, co-morbidities, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, and imaging criterion including computed tomography (CT head, CT angiogram and CT perfusion. Patients presenting within 4.5 hours of onset are considered for intravenous (IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment. Mechanical clot retrieval devices have evolved over the past decade. The Mechanical Embolus Removal in Cerebral Ischemia device was approved first followed by the penumbra revascularization system. They have proven in various studies to improve recanalization with acceptable rates of symptomatic intra-cerebral hemorrhage. Introduction of stent retrievers has led to a new era in the interventional management of acute ischemic stroke (AIS. Recent trials namely MRCLEAN, ESCAPE, SWIFT PRIMEs, and EXTEND-IA have used the stent retriever predominantly and have shown unequivocal benefit in the outcome at 90 days for AIS patients with large vessel occlusion. More recently, a new catheter namely 5 MAX ACE was introduced along with improvement in the suction device. This has led to a direct aspiration first pass technique resulting in faster recanalization. Advancements in the endovascular management of AIS with large vessel occlusion have resulted in a paradigm shift in the way this disease is managed. Improvements in patient selection using clinical and imaging criterion along with technical and technological advancements in mechanical thrombectomy have made possible a significantly

  14. Current trends in the management of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramasivam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability and most of the cases are those of ischemic stroke. Management strategies especially for large vessel occlusive stroke have undergone a significant change in the recent years that include widespread use of thrombolytic medications followed by endovascular clot removal. For successful treatment by endovascular thrombectomy, the important factors are patient selection based on clinical criterion including age, time of onset, premorbid clinical condition, co-morbidities, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, and imaging criterion including computed tomography (CT) head, CT angiogram and CT perfusion. Patients presenting within 4.5 hours of onset are considered for intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment. Mechanical clot retrieval devices have evolved over the past decade. The Mechanical Embolus Removal in Cerebral Ischemia device was approved first followed by the penumbra revascularization system. They have proven in various studies to improve recanalization with acceptable rates of symptomatic intra-cerebral hemorrhage. Introduction of stent retrievers has led to a new era in the interventional management of acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Recent trials namely MRCLEAN, ESCAPE, SWIFT PRIMEs, and EXTEND-IA have used the stent retriever predominantly and have shown unequivocal benefit in the outcome at 90 days for AIS patients with large vessel occlusion. More recently, a new catheter namely 5 MAX ACE was introduced along with improvement in the suction device. This has led to a direct aspiration first pass technique resulting in faster recanalization. Advancements in the endovascular management of AIS with large vessel occlusion have resulted in a paradigm shift in the way this disease is managed. Improvements in patient selection using clinical and imaging criterion along with technical and technological advancements in mechanical thrombectomy have made possible a significantly improved outcome

  15. Acute stroke alert activation, emergency service use, and reperfusion therapy in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Marie; Glader, Eva-Lotta; Norrving, Bo; Stegmayr, Birgitta; Asplund, Kjell

    2017-04-01

    Ambulance services and stroke alerts reduce the time from stroke onset to acute stroke diagnosis. We describe the use of stroke alerts and ambulance services in different hospitals and patient groups and their relationship with reperfusion therapy. This nationwide study included 49,907 patients admitted with acute stroke who were registered in The Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) in 2011-2012. The proportions of patients admitted as stroke alerts out of all acute stroke admissions varied from 12.2% to 45.7% in university hospitals (n = 9), 0.5% to 38.7% in specialized nonuniversity hospitals (n = 22), and 4.2% to 40.3% in community hospitals (n = 41). Younger age, atrial fibrillation (AF), living in an institution, reduced consciousness upon admission, and hemorrhagic stroke were factors associated with a higher probability of stroke alerts. Living alone, primary school education, non-European origin, previous stroke, diabetes, smoking, and dependency in activities of daily living (ADL) were associated with a lower probability of stroke alert. The proportion of patients arriving at the hospital by ambulance varied from 60.3% to 94.5%. Older age, living alone, primary school education, being born in a European country, previous stroke, AF, dependency in ADL, living in an institution, reduced consciousness upon admission, and hemorrhagic stroke were associated with ambulance services. Hospital stroke alert frequencies correlated strongly with reperfusion rates (r = .75). Acute stroke alerts have a significant potential to improve stroke reperfusion rates. Prehospital stroke management varies conspicuously between hospitals and patient groups, and the elderly and patients living alone have a markedly reduced likelihood of stroke alerts.

  16. Susceptibility weighted imaging: a new tool in magnetic resonance imaging of stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K. [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India); Kesavadas, C. [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India)], E-mail: chandkesav@yahoo.com; Thomas, B.; Gupta, A.K.; Thamburaj, K.; Kapilamoorthy, T. Raman [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India)

    2009-01-15

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance (MR) technique that is exquisitely sensitive to paramagnetic substances, such as deoxygenated blood, blood products, iron, and calcium. This sequence allows detection of haemorrhage as early as 6 h and can reliably detect acute intracerebral parenchymal, as well as subarachnoid haemorrhage. It detects early haemorrhagic transformation within an infarct and provides insight into the cerebral haemodynamics following stroke. It helps in the diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis. It also has applications in the work-up of stroke patients. The sequence helps in detecting microbleeds in various conditions, such as vasculitis, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy, subacute infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL), amyloid angiopathy, and Binswanger's disease. The sequence also aids in the diagnosis of vascular malformations and perinatal cerebrovascular injuries. This review briefly illustrates the utility of this MR technique in various aspects of stroke diagnosis and management.

  17. Validation of hyperintense middle cerebral artery sign in acute ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Guo; Yonggui Yang; Weiqun Yang

    2012-01-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of non-contrast computed tomography (CT) scans, immediately subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cerebral angiography data from 30 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke within 6 hours after symptom onset. Results showed that eleven patients developed subsequent hemorrhagic transformation at follow-up. A hyperintense middle cerebral artery sign on MRI was found in six hemorrhagic patients, all of who had acute thrombosis formation on magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography. No patients in the non-hemorrhagic group had hyperintense middle cerebral artery sign on MRI. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of the hyperintense middle cerebral artery sign on MRI T1-weighted image for subsequent hemorrhagic transformation were 54.5%, 100%, and 100% respectively. Hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign on non-contrast CT was observed in nine patients, five of who developed hemorrhagic transformation. These data suggest that hyperintense middle cerebral artery sign on MRI T1-weighted image is a highly specific and moderately sensitive indicator of subsequent hemorrhagic transformation in patients after acute ischemic stroke, and its specificity is superior to CT.

  18. Systemic inflammation as a therapeutic target in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Tomasz

    2015-05-01

    Acute systemic inflammatory reaction superimposed on chronic low-grade inflammation accompanies acute ischemic stroke. Elevated blood levels of systemic inflammatory markers such as IL-6 or C-reactive protein are associated with an unfavorable functional outcome and increased mortality after stroke. Animal studies have demonstrated a causal relationship between systemic inflammation and ischemic brain damage. The mechanisms linking systemic inflammation with poor outcome include increased neutrophil infiltration of cerebral cortex, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, impaired tissue reperfusion, increased platelet activation and microvascular coagulation and complement-dependent brain injury. Non-selective (e.g., by statins) or selective (e.g., by inhibition of IL-6) attenuation of systemic inflammation, enhancement of systemic anti-inflammatory response (e.g., by infusion of IL-1 receptor antagonist), prevention of infections that exacerbate systemic inflammation or inhibition of neuronal pathways triggering inflammatory reaction are potential therapeutic targets in stroke patients. This review discusses the relationship between systemic inflammation, cerebral ischemia and prognosis in the context of therapeutic strategies.

  19. Determinants of Emergency Medical Services Utilization Among Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients in Hubei Province in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaoxv; Yang, Tingting; Gong, Yanhong; Zhou, Yanfeng; Li, Wenzhen; Song, Xingyue; Wang, Mengdie; Hu, Bo; Lu, Zuxun

    2016-03-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) can effectively shorten the prehospital delay for patients with acute ischemic stroke. This study aimed to investigate EMS utilization and its associated factors in patients with acute ischemic stroke in China. A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 1, 2014, to January 31, 2015, which included 2096 patients admitted for acute ischemic stroke from 66 hospitals in Hubei province in China. A multivariable stepwise logistic regression model was undertaken to identify the factors associated with EMS utilization. Of the 2096 participants, only 323 cases (15.4%) used EMS. Those acute ischemic stroke patients who previously used EMS (odds ratio [OR] =9.8), whose National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was ≥10 (OR=3.7), who lived in urban communities (OR=2.5), who had sudden onset of symptoms (OR=2.4), who experienced their first stroke (OR=1.8), and who recognized initial symptom as stroke (OR=1.4) were more likely to use EMS. Additionally, when acute ischemic stroke patients' stroke symptom were noticed first by others (OR=2.1), rather than by the patients, EMS was more likely to be used. A very low proportion of patients with acute ischemic stroke used the EMS in Hubei province in China. Considerable education programs are required regarding knowledge of potential symptoms and the importance of EMS for stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Constraint-induced movement therapy for the upper paretic limb in acute or sub-acute stroke : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, Rinske; Kwakkel, Gert; Bakers, Japie; van Wegen, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy is a commonly used intervention to improve upper limb function after stroke. However, the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy and its optimal dosage during acute or sub-acute stroke is still under debate. To examine the literature on the effects o

  1. Constraint-induced movement therapy for the upper paretic limb in acute or sub-acute stroke : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, Rinske; Kwakkel, Gert; Bakers, Japie; van Wegen, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy is a commonly used intervention to improve upper limb function after stroke. However, the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy and its optimal dosage during acute or sub-acute stroke is still under debate. To examine the literature on the effects

  2. Variability in Criteria for Emergency Medical Services Routing of Acute Stroke Patients to Designated Stroke Center Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay; Koenig, William; Bosson, Nichole; Song, Sarah; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Mack, William J.; Sanossian, Nerses

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Comprehensive stroke systems of care include routing to the nearest designated stroke center hospital, bypassing non-designated hospitals. Routing protocols are implemented at the state or county level and vary in qualification criteria and determination of destination hospital. We surveyed all counties in the state of California for presence and characteristics of their prehospital stroke routing protocols. Methods Each county’s local emergency medical services agency (LEMSA) was queried for the presence of a stroke routing protocol. We reviewed these protocols for method of stroke identification and criteria for patient transport to a stroke center. Results Thirty-three LEMSAs serve 58 counties in California with populations ranging from 1,175 to nearly 10 million. Fifteen LEMSAs (45%) had stroke routing protocols, covering 23 counties (40%) and 68% of the state population. Counties with protocols had higher population density (1,500 vs. 140 persons per square mile). In the six counties without designated stroke centers, patients meeting criteria were transported out of county. Stroke identification in the field was achieved using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Screen in 72%, Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen in 7% and a county-specific protocol in 22%. Conclusion California EMS prehospital acute stroke routing protocols cover 68% of the state population and vary in characteristics including activation by symptom onset time and destination facility features, reflecting matching of system design to local geographic resources. PMID:26587100

  3. Variability in Criteria for Emergency Medical Services Routing of Acute Stroke Patients to Designated Stroke Center Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Dimitrov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Comprehensive stroke systems of care include routing to the nearest designated stroke center hospital, bypassing non-designated hospitals. Routing protocols are implemented at the state or county level and vary in qualification criteria and determination of destination hospital. We surveyed all counties in the state of California for presence and characteristics of their prehospital stroke routing protocols. Methods: Each county’s local emergency medical services agency (LEMSA was queried for the presence of a stroke routing protocol. We reviewed these protocols for method of stroke identification and criteria for patient transport to a stroke center. Results: Thirty-three LEMSAs serve 58 counties in California with populations ranging from 1,175 to nearly 10 million. Fifteen LEMSAs (45% had stroke routing protocols, covering 23 counties (40% and 68% of the state population. Counties with protocols had higher population density (1,500 vs. 140 persons per square mile. In the six counties without designated stroke centers, patients meeting criteria were transported out of county. Stroke identification in the field was achieved using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Screen in 72%, Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen in 7% and a county-specific protocol in 22%. Conclusion: California EMS prehospital acute stroke routing protocols cover 68% of the state population and vary in characteristics including activation by symptom onset time and destination facility features, reflecting matching of system design to local geographic resources.

  4. Safety Outcomes After Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke in Patients With Recent Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkler, Alexander E; Salehi Omran, Setareh; Gialdini, Gino; Lerario, Michael P; Yaghi, Shadi; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Navi, Babak B

    2017-08-01

    It is uncertain whether previous ischemic stroke within 3 months of receiving intravenous thrombolysis (tPA [tissue-type plasminogen activator]) for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Using administrative claims data, we identified adults with AIS who received intravenous tPA at California, New York, and Florida hospitals from 2005 to 2013. Our primary outcome was intracerebral hemorrhage, and our secondary outcomes were unfavorable discharge disposition and inpatient mortality. We used logistic regression to compare rates of outcomes in patients with and without previous ischemic stroke within 3 months of intravenous tPA for AIS. We identified 36 599 AIS patients treated with intravenous tPA, of whom 568 (1.6%) had a previous ischemic stroke in the past 3 months. Of all patients who received intravenous tPA, the rate of intracerebral hemorrhage was 4.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.7%-5.1%), and death occurred in 10.7% (95% CI, 10.4%-11.0%). After adjusting for demographics, vascular risk factors, and the Elixhauser Comorbidity Index, previous ischemic stroke within 3 months of thrombolysis for AIS was not associated with an increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (odds ratio, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.6-1.4; P=0.62), but was associated with an increased risk of death (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.9; P=0.001) and unfavorable discharge disposition (odds ratio, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.7; P=0.04). Among patients who receive intravenous tPA for AIS, recent ischemic stroke is not associated with an increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage but is associated with a higher risk of death and unfavorable discharge disposition. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. A Research on Factors Influencing the Clinical Prognosis of Acute Stroke Patie.patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Zuming; Li Manli

    2000-01-01

    Object: To search for the factors significantly influencing the clinical prognosis of acute stroke patients. Background: There are lack of prospective multivariate analysis research m acute stroke in the world. Method: We chose 17 factors possibly influencing the prognosis of acute patients, took Barthel′s Index at the end of 2 months after stroke onset and decreased percentage of neurological deficit scores (MESSS) between 72h after hospitalization and 2 months after onset as gold standard, to have a prospective, multivariate analysis research combined with univariate analysis. Results: Multivariate analysis of 106 acute stroke patients combined with univariate analysis showed the factors significantly influencing the clinical prognosis of acute stroke patients were: initial MESSS score、 age、 complication、 mass effect、 stroke location、 time of delay before emergency arrival (BDT). Time of delay after emergency arrival was not found to be a significant prognostic factor. Discussion: Barthel Index at the end of 1 month after stroke onset was strongly related to that at the end of 2 month after onset, as was the same with MESSS score. It showed there was no significant difference between 1 month and 2 months after stroke onset when we choose time interval in evaluating prognosis of acute stroke patients.Conclusion: BDT、 initial MESSS score、 age、 stroke location、 mass effect、 complication were important factors of acute stroke patients. Avoid the delay before emergency arrival after onset, prevent and treat complications after stroke, more carefully treat acute stroke patients with advanced age, advanced age, high initial MESSS scores and those with mass effect reported by CT, we can improve the outcome of stroke patients.

  6. Hyperintense acute reperfusion marker is associated with higher contrast agent dosage in acute ischaemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Schaefer, Tabea; Villringer, Kersten; Fiebach, Jochen B. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Academic Neuroradiology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB), Berlin (Germany); Rozanski, Michal; Ebinger, Martin [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Academic Neuroradiology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB), Berlin (Germany); Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Jungehuelsing, Gerhard J. [Stiftung des Buergerlichen Rechts, Juedisches Krankenhaus Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability changes. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of contrast agent dosage on HARM incidence in acute ischaemic stroke patients. We prospectively included 529 acute ischaemic stroke patients (204 females, median age 71 years). Patients underwent a first stroke-MRI within 24 hours from symptom onset and had a follow-up on day 2. The contrast agent Gadobutrol was administered to the patients for perfusion imaging or MR angiography. The total dosage was calculated as ml/kg body weight and ranged between 0.04 and 0.31 mmol/kg on the first examination. The incidence of HARM was evaluated on day 2 FLAIR images. HARM was detected in 97 patients (18.3 %). HARM incidence increased significantly with increasing dosages of Gadobutrol. Also, HARM positive patients were significantly older. HARM was not an independent predictor of worse clinical outcome, and we did not find an association with increase risk of haemorrhagic transformation. A higher dosage of Gadobutrol in acute stroke patients on initial MRI is associated with increased HARM incidence on follow-up. MRI studies on BBB should therefore standardize contrast agent dosages. (orig.)

  7. Use of 3-D magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography in detecting human cerebral stroke: a simulation study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Nuo; ZHU Shan-an; HE Bin

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a new three dimensional (3-D) conductivity imaging approach and have used it to detect human brain conductivity changes corresponding to acute cerebral stroke. The proposed Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) approach is based on the J-Substitution algorithm and is expanded to imaging 3-D subject conductivity distribution changes. Computer simulation studies have been conducted to evaluate the present MREIT imaging approach.Simulations of both types of cerebral stroke, hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke, were performed on a four-sphere head model Simulation results showed that the correlation coefficient (CC) and relative error (RE) between target and estimated conductivity distributions were 0.9245±0.0068 and 8.9997%±0.0084%, for hemorrhagic stroke, and 0.6748±0.0197 and 8.8986%±0.0089%,for ischemic stroke, when the SNR (signal-to-noise radio) of added GWN (Gaussian White Noise) was 40. The convergence characteristic was also evaluated according to the changes of CC and RE with different iteration numbers. The CC increases and RE decreases monotonously with the increasing number of iterations. The present simulation results show the feasibility of the proposed 3-D MREIT approach in hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke detection and suggest that the method may become a useful alternative in clinical diagnosis of acute cerebral stroke in humans.

  8. Perfusion differences on SPECT and PWI in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuutinen, Juho [Kuopio University Hospital, University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Liu, Yawu; Laakso, Mikko P. [Kuopio University Hospital, University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, P. O. Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); Karonen, Jari O. [Mikkeli Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, Mikkeli (Finland); Vanninen, Esko J. [Kuopio University Hospital, University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio (Finland); Kuikka, Jyrki T. [Kuopio University Hospital, University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio (Finland); Niuvanniemi Hospital, Kuopio (Finland); Aronen, Hannu J. [University of Turku, Department of Radiology, Turku (Finland); Vanninen, Ritva L. [Kuopio University Hospital, University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, P. O. Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-10-15

    The purposes of the present study were to compare the flow defect volumes on perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (PWI) and {sup 99m}Tc-labeled ethylcysteinate dimer ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at acute and subacute stages of ischemic stroke and to analyze the relationship between the detected flow defects on the two methods and neurological status and clinical outcomes. Perfusion defects on PWI and SPECT were measured within 48 h and on day 8 of the onset of stroke from 22 patients with their first-ever acute supratentorial ischemic stroke. The primary neurological status was evaluated prior to the imaging. Clinical outcome was assessed at 3 months after the onset of the stroke. The volumes of cerebral blood flow (CBF) defects did not differ between SPECT and PWI within the 48-h examinations. However, the volume of CBF defect was significantly larger on SPECT than on PWI on day 8 (p = 0.03). Within the 48-h examinations, the CBF defect volumes on SPECT and PWI were comparably related to the neurological status. On day 8, the CBF defect volume on SPECT showed higher correlation to the neurological status and more precisely predicted the clinical outcomes at 3 months than PWI. {sup 99m}TC-ECD-SPECT and PWI both have ability to detect cerebral hypoperfusion in patients with ischemic stroke but with some differences. The value of SPECT is more accurate in terms of the delayed outcome, such as prognosis and rehabilitation planning. (orig.)

  9. Relationship between Barthel Index scores during the acute phase of rehabilitation and subsequent ADL in stroke patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nakao, Shigetaka; Takata, Shinjiro; Uemura, Hirokazu; Kashihara, Michiharu; Osawa, Toshifumi; Komatsu, Koji; Masuda, Yuki; Okahisa, Tetsuya; Nishikawa, Koji; Kondo, Shin; Yamada, Megumi; Takahara, Risa; Ogata, Yoshimi; Nakamura, Yuka; Nagahiro, Shinji; Kaji, Ryuji; Yasui, Natsuo

    2010-01-01

    The Barthel Index (BI) cannot be used to measure initial stroke severity or by extension, to stratify patients by severity in acute stroke trials because most patients are bedbound in the first few hours after stroke...

  10. Theophylline as an add-on to thrombolytic therapy in acute ischaemic stroke (TEA-Stroke): A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, two-centre phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modrau, Boris; Hjort, Niels; Østergaard, Leif;

    2016-01-01

    the collateral supply in acute ischaemic brain tissue and thus facilitate reperfusion despite proximal vessel occlusion. The primary study objective is to evaluate whether theophylline is safe and efficient in acute ischaemic stroke patients as an add-on to thrombolytic therapy.MethodsThe TEA-Stroke Trial...... is a two-centre, proof of concept phase II clinical study with a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled design. One hundred and twenty patients with acute ischaemic stroke and significant perfusion?diffusion mismatch, as determined by magnetic resonance imaging, are randomized 1:1 to either...... theophylline or placebo as an add-on to standard thrombolytic therapy.Study outcomeThe dual primary outcome measures include penumbra salvage (penumbral tissue not developing into infarcted tissue) and clinical improvement at the 24-h follow-up.DiscussionResults from studies of theophylline in stroke animal...

  11. Reperfusion Therapies of Acute Ischemic Stroke: potentials and failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios eTsivgoulis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past twenty years clinical research has focused on the development of reperfusion therapies for acute ischemic stroke (AIS, which include the use of systemic intravenous thrombolytics (alteplase, desmoteplase or tenecteplase, the augmentation of systemic intravenous recanalization with ultrasound, the bridging of intravenous with intra-arterial thrombolysis, the use of multi-modal approaches to reperfusion including thrombectomy and thromboaspiration with different available retrievers. Clinical trials testing these acute reperfusion therapies provided novel insight regarding the comparative safety and efficacy, but also raised new questions and further uncertainty on the field. Intravenous alteplase (tPA remains the fastest and easiest way to initiate acute stroke reperfusion treatment, and should continue to be the first-line treatment for patients with AIS within 4.5 hours from onset. The use of tenecteplase instead of tPA and the augmentation of systemic thrombolysis with ultrasound are both novel therapeutical modalities that may emerge as significant options in AIS treatment. Endovascular treatments for AIS are rapidly evolving due to technological advances in catheter-based interventions and are currently emphasizing speed in order to result in timely restoration of perfusion of still-salvageable, infracted brain tissue, since delayed recanalization of proximal intracranial occlusions has not been associated with improved clinical outcomes. Comprehensive imaging protocols in AIS may enable better patient selection for endovascular interventions and for testing multi-modal combinatory strategies.

  12. Actual diagnostic approach to the acute stroke patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevblad, Karl-Olof [HUG Geneva University Hospital, Neuroradiology Unit, Radiology Department, SRRI, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Baird, Alison E. [Stroke Neuroscience Unit, NiNDS, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Since acute stroke is now considered a potentially treatable medical emergency, a rapid and correct diagnosis must be made. The first step is to exclude hemorrhage, then to visualize any early ischemic changes, demonstrate the presence of hypoperfusion and locate the presence of a vascular underlying pathology as well as elucidate the presence of a potential penumbra (tissue at risk). Thanks to improvements and advances in both MR and CT technology, this can now be done in a number of ways. At the moment, CT is the most widely available and fast method for obtaining imaging of the brain and neck vessels of patients presenting with acute stroke. MRI can provide more precise information, although it remains slightly more time-consuming, but is, however, the method of choice for follow-up imaging. The main point is to take the one-stop-shopping approach where imaging of the vessels and brain is done from the aortic arch to the circle of Willis in one single session in order to have all the necessary information in the acute phase. (orig.)

  13. Plasminogen Activators and Ischemic Stroke: Conditions for Acute Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate acute treatment with plasminogen activators (PAs) can significantly increase the probability of minimal or no disability in selected ischemic stroke patients. There is a great deal of evidence showing that intravenous recombinant tissue PAs (rt-PA) infusion accomplishes this goal, recanalization with other PAs has also been demonstrated in the development of this treatment. Recanalization of symptomatic, documented carotid or vertebrobasilar arterial territory occlusions have also been achieved by local intra-arterial PA delivery, although only a single prospective double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled study has been reported. The increase in intracerebral hemorrhage with these agents by either delivery approach underscores the need for careful patient selection, dose-appropriate safety and efficacy, proper clinical trial design, and an understanding of the evolution of cerebral tissue injury due to focal ischemia. Principles underlying the evolution of focal ischemia have been expanded by experience with acute PA intervention. Several questions remain open that concern the manner in which PAs can be applied acutely in ischemic stroke and how injury development can be limited. PMID:23539414

  14. Patterns of Reading Performance in Acute Stroke: A Descriptive Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren L. Cloutman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main sources of information regarding the underlying processes involved in both normal and impaired reading has been the study of reading deficits that occur as a result of brain damage. However, patterns of reading deficits found acutely after brain injury have been little explored. The observed patterns of performance in chronic stroke patients might reflect reorganization of the cognitive processes underlying reading or development of compensatory strategies that are not normally used to read. Method: 112 acute left hemisphere stroke patients were administered a task of oral reading of words and pseudowords within 1–2 days of hospital admission; performance was examined for error rate and type, and compared to that on tasks involving visual lexical decision, visual/auditory comprehension, and naming. Results: Several distinct patterns of performance were identified. Although similarities were found between the patterns of reading performance observed acutely and the classical acquired dyslexias generally identified more chronically, some notable differences were observed. Of interest was the finding that no patient produced any pure semantic errors in reading, despite finding such errors in comprehension and naming.

  15. Improving door-to-needle times in acute ischemic stroke: the design and rationale for the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Target: Stroke initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonarow, Gregg C; Smith, Eric E; Saver, Jeffrey L; Reeves, Mathew J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Peterson, Eric D; Sacco, Ralph L; Schwamm, Lee H

    2011-10-01

    The benefits of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) in acute ischemic stroke are time-dependent, and guidelines recommend a door-to-needle time of ≤60 minutes. However, fewer than one third of acute ischemic stroke patients who receive tPA are treated within guideline-recommended door-to-needle times. This article describes the design and rationale of Stroke, a national initiative organized by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association in partnership with other organizations to assist hospitals in increasing the proportion of tPA-treated patients who achieve guideline-recommended door-to-needle times. The initial program goal is to achieve a door-to-needle time≤60 minutes for at least 50% of acute ischemic stroke patients. Key best practice strategies previously associated with achieving faster door-to-needle times in acute ischemic stroke were identified. The 10 key strategies chosen by Stroke include emergency medical service prenotification, activating the stroke team with a single call, rapid acquisition and interpretation of brain imaging, use of specific protocols and tools, premixing tPA, a team-based approach, and rapid data feedback. The program includes many approaches intended to promote hospital participation, implement effective strategies, share best practices, foster collaboration, and achieve stated goals. A detailed program evaluation is also included. In the first year, Stroke has enrolled over 1200 United States hospitals. Stroke, a multidimensional initiative to improve the timeliness of tPA administration, aims to elevate clinical performance in the care of acute ischemic stroke, facilitate the more rapid integration of evidence into clinical practice, and improve outcomes.

  16. Acute Ischaemic Stroke | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Ischa...F.3.3.6.1Details of subjects incapable of giving consent Acute Ischaemic Stroke patients with communication

  17. Lower Serum Caveolin-1 Is Associated with Cerebral Microbleeds in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Wusheng; Xiao, Lulu; Cao, Qinqin; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Huaiming; Ye, Zusen; Hao, Yonggang; Dai, Qiliang; Sun, Wen; Liu, Xinfeng; Ye, Ruidong

    2016-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) plays pivotal roles in the endothelial damage following stroke. The present study aimed to investigate whether serum Cav-1 level is associated with the presence of cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD) in patients with acute ischemic stroke. To this end, 156 patients were consecutively enrolled. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging was analyzed to determine the surrogates of cSVD, including cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), silent lacunar infarcts (SLIs), and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs). After adjusting for potential confounders, patients with low Cav-1 level had a higher risk of CMBs than patients with high Cav-1 level (OR: 4.05, 95% CI: 1.77–9.30). However, there was no relationship between Cav-1 and the presence of SLIs or WMHs. When CMBs were stratified by location and number, a similar association was found in patients with deep or infratentorial CMBs (OR: 4.04, 95% CI: 1.59–10.25) and with multiple CMBs (OR: 3.18, 95% CI: 1.16–8.72). These results suggest lower serum Cav-1 levels may be associated with CMBs, especially those that are multiple and located in deep brain or infratentorial structures, in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cav-1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of CMBs, and may act as a potential target for treating cSVD. PMID:27119011

  18. Lower Serum Caveolin-1 Is Associated with Cerebral Microbleeds in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 plays pivotal roles in the endothelial damage following stroke. The present study aimed to investigate whether serum Cav-1 level is associated with the presence of cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD in patients with acute ischemic stroke. To this end, 156 patients were consecutively enrolled. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging was analyzed to determine the surrogates of cSVD, including cerebral microbleeds (CMBs, silent lacunar infarcts (SLIs, and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs. After adjusting for potential confounders, patients with low Cav-1 level had a higher risk of CMBs than patients with high Cav-1 level (OR: 4.05, 95% CI: 1.77–9.30. However, there was no relationship between Cav-1 and the presence of SLIs or WMHs. When CMBs were stratified by location and number, a similar association was found in patients with deep or infratentorial CMBs (OR: 4.04, 95% CI: 1.59–10.25 and with multiple CMBs (OR: 3.18, 95% CI: 1.16–8.72. These results suggest lower serum Cav-1 levels may be associated with CMBs, especially those that are multiple and located in deep brain or infratentorial structures, in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cav-1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of CMBs, and may act as a potential target for treating cSVD.

  19. The Prognostic Values of Leukocyte Rho Kinase Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-I. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. It has been reported that leukocyte ROCK activity is elevated in patients after ischemic stroke, but it is unclear whether leukocyte ROCK activity is associated with clinical outcomes following acute stroke events. The objective of this study is to investigate if leukocyte ROCK activity can predict the outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 110 patients of acute ischemic stroke and measured the leukocyte ROCK activity and plasma level of inflammatory cytokines to correlate the clinical outcomes of these patients. Results. The leukocyte ROCK activity at 48 hours after admission in acute ischemic stroke patients was higher as compared to a risk-matched population. The leukocyte ROCK activity significantly correlated with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS difference between admission and 90 days after stroke event. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates showed lower stroke-free survival during follow-up period in patients with high leukocyte ROCK activity or plasma hsCRP level. Leukocyte ROCK activity independently predicted the recurrent stroke in patients with atherosclerotic stroke. Conclusions. This study shows elevated leukocyte ROCK activity in patients with ischemic stroke as compared to risk-matched subjects and is an independent predictor for recurrent stroke.

  20. Discharge home after acute stroke : Differences between older and younger patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutrieux, Roy D.; Van Eijk, Monica; Van Mierlo, Marloes L.; Van Heugten, Caroline M.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Achterberg, Wilco P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify determinants for discharge destination of older (≥ 70 years) and younger (<70 years) acute stroke patients. Design: Multicentre prospective cohort. Patients: A total of 395 patients, within 7 days of clinically evaluated stroke, were included from 6 hospital stroke units. Meth

  1. Moderate hyperglycaemia is associated with favourable outcome in acute lacunar stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Koch, Marcus W; Stewart, Roy E; Vroomen, Patrick C; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; De Keyser, Jacques

    Hyperglycaemia in acute ischaemic stroke is traditionally associated with a worsened outcome. However, it is unclear whether the impact of hyperglycaemia on stroke outcome is similar in lacunar and non-lacunar infarctions. The relation between serum glucose measured within 6 h after stroke onset and

  2. [Telemedicine in acute stroke care--a health economics view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günzel, F; Theiss, S; Knüppel, P; Halberstadt, S; Rose, G; Raith, M

    2010-05-01

    Specialized stroke units offer optimal treatment of patients with an acute stroke. Unfortunately, their installation is limited by an acute lack of experienced neurologists and the small number of stroke patients in sparsely populated rural areas. This problem is increasingly being solved by the use of telemedicine, so that neurological expertise is made available to basic and regular care. It has been demonstrated by national and international pilot studies that solidly based and rapid decisions can be made by telemedicine regrading the use of thrombolysis, as the most important acute treatment, but also of other interventions. So far studies have only evaluated improvement in the quality of care achieved by networking, but not of any lasting effect on any economic benefit. Complementary to a medical evaluation, the qualitative economic assessment presented here of German and American concepts of telemetric care indicate no difference in efficacy between various ways of networking. Most noteworthy, when comparing two large American and German studies, is the difference in their priorities. While the American networks achieved targeted improvements in efficacy of care that go beyond the immediate wishes of the doctors involved, this was of only secondary importance in the German studies. Also, in contrast to several American networks, the German telemetry networks have not tended to be organized for future growth. In terms of economic benefits, decentralized organized networks offer a greater potential of efficacy than purely local ones. Furthermore, the integration of inducements into the design of business models is a fundamental factor for achieving successful and lasting existence, especially within a highly competitive market.

  3. Intracranial stents in the endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Acosta, F; Jiménez Gómez, E; Bravo Rey, I; Bravo Rodríguez, F A; Ochoa Sepúlveda, J J; Oteros Fernández, R

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intracranial stenting as a rescue therapy after failed mechanical thrombectomy in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We retrospectively studied 42 patients treated with intracranial stenting after failed mechanical thrombectomy between December 2008 and January 2016. We compared outcomes before and after the incorporation of stentrievers. We assessed the degree of recanalization in the carotid and basilar territories (modified TIMI score), prognostic factors, and outcome (modified Rankin Score at 3 months). Safety was evaluated in function of the appearance of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH). Median NIHSS was 17 in patients with carotid territory strokes and 26 in those with vertebrobasilar territory strokes. Median time from onset of symptoms to treatment was 225minutes in carotid territory strokes and 390minutes in vertebrobasilar territory strokes. A total of 10 patients underwent intravenous fibrinolytic therapy before treatment with stentrievers. Two patients developed SICH; both had undergone intravenous fibrinolytic therapy (p=0.0523). Recanalization was effective in 30 (71.4%) in the entire series: in 7 (50%) of 14 patients treated before the incorporation of stentrievers and in 23 (82.1%) of 28 treated after the incorporation of stentrievers (p=0.0666). Outcome at 3 months was good in 2 (14.3%) patients in the earlier group and in 14 (50%) patients in the later group (p=0.042). We found significant associations between recanalization and outcome (p=0.0415) and between shorter time to treatment and outcome (p=0.002). Outcome was good in 14 (48.3%) of the 29 patients with carotid territory strokes and in 2 (15.4%) of the 13 patients with vertebrobasilar territory strokes (p=0.078). Intracranial stenting is the rescue treatment when the usual treatment fails. Stentrievers must be used to eliminate the clot burden before stenting. In our study, antiplatelet treatment did not seem to increase the risk of SICH

  4. Sildenafil: Can Cause Acute Ischaemic Stroke? A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Özözen Ayas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sildenafil is an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE-5, is used for erectile dysfunction. There is not enough information about its effects on the central nervous system Headache, nasal congestion, facial flushing, nausea are the most common side effects. However, neurological complications such as third cranial nerve palsy, transient global amnesia, seizures, cerebral hemorrhage, and infarction are less commonly observed. We present a case of a 60-year-old man with acute ischaemic stroke, which we considered to be interrelated to sildenafil intake. Clinicians must be aware of the possibility of neurological side effects when the patient use sildenafil.

  5. Acute-Phase Blood Pressure Levels Correlate With a High Risk of Recurrent Strokes in Young-Onset Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustanoja, Satu; Putaala, Jukka; Gordin, Daniel; Tulkki, Lauri; Aarnio, Karoliina; Pirinen, Jani; Surakka, Ida; Sinisalo, Juha; Lehto, Mika; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2016-06-01

    High blood pressure (BP) in acute stroke has been associated with a poor outcome; however, this has not been evaluated in young adults. The relationship between BP and long-term outcome was assessed in 1004 consecutive young, first-ever ischemic stroke patients aged 15 to 49 years enrolled in the Helsinki Young Stroke Registry. BP parameters included systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure at admission and 24 hours. The primary outcome measure was recurrent stroke in the long-term follow-up. Adjusted for demographics and preexisting comorbidities, Cox regression models were used to assess independent BP parameters associated with outcome. Of our patients (63% male), 393 patients (39%) had prestroke hypertension and 358 (36%) used antihypertensive treatment. The median follow-up period was 8.9 years (interquartile range 5.7-13.2). Patients with a recurrent stroke (n=142, 14%) had significantly higher admission SBP, diastolic BP, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure (Ppressure compared with patients without the recurrent stroke. Patients with SBP ≥160 mm Hg compared with those with SBP pressure, and mean arterial pressure were independently associated with the risk of recurrent stroke, while the 24-hour BP levels were not. In young ischemic stroke patients, high acute phase BP levels are independently associated with a high risk of recurrent strokes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Effect of paracetamol (acetaminophen) on body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: a double-blind, randomized phase II clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); E.J. van Breda (Eric); H.M.A. van Gemert (Maarten); H.B. van der Worp (Bart); R.J. Meijer (Ron); L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Body temperature is a strong predictor of outcome in acute stroke. However, it is unknown whether antipyretic treatment leads to early and clinically worthwhile reduction of body temperature in patients with acute stroke, especially w

  7. Diagnosis of presumed acute ischemic stroke and associated seizure management in a Congo African grey parrot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufrère, Hugues; Nevarez, Javier; Gaschen, Lorrie; Ryan, Kirk; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    A 14-year-old Congo African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus erithacus) was evaluated for an acute onset of falling off of its perch and tonic-clonic movements. Clinical signs were consistent with partial seizures. Findings on whole-body radiography, CBC, and plasma biochemical analysis were unremarkable. Plasma magnesium, ionized calcium, and bile acids concentrations were within reference limits. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the head revealed the presence of a focal hyperintensity at the central to left side of the optic chiasm and a hyperintense focus in the right side of the midbrain area in T2-weighted and FLAIR pulse sequence images. These findings were most consistent with an acute ischemic stroke with 2 brain infarcts. Seizures were initially managed with potassium bromide and phenobarbital administration. On the basis of poor results and difficulties to reach therapeutic blood concentrations, the treatment plan was changed to levetiracetam and zonisamide administration. Blood concentrations were monitored for both drugs, and the frequency of seizures substantially decreased thereafter. A follow-up MRI examination 2 months later revealed resolution of the hyperintense signals. During the 20-month follow-up period, subsequent clusters of seizures were managed by adjusting levetiracetam and zonisamide dosages and adding clonazepam and gabapentin administration to the treatment plan. Regression of intraparenchymal hyperintense lesions and improvement of clinical signs made a diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke most likely. Findings for this Congo African grey parrot indicated that an antemortem diagnosis of an acute ischemic stroke followed by long-term seizure management may be possible in affected psittacines.

  8. Manual and oral apraxia in acute stroke, frequency and influence on functional outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P M; Jørgensen, H S; Kammersgaard, L P;

    2001-01-01

    To determine the frequency of manual and oral apraxia in acute stroke and to examine the influence of these symptoms on functional outcome.......To determine the frequency of manual and oral apraxia in acute stroke and to examine the influence of these symptoms on functional outcome....

  9. Statin Use and Functional Outcome after Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment in Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, I; Uyttenboogaart, M; Koopman, K; De Keyser, J; Luijckx, G J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Preliminary findings suggest that statins may have a neuroprotective effect in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. This study investigated whether patients prior on statin therapy and treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for acute ischaemic stroke have a better functional ou

  10. Neuroprotection as initial therapy in acute stroke - Third report of an Ad Hoc Consensus Group Meeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogousslavsky, J; De Keyser, J; Diener, HC; Fieschi, C; Hacke, W; Kaste, M; Orgogozo, JM; Pulsinelli, W; Wahlgren, NG

    1998-01-01

    Although a considerable body of scientific data is now available on neuroprotection in acute ischaemic stroke, this field is not yet established in clinical practice. At its third meeting, the European Ad Hoc Consensus Group considered the potential for neuroprotection in acute stroke and the practi

  11. Predictors of extubation success in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioutas, Vasileios-Arsenios; Hanafy, Khalid A; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-09-15

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients often undergo intubation and mechanical ventilation (MV). Prolonged intubation and MV have disadvantages and complications. Conventional extubation criteria based only on respiratory parameters are insufficient to guide extubation practices in stroke patients where capacity for airway protection is a major concern. To identify clinical and neuroanatomical markers of successful extubation in AIS patients requiring MV. Retrospective review of tertiary care hospital patient database from May 2009-November 2012 to identify consecutive patients with AIS intubated during hospitalization. We assessed the effect of age, sex, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, level of consciousness, facial weakness, dysarthria, neglect, infarct location, dysphagia, respiratory parameters and history of pneumonia on successful extubation by hospital discharge using multivariate logistic regression analysis. 112 subjects met study criteria and were included in the analysis. Age and NIHSS scores (mean±standard deviation) were 74.5±16.1years and 19±9.8, respectively; 56% were women. In multivariate analysis, NIHSS score≤15 (Odds Ratio 4.6, 95% Confidence Interval 1.9-11.3, pstroke and absence of dysarthria prior to intubation were independently associated with extubation success. Our findings could help inform extubation practices in patients with AIS though prospective validation is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Lack of Gender Disparities in Emergency Department Triage of Acute Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Tracy E.; Choo, Esther K.; Seigel, Todd A.; Palms, Danielle; Silver, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Previous literature has shown gender disparities in the care of acute ischemic stroke. Compared to men, women wait longer for brain imaging and are less likely to receive intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Emergency department (ED) triage is an important step in the rapid assessment of stroke patients and is a possible contributor to disparities. It is unknown whether gender differences exist in ED triage of acute stroke patients. Our primary objective was to d...

  13. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging for stroke diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Rastogi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In stroke, diagnosis and identification of the infarct core and the penumbra is integral to therapeutic determination. With advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technology, stroke visualization has been radically altered. MRI allows for better visualization of factors such as cerebral microbleeds (CMBs, lesion and penumbra size and location, and thrombus identification; these factors help determine which treatments, ranging from tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, anti-platelet therapy, or even surgery, are appropriate. Current stroke diagnosis standards use several MRI modalities in conjunction, with T2- or T2FNx01- weighted MRI to rule out intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA for thrombus identification, and the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI mismatch for penumbral identification and therapeutic determination. However, to better clarify the neurological environment, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI for assessing oxygen saturation and the presence of CMBs as well as additional modalities, such as amide proton transfer (APT imaging for pH mapping, have emerged to offer more insight into anatomical and biological conditions during stroke. Further research has unveiled potential for alternative contrasts to gadolinium for PWI as well, as the contrast has contraindications for patients with renal disease. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs as an exogenous contrast and arterial spin labeling (ASL as an endogenous contrast offer innovative alternatives. Thus, emerging MRI modalities are enhancing the diagnostic capabilities of MRI in stroke and provide more guidance for patient outcome by offering increased accessibility, accuracy, and information.

  14. Statins in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Statins have pleiotropic effects of potential neuroprotection. However, because of lack of large randomized clinical trials, current guidelines do not provide specific recommendations on statin initiation in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The current study aims to systematically review the statin effect in AIS. Methods From literature review, we identified articles exploring prestroke and immediate post-stroke statin effect on imaging surrogate markers, initial stroke severity, functional outcome, and short-term mortality in human AIS. We summarized descriptive overview. In addition, for subjects with available data from publications, we conducted meta-analysis to provide pooled estimates. Results In total, we identified 70 relevant articles including 6 meta-analyses. Surrogate imaging marker studies suggested that statin might enhance collaterals and reperfusion. Our updated meta-analysis indicated that prestroke statin use was associated with milder initial stroke severity (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval], 1.24 [1.05-1.48]; P=0.013), good functional outcome (1.50 [1.29-1.75]; P<0.001), and lower mortality (0.42 [0.21-0.82]; P=0.0108). In-hospital statin use was associated with good functional outcome (1.31 [1.12-1.53]; P=0.001), and lower mortality (0.41 [0.29-0.58]; P<0.001). In contrast, statin withdrawal was associated with poor functional outcome (1.83 [1.01-3.30]; P=0.045). In patients treated with thrombolysis, statin was associated with good functional outcome (1.44 [1.10-1.89]; P=0.001), despite an increased risk of symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation (1.63 [1.04-2.56]; P=0.035). Conclusions The current study findings support the use of statin in AIS. However, the findings were mostly driven by observational studies at risk of bias, and thereby large randomized clinical trials would provide confirmatory evidence. PMID:26437994

  15. Role of heparin during endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farook, Naureen; Haussen, Diogo; Sur, Samir; Snelling, Brian; Gersey, Zachary; Yavagal, Dileep; Peterson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Systemic heparinization has become the mainstay anticoagulant in neurointerventional procedures to prevent thromboembolic complications. Its benefit during endovascular therapy for acute stroke however has not been established. The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the impact of heparin during endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We performed a retrospective review of our interventional stroke database from February 2009 to September 2012 for patients with anterior circulation AIS with ICA-T or MCA M1 occlusions. 76 patients were categorized into 2 groups: intraprocedural vs. no intraprocedural heparin use. Outcomes measured included reperfusion (modified TICI scale), cerebral hemorrhages (ECASS criteria), and 90-day outcomes (modified Rankin scale). Baseline characteristics were similar between heparin and non-heparin treated patients, except for presence of CAD (6% vs. 30%, p=0.01), Coumadin (0% vs. 11%, p=0.04), and NIHSS (15.6±5.0 vs. 18.1±4.6, p=0.03). There was a nonsignificantly higher reperfusion rate achieved in heparin-treated patients compared to non heparin-treated patients (63% vs. 50%, p=0.35). Patients who received heparin had significantly lower rates of hemorrhage (p=0.02). Multivariate logistic regression for good outcome revealed only age (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.78-0.95; p<0.01), ASPECTS (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.01-4.50; p=0.04), and successful reperfusion (OR 19.25; 95% CI 2.37-155.95; p<0.01) independently associated with mRS 0-2 at 90 days. The use of intraprocedural heparin in patients with AIS from MCA M1 or ICA-T occlusion was found safe. The impact of heparinization is unclear and warrants further evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The third international stroke trial (IST-3 of thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantisani Teresa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA is approved for use in selected patients with ischaemic stroke within 3 hours of symptom onset. IST-3 seeks to determine whether a wider range of patients may benefit. Design International, multi-centre, prospective, randomized, open, blinded endpoint (PROBE trial of intravenous rt-PA in acute ischaemic stroke. Suitable patients must be assessed and able to start treatment within 6 hours of developing symptoms, and brain imaging must have excluded intracerebral haemorrhage. With 1000 patients, the trial can detect a 7% absolute difference in the primary outcome. With3500 patients, it can detect a 4.0% absolute benefit & with 6000, (mostly treated between 3 & 6 hours, it can detect a 3% benefit. Trial procedures Patients are entered into the trial by telephoning a fast, secure computerised central randomisation system or via a secure web interface. Repeat brain imaging must be performed at 24–48 hours. The scans are reviewed 'blind' by expert readers. The primary measure of outcome is the proportion of patients alive and independent (Modified Rankin 0–2 at six months (assessed via a postal questionnaire mailed directly to the patient. Secondary outcomes include: events within 7 days (death, recurrent stroke, symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage, outcome at six months (death, functional status, EuroQol. Trial registration ISRCTN25765518

  17. In-hospital medical complications associated with patient dependency after acute ischemic stroke: data from the China National Stroke Registry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng-lian; ZHAO Xing-quan; DU Wan-liang; WANG An-xin; JI Rui-jun; YANG Zhong-hua; WANG Chun-xue

    2013-01-01

    Background The mortality of stroke patients is strongly affected by medical complications.However,there are limited data investigating the effect of in-hospital medical complications on the dependency of stroke patients worldwide.We prospectively and systematically investigated the effect of medical complications on dependency of patients at 3,6 and 12 months after stroke using the China National Stroke Registry (CNSR).Methods This prospective cohort study collected data of patients age >18 years with acute ischemic stroke in 132 clinical centers distributed across 32 provinces and four municipalities (including Hong Kong region) of China,from September 2007 to August 2008.Data on medical complications,dependency and other information were obtained from paper-based registry forms.Medical complications associated with stroke outcomes were assessed using multivariable Logistic regression.Results Of 11 560 patients with acute ischemic stroke,1826 (15.80%) presented with in-hospital medical complications.In-hospital medical complications were independent risk factors for dependency of patients at 3 months (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.367,95% confidence interval (CI) 2.021-2.771),6 months (adjusted OR 2.257,95% CI 1.922-2.650),and 12 months (adjusted OR 1.820,95% CI 1.538-2.154) after acute ischemic stroke.Conclusion The results demonstrated that the short-term and long-term dependency of acute ischemic stroke patients is significantly associated with in-hospital medical complications in China.

  18. Prestroke glycemic control is associated with the functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke: the Fukuoka Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamouchi, Masahiro; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hata, Jun; Kuwashiro, Takahiro; Ago, Tetsuro; Sambongi, Yoshiki; Fukushima, Yoshihisa; Sugimori, Hiroshi; Kitazono, Takanari

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an established risk factor for stroke. However, it is uncertain whether prestroke glycemic control (PSGC) status affects clinical outcomes of acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this study was to elucidate the association between PSGC status and neurological or functional outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. From the Fukuoka Stroke Registry (FSR), a multicenter stroke registry in Japan, 3627 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke within 24 hours after onset were included in the present analysis. The patients were categorized into 4 groups based on their PSGC status: excellent (hemoglobin [Hb] A1c on admissionStroke Scale [NIHSS] score during hospitalization or 0 points on NIHSS score at discharge), neurological deterioration (≥1 point increase in NIHSS score) and poor functional outcome (death or dependency at discharge, modified Rankin Scale 2-6). The age- and sex-adjusted ORs for neurological improvement were lower, and those for neurological deterioration and a poor functional outcome were higher in patients with poorer PSGC status. After adjusting for multiple confounding factors, these trends were unchanged (all probability values for trends were ischemic stroke patients, HbA1c on admission was an independent significant predictor for neurological and functional outcomes.

  19. Stroke recovery can be enhanced by using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefaucheur, J-P

    2006-01-01

    Post-stroke recovery is based on plastic changes in the central nervous system that can compensate the loss of activity in affected brain regions. In particular, monohemispheric stroke is thought to result in disinhibition of the contralesional unaffected hemisphere. Neurorehabilitation programs improve function partly by enhancing cortical reorganization. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive way of producing potent changes in cortical excitability. Therefore, the application of rTMS was recently proposed to promote functional recovery in stroke patients, owing to the induced neuroplasticity. This review discusses the first clinical results that were obtained by rTMS in patients with post-stroke motor deficit, visuospatial neglect, or aphasia. These results are promising and depend on the site and frequency of stimulation. In summary, functional recovery might be obtained either when rTMS is applied at low-frequency (around 1 Hz) over the disinhibited, unaffected hemisphere in order to restore defective inhibition or when rTMS is applied at high-frequency (5 Hz or more) over the affected hemisphere in order to reactivate hypoactive regions. The overall procedure remains to be optimized, in particular regarding the number of rTMS sessions and the time of rTMS application after stroke. Cortical stimulation is an exciting perspective for improving functional recovery from stroke. Transient application of non-invasive transcranial stimulation during the time of the rehabilitation process will be preferable to the temporary implantation of epidural cortical electrodes, as recently proposed. Therefore, in the future, acute or recent stroke might be a major indication of rTMS in neurological practice.

  20. Vessel Wall Enhancement and Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier Disruption After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renú, Arturo; Laredo, Carlos; Lopez-Rueda, Antonio; Llull, Laura; Tudela, Raúl; San-Roman, Luis; Urra, Xabier; Blasco, Jordi; Macho, Juan; Oleaga, Laura; Chamorro, Angel; Amaro, Sergio

    2017-03-01

    Less than half of acute ischemic stroke patients treated with mechanical thrombectomy obtain permanent clinical benefits. Consequently, there is an urgent need to identify mechanisms implicated in the limited efficacy of early reperfusion. We evaluated the predictors and prognostic significance of vessel wall permeability impairment and its association with blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) disruption after acute stroke treated with thrombectomy. A prospective cohort of acute stroke patients treated with stent retrievers was analyzed. Vessel wall permeability impairment was identified as gadolinium vessel wall enhancement (GVE) in a 24- to 48-hour follow-up contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and severe BCSFB disruption was defined as subarachnoid hemorrhage or gadolinium sulcal enhancement (present across >10 slices). Infarct volume was evaluated in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical outcome was evaluated with the modified Rankin Scale at day 90. A total of 60 patients (median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, 18) were analyzed, of whom 28 (47%) received intravenous alteplase before mechanical thrombectomy. Overall, 34 (57%) patients had GVE and 27 (45%) had severe BCSFB disruption. GVE was significantly associated with alteplase use before thrombectomy and with more stent retriever passes, along with the presence of severe BCSFB disruption. GVE was associated with poor clinical outcome, and both GVE and severe BCSFB disruption were associated with increased final infarct volume. These findings may support the clinical relevance of direct vessel damage and BCSFB disruption after acute stroke and reinforce the need for further improvements in reperfusion strategies. Further validation in larger cohorts of patients is warranted. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. The longitudinal changes of BOLD response and cerebral hemodynamics from acute to subacute stroke. A fMRI and TCD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzei Farsin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background By mapping the dynamics of brain reorganization, functional magnetic resonance imaging MRI (fMRI has allowed for significant progress in understanding cerebral plasticity phenomena after a stroke. However, cerebro-vascular diseases can affect blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal. Cerebral autoregulation is a primary function of cerebral hemodynamics, which allows to maintain a relatively constant blood flow despite changes in arterial blood pressure and perfusion pressure. Cerebral autoregulation is reported to become less effective in the early phases post-stroke. This study investigated whether any impairment of cerebral hemodynamics that occurs during the acute and the subacute phases of ischemic stroke is related to changes in BOLD response. We enrolled six aphasic patients affected by acute stroke. All patients underwent a Transcranial Doppler to assess cerebral autoregulation (Mx index and fMRI to evaluate the amplitude and the peak latency (time to peak-TTP of BOLD response in the acute (i.e., within four days of stroke occurrence and the subacute (i.e., between five and twelve days after stroke onset stroke phases. Results As patients advanced from the acute to subacute stroke phase, the affected hemisphere presented a BOLD TTP increase (p = 0.04 and a deterioration of cerebral autoregulation (Mx index increase, p = 0.046. A similar but not significant trend was observed also in the unaffected hemisphere. When the two hemispheres were grouped together, BOLD TTP delay was significantly related to worsening cerebral autoregulation (Mx index increase (Spearman's rho = 0.734; p = 0.01. Conclusions The hemodynamic response function subtending BOLD signal may present a delay in peak latency that arises as patients advance from the acute to the subacute stroke phase. This delay is related to the deterioration of cerebral hemodynamics. These findings suggest that remodeling the fMRI hemodynamic response function in the

  2. Relation between change in blood pressure in acute stroke and risk of early adverse events and poor outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandset, Else C; Murray, Gordon D; Bath, Philip M W;

    2012-01-01

    The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial (SCAST) found no benefits of candesartan in acute stroke. In the present analysis we aim to investigate the effect of change in blood pressure during the first 2 days of stroke on the risk of early adverse events and poor outcome.......The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial (SCAST) found no benefits of candesartan in acute stroke. In the present analysis we aim to investigate the effect of change in blood pressure during the first 2 days of stroke on the risk of early adverse events and poor outcome....

  3. Influence of arterial occlusion on outcome after intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlin, Friedrich; Amiguet, Michael; Vanacker, Peter; Michel, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to assess the interaction between intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) and arterial occlusion on acute cervicocerebral computed tomographic angiography on the outcome of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Patients from the Acute Stroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL) registry with onset-to-door-time ≤4 hours, acute cervicocerebral computed tomographic angiography, a premorbid modified Rankin Scale ≤2, and a National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) >4 were selected. Patients with significant intracranial arterial obstruction (≥50%-99%) and undergoing acute endovascular treatment were excluded. An interaction analysis of IVT and initial arterial occlusion for favorable 3 months outcome (modified Rankin Scale acute ischemic stroke, there was a trend for more favorable outcomes with IVT in the setting of initial arterial occlusion than in the setting of no/minimal obstruction. Before confirmation in randomized controlled studies, this information should not influence thrombolysis decisions, however. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke: the end or just the beginning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokin, Maxim; Khalessi, Alexander A; Mocco, J; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Dumont, Travis M; Hanel, Ricardo A; Lopes, Demetrius K; Fessler, Richard D; Ringer, Andrew J; Bendok, Bernard R; Veznedaroglu, Erol; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Hopkins, L Nelson; Levy, Elad I

    2014-01-01

    Various endovascular intraarterial approaches are available for treating patients with acute ischemic stroke who present with severe neurological deficits. Three recent randomized trials-Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) III, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy (MR RESCUE), and Synthesis Expansion: A Randomized Controlled Trial on Intra-Arterial Versus Intravenous Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke (SYNTHESIS Expansion)-evaluated the efficacy of endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke and, after failing to demonstrate any significant clinical benefit of endovascular therapies, raised concerns and questions in the medical community regarding the future of endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke. In this paper, the authors review the evolution of endovascular treatment strategies for the treatment of acute stroke and provide their interpretation of findings and potential limitations of the three recently published randomized trials. The authors discuss the advantage of stent-retriever technology over earlier endovascular approaches and review the current status and future directions of endovascular acute stroke studies based on lessons learned from previous trials.

  5. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Is a Prognostic Marker in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jie; Huang, Wensi; Chen, Xiaoli; Li, Qian; Cai, Zhengyi; Yu, Tieer; Shao, Bei

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, it is uncertain whether neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is related with functional outcome and recurrent ischemic stroke. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio with stroke severity, functional outcome, and recurrent ischemic stroke after acute ischemic stroke. A total of 280 patients with acute ischemic stroke were included in the study. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio value (3). Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected for all patients. We evaluated the association between neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and (1) stroke severity on admission, (2) functional outcome at 3 months, and (3) recurrent ischemic stroke. Regression analyses were performed, adjusting for confounders. After adjustment for potential confounders, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was associated with an increased risk of stroke severity on admission (odds ratio [OR] 1.364, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.101-1.690, P = .005) and primary unfavorable outcome (OR 1.455, 95% CI 1.083-1.956, P = .013). After a median of 1.13 years (interquartile range.91-1.42) of follow-up, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was associated with recurrent ischemic stroke after adjustment (hazard ratio 1.499, 95% CI 1.161-1.935, P = .002). Our study suggests that neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio is associated with stroke severity on admission, primary unfavorable functional outcome, and recurrent ischemic stroke in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in chronic ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Evelyn M R; Bazzigaluppi, Paolo; Stefanovic, Bojana

    2016-10-05

    Ischaemic stroke is the leading cause of adult disability worldwide. Effective rehabilitation is hindered by uncertainty surrounding the underlying mechanisms that govern long-term ischaemic injury progression. Despite its potential as a sensitive non-invasive in vivo marker of brain function that may aid in the development of new treatments, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has found limited application in the clinical research on chronic stage stroke progression. Stroke affects each of the physiological parameters underlying the BOLD contrast, markedly complicating the interpretation of BOLD fMRI data. This review summarizes current progress on application of BOLD fMRI in the chronic stage of ischaemic injury progression and discusses means by which more information may be gained from such BOLD fMRI measurements. Concomitant measurements of vascular reactivity, neuronal activity and metabolism in preclinical models of stroke are reviewed along with illustrative examples of post-ischaemic evolution in neuronal, glial and vascular function. The realization of the BOLD fMRI potential to propel stroke research is predicated on the carefully designed preclinical research establishing an ischaemia-specific quantitative model of BOLD signal contrast to provide the framework for interpretation of fMRI findings in clinical populations.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Use of magnetic resonance imaging to predict outcome after stroke: a review of experimental and clinical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Tracy D; Wegener, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    Despite promising results in preclinical stroke research, translation of experimental data into clinical therapy has been difficult. One reason is the heterogeneity of the disease with outcomes ranging from complete recovery to continued decline. A successful treatment in one situation may be ineffective, or even harmful, in another. To overcome this, treatment must be tailored according to the individual based on identification of the risk of damage and estimation of potential recovery. Neuroimaging, particularly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could be the tool for a rapid comprehensive assessment in acute stroke with the potential to guide treatment decisions for a better clinical outcome. This review describes current MRI techniques used to characterize stroke in a preclinical research setting, as well as in the clinic. Furthermore, we will discuss current developments and the future potential of neuroimaging for stroke outcome prediction. PMID:20087362

  8. Dysphagia in acute stroke: Correlation with stroke subtype, vascular territory and in-hospital respiratory morbidity and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundar Uma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The study aimed at correlation of post-stroke dysphagia with area and volume of infarct/ bleed, and with subsequent in-hospital respiratory morbidity and mortality. Materials and Methods: 50 patients of acute stroke were serially recruited. Standard Staff swallowing assessment was performed within 24 hours of admission along with pulse oximetry. Ischemic strokes were classified as per OCPS registry. In-hospital respiratory morbidity and mortality, mode of nutrition and disability status at discharge were noted. Results: 21/50 (42% patients had post-stroke dysphagia during their hospital course. Among infarcts, Total Anterior Circulation Infarcts (TACI had 100% incidence of dysphagia, followed by Partial Anterior Circulation Infarcts (PACI-36%, Posterior Circulation infarcts (POCI-33%, and Lacunar infarcts (LACI-18%. 67% of hemorrhages had post-stroke dysphagia. Staff swallowing assessment had a sensitivity and specificity of 75% and 73% respy., for predicting respiratory morbidity. The corresponding figures for Pulse oximetry were 79% and 91%.

  9. The Norwegian tenecteplase stroke trial (NOR-TEST): Randomised controlled trial of tenecteplase vs. alteplase in acute ischaemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alteplase is the only approved thrombolytic agent for acute ischaemic stroke. The overall benefit from alteplase is substantial, but some evidence indicates that alteplase also has negative effects on the ischaemic brain. Tenecteplase may be more effective and less harmfull than alteplase, but large randomised controlled phase 3 trials are lacking. The Norwegian Tenecteplase Stroke Trial (NOR-TEST) aims to compare efficacy and safety of tenecteplase vs. alteplase. Methods/Desig...

  10. Anosognosia in patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Grigoryeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the frequency of anosognosia (a deficit of self-awareness, its anatomic correlates associated with other neuropsychological and neurological disorders in acute hemispheric ischemic stroke (IS.Patients and methods 150 patients (83 men and 67 women; mean age, 63.0±9.3 years with acute hemispheric IS were examined. All the patients underwent neurological, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological (by the procedure described by A.R. Luria examinations. neuropsychological investigations. Anosognosia was diagnosed using the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX and the authors' procedure involving a scale to measure impaired self-rating of motor abilities and a scale to measure impaired self-rating of cognitive abilities in everyday life.Results and discussion. In the acute period of hemispheric IS, reduced self-awareness of motor and cognitive abilities was noted in 14% of the patients and unawareness of only cognitive abilities was recorded in 15%. Patients with anosognosia and cognitive dysfunction (ACD and those with anosognosia and motor dysfunction (AMD had right-sided hemispheric IS more frequently (76% while this was not found in patients with isolated ACD. The development of anosognosia for paralysis and paresis was favored by the large sizes of an ischemic focus that involved a few lobes in the posterior regions of the brain although no lesions were found in the anosognosia-specific anatomical regions. ACD and AMD proved to be associated with unilateral spatial and tactile neglect and obvious regulatory dysfunction. 

  11. Physical therapists' guideline adherence on early mobilization and intensity of practice at dutch acute stroke units: a country-wide survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otterman, N.M.; Wees, P.J. van der; Bernhardt, J.; Kwakkel, G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Clinical practice guidelines for patients with stroke recommend early stroke rehabilitation at acute hospital stroke units. The present study aimed to (1) explore the organization of early stroke rehabilitation; (2) investigate current practice with respect to early

  12. Apoptosis and Acute Brain Ischemia in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radak, Djordje; Katsiki, Niki; Resanovic, Ivana; Jovanovic, Aleksandra; Sudar-Milovanovic, Emina; Zafirovic, Sonja; Mousad, Shaker A; Isenovic, Esma R

    2017-01-01

    Apoptosis may contribute to a significant proportion of neuron death following acute brain ischemia (ABI), but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. Brain ischemia may lead to stroke, which is one of the main causes of long-term morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing countries. Therefore, stroke prevention and treatment is clinically important. There are two important separate areas of the brain during ABI: the ischemic core and the ischemic penumbra. The ischemic core of the brain experiences a sudden reduction of blood flow, just minutes after ischemic attack with irreversible injury and subsequent cell death. On the other hand, apoptosis within the ischemic penumbra may occur after several hours or days, while necrosis starts in the first hours after the onset of ABI in the ischemic core. ABI is characterized by key molecular events that initiate apoptosis in many cells, such as overproduction of free radicals, Ca2+ overload and excitotoxicity. These changes in cellular homeostasis may trigger either necrosis or apoptosis, which often depends on cell type, cell age, and location in the brain. Apoptosis results in DNA fragmentation, degradation of cytoskeletal and nuclear proteins, cross-linking of proteins, formation of apoptotic bodies, expression of ligands for phagocytic cell receptors and finally uptake by phagocytic cells. This review focuses on recent findings based on animal and human studies regarding the apoptotic mechanisms of neuronal death following ABI and the development of potential neuroprotective agents that reduce morbidity. The effects of statins on stroke prevention and treatment as well as on apoptotic mediators are also considered. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Endovascular therapy for acute ischaemic stroke: the Pragmatic Ischaemic Stroke Thrombectomy Evaluation (PISTE) randomised, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Keith W; Ford, Gary A; Messow, Claudia-Martina; Ford, Ian; Murray, Alicia; Clifton, Andrew; Brown, Martin M; Madigan, Jeremy; Lenthall, Rob; Robertson, Fergus; Dixit, Anand; Cloud, Geoffrey C; Wardlaw, Joanna; Freeman, Janet; White, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Pragmatic Ischaemic Thrombectomy Evaluation (PISTE) trial was a multicentre, randomised, controlled clinical trial comparing intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) alone with IVT and adjunctive intra-arterial mechanical thrombectomy (MT) in patients who had acute ischaemic stroke with large artery occlusive anterior circulation stroke confirmed on CT angiography (CTA). Design Eligible patients had IVT started within 4.5 hours of stroke symptom onset. Those randomised to additional MT underwent thrombectomy using any Conformité Européene (CE)-marked device, with target interval times for IVT start to arterial puncture of <90 min. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients achieving independence defined by a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0–2 at day 90. Results Ten UK centres enrolled 65 patients between April 2013 and April 2015. Median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 16 (IQR 13–21). Median stroke onset to IVT start was 120 min. In the intention-to-treat analysis, there was no significant difference in disability-free survival at day 90 with MT (absolute difference 11%, adjusted OR 2.12, 95% CI 0.65 to 6.94, p=0.20). Secondary analyses showed significantly greater likelihood of full neurological recovery (mRS 0–1) at day 90 (OR 7.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 37.2, p=0.010). In the per-protocol population (n=58), the primary and most secondary clinical outcomes significantly favoured MT (absolute difference in mRS 0–2 of 22% and adjusted OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.2 to 19.7, p=0.021). Conclusions The trial did not find a significant difference between treatment groups for the primary end point. However, the effect size was consistent with published data and across primary and secondary end points. Proceeding as fast as possible to MT after CTA confirmation of large artery occlusion on a background of intravenous alteplase is safe, improves excellent clinical outcomes and, in the per-protocol population, improves disability

  14. Technologies for diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitch, J.P.

    1998-02-09

    From October 1994 to June 1997, a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were funded through LDRD to develop and integrate technologies for diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke. The project was summarized in a Science and Technology Review article `Brain Attack` that appeared in June 1997 and again in the Center for Healthcare Technologies Report (UCRL-LR-124761). This article is the best overview of the project, epidemiology of stroke and technical progress. Most of the technical progress has been documented in conference papers and presentations and refereed journal articles. Additional technical publication can be expected as our remaining patent applications progress through the US Patent and Trademark Office. The purpose of this report is to provide an appropriate introduction and organization to the numerous publications so that interested readers can quickly find information. Because there is no documentation for the history of this project, this report provides a summary. It also provides the final status report for the LDRD funding.

  15. Reversed Robin Hood syndrome in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Andrei V; Sharma, Vijay K; Lao, Annabelle Y; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Malkoff, Marc D; Alexandrov, Anne W

    2007-11-01

    Recurrent hemodynamic and neurological changes with persisting arterial occlusions may be attributable to cerebral blood flow steal from ischemic to nonaffected brain. Transcranial Doppler monitoring with voluntary breath-holding and serial NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were obtained in patients with acute middle cerebral artery or internal carotid artery occlusions. The steal phenomenon was detected as transient, spontaneous, or vasodilatory stimuli-induced velocity reductions in affected arteries at the time of velocity increase in normal vessels. The steal magnitude (%) was calculated as [(MFVm-MFVb)/MFVb]x100, where m=minimum and b=baseline mean flow velocities (MFV) during the 15- to 30-second period of a total 30 second of breath-holding. Six patients had steal phenomenon on transcranial Doppler (53 to 73 years, NIHSS 4 to 15 points). Steal magnitude ranged from -15.0% to -43.2%. All patients also had recurrent neurological worsening (>2 points increase in NIHSS scores) at stable blood pressure. In 3 of 5 patients receiving noninvasive ventilatory correction for snoring/sleep apnea, no further velocity or NIHSS score changes were noted. Our descriptive study suggests possibility to detect and quantify the cerebral steal phenomenon in real-time. If the steal is confirmed as the cause of neurological worsening, reversed Robin Hood syndrome may identify a target group for testing blood pressure augmentation and noninvasive ventilatory correction in stroke patients.

  16. Endovascular thrombectomy for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleusa P. Ferri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Few patients benefit from the current standard treatment for acute ischemic stroke (AIS, encouraging the development of new treatments. Objective To systematically review the literature on the efficacy and/or safety of endovascular thrombectomy in AIS compared to standard treatment and to identify ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Method Searches for RCTs were performed in Medline/Embase, and for ongoing trials: International Clinical Trial Registry Platform, Clinicaltrials.gov and ISRCTN registry (to June 15th, 2015. Results From the eight published RCTs, five showed the superiority of treatment that includes thrombectomy compared to standard care alone. From the 13 ongoing RCTs, 3 have been halted, one has not started, one has unknown status and eight will end between 2016 - 2020. Conclusion Evidence favours a combination of the standard therapy with endovascular thrombectomy. The selection criteria however limit the number of people who can benefit. Further studies are needed to prove its cost-effectiveness.

  17. Trends in management and outcome of hospitalized patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack: the National Acute Stroke Israeli (NASIS) registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanne, David; Koton, Silvia; Molshazki, Noa; Goldbourt, Uri; Shohat, Tamar; Tsabari, Rakefet; Grossman, Ehud; Bornstein, Natan M

    2012-08-01

    Improving stroke management, guideline adherence, and outcome is a global priority. Our aim was to examine trends in nationwide use of reperfusion therapy, stroke in-hospital management, and outcome. Data were based on the triennial 2-month period of the National Acute Stroke Israeli registry (February to March 2004, March to April 2007, April to May 2010). The registry includes unselected patients admitted to all hospitals nationwide. There were in total 6279 patients: ischemic stroke, 4452 (70.9%); intracerebral hemorrhage, 485 (7.7%); undetermined stroke, 97 (1.6%); and transient ischemic attacks, 1245 (19.8%). Overall use of reperfusion therapy for acute ischemic stroke increased from 0.4% in 2004% to 5.9% in 2010 (Pischemic events increased from 2.1% in 2004% to 16.6% in 2010 (Pstroke patient volumes. In-hospital mortality after acute ischemic stroke decreased from 7.2% in 2004 to 3.9% in 2010 (Pstroke registry, use of reperfusion therapy, vascular imaging, and statins is steadily increasing, whereas in-hospital mortality is decreasing.

  18. Relation between reperfusion and hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsch, Alexander D. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rijnstate Hospital, Department of Radiology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Niesten, Joris M.; Seeters, Tom van; Schaaf, Irene C. van der; Velthuis, Birgitta K. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Graaf, Yolanda van der [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kappelle, L.J. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Utrecht Stroke Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Collaboration: DUST investigators

    2015-12-15

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) is given in acute ischemic stroke patients to achieve reperfusion. Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is a serious complication of IV-rtPA treatment and related to blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury. It is unclear whether HT occurs secondary to reperfusion in combination with ischemic BBB injury or is caused by the negative effect of IV-rtPA on BBB integrity. The aim of this study was to establish the association between reperfusion and the occurrence of HT. From the DUST study, patients were selected with admission and follow-up non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CT perfusion (CTP) imaging, and a perfusion deficit in the middle cerebral artery territory on admission. Reperfusion was categorized qualitatively as reperfusion or no-reperfusion by visual comparison of admission and follow-up CTP. Occurrence of HT was assessed on follow-up NCCT. The association between reperfusion and occurrence of HT on follow-up was estimated by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) with additional stratification for IV-rtPA treatment. Inclusion criteria were met in 299 patients. There was no significant association between reperfusion and HT (OR 1.2 95%CI 0.5-3.1). In patients treated with IV-rtPA (n = 203), the OR was 1.3 (95%CI 0.4-4.0), and in patients not treated with IV-rtPA (n = 96), the OR was 0.8 (95%CI 0.1-4.5). HT occurred in 14 % of the IV-rtPA patients and in 7 % of patients without IV-rtPA (95%CI of difference -1 to 14 %). Our results suggest that the increased risk of HT after acute ischemic stroke treatment is not dependent on the reperfusion status. (orig.)

  19. Myocardial infarction following recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment for acute ischemic stroke: a dangerous complication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhi-gang; WANG Rui-lan; YU Kang-long

    2012-01-01

    Thrombolysis with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is currently an approved therapy for patients with acute ischemic stroke.Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) immediately following t-PA treatment for stroke is a rare but serious complication.A case of acute myocardial infarction (MI) following IV t-PA infusion for acute stroke was observed.This is a 52-year-old male with a known history of hypertension and chest pain,who subsequently developed MI four hours after IV t-PA was administered for acute ischemic stroke.The disruption of intra-cardiac thrombus and subsequent embolization to the coronary arteries may be an important mechanism.In addition.spontaneous recanalization of infarct-related arteries may be associated with 9reater myocardial salvage and better prognosis.

  20. Elevated troponin in patients with acute stroke – Is it a true heart attack?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George V. Dous

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the prognostic value of a positive troponin in an acute stroke patient is still uncertain, it is a commonly encountered clinical situation given that Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD and cerebrovascular disease (CVD frequently co-exist in the same patient and share similar risk factors. Our objectives in this review are to (1 identify the biologic relationship between acute cerebrovascular stroke and elevated troponin levels, (2 determine the pathophysiologic differences between positive troponin in the setting of acute stroke versus acute myocardial infarction (AMI, and (3 examine whether positive troponin in the setting of acute stroke has prognostic significance. We also will provide an insight analysis of some of the available studies and will provide guidance for a management approach based on the available data according to the current guidelines.

  1. Etiologic Subtypes, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Acute Ischemic Stroke in Young Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnci Şule Özer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Stroke in people aged less than 45 years is less frequent than in older patients, but has major impacts on both the individual and society. The aim of this study was to determine the etiologic subtypes of acute ischemic stroke in the young. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the hospital records of 619 patients who were admitted with acute ischemic stroke between January 2011 and November 2014. Acute ischemic stroke in the young was defined as patients aged 45 years and under. Demographic data, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores at admission and detailed investigations aimed at determining etiologic cause were recorded. Etiologic stroke subtypes were determined using the automated Causative Classification System. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS scores were recorded in the follow-up. Results: There were 32 (5.2% young patients with acute ischemic stroke. The rates of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and coronary artery disease were significantly lower in young patients compared with patients aged more than 45 years (p<0.05. The mean NIHSS score at admission and hospital mortality was significantly lower in patients aged 45 years and under compared with those older than 45 years (p=0.006, p=0.043. Cardioaortic embolism was the most common etiologic stroke subtype in both groups. Other causes were significantly more frequent in the young acute ischemic stroke group compared with the older patients. The median follow-up mRS was significantly lower in patients aged 45 years and under compared with those older than 45 years (p<0.001. Conclusion: Young patients with ischemic stroke have different risk factors, stroke etiology, stroke severity and prognosis compared with patients older than 45 years with the same condition

  2. The Longitudinal Evolution of Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation after Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela S.M. Salinet

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute stroke is known to impair cerebral blood flow (CBF regulation, but the longitudinal changes of these effects have been poorly reported. The main CBF regulatory mechanisms [cerebral autoregulation (CA and neurovascular coupling (NVC] were assessed over 3 months after acute ischaemic stroke. Methods: Recordings of CBF velocity (CBFv, blood pressure (BP, and end-tidal CO2 were performed during 5 min baseline and 1 min passive movement of the elbow. Stroke patients were assessed Results: Fifteen acute stroke subjects underwent all 4 sessions and were compared to 22 control subjects. Baseline recordings revealed a significantly lower CBFv in the affected hemisphere within 72 h after stroke compared to controls (p = 0.02 and a reduction in CA index most marked at 2 weeks (p = 0.009. CBFv rise in response to passive arm movement was decreased bilaterally after stroke, particularly in the affected hemisphere (p Conclusion: The major novel finding of this study was that both CA and NVC regulatory mechanisms deteriorated initially following stroke onset, but returned to control levels during the recovery period. These findings are relevant to guide the timing of interventions to manipulate BP and potentially for the impact of intensive rehabilitation strategies that may precipitate acute physiological perturbations but require further exploration in a larger population that better reflects the heterogeneity of stroke. Further, they will also enable the potential influence of stroke subtype to be investigated.

  3. Real-time ultrasound brain perfusion imaging with analysis of microbubble replenishment in acute MCA stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Rolf; Diels, Anna; Pettenpohl, Johanna; Kablau, Micha; Brade, Joachim; Hennerici, Michael G; Meairs, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    Real-time ultrasound perfusion imaging (rt-UPI) allows visualization of microbubbles flowing through the cerebral microvasculature. We hypothesized that analysis of microbubble tissue replenishment would enable for characterization of perfusion deficits in acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory stroke. Twenty-three patients (mean age 70.2 ± 13.2 years, 9 weeks) were included. Sequential images of bubble replenishment were acquired by transcranial rt-UPI at low mechanical index immediately after microbubble destruction. Different parameters were calculated from regions of interest (ROIs): real-time time to peak (rt-TTP), rise rate (β), and plateau (A) of acoustic intensity, and A × β was used as an index of blood flow. Results were compared with diffusion-weighted and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging. Parameters of rt-UPI had lower values in ROIs of ischemic as compared with normal tissue (β=0.58 ± 0.40 versus 1.25 ± 0.83; P=0.001; A=1.44 ± 1.75 versus 2.63 ± 2.31; P=0.05; A × β=1.14 ± 2.25 versus 2.98 ± 2.70; P=0.01). Real-time time to peak was delayed in ischemic tissue (11.43 ± 2.67 versus 8.88 ± 1.66 seconds; Preplenishment correctly identifies ischemic brain tissue in acute MCA stroke.

  4. Acute hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation: population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Niamh; Daly, Leslie; Murphy, Sean; Smith, Samantha; Hayden, Derek; Ní Chróinín, Danielle; Callaly, Elizabeth; Horgan, Gillian; Sheehan, Orla; Honari, Bahman; Duggan, Joseph; Kyne, Lorraine; Dolan, Eamon; Williams, David; Wiley, Miriam; Kelly, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    No economic data from population-based studies exist on acute or late hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation (AF-stroke). Such data are essential for policy development, service planning, and cost-effectiveness analysis of new therapeutic agents. In a population-based prospective study of incident and recurrent stroke treated in hospital and community settings, we investigated direct (healthcare related) and indirect costs for a 2-year period. Survival, disability, poststroke residence, and healthcare use were determined at 90 days, 1 year, and 2 years. Acute hospital cost was determined using a case-mix approach, and other costs using a bottom-up approach (2007 prices). In 568 patients ascertained in 1 year (2006), the total estimated 2-year cost was $33.84 million. In the overall sample, AF-stroke accounted for 31% (177) of patients, but a higher proportion of costs (40.5% of total and 45% of nursing home costs). On a per-patient basis compared with non-AF-stroke, AF-stroke was associated with higher total (P<0.001) and acute hospital costs (P<0.001), and greater nursing home (P=0.001) and general practitioner (P<0.001) costs among 90-day survivors. After stratification by stroke severity in survivors, AF was associated with 2-fold increase in costs in patients with mild-moderate (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, 0-15) stroke (P<0.001) but not in severe stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≥16; P=0.7). In our population study, AF-stroke was associated with substantially higher total, acute hospital, nursing home, and general practitioner costs per patient. Targeted programs to identify AF and prevent AF-stroke may have significant economic benefits, in addition to health benefits. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Patients' and carers' experiences of gaining access to acute stroke care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Madeleine; Ryan, Tony; Gardiner, Clare; Jones, Amanda

    2013-12-01

    Rapid access to acute stroke care is essential to improve stroke patient outcomes. Policy recommendations for the emergency management of stroke have resulted in significant changes to stroke services, including the introduction of hyper-acute care. To explore patients' and carers' experiences of gaining access to acute stroke care and identify the factors that enabled or prevented stroke from being treated as a medical emergency. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 59 stroke survivors and carers who had received care at seven UK centres. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was undertaken. Themes emerging showed that participants recognised signs and symptoms, they were satisfied with access to emergency medical services (EMS), and they experienced setbacks in the emergency department and delays caused by the lack of availability of specialist services outside normal working hours. Awareness of the importance of time to treatment was generally attributed to the UK stroke awareness campaign, although some felt the message was not sufficiently comprehensive. This awareness led to increased frustration when participants perceived a lack of urgency in the provision of assessment and medical care. The stroke awareness social marketing campaign has contributed to public knowledge and was perceived to assist in reducing prehospital delay. It has also resulted in an enhanced knowledge of the significance of rapid treatment on admission to hospital and raised public expectation of EMS and stroke services to act fast. More research is required to assist organisational change to reduce in-hospital delay.

  6. Endovascular Intervention for Acute Ischemic Stroke in Light of Recent Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Alkhalili

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three recently published trials, MR RESCUE, IMS III, and SYNTHESIS Expansion, evaluating the efficacy and safety of endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke have generated concerns about the future of endovascular approach. However, the tremendous evolution that imaging and endovascular treatment modalities have undergone over the past several years has raised doubts about the validity of these trials. In this paper, we review the role of endovascular treatment strategies in acute ischemic stroke and discuss the limitations and shortcomings that prevent generalization of the findings of recent trials. We also provide our experience in endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  7. Imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke patients: Current neuroradiological perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Dong Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Neuroradiology, Head and Neck Radiology, Thyroid Radiology Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Chul Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung Yeop [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Advances in imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke now provide crucial information such as infarct core, ischemic penumbra/degree of collaterals, vessel occlusion, and thrombus that helps in the selection of the best candidates for reperfusion therapy. It also predicts thrombolytic efficacy and benefit or potential hazards from therapy. Thus, radiologists should be familiar with various imaging studies for patients with acute ischemic stroke and the applicability to clinical trials. This helps radiologists to obtain optimal rapid imaging as well as its accurate interpretation. This review is focused on imaging studies for acute ischemic stroke, including their roles in recent clinical trials and some guidelines to optimal interpretation.

  8. Clinical application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke rehabilitation☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joonho; Yang, EunJoo; Cho, KyeHee; Barcenas, Carmelo L; Kim, Woo Jin; Min, Yusun; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Proper stimulation to affected cerebral hemisphere would promote the functional recovery of patients with stroke. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on cortical excitability can be can be altered by the stimulation frequency, intensity and duration. There has been no consistent recognition regarding the best stimulation frequency and intensity. This study reviews the intervention effects of repetitive transcranial stimulation on motor impairment, dysphagia, visuospatial neglect and aphasia, and summarizes the stimulation frequency, intensity and area for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to yield the best therapeutic effects. PMID:25745455

  9. Clinical application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke rehabilitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joonho Shin; EunJoo Yang; KyeHee Cho; Carmelo L Barcenas; Woo Jin Kim; Yusun Min; Nam-Jong Paik

    2012-01-01

    Proper stimulation to affected cerebral hemisphere would promote the functional recovery of patients with stroke. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on cortical excitability can be can be altered by the stimulation frequency, intensity and duration. There has been no consistent recognition regarding the best stimulation frequency and intensity. This study reviews the intervention effects of repetitive transcranial stimulation on motor impairment, dysphagia, visuospatial neglect and aphasia, and summarizes the stimulation frequency, intensity and area for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to yield the best therapeutic effects.

  10. Resting interhemispheric functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity predicts performance after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Alex R; Astafiev, Serguei V; Lang, Catherine E; Connor, Lisa T; Rengachary, Jennifer; Strube, Michael J; Pope, Daniel L W; Shulman, Gordon L; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2010-03-01

    Focal brain lesions can have important remote effects on the function of distant brain regions. The resulting network dysfunction may contribute significantly to behavioral deficits observed after stroke. This study investigates the behavioral significance of changes in the coherence of spontaneous activity in distributed networks after stroke by measuring resting state functional connectivity (FC) using functional magnetic resonance imaging. In acute stroke patients, we measured FC in a dorsal attention network and an arm somatomotor network, and determined the correlation of FC with performance obtained in a separate session on tests of attention and motor function. In particular, we compared the behavioral correlation with intrahemispheric FC to the behavioral correlation with interhemispheric FC. In the attention network, disruption of interhemispheric FC was significantly correlated with abnormal detection of visual stimuli (Pearson r with field effect = -0.624, p = 0.002). In the somatomotor network, disruption of interhemispheric FC was significantly correlated with upper extremity impairment (Pearson r with contralesional Action Research Arm Test = 0.527, p = 0.036). In contrast, intrahemispheric FC within the normal or damaged hemispheres was not correlated with performance in either network. Quantitative lesion analysis demonstrated that our results could not be explained by structural damage alone. These results suggest that lesions cause state changes in the spontaneous functional architecture of the brain, and constrain behavioral output. Clinically, these results validate using FC for assessing the health of brain networks, with implications for prognosis and recovery from stroke, and underscore the importance of interhemispheric interactions.

  11. Acute ischaemic stroke | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nguage Imatinib Treatment in Acute Ischemic Stroke A.4.1Sponsor's protocol code numberIstrokepilot A.7Trial ...Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute....g. in diabetes (vision disturbances may indicate haemorrhagic retinopathy) or other haemorrhagic ophthalmic conditions - Acute

  12. Soluble CXCL16 and long-term outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ueland, T; Smedbakken, L M; Hallén, J

    2012-01-01

    CXCL16 is a chemokine involved in atherosclerosis by promoting inflammation, lipid accumulation and matrix degradation. The level of circulating CXCL16 has been proposed as a predictor of long-term mortality in acute coronary syndromes. We studied plasma CXCL16 in acute ischemic stroke and examined...... associations with long-term mortality following the acute event....

  13. Hospitalized Infection as a Trigger for Acute Ischemic Stroke: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Logan T; Alonso, Alvaro; Pankow, James S; Folsom, Aaron R; Rosamond, Wayne D; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi

    2016-06-01

    Acute triggers for ischemic stroke, which may include infection, are understudied, as is whether background cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk modifies such triggering. We hypothesized that infection increases acute stroke risk, especially among those with low CVD risk. Hospitalized strokes and infections were identified in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort. A case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression were used to compare hospitalized infections among patients with stroke (14, 30, 42, and 90 days before stroke) with corresponding control periods 1 year and 2 years before stroke. Background CVD risk was assessed at both visit 1 and the visit most proximal to stroke, with risk dichotomized at the median. A total of 1008 adjudicated incident ischemic strokes were included. Compared with control periods, hospitalized infection was more common within 2 weeks before stroke (14-day odds ratio [OR], 7.7; 95% CI, 2.1-27.3); the strength of association declined with increasing time in the exposure window before stroke (30-day OR, 5.7 [95% CI, 2.3-14.3]; 42-day OR, 4.5 [95% CI, 2.0-10.2]; and 90-day OR, 3.6 [95% CI, 2.1-6.5]). Stroke risk was higher among those with low compared with high CVD risk, with this interaction reaching statistical significance for some exposure periods. These results support the hypothesis that hospitalized infection is a trigger of ischemic stroke and may explain some cryptogenic strokes. Infection control efforts may prevent strokes. CVD preventive therapies may prevent strokes if used in the peri-infection period, but clinical trials are needed. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Normobaric oxygen therapy in acute ischemic stroke: A pilot study in Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Clinical and radiological assessment of effects of normobaric high-flow oxygen therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS. Materials and Methods: Patients with anterior circulation ischemic strokes presenting within 12 h of onset, ineligible for intravenous thrombolysis, an National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score of >4, a mean transit time (MTT lesion larger than diffusion-weighted image (DWI (perfusiondiffusion mismatch, and an evidence of cortical hypoperfusion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were included into the trial. Active chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, requirement of >3/L min oxygen delivery to maintain SaO2 > 95%, rapidly improving neurological deficits, pregnancy, contraindications to MRI, or unstable medical conditions were excluded. The experimental group received humidified oxygen at flow rates of 10 L/min for 12 h. The NIHSS, modified Rankin Score (mRS, Barthel Index (BI were measured at 0, 1, 7 day of admission and at 3 months follow-up. MRI with DWI/PWI was performed at admission, 24 h later and at 3 months follow-up. Results: Of 40 patients (mean age = 55.8 years ± 13.2 (range, 26-82, 20 patients were randomized to normobaric oxygen (NBO. The mean NIHSS in NBO and control groups were 14.25 and 12.7 at admission which decreased to 11.6 and 9.5 on the seventh day, and 9.4 and 9.05 at 3 months, respectively. The mean mRS (3.7/3.7 and BI (58.2/53.9 in NBO and control groups improved to 2/2.2 and 73.05/73.8 at the end of 3 months, respectively. Conclusions: NBO did not improve the clinical scores of stroke outcome in Indian patients with AIS.

  15. Stenting in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke: literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar A Samaniego

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recanalization of acute large artery occlusions is a strong predictor of good outcome. The development of thrombectomy devices resulted in a significant improvement in recanalization rates compared to thrombolytics alone. However, clinical trials and registries with these thrombectomy devices in acute ischemic stroke (AIS have shown recanalization rates in the range of 40-81%. The last decade has seen the development of nickel titanium self-expandable stents (SES. These stents, in contrast to balloon-mounted stents, allow better navigability and deployment in tortuous vessels and therefore are optimal for the cerebral circulation. SES were initially used for stent-assisted coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms and for treatment of intracranial stenosis. However, a few authors have recently reported feasibility of deployment of SES in AIS. The use of these devices yielded higher recanalization rates compared to traditional thrombectomy devices. Encouraged by these results, retrievable SES systems have been recently used in AIS. These devices offer the advantage of resheathing and retrieving of the stent even after full deployment. Some of these stents can also be detached in case permanent stent placement is needed. Retrievable SES are being used in Europe and currently tested in clinical trials in the United States. We review the recent literature in the use of stents for the treatment of AIS secondary to large vessel occlusion.

  16. Functional magnetic resonance imaging as experienced by stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadidi, Niloufar Niakosari; Cullen, Kathryn R; Hall, Leah M J; Lindquist, Ruth; Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Mathews, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a noninvasive technique that measures brain activation, has been increasingly used in the past decade, particularly among older adults. Use of fMRI in research with stroke survivors in recent years has substantially contributed to researchers' understanding of the pathophysiology of stroke sequelae. However, despite the increasing popularity and use of fMRI, little is known about the patient experience of fMRI under research circumstances. The current research brief reports the findings of a pilot study undertaken to understand stroke survivors' experiences with fMRI under research circumstances. Nine ischemic stroke patients underwent two MRI sessions, each of which lasted 1.5 hours and included several fMRI tasks. Patients were asked about their experiences and to share any advice. All participants reported that they did not feel claustrophobic; in addition, the importance of educating participants about fMRI was a universal theme that emerged. Knowledge of participant experiences may help with enrollment strategies for fMRI studies and improve research outcomes related to the fMRI experience. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Preliminary findings of the effects of autonomic dysfunction on functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Li; Leung, Howan; Chen, Xiang Yan; Han, Jing Hao; Leung, Thomas; Soo, Yannie; Wong, Eddie; Chan, Anne; Lau, Alexander; Wong, Ka Sing

    2012-05-01

    Impaired autonomic function is common in the acute poststroke phase but little is known about its effects on functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke. This study sought to investigate the impact of autonomic dysfunction by Ewing's classification on functional outcome 2 months after acute ischemic stroke. 34 consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients within 7 days after onset were enrolled. On admission, autonomic function was assessed by Ewing's battery tests. Stroke severity was assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), autonomy in activities of daily living by the Barthel Index (BI), and global disability by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). BI and mRS were also evaluated 2 months after ischemic stroke onset. On admission, eight patients were diagnosed as minor autonomic dysfunction and 26 patients as relatively severe autonomic dysfunction. The prevalence of relatively severe autonomic dysfunction in ischemic stroke patients was 76.5%. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the minor and severe autonomic dysfunction groups. 2 months after stroke onset, the mean BI score of patients with minor autonomic dysfunction and severe autonomic dysfunction increased from 76.3±15.3 on admission to 95.0±7.1, 66.5±15.2 on admission to 74.8±15.9 respectively. The mean BI score after 2-month stroke onset and the change in BI from admission to 2-month outcome (delta BI) in patients with severe autonomic dysfunction were lower than those in patients with minor autonomic dysfunction (all Pacute stroke patients. Relatively severe autonomic dysfunction is related to an unfavorable functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Determinants of fatigue after first-ever ischemic stroke during acute phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Shan Wang

    Full Text Available Fatigue after stroke is common and has a negative impact on rehabilitation and survival. However, its pathogenesis and contributing factors remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing the occurrence of fatigue after first-ever ischemic stroke in acute phase.We examined 265 consecutive patients with first-ever ischemic stroke during acute phase (within 2 weeks in two tertiary stroke care hospitals in Henan, China. We documented patients' demographic and clinical characteristics through face-to-face interviews using structured questionnaires and reviews of medical records. Post-stroke fatigue was defined as a score of ≥4 using the Fatigue Severity Scale. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine post-stroke fatigue in relation to socio-demographic, lifestyle, clinical characteristics and family function.About 40% first-ever ischemic stroke patients experienced post-stroke fatigue in acute phase. Post-stroke fatigue was associated with lack of exercise before stroke (adjusted odds ratio 4.01, 95% CI 1.95-8.24, family dysfunction (2.63, 1.20-5.80, depression (2.39, 1.02-5.58, the presence of pre-stroke fatigue (4.89, 2.13-11.21, use of sedative medications (4.14, 1.58-10.88, coronary heart disease (3.38, 1.46-7.79 and more severe Modified Rankin Scale (2.55, 1.65-3.95.The causes of post-stroke fatigue are multifaceted. More physical exercise, improving family function, reducing depression and appropriate use of sedative medications may be helpful in preventing post-stroke fatigue.

  19. Effects of blood pressure-lowering treatment in different subtypes of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Jusufovic, Mirza; Sandset, Per Morten; Bath, Philip M W; Berge, Eivind

    2015-03-01

    The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial (SCAST) found no benefits of blood pressure-lowering treatment with candesartan in acute stroke. We have investigated whether the effect of treatment is different in different subtypes of ischemic stroke. SCAST was a randomized- and placebo-controlled trial of candesartan in 2029 patients presenting within 30 hours of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg. Ischemic stroke subtype was categorized by the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification. There were 2 primary effect variables: the composite vascular end point of vascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke during the first 6 months and functional outcome at 6 months. A total of 1733 patients with ischemic stroke were included: total anterior circulation infarcts in 129, partial anterior in 850, posterior in 236, and lacunar in 510 patients. For functional outcome there was a significant trend toward a better effect of candesartan in patients with larger infarcts (total anterior circulation or partial anterior circulation) than in patients with smaller infarcts (lacunar infarction; P=0.02). For the composite vascular end point, there were no differences in treatment effect. The results suggest that the effect of blood pressure-lowering treatment with candesartan may differ according to different types of acute ischemic stroke, but this needs to be confirmed in future trials. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00120003. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Discontinuation of oral anticoagulation preceding acute ischemic stroke--prevalence and outcomes: Comprehensive chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanga, Subba R; Satti, Sudhakar R; Williams, James; Weintraub, William; Doorey, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Oral anticoagulants (OAC) are the therapy of choice to prevent thromboembolism in patients at risk. Discontinuation of OAC prior to elective medical and surgical procedures may reduce the risk of bleeding, but may expose patients to increased risk of thromboembolism and ischemic stroke. The current public health burden of ischemic strokes associated with OAC discontinuation is unknown. We aimed to study the prevalence OAC discontinuation in patients who presented with acute ischemic stroke as well as the outcomes of these strokes. Retrospective cross-sectional study by intensive chart review of all acute ischemic stroke patients over 6 months in a large tertiary care community hospital. A total of 431 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted during study period, of which 11 (2.6%) had OAC discontinuation within 120 days prior to the index admission. Several strokes occurred after relatively brief discontinuations. The patient group with discontinuation was older, had higher comorbidities and also had a clinically significant stroke and resulting higher mortality and morbidity. About 2.6% or 1 in every 38 of all ischemic stokes occurred after OAC discontinuation. Strokes occurring after OAC discontinuation also have higher mortality and morbidity. Our data suggest that any planned discontinuation of OAC, however brief, should be carefully considered.

  1. History, Evolution, and Importance of Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holodinsky, Jessalyn K; Yu, Amy Y X; Assis, Zarina A; Al Sultan, Abdulaziz S; Menon, Bijoy K; Demchuk, Andrew M; Goyal, Mayank; Hill, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    More than 800,000 people in North America suffer a stroke each year, with ischemic stroke making up the majority of these cases. The outcomes of ischemic stroke range from complete functional and cognitive recovery to severe disability and death; outcome is strongly associated with timely reperfusion treatment. Historically, ischemic stroke has been treated with intravenous thrombolytic agents with moderate success. However, five recently published positive trials have established the efficacy of endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we will discuss the history of stroke treatments moving from various intravenous thrombolytic drugs to intra-arterial thrombolysis, early mechanical thrombectomy devices, and finally modern endovascular devices. Early endovascular therapy failures, recent successes, and implications for current ischemic stroke management and future research directions are discussed.

  2. Acute hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation: population-based study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Niamh

    2014-10-30

    No economic data from population-based studies exist on acute or late hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation (AF-stroke). Such data are essential for policy development, service planning, and cost-effectiveness analysis of new therapeutic agents.

  3. ACUTE BEHAVORIAL EFFECTS FROM EXPOSURE TO TWO-STROKE ENGINE EXHAUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benefits of changing from two-stroke to four-stroke engines (and other remedial requirements) can be evaluated (monetized) from the standpoint of acute behavioral effects of human exposure to exhaust from these engines. The monetization process depends upon estimates of the magn...

  4. Cerebral blood flow velocity changes during upright positioning in bed after acute stroke : An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aries, Marcel J; Elting, Jan Willem; Stewart, Roy; De Keyser, Jacques; Kremer, Berry; Vroomen, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: National guidelines recommend mobilisation in bed as early as possible after acute stroke. Little is known about the influence of upright positioning on real-time cerebral flow variables in patients with stroke. We aimed to assess whether cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) changes signi

  5. Predictive value of upper-limb accelerometry in acute stroke with hemiparesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebruers, Nick; Truijen, Steven; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have investigated how well early activity measurements by accelerometers predict recovery after stroke. First, we assessed the predictive value of accelerometer-based measurements of upper-limb activity in patients with acute stroke with a hemiplegic arm. Second, we established the

  6. Thrombolysis with alteplase 3 to 4.5 hours after acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hacke, Werner; Kaste, Markku; Bluhmki, Erich

    2008-01-01

    and 4.5 hours after the onset of a stroke. METHODS: After exclusion of patients with a brain hemorrhage or major infarction, as detected on a computed tomographic scan, we randomly assigned patients with acute ischemic stroke in a 1:1 double-blind fashion to receive treatment with intravenous alteplase...

  7. Palliative care in the acute phase after a severe stroke: experiences of relatives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, M.E. de; Depla, M.; Woijtkwiak, J.; Francke, A.; Visser, M.C.; Widdershoven, G.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Palliative care has potentially a lot to offer to patients in the acute phase after a severe stroke, but its deliberation and decisions towards palliative care are limited in this phase. This study aims at providing insight into the experiences of relatives of stroke patients with the care

  8. Occurrence and predictors of persistent impaired glucose tolerance after acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Fonville (Susanne); H.M. den Hertog (Heleen); A.A.M. Zandbergen (Adrienne); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); H.F. Lingsma (Hester)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Impaired glucose tolerance is often present in patients with a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or ischemic stroke and doubles the risk of recurrent stroke. This impaired glucose tolerance can be transient, reflecting an acute stress response, or persistent, representing undiag

  9. Spontaneous swallowing frequency has potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael F

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases, swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute [SPM]) were compared with stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with versus without clinically significant dysphagia. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM, which was compared with a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was used to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis yielded a threshold of SPM≤0.40 that identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5- to 10-minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel.

  10. Spontaneous Swallowing Frequency [Has Potential to] Identify Dysphagia in Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. Methods In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute: SPM) were compared to stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with vs. without clinically significant dysphagia. ROC analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM which was compared to a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was employed to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. Results SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. ROC analysis yielded a threshold of SPM ≤ 0.40 which identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5 to 10 minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Conclusions Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel. PMID:24149008

  11. Lipid profile, statin use, and outcome after intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, M; Koch, M W; Koopman, K; Vroomen, P C; Luijckx, G J; De Keyser, J

    BACKGROUND: Low cholesterol levels have been associated with an increased risk of haemorrhagic stroke. This study investigated whether lipid levels or prior statin use influence outcome in patients with acute ischaemic stroke treated with IV thrombolysis. METHODS: The relation between admission

  12. New standardized nursing cooperation workflow to reduce stroke thrombolysis delays in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Y

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yan Zhou,1 Zhuojun Xu,2 Jiali Liao,1 Fangming Feng,1 Lai Men,3 Li Xu,2 Yanan He,2 Gang Li2 1Nursing Department, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2Department of Neurology, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Paddington Dental Practice, London, UK Objective: We assessed the effectiveness of a new standardized nursing cooperation workflow in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS to reduce stroke thrombolysis delays.Patients and methods: AIS patients receiving conventional thrombolysis treatment from March to September 2015 were included in the control group, referred to as T0. The intervention group, referred to as T1 group, consisted of AIS patients receiving a new standardized nursing cooperation workflow for intravenous thrombolysis (IVT at the emergency department of Shanghai East Hospital (Shanghai, People’s Republic of China from October 2015 to March 2016. Information was collected on the following therapeutic techniques used: application or not of thrombolysis, computed tomography (CT time, and door-to-needle (DTN time. A nursing coordinator who helped patients fulfill the medical examinations and diagnosis was appointed to T1 group. In addition, a nurse was sent immediately from the stroke unit to the emergency department to aid the thrombolysis treatment.Results: The average value of the door-to-CT initiation time was 38.67±5.21 min in the T0 group, whereas it was 14.39±4.35 min in the T1 group; the average values of CT completion-to-needle time were 55.06±4.82 and 30.26±3.66 min; the average values of DTN time were 100.43±6.05 and 55.68±3.62 min, respectively; thrombolysis time was improved from 12.8% (88/689 in the T0 group to 32.5% (231/712 in the T1 group (all P<0.01. In addition, the new standardized nursing cooperation workflow decreased the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores at 24 h (P<0

  13. Somatosensory evoked magnetic fields in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclin, E L; Rose, D F; Knight, J E; Orrison, W W; Davis, L E

    1994-12-01

    We used magnetoencephalography to evaluate areas of sensory cortex in patients with ischemic strokes involving the somatomotor system. We measured somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using a 7-channel neuromagnetometer and estimated the location of cortical responses to median nerve stimulation in 5 patients with cortical or subcortical strokes involving the somatomotor system. All patients underwent quantitative neurological examinations and a high resolution volumetric magnetic resonance imaging. The estimated current dipoles were localized onto the patient's own MRI scan in all patients with measurable responses. The location of the estimated dipole was always in non-infarcted tissue in the anatomical region of the somatosensory cortex. In 1 patient the somatosensory dipole localized to a peninsula of cortex flanked by infarcted tissue. Single photon emission computed tomography found the localized area of cortex to have significant blood flow. The estimated current dipole strengths of somatosensory evoked fields from median nerve stimulation correlated significantly (r = 0.95, P graphesthesia). The combination of evoked magnetic field recording and magnetic resonance imaging is a promising non-invasive technology for studying brain function in patients with cerebrovascular disease.

  14. Design and Rationale of the RELAXED (Recurrent Embolism Lessened by rivaroxaban, an Anti-Xa agent, of Early Dosing for acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack with atrial fibrillation) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasaka, Masahiro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Toyoda, Kazunori; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Nagao, Takehiko; Mori, Etsuro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    2016-06-01

    In the acute phase of cardioembolic stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), the recurrence rate is high. Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants may be appropriate for prevention of early recurrence because they have a much lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke than warfarin. RELAXED (Recurrent Embolism Lessened by rivaroxaban, an Anti-Xa agent, of Early Dosing for acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack with atrial fibrillation) study is an observational study designed to investigate the optimal timing to start administration of rivaroxaban for prevention of recurrence in NVAF patients in the acute phase of cardioembolic stroke (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02129920 and UMIN-clinical trials registry: UMIN000013932). It will evaluate the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban with regard to infarct size, timing of initiation of rivaroxaban medication, and other patient characteristics. A total of 2000 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke in the territory of the middle cerebral artery and NVAF will be enrolled in 100 institutes throughout Japan, and they will receive rivaroxaban within 30 days of the index stroke for secondary prevention of stroke. The infarct size within 48 hours after stroke onset will be measured by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The primary efficacy endpoint is recurrent ischemic stroke, and the primary safety endpoint is major bleeding during the observational period of 3 months after stroke onset. The optimal timing to start treatment with rivaroxaban during the acute stage of ischemic stroke will be determined by analysis of the correlation between primary endpoints and the size of cerebral infarct. The RELAXED observational registry study will elucidate the optimal timing of the initiation of rivaroxaban in acute cardioembolic stroke associated with NVAF. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development and Validation of Intracranial Thrombus Segmentation on CT Angiography in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, E.M.M.; Marquering, H.A.; Berkhemer, O.A.; Van Zwam, W.H.; Van der Lugt, A.; Majoie, C.B.; Niessen, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Thrombus characterization is increasingly considered important in predicting treatment success for patients with acute ischemic stroke. The lack of intensity contrast between thrombus and surrounding tissue in CT images makes manual delineation a difficult and time consuming

  16. Development and validation of intracranial thrombus segmentation on CT angiography in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, E.M.; Marquering, H.A.; Berkhemer, O.A.; Zwam, W.H. van; Lugt, A. van der; Majoie, C.B.; Niessen, W.J.; Dijk, E.J. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Thrombus characterization is increasingly considered important in predicting treatment success for patients with acute ischemic stroke. The lack of intensity contrast between thrombus and surrounding tissue in CT images makes manual delineation a difficult and time consuming

  17. Variables That Best Differentiate In-Patient Acute Stroke from Stroke-Mimics with Acute Neurological Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Natteru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Strokes and stroke-mimics have been extensively studied in the emergency department setting. Although in-hospital strokes are less studied in comparison to strokes in the emergency department, they are a source of significant direct and indirect costs. Differentiating in-hospital strokes from stroke-mimics is important. Thus, our study aimed to identify variables that can differentiate in-hospital strokes from stroke-mimics. Methods. We present here a retrospective analysis of 93 patients over a one-year period (2009 to 2010, who were evaluated for a concern of in-hospital strokes. Results. About two-thirds (57 of these patients were determined to have a stroke, and the remaining (36 were stroke-mimics. Patients with in-hospital strokes were more likely to be obese (p=0.03, have been admitted to the cardiology service (p=0.01, have atrial fibrillation (p=0.03, have a weak hand or hemiparesis (p=0.03, and have a prior history of stroke (p=0.05, whereas, when the consults were called for “altered mental status” but no other deficits (p<0.0001, it is likely a stroke-mimic. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that in-hospital strokes are a common occurrence, and knowing the variables can aid in their timely diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Spontaneous swallow frequency compared with clinical screening in the identification of dysphagia in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare spontaneous swallow frequency analysis (SFA) with clinical screening protocols for identification of dysphagia in acute stroke. In all, 62 patients with acute stroke were evaluated for spontaneous swallow frequency rates using a validated acoustic analysis technique. Independent of SFA, these same patients received a routine nurse-administered clinical dysphagia screening as part of standard stroke care. Both screening tools were compared against a validated clinical assessment of dysphagia for acute stroke. In addition, psychometric properties of SFA were compared against published, validated clinical screening protocols. Spontaneous SFA differentiates patients with versus without dysphagia after acute stroke. Using a previously identified cut point based on swallows per minute, spontaneous SFA demonstrated superior ability to identify dysphagia cases compared with a nurse-administered clinical screening tool. In addition, spontaneous SFA demonstrated equal or superior psychometric properties to 4 validated, published clinical dysphagia screening tools. Spontaneous SFA has high potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke with psychometric properties equal or superior to clinical screening protocols. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. STUDY OF RENAL FUNCTION TESTS IN PATIEN TS OF ACUTE HAEMORRHAGIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Vardhan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study renal function tests in patients with acute haemorrhagic stroke and to find association of abnormal renal function with adverse outcome in patients with acute haemorrhagic stroke . MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted at Darbhanga Medical College & Hospital , Laheriasarai , Darbhanga during the period from January 2012 to September 2013 . This was an observational study . A total of 100 patients presenting with acute haemorrhagic stroke admitted to the hospital or reporting in OPD/Emergency for stroke were included in this study after having taken written informed consent . Cases were selected by random sampling . OBSERVATION: Out of 100 patients with acute haemorrhagic stroke 92 patients had intracerebral haemorrhage and 8 patie nts had subarachnoid haemorrhage . Patients were divided into two groups on the basis of estimated glomerular filtration rate ( eGFR . Group A ( eGFR > 60 ml/min/1 . 73 m 2 BSA comprised of 71% of total stroke patients and group B ( eGFR 98umol/L and 15 ( 68 . 60% patients had blood urea >6 . 8mmol/L . CONCLUSION: This study clearly indicated that renal dysfunction as evidenced by ( a eGFR 98umol/L & c Blood urea >6 . 8mmol/L , are not only an important risk factor for acute haemorrhagic stroke but are also an independent predictor of mortality within 30 days of presentation .

  20. Intrinsic factors influencing help-seeking behaviour in an acute stroke situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zock, Elles; Kerkhoff, Henk; Kleyweg, Ruud Peter; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-09-01

    The proportion of stroke patients eligible for intravenous or intra-arterial treatment is still limited because many patients do not seek medical help immediately after stroke onset. The aim of our study was to explore which intrinsic factors and considerations influence help-seeking behaviour of relatively healthy participants, confronted with stroke situations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 non-stroke participants aged 50 years or older. We presented 5 clinical stroke situations as if experienced by the participants themselves. Recognition and interpretation of symptoms were evaluated and various factors influencing help-seeking behaviour were explored in-depth. We used the thematic synthesis method for data analysis. Five themes influencing help-seeking behaviour in a stroke situation were identified: influence of knowledge, views about seriousness, ideas about illness and health, attitudes towards others and beliefs about the emergency medical system. A correct recognition of stroke symptoms or a correct interpretation of the stroke situations did not automatically result in seeking medical help. Interestingly, similar factors could lead to different types of actions between participants. Many intrinsic, as well as social and environmental factors are of influence on help-seeking behaviour in an acute stroke situation. All these factors seem to play a complex role in help-seeking behaviour with considerable inter-individual variations. Accomplishing more patients eligible for acute stroke treatment, future research should focus on better understanding of all factors at various levels grounded in a theory of help-seeking behaviour.

  1. Quantitative Measurement of Physical Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to quantitatively measure and describe the amount and pattern of physical activity in patients within the first week after acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack using accelerometers. METHODS: A total of 100 patients with acute is...... ischemic stroke. The method offers a low cost and noninvasive tool for future clinical interventional physiotherapeutic and early mobilization studies. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01560520....

  2. Mechanical thrombectomy with snare in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Alejandro; Mayol, Antonio [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Seville (Spain); Martinez, Eva; Gonzalez-Marcos, Jose R.; Gil-Peralta, Alberto [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Department of Neurology, Seville (Spain)

    2007-04-15

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of thrombus extraction using a microsnare in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). This was a prospective, observational, cohort study in which consecutive patients with AIS (<6 hours of ischemia for anterior circulation and <24 hours for posterior circulation) who had been previously excluded from intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) thrombolysis were included and followed-up for 3 months. Mechanical embolectomy with a microsnare of 2-4 mm was undertaken as the first treatment. Low-dose intraarterial thrombolysis or angioplasty was used if needed. TIMI grade and modified Rankin stroke scale (mRSS) score were used to evaluate vessel recanalization and clinical efficacy, respectively. Nine patients (mean age 55 years, range 17-69 years) were included. Their basal mean NIHSS score was 16 (range 12-24). In seven out of the nine patients (77.8%) the clot was removed, giving a TIMI grade of 3 in four patients and TIMI grade 2 in three patients. Occlusion sites were: middle cerebral artery (four), basilar artery (two) and anterior cerebral artery plus middle cerebral artery (one). The mean time for recanalization from the start of the procedure was 50 min (range 50-75 min). At 3 months, the mRSS score was 0 in two patients and 3-4 in three patients (two patients died). According to our results, the microsnare is a safe procedure for mechanical thrombectomy with a good recanalization rate. Further studies are required to determine the role of the microsnare in the treatment of AIS. (orig.)

  3. Does spasticity interfere with functional recovery after stroke? A novel approach to understand, measure and treat spasticity after acute stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malhotra, S.; Malhotra, Shweta

    2013-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis is on identifying if spasticity on the wrist after an acute stroke interferes with functional recovery of the upper limb.This randomized study demonstrated that sNMES treatment along with standardized upper limb therapy improves muscle strength for wrist extension

  4. Does spasticity interfere with functional recovery after stroke? A novel approach to understand, measure and treat spasticity after acute stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malhotra, Shweta

    2013-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis is on identifying if spasticity on the wrist after an acute stroke interferes with functional recovery of the upper limb. In this thesis, it is proven that not only is spasticity inconsistently defined but also the measures of spasticity are incongruent to the defin

  5. Day-by-Day Blood Pressure Variability and Functional Outcome After Acute Ischemic Stroke: Fukuoka Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Kenji; Kai, Hisashi; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Hata, Jun; Ago, Tetsuro; Nakane, Hiroshi; Imaizumi, Tsutomu; Kitazono, Takanari

    2015-07-01

    The relationship between blood pressure (BP) variability and functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke remains unclear. This study aimed to elucidate whether in-hospital day-by-day BP variability is associated with functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke. Using the Fukuoka Stroke Registry, we included 2566 patients with a first-ever ischemic stroke who had been functionally independent before the onset and were hospitalized within 24 hours. BP was measured daily, and its variability was assessed by SD, coefficients of variance, and variations independent of mean. Poor functional outcome was assessed by modified Rankin Scale scores ≥3 at 3 months. After adjustment for multiple confounding factors including age, sex, risk factors, stroke features, baseline severity, thrombolytic therapy, antihypertensive agents, and mean BP, day-by-day BP variability during the subacute stage (4-10 days after onset) was independently associated with a poor functional outcome (multivariable-adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence interval] in the top versus bottom quartile of systolic BP variability, 1.51 [1.09-2.08] for SD; 1.63 [1.20-2.22] for coefficients of variance; 1.64 [1.21-2.24] for variations independent of mean). Similar trends were also observed for diastolic BP variability. These trends were unchanged in patients who were not treated with antihypertensive drugs. In contrast, no association was found between indices of BP variability during the acute stage and functional outcome after adjusting for potential confounders. These data suggest that intraindividual day-by-day BP variability during the subacute stage is associated with the 3-month functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Transient ischemic attack and acute ischemic stroke: associations with retinal microvascular signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie Jin; Baker, Michelle L; Hand, Peter J; Hankey, Graeme J; Lindley, Richard I; Rochtchina, Elena; Wong, Tien Y; Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Small vessel disease plays a role in cerebral events. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and patterns of retinal microvascular signs (surrogates for cerebral small vessel disease) among patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or acute stroke and population control subjects. Patients with TIA or acute stroke aged ≥49 years admitted to hospitals in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia, were recruited to the Multi-Centre Retina and Stroke Study (n=693, 2005 to 2007). Control subjects were Blue Mountains Eye Study participants aged ≥49 years without TIAs or stroke (n=3384, 1992 to 1994, west of Sydney). TIA, ischemic stroke, or primary intracerebral hemorrhage was classified using standardized neurological assessments, including neuroimaging. Retinal microvascular signs (retinopathy, focal arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous nicking, enhanced arteriolar light reflex) were assessed from retinal photographs masked to clinical information. Patients with TIA or acute stroke were older than control subjects and more likely to have stroke risk factors. After adjustment for study site and known risk factors, all retinal microvascular signs were more common in patients with TIA or acute stroke than in control subjects (OR, 1.9 to 8.7; Pischemic stroke had similar prevalences of nondiabetic retinopathy (26.9% versus 29.5%; OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.5 to 1.6), diabetic retinopathy (55.5% versus 50.0%; OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.4 to 3.6), focal arteriolar narrowing (15.6% versus 18.4%; OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.4 to 1.5), and arteriovenous nicking (23.0% versus 17.8%; OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.7 to 2.7). Patients with TIA and acute stroke may share similar risk factors or pathogenic mechanisms.

  7. Characteristics of inpatient care and rehabilitation for acute first-ever stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Shin, Yong-Il; Lee, Sam-Gyu; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Lim, Young Shil; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the status of inpatient care for acute first-ever stroke at three general hospitals in Korea to provide basic data and useful information on the development of comprehensive and systematic rehabilitation care for stroke patients. This study conducted a retrospective complete enumeration survey of all acute first-ever stroke patients admitted to three distinct general hospitals for 2 years by reviewing medical records. Both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes were included. Survey items included demographic data, risk factors, stroke type, state of rehabilitation treatment, discharge destination, and functional status at discharge. A total of 2159 patients were reviewed. The mean age was 61.5±14.4 years and the ratio of males to females was 1.23:1. Proportion of ischemic stroke comprised 54.9% and hemorrhagic stroke 45.1%. Early hospital mortality rate was 8.1%. Among these patients, 27.9% received rehabilitation consultation and 22.9% underwent inpatient rehabilitation treatment. The mean period from admission to rehabilitation consultation was 14.5 days. Only 12.9% of patients were transferred to a rehabilitation department and the mean period from onset to transfer was 23.4 days. Improvements in functional status were observed in the patients who had received inpatient rehabilitation treatment after acute stroke management. Our analysis revealed that a relatively small portion of patients who suffered from an acute first-ever stroke received rehabilitation consultation and inpatient rehabilitation treatment. Thus, applying standardized clinical practice guidelines for post-acute rehabilitation care is needed to provide more effective and efficient rehabilitation services to patients with stroke.

  8. Significance of large vessel intracranial occlusion causing acute ischemic stroke and TIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wade S; Lev, Michael H; English, Joey D; Camargo, Erica C; Chou, Maggie; Johnston, S Claiborne; Gonzalez, Gilberto; Schaefer, Pamela W; Dillon, William P; Koroshetz, Walter J; Furie, Karen L

    2009-12-01

    Acute ischemic stroke due to large vessel occlusion (LVO)-vertebral, basilar, carotid terminus, middle and anterior cerebral arteries-likely portends a worse prognosis than stroke unassociated with LVO. Because little prospective angiographic data have been reported on a cohort of unselected patients with stroke and with transient ischemic attack, the clinical impact of LVO has been difficult to quantify. The Screening Technology and Outcome Project in Stroke Study is a prospective imaging-based study of stroke outcomes performed at 2 academic medical centers. Patients with suspected acute stroke who presented within 24 hours of symptom onset and who underwent multimodality CT/CT angiography were approached for consent for collection of clinical data and 6-month assessment of outcome. Demographic and clinical variables and 6-month modified Rankin Scale scores were collected and combined with blinded interpretation of the CT angiography data. The OR of each variable, including occlusion of intracranial vascular segment in predicting good outcome and 6-month mortality, was calculated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Over a 33-month period, 735 patients with suspected stroke were enrolled. Of these, 578 were adjudicated as stroke and 97 as transient ischemic attack. Among patients with stroke, 267 (46%) had LVO accounting for the stroke and 13 (13%) of patients with transient ischemic attack had LVO accounting for transient ischemic attack symptoms. LVO predicted 6-month mortality (OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 2.7 to 7.3; PStroke Scale and age, independently predicted outcome. Large vessel intracranial occlusion accounted for nearly half of acute ischemic strokes in unselected patients presenting to academic medical centers. In addition to age and baseline stroke severity, occlusion of either the basilar or internal carotid terminus segment is an independent predictor of outcome at 6 months.

  9. Red cell distribution width and neurological scoring systems in acute stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Kara,1 Selim Degirmenci,1 Aysegul Bayir,1 Ahmet Ak,1 Murat Akinci,1 Ali Dogru,1 Fikret Akyurek,2 Seyit Ali Kayis3 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey; 2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey; 3Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Karabuk University, Karabuk, Turkey Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the association between the red blood cell distribution width (RDW and the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, Canadian Neurological Scale (CNS, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores in patients who had acute ischemic stroke. Methods: This prospective observational cohort study included 88 patients who have had acute ischemic stroke and a control group of 40 patients who were evaluated in the Emergency Department for disorders other than acute ischemic stroke. All subjects had RDW determined, and stroke patients had scoring with the GCS, CNS, and NIHSS scores. The GCS, CNS, and NIHSS scores of the patients were rated as mild, moderate, or severe and compared with RDW. Results: Stroke patients had significantly higher median RDW than control subjects. The median RDW values were significantly elevated in patients who had more severe rather than milder strokes rated with all three scoring systems (GCS, CNS, and NIHSS. The median RDW values were significantly elevated for patients who had moderate rather than mild strokes rated by GCS and CNS and for patients who had severe rather than mild strokes rated by NIHSS. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.760 (95% confidence interval, 0.676–0.844. Separation of stroke patients and control groups was optimal with RDW 14% (sensitivity, 71.6%; specificity, 67.5%; accuracy, 70.3%. Conclusion: In stroke patients who have symptoms <24 hours, the RDW may be useful in predicting the severity and functional outcomes of the stroke

  10. The Neuropsychology of Acute Stroke : Characterisation and Prognostic Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, G.M.S.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, a longitudinal study was performed in a large cohort of patients with a first symptomatic stroke who had no neurological, psychiatric, and/or cognitive history prior to the stroke. The patient cohort was examined in a very early phase (mean interval eight days post-stroke) with a

  11. The Neuropsychology of Acute Stroke : Characterisation and Prognostic Implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, G.M.S.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, a longitudinal study was performed in a large cohort of patients with a first symptomatic stroke who had no neurological, psychiatric, and/or cognitive history prior to the stroke. The patient cohort was examined in a very early phase (mean interval eight days post-stroke) with a neu

  12. Complete recovery following intra-arterial tenecteplase administration in a woman with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenakshi-Sundaram, S; Periakaruppan, A; Karuppiah, S N K P; Karthik, S N; Roopakumar, L; Thembavani, I

    2013-12-01

    A 23-year-old woman, who underwent a percutaneous transluminal mitral commissurotomy for a tight mitral stenosis, developed an acute ischemic stroke involving the proximal right middle cerebral artery territory. She had a dense left hemiplegia with a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 12. She was emergently treated within 1 hour with intra-arterial tenecteplase and made a dramatic recovery. Intra-arterial tenecteplase is an attractive option for treating acute ischemic stroke with proximal or major vessel occlusion.

  13. Acute Ischemic Stroke | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available State ConcernedFinland - Fimea A.2EudraCT number2011-003474-86 A.3Full title of the trial Albumin in Acute ...erapy for Neuroprotection in Acute Ischemic Stroke A.3.1Title of the trial for la...y people, in easily understood, i.e. non-technical, language Albumin in Acute Stroke (ALIAS) Trial-Part 2 A....se under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Ischemic Stroke E.1.1.2Therapeutic...n, - cognition measured at 3 months by Trailmaking A and B. E.2.3Trial contains a sub-study No E.3Principal inclusion criteria - Acut

  14. Prior Antithrombotic Use Is Associated With Favorable Mortality and Functional Outcomes in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo K; Hellkamp, Anne S; Fonarow, Gregg C; Reeves, Matthew J; Schwamm, Lee H; Schulte, Phillip J; Xian, Ying; Suter, Robert E; Bhatt, Deepak L; Saver, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Eric D; Smith, Eric E

    2016-08-01

    Antithrombotics are the mainstay of treatment in primary and secondary prevention of stroke, and their use before an acute event may be associated with better outcomes. Using data from Get With The Guidelines-Stroke with over half a million acute ischemic strokes recorded between October 2011 and March 2014 (n=540 993) from 1661 hospitals across the United States, we examined the unadjusted and adjusted associations between previous antithrombotic use and clinical outcomes. There were 250 104 (46%) stroke patients not receiving any antithrombotic before stroke; of whom approximately one third had a documented previous vascular indication. After controlling for clinical and hospital factors, patients who were receiving antithrombotics before stroke had better outcomes than those who did not, regardless of whether a previous vascular indication was present or not: adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) were 0.82 (0.80-0.84) for in-hospital mortality, 1.18 (1.16-1.19) for home as the discharge destination, 1.15 (1.13-1.16) for independent ambulatory status at discharge, and 1.15 (1.12-1.17) for discharge modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1. Previous antithrombotic therapy was independently associated with improved clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. Ensuring the use of antithrombotics in appropriate patient populations may be associated with benefits beyond stroke prevention. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. The iScore predicts effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K; Tu, Jack V; Mamdani, Muhammad; Austin, Peter; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2012-05-01

    Tools to predict the clinical response after intravenous thrombolytic therapy (tPA) are scarce. The iScore is an existing validated tool to estimate outcomes after an acute ischemic stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of the iScore to predict clinical response and risk of hemorrhagic transformation after tPA. We applied the iScore (www.sorcan.ca/iscore) to patients presenting with an acute ischemic stroke at 11 stroke centers in Ontario, Canada, between 2003 and 2009 identified from the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network. A cohort of patients with stroke treated at 154 centers in Ontario was used for external validation. We compared outcomes between patients receiving and not receiving tPA after adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics using propensity-score matching. Patients were stratified into 3 a priori defined groups according to stroke severity using the iScore. Among 12 686 patients with an acute ischemic stroke, 1696 (13.4%) received intravenous thrombolysis. Higher iScores were associated with poor outcomes in both the tPA and non-tPA groups (Pacute ischemic stroke. Patients with high iScores may not have a clinically meaningful benefit from intravenous tPA at the time of carrying a higher risk of hemorrhagic complications.

  16. Current Canadian And American Experiences In The Treatment Of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Dolati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke remains one of the main public health issues worldwide. It is the third leading cause of death in the United States, with more than 200,000 people dying from strokes each year. Approximately 80% of all acute ischemic strokes are due to intracranial artery occlusion, most commonly thromboembolic clot occlusion. Revascularization of occluded territories is the cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke and Thrombolysis for ischemic stroke has been systematically studied in large randomized trials only since the 1990s. To date, thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke has been investigated in 21 randomized controlled clinical trials enrolling more than 7,000 patients. The advent of modern imaging and endovascular tools and technologyhas revolutionized treatment of stroke. In this talk, I will review current clinical trials published in The NEJM (ESCAPE, MR Clean, EXTENDED IA, …. regarding superiority of the endovascular treatments, especially, the stent retrievers, over Iv tPA. I will also go over all endovascular techniques used in the endovascular treatment of acute stroke using my Canadian and American experiences.

  17. Current Canadian And American Experiences In The Treatment Of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Dolati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke remains one of the main public health issues worldwide. It is the third leading cause of death in the United States, with more than 200,000 people dying from strokes each year. Approximately 80% of all acute ischemic strokes are due to intracranial artery occlusion, most commonly thromboembolic clot occlusion. Revascularization of occluded territories is the cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke and Thrombolysis for ischemic stroke has been systematically studied in large randomized trials only since the 1990s. To date, thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke has been investigated in 21 randomized controlled clinical trials enrolling more than 7,000 patients. The advent of modern imaging and endovascular tools and technology has revolutionized treatment of stroke. In this talk, I will review current clinical trials published in The NEJM (ESCAPE, MR Clean, EXTENDED IA, …. regarding superiority of the endovascular treatments, especially, the stent retrievers, over Iv tPA. I will also go over all endovascular techniques used in the endovascular treatment of acute stroke using my Canadian and American experiences.

  18. MRI-based mismatch detection in acute ischemic stroke: Optimal PWI maps and thresholds validated with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaro-Weber, Olivier; Moeller-Hartmann, Walter; Siegmund, Dora; Kandziora, Alexandra; Schuster, Alexander; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Sobesky, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Perfusion-weighted (PW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to detect penumbral tissue in acute stroke, but the selection of optimal PW-maps and thresholds for tissue at risk detection remains a matter of debate. We validated the performance of PW-maps with 15O-water-positron emission tomography (PET) in a large comparative PET-MR cohort of acute stroke patients. In acute and subacute stroke patients with back-to-back MRI and PET imaging, PW-maps were validated with 15O-water-PET. We pooled two different cerebral blood flow (CBF) PET-maps to define the critical flow (CF) threshold, (i) quantitative (q)CBF-PET with the CF threshold 6.1 s (AUC = 0.94) and non-deconvolved PW-time-to-peak (TTP) >4.8 s (AUC = 0.93) showed the best performance to detect the CF threshold as defined by PET. PW-Tmax with a threshold >6.1 s and TTP with a threshold >4.8 s are the most predictive in detecting the CF threshold for MR-based mismatch definition.

  19. Strong complement activation after acute ischemic stroke is associated with unfavorable outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Széplaki, Gábor; Szegedi, Róbert; Hirschberg, Kristóf

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: According to data from animal models, complement activation plays a major role in the brain injury after acute ischemic stroke. Scarce findings are, however, available on the detection of complement activation products in stroke patients. METHODS: We have measured plasma levels...... role in the development of brain infarct. The measurement of complement activation products might help to determine the clinical prognosis after acute ischemic stroke. Furthermore, there is potential usefulness of complement modulating therapy in ischemic stroke....... of the five complement activation products (C1rC1sC1inh, C4d, C3a, C5a and SC5b-9) in samples of 26 patients with ischemic stroke upon admission. Twenty-six patients with severe carotid atherosclerosis served as patient controls. RESULTS: Levels of two activation products (SC5b-9 and C4d)) were significantly...

  20. Cardiac myxoma causing acute ischemic stroke in a pediatric patient and a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Jennifer; Leszczyszyn, David; Mathew, Don

    2014-05-01

    Ischemic stroke in the pediatric population is a rare occurrence, and its possible causes span a wide differential that includes atrial myxomas. Myxomas are friable cardiac tumors that produce "showers" of emboli resulting in transient neurological deficits, cutaneous eruptions, and ophthalmologic deficits. We present an 11-year-old boy with a months-long history of an intermittent spotted "rash" who presented with acute ischemic stroke caused by a left atrial myxoma. We also review clinical features in all 16 other cases of cardiac myxoma causing pediatric stroke reported in the literature. Our case, along with the review of the literature, highlights the fact that myxomas often initially present as stroke with acute hemiplegia and transient cutaneous eruptions due to fragmentation of the tumor. Cardiac myxoma should be considered in any child presenting with ischemic stroke, and transient skin findings may provide an important diagnostic clue prior to onset of neurological symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute tendon ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daffner, R.H.; Lupetin, A.R.; Dash, N.; Riemer, B.L.

    1986-11-01

    The diagnosis of acute tendon ruptures of the extensor mechanism of the knee or the Achilles tendon of the ankle may usually be made by clinical means. Massive soft tissue swelling accompanying these injuries often obscures the findings, however. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can rapidly demonstrate these tendon ruptures. Examples of the use of MRI for quadriceps tendon, and Achilles tendon rupture are presented.

  2. Impact of Guidelines on Clinical Practice: Intravenous Heparin Use for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jong-Won; Kim, Beom Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Ko, Youngchai; Lee, SooJoo; Kang, Kyusik; Park, Jong-Moo; Park, Sang-Soon; Park, Tai Hwan; Cho, Yong-Jin; Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Jun; Ryu, Wi-Sun; Kim, Dong-Eog; Nah, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Joon-Tae; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Choi, Jay Chol; Oh, Mi-Sun; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Byung-Chul; Jang, Myung Suk; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Juneyoung; Gorelick, Philip B; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2016-06-01

    Since its introduction, controversy has existed about the administration of intravenous heparin for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. We studied trends in the intravenous heparin use during a 6-year time period and the potential influence of clinical guidelines in national language on intravenous heparin administration in Korea. On the basis of a prospective nationwide multicenter stroke registry, we collected data on patients with acute ischemic stroke who arrived within 7 days of symptom onset during the time period 2008 to 2013. We studied patient demographics, prestroke medical history, stroke characteristics, and stroke treatment. Data from a total of 23 425 patients from 12 university hospitals or regional stroke centers were analyzed. The administration of intravenous heparin steadily decreased throughout the study period: 9.7% in 2008, 10.9% in 2009, 9.4% in 2010, 6.0% in 2011, 4.7% in 2012, and 4.3% in 2013 (P for trend stroke severity, atrial fibrillation, and stroke of cardioembolic, other-, and undetermined etiology. In a multivariable logistic model, increase of 1 calendar year (odds ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.95; Pacute ischemic stroke treatment has decreased in Korea, and this change may be attributable to the spread and successful implementation of regional clinical practice guidelines. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Acute Psychosis Associated with Subcortical Stroke: Comparison between Basal Ganglia and Mid-Brain Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron McMurtray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute onset of psychosis in an older or elderly individual without history of previous psychiatric disorders should prompt a thorough workup for neurologic causes of psychiatric symptoms. This report compares and contrasts clinical features of new onset of psychotic symptoms between two patients, one with an acute basal ganglia hemorrhagic stroke and another with an acute mid-brain ischemic stroke. Delusions and hallucinations due to basal ganglia lesions are theorized to develop as a result of frontal lobe dysfunction causing impairment of reality checking pathways in the brain, while visual hallucinations due to mid-brain lesions are theorized to develop due to dysregulation of inhibitory control of the ponto-geniculate-occipital system. Psychotic symptoms occurring due to stroke demonstrate varied clinical characteristics that depend on the location of the stroke within the brain. Treatment with antipsychotic medications may provide symptomatic relief.

  4. [Application of stroke rehabilitation unit in municipal hospitals during the acute phase of cerebral infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-min; Wang, Peng; Chen, Jie; Luo, Dan-hong; Shen, Wang-ming

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of stroke rehabilitation unit in municipal hospitals during the acute phase of cerebral infarction. 77 acute cerebral infarction patients were randomly assigned to stroke rehabilitation unit group and 73 to ordinary group. The NIH stroke scale (NIHSS), activities of daily living (ADL) Barthel index and average hospitalized time were compared in two groups before and after the treatment. The average NIHSS in two groups before treatment were 9.26 and 9.12 respectively (P > 0.05) but became 2.62 and 7.64 after treatment (P 0.05) but 87.26 and 64.20 after the treatment (P stroke rehabilitation unit being applied in the acute phase of cerebral infarction, it showed positive results in the following aspects as: improving the neurological function, capabilities of managing daily life, and also shortening the days of hospitalization.

  5. Assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke in China: Findings from the China National Stroke Registry II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettger, Janet Prvu; Li, Zixiao; Xian, Ying; Liu, Liping; Zhao, Xingquan; Li, Hao; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Chunjuan; Meng, Xia; Wang, Anxin; Pan, Yuesong; Peterson, Eric D; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-04-01

    Background Stroke rehabilitation improves functional recovery among stroke patients. However, little is known about clinical practice in China regarding the assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients with acute ischemic stroke. Aims We examined the frequency and determinants of an assessment for rehabilitation among acute ischemic stroke patients from the China National Stroke Registry II. Methods Data for 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to 219 hospitals from June 2012 to January 2013 were analyzed. The multivariable logistic regression model with the generalized estimating equation method accounting for in-hospital clustering was used to identify patient and hospital factors associated with having a rehabilitation assessment during the acute hospitalization. Results Among 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients, 11,451 (59.4%) were assessed for rehabilitation. Rates of rehabilitation assessment varied among 219 hospitals (IQR 41.4% vs 81.5%). In the multivariable analysis, factors associated with increased likelihood of a rehabilitation assessment ( p < 0.05) included disability prior to stroke, higher NIHSS on admission, receipt of a dysphagia screen, deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis, carotid vessel imaging, longer length of stay, and treatment at a hospital with a higher number of hospital beds (per 100 units). In contrast, patients with a history of atrial fibrillation and hospitals with higher number of annual stroke discharges (per 100 patients) were less likely to receive rehabilitation assessment during the acute stroke hospitalization. Conclusions Rehabilitation assessment among acute ischemic stroke patients was suboptimal in China. Rates varied considerably among hospitals and support the need to improve adherence to recommended care for stroke survivors.

  6. Worldwide reported use of IV tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Aaron L; Mittal, Manoj K; McLane, Hannah C; Shen, Gordon C; Muralidharan, Rajanandini; Lyons, Jennifer L; Shinohara, Russell T; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Mateen, Farrah J

    2014-04-01

    Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator is the most effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke, and its use may therefore serve as an indicator of the available level of acute stroke care. The greatest burden of stroke is in low- and middle-income countries, but the extent to which intravenous tissue plasminogen activator is used in these countries is unreported. A systematic review was performed searching each country name AND 'stroke' OR 'tissue plasminogen activator' OR 'thrombolysis' using PubMed, Embase, Global Health, African Index Medicus, and abstracts published in the International Journal of Stroke (Jan. 1, 1996-Oct. 1, 2012). The reported use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was then analyzed according to country-level income status, total expenditure on health per capita, and mortality and disability-adjusted life years due to stroke. There were 118,780 citations reviewed. Of 214 countries and independent territories, 64 (30%) reported use of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke in the medical literature: 3% (1/36) low-income, 19% (10/54) lower-middle-income, 33% (18/54) upper-middle-income, and 50% (35/70) high-income-countries (test for trend, P acute ischemic stroke, total healthcare expenditure per capita (odds ratio 3.3 per 1000 international dollar increase, 95% confidence interval 1.4-9.9, P = 0.02) and reported mortality rate from cerebrovascular disease (odds ratio 1.02, 95% confidence interval 0.99-1.06, P = 0.02) were significant, but reported disability-adjusted life years from cerebrovascular diseases and gross national income per capita were not (P > 0.05). Of the 10 countries with the highest disability-adjusted life years due to stroke, only one reported intravenous tissue plasminogen activator use. By reported use, intravenous tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke is available to some patients in approximately one-third of countries. Access to advanced acute

  7. Therapeutic implications of transesophageal echocardiography after transthoracic echocardiography on acute stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Tribolet de Abreu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Tiago Tribolet de Abreu, Sonia Mateus, Cecilia Carreteiro, Jose CorreiaLaboratorio de Ultrasonografia Cardiaca e Neurovascular, Hospital do Espirito Santo-Evora, E. P. E., PortugalBackground: The role of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE in the evaluation of acute stroke patients is still ill-defined. We conducted a prospective observational study to find the prevalence of TEE findings that indicate anticoagulation as beneficial, in acute ischemic stroke patients without indication for anticoagulation based on clinical, electrocardiographic and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE findings.Methods: We prospectively studied all patients referred to our laboratory for TTE and TEE. Patients were excluded if the diagnosis was not acute ischemic stroke or if they had an indication for anticoagulation based on clinical, electrocardiographic, or TTE data. Patients with TEE findings that might indicate anticoagulation as beneficial were identified.Results: A total of 84 patients with acute ischemic stroke and without indication for anticoagulation based on clinical and electrocardiographic or TTE data were included in the study. Findings indicating anticoagulation as beneficial were found in 32.1%: spontaneous echo contrast (1.2%, complex aortic atheroma (27.4%, thrombus (8.3%, and simultaneous patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm (2.4%.Conclusions: The results of our study show that TEE can have therapy implications in 32.1% of ischemic stroke patients in sinus rhythm and with TTE with no indication for anticoagulation.Keywords: acute ischemic stroke, transesophageal echocardiography, transthoracic echocardiography, therapy

  8. Drivers of costs associated with reperfusion therapy in acute stroke: the Interventional Management of Stroke III Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kit N; Simpson, Annie N; Mauldin, Patrick D; Hill, Michael D; Yeatts, Sharon D; Spilker, Judith A; Foster, Lydia D; Khatri, Pooja; Martin, Renee; Jauch, Edward C; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Palesch, Yuko Y; Broderick, Joseph P

    2014-06-01

    The Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) III study tested the effect of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) alone when compared with intravenous tPA followed by endovascular therapy and collected cost data to assess the economic implications of the 2 therapies. This report describes the factors affecting the costs of the initial hospitalization for acute stroke subjects from the United States. Prospective cost analysis of the US subjects was treated with intravenous tPA alone or with intravenous tPA followed by endovascular therapy in the IMS III trial. Results were compared with expected Medicare payments. The adjusted cost of a stroke admission in the study was $35 130 for subjects treated with endovascular therapy after intravenous tPA treatment and $25 630 for subjects treated with intravenous tPA alone (Pcosts included treatment group, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, time from stroke onset to intravenous tPA, age, stroke location, and comorbid diabetes mellitus. The mean cost for subjects who had routine use of general anesthesia as part of endovascular therapy was $46 444 when compared with $30 350 for those who did not have general anesthesia. The costs of embolectomy for IMS III subjects and patients from the National Inpatient Sample cohort exceeded the Medicare diagnosis-related group payment in ≥75% of patients. Minimizing the time to start of intravenous tPA and decreasing the use of routine general anesthesia may improve the cost-effectiveness of medical and endovascular therapy for acute stroke. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00359424. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. The iScore predicts total healthcare costs early after hospitalization for an acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewara, Emmanuel M; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Bravata, Dawn M; Williams, Linda S; Fang, Jiming; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    The ischemic Stroke risk score is a validated prognostic score which can be used by clinicians to estimate patient outcomes after the occurrence of an acute ischemic stroke. In this study, we examined the association between the ischemic Stroke risk score and patients' 30-day, one-year, and two-year healthcare costs from the perspective of a third party healthcare payer. Patients who had an acute ischemic stroke were identified from the Registry of Canadian Stroke Network. The 30-day ischemic Stroke risk score prognostic score was determined for each patient. Direct healthcare costs at each time point were determined using administrative databases in the province of Ontario. Unadjusted mean and the impact of a 10-point increase ischemic Stroke risk score and a patient's risk of death or disability on total cost were determined. There were 12,686 patients eligible for the study. Total unadjusted mean costs were greatest among patients at high risk. When adjusting for patient characteristics, a 10-point increase in the ischemic Stroke risk score was associated with 8%, 7%, and 4% increase in total costs at 30 days, one-year, and two-years. The same increase was found to impact patients at low, medium, and high risk differently. When adjusting for patient characteristics, patients in the high-risk group had the highest total costs at 30 days, while patients at medium risk had the highest costs at both one and two-years. The ischemic Stroke risk score can be useful as a predictor of healthcare utilization and costs early after hospitalization for an acute ischemic stroke. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  10. The iScore predicts poor functional outcomes early after hospitalization for an acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Raptis, Stavroula; Kapral, Moira K; Liu, Ying; Tu, Jack V; Mamdani, Muhammad; Austin, Peter C

    2011-12-01

    The iScore is a prediction tool originally developed to estimate the risk of death after hospitalization for an acute ischemic stroke. Our objective was to determine whether the iScore could also predict poor functional outcomes. We applied the iScore to patients presenting with an acute ischemic stroke at multiple hospitals in Ontario, Canada, between 2003 and 2008, who had been identified from the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network regional stroke center database (n=3818) and from an external data set, the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network Ontario Stroke Audit (n=4635). Patients were excluded if they were included in the sample used to develop and validate the initial iScore. Poor functional outcomes were defined as: (1) death at 30 days or disability at discharge, in which disability was defined as having a modified Rankin Scale 3 to 5; and (2) death at 30 days or institutionalization at discharge. The prevalence of poor functional outcomes in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network and the Ontario Stroke Audit, respectively, were 55.7% and 44.1% for death at 30 days or disability at discharge and 16.9% and 16.2%, respectively, for death at 30 days or institutionalization at discharge. The iScore stratified the risk of poor outcomes in low- and high-risk individuals. Observed versus predicted outcomes showed high correlations: 0.988 and 0.940 for mortality or disability and 0.985 and 0.993 for mortality or institutionalization in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network and Ontario Stroke Audit cohorts. The iScore can be used to estimate the risk of death or a poor functional outcome after an acute ischemic stroke.

  11. Risk assessment of deep-vein thrombosis after acute stroke: a prospective study using clinical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Ping; Zheng, Hua-Guang; Wang, David Z; Wang, Yi-Long; Hussain, Mohammed; Sun, Hai-Xin; Wang, An-Xin; Zhao, Xing-Quan; Dong, Ke-Hui; Wang, Chun-Xue; He, Wen; Ning, Bin; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) represents a serious complication in acute stroke patients with pulmonary embolus (PE) as a potential outcome. Prediction of DVT may help with formulating a proper prevention strategy. To assess of the risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in acute stroke patients, we developed and validated a clinical score in a cohort study. Incidence of Deep Venous Thrombosis after Acute Stroke in China (INVENT-China) is a multicenter prospective cohort study. The potential predictive variables for DVT at baseline were collected, and the presence of DVT was evaluated using ultrasonography on the 14 ± 3 days. Data were randomly assigned to either a training data set or a test data set. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to develop risk scores to predict DVT in the training data set and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to validate the score in the test data set. From 2006-2007, 862 hospital-based acute stroke patients were enrolled in China. The overall incidence of DVT after acute stroke within two weeks was 12.4% (95%CI 10.3-14.7%). A seven-point score derived in the training data set (age [≥65 years = 1], sex [female gender = 1]), obesity [BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) = 1], active cancer [yes = 2], stroke subtype [cerebral hemorraghe = 1], muscle weakness [≥2 on Lower limb NIHSS score = 1] was highly predictive of 14-day risk of DVT(c statistic = 0.70, 95% CI, 0.64-0.76, P < 0.001), in the overall study population(c statistic = 0.65, 95% CI 0.59-0.70, P < 0.001). This clinical score may help identify acute stroke patients with high risk of DVT. In addition, it also serves as a platform to develop further models of DVT prediction in stroke patients based on clinical factors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Early treatment of hypertension in acute ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke: progress achieved, challenges, and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2014-03-01

    Hypertension is the leading risk factor for ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of stroke. Additionally, high blood pressure (BP) in the acute cerebrovascular event is associated with poor outcome, and a high percentage of stroke survivors have inadequate control of hypertension. The present is a systematic review of prospective, randomized, and controlled trials carried out on safety and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of both subtypes of acute stroke. Six trials involving 7512 patients were included, which revealed controversies on the speed and the goals of treatment. These controversies could be due at least in part, from the fact that some studies analyzed the results of antihypertensive treatment in ischemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic subtypes of acute stroke together, and from a different prevalence of past-stroke in the randomized groups. Further research is necessary to establish whether standard antihypertensive treatment provides greater benefit than simple observation in patients with ischemic acute stroke and Stage 2 hypertension of JNC 7, albeit they were not candidates for acute reperfusion. In that case, the target reduction in BP could be 10% to 15% within 24 hours. The recently published INTERACT 2 has provided evidence that patients with hemorrhagic stroke may receive intensive antihypertensive treatment safely with the goal of reducing systolic BP to levels no lower than 130 mm Hg. It is important to take into account that marked BP lowering in acute stroke increases the risk of poor outcome by worsening cerebral ischemia from deterioration of cerebral blood flow autoregulation. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of neurogenic dysphagia in Iraqi patients with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Zeki N; Al-Shimmery, Ehsan K; Taha, Mufeed A

    2010-04-01

    To clinically assess neurogenic dysphagia, and to correlate its presence with demographic features, different stroke risk factors, anatomical arterial territorial stroke types, and pathological stroke types. Seventy-two stroke inpatients were studied between July 2007 and February 2008, at the Departments of Medicine and Neurology at Al-Yarmouk Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, and Rizgary Teaching Hospital, Erbil, Iraq. All patients were assessed using the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability score (MASA), Modified Rankin Scale, and the Stroke Risk Scorecard. All patients were reassessed after one month. There were 40 males and 32 females. Sixty-eight patients had ischemic stroke, and 4 had primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). According to the MASA score, 55% of anterior circulation stroke (ACS) cases were associated with dysphasia, and 91% of lateral medullary syndrome cases were associated with dysphagia. Fifty-six percent of ACS dysphagic cases improved within the first month. Forty percent of dysphagic patients died in the one month follow up period, and in most, death was caused by aspiration pneumonia. We observed no significant differences regarding demographic features of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be an indicator of the severity of stroke causing higher mortality and morbidity in affected patients. It was not related to the stroke risk factors and the type of stroke. It is essential from a prognostic point of view to assess swallowing, and to treat its complications early.

  14. Accuracy of Administrative Data for the Coding of Acute Stroke and TIAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ruth; Mondor, Luke; Porter, Joan; Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K

    2016-11-01

    Administrative data validation is essential for identifying biases and misclassification in research. The objective of this study was to determine the accuracy of diagnostic codes for acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) using the Ontario Stroke Registry (OSR) as the reference standard. We identified stroke and TIA events in inpatient and emergency department (ED) administrative data from eight regional stroke centres in Ontario, Canada, from April of 2006 through March of 2008 using ICD-10-CA codes for subarachnoid haemorrhage (I60, excluding I60.8), intracerebral haemorrhage (I61), ischemic (H34.1 and I63, excluding I63.6), unable to determine stroke (I64), and TIA (H34.0 and G45, excluding G45.4). We linked administrative data to the Ontario Stroke Registry and calculated sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV). We identified 5,270 inpatient and 4,411 ED events from the administrative data. Inpatient administrative data had an overall sensitivity of 82.2% (95% confidence interval [CI 95%]=81.0, 83.3) and a PPV of 68.8% (CI 95%=67.5, 70.0) for the diagnosis of stroke, with notable differences observed by stroke type. Sensitivity for ischemic stroke increased from 66.5 to 79.6% with inclusion of I64. The sensitivity and PPV of ED administrative data for diagnosis of stroke were 56.8% (CI 95%=54.8, 58.7) and 59.1% (CI 95%=57.1, 61.1), respectively. For all stroke types, accuracy was greater in the inpatient data than in the ED data. The accuracy of stroke identification based on administrative data from stroke centres may be improved by including I64 in ischemic stroke type, and by considering only inpatient data.

  15. Thrombolysis outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients with prior stroke and diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, N K; Ahmed, N; Davalos, A;

    2011-01-01

    in Stroke-International Stroke Thrombolysis Register) compared to nonthrombolyzed controls (C; data from Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive). METHODS: We selected ischemic stroke patients on whom we held data on age, baseline NIH Stroke Scale score (NIHSS), and 90-day modified Rankin Scale score (m......BACKGROUND: Patients with concomitant diabetes mellitus (DM) and prior stroke (PS) were excluded from European approval of alteplase in stroke. We examined the influence of DM and PS on the outcomes of patients who received thrombolytic therapy (T; data from Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis......RS). We compared the distribution of mRS between T and C by Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel (CMH) test and proportional odds logistic regression, after adjustment for age and baseline NIHSS, in patients with and without DM, PS, or the combination. We report odds ratios (OR) for improved distribution of m...

  16. Prediction of outcome in patients with suspected acute ischaemic stroke with CT perfusion and CT angiography: the Dutch acute stroke trial (DUST) study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seeters, T. van; Biessels, G.J.; Schaaf, I.C. van der; Dankbaar, J.W.; Horsch, A.D.; Luitse, M.J.; Niesten, J.M.; Mali, W.P.Th.; Kappelle, L.J.; Graaf, Y. van der; Velthuis, B.K.; Dijk, E.J. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prediction of clinical outcome in the acute stage of ischaemic stroke can be difficult when based on patient characteristics, clinical findings and on non-contrast CT. CT perfusion and CT angiography may provide additional prognostic information and guide treatment in the early stage. We

  17. Comparison of arterial spin labeling and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI in patients with acute stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chu Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether arterial spin labeling (ASL perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can reliably quantify perfusion deficit as compared to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC perfusion MRI. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation territory were recruited. All underwent ASL and DSC MRI perfusion scans within 30 hours after stroke onset and 31 patients underwent follow-up MRI scans. ASL cerebral blood flow (CBF and DSC time to maximum (T(max maps were used to calculate the perfusion defects. The ASL CBF lesion volume was compared to the DSC Tmax lesion volume by Pearson's correlation coefficient and likewise the ASL CBF and DSC T(max lesion volumes were compared to the final infarct sizes respectively. A repeated measures analysis of variance and least significant difference post hoc test was used to compare the mean lesion volumes among ASL CBF, DSC T(max >4-6 s and final infarct. RESULTS: Mean patient age was 72.6 years. The average time from stroke onset to MRI was 13.9 hours. The ASL lesion volume showed significant correlation with the DSC lesion volume for T(max >4, 5 and 6 s (r = 0.81, 0.82 and 0.80; p5 s (29.2 ml, p6 s (21.8 ml, p5 or 6 s were close to mean final infarct size. CONCLUSION: Quantitative measurement of ASL perfusion is well correlated with DSC perfusion. However, ASL perfusion may overestimate the perfusion defects and therefore further refinement of the true penumbra threshold and improved ASL technique are necessary before applying ASL in therapeutic trials.

  18. Cortisol levels and the severity and outcomes of acute stroke: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barugh, Amanda Jayne; Gray, Paul; Shenkin, Susan Deborah; MacLullich, Alasdair Maurice Joseph; Mead, Gillian Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Studies in non-stroke patients have shown an association between dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and morbidity and mortality. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate cortisol levels in acute stroke and their associations with outcome. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for articles up to April 2013 and PsychINFO for articles up to July 2013, using the keywords "cortisol" and "stroke" and associated terms or synonyms. We included studies published in peer-reviewed journals that recruited 10 or more participants and measured cortisol at least once in the first year following stroke. Data were extracted regarding cortisol levels, including changes over time and their relationship to stroke severity, and outcome. Of 11,240 abstracts, 101 full texts were obtained and 48 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Cortisol levels were high in the first week after stroke in the majority of studies (26 studies, n = 1,340). Higher cortisol was associated with dependency (8/11 studies, n = 822), delirium (5/6 studies, n = 269) depression (3/5 studies n = 117) and mortality (8/10 studies, n = 856). Five studies adjusted for stroke severity; one found an association between higher cortisol and dependency, and three found an association between higher cortisol and mortality. Cortisol levels are high for at least 7 days after stroke. Elevated cortisol after stroke is associated with dependency, morbidity, and mortality; however, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that these relationships are independent of stroke severity.

  19. Spontaneous Low Frequency Oscillations in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillip, Dorte; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2014-01-01

    patients admitted to the stroke unit with symptoms of ischemic stroke. 11/29 patients received thrombolytic therapy. NIRS examination was conducted 2 days (median time) from stroke onset. NIRS optodes were placed on each side of the head with a 3 cm source-detector distance. Using transfer function.......09-0.11 Hz range are affected by changes in cerebral autoregulation (CA), which is altered following stroke. We examined oxyHb LFOs at bed-side as a marker of CA in the subacute phase in stroke patients with or without recombinant tissue plasminogen activator thrombolytic therapy. Methods: We recruited 29...... analysis, inter-hemispheric phase shift and amplitude ratio of the oxyHb oscillations in the 0.09-0.11 Hz range were assessed. Results: The correlation between NIHSS scores at admission and oxyHb parameters revealed a significant positive correlation between stroke severity at admission and inter...

  20. Acute ischemic stroke in a child with cyanotic congenital heart disease due to non-compliance of anticoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Misbahuddin; James, Anish F.; Qureshi, Raheel S.; Saraf, Sapan; Ahluwalia, Tina; Mukherji, Joy Dev; Kole, Tamorish

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a common presentation in geriatric patients in emergency department but rarely seen in pediatric patients. In case of acute ischemic stroke in pediatric age group, management is different from that of adult ischemic stroke where thrombolysis is a good op. METHODS: We report a case of a 17-year-old male child presenting in emergency with an episode of acute ischemic stroke causing left hemiparesis with left facial weakness and asymmetry. The patient suffered from cyanotic congenital heart disease for which he had undergone Fontan operation previously. He had a history of missing his daily dose of warfarin for last 3 days prior to the stroke. RESULTS: The patient recovered from acute ischemic stroke without being thrombolyzed. CONCLUSION: In pediatric patients, acute ischemic stroke usually is evolving and may not require thrombolysis. PMID:25215056

  1. Starting early: integration of self-management support into an acute stroke service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Petra; Gawned, Sara; Jones, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Self-management support following stroke is rare, despite emerging evidence for impact on patient outcomes. The promotion of a common approach to self-management support across a stroke pathway requires collaboration between professionals. To date, the feasibility of self-management support in acute stroke settings has not been evaluated. The Bridges stroke self-management package (SMP) is based on self-efficacy principles. It is delivered by professionals and supported by a patient-held workbook. The aim of this project was to introduce the Bridges stroke SMP to the multidisciplinary staff of a London hyperacute and acute stroke unit. The 'Plan Do Study Act' (PDSA) cycle guided iterative stages of project development, with normalisation process theory helping to embed the intervention into existing ways of working. Questionnaires explored attitudes, beliefs and experiences of the staff who were integrating self-management support into ways of working in the acute stroke setting. Self-management support training was delivered to a total of 46 multidisciplinary stroke staff. Of the staff who attended the follow-up training, 66% had implemented Bridges self-management support with patients since initial training, and 100% felt their practice had changed. Questionnaire findings demonstrated that staff attitudes and beliefs had changed following training, particularly regarding ownership and type of rehabilitation goals set, and prioritisation of self-management support within acute stroke care. Staff initiated an audit of washing and dressing practices pre- and post-training. This was designed to evaluate the number of occasions when techniques were used by staff to facilitate patients' independence and self-management. They found that the number of occasions featuring optimum practice went from 54% at baseline to 63% at three months post-training. This project demonstrated the feasibility of integrating self-management support into an acute stroke setting. Further

  2. Noninvasive Ventilatory Correction as an Adjunct to an Experimental Systemic Reperfusion Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Barlinn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common condition in patients with acute ischemic stroke and associated with early clinical deterioration and poor functional outcome. However, noninvasive ventilatory correction is hardly considered as a complementary treatment option during the treatment phase of acute ischemic stroke. Summary of Case. A 55-year-old woman with an acute middle cerebral artery (MCA occlusion received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA and enrolled into a thrombolytic research study. During tPA infusion, she became drowsy, developed apnea episodes, desaturated and neurologically deteriorated without recanalization, re-occlusion or intracerebral hemorrhage. Urgent noninvasive ventilatory correction with biphasic positive airway pressure (BiPAP reversed neurological fluctuation. Her MCA completely recanalized 24 hours later. Conclusions. Noninvasive ventilatory correction should be considered more aggressively as a complementary treatment option in selected acute stroke patients. Early initiation of BiPAP can stabilize cerebral hemodynamics and may unmask the true potential of other therapies.

  3. Association between Oxidative Stress and Outcome in Different Subtypes of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Wen Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study investigated serum thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS and free thiol levels in different subtypes of acute ischemic stroke (AIS and evaluated their association with clinical outcomes. Methods. This prospective study evaluated 100 AIS patients, including 75 with small-vessel and 25 with large-vessel diseases. Serum oxidative stress (TBARS and antioxidant (thiol were determined within 48 hours and days 7 and 30 after stroke. For comparison, 80 age- and sex-matched participants were evaluated as controls. Results. Serum TBARS was significantly higher and free thiol was lower in stroke patients than in the controls on days 1 and 7 after AIS. The level of free thiol was significantly lower in the large-vessel disease than in the small-vessel disease on day 7 after stroke. Using the stepwise logistic regression model for potential variables, only stroke subtype, NIHSS score, and serum TBARS level were independently associated with three-month outcome. Higher TBARS and lower thiol levels in the acute phase of stroke were associated with poor outcome. Conclusions. Patients with large-vessel disease have higher oxidative stress but lower antioxidant defense compared to those with small-vessel disease after AIS. Serum TBARS level at the acute phase of stroke is a potential predictor for three-month outcome.

  4. Endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balwinder; Parsaik, Ajay K; Prokop, Larry J; Mittal, Manoj K

    2013-10-01

    To consolidate the evidence from randomized trials for the use of endovascular therapy (ET) in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We searched major databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Scopus) from their inception to February 12, 2013, for randomized trials evaluating the efficacy of ET compared with standard of care for acute ischemic stroke. Pooled absolute and relative risk estimates were synthesized by using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed by using Q statistic and I(2) statistic. Subset analysis was performed for patients with severe stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≥20). The study was conducted from January 15, 2013 to April 30, 2013. Of the 1252 retrieved articles, 5 randomized trials enrolling 1197 patients with acute ischemic stroke were included. Seven hundred eleven patients received ET, and 486 received intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator. There was no significant improvement in any of the outcomes in patients receiving ET compared with those receiving IV thrombolysis. On subgroup analysis, ET was found to have better outcomes in patients with severe stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≥20), showing a dose-response gradient and improving excellent, good, and fair outcomes by an additional 4%, 7%, and 13%, respectively, compared with IV thrombolysis. Overall, ET is not superior to IV thrombolysis for acute ischemic strokes (level B recommendation). However, ET showed promise and improved outcomes in patients with severe strokes, but the evidence is limited due to sample size. There is a need for further trials evaluating the role of ET in this high-risk group. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 'Living a life in shades of grey': experiencing depressive symptoms in the acute phase after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouwenhoven, Siren E; Kirkevold, Marit; Engedal, Knut; Kim, Hesook S

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the lived experience of stroke survivors suffering from depressive symptoms in the acute phase; addressing the following questions: (a) what is the nature of depression as experienced by post-stroke patients in the acute phase? (b) what is it like to live with depression within the first weeks following stroke? Post-stroke depression occurs in at least one quarter of stroke survivors and is linked to poorer outcomes. This qualitative study is methodologically grounded in hermeneutic phenomenology, influenced by van Manen and Ricoeur. A descriptive, qualitative design was used applying in-depth interviews as the method of data collection with nine participants. The data collection took place in 2008. The material revealed two main themes that generate the feeling and description of 'living a life in shades of grey': (a) being trapped and (b) losing oneself. 'Shades of grey' could be understood as being confined in a new life-world and losing oneself as the person one knew. The participants confirmed suffering from depressive symptoms, but depression was not seen as meaningful on its own. They related their experiences of post-stroke depression in the acute phase to the losses they experienced. Nurses ought to take into account the depth of the life changes that stroke survivors may experience. There is a need for continued empirical research on how nurses may help and support stroke survivors dealing with depressive symptoms in the acute phase after stroke and how depressive symptoms develop over time. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Optimal workflow and process-based performance measures for endovascular therapy in acute ischemic stroke: analysis of the Solitaire FR thrombectomy for acute revascularization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Bijoy K; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Gralla, Jan; Bonafe, Alain; Davalos, Antoni; Chapot, Rene; Goyal, Mayank

    2014-07-01

    We report on workflow and process-based performance measures and their effect on clinical outcome in Solitaire FR Thrombectomy for Acute Revascularization (STAR), a multicenter, prospective, single-arm study of Solitaire FR thrombectomy in large vessel anterior circulation stroke patients. Two hundred two patients were enrolled across 14 centers in Europe, Canada, and Australia. The following time intervals were measured: stroke onset to hospital arrival, hospital arrival to baseline imaging, baseline imaging to groin puncture, groin puncture to first stent deployment, and first stent deployment to reperfusion. Effects of time of day, general anesthesia use, and multimodal imaging on workflow were evaluated. Patient characteristics and workflow processes associated with prolonged interval times and good clinical outcome (90-day modified Rankin score, 0-2) were analyzed. Median times were onset of stroke to hospital arrival, 123 minutes (interquartile range, 163 minutes); hospital arrival to thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (TICI) 2b/3 or final digital subtraction angiography, 133 minutes (interquartile range, 99 minutes); and baseline imaging to groin puncture, 86 minutes (interquartile range, 24 minutes). Time from baseline imaging to puncture was prolonged in patients receiving intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (32-minute mean delay) and when magnetic resonance-based imaging at baseline was used (18-minute mean delay). Extracranial carotid disease delayed puncture to first stent deployment time on average by 25 minutes. For each 1-hour increase in stroke onset to final digital subtraction angiography (or TICI 2b/3) time, odds of good clinical outcome decreased by 38%. Interval times in the STAR study reflect current intra-arterial therapy for patients with acute ischemic stroke. Improving workflow metrics can further improve clinical outcome. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01327989. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Revisiting 'progressive stroke': incidence, predictors, pathophysiology, and management of unexplained early neurological deterioration following acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seners, Pierre; Baron, Jean-Claude

    2017-04-28

    Early neurological deterioration (END) following acute ischemic stroke is a serious clinical event strongly associated with poor outcome. Regarding specifically END occurring within 24 h following stroke onset, apart from straightforward causes such as symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage and malignant edema, the cause of END remains unclear in more than a half of cases. In the latter situation, patients are often referred to as 'progressive stroke', a default clinical category that does not imply underlying mechanisms, precluding informed management. In this review article, we summarize the available evidence on the incidence, predictors, and associated factors of unexplained END, and discuss its underlying pathophysiology. We particularly address the hemodynamic and thrombotic mechanisms that likely play a critical role in unexplained END, and in turn highlight potential new avenues to prevent and manage this ominous event.

  8. Features of acute ischemic stroke with rheumatic heart disease in a hospitalized Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deren; Liu, Ming; Hao, Zilong; Tao, Wendan; Lin, Sen; Zhang, Shihong; Wu, Bo; Ma, Zhenxing; Dong, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is an important risk factor for ischemic stroke in developing countries. Observational data on its characteristics and influence on outcome or recurrence of ischemic stroke are scarce. We aimed to investigate proportions, characteristics, functional outcome, and recurrence of acute ischemic stroke patients with RHD in a hospitalized Chinese population. We prospectively enrolled consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke who were admitted within 1 month of stroke onset from January 2003 to February 2007, into the analysis. Clinical characteristics such as age, gender, risk factors, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission were investigated. Basic characteristics, functional outcomes, and recurrence were compared between RHD group and nonRHD group. Of the 1638 cases included, RHD was present in 130 patients (7.9%). RHD patients, compared with those without RHD, were younger, more frequently female, and more often had experienced atrial fibrillation and higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score on admission (all PStroke Scale on admission, the death risk in patients with RHD was 2.0-fold higher at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year compared with patients without RHD (all PStroke attributable to RHD is still common in the Chinese population. RHD was associated with 2-fold increased risk of death and 1-fold increased risk of recurrence in stroke patients.

  9. Trends in Recruitment Rates for Acute Stroke Trials, 1990-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, William B; Kim, Anthony S; Chiong, Winston

    2017-03-01

    Slow recruitment in acute stroke trials hampers the evaluation of new therapies and delays the adoption of effective therapies into clinical practice. This systematic review evaluates whether recruitment efficiency and rates have increased in acute stroke trials from 1990 to 2014. Acute stroke trials from 2010 to 2014 were identified by a search of PubMed, Medline, the Cochrane Database of Research in Stroke, and the Stroke Trials Registry. These trials were compared to a previously published data set of trials conducted from 1990 to 2004. The median recruitment efficiency of trials from 1990 to 2004 was 0.41 participants/site/month compared with 0.26 participants/site/month from 2010 to 2014 (P=0.14). The median recruitment rate of trials from 1990 to 2004 was 26.8 participants/month compared with 19.0 participants/month from 2010 to 2014 (P=0.13). For acute stroke trials, neither recruitment efficiency nor recruitment rates have increased over the past 25 years and, if anything, have declined. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. [CLINICAL-HEMODYNAMIC PECULIARITIES OF THE COURSE OF HEMODYNAMIC ISCHEMIC STROKE IN ACUTE PERIOD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrobot, S; Sokhor, N; Milevska-Vovchuk, L; Yasniy, O; Shkrobot, L

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the research is to study the peculiarities of cardiac morphometric parameters, the parameters of central hemodynamics and their impact on the course of hemodynamic ischemic stroke in acute period. 116 patients were performed Echo-Doppler-cardiography in acute period of hemodynamic ischemic stroke in order to evaluate cardiac morphometric parameters. These patients were also performed transcranial duplex scanning. The results established that among significant clinical factors that influence the course of the acute period of hemodynamic ischemic stroke the most important are: the size of the focus, the level of consciousness on the 1st day, primary systolic arterial pressure, age of the patient. Hemodynamic ischemic stroke occurs on the background of changes of cardiac morphometric parameters and the disorders of the central hemodynamics. There is a close connection between the severity of hemodynamic ischemic stroke on the 7th and 14th day with the ejection fraction, the size of left atrium, the thickness of posterior wall of left ventricle, final diastolic size of left ventricle. The interrelation between the parameters of cerebral hemodynamics and cardiac morphometric parameters was established. cardiac morphometric parameters and parameters of central hemodynamics can be predictors of the course of hemodynamic ischemic stroke in acute period.

  11. Endovascular Interventions for Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Review of Recent Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Bryan M

    2016-03-01

    To review recent endovascular intervention trials for acute ischemic stroke. Recent, randomized controlled trials of endovascular interventions for acute ischemic stroke were identified. The search terms "endovascular" AND "stroke" were used and filter for "randomized controlled trial" was applied; the period searched was January 1, 2013, to October 31, 2015. Randomized controlled trials of endovascular interventions in acute ischemic stroke published within the past 3 years (2013-2015). A total of 8 trials are reviewed: 3 trials published in 2013 demonstrated neutral results for endovascular interventions, and 5 trials published in 2015 demonstrated positive results for endovascular interventions. Potential reasons for the change in outcomes include better patient selection and improvement indevice technology. Patient selection improvements included selecting patients with salvageable brain tissue with an identifiable thrombus on perfusion imaging. The major improvement in device technology was the introduction of the Solitaire Flow Restoration stent retriever and the Trevo stent retriever, both of which have improved recanalization rates compared with earlier devices. Adjunctive medication considerations include the mode of sedation (general or conscious), intraprocedural anticoagulation with heparin, and intra-arterial tissue plasminogen activator. The use of endovascular devices for treating acute ischemic stroke is likely to increase as more centers become capable of integrating them into their stroke programs. It is important for pharmacists to understand the trials that evaluated endovascular interventions because differences exist with respect to device, adjunctive medication, and patient selection, all of which affect patient outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Safflower yellow for acute ischemic stroke: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Siyuan; Lin, Nan; Shan, Guangliang; Zuo, Pingping; Cui, Liying

    2014-04-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of mortality worldwide. Safflower yellow is widely used for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke in China. Several trials comparing safflower yellow and placebo or no intervention were unavailable for prior meta-analysis. Here, we present an updated and expanded systematic review, including four new trials, to evaluate the efficacy and safety of safflower yellow for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. A comprehensive search was performed in Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), China Biological Medicine Database (CBM), CQVIP Information and Wanfang Database until January 2013. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the efficacy and safety of safflower yellow for acute ischemic stroke were included. Two researchers (Fan, S.Y. and Lin, N.) independently extracted data, assessed the study quality, and selected trials for inclusion. 7 RCTs with 762 participants were included. None of the included studies were of high methodological quality. The meta-analysis showed that safflower yellow was more effective assessed by neurological improvement rate [odds ratio (OR), 3.11; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.06-4.68, Pacute ischemic stroke. However, RCTs of high methodological quality are warranted before drawing any conclusion on the efficacy or safety of safflower yellow for acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of emergency department transitions of care on thrombolytic use in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madej-Fermo, Olga P; Staff, Ilene; Fortunato, Gil; Abbott, Lincoln; McCullough, Louise D

    2012-04-01

    In-hospital mortality is higher for certain medical conditions based on the time of presentation to the emergency department. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether patients with acute ischemic stroke who arrived to the emergency department during a nursing shift change had similar rates of thrombolytic use and functional outcomes compared with patients presenting during nonshift change hours. A retrospective review of patients with acute ischemic stroke presenting to the emergency department of a primary stroke center from 2005 through 2010. The time to notify the stroke team, perform a head CT scan, and to start intravenous or intra-arterial thrombolysis was assessed. Thrombolysis rates, mortality rate, discharge disposition, change in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and change in modified Barthel Index at 3 and 12 months were assessed. Of 3133 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 917 met criteria for inclusion. Arrival during nursing shift change, weekends, and July through September had no impact on process times, thrombolysis rates, and functional outcomes. Arrival at night did result in longer time to intra-arterial but not to intravenous thrombolysis, higher mortality rate, and smaller gain in functional status as measured by the modified Barthel Index at 3 months. The degree of emergency department "busyness" also did not influence tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment times. Presentation during a nursing shift change, a time of transition of care, did not delay thrombolytic use in eligible patients with acute ischemic stroke. Presentation with acute ischemic stroke at night did result in delays of care for patients undergoing interventional therapies.

  14. Results of Membrane-Activated Chelator Stroke Intervention randomized trial of DP-b99 in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Kennedy R; Bornstein, Natan; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Gorelick, Philip B; Rosenberg, Gilad; Shuaib, Ashfaq

    2013-03-01

    DP-b99, a lipophilic moderate-affinity chelator of zinc, was postulated to improve recovery after acute ischemic stroke. We evaluated the safety and therapeutic effects of DP-b99 in patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke. The Membrane-Activated Chelator Stroke Intervention trial was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, parallel-group trial of intravenous DP-b99 administered for 4 consecutive days (NCT00893867). Acute ischemic stroke patients within 9 hours of onset, but untreated by alteplase, with a baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 10 to 16, and evidence of language dysfunction, visual field defect, and neglect were eligible. The primary efficacy analysis compared distributions of functional status measured by modified Rankin score in the intent-to-treat population of patients with any post-treatment outcome, adjusted for initial severity. Functional and neurological recovery were secondary measures. Home time was an exploratory end point. Enrollment terminated at n=446 after the planned interim analysis determined futility; follow-up continued. Final modified Rankin score distributions were equal between DP-b99 and placebo-treated groups (P=0.10; P(adj) adjusted for baseline age and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale=0.21). Fewer patients recovered to modified Rankin score ≤1 in the DP-b99-treated group (45/218; 20.6%) than after placebo (63/219; 28.8%) (P=0.05; P(adj)=0.10). Similarly, fewer patients attained National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤1 after DP-b99 (42/218; 19.3%) than placebo (56/219; 25.6%; P=0.10; P(adj)=0.26). Mortality was similar between DP-b99 and placebo intent-to-treat groups (36/218; 16.5% vs 33/219; 15.1%; P=0.68). Home time was unchanged by treatment (median 36 vs 36.5 days; P=0.25). Despite encouraging preclinical and phase II trial data, DP-b99 shows no evidence of efficacy in treating human ischemic stroke.

  15. Hospitalization for infection and risk of acute ischemic stroke: the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkind, Mitchell S V; Carty, Cara L; O'Meara, Ellen S; Lumley, Thomas; Lefkowitz, David; Kronmal, Richard A; Longstreth, W T

    2011-07-01

    Little is known about the acute precipitants of ischemic stroke, although evidence suggests infections contribute to risk. We hypothesized that acute hospitalization for infection is associated with the short-term risk of stroke. The case-crossover design was used to compare hospitalization for infection during case periods (90, 30, or 14 days before an incident ischemic stroke) and control periods (equivalent time periods exactly 1 or 2 years before stroke) in the Cardiovascular Health Study, a population-based cohort of 5888 elderly participants from 4 US sites. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated by conditional logistic regression. Confirmatory analyses assessed hazard ratios of stroke from Cox regression models, with hospitalization for infection as a time-varying exposure. During a median follow-up of 12.2 years, 669 incident ischemic strokes were observed in participants without a baseline history of stroke. Hospitalization for infection was more likely during case than control time periods; for 90 days before stroke, OR=3.4 (95% CI, 1.8 to 6.5). The point estimates of risks were higher when we examined shorter intervals: for 30 days, OR=7.3 (95% CI, 1.9 to 40.9), and for 14 days, OR=8.0 (95% CI, 1.7 to 77.3). In survival analyses, risk of stroke was associated with hospitalization for infection in the preceding 90 days, adjusted hazard ratio=2.4 (95% CI, 1.6 to 3.4). Hospitalization for infection is associated with a short-term increased risk of stroke, with higher risks observed for shorter intervals preceding stroke.

  16. Low dose CT perfusion in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Amanda; Symons, Sean; Jakubovic, Raphael; Zhang, Liying; Aviv, Richard I. [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); So, Aaron; Lee, Ting-Yim [Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine if CT perfusion (CTP) measurements at low doses (LD = 20 or 50 mAs) are similar to those obtained at regular doses (RD = 100 mAs), with and without the addition of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). A single-center, prospective study was performed in patients with acute ischemic stroke (n = 37; 54 % male; age = 74 ± 15 years). Two CTP scans were performed on each subject: one at 100 mAs (RD) and one at either 50 or 20 mAs (LD). CTP parameters were compared between the RD and LD scans in regions of ischemia, infarction, and normal tissue. Differences were determined using a within-subjects ANOVA (p < 0.05) followed by a paired t test post hoc analysis (p < 0.01). At 50 mAs, there was no significant difference between cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), or time to maximum enhancement (Tmax) values for the RD and LD scans in the ischemic, infarcted, or normal contralateral regions (p < 0.05). At 20 mAs, there were significant differences between the RD and LD scans for all parameters in the ischemic and normal tissue regions (p > 0.05). CTP-derived CBF and CBV are not different at 50 mAs compared to 100 mAs, even without the addition of ASIR. Current CTP protocols can be modified to reduce the effective dose by 50 % without altering CTP measurements. (orig.)

  17. Patterns of regional cerebral blood flow in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Skriver, E B

    1981-01-01

    In a consecutive group of 56 stroke patients the regional cerebral blood flow was measured within 84 hours after stroke. A 254 multidetector scintillation camera and the intracarotid Xenon-133 injection method was used to study rCBF. Typical rCBF-patterns are described and compared to the findings...

  18. Report of moderate or severe sodium and chloride disturbance on 82 cases with acute cerebral stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma shun-tian

    2000-01-01

    Abtract Objective: To decrease the fatality rate and prevalence rotc of acute cerebral stroke complicated with morderate or servere serum sodium and chioride disturbance by explonng the relation between the pathogency and prognosis Methods: Medical records were surveyed and clinical presentation, laboratory test, complicated。 Actiology pathogency and prognosis were analyzed m 82 cases with moderate or severe serum sodium and chloride disturbance among 736 cases with acute cerebral stroke collected, Results: The prevalence rate and fatality rate of acutc cerebral stroke complicated with moderate or severe serum sodium and chlorede disturbance were 11.3% (82/ 736) and 60.8% (49/52) which were different significantly form that complicated with normal or minimal sedium sodium and chloride disturbame (p (0.001) 。 The 82 cases occured at 3-13 days after hospitalization (mean 6 days) 。 The actiology and pathogency were mainly ralated with some endogenic and iatrogenic factors such as hypothalamic-pituitary system were destroyed resultly from acute cerbral stroke which led to SIADH。 Conclusion: The fatality rate of acute cerebral stroke complicatee with moderate or seyere serum sodium and chloride disturbance is mcreased significantly, Put prophylaxis first to decrease the prevalence rate and fatalty rate。 Pay attlention to comprehensive therapy of acute cerebral stoke to prevent endogenic sodium and chloride disturbance and especially place importance on iatrogenic disturbance。

  19. Predictors of early arrival at the emergency department in acute ischaemic stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Curran, C

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: A requirement of an effective acute stroke service is the early arrival of patients to the hospital emergency department (ED). This will allow the possible use of thrombolytic therapy or other acute interventions within a limited time window. AIMS: We investigated the predictors of early arrival in a single hospital serving a mixed urban and rural catchment area. METHODS: A retrospective review of all case notes for 1 year was performed. RESULTS: Of 105 acute strokes, 91 were cerebral infarcts and a total of 71 cases presenting initially to the ED had timing available for analysis. 39.4% presented within 3 h, and 12.7% were potentially suitable for thrombolysis. Those living closer to the hospital were not more likely to arrive within 3 h (Z = -0.411, p = 0.68). Presenting directly to the hospital by emergency services (or private transport) was significantly associated with early arrival in a univariate comparison (p < 0.001), and in a multivariate model. CONCLUSION: The only independent predictor of early arrival to the ED is direct presentation. Improved public education of the importance of recognition of stroke symptoms and rapid contact with the emergency services will improve the early attendance following acute stroke, allowing increased use of acute stroke treatments.

  20. The Role of Prestroke Glycemic Control on Severity and Outcome of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Hjalmarsson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Relatively few studies have investigated the association of prestroke glycemic control and clinical outcome in acute ischemic stroke (IS patients, regardless of presence of diabetes mellitus (DM. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of prestroke glycemic control on survival, stroke severity, and functional outcome of patients with acute IS. Methods. We performed a retrospective survival analysis of 501 patients with IS admitted to Sahlgrenska University Hospital from February 15, 2005, through May 31, 2009. The outcomes of interest were acute and long-term survival; the stroke severity (NIHSS and the functional outcome, mRS, at 12 months. Results. HbA1c was a good predictor of acute (HR 1.45; CI, 1.09 to 1.93, P=0.011 and long-term mortality (HR 1.29; CI 1.03 to 1.62; P=0.029. Furthermore, HbA1c >6% was significantly correlated with acute stroke severity (OR 1.29; CI 1.01 to 1.67; P=0.042 and predicted worse functional outcome at 12 months (OR 2.68; CI 1.14 to 6.03; P=0.024. Conclusions. Our study suggests that poor glycemic control (baseline HbA1c prior to IS is an independent risk factor for poor survival and a marker for increased stroke severity and unfavorable long-term functional outcome.

  1. Assessment of Serum UCH-L1 and GFAP in Acute Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Changhong; Kobeissy, Firas; Alawieh, Ali; Li, Na; Li, Ning; Zibara, Kazem; Zoltewicz, Susie; Guingab-Cagmat, Joy; Larner, Stephen F.; Ding, Yuchuan; Hayes, Ronald L.; Ji, Xunming; Mondello, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and reliable diagnostic test to distinguish ischemic from hemorrhagic stroke in patients presenting with stroke-like symptoms is essential to optimize management and triage for thrombolytic therapy. The present study measured serum concentrations of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase (UCH-L1) and glial fibrillary astrocytic protein (GFAP) in acute stroke patients and healthy controls and investigated their relation to stroke severity and patient characteristics. We also assessed the diagnostic performance of these markers for the differentiation of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) from ischemic stroke (IS). Both UCH-L1 and GFAP concentrations were significantly greater in ICH patients than in controls (p < 0.0001). However, exclusively GFAP differed in ICH compared with IS (p < 0.0001). GFAP yielded an AUC of 0.86 for differentiating between ICH and IS within 4.5hrs of symptom onset with a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 96% using a cut-off of 0.34ng/ml. Higher GFAP levels were associated with stroke severity and history of prior stroke. Our results demonstrate that blood UCH-L1 and GFAP are increased early after stroke and distinct biomarker-specific release profiles are associated with stroke characteristics and type. We also confirmed the potential of GFAP as a tool for early rule-in of ICH, while UCH-L1 was not clinically useful. PMID:27074724

  2. Multimodal use of computed tomography in early acute stroke, part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaroni, R; Tambasco, N; Cardaioli, G; Parnetti, L; Paloni, F; Boranga, B; Pelliccioli, G P

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scan remains the most widely technique in the cerebrovascular emergency, as it is largely available, minimally invasive, fast, cheap and reliable. Noncontrast enhanced CT (NeCT) imaging can show early signs of infarction in ischemic stroke; however, it could not show if the ischemic tissue is irreversibly damaged. CT perfusion (CTP) imaging has been shown to predict stroke location and size and can provide information about ischemic cerebral parenchyma not definitively compromised. CT angiography (CTA) could highlight stenosis or occlusion both in intracranial and extracranial vessels. By combining NeCT, CTP, and CTA the entire cerebrovascular axis can be imaged during acute stroke. Currently, the term "multimodal CT" indicates the combined use of these three techniques in order to obtain a complete picture of the extension of ischemic damage in acute stroke patients.

  3. Tools and early management of language and swallowing disorders in acute stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamand-Roze, Constance; Cauquil-Michon, Cécile; Denier, Christian

    2012-02-01

    The role of the stroke units in improving morbidity, mortality, and recovery from stroke is clearly demonstrated. However, acute management of language disorders in these specialized units remains controversial, and management of swallowing disorders is usually nonstandardized. The recent validation of a scale for rapid screening of language disorders (LAST [Language Screening Test]) in acute stroke patients should allow optimization of their detection and early management. Swallowing disorders should be screened and managed using a standardized protocol. Following early initial evaluation repeated on a daily basis, they justify tailored rehabilitation sessions, adaptation of food textures, team formation, and families' information. The use of these protocols implies the cooperation and coordination of the medical and paramedical teams and the daily presence of speech therapists. These aspects are crucial for patients in the stroke units to achieve full benefits from the management proposed in this paper, leading to diminution of complications and better long-term functional prognosis.

  4. Chronic hyperglycemia is related to poor functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luitse, Merel Ja; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Kappelle, L Jaap; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2017-02-01

    Background Acute hyperglycemia is associated with poor functional outcome after ischemic stroke, but the association between chronic antecedent hyperglycemia and outcome is unclear. Aim We assessed the association between chronic hyperglycemia, measured by hemoglobin A1c, and functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods We included 812 patients with acute ischemic stroke (mean age 66 ± 14 years; 61.5% male). Patients were categorized per hemoglobin A1c level: no (chronic hyperglycemia (>42 mmol/mol). Poor functional outcome was defined as modified Rankin Scale score > 2 after 3 months. The relation between chronic hyperglycemia and functional outcome was assessed with a Poisson regression analysis and expressed as risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals with no chronic hyperglycemia as the reference. Results Moderate chronic hyperglycemia was present in 234 (28.8%) patients and severe chronic hyperglycemia in 183 (22.5%) patients. Acute hyperglycemia on admission was present in 338 (41.6%) patients. Severe chronic hyperglycemia was associated with poor outcome (risk ratios 1.40; 95% confidence interval 1.09-1.79). After adjustment for age, sex, stroke severity, vascular risk factors, and acute hyperglycemia on admission the risk ratios was 1.35 (95% confidence interval 1.04-1.76). Moderate chronic hyperglycemia was not associated with poor outcome (risk ratios 1.12; 95% confidence interval 0.87-1.44). Conclusion Severe chronic hyperglycemia is associated with poor functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This association is independent of hyperglycemia in the acute stage of stroke and of an unfavorable vascular risk factor profile.

  5. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rehabilitation helps individuals overcome disabilities that result from stroke damage. Drug therapy with blood thinners is the most common treatment for stroke. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  6. Brain CT-scan in acute stroke patients: silent infarcts and relation to outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corea, Francesco; Tambasco, Nicola; Luccioli, Roberto; Ciorba, Ettore; Parnetti, Lucilla; Gallai, Virgilio

    2002-01-01

    Silent infarcts (SIs) are common findings in stroke patients, but their clinical significance remains controversial. Aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of SI in consecutive stroke patients, characteristics, associated factors, and influence on in-hospital mortality. The population consisted of 191 patients, consecutively admitted for an acute stroke. Of 191 patients, 74 had SI on CT-scan. Silent infarcts were often multiple, right sided, lacunar. We found SI more frequently in older patients, smokers, with an ischemic stroke having small vessel disease as presumed cause. In our study SI were associated with ageing, smoke habit and lacunar stroke. Silent infarcts size influenced the rate of in-hospital mortality.

  7. Reliability of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging in detection of cerebral microbleeds in stroke patients

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    Lamiaa G. El-Serougy

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: SWI is an important reliable technique allows accurate detection of CMBs occurring in association with hemorrhage in acute and chronic stroke and should be included in the protocols for assessment of stroke to help in choice of proper treatment and prediction of future attacks.

  8. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate: Can be a prognostic marker in acute ischemic stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Selçuk Çomoğlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR values and the severity of neurological findings on admission, short- term prognosis, risk factors and etiology of the patients with acute ischemic stroke. MATERIAL and METHODS: One hundred and fifty-eight consecutive patients who admitted to the hospital within 24 hours of stroke onset were retrospectively analyzed. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS and modified Rankin Scale (mRS scores on admission and mRS scores at discharge, brain imaging findings, stroke etiology and risk factors of the patients were recorded. Patients were classified into three groups according to ESR values on admission and compared in terms of severity of clinical symptoms on admission, short-term prognosis, risk factors and etiology of stroke. RESULTS: A total 158 patients with acute ischemic stroke including 89 women and 69 men were enrolled in the study. Patients with ESR≤10 mm/h were included in group 1 (n=49, ESR levels between 11-25 mm/h were included in group 2 (n=69 and ESR≥26 mm/h were included in group 3 (n=40. No significant difference was determined between the groups in terms of NIHSS and mRS scores on admission and mRS scores at discharge and etiology of stroke. While coronary artery disease was found more frequently in group 1 and 2 than group 3 (p=0.018, valvular heart disease was more frequently in group 2 than group 1 (p=0.037. CONCLUSION: The results of our study revealed that ESR levels on admission do not reflect the severity of stroke and can not be accepted as a useful predictor of short-term prognosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  9. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents increase the risk of acute stroke in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliger, Stephen L.; Zhang, Amy D.; Weir, Matthew R.; Walker, Loreen; Hsu, Van Doren; Parsa, Afshin; Diamantidis, Clarissa; Fink, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are effective in ameliorating anemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, a recent trial in diabetic CKD patients suggested a greater stroke risk associated with full correction of anemia using ESAs. We performed a case-control study examining the association of incident ESA use with acute stroke in CKD patients, using national Veterans Affairs data. Patients with eGFR<60 cc/min/1.73m2 and outpatient hemoglobin (Hb)<12g/dL were included. Acute hospitalized stroke cases (N=2071) were identified using diagnosis codes and matched 1:5 to controls without stroke. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the association of ESA use with stroke, adjusting for potential confounders. After multivariate adjustment, ESA use (N=1026, 8.3%) was associated with 30% greater odds of stroke (odds ratio[OR]=1.30, 95% confidence interval[CI]: 1.06, 1.58). There was significant interaction (p=.015) between ESA use and cancer; ESA use was associated with 85% greater odds of stroke in cancer patients (95% CI: 1.26, 2.65), but not associated with stroke in patients without cancer (OR=1.07, 95% CI: 0.85, 1.35). ESA-treated patients with cancer received a median initial dose 2.5 to 4 times greater than ESA patients without cancer, but pre-ESA Hb and rate of Hb change did not differ between groups. Among a large national sample of anemic CKD patients, ESA treatment is associated with an increased risk of acute stroke, with the greatest effect among patients with cancer. PMID:21389972

  10. Impact of early enteral nutrition on short term prognosis after acute stroke.

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    Zheng, Tianheng; Zhu, Xinpu; Liang, Huazheng; Huang, Haixia; Yang, Jiandao; Wang, Shaoshi

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesized that early enteral nutritional support would improve the short term prognosis of acute stroke patients with dysphagia, demonstrated by lower malnutrition rates, lower complication rates, and lower National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores at 90 days post stroke. Nutrition support is an essential element in the care of stroke patients and many studies have investigated the effect of specific nutritional elements on stroke patients. However, few studies have looked at the impact of complete enteral nutrition on Chinese patients with acute stroke. To investigate this, we conducted a randomized controlled trial of 146 patients with acute stroke and dysphagia, among whom 75 were supported with nasogastric nutrition and 71 received family managed nutrition after randomization. Nutritional status, nosocomial infection and mortality rates were recorded on day 21 of hospitalization. Neurological deficits were evaluated by the NIHSS activities of daily living Barthel index (ADLBI) and the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and compared between the two groups. We found that the nasogastric nutrition group had a better nutritional status and reduced nosocomial infection and mortality rates after 21 days compared with patients in the family managed nutrition group. In addition, the nasogastric nutrition group showed a lower score on the NIHSS than the control group. However, the differences in the scores of the ADLBI and the 90 day mRS between the groups were not significant. Taken together, the present study shows that early enteral nutrition support improves the short term prognosis of acute stroke patients with dysphagia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Predictive value of routine hematological and biochemical parameters on 30-day fatality in acute stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia R; Garg R.; Gaur S; Kar A; Shukla R; Agarwal A; Verma R

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This prospective study was planned to study the prognostic value of routine clinical, hematological and biochemical parameters, including platelet aggregation in patients of acute stroke, on fatality occurring during the first 30 days. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this study 116 consecutive patients (77 males and 39 females) of stroke (within 72 hours of onset) were included. After clinical evaluation and neuroimaging, blood investigations, hemoglobin, total leukocyte count, platelet c...

  12. Routine Troponin Measurements Are Unnecessary to Exclude Asymptomatic Coronary Events in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farwa; Young, Jimmy; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Flemming, Kelly D; Fugate, Jennifer E

    2016-05-01

    Obtaining serum troponin levels in every patient with acute stroke is recommended in recent stroke guidelines, but there is no evidence that these contribute positively to clinical care. We sought to determine the clinical significance of measuring troponin levels in acute ischemic stroke patients. We reviewed 398 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke at a large academic institution from 2010 to 2012. Troponin levels were measured as a result of protocol in place during part of the study period. The mean age was 70 years (standard deviation ±16 years) and 197 (49.5%) were men. Chronic kidney disease was present in 78 (19.6%), coronary artery disease in 107 (26.9%), and atrial fibrillation in 107 (26.9%). Serum troponin T was measured in 246 of 398 patients (61.8%). Troponin was elevated (>.01 ng/mL) at any point in 38 of 246 patients (15.5%) and was elevated in 28 patients at all 3 measurements (11.3% of those with troponin measured). Only 4 of 246 patients (1.6%) had a significant uptrend. Two were iatrogenic in the setting of hemodynamic augmentation using vasopressors to maintain cerebral perfusion. One case was attributed to stroke and chronic kidney disease and another case to heart failure from inflammatory fibrocalcific mitral valvular heart disease. Serum troponin elevation in patients with ischemic stroke is not usually caused by clinically significant acute myocardial ischemia unless iatrogenic in the setting of vasopressor administration. Serum troponin levels should be measured judicially, based on clinical context, rather than routinely in all stroke patients. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Incidence, trends, and predictors of ischemic stroke 30 days after an acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajermo, Ulf; Ulvenstam, Anders; Modica, Angelo; Jernberg, Tomas; Mooe, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Ischemic stroke is a known complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Treatment of AMI has undergone great changes in recent years. We aimed to investigate whether changes in treatment corresponded to a lower incidence of ischemic stroke and which factors predicted ischemic stroke after AMI. Data were taken from the Swedish Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive Care Admissions. Patients with their first registered AMI between 1998 and 2008 were included. To identify ischemic strokes, we used the Swedish national patient register. To study a potential trend in the incidence of ischemic stroke after AMI over time, we divided the patient population into 5 time periods. Event-free survival was studied by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to identify stroke predictors. Of 173,233 patients with AMI, 3571 (2.1%) developed ischemic stroke within 30 days. The incidence of ischemic stroke was significantly lower during the years 2007 to 2008 compared with 1998 to 2000, with respective rates of 2.0% and 2.2% (P=0.02). Independent predictors of an increased risk of stroke were age, female sex, prior stroke, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, clinical signs of heart failure in hospital, ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment at discharge. Percutaneous coronary intervention, fibrinolysis, acetylsalicylic acid, statins, and P2Y12 inhibitors were predictors of reduced risk of stroke. The incidence of ischemic stroke within 30 days of an AMI has decreased during the period 1998 to 2008. This decrease is associated with increased use of acetylsalicylic acid, P2Y12 inhibitors, statins, and percutaneous coronary intervention.

  14. Expedited computed tomography perfusion and angiography in acute ischemic stroke: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Nina T; Cernetich, John; Kanamalla, Uday S; Kochan, Jeffrey P; Reimer, Hannah; Freeman, Brent; Jungreis, Charles

    2012-08-01

    Acute ischemic stroke diagnosis and treatment are among the most challenging in Emergency Medicine. Perfusion computed tomography (CTP) can increase the sensitivity for detecting ischemic stroke and, especially with the addition of CT angiography (CTA), improve decision-making regarding thrombolytic therapy compared to non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) alone. However, because acute stroke protocols do not generally include procedures for multimodal imaging, they are not commonly performed. In addition, there is concern that additional studies could delay or preclude therapy in patients otherwise eligible for thrombolytic therapy. To demonstrate the feasibility of perfusion CTP and CTA in addition to NCCT of the brain in the emergency assessment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Starting January 2008, multimodal (CTP and CTA) imaging was added to NCCT in the Emergency Department (ED) initial assessment of patients with stroke of ≤ 5 h duration. Over the subsequent 9 months, we measured the time from ED arrival to imaging and to recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) treatment and compared these times to patients evaluated with CT alone. From January to October 2008, 95 patients had CTP and CTA studies in addition to NCCT for acute ischemic stroke. There were no differences between the average time to CT study or to rt-PA treatment between patients evaluated with multimodal CT imaging and patients assessed with NCCT alone. Combining CTP and CTA with NCCT is feasible and does not adversely increase the time to CT imaging or rt-PA treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical review and implications of the guideline for the early management of patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesay, Sarah L

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and the leading cause of significant, long-term disability in the United States. Clinicians' knowledge and use of evidence to guide the care of patients with ischemic stroke are paramount to improving patient outcomes. The recently updated "Guidelines for the Early Management of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association" provides clinicians with evidence-based, expert consensus to guide the recognition and early management of patients with acute ischemic stroke. The guideline provides 115 recommendations for the management of patients with acute ischemic stroke, including 24 new recommendations and 51 revised recommendations divided into 14 major topic areas. This article reviews the recommendations and related literature and provides suggestions for use and implementation of the guideline within a stroke program of care.

  16. Gender differences in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Valeria; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Corea, Francesco; Ageno, Walter; Alberti, Andrea; Lanari, Alessia; Micheli, Sara; Bertolani, Luca; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Billeci, Antonia M R; Comi, Giancarlo; Previdi, Paolo; Silvestrelli, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on women than men owing to the fact that women have more stroke events and are less likely to recover. Age-specific stroke rates are higher in men; however, because of women's longer life expectancy and the much higher incidence of stroke at older ages, women have more stroke events than men overall. The aims of this prospective study in consecutive patients were to assess whether there are gender differences in stroke risk factors, treatment or outcome. Consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were included in this prospective study at four study centers. Disability was assessed using a modified Rankin Scale score (>or=3 indicating disabling stroke) in both genders at 90 days. Outcomes and risk factors in both genders were compared using the chi(2) test. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify any independent predictors of outcome. A total of 1136 patients were included in this study; of these, 494 (46%) were female. Women were statistically older compared with men: 76.02 (+/- 12.93) and 72.68 (+/- 13.27) median years of age, respectively. At admission, females had higher NIH Stroke Scale scores compared with males (9.4 [+/- 6.94] vs 7.6 [+/- 6.28] for men; p = 0.0018). Furthermore, females tended to have more cardioembolic strokes (153 [30%] vs 147 [23%] for men; p = 0.004). Males had lacunar and atherosclerotic strokes more often (146 [29%] vs 249 [39%] for men; p = 0.002, and 68 [13%] vs 123 [19%] for men; p = 0.01, respectively). The mean modified Rankin Scale score at 3 months was also significantly different between genders, at 2.5 (+/- 2.05) for women and 2.1 (+/- 2.02) for men (p = 0.003). However, at multivariate analysis, female gender was not an indicator for negative outcome. It was concluded that female gender was not an independent factor for negative outcome. In addition, both genders demonstrated different stroke pathophysiologies. These findings should be taken into account when diagnostic workup and

  17. Cardiac Arrest in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Incidence, Predisposing Factors, and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joundi, Raed A; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Nikneshan, Davar; Tu, Jack V; Fang, Jiming; Holloway, Robert; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac arrest is a devastating complication of acute ischemic stroke, but little is known about its incidence and characteristics. We studied a large ischemic stroke inpatient population and compared patients with and without cardiac arrest. We studied consecutive patients from the Ontario Stroke Registry who had an ischemic stroke between July 2003 and June 2008 at 11 tertiary care stroke centers in Ontario. Multivariable analyses were used to determine independent predictors of cardiac arrest and associated outcomes. Adjusted survival curves were computed, and hazard ratios for mortality at 30 days and 1 year were determined for cardiac arrest and other major outcomes. Among the 9019 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 352 had cardiac arrest, for an overall incidence of 3.9%. In a sensitivity analysis with palliative patients removed, the incidence of cardiac arrest was 2.5%. Independent predictors of cardiac arrest were as follows: older age, greater stroke severity, preadmission dependence, and a history of diabetes, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Systemic complications associated with cardiac arrest were as follows: myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, sepsis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and pneumonia. Patients with cardiac arrest had higher disability at discharge, and a markedly increased 30-day mortality of 82.1% compared with 9.3% without cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest had a high incidence and was associated with poor outcomes after ischemic stroke, including multiple medical complications and very high mortality. Predictors of cardiac arrest identified in this study could help risk stratify ischemic stroke patients for cardiac investigations and prolonged cardiac monitoring. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Torsade de pointes indicates early neurologic damage in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Yen; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Lin, Wen-Yu; Cheng, Cheng-Chung; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Tsai, Tsung-Neng

    2013-12-01

    Torsade de pointes (TdP) is a life-threatening polymorphic ventricular tachycardia that is related to QT prolongation. Although QT prolongation is commonly seen in acute stroke, TdP is rare. We report the case of a 78-year-old woman with ischemic stroke who presented with TdP as the initial manifestation of early neurologic deterioration. We hypothesized that an increase in intracranial pressure may result in neurohormonal activation, QT prolongation, and then myocardial damage, leading to TdP. We highlight that new onset of TdP in a patient with stroke may reflect neurologic deterioration, requiring further evaluation and specific intervention.

  19. Disruption of brain connectivity in acute stroke patients with early impairment in consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hsiung eTsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impairment in consciousness is common in acute stroke patients and is correlated with the clinical outcome after stroke. The underlying mechanism is not completely understood, with little known about brain activity and connectivity changes in acute stroke patients having impaired consciousness. In this study, we investigated changes in regional brain activity and brain networks of consciousness impaired stroke patients, as well as the amplitude of spontaneous low frequency fluctuation (ALFF of each time series. Regional homogeneity (ReHo of each voxel was measured, and resting state network analysis was consequently conducted. Results from this study demonstrate that, compared to normal subjects, the intensities of ALFF and ReHo, as well as the strength of the default mode network (DMN connectivity, were significantly decreased in the precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex regions among stroke patients with impaired consciousness. Furthermore, the strength of the DMN was highly correlated with differences in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS scores between the onset time and the scanning time. Results from this study suggest that the resting state fMRI is a feasible tool for the evaluation of acute stroke patients with an early impairment of consciousness. The detailed mechanisms, implications of these brain activities and networks exhibiting changes will require further investigation.

  20. Current knowledge on the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties of citicoline in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, Mikhail Yu; Gusev, Eugeny I

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of long-lasting disability and death. Two main strategies have been proposed for the treatment of ischemic stroke: restoration of blood flow by thrombolysis or mechanical thrombus extraction during the first few hours of ischemic stroke, which is one of the most effective treatments and leads to a better functional and clinical outcome. The other direction of treatment, which is potentially applicable to most of the patients with ischemic stroke, is neuroprotection. Initially, neuroprotection was mainly targeted at protecting gray matter, but during the past few years there has been a transition from a neuron-oriented approach toward salvaging the whole neurovascular unit using multimodal drugs. Citicoline is a multimodal drug that exhibits neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects in a variety of experimental and clinical disorders of the central nervous system, including acute and chronic cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and global cerebral hypoxia. Citicoline has a prolonged therapeutic window and is active at various temporal and biochemical stages of the ischemic cascade. In acute ischemic stroke, citicoline provides neuroprotection by attenuating glutamate exitotoxicity, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In the subacute and chronic phases of ischemic stroke, citicoline exhibits neuroregenerative effects and activates neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and angiogenesis and enhances neurotransmitter metabolism. Acute and long-term treatment with citicoline is safe and in most clinical studies is effective and improves functional outcome.

  1. Matrix metalloproteinases and blood-brain barrier disruption in acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen E Lakhan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke continues to be one of the most challenging diseases in translational neurology. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA remains the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its use is limited to the first hours after stroke onset due to an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation over time resulting in enhanced brain injury. In this review we discuss the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption as a consequence of ischemic stroke. MMP-9 in particular appears to play an important role in tPAassociated hemorrhagic complications.Reactive oxygen species (ROS can enhance the effects of tPA on MMP activation through the loss of caveolin-1, a protein encoded in the cav-1 gene that serves as a critical determinant of BBB permeability. This review provides an overview of MMPs' role in BBB breakdown during acute ischemic stroke. The possible role of MMPs in combination treatment of acute ischemic stroke is also examined.

  2. Reduction of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Contrast of Acute Ischemic Stroke at Short Diffusion Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Corey Allan; Kate, Mahesh; Gioia, Laura; Butcher, Kenneth; Emery, Derek; Budde, Matthew; Beaulieu, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of tissue water is a sensitive and specific indicator of acute brain ischemia, where reductions of the diffusion of tissue water are observed acutely in the stroke lesion core. Although these diffusion changes have been long attributed to cell swelling, the precise nature of the biophysical mechanisms remains uncertain. The potential cause of diffusion reductions after stroke was investigated using an advanced DWI technique, oscillating gradient spin-echo DWI, that enables much shorter diffusion times and can improve specificity for alterations of structure at the micron level. Diffusion measurements in the white matter lesions of patients with acute ischemic stroke were reduced by only 8% using oscillating gradient spin-echo DWI, in contrast to a 37% decrease using standard DWI. Neurite beading has recently been proposed as a mechanism for the diffusion changes after ischemic stroke with some ex vivo evidence. To explore whether beading could cause such differential results, simulations of beaded cylinders and axonal swelling were performed, yielding good agreement with experiment. Short diffusion times result in dramatically reduced diffusion contrast of human stroke. Simulations implicate a combination of neuronal beading and axonal swelling as the key structural changes leading to the reduced apparent diffusion coefficient after stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Knowledge of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke among community residents in western urban China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Zheng, Min; Chen, Shuqun; Ou, Shu; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Ni; Cao, Yingying; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Thrombolytic therapy rate for acute ischemic stroke remains low, and improving public awareness of thrombolytic therapy may be helpful to reduce delay and increase chances of thrombolytic therapy. Our purpose was to survey the level of knowledge about thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke among community residents in Yuzhong district, Chongqing, China. In 2011, a population-based face-to-face interview survey was conducted in Yuzhong district, Chongqing. A total of 1500 potential participants aged ≥18 years old were selected using a multi-stage sampling method. A total of 1101 participants completed the survey. Only 23.3% (95% CI = 20.8 to 25.8) were aware of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke, of whom 59.9% (95% CI = 53.9 to 65.9) knew the time window. Awareness of thrombolytic therapy was higher among young people, those with higher levels of education and household income, those with health insurance, and those who knew all 5 stroke warning signs, while awareness of the time window was higher among those aged 75 years or older. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that awareness of thrombolytic therapy was independently associated with age, education level, health insurance and knowledge of stroke warning signs (Pacute ischemic stroke.

  4. Thrombolytic therapy. From myocardial to cerebral infarction. The MAST-I Group. Multicentre Acute Stroke Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candelise, L; Roncaglioni, C; Aritzu, E; Ciccone, A; Maggioni, A P

    1996-02-01

    Thrombolysis is proposed for the acute treatment of cerebral infarction as it is able to recanalize occluded arteries and thus potentially restore normal perfusion of the cerebral parenchyma, but the results concerning the efficacy of this treatment are still inconclusive. However, it has been fully demonstrated that thrombolytic treatment, leads to a significant reduction in mortality, in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Data from all of the pilot studies using SK or tPA treatment in acute stroke are described in this review, which underlines the incidence of hemorrhagic transformation (hemorrhagic infart and parenchymal hematoma) and its possible correlation to clinical worsening. Pharmacological, experimental and clinical studies encourage the carrying out of large-scale clinical trials using thrombolytics in patients with acute cerebral infarction. Significant data relating to ongoing controlled clinical trials will be available in the near future; only after the analysis of these results will it be possible to confirm the efficacy of thrombolytics in acute stroke.

  5. Troponin elevation in acute ischemic stroke (TRELAS)--protocol of a prospective observational trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheitz, Jan F; Mochmann, Hans-Christian; Nolte, Christian H; Haeusler, Karl G; Audebert, Heinrich J; Heuschmann, Peter U; Laufs, Ulrich; Witzenbichler, Bernhard; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Endres, Matthias

    2011-08-08

    Levels of the cardiac muscle regulatory protein troponin T (cTnT) are frequently elevated in patients with acute ischemic stroke and elevated cTnT predicts poor outcome and mortality. The pathomechanism of troponin release may relate to co-morbid coronary artery disease and myocardial ischemia or, alternatively, to neurogenic cardiac damage due to autonomic activation after acute ischemic stroke. Therefore, there is uncertainty about how acute ischemic stroke patients with increased cTnT levels should be managed regarding diagnostic and therapeutic workup. The primary objective of the prospective observational trial TRELAS (TRoponin ELevation in Acute ischemic Stroke) is to investigate the frequency and underlying pathomechanism of cTnT elevation in acute ischemic stroke patients in order to give guidance for clinical practice. All consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted within 72 hours after symptom onset to the Department of Neurology at the Campus Benjamin Franklin of the University Hospital Charité will be screened for cTnT elevations (i.e. ≥ 0.05 μg/l) on admission and again on the following day. Patients with increased cTnT will undergo coronary angiography within 72 hours. Diagnostic findings of coronary angiograms will be compared with age- and gender-matched patients presenting with Non-ST-Elevation myocardial infarction to the Department of Cardiology. The primary endpoint of the study will be the occurrence of culprit lesions in the coronary angiogram indicating underlying co-morbid obstructive coronary artery disease. Secondary endpoints will be the localization of stroke in the cerebral imaging and left ventriculographic findings of wall motion abnormalities suggestive of stroke-induced global cardiac dysfunction. TRELAS will prospectively determine the frequency and possible etiology of troponin elevation in a large cohort of ischemic stroke patients. The findings are expected to contribute to clarify pathophysiologic concepts of

  6. Prognostic Relationships between Microbleed, Lacunar Infarction, White Matter Lesion, and Renal Dysfunction in Acute Ischemic Stroke Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae Woong; Jeong, Hye Seon; Choi, Dae Eun; Ham, Young Rok; Na, Ki Ryang; Lee, Kang Wook; Shin, Jong Wook; Kim, Jei

    2017-02-01

    It is well known that renal dysfunction and cerebral small-vessel disease (SVD), including microbleed, lacunar infarction, and white matter lesion (WML), are associated with poor prognosis after ischemic stroke. However, the prognostic relationship between renal dysfunction and SVD has not been well evaluated in acute ischemic stroke survivors. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the prognostic relationships between estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and cerebral SVD after acute ischemic stroke. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological data of acute ischemic stroke survivors with decreased eGFR (acute ischemic stroke survivors. Both renal impairment and the presence of SVD were predictors of poor poststroke survival. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Endovascular therapy in acute ischemic stroke: The way forward after results from the IMS 3, SYNTHESIS and MR Rescue trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijoy K Menon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular therapy (EVT has gained vogue in the management of patients with acute stroke. Newer stent-retriever devices have led to better recanalization rates. In many centers, EVT is slowly being used as an add on to or in some instances, even as an alternative to intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA. The publication of the results of the SYNTHESIS expansion, Interventional Management of Stroke III and Mechanical Retrieval Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy trials in 2013 has questioned the enthusiastic use of EVT in acute stroke. They demonstrate that EVT (using a variety of devices is no superior to IV tPA in the management of acute stroke. In the light of these controversial findings, we review the current status of EVT in the management of acute stroke.

  8. RECAST (Remote Ischemic Conditioning After Stroke Trial): A Pilot Randomized Placebo Controlled Phase II Trial in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Timothy J; Hedstrom, Amanda; O'Sullivan, Saoirse; Donnelly, Richard; Barrett, David A; Sarmad, Sarir; Sprigg, Nikola; Bath, Philip M

    2017-05-01

    Repeated episodes of limb ischemia and reperfusion (remote ischemic conditioning [RIC]) may improve outcome after acute stroke. We performed a pilot blinded placebo-controlled trial in patients with acute ischemic stroke, randomized 1:1 to receive 4 cycles of RIC within 24 hours of ictus. The primary outcome was tolerability and feasibility. Secondary outcomes included safety, clinical efficacy (day 90), putative biomarkers (pre- and post-intervention, day 4), and exploratory hemodynamic measures. Twenty-six patients (13 RIC and 13 sham) were recruited 15.8 hours (SD 6.2) post-onset, age 76.2 years (SD 10.5), blood pressure 159/83 mm Hg (SD 25/11), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score 5 (interquartile range, 3.75-9.25). RIC was well tolerated with 49 out of 52 cycles completed in full. Three patients experienced vascular events in the sham group: 2 ischemic strokes and 2 myocardial infarcts versus none in the RIC group (P=0.076, log-rank test). Compared with sham, there was a significant decrease in day 90 NIHSS score in the RIC group, median NIHSS score 1 (interquartile range, 0.5-5) versus 3 (interquartile range, 2-9.5; P=0.04); RIC augmented plasma HSP27 (heat shock protein 27; Pacute stroke is well tolerated and appears safe and feasible. RIC may improve neurological outcome, and protective mechanisms may be mediated through HSP27. A larger trial is warranted. URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN86672015. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Paradoxical effect of obesity on hemorrhagic transformation after acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chi Kyung; Ryu, Wi-Sun; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Seung-Hoon

    2013-09-23

    Among the patients with established coronary artery diseases, obese patients tend to have a more favorable prognosis, which is called as obesity paradox. Interestingly, mildly obese patients who underwent coronary revascularization had a lower risk of bleeding. In this context, we have investigated the association between obesity and hemorrhagic transformation (HTf) after acute ischemic stroke. A total of 365 patients with first-ever acute ischemic stroke were included in this study. Demographic, clinical and radiological information was collected and HTf was evaluated through follow-up T2*-weighted gradient-recalled echo MRI performed usually within 1 week after occurrence of stroke. Body mass index was calculated, and obesity was defined using the World Health Organization Western Pacific Regional Office criteria. The HTf was identified in 59 patients (16.2%). As the severity of obesity increased, the occurrence of HTf decreased. Compared with the normal weight group and after controlling possible confounders including acute and previous treatment, stroke severity and subtype, the risk of HTf decreased significantly in the obese group (odds ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.87). The better outcome for HTf seen in obese patients suggests the existence of a "bleeding-obesity paradox" in acute ischemic stroke.

  10. Quality of health information on acute myocardial infarction and stroke in the world wide web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Ana; Paiva, Dagmara; Azevedo, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The quality of health information in the Internet may be low. This is a concerning issue in cardiovascular diseases which warrant patient self-management. We aimed to assess the quality of Portuguese websites as a source of health information on acute myocardial infarction and stroke. We used the search terms 'enfarte miocardio' and 'acidente vascular cerebral' (Portuguese terms for myocardial infarction and stroke) on Google(®), on April 5th and 7th 2011, respectively, using Internet Explorer(®). The first 200 URL retrieved in each search were independently visited and Portuguese websites in Portuguese language were selected. We analysed and classified 121 websites for structural characteristics, information coverage and accuracy of the web pages with items defined a priori, trustworthiness in general according to the Health on the Net Foundation and regarding treatments using the DISCERN instrument (48 websites). Websites were most frequently commercial (49.5%), not exclusively dedicated to acute myocardial infarction/ stroke (94.2%), and with information on medical facts (59.5%), using images, video or animation (60.3%). Websites' trustworthiness was low. None of the websites displayed the Health on the Net Foundation seal. Acute myocardial infarction/ stroke websites differed in information coverage but the accuracy of the information was acceptable, although often incomplete. The quality of information on acute myocardial infarction/ stroke in Portuguese websites was acceptable. Trustworthiness was low, impairing users' capability of identifying potentially more reliable content.

  11. Effect of paracetamol (acetaminophen) on body temperature in acute stroke: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Junjie; Chen, Chensong; Cheng, Hongsen; Wang, Ren; Ma, Linhao

    2017-03-18

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of paracetamol (acetaminophen) on body temperature in acute stroke. Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched electronically. Relevant journals and references of studies included were hand-searched for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and controlled clinical trials (CCT) regarding the efficacy of paracetamol (acetaminophen) on body temperature in acute stroke. Two reviewers independently performed data extraction and quality assessment. Data were analyzed using RevMan 5.3 software by the Cochrane Collaboration. Five studies were included. To compare the efficacy of paracetamol (acetaminophen) in acute stroke, the pooled RR (Risk Ratio) and its 95% CI of body temperature reduction at 24h from the start of treatment were -0.3 (95% CI: -0.52 to -0.08), with statistical significance (P=0.007). Consistently, the pooled RR (Risk Ratio) and its 95% CI of body temperature at 24h from the start of treatment were -0.22 (-0.29, -0.15), with statistical significance (Pacetaminophen and placebo was 0.86 (95% CI: 0.62 to 1.2), with no statistical significance (P=0.27). Acetaminophen was revealed to have some favorable influence in body temperature reduction in acute stroke, but showed no important effect on improving functional outcome and reducing adverse events of patients. What is already known on this subject? Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is one of the most commonly used antipyretic drugs and has some capability to reduce body temperature through acting on central nervous system. Acetaminophen showed some capability to decrease body temperature for acute stroke. Acetaminophen could not improve functional outcome and reduce adverse events of patients with acute stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Subclinical Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Patients with Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroosh Dabiri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is the first cause of morbidity all around the world. Entrapment neuropathies are a known complication of stroke. The objective of this study is to assess the frequency of subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in the healthy and paretic hands of stroke patients.Methods: The authors performed nerve conduction study in the first three days after admission in 39 stroke patients without subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome and 30 days after admission. Electrophysiological studies were done in both paretic and non-paretic hands. Both ulnar and median nerves were studied.Results: After one month we found subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in 16 paretic hands and 13 healthy hands. We did not find any difference in the frequency of carpal tunnel syndrome in two sides.Conclusion: The authors suggest that simultaneous different mechanisms may act in inducing carpal tunnel syndrome in both hands of hemiparetic patients.

  13. Thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting in acute ischemic stroke management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steglich-Arnholm, Henrik; Holtmannspötter, Markus; Kondziella, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    -term outcome (mRS ≤ 2). Harms included complications during and following EVT. Mean age was 64.3 years (standard deviation ±12.5), 40 (85%) patients received IVT initially. Median NIHSS was 16 (inter-quartile range 14-19). Mean time from stroke onset to recanalization was 311 min (standard deviation ±78......Extracranial carotid artery occlusion or high-grade stenosis with concomitant intracranial embolism causes severe ischemic stroke and shows poor response rates to intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). Endovascular therapy (EVT) utilizing thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting was long considered risky......-center analysis of 47 consecutive stroke patients with carotid occlusion or high-grade stenosis and concomitant intracranial embolus treated between September 2011 and December 2014. Benefits included early improvement of stroke severity (NIHSS ≥ 10) or complete remission within 72 h and favorable long...

  14. Evolution of Intra-arterial Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands : MR CLEAN Pretrial Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozeman, Anouk D.; Wermer, Marieke J H; Vos, Jan Albert; Nijeholt, Geert J Lycklama À; Beumer, Debbie; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Dippel, Diederik W J; Algra, Ale; Boiten, Jelis; Schonewille, Wouter J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Multicenter Randomized Clinical trial of Endovascular treatment for Acute ischemic stroke in the Netherlands (MR CLEAN) trial showed efficacy of intra-arterial (IA) treatment in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We studied the evolution of IA treatment for AIS and its effects on clinical

  15. Observer reliability of CT angiography in the assessment of acute ischaemic stroke: data from the Third International Stroke Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mair, Grant; Farrall, Andrew J.; Sellar, Robin J.; Mollison, Daisy; Sakka, Eleni; Palmer, Jeb; Wardlaw, Joanna M. [University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Division of Neuroimaging Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kummer, Ruediger von [Dresden University Stroke Centre, University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Dresden (Germany); Adami, Alessandro [Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria Hospital, Stroke Center, Department of Neurology, Negrar (Italy); White, Philip M. [Stroke Research Group, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Adams, Matthew E. [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Department of Neuroradiology, London (United Kingdom); Yan, Bernard [Royal Melbourne Hospital, Neurovascular Research Group, Parkville (Australia); Demchuk, Andrew M. [Calgary Stroke Program, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Calgary (Canada); Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Rodrigues, Mark A.; Samji, Karim; Baird, Andrew J. [Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Department of Radiology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Boyd, Elena V. [Northwick Park Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harrow (United Kingdom); Cohen, Geoff; Perry, David; Sandercock, Peter A.G. [University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Lindley, Richard [University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital Clinical School and The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney (Australia); Collaboration: The IST-3 Collaborative Group

    2014-10-07

    CT angiography (CTA) is often used for assessing patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Only limited observer reliability data exist. We tested inter- and intra-observer reliability for the assessment of CTA in acute ischaemic stroke. We selected 15 cases from the Third International Stroke Trial (IST-3, ISRCTN25765518) with various degrees of arterial obstruction in different intracranial locations on CTA. To assess inter-observer reliability, seven members of the IST-3 expert image reading panel (>5 years experience reading CTA) and seven radiology trainees (<2 years experience) rated all 15 scans independently and blind to clinical data for: presence (versus absence) of any intracranial arterial abnormality (stenosis or occlusion), severity of arterial abnormality using relevant scales (IST-3 angiography score, Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) score, Clot Burden Score), collateral supply and visibility of a perfusion defect on CTA source images (CTA-SI). Intra-observer reliability was assessed using independently repeated expert panel scan ratings. We assessed observer agreement with Krippendorff's-alpha (K-alpha). Among experienced observers, inter-observer agreement was substantial for the identification of any angiographic abnormality (K-alpha = 0.70) and with an angiography assessment scale (K-alpha = 0.60-0.66). There was less agreement for grades of collateral supply (K-alpha = 0.56) or for identification of a perfusion defect on CTA-SI (K-alpha = 0.32). Radiology trainees performed as well as expert readers when additional training was undertaken (neuroradiology specialist trainees). Intra-observer agreement among experts provided similar results (K-alpha = 0.33-0.72). For most imaging characteristics assessed, CTA has moderate to substantial observer agreement in acute ischaemic stroke. Experienced readers and those with specialist training perform best. (orig.)

  16. Development and Pilot Testing of 24/7 In-Ambulance Telemedicine for Acute Stroke : Prehospital Stroke Study at the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel-Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espinoza, Alexis Valenzuela; Van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; De Smedt, Ann; Moens, Maarten; Yperzeele, Laetitia; Nieboer, Koenraad; Hubloue, Ives; de Keyser, Jacques; Convents, Andre; Tellez, Helio Fernandez; Dupont, Alain; Putman, Koen; Brouns, Raf

    2016-01-01

    Background: In-ambulance telemedicine is a recently developed and a promising approach to improve emergency care. We implemented the first ever 24/7 in-ambulance telemedicine service for acute stroke. We report on our experiences with the development and pilot testing of the Prehospital Stroke Study

  17. The angiotensin-receptor blocker candesartan for treatment of acute stroke (SCAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Bath, Philip M W; Boysen, Gudrun;

    2011-01-01

    blood pressure. METHODS: Participants in this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial were recruited from 146 centres in nine north European countries. Patients older than 18 years with acute stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic) and systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher were included......%) patients taking candesartan and 13 (1%) allocated placebo. INTERPRETATION: There was no indication that careful blood-pressure lowering treatment with the angiotensin-receptor blocker candesartan is beneficial in patients with acute stroke and raised blood pressure. If anything, the evidence suggested...

  18. Endovascular Treatment In Acute Ischemic Stroke: What Has Changed Over The Last One Year?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesna Bektaş

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of sufficent data from randomised controlled trials, endovascular treatment has always been considered as a therapeutic option in the setting of acute ischemic stroke. Our knowledge regarding in this field has dramatically expanded over the last three years. Following the initial dissapointing and negative trials, the subsequent positive results observed in a series of studies has consolidated the role of endovascular treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. In this review we will comment on the recent developments in the field of endovascular treatment and discuss the messages that underlie the controversial findings observed in these trials.

  19. Endovascular Treatment For Acute Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke - New Evidence And Current Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA Salam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular mechanical treatment can remove large proximal clots rapidly and result in higher rates of reperfusion than IV rt-PA alone. Three initial trials of endovascular therapies in 2013 did not show a benefit for thrombectomy over IV rt-PA. But in 2015, 5 trials from around the world, namely MR CLEAN, EXTEND-IA, ESCAPE, SWIFT-PRIME, and REVASCAT, advanced the scope of endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke. We review these trials and discuss how they have shaped the current status of endovascular therapy in acute ischaemic stroke.

  20. Neurological deterioration in the acute phase of minor ischemic stroke is an independent predictor of poor outcomes at 1 year: results from the China National Stroke Registry (CNSR)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Yi; ZHAO Xing-quan; WANG Chun-xue; WANG Yi-long; LIU Gai-fen; WANG Yong-jun

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk of clinical deterioration still exists in the acute phase despite the fact that patients with minor stroke may display less severe symptoms.The impact of this clinical deterioration on long-term outcomes is unknown.We characterized the clinical features of neurological deterioration (ND) in the acute phase of minor ischemic stroke (MIS) and investigated its impact on mid-and long-term outcomes.Methods This was a multi-centered,prospective clinical study involving patients with MIS (the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale,NIHSS <3) recruited from the China National Stroke Registry.Patients were included who had been hospitalized within 24 hours of stroke onset.Baseline characteristics,complication rates during hospitalization,etiology of stroke,as well as 3-,6-,and 12-month post-stroke outcomes were compared between patients with and without ND during the acute phase.Results A number of 368 (15.2%) out of 2424 patients included in the study exhibited ND in the acute phase.Compared to patients without ND,patients with ND had longer hospital stay,increased rate of baseline diabetes,and multiple complications.Multivariate Logistic regression indicated that ND in acute phase was an independent factor predictive of increased dependence (adjusted odds ratio =5.20,95% Cl,3.51-7.70,P <0.001) at 12-month post-stroke.Conclusions The risk of ND in the acute phase is high in patients with MIS.ND in the acute phase is an independent predictor for poor outcomes at 12 months post-stroke onset.

  1. Abnormal EEG Complexity and Functional Connectivity of Brain in Patients with Acute Thalamic Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Guo, Jie; Meng, Jiayuan; Wang, Zhijun; Yao, Yang; Yang, Jiajia; Qi, Hongzhi; Ming, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic thalamus stroke has become a serious cardiovascular and cerebral disease in recent years. To date the existing researches mostly concentrated on the power spectral density (PSD) in several frequency bands. In this paper, we investigated the nonlinear features of EEG and brain functional connectivity in patients with acute thalamic ischemic stroke and healthy subjects. Electroencephalography (EEG) in resting condition with eyes closed was recorded for 12 stroke patients and 11 healthy subjects as control group. Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC), Sample Entropy (SampEn), and brain network using partial directed coherence (PDC) were calculated for feature extraction. Results showed that patients had increased mean LZC and SampEn than the controls, which implied the stroke group has higher EEG complexity. For the brain network, the stroke group displayed a trend of weaker cortical connectivity, which suggests a functional impairment of information transmission in cortical connections in stroke patients. These findings suggest that nonlinear analysis and brain network could provide essential information for better understanding the brain dysfunction in the stroke and assisting monitoring or prognostication of stroke evolution. PMID:27403202

  2. Dysphagia, nutrition, and hydration in ischemic stroke patients at admission and discharge from acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Humphrey, Jamie L; Carnaby-Mann, Giselle; Sambandam, Raam; Miller, Leslie; Silliman, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Dysphagia may predispose stroke patients toward undernutrition and hydration. These comorbidities increase patient risks for reduced functional outcome and short-term mortality. Despite this impact, available information on relationships among dysphagia, nutrition, and hydration status in acute stroke is limited and conflicted. This study evaluated nutrition and hydration status in ischemic stroke patients with versus without clinically significant dysphagia at admission and at discharge from acute care. Sixty-seven patients admitted to the stroke unit in a tertiary-care hospital provided data for this study. On the day of hospital admission and upon discharge or at 7 days post admission, serum biochemical measures were obtained for nutrition (prealbumin) and hydration status (BUN/Cr). Clinical evaluation for dysphagia, nutrition status, and stroke severity were completed an average of 1.4 days following hospital admission. Dysphagia was identified in 37 % of the cohort. At admission 32 % of patients demonstrated malnutrition based on prealbumin levels and 53 % demonstrated evidence of dehydration based on BUN/Cr levels. No differences in nutrition status were attributed to dysphagia. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly higher BUN/Cr levels (greater dehydration) than patients without dysphagia at admission and at discharge. Dehydration at both admission and discharge was associated with dysphagia, clinical nutrition status, and stroke severity. Results of this study support prior results indicating that dysphagia is not associated with poor nutrition status during the first week post stroke. Dehydration status is associated with dysphagia during this period. The results have implications for future confirmatory research and for clinical management of dysphagia in the acute stroke period.

  3. Antiphosphatidylserine Antibodies and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xiaoqing; Peng, Hao; Zhong, Chongke; Xu, Tan; Xu, Tian; Peng, Yanbo; Chen, Chung-Shiuan; Wang, Jinchao; Ju, Zhong; Li, Qunwei; Geng, Deqin; Sun, Yingxian; Zhang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Jintao; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Yonghong; He, Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Antiphosphatidylserine antibodies (aPS) have been associated with the risk of ischemic stroke. However, it remains unclear whether aPS will influence clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. A total of 3013 patients with acute ischemic stroke recruited from 26 hospitals across China from August 2009 to May 2013 were included in the study The primary outcome was a combination of death and major disability (modified Rankin Scale score ≥3) at 3 months after stroke. Secondary outcomes included death, major disability, recurrent stroke, and vascular events. Composite outcome of death and major disability rates were 29.1% versus 23.9% in aPS-positive and aPS-negative groups. Compared with aPS-negative, adjusted odds ratios or hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) associated with aPS-positive were 1.35 (1.07-1.71), 1.63 (0.99-2.69), and 1.25 (0.98-1.59) for composite outcome of death or major disability, death, and major disability, respectively. For 1 interquartile range increase of aPS, the adjusted odds ratios or hazard ratios were 1.10 (1.01-1.20), 1.19 (1.05-1.35), and 1.05 (0.96-1.14), respectively. Adding aPS status to a model containing conventional risk factors improved risk prediction for composite outcome of death or major disability (net reclassification improvement index=11.3%, P=0.006; integrated discrimination improvement=0.2%, P=0.04). There was no significant association between aPS and risks of recurrent stroke and vascular events. We found that positive aPS increased risks of death or major disability at 3 months after an acute ischemic stroke, suggesting that aPS might be a prognostic marker for ischemic stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Comparison of nutritional status indicators according to feeding methods in patients with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghee; Byeon, Youngsoon

    2014-04-01

    Feeding methods for patients with acute stroke differ based on their ability to swallow; therefore, it is necessary to determine whether these methods deliver enough nourishment to these patients. Although nutrition could affect recovery from acute stroke, it is often overlooked. Indicators of nutritional status are important for the nutritional assessment of patients. The purpose of this study was to compare changes in nutritional indicators with various feeding methods in patients with acute stroke. Data on 261 patients with acute stroke who were admitted to a stroke unit in 2010 and met the inclusion criteria of the study were retrospectively analyzed. For comparative analysis, we investigated the participants' National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, feeding methods using the Modified Gugging Swallowing Screen, and indicators of nutritional status, such as body mass index, pre-albumin level, albumin level, total lymphocyte count, and total protein level. All nutritional indicators were compared at the time of admission to the stroke unit and at 7 days after admission. At the time of admission, indicators of nutritional status were within normal ranges in all feeding groups (tube, dysphagia, and general diet). At 7 days after admission, pre-albumin (P = 0.003), albumin (P = 0.001), and total protein (P = 0.000) values in the tube feeding group were below the normal range, and the pre-albumin value and total lymphocyte count were below the normal range in the dysphagia diet group (P = 0.027). The values for all nutritional indicators were within normal limits in the general diet group. Indicators of nutritional status change according to the swallowing ability of patients with acute stroke. At 7 days after admission to the stroke unit, patients with severe dysphagia had higher levels of indicators of malnutrition. Health care providers should consider whether the feeding method of each patient with stroke provides suitable nourishment. Additionally, it

  5. Serum antioxidant enzymes activities and oxidative stress levels in patients with acute ischemic stroke: influence on neurological status and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanlioglu, Aysel; Aslan, Mehmet; Ozkol, Halil; Çilingir, Vedat; Nuri Aydın, Mehmet; Karadas, Sevdegül

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is well believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of acute ischemic stroke. Reports on antioxidant enzyme activities in patients with stroke are conflicting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate serum antioxidant enzyme activities and oxidative stress levels in patients with acute ischemic stroke within 1st, 5th, and 21st day after stroke onset and also the relationship between these results and the clinical status of patients. The current study comprised 45 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 30 healthy controls. Serum malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase activities were measured spectrophotometrically. Serum MDA levels were significantly higher in acute ischemic stroke patients within 24 h after stroke onset than controls (p levels did not change (p > 0.05). Serum SOD activity was significantly lower in 21st day compared to SOD activity of controls (p levels, GSH-Px, and CAT activities did not change significantly. Our study demonstrated that acute ischemic stroke patients have increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant enzymes activities. These findings indicated that an imbalance of oxidant and antioxidant status might play a role in the pathogenesis of acute ischemic stroke.

  6. Clinical Implications of Changes in Individual Platelet Reactivity to Aspirin Over Time in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon-Tae; Heo, Suk-Hee; Choi, Kang-Ho; Nam, Tai-Seung; Choi, Seong-Min; Lee, Seung-Han; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Byeong C; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Saver, Jeffrey L; Cho, Ki-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Time-dependent changes in individual platelet reactivity have been detected in patients with coronary artery disease. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the time-dependent changes in platelet reactivity to aspirin during the acute stage after ischemic stroke and the clinical implications of variable patient responses to aspirin in acute ischemic stroke. We conducted a single-center, prospective, observational study. The acute aspirin reaction unit (ARU) was measured after 3 hours of aspirin loading, with higher values indicating increased platelet reactivity despite aspirin therapy. The follow-up ARU was measured on the fifth day of consecutive aspirin intake. The numeric difference between the follow-up ARU and the acute ARU was defined as ΔARU and was stratified into quartiles. Early neurological deterioration was regarded as an early clinical outcome. Both the acute ARU (476±69 IU) and the follow-up ARU (451±68 IU) were measured in 349 patients in this study. Early neurological deterioration was observed in 72 patients (20.6%). Changes in aspirin platelet reactivity over time showed an approximately Gaussian distribution. The highest ΔARU quartile was independently associated with early neurological deterioration (odds ratio, 3.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.43-7.10; P=0.005) by multivariate logistic regression analysis. The results of our study showed that the increase in platelet reactivity to aspirin over time is independently associated with early neurological deterioration in patients with acute ischemic stroke. In addition, during the acute stage of ischemic stroke, serial platelet reactivity assays may be more useful than a single assay for identifying the clinical implications of aspirin platelet reactivity after ischemic stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Noninvasive Ventilatory Correction in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Barlinn, Kristian; Mikulik, Robert; Lambadiari, Vaia; Bonakis, Anastasios; Alexandrov, Anne W

    2017-08-01

    Even though current guidelines suggest that noninvasive ventilatory correction (NIVC) could be considered for acute ischemic stroke patients with obstructive sleep apnea, available evidence is conflicting, with no adequately powered randomized clinical trial being available to date. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all available literature data evaluating the effect of NIVC on neurological improvement (based on decrease in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score), vascular events (recurrent stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction and unstable angina), and mortality during the follow-up period. We identified 4 randomized clinical trials and 1 prospectively matched observational cohort, comprising a total of 389 patients (59.8% males, mean age: 64.4 years). The risk of both performance and detection bias was considered high in most of the included randomized clinical trials because of the lack of blinding in participants, personnel and/or outcome assessors. The mean decrease in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores during the first (≤30) days of acute ischemic stroke was found to be greater in NIVC-treated patients in comparison to controls (standardized mean difference, 0.38; 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.66; P=0.007). However, no significant differences were detected between NIVC-treated acute ischemic stroke patients and controls on both the risk of vascular events (risk ratio, 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-1.14; P=0.11) and mortality (risk ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-1.36; P=0.30). No evidence of heterogeneity (I(2)=0%; P for Cochran Q>0.50) or publication bias were detected in all analyses. NIVC seems to be associated with greater short-term neurological improvement in acute ischemic stroke patients with obstructive sleep apnea. This finding deserves further investigation within the settings of an adequately powered, sham-control, randomized clinical trial. © 2017 American Heart

  8. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors to improve outcome in acute ischemic stroke: possible mechanisms and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, Timo; Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Kepplinger, Jessica; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Weidner, Kerstin; Reichmann, Heinz; Barlinn, Kristian

    2015-10-01

    Several clinical studies have indicated that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) administered in patients after acute ischemic stroke can improve clinical recovery independently of depression. Due to small sample sizes and heterogeneous study designs interpretability was limited in these studies. The mechanisms of action whereby SSRI might improve recovery from acute ischemic stroke are not fully elucidated. We searched MEDLINE using the PubMed interface to identify evidence of SSRI mediated improvement of recovery from acute ischemic stroke and reviewed the literature on the potential underlying mechanisms of action. Among identified clinical studies, a well-designed randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study (FLAME - fluoxetine for motor recovery after acute ischemic stroke) demonstrated improved recovery of motor function in stroke patients receiving fluoxetine. The positive effects of SSRIs on stroke recovery were further supported by a meta-analysis of 52 trials in a total of 4060 participants published by the Cochrane collaboration. Based on animal models, the mechanisms whereby SSRIs might ameliorate functional and structural ischemic-brain damage were suggested to include stimulation of neurogenesis with migration of newly generated cells toward ischemic-brain regions, anti-inflammatory neuroprotection, improved regulation of cerebral blood flow, and modulation of the adrenergic neurohormonal system. However, to date, it remains speculative if and to what degree these mechanisms convert into humans and randomized controlled trials in large populations of stroke patients comparing different SSRIs are still lacking. In addition to the need of comprehensive-clinical evidence, further elucidation of the beneficial mechanisms whereby SSRIs may improve structural and functional recovery from ischemic-brain damage is needed to form a basis for translation into clinical practice.

  9. Insulin Resistance Is Associated With a Poor Response to Intravenous Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja, Ana I.; García-Bermejo, Pablo; Cortijo, Elisa; Bustamante, Rosa; Rojo Martínez, Esther; González Sarmiento, Enrique; Fernández-Herranz, Rosa; Arenillas, Juan F.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance (IR) may not only increase stroke risk, but could also contribute to aggravate stroke prognosis. Mainly through a derangement in endogenous fibrinolysis, IR could affect the response to intravenous thrombolysis, currently the only therapy proved to be efficacious for acute ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that high IR is associated with more persistent arterial occlusions and poorer long-term outcome after stroke thrombolysis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a prospective, observational, longitudinal study in consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients presenting with middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion who received intravenous thrombolysis. Patients with acute hyperglycemia (≥155 mg/dL) receiving insulin were excluded. IR was determined during admission by the homeostatic model assessment index (HOMA-IR). Poor long-term outcome, as defined by a day 90 modified Rankin scale score ≥3, was considered the primary outcome variable. Transcranial Duplex-assessed resistance to MCA recanalization and symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation were considered secondary end points. RESULTS A total of 109 thrombolysed MCA ischemic stroke patients were included (43.1% women, mean age 71 years). The HOMA-IR was higher in the group of patients with poor outcome (P = 0.02). The probability of good outcome decreased gradually with increasing HOMA-IR tertiles (80.6%, 1st tertile; 71.4%, 2nd tertile; and 55.3%, upper tertile). A HOMA-IR in the upper tertile was independently associated with poor outcome when compared with the lower tertile (odds ratio [OR] 8.54 [95% CI 1.67–43.55]; P = 0.01) and was associated with more persistent MCA occlusions (OR 8.2 [1.23–54.44]; P = 0.029). CONCLUSIONS High IR may be associated with more persistent arterial occlusions and worse long-term outcome after acute ischemic stroke thrombolysis. PMID:21911778

  10. A population-based study for 30-d hospital readmissions after acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Manoj K; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Mandrekar, Jay; Brown, Robert D; Flemming, Kelly D

    2017-04-01

    To determine post-stroke 30-d readmission rate, its predictors, its impact on mortality and to identify potentially preventable causes of post-stroke 30-d readmission in a population-based study. We identified all acute ischemic strokes (AIS) using the International Classification of Diseases 9th revision codes (433.x1, 434.xx and 436) via the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) between January 2007 and December 2011. Acute stroke care in Olmsted County is provided by two medical centers, Saint Marys Hospital and Olmsted Medical Center Hospital. All readmissions to these two hospitals were accounted for this study. Thirty-day readmission data was abstracted through manual chart review. The REP linkage database was used to identify the status (living/dead) of all patients at last follow up. Forty-one (7.6%, 95% CI 5.7%-10.2%) of total 537 AIS patients were readmitted 30-d post-stroke. In a multivariable logistic regression model, discharge to nursing home following index stroke (OR: 0.29, 95% CI 0.08-0.84) was an independent negative predictor of unplanned 30-d readmission. In a subgroup of patients with dementia, being married at time of index stroke was found to be a negative predictor of readmission (OR: 0.10, 95% CI 0.005-0.58). Only 2.8% of the patients had potentially preventable readmissions. Hospital readmission had no significant impact on patient's short-term (three months) or long-term (one or two years) mortality (p > 0.05). Post-stroke 30-d readmission rate is low in AIS patients from Olmsted County. Further research is needed in regarding discharge checklists, protocols and stroke transitional programs to reduce potentially preventable readmissions.

  11. Troponin I degradation in serum of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K; Hallén, Jonas; Lund, Terje

    2011-01-01

    with acute coronary syndrome has been described; however whether such post-release modification occurs in other non-acute coronary syndrome states remains unknown. The aim of this study was to define troponin degradation in patients with acute ischemic stroke.......Although troponin is a cornerstone biomarker in the assessment and management of patients with acute coronary syndrome, much remains to be learned about the biology of this widely used biomarker, including its post-release modification. Degradation of troponin following release in patients...

  12. Efficacy of citicoline as an acute stroke treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Wayne M

    2009-04-01

    Citicoline (cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine or CDP-choline) is a precursor essential for the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, one of the cell membrane components that is degraded during cerebral ischemia to free fatty acids and free radicals. Animal studies suggest that citicoline may protect cell membranes by accelerating resynthesis of phospholipids and suppressing the release of free fatty acids, stabilizing cell membranes, and reducing free radical generation. Numerous experimental stroke studies with citicoline have shown improved outcome and reduced infarct size in both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke models. Citicoline has been studied worldwide in both ischemic and hemorrhagic clinical stroke with excellent safety and possibly efficacy found in several trials. A meta-analysis of four randomized US clinical citicoline trials concluded that treatment with oral citicoline within the first 24 h after a moderate to severe stroke is safe and increases the probability of complete recovery at 3 months. Citicoline clinical efficacy trials are now continuing outside of the US in both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. A citicoline supplement is now available from several sources on the internet.

  13. Tissue-factor-bearing microparticles (MPs-TF) in patients with acute ischaemic stroke: the influence of stroke treatment on MPs-TF generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świtońska, M; Słomka, A; Sinkiewicz, W; Żekanowska, E

    2015-02-01

    Stroke is an important cause of death and disability throughout the world. Microparticles play a cardinal role in vascular hemostasis. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the procoagulant activity of microparticles and levels of tissue-factor-bearing microparticles (MPs-TF), tissue factor (TF) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Seventy-three patients with a diagnosis of acute ischaemic stroke were included. Venous blood samples were drawn on the first day and the seventh day after stroke onset. Plasma microparticles, MPs-TF, TF and TFPI were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Assessment variables were timing of blood collection, type of stroke treatment, presence or absence of diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and scores on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale together with scores on the modified Rankin Scale. Whilst MPs-TF and TFPI levels of stroke subjects were significantly higher (median, 1.63 vs. 0.73 pg/ml; median, 114.26 vs. 78.60 ng/ml, respectively), TF levels in the plasma of stroke patients were significantly lower (median, 82.27 vs. 97.80 pg/ml) than those of healthy individuals. Lower levels of TF were detected in patients with severe stroke in comparison with patients with mild stroke. Moreover, the data also showed that in stroke patients not treated with alteplase the activity of microparticles was significantly higher 1 week after diagnosis in comparison with the activity at the time of diagnosis. Our findings suggest that patients with acute ischaemic stroke have increased generation of MPs-TF. Nevertheless, further studies are needed in order to confirm such inference. © 2014 EAN.

  14. Outcomes of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke in Chinese patients: the Taiwan Thrombolytic Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke (TTT-AIS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, A-Ching; Hsu, Hung-Yi; Chung, Chih-Ping; Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Chen, Chih-Hung; Teng, Michael Mu-Huo; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Sheng, Wen-Yung; Hu, Han Hwa

    2010-05-01

    The safety and efficacy of alteplase for ischemic stroke has not been examined in Chinese patients. We assessed the safety and efficacy of alteplase for acute ischemic stroke in daily clinical practice in Taiwan. A prospective, multicenter, observational study was conducted in Taiwan from December 2004 to July 2008. Eligible patients (241) receiving alteplase were recruited and divided into 2 groups: standard dose (0.90 + or - 0.02 mg/kg, n=125) and lower dose (0.72 + or - 0.07 mg/kg, n=116). Primary outcome measures were safety: symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage and death within 3 months. The secondary outcome measure was efficacy a modified Rankin scale of 0 to 2 after 3 months. The standard-dose group had higher rates of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage using National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study, and Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-Monitoring Study definitions (10.4% versus 5.2%, 8.0% versus 2.6%, and 5.6% versus 1.7%, respectively) and mortality within 3 months (12.8% versus 6.9%), twice that of the lower-dose group. This pattern was more prominent in older patients. Significantly higher rates of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage per European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (15.4% versus 3.3%, P=0.0257) and mortality (21.1% versus 5.0%, P=0.0099) and significantly lower independence rate (32.6% versus 53.6%, P=0.0311) were observed among patients > or = 70 years old receiving the standard dose than those receiving the lower dose. This study suggests that the standard dose of 0.9 mg/kg alteplase may not be optimal for treating aged Chinese patients. However, the dose of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for ischemic stroke in Chinese patients should be based on more broad and convincing evidences and randomized trials of lower versus higher doses are needed.

  15. Adapting the Computed Tomography Criteria of Hemorrhagic Transformation to Stroke Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Neeb

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main safety aspect in the use of stroke thrombolysis and in clinical trials of new pharmaceutical or interventional stroke therapies is the incidence of hemorrhagic transformation (HT after treatment. The computed tomography (CT-based classification of the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASS distinguishes four categories of HTs. An HT can range from a harmless spot of blood accumulation to a symptomatic space-occupying parenchymal bleeding associated with a massive deterioration of symptoms and clinical prognosis. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI HTs are often categorized using the ECASS criteria although this classification has not been validated in MRI. We developed MRI-specific criteria for the categorization of HT and sought to assess its diagnostic reliability in a retrospective study. Methods: Consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients, who had received a 3-tesla MRI before and 12-36 h after thrombolysis, were screened retrospectively for an HT of any kind in post-treatment MRI. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was given to all patients within 4.5 h. HT categorization was based on a simultaneous read of 3 different MRI sequences (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, diffusion-weighted imaging and T2* gradient-recalled echo. Categorization of HT in MRI accounted for the various aspects of the imaging pattern as the shape of the bleeding area and signal intensity on each sequence. All data sets were independently categorized in a blinded fashion by 3 expert and 3 resident observers. Interobserver reliability of this classification was determined for all observers together and for each group separately by calculating Kendall's coefficient of concordance (W. Results: Of the 186 patients screened, 39 patients (21% had an HT in post-treatment MRI and were included for the categorization of HT by experts and residents. The overall agreement of HT categorization according to the modified classification was

  16. Correlation between serum neuron specific enolase and functional neurological outcome in patients of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, Sana; Beg, Mujahid; Rizvi, Imran; Islam, Najmul; Ullah, Ekram; Akhtar, Nishat

    2013-10-01

    The use of biomarkers to predict stroke prognosis is gaining particular attention nowadays. Neuron specific enolase (NSE), which is a dimeric isoenzyme of the glycolytic enzyme enolase and is found mainly in the neurons is one such biomarker. This study was carried out on patients of acute ischemic stroke with the aims to determine the correlation between NSE levels on the day of admission with infarct volume, stroke severity, and functional neurological outcome on day 30. Seventy five patients of acute ischemic stroke admitted in the Department of Medicine were included in the study. Levels of NSE were determined on day 1 using the human NSE ELISA kit (Alpha Diagnostic International Texas 78244, USA). Volume of infarct was measured by computed tomography (CT) scan using the preinstalled software Syngo (version A40A) of Siemen's medical solutions (Forchheim, Germany). Stroke severity at admission was assessed using Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and functional neurological outcome was assessed using modified Rankin scale (mRS) on day 30. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software for windows version 15.0 (SPSS). A positive correlation was found between concentration of NSE on day 1 and infarct volume determined by CT scan (r = 0.955, P serve as a useful marker to predict stroke severity and early functional outcome. However, larger studies with serial estimation of NSE are needed to establish these observations more firmly.