WorldWideScience

Sample records for acute stroke care

  1. Relevance of stroke code, stroke unit and stroke networks in organization of acute stroke care--the Madrid acute stroke care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana-Cases, María; Gil-Núñez, Antonio; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a neurological emergency. The early administration of specific treatment improves the prognosis of the patients. Emergency care systems with early warning for the hospital regarding patients who are candidates for this treatment (stroke code) increases the number of patients treated. Currently, reperfusion via thrombolysis for ischemic stroke and attention in stroke units are the bases of treatment. Healthcare professionals and health provision authorities need to work together to organize systems that ensure continuous quality care for the patients during the whole process of their disease. To implement this, there needs to be an appropriate analysis of the requirements and resources with the objective of their adjustment for efficient use. It is necessary to provide adequate information and continuous training for all professionals who are involved in stroke care, including primary care physicians, extrahospital emergency teams and all physicians involved in the care of stroke patients within the hospital. The neurologist has the function of coordinating the protocols of intrahospital care. These organizational plans should also take into account the process beyond the acute phase, to ensure the appropriate application of measures of secondary prevention, rehabilitation, and chronic care of the patients that remain in a dependent state. We describe here the stroke care program in the Community of Madrid (Spain). (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Critical care management of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Peter J D

    2004-04-01

    To review and examine the efficacy of recently described medical and surgical interventions after acute ischaemic stroke using data from well conducted, clinical trials and systematic reviews. This review will consider recently published or updated articles. As therapeutic options evolve, including thrombolysis and anti-platelet therapy, prevention of secondary insults, becomes increasingly important during periods of acute cerebral ischaemia in order to prevent worsening of the neurological injury. As in other acute medical conditions, urgent management of patients with acute ischaemic stroke should begin with the assessment and treatment of the airway, breathing, circulation, temperature, and blood glucose control. It is estimated that there will be 8.5 million patients with acute ischaemic stroke in the European Union and the USA over the next decade, and of these, about one and a half million will die within six months of stroke onset. Of those who survive, about one third will depend on other people for help with their activities of daily living. Future treatment strategies are likely to involve agents that re-canalise vessels and minimise further neuronal damage.

  3. Malpractice litigation in acute stroke care - where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Gilberto Kk; Porter, Gerard

    2018-01-01

    Acute stroke care has undergone momentous changes in recent years with the introduction of intravenous thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy and integrated stroke services. While these are welcome developments, they also carry unique medico-legal challenges. In 2015, a patient from Greater Manchester was awarded over £1 million in compensation after ambulance paramedics failed to admit her to a specialist unit. This paper explores the medico-legal implications of this first but over looked thrombolysis-related claim in the United Kingdom. It is submitted that the highly time-dependent and multidisciplinary nature of acute stroke care may expose a host of healthcare personnel, both medical and non-medical, to risks of legal pursuit for failing to provide appropriate care, and that available scientific evidence will likely support such claims. The situation calls for an urgent and concerted effort at implementing improvement measures at national levels. A reminder of the legal consequences of substandard acute stroke care is timely and necessary.

  4. Differences in Acute Ischemic Stroke Quality of Care and Outcomes by Primary Stroke Center Certification Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Shumei; Cox, Margueritte; Patel, Puja; Smith, Eric E; Reeves, Mathew J; Saver, Jeffrey L; Bhatt, Deepak L; Xian, Ying; Schwamm, Lee H; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2017-02-01

    Primary stroke center (PSC) certification was established to identify hospitals providing evidence-based care for stroke patients. The numbers of PSCs certified by Joint Commission (JC), Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, Det Norske Veritas, and State-based agencies have significantly increased in the past decade. This study aimed to evaluate whether PSCs certified by different organizations have similar quality of care and in-hospital outcomes. The study population consisted of acute ischemic stroke patients who were admitted to PSCs participating in Get With The Guidelines-Stroke between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012. Measures of care quality and outcomes were compared among the 4 different PSC certifications. A total of 477 297 acute ischemic stroke admissions were identified from 977 certified PSCs (73.8% JC, 3.7% Det Norske Veritas, 1.2% Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, and 21.3% State-based). Composite care quality was generally similar among the 4 groups of hospitals, although State-based PSCs underperformed JC PSCs in a few key measures, including intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator use. The rates of tissue-type plasminogen activator use were higher in JC and Det Norske Veritas (9.0% and 9.8%) and lower in State and Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program certified hospitals (7.1% and 5.9%) (Pcertification, acute ischemic stroke quality of care and outcomes may differ according to which organization provided certification. These findings may have important implications for further improving systems of care. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Socioeconomic Status and the Quality of Acute Stroke Care: The China National Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuesong; Chen, Ruoling; Li, Zixiao; Li, Hao; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-11-01

    The association of socioeconomic status (SES) with quality of stroke care is not well understood, and few studies have examined the association with different indicators of SES simultaneously. We assessed the impacts of low levels of education, occupation, and income on the quality of stroke care. We examined data from the China National Stroke Registry recording consecutive stroke patients between September 2007 and August 2008. Baseline low SES was measured using educational level job, and average family income per capita at ≤¥1000 per month. Compliance with 11 performances was summarized in a composite score defined as the proportion of all needed care given. Poor quality of care was defined as having a composite score of 0.71 or less. Among 12 270 patients with ischemic stroke, 38.6% had educational years, 37.6% had manual workers/no job, and 34.7% had income ≤¥1000 per month. There was an increased chance of receiving poor quality of care in patients with low education (adjusted odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.28), low occupation (adjusted odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.32), and low income (adjusted odds ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.30), respectively. People with low SES had poor performances on some aspects of care quality. Combined effects existed among these SES indicators; those with low SES from all 3 indicators had the poorest quality of care. There was a social gradient in the quality of stroke care. Continuous efforts of socioeconomic improvement will increase the quality of acute stroke care. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Racial-Ethnic Disparities in Acute Stroke Care in the Florida-Puerto Rico Collaboration to Reduce Stroke Disparities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Ralph L; Gardener, Hannah; Wang, Kefeng; Dong, Chuanhui; Ciliberti-Vargas, Maria A; Gutierrez, Carolina M; Asdaghi, Negar; Burgin, W Scott; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Garcia-Rivera, Enid J; Nobo, Ulises; Oluwole, Sofia; Rose, David Z; Waters, Michael F; Zevallos, Juan Carlos; Robichaux, Mary; Waddy, Salina P; Romano, Jose G; Rundek, Tatjana

    2017-02-14

    Racial-ethnic disparities in acute stroke care can contribute to inequality in stroke outcomes. We examined race-ethnic disparities in acute stroke performance metrics in a voluntary stroke registry among Florida and Puerto Rico Get With the Guidelines-Stroke hospitals. Seventy-five sites in the Florida Puerto Rico Stroke Registry (66 Florida and 9 Puerto Rico) recorded 58 864 ischemic stroke cases (2010-2014). Logistic regression models examined racial-ethnic differences in acute stroke performance measures and defect-free care (intravenous tissue plasminogen activator treatment, in-hospital antithrombotic therapy, deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis, discharge antithrombotic therapy, appropriate anticoagulation therapy, statin use, smoking cessation counseling) and temporal trends. Among ischemic stroke cases, 63% were non-Hispanic white (NHW), 18% were non-Hispanic black (NHB), 14% were Hispanic living in Florida, and 6% were Hispanic living in Puerto Rico. NHW patients were the oldest, followed by Hispanics, and NHBs. Defect-free care was greatest among NHBs (81%), followed by NHWs (79%) and Florida Hispanics (79%), then Puerto Rico Hispanics (57%) ( P disparity in Puerto Rico persisted (2010: NHWs=63%, NHBs=65%, Florida Hispanics=59%, Puerto Rico Hispanics=31%; 2014: NHWs=93%, NHBs=94%, Florida Hispanics=94%, Puerto Rico Hispanics=63%). Racial-ethnic/geographic disparities were observed for acute stroke care performance metrics. Adoption of a quality improvement program improved stroke care from 2010 to 2014 in Puerto Rico and all Florida racial-ethnic groups. However, stroke care quality delivered in Puerto Rico is lower than in Florida. Sustained support of evidence-based acute stroke quality improvement programs is required to improve stroke care and minimize racial-ethnic disparities, particularly in resource-strained Puerto Rico. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  7. Development of smartphone application that aids stroke screening and identifying nearby acute stroke care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyo Suk; Heo, JoonNyung; Kim, Jinkwon; Kim, Young Dae; Song, Tae Jin; Park, Eunjeong; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of thrombolytic treatment are time-dependent. We developed a smartphone application that aids stroke patient self-screening and hospital selection, and may also decrease hospital arrival time. The application was developed for iPhone and Android smartphones. Map data for the application were adopted from the open map. For hospital registration, a web page (http://stroke119.org) was developed using PHP and MySQL. The Stroke 119 application includes a stroke screening tool and real-time information on nearby hospitals that provide thrombolytic treatment. It also provides information on stroke symptoms, thrombolytic treatment, and prescribed actions when stroke is suspected. The stroke screening tool was adopted from the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale and is displayed in a cartoon format. If the user taps a cartoon image that represents abnormal findings, a pop-up window shows that the user may be having a stroke, informs the user what to do, and directs the user to call emergency services. Information on nearby hospitals is provided in map and list views, incorporating proximity to the user's location using a Global Positioning System (a built-in function of smartphones). Users can search for a hospital according to specialty and treatment levels. We also developed a web page for hospitals to register in the system. Neurology training hospitals and hospitals that provide acute stroke care in Korea were invited to register. Seventy-seven hospitals had completed registration. This application may be useful for reducing hospital arrival times for thrombolytic candidates.

  8. Disparities in Post-Acute Rehabilitation Care for Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freburger, Janet K.; Holmes, George M.; Ku, Li-Jung; Cutchin, Malcolm; Heatwole-Shank, Kendra; Edwards, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Objective To use population-based, hospital discharge data to determine the extent to which demographic and geographic disparities exist in the use of PARC following stroke. Design Cross-sectional analysis of two years (2005-2006) of population-based, hospital discharge data. Setting All short-term acute care hospitals in four demographically and geographically diverse states (AZ, FL, NJ, WI). Participants Individuals 45 years and older (mean age of 72.6 years) admitted to the hospital with a primary diagnosis of stroke, who survived their inpatient stay and who were not transferred to a hospice or other short-term, acute care facility (N=187,188). The sample was 52.4 percent female, 79.5 percent White, 11.4 percent Black, and 9.1 percent Hispanic. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures 1) Discharge to an institution versus home. 2) For those discharged home, discharge home with or without home health (HH). 3) For those discharged to an institution, discharge to an inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) or skilled nursing facility (SNF). Multilevel logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify demographic and geographic disparities in PARC use, controlling for illness severity/comorbidities, hospital characteristics, and PARC supply. Results Blacks, females, older individuals, and those with lower incomes were more likely to be discharged to an institution; Hispanic individuals and the uninsured were less likely. Racial minorities, females, older individuals, and those with lower incomes were more likely to receive HH; uninsured individuals and rural residents were less likely. Blacks, females, older individuals, the uninsured, and those with lower incomes were more likely to use SNF vs IRF care. PARC use varied significantly by state and by hospital. Conclusions Several demographic and geographic disparities in PARC use were identified. PMID:21807141

  9. [Endovascular treatment in acute ischaemic stroke. A stroke care plan for the region of Madrid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Díaz-Guzmán, J; Egido, J A; García Pastor, A; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Vivancos, J; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2013-09-01

    Endovascular therapies (intra-arterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy) after acute ischaemic stroke are being implemented in the clinical setting even as they are still being researched. Since we lack sufficient data to establish accurate evidence-based recommendations for use of these treatments, we must develop clinical protocols based on current knowledge and carefully monitor all procedures. After review of the literature and holding work sessions to reach a consensus among experts, we developed a clinical protocol including indications and contraindications for endovascular therapies use in acute ischaemic stroke. The protocol includes methodology recommendations for diagnosing and selecting patients, performing revascularisation procedures, and for subsequent patient management. Its objective is to increase the likelihood of efficacy and treatment benefit and minimise risk of complications and ineffective recanalisation. Based on an analysis of healthcare needs and available resources, a cooperative inter-hospital care system has been developed. This helps to ensure availability of endovascular therapies to all patients, a fast response time, and a good cost-to-efficacy ratio. It includes also a prospective register which serves to monitor procedures in order to identify any opportunities for improvement. Implementation of endovascular techniques for treating acute ischaemic stroke requires the elaboration of evidence-based clinical protocols and the establishment of appropriate cooperative healthcare networks guaranteeing both the availability and the quality of these actions. Such procedures must be monitored in order to improve methodology. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Sex Disparities in Access to Acute Stroke Care: Can Telemedicine Mitigate this Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Catherine; Boehme, Amelia K; Albright, Karen C; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Mullen, Michael T; Branas, Charles C; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I; Carr, Brendan G

    2016-01-01

    Women have more frequent and severe ischemic strokes than men, and are less likely to receive treatment for acute stroke. Primary stroke centers (PSCs) have been shown to utilize treatment more frequently. Further, as telemedicine (TM) has expanded access to acute stroke care we sought to investigate the association between PSC, TM and access to acute stroke care in the state of Texas. Texas hospitals and resources were identified from the 2009 American Hospital Association Annual Survey. Hospitals were categorized as: (1) stand-alone PSCs not using telemedicine for acute stroke care, (2) PSCs using telemedicine for acute stroke care (PSC-TM), (3) non-PSC hospitals using telemedicine for acute stroke care, or (4) non-PSC hospitals not using telemedicine for acute stroke care. The proportion of the population who could reach a PSC within 60 minutes was determined for stand-alone PSCs, PSC-TM, and non-PSCs using TM for stroke care. Overall, women were as likely to have 60-minute access to a PSC or PSC-TM as their male counterparts (POR 1.02, 95% CI 1.02-1.03). Women were also just as likely to have access to acute stroke care via PSC or PSC-TM or TM as men (POR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02-1.04). Our study found no sex disparities in access to stand alone PSCs or to hospitals using TM in the state of Texas. The results of this study suggest that telemedicine can be used as part of an inclusive strategy to improve access to care equally for men and women.

  11. Characteristics of inpatient care and rehabilitation for acute first-ever stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Shin, Yong-Il; Lee, Sam-Gyu; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Lim, Young Shil; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the status of inpatient care for acute first-ever stroke at three general hospitals in Korea to provide basic data and useful information on the development of comprehensive and systematic rehabilitation care for stroke patients. This study conducted a retrospective complete enumeration survey of all acute first-ever stroke patients admitted to three distinct general hospitals for 2 years by reviewing medical records. Both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes were included. Survey items included demographic data, risk factors, stroke type, state of rehabilitation treatment, discharge destination, and functional status at discharge. A total of 2159 patients were reviewed. The mean age was 61.5±14.4 years and the ratio of males to females was 1.23:1. Proportion of ischemic stroke comprised 54.9% and hemorrhagic stroke 45.1%. Early hospital mortality rate was 8.1%. Among these patients, 27.9% received rehabilitation consultation and 22.9% underwent inpatient rehabilitation treatment. The mean period from admission to rehabilitation consultation was 14.5 days. Only 12.9% of patients were transferred to a rehabilitation department and the mean period from onset to transfer was 23.4 days. Improvements in functional status were observed in the patients who had received inpatient rehabilitation treatment after acute stroke management. Our analysis revealed that a relatively small portion of patients who suffered from an acute first-ever stroke received rehabilitation consultation and inpatient rehabilitation treatment. Thus, applying standardized clinical practice guidelines for post-acute rehabilitation care is needed to provide more effective and efficient rehabilitation services to patients with stroke.

  12. Admitting acute ischemic stroke patients to a stroke care monitoring unit versus a conventional stroke unit : a randomized pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulter, Geert; Elting, Jan Willem; Langedijk, Marc; Maurits, Natasha M; De Keyser, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Pathophysiological considerations and observational studies indicate that elevated body temperature, hypoxia, hypotension, and cardiac arrhythmias in the acute phase of ischemic stroke may aggravate brain damage and worsen outcome. METHODS: Both units were organized with the

  13. Stroke care in Galicia: telemedicine in the early, multidisciplinary treatment of all acute stroke cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castro, Emilio; Vázquez-Lima, Manuel José; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; Verde, Luis; Castillo, José

    2018-02-01

    Stroke is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in Spain and in Galicia in particular. Tissue viability after stroke depends on the time taken to restore circulation. The widely dispersed and aging population of this region challenges efforts to provide equal care for patients with time-sensitive emergencies such as stroke. Two regional hospitals (Hospital do Salnés and Hospital do Barbanza) and the reference Hospital Clínico de Santiago launched a telestroke pilot program in 2011 in which patients whose treatment was guided at a distance were discharged with lower levels of stroke severity and mortality. That outcome was probably attributable to more rapid diagnosis. Given those preliminary results and the characteristics of the population, the centrally coordinated Galician Stroke Care Plan was launched in 2016 to provide a telemedicine service that connects all hospitals in the health system of Galicia. This paper summarizes the experience of developing and implementing the program.

  14. [A Delphi Method Survey of the Core Competences of Post-Acute-Care Nurses in Caring for Acute Stroke Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shu-Ching; Yeh, Lily; Lu, Meei-Shiow; Lin, Pei-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Post-acute care (PAC) service is becoming increasingly important in Taiwan as a core focus of government policies that are designed to ensure continuity of care. In order to improve PAC nursing education and quality of care, the present study applies a modified Delphi method to identify the core competences of nurses who provide PAC services to acute stroke patients. We surveyed 18 experts in post-acute care and long-term care anonymously using a 29-question questionnaire in order to identify the essential professional skills that are required to perform PAC effectively. The results of this survey indicate that the core competences of PAC may be divided into two categories: Case Management and Care Management. Case Management includes Direct Care, Communication, Health Care Education, Nursing Consulting, and Family Assessment & Health Care. Care Management includes Interdisciplinary Teamwork, Patient Care Management, and Resource Integration. The importance and practicality of each item was evaluated using a 7-point Likert scale. The experts required 2 rounds to reach a consensus about the importance and 3 rounds to determine the practicality of PAC core competences. This process highlighted the differing points of view that are held by professionals in the realms of nursing, medicine, and national health policy. The PAC in-job training program in its current form inadequately cul-tivates core competence in Care Management. The results of the present study may be used to inform the development of PAC nurse orientation training programs and continuing education courses.

  15. Point-of-Care-Testing in Acute Stroke Management: An Unmet Need Ripe for Technological Harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpaz, Dorin; Eltzov, Evgeni; Seet, Raymond C S; Marks, Robert S; Tok, Alfred I Y

    2017-08-03

    Stroke, the second highest leading cause of death, is caused by an abrupt interruption of blood to the brain. Supply of blood needs to be promptly restored to salvage brain tissues from irreversible neuronal death. Existing assessment of stroke patients is based largely on detailed clinical evaluation that is complemented by neuroimaging methods. However, emerging data point to the potential use of blood-derived biomarkers in aiding clinical decision-making especially in the diagnosis of ischemic stroke, triaging patients for acute reperfusion therapies, and in informing stroke mechanisms and prognosis. The demand for newer techniques to deliver individualized information on-site for incorporation into a time-sensitive work-flow has become greater. In this review, we examine the roles of a portable and easy to use point-of-care-test (POCT) in shortening the time-to-treatment, classifying stroke subtypes and improving patient's outcome. We first examine the conventional stroke management workflow, then highlight situations where a bedside biomarker assessment might aid clinical decision-making. A novel stroke POCT approach is presented, which combines the use of quantitative and multiplex POCT platforms for the detection of specific stroke biomarkers, as well as data-mining tools to drive analytical processes. Further work is needed in the development of POCTs to fulfill an unmet need in acute stroke management.

  16. Acute Stroke: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glober, Nancy K.; Sporer, Karl A.; Guluma, Kama Z.; Serra, John P.; Barger, Joe A.; Brown, John F.; Gilbert, Gregory H.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS) protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the stroke protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were the use of a stroke scale, blood glucose evaluation, use of supplemental oxygen, patient positioning, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac monitoring, fluid assessment and intravenous access, and stroke regionalization. Results Protocols across EMS agencies in California varied widely. Most used some sort of stroke scale with the majority using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS). All recommended the evaluation of blood glucose with the level for action ranging from 60 to 80mg/dL. Cardiac monitoring was recommended in 58% and 33% recommended an ECG. More than half required the direct transport to a primary stroke center and 88% recommended hospital notification. Conclusion Protocols for a patient with a suspected stroke vary widely across the state of California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols. PMID:26973735

  17. Leukocytosis in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Leukocytosis is a common finding in the acute phase of stroke. A detrimental effect of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has been suggested, and trials aiming at reducing the leukocyte response in acute stroke are currently being conducted. However, the influence of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has...

  18. Effectiveness of a clinical pathway for acute stroke care in a district general hospital: an audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegert Richard J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organised stroke care saves lives and reduces disability. A clinical pathway might be a form of organised stroke care, but the evidence for the effectiveness of this model of care is limited. Methods This study was a retrospective audit study of consecutive stroke admissions in the setting of an acute general medical unit in a district general hospital. The case-notes of patients admitted with stroke for a 6-month period before and after introduction of the pathway, were reviewed to determine data on length of stay, outcome, functional status, (Barthel Index, BI and Modified Rankin Scale, MRS, Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP sub-type, use of investigations, specific management issues and secondary prevention strategies. Logistic regression was used to adjust for differences in case-mix. Results N = 77 (prior to the pathway and 76 (following the pathway. The median (interquartile range, IQR age was 78 years (67.75–84.25, 88% were European NZ and 37% were male. The median (IQR BI at admission for the pre-pathway group was less than the post-pathway group: 6 (0–13.5 vs. 10 (4–15.5, p = 0.018 but other baseline variables were statistically similar. There were no significant differences between any of the outcome or process of care variables, except that echocardiograms were done less frequently after the pathway was introduced. A good outcome (MRS Conclusion A clinical pathway for acute stroke management appeared to have no benefit for the outcome or processes of care and may even have been associated with worse outcomes. These data support the conclusions of a recent Cochrane review.

  19. Effect of prehospital notification on acute stroke care: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Tang, Sung-Chun; Chiang, Wen-Chu; Tsai, Li-Kai; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming

    2016-04-27

    The sooner thrombolytic therapy is given to acute ischemic stroke patients, the better the outcome. Prehospital notification may shorten the time between hospital arrival and brain computed tomography (door-to-CT) and the door-to-needle (DTN) time. This study investigated the effect of prehospital notification on acute stroke care in an urban city in Taiwan. This retrospective observational study utilized a prospectively collected dataset from patients treated at 9 hospitals and the emergency medical service (EMS) system in Taipei City from September 1, 2012 to December 31, 2014. During the study period, prehospital notification was performed by emergency medical technicians if the patient met the following criteria: (1) positive Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS), (2) symptom onset within 3 h, and (3) a sugar pinprick test result ≥ 60 mg/dL. The demographics, final diagnoses, and data associated with stroke for all patients in the prenotification group and for patients diagnosed with acute stroke within 3 h of symptoms onset were prospectively recorded in the stroke registry. The primary outcome was door-to-CT time and the secondary outcome was DTN time. The sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of prehospital notifications and the association between the volume of patients receiving thrombolytic therapy at individual hospitals and DTN time were also evaluated. There were 928 patients who presented ≤ 3 h from stroke onset. Among them, 727 (78.3 %) patients were in the prenotification group; of these, more were male, smokers, and presented with severe symptoms, and fewer had a history of prior stroke or cardiac diseases compared to patients in the non-prenotification group. The median door-to-CT time was significantly shorter in the prenotification group than among the non-prenotification group (13 versus 19 min, p prehospital notification was associated with faster door-to-CT scan and shorter DTN time in patients presenting

  20. Centralising acute stroke care and moving care to the community in a Danish health region: Challenges in implementing a stroke care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douw, Karla; Nielsen, Camilla Palmhøj; Pedersen, Camilla Riis

    2015-08-01

    In May 2012, one of Denmark's five health care regions mandated a reform of stroke care. The purpose of the reform was to save costs, while at the same time improving quality of care. It included (1) centralisation of acute stroke treatment at specialised hospitals, (2) a reduced length of hospital stay, and (3) a shift from inpatient rehabilitation programmes to community-based rehabilitation programmes. Patients would benefit from a more integrated care pathway between hospital and municipality, being supported by early discharge teams at hospitals. A formal policy tool, consisting of a health care agreement between the region and municipalities, was used to implement the changes. The implementation was carried out in a top-down manner by a committee, in which the hospital sector--organised by regions--was better represented than the primary care sector-organised by municipalities. The idea of centralisation of acute care was supported by all stakeholders, but municipalities opposed the hospital-based early discharge teams as they perceived this to be interfering with their core tasks. Municipalities would have liked more influence on the design of the reform. Preliminary data suggest good quality of acute care. Cost savings have been achieved in the region by means of closure of beds and a reduction of hospital length of stay. The realisation of the objective of achieving integrated rehabilitation care between hospitals and municipalities has been less successful. It is likely that greater involvement of municipalities in the design phase and better representation of health care professionals in all phases would have led to more successful implementation of the reform. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Reasoning about truth-telling in end-of-life care of patients with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejnö, Åsa; Silfverberg, Gunilla; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie

    2017-02-01

    Ethical problems are a universal phenomenon but rarely researched concerning patients dying from acute stroke. These patients often have a reduced consciousness from stroke onset and thereby lack ability to convey their needs and could be described as 'incompetent' decision makers regarding their own care. The aim of the study was to deepen the understanding of stroke team members' reasoning about truth-telling in end-of-life care due to acute stroke. Qualitative study based on individual interviews utilizing combined deductive and inductive content analysis. Participants and research context: A total of 15 stroke team members working in stroke units of two associated county hospitals in western Sweden participated. Ethical considerations: The study was approved by the Regional Ethics Review Board, Gothenburg, Sweden. The main findings were the team members' dynamic movement between the categories 'Truth above all' and 'Hide truth to protect'. Honesty was highly valued and considered as a reason for always telling the truth, with the argument of truth as common morality. However, the carers also argued for hiding the truth for different reasons such as not adding extra burden in the sorrow, awaiting a timely moment and not being a messenger of bad news. Withholding truth could both be seen as a way of protecting themselves from difficult conversations and to protect others. The results indicate that there are various barriers for truthfulness. Interpreted from a virtue of ethics perspective, withholding of truth might also be seen as an expression of sound judgement to put the patient's best interest first. The carers may need support in the form of supervision to be given space to reflect on their experience and thereby promote ethically justified care. Here, the multi-professional team can be of great value and contribute through inter-professional sharing of knowledge.

  2. Professional Medical Interpreters Influence the Quality of Acute Ischemic Stroke Care for Patients Who Speak Languages Other than English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan Erfe, Betty M; Siddiqui, Khawja A; Schwamm, Lee H; Kirwan, Chris; Nunes, Anabela; Mejia, Nicte I

    2017-09-21

    The inability to communicate effectively in a common language can jeopardize clinicians' efforts to provide quality patient care. Professional medical interpreters (PMIs) can help provide linguistically appropriate health care, in particular for the >25 million Americans who identify speaking English less than very well. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between use of PMIs and quality of acute ischemic stroke care received by patients who preferred to have their medical care in languages other than English. We analyzed data from 259 non-English-preferring acute ischemic stroke patients who participated in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines-Stroke program at our hospital from January 1, 2003, to April 30, 2014. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression models to examine associations between involvement of PMIs and patients' receipt of defect-free stroke care. A total of 147 of 259 (57%) non-English-preferring patients received PMI services during their hospital stays. Multivariable analyses adjusting for other socioeconomic factors showed that acute ischemic stroke patients who did not receive PMIs had lower odds of receiving defect-free stroke care (odds ratio: 0.52; P=0.04). Our findings suggest that PMIs may influence the quality of acute ischemic stroke care. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  3. The Effect of Telemedicine on Access to Acute Stroke Care in Texas: The Story of Age Inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen C. Albright

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ischemic stroke is a time sensitive disease with the effectiveness of treatment decreasing over time. Treatment is more likely to occur at Primary Stroke Centers (PSC; thus rapid access to acute stroke care through stand-alone PSCs or telemedicine (TM is vital for all Americans. The objective of this study is to determine if disparities exist in access to PSCs or the extended access to acute stroke care provided by TM. Methods. Data from the US Census Bureau and the 2010 Neilson Claritas Demographic Estimation Program, American Hospital Association annual survey, and The Joint Commission list of PSCs and survey response data for all hospitals in the state of Texas were used. Results. Over 64% of block groups had 60-minute ground access to acute stroke care. The odds of a block group having 60-minute access to acute stroke care decreased with age, despite adjustment for sex, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, urbanization, and total population. Conclusion. Our survey of Texas hospitals found that as the median age of a block group increased, the odds of having access to acute stroke care decreased.

  4. Post-acute care for stroke – a retrospective cohort study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai CL

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chung-Liang Lai,1,* Ming-Miau Tsai,1,* Jia-Yuan Luo,1 Wan-Chun Liao,1 Pi-Shan Hsu,2,3 Han-Yu Chen4 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2Department of Family Medicine, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, 3Graduate Institute of Microbiology and Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung-Hsing University, 4Department of Physical Therapy, Hungkuang University, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Stroke often causes functional decline in patients. Therefore, after the acute phase, many patients require post-acute care (PAC to maximize their functional progress, reduce disability, and make it possible for them to return to their home and community. PAC can be provided in different settings. Taiwan’s National Health Insurance (NHI proposed a PAC pilot program, effective since 2014, for stroke patients that allowed patients with the potential for functional improvement to receive PAC rehabilitation in regional or community hospitals. The purpose of this study was to explore the initial achievements and clinical impact of this program in Taiwan. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study that mainly analyzed basic hospitalization data and scores for function and quality of life, as recorded immediately after admission and before discharge, for stroke patients in the PAC program in a hospital in Taiwan. Results: This study collected complete data from a total of 168 patients. After an average of 43.57 days in the program, patients showed significant improvement in the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS, the Barthel Activity Daily Living Index (B-ADL, the Lawton–Brody Instrumental Activity Daily Living Scale (LB-IADL, the Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS, and the Mini Nutrition Assessment (MNA, in mobility, self-care, and usual activity, as well as on anxiety/depression in the EuroQol Five Dimensions Questionnaire (EQ-5D and in the Mini Mental State Examination

  5. Integrating palliative care within acute stroke services: developing a programme theory of patient and family needs, preferences and staff perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton Christopher R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Palliative care should be integrated early into the care trajectories of people with life threatening illness such as stroke. However published guidance focuses primarily on the end of life, and there is a gap in the evidence about how the palliative care needs of acute stroke patients and families should be addressed. Synthesising data across a programme of related studies, this paper presents an explanatory framework for the integration of palliative and acute stroke care. Methods Data from a survey (n=191 of patient-reported palliative care needs and interviews (n=53 exploring experiences with patients and family members were explored in group interviews with 29 staff from 3 United Kingdom stroke services. A realist approach to theory building was used, constructed around the mechanisms that characterise integration, their impacts, and mediating, contextual influences. Results The framework includes two cognitive mechanisms (the legitimacy of palliative care and individual capacity, and behavioural mechanisms (engaging with family; the timing of intervention; working with complexity; and the recognition of dying through which staff integrate palliative and stroke care. A range of clinical (whether patients are being ‘actively treated’, and prognostic uncertainty and service (leadership, specialty status and neurological focus factors appear to influence how palliative care needs are attended to. Conclusions Our framework is the first, empirical explanation of the integration of palliative and acute stroke care. The specification in the framework of factors that mediate integration can inform service development to improve the outcomes and experiences of patients and families.

  6. Nursing care for stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Poulsen, Ingrid; Gillis, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of the clinical nursing practice in European countries in accordance with the European Stroke Strategies (ESS) 2006, and to examine to what extent the ESS have been implemented in stroke care nursing in Europe. BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death...... comprising 61 questions based on the ESS and scientific evidence in nursing practice was distributed to representatives of the European Association of Neuroscience Nurses, who sent the questionnaire to nurses active in stroke care. The questionnaire covered the following areas of stroke care: Organization...... of stroke services, Management of acute stroke and prevention including basic care and nursing, and Secondary prevention. RESULTS: Ninety-two nurses in stroke care in 11 European countries participated in the survey. Within the first 48 hours after stroke onset, 95% monitor patients regularly, 94% start...

  7. Functional Status Predicts Acute Care Readmissions from Inpatient Rehabilitation in the Stroke Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Slocum

    Full Text Available Acute care readmission risk is an increasingly recognized problem that has garnered significant attention, yet the reasons for acute care readmission in the inpatient rehabilitation population are complex and likely multifactorial. Information on both medical comorbidities and functional status is routinely collected for stroke patients participating in inpatient rehabilitation. We sought to determine whether functional status is a more robust predictor of acute care readmissions in the inpatient rehabilitation stroke population compared with medical comorbidities using a large, administrative data set.A retrospective analysis of data from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation from the years 2002 to 2011 was performed examining stroke patients admitted to inpatient rehabilitation facilities. A Basic Model for predicting acute care readmission risk based on age and functional status was compared with models incorporating functional status and medical comorbidities (Basic-Plus or models including age and medical comorbidities alone (Age-Comorbidity. C-statistics were compared to evaluate model performance.There were a total of 803,124 patients: 88,187 (11% patients were transferred back to an acute hospital: 22,247 (2.8% within 3 days, 43,481 (5.4% within 7 days, and 85,431 (10.6% within 30 days. The C-statistics for the Basic Model were 0.701, 0.672, and 0.682 at days 3, 7, and 30 respectively. As compared to the Basic Model, the best-performing Basic-Plus model was the Basic+Elixhauser model with C-statistics differences of +0.011, +0.011, and + 0.012, and the best-performing Age-Comorbidity model was the Age+Elixhauser model with C-statistic differences of -0.124, -0.098, and -0.098 at days 3, 7, and 30 respectively.Readmission models for the inpatient rehabilitation stroke population based on functional status and age showed better predictive ability than models based on medical comorbidities.

  8. Quality of Acute Care and Long-Term Quality of Life and Survival: The Australian Stroke Clinical Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadilhac, Dominique A; Andrew, Nadine E; Lannin, Natasha A; Middleton, Sandy; Levi, Christopher R; Dewey, Helen M; Grabsch, Brenda; Faux, Steve; Hill, Kelvin; Grimley, Rohan; Wong, Andrew; Sabet, Arman; Butler, Ernest; Bladin, Christopher F; Bates, Timothy R; Groot, Patrick; Castley, Helen; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Anderson, Craig S

    2017-04-01

    Uncertainty exists over whether quality improvement strategies translate into better health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and survival after acute stroke. We aimed to determine the association of best practice recommended interventions and outcomes after stroke. Data are from the Australian Stroke Clinical Registry during 2010 to 2014. Multivariable regression was used to determine associations between 3 interventions: received acute stroke unit (ASU) care and in various combinations with prescribed antihypertensive medication at discharge, provision of a discharge care plan, and outcomes of survival and HRQoL (EuroQoL 5-dimensional questionnaire visual analogue scale) at 180 days, by stroke type. An assessment was also made of outcomes related to the number of processes patients received. There were 17 585 stroke admissions (median age 77 years, 47% female; 81% managed in ASUs; 80% ischemic stroke) from 42 hospitals (77% metropolitan) assessed. Cumulative benefits on outcomes related to the number of care processes received by patients. ASU care was associated with a reduced likelihood of death (hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-0.56) and better HRQoL (coefficient, 21.34; 95% confidence interval, 15.50-27.18) within 180 days. For those discharged from hospital, receiving ASU+antihypertensive medication provided greater 180-day survival (hazard ratio, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.52) compared with ASU care alone (hazard ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.76). HRQoL gains were greatest for patients with intracerebral hemorrhage who received care bundles involving discharge processes (range of increase, 11%-19%). Patients with stroke who receive best practice recommended hospital care have improved long-term survival and HRQoL. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Five Years of Acute Stroke Unit Care: Comparing ASU and Non-ASU Admissions and Allied Health Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobel J. Hubbard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence indicates that Stroke Units decrease mortality and morbidity. An Acute Stroke Unit (ASU provides specialised, hyperacute care and thrombolysis. John Hunter Hospital, Australia, admits 500 stroke patients each year and has a 4-bed ASU. Aims. This study investigated hospital admissions over a 5-year period of all strokes patients and of all patients admitted to the 4-bed ASU and the involvement of allied health professionals. Methods. The study retrospectively audited 5-year data from all stroke patients admitted to John Hunter Hospital (n=2525 and from nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU (n=826. The study’s primary outcomes were admission rates, length of stay (days, and allied health involvement. Results. Over 5 years, 47% of stroke patients were admitted to the ASU. More male stroke patients were admitted to the ASU (chi2=5.81; P=0.016. There was a trend over time towards parity between the number of stroke and nonstroke patients admitted to the ASU. When compared to those admitted elsewhere, ASU stroke patients had a longer length of stay (z=−8.233; P=0.0000 and were more likely to receive allied healthcare. Conclusion. This is the first study to report 5 years of ASU admissions. Acute Stroke Units may benefit from a review of the healthcare provided to all stroke patients. The trends over time with respect to the utilisation of the John Hunter Hospitall’s ASU have resulted in a review of the hospitall’s Stroke Unit and allied healthcare.

  10. Preferences of general practitioners regarding an application running on a personal digital assistant in acute stroke care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis in 't Veld, M.H.A.; van Til, Janine Astrid; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2005-01-01

    An application was developed to optimize information exchange in acute stroke care, with which general practitioners (GPs) could consult hospital emergency units. However, it was difficult to obtain clear preferences from GPs regarding the functional requirements of the information to be transferred

  11. No Racial Difference in Rehabilitation Therapy Across All Post-Acute Care Settings in the Year Following a Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Lesli E; Feng, Chunyang; Burke, James F

    2017-12-01

    Black stroke survivors experience greater poststroke disability than whites. Differences in post-acute rehabilitation may contribute to this disparity. Therefore, we estimated racial differences in rehabilitation therapy utilization, intensity, and the number of post-acute care settings in the first year after a stroke. We used national Medicare data to study 186 168 elderly black and white patients hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of stroke in 2011. We tabulated the proportion of stroke survivors receiving physical, occupational, and speech and language therapy in each post-acute care setting (inpatient rehabilitation facility, skilled nursing facility, and home health agency), minutes of therapy, and number of transitions between settings. We then used generalized linear models to determine whether racial differences in minutes of physical therapy were influenced by demographics, comorbidities, thrombolysis, and markers of stroke severity. Black stroke patients were more likely to receive each type of therapy than white stroke patients. Compared with white stroke patients, black stroke patients received more minutes of physical therapy (897.8 versus 743.4; P <0.01), occupational therapy (752.7 versus 648.9; P <0.01), and speech and language therapy (865.7 versus 658.1; P <0.01). There were no clinically significant differences in physical therapy minutes after adjustment. Blacks had more transitions (median, 3; interquartile range, 1-5) than whites (median, 2; interquartile range, 1-5; P <0.01). There are no clinically significant racial differences in rehabilitation therapy utilization or intensity after accounting for patient characteristics. It is unlikely that differences in rehabilitation utilization or intensity are important contributors to racial disparities in poststroke disability. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Acute stroke imaging research roadmap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Koehrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Warach, Steven

    The recent "Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment" meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  13. Neuropsychology of acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinanović, Osman

    2010-06-01

    Neuropsychology includes both the psychiatric manifestations of neurological illness (primary brain-based disorders) and neurobiology of "idiopathic" psychiatric disorders. Neurological primary brain disorders provoke broad spectrum of brain pathophysiology that cause deficit sin human behaviour, and the magnitude of neurobehavioral-related problems is a world wide health concern. Speech disorders of aphasic type, unilateral neglect, anosognosia (deficit disorders), delirium and mood disorders (productive disorders) in urgent neurology, first of all in acute phase of stroke are more frequent disorders then it verified in routine exam, not only in the developed and large neurological departments. Aphasia is common consequence of left hemispheric lesion and most common neuropsychological consequence of stroke, with prevalence of one third of all stroke patients in acute phase although exist reports on greater frequency. Unilateral neglect is a disorder that mostly effects the patient after the lesion of the right hemisphere, mostly caused by a cerebrovascular insult (infarct or haemorrhage affecting a large area - up to two thirds of the right hemisphere), and in general the left-side neglect is the most widespread neuropsychological deficit after the lesion of the right cerebral hemisphere. Reports on the incidence of visual neglect vary and they range from 13 to 85%. Anosognosia is on the second place as neuropsychological syndrome of stroke in right hemisphere, characterized by the denial of the motor, visual or cognitive deficit. This syndrome, defined as denial of hemiparesis or hemianopsia, is a common disorder verified in 17-28% of all patents with acute brain stoke. There are different reports on frequency of delirium in acute stroke, from 24 to 48%, and it is more frequent in hemorrhagic then ischemic stoke. Post stroke depression (PSD) is one of the more frequent consequences on the stroke, and the prevalence of PSD has ranged from 5 to 63% of patients in

  14. Mortality Reduction for Fever, Hyperglycemia, and Swallowing Nurse-Initiated Stroke Intervention: QASC Trial (Quality in Acute Stroke Care) Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sandy; Coughlan, Kelly; Mnatzaganian, George; Low Choy, Nancy; Dale, Simeon; Jammali-Blasi, Asmara; Levi, Chris; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Ward, Jeanette; Cadilhac, Dominique A; McElduff, Patrick; Hiller, Janet E; D'Este, Catherine

    2017-05-01

    Implementation of nurse-initiated protocols to manage fever, hyperglycemia, and swallowing dysfunction decreased death and disability 90 days poststroke in the QASC trial (Quality in Acute Stroke Care) conducted in 19 Australian acute stroke units (2005-2010). We now examine long-term all-cause mortality. Mortality was ascertained using Australia's National Death Index. Cox proportional hazards regression compared time to death adjusting for correlation within stroke units using the cluster sandwich (Huber-White estimator) method. Primary analyses included treatment group only unadjusted for covariates. Secondary analysis adjusted for age, sex, marital status, education, and stroke severity using multiple imputation for missing covariates. One thousand and seventy-six participants (intervention n=600; control n=476) were followed for a median of 4.1 years (minimum 0.3 to maximum 70 months), of whom 264 (24.5%) had died. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were generally well balanced by group. The QASC intervention group had improved long-term survival (>20%), but this was only statistically significant in adjusted analyses (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58-1.07; P =0.13; adjusted HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.59-0.99; P =0.045). Older age (75-84 years; HR, 4.9; 95% CI, 2.8-8.7; P stroke severity (HR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.9; P stroke) was listed either as the primary or secondary cause of death in 80% (211/264) of all deaths. Our results demonstrate the potential long-term and sustained benefit of nurse-initiated multidisciplinary protocols for management of fever, hyperglycemia, and swallowing dysfunction. These protocols should be a routine part of acute stroke care. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au. Unique identifier: ACTRN12608000563369. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Healthcare resource utilization and clinical outcomes associated with acute care and inpatient rehabilitation of stroke patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kyoko; Hinotsu, Shiro; Sadamasa, Nobutake; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Yamagata, Sen; Asari, Shoji; Miyamoto, Susumu; Kawakami, Koji

    2017-02-01

    To investigate healthcare resource utilization and changes in functional status in stroke patients during hospitalization in an acute hospital and a rehabilitation hospital. Retrospective cohort study. One acute and one rehabilitation hospital in Japan. Patients who were admitted to the acute hospital due to stroke onset and then transferred to the rehabilitation hospital (n = 263, 56% male, age 70 ± 12 years). Hospitalization costs and functional independence measure (FIM) were evaluated according to stroke subtype and severity of disability at discharge from the acute hospital. Median (IQR) costs at the acute hospital were dependent on the length of stay (LOS) and implementation of neurosurgery, which resulted in higher costs in subarachnoid hemorrhage [$52 413 ($49 166-$72 606) vs $14 129 ($11 169-$19 459) in cerebral infarction; and vs $15 035 ($10 920-$21 864) in intracerebral hemorrhage]. The costs at the rehabilitation hospital were dependent on LOS, and higher in patients with moderate disability than in those with mild disability [$30 026 ($18 419-$39 911) vs $18 052 ($10 631-$24 384)], while those with severe disability spent $25 476 ($13 340-$43 032). Patients with moderate disability gained the most benefits during hospitalization in the rehabilitation hospital, with a median (IQR) total FIM gain of 16 (5-24) points, compared with a modest improvement in patients with mild (6, 2-14) or severe disability (0, 0-5). The costs for in-hospital stroke care were substantial and the improvement in functional status varied by severity of disability. Our findings would be valuable to organize efficient post-acute stroke care.

  16. Biomarkers for acute diagnosis and management of stroke in neurointensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Y Glushakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of current management of critically ill stroke patients depends on rapid assessment of the type of stroke, ischemic or hemorrhagic, and on a patient′s general clinical status. Thrombolytic therapy with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA is the only effective treatment for ischemic stroke approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA, whereas no treatment has been shown to be effective for hemorrhagic stroke. Furthermore, a narrow therapeutic window and fear of precipitating intracranial hemorrhage by administering r-tPA cause many clinicians to avoid using this treatment. Thus, rapid and objective assessments of stroke type at admission would increase the number of patients with ischemic stroke receiving r-tPA treatment and thereby, improve outcome for many additional stroke patients. Considerable literature suggests that brain-specific protein biomarkers of glial [i.e. S100 calcium-binding protein B (S100B, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP] and neuronal cells [e.g., ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1, neuron-specific enolase (NSE, αII-spectrin breakdown products SBDP120, SBDP145, and SBDP150, myelin basic protein (MBP, neurofilament light chain (NF-L, tau protein, visinin-like protein-1 (VLP 1, NR2 peptide] injury that could be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and peripheral blood might provide valuable and timely diagnostic information for stroke necessary to make prompt management and decisions, especially when the time of stroke onset cannot be determined. This information could include injury severity, prognosis of short-term and long-term outcomes, and discrimination of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. This chapter reviews the current status of the development of biomarker-based diagnosis of stroke and its potential application to improve stroke care.

  17. Navigating stroke care: the experiences of younger stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Euan; Daniel, Katie; Wolfe, Charles D A; McKevitt, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Although stroke is associated with ageing, a significant proportion of strokes occur in younger people. Younger stroke survivors have experienced care available as inappropriate to their needs. However, insufficient attention has been paid to how the social context shapes their experiences of care. We investigated this question with younger stroke survivors in Greater London, UK. We conducted in-depth interviews with individuals aged between 24 and 62 years. Interviews were analysed thematically, with interpretation informed by Bourdieu's concepts of field, capital and habitus. In the acute care setting it was implicit for participants that expertise and guidance was to be prioritised and largely this was reported as what was received. Individuals' cultural capital shaped expectations to access information, but health care professionals' symbolic capital meant they controlled its provision. After discharge, professional guidance was still looked for, but many felt it was limited or unavailable. It was here that participants' social, cultural and economic capital became more important in experiences of care. The field of stroke shaped younger stroke survivors' experiences of care. Navigating stroke care was contingent on accessing different forms of capital. Differences in access to these resources influenced longer term adjustment after stroke. Stroke care can be conceptualised as a temporal field of social activity and relationships which shapes variations in experiences of care among younger stroke survivors, and differences in expectations of support at different time points after stroke. On entering the field of stroke participants reported needing health care professional guidance and expertise to manage the acute event, yet difficulties accessing information in hospital limited the agency of some individuals wanting to take an active role in their recovery. After discharge from hospital variations in experiences of care among participants were more evident

  18. Neurocritical care in the treatment of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbos Iii, David; Powers, Ciaran J; Ding, Yuchuan; Liu, Liping

    2016-06-01

    In this review, we briefly introduce recent developments and updates in neurocritical care in the treatment of stroke, including both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Time to recanalization remains the major rate limiting step in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke as only a minority of patients arrive within a timeframe appropriate for treatment. Whether caring for a patient following ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, the principle focus of neurocritical care for acute brain catastrophes is the identification and prevention of secondary brain injury. While much advancement is still needed for optimum care of patients suffering from ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, the field continues to evolve in ways that promote improved patient outcomes.

  19. Acute stroke differential diagnosis: Stroke mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Pedro

    2017-11-01

    Stroke mimics (SM) are non-vascular conditions that present with an acute neurological deficit simulating acute ischemic stroke and represent a significant percentage of all acute stroke hospital admissions. The most common clinical SM includes conversion/functional (psychiatric disorder); seizures and postictal paralysis; toxic-metabolic disturbances; brain tumours; infections, and migraine. Imaging is essential for SM recognition, being Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion imaging and angiographic studies very useful. There are several disorders that may have imaging features that simulate acute ischemic stroke, mainly presenting with cytotoxic oedema and/or perfusion deficits. The imaging features of the most frequent clinical and imaging stroke mimics are reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. How can we improve stroke thrombolysis rates? A review of health system factors and approaches associated with thrombolysis administration rates in acute stroke care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Christine L; Ryan, Annika; Rose, Shiho; Attia, John R; Kerr, Erin; Koller, Claudia; Levi, Christopher R

    2016-04-08

    Thrombolysis using intravenous (IV) tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is one of few evidence-based acute stroke treatments, yet achieving high rates of IV tPA delivery has been problematic. The 4.5-h treatment window, the complexity of determining eligibility criteria and the availability of expertise and required resources may impact on treatment rates, with barriers encountered at the levels of the individual clinician, the social context and the health system itself. The review aimed to describe health system factors associated with higher rates of IV tPA administration for ischemic stroke and to identify whether system-focussed interventions increased tPA rates for ischemic stroke. Published original English-language research from four electronic databases spanning 1997-2014 was examined. Observational studies of the association between health system factors and tPA rates were described separately from studies of system-focussed intervention strategies aiming to increase tPA rates. Where study outcomes were sufficiently similar, a pooled meta-analysis of outcomes was conducted. Forty-one articles met the inclusion criteria: 7 were methodologically rigorous interventions that met the Cochrane Collaboration Evidence for Practice and Organization of Care (EPOC) study design guidelines and 34 described observed associations between health system factors and rates of IV tPA. System-related factors generally associated with higher IV tPA rates were as follows: urban location, centralised or hub and spoke models, treatment by a neurologist/stroke nurse, in a neurology department/stroke unit or teaching hospital, being admitted by ambulance or mobile team and stroke-specific protocols. Results of the intervention studies suggest that telemedicine approaches did not consistently increase IV tPA rates. Quality improvement strategies appear able to provide modest increases in stroke thrombolysis (pooled odds ratio = 2.1, p = 0.05). In order to improve IV tPA rates in

  1. Periprocedural management of acute ischemic stroke intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlov, Nicholas; Nien, Yih Lin; Zaidat, Osama O; Nguyen, Thanh N

    2012-09-25

    Periprocedural medical management is an important aspect in optimizing the outcome of patients who undergo endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke. Blood pressure, fluid hydration, and antithrombotics are some of the elements that need to be tailored carefully to the patient according to the patency of his or her cerebral vasculature, the extent of his or her infarct, and the potential for hemorrhagic transformation. This article reviews the medical care of acute stroke patients before and after endovascular therapy.

  2. Weekly variation in health-care quality by day and time of admission: a nationwide, registry-based, prospective cohort study of acute stroke care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Benjamin D; Cloud, Geoffrey C; James, Martin A; Hemingway, Harry; Paley, Lizz; Stewart, Kevin; Tyrrell, Pippa J; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony G

    2016-07-09

    Studies in many health systems have shown evidence of poorer quality health care for patients admitted on weekends or overnight than for those admitted during the week (the so-called weekend effect). We postulated that variation in quality was dependent on not only day, but also time, of admission, and aimed to describe the pattern and magnitude of variation in the quality of acute stroke care across the entire week. We did this nationwide, registry-based, prospective cohort study using data from the Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme. We included all adult patients (aged >16 years) admitted to hospital with acute stroke (ischaemic or primary intracerebral haemorrhage) in England and Wales between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014. Our outcome measure was 30 day post-admission survival. We estimated adjusted odds ratios for 13 indicators of acute stroke-care quality by fitting multilevel multivariable regression models across 42 4-h time periods per week. The study cohort comprised 74,307 patients with acute stroke admitted to 199 hospitals. Care quality varied across the entire week, not only between weekends and weekdays, with different quality measures showing different patterns and magnitudes of temporal variation. We identified four patterns of variation: a diurnal pattern (thrombolysis, brain scan within 12 h, brain scan within 1 h, dysphagia screening), a day of the week pattern (stroke physician assessment, nurse assessment, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and assessment of communication and swallowing by a speech and language therapist), an off-hours pattern (door-to-needle time for thrombolysis), and a flow pattern whereby quality changed sequentially across days (stroke-unit admission within 4 h). The largest magnitude of variation was for door-to-needle time within 60 min (range in quality 35-66% [16/46-232/350]; coefficient of variation 18·2). There was no difference in 30 day survival between weekends and weekdays (adjusted odds ratio 1

  3. Effects of candesartan in acute stroke on activities of daily living and level of care at 6 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornslien, Astrid G; Sandset, Else C; Wyller, Torgeir B; Berge, Eivind

    2015-07-01

    The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial (SCAST) indicated that blood pressure-lowering treatment with candesartan in the acute phase of stroke has a negative effect on functional outcome at 6 months, measured by the modified Rankin scale. We wanted to see if similar effects can be observed on activities of daily living and level of care. SCAST was an international multicentre, randomized and placebo-controlled trial of candesartan in 2029 patients recruited within 30  h of acute ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. Treatment lowered blood pressure by 5/2  mmHg from day 2 onwards, and was administered for 7 days. At 6 months, activities of daily living were assessed by the Barthel index, and categorized as 'dependency' (≤55 points), 'assisted dependency' (60-90), or 'independency' (≥95). Level of care was categorized as 'living at own home without public help', 'living at home with public help, or in institution for rehabilitation', or 'living in institution for long or permanent stay'. We used ordinal and binary logistic regression for statistical analysis, and adjusted for predefined key variables. Data were available in 1825 patients, of which 1559 (85%) patients had ischaemic and 247 (13%) had haemorrhagic stroke. There were no statistically significant effects of candesartan on the Barthel index or on level of care (adjusted common odds ratio for poor outcome 1.09, 95% confidence interval 0.88-1.35, P = 0.44; and odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 0.82-1.34, P = 0.69, respectively). In the individual Barthel index domains, there were also no statistically significant differences. Blood pressure-lowering treatment with candesartan had no beneficial effect on activities of daily living and level of care at 6 months. This result is compatible with the results of the main analysis of the modified Rankin scale, and supports the conclusion that there is no indication for routine blood pressure treatment with candesartan in the acute phase

  4. Assessment of the needs of caregivers of stroke patients at state-owned acute-care hospitals in southern Vietnam, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumiko; Hai, Hoang Hoa; Tai, Nguyen Anh

    2013-08-22

    Care for stroke patients has improved steadily in southern Vietnam. Medical treatments such as thrombolytic therapy have been implemented at several hospitals, and stroke-care units composed of a team of various health professionals have been created. However, little attention has been focused on providing support to caregivers of stroke patients. This study aimed to characterize the caregivers of stroke patients who were treated in state-owned acute-care hospitals and to learn about their needs when patients are discharged. Such information can be used to enhance the caregiver's support system. We used questionnaires to conduct a descriptive study in 2011 at a state-owned acute-care hospital in southern Vietnam. We recruited study participants from among caregivers of stroke patients who had been informed of their hospital discharge date. We assessed 8 caregiver characteristics, and caregiver participants selected their needs from the survey's list of 15 possible needs. We analyzed the data by using the independent sample t test and logistic regression. Of the 93 caregivers who consented to participate, 86 (92.5%) completed the survey and indicated their concerns at discharge. The most frequently cited need was information on how to prevent stroke recurrence (72, 83.7%), followed by which drugs are most effective in preventing a relapse (62, 72.1%), how long recovery would take (61, 70.9%), and availability of hospitals in the patient's hometown (60, 69.8%). A little over half of caregivers indicated financial concerns. A caregiver's need for information on diet for a stroke survivor increased with the caregiver's education level. This study revealed several needs among caregivers of stroke survivors in southern Vietnam that are similar to those found by studies of caregivers of stroke survivors in high-income countries. Our findings suggest that comprehensive stroke care that includes caregiver education about healthful diets and prevention of stroke recurrence

  5. Cerebrogenic tachyarrhythmia in acute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Praveen Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiac abnormalities following acute stroke are frequent and seen in both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. The changes seen in electrocardiogram (ECG consist of repolarization abnormalities such as ST elevation, ST depression, negative T waves, and QT prolongation. Among tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation is the most common and occurrence of focal atrial tachycardia is very rare though any cardiac arrhythmias can follow acute stroke. We report a case of focal atrial tachycardia following acute ischemic stroke in 50-year-old female without structural heart disease, and their mechanisms and clinical implications.

  6. Blood glucose in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose is often elevated in acute stroke, and higher admission glucose levels are associated with larger lesions, greater mortality and poorer functional outcome. In patients treated with thrombolysis, hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation...... to the risk of inducing potentially harmful hypoglycemia has been raised. Still, basic and observational research is overwhelmingly in support of a causal relationship between blood glucose and stroke outcome and further research on glucose-lowering therapy in acute stroke is highly warranted....

  7. Results and functional outcomes of acute ischemic stroke patients who underwent mechanical thrombectomy admitted to intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viña Soria, L; Martín Iglesias, L; López Amor, L; Astola Hidalgo, I; Rodríguez García, R; Forcelledo Espina, L; Gonzalo Guerra, J A; de Cima Iglesias, S; Murias Quintana, E; Vega Valdés, P; Calleja Puerta, S; Escudero Augusto, D

    2017-11-11

    To study the results and complications of endovascular treatment (EVT) in acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU). To analyse the possible factors related to mortality and level of disability at ICU discharge and one year after stroke. Observational prospective study. Mixed ICU. Third level hospital. Sixty adult patients. Consecutive sample. None. Epidemiological data, time from symptom onset to EVT, angiographic result, length of stay, days on mechanical ventilation, neurological complications, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at ICU admission and discharge, modified Rankin scale score (mRS) at one year. Mean age 68,90±8,84years. Median time from symptom onset to EVT: 180minutes. Median NIHSS at admission: 17,5; at discharge: 3. Distal flow was achieved in 90% of cases. Median ICU stay: 3 days. Mechanical ventilation: 81,7.%. Functional independence (mRS≤2) 50% at one year. Deaths: 22 (36,6%) of which 8 (13,3%) died during UCI stay and the rest during the first year. The factors relating to a worse functional outcome were symptomatic hemorrhage transformation, lack of recanalization and complications during EVT. The factors relating to mortality were symptomatic hemorrhage and hydrocephalus. Distal flow was achieve in most cases with a low complication rate. Half of the patients presented functional independence one year after the stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  8. Plasma cytokines in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Krarup; Boysen, Gudrun; Christensen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    GOALS: The aim of this study was to test the relations between plasma cytokines and the clinical characteristics, course, and risk factors in acute stroke. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The analysis was based on 179 patients with acute stroke included within 24 hours of stroke onset. On inclusion and 3...... measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). FINDINGS: The levels of most cytokines were significantly different in acute stroke from the levels 3 months later; but only IL-10 was positively associated with stroke severity. C-reactive protein and white blood cell count were positively associated...... with the cytokine response. CONCLUSIONS: We found a substantial overall cytokine reaction that reflected the stroke incident. However, these results do not, at present, suggest a potential for clinical use, as they do not seem to add to the information obtained from the clinical workup of the individual patient....

  9. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature...... is directly related to stroke severity and outcome, and fever after stroke is associated with substantial increases in morbidity and mortality. Normalisation of temperature in acute stroke by antipyretics is generally recommended, although there is no direct evidence to support this treatment. Despite its...... obvious therapeutic potential, hypothermia as a form of neuroprotection for stroke has been investigated in only a few very small studies. Therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in acute stroke but owing to serious side-effects--such as hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, and pneumonia--it is still thought...

  10. Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; De Keyser, J.; Luijckx, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    In the last decennium, thrombolytic therapy has changed the management of acute ischemic stroke. Randomized clinical studies have demonstrated that intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator improves functional outcomes. Recently the time window for intravenous thrombolysis has been

  11. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature...... obvious therapeutic potential, hypothermia as a form of neuroprotection for stroke has been investigated in only a few very small studies. Therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in acute stroke but owing to serious side-effects--such as hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, and pneumonia--it is still thought...

  12. Registration of acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Cathrine; Mehnert, Frank; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The validity of the registration of patients in stroke-specific registries has seldom been investigated, nor compared with administrative hospital discharge registries. The objective of this study was to examine the validity of the registration of patients in a stroke-specific registry...... (The Danish Stroke Registry [DSR]) and a hospital discharge registry (The Danish National Patient Registry [DNRP]). METHODS: Assuming that all patients with stroke were registered in either the DSR, DNRP or both, we first identified a sample of 75 patients registered with stroke in 2009; 25 patients...... in the DSR, 25 patients in the DNRP, and 25 patients registered in both data sources. Using the medical record as a gold standard, we then estimated the sensitivity and positive predictive value of a stroke diagnosis in the DSR and the DNRP. Secondly, we reviewed 160 medical records for all potential stroke...

  13. High sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in Acute Ischemic Stroke and subtypes: A study from a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Jaydip Ray; Mridula, Kandadai Rukmini; Umamahesh, Matapathi; Swathi, Alluri; Balaraju, Banda; Bandaru, Venkata Chandrasekher Srinivasarao

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a heterogeneous disease with several risk factors. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a marker for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Recent studies have shown that high hsCRP level is a risk factor for ischemic stroke. The objective of our study was to investigate the association of high hsCRP (> 3 mg/L) levels with ischemic stroke and its subtypes in Indian patients. We recruited 210 consecutive acute stroke patients and 150 age and sex matched controls. Stroke patients were admitted within 72 hours of onset, at Yashoda Hospital, Hyderabad, India. The study period was from January 2011 to December 2012. All patients underwent tests as per standard protocol for stroke workup. Serum hsCRP level was assessed in all stroke patients and controls on the day of admission. The mean hsCRP was significantly higher in stroke patients (3.8 ± 2.5) than controls (1.8 ± 1.5) (P < 0.001). High hsCRP had higher frequency in stroke patients 130 (61.9%) compared to controls 10 (6.6%), P < 0.001. High hsCRP level was more prevalent in the stroke subtypes of cardioembolic stroke (83.3%) and large artery atherosclerosis (72%). High hsCRP level was significantly associated with hypercholesterolemia (P = 0.001), age (P = 0.01), and mortality (0.04). After adjustment of regression analysis it was observed that high level hsCRP is independently associated with acute ischemic stroke (Odds 4.5; 95% CI: 2.5-12.2); especially the stroke subtypes of cardioembolic stroke, (odds ratio 3.4, 95% CI: 1.9-10.5) and large artery atherosclerosis (odds ratio 2.1, 95% CI: 1.5-3.8). High hsCRP level is strongly associated with and an independent predictor of acute ischemic stroke. The association was found in all ischemic stroke subtypes.

  14. Update on Neurocritical Care of Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jason; Pizzi, Michael A; Brent Peel, J; Alejos, David; Mbabuike, Nnenne; Brown, Benjamin L; Hodge, David; David Freeman, W

    2017-08-01

    This review will highlight the recent advancements in acute ischemic stroke diagnosis and treatment, with special attention to new features and recommendations of stroke care in the neurocritical care unit. New studies suggest that pre-hospital treatment of stroke with mobile stroke units and telestroke technology may lead to earlier stroke therapy with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and recent studies show tPA can be given in previously contraindicated situations. More rapid automated CT perfusion and angiography may demonstrate a vascular penumbra for neuroendovascular intervention. Further, the greatest advance in acute stroke treatment since 2014 is the demonstration that neuroendovascular catheter-based thrombectomy with stent retrievers recanalizing intracranial large vessel occlusion (LVO) improves both recanalization and long-term outcomes in several trials. Hemorrhagic transformation and severe large infarct cerebral edema remain serious post-stroke challenges, with new guidelines describing who and when patients should get medical or surgical intervention. The adage "time is brain" directs the most evidence-based approach for rapid stroke diagnosis for tPA eligible and LVO recanalization using an orchestrated team approach. The neurocritical care unit is the appropriate location to optimize stroke outcomes for the most severely affected stroke patients.

  15. Auditory Hallucinations in Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Lampl

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory hallucinations are uncommon phenomena which can be directly caused by acute stroke, mostly described after lesions of the brain stem, very rarely reported after cortical strokes. The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency of this phenomenon. In a cross sectional study, 641 stroke patients were followed in the period between 1996–2000. Each patient underwent comprehensive investigation and follow-up. Four patients were found to have post cortical stroke auditory hallucinations. All of them occurred after an ischemic lesion of the right temporal lobe. After no more than four months, all patients were symptom-free and without therapy. The fact the auditory hallucinations may be of cortical origin must be taken into consideration in the treatment of stroke patients. The phenomenon may be completely reversible after a couple of months.

  16. Impact on clinical and cost outcomes of a centralized approach to acute stroke care in London: a comparative effectiveness before and after model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Maree Hunter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In July 2010 a new multiple hub-and-spoke model for acute stroke care was implemented across the whole of London, UK, with continuous specialist care during the first 72 hours provided at 8 hyper-acute stroke units (HASUs compared to the previous model of 30 local hospitals receiving acute stroke patients. We investigated differences in clinical outcomes and costs between the new and old models. METHODS: We compared outcomes and costs 'before' (July 2007-July 2008 vs. 'after' (July 2010-June 2011 the introduction of the new model, adjusted for patient characteristics and national time trends in mortality and length of stay. We constructed 90-day and 10-year decision analytic models using data from population based stroke registers, audits and published sources. Mortality and length of stay were modelled using survival analysis. FINDINGS: In a pooled sample of 307 patients 'before' and 3156 patients 'after', survival improved in the 'after' period (age adjusted hazard ratio 0.54; 95% CI 0.41-0.72. The predicted survival rates at 90 days in the deterministic model adjusted for national trends were 87.2% 'before' % (95% CI 86.7%-87.7% and 88.7% 'after' (95% CI 88.6%-88.8%; a relative reduction in deaths of 12% (95% CI 8%-16%. Based on a cohort of 6,438 stroke patients, the model produces a total cost saving of £5.2 million per year at 90 days (95% CI £4.9-£5.5 million; £811 per patient. CONCLUSION: A centralized model for acute stroke care across an entire metropolitan city appears to have reduced mortality for a reduced cost per patient, predominately as a result of reduced hospital length of stay.

  17. From stroke unit care to stroke care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    1999-01-01

    In some stroke units continuous monitoring of blood pressure, electrocardiogram, body temperature, and oxygen saturation has become an integral part of the management of acute stroke. In addition, regular measurements of blood glucose are performed. Stroke units equipped with such monitoring

  18. [Stroke health care plan (ICTUS II. 2010)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjuan, J; Alvarez-Sabín, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Castillo, J; Dávalos, A; Díez Tejedor, E; Freijo, M; Gil-Núñez, A; Fernández, J C López; Maestre, J F; Martínez-Vila, E; Morales, A; Purroy, F; Ramírez, J M; Segura, T; Serena, J; Tejada, J; Tejero, C

    2011-09-01

    The Spanish Stroke Group published the "Plan for stroke healthcare delivery" in 2006 with the aim that all stroke patients could receive the same degree of specialised healthcare according to the stage of their disease, independently of where they live, their age, gender or ethnicity. This Plan needs to be updated in order to introduce new developments in acute stroke. A committee of 19 neurologists specialised in neurovascular diseases representing different regions of Spain evaluated previous experience with this Plan and the available scientific evidence according to published literature. The new organised healthcare system must place emphasis on the characteristics of the different care levels with promotion of Reference Stroke Hospitals, set up less restrictive Stroke Code activation criteria that include new therapeutic options, establish new standard measures for endovascular treatment and develop tele-medicine stroke networks. 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Applying principles from the game theory to acute stroke care: Learning from the prisoner's dilemma, stag-hunt, and other strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2016-04-01

    Acute stroke care represents a challenge for decision makers. Decisions based on erroneous assessments may generate false expectations of patients and their family members, and potentially inappropriate medical advice. Game theory is the analysis of interactions between individuals to study how conflict and cooperation affect our decisions. We reviewed principles of game theory that could be applied to medical decisions under uncertainty. Medical decisions in acute stroke care are usually made under constrains: short period of time, with imperfect clinical information, limit understanding about patients and families' values and beliefs. Game theory brings some strategies to help us manage complex medical situations under uncertainty. For example, it offers a different perspective by encouraging the consideration of different alternatives through the understanding of patients' preferences and the careful evaluation of cognitive distortions when applying 'real-world' data. The stag-hunt game teaches us the importance of trust to strength cooperation for a successful patient-physician interaction that is beyond a good or poor clinical outcome. The application of game theory to stroke care may improve our understanding of complex medical situations and help clinicians make practical decisions under uncertainty. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  20. The immunology of acute stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chamorro, Angel; Meisel, Andreas; Planas, Anna M.; Urra, Xabier; van de Beek, Diederik; Veltkamp, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Recent clinical and experimental studies have highlighted a complex role for the immune system in the pathophysiological changes that occur after acute stroke. Sensors of the innate immune system such as Toll-like receptors, or effectors such as the lectin pathway of complement activation and innate

  1. Effect of aphasia on acute stroke outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Amelia K; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Marshall, Randolph S; Lazar, Ronald M

    2016-11-29

    To determine the independent effects of aphasia on outcomes during acute stroke admission, controlling for total NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and loss of consciousness. Data from the Tulane Stroke Registry were used from July 2008 to December 2014 for patient demographics, NIHSS scores, length of stay (LOS), complications (sepsis, deep vein thrombosis), and discharge modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score. Aphasia was defined as a score >1 on question 9 on the NIHSS on admission and hemiparesis as >1 on questions 5 or 6. Among 1,847 patients, 866 (46%) had aphasia on admission. Adjusting for NIHSS score and inpatient complications, those with aphasia had a 1.22 day longer LOS than those without aphasia, whereas those with hemiparesis (n = 1,225) did not have any increased LOS compared to those without hemiparesis. Those with aphasia had greater odds of having a complication (odds ratio [OR] 1.44, confidence interval [CI] 1.07-1.93, p = 0.0174) than those without aphasia, which was equivalent to those having hemiparesis (OR 1.47, CI 1.09-1.99, p = 0.0137). Controlling for NIHSS scores, aphasia patients had higher odds of discharge mRS 3-6 (OR 1.42 vs 1.15). Aphasia is independently associated with increased LOS and complications during the acute stroke admission, adding $2.16 billion annually to US acute stroke care. The presence of aphasia was more likely to produce a poor functional outcome than hemiparesis. These data suggest that further research is necessary to determine whether establishing adaptive communication skills can mitigate its consequences in the acute stroke setting. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Physical activity patterns of acute stroke patients managed in a rehabilitation focused stroke unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Tanya; Bernhardt, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive stroke unit care, incorporating acute care and rehabilitation, may promote early physical activity after stroke. However, previous information regarding physical activity specific to the acute phase of stroke and the comprehensive stroke unit setting is limited to one stroke unit. This study describes the physical activity undertaken by patients within 14 days after stroke admitted to a comprehensive stroke unit. This study was a prospective observational study. Behavioural mapping was used to determine the proportion of the day spent in different activities. Therapist reports were used to determine the amount of formal therapy received on the day of observation. The timing of commencement of activity out of bed was obtained from the medical records. On average, patients spent 45% (SD 25) of the day in some form of physical activity and received 58 (SD 34) minutes per day of physiotherapy and occupational therapy combined. Mean time to first mobilisation out of bed was 46 (SD 32) hours post-stroke. This study suggests that commencement of physical activity occurs earlier and physical activity is at a higher level early after stroke in this comprehensive stroke unit, when compared to studies of other acute stroke models of care.

  3. Reliability of point-of-care coagulometer measurements in patients with acute ischaemic stroke receiving intravenous fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado-Alonso, D; Fayos-Vidal, F; Martí-Fàbregas, J; Prats-Sánchez, L; Marín-Bueno, R; Martínez-Domeño, A; Delgado-Mederos, R; Camps-Renom, P

    2017-09-25

    Speed of administration conditions the effectiveness of intravenous fibrinolysis in treating acute ischaemic stroke. To reduce the risk of haemorrhagic complications, the intervention is contraindicated in certain cases, such as where the International Normalised Ratio (INR) is ≥ 1.7. This study aimed to determine the reliability of point-of-care INR readings (POC-INR) taken using the CoaguChek® XS portable coagulometer compared to laboratory results (L-INR). We conducted a retrospective observational study of consecutive patients admitted to our centre with acute ischaemic stroke and who were treated with intravenous fibrinolysis, over a period of 4 years. Patients' INR was measured with a portable coagulometer and in the laboratory. Results were compared using the paired-sample t test; using L-INR results as a reference value, ROC analysis was performed to determine POC-INR with greater predictive value. The study included 210 patients with a mean age of 74.3±11.5 years old; 18 (8.6%) were taking vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (OAC). There were no significant differences between the 2 INR measurements in the population as a whole (POC-INR-L-INR difference: 0.001±0.085; P=.82). In subgroup analysis, the results coincided for patients taking OACs (0.001±0.081; P=.42) and those with L-INR ≤ 1.2 (0.008±0.081; P=.16). For L-INR>1.2, however, the portable coagulometer underestimated INR (0.058±0.095; P=.01). Through ROC analysis, POC-INR < 1.6 was found to be the cut-off point with greatest sensitivity (100%) and specificity (98.97%) for identifying patients eligible for intravenous fibrinolysis (L-INR < 1.7). POC-INR shows a good correlation with L-INR. Our results suggest that the best threshold to predict an L-INR < 1.7 is POC-INR < 1.6. Internal validation studies for POC-INR should be considered in all treatment centres. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Early infection and prognosis after acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Reith, J

    2001-01-01

    Infection is a frequent complication in the early course of acute stroke and may adversely affect stroke outcome. In the present study, we investigate early infection developing in patients within 3 days of admission to the hospital and its independent relation to recovery and stroke outcome....... In addition, we identify predictors for early infections, infection subtypes, and their relation to initial stroke severity....

  5. Compliance with the stroke education performance measure in the Michigan Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickles, Adrienne; Fiedler, Jay; Roberts, Stacey; Lyon-Callo, Sarah; Hurst, Rochelle; Reeves, Mathew

    2013-05-01

    Stroke education, 1 of 8 endorsed stroke performance measures, consists of 5 specific subcomponents: risk factors, stroke warning signs, emergency medical service activation, physician follow-up, and discharge medications. We identified predictors of stroke education performance measure compliance in the Michigan Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry. Data were collected on 9609 acute stroke admissions to 20 registry hospitals during 2008 and 2009. Predictors of measure compliance (delivery of all 5 subcomponents) were determined using multivariable logistic regression. Overall compliance with the stroke education measure was 61.8% (hospital-level compliance ranged between 16% and 93%). Compliance with individual subcomponents were risk factors (65.5%), stroke warning signs (68.9%), emergency medical service activation (66.8%), physician follow-up (92.9%), and discharge medications (91.5%). Age, gender, stroke subtype, prestroke ambulation, discharge destination, and hospital size were all significant independent predictors of compliance. Stroke education was delivered less often to patients who were ≥ 70 years of age, nonambulatory prestroke, not discharged to home, had transient ischemic attack, or hemorrhagic stroke. Only 60% of patients received stroke education consistent with the endorsed performance measures. Strategies to increase stroke education, including the impact of incorporating stroke-specific education measures into hospital care protocols, should be explored.

  6. Measuring Quality Improvement in Acute Ischemic Stroke Care: Interrupted Time Series Analysis of Door-to-Needle Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Margreet van Dishoeck

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In patients with acute ischemic stroke, early treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA improves functional outcome by effectively reducing disability and dependency. Timely thrombolysis, within 1 h, is a vital aspect of acute stroke treatment, and is reflected in the widely used performance indicator ‘door-to-needle time' (DNT. DNT measures the time from the moment the patient enters the emergency department until he/she receives intravenous rtPA. The purpose of the study was to measure quality improvement from the first implementation of thrombolysis in stroke patients in a university hospital in the Netherlands. We further aimed to identify specific interventions that affect DNT. Methods: We included all patients with acute ischemic stroke consecutively admitted to a large university hospital in the Netherlands between January 2006 and December 2012, and focused on those treated with thrombolytic therapy on admission. Data were collected routinely for research purposes and internal quality measurement (the Erasmus Stroke Study. We used a retrospective interrupted time series design to study the trend in DNT, analyzed by means of segmented regression. Results: Between January 2006 and December 2012, 1,703 patients with ischemic stroke were admitted and 262 (17% were treated with rtPA. Patients treated with thrombolysis were on average 63 years old at the time of the stroke and 52% were male. Mean age (p = 0.58 and sex distribution (p = 0.98 did not change over the years. The proportion treated with thrombolysis increased from 5% in 2006 to 22% in 2012. In 2006, none of the patients were treated within 1 h. In 2012, this had increased to 81%. In a logistic regression analysis, this trend was significant (OR 1.6 per year, CI 1.4-1.8. The median DNT was reduced from 75 min in 2006 to 45 min in 2012 (p Conclusion and Implications: The DNT steadily improved from the first implementation of thrombolysis. Specific

  7. RecoverNow: Feasibility of a Mobile Tablet-Based Rehabilitation Intervention to Treat Post-Stroke Communication Deficits in the Acute Care Setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen H Mallet

    Full Text Available Approximately 40% of patients diagnosed with stroke experience some degree of aphasia. With limited health care resources, patients' access to speech and language therapies is often delayed. We propose using mobile-platform technology to initiate early speech-language therapy in the acute care setting. For this pilot, our objective was to assess the feasibility of a tablet-based speech-language therapy for patients with communication deficits following acute stroke.We enrolled consecutive patients admitted with a stroke and communication deficits with NIHSS score ≥1 on the best language and/or dysarthria parameters. We excluded patients with severe comprehension deficits where communication was not possible. Following baseline assessment by a speech-language pathologist (SLP, patients were provided with a mobile tablet programmed with individualized therapy applications based on the assessment, and instructed to use it for at least one hour per day. Our objective was to establish feasibility by measuring recruitment rate, adherence rate, retention rate, protocol deviations and acceptability.Over 6 months, 143 patients were admitted with a new diagnosis of stroke: 73 had communication deficits, 44 met inclusion criteria, and 30 were enrolled into RecoverNow (median age 62, 26.6% female for a recruitment rate of 68% of eligible participants. Participants received mobile tablets at a mean 6.8 days from admission [SEM 1.6], and used them for a mean 149.8 minutes/day [SEM 19.1]. In-hospital retention rate was 97%, and 96% of patients scored the mobile tablet-based communication therapy as at least moderately convenient 3/5 or better with 5/5 being most "convenient".Individualized speech-language therapy delivered by mobile tablet technology is feasible in acute care.

  8. Cerebrolysin for acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziganshina, Liliya Eugenevna; Abakumova, Tatyana; Vernay, Ludivine

    2016-12-05

    Cerebrolysin is a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue, which has potential neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties. It is widely used in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke in Russia, Eastern Europe, China, and other Asian and post-Soviet countries. To assess the benefits and risks of cerebrolysin for treating acute ischaemic stroke. In May 2016 we searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science Core Collection, with Science Citation Index, LILACS, OpenGrey, and a number of Russian Databases. We also searched reference lists, ongoing trials registers and conference proceedings, and contacted the manufacturer of cerebrolysin, EVER Neuro Pharma GmbH (formerly Ebewe Pharma). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing cerebrolysin, started within 48 hours of stroke onset and continued for any time, with placebo or no treatment in people with acute ischaemic stroke. Two review authors independently applied inclusion criteria, assessed trial quality and risk of bias, and extracted data. We identified six RCTs (1501 participants) that met the inclusion criteria.We evaluated risk of bias and judged it to be unclear for generation of allocation sequence in four studies and low in two studies; unclear for allocation concealment in five studies and low in one study; high for incomplete outcome data (attrition bias) in five studies and unclear in one study; unclear for blinding; high for selective reporting in four studies and unclear in two; and high for other sources of bias in three studies and unclear in the rest. The manufacturer of cerebrolysin, pharmaceutical company EVER Neuro Pharma, supported three multi-centre studies, either totally, or providing cerebrolysin and placebo, randomisation codes, research grants, or statisticians.None of the included trials reported on poor functional outcome defined as death or dependence at the end of the follow-up period or

  9. Neighborhood income and stroke care and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiming; Chan, Crystal; Alter, David A.; Bronskill, Susan E.; Hill, Michael D.; Manuel, Douglas G.; Tu, Jack V.; Anderson, Geoffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate factors that may contribute to the increased stroke case fatality rates observed in individuals from low-income areas. Methods: We conducted a cohort study on a population-based sample of all patients with stroke or TIA seen at 153 acute care hospitals in the province of Ontario, Canada, between April 1, 2002, and March 31, 2003, and April 1, 2004, and March 31, 2005. Socioeconomic status measured as income quintiles was imputed from median neighborhood income. In the study sample of 7,816 patients we determined 1-year mortality by grouped income quintile and used multivariable analyses to assess whether differences in survival were explained by cardiovascular risk factors, stroke severity, stroke management, or other prognostic factors. Results: There was no significant gradient across income groups for stroke severity or stroke management. However, 1-year mortality rates were higher in those from the lowest income group compared to those from the highest income group, even after adjustment for age, sex, stroke type and severity, comorbid conditions, hospital and physician characteristics, and processes of care (adjusted hazard ratio for low- vs high-income groups, 1.18; 95 confidence interval 1.03 to 1.29). Conclusions: In Ontario, 1-year survival rates after an index stroke are higher for those from the richest compared to the least wealthy areas, and this is only partly explained by age, sex, comorbid conditions, and other baseline risk factors. PMID:22895592

  10. Symptomatic and Palliative Care for Stroke Survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Creutzfeldt, Claire J; Holloway, Robert G; Walker, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    ... care needs of stroke survivors. Some of the most common and disabling post-stroke symptoms that are reviewed here include central post-stroke pain, hemiplegic shoulder pain, painful spasticity, fatigue, incontinence, post-stroke...

  11. Mailuoning for acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weimin; Shi, Zhaobo; Yang, Hong-Qi; Teng, Junfang; Zhao, Jun; Xiang, Guoliang

    2015-01-09

    Mailuoning is widely used in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke in China. Animal experimental studies and clinical pharmacological research indicate that mailuoning might improve blood circulation, prevent ischaemic injury, and protect heart and brain tissue. This review was last published in 2009. As new data have become available, it is necessary to reassess the evidence from randomised controlled trials. To determine the effects and safety of mailuoning agents (injection or oral liquid) in the treatment of people with acute ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (May 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL;2014, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2014), Embase (1980 to May 2014), AMED (1985 to May 2014), the Chinese Stroke Trials Register (June 2014), the China Biological Medicine Database (CBM-disc; 1979 to June 2014), China Science and Technology Journal database (CSTJ; 1979 to June 2014), Wanfang Data Chinese databases (1979 to June 2014), and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (1979 to June 2014). We searched clinical trials and research registers, handsearched 10 Chinese journals including relevant conference proceedings, scanned reference lists, and contacted the pharmaceutical company that manufactures mailuoning. We also attempted to contact trial authors to obtain further data. Randomised controlled trials comparing mailuoning with placebo or mailuoning plus other treatment compared with that other treatment in people with acute ischaemic stroke. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality, and extracted data. We included 21 trials, involving 1746 participants, in this update; six trials were new. The included trials did not report the numbers of dead and dependent participants at the end of at least three months' follow-up. Of the 12 trials that reported adverse events, five events occurred in two trials. There was no significant difference

  12. Off-Hours Admission and Acute Stroke Care Quality: A Nationwide Study of Performance Measures and Case-Fatality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Nina Sahlertz; Mainz, Jan; Nørgård, Bente Mertz

    2014-01-01

    975). Off-hours were weekends and evening and nighttime shifts on weekdays. Compliance with performance measures was compared using general linear modeling, and odds ratios for 30 days case-fatality were obtained using multivariable logistic regression. Results-Patients admitted off-hours had a lower......Background and Purpose-Studies have reported higher risks of death and other adverse outcomes in acute stroke patients admitted off-hours; however, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. According to time of admission, our aim was to examine compliance with performance measures for acute...... chance of compliance with 8 out of 10 performance measures; however, these differences diminished over time. Unadjusted odds ratio for 30 days case-fatality, for patients admitted off-hours compared with patients admitted on-hours, was 1.15 (95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.21). Adjusting for patient...

  13. Transition of care for acute stroke and myocardial infarction patients: from hospitalization to rehabilitation, recovery, and secondary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, DaiWai M; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Alexander, Karen P; Kendrick, Amy S; Irvine, Julian R; Wing, Liz; Coeytaux, Remy R; Dolor, Rowena J; Duncan, Pamela W; Graffagnino, Carmelo

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To review the available published literature to assess whether evidence supports a beneficial role for coordinated transition of care services for the postacute care of patients hospitalized with first or recurrent stroke or myocardial infarction (MI). This review was framed around five areas of investigation: (1) key components of transition of care services, (2) evidence for improvement in functional outcomes, morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, (3) associated risks or potential harms, (4) evidence for improvement in systems of care, and (5) evidence that benefits and harms vary by patient-based or system-based characteristics. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE(®), CINAHL(®), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Embase(®). REVIEW METHODS We included studies published in English from 2000 to 2011 that specified postacute hospitalization transition of care services as well as prevention of recurrent stroke or MI. RESULTS A total of 62 articles representing 44 studies were included for data abstraction. Transition of care interventions were grouped into four categories: (1) hospital -initiated support for discharge was the initial stage in the transition of care process, (2) patient and family education interventions were started during hospitalization but were continued at the community level, (3) community-based models of support followed hospital discharge, and (4) chronic disease management models of care assumed the responsibility for long-term care. Early supported discharge after stroke was associated with reduced total hospital length of stay without adverse effects on functional recovery, and specialty care after MI was associated with reduced mortality. Because of several methodological shortcomings, most studies did not consistently demonstrate that any specific intervention resulted in improved patient-or system -based outcomes. Some studies included more than one intervention, which made it difficult to determine the effect of individual

  14. Guidelines for acute ischemic stroke treatment: part II: stroke treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Ouriques Martins

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The second part of these Guidelines covers the topics of antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke, reperfusion therapy, and classification of Stroke Centers. Information on the classes and levels of evidence used in this guideline is provided in Part I. A translated version of the Guidelines is available from the Brazilian Stroke Society website (www.sbdcv.com.br.

  15. AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE STROKE HOSPITAL PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kes, Vanja Bašić; Jurašić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Lisak, Marijana; Jelec, Vjekoslav; Matovina, Lucija Zadro

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the most important cause of adult disability worldwide and in Croatia. In the past, stroke was almost exclusively considered to be a disease of the elderly; however, today the age limit has considerably lowered towards younger age. The aim of this study was to determine age and gender impact on stroke patients in a Croatian urban area during one-year survey. The study included all acute stroke patients admitted to our Department in 2004. A compiled stroke questionnaire was fulfilled during hospitalization by medical personnel on the following items: stroke risk factors including lifestyle habits (smoking and alcohol), pre-stroke physical ability evaluation, stroke evolution data, laboratory and computed tomography findings, outcome data and post-stroke disability assessment. Appropriate statistical analysis of numerical and categorical data was performed at the level of p alcohol intake. Additionally, age analysis showed that heart conditions and smoking were more prevalent among older stroke patients. In conclusion, considerable differences were established between age and gender stroke patient groups, confirming the need of permanent national stroke registry and subsequent targeted action in secondary care, and prevention with education on risk factors, preferably personally tailored.

  16. Predictors and Outcomes of Dysphagia Screening After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joundi, Raed A; Martino, Rosemary; Saposnik, Gustavo; Giannakeas, Vasily; Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K

    2017-04-01

    Guidelines advocate screening all acute stroke patients for dysphagia. However, limited data are available regarding how many and which patients are screened and how failing a swallowing screen affects patient outcomes. We sought to evaluate predictors of receiving dysphagia screening after acute ischemic stroke and outcomes after failing a screening test. We used the Ontario Stroke Registry from April 1, 2010, to March 31, 2013, to identify patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke and determine predictors of documented dysphagia screening and outcomes after failing the screening test, including pneumonia, disability, and death. Among 7171 patients, 6677 patients were eligible to receive dysphagia screening within 72 hours, yet 1280 (19.2%) patients did not undergo documented screening. Patients with mild strokes were significantly less likely than those with more severe strokes to have documented screening (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-0.64). Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio, 4.71; 95% CI, 3.43-6.47), severe disability (adjusted odds ratio, 5.19; 95% CI, 4.48-6.02), discharge to long-term care (adjusted odds ratio, 2.79; 95% CI, 2.11-3.79), and 1-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 2.09-2.80). Associations were maintained in patients with mild strokes. One in 5 patients with acute ischemic stroke did not have documented dysphagia screening, and patients with mild strokes were substantially less likely to have documented screening. Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including in patients with mild strokes, highlighting the importance of dysphagia screening for all patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Acute MRI Changes in Progressive Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalowska, Elizabeth; Rostrup, Egill; Rosenbaum, S

    2008-01-01

    aimed to assess if acute MRI findings could be used for the prediction of stroke in progression (SIP). Methods: Prospectively 41 patients, 13 with lacunar infarcts and 28 with territorial infarcts, were admitted to an acute stroke unit within 24 h of stroke onset (median 11 h, range 3- 22). Diffusion...... the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index and SSS score. Patients with and without SIP were compared using both clinical and MRI data obtained on admission, on day 7 and after 3 months. Results: Fifteen patients (37%) developed SIP. Increased DWI lesion volume on day 7 in all strokes was associated with SIP...

  18. Acute MRI changes in progressive ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalowska, E.; Rostrup, E.; Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    aimed to assess if acute MRI findings could be used for the prediction of stroke in progression (SIP). METHODS: Prospectively 41 patients, 13 with lacunar infarcts and 28 with territorial infarcts, were admitted to an acute stroke unit within 24 h of stroke onset (median 11 h, range 3- 22). Diffusion...... the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index and SSS score. Patients with and without SIP were compared using both clinical and MRI data obtained on admission, on day 7 and after 3 months. RESULTS: Fifteen patients (37%) developed SIP. Increased DWI lesion volume on day 7 in all strokes was associated with SIP...

  19. Stepped psychological care after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneebone, Ian I

    2016-09-01

    Emotional difficulties are common after stroke and have an impact on rehabilitation outcome. It is a challenge to manage these problems effectively, particularly in times of resource stringency. One proposal for how to do this has arisen out of an approach to general mental health management: a system of 'stepped care'. Such a system directs intervention by considering level of need, thereby making the most efficient use of available resources. It is the purpose of this article to articulate a stepped psychological care approach for emotional problems after stroke. Narrative review and elaboration of the model proposed by the Department of Health in England for the management of emotional problems after stroke. A stepped care model for the management of emotional problems after stroke is presented in detail, including descriptions of specific interventions and guidance to inform the level of management. The stepped psychological care proposal for emotional problems after stroke requires evaluation but is potentially of use within comparable healthcare systems. Implications for Rehabilitation Emotional problems are common after stroke and effect rehabilitation outcomes. A stepped care approach to these problems offers the ability to cater to all according to need. Greater specification of the services at each step can be outlined. While recommended, such an approach requires evaluation to prove its efficacy.

  20. Costs of stroke and stroke services: Determinants of patient costs and a comparison of costs of regular care and care organised in stroke services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koopmanschap Marc A

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a major cause of death and long-term disability in Western societies and constitutes a major claim on health care budgets. Organising stroke care in a stroke service has recently been demonstrated to result in better health effects for patients. This paper discusses patient costs after stroke and compares costs between regular and stroke service care. Methods Costs were calculated within the framework of the evaluation of three experiments with stroke services in the Netherlands. Cost calculations are base on medical consumption data and actual costs. Results 598 patients were consecutively admitted to hospital after stroke. The average total costs of care per patient for the 6 month follow-up are estimated at €16,000. Costs are dominated by institutional and accommodation costs. Patients who die after stroke incur less costs. For patients that survive the acute phase, the most important determinants of costs are disability status and having a partner – as they influence patients' stroke careers. These determinants also interact. The most efficient stroke service experiment was most successful in co-ordinating patient flow from hospital to (nursing home, through capacity planning and efficient discharge procedures. In this region the costs of stroke service care are the same as for regular stroke care. The other experiments suffered from waiting lists for nursing homes and home care, leading to "blocked beds" in hospitals and nursing homes and higher costs of care. Costs of co-ordination are estimated at about 3% of total costs of care. Conclusion This paper demonstrates that by organising care for stroke patients in a stroke service, better health effects can be achieved with the same budget. In addition, it provides insight in need, predisposing and enabling factors that determine costs of care after stroke.

  1. Copeptin Levels in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke and Stroke Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Matthias; Ebinger, Martin; Kunz, Alexander; Rozanski, Michal; Waldschmidt, Carolin; Weber, Joachim E; Winter, Benjamin; Koch, Peter M; Nolte, Christian H; Hertel, Sabine; Ziera, Tim; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2015-09-01

    Copeptin levels are increased in patients diagnosed with stroke and other vascular diseases. Copeptin elevation is associated with adverse outcome, predicts re-events in patients with transient ischemic attack and is used in ruling-out acute myocardial infarction. We evaluated whether copeptin can also be used as a diagnostic marker in the prehospital stroke setting. We prospectively examined patients with suspected stroke on the Stroke Emergency Mobile-an ambulance that is equipped with computed tomography and point-of-care laboratory. A blood sample was taken from patients immediately after arrival. We analyzed copeptin levels in patients with final hospital-based diagnosis of stroke or stroke mimics as well as in vascular or nonvascular patients. In addition, we examined the associations of symptom onset with copeptin levels and the prognostic value of copeptin in patients with stroke. Blood samples of 561 patients were analyzed. No significant differences were seen neither between cerebrovascular (n=383) and other neurological (stroke mimic; n=90) patients (P=0.15) nor between vascular (n=391) and nonvascular patients (n=170; P=0.57). We could not detect a relationship between copeptin levels and time from onset to blood draw. Three-month survival status was available in 159 patients with ischemic stroke. Copeptin levels in nonsurviving patients (n=8: median [interquartile range], 27.4 [20.2-54.7] pmol/L) were significantly higher than in surviving patients (n=151: median [interquartile range], 11.7 [5.2-30.9] pmol/L; P=0.024). In the prehospital setting, copeptin is neither appropriate to discriminate between stroke and stroke mimic patients nor between vascular and nonvascular patients. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01382862. The Pre-Hospital Acute Neurological Therapy and Optimization of Medical Care in Stroke Patients study (PHANTOM-S) was registered (NCT01382862). This sub-study was observational and not registered separately

  2. Retrospective checking of compliance with practice guidelines for acute stroke care: a novel experiment using openEHR's Guideline Definition Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anani, Nadim; Chen, Rong; Prazeres Moreira, Tiago; Koch, Sabine

    2014-05-10

    Providing scalable clinical decision support (CDS) across institutions that use different electronic health record (EHR) systems has been a challenge for medical informatics researchers. The lack of commonly shared EHR models and terminology bindings has been recognised as a major barrier to sharing CDS content among different organisations. The openEHR Guideline Definition Language (GDL) expresses CDS content based on openEHR archetypes and can support any clinical terminologies or natural languages. Our aim was to explore in an experimental setting the practicability of GDL and its underlying archetype formalism. A further aim was to report on the artefacts produced by this new technological approach in this particular experiment. We modelled and automatically executed compliance checking rules from clinical practice guidelines for acute stroke care. We extracted rules from the European clinical practice guidelines as well as from treatment contraindications for acute stroke care and represented them using GDL. Then we executed the rules retrospectively on 49 mock patient cases to check the cases' compliance with the guidelines, and manually validated the execution results. We used openEHR archetypes, GDL rules, the openEHR reference information model, reference terminologies and the Data Archetype Definition Language. We utilised the open-sourced GDL Editor for authoring GDL rules, the international archetype repository for reusing archetypes, the open-sourced Ocean Archetype Editor for authoring or modifying archetypes and the CDS Workbench for executing GDL rules on patient data. We successfully represented clinical rules about 14 out of 19 contraindications for thrombolysis and other aspects of acute stroke care with 80 GDL rules. These rules are based on 14 reused international archetypes (one of which was modified), 2 newly created archetypes and 51 terminology bindings (to three terminologies). Our manual compliance checks for 49 mock patients were a

  3. Acute ischemic stroke prognostication, comparison between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ossama Y. Mansour

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... Abstract Background: Stroke is the second most common cause of death worldwide and a fre- quent cause of adult disability in developed countries. No single outcome measure can describe or predict all dimensions of recovery and disability after acute stroke. Several scales have proven reliability and ...

  4. Innovation in Stroke Care Quality: NIH Stroke Scale Change and Shewhart Charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Michael R; Krishnamohan, Prashanth; Jicha, Gregory; Cohen, Amy P

    2015-01-01

    Stroke care, admission through discharge, is a process that should lead to symptomatic improvement. Improvement or decline in conditions of patients with acute stroke during hospitalization can be measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIH Stroke Scale or NIHSS) at both admission and discharge and may indicate the overall quality of acute stroke care for a patient and the stability of care in the system. Shewhart control charts were analyzed for 98 patients with stroke admissions in a random sample at a tertiary care stroke center to determine the feasibility of examining the NIHSS score change to detect statistical control or identify excess variance in outcomes. The study sample showed a mean improvement of 1.33 points from admission to discharge on the NIHSS. Three statistical outliers were found. Excess statistical variation clustered within a specific stroke team's tenure suggested a need for targeted education and examination for process redesign. Using the NIHSS and the Shewhart control charts identified a systematic process flaw that could be targeted to improve stroke outcomes and move the delivery system toward statistical control.

  5. [Nutrition for elderly acute stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Lisa; Iversen, Per Ole; Hauge, Truls

    2008-09-11

    Elderly people have an increased risk of malnutrition due to biological and physiological changes and underlying disease. Almost 90% of the stroke patients are older than 65 years, and the consequences of acute stroke may lead to additional nutritional problems. This paper reviews nutritional therapy for stroke patients. PubMed was searched (non-systematically) for prospective cohort studies of occurrence, diagnostics and consequences of undernutrition in stroke patients. Randomized trials were examined to identify clinical effects of oral protein and energy supplements or tube feeding on nutritional status and intake, functional status, infections, length of stay, quality of life and mortality. 8-35% of stroke patients are undernourished. Body weight is one of the most important parameters for assessment of nutritional status. Dysphagia occurs in up to 80% of patients with acute stroke and increases the risk of undernutrition, which again leads to prolonged length of stay, reduced functional status and poorer survival. Early nasogastric tube feeding does not increase the risk of pneumonia and may improve survival after six months. Oral supplements lead to a significantly improved nutritional intake in undernourished stroke patients, as well as improved nutritional status and survival in undernourished elderly. Nutritional treatment can improve the clinical outcome after an acute stroke, provided that there are good procedures for follow-up and monitoring of the treatment.

  6. [Crew resource management and simulator training in acute stroke therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahtali, D; Bohmann, F; Rostek, P; Misselwitz, B; Reihs, A; Heringer, F; Jahnke, K; Steinmetz, H; Pfeilschifter, W

    2016-12-01

    Time is of critical importance in acute stroke management. The establishment of thrombectomy now adds to the complexity and interdisciplinarity of the initial phase. In non-medical high-fidelity situations, such as aviation, crew resource management (CRM) has proven to be highly efficient. It has therefore also been implemented in professional cardiovascular life support training. In a setting where every minute counts, CRM and regular training of the high-fidelity stroke team could offer ways to improve treatment of acute stroke patients. We evaluated the effects of a CRM-based stroke team with regular simulation training on the quality of care (e.g. door to needle time and thrombolysis rate) as well as on staff satisfaction and perceived patient safety in the emergency department of a tertiary care neurocenter. We implemented a dedicated stroke team consisting of 7 persons who are notified by a collective call via speed dial and conceived a simulator-based team training for all new stroke team members which we conduct at monthly intervals. We recorded door to needle times of all consecutive patients, staff satisfaction in the emergency room and the acceptance of this new learning format. This approach led to a relevant and sustained reduction of the mean door to needle time to less than 30 min. It improved perceived patient safety in residents with professional experience of less than 2 years. There was a very high acceptance within the stroke team training and staff and its usefulness was judged to be very high. Even though our data do not allow positive effects on patient outcomes to be inferred, the implementation of a CRM-based stroke team and simulator training has had multiple positive effects on the workflow and work satisfaction in the treatment of acute stroke patients.

  7. Apathy in acute stroke and apathetic personality disturbance secondary to stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Caeiro, Lara Isabel Pires de Melo, 1972-

    2013-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (Desenvolvimento Social e Humano), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina, 2013 In this thesis we investigated apathy secondary to stroke, both in acute and in post-acute phases. We aimed at studying apathy at 1-year after stroke and its relationship with apathy in acute stroke, demographic, pre-stroke predisposing conditions and clinical features (stroke type and location), post-stroke depression and cognitive impairment, fu...

  8. Physiologically based model of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Vincent; Chabaud, Sylvie; Girard, Pascal; Cucherat, Michel; Hommel, Marc; Boissel, Jean Pierre

    2002-08-01

    In the treatment of acute ischemic stroke most of the clinical trials have failed, contrasting with promising results in the preclinical stages. This continuing discrepancy suggests some misconceptions in the understanding of acute ischemic stroke. One possible method for identifying the shortcomings of present-day approaches is to integrate all the available knowledge into a single mathematical model and to subject that model to challenges via simulations with available experimental data. As a first stage, then, the authors developed a simplified model, defining the structure and the different parameters that represent the phenomena that occur during the hyperacute phase of ischemic stroke. First, the different critical points of the evolution of ischemic stroke, based on the available evidence on the pathophysiology of stroke, were identified. Those key steps were then related to the quantitative data obtained by magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scan. These two techniques allow the measurement of diverse key markers of cerebral metabolism: cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction factor, cerebral metabolism rate of oxygen, and the apparent diffusion coefficient of water, among others. Those markers were organized together through mathematical equations, and changed over time in order to describe the evolution of an acute ischemic stroke. At each time during the evolution of stroke those parameters are summarized in a parameter called survival delay. This parameter made possible the definition of three different states for tissues-functional, infarcted, salvageable-as end point. Once the model was designed, simulations were performed to explore its internal validity. Simulation results were consistent with the reality of acute ischemic stroke and did not reveal any major drawbacks in the use of the model. The more rapid the decrease in CBF, the larger is the final infarcted area. The model also allowed for the characterization of two

  9. Satisfaction with palliative care after stroke: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacquiere, Dylan; Bhimji, Khadija; Meggison, Hilary; Sinclair, John; Sharma, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The determinants of satisfaction for families of acute stroke patients receiving palliative care have not been extensively studied. We surveyed families to determine how they perceived palliative care after stroke. Families of patients palliated after ischemic stroke, intracerebral, or subarachnoid hemorrhage were approached. Four weeks after the patient's death, families were administered the After-Death Bereaved Family Member Interview to determine satisfaction with the care provided. Fifteen families participated. Families were most satisfied with participation in decision making and least satisfied with attention to emotional needs. In stroke-specific domains, families had less satisfaction with artificial feeding, hydration, and communication. Overall satisfaction was high (9.04 out of 10). Families of patients receiving palliative care at our institution showed generally high satisfaction with palliation after stroke; specific domains were identified for improvement. Further study in larger populations is required.

  10. Older patients with acute stroke in Denmark: quality of care and short-term mortality. A nationwide follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palnum, K.D.; Sorensen, H.T.; Ingeman, A.

    2008-01-01

    care across age groups, as measured by admission to a specialised stroke unit, administration of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, examination with CT/MR scan, assessment by a physiotherapist and an occupational therapist, or assessment of nutritional risk. Further, we estimated 30- and 90-day....... CONCLUSIONS: elderly stroke patients in Denmark receive a lower quality of care than do younger stroke patients, however, the age-related differences are modest for most examined quality-of-care criteria and do not appear to explain the higher mortality among older patients Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...

  11. EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS IN ACUTE STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebrovascular disease is the third most common cause of death in the developed world after cancer and ischemic heart disease. In India, community surveys have shown a crude prevalence rate of 200 per 100000 population for hemiplegia. Aims and objectives: Identification of risk factors for c erebrovascular disease. Materials and Methods: Inclusion Criteria: Cases of acute stroke admitted in S.V.R.R.G.G.H, Tirupati were taken for the study. Exclusion Criteria: Head injury cases, neoplasm cases producing cerebrovascular disease were excluded. Re sults: Stroke was more common in male, 54% patients were male 46% were female. It was more common in 6 th and 7 th decade. More common risk factors were hypertension followed by smoking, diabetes mellitus. More common pathology was infarction. Conclusion: Com mon risk factors for acute stroke are hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, obesity, cardiac disease. Stroke was confirmed by CT scan of brain.

  12. Association between pneumonia in acute stroke stage and 3-year mortality in patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi-Jing; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Su, Feng-Chieh; Peng, Tsung-I; Chien, Yu-Yi; Wu, Chia-Lun; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Wei, Yi-Chia; Lin, Shun-Wen; Zhu, Jun-Xiao; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2016-11-01

    The influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the clinical presentation and long-term outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. We investigate the influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the 3-year outcomes of patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. Nine-hundred and thirty-four patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke were enrolled and had been followed for 3years. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether pneumonia occurred during acute stroke stage or not. Clinical presentations, risk factors for stroke, laboratory data, co-morbidities, and outcomes were recorded. The result showed that a total of 100 patients (10.7%) had pneumonia in acute stroke stage. The prevalence of older age, atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage. Total anterior circulation syndrome and posterior circulation syndrome occurred more frequently among patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage (Ppneumonia in acute stroke stage is a significant predictor of 3-year mortality (hazard ratio=6.39, 95% confidence interval=4.03-10.11, Ppneumonia during the acute stroke stage is associated with increased risk of 3-year mortality. Interventions to prevent pneumonia in acute stroke stage might improve ischemic stroke outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Guidelines for the early management of patients with acute ischemic stroke: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Edward C; Saver, Jeffrey L; Adams, Harold P; Bruno, Askiel; Connors, J J Buddy; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Khatri, Pooja; McMullan, Paul W; Qureshi, Adnan I; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Scott, Phillip A; Summers, Debbie R; Wang, David Z; Wintermark, Max; Yonas, Howard

    2013-03-01

    The authors present an overview of the current evidence and management recommendations for evaluation and treatment of adults with acute ischemic stroke. The intended audiences are prehospital care providers, physicians, allied health professionals, and hospital administrators responsible for the care of acute ischemic stroke patients within the first 48 hours from stroke onset. These guidelines supersede the prior 2007 guidelines and 2009 updates. Members of the writing committee were appointed by the American Stroke Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee, representing various areas of medical expertise. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained throughout the consensus process. Panel members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise, reviewed the stroke literature with emphasis on publications since the prior guidelines, and drafted recommendations in accordance with the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Level of Evidence grading algorithm. The goal of these guidelines is to limit the morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. The guidelines support the overarching concept of stroke systems of care and detail aspects of stroke care from patient recognition; emergency medical services activation, transport, and triage; through the initial hours in the emergency department and stroke unit. The guideline discusses early stroke evaluation and general medical care, as well as ischemic stroke, specific interventions such as reperfusion strategies, and general physiological optimization for cerebral resuscitation. Because many of the recommendations are based on limited data, additional research on treatment of acute ischemic stroke remains urgently needed.

  14. Acute stroke unit improves stroke management-four years on from INASC.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, E

    2015-02-01

    The Irish Heart Foundation carried out the Irish National Audit of Stroke Care (INASC) in 2008. Management practices were significantly poorer than those in the UK Sentinel audits. Since then an acute stroke unit has been established in University Hospital Limerick. A stroke database was established. 12 key indicators of stroke management audited by INASC were identified. Results were compared to those in INASC. 89 stroke patients were admitted. 8 of the 12 key indicators scored significantly better than in INASC. 92.5% had a brain scan within 24hrs (INASC-40%, p = < 0.001). 100% of ischaemic strokes received anti-thrombotics (INASC-85%, p = 0.001). 94% had rehab goals agreed by MDT (22% in INASC p = 0.0000). 55% were treated in stroke unit (2% in INASC, p = 0.0000). MDT input improved with regard to physiotherapy (87% vs 43% in INASC, p = < 0.02) and SALT (74% vs 26%, p = < 0.02). Stroke management has significantly improved from 2008, however some deficiencies remain.

  15. Evaluation of stroke services in Anglia stroke clinical network to examine the variation in acute services and stroke outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Abraham

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed countries and the leading cause of long-term disability worldwide. A series of national stroke audits in the UK highlighted the differences in stroke care between hospitals. The study aims to describe variation in outcomes following stroke and to identify the characteristics of services that are associated with better outcomes, after accounting for case mix differences and individual prognostic factors. Methods/Design We will conduct a cohort study in eight acute NHS trusts within East of England, with at least one year of follow-up after stroke. The study population will be a systematically selected representative sample of patients admitted with stroke during the study period, recruited within each hospital. We will collect individual patient data on prognostic characteristics, health care received, outcomes and costs of care and we will also record relevant characteristics of each provider organisation. The determinants of one year outcome including patient reported outcome will be assessed statistically with proportional hazards regression models. Self (or proxy completed EuroQol (EQ-5D questionnaires will measure quality of life at baseline and follow-up for cost utility analyses. Discussion This study will provide observational data about health service factors associated with variations in patient outcomes and health care costs following hospital admission for acute stroke. This will form the basis for future RCTs by identifying promising health service interventions, assessing the feasibility of recruiting and following up trial patients, and provide evidence about frequency and variances in outcomes, and intra-cluster correlation of outcomes, for sample size calculations. The results will inform clinicians, public, service providers, commissioners and policy makers to drive further improvement in health services which will bring direct benefit to the patients.

  16. Stroke: Critical appraissal of intensive care management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Stroke is a common medical condition in the medical units.Stroke patients are usually managed on the medical wards while some that needs organ support are admitted into the intensive care unit.However there is conflicting data on the benefits or otherwise of admitting stroke patients into the intensive care ...

  17. Guidelines for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Egido, J A; Casado, I; Ribó, M; Dávalos, A; Masjuan, J; Caniego, J L; Martínez Vila, E; Díez Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B; Álvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Díaz-Otero, F; López-Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; Gállego, J; García-Pastor, A; Gil-Núñez, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Lago, A; Maestre, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Molina, C; Morales, A; Nombela, F; Purroy, F; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Roquer, J; Rubio, F; Segura, T; Serena, J; Simal, P; Tejada, J; Vivancos, J

    2014-03-01

    Update of Acute Ischaemic Stroke Treatment Guidelines of the Spanish Neurological Society based on a critical review of the literature. Recommendations are made based on levels of evidence from published data and studies. Organized systems of care should be implemented to ensure access to the optimal management of all acute stroke patients in stroke units. Standard of care should include treatment of blood pressure (should only be treated if values are over 185/105 mmHg), treatment of hyperglycaemia over 155 mg/dl, and treatment of body temperature with antipyretic drugs if it rises above 37.5 °C. Neurological and systemic complications must be prevented and promptly treated. Decompressive hemicraniectomy should be considered in cases of malignant cerebral oedema. Intravenous thrombolysis with rtPA should be administered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset, except when there are contraindications. Intra-arterial pharmacological thrombolysis can be considered within 6 hours, and mechanical thrombectomy within 8 hours from onset, for anterior circulation strokes, while a wider window of opportunity up to 12-24 hours is feasible for posterior strokes. There is not enough evidence to recommend routine use of the so called neuroprotective drugs. Anticoagulation should be administered to patients with cerebral vein thrombosis. Rehabilitation should be started as early as possible. Treatment of acute ischaemic stroke includes management of patients in stroke units. Systemic thrombolysis should be considered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset. Intra-arterial approaches with a wider window of opportunity can be an option in certain cases. Protective and restorative therapies are being investigated. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. An acute stroke evaluation app: a practice improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Mark N; Fugate, Jennifer E; Barrett, Kevin M; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Flemming, Kelly D

    2015-04-01

    A point-of-care workflow checklist in the form of an iOS (iPhone Operating System) app for use by stroke providers was introduced with the objective of standardizing acute stroke evaluation and documentation at 2 affiliated academic medical centers. Providers used the app in unselected, consecutive patients undergoing acute stroke evaluation in an emergency department or hospital setting between August 2012 and January 2013 and August 2013 and February 2014. Satisfaction surveys were prospectively collected pre- and postintervention from residents, staff neurologists, and clinical data specialists. Residents (20 preintervention and 16 postintervention), staff neurologists (6 pre and 5 post), and clinical data specialists (4 pre and 4 post) participated in this study. All 16 (100%) residents had increased satisfaction with their ability to perform an acute stroke evaluation postintervention but only 9 (56%) of 16 felt the app was more help than hindrance. Historical controls aligned with preintervention results. Staff neurologists conveyed increased satisfaction with resident presentations and decision making when compared to preintervention surveys. Stroke clinical data specialists estimated a 50% decrease in data abstraction when the app data were used in the clinical note. Concomitant effect on door-to-needle (DTN) time at 1 site, although not a primary study measure, was also evaluated. At that 1 center, the mean DTN time decreased by 16 minutes when compared to the corresponding months from the year prior. The point-of-care acute stroke workflow checklist app may assist trainees in presenting findings in a standardized manner and reduce data abstraction time. The app may help reduce DTN time, but this requires further study.

  19. Diagnostic value of prehospital ECG in acute stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobinger, Tobias; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Kopp, Markus; Kurka, Natalia; Arnold, Martin; Heider, Stefan; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2017-05-16

    To investigate the diagnostic yield of prehospital ECG monitoring provided by emergency medical services in the case of suspected stroke. Consecutive patients with acute stroke admitted to our tertiary stroke center via emergency medical services and with available prehospital ECG were prospectively included during a 12-month study period. We assessed prehospital ECG recordings and compared the results to regular 12-lead ECG on admission and after continuous ECG monitoring at the stroke unit. Overall, 259 patients with prehospital ECG recording were included in the study (90.3% ischemic stroke, 9.7% intracerebral hemorrhage). Atrial fibrillation (AF) was detected in 25.1% of patients, second-degree or greater atrioventricular block in 5.4%, significant ST-segment elevation in 5.0%, and ventricular ectopy in 9.7%. In 18 patients, a diagnosis of new-onset AF with direct clinical consequences for the evaluation and secondary prevention of stroke was established by the prehospital recordings. In 2 patients, the AF episodes were limited to the prehospital period and were not detected by ECG on admission or during subsequent monitoring at the stroke unit. Of 126 patients (48.6%) with relevant abnormalities in the prehospital ECG, 16.7% received medical antiarrhythmic therapy during transport to the hospital, and 6.4% were transferred to a cardiology unit within the first 24 hours in the hospital. In a selected cohort of patients with stroke, the in-field recordings of the ECG detected a relevant rate of cardiac arrhythmia. The results can add to the in-hospital evaluation and should be considered in prehospital care of acute stroke. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Acute stroke symptoms: comparing women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisabeth, Lynda D; Brown, Devin L; Hughes, Rebecca; Majersik, Jennifer J; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2009-06-01

    In a recent meta-analysis, women with stroke had 30% lower odds of receiving tissue plasminogen activator than did men, and some studies have reported greater in-hospital delays in women with stroke. Causes of these disparities are unclear but could result from a different symptom presentation in women. Our objective was to prospectively investigate gender differences in acute stroke symptoms. Ischemic stroke/TIA cases presenting to the University of Michigan Hospital (January 2005 to December 2007) were identified. Stroke/TIA symptoms, ascertained by patient interview, were classified as traditional or nontraditional (pain, mental status change, lightheadedness, headache, other neurological, nonneurological). Prevalence of any nontraditional symptom and of each symptom were calculated by gender. Logistic regression was used to compare nontraditional symptoms by gender adjusted for stroke vs TIA, proxy use, age, and discharge disposition (home vs other). Included were 461 cases (48.6% women; median age, 67). Among women, 51.8% reported >or=1 nontraditional stroke/TIA symptom compared to 43.9% of men (P=0.09). The most prevalent nontraditional symptom was mental status change (women, 23.2%; men, 15.2%; P=0.03). The odds of reporting at least 1 nontraditional stroke/TIA symptom were 1.42 times (95% CI, 0.97-2.06) greater in women than in men. A high prevalence of nontraditional symptoms among both genders was found, with women more likely to report nontraditional symptoms and, in particular, altered mental status, compared with men. Larger-scale studies focusing on stroke in women are warranted and could confirm gender differences in symptoms in a larger, more representative stroke population and address the clinical consequences.

  1. The integrated care pathway for post stroke patients (iCaPPS): a shared care approach between stakeholders in areas with limited access to specialist stroke care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Aziz, Aznida Firzah; Mohd Nordin, Nor Azlin; Ali, Mohd Fairuz; Abd Aziz, Noor Azah; Sulong, Saperi; Aljunid, Syed Mohamed

    2017-01-13

    Lack of intersectoral collaboration within public health sectors compound efforts to promote effective multidisciplinary post stroke care after discharge following acute phase. A coordinated, primary care-led care pathway to manage post stroke patients residing at home in the community was designed by an expert panel of specialist stroke care providers to help overcome fragmented post stroke care in areas where access is limited or lacking. Expert panel discussions comprising Family Medicine Specialists, Neurologists, Rehabilitation Physicians and Therapists, and Nurse Managers from Ministry of Health and acadaemia were conducted. In Phase One, experts chartered current care processes in public healthcare facilities, from acute stroke till discharge and also patients who presented late with stroke symptoms to public primary care health centres. In Phase Two, modified Delphi technique was employed to obtain consensus on recommendations, based on current evidence and best care practices. Care algorithms were designed around existing work schedules at public health centres. Indication for patients eligible for monitoring by primary care at public health centres were identified. Gaps in transfer of care occurred either at post discharge from acute care or primary care patients diagnosed at or beyond subacute phase at health centres. Essential information required during transfer of care from tertiary care to primary care providers was identified. Care algorithms including appropriate tools were summarised to guide primary care teams to identify patients requiring further multidisciplinary interventions. Shared care approaches with Specialist Stroke care team were outlined. Components of the iCaPPS were developed simultaneously: (i) iCaPPS-Rehab© for rehabilitation of stroke patients at community level (ii) iCaPPS-Swallow© guided the primary care team to screen and manage stroke related swallowing problems. Coordinated post stroke care monitoring service for patients

  2. Radiological strategy in acute stroke in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paonessa, Amalia [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University Hospital ' S. Salvatore' , L' Aquila (Italy)], E-mail: apaonessa7@hotmail.com; Limbucci, Nicola [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University Hospital ' S. Salvatore' , L' Aquila (Italy); Tozzi, Elisabetta [Dept. of Pediatrics, University Hospital ' S. Salvatore' , L' Aquila (Italy); Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University Hospital ' S. Salvatore' , L' Aquila (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    The aim of the study was to estimate the preponderance of patterns of pediatric stroke, ischemic or hemorrhagic, their etiologies and the correct diagnostic protocol for acute management. Forty-one consecutive pediatric patients (age range 5-16 years) with an acute stroke observed in acute phase during a 10-year period, were retrospectively evaluated. Twenty-three patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 3 cases were studied by computed tomography (CT) without MRI, and 15 underwent both CT and MRI studies. In 9 cases, intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IADSA) was performed after non-invasive preliminary assessment. Seventeen hemorrhagic (41%) and 24 ischemic (59%) strokes were found. Among hemorrhagic forms, 5 cases were due to arteriovenous malformation (AVM), 7 to cavernoma, and 2 to aneurysm. Among ischemic forms, 2 were due to sickle-cell disease, 1 to hyperomocysteinemia, 1 to moyamoya syndrome, 1 to pseudoxantoma elasticum, 3 to prothrombotic state, 1 to Fabry's disease, 1 concomitant with CO intoxication, 5 to venous sinus thrombosis, and 4 to cardio-embolic state. Etiology remains unknown in 8 cases (20.5%). This study shows a moderate prevalence of ischemic over hemorrhagic strokes. Moreover, personal experience suggests that MRI is always more informative than CT and in selected cases should be the first-choice examination in the acute phase.

  3. Angiotensin receptor blockade in acute stroke. The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Murray, Gordon; Boysen, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated blood pressure following acute stroke is common, and yet early antihypertensive treatment is controversial. ACCESS suggested a beneficial effect of the angiotensin receptor blocker candesartan in the acute phase of stroke, but these findings need to be confirmed in new, large......-European countries: Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Belgium, Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Estonia and Finland. STUDY OUTCOMES: There are two co-primary effect variables: • Functional status at 6-months, measured by the modified Rankin Scale, and • vascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke during the first 6-months...

  4. Interventions for acute stroke management in Africa: a systematic review of the evidence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leonard Baatiema; Carina K Y Chan; Adem Sav; Shawn Somerset

    2017-01-01

    [...]studies had to be conducted in an African country hospital setting. [...]this current review confirms the previously described paucity of evidence-based acute stroke care interventions in resource-poor settings such as Africa [33...

  5. Hyperglycemia in nondiabetic patients during the acute phase of stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Godoy, Daniel Agustin; Soler,Caridad; Videtta,Walter; Castillo Fuenzalida,Luis; Paranhos,Jorge; Costilla, Marcelo; Piñero, Gustavo; Jibaja,Manuel; Melo,Leonardo Jardim Vaz de

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine patterns of hyperglycemic (HG) control in acute stroke. METHODS: Anonymous survey through Internet questionnaire. Participants included Latin-American physicians specialized in neurocritical care. RESULTS: The response rate was 74%. HG definition varied widely. Fifty per cent considered it when values were >140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L). Intravenous (IV) regular insulin was the drug of choice for HG correction. One fifth of the respondents expressed adherence to a protocol. I...

  6. Platelet transfusion versus standard care after acute stroke due to spontaneous cerebral haemorrhage associated with antiplatelet therapy (PATCH): a randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baharoglu, M. Irem; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; de Gans, Koen; Koopman, Maria M.; Brand, Anneke; Majoie, Charles B.; Beenen, Ludo F.; Marquering, Henk A.; Vermeulen, Marinus; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; de Haan, Rob J.; Roos, Yvo B.; Reitsma, J. B.; Kamphuisen, P. W.; Touzé, E.; Lasne, D.; François, A.; Baharoglu, Irem; Zinkstok, Sanne; Coutinho, Jonathan; Boers, Merel; Geuskens, Ralph; Hart, Groene; Bloodbank, Sanquin; Koopman, Rianne; de Graaf, Reinier; Aerden, Leo; Vermeer, Sarah; Schreuder, Tobien; Schuiling, Wouter; Haag, Den; Bienfait, Henriette; Bakker, Stef; Ziekenhuis, Canisius Wilhelmina; Klijn, Catharina; Bronner, Irene; Ziekenhuis, St Elisabeth; de Kort, Paul; Raaijmakers, Dianne; Visser, Marieke; Ziekenhuis, Catharina; Keizer, Koos; Jansen, Ben; Ziekenhuis, Kruis; van der, Willem; Rooyer, Fergus; Verhey, Hans; Macleod, Mary Joan; Joyson, Anu; Reed, Matthew; Burgess, Seona; Mead, Gillian; Hart, Simon; Muir, Keith; Welch, Angela; Baird, Sally; Smith, Wilma; Huang, Xuya; Moreton, Fiona; Cheripelli, Bharath; El Tawil, Salwa; Baird, Tracey; Duncan, George; Nazir, Fozia; Birschel, Phil; Selvarajah, Johann; Dennis, Martin; Samarasekera, Neshika; Ramsay, Scott; Jackson, Katherine; Ferrigno, Marc; Susen, Sophie; Rossi, Costanza; Dequatre-Ponchelle, Nelly; Bodenant, Marie; Jacquet, Clémence; Oune, Fanny Ben; Ouk, Thavarak; Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Ozkul, Ozlem; Fetter, Damien; Duchez, Veronique Le Cam; Soufi, Hicham; Sibon, Igor; Desbruxelles, Sabrina; Renou, Pauline; Ledure, Sylvain; Neau, Philippe; Lamy, Matthias; Timsit, Serge; Viakhireva, Irina; Zuber, Mathieu; Tamazyan, Ruben; Lambert, Claire Join; Alamowitch, Sonia; Favrole, Pascal; Gerotziafas, Grigorios; Mazighi, Mikael; Stapf, Christian; Béjot, Yannick; Giroud, Maurice; Daubail, Benoit; Delpont, Benoit; Resch, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Platelet transfusion after acute spontaneous primary intracerebral haemorrhage in people taking antiplatelet therapy might reduce death or dependence by reducing the extent of the haemorrhage. We aimed to investigate whether platelet transfusion with standard care, compared with standard care alone,

  7. Impact of language barriers on stroke care and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Baiju R; Khan, Nadia A; O'Donnell, Martin J; Kapral, Moira K

    2015-03-01

    Language barriers may lead to poor quality of care, particularly for conditions like acute stroke for which diagnosis and treatment decision making rely on taking an accurate patient history. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of patient language barriers on quality of stroke care and clinical outcomes. This retrospective cohort study used data from the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network. All Ontario patients who were admitted with acute stroke or transient ischemic attack between July 2003 and March 2008 were selected. Mortality, stroke outcomes, in-hospital complications, quality of care, and disposition were compared between those without (n=12 787) and with (n=1506) language barriers, which was defined based on the patient's preferred language. Hierarchical multivariable regression models determined the effect of language barriers, independent of baseline covariates. Patients with language barriers had better 7-day mortality than those without (7.0% versus 9.2%; OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.57-0.82; Planguage barriers. Patients who had language barriers had reduced mortality and better performance on some quality of care measures. These differences existed despite adjustment for many potential confounders, including ethnicity, prognostic factors, and stroke characteristics. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Variability in Criteria for Emergency Medical Services Routing of Acute Stroke Patients to Designated Stroke Center Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay; Koenig, William; Bosson, Nichole; Song, Sarah; Saver, Jeffrey L; Mack, William J; Sanossian, Nerses

    2015-09-01

    Comprehensive stroke systems of care include routing to the nearest designated stroke center hospital, bypassing non-designated hospitals. Routing protocols are implemented at the state or county level and vary in qualification criteria and determination of destination hospital. We surveyed all counties in the state of California for presence and characteristics of their prehospital stroke routing protocols. Each county's local emergency medical services agency (LEMSA) was queried for the presence of a stroke routing protocol. We reviewed these protocols for method of stroke identification and criteria for patient transport to a stroke center. Thirty-three LEMSAs serve 58 counties in California with populations ranging from 1,175 to nearly 10 million. Fifteen LEMSAs (45%) had stroke routing protocols, covering 23 counties (40%) and 68% of the state population. Counties with protocols had higher population density (1,500 vs. 140 persons per square mile). In the six counties without designated stroke centers, patients meeting criteria were transported out of county. Stroke identification in the field was achieved using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Screen in 72%, Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen in 7% and a county-specific protocol in 22%. California EMS prehospital acute stroke routing protocols cover 68% of the state population and vary in characteristics including activation by symptom onset time and destination facility features, reflecting matching of system design to local geographic resources.

  9. Defining minor symptoms in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strambo, Davide; Zambon, Alberto A; Roveri, Luisa; Giacalone, Giacomo; Di Maggio, Giovanni; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; La Gioia, Sara; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Comi, Giancarlo; Sessa, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Thrombolysis is often withheld from acute ischemic stroke patients presenting with mild symptoms; however, up to 40% of these patients end up with a poor outcome when left untreated. Since there is lack of consensus on the definition of minor symptoms, we aimed at addressing this issue by looking for features that would better predict functional outcomes at 3 months. Among all acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to our Stroke Unit (n = 1,229), we selected a cohort of patients who arrived within 24 hours from symptoms onset, with baseline NIHSS ≤6, not treated with thrombolysis (n = 304). Epidemiological data, comorbidities, radiological features and clinical presentation (NIHSS items) were collected to identify predictors of outcome. Our cohort was tested against minor stroke definitions selected from the literature and a newly proposed one. Three months after stroke onset, 97 patients (31.9%) had mRS ≥ 2. Independent predictors of poor outcome were age (OR 0.97 [95% CI 0.95-9.99]) and baseline NIHSS score (OR 0.79 [95% CI 0.67-0.94]), while cardioembolic aetiology was negatively associated (OR 3.29 [95% CI 1.51-7.14]). Items of NIHSS associated with poor outcome were impairment of right motor arm (OR 0.49 [95% CI 0.27-0.91]) or the involvement of any of the motor items (OR 0.69 [95% CI 0.48-0.99]). The definition of minor stroke as NIHSS ≤3 and the new proposed definition had the highest sensitivity and accuracy and were independent predictors of outcome. Our study confirmed that in spite of a low NIHSS score, one third of patients had poor outcome. As already described, age and NIHSS score remained independent predictors of poor outcome even in mild stroke. Also, motor impairment appeared a major determinant of poor outcome. The new proposed definition of minor stroke featured the NIHSS score and the NIHSS items that better predicted functional outcome. Awareness that even minor stroke can yield to poor outcome should sensitize patients to arrive early

  10. Comparison of the university hospital and county hospitals in western Sweden to identify potential weak links in the early chain of care for acute stroke: results of an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta; Herlitz, Johan; Hansson, Per Olof; Brink, Peter

    2015-09-08

    To identify weak links in the early chain of care for acute stroke. 9 emergency hospitals in western Sweden, each with a stroke unit, and the emergency medical services (EMS). All patients hospitalised with a first and a final diagnosis of stroke-between 15 December 2010 and 15 April 2011. The university hospital in the city of Gothenburg was compared with 6 county hospitals. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY MEASURES: (1) The system delay, that is, median delay time from call to the EMS until diagnosis was designated as the primary end point. Secondary end points were: (2) the system delay time from call to the EMS until arrival in a hospital ward, (3) the use of the EMS, (4) priority at the dispatch centre and (5) suspicion of stroke by the EMS nurse. In all, 1376 acute patients with stroke (median age 79 years; 49% women) were included. The median system delay from call to the EMS until (1) diagnosis (CT scan) and (2) arrival in a hospital ward was 3 h and 52 min and 4 h and 22 min, respectively. The system delay (1) was significantly shorter in county hospitals. (3) The study showed that 76% used the EMS (Gothenburg 71%; the county 79%; pStroke was suspected in 65% of cases. A prenotification was sent in 32% (Gothenburg 52%; the county 20%; pStroke was suspected in two-thirds of the cases, but a prenotification was seldom sent to the hospital. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Hyperglycemia, Acute Ischemic Stroke and Thrombolytic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Askiel; Fagan, Susan C.; Ergul, Adviye

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of disability and is considered now the 4th leading cause of death. Many clinical trials have shown that stroke patients with acute elevation in blood glucose at onset of stroke suffer worse functional outcomes, longer in-hospital stay and higher mortality rates. The only therapeutic hope for these patients is the rapid restoration of blood flow to the ischemic tissue through intravenous administration of the only currently proven effective therapy, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, even this option is associated with the increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. Nonetheless, the underlying mechanisms through which hyperglycemia (HG) and tPA worsen the neurovascular injury after stroke are not fully understood. Accordingly, this review summarizes the latest updates and recommendations about the management of HG and co-administration of tPA in a clinical setting while focusing more on the various experimental models studying: 1. the effect of HG on stroke outcomes; 2. the potential mechanisms involved in worsening the neurovasular injury; 3. the different therapeutic strategies employed to ameliorate the injury, and finally; 4. the interaction between HG and tPA. Developing therapeutic strategies to reduce the hemorrhage risk with tPA in hyperglycemic setting is of great clinical importance. This can best be achieved by conducting robust preclinical studies evaluating the interaction between tPA and other therapeutics in order to develop potential therapeutic strategies with high translational impact. PMID:24619488

  12. Processes and outcomes of ischemic stroke care: the influence of hospital level of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Yu-Chi; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chang, Guann-Ming; Chung, Kuo-Piao

    2015-08-01

    Processes of stroke care play an increasingly important role in comparing hospital performance. The relationship between processes of care and outcomes for stroke is unclear. Moreover, in terms of stroke care regionalization, little information is available with regard to the relationships among hospital level of care, processes and outcomes of stroke care. We used nationwide population-based data to examine the relationship between processes of care and mortality and the relationships among hospital level of care, processes and mortality for ischemic stroke. Cross-sectional study. General acute care hospitals throughout Taiwan. A total of 31 274 ischemic stroke patients admitted in 2010 through Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. Processes of care and 30-day mortality. Multilevel models were used after adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics to test the relationship between processes of care and 30-day mortality and the relationships among hospital level of care, processes and 30-day mortality. The use of thrombolytic therapy, antithrombotic therapy, statin treatment and rehabilitation assessment was associated with lower mortality. Hospital level of care was associated with the use of thrombolytic therapy, antithrombotic therapy, statin treatment and rehabilitation assessment, and mortality. These processes of care were mediators of the relationship between hospital level of care and mortality. Outcomes among patients with ischemic stroke can be improved by thrombolytic therapy, antithrombotic therapy, statin treatment and rehabilitation assessment. Among patients with ischemic stroke, admission to designated stroke center hospitals may be associated with lower mortality through better processes of care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  13. Treatment of hyperglycaemia in patients with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Hewitt, J

    2016-03-01

    The proportion of diabetic patients who are hospitalised for stroke has been increasing in recent years, currently reaching almost a third of all cases of stroke. In addition, about half of patients with acute stroke present hyperglycaemia in the first hours of the stroke. Although hyperglycaemia in the acute phase of stroke is associated with a poor prognosis, its treatment is currently a topic of debate. There is no evidence that the adminstration of intravenous insulin to these patients offers benefits in terms of the evolution of the stroke. New studies in development, such as the SHINE study (Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort), may contribute to clarifying the role of intensive control of glycaemia during the acute phase of the stroke. Ultimately, patients who have presented with stroke should be screened for diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  14. Pneumonia in acute stroke patients fed by nasogastric tube

    OpenAIRE

    Dziewas, R; M. Ritter; Schilling, M.; Konrad, C.; Oelenberg, S; Nabavi, D; Stogbauer, F.; Ringelstein, E; Ludemann, P

    2004-01-01

    Background: Aspiration pneumonia is the most important acute complication of stroke related dysphagia. Tube feeding is usually recommended as an effective and safe way to supply nutrition in dysphagic stroke patients.

  15. Determining level of care appropriateness in the patient journey from acute care to rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Bashford Guy; Magee Christopher; Poulos Christopher J; Eagar Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The selection of patients for rehabilitation, and the timing of transfer from acute care, are important clinical decisions that impact on care quality and patient flow. This paper reports utilization review data on inpatients in acute care with stroke, hip fracture or elective joint replacement, and other inpatients referred for rehabilitation. It examines reasons why acute level of care criteria are not met and explores differences in decision making between acute care an...

  16. Incidence and Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury Following Mannitol Infusion in Patients With Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-Yi; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, is commonly used to treat patients with acute brain edema, but its use also increases the risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we investigated the incidence and risk factors of mannitol-related AKI in acute stroke patients. A total of 432 patients (ischemic stroke 62.3%) >20 years of age who were admitted to the neurocritical care center in a tertiary hospital and received mannitol treatment were enrolled in this study. Clinical parameters including the scores of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission, vascular risk factors, laboratory data, and concurrent nephrotoxic medications were registered. Acute kidney injury was defined as an absolute elevation in the serum creatinine (Scr) level of ≥0.3 mg/dL from the baseline or a ≥50% increase in Scr. The incidence of mannitol-related AKI was 6.5% (95% confidence interval, 4.5%–9.3%) in acute stroke patients, 6.3% in patients with ischemic stroke, and 6.7% in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline, higher initial NIHSS score, and concurrent use of diuretics increased the risk of mannitol-related AKI. When present, the combination of these elements displayed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.839 (95% confidence interval, 0.770–0.909). In conclusion, mannitol-related AKI is not uncommon in the treatment of acute stroke patients, especially in those with vulnerable risk factors. PMID:26632702

  17. Reconciling Marriage and Care after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon; Keating, Norah; Wilson, Donna

    2017-09-01

    Most research on stroke's impact on couples has focused on the transition to caregiving/receiving. Despite considerable evidence that marriage is the primary source of support in the face of chronic conditions, little is known about what happens to marriage in the context of care after stroke. To address this gap, we undertook a qualitative grounded-theory study of 18 couples in which one partner had experienced a stroke. Findings revealed two interrelated themes of the couple processes: working out care, which involved discovering and addressing disruptions in day-to-day activities; and rethinking marriage, which involved determining the meaning of their relationship within the new context of care and disability. Three distinct types of marriages evolved from these processes: reconfirmed around their pre-stroke marriage; recalibrated around care; and a parallel relationship, "his" and "her" marriage. Our findings highlight the need to consider relationship dynamics in addition to knowledge about stroke and care.

  18. The association between rural residence and stroke care and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koifman, Julius; Hall, Ruth; Li, Shudong; Stamplecoski, Melissa; Fang, Jiming; Saltman, Alexandra P; Kapral, Moira K

    2016-04-15

    Little is known about stroke care and outcomes in those residing in rural compared to urban areas. We conducted a cohort study on a population-based sample of patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack seen at 153 acute care hospitals in the province of Ontario, Canada, between April 1, 2008 and March 31, 2011. Based on their primary residence, patients were categorized as residing in a rural (populationrural and urban areas, with multivariable models constructed to evaluate the association between rural residence and outcomes after adjustment for potential confounders. Patients from rural areas were less likely than those from urban areas to receive stroke unit care, brain imaging within 24 h, carotid imaging, and consultations from neurologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists and speech language pathologists, and were less likely to be transferred to inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Use of antithrombotic agents and lipid lowering therapy was similar in rural and urban residents, as was disability at discharge. There was a trend toward higher 30-day mortality in rural compared to urban residents (adjusted hazard ratio 1.14; 95% confidence interval 0.99-1.32). Rural residence is associated with lower use of key stroke care interventions after stroke. Future work should focus on developing interventions to address gaps in stroke care in rural areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Challenges in building interpersonal care in organized hospital stroke units: The perspectives of stroke survivors, family caregivers and the multidisciplinary team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Tony; Harrison, Madeleine; Gardiner, Clare; Jones, Amanda

    2017-10-01

    To explore the organized stroke unit experience from the multiple perspectives of stroke survivor, family carer and the multi-disciplinary team. Organized stroke unit care reduces morbidity, mortality and institutionalization and is promoted globally as the most effective form of acute and postacute provision. Little research has focused on how care is experienced in this setting from the perspectives of those who receive and provide care. This study used a qualitative approach, employing Framework Analysis. This methodology allows for a flexible approach to data collection and a comprehensive and systematic method of analysis. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken during 2011 and 2012 with former stroke unit stroke survivors, family carers and senior stroke physicians. In addition, eight focus groups were conducted with members of the multi-disciplinary team. One hundred and twenty-five participants were recruited. Three key themes were identified across all data sets. First, two important processes are described: responses to the impact of stroke and seeking information and stroke-specific knowledge. These are underpinned by a third theme: the challenge in building relationships in organized stroke unit care. Stroke unit care provides satisfaction for stroke survivors, particularly in relation to highly specialized medical and nursing care and therapy. It is proposed that moves towards organized stroke unit care, particularly with the emphasis on reduction of length of stay and a focus on hyper-acute models, have implications for interpersonal care practices and the sharing of stroke-specific knowledge. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Acute Ischemic Stroke and Acute on Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Ahsan Aftab

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is due to either local thrombus formation or emboli that occlude a cerebral artery, together with chronic kidney disease represent major mortality and morbidity. Here wer present a case of 53 years old Malay man, admitted to a hospital in Malaysia complaining of sudden onset of weakness on right sided upper and lower limb associated with slurred speech. Patient was also suffering from uncontrolled hypertension, hyperlipidemia, chronic kidney disease stage 4, and diabetes mellitus(un controlled. He was diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke with cranial nerve 7 palsy (with right hemiparesis, acute on chronic kidney disease precipitated by dehydration and ACE inhibitor, and hyperkalemia. Patients with ischemic disease and chronic kidney disaese require constant monitering and carefull selected pharmacotherapy. Patient was placed under observation and was prescribed multiple pharamacotherpay to stabalise detoriating condition. Keywords: ischemic disease; chronic kidney disease; uncontrolled hypertension. | PubMed

  1. Change in cognitive performance is associated with functional recovery during post-acute stroke rehabilitation: a multi-centric study from intermediate care geriatric rehabilitation units of Catalonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Laura Mónica; Inzitari, Marco; Roqué, Marta; Duarte, Esther; Vallés, Elisabeth; Rodó, Montserrat; Gallofré, Miquel

    2015-10-01

    Recovery after a stroke is determined by a broad range of neurological, functional and psychosocial factors. Evidence regarding these factors is not well established, in particular influence of cognition changes during rehabilitation. We aimed to investigate whether selective characteristics, including cognitive performance and its change over time, modulate functional recovery with home discharge in stroke survivors admitted to post-acute rehabilitation units. We undertook a multicenter cohort study, including all patients discharged from acute wards to any geriatric rehabilitation unit in Catalonia-Spain during 2008. Patients were assessed for demographics, clinical and functional variables using Conjunt Mínim Bàsic de Dades dels Recursos Sociosanitaris (CMBD-RSS), which adapts the Minimum Data Set tool used in America's nursing homes. Baseline-to-discharge change in cognition was calculated on repeated assessments using the Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS, range 0-6, best-worst cognition). The multivariable effect of these factors was analyzed in relation to the outcome. 879 post-stroke patients were included (mean age 77.48 ± 10.18 years, 52.6% women). A worse initial CPS [OR (95% CI) = 0.851 (0.774-0.935)] and prevalent fecal incontinence [OR (95% CI) = 0.560 (0.454-0.691)] reduced the likelihood of returning home with functional improvement; whereas improvement of CPS, baseline to discharge, [OR (95% CI) = 1.348 (1.144-1.588)], more rehabilitation days within the first 2 weeks [OR (95% CI) = 1.011 (1.006-1.015)] and a longer hospital stay [OR (95% CI) = 1.011 (1.006-1.015)] were associated with the outcome. In our sample, different clinical characteristics, including cognitive function and its improvement over time, are associated with functional improvement in stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation. Our results might provide information to further studies aimed at exploring the influence of cognition changes during rehabilitation.

  2. Dan Shen agents for acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, B; Liu, M; Zhang, S

    2007-04-18

    Based mainly on experimental data that indicates improvement to the cerebral microcirculation, Dan Shen, a herbal medicine, is widely used in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke in China. To assess the effects of Dan Shen agents in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched July 2006), the register of the Cochrane Complementary Field (last searched July 2006) and the Chinese Stroke Trials Register (last searched August 2006). In addition, we searched the following bibliographic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2006), MEDLINE (1996 to August 2006), EMBASE (1980 to August 2006), CINAHL (1982 to August 2006), AMED (1985 to August 2006), and the China Biological Medicine Database (CBM-disc) (1979 to August 2006). We handsearched 10 Chinese journals, searched clinical trials and research databases, scanned reference lists and contacted the pharmaceutical company manufacturing Dan Shen. We also attempted to contact trial authors to obtain further data. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing Dan Shen agents with placebo or open control in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality, and extracted the data. Six trials involving 494 patients were included. Three trials are awaiting assessment. Numbers of deaths and dependent patients at the end of follow up of at least three months were not reported in the six included trials. Only two trials reported adverse events. All trials measured the outcome 'significant improvement in neurological deficit at the end of treatment'. Dan Shen agents were associated with a significant increase in the number of patients with the outcome (Peto odds ratio 3.02, 95% confidence interval 1.73 to 5.26). No deaths were reported within the first two weeks of treatment or during the whole follow-up period. The

  3. The angiotensin-receptor blocker candesartan for treatment of acute stroke (SCAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Bath, Philip M W; Boysen, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    significant at p≤0·025 level]). The observed effects were similar for all prespecified secondary endpoints (including death from any cause, vascular death, ischaemic stroke, haemorrhagic stroke, myocardial infarction, stroke progression, symptomatic hypotension, and renal failure) and outcomes (Scandinavian...... Stroke Scale score at 7 days and Barthel index at 6 months), and there was no evidence of a differential effect in any of the prespecified subgroups. During follow-up, nine (1%) patients on candesartan and five (renal failure was reported for 18 (2......BACKGROUND: Raised blood pressure is common in acute stroke, and is associated with an increased risk of poor outcomes. We aimed to examine whether careful blood-pressure lowering treatment with the angiotensin-receptor blocker candesartan is beneficial in patients with acute stroke and raised...

  4. Medical dispatchers recognise substantial amount of acute stroke during emergency calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immediate recognition of stroke symptoms is crucial to ensure timely access to revascularisation therapy. Medical dispatchers ensure fast admission to stroke facilities by prioritising the appropriate medical response. Data on medical dispatchers' ability to recognise symptoms of acute...... stroke are therefore critical in organising emergency stroke care. We aimed to describe the sensitivity and positive predictive value of medical dispatchers' ability to recognise acute stroke during emergency calls, and to identify factors associated with recognition. METHODS: This was an observational...... study of 2653 consecutive unselected patients with a final diagnosis of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). All admitted through the Emergency Medical Services Copenhagen, during a 2-year study period (2012-2014). Final diagnoses were matched with dispatch codes from the Emergency Medical...

  5. Basics of acute stroke treatment; Grundzuege der akuten Schlaganfalltherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haass, A. [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Acute stroke presents an emergency that requires immediate referral to a specialized hospital, preferably with a stroke unit. Disability and mortality are reduced by 30% in patients treated in stroke units compared to those treated on regular wards, even if a specialized team is present on the ward. Systolic blood pressure may remain high at 200-220 mmHg in the acute phase and should not be lowered too quickly. Further guidelines for basic care include: optimal O{sub 2} delivery, blood sugar levels below 100-150 mg%, and lowering body temperature below 37.5 C using physical means or drugs. Increased intracranial pressure should be treated by raising the upper body of the patient, administration of glycerol, mannitol, and/or sorbitol, artificial respiration, and special monitoring of Tris buffer. Decompressive craniectomy may be considered in cases of ''malignant'' media stroke and expansive cerebellar infarction. Fibrinolysis is the most effective stroke treatment and is twice as effective in the treatment of stroke than myocardial infarction. Fibrinolysis may be initiated within 3 h of a stroke in the anterior circulation. If a penumbra is detectable by ''PWI-DWI mismatch MRI,'' specialized hospitals may perform fibrinolysis up to 6 h after symptom onset. In cases of stroke in the basilar artery, fibrinolysis may be performed even later after symptom onset. Intra-arterial fibrinolysis is performed in these cases using rt-PA or urokinase. Follow-up treatment of stroke patients should not only address post-stroke depression and neuropsychological deficits, but also include patient education about risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and cardiac arrhythmias. (orig.) [German] Jeder akute Schlaganfall ist ein Notfall und muss sofort in einer spezialisierten Klinik, am besten einer Stroke Unit, behandelt werden. Die Stroke-Unit-Behandlung senkt den Behinderungsgrad und die Letalitaet um 30% staerker als die

  6. Radiologic manifestations of focal cerebral hyperemia in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Skriver, E B; Herning, M

    1991-01-01

    In 16 acute stroke patients with focal cerebral hyperemia angiography and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were studied 1 to 4 days post stroke. CT was performed twice with and without contrast enhancement 3 +/- 1 days and 16 +/- 4 days post stroke. Angiographic evidence of focal cerebral hype...

  7. Retrospective audit of the acute management of stroke in two districy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: An audit of the acute management of stroke in two hospitals belonging to the same health care trust in the UK. Method: Retrospective review of 98 randomly selected case-notes of patients managed for cerebrovascular disease in two acute hospitals in the UK between April and June 2004. The pertinent ...

  8. Post-stroke disposition from a geriatric-rehabilitative stroke care area: an Italian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Masina

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A large number of stroke patients cannot be discharged at home. Studies on post stroke disposition have low validity outside the country in which they are carried out because healthcare systems offer different rehabilitative and long-term facilities. Moreover absolute selection criteria for admission to rehabilitation are not available yet. Few studies on post-stroke disposition from Italian stroke units are available. Authors evaluated data of a 18-month period from a geriatric managed stroke care area where comprehensive multi-professional assessment and discharge planning are routinely carried out. Only patients discharged with diagnosis related to acute stroke were considered. Baseline characteristics, clinical, neurological and functional conditions according to the structured multidimensional assessment were prospectively collected in the stroke unit registry. Univariate and multinomial logistic regression were performed to identify independent variables associated with three discharge settings: home, rehabilitation and skilled long-term ward. Out of 188 patients evaluated, 56.4% were discharged home, 18.6% to rehabilitation and 25.0% to long-term ward. Data showed an efficient disposition to intermediate settings with a shorter length of stay compared to other international studies. Factors associated with post-stroke disposition were age, dysphagia, neurological impairment on admission (NIH-SS≥6, after stroke functional status (mRankin≥3, poor pre-stroke functional level (mRankin≥3 and hemorrhagic stroke. Dysphagia, severe neurological impairment and post-stroke disability were associated with discharge to rehabilitation and long term ward. These two settings differed in age and pre-stroke functional condition. Patients discharged to long-term wards were about 10 years older than those admitted to rehabilitative ward. Only 5% of patients discharged to rehabilitation had a pre-stroke mRankin score ≥3. Disposition to a skilled

  9. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intra‐arterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhemer, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with current issues in the field of acute ischemic stroke. The main objective has been to proof the effectiveness and safety of intra-arterial treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. MR CLEAN was the first study to proof the safety and effectiveness of intra-arterial

  11. Theophylline as an add-on to thrombolytic therapy in acute ischaemic stroke (TEA-Stroke)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modrau, Boris; Hjort, Niels; Østergaard, Leif

    2016-01-01

    the collateral supply in acute ischaemic brain tissue and thus facilitate reperfusion despite proximal vessel occlusion. The primary study objective is to evaluate whether theophylline is safe and efficient in acute ischaemic stroke patients as an add-on to thrombolytic therapy.MethodsThe TEA-Stroke Trial...... models, clinical case series and randomized clinical trials are controversial. A Cochrane analysis from 2004 concluded that there was not enough evidence to assess whether theophylline is safe and improves outcomes in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. The TEA-Stroke Trial will clarify whether...

  12. Acute evaluation of the acute vestibular syndrome: differentiating posterior circulation stroke from acute peripheral vestibulopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Benjamin K T; Chen, Alex S K; Paine, Mark

    2017-12-01

    This review article aims to provide an evidence-based approach to evaluating the patient who presents with acute prolonged, spontaneous vertigo in the context of the acute vestibular syndrome (AVS). Differentiation of posterior circulation stroke (PCS) presenting as an AVS has been regarded as an important diagnostic challenge for physicians involved in acute care. Current evidence suggests that a targeted approach to history taking and physical examination with emphasis on the oculomotor examination, more specifically the HINTS (Head Impulse/Nystagmus/Test-of-skew) examination battery, yields a higher sensitivity for the diagnosis of PCS than even standard magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion-weighted imaging. However, most studies have only validated the utility of the HINTS examination when performed by experts, who interpret the most powerful component of HINTS, namely the head impulse test (HIT), considerably different to the novice. Several investigations useful in the differentiation of the AVS are becoming more accessible and portable, such as videooculography with Frenzel goggles and video head impulse testing (vHIT), which allows for the quantitative assessment of the HIT. In clinical practice, vHIT has already become accepted as standard of care in the evaluation of AVS. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  13. Delirium in acute stroke--prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, M H; Rønning, O M; Thommessen, B

    2010-01-01

    Delirium is frequently seen as a major complication among elderly stroke patients. Few studies have prospectively studied delirium as a complication of acute stroke. In these studies, the results are conflicting regarding risk factors and estimated prevalence. The aims of the present study are to assess the prevalence of delirium in patients with acute stroke treated in an acute Stroke Unit, identify characteristics of patients with delirium and important factors associated with the development of delirium. We conducted a prospective study of patients with delirium and acute stroke consecutively admitted to a Stroke Unit. The diagnosis of delirium was based on Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). CAM is devised from DSM-III-R criteria based on the diagnosis of delirium, and is a simple test with high sensitivity and specificity. One hundred and seventy-eight patients with a diagnosis of stroke were eligible for the study. The prevalence of delirium in acute stroke in our study was 10% (18 of 178 patients). Patients with delirium had significantly longer length of stay in the Stroke Unit (12.3 vs 8.5 days, P apraxia (OR 11.0), higher age (OR 5.5) and infection (UTI or pneumonia) (OR 4.9) during in-hospital stay were associated with increased risk of delirium. One of 10 stroke patients had delirium. This is the lowest prevalence of delirium shown in acute stroke patients. In our study, all patients were treated in a Stroke Unit. A Stroke Unit like the Scandinavian model may be beneficial in preventing delirium.

  14. Spontaneous swallow frequency compared with clinical screening in the identification of dysphagia in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare spontaneous swallow frequency analysis (SFA) with clinical screening protocols for identification of dysphagia in acute stroke. In all, 62 patients with acute stroke were evaluated for spontaneous swallow frequency rates using a validated acoustic analysis technique. Independent of SFA, these same patients received a routine nurse-administered clinical dysphagia screening as part of standard stroke care. Both screening tools were compared against a validated clinical assessment of dysphagia for acute stroke. In addition, psychometric properties of SFA were compared against published, validated clinical screening protocols. Spontaneous SFA differentiates patients with versus without dysphagia after acute stroke. Using a previously identified cut point based on swallows per minute, spontaneous SFA demonstrated superior ability to identify dysphagia cases compared with a nurse-administered clinical screening tool. In addition, spontaneous SFA demonstrated equal or superior psychometric properties to 4 validated, published clinical dysphagia screening tools. Spontaneous SFA has high potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke with psychometric properties equal or superior to clinical screening protocols. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Determinants of fatigue after first-ever ischemic stroke during acute phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Shan Wang

    Full Text Available Fatigue after stroke is common and has a negative impact on rehabilitation and survival. However, its pathogenesis and contributing factors remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing the occurrence of fatigue after first-ever ischemic stroke in acute phase.We examined 265 consecutive patients with first-ever ischemic stroke during acute phase (within 2 weeks in two tertiary stroke care hospitals in Henan, China. We documented patients' demographic and clinical characteristics through face-to-face interviews using structured questionnaires and reviews of medical records. Post-stroke fatigue was defined as a score of ≥4 using the Fatigue Severity Scale. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine post-stroke fatigue in relation to socio-demographic, lifestyle, clinical characteristics and family function.About 40% first-ever ischemic stroke patients experienced post-stroke fatigue in acute phase. Post-stroke fatigue was associated with lack of exercise before stroke (adjusted odds ratio 4.01, 95% CI 1.95-8.24, family dysfunction (2.63, 1.20-5.80, depression (2.39, 1.02-5.58, the presence of pre-stroke fatigue (4.89, 2.13-11.21, use of sedative medications (4.14, 1.58-10.88, coronary heart disease (3.38, 1.46-7.79 and more severe Modified Rankin Scale (2.55, 1.65-3.95.The causes of post-stroke fatigue are multifaceted. More physical exercise, improving family function, reducing depression and appropriate use of sedative medications may be helpful in preventing post-stroke fatigue.

  16. Assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke in China: Findings from the China National Stroke Registry II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettger, Janet Prvu; Li, Zixiao; Xian, Ying; Liu, Liping; Zhao, Xingquan; Li, Hao; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Chunjuan; Meng, Xia; Wang, Anxin; Pan, Yuesong; Peterson, Eric D; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-04-01

    Background Stroke rehabilitation improves functional recovery among stroke patients. However, little is known about clinical practice in China regarding the assessment and provision of rehabilitation among patients with acute ischemic stroke. Aims We examined the frequency and determinants of an assessment for rehabilitation among acute ischemic stroke patients from the China National Stroke Registry II. Methods Data for 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to 219 hospitals from June 2012 to January 2013 were analyzed. The multivariable logistic regression model with the generalized estimating equation method accounting for in-hospital clustering was used to identify patient and hospital factors associated with having a rehabilitation assessment during the acute hospitalization. Results Among 19,294 acute ischemic stroke patients, 11,451 (59.4%) were assessed for rehabilitation. Rates of rehabilitation assessment varied among 219 hospitals (IQR 41.4% vs 81.5%). In the multivariable analysis, factors associated with increased likelihood of a rehabilitation assessment ( p stroke, higher NIHSS on admission, receipt of a dysphagia screen, deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis, carotid vessel imaging, longer length of stay, and treatment at a hospital with a higher number of hospital beds (per 100 units). In contrast, patients with a history of atrial fibrillation and hospitals with higher number of annual stroke discharges (per 100 patients) were less likely to receive rehabilitation assessment during the acute stroke hospitalization. Conclusions Rehabilitation assessment among acute ischemic stroke patients was suboptimal in China. Rates varied considerably among hospitals and support the need to improve adherence to recommended care for stroke survivors.

  17. Improved in-hospital outcomes and care for patients in stroke research: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Tara; Hill, Kelvin; Kilkenny, Monique; Andrew, Nadine; Cadilhac, Dominique

    2016-07-12

    To describe stroke research activity in Australian acute public hospitals and determine if participation in research provides better quality of care and outcomes for patients with stroke. This was an observational study using data from hospitals that participated in the National Stroke Foundation (Australia) acute services audit program in 2009, 2011, and 2013. This included self-reported organizational features and a retrospective clinical audit of up to 40 medical records of patients with stroke from each hospital. Multilevel random effects logistic regression with level defined as hospital and adjustments for hospital, demographic, clinical, and stroke severity factors were undertaken. A total of 240 hospitals submitted organizational data. Hospitals with a stroke unit (70% vs 7%, p 200 stroke admissions per year (80% vs 17%, p research studies. Of 9,537 patients audited at 129 hospitals, 469 (5%) consented to participate in research. Patients who participated in research compared to nonparticipants were likely to be younger (median age 73 years; 25th percentile [Q1]: 63, 75th percentile [Q3]: 80, vs median age 76 years Q1: 64, Q3: 83; p research regardless of access to stroke unit care. Patients who participate in stroke research receive better in-hospital care and are more likely to survive compared to nonresearch participants. This study provides Class III evidence that patients with stroke who participate in research receive better quality of care and have reduced in-hospital mortality. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Prehospital systolic blood pressure is higher in acute stroke compared with stroke mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Laura C; Zewude, Rahel T; Kate, Mahesh P; Liss, Kim; Rowe, Brian H; Buck, Brian; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Butcher, Ken

    2016-06-07

    To assess the natural history of prehospital blood pressure (BP) during emergency medical services (EMS) transport of suspected stroke and determine whether prehospital BP differs among types of patients with suspected stroke (ischemic stroke, TIA, intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH], or stroke mimic). A retrospective, cross-sectional, observational analysis of a centralized EMS database containing electronic records of patients transported by EMS to the emergency department (ED) with suspected stroke during an 18-month period was conducted. Hospital charts and neuroimaging were utilized to determine the final diagnosis (ischemic stroke, TIA, ICH, or stroke mimic). A total of 960 patients were transported by EMS to ED with suspected stroke. Stroke was diagnosed in 544 patients (56.7%) (38.2% ischemic stroke, 12.2% TIA, 5.3% ICH) and 416 (43.2%) were considered mimics. Age-adjusted mean prehospital systolic BP (SBP) was higher in acute stroke patients (155.6 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 153.4-157.9 mm Hg) compared to mimics (146.1 mm Hg; 95% CI: 142.5-148.6 mm Hg; p prehospital SBP was higher in ICH (172.3 mm Hg; 95% CI: 165.1-179.7 mm Hg) than in either ischemic stroke or TIA (154.7 mm Hg; 95% CI: 152.3-157.0 mm Hg; p prehospital SBP to ED SBP was 4 mm Hg (-6 to 17 mm Hg). Mean prehospital SBP was strongly correlated with ED SBP (r = 0.82, p Prehospital SBP is higher in acute stroke relative to stroke mimics and highest in ICH. Given the stability of BP between initial EMS and ED measurements, it may be reasonable to test the feasibility and safety of prehospital antihypertensive therapy in patients with suspected acute stroke. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. D-dimer levels and stroke progression in patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, L-H; Sandset, E C; Sandset, P M

    2011-01-01

    Krarup L-H, Sandset EC, Sandset PM, Berge E. D-dimer levels and stroke progression in patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation. Acta Neurol Scand: 2011: 124: 40-44. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Background -  Patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation...... progression was defined as a ≥3-point worsening on the Scandinavian Stroke Scale during the first 48 h after randomization. Blood samples were analyzed for D-dimer, prothrombin fragment 1 + 2, soluble fibrin monomer, and C-reactive protein. Results -  A total of 382 patients were included in the analyses...

  20. Quality of stroke care at an Irish Regional General Hospital and Stroke Rehabilitation Unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, T

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Robust international data support the effectiveness of stroke unit (SU) care. Despite this, most stroke care in Ireland are provided outside of this setting. Limited data currently exist on the quality of care provided. AIM: The aim of this study is to examine the quality of care for patients with stroke in two care settings-Regional General Hospital (RGH) and Stroke Rehabilitation Unit (SRU). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the stroke records of consecutive patients admitted to the SRU between May-November 2002 and April-November 2004 was performed applying the UK National Sentinel Audit of Stroke (NSAS) tool. RESULTS: The results of the study reveal that while SRU processes of care was 74% compliant with standards; compliance with stroke service organisational standards was only 15 and 43% in the RGH and SRU, respectively. CONCLUSION: The quality of stroke care in our area is deficient. Comprehensive reorganisation of stroke services is imperative.

  1. Acute management of stroke patients taking non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants Addressing Real-world Anticoagulant Management Issues in Stroke (ARAMIS) Registry: Design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Ying; Hernandez, Adrian F; Harding, Tina; Fonarow, Gregg C; Bhatt, Deepak L; Suter, Robert E; Khan, Yosef; Schwamm, Lee H; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-12-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban) have been increasingly used as alternatives to warfarin for stroke prophylaxis in patients with atrial fibrillation. Yet there is substantial lack of information on how patients on NOACs are currently treated when they have an acute ischemic stroke and the best strategies for treating intracerebral hemorrhage for those on chronic anticoagulation with warfarin or a NOAC. These are critical unmet needs for real world clinical decision making in these emergent patients. The ARAMIS Registry is a multicenter cohort study of acute stroke patients who were taking chronic anticoagulation therapy prior to admission and are admitted with either an acute ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Built upon the existing infrastructure of American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Get With the Guidelines Stroke, the ARAMIS Registry will enroll a total of approximately 10,000 patients (5000 with acute ischemic stroke who are taking a NOAC and 5000 with anticoagulation-related intracerebral hemorrhage who are on warfarin or a NOAC). The primary goals of the ARAMIS Registry are to provide a comprehensive picture of current treatment patterns and outcomes of acute ischemic stroke patients on NOACs, as well as anticoagulation-related intracerebral hemorrhage in patients on either warfarin or NOACs. Beyond characterizing the index hospitalization, up to 2500 patients (1250 ischemic stroke and 1250 intracerebral hemorrhage) who survive to discharge will be enrolled in an optional follow-up sub-study and interviewed at 3 and 6 months after discharge to assess longitudinal medication use, downstream care, functional status, and patient-reported outcomes. The ARAMIS Registry will document the current state of management of NOAC treated patients with acute ischemic stroke as well as contemporary care and outcome of anticoagulation-related intracerebral hemorrhage. These

  2. In-hospital direct cost of acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioldasis, G; Talelli, P; Chroni, E; Daouli, J; Papapetropoulos, T; Ellul, J

    2008-10-01

    The geographic inequity and the wide variation in the patterns of care of stroke found across Europe together with the lack of health economics evaluation in Greece led to this prospective study, aiming to provide data on in-hospital direct cost of patients with an acute stroke in Greece, and to identify independent prognostic factors. Demographic and clinical data were recorded on 429 consecutive patients with an acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke admitted to a tertiary care hospital in Greece during a period of 18 months. The costs incurred were estimated using the official financial charts listing in euro (euro), the real expenditure of all hospital departments. The direct in-hospital cost for all stroke cases was 1,551,445euro for a total of 4674 days (331.9euro per day in-hospital). The mean in-hospital cost per stroke patient was 3624.9euro (+/-2695.4). Hemorrhagic strokes were significantly more expensive than the ischemic strokes [mean 5305.4 (+/-4204.8)euro and 3214.5 (+/-1976.2)euro, respectively) and lacunar strokes the least expensive among ischemic stroke subtypes. The length of stay was highly correlated with in-hospital total cost. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that admission ward, stroke severity on admission, stroke type and status discharge were independent predictors of cost. Purchasers in our health services should differentiate in their cost estimates and pricing schemes between types of cerebrovascular events. Future studies should focus on modifiable factors related, not only with stroke characteristics, but also with operational policies of hospitals, that may influence length of stay.

  3. A modelling tool for capacity planning in acute and community stroke services

    OpenAIRE

    Monks, Thomas; Worthington, David; Allen, Micheal; Pitt, Martin; Stein, Ken; James, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mathematical capacity planning methods that can take account of variations in patient complexity, admission rates and delayed discharges have long been available, but their implementation in complex pathways such as stroke care remains limited. Instead simple average based estimates are commonplace. These methods often substantially underestimate capacity requirements. We analyse the capacity requirements for acute and community stroke services in a pathway with over 630 admission...

  4. European Stroke Organisation (ESO) guidelines for the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntaios, George; Dziedzic, Tomasz; Michel, Patrik; Papavasileiou, Vasileios; Petersson, Jesper; Staykov, Dimitre; Thomas, Brenda; Steiner, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    Hyperthermia is a frequent complication in patients with acute ischemic stroke. On the other hand, therapeutically induced hypothermia has shown promising potential in animal models of focal cerebral ischemia. This Guideline Document presents the European Stroke Organisation guidelines for the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke. A multidisciplinary group identified related questions and developed its recommendations based on evidence from randomized controlled trials elaborating the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. This Guideline Document was reviewed within the European Stroke Organisation and externally and was approved by the European Stroke Organisation Guidelines Committee and the European Stroke Organisation Executive Committee. We found low-quality evidence, and therefore, we cannot make any recommendation for treating hyperthermia as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke and hyperthermia; moderate evidence to suggest against routine prevention of hyperthermia with antipyretics as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke and normothermia; very low-quality evidence to suggest against routine induction of hypothermia as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The currently available data about the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke are limited, and the strengths of the recommendations are therefore weak. We call for new randomized controlled trials as well as recruitment of eligible patients to ongoing randomized controlled trials to allow for better-informed recommendations in the future. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  5. Age and gender as predictors of allied health quality stroke care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luker JA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Julie A Luker1, Julie Bernhardt2, Karen A Grimmer-Somers11International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 2School of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University Melbourne, Victoria, Australia and Stroke Division, Florey Neurosciences Institutes Heidelberg Heights, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: Improvement in acute stroke care requires the identification of variables which may influence care quality. The nature and impact of demographic and stroke-related variables on care quality provided by allied health (AH professionals is unknown.Aims: Our research explores the association of age and gender on an index of acute stroke care quality provided by AH professionals.Methods: A retrospective clinical audit of 300 acute stroke patients extracted data on AH care, patients' age and gender. AH care quality was determined by the summed compliance with 20 predetermined process indicators. Our analysis explored relationships between this index of quality, age, and gender. Age was considered in different ways (as a continuous variable, and in different categories. It was correlated with care quality, using gender-specific linear and logistic regression models. Gender was then considered as a confounder in an overall model.Results: No significant association was found for any treatment of age and the index of AH care quality. There were no differences in gender-specific models, and gender did not significantly adjust the age association with care quality.Conclusion: Age and gender were not predictors of the quality of care provided to acute stroke patients by AH professionals.Keywords: acute stroke, allied health, quality of care, age, gender

  6. Hyperglycemia in acute ischemic stroke: pathophysiology and clinical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Nyika D.; Biessels, Geert Jan; DeVries, J. Hans; Roos, Yvo B.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with acute ischemic stroke frequently test positive for hyperglycemia, which is associated with a poor clinical outcome. This association between poor glycemic control and an unfavorable prognosis is particularly evident in patients with persistent hyperglycemia, patients without a known

  7. Aphemia as a presenting symptom in acute stroke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ojha, Pawan K; Nandavar, Shobha; Pearson, Dawn M; Demchuk, Andrew M

    2011-01-01

    Aphemia is an apraxia of speech characterized by complete articulatory failure in the presence of preserved writing, comprehension and oropharyngeal function and can be the presenting manifestation of acute stroke...

  8. Improving stroke care: Quality of care and health education in patients with a stroke or transient ischemic attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Maasland (Lisette)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the applicability of results of clinical trials of stroke and TIA patients in everyday practice and on measurement of quality of stroke care. A third aim is to further expand an underexposed aspect of stroke care, namely health education in stroke patients. Chapter

  9. The Acute STroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL): design and baseline analysis of an ischemic stroke registry including acute multimodal imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michel, Patrik; Odier, Céline; Rutgers, Matthieu; Reichhart, Marc; Maeder, Philippe; Meuli, Reto; Wintermark, Max; Maghraoui, Ali; Faouzi, Mohamed; Croquelois, Alexandre; Ntaios, George

    2010-01-01

    .... The Acute STroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL) prospectively collects epidemiological, clinical, laboratory and multimodal brain imaging data of acute ischemic stroke patients in the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV...

  10. Is management of hyperglycaemia in acute phase stroke still a dilemma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savopoulos, C; Kaiafa, G; Kanellos, I; Fountouki, A; Theofanidis, D; Hatzitolios, A I

    2017-05-01

    Close monitoring of blood glucose levels during the immediate post-acute stroke phase is of great clinical value, as there is evidence that the risk of neurological deterioration is associated with both hyper- and hypoglycaemia. The aim of this review paper is to summarise the evidence on post-stroke blood glucose management and its impact on clinical outcomes, during the early post-acute stage. Post-stroke hyperglycaemia has been associated with increased cerebral oedema, haemorrhagic transformation, lower likelihood of recanalisation and deteriorating neurological state. Thus, hyperglycaemia during an acute stroke may result in poorer clinical outcomes, infarct progression, poor functional recovery and increased mortality rates. Although hypoglycaemia may also lead to poorer outcomes via further brain injury, it can be readily reversed by glucose administration. In most patients, the goal of regular treatment is euglycaemia and for acute-stroke patients, a reasonable approach is to target control of glucose level at 100-150 mg/dL. Both hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia may lead to further brain injury and clinical deterioration; that is the reason these conditions should be avoided after stroke. Yet, when correcting hyperglycaemia, great care should be taken not to switch the patient into hypoglycaemia, and subsequently aggressive insulin administration treatment should be avoided. Early identification and prompt management of hyperglycaemia, especially in acute ischaemic stroke, is recommended. Although the appropriate level of blood glucose during acute stroke is still debated, a reasonable approach is to keep the patient in a mildly hyperglycaemic state, rather than risking hypoglycaemia, using continuous glucose monitoring.

  11. Improving stroke care for patients at Cavan hospital [poster

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murugasu, G Dr.

    2013-07-01

    Under the Quality and Continuing Care Directorate (QCCD) in stroke care Cavan General Hospital was identified as a hospital that received a large number of stroke and TIA patients. A programme was established to improve services to this population.

  12. Acute Predictors of Social Integration Following Mild Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Frances M; Harris, Darren W; Olver, John H; Davis, Stephen M; Disler, Peter B

    2017-12-14

    Despite an acknowledged need to accurately predict stroke outcome, there is little empirical evidence regarding acute predictors of participation restriction post stroke. The current study examines prediction of social integration following mild stroke, using combinations of acute poststroke factors. In a prospective, longitudinal study, a cohort of 60 stroke survivors was followed up at 6 months post stroke. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were employed to evaluate the value of acute poststroke variables in predicting social integration at 6 months post stroke. A combination of age, number of comorbidities, stroke severity, social support factors, and general self-efficacy in the acute poststroke period accounted for 42% of the variance in 6-month social integration. The largest amount of variance (20%) was explained by inclusion of social support factors, including number and types of support. Post hoc analysis was conducted to establish whether marital status was the mediating variable through which early poststroke social support factors exerted influence upon subsequent social integration. The new combination of acute variables accounted for 48% of the variance in 6-month social integration. Results suggested that subjects with partners perceived higher levels of functional social support and lower levels of participation restriction. Stroke survivors with partners may receive greater amounts of companionship and encouragement from their partners, which enhances self-esteem and confidence. Such individuals are possibly more able to participate in and maintain relationships, thus improving social integration. Social support factors, mediated via marital status, are the strongest predictors of subsequent social integration following mild stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pharmaceutical Sponsorship Bias Influences Thrombolytic Literature in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Radecki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains controversial in Emergency Medicine and has not been fully endorsed by either the American College of Emergency Physicians or the American Academy of emergency medicine. A growing recognition exists of the influence of pharmaceutical sponsorship on the reported findings of published clinical trials. Sponsorship bias has been suggested as a potential criticism of the literature and guidelines favoring thrombolytic therapy. Objective: The objective of this study is to review the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke and document the presence or absence of pharmaceutical sponsorship. Methods: A publication-citation analysis was performed to identify the most frequently cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Identified articles were reviewed for disclosures of pharmaceutical funding. Results: Of the 20 most-cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute stroke, 17 (85% disclosed pharmaceutical sponsorship. These disclosures range from general sponsorship to direct employment of authors by pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion: An overwhelming predominance of the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is susceptible to sponsorship bias. This potential bias may provide a basis for physician concern regarding the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy. Further, large, independent, placebo-controlled studies may be required to guide therapy and professional guidelines definitively for acute ischemic stroke. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:435–441.

  14. Update on acute endovascular and surgical stroke treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, D; Cortsen, M; Eskesen, V

    2013-01-01

    Emergency stroke care has become a natural part of the emerging discipline of neurocritical care and demands close cooperation between the neurologist and neurointerventionists, neurosurgeons, and anesthesiologists. Endovascular treatment (EVT), including intra-arterial thrombolysis, mechanical...

  15. Association between Stroke Center Hospitalization for Acute Ischemic Stroke and Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Ying; Holloway, Robert G.; Chan, Paul S.; Noyes, Katia; Shah, Manish N.; Ting, Henry H.; Chappel, Andre R.; Peterson, Eric D.; Friedman, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Context Although stroke centers are widely accepted and supported, little is known about their impact on patient outcomes. Objective To examine the association between admission to stroke centers for an acute ischemic stroke and mortality. Design, Setting, and Participants Observational study using data from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System. We compared mortality for patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke (n=30,947) between 2005 and 2006 at designated stroke centers and non-designated hospitals using differential distance to hospitals as an instrumental variable to adjust for potential pre-hospital selection bias. Patients were followed for mortality for 1 year after the index hospitalization through 2007. To assess whether our findings were specific to stroke, we also compared mortality for patients admitted with gastrointestinal hemorrhage (n=39,409) or acute myocardial infarction (n=40,024) at designated stroke centers and non-designated hospitals. Main Outcome Measure Thirty-day all-cause mortality. Results Among 30,947 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 15,297 (49.4%) were admitted to designated stroke centers. Using the instrumental variable analysis, admission to designated stroke centers was associated with greater use of thrombolytic therapy (4.8% vs. 1.7%; adjusted difference 2.2%, 95% CI, 1.6% to 2.8%; P<0.001) and lower 30-day all-cause mortality (10.1% vs. 12.5%; adjusted mortality difference: −2.5%, 95% CI, −3.6% to −1.4%; P<0.001). Differences in mortality also were observed at all time points, including at 1-day, 7-day, and 1-year follow-up. Moreover, the outcome differences were specific to stroke, as stroke centers and non-stroke centers had similar 30-day all-cause mortality rates among those with acute myocardial infarction (adjusted mortality difference: +0.3%, 95% CI, −0.5% to 1.0%; P=0.50) and/or gastrointestinal hemorrhage (adjusted mortality difference: +0.1%, 95% CI, −0.9% to 1.1%; P=0

  16. Is primary care a neglected piece of the jigsaw in ensuring optimal stroke care? Results of a national study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Sullivan Bernadette

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a major cause of mortality and morbidity with potential for improved care and prevention through general practice. A national survey was undertaken to determine current resources and needs for optimal stroke prevention and care. Methods Postal survey of random sample of general practitioners undertaken (N = 204; 46% response. Topics included practice organisation, primary prevention, acute management, secondary prevention, long-term care and rehabilitation. Results Service organisation for both primary and secondary prevention was poor. Home management of acute stroke patients was used at some stage by 50% of responders, accounting for 7.3% of all stroke patients. Being in a structured cardiovascular management scheme, a training practice, a larger practice, or a practice employing a practice nurse were associated with structures and processes likely to support stroke prevention and care. Conclusion General practices were not fulfilling their potential to provide stroke prevention and long-term management. Systems of structured stroke management in general practice are essential to comprehensive national programmes of stroke care.

  17. Is primary care a neglected piece of the jigsaw in ensuring optimal stroke care? Results of a national study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whitford, David L

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a major cause of mortality and morbidity with potential for improved care and prevention through general practice. A national survey was undertaken to determine current resources and needs for optimal stroke prevention and care. METHODS: Postal survey of random sample of general practitioners undertaken (N = 204; 46% response). Topics included practice organisation, primary prevention, acute management, secondary prevention, long-term care and rehabilitation. RESULTS: Service organisation for both primary and secondary prevention was poor. Home management of acute stroke patients was used at some stage by 50% of responders, accounting for 7.3% of all stroke patients. Being in a structured cardiovascular management scheme, a training practice, a larger practice, or a practice employing a practice nurse were associated with structures and processes likely to support stroke prevention and care. CONCLUSION: General practices were not fulfilling their potential to provide stroke prevention and long-term management. Systems of structured stroke management in general practice are essential to comprehensive national programmes of stroke care.

  18. A set of care quality indicators for stroke management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Soler, I M; Ignacio García, E; Masjuan Vallejo, J; Gállego Culleré, J; Mira Solves, J J

    2017-06-22

    This study proposes a set of quality indicators for care outcomes in patients with acute cerebral infarction. These indicators are understandable and relevant from a clinical viewpoint, as well as being acceptable and feasible in terms of time required, ease of data capture, and interpretability. The method consisted of reaching consensus among doctors after having reviewed the literature on quality indicators in stroke. We then designed and conducted a field study to assess the understandability and feasibility of the set of indicators. Consensus yielded 8 structural indicators, 5 process indicators, and 12 result indicators. Additionally, standards of reference were established for each indicator. This set of indicators can be used to monitor the quality care for stroke patients, identify strengths, and potentially to identify areas needing improvement. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiac Complications in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Lewandowski

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To characterize cardiac complications in acute ischemic stroke (AIS patients admitted from an urban emergency department (ED. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study evaluating AIS patients admitted from the ED within 24 hours of symptom onset who also had an echocardiogram performed within 72 hours of admission. Results: Two hundred AIS patients were identified with an overall in-hospital mortality rate of 8% (n¼ 16. In our cohort, 57 (28.5% of 200 had an ejection fraction less than 50%, 35 (20.4% of 171 had ischemic changes on electrocardiogram (ECG, 18 (10.5% of 171 presented in active atrial fibrillation, 21 (13.0% of 161 had serum troponin elevation, and 2 (1.1% of 184 survivors had potentially lethal arrhythmias on telemetry monitoring. Subgroup analysis revealed higher in-hospital mortality rates among those with systolic dysfunction (15.8% versus 4.9%; P ¼ 0.0180, troponin elevation (38.1% versus 3.4%; P , 0.0001, atrial fibrillation on ECG (33.3% versus 3.8%; P ¼ 0.0003, and ischemic changes on ECG (17.1% versus 6.1%; P ¼ 0.0398 compared with those without. Conclusion: A proportion of AIS patients may have cardiac complications. Systolic dysfunction, troponin elevation, atrial fibrillation, or ischemic changes on ECG may be associated with higher inhospital mortality rates. These findings support the adjunctive role of cardiac-monitoring strategies in the acute presentation of AIS. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:414–420.

  20. Natural history of post-stroke apathy during acute rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Juliana M.; Granato, Dora A.; Goldfine, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the natural history of post-stroke apathy, the authors tested 96 patients undergoing acute rehabilitation for stroke using the Apathy Inventory (AI). 28% of patients had apathy, and their AI scores improved on average 1 point by week 2 and 2 points by week 3 with the majority apathetic at discharge. Apathy severity correlated with aphasia, weakness, and impaired cognition, but not with depression. The findings suggest that acute rehabilitation is an optimal setting for clinical trials for post-stroke apathy because apathy is associated with poor outcomes and shows only a small degree of spontaneous improvement. PMID:26185903

  1. Contralateral diaphragmatic palsy in acute stroke: an interesting observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Reddy, Rajesh; Prabhakar, Subhashini

    2009-01-01

    Diaphragmatic palsy in hemiparetic stroke is not well recognized. Further, its implications on stroke outcome have not been studied. Here, we report a patient with left-sided diaphragmatic palsy due to an acute right middle cerebral artery territory infarction. The diagnosis was suspected on finding an elevated dome of the diaphragm on the left side in a routine chest radiograph and was confirmed by finding decreased movements of the left hemidiaphragm on fluoroscopic examination. We hypothesize that this condition is probably under-recognized in clinical practice and its clinical importance not well known. The pathophysiological basis of diaphragmatic palsy in acute stroke and its possible clinical implications are discussed.

  2. Osteoprotegerin concentrations and prognosis in acute ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Khédri; Ueland, T; Gullestad, L

    2010-01-01

    Abstract. Jensen JK, Ueland T, Atar D, Gullestad L, Mickley H, Aukrust P, Januzzi JL (Odense University Hospital, Denmark; Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway; Massachusetts General Hospital, USA). Osteoprotegerin concentrations and prognosis in acute ischaemic stroke. J Intern Med 2009; doi: 10.1111/j.......1365-2796.2009.02163.x.Aim. Concentrations of osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been associated with the presence of vascular and cardiovascular diseases, but the knowledge of this marker in the setting of ischaemic stroke is limited. Methods and results. In 244 patients with acute ischaemic stroke (age: 69...

  3. Women's interpretation of and cognitive and behavioral responses to the symptoms of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Claudia C

    2014-10-01

    Delay seeking medical assistance for acute ischemic stroke remains a barrier to the provision of optimal care, including the administration of tissue plasminogen activator. Although women report greater knowledge of stroke symptoms and stroke risk factors than men, earlier hospital arrival in women has not been consistently reported. The purposes of this study were to examine women's interpretation of stroke symptoms and compare cognitive and behavioral responses between women who arrived at the hospital within 3 hours of symptom onset and women who arrived after 3 hours. More than half of the participants arrived at the hospital greater than 3 hours after first noticing symptoms. Most women did not recognize the cause of symptoms. Knowledge about a treatment of stroke was limited, and a minority of the women knew they were at risk for stroke despite having known risk factors. Maladaptive responses to symptoms were reported more frequently by women with hospital arrival greater than 3 hours after symptom onset than by women with earlier arrival. Efforts are needed to reduce maladaptive responses to stroke onset that may contribute to delay seeking medical assistance for the symptoms of acute ischemic stroke.

  4. Informed Consent: the Rate-Limiting Step in Acute Stroke Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Z Rose

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Successful implementation of a randomized clinical trial (RCT for neuro-vascular emergencies such as cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is difficult. Besides establishing an accurate, hyper-expedited diagnosis among many mimics in a person with acute neurological deficits, informed consent must be obtained from this vulnerable group of patients who may be unable to convey their own wishes, grasp the gravity of their situation, or give a complete history or examination. We review the influences, barriers, and factors investigators encounter when providing established and putative stroke therapies, and focus on informed consent, the most important research protector of human subjects, as the rate-limiting step for enrollment into acute stroke RCTs. The informed consent process has received relatively little attention in the stroke literature, but is especially important for stroke victims with acute cognitive, aural, lingual, motor, or visual impairments. Consent by a surrogate may not accurately reflect the patient’s wishes. Further, confusion about trial methodology, negative opinions of placebo-controlled studies, and therapeutic misconception by patients or surrogates may impede trial enrollment and requires further study. Exception From Informed Consent (EFIC offers an opportunity that is rarely if ever utilized for stroke RCTs. Ultimately, advancing the knowledge base and treatment paradigms for acute stroke is essential but autonomy, beneficence (non-malfeasance, and justice must also be carefully interwoven into any well-designed RCT.

  5. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression...... lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute......,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator...

  6. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Bhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke’s encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT including a CT perfusion (CTP scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report.

  7. Interventions for acute stroke management in Africa: a systematic review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Baatiema

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The past decades have witnessed a rapid evolution of research on evidence-based acute stroke care interventions worldwide. Nonetheless, the evidence-to-practice gap in acute stroke care remains variable with slow and inconsistent uptake in low-middle income countries (LMICs. This review aims to identify and compare evidence-based acute stroke management interventions with alternative care on overall patient mortality and morbidity outcomes, functional independence, and length of hospital stay across Africa. Methods This review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guideline. An electronic search was conducted in six databases comprising MEDLINE, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete and Cochrane Library for experimental and non-experimental studies. Eligible studies were abstracted into evidence tables and their methodological quality appraised using the Joanna Briggs Institute checklist. Data were analysed and presented narratively with reference to observed differences in patient outcomes, reporting p values and confidence intervals for any possible relationship. Results Initially, 1896 articles were identified and 37 fully screened. Four non-experimental studies (three cohort and one case series studies were included in the final review. One study focused on the clinical efficacy of a stroke unit whilst the remaining three reported on thrombolytic therapy. The results demonstrated a reduction in patient deaths attributed to stroke unit care and thrombolytic therapy. Thrombolytic therapy was also associated with reductions in symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage (SICH. However, the limited eligible studies and methodological limitations compromised definitive conclusions on the extent of and level of efficacy of evidence-based acute stroke care interventions across Africa

  8. Lack of international consensus on ethical aspects of acute stroke trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leira, Enrique C; Kaldjian, Lauris C; Ludwig, Bryan R; Torner, James C; Olalde, Heena M; Hacke, Werner; Adams, Harold P

    2012-04-01

    Acute stroke trials are becoming increasingly multinational. Working toward a shared ethical standard for acute stroke research necessitates evaluating the degree of consensus among international researchers. We surveyed all 275 coinvestigators and coordinators who participated in the AbESTT II study (evaluating abciximab vs placebo) about their experience with their local institutional review board (IRB) or equivalent, as well as, about their personal beliefs regarding the ethical aspects of acute stroke trials. A total of 90 coinvestigators from 15 different countries responded to our survey. Among the IRBs represented by the responding coinvestigators, only 18% allowed surrogate consent to be obtained over the phone. Although 52% allowed the participation of subjects with aphasia, only 5% allowed the participation of subjects with neglect/hemi-inattention. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was deemed adequate to establish decisional capacity based on language by 62% of the coinvestigators and 36% of the IRBs. A belief that IRB regulations cause unnecessary delays and fear in relatives/patients was reported by 67% of coinvestigators, and the belief that granting an exemption from informed consent under specific circumstances is appropriate was reported by 41%. There appears to be considerable international diversity in the ethical priorities and informed consent standards among different IRBs and investigators in stroke research. The stroke community should make an attempt to standardize the consent process used in research. Given the critical nature of the time to treatment in stroke care, these standards should be integrated into current frameworks of clinical care and research. The absence of an ethical consensus can become a barrier to advancing stroke treatment internationally. Copyright © 2012 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy after acute stroke: complications and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, E F; McMahon, M M

    1999-01-01

    To review the complications and outcome of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement (PEG) in 74 patients with acute stroke. Medical record review and follow-up of patients with acute stroke admitted to a referral center. There were no immediate procedure-related complications. Late complications included aspiration pneumonia (11%), PEG occlusion and replacement (6%), accidental PEG removal (6%), wound infection (3%) and fatal gastrointestinal bleeding in 1 patient. In 18 patients (28%), PEG could be subsequently removed due to improvement in swallowing. PEG provides an effective alternative method of enteral feeding, but its impact on outcome remains uncertain. Late complications occurred in one third of the patients, but were seldom life threatening. Removal of the gastrostomy tube and resumption of oral feeding was possible in more than a quarter of the patients. All our patients who received PEG placement after acute stroke remained severely disabled; one third of the patients died from systemic complications of their stroke.

  10. Acute post-stroke blood pressure relative to premorbid levels in intracerebral haemorrhage versus major ischaemic stroke: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Urs; Cooney, Marie Therese; Bull, Linda M; Silver, Louise E; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S; Mehta, Ziyah; Rothwell, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background It is often assumed that blood pressure increases acutely after major stroke, resulting in so-called post-stroke hypertension. In view of evidence that the risks and benefits of blood pressure-lowering treatment in acute stroke might differ between patients with major ischaemic stroke and those with primary intracerebral haemorrhage, we compared acute-phase and premorbid blood pressure levels in these two disorders. Methods In a population-based study in Oxfordshire, UK, we recruited all patients presenting with stroke between April 1, 2002, and March 31, 2012. We compared all acute-phase post-event blood pressure readings with premorbid readings from 10-year primary care records in all patients with acute major ischaemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale >3) versus those with acute intracerebral haemorrhage. Findings Of 653 consecutive eligible patients, premorbid and acute-phase blood pressure readings were available for 636 (97%) individuals. Premorbid blood pressure (total readings 13 244) had been measured on a median of 17 separate occasions per patient (IQR 8–31). In patients with ischaemic stroke, the first acute-phase systolic blood pressure was much lower than after intracerebral haemorrhage (158·5 mm Hg [SD 30·1] vs 189·8 mm Hg [38·5], pblood pressure after intracerebral haemorrhage was substantially higher than premorbid levels (mean increase of 40·7 mm Hg, pblood pressure also increased steeply in the days and weeks before intracerebral haemorrhage (regression pblood pressure reading after primary intracerebral haemorrhage was more likely than after ischaemic stroke to be the highest ever recorded (OR 3·4, 95% CI 2·3–5·2, pblood pressure within 3 h of onset was 50 mm Hg higher, on average, than the maximum premorbid level whereas that after ischaemic stroke was 5·2 mm Hg lower (pblood pressure is substantially raised compared with usual premorbid levels after intracerebral haemorrhage, whereas acute

  11. [The Swedish stroke register indicates differences in stroke care. Unconscious discrimination might explain some of the differences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Marie; Glader, Eva-Lotta; Norrving, Bo; Asplund, Kjell

    2015-12-15

    In this article, results from a series of studies on the relationships between socioeconomic factors and stroke processes (stroke unit care, acute reperfusion treatment, secondary prevention with oral anticoagulants and statins) and outcomes (long-term survival, return to work and risk of suicide and suicide attempts) are summarized. The overall pattern is that acute and secondary prevention interventions and prognosis are better in patients with a high compared with a low level of education, better in people with high than low income, better in people who are cohabitant than single. As to country of birth, a more complex pattern has emerged. Unmeasured confounding may possibly explain part of the difference, but the socioeconomic gradients remain after adjustment for multiple potential confounders, leaving the possibility that there is an element of unconscious discrimination in stroke care.

  12. Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry Surveillance - four states, 2005-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mary G; Tong, Xin; McGruder, Henraya; Yoon, Paula; Rosamond, Wayne; Winquist, Andrea; Hinchey, Judith; Wall, Hilary K; Pandey, Dilip K

    2009-11-06

    Each year, approximately 795,000 persons in the United States experience a new or recurrent stroke. Data from the prototype phase (2001-2004) of the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry (PCNASR) suggested that numerous acute stroke patients did not receive treatment according to established guidelines. This report summarizes PCNASR data collected during 2005-2007 from Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, and North Carolina, the first states to have PCNASRs implemented in and led by state health departments. PCNASR was established by CDC in 2001 to track and improve the quality of hospital-based acute stroke care. The prototype phase (2001-2004) registries were led by CDC-funded clinical investigators in academic and medical institutions, whereas the full implementation of the 2005-2007 statewide registries was led by CDC-funded state health departments. Health departments in each state recruit hospitals to collect data. To be included in PCNASR, patients must be aged >or=18 years and have a clinical diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or transient ischemic attack (TIA) or an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code indicative of a stroke or TIA. Data for patients who are already hospitalized at the time of stroke are not included. The following 10 performance measures of care, based on established guidelines for care of acute stroke patients, were developed by CDC in partnership with neurologists who specialize in stroke care: 1) received deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis, 2) received antithrombotic therapy at discharge, 3) received anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation, 4) received tissue plasminogen activator (among eligible patients), 5) received antithrombotic therapy within 48 hours of admission or by the end of the second hospital day, 6) received lipid level testing, 7) received dysphagia screening, 8) received stroke education, 9

  13. Incidence and Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury Following Mannitol Infusion in Patients With Acute Stroke: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-Yi; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-11-01

    Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, is commonly used to treat patients with acute brain edema, but its use also increases the risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we investigated the incidence and risk factors of mannitol-related AKI in acute stroke patients.A total of 432 patients (ischemic stroke 62.3%) >20 years of age who were admitted to the neurocritical care center in a tertiary hospital and received mannitol treatment were enrolled in this study. Clinical parameters including the scores of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission, vascular risk factors, laboratory data, and concurrent nephrotoxic medications were registered. Acute kidney injury was defined as an absolute elevation in the serum creatinine (Scr) level of ≥0.3 mg/dL from the baseline or a ≥50% increase in Scr.The incidence of mannitol-related AKI was 6.5% (95% confidence interval, 4.5%-9.3%) in acute stroke patients, 6.3% in patients with ischemic stroke, and 6.7% in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline, higher initial NIHSS score, and concurrent use of diuretics increased the risk of mannitol-related AKI. When present, the combination of these elements displayed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.839 (95% confidence interval, 0.770-0.909). In conclusion, mannitol-related AKI is not uncommon in the treatment of acute stroke patients, especially in those with vulnerable risk factors.

  14. A Clinical Survey Efficacy Of Frankincense In Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Jivad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background &Aims: Ischemic stroke is the most common cause of stroke ,and paralysis and movement disorders are the most symptoms of stroke. Therefore, it is important to find a method for improving the disorders. This study aimed to examine the clinical efficacy of frankincense in patients with the acute ischemic stroke. Methods: In this clinical trial, 60 patients with ischemic stroke were randomly allocated into the treatment and control groups (n=30. In the treatment group, in addition to routine treatment of stroke, four capsules containing 500 mg powdered frankincense was given daily  , but in the control group, was performed only the treatment of stroke (no frankincense. The treatment lasted for 1 month. The NIHSS scale (for assessment of speech and muscle strength at the beginning,  the seventh day and end of the study for each patient was completed. Statistical analysis was performed using independent t-test, chi-square, mann withney in SPSS software. Results: Results showed that only improvement of muscle strength in patients left limb increased significantly in stage II in the treatment group than the control group. Conclusion: Adding frankincense to treatment of patients with stroke can be effective on improvement muscle strength in patients with muscle weakness and non-dominant side in acute neurological disorders. While that is not effective on improving muscle strength of the right limb or speech.

  15. Number of nursing staff and falls: a case-control study on falls by stroke patients in acute-care settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tutuarima, J. A.; de Haan, R. J.; Limburg, M.

    1993-01-01

    Falls occur frequently in patients with a stroke and have serious consequences: discharge delays and hip fractures can result. In order to evaluate the impact of nursing workload on stroke-patient falls, we assessed the patients per nurse ratio in a detailed case-control study carried out in nine

  16. Early warning score predicts acute mortality in stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liljehult, J; Christensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Clinical deterioration and death among patients with acute stroke are often preceded by detrimental changes in physiological parameters. Systematic and effective tools to identify patients at risk of deterioration early enough to intervene are therefore needed. The aim of the study wa...... tool for identifying patients at risk of dying after acute stroke. Readily available physiological parameters are converted to a single score, which can guide both nurses and physicians in clinical decision making and resource allocation.......OBJECTIVES: Clinical deterioration and death among patients with acute stroke are often preceded by detrimental changes in physiological parameters. Systematic and effective tools to identify patients at risk of deterioration early enough to intervene are therefore needed. The aim of the study...... was to investigate whether the aggregate weighted track and trigger system early warning score (EWS) can be used as a simple observational tool to identify patients at risk and predict mortality in a population of patients with acute stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients admitted with acute stroke...

  17. Routine Troponin Measurements Are Unnecessary to Exclude Asymptomatic Coronary Events in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farwa; Young, Jimmy; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Flemming, Kelly D; Fugate, Jennifer E

    2016-05-01

    Obtaining serum troponin levels in every patient with acute stroke is recommended in recent stroke guidelines, but there is no evidence that these contribute positively to clinical care. We sought to determine the clinical significance of measuring troponin levels in acute ischemic stroke patients. We reviewed 398 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke at a large academic institution from 2010 to 2012. Troponin levels were measured as a result of protocol in place during part of the study period. The mean age was 70 years (standard deviation ±16 years) and 197 (49.5%) were men. Chronic kidney disease was present in 78 (19.6%), coronary artery disease in 107 (26.9%), and atrial fibrillation in 107 (26.9%). Serum troponin T was measured in 246 of 398 patients (61.8%). Troponin was elevated (>.01 ng/mL) at any point in 38 of 246 patients (15.5%) and was elevated in 28 patients at all 3 measurements (11.3% of those with troponin measured). Only 4 of 246 patients (1.6%) had a significant uptrend. Two were iatrogenic in the setting of hemodynamic augmentation using vasopressors to maintain cerebral perfusion. One case was attributed to stroke and chronic kidney disease and another case to heart failure from inflammatory fibrocalcific mitral valvular heart disease. Serum troponin elevation in patients with ischemic stroke is not usually caused by clinically significant acute myocardial ischemia unless iatrogenic in the setting of vasopressor administration. Serum troponin levels should be measured judicially, based on clinical context, rather than routinely in all stroke patients. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute ischaemic stroke prediction from physiological time series patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhang,

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundStroke is one of the major diseases with human mortality. Recent clinical research has indicated that early changes in common physiological variables represent a potential therapeutic target, thus the manipulation of these variables may eventually yield an effective way to optimise stroke recovery.AimsWe examined correlations between physiological parameters of patients during the first 48 hours after a stroke, and their stroke outcomes after 3 months. We wanted to discover physiological determinants that could be used to improve health outcomes by supporting the medical decisions that need to be made early on a patient’s stroke experience.Method We applied regression-based machine learning techniques to build a prediction algorithm that can forecast 3-month outcomes from initial physiological time series data during the first 48 hours after stroke. In our method, not only did we use statistical characteristics as traditional prediction features, but also we adopted trend patterns of time series data as new key features.ResultsWe tested our prediction method on a real physiological data set of stroke patients. The experiment results revealed an average high precision rate: 90%. We also tested prediction methods only considering statistical characteristics of physiological data, and concluded an average precision rate: 71%.ConclusionWe demonstrated that using trend pattern features in prediction methods improved the accuracy of stroke outcome prediction. Therefore, trend patterns of physiological time series data have an important role in the early treatment of patients with acute ischaemic stroke.

  19. Circulating extracellular DNA levels are acutely elevated in ischaemic stroke and associated with innate immune system activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Grant C; Petrone, Ashley B; Tennant, Connie S; Lucke-Wold, Noelle; Kabbani, Yasser; Tarabishy, Abdul R; Chantler, Paul D; Barr, Taura L

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the ability of peripheral blood cell-free DNA (cfDNA) levels to identify ischaemic stroke early in the acute phase of care, as well as to examine the relationship between peripheral blood cfDNA levels and stroke-induced innate immune system activation. Upon emergency department admission, peripheral blood samples were obtained from 43 patients experiencing acute ischaemic stroke and 20 patients identified as stroke mimics. Plasma cfDNA levels were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), infarct volume and NIH stroke scale (NIHSS) were used to assess injury severity, and peripheral blood neutrophil count was used as a measure of innate immune system status. Peripheral blood cfDNA levels were significantly elevated in patients suffering stroke relative to those diagnosed as stroke mimics, and could differentiate between groups with 86% (95% CI = 72-95%) sensitivity and 75% (95% CI = 51-91%) specificity. Furthermore, cfDNA levels displayed significant positive associations between both infarct volume and peripheral blood neutrophil count within the stroke group. These findings suggest that assessment of peripheral blood cfDNA levels may be useful for the identification of ischaemic stroke in the acute care setting, and provide associative evidence that cfDNA is a potential activator of the peripheral innate immune system in response to cerebral ischaemia.

  20. Stroke outcomes measures must be appropriately risk adjusted to ensure quality care of patients: a presidential advisory from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonarow, Gregg C; Alberts, Mark J; Broderick, Joseph P; Jauch, Edward C; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Saver, Jeffrey L; Solis, Penelope; Suter, Robert; Schwamm, Lee H

    2014-05-01

    Because stroke is among the leading causes of death, disability, hospitalizations, and healthcare expenditures in the United States, there is interest in reporting outcomes for patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke. The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, as part of its commitment to promote high-quality, evidence-based care for cardiovascular and stroke patients, fully supports the development of properly risk-adjusted outcome measures for stroke. To accurately assess and report hospital-level outcomes, adequate risk adjustment for case mix is essential. During the development of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 30-day stroke mortality and 30-day stroke readmission measures, concerns were expressed that these measures were not adequately designed because they do not include a valid initial stroke severity measure, such as the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. These outcome measures, as currently constructed, may be prone to mischaracterizing the quality of stroke care being delivered by hospitals and may ultimately harm acute ischemic stroke patients. This article details (1) why the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services acute ischemic stroke outcome measures in their present form may not provide adequate risk adjustment, (2) why the measures as currently designed may lead to inaccurate representation of hospital performance and have the potential for serious unintended consequences, (3) what activities the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association has engaged in to highlight these concerns to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and other interested parties, and (4) alternative approaches and opportunities that should be considered for more accurately risk-adjusting 30-day outcomes measures in patients with ischemic stroke.

  1. Cardiac Arrest in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Incidence, Predisposing Factors, and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joundi, Raed A; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Nikneshan, Davar; Tu, Jack V; Fang, Jiming; Holloway, Robert; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac arrest is a devastating complication of acute ischemic stroke, but little is known about its incidence and characteristics. We studied a large ischemic stroke inpatient population and compared patients with and without cardiac arrest. We studied consecutive patients from the Ontario Stroke Registry who had an ischemic stroke between July 2003 and June 2008 at 11 tertiary care stroke centers in Ontario. Multivariable analyses were used to determine independent predictors of cardiac arrest and associated outcomes. Adjusted survival curves were computed, and hazard ratios for mortality at 30 days and 1 year were determined for cardiac arrest and other major outcomes. Among the 9019 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 352 had cardiac arrest, for an overall incidence of 3.9%. In a sensitivity analysis with palliative patients removed, the incidence of cardiac arrest was 2.5%. Independent predictors of cardiac arrest were as follows: older age, greater stroke severity, preadmission dependence, and a history of diabetes, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Systemic complications associated with cardiac arrest were as follows: myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, sepsis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and pneumonia. Patients with cardiac arrest had higher disability at discharge, and a markedly increased 30-day mortality of 82.1% compared with 9.3% without cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest had a high incidence and was associated with poor outcomes after ischemic stroke, including multiple medical complications and very high mortality. Predictors of cardiac arrest identified in this study could help risk stratify ischemic stroke patients for cardiac investigations and prolonged cardiac monitoring. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Therapeutically Targeting Neuroinflammation and Microglia after Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjeon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, and recent studies posit that inflammation acts as a double-edged sword, not only detrimentally augmenting secondary injury, but also potentially promoting recovery. An initial event of inflammation in ischemic stroke is the activation of microglia, leading to production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators acting through multiple receptor signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the role of microglial mediators in acute ischemic stroke and elaborate on preclinical and clinical studies focused on microglia in stroke models. Understanding how microglia can lead to both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses may be essential to implement therapeutic strategies using immunomodulatory interventions in ischemic stroke.

  3. Acute stroke symptoms: do differences exist between sexes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciarresi, Monica; De Luca, Pierpaolo; Caso, Valeria; Agnelli, Giancarlo; D'Amore, Cataldo; Alberti, Andrea; Venti, Michele; Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that women with stroke often present different stroke symptoms than men. The aim of our study was to assess for the relevance of these differences from a large case series. Consecutive patients admitted to the Stroke Unit at the University of Perugia, with acute stroke or transient ischemic attack between 1 June, 2005, and May 2012, and recorded in Perugia Stroke Registry were prospectively included. Associations between the recorded symptoms and sex were assessed by preliminary cross-tabulations with the Chi-square test or Fisher exact test with Yate correction when appropriate. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of a single symptom including sex as an independent variable. Overall, 1072 men and 811 women were included in this study. Women had a higher average age at onset (75.40 ± 12.90 years in women and 70.14 ± 12.61 years in men) and presented more severe strokes with higher National Institute of Health Stroke Scale scores than men, whereas men were more likely to have a posterior stroke.Regarding symptoms, multivariate analysis revealed correlations between postural instability and male sex and between dysphagia and female sex. We found no differences in the clinical presentation of stroke between the sexes, except that men were more likely to have postural instability and females were more likely to have dysphagia. These findings suggest that stroke locations and stroke severity were associated with sex. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The organisational context of nursing care in stroke units: a case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Christopher R; Fisher, Andrea; Green, Theresa L

    2009-01-01

    Internationally the stroke unit is recognised as the evidence-based model for patient management, although clarity about the effective components of stroke units is lacking. Whilst skilled nursing care has been proposed as one component, the theoretical and empirical basis for stroke nursing is limited. We attempted to explore the organisational context of stroke unit nursing, to determine those features that staff perceived to be important in facilitating high quality care. A case study approach was used, that included interviews with nurses and members of the multidisciplinary teams in two Canadian acute stroke units. A total of 20 interviews were completed, transcribed and analysed thematically using the Framework Approach. Trustworthiness was established through the review of themes and their interpretation by members of the stroke units. Nine themes that comprised an organisational context that supported the delivery of high quality nursing care in acute stroke units were identified, and provide a framework for organisational development. The study highlighted the importance of an overarching service model to guide the organisation of care and the development of specialist and advanced nursing roles. Whilst multidisciplinary working appears to be a key component of stroke unit nursing, various organisational challenges to its successful implementation were highlighted. In particular the consequence of differences in the therapeutic approach of nurses and therapy staff needs to be explored in greater depth. Successful teamwork appears to depend on opportunities for the development of relationships between team members as much as the use of formal communication systems and structures. A co-ordinated approach to education and training, clinical leadership, a commitment to research, and opportunities for role and practice development also appear to be key organisational features of stroke unit nursing. Recommendations for the development of stroke nursing

  5. Factoring in Factor VIII With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, James E; Samai, Alyana; Albright, Karen C; Boehme, Amelia K; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-10-01

    There is growing research interest into the etiologies of cryptogenic stroke, in particular as it relates to hypercoagulable states. An elevation in serum levels of the procoagulant factor VIII is recognized as one such culprit of occult cerebral infarctions. It is the objective of the present review to summarize the molecular role of factor VIII in thrombogenesis and its clinical use in the diagnosis and prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. We also discuss the utility of screening for serum factor VIII levels among patients at risk for, or those who have experienced, ischemic stroke. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers of Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugunavathi Sepramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs have been identified as key regulators of gene expression and thus their potential in disease diagnostics, prognosis and therapy is being actively pursued. Deregulation of microRNAs in cerebral pathogenesis has been reported to a limited extent in both animal models and human. Due to the complexity of the pathology, identifying stroke specific microRNAs has been a challenge. This study shows that microRNA profiles reflect not only the temporal progression of stroke but also the specific etiologies. A panel of 32 microRNAs, which could differentiate stroke etiologies during acute phase was identified and verified using a customized TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA. Furthermore we also found 5 microRNAs, miR-125b-2*, -27a*, -422a, -488 and -627 to be consistently altered in acute stroke irrespective of age or severity or confounding metabolic complications. Differential expression of these 5 microRNAs was also observed in rat stroke models. Hence, their specificity to the stroke pathology emphasizes the possibility of developing these microRNAs into accurate and useful tools for diagnosis of stroke.

  7. Highly sensitive troponin T in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J K; Ueland, T; Aukrust, P

    2012-01-01

    in decedents than in survivors. After adjustment for stroke severity, C-reactive protein, age, NT-proBNP and prior heart and/or renal failure, hsTnT levels were not a significant predictor of long-term all-cause or cardiovascular mortality. Conclusion: Elevated levels of hsTnT are frequently present......Background: Newly developed troponin assays have superior diagnostic and prognostic performance in acute coronary syndrome (ACS), when compared to conventional troponin assays; however, highly sensitive troponin has not been evaluated in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: Highly...... sensitive troponin T (hsTnT) was measured daily during the first 4 days in 193 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke without overt ACS or atrial fibrillation. The patients were previously tested normal with a fourth-generation TnT assay. The patients were followed for 47 months, with all...

  8. [Acute surgical treatment of malignant stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja-Cyron, Alexander; Eskesen, Vagn; Hansen, Klaus; Kondziella, Daniel; Kelsen, Jesper

    2016-10-24

    Malignant stroke is an intracranial herniation syndrome caused by cerebral oedema after a large hemispheric or cerebellar stroke. Malignant middle cerebral artery infarction is a devastating disease with a mortality around 80% despite intensive medical treatment. Decompressive craniectomy reduces mortality and improves functional outcome - especially in younger patients (age ≤ 60 years). Decompression of the posterior fossa is a life-saving procedure in patients with malignant cerebellar infarctions and often leads to good neurological outcome.

  9. Anxiety and depressive symptoms in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuletić, Vladimira; Sapina, Lidija; Lozert, Marija; Lezaić, Zeljka; Morović, Sandra

    2012-06-01

    Inadequate attention is being paid to the anxiety and depressive symptoms in acute stroke, although these problems are known to influence the patients' neurological outcome. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms in the acute stage of ischemic stroke and to identify the factors associated with such problems. Anxiety and depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in 40 patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted during a period of one month. Statistical analyses were performed by the SigmaStat (Version 2.0) software. Study results showed 55% of study patients to suffer from depressive symptoms and 40% from both anxiety symptoms and depressive symptoms. There was a correlation of depressive symptoms (HADS-D score) with MMSE (p symptoms (HADS-A score) with MMSE (p symptoms were more frequent in the acute stage ofischemic stroke. Study patients had a high prevalence of both groups of symptoms. Therefore, attention should be paid to the anxiety and depressive symptoms in stroke units and try to relieve the patients' emotional stress and personal suffering, which could improve their neurological outcome.

  10. Admission body temperature predicts long-term mortality after acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Rungby, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    Body temperature is considered crucial in the management of acute stroke patients. Recently hypothermia applied as a therapy for stroke has been demonstrated to be feasible and safe in acute stroke patients. In the present study, we investigated the predictive role of admission body temperature t...... to the long-term mortality in stroke patients....

  11. Calcification and endothelialization of thrombi in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Hu, William Y; Hill, Michael D; Auer, Roland N

    2008-09-01

    We report chronic histopathological features in thrombi mechanically retrieved from five acute ischemic stroke patients with a median age of 68 years and a median pretreatment National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 13. Early endothelialization occurred over and within the thrombus, and calcifications were seen, in addition to the usual acute laminar fibrin, intervening red blood cells, and neutrophils. The effectiveness of tissue plasminogen activator in clot dissolution might be affected by these features, if extensive. Thrombus composition could critically determine the success of chemical thrombolysis. Our results should stimulate the development of imaging modalities to determine thrombus composition.

  12. Acute traumatic stroke: a case of bow hunter's stroke in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, E L; Van Coster, R; Verstraeten, K

    1998-06-01

    Acute traumatic stroke of the cerebellum is rarely seen in children. In adults, chiropractical manipulation, yoga exercises, bow hunting and cervical trauma have all been associated with vertebrobasillar damage and subsequent stroke due to cerebellar infarction. We present a case of bow hunter's stroke in a child. An 11-year-old boy developed deep coma one day after minor occipital head injury due to an infarct in the left cerebellum and ipsilateral medulla oblongata. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed hypoperfusion of the left vertebral artery and occlusion of the posterior and anterior inferior cerebellar arteries (PICA and AICA respectively).

  13. Nursing application of Bobath principles in stroke care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarella, P M; Lewis, N

    1987-04-01

    The nursing approach in the care of stroke patients has a direct impact on functional outcome. Nursing application of Bobath principles in stroke care offers a nursing focus on involvement of the affected side; facilitation of normal tone, posture, and movement; and development of more normal function. A research study evaluating the functional gains of stroke patients demonstrated a significant level of functional improvement in those treated with Bobath principles over stroke patients treated with the traditional nursing approach. Practical methods for applying Bobath principles in patient care activities are described. These therapeutic methods provide nurses with the means to maximize stroke patients' potential and further influence their functional recovery.

  14. Intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with left atrial myxoma with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Baburao Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT is an accepted therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke presenting within 3-4.5 hours of symptom onset. Selection of the patient for thrombolysis depends on the careful assessment for the risk of post thrombolysis symptomatic haemorrhage (6.2-8.9% which may be fatal. Atrial myxomas which are the commonest tumors of the heart are associated with stroke due to tumor/clot embolism. There are very few case reports of IVT and its outcome in patients with atrial myxoma with stroke. Some have reported successful thrombolysis, while others have reported intracerebral bleeding. In this report we describe our experience of IVT in atrial myxoma patient with ischemic stroke and review the relevant literature.

  15. Comparison of Characteristics of Stroke-Associated Pneumonia in Stroke Care Units in Indonesia and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Ita Muharram; Soertidewi, Lyna; Yokota, Chiaki; Kikuno, Muneaki; Koga, Masatoshi; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2017-02-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most common medical complications after stroke. Incidence and risk factor analyses of stroke-associated pneumonia (SAP) in stroke care units (SCUs) are limited. SAP incidence comparisons across countries can identify the most effective treatment to reduce this incidence. This was a retrospective study including consecutive patients with acute stroke in SCUs in 2 hospitals: 105 patients (mean age 78.2 ± 5.8) from the National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center (NCVC) in Osaka, Japan (from July to August 2015), and 105 patients (mean age 60 ± 5.8) from the National Brain Centre (NBC) Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia (from May to September 2015). We used descriptive statistics and a logistic regression model for statistical analysis. The incidence of SAP in the SCU NBC Hospital was higher than that in the SCU NCVC (22.9% versus 12.4%, P = .0466). In the SCU NBC Hospital, dysphagia (odds ratio [OR] 15.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.77-130.73) and severe neurological deficits on admission (OR 5.31, 95% CI 1.60-17.60) were significantly associated with SAP, whereas in the SCU NCVC, dysphagia (OR 14.42, 95% CI 2.34-88.98) and diabetes mellitus (OR 7.16, 95% CI 1.27-40.18) were the risk factors. When the patients of both hospitals were analyzed together, severe neurological deficits on admission (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.31-8.64) and dysphagia (OR 12.62, 95% CI 3.75-42.45) were significant determinants for developing SAP. The incidence of SAP was higher in the Indonesian hospital than in the Japanese one. Our findings support other epidemiological data of a high incidence of SAP with severe neurological deficits on admission and dysphagia in an SCU setting. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Why people do, or do not, immediately contact emergency medical services following the onset of acute stroke: qualitative interview study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan E Mackintosh

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To identify the reasons why individuals contact, or delay contacting, emergency medical services in response to stroke symptoms. DESIGN: Qualitative interview study with a purposive sample of stroke patients and witnesses, selected according to method of accessing medical care and the time taken to do so. Data were analysed using the Framework approach. SETTING: Area covered by three acute stroke units in the north east of England. PARTICIPANTS: Nineteen stroke patients and 26 witnesses who had called for help following the onset of stroke symptoms. RESULTS: Factors influencing who called emergency medical services and when they called included stroke severity, how people made sense of symptoms and their level of motivation to seek help. Fear of the consequences of stroke, including future dependence or disruption to family life, previous negative experience of hospitals, or involving a friend or relations in the decision to access medical services, all resulted in delayed admission. Lack of knowledge of stroke symptoms was also an important determinant. Perceptions of the remit of medical services were a major cause of delays in admission, with many people believing the most appropriate action was to telephone their GP. Variations in the response of primary care teams to acute stroke symptoms were also evident. CONCLUSIONS: The factors influencing help-seeking decisions are complex. There remains a need to improve recognition by patients, witnesses and health care staff of the need to treat stroke as a medical emergency by calling emergency medical services, as well as increasing knowledge of symptoms of stroke among patients and potential witnesses. Fear, denial and reticence to impose on others hinders the process of seeking help and will need addressing specifically with appropriate interventions. Variability in how primary care services respond to stroke needs further investigation to inform interventions to promote best

  17. The SOAR (Stroke subtype, Oxford Community Stroke Project classification, Age, prestroke modified Rankin) score strongly predicts early outcomes in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo Kyaw; Clark, Allan B; Kwok, Chun Shing; Davis, John; Durairaj, Ramesh; Dixit, Anand K; Sharma, Anil K; Ford, Gary A; Potter, John F

    2014-04-01

    Previous prognostic scoring systems in predicting stroke mortality are complex, require multiple measures that vary with time and failed to produce a simple scoring system. The study aims to derive and internally validate a stroke prognostic scoring system to predict early mortality and hospital length of stay. Data from a U.K. multicenter stroke register were examined (1997-2010). Using a prior hypothesis based on our and others observations, we selected five patient-related factors (age, gender, stroke subtype, clinical classification, and prestroke disability) as candidate prognostic indicators. An 8-point score was derived based on multiple logistic regression model using four out of five variables. Performance of the model was assessed by plotting the estimated probability of in-hospital death against the actual probability by testing for overfitting (calibration) and area under the curve methods (discrimination). The total sample consisted of 12,355 acute stroke patients (ischemic stroke 91.0%). The score predicted both in-patient and seven-day mortality. The crude in-patient mortality were 1.57%, 4.02%, 10.65%, 21.41%, 46.60%, 62.72%, and 75.81% for those who scored 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, respectively. The calibration of the model revealed no evidence of overfitting (estimated overfitting 0.001). The area under the curve values for both in-hospital and seven-day mortality were 0.79. The score predicted length of stay with a higher score was associated with longer median length of stay in those discharged alive and shorter median length of stay in those who died (P for both <0.001). A simple 8-point clinical score is highly predictive of acute stroke mortality and length of hospital stay. It could be used as prognostic tool in service planning and also to risk-stratify patients to use these outcomes as markers of stroke care quality across institutions. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  18. Informal care for stroke survivors: results from the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, H M; Thrift, A G; Mihalopoulos, C; Carter, R; Macdonell, R A L; McNeil, J J; Donnan, G A

    2002-04-01

    Informal caregivers play an important role in the lives of stroke patients, but the cost of providing this care has not been estimated. The purpose of this study was to determine the nature and amount of informal care provided to stroke patients and to estimate the economic cost of that care. The primary caregivers of stroke patients registered in the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS) were interviewed at 3, 6, and 12 months after stroke, and the nature and amount of informal care provided were documented. The opportunity and replacement costs of informal care for all first-ever-in-a-lifetime strokes (excluding subarachnoid hemorrhages) that occurred in 1997 in Australia were estimated. Among 3-month stroke survivors, 74% required assistance with activities of daily living and received informal care from family or friends. Two thirds of primary caregivers were women, and most primary caregivers (>90%) provided care during family or leisure time. Total first-year caregiver time costs for all first-ever-in-a-lifetime strokes were estimated to be A$21.7 million (opportunity cost approach) or A$42.5 million (replacement cost approach), and the present values of lifetime caregiver time costs were estimated to be A$171.4 million (opportunity cost approach) or A$331.8 million (replacement cost approach). Informal care for stroke survivors represents a significant hidden cost to Australian society. Because our community is rapidly aging, this informal care burden may increase significantly in the future.

  19. Toward a more effective approach to stroke: Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Patrice; Bayley, Mark; McDonald, Alison; Graham, Ian D.; Warner, Grace; Phillips, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Each year more than 50 000 Canadians experience a stroke and more than 300 000 currently live with its effects. Despite the evidence supporting best practices in stroke care, significant gaps in translating this knowledge into action remains in Canada. An interdisciplinary working group of the Canadian Stroke Strategy was formed to develop best-practice recommendations relevant to Canadian health care. The working group used a rigorous process to develop the guidelines, which included reviewing existing stroke recommendations and research literature, and consulting a national interprofessional consensus panel. The Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care consist of 24 recommendations based on the strongest evidence and address topics that span the full continuum of stroke care. Implementation and dissemination of these recommendations is in progress. Bringing about change will require political will and collaboration throughout the health care system. PMID:18490636

  20. Thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke: where and when?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Micieli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The therapy of acute ischemic stroke remains an open challenge for the clinicians and is closely connected to the ready acknowledgment of symptoms, to the promptness of the instrumental diagnosis and consequently to the rapidity of the pharmacological intervention. Although several studies have validated the effectiveness and the safety profileof the intravenous fibrinolytic treatment, the number of patients who benefit of such therapeutic opportunity is still too little. This data is partially due to the delay within patients arrive to the hospital and to the doubts of the physicians on the possible collateral effects, but it is also related to logistic and organizational-managerial problematic of the patient with acute stroke.These last ones mainly derive from the deficiency on the national territory of dedicated structures (Stroke Unit, from the absence of operative connections between the 118-service and the Stroke Unit, from the delay of the neurologist calling in the emergency room that does not allow an adapted diagnostic evaluation of the ischemic event. The spread of the intravenous fibrinolysis must therefore necessarily pass through the creation of participation protocols between hospitals with stroke unit and primary aid, and between department of emergency/ urgency and staff of the stroke unit also previewing the creation of professional figures like those of the urgency neurologist that could have the full right of the management and the treatment of cerebral ischemic pathology.

  1. Costs of stroke and stroke services: Determinants of patient costs and a comparison of costs of regular care and care organised in stroke services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); W.J.M. Scholte op Reimer (Wilma); J.D.H. van Wijngaarden (Jeroen); N.J.A. van Exel (Job)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Stroke is a major cause of death and long-term disability in Western societies and constitutes a major claim on health care budgets. Organising stroke care in a stroke service has recently been demonstrated to result in better health effects for patients.

  2. Costs of stroke and stroke services: Determinants of patient costs and a comparison of costs of regular care and care organised in stroke services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J.A. van Exel (Job); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); J.D.H. van Wijngaarden (Jeroen); W.J.M. Scholte op Reimer (Wilma)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Stroke is a major cause of death and long-term disability in Western societies and constitutes a major claim on health care budgets. Organising stroke care in a stroke service has recently been demonstrated to result in better health effects for patients. This paper discusses

  3. Transthoracic echocardiography in Thai patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriyapong, Tapawas; Dharmasaroja, Pompatr A; Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat; Piyayotai, Dilok; Hutayanon, Pisit

    2012-01-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is routinely performed to look for the cardiac sources of emboli in many Western stroke centers. Due to a limitation of resources in Thailand, echocardiography is done in only some patients with acute ischemic stroke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the need for cardiac investigations, especially TTE, in Thai patients with acute ischemic stroke. Two-hundred and seven patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), who had TTE results during August 2006 to November 2008, were studied. Patients were divided into 2 groups by the risk of cardioembolism: low- versus high-risk groups. All echocardiography results were reviewed and classified by the need for management change following the echocardiography. Abnormal TTE results indicating a need for change in management were found in 4% (4/102) and 18% (18/105) in low- and high- risk patients, respectively The results of ECG alone led to change in management in 17% (36 patients). Atrial fibrillation was the most common cause of cardioembolism, which was found in 35 patients (17%). Because of limited resources in Thailand, ECG should be routinely performed on all ischemic stroke patients and TTE in patients with high risk for cardioembolism. However larger studies are still needed to clarify the benefits of echocardiography in low-risk patients.

  4. Pseudoradial Nerve Palsy Caused by Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Tahir MD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoperipheral palsy has been used to characterize isolated monoparesis secondary to stroke. Isolated hand nerve palsy is a rare presentation for acute cerebral stroke. Our patient presented with clinical features of typical peripheral radial nerve palsy and a normal computed tomography scan of the head, which, without a detailed history and neurological examination, could have been easily misdiagnosed as a peripheral nerve lesion deferring further investigation for a stroke. We stress the importance of including cerebral infarction as a critical differential diagnosis in patients presenting with sensory-motor deficit in an isolated peripheral nerve pattern. A good history and physical exam can differentiate stroke from peripheral neuropathy as the cause of radial nerve palsy.

  5. Brazilian guidelines for endovascular treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octávio Marques Pontes-Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT These guidelines are the result of a joint effort from writing groups of the Brazilian Stroke Society, the Scientific Department of Cerebrovascular Diseases of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology, the Brazilian Stroke Network and the Brazilian Society of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Neuroradiology. Members from these groups participated in web-based discussion forums with predefined themes, followed by videoconference meetings in which controversies and position statements were discussed, leading to a consensus. This guidelines focuses on the implications of the recent clinical trials on endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke due to proximal arterial occlusions, and the final text aims to guide health care providers, health care managers and public health authorities in managing patients with this condition in Brazil.

  6. Prognosis and outcome of acute stroke in the University College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-02

    Mar 2, 2011 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Jul-Sep 2011 • Vol 14 • Issue 3 ... Background: Many factors influence the outcome of acute stroke, the third leading cause of morbidity and mortality ... Materials and Methods: A prospectively study of 66 adult patients who presented to the medical emergency unit of.

  7. Prognosis and outcome of acute stroke in the University College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: A prospectively study of 66 adult patients who presented to the medical emergency unit of University College Hospital (U.C.H), Ibadan, in coma from acute stroke, from August 2004 to March 2005, was undertaken after obtaining ethical clearance and written consent of the patients' relations.

  8. Advance care planning in stroke: influence of time on engagement in the process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green T

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Theresa Green1, Shreyas Gandhi2, Tessa Kleissen1, Jessica Simon1,3, Shelley Raffin-Bouchal1, Karla Ryckborst41Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 3Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Calgary Stroke Program, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB, CanadaPurpose: Individuals who experience stroke have a higher likelihood of subsequent stroke events, making it imperative to plan for future medical care. In the event of a further serious health event, engaging in the process of advanced care planning (ACP can help family members and health care professionals (HCPs make medical decisions for individuals who have lost the capacity to do so. Few studies have explored the views and experiences of patients with stroke about discussing their wishes and preferences for future medical events, and the extent to which stroke HCPs engage in conversations around planning for such events. In this study, we sought to understand how the process of ACP unfolded between HCPs and patients post-stroke.Patients and methods: Using grounded theory (GT methodology, we engaged in direct observation of HCP and patient interactions on an acute stroke unit and two stroke rehabilitation units. Using semi-structured interviews, 14 patients and four HCPs were interviewed directly about the ACP process.Results: We found that open and continual ACP conversations were not taking place, patients experienced an apparent lack of urgency to engage in ACP, and HCPs were uncomfortable initiating ACP conversations due to the sensitive nature of the topic.Conclusion: In this study, we identified lack of engagement in ACP post-stroke, attributable to patient and HCP factors. This encourages us to look further into the process of ACP in order to develop open communication between the patient with stroke, their families, and stroke HCPs.Keywords: qualitative, engagement

  9. A STUDY ON INTRACRANIAL STENOSIS IN ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerrin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Acute ischemic stroke is very common cause of significant morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The causes of acute ischemic stroke could be intracranial or extra cranial. Prevention of the acute episode could be decreased by surgically treating ex tra - cranial vascular disease but the prevention of intracranial cause is only medical. Various risk factors are also associated with development of ischemic stroke. However, the association between these and the pattern of vascular involvement is not clear . AIM: The aim of the study was to 1. Identify the location of the vessel involved in different cases of ischemic stroke 2. To study the various risk factors associated with the development of ischemic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: This was a prospective study conducted between the years 2010 and 2012. All adult patients with acute ischemic stroke which was confirmed by MRI and less than two weeks duration were included in the study. Parameters recorded were presence of pre - existing comorbid conditions, n eurological examination findings, Cardiovascular system examination findings, Blood pressures, blood sugar levels and pattern of vascular involvement. This was assessed using MR angiography or four vessel Doppler. Statistical analysis was done using the SP SS software. RESULTS: Two hundred patients were enrolled in the study. Pure extracranial stenosis was present in 21.5%, extracranial with intracranial stenosis in 34%, and pure intracranial stenosis in 44.5%, which was predominant and resembled other Indi an studies. 15.5% of patients had significant carotid stenosis based on Doppler study and were suitable candidates for carotid endarterectomy. Middle cerebral artery was commonly involved (55%. Hypertension (63.5%, diabetes mellitus (48%, alcoholism (20 .5% and smoking (18.5% were the common risk factors. Prevalence of these risk factors was more in those with intracranial stenosis in our study, elevated total

  10. Continuous Hemodynamic Monitoring in Acute Stroke: An Exploratory Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayan Sen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-invasive, continuous hemodynamic monitoring is entering the clinical arena. The primary objective of this study was to test the feasibility of such monitoring in a pilot sample of Emergency Department (ED stroke patients. Secondary objectives included analysis of hemodynamic variability and correlation of continuous blood pressure measurements with standard measurements. Methods: This study was a secondary analysis of 7 stroke patients from a prospectively collected data set of patients that received 2 hours of hemodynamic monitoring in the ED. Stroke patients were included if hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke was confirmed by neuroimaging, and symptom onset was within 24 hours. They were excluded for the presence of a stroke mimic or transient ischemic attack. Monitoring was performed using the Nexfin device (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine CA. Results: The mean age of the cohort was 71 ± 17 years, 43% were male, and the mean National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS was 6.9 ± 5.5. Two patients had hemorrhagic stroke. We obtained 42,456 hemodynamic data points, including beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements with variability of 18 mmHg and cardiac indices ranging from 1.8 to 3.6 l/min/m2. The correlation coefficient between continuous blood pressure measurements with the Nexfin device and standard ED readings was 0.83. Conclusion: This exploratory investigation revealed that continuous, noninvasive monitoring in the ED is feasible in acute stroke. Further research is currently underway to determine how such monitoring may impact outcomes in stroke or replace the need for invasive monitoring. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(4:–0.

  11. What is next after transfer of care from hospital to home for stroke patients? Evaluation of a community stroke care service based in a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aznida Firzah Abdul Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Poststroke care in developing countries is inundated with poor concordance and scarce specialist stroke care providers. A primary care-driven health service is an option to ensure optimal care to poststroke patients residing at home in the community. Aims: We assessed outcomes of a pilot long-term stroke care clinic which combined secondary prevention and rehabilitation at community level. Settings and Design: A prospective observational study of stroke patients treated between 2008 and 2010 at a primary care teaching facility. Subjects and Methods: Analysis of patients was done at initial contact and at 1-year post treatment. Clinical outcomes included stroke risk factor(s control, depression according to Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9, and level of independence using Barthel Index (BI. Statistical Analysis Used: Differences in means between baseline and post treatment were compared using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon-signed rank test. Significance level was set at 0.05. Results: Ninety-one patients were analyzed. Their mean age was 62.9 [standard deviation (SD 10.9] years, mean stroke episodes were 1.30 (SD 0.5. The median interval between acute stroke and first contact with the clinic 4.0 (interquartile range 9.0 months. Mean systolic blood pressure decreased by 9.7 mmHg (t = 2.79, P = 0.007, while mean diastolic blood pressure remained unchanged at 80mmHg (z = 1.87, P = 0.06. Neurorehabilitation treatment was given to 84.6% of the patients. Median BI increased from 81 (range: 2−100 to 90.5 (range: 27−100 (Z = 2.34, P = 0.01. Median PHQ9 scores decreased from 4.0 (range: 0−22 to 3.0 (range: 0−19 though the change was not significant (Z= −0.744, P = 0.457. Conclusions: Primary care-driven long-term stroke care services yield favorable outcomes for blood pressure control and functional level.

  12. Periodontal Disease, Regular Dental Care Use, and Incident Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Souvik; Giamberardino, Lauren D; Moss, Kevin; Morelli, Thiago; Rosamond, Wayne D; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Beck, James; Offenbacher, Steven

    2018-02-01

    Periodontal disease is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. Identification of periodontal disease as a risk factor for incident ischemic stroke raises the possibility that regular dental care utilization may reduce the stroke risk. In the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) study, pattern of dental visits were classified as regular or episodic dental care users. In the ancillary dental ARIC study, selected subjects from ARIC underwent fullmouth periodontal measurements collected at 6 sites per tooth and classified into 7 periodontal profile classes (PPCs). In the ARIC study 10 362 stroke-free participants, 584 participants had incident ischemic strokes over a 15-year period. In the dental ARIC study, 6736 dentate subjects were assessed for periodontal disease status using PPC with a total of 299 incident ischemic strokes over the 15-year period. The 7 levels of PPC showed a trend toward an increased stroke risk (χ 2 trend P periodontal disease). Periodontal disease was significantly associated with cardioembolic (hazard ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-5.6) and thrombotic (hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.8) stroke subtypes. Regular dental care utilization was associated with lower adjusted stroke risk (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.94). We confirm an independent association between periodontal disease and incident stroke risk, particularly cardioembolic and thrombotic stroke subtype. Further, we report that regular dental care utilization may lower this risk for stroke. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Stroke-related mortality in a tertiary care hospital in Andalusia: Analysis and reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre-Moreno, J F; Fernández-Pérez, M D; Triguero-Cueva, L; Gutiérrez-Zúñiga, R; Herrera-García, J D; Espigares-Molero, A; Mínguez-Castellanos, A

    Stroke is a very common cause of death, especially in southern Spain. The present study analyses in-hospital mortality associated with stroke in an Andalusian tertiary care hospital. We gathered the files of all patients who had died at Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves in Granada in 2013 and whose death certificates indicated stroke as the cause of death. We also gathered stroke patients discharge data and compared them to that of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). A total of 825 patients had a diagnosis of stroke (96 deaths, 11.6%); of these, 562 had ischaemic stroke (44 deaths, 7.8%) and 263 haemorrhagic stroke (52 deaths, 19.7%). Patients with haemorrhagic stroke therefore showed greater mortality rate (OR=2.9). Patients in this group died after a shorter time in hospital (median, 4 vs 7 days; mean, 6 days). However, patients with ischaemic stroke were older and presented with more comorbidities. On the other hand, 617 patients had a diagnosis of ACS (36 deaths, 5.8%). The mortality odds ratio (MOR) was 2.1 (stroke/SCA). Around 23% of the patients who died from stroke were taking anticoagulants. 60% of the deceased patients with ischaemic stroke and 20% of those with haemorrhagic stroke had atrial fibrillation (AF); 35% of the patients with ischaemic stroke and AF were taking anticoagulants. Stroke is associated with higher admission and in-hospital mortality rates than SCA. Likewise, patients with haemorrhagic stroke showed higher mortality rates than those with ischaemic stroke. Patients with fatal stroke usually had a history of long-term treatment with anticoagulants; 2 thirds of the patients with fatal ischaemic stroke and atrial fibrillation were not receiving anticoagulants. According to our results, optimising prevention in patients with AF may have a positive impact on stroke-related in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Carotid endarterectomy following thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Naz; Kelleher, Damian; Madan, Manmohan; Sochart, Sarita; Antoniou, George A

    2017-03-01

    Insufficient evidence exists to support the safety of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) following intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) for acute ischaemic stroke. Our study aimed to report a single-centre experience of patients treated over a five-year period. Departmental computerised databases were interrogated to identify patients who suffered an ischaemic stroke and subsequently underwent thrombolysis followed by CEA. Mortality and stroke within 30 days of surgery were defined as the primary outcome end points. Over a five-year period, 177 out of a total of 679 carotid endarterectomies (26 %) were performed in patients presenting with acute ischaemic stroke. Twenty-five patients (14 %) received IVT prior to CEA in the form of alteplase. Sixty percent of patients were male with a mean age of 68 years. Sixteen patients (64 %) underwent CEA within 14 days of IVT and the median interval between thrombolysis and CEA was 7.5 days (range, 3-50 days). One female patient died of a further intraoperative stroke within 30 days of surgery, yielding a mortality rate of 4 %. Two patients (8 %) suffered from cardiac complications postoperatively resulting in a short high dependency unit stay. Another two patients (8 %) developed local wound complications, which were managed conservatively without the need for re-operation. The median hospital length of stay was 4.5 days (range, 1-33 days). Our experience indicates that CEA post-thrombolysis has a low incidence of mortality. Further high quality evidence is required before CEA can be routinely recommended following IVT for acute ischaemic stroke.

  15. Neuroanatomical correlates of severe cardiac arrhythmias in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Frank; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Gutjahr, Isabell; Breuer, Lorenz; Winder, Klemens; Kaschka, Iris; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd; Hilz, Max-Josef; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Neurocardiological interactions can cause severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The relationship between the lesion location in the brain and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is still discussed controversially. The aim of the present study was to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardiac arrhythmias were systematically assessed in patients with acute ischemic stroke during the first 72 h after admission to a monitored stroke unit. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) was used to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of clinically relevant severe arrhythmias. Overall 150 patients, 56 with right-hemispheric and 94 patients with a left-hemispheric lesion, were eligible to be included in the VLSM study. Severe cardiac arrhythmias were present in 49 of these 150 patients (32.7%). We found a significant association (FDR correction, q cardiac arrhythmias. Because left- and right-hemispheric lesions were analyzed separately, the significant findings rely on the 56 patients with right-hemispheric lesions. The data indicate that these areas are involved in central autonomic processing and that right-hemispheric lesions located to these areas are associated with an elevated risk for severe cardiac arrhythmias.

  16. Modern Imaging Modalities in the Assessment of Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatareva Dora K.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The AIM of this review was to present the modern concepts of diagnostic imaging in acute stroke. Neuroimaging in acute stroke aims at diagnosing the condition as early as possible and assessing the extent of parenchymal perfusion and the intracranial vessels patency. A modern approach would involve a combination of various imaging modalities as multidetector computed tomography and high field magnetic resonance imaging. A non-enhanced computed tomography (CT is used to detect hemorrhage or to identify early signs of ischemic stroke. CT angiography finds evidence of intravascular thrombi or significant stenoses, and CT perfusion displays brain tissue at risk of irreversible alterations that can be salvaged therapeutically. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a more sensitive modality than CT in diagnosing acute brain ischemia. MR diffusion-weighted imaging is more sensitive than conventional MR sequences in hyperacute stage. MR angiography as a non-invasive and non-ionizing imaging method is used as an alternative modality to CT angiography. To find brain tissue at risk diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging modalities are used. The authors present briefly the modern neuroimaging modalities used in patients with transient ischemic attack, minor stroke and venous infarction. By combining different imaging techniques in a multimodal approach we can acquire the information necessary for therapeutic planning and differentiate patients who need thrombolysis.

  17. A modelling tool for capacity planning in acute and community stroke services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monks, Thomas; Worthington, David; Allen, Michael; Pitt, Martin; Stein, Ken; James, Martin A

    2016-09-29

    Mathematical capacity planning methods that can take account of variations in patient complexity, admission rates and delayed discharges have long been available, but their implementation in complex pathways such as stroke care remains limited. Instead simple average based estimates are commonplace. These methods often substantially underestimate capacity requirements. We analyse the capacity requirements for acute and community stroke services in a pathway with over 630 admissions per year. We sought to identify current capacity bottlenecks affecting patient flow, future capacity requirements in the presence of increased admissions, the impact of co-location and pooling of the acute and rehabilitation units and the impact of patient subgroups on capacity requirements. We contrast these results to the often used method of planning by average occupancy, often with arbitrary uplifts to cater for variability. We developed a discrete-event simulation model using aggregate parameter values derived from routine administrative data on over 2000 anonymised admission and discharge timestamps. The model mimicked the flow of stroke, high risk TIA and complex neurological patients from admission to an acute ward through to community rehab and early supported discharge, and predicted the probability of admission delays. An increase from 10 to 14 acute beds reduces the number of patients experiencing a delay to the acute stroke unit from 1 in every 7 to 1 in 50. Co-location of the acute and rehabilitation units and pooling eight beds out of a total bed stock of 26 reduce the number of delayed acute admissions to 1 in every 29 and the number of delayed rehabilitation admissions to 1 in every 20. Planning by average occupancy would resulted in delays for one in every five patients in the acute stroke unit. Planning by average occupancy fails to provide appropriate reserve capacity to manage the variations seen in stroke pathways to desired service levels. An appropriate uplift

  18. Orientation in the acute and chronic stroke patient: impact on ADL and social activities. The Copenhagen Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, P M; Jørgensen, H S; Nakayama, H; Raaschou, H O; Olsen, T S

    1996-04-01

    To determine the influence of initially lowered orientation on rehabilitation outcome in stroke patients, and how decreased orientation 6 months after stroke influences ADL and social activities. Prospective, consecutive, and community based. A stroke unit receiving all acute stroke patients from a well-defined catchment area. All stages of rehabilitation were completed within the unit. 524 patients with acute stroke. Basic ADL assessed by the Barthel Index (BI) at discharge; discharge placement; higher level ADL and social functions assessed by the Frenchay Activity Index(FAI) at a 6-month follow-up. The independent influence of orientation in acute stroke on rehabilitation outcome was analyzed with multiple linear and logistic regression models, using initial stroke severity (Scandinavian Neurologic Stroke Scale), initial BI, age, sex, comorbidity, prior stroke, and marital status as covariates. A one-point decrease in orientation decreased BI with 9 points (coefficient b=8.66, SE(b)=1.02,porientation at this point still exerted a marked, negative influence on ADL and social functions (BI: coefficient b=12.06, SE(b)=1.95,porientation influences basic ADL and higher level ADL and social activities in acute as well as chronic stroke. This finding suggests that rehabilitation of memory and attention might be relevant in stroke patients with impaired orientation.

  19. An associative Brain-Computer-Interface for acute stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Aliakbaryhosseinabadi, Susan

    2016-01-01

    An efficient innovative Brain-Computer-Interface system that empowers chronic stroke patients to control an artificial activation of their lower limb muscle through task specific motor intent has been tested in the past. In the current study it was applied to acute stroke patients. The system...... (tibialis anterior). This activation is precisely and individually timed such that the sensory signal arising from the stimulation reaches the motor cortex during its maximum activation due to the intention. The output of the motor cortical area representing the dorsiflexor muscles was significantly...

  20. Different Perfusion Patterns in a Patient with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudilosso, Salvatore; Laredo, Carlos; Urra, Xabier; Chamorro, Ángel

    2017-05-01

    A 29-year-old male patient with aphasia and mild weakness of the right arm arrived at the emergency room 4 hours after symptom onset. The computed tomography perfusion showed a typical delay in the time-based maps in the left occipital lobe and another hyperperfused area in the left frontal lobe. The follow-up magnetic resonance imaging confirmed cortical ischemic lesions in both areas. This case shows that besides hypoperfusion, hyperperfusion can also be found in the first stages of acute stroke, and it is highly suggestive of established ischemic lesions. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical Variables Associated with Hydration Status in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients with Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Shabbir, Yasmeen; Miller, Leslie; Silliman, Scott

    2016-02-01

    Acute stroke patients with dysphagia are at increased risk for poor hydration. Dysphagia management practices may directly impact hydration status. This study examined clinical factors that might impact hydration status in acute ischemic stroke patients with dysphagia. A retrospective chart review was completed on 67 ischemic stroke patients who participated in a prior study of nutrition and hydration status during acute care. Prior results indicated that patients with dysphagia demonstrated elevated BUN/Cr compared to non-dysphagia cases during acute care and that BUN/Cr increased selectively in dysphagic patients. This chart review evaluated clinical variables potentially impacting hydration status: diuretics, parenteral fluids, tube feeding, oral diet, and nonoral (NPO) status. Exposure to any variable and number of days of exposure to each variable were examined. Dysphagia cases demonstrated significantly more NPO days, tube fed days, and parenteral fluid days, but not oral fed days, or days on diuretics. BUN/Cr values at discharge were not associated with NPO days, parenteral fluid days, oral fed days, or days on diuretics. Patients on modified solid diets had significantly higher mean BUN/Cr values at discharge (27.12 vs. 17.23) as did tube fed patients (28.94 vs. 18.66). No difference was noted between these subgroups at baseline (regular diet vs. modified solids diets). Any modification of solid diets (31.11 vs. 17.23) or thickened liquids (28.50 vs. 17.81) resulted in significantly elevated BUN/Cr values at discharge. Liquid or diet modifications prescribed for acute stroke patients with dysphagia may impair hydration status in these patients.

  2. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipoprotein-related phospholipase A2, and acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara H

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Kara,1 Murat Akinci,1 Selim Degirmenci,1 Aysegul Bayir,1 Ahmet Ak,1 Alaaddin Nayman,2 Ali Unlu,3 Fikret Akyurek,3 Mesut Sivri2 1Department of Emergency Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey Background: Serum biomarkers may be useful for early diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke, exclusion of other diseases that may mimic stroke, and prediction of infarct volume. We evaluated serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and lipoprotein-related phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2 in patients who had acute ischemic stroke.Methods: In 200 patients who presented to an emergency service (acute ischemic stroke, 102 patients; control with no stroke, 98 patients, stroke patients were evaluated with the Canadian neurological scale and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and all patients were evaluated with the Glasgow coma scale and their serum hs-CRP level and Lp-PLA2 activity were assessed. The volume of stroke lesions was calculated from magnetic resonance images.Results: Patients who had stroke had higher mean serum hs-CRP level (stroke, 7±6 mg/dL; ­control, mean ± standard deviation 1±1 mg/dL; P≤0.001 and Lp-PLA2 activity (stroke, mean ± standard deviation 113±86 nmol/min/mL; control, mean ± standard deviation 103±50 nmol/min/mL; P≤0.001 than control patients who did not have stroke. The mean hs-CRP level and Lp-PLA2 activity were higher in patients who had greater stroke severity (lower Canadian neurological scale score and were higher in patients who had larger volume strokes. Conclusion: Higher hs-CRP level and Lp-PLA2 activity are significantly associated with more severe neurologic impairment and larger infarct size in patients who have acute ischemic stroke. These biomarkers may be useful for rapid diagnosis and prediction of ischemic tissue volume in the early stage of ischemic stroke. These findings may be important for health

  3. Heat stroke leading to acute liver injury & failure: A case series from the Acute Liver Failure Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian C; Tillman, Holly; Chung, Raymond T; Stravitz, Richard T; Reddy, Rajender; Fontana, Robert J; McGuire, Brendan; Davern, Timothy; Lee, William M

    2017-04-01

    In the United States, nearly 1000 annual cases of heat stroke are reported but the frequency and outcome of severe liver injury in such patients is not well described. The aim of this study was to describe cases of acute liver injury (ALI) or failure (ALF) caused by heat stroke in a large ALF registry. Amongst 2675 consecutive subjects enrolled in a prospective observational cohort of patients with ALI or ALF between January 1998 and April 2015, there were eight subjects with heat stroke. Five patients had ALF and three had ALI. Seven patients developed acute kidney injury, all eight had lactic acidosis and rhabdomyolysis. Six patients underwent cooling treatments, three received N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), three required mechanical ventilation, three required renal replacement therapy, two received vasopressors, one underwent liver transplantation, and two patients died-both within 48 hours of presentation. All cases occurred between May and August, mainly in healthy young men because of excessive exertion. Management of ALI and ALF secondary to heat stroke should focus on cooling protocols and supportive care, with consideration of liver transplantation in refractory patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Intensive treadmill training in the acute phase after ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to (a) assess the feasibility of intensive treadmill training in patients with acute ischemic stroke, (b) test whether physical activity of the legs during training increases with time, and (c) evaluate to what extent training sessions contribute toward the overall physical...... activity of these patients. Twenty hospitalized patients with acute ischemic stroke trained on a treadmill twice daily for 30 min for 5 days and on day 30. Physical activity was measured as activity counts (AC) from accelerometers. A total of 196 of 224 initiated training sessions were completed. Training...... started 41.5±14 h after symptom onset. Only nonserious adverse events occurred in 14.7% of the sessions. An intensity of at least 50% of the individual heart rate reserve was obtained in 31% of training sessions. There was a significant increase in AC/min in the legs during training sessions...

  5. Routing Ambulances to Designated Centers Increases Access to Stroke Center Care and Enrollment in Prehospital Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanossian, Nerses; Liebeskind, David S; Eckstein, Marc; Starkman, Sidney; Stratton, Samuel; Pratt, Franklin D; Koenig, William; Hamilton, Scott; Kim-Tenser, May; Conwit, Robin; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2015-10-01

    Emergency medical services routing of patients with acute stroke to designated centers may increase the proportion of patients receiving care at facilities meeting national standards and augment recruitment for prehospital stroke research. We analyzed consecutive patients enrolled within 2 hours of symptom onset in a prehospital stroke trial, before and after regional Los Angeles County Emergency Medical Services implementation of preferentially routing patients with acute stroke to approved stroke centers (ASCs). From January 2005 to mid-November 2009, patients were transported to the nearest emergency department, whereas from mid-November 2009 to December 2012, patients were preferentially transported to first 9, and eventually 29, ASCs. There were 863 subjects enrolled before and 764 after emergency medical service preferential routing, with implementation leading to an increase in the proportion cared for at an ASC from 10% to 91% (Prouting were immediate and included an increase in proportion of receiving ASC care (from 17% to 88%; P9 in 10, with no clinically significant increase in prehospital care times and enhanced recruitment of patients into a prehospital treatment trial. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00059332. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Help seeking behavior and onset-to-alarm time in patients with acute stroke: sub-study of the preventive antibiotics in stroke study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zock, E.; Kerkhoff, H.; Kleyweg, R. P.; van Bavel-Ta, T. B. V.; Scott, S.; Kruyt, N. D.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; van de Beek, D.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute stroke often do not seek immediate medical help, which is assumed to be driven by lack of knowledge of stroke symptoms. We explored the process of help seeking behavior in patients with acute stroke, evaluating knowledge about stroke symptoms, socio-demographic and clinical

  7. GERSTMANN?S SYNDROME IN ACUTE STROKE PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Zukic, Sanela; MRKONJIC Zamir; Sinanovic, Osman; Vidovic, Mirjana; Kojic, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Gerstmann in 1924. observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe. Since than, Gerstmann`s syndrome (GS) was enigma for neuropsychologists. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency and clinical features of GS among acute stroke patient...

  8. Diffusion-weighted MRI in acute cerebral stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, Hideichi; Kobayashi, Masahito; Suga, Sadao; Kawase, Takeshi; Nagasawa, Masakazu; Sadanaga, Humiko; Okamura, Miyuki; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Mihara, Ban [Mihara Memorial Hospital, Isezaki, Gunma (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI has been demonstrated to be valuable in the assessment of cerebral stroke. Recent advance in MR systems of hardware with larger maximum gradient amplitude and faster imaging strategies, such as EPI, has made it possible to acquire whole brain diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in less that one minute. The purposes of this study are to evaluate clinical usefulness of DWI and to clarify pitfalls in the diagnosis of acute cerebral stroke. Seventeen patients with 18 ischemic lesions were studied. DWI were taken with 1.5 Tesla MRI (Magnetom Vision, Siemens, Germany) using EPI sequence. Fifteen lesions out of them (3 in cerebral cortex, 9 in basal ganglia/deep white matter and 3 in cerebellum) were studied serially at various times up to 147 days. Acute cerebral infarction was seen clearly as an area of hyperintensity with DWI and as hypointensity in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps which are indicative of decreased diffusion. DWI detected areas of hyperintense acute infarcts, as early as 2.5 hours after onset, which were not visualized on T{sub 2}-weighted image (T2WI). The lesion of cerebral infarction became isointense in ADC maps at 14-28 days after onset, whereas with DWI it became isointense at about 2 months. Because ADC changed earlier than DWI, ADC maps were useful for differentiate acute from nonacute lesion in cases of recurrent stroke within a short period. In a patient with transient global amnesia for 7 hours, DWI did not show any lesion at 8 hours. In terms of cerebral hemorrhage, lesions were seen as area of hyperintensity in DWI at 3 days and were not distinguishable from that of infarct. Despite limitations in the diagnosis of transient ischemia and cerebral hemorrhage, DWI is a useful technique for early detection of cerebral infarction, especially within the first 6 hours after stroke onset. (author)

  9. Myocardial infarction, acute ischemic stroke, and hyperglycemia triggered by acute chlorine gas inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Ataman; Kose, Beril; Açikalin, Ayça; Gunay, Nurullah; Yildirim, Cuma

    2009-10-01

    Chlorine is one of the most common substances involved in toxic inhalation. Until now, several accidental exposures have been reported. The damage to the respiratory tract in the immediate phase after exposure to chlorine is well defined. Death occurs particularly due to pulmonary edema with respiratory failure and circulatory collapse. On the other hand, no association with myocardial infarction, acute stroke, severe hyperglycemia, and acute chlorine inhalation has been reported in literature. In the present study, an elderly (74-year-old) and diabetic case with myocardial infarction, acute stroke, hyperglycemia, and respiratory failure associated with acute chlorine intoxication after a diagnosis of acute chlorine poisoning and treatment in the emergency department is reported and the literature is revisited. Physicians should know that in elderly patients with a systemic disease who apply with chlorine gas inhalation, more serious complications along with damage in respiratory tract might be observed.

  10. Intravenous thrombolysis plus hypothermia for acute treatment of ischemic stroke (ICTuS-L): final results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hemmen, Thomas M; Raman, Rema; Guluma, Kama Z; Meyer, Brett C; Gomes, Joao A; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Wijman, Christine A; Rapp, Karen S; Grotta, James C; Lyden, Patrick D

    2010-01-01

    .... Intravenous Thrombolysis Plus Hypothermia for Acute Treatment of Ischemic Stroke (ICTuS-L) was a randomized, multicenter trial of hypothermia and intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in patients treated within 6 hours after ischemic stroke...

  11. GERSTMANN’S SYNDROME IN ACUTE STROKE PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukic, Sanela; Mrkonjic, Zamir; Sinanovic, Osman; Vidovic, Mirjana; Kojic, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Gerstmann in 1924. observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe. Since than, Gerstmann`s syndrome (GS) was enigma for neuropsychologists. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency and clinical features of GS among acute stroke patients. Patients and methods: We prospectively analyzed 194 acute stroke patients (average age 65±11.06 years, male 113 (58.2%), female 81 (41.8%) hospitalized at department of Neurology, University Clinical Center tuzla, during the six mounths in 2010. For clinical assessment of agraphia, alexia and acalculia we used Minessota test for differential diagnosis of aphasia’s. Results: Among these acute stroke patients, 59 (30.40%) had alexia, agraphia and acalculia or different combinations of these disorders. two patients (3.4%) had agraphia and acalculia associated with other part of tetrad of GS: fi nger agnosia and left-right disorientation. they both where men, right handed, and cranial computed tomography scan showed ischemic lesion in the left parietal and left temporoparietal lobe. Conclusion: Gerstmann`s syndrome is rare clinical entity, and has the high value in localization and the lesion is mainly localized to angular gyrus of the dominant hemisphere. PMID:23378691

  12. Hospital-based stroke care in Ireland: results from one regional register.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fan, C W

    2000-01-01

    Most patients with acute stroke are admitted to hospital. If stroke services in this country are to be improved, we need accurate and reliable information about the types of stroke patients being admitted, their present management and outcome.

  13. Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated with Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes (SOCRATES) trial: rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, S Claiborne; Amarenco, Pierre; Albers, Gregory W; Denison, Hans; Easton, J Donald; Held, Peter; Jonasson, Jenny; Minematsu, Kazuo; Molina, Carlos A; Wong, Lawrence K S

    2015-12-01

    The risk of recurrent ischemia is high in the acute period after ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. Aspirin is recommended by guidelines for this indication, but more intensive antiplatelet therapy may be justified. We aim to evaluate whether ticagrelor, a potent antiplatelet agent that blocks the P2Y12 receptor without requiring metabolic activation, reduces the risk of major vascular events compared with aspirin when randomization occurs within 24 h after symptom onset of a nonsevere ischemic stroke or high-risk transient ischemic attack. Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated with Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes (SOCRATES) is a randomized, double-blind, event-driven trial and will include an estimated 13,600 participants randomized in 33 countries worldwide to collect 844 primary events. The primary endpoint is the composite of stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic), myocardial infarction, and death. Time to the first primary endpoint will be compared in the treatment groups during 90-day follow-up, with major hemorrhage serving as the primary safety endpoint. Participants will be followed for an additional 30 days after the randomized treatment period. The SOCRATES trial fulfills an important clinical need by evaluating a potent antiplatelet agent as a superior alternative to current standard of care in patients presenting acutely with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Stroke Organization.

  14. National Trends in the Utilization of Emergency Medical Services for Acute Myocardial Infarction and Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Tataris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The emergency medical services (EMS system plays a crucial role in the chain of survival for acute myocardial infarction (AMI and stroke. While regional studies have shown underutilization of the 911 system for these time-sensitive conditions, national trends have not been studied. Our objective was to describe the national prevalence of EMS use for AMI and stroke, examine trends over a six-year period, and identify patient factors that may contribute to utilization. Methods: Using the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey-ED (NHAMCS dataset from 2003-2009, we looked at patients with a discharge diagnosis of AMI or stroke who arrived to the emergency department (ED by ambulance. We used a survey-weighted χ2 test for trend and logistic regression analysis. Results: In the study, there were 442 actual AMI patients and 220 (49.8% presented via EMS. There were 1,324 actual stroke patients and 666 (50.3% presented via EMS. There was no significant change in EMS usage for AMI or stroke over the six-year period. Factors independently associated with EMS use for AMI and stroke included age (OR 1.21; 95% CI 1.12-1.31, Non-Hispanic black race (OR 1.72; 95% CI 1.16-2.29, and nursing home residence (OR 11.50; 95% CI 6.19-21.36. Conclusion: In a nationally representative sample of ED visits from 20003-2009, there were no trends of increasing EMS use for AMI and stroke. Efforts to improve access to care could focus on patient groups that underutilize the EMS system for such conditions. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:–0.

  15. Stroke management: Informal caregivers' burdens and strians of caring for stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbiri, Caleb Ademola; Olawale, Olajide Ayinla; Isaac, Sarah Oghenekewe

    2015-04-01

    Stroke survivors live with varied degrees of disabilities and cares are provided largely by the informal caregivers. This study investigated informal caregivers' burden and strains of caring for stroke patients. This study involved 157 (81 males and 76 females) informal caregivers of stroke survivors receiving care in all secondary and tertiary health institutions with physiotherapy services in Lagos State, Nigeria. Information was collected through self-administered questionnaire during clinic-hours. Data was analyzed using Spearman's Rank Correlation Coefficient. The patients' age ranged between 20 and 79 (mean=59.6 ± 14.6 years). Sixty-one had haemorrhagic stroke while 96 had ischaemic stroke. The informal caregivers' age was 39.2 ± 12.8 years (range: 17-36 years). More (60.8%) participants reported moderate objective while 79.2% had mild subjective burdens. The following factors significantly increased (Pbeings of the informal caregivers. Caring for stroke survivors put social, emotional, health and financial burdens and strains on the informal caregivers. These burdens and strains increase with duration of stroke, intimacy, smaller number of caregivers and length of daily caregiving. Therefore, informal caregivers should be involved in the rehabilitation plan for stroke patients and their well-being should also be given adequate attention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Disparities in stroke preventive care in general practice did not explain socioeconomic disparities in stroke.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avendano, Mauricio; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Schellevis, F G; Mackenbach, Johan P; Lenthe, Frank J van; Bos, G A M van den

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess socioeconomic disparities in stroke incidence and in the quality of preventive care for stroke in the Netherlands. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTINGS: A total of 190,664 patients who registered in 96 general practices were followed up for 12 months. Data were collected on diagnoses,

  17. Disparities in stroke preventive care in general practice did not explain socioeconomic disparities in stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avendano, M.; Boshuizen, H. C.; Schellevis, F. G.; Mackenbach, J. P.; van Lenthe, F. J.; van den Bos, G. A. M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess socioeconomic disparities in stroke incidence and in the quality of preventive care for stroke in the Netherlands. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTINGS: A total of 190,664 patients who registered in 96 general practices were followed up for 12 months. Data were collected on diagnoses,

  18. [Mobile computing systems in preclinical care of stroke. Results of the Stroke Angel initiative within the BMBF project PerCoMed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, V; Rashid, A; Müller-Gorchs, M; Kippnich, U; Hiermann, E; Kögerl, C; Holtmann, C; Siebler, M; Griewing, B

    2008-07-01

    Telemedical networks that apply innovative mobile information technologies (IT) are an innovative approach to improve stroke care in community settings. Within the German Stroke Angel initiative and the research project PerCoMed (Pervasive Computing in Medical Care, funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, http://www.percomed.de) the effects of such a solution were assessed by an interdisciplinary research approach. The main goal of the team of researchers and practitioners was to provide clear evidence of improvements in intersectional processes of the stroke chain survival, namely in the acute stroke processes between prehospital rescue services and hospital stroke units. Between October 2005 and October 2007 the paramedical staff of five rescue service transporters in a rural area of northern Bavaria was included in a network with the stroke unit of the Neurological Clinic Bad Neustadt. Telemedical support by the Stroke Angel computing system - a software running on a personal digital assistant (PDA) to transmit patient data from the rescue team to the hospital during patient transporting time - was established. As procedural guidance, the Stroke Angel system suggests a predefined path through the necessary emergency procedures according to the structure of the mandatory protocol and the implemented Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen (LAPSS). In the empirical study the authors obtained a complete data set of 226 consecutively admitted patients for analysis in Bad Neustadt and LAPSS data of 217 patients from a second scenario in Düsseldorf. Medical, economic and technical analyses were applied. The technological robustness of the Stroke Angel system could be proven and information entered was transmitted fully and correctly. Concerning medical research questions, for both scenario locations LAPSS with a sensitivity of 68.3% and a specificity of 85.1% has to be deemed insufficient. Hence, alternative algorithms will have to be used in the next

  19. Rural-urban differences in inpatient quality of care in US Veterans with ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Michael S; Jia, Huanguang; Chumbler, Neale R; Li, Xinli; Castro, Jaime G; Myers, Jennifer; Williams, Linda S; Bravata, Dawn M

    2014-01-01

    Differences in stroke care quality for patients in rural and urban locations have been suggested, but whether differences exist across Veteran Administration Medical Centers (VAMCs) is unknown. This study examines whether rural-urban disparities exist in inpatient quality among veterans with acute ischemic stroke. In this retrospective study, inpatient stroke care quality was assessed in a national sample of veterans with acute ischemic stroke using 14 quality indicators (QIs). Rural-Urban Commuting Areas codes defined each VAMC's rural-urban status. A hierarchical linear model assessed the rural-urban differences across the 14 QIs, adjusting for patient and facility characteristics, and clustering within VAMCs. Among 128 VAMCs, 18 (14.1%) were classified as rural VAMCs and admitted 284 (7.3%) of the 3,889 ischemic stroke patients. Rural VAMCs had statistically significantly lower unadjusted rates on 6 QIs: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis, antithrombotic at discharge, antithrombotic at day 2, lipid management, smoking cessation counseling, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale completion, but they had higher rates of stroke education, functional assessment, and fall risk assessment. After adjustment, differences in 2 QIs remained significant-patients treated in rural VAMCs were less likely to receive DVT prophylaxis, but more likely to have documented functional assessment. After adjustment for key demographic, clinical, and facility-level characteristics, there does not appear to be a systematic difference in inpatient stroke quality between rural and urban VAMCs. Future research should seek to understand the few differences in care found that could serve as targets for future quality improvement interventions. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Life-and-death decision-making in the acute phase after a severe stroke: Interviews with relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, M.E.; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Wojtkowiak, J.; Visser, M.C.; Widdershoven, G.A.M.; Francke, A.L.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Decision-making in the acute phase after a severe stroke is complex and may involve life-and-death decisions. Apart from the medical condition and prognosis, quality of life and the deliberation of palliative care should be part of the decision-making process. Relatives play an important

  1. Life-and-death decision-making in the acute phase after a severe stroke: interviews with relatives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, M.E. de; Depla, M.; Woijtkwiak, J.; Visser, M.C.; Widdershoven, G.; Francke, A.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Decision-making in the acute phase after a severe stroke is complex and may involve life-and-death decisions. Apart from the medical condition and prognosis, quality of life and the deliberation of palliative care should be part of the decision-making process. Relatives play an important

  2. Topographic distribution of cerebral infarct probability in patients with acute ischemic stroke : mapping of intra-arterial treatment effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, A M M; Berkhemer, O A; Slump, C H; van Zwam, W H; Roos, Y B W E M; van der Lugt, A; van Oostenbrugge, R J; Yoo, A J; Dippel, D W J; Marquering, H A; Majoie, C B L M; Vroomen, P. C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since proof emerged that IA treatment (IAT) is beneficial for patients with acute ischemic stroke, it has become the standard method of care. Despite these positive results, recovery to functional independence is established in only about one-third of treated patients. The effect of IAT

  3. Determining level of care appropriateness in the patient journey from acute care to rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Christopher J; Magee, Christopher; Bashford, Guy; Eagar, Kathy

    2011-10-31

    The selection of patients for rehabilitation, and the timing of transfer from acute care, are important clinical decisions that impact on care quality and patient flow. This paper reports utilization review data on inpatients in acute care with stroke, hip fracture or elective joint replacement, and other inpatients referred for rehabilitation. It examines reasons why acute level of care criteria are not met and explores differences in decision making between acute care and rehabilitation teams around patient appropriateness and readiness for transfer. Cohort study of patients in a large acute referral hospital in Australia followed with the InterQual utilization review tool, modified to also include reasons why utilization criteria are not met. Additional data on team decision making about appropriateness for rehabilitation, and readiness for transfer, were collected on a subset of patients. There were 696 episodes of care (7189 bed days). Days meeting acute level of care criteria were 56% (stroke, hip fracture and joint replacement patients) and 33% (other patients, from the time of referral). Most inappropriate days in acute care were due to delays in processes/scheduling (45%) or being more appropriate for rehabilitation or lower level of care (30%).On the subset of patients, the acute care team and the utilization review tool deemed patients ready for rehabilitation transfer earlier than the rehabilitation team (means of 1.4, 1.3 and 4.0 days from the date of referral, respectively). From when deemed medically stable for transfer by the acute care team, 28% of patients became unstable. From when deemed stable by the rehabilitation team or utilization review, 9% and 11%, respectively, became unstable. A high proportion of patient days did not meet acute level of care criteria, due predominantly to inefficiencies in care processes, or to patients being more appropriate for an alternative level of care, including rehabilitation. The rehabilitation team was the

  4. Determining level of care appropriateness in the patient journey from acute care to rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashford Guy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of patients for rehabilitation, and the timing of transfer from acute care, are important clinical decisions that impact on care quality and patient flow. This paper reports utilization review data on inpatients in acute care with stroke, hip fracture or elective joint replacement, and other inpatients referred for rehabilitation. It examines reasons why acute level of care criteria are not met and explores differences in decision making between acute care and rehabilitation teams around patient appropriateness and readiness for transfer. Methods Cohort study of patients in a large acute referral hospital in Australia followed with the InterQual utilization review tool, modified to also include reasons why utilization criteria are not met. Additional data on team decision making about appropriateness for rehabilitation, and readiness for transfer, were collected on a subset of patients. Results There were 696 episodes of care (7189 bed days. Days meeting acute level of care criteria were 56% (stroke, hip fracture and joint replacement patients and 33% (other patients, from the time of referral. Most inappropriate days in acute care were due to delays in processes/scheduling (45% or being more appropriate for rehabilitation or lower level of care (30%. On the subset of patients, the acute care team and the utilization review tool deemed patients ready for rehabilitation transfer earlier than the rehabilitation team (means of 1.4, 1.3 and 4.0 days from the date of referral, respectively. From when deemed medically stable for transfer by the acute care team, 28% of patients became unstable. From when deemed stable by the rehabilitation team or utilization review, 9% and 11%, respectively, became unstable. Conclusions A high proportion of patient days did not meet acute level of care criteria, due predominantly to inefficiencies in care processes, or to patients being more appropriate for an alternative level of

  5. Serum cardiac troponin I in acute stroke is related to serum cortisol and TNF-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Krarup; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Christensen, Anders Fogh

    2004-01-01

    Serum cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is a specific marker of myocardial injury related to in-patient fatality and cardiac injury in acute stroke. We investigated whether cTnI in acute stroke is related to serum cortisol, acute inflammatory response, and insular damage. We also investigated whether c...

  6. Correlation between clot density and recanalization success or stroke etiology in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagani, Manoj; Kallmes, David F; Brinjikji, Waleed

    2017-06-01

    Background Predicting recanalization success for patients undergoing endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke is of significant interest. Studies have previously correlated the success of recanalization with the density of the clot. We evaluated clot density and its relationship to revascularization success and stroke etiology. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of 118 patients undergoing intra-arterial therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Mean and maximum thrombus density was measured by drawing a circular region of interest on an axial slice of a non-contrast computed tomography scan. T-tests were used to compare clot density to recanalization success or to stroke etiology, namely large artery atherosclerosis and cardioembolism. Recanalization success was compared in four device groups: aspiration, stent retriever, aspiration and stent retriever, and all other. Results There was no significant difference in the mean clot density in patients with successful ( n = 80) versus unsuccessful recanalization ( n = 38, 50.1 ± 7.4 Hounsfield unit (HU) vs. 53 ± 12.7 HU; P = 0.17). Comparing the large artery thromboembolism ( n = 35) to the cardioembolic etiology group ( n = 56), there was no significant difference in mean clot density (51.5 ± 7.7 HU vs. 49.7 ± 8.5 HU; P = 0.31). A subgroup analysis of middle cerebral artery occlusions ( n = 65) showed similar, non-statistically significant differences between groups. There was no difference in the rate of recanalization success in patients with a mean clot density greater than 50 HU or less than 50 HU in each of the four device groups. Conclusions There was no relationship between clot density and revascularization success or stroke etiology in our study. More research is needed to determine if clot density can predict recanalization rates or indicate etiology.

  7. Variations and determinants of hospital costs for acute stroke in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade W Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The burden of stroke is high and increasing in China. We modelled variations in, and predictors of, the costs of hospital care for patients with acute stroke in China. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Baseline characteristics and hospital costs for 5,255 patients were collected using the prospective register-based ChinaQUEST study, conducted in 48 Level 3 and 14 Level 2 hospitals in China during 2006-2007. Ordinary least squares estimation was used to determine factors associated with hospital costs. Overall mean cost of hospitalisation was 11,216 Chinese Yuan Renminbi (CNY (≈US$1,602 per patient, which equates to more than half the average annual wage in China. Variations in cost were largely attributable to stroke severity and length of hospital stay (LOS. Model forecasts showed that reducing LOS from the mean of 20 days for Level 3 and 18 days for Level 2 hospitals to a duration of 1 week, which is common among Western countries, afforded cost reductions of 49% and 19%, respectively. Other lesser determinants varied by hospital level: in Level 3 hospitals, health insurance and the occurrence of in-hospital complications were each associated with 10% and 18% increases in cost, respectively, whilst treatment in a teaching hospital was associated with approximately 39% decrease in cost on average. For Level 2 hospitals, stroke due to intracerebral haemorrhage was associated with a 19% greater cost than for ischaemic stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Changes to hospital policies to standardise resource use and reduce the variation in LOS could attenuate costs and improve efficiencies for acute stroke management in China. The success of these strategies will be enhanced by broader policy initiatives currently underway to reform hospital reimbursement systems.

  8. Critical early thrombolytic and endovascular reperfusion therapy for acute ischemic stroke victims: a call for adjunct neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapchak, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    Today, there is an enormous amount of excitement in the field of stroke victim care due to the recent success of MR. CLEAN, SWIFT PRIME, ESCAPE, EXTEND-IA, and REVASCAT endovascular trials. Successful intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) clinical trials [i.e., National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) rt-PA trial, Third European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASSIII), and Third International Stroke study (IST-3)] also need to be emphasized. In the recent endovascular and thrombolytic trials, there is statistically significant improvement using both the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the modified Rankin Score (mRS) scale, but neither approach promotes complete recovery in patients enrolled within any particular NIHSS or mRS score tier. Absolute improvement (mRS 0-2 at 90 days) with endovascular therapy is 13.5-31 %, whereas thrombolytics alone also significantly improve patient functional independence, but to a lesser degree (NINDS rt-PA trial 13 %). This article has 3 main goals: (1) first to emphasize the utility and cost-effectiveness of rt-PA to treat stroke; (2) second to review the recent endovascular trials with respect to efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness as a stroke treatment; and (3) to further consider and evaluate strategies to develop novel neuroprotective drugs. A thesis will be put forth so that future stroke trials and therapy development can optimally promote recovery so that stroke victims can return to "normal" life.

  9. Recent trauma and acute infection as risk factors for childhood arterial ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Nancy K; Johnston, S Claiborne; Sidney, Stephen; Zielinski, Brandon A; Fullerton, Heather J

    2012-12-01

    Trauma and acute infection have been associated with stroke in adults, and are prevalent exposures in children. We hypothesized that these environmental factors are independently associated with childhood arterial ischemic stroke (AIS). In a case-control study nested within a cohort of 2.5 million children (≤19 years old) enrolled in an integrated health care plan (1993-2007), childhood AIS cases (n = 126) were identified from electronic records and confirmed through chart review. Age- and facility-matched controls (n = 378) were randomly selected from the cohort. Exposures were determined from review of medical records prior to the stroke diagnosis, or the same date for the paired controls; time windows were defined a priori. A medical encounter for head or neck trauma within the prior 12 weeks was an independent risk factor for childhood AIS (odds ratio [OR], 7.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9-19.3), present in 12% of cases (1.6% of controls). Median time from trauma to stroke was 0.5 days (interquartile range, 0-2 days); post hoc redefinition of trauma exposure (prior 1 week) was more strongly associated with AIS: OR, 39; 95% CI, 5.1-298. A medical encounter for a minor acute infection (prior 4 weeks) was also an independent risk factor (OR, 4.6; 95% CI, 2.6-8.2), present in 33% of cases (13% of controls). No single infection type predominated. Only 2 cases had exposure to trauma and infection. Trauma and acute infection are common independent risk factors for childhood AIS, and may be targets for stroke prevention strategies. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  10. Mediterranean Diet in patients with acute ischemic stroke: Relationships between Mediterranean Diet score, diagnostic subtype, and stroke severity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Casuccio, Alessandra; Buttà, Carmelo; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Della Corte, Vittoriano; Arnao, Valentina; Clemente, Giuseppe; Maida, Carlo; Simonetta, Irene; Miceli, Giuseppe; Lucifora, Benedetto; Cirrincione, Anna; Di Bona, Danilo; Corpora, Francesca; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet appears to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, as well as the risk of death due to cardiovascular disease. No study has addressed the association between diagnostic subtype of stroke and its severity and adherence to a Mediterranean Diet in subjects with acute ischemic stroke. To evaluate the association between Mediterranean Diet adherence, TOAST subtype, and stroke severity by means of a retrospective study. The type of acute ischemic stroke was classified according to the TOAST criteria. All patients admitted to our ward with acute ischemic stroke completed a 137-item validated food-frequency questionnaire adapted to the Sicilian population. A scale indicating the degree of adherence to the traditional Mediterranean Diet was used (Me-Di score: range 0-9). 198 subjects with acute ischemic stroke and 100 control subjects without stroke. Stroke subjects had a lower mean Mediterranean Diet score compared to 100 controls without stroke. We observed a significant positive correlation between Me-Di score and SSS score, whereas we observed a negative relationship between Me-Di score and NIHSS and Rankin scores. Subjects with atherosclerotic (LAAS) stroke subtype had a lower mean Me-Di score compared to subjects with other subtypes. Multinomial logistic regression analysis in a simple model showed a negative relationship between MeDi score and LAAS subtype vs. lacunar subtype (and LAAS vs. cardio-embolic subtype). Patients with lower adherence to a Mediterranean Diet are more likely to have an atherosclerotic (LAAS) stroke, a worse clinical presentation of ischemic stroke at admission and a higher Rankin score at discharge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Statins in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-09-01

    Statins have pleiotropic effects of potential neuroprotection. However, because of lack of large randomized clinical trials, current guidelines do not provide specific recommendations on statin initiation in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The current study aims to systematically review the statin effect in AIS. From literature review, we identified articles exploring prestroke and immediate post-stroke statin effect on imaging surrogate markers, initial stroke severity, functional outcome, and short-term mortality in human AIS. We summarized descriptive overview. In addition, for subjects with available data from publications, we conducted meta-analysis to provide pooled estimates. In total, we identified 70 relevant articles including 6 meta-analyses. Surrogate imaging marker studies suggested that statin might enhance collaterals and reperfusion. Our updated meta-analysis indicated that prestroke statin use was associated with milder initial stroke severity (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval], 1.24 [1.05-1.48]; P=0.013), good functional outcome (1.50 [1.29-1.75]; Ptransformation (1.63 [1.04-2.56]; P=0.035). The current study findings support the use of statin in AIS. However, the findings were mostly driven by observational studies at risk of bias, and thereby large randomized clinical trials would provide confirmatory evidence.

  12. 2018 Guidelines for the Early Management of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, William J; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Ackerson, Teri; Adeoye, Opeolu M; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; Becker, Kyra; Biller, José; Brown, Michael; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Hoh, Brian; Jauch, Edward C; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Scott, Phillip A; Sheth, Kevin N; Southerland, Andrew M; Summers, Deborah V; Tirschwell, David L

    2018-01-24

    The purpose of these guidelines is to provide an up-to-date comprehensive set of recommendations for clinicians caring for adult patients with acute arterial ischemic stroke in a single document. The intended audiences are prehospital care providers, physicians, allied health professionals, and hospital administrators. These guidelines supersede the 2013 guidelines and subsequent updates. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee, representing various areas of medical expertise. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained. Members were not allowed to participate in discussions or to vote on topics relevant to their relations with industry. The members of the writing group unanimously approved all recommendations except when relations with industry precluded members voting. Prerelease review of the draft guideline was performed by 4 expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. These guidelines use the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2015 Class of Recommendations and Levels of Evidence and the new American Heart Association guidelines format. These guidelines detail prehospital care, urgent and emergency evaluation and treatment with intravenous and intra-arterial therapies, and in-hospital management, including secondary prevention measures that are appropriately instituted within the first 2 weeks. The guidelines support the overarching concept of stroke systems of care in both the prehospital and hospital settings. These guidelines are based on the best evidence currently available. In many instances, however, only limited data exist demonstrating the urgent need for continued research on treatment of acute ischemic stroke. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Constraint-induced movement therapy for the upper paretic limb in acute or sub-acute stroke : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, Rinske; Kwakkel, Gert; Bakers, Japie; van Wegen, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy is a commonly used intervention to improve upper limb function after stroke. However, the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy and its optimal dosage during acute or sub-acute stroke is still under debate. To examine the literature on the effects

  14. Constraint-induced movement therapy for the upper paretic limb in acute or sub-acute stroke: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, R.H.M.; Kwakkel, G.; Bakers, J.; van Wegen, E.E.H.

    2011-01-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy is a commonly used intervention to improve upper limb function after stroke. However, the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy and its optimal dosage during acute or sub-acute stroke is still under debate. To examine the literature on the effects

  15. Exploring health care providers' perceptions of the needs of stroke carers: informing development of an optimal health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Casey L; Moore, Gaye; Rolley, John X; Ski, Chantal F; Thompson, David R; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Gonzales, Graeme; Hsueh, Ya-Seng Arthur; Castle, David

    2014-01-01

    Health care provider experiences of the carer have been researched, but little is written about how these can inform development of support programs. This study aimed to (1) explore health care provider perceptions of stroke carer roles and support needs and (2) examine carer needs across the stroke care trajectory to assist with development of an Optimal Health Program (OHP) to support carers. This study is part of a staged program of research that will evaluate and refine the OHP. Four dual-moderated semi-structured focus groups of stroke health care providers across acute, subacute, and community rehabilitation services were conducted. Facilitators used a semi-structured focus group schedule to guide discussion. Sessions were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic and content analysis. Three key themes emerged: transition, information, and impact of stroke. A number of subthemes highlighted the distinct roles of health care providers and carers. Specific elements of the OHP were identified as having the potential to advance support for carers across the stroke care trajectory. Findings support the integration of an OHP for carers within existing stroke care services in Australian public hospital and community settings. This study suggests how health care provider experiences could inform a self-management OHP to assist carers in navigating stroke services and to address their health-related concerns.

  16. Dysphagia in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke: Early Dysphagia Screening May Reduce Stroke-Related Pneumonia and Improve Stroke Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaled, Mohamed; Matthis, Christine; Binder, Andreas; Mudter, Jonas; Schattschneider, Joern; Pulkowski, Ulrich; Strohmaier, Tim; Niehoff, Torsten; Zybur, Roland; Eggers, Juergen; Valdueza, Jose M; Royl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is associated with poor outcome in stroke patients. Studies investigating the association of dysphagia and early dysphagia screening (EDS) with outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) are rare. The aims of our study are to investigate the association of dysphagia and EDS within 24 h with stroke-related pneumonia and outcomes. Over a 4.5-year period (starting November 2007), all consecutive AIS patients from 15 hospitals in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, were prospectively evaluated. The primary outcomes were stroke-related pneumonia during hospitalization, mortality, and disability measured on the modified Rankin Scale ≥2-5, in which 2 indicates an independence/slight disability to 5 severe disability. Of 12,276 patients (mean age 73 ± 13; 49% women), 9,164 patients (74%) underwent dysphagia screening; of these patients, 55, 39, 4.7, and 1.5% of patients had been screened for dysphagia within 3, 3 to 72 h following admission. Patients who underwent dysphagia screening were likely to be older, more affected on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and to have higher rates of neurological symptoms and risk factors than patients who were not screened. A total of 3,083 patients (25.1%; 95% CI 24.4-25.8) had dysphagia. The frequency of dysphagia was higher in patients who had undergone dysphagia screening than in those who had not (30 vs. 11.1%; p dysphagia had a higher rate of pneumonia than those without dysphagia (29.7 vs. 3.7%; p dysphagia was associated with increased risk of stroke-related pneumonia (OR 3.4; 95% CI 2.8-4.2; p dysphagia was independently correlated with an increase in mortality (OR 3.2; 95% CI 2.4-4.2; p Dysphagia exposes stroke patients to a higher risk of pneumonia, disability, and death, whereas an EDS seems to be associated with reduced risk of stroke-related pneumonia and disability. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Hyperintense acute reperfusion marker is associated with higher contrast agent dosage in acute ischaemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Schaefer, Tabea; Villringer, Kersten; Fiebach, Jochen B. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Academic Neuroradiology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB), Berlin (Germany); Rozanski, Michal; Ebinger, Martin [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Academic Neuroradiology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB), Berlin (Germany); Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Jungehuelsing, Gerhard J. [Stiftung des Buergerlichen Rechts, Juedisches Krankenhaus Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability changes. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of contrast agent dosage on HARM incidence in acute ischaemic stroke patients. We prospectively included 529 acute ischaemic stroke patients (204 females, median age 71 years). Patients underwent a first stroke-MRI within 24 hours from symptom onset and had a follow-up on day 2. The contrast agent Gadobutrol was administered to the patients for perfusion imaging or MR angiography. The total dosage was calculated as ml/kg body weight and ranged between 0.04 and 0.31 mmol/kg on the first examination. The incidence of HARM was evaluated on day 2 FLAIR images. HARM was detected in 97 patients (18.3 %). HARM incidence increased significantly with increasing dosages of Gadobutrol. Also, HARM positive patients were significantly older. HARM was not an independent predictor of worse clinical outcome, and we did not find an association with increase risk of haemorrhagic transformation. A higher dosage of Gadobutrol in acute stroke patients on initial MRI is associated with increased HARM incidence on follow-up. MRI studies on BBB should therefore standardize contrast agent dosages. (orig.)

  18. Use of emergency medical transport and impact on time to care in patients with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olascoaga Arrate, A; Freijo Guerrero, M M; Fernández Maiztegi, C; Azkune Calle, I; Silvariño Fernández, R; Fernández Rodríguez, M; Vazquez Naveira, P; Anievas Elena, A; Iturraspe González, I; Pérez Díez, Y; Ruiz Fernández, R

    2017-01-13

    According to numerous studies, using emergency medical services (EMS) to transport stroke patients to hospitals decreases diagnostic and treatment delays. To determine the frequency of use of EMS by stroke patients in Bizkaia (Spain), analyse the factors associated with using EMS, and study the impact of EMS on time to care. We gathered data from 545 patients hospitalised for acute ischaemic stroke and recruited consecutively. Data were obtained from the patients' medical histories and interviews with the patients themselves or their companions. We studied the following variables: previous health status, stroke symptoms and severity (NIHSS), type of transport, and time to medical care. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with use of EMS and care delays. Patients transported to hospital by the EMS accounted for 47.2% of the total. Greater stroke severity, arriving at the hospital at night, and poor functional status at baseline were found to be independently associated with use of EMS. Use of EMS was linked to earlier arrival at the hospital. Door-to-imaging times were shorter in the EMS group; however, this association disappeared after adjusting for stroke severity. Revascularisation was more frequent among patients transported by the EMS. EMS transport was associated with shorter prehospital delays. Effective health education programmes should be developed to promote EMS transport for patients with stroke symptoms. In-hospital stroke management should also be improved to reduce time to medical care. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Satisfaction of Nigerian stroke survivors with outpatient physiotherapy care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaleye, Olubukola A; Hamzat, Talhatu K; Akinrinsade, Marvellous A

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the satisfaction of stroke survivors with outpatient physiotherapy care. Sixty stroke survivors were surveyed using the European Physiotherapy Treatment Outpatient Satisfaction Survey (EPTOPS). Focus group discussion (FGD) was also conducted with four stroke survivors from the same sample. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal Wallis test and Spearman's correlation coefficients at p = 0.05. FGD was transcribed and thematically analyzed. Nearly all the participants (98.3%) indicated one of good, very good, and excellent improvement in their clinical conditions with physiotherapy. Majority expressed satisfaction with their physiotherapy care, the modal response being very good (59.3%). Patients' satisfaction and socio-demographics were not significantly correlated (p > 0.05). Overarching themes from FGD were physiotherapy in stroke rehabilitation, satisfaction with physiotherapy care, cost, and lack of continuity of care as sources of dissatisfaction. Physiotherapists' demeanor was a facilitator of satisfaction. The stroke survivors were generally satisfied with outpatient physiotherapy care. However, lack of continuity and cost of care were sources of dissatisfaction among patients. Delivery of physiotherapy to stroke survivors in Nigeria should be structured to allow for continuity of care as this may enhance satisfaction. Implementation of inexpensive rehabilitation strategies may help reduce cost of physiotherapy.

  20. Acute cerebral paragonimiasis presenting as hemorrhagic stroke in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Zhu, Gang; Lin, Jiangkai; Wu, Nan; Feng, Hua

    2008-08-01

    A hemorrhagic stroke in children is rarely secondary to cerebral paragonimiasis. We describe a 9-year-old boy in whom an intracerebral hemorrhage was the leading clinical indication of acute cerebral paragonimiasis. He was hospitalized because of a sudden onset of headache, right hemiparesis, and dysarthria. A computed tomography scan revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage in the left parietal lobe. Magnetic resonance angiography did not confirm any vascular abnormalities at the location of the hematoma. Four weeks later, he presented with right hemiparesis again, and fever. A diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis was based on repeated magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for paragonimiasis. The patient gradually recovered with praziquantel treatment. Cerebral paragonimiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemorrhagic strokes in children in areas where paragonimiasis is epidemic.

  1. Timing of blood pressure lowering in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcel, Cheryl; Anderson, Craig S

    2015-08-01

    Whether there are any benefits without harm from early lowering of blood pressure (BP) in the setting of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) has been a longstanding controversy in medicine. Whilst most studies have consistently shown associations between elevated BP, particularly systolic BP, and poor outcome, some also report that very low BP (systolic <130 mmHg) and large reductions in systolic BP are associated with poor outcomes in AIS. However, despite these associations, the observed U- or J-shaped relationship between BP and outcome in these patients may not be causally related. Patients with more severe strokes may have a more prominent autonomic response and later lower BP as their condition worsens, often pre-terminally. Fortunately, substantial progress has been made in recent years with new evidence arising from well-conducted randomized trials. This review outlines new evidence and recommendations for clinical practice over BP management in AIS.

  2. Factors associated with prognosis of eating and swallowing disability after stroke: a study from a community-based stroke care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshima, Shinichiro; Osawa, Aiko; Hayashi, Takeshi; Tanahashi, Norio

    2013-10-01

    The long-term prognosis of eating and swallowing disability has not been fully clarified. As community-based stroke care systems have developed in Japan, these data have become available. We examined changes in nutritional intake using data acquired from a community-based stroke care system. There were 334 stroke patients who were discharged from our acute care hospital and transferred to rehabilitation hospitals with tube feeding. We examined the relationship between the initial bedside swallowing assessment and the method of nutrition delivery at discharge from a rehabilitation hospital. We also calculated the functional independent measure (FIM) to examine the relationship between activities of daily living and nutritional intake. There were 291 patients on oral intake and 43 on enteral feeding at discharge from a rehabilitation hospital. Patients with enteral feeding were older than patients with oral intake (69.4 ± 11.4 v 75.2 ± 9.9 years; P = .0016). The enteral feeding group also had lower FIM gain (27.5 ± 28.3 v 16.5 ± 23.5; P = .0161) and FIM efficiency (1.10 ± 1.24 v 0.65 ± 1.26; P = .0270) at the acute care hospital. Age, FIM gain, and FIM efficacy in the acute care hospital reliably predicted the long-term prognosis of eating and swallowing disability. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Patterns of Reading Performance in Acute Stroke: A Descriptive Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren L. Cloutman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main sources of information regarding the underlying processes involved in both normal and impaired reading has been the study of reading deficits that occur as a result of brain damage. However, patterns of reading deficits found acutely after brain injury have been little explored. The observed patterns of performance in chronic stroke patients might reflect reorganization of the cognitive processes underlying reading or development of compensatory strategies that are not normally used to read. Method: 112 acute left hemisphere stroke patients were administered a task of oral reading of words and pseudowords within 1–2 days of hospital admission; performance was examined for error rate and type, and compared to that on tasks involving visual lexical decision, visual/auditory comprehension, and naming. Results: Several distinct patterns of performance were identified. Although similarities were found between the patterns of reading performance observed acutely and the classical acquired dyslexias generally identified more chronically, some notable differences were observed. Of interest was the finding that no patient produced any pure semantic errors in reading, despite finding such errors in comprehension and naming.

  4. Early blood pressure lowering treatment in acute stroke. Ordinal analysis of vascular events in the Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial (SCAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jusufovic, Mirza; Sandset, Else Charlotte; Bath, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Early blood pressure-lowering treatment appears to be beneficial in patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage and potentially in ischaemic stroke. We used a new method for analysis of vascular events in the Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial to see if the effect was depend......OBJECTIVE: Early blood pressure-lowering treatment appears to be beneficial in patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage and potentially in ischaemic stroke. We used a new method for analysis of vascular events in the Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial to see if the effect...... was dependent on the timing of treatment. METHODS: Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial was a randomized controlled and placebo-controlled trial of candesartan within 30 h of ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke. Of 2029 patients, 231 (11.4%) had a vascular event (vascular death, nonfatal stroke or nonfatal...... logistic regression for analysis and adjusted for predefined prognostic variables. RESULTS: Candesartan had no overall effect on vascular events (adjusted common odds ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval 0.84-1.47, P = 0.48), and the effects were the same in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Among...

  5. Interprofessional working in acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Chris; Bench, Suzanne; Brown, Kate; Bradley, Claire; Johnson, Lorna; Frisby, Jayne

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of an interprofessional (IP) module for pre-qualification medical, nursing and physiotherapy students. The module focuses on clinical care in the acute care setting, and is called Interprofessional Working in Acute Care (IWAC). The authors are acute-care practitioners and educators familiar with an environment where good interprofessional collaboration and communication are prerequisite for, and linked to, good patient outcomes. We believe that explicit opportunities to learn the skills of collaborative IP working are required. We developed a blended-learning 15-credit module that was vertically integrated into the existing curricula of the three programmes. It used several different types of learning: self-directed learning; in-practice teaching; clinical observation; simulation-based teaching (SBT); and collaborative peer-group working and student presentations. The contact teaching time had to be limited because of the constraints of three divergent timetables, and was dominated by SBT that featured four acute care scenarios. The scenarios were formulated so that they could not be managed without interprofessional collaboration. Each student was assigned to an IP group (comprising at least one student from each discipline) for the whole module. A common assessment included a collaborative presentation by each IP group where members were expected to discuss and reflect upon the role of a different professional within their group. This narrative account exhibits our development of teaching praxis in the story of teaching innovation, and highlights some of the challenges and opportunities within IP learning in undergraduate education. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2013.

  6. Intracranial stents in the endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Acosta, F; Jiménez Gómez, E; Bravo Rey, I; Bravo Rodríguez, F A; Ochoa Sepúlveda, J J; Oteros Fernández, R

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intracranial stenting as a rescue therapy after failed mechanical thrombectomy in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We retrospectively studied 42 patients treated with intracranial stenting after failed mechanical thrombectomy between December 2008 and January 2016. We compared outcomes before and after the incorporation of stentrievers. We assessed the degree of recanalization in the carotid and basilar territories (modified TIMI score), prognostic factors, and outcome (modified Rankin Score at 3 months). Safety was evaluated in function of the appearance of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH). Median NIHSS was 17 in patients with carotid territory strokes and 26 in those with vertebrobasilar territory strokes. Median time from onset of symptoms to treatment was 225minutes in carotid territory strokes and 390minutes in vertebrobasilar territory strokes. A total of 10 patients underwent intravenous fibrinolytic therapy before treatment with stentrievers. Two patients developed SICH; both had undergone intravenous fibrinolytic therapy (p=0.0523). Recanalization was effective in 30 (71.4%) in the entire series: in 7 (50%) of 14 patients treated before the incorporation of stentrievers and in 23 (82.1%) of 28 treated after the incorporation of stentrievers (p=0.0666). Outcome at 3 months was good in 2 (14.3%) patients in the earlier group and in 14 (50%) patients in the later group (p=0.042). We found significant associations between recanalization and outcome (p=0.0415) and between shorter time to treatment and outcome (p=0.002). Outcome was good in 14 (48.3%) of the 29 patients with carotid territory strokes and in 2 (15.4%) of the 13 patients with vertebrobasilar territory strokes (p=0.078). Intracranial stenting is the rescue treatment when the usual treatment fails. Stentrievers must be used to eliminate the clot burden before stenting. In our study, antiplatelet treatment did not seem to increase the risk of SICH

  7. Moderate hyperglycaemia is associated with favourable outcome in acute lacunar stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Koch, Marcus W; Stewart, Roy E; Vroomen, Patrick C; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; De Keyser, Jacques

    Hyperglycaemia in acute ischaemic stroke is traditionally associated with a worsened outcome. However, it is unclear whether the impact of hyperglycaemia on stroke outcome is similar in lacunar and non-lacunar infarctions. The relation between serum glucose measured within 6 h after stroke onset and

  8. The Prognostic Values of Leukocyte Rho Kinase Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-I. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. It has been reported that leukocyte ROCK activity is elevated in patients after ischemic stroke, but it is unclear whether leukocyte ROCK activity is associated with clinical outcomes following acute stroke events. The objective of this study is to investigate if leukocyte ROCK activity can predict the outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 110 patients of acute ischemic stroke and measured the leukocyte ROCK activity and plasma level of inflammatory cytokines to correlate the clinical outcomes of these patients. Results. The leukocyte ROCK activity at 48 hours after admission in acute ischemic stroke patients was higher as compared to a risk-matched population. The leukocyte ROCK activity significantly correlated with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS difference between admission and 90 days after stroke event. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates showed lower stroke-free survival during follow-up period in patients with high leukocyte ROCK activity or plasma hsCRP level. Leukocyte ROCK activity independently predicted the recurrent stroke in patients with atherosclerotic stroke. Conclusions. This study shows elevated leukocyte ROCK activity in patients with ischemic stroke as compared to risk-matched subjects and is an independent predictor for recurrent stroke.

  9. Effects of melatonin in experimental stroke models in acute, sub-acute, and chronic stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Wen Lin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hsiao-Wen Lin, E-Jian LeeNeurophysiology Laboratory, Neurosurgical Service, Department of Surgery, National Cheng Kung University Medical Center and Medical School, Tainan, TaiwanAbstract: Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxy-tryptamine, a naturally occurring indole produced mainly by the pineal gland, is a well known antioxidant. Stroke (cerebral ischemia is the second leading cause of death worldwide. To date, however, effective and safe treatment for stroke remains unavailable. Melatonin is both lipid- and water-soluble and readily crosses the blood–brain barrier (BBB. Increasing evidence has shown that, in animal stroke models, administering melatonin significantly reduces infarct volume, edema, and oxidative damage and improves electrophysiological and behavioral performance. Here, we reviewed studies that assess effects of melatonin on cerebral ischemia in acute, sub-acute, and chronic stages. In addition to its potent antioxidant properties, melatonin exerts antiapoptotic, antiexcitotoxic, anti-inflammatory effects and promotes mitochondrial functions in animals with cerebral ischemia. Given that melatonin shows almost no toxicity to humans and possesses multifaceted protective capacity against cerebral ischemia, it is valuable to consider using melatonin in clinical trials on patients suffering from stroke.Keywords: cerebral ischemia, melatonin, stroke, neuroprotection

  10. Inter-rater reliability of data elements from a prototype of the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wehner Susan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry (PCNASR is a U.S. based national registry designed to monitor and improve the quality of acute stroke care delivered by hospitals. The registry monitors care through specific performance measures, the accuracy of which depends in part on the reliability of the individual data elements used to construct them. This study describes the inter-rater reliability of data elements collected in Michigan's state-based prototype of the PCNASR. Methods Over a 6-month period, 15 hospitals participating in the Michigan PCNASR prototype submitted data on 2566 acute stroke admissions. Trained hospital staff prospectively identified acute stroke admissions, abstracted chart information, and submitted data to the registry. At each hospital 8 randomly selected cases were re-abstracted by an experienced research nurse. Inter-rater reliability was estimated by the kappa statistic for nominal variables, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC for ordinal and continuous variables. Factors that can negatively impact the kappa statistic (i.e., trait prevalence and rater bias were also evaluated. Results A total of 104 charts were available for re-abstraction. Excellent reliability (kappa or ICC > 0.75 was observed for many registry variables including age, gender, black race, hemorrhagic stroke, discharge medications, and modified Rankin Score. Agreement was at least moderate (i.e., 0.75 > kappa ≥; 0.40 for ischemic stroke, TIA, white race, non-ambulance arrival, hospital transfer and direct admit. However, several variables had poor reliability (kappa Conclusion The excellent reliability of many of the data elements supports the use of the PCNASR to monitor and improve care. However, the poor reliability for several variables, particularly time-related events in the emergency department, indicates the need for concerted efforts to improve the quality of data collection. Specific recommendations

  11. Stroke unit care, inpatient rehabilitation and early supported discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Helen; Price, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Stroke units reduce death and disability through the provision of specialist multidisciplinary care for diagnosis, emergency treatments, normalisation of homeostasis, prevention of complications, rehabilitation and secondary prevention. All stroke patients can benefit from provision of high-quality basic medical care and some need high impact specific treatments, such as thrombolysis, that are often time dependent. A standard patient pathway should include assessment of neurological impairment, vascular risk factors, swallowing, fluid balance and nutrition, cognitive function, communication, mood disorders, continence, activities of daily living and rehabilitation goals. Good communication and shared decision making with patients and their families are key to high-quality stroke care. Patients with mild or moderate disability, who are medically stable, can continue rehabilitation at home with early supported discharge teams rather than needing a prolonged stay in hospital. National clinical guidelines and prospective audits are integral to monitoring and developing stroke services in the UK. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  12. Manual and oral apraxia in acute stroke, frequency and influence on functional outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P M; Jørgensen, H S; Kammersgaard, L P

    2001-01-01

    To determine the frequency of manual and oral apraxia in acute stroke and to examine the influence of these symptoms on functional outcome.......To determine the frequency of manual and oral apraxia in acute stroke and to examine the influence of these symptoms on functional outcome....

  13. Safety of thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke and cerebral cavernous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdur, Hebun; Scheitz, Jan F; Tütüncü, Serdar; Fiebach, Jochen B; Endres, Matthias; Werring, David J; Nolte, Christian H

    2014-06-01

    Data on safety of intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke in patients with coexisting cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are scarce. We assessed the risk of thrombolysis-associated hemorrhage in these patients. We searched our tertiary care hospital thrombolysis register for patients with CCM confirmed by MRI (3 T, Siemens, TimTrio) before thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke. CCMs were graded into subtypes according to the Zabramski classification on the basis of their MRI appearance. The primary end point was symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage according to European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study III (ECASS III) criteria. The secondary end point was any parenchymal hemorrhage. In a total of 350 patients (median age, 76 years; interquartile range, 68-84; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, 8; interquartile range, 5-14; 51.4% women), CCMs were found in 9 patients (2.6%). Seven patients had a single CCM, and 2 patients had multiple CCMs with a total number of 12 CCMs in all patients. The subtype of CCMs was type III in 9 cases and type I in 3 cases. Symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in 1 of 9 patients with CCM versus 11 of 341 patients without CCM (P=0.27). Parenchymal hemorrhage occurred in 2 of 9 patients with CCM versus 27 of 341 patients (P=0.17) without CCM. Given the limitations of our study (mainly low number of patients with CCM), the risk of thrombolysis-associated hemorrhage in patients with CCM remains uncertain. Although our data do not suggest an increased hazard from thrombolysis in patients with CCM, larger studies are necessary to determine definitively the influence of CCMs on parenchymal hemorrhage and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Specific features of acute stroke in the Russian Federation and in the People’s Republic of China (according to the data of some big stroke units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on comparison and analysis of the work of big stroke units in the Russian Federation and the People’s Republic of China specialized in the medical care for patients with acute stroke. 522 patients were surveyed in Russia’s and China’s regional stroke units. In the Russian Federation, patients being treated in the «City Hospital No.26» (SaintPetersburg took part in the study. In China patients of the First Affiliated Hospital of the Chongqing Medical University, Central Hospital Jiang jin, Regional People’s Hospital Yubei district, Regional People’s Hospital Bishan (Chongqing Province. The analysis of differences was performed by the following parameters: personality traits, age, gender, level of education, income, health insurance category, profession, employment, professional activities over the last year, place of residence of the patient, features of the stroke, time during the first symptoms of stroke to hospitalization, kinds of medical services, the main risk factors and value of prevention before stroke.

  15. Epidemiology of Stroke in Costa Rica: A 7-Year Hospital-Based Acute Stroke Registry of 1319 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrealba-Acosta, Gabriel; Carazo-Céspedes, Kenneth; Chiou, Sy Han; O'Brien, Anthony Terrence; Fernández-Morales, Huberth

    2017-12-25

    Limited data on stroke exist for Costa Rica. Therefore, we created a stroke registry out of patients with stroke seen in the Acute Stroke Unit of the Hospital Calderon Guardia. We analyzed 1319 patients enrolled over a 7-year period, which incorporated demographic, clinical, laboratory, and neuroimaging data. The mean age of patients with stroke was 68.0 ± 15.5 years. Seven hundred twenty-five were men and the age range was 13-104 years. The most prevalent risk factors were hypertension (78.8%), dyslipidemia (36.3%), and diabetes (31.9%). Fifteen percent had atrial fibrillation and 24.7% had a previous stroke or transient ischemic attack. Prevalence of hypertension and atrial fibrillation increased with age; however, younger patients were more associated with thrombophilia. We documented 962 (72.9%) ischemic and 270 (20.5%) hemorrhagic strokes. Of the ischemic strokes, 174 (18.1%) were considered secondary to large-artery atherothrombosis, 175 (18.2%) were due to cardiac embolism, 19 (2.0%) were due to lacunar infarcts, and 25 (2.6%) were due to other determined causes. Five hundred sixty-nine (59.1%) remained undetermined. Atherothrombotic strokes were mostly associated with dyslipidemia, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity, whereas lacunar infarcts were associated with hypertension, smoking, sedentary lifestyle, and previous stroke or transient ischemic attack. Of our patients, 69.9% scored between 0 and 9 in the initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We found differences in sociodemographic features, risk factors, and stroke severity among stroke subtypes. Risk factor prevalence was similar to other registries involving Hispanic populations. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute stroke-like presentation of acquired hepatocerebral degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Smita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological manifestations in liver diseases have been well-described. Parkinsonism developing in cirrhotic patients is a unique clinical, neuroradiological, and biological entity. The symptoms are often insidious in onset and occur after liver disease has made its presentation. Acute dysarthria as the presenting manifestation of cirrhosis is rare. Here we report three cases where liver disease made an unusual presentation as acute dysarthria. In all cases the abruptness of the onset prompted the treating physicians to make a diagnosis of stroke. The computed tomography (CT scans of all these patients did not show any evidence of stroke. This was followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI which showed the characteristic symmetric high-signal intensities in globus pallidus and substantia nigra in T1-weighted images, a reflection of increased tissue concentrations of manganese that helped in making a retrospective diagnosis of liver disease, confirmed later by altered serum albumin to globulin ratios and altered liver echo texture in ultra sonogram.

  17. Use of visual feedback in retraining balance following acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C; Brouwer, B J; Culham, E G

    2000-09-01

    Visual feedback related to weight distribution and center-of-pressure positioning has been shown to be effective in increasing stance symmetry following stroke, although it is not clear whether functional balance ability also improves. This study compared the relative effectiveness of visual feedback training of center-of-gravity (CoG) positioning with conventional physical therapy following acute stroke. Forty-six people who had strokes within 80 days before the study, resulting in unilateral hemiparesis, and who were in need of balance retraining participated. Initially, subjects were randomly assigned to visual feedback or conventional physical therapy groups for balance retraining until 16 subjects per group were recruited. The next 14 subjects were assigned to a control group. All subjects received physical therapy and occupational therapy (regular therapy) 2 hours a day, and subjects in the 2 experimental groups received additional balance training 30 minutes a day until discharge. The visual feedback group received information about their CoG position as they shifted their weight during various activities. The conventional therapy group received verbal and tactile cues to encourage symmetrical stance and weight shifting. Static (postural sway) and activity-based measures of balance (Berg Balance Scale, gait speed, and the Timed "Up & Go" Test) were contrasted across the 3 groups at baseline, at discharge, and at 1 month following discharge using an analysis of variance for repeated measures. All groups demonstrated marked improvement over time for all measures of balance ability, with the greatest improvements occurring in the period from baseline to discharge. No between-group differences were detected in any of the outcome measures. Visual feedback or conventional balance training in addition to regular therapy affords no added benefit when offered in the early stages of rehabilitation following stroke.

  18. Diurnal Variation of Intravenous Thrombolysis Rates for Acute Ischemic Stroke and Associated Quality Performance Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Reuter

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionBased on data from the Baden-Wuerttemberg stroke registry, we aimed to explore the diurnal variation of acute ischemic stroke (IS care delivery.Materials and methods92,530 IS patients were included, of whom 37,471 (40% presented within an onset-to-door time ≤4.5 h. Daytime was stratified in 3-h time intervals and working vs. non-working hours. Stroke onset and hospital admission time, rate of door-to-neurological examination time ≤30 min, onset-/door-to-imaging time IV thrombolysis (IVT rates, and onset-/door-to-needle time were determined. Multivariable regression models were used stratified by stroke onset and hospital admission time to assess the relationship between IVT rates, quality performance parameters, and daytime. The time interval 0:00 h to 3:00 h and working hours, respectively, were taken as reference.ResultsThe IVT rate of the whole study population was strongly associated with the sleep–wake cycle. In patients presenting within the 4.5-h time window and potentially eligible for IVT stratification by hospital admission time identified two time intervals with lower IVT rates. First, between 3:01 h and 6:00 h (IVT rate 18% and likely attributed to in-hospital delays with the lowest diurnal rate of door-to-neurological examination time ≤30 min and the longest door-to-needle time Second, between 6:01 h and 15:00 h (IVT rate 23–25% compared to the late afternoon and evening hours (IVT rate 27–29% due to a longer onset-to-imaging time and door-to-imaging time. No evidence for a compromised stroke service during non-working hours was observed.ConclusionThe analysis provides evidence that acute IS care is subject to diurnal variation which may affect stroke outcome. An optimization of IS care aiming at constantly high IVT rates over the course of the day therefore appears desirable.

  19. Does HIPE data capture the complexity of stroke patients in an acute hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clarke, B

    2010-01-01

    The Hospital Inpatient Enquiry (HIPE) system is currently used as a principle source of national data on discharges from acute hospitals. The Casemix Programme is used to calculate funding for patient care (HIPE activity and Specialty Costs Returns). Th coding is usually undertaken by clerical personnel. We were concerned that the medical complexity of our stroke patients was not captured by the process. The aims of this study were to compare activity coded by HIPE coding staff and medical staff in consecutive stroke patients discharged from the hospital. One hundred consecutive discharged patients with stroke as primary diagnosis were coded by clerical staff [usual practice] and by medical staff. We compared the coding and any differences. We calculated the financial comparison of subsequent differences in Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) and Relative Values (RVs). Clinician coded DRGs resulted in a higher assigned RV in 45 cases. The total RV value for HIPE using clerical coding was 595,268.94 euros and using medical coding was 725,252.16 euros. We conclude that medical input is useful in detailing the complications arising in stroke patients. We suggest that physicians should assist in the HIPE coding process in order to capture clinical complexity, so that funding can be appropriately assigned to manage these complex patients.

  20. Unsolved Issues in the Management of High Blood Pressure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordian J. Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High blood pressure is common in acute stroke patients. Very high as well as very low blood pressure is associated with poor outcome. Spontaneous fall of blood pressure within the first few days after stroke was associated both with neurological improvement and impairment. Several randomized trials investigated the pharmacological reduction of blood pressure versus control. Most trials showed no significant difference in their primary outcome apart from the INWEST trial which found an increase of poor outcome when giving intravenous nimodipine. Nevertheless, useful information can be extracted from the published data to help guide the clinician's decision. Blood pressure should only be lowered when it is clearly elevated, and early after onset, reduction should be moderate but may be achieved rapidly. No clear recommendations can be given on the substances to use; however, care should be taken with intravenous calcium channel blockers and angiotensin receptor antagonists. Two ongoing randomized trials will help to solve the questions on blood pressure management in acute stroke.

  1. Study design for the fostering eating after stroke with transcranial direct current stimulation trial: a randomized controlled intervention for improving Dysphagia after acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchina, Sarah; Schlaug, Gottfried; Kumar, Sandeep

    2015-03-01

    Dysphagia is a major stroke complication but lacks effective therapy that can promote recovery. Noninvasive brain stimulation with and without peripheral sensorimotor activities may be an attractive treatment option for swallowing recovery but has not been systematically investigated in the stroke population. This article describes the study design of the first prospective, single-center, double-blinded trial of anodal versus sham transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) used in combination with swallowing exercises in patients with dysphagia from an acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this study is to gather safety data on cumulative sessions of tDCS in acute-subacute phases of stroke, obtain information about effects of this intervention on important physiologic and clinically relevant swallowing parameters, and examine possible dose effects. Ninety-nine consecutive patients with dysphagia from an acute unilateral hemispheric infarction with a Penetration and Aspiration Scale (PAS) score of 4 or more and without other confounding reasons for dysphagia will be enrolled at a single tertiary care center. Subjects will be randomized to either a high or low dose tDCS or a sham group and will undergo 10 sessions over 5 consecutive days concomitantly with effortful swallowing maneuvers. The main efficacy measures are a change in the PAS score before and after treatment; the main safety measures are mortality, seizures, neurologic, motor, and swallowing deterioration. The knowledge gained from this study will help plan a larger confirmatory trial for treating stroke-related dysphagia and advance our understanding of important covariates influencing swallowing recovery and response to the proposed intervention. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The third international stroke trial (IST-3 of thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantisani Teresa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA is approved for use in selected patients with ischaemic stroke within 3 hours of symptom onset. IST-3 seeks to determine whether a wider range of patients may benefit. Design International, multi-centre, prospective, randomized, open, blinded endpoint (PROBE trial of intravenous rt-PA in acute ischaemic stroke. Suitable patients must be assessed and able to start treatment within 6 hours of developing symptoms, and brain imaging must have excluded intracerebral haemorrhage. With 1000 patients, the trial can detect a 7% absolute difference in the primary outcome. With3500 patients, it can detect a 4.0% absolute benefit & with 6000, (mostly treated between 3 & 6 hours, it can detect a 3% benefit. Trial procedures Patients are entered into the trial by telephoning a fast, secure computerised central randomisation system or via a secure web interface. Repeat brain imaging must be performed at 24–48 hours. The scans are reviewed 'blind' by expert readers. The primary measure of outcome is the proportion of patients alive and independent (Modified Rankin 0–2 at six months (assessed via a postal questionnaire mailed directly to the patient. Secondary outcomes include: events within 7 days (death, recurrent stroke, symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage, outcome at six months (death, functional status, EuroQol. Trial registration ISRCTN25765518

  3. Processes of early stroke care and hospital costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Marie Louise; Ehlers, Lars H.; Hundborg, Heidi H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The relationship between processes of early stroke care and hospital costs remains unclear. Aims: We therefore examined the association in a population-based cohort study. Methods: We identified 5909 stroke patients who were admitted to stroke units in a Danish county between 2005...... and 2010. The examined recommended processes of care included early admission to a stroke unit, early initiation of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, early computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) scan, early physiotherapy and occupational therapy, early assessment of nutritional risk......, constipation risk and of swallowing function, early mobilization, early catheterization, and early thromboembolism prophylaxis. Hospital costs were assessed for each patient based on the number of days spent in different in-hospital facilities using local hospital charges. Results: The mean costs...

  4. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with acute ischemic stroke is associated with more severe stroke and worse outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeldyem, Sabry M; Goda, Tarek; Khodeir, Samy A; Abou Saif, Sabry; Abd-Elsalam, Sherief

    There is a paucity of data regarding the association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and acute ischemic stroke. Stroke is largely preventable, so that knowledge of risk factors is essential to achieve reductions in the stroke rate and resulting disease burden. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of NAFLD on stroke severity and outcome. We prospectively studied 200 patients who were admitted with acute ischemic stroke between September 2013 and August 2015. Demographic and vascular risk factors were detailed for all subjects. The severity of stroke was assessed with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at admission. NAFLD was defined as serum alanine aminotransferase and/or aspartate aminotransferase levels above the upper limit of normal in the absence of other causes of elevated aminotransferase levels. The outcome was assessed with the modified Rankin scale score at discharge. NAFLD was found in 42.5% of the study population. The prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher among patients with NAFLD than those without NAFLD (P = .001). Waist circumference was significantly higher among patients with NAFLD than those without NAFLD (P < .05). Patients with NAFLD had significantly higher glucose, Triglycerides, Low density lipoprotein, serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase than those without NAFLD (P < .05 for each comparison). National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at admission and modified Rankin scale score at discharge were significantly higher in patients with NAFLD than those without NAFLD (P < .05 for each comparison). NAFLD was found in 42.5% of acute ischemic stroke patients. NAFLD might be associated with more severe stroke and worse outcome. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Angiotensin receptor blockade in acute stroke. The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial: rationale, methods and design of a multicentre, randomised- and placebo-controlled clinical trial (NCT00120003)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Murray, Gordon; Boysen, Gudrun Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure following acute stroke is common, and yet early antihypertensive treatment is controversial. ACCESS suggested a beneficial effect of the angiotensin receptor blocker candesartan in the acute phase of stroke, but these findings need to be confirmed in new, large trials. AIMS......, Sweden, Denmark, Belgium, Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Estonia and Finland. STUDY OUTCOMES: There are two co-primary effect variables: • Functional status at 6-months, measured by the modified Rankin Scale, and • vascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke during the first 6-months. Secondary outcome...

  6. Occupational therapy for care home residents with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher-Smith, Joanna C; Walker, Marion F; Cobley, Christine S; Steultjens, Esther M J; Sackley, Catherine M

    2013-06-05

    Stroke is a worldwide problem and is a leading cause of adult disability, resulting in dependency in activities of daily living (ADL) for around half of stroke survivors. It is estimated that up to 25% of all care home residents in the USA and in the UK have had a stroke. Stroke survivors who reside in care homes are likely to be more physically and cognitively impaired and therefore more dependent than those able to remain in their own home. Overall, 75% of care home residents are classified as severely disabled, and those with stroke are likely to have high levels of immobility, incontinence and confusion, as well as additional co-morbidities. It is not known whether this clinically complex population could benefit from occupational therapy in the same way as community-dwelling stroke survivors. The care home population with stroke differs from the general stroke population living at home, and a review was needed to examine the benefits of occupational therapy provided to this specific group. This review therefore focused on occupational therapy interventions for ADL for stroke survivors residing in care homes. To measure the effects of occupational therapy interventions (provided directly by an occupational therapist or under the supervision of an occupational therapist) targeted at improving, restoring and maintaining independence in ADL among stroke survivors residing in long-term institutional care, termed collectively as 'care homes'. As a secondary objective, we aimed to evaluate occupational therapy interventions for reducing complications such as depression and low mood. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (August 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, September 2012), MEDLINE (1948 to September 2012), EMBASE (1980 to September 2012), CINAHL (1982 to September 2012) and 10 additional bibliographic databases and six trials registers. We also handsearched seven journals, checked

  7. 24/7 Neurocritical Care Nurse Practitioner Coverage Reduced Door-to-Needle Time in Stroke Patients Treated with Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Jennifer L; Nakagawa, Kazuma; Asai, Susan M; Koenig, Matthew A

    2016-05-01

    Stroke centers with limited on-site neurovascular physician coverage may experience delays in acute stroke treatment. We sought to assess the impact of providing 24/7 neurocritical care acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) "stroke code" first responder coverage on treatment delays in acute stroke patients who received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous tPA at a primary stroke center on Oahu between 2009 and 2014were retrospectively studied. 24/7 ACNP stroke code coverage (intervention) was introduced on July 1, 2011. The tPA utilization, door-to-needle (DTN) time, imaging-to-needle (ITN) time, and independent ambulation at hospital discharge were compared between the preintervention period (24 months) and the postintervention period (33 months). We studied 166 stroke code patients who were treated with intravenous tPA, 44 of whom were treated during the preintervention period and 122 of whom were treated during the postintervention period. After the intervention, the median DTN time was reduced from 53 minutes (interquartile range [IQR] 45-73) to 45 minutes (IQR 35-58) (P = .001), and the median ITN time was reduced from 36 minutes (IQR 28-64) to 21 minutes (IQR 16-31) (P < .0001). Compliance with the 60-minute target DTN improved from 61.4% (27 of 44 patients) in the preintervention period to 81.2% (99 of 122 patients) in the postintervention period (P = .004). The tPA treatment rates were similar between the preintervention and postintervention periods (P = .60). Addition of 24/7 on-site neurocritical care ACNP first responder coverage for acute stroke code significantly reduced the DTN time among acute stroke patients treated with tPA. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnostic and prognostic role of resistin and copeptin in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Edi; Mrdjen, Anamarija; Harapin, Mladen; Tesija Kuna, Andrea; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2017-12-01

    Our aim was to evaluate (i) whether there is a difference in the concentration of resistin and copeptin between acute ischemic stroke patients and stroke-free controls; and (ii) if there is any prognostic value of resistin and copeptin in predicting stroke infarct volume, stroke severity, and outcome. Our case-control study has recruited 112 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted within 24 h after the stroke onset. We have also included 63 age and gender matched stroke-free controls. Resistin and copeptin levels were measured by a commercial ELISA kits. Stroke severity was assessed according to the modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (mNIHSS) and the degree of disability was assessed using Barthel index (BI). Stroke infarct volume was determined by the volumetric estimation. Resistin concentrations were significantly higher in patients (3.2 mg/L; IQR: 1.9-6.4) than in stroke-free controls (2.5 mg/L; IQR: 1.4-5.2; p = 0.024) whereas the concentration of copeptin did not differ between patients and controls. Copeptin concentrations were significantly higher in patients with poor functional outcome (Barthel index copeptin and BI score (ρ = -0.309, p = 0.020). Resistin, but not copeptin levels are higher in acute ischemic stroke patients early after the stroke onset, than in age and gender matched stroke-free controls. Moreover, higher copeptin concentrations are predictive of poor short term functional outcome after ischemic stroke. If confirmed in larger prospective studies, resistin and copeptin could improve clinical diagnosis of stroke and effective management of patient recovery.

  9. Relation between change in blood pressure in acute stroke and risk of early adverse events and poor outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandset, Else C; Murray, Gordon D; Bath, Philip M W

    2012-01-01

    The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial (SCAST) found no benefits of candesartan in acute stroke. In the present analysis we aim to investigate the effect of change in blood pressure during the first 2 days of stroke on the risk of early adverse events and poor outcome.......The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial (SCAST) found no benefits of candesartan in acute stroke. In the present analysis we aim to investigate the effect of change in blood pressure during the first 2 days of stroke on the risk of early adverse events and poor outcome....

  10. The Comprehensive Post-Acute Stroke Services (COMPASS) study: design and methods for a cluster-randomized pragmatic trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Pamela W; Bushnell, Cheryl D; Rosamond, Wayne D; Jones Berkeley, Sara B; Gesell, Sabina B; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Ambrosius, Walter T; Barton-Percival, Blair; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Coleman, Sylvia W; Cummings, Doyle M; Freburger, Janet K; Halladay, Jacqueline; Johnson, Anna M; Kucharska-Newton, Anna M; Lundy-Lamm, Gladys; Lutz, Barbara J; Mettam, Laurie H; Pastva, Amy M; Sissine, Mysha E; Vetter, Betsy

    2017-07-17

    Patients discharged home after stroke face significant challenges managing residual neurological deficits, secondary prevention, and pre-existing chronic conditions. Post-discharge care is often fragmented leading to increased healthcare costs, readmissions, and sub-optimal utilization of rehabilitation and community services. The COMprehensive Post-Acute Stroke Services (COMPASS) Study is an ongoing cluster-randomized pragmatic trial to assess the effectiveness of a comprehensive, evidence-based, post-acute care model on patient-centered outcomes. Forty-one hospitals in North Carolina were randomized (as 40 units) to either implement the COMPASS care model or continue their usual care. The recruitment goal is 6000 patients (3000 per arm). Hospital staff ascertain and enroll patients discharged home with a clinical diagnosis of stroke or transient ischemic attack. Patients discharged from intervention hospitals receive 2-day telephone follow-up; a comprehensive clinic visit within 2 weeks that includes a neurological evaluation, assessments of social and functional determinants of health, and an individualized COMPASS Care Plan™ integrated with a community-specific resource database; and additional follow-up calls at 30 and 60 days post-stroke discharge. This model is consistent with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services transitional care management services provided by physicians or advanced practice providers with support from a nurse to conduct patient assessments and coordinate follow-up services. Patients discharged from usual care hospitals represent the control group and receive the standard of care in place at that hospital. Patient-centered outcomes are collected from telephone surveys administered at 90 days. The primary endpoint is patient-reported functional status as measured by the Stroke Impact Scale 16. Secondary outcomes are: caregiver strain, all-cause readmissions, mortality, healthcare utilization, and medication adherence. The

  11. Holter-electrocardiogram-monitoring in patients with acute ischaemic stroke (Find-AFRANDOMISED): an open-label randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Rolf; Gröschel, Klaus; Gelbrich, Götz; Hamann, Gerhard F; Kermer, Pawel; Liman, Jan; Seegers, Joachim; Wasser, Katrin; Schulte, Anna; Jürries, Falko; Messerschmid, Anna; Behnke, Nico; Gröschel, Sonja; Uphaus, Timo; Grings, Anne; Ibis, Tugba; Klimpe, Sven; Wagner-Heck, Michaela; Arnold, Magdalena; Protsenko, Evgeny; Heuschmann, Peter U; Conen, David; Weber-Krüger, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for recurrent ischaemic stroke, but often remains undiagnosed in patients who have had an acute ischaemic stroke. Enhanced and prolonged Holter-electrocardiogram-monitoring might increase detection of atrial fibrillation. We therefore investigated whether enhanced and prolonged rhythm monitoring was better for detection of atrial fibrillation than standard care procedures in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Find-AF randomised is an open-label randomised study done at four centres in Germany. We recruited patients with acute ischaemic stroke (symptoms for 7 days or less) aged 60 years or older presenting with sinus rhythm and without history of atrial fibrillation. Patients were included irrespective of the suspected cause of stroke, unless they had a severe ipsilateral carotid or intracranial artery stenosis, which were the exclusion criteria. We used a computer-generated allocation sequence to randomly assign patients in a 1:1 ratio with permuted block sizes of 2, 4, 6, and 8, stratified by centre, to enhanced and prolonged monitoring (ie, 10-day Holter-electrocardiogram [ECG]-monitoring at baseline, and at 3 months and 6 months of follow-up) or standard care procedures (ie, at least 24 h of rhythm monitoring). Participants and study physicians were not masked to group assignment, but the expert committees that adjudicated endpoints were. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter (30 sec or longer) within 6 months after randomisation and before stroke recurrence. Because Holter ECG is a widely used procedure and not known to harm patients, we chose not to assess safety in detail. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01855035. Between May 8, 2013, and Aug 31, 2014, we recruited 398 patients. 200 patients were randomly assigned to the enhanced and prolonged monitoring group and 198 to the standard care group. After 6

  12. Post-stroke depression as a predictor of caregivers burden of acute ischemic stroke patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Dong-Mei; Huang, Ling-Ling; Dou, Jin; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2017-08-29

    Our aim was to explore the independent attribution of Post-stroke depression (PSD) to caregiver burden of acute ischemic stroke patients. A cross-sectional survey was performed with 271 acute ischemic stroke patients in the Huai-He Hospital and First People's Hospital of Kaifeng City in China. PSD was assessed by Self-rating Depressive Scale, and caregiver burden was assessed by Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview. Clustered logistic regression was applied to identify the impact of PSD on caregiver burden. As results, female patients, normal muscle strength and PSD were associated with caregiver burden. PSD correlated with an independent influence of 17.2% on the risk of caregiver burden, The independent influence of PSD on caregiver burden was smaller than that of social-demographics of caregivers and clinical factors of stroke patients This study suggests that PSD may have a modest influence on caregiver burden.

  13. Satisfaction with care and rehabilitation among people with stroke, from hospital to community care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholin, Helena; Forsberg, Anette

    2014-12-01

    Despite recent improvements in Swedish stroke care some patients still experience a lack of support and follow-up after discharge from hospital. In order to provide good care according to the National Board of Health and Welfare, systematic evaluations of stroke care must be performed. Quality indicators in the national guidelines could be useful when measuring quality of care in all parts of the stroke care chain. To investigate how people with stroke experienced their care, rehabilitation, support, and participation from hospital to community care. Qualitative interviews were performed with 11 people in 2009-2010 covering their experiences of care, rehabilitation, support, and participation. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis. The interviewees were satisfied with their hospital care, but reported both positive and negative experiences of the continuing care. Most of them appreciated intense, specific, and professional rehabilitation, and had experienced these qualities in the rehabilitation they received in most parts of the stroke care chain. Those who received support from the community services expressed satisfaction with the staff, but also felt that autonomy was lost. Several did not feel involved in the health care planning, but instead relied on the judgement of the staff. To ensure high quality throughout the whole stroke care chain, people with stroke must be invited to participate in the care and the planning of care. To offer evidence-based stroke rehabilitation, it is important that the rehabilitation is specific, intense, and performed by professionals, regardless of where the rehabilitation is performed. A changed view of the patient's autonomy in residential community services should be developed, and this process must start from the staff and residents. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  14. Coping and caring: support for family caregivers of stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Susan K Y; Wong, Frances K Y; Poon, Christopher Y F

    2007-07-01

    This study examines the physical and emotional burden experienced by caregivers of stroke survivors, compared with caregivers of patients having neurological diseases. Stroke survivors have residual neurological impairment, which requires long-term support and care. Anxiety, depression and poor physical health are common sequelae among family caregivers of stroke survivors. There is a reasonably consistent association between patients' levels of disability and emotional state and the emotional distress of their caregivers. A convenience sample of 47 families was recruited: of the 47 families, 23 had a member who suffered from stroke and 24 had a member with neurological disease. Two interviews were conducted at three and six months after the occurrence of the index stroke or neurological disease. When the two groups of caregivers were compared for anxiety, depression and physical health status after care giving, the caregivers of stroke patients demonstrated higher levels of anxiety and depression than their counterparts in the neurological disease group (p caregivers, while their age and level of depression contributed significantly to their physical health status. The physical and emotional well-being of two groups of family caregivers in a neurosurgical unit were compared in the caring context. The caregivers of stroke survivors are at a greater risk of developing poor physical and emotional health than the caregivers of patients having neurological diseases. The results illustrated that enhanced discharge planning and nurse follow-up sessions are considered essential in maintaining the well-being of the stroke caregivers and bridging the gap between the hospital and the community.

  15. Anosognosia in patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Grigoryeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the frequency of anosognosia (a deficit of self-awareness, its anatomic correlates associated with other neuropsychological and neurological disorders in acute hemispheric ischemic stroke (IS.Patients and methods 150 patients (83 men and 67 women; mean age, 63.0±9.3 years with acute hemispheric IS were examined. All the patients underwent neurological, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological (by the procedure described by A.R. Luria examinations. neuropsychological investigations. Anosognosia was diagnosed using the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX and the authors' procedure involving a scale to measure impaired self-rating of motor abilities and a scale to measure impaired self-rating of cognitive abilities in everyday life.Results and discussion. In the acute period of hemispheric IS, reduced self-awareness of motor and cognitive abilities was noted in 14% of the patients and unawareness of only cognitive abilities was recorded in 15%. Patients with anosognosia and cognitive dysfunction (ACD and those with anosognosia and motor dysfunction (AMD had right-sided hemispheric IS more frequently (76% while this was not found in patients with isolated ACD. The development of anosognosia for paralysis and paresis was favored by the large sizes of an ischemic focus that involved a few lobes in the posterior regions of the brain although no lesions were found in the anosognosia-specific anatomical regions. ACD and AMD proved to be associated with unilateral spatial and tactile neglect and obvious regulatory dysfunction. 

  16. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  17. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  18. Optimal Tmax Threshold for Predicting Penumbral Tissue in Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivot, Jean-Marc; Mlynash, Michael; Thijs, Vincent N.; Kemp, Stephanie; Lansberg, Maarten G.; Wechsler, Lawrence; Bammer, Roland; Marks, Michael P.; Albers, Gregory W.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose We sought to assess whether the volume of the ischemic penumbra can be estimated more accurately by altering the threshold selected for defining perfusion-weighting imaging (PWI) lesions. Methods DEFUSE is a multicenter study in which consecutive acute stroke patients were treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator 3 to 6 hours after stroke onset. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained before, 3 to 6 hours after, and 30 days after treatment. Baseline and posttreatment PWI volumes were defined according to increasing Tmax delay thresholds (>2, >4, >6, and >8 seconds). Penumbra salvage was defined as the difference between the baseline PWI lesion and the final infarct volume (30-day fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequence). We hypothesized that the optimal PWI threshold would provide the strongest correlations between penumbra salvage volumes and various clinical and imaging-based outcomes. Results Thirty-three patients met the inclusion criteria. The correlation between infarct growth and penumbra salvage volume was significantly better for PWI lesions defined by Tmax >6 seconds versus Tmax >2 seconds, as was the difference in median penumbra salvage volume in patients with a favorable versus an unfavorable clinical response. Among patients who did not experience early reperfusion, the Tmax >4 seconds threshold provided a more accurate prediction of final infarct volume than the >2 seconds threshold. Conclusions Defining PWI lesions based on a stricter Tmax threshold than the standard >2 seconds delay appears to provide more a reliable estimate of the volume of the ischemic penumbra in stroke patients imaged between 3 and 6 hours after symptom onset. A threshold between 4 and 6 seconds appears optimal for early identification of critically hypoperfused tissue. PMID:19109547

  19. GPs' adherence to guidelines for structured assessments of stroke survivors in the community and care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C; Boylan, Anne-Marie; Koshiaris, Constantinos; Vazquez Montes, Maria; Ford, Gary A; Lasserson, Daniel S

    2015-12-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend that stroke survivors' needs be assessed at regular intervals after stroke. The extent to which GPs comply with national guidance particularly for patients in care homes who have greatest clinical complexity is unknown. This study aimed to establish the current clinical practice in the UK of needs assessment by GPs for stroke survivors after hospital discharge for acute stroke. Cross-sectional online survey of current practice of GPs, using the national doctors.net network. The survey was completed by 300 GPs who had on average been working for 14 years. The structured assessment of stroke survivors' needs was not offered by 31% of GPs, with no significant difference for level of provision in community or care home settings. The outputs of reviews were added to patients' notes by 89% of GPs and used to change management by 57%. Only half the GPs reported integrating the information obtained into care plans and only a quarter of GPs had a protocol for follow-up of identified needs. Analysis of free-text comments indicated that patients in some care homes may receive more regular and structured reviews. This survey suggests that at least one-third of GPs provide no formal review of the needs of stroke patients and that in only a minority are identified needs addressed in a structured way. Standardization is required for what is included in reviews and how needs are being identified and met. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Reversed Robin Hood syndrome in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Andrei V; Sharma, Vijay K; Lao, Annabelle Y; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Malkoff, Marc D; Alexandrov, Anne W

    2007-11-01

    Recurrent hemodynamic and neurological changes with persisting arterial occlusions may be attributable to cerebral blood flow steal from ischemic to nonaffected brain. Transcranial Doppler monitoring with voluntary breath-holding and serial NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were obtained in patients with acute middle cerebral artery or internal carotid artery occlusions. The steal phenomenon was detected as transient, spontaneous, or vasodilatory stimuli-induced velocity reductions in affected arteries at the time of velocity increase in normal vessels. The steal magnitude (%) was calculated as [(MFVm-MFVb)/MFVb]x100, where m=minimum and b=baseline mean flow velocities (MFV) during the 15- to 30-second period of a total 30 second of breath-holding. Six patients had steal phenomenon on transcranial Doppler (53 to 73 years, NIHSS 4 to 15 points). Steal magnitude ranged from -15.0% to -43.2%. All patients also had recurrent neurological worsening (>2 points increase in NIHSS scores) at stable blood pressure. In 3 of 5 patients receiving noninvasive ventilatory correction for snoring/sleep apnea, no further velocity or NIHSS score changes were noted. Our descriptive study suggests possibility to detect and quantify the cerebral steal phenomenon in real-time. If the steal is confirmed as the cause of neurological worsening, reversed Robin Hood syndrome may identify a target group for testing blood pressure augmentation and noninvasive ventilatory correction in stroke patients.

  1. Acute heat stroke. Epidemiologic, biochemical, renal, and coagulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, T F

    1975-11-24

    Fifteen Marine recruits with acute heat stroke were examined for (1) predisposing factors, (2) blood coagulation disturbances, (3) renal function abnormalities, and (4) blood composition alterations. Epidemiologic data identified the following risk factors; previous residence in a temperate climate, first phase of training, fatigue, and strenuous exercise in hot, humid conditions. Results of blood coagulation studies disclosed an increase in prothrombin and partial thromboplastin times, with a decrease in platelet count, probably indicating a transient, low-grade consumptive process. Blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and creatinine clearance were normal. Only mild elevations of SGOT, SGPT, and lactic dehydrogenase levels were noted, and in combination with clinical observations, they argued against significant muscle damage. No deaths or instances of renal failure occurred.

  2. Relation between reperfusion and hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsch, Alexander D. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rijnstate Hospital, Department of Radiology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Niesten, Joris M.; Seeters, Tom van; Schaaf, Irene C. van der; Velthuis, Birgitta K. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Graaf, Yolanda van der [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kappelle, L.J. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Utrecht Stroke Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Collaboration: DUST investigators

    2015-12-15

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) is given in acute ischemic stroke patients to achieve reperfusion. Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is a serious complication of IV-rtPA treatment and related to blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury. It is unclear whether HT occurs secondary to reperfusion in combination with ischemic BBB injury or is caused by the negative effect of IV-rtPA on BBB integrity. The aim of this study was to establish the association between reperfusion and the occurrence of HT. From the DUST study, patients were selected with admission and follow-up non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CT perfusion (CTP) imaging, and a perfusion deficit in the middle cerebral artery territory on admission. Reperfusion was categorized qualitatively as reperfusion or no-reperfusion by visual comparison of admission and follow-up CTP. Occurrence of HT was assessed on follow-up NCCT. The association between reperfusion and occurrence of HT on follow-up was estimated by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) with additional stratification for IV-rtPA treatment. Inclusion criteria were met in 299 patients. There was no significant association between reperfusion and HT (OR 1.2 95%CI 0.5-3.1). In patients treated with IV-rtPA (n = 203), the OR was 1.3 (95%CI 0.4-4.0), and in patients not treated with IV-rtPA (n = 96), the OR was 0.8 (95%CI 0.1-4.5). HT occurred in 14 % of the IV-rtPA patients and in 7 % of patients without IV-rtPA (95%CI of difference -1 to 14 %). Our results suggest that the increased risk of HT after acute ischemic stroke treatment is not dependent on the reperfusion status. (orig.)

  3. Latent Growth Modeling of nursing care dependency of acute neurological inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piredda, M; Ghezzi, V; De Marinis, M G; Palese, A

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal three-time point study, addressing how neurological adult patient care dependency varies from the admission time to the 3rd day of acute hospitalization. Nursing care dependency was measured with the Care Dependency Scale (CDS) and a Latent Growth Modeling approach was used to analyse the CDS trend in 124 neurosurgical and stroke inpatients. Care dependence followed a decreasing linear trend. Results can help nurse-managers planning an appropriate amount of nursing care for acute neurological patients during their initial stage of hospitalization. Further studies are needed aimed at investigating the determinants of nursing care dependence during the entire in-hospital stay.

  4. Pathophysiology and Biomarkers in Acute Ischemic Stroke – A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and disability, including ischemic stroke, which accounts for 85 - 87 % of cases. Currently, there are few treatment options available for minimizing tissue death following a stroke. Emerging data suggest that biomarkers may help improve current clinical outcome of stroke. As such ...

  5. Acute hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation: population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Niamh; Daly, Leslie; Murphy, Sean; Smith, Samantha; Hayden, Derek; Ní Chróinín, Danielle; Callaly, Elizabeth; Horgan, Gillian; Sheehan, Orla; Honari, Bahman; Duggan, Joseph; Kyne, Lorraine; Dolan, Eamon; Williams, David; Wiley, Miriam; Kelly, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    No economic data from population-based studies exist on acute or late hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation (AF-stroke). Such data are essential for policy development, service planning, and cost-effectiveness analysis of new therapeutic agents. In a population-based prospective study of incident and recurrent stroke treated in hospital and community settings, we investigated direct (healthcare related) and indirect costs for a 2-year period. Survival, disability, poststroke residence, and healthcare use were determined at 90 days, 1 year, and 2 years. Acute hospital cost was determined using a case-mix approach, and other costs using a bottom-up approach (2007 prices). In 568 patients ascertained in 1 year (2006), the total estimated 2-year cost was $33.84 million. In the overall sample, AF-stroke accounted for 31% (177) of patients, but a higher proportion of costs (40.5% of total and 45% of nursing home costs). On a per-patient basis compared with non-AF-stroke, AF-stroke was associated with higher total (P<0.001) and acute hospital costs (P<0.001), and greater nursing home (P=0.001) and general practitioner (P<0.001) costs among 90-day survivors. After stratification by stroke severity in survivors, AF was associated with 2-fold increase in costs in patients with mild-moderate (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, 0-15) stroke (P<0.001) but not in severe stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≥16; P=0.7). In our population study, AF-stroke was associated with substantially higher total, acute hospital, nursing home, and general practitioner costs per patient. Targeted programs to identify AF and prevent AF-stroke may have significant economic benefits, in addition to health benefits. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Endovascular Intervention for Acute Ischemic Stroke in Light of Recent Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Alkhalili

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three recently published trials, MR RESCUE, IMS III, and SYNTHESIS Expansion, evaluating the efficacy and safety of endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke have generated concerns about the future of endovascular approach. However, the tremendous evolution that imaging and endovascular treatment modalities have undergone over the past several years has raised doubts about the validity of these trials. In this paper, we review the role of endovascular treatment strategies in acute ischemic stroke and discuss the limitations and shortcomings that prevent generalization of the findings of recent trials. We also provide our experience in endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  7. Methods guiding stakeholder engagement in planning a pragmatic study on changing stroke systems of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Sabina B; Klein, Karen Potvin; Halladay, Jacqueline; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Freburger, Janet; Cummings, Doyle M; Lutz, Barbara J; Coleman, Sylvia; Bushnell, Cheryl; Rosamond, Wayne; Duncan, Pamela W

    2017-04-01

    The Comprehensive Post-Acute Stroke Services (COMPASS) Study is one of the first large pragmatic randomized-controlled clinical trials using comparative effectiveness research methods, funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. In the COMPASS Study, we compare the effectiveness of a patient-centered, transitional care intervention versus usual care for stroke patients discharged home from acute care. Outcomes include stroke patient post-discharge functional status and caregiver strain 90 days after discharge, and hospital readmissions. A central tenet of Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-funded research is stakeholder engagement throughout the research process. However, evidence on how to successfully implement a pragmatic trial that changes systems of care in combination with robust stakeholder engagement is limited. This combination is not without challenges. We present our approach for broad-based stakeholder engagement in the context of a pragmatic trial with the participation of patients, caregivers, community stakeholders, including the North Carolina Stroke Care Collaborative hospital network, and policy makers. To maximize stakeholder engagement throughout the COMPASS Study, we employed a conceptual model with the following components: (1) Patient and Other Stakeholder Identification and Selection; (2) Patient and Other Stakeholder Involvement Across the Spectrum of Research Activities; (3) Dedicated Resources for Patient and Other Stakeholder Involvement; (4) Support for Patient and Other Stakeholder Engagement Through Organizational Processes; (5) Communication with Patients and Other Stakeholders; (6) Transparent Involvement Processes; (7) Tracking of Engagement; and (8) Evaluation of Engagement. In this paper, we describe how each component of the model is being implemented and how this approach addresses existing gaps in the literature on strategies for engaging stakeholders in meaningful and useful ways when conducting

  8. Effects of candesartan in acute stroke on vascular events during long-term follow-up: results from the Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial (SCAST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornslien, Astrid G; Sandset, Else C; Igland, Jannicke; Terént, Andreas; Boysen, Gudrun; Bath, Philip M W; Murray, Gordon D; Berge, Eivind

    2015-08-01

    Randomized-controlled trials have shown no beneficial short-term effects of blood pressure lowering treatment in the acute phase of stroke. We aimed to see whether blood pressure lowering treatment with candesartan in the acute phase can lead to benefits that become apparent over a longer period of follow-up. The Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stoke Trial was a randomized- and placebo-controlled trial of candesartan in 2,029 patients with acute stroke and systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg. Trial treatment was given for seven-days, and the primary follow-up period was six-months. We have used the national patient registries and the cause of death registries in the Scandinavian countries to collect data on vascular events and deaths up to three-years from randomization. The primary end-point was the composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death, and we used Cox proportional hazards regression model for analysis. Long-term data were available for 1,256 of the 1,286 patients (98%) from Scandinavia. The risk of the primary composite end-point did not differ significantly between the groups (candesartan 178/632 events, placebo 203/624 events, hazard ratio = 0·87, 95% confidence interval 0·71-1·07). There were also no statistically significant differences for the secondary end-points stroke and all-cause death, or in any of the pre-specified subgroups. Treatment with candesartan in the acute phase of stroke was not associated with clear long-term clinical benefits. This result supports the conclusion from trials with short-term follow-up, that blood pressure lowering treatment with candesartan should not be given routinely to patients with acute stroke and raised blood pressure. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  9. Critical appraisal of advance directives given by patients with fatal acute stroke: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, A; Dörr, D; Szabo, K

    2017-02-02

    Advance directives (AD) imply the promise of determining future medical treatment in case of decisional incapacity. However, clinical practice increasingly indicates that standardized ADs often fail to support patients' autonomy. To date, little data are available about the quality and impact of ADs on end-of-life decisions for incapacitated acute stroke patients. We analyzed the ADs of patients with fatal stroke, focusing on: (a) their availability and type, (b) stated circumstances to which the AD should apply, and (c) stated wishes regarding specific treatment options. Between 2011 and 2014, 143 patients died during their hospitalization on our stroke unit. Forty-two of them (29.4%) had a completed and signed, written AD, as reported by their family, but only 35 ADs (24.5%) were available. The circumstances in which the AD should apply were stated by 21/35 (60%) as a "terminal condition that will cause death within a relatively short time" or an ongoing "dying process." A retrospective review found only 16 of 35 ADs (45.7%) described circumstances that, according to the medical file, could have been considered applicable by the treating physicians. A majority of patients objected to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (22/35, 62.9%), mechanical ventilation (19/35, 54.3%), and artificial nutrition (26/35, 74.3%), while almost all (33/35, 94.3%) directed that treatment for alleviation of pain or discomfort should be provided at all times even if it could hasten death. The prevalence of ADs among patients who die from acute stroke is still low. A major flaw of the ADs in our cohort was their attempt to determine single medical procedures without focusing on a precise description of applicable scenarios. Therefore, less than half of the ADs were considered applicable for severe acute stroke. These findings stress the need to foster educational programs for the general public about advance care planning to facilitate the processing of timely, comprehensive, and

  10. Early supported discharge services for people with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorne, Peter; Baylan, Satu

    2017-07-13

    People with stroke conventionally receive a substantial part of their rehabilitation in hospital. Services have now been developed that offer people in hospital an early discharge with rehabilitation at home (early supported discharge: ESD). To establish if, in comparison with conventional care, services that offer people in hospital with stroke a policy of early discharge with rehabilitation provided in the community (ESD) can: 1) accelerate return home, 2) provide equivalent or better patient and carer outcomes, 3) be acceptable satisfactory to patients and carers, and 4) have justifiable resource implications use. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (January 2017), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2017, Issue 1) in the Cochrane Library (searched January 2017), MEDLINE in Ovid (searched January 2017), Embase in Ovid (searched January 2017), CINAHL in EBSCO (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; 1937 to December 2016), and Web of Science (to January 2017). In an effort to identify further published, unpublished, and ongoing trials we searched six trial registries (March 2017). We also performed citation tracking of included studies, checked reference lists of relevant articles, and contacted trialists. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) recruiting stroke patients in hospital to receive either conventional care or any service intervention that has provided rehabilitation and support in a community setting with an aim of reducing the duration of hospital care. The primary patient outcome was the composite end-point of death or long-term dependency recorded at the end of scheduled follow-up. Two review authors scrutinised trials, categorised them on their eligibility and extracted data. Where possible we sought standardised data from the primary trialists. We analysed the results for all trials and for subgroups of patients and services, in particular whether the intervention was provided by a co

  11. Determinants of mobility and self-care in older people with stroke: importance of somatosensory and perceptual functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welmer, Anna-Karin; von Arbin, Magnus; Murray, Veronica; Holmqvist, Lotta Widén; Sommerfeld, Disa K

    2007-12-01

    Somatosensory as well as mental impairments are easily overlooked after acute stroke. Furthermore, their associations with activity limitations are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to examine this association and whether the assessment of somatosensory functions will provide information on perceptual functions after acute stroke. In 115 subjects who were > or =65 years of age, the following parameters were assessed 5 days after stroke: somatosensory (touch and proprioceptive), perceptual, and cognitive functions; depressive symptoms; mobility; and self-care. Multivariate analyses showed that normal proprioceptive function was significantly associated with better mobility. Normal perceptual and touch functions were significantly associated with better self-care. Subjects with normal proprioceptive function were 8.6 times as likely to have normal perceptual function as subjects with proprioceptive impairment. Somatosensory and perceptual functions were significantly associated with subjects' activity levels. Normal proprioceptive function also might indicate normal perceptual function.

  12. MR-visible brain water content in human acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Rosenbaum, S; Sperling, B

    1999-01-01

    Quantification of metabolite concentrations by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in the human brain using water as an internal standard is based on the assumption that water content does not change significantly in pathologic brain tissue. To test this, we used 1H-MRS to estimate...... brain water content during the course of cerebral infarction. Measurements were performed serially in the acute, subacute, and chronic phase of infarction. Fourteen patients with acute cerebral infarction were examined as well as 9 healthy controls. To correlate with regional cerebral blood flow (r......CBF from Day 0-3 to Day 4-7 (p = 0.050) and from Day 0-3 to Day 8-21 (p = 0.028). No correlation between rCBF and water content was found. Water content in ischemic brain tissue increased significantly between Day 4-7 after stroke. This should be considered when performing quantitative 1H-MRS using water...

  13. MR-visible brain water content in human acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Rosenbaum, S; Sperling, B

    1999-01-01

    CBF) SPECT-scanning using 99mTc-HMPAO as flow tracer was performed in the patients. Mean water content (SD) in the infarct area was 37.7 (5.1); 41.8 (4.8); 35.2 (5.4); and 39.3 (5.1) mol x [kg wet weight](-1) at 0-3; 4-7; 8-21; and >180 days after stroke, respectively. Water content increased between Day 0......Quantification of metabolite concentrations by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in the human brain using water as an internal standard is based on the assumption that water content does not change significantly in pathologic brain tissue. To test this, we used 1H-MRS to estimate...... brain water content during the course of cerebral infarction. Measurements were performed serially in the acute, subacute, and chronic phase of infarction. Fourteen patients with acute cerebral infarction were examined as well as 9 healthy controls. To correlate with regional cerebral blood flow (r...

  14. Corneal Confocal Microscopy Detects Corneal Nerve Damage in Patients Admitted With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Adnan; Akhtar, Naveed; Kamran, Saadat; Ponirakis, Georgios; Petropoulos, Ioannis N; Tunio, Nahel A; Dargham, Soha R; Imam, Yahia; Sartaj, Faheem; Parray, Aijaz; Bourke, Paula; Khan, Rabia; Santos, Mark; Joseph, Sujatha; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Malik, Rayaz A

    2017-11-01

    Corneal confocal microscopy can identify corneal nerve damage in patients with peripheral and central neurodegeneration. However, the use of corneal confocal microscopy in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is unknown. One hundred thirty patients (57 without diabetes mellitus [normal glucose tolerance], 32 with impaired glucose tolerance, and 41 with type 2 diabetes mellitus) admitted with acute ischemic stroke, and 28 age-matched healthy control participants underwent corneal confocal microscopy to quantify corneal nerve fiber density, corneal nerve branch density, and corneal nerve fiber length. There was a significant reduction in corneal nerve fiber density, corneal nerve branch density, and corneal nerve fiber length in stroke patients with normal glucose tolerance ( P stroke. Corneal confocal microscopy is a rapid noninvasive ophthalmic imaging technique that identifies corneal nerve fiber loss in patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Interprofessional teamwork in stroke care: Is it visible or important to patients and carers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Gillian; Sims, Sarah; Greenwood, Nan; Jones, Fiona; Ross, Fiona; Harris, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional teamwork is seen in healthcare policy and practice as a key strategy for providing safe, efficient and holistic healthcare and is an accepted part of evidence-based stroke care. The impact of interprofessional teamwork on patient and carer experience(s) of care is unknown, although some research suggests a relationship might exist. This study aimed to explore patient and carer perceptions of good and poor teamwork and its impact on experiences of care. Critical incident interviews were conducted with 50 patients and 33 carers in acute, inpatient rehabilitation and community phases of care within two UK stroke care pathways. An analytical framework, derived from a realist synthesis of 13 'mechanisms' (processes) of interprofessional teamwork, was used to identify positive and negative 'indicators' of teamwork. Participants identified several mechanisms of teamwork, but it was not a subject most talked about readily. This suggests that interprofessional teamwork is not a concept that is particularly important to stroke patients and carers; they do not readily perceive any impacts of teamwork on their experiences. These findings are a salient reminder that what might be expected by healthcare professionals to be important influences on experience may not be perceived to be so by patients and carers.

  16. Impact of nutritional status on long-term functional outcomes of post-acute stroke patients in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hsiu-Chu; Chen, Hsueh-Fen; Peng, Li-Ning; Lin, Ming-Hsien; Chen, Liang-Kung; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Lo, Yuk-Keung; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional status is important in stroke care, but little is known regarding to the prognostic role of nutritional status on long-term functional outcomes among stroke survivors. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate to the prognostic role of nutritional status on long-term functional outcomes among stroke survivors. Data of acute stroke registry in Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital were retrieved for analysis. Overall, 483 patients (mean age = 70.7 ± 10.3 years) with first-ever stroke were found. Among them, 95 patients (19.7%) were malnourished at admission, 310 (mean age = 70.4 ± 10.1 years, 63.5% males) survived for 6 months, and 244 (78.7%) had good functional outcomes. Subjects with poor functional outcomes were older (74.7 ± 8.9 vs. 69.0 ± 10.1 years, p pneumonia upon admission (23.3% vs. 12.7%, p = 0.027), had a longer hospital stay (23.5 ± 13.9 vs. 12.5 ± 8.2 days, p < 0.001), had a higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score (12.9 ± 9.3 vs. 4.9 ± 4.3, p < 0.001), poorer stroke recovery (NIHSS improvement: 6.9% vs. 27.4%, p = 0.005), and poorer functional improvement (Barthel index = BI improvement in the first month: 31.4% vs. 138%, p < 0.001). Older age (odds ratio = OR) = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.03-1.11, p<0.001), baseline NIHSS score (OR = 1.23, 95%CI = 1.15-1.31, p < 0.001) and malnutrition at acute stroke (OR = 2.57, 95%CI: 1.29-5.13, p<0.001) were all independent risk factors for poorer functional outcomes. In conclusion, as a potentially modifiable factor, more attentions should be paid to malnutrition to promote quality of stroke care since the acute stage. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk factors for chest infection in acute stroke: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Sellars, C.; Bowie, L.; Bagg, J.; Sweeney, M.P.; Miller, H.; Tilston, J.; Langhorne, P.; Stott, D. J.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after stroke. We aimed to determine key characteristics that would allow prediction of those patients who are at highest risk for poststroke pneumonia.\\ud \\ud Methods: We studied a series of consecutive patients with acute stroke who were admitted to hospital. Detailed evaluation included the modified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale; the Abbreviated Mental Test; and measures of swallow, respiratory, and o...

  18. New standardized nursing cooperation workflow to reduce stroke thrombolysis delays in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Y

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yan Zhou,1 Zhuojun Xu,2 Jiali Liao,1 Fangming Feng,1 Lai Men,3 Li Xu,2 Yanan He,2 Gang Li2 1Nursing Department, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2Department of Neurology, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Paddington Dental Practice, London, UK Objective: We assessed the effectiveness of a new standardized nursing cooperation workflow in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS to reduce stroke thrombolysis delays.Patients and methods: AIS patients receiving conventional thrombolysis treatment from March to September 2015 were included in the control group, referred to as T0. The intervention group, referred to as T1 group, consisted of AIS patients receiving a new standardized nursing cooperation workflow for intravenous thrombolysis (IVT at the emergency department of Shanghai East Hospital (Shanghai, People’s Republic of China from October 2015 to March 2016. Information was collected on the following therapeutic techniques used: application or not of thrombolysis, computed tomography (CT time, and door-to-needle (DTN time. A nursing coordinator who helped patients fulfill the medical examinations and diagnosis was appointed to T1 group. In addition, a nurse was sent immediately from the stroke unit to the emergency department to aid the thrombolysis treatment.Results: The average value of the door-to-CT initiation time was 38.67±5.21 min in the T0 group, whereas it was 14.39±4.35 min in the T1 group; the average values of CT completion-to-needle time were 55.06±4.82 and 30.26±3.66 min; the average values of DTN time were 100.43±6.05 and 55.68±3.62 min, respectively; thrombolysis time was improved from 12.8% (88/689 in the T0 group to 32.5% (231/712 in the T1 group (all P<0.01. In addition, the new standardized nursing cooperation workflow decreased the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores at 24 h (P<0

  19. Changes in Identity after Aphasic Stroke: Implications for Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Musser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stroke survivors with aphasia experience difficulty associated with their communication disorder. While much has been written about aphasia’s impacts on partners/family, we lack data regarding the psychosocial adjustment of aphasic stroke survivors, with a paucity of data from the patients themselves. Methods. Qualitative study of lived experiences of individuals with poststroke aphasia. Each of the stroke survivors with aphasia completed 3-4 semistructured interviews. In most cases, patients’ partners jointly participated in interviews, which were transcribed and analyzed using techniques derived from grounded theory. Results. 12 patients were interviewed, with the total of 45 interviews over 18 months. Themes included poststroke changes in patients’ relationships and identities, which were altered across several domains including occupational identity, relationship and family roles, and social identity. While all these domains were impacted by aphasia, the impact varied over time. Conclusion. Despite the challenges of interviewing individuals with aphasia, we explored aphasia’s impacts on how individuals experience their identity and develop new identities months and years after stroke. This data has important implications for primary care of patients with aphasia, including the importance of the long-term primary care relationship in supporting psychosocial adjustment to life after aphasic stroke.

  20. Combining MRI with NIH Stroke Scale Thresholds to Predict Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke – Value for Patient Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Pamela W.; Pulli, Benjamin; Copen, William A.; Hirsch, Joshua A.; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele; Schwamm, Lee H.; Wu, Ona; González, R.Gilberto; Yoo, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We sought to validate a previously described model combining clinical and MRI thresholds to predict outcome in acute ischemic stroke in a larger cohort, and evaluate effects of reperfusion therapy and stroke side. Materials and Methods 123 consecutive anterior circulation AIS patients underwent MRI within 6 hours of stroke onset. DWI and PWI volumes were measured. Lesion volume and NIH Stroke Scale Score thresholds were used in models predicting good three-month clinical outcome (mRS 0-2). Patients were stratified by treatment and stroke side. Results ROC analysis demonstrated 95.6% and 100% specificity for DWI > 70mL and NIH Stroke Scale Score > 20 to predict poor outcome, and 92.7% and 91.3% specificity for PWI (mean transit time) 50mL and NIH Stroke Scale Score < 8 to predict good outcome. Combining clinical and imaging thresholds led to 88.8% (71/80) positive predictive value with 65.0% (80/123) prognostic yield. 100 percent specific thresholds for DWI (103 versus 31 mL) and NIHSSS (20 versus 17) to predict poor outcome were significantly higher in treated (intravenous and/or intraarterial) versus untreated patients. Prognostic yield was lower in right versus left-sided strokes for all thresholds (10.4-20.7 vs. 16.9-40.0%). Patients with right-sided strokes had higher 100 percent specific DWI (103.1 vs. 74.8 mL) thresholds for poor outcome, and positive predictive value was lower. Conclusion Our predictive model is validated in a much larger patient cohort. Outcome may be predicted in up to two-thirds of patients, and thresholds are affected by stroke side and reperfusion therapy. PMID:25258369

  1. Variables That Best Differentiate In-Patient Acute Stroke from Stroke-Mimics with Acute Neurological Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Natteru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Strokes and stroke-mimics have been extensively studied in the emergency department setting. Although in-hospital strokes are less studied in comparison to strokes in the emergency department, they are a source of significant direct and indirect costs. Differentiating in-hospital strokes from stroke-mimics is important. Thus, our study aimed to identify variables that can differentiate in-hospital strokes from stroke-mimics. Methods. We present here a retrospective analysis of 93 patients over a one-year period (2009 to 2010, who were evaluated for a concern of in-hospital strokes. Results. About two-thirds (57 of these patients were determined to have a stroke, and the remaining (36 were stroke-mimics. Patients with in-hospital strokes were more likely to be obese (p=0.03, have been admitted to the cardiology service (p=0.01, have atrial fibrillation (p=0.03, have a weak hand or hemiparesis (p=0.03, and have a prior history of stroke (p=0.05, whereas, when the consults were called for “altered mental status” but no other deficits (p<0.0001, it is likely a stroke-mimic. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that in-hospital strokes are a common occurrence, and knowing the variables can aid in their timely diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Acute hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation: population-based study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Niamh

    2014-10-30

    No economic data from population-based studies exist on acute or late hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation (AF-stroke). Such data are essential for policy development, service planning, and cost-effectiveness analysis of new therapeutic agents.

  3. Review article: Acute stroke: basic concents and use of imaging for clinicians

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, M.; Alvarez, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we review basic and some advanced concepts of stroke imaging. The benefits and caveats of both CT and MRI are stressed and we attempt to familiarize the reader with current concepts regarding collateral brain circulation, its nature, and its importance in acute stroke.

  4. Spontaneous swallowing frequency has potential to identify dysphagia in acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Michael A; Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael F

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases, swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute [SPM]) were compared with stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with versus without clinically significant dysphagia. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM, which was compared with a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was used to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis yielded a threshold of SPM≤0.40 that identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5- to 10-minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel.

  5. Spontaneous Swallowing Frequency [Has Potential to] Identify Dysphagia in Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaby, Giselle D; Sia, Isaac; Khanna, Anna; Waters, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Spontaneous swallowing frequency has been described as an index of dysphagia in various health conditions. This study evaluated the potential of spontaneous swallow frequency analysis as a screening protocol for dysphagia in acute stroke. Methods In a cohort of 63 acute stroke cases swallow frequency rates (swallows per minute: SPM) were compared to stroke and swallow severity indices, age, time from stroke to assessment, and consciousness level. Mean differences in SPM were compared between patients with vs. without clinically significant dysphagia. ROC analysis was used to identify the optimal threshold in SPM which was compared to a validated clinical dysphagia examination for identification of dysphagia cases. Time series analysis was employed to identify the minimally adequate time period to complete spontaneous swallow frequency analysis. Results SPM correlated significantly with stroke and swallow severity indices but not with age, time from stroke onset, or consciousness level. Patients with dysphagia demonstrated significantly lower SPM rates. SPM differed by dysphagia severity. ROC analysis yielded a threshold of SPM ≤ 0.40 which identified dysphagia (per the criterion referent) with 0.96 sensitivity, 0.68 specificity, and 0.96 negative predictive value. Time series analysis indicated that a 5 to 10 minute sampling window was sufficient to calculate spontaneous swallow frequency to identify dysphagia cases in acute stroke. Conclusions Spontaneous swallowing frequency presents high potential to screen for dysphagia in acute stroke without the need for trained, available personnel. PMID:24149008

  6. Histologic features of acute thrombi retrieved from stroke patients during mechanical reperfusion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Seong Hwan; Hong, Ran; Choo, In Sung; Heo, Ji Hoe; Nam, Hyo Suk; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hoo Won; Kim, Jin Ho

    2016-12-01

    The histologic features of thrombus may differ according to the stroke subtypes. However, in acute reperfusion therapy, fibrin-specific thrombolytics are used based on the assumption that all thrombi are alike. The histologic characteristics of thrombi were compared between patients with different stroke etiologies. Between April 2010 and March 2012, we analyzed thrombi retrieved from acute stroke patients during mechanical thrombectomy. All thrombi were analyzed using component-specific stains such as Martius scarlet blue for fibrins and immunostaining with CD42b antibody for platelets. The stroke subtypes were determined based on the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification. Among 36 patients, 22 were diagnosed with cardioembolism, 8 with atherothrombosis, and 6 with undetermined etiology. In arteriogenic thrombi, red blood cells were most abundant (56.9 ± 12.2%), and the platelets covered the fibrin layers or were localized at the edge or periphery of the thrombus. In cardiogenic thrombi, fibrin was most abundant (39.5 ± 13.5%), and platelets were clustered within the rich fibrin. Red blood cells proportion was greater in arteriogenic thrombi than in cardiogenic thrombi (p thrombi than in arteriogenic thrombi (p = 0.003). Of six patients with undetermined etiology, the thrombi in five showed histologic features and composition similar to that of cardiogenic thrombi. Acute thrombi showed different histologic features according to the stroke etiology. The distribution of platelets and proportion of red blood cells and fibrin were major distinguishing factors between stroke subtypes. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  7. Signs and symptoms of sleep apnea and acute stroke severity: is sleep apnea neuroprotective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sebastian; Zuniga, Sylvia; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Romano, Jose G; Nolan, Bruce; Chirinos, Julio; Forteza, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    In animal models, brief periods of hypoxemia render the brain tolerant to subsequent ischemic insults. Sleep apnea leads to frequent episodes of nocturnal hypoxemia and may induce ischemic tolerance. Snoring and daytime sleepiness are cardinal symptoms of sleep apnea. We undertook this study to determine differences in stroke severity and early neurologic course in patients at risk for sleep apnea as determined by a sleep questionnaire. Patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke completed the Berlin questionnaire. The Berlin questionnaire examines habitual snoring, daytime sleepiness, presence of hypertension, and body mass index (BMI) and classifies patients into a high or low risk for sleep apnea group. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score was determined on admission and day 5 of hospitalization. Age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, BMI, and stroke mechanism were determined prospectively. We enrolled 190 patients with a mean age of 60 years and 53% were men. The Berlin questionnaire classified 103 patients (54%) at high risk for sleep apnea. The median NIHSS score on admission and day 5 of hospitalization did not differ between the two groups after multivariate analysis. Examined separately, we found no effect of snoring, daytime sleepiness, or BMI on acute stroke severity and outcome. We found that a large number of patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke were at high risk for having sleep apnea. We were not able to show that a constellation of symptoms and features highly suggestive of sleep apnea influenced stroke severity or early neurologic course after acute ischemic stroke.

  8. Feasibility and safety of inducing modest hypothermia in awake patients with acute stroke through surface cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Rasmussen, B H; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig

    2000-01-01

    Hypothermia reduces neuronal damage in animal stroke models. Whether hypothermia is neuroprotective in patients with acute stroke remains to be clarified. In this case-control study, we evaluated the feasibility and safety of inducing modest hypothermia by a surface cooling method in awake patients...

  9. Neighborhood Influences on Emergency Medical Services Use for Acute Stroke: A Population-Based Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurer, William J; Levine, Deborah A; Kerber, Kevin A; Zahuranec, Darin B; Burke, James; Baek, Jonggyu; Sánchez, Brisa; Smith, Melinda A; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2016-03-01

    Delay to hospital arrival limits acute stroke treatment. Use of emergency medical services (EMS) is key in ensuring timely stroke care. We aim to identify neighborhoods with low EMS use and to evaluate whether neighborhood-level factors are associated with EMS use. We conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi project, a population-based stroke surveillance study of ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage cases presenting to emergency departments in Nueces County, TX. The primary outcome was arrival by EMS. The primary exposures were neighborhood resident age, poverty, and violent crime. We estimated the association of neighborhood-level factors with EMS use, using hierarchic logistic regression, controlling for individual factors (stroke severity, ethnicity, and age). During 2000 to 2009 there were 4,004 identified strokes, with EMS use data available for 3,474. Nearly half (49%) of stroke cases arrived by EMS. Adjusted stroke EMS use was lower in neighborhoods with higher family income (odds ratio [OR] 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75 to 0.97) and a larger percentage of older adults (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.56 to 0.89). Individual factors associated with stroke EMS use included white race (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.13 to 1.76) and older age (OR 1.36 per 10-year age increment; 95% CI 1.27 to 1.46). The proportion of neighborhood stroke cases arriving by EMS ranged from 17% to 71%. The fully adjusted model explained only 0.3% (95% CI 0% to 1.1%) of neighborhood EMS stroke use variance, indicating that individual factors are more strongly associated with stroke EMS use than neighborhood factors. Although some neighborhood-level factors were associated with EMS use, patient-level factors explained nearly all variability in stroke EMS use. In this community, strategies to increase EMS use should target individuals rather than specific neighborhoods. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by

  10. Mechanical thrombectomy with snare in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Alejandro; Mayol, Antonio [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Seville (Spain); Martinez, Eva; Gonzalez-Marcos, Jose R.; Gil-Peralta, Alberto [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Department of Neurology, Seville (Spain)

    2007-04-15

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of thrombus extraction using a microsnare in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). This was a prospective, observational, cohort study in which consecutive patients with AIS (<6 hours of ischemia for anterior circulation and <24 hours for posterior circulation) who had been previously excluded from intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) thrombolysis were included and followed-up for 3 months. Mechanical embolectomy with a microsnare of 2-4 mm was undertaken as the first treatment. Low-dose intraarterial thrombolysis or angioplasty was used if needed. TIMI grade and modified Rankin stroke scale (mRSS) score were used to evaluate vessel recanalization and clinical efficacy, respectively. Nine patients (mean age 55 years, range 17-69 years) were included. Their basal mean NIHSS score was 16 (range 12-24). In seven out of the nine patients (77.8%) the clot was removed, giving a TIMI grade of 3 in four patients and TIMI grade 2 in three patients. Occlusion sites were: middle cerebral artery (four), basilar artery (two) and anterior cerebral artery plus middle cerebral artery (one). The mean time for recanalization from the start of the procedure was 50 min (range 50-75 min). At 3 months, the mRSS score was 0 in two patients and 3-4 in three patients (two patients died). According to our results, the microsnare is a safe procedure for mechanical thrombectomy with a good recanalization rate. Further studies are required to determine the role of the microsnare in the treatment of AIS. (orig.)

  11. Dehydration is an independent predictor of discharge outcome and admission cost in acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C-H; Lin, S-C; Lin, J-R; Yang, J-T; Chang, Y-J; Chang, C-H; Chang, T-Y; Huang, K-L; Ryu, S-J; Lee, T-H

    2014-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate the influence of admission dehydration on the discharge outcome in acute ischaemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Between January 2009 and December 2011, 4311 ischaemic and 1371 hemorrhagic stroke patients from the stroke registry of Chang Gung healthcare system were analyzed. The eligible patients were identified according to inclusion/exclusion criteria. In total, 2570 acute ischaemic and 573 acute hemorrhagic stroke patients were finally recruited. According to the blood urea nitrogen (BUN) to creatinine (Cr) ratio (BUN/Cr), these patients were divided into dehydrated (BUN/Cr ≥ 15) and non-dehydrated (BUN/Cr dehydration had higher infection rates (P = 0.006), worse discharge BI (62.8 ± 37.4 vs. 73.4 ± 32.4, P dehydration. However, acute hemorrhagic stroke with or without admission dehydration showd no difference in admission costs (P = 0.618) and discharge outcomes (BI, P = 0.058; mRS, P = 0.058). Admission dehydration is associated with worse discharge outcomes and higher admission costs in acute ischaemic stroke but not in hemorrhagic stroke. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  12. Does spasticity interfere with functional recovery after stroke? A novel approach to understand, measure and treat spasticity after acute stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malhotra, S.; Malhotra, Shweta

    2013-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis is on identifying if spasticity on the wrist after an acute stroke interferes with functional recovery of the upper limb.This randomized study demonstrated that sNMES treatment along with standardized upper limb therapy improves muscle strength for wrist extension

  13. Autonomic symptoms in hypertensive patients with post-acute minor ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idiaquez, Juan; Farias, Hector; Torres, Francisco; Vega, Jorge; Low, David A

    2015-12-01

    Most studies regarding autonomic dysfunction in ischemic stroke are limited to heart rate and blood pressure changes during the acute phase. However, there are few data on quantitative assessment of autonomic symptoms. We sought to assess autonomic symptoms in hypertensive ischemic stroke patients. In 100 hypertensive patients (45 with symptomatic ischemic stroke (6 months after stroke onset) and 55 without stroke), we assessed autonomic symptoms using the Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson disease-Autonomic (SCOPA-AUT). The age (mean ± standard deviation) for the stroke group was 66 ± 12 and 63 ± 15 for the without stroke group (P=0.8). Orthostatic hypotension occurred in 3.6% of the stroke group and 4.4% in the group without stroke. The total SCOPA-AUT score was higher in the stroke group compared with the group without stroke (P=0.001). Domain scores for gastrointestinal (P=0.001), urinary (P=0.005) and cardiovascular (P=0.001) were higher in the stroke group. No differences were found when comparing the total SCOPA-AUT scores for stroke subtypes (P=0.168) and for lateralization (P=0.6). SCOPA AUT scores were correlated with depression scores (P=0.001) but not with stroke severity (P=0.2). Autonomic symptoms, especially, gastrointestinal, urinary and cardiovascular function, were significantly increased in hypertensive patients with minor ischemic stroke. Symptoms were associated with depression but not with the characteristic of the stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative Measurement of Physical Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to quantitatively measure and describe the amount and pattern of physical activity in patients within the first week after acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack using accelerometers. METHODS: A total of 100 patients with acute is...... ischemic stroke. The method offers a low cost and noninvasive tool for future clinical interventional physiotherapeutic and early mobilization studies. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01560520....

  15. Feasibility and safety of acute phase rehabilitation after stroke using the hybrid assistive limb robot suit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueba, Tetsuya; Hamada, Omi; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Inoue, Tooru; Shiota, Etsuji; Sankai, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Acute phase rehabilitation is an important treatment for improving the functional outcome of patients after stroke. The present cohort study analyzed the feasibility and safety of acute phase rehabilitation using the hybrid assistive limb robot suit in 22 patients, 7 males and 15 females (mean age 66.6 ± 17.7 years). Neurological deterioration, mortality, or other accidents were recorded as adverse events. Baseline characteristics of each patient were recorded at the first hybrid assistive limb rehabilitation. Hybrid assistive limb rehabilitation was conducted for 12.1 ± 7.0 days with the patients in stable condition. Acute phase hybrid assistive limb rehabilitation was performed a total of 84 times with no adverse events recorded except for orthostatic hypotension. Good functional outcomes were obtained in 14 patients. Orthostatic hypotension was observed during the first hybrid assistive limb rehabilitation in four patients, and was significantly associated with intracerebral hemorrhage (p = 0.007) and lower Brunnstrom stage (p = 0.033). Acute phase rehabilitation using the hybrid assistive limb suit is feasible and safe. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and lower Brunnstrom stage should be carefully monitored for orthostatic hypotension.

  16. The Norwegian tenecteplase stroke trial (NOR-TEST): randomised controlled trial of tenecteplase vs. alteplase in acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logallo, Nicola; Kvistad, Christopher E; Nacu, Aliona; Naess, Halvor; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Asmuss, Jörg; Aamodt, Anne Hege; Lund, Christian; Kurz, Martin W; Rønning, Ole Morten; Salvesen, Rolf; Idicula, Titto T; Thomassen, Lars

    2014-05-15

    Alteplase is the only approved thrombolytic agent for acute ischaemic stroke. The overall benefit from alteplase is substantial, but some evidence indicates that alteplase also has negative effects on the ischaemic brain. Tenecteplase may be more effective and less harmfull than alteplase, but large randomised controlled phase 3 trials are lacking. The Norwegian Tenecteplase Stroke Trial (NOR-TEST) aims to compare efficacy and safety of tenecteplase vs. alteplase. NOR-TEST is a multi-centre PROBE (prospective randomised, open-label, blinded endpoint) trial designed to establish superiority of tenecteplase 0.4 mg/kg (single bolus) as compared with alteplase 0.9 mg/kg (10% bolus + 90% infusion/60 minutes) for consecutively admitted patients with acute ischaemic stroke eligible for thrombolytic therapy, i.e. patients a) admitted <4½ hours after symptoms onset; b) admitted <4½ hours after awakening with stroke symptoms c) receiving bridging therapy before embolectomy.Randomisation tenecteplase:alteplase is 1:1. The primary study endpoint is favourable functional outcome defined as modified Rankin Scale 0-1 at 90 days. Secondary study endpoints are: 1) haemorrhagic transformation (haemorrhagic infarct/haematoma); 2) symptomatic cerebral haemorrhage on CT 24-48 hours; 3) major neurological improvement at 24 hours; 4) recanalisation at 24-36 hours; 5) death. NOR-TEST may establish a novel approach to acute ischaemic stroke treatment. A positive result will lead to a more effective, safer and easier treatment for all acute ischaemic stroke pasients.NOR-TEST is reviewed and approved by the Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics (2011/2435), and The Norwegian Medicines Agency (12/01402). NOR-TEST is registered with EudraCT No 2011-005793-33 and in ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01949948).

  17. Prognosis and outcome of acute stroke in the University College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-02

    Mar 2, 2011 ... pathological process of blood vessel.[1] The incidence of stroke is 254/100,000 person years ... usually due to the consequences of immobilization, recurrent seizures, and stroke recurrence.[12] Because of .... gender and aging are known non-modifiable risk factors for stroke and several non-communicable ...

  18. Feasibility and Diagnostic Value of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Acute Ischemic Stroke of Undetermined Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, Karl Georg; Wollboldt, Christian; Bentheim, Laura Zu; Herm, Juliane; Jäger, Sebastian; Kunze, Claudia; Eberle, Holger-Carsten; Deluigi, Claudia Christina; Bruder, Oliver; Malsch, Carolin; Heuschmann, Peter U; Endres, Matthias; Audebert, Heinrich J; Morguet, Andreas J; Jensen, Christoph; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2017-05-01

    Etiology of acute ischemic stroke remains undetermined (cryptogenic) in about 25% of patients after state-of-the-art diagnostic work-up. One-hundred and three patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-proven acute ischemic stroke of undetermined origin were prospectively enrolled and underwent 3-T cardiac MRI and magnetic resonance angiography of the aortic arch in addition to state-of-the-art diagnostic work-up, including transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). We analyzed the feasibility, diagnostic accuracy, and added value of cardiovascular MRI (cvMRI) compared with TEE for detecting sources of stroke. Overall, 102 (99.0%) ischemic stroke patients (median 63 years [interquartile range, 53-72], 24% female, median NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale) score on admission 2 [interquartile range, 1-4]) underwent cvMRI and TEE in hospital; 89 (86.4%) patients completed the cvMRI examination. In 93 cryptogenic stroke patients, a high-risk embolic source was found in 9 (8.7%) patients by cvMRI and in 11 (11.8%) patients by echocardiography, respectively. cvMRI and echocardiography findings were consistent in 80 (86.0%) patients, resulting in a degree of agreement of κ=0.24. In 82 patients with cryptogenic stroke according to routine work-up, including TEE, cvMRI identified stroke etiology in additional 5 (6.1%) patients. Late gadolinium enhancement consistent with previous myocardial infarction was found in 13 (14.6%) out of 89 stroke patients completing cvMRI. Only 2 of these 13 patients had known coronary artery disease. Our study demonstrated that cvMRI was feasible in the vast majority of included patients with acute ischemic stroke. The diagnostic information of cvMRI seems to be complementary to TEE but is not replacing echocardiography after acute ischemic stroke. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01917955. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Outcome of acute ischemic stroke after intra-arterial thrombolysis: A study from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Jaydip Ray; Kumar, Randhir; Umamahesh, Matapathi; Mridula, Kandadai Rukmini; Alladi, Suvarnal; Bandaru, Srinivasarao

    2016-10-07

    Background: Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is the currently standard treatment of acute ischemic stroke within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke. Recent studies have looked at the benefits of administration of intra-arterial (IA) rt-PA within 8 hours onset of symptoms. Our objective was to assess the outcome of stroke after administration of IA rt-PA in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: We recruited 10 consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients with onset of stroke from 4.5 hours to 6.5 hours. The present study was conducted at Yashoda Hospital, Hyderabad, India, between January 2008 and December 2013. All patients underwent stroke subtyping and were administered rt-PA. We measured the thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (TICI) score after thrombolysis and functional outcomes at time of admission, after 24 hours, 30, 60, and 90 days. A good outcome was defined as modified Rankin Scale (mRS) ≤ 2 after 90 days. Results: Out of 10 patients 9 were men, mean age 56.3 ± 1.8 years and age range from 35-68 years. On stroke subtyping, 6 (60%) patients had large artery atherosclerosis, 3 (30%) had a stroke of indeterminate etiology and 1 (10%) had a stroke of other etiologies. Mean time of recanalization was 6.2 ± 0.5 hours, 7 (70%) patients showed major neurological improvement with a mRS score of ≤ 2 at 90 days and one patient was lost to follow-up. Conclusion: Our study established good outcome at 90 days after administration of IA thrombolysis rt-PA in acute ischemic stroke.

  20. Patterns of Acute Ischemic Strokes After Carotid Endarterectomy and Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lareyre, Fabien; Raffort, Juliette; Weill, Caroline; Marsé, Claire; Suissa, Laurent; Chikande, Julien; Hassen-Khodja, Réda; Jean-Baptiste, Elixène

    2017-10-01

    Acute ischemic strokes following surgical treatment of carotid stenosis lead to substantial disability and mortality, and vascular mechanisms underlying their development are not fully elucidated. The goal of this study was to analyze the topographic patterns of acute ischemic stroke following carotid endarterectomy (CEA) on diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Data were retrospectively collected from consecutive patients who underwent CEA and developed postoperative acute ischemic stroke. Based on the MRI data sets, the lesion patterns of acute stoke were characterized. Morphology of the circle of Willis, the 3-D time-of-flight (3D-TOF) of the cerebral arteries, and status of the carotid circulation were also analyzed in order to determine the vascular mechanisms involved in stroke development. Between January 2008 and May 2015, 821 patients were treated surgically for a symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis at the University Hospital of Nice. Nineteen (2.3%) patients had an acute ischemic stroke after surgery. Among them, 11 (57.9%) patients had a territorial infarction and 8 (42.1%) patients had an internal watershed infarction, cortical watershed infarction, or mixed border zone infarction. According to imaging data sets, embolic mechanism of stroke was reported for 12 (63.2%) patients, hemodynamic mechanism for 2 (10.5%) patients, and mixed mechanism for 5 (26.3%) patients. An asymmetry on 3D-TOF was observed in 60% and 50% of patients with hemodynamic and mixed stroke and in 25% of patients with embolic stroke. The latter 2 patients with embolic stroke underwent successful mechanical thrombectomy using stent-retriever devices. In this cohort, embolic mechanism leading to postoperative stroke was more frequently observed than hemodynamic mechanism. Immediate characterization of the cerebral lesion by postoperative brain MRI is of utmost importance because it may rapidly identify patients eligible for treatments

  1. Red cell distribution width and neurological scoring systems in acute stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Kara,1 Selim Degirmenci,1 Aysegul Bayir,1 Ahmet Ak,1 Murat Akinci,1 Ali Dogru,1 Fikret Akyurek,2 Seyit Ali Kayis3 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey; 2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey; 3Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Karabuk University, Karabuk, Turkey Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the association between the red blood cell distribution width (RDW and the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, Canadian Neurological Scale (CNS, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores in patients who had acute ischemic stroke. Methods: This prospective observational cohort study included 88 patients who have had acute ischemic stroke and a control group of 40 patients who were evaluated in the Emergency Department for disorders other than acute ischemic stroke. All subjects had RDW determined, and stroke patients had scoring with the GCS, CNS, and NIHSS scores. The GCS, CNS, and NIHSS scores of the patients were rated as mild, moderate, or severe and compared with RDW. Results: Stroke patients had significantly higher median RDW than control subjects. The median RDW values were significantly elevated in patients who had more severe rather than milder strokes rated with all three scoring systems (GCS, CNS, and NIHSS. The median RDW values were significantly elevated for patients who had moderate rather than mild strokes rated by GCS and CNS and for patients who had severe rather than mild strokes rated by NIHSS. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.760 (95% confidence interval, 0.676–0.844. Separation of stroke patients and control groups was optimal with RDW 14% (sensitivity, 71.6%; specificity, 67.5%; accuracy, 70.3%. Conclusion: In stroke patients who have symptoms <24 hours, the RDW may be useful in predicting the severity and functional outcomes of the stroke

  2. Dysphagia and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Acute, First-Ever, Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losurdo, Anna; Brunetti, Valerio; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Caliandro, Pietro; Frisullo, Giovanni; Morosetti, Roberta; Pilato, Fabio; Profice, Paolo; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Sacchetti, Maria Luisa; Testani, Elisa; Vollono, Catello; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2018-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and dysphagia are common in acute stroke and are both associated with increased risk of complications and worse prognosis. The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate the prevalence of OSA and dysphagia in patients with acute, first-ever, ischemic stroke; (2) to investigate their clinical correlates; and (3) to verify if these conditions are associated in acute ischemic stroke. We enrolled a cohort of 140 consecutive patients with acute-onset (<48 hours), first-ever ischemic stroke. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging scans confirmed the diagnosis. Neurological deficit was measured using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) by examiners trained and certified in the use of this scale. Patients underwent a clinical evaluation of dysphagia (Gugging Swallowing Screen) and a cardiorespiratory sleep study to evaluate the presence of OSA. There are 72 patients (51.4%) with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA+), and there are 81 patients (57.8%) with dysphagia (Dys+). OSA+ patients were significantly older (P = .046) and had greater body mass index (BMI) (P = .002), neck circumference (P = .001), presence of diabetes (P = .013), and hypertension (P < .001). Dys+ patients had greater NIHSS (P < .001), lower Alberta Stroke Programme Early CT Score (P < .001), with greater BMI (P = .030). The association of OSA and dysphagia was greater than that expected based on the prevalence of each condition in acute stroke (P < .001). OSA and dysphagia are associated in first-ever, acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Informal care giving for disabled stroke survivors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hankey, Graeme J

    2004-01-01

    ... provided in a nursing home, hostel, or the home of the patient or carer, often after a period of care and rehabilitation in hospital. Additional formal support may sometimes be forthcoming from community nursing services and allied health and social services. But the onus of caring for such patients at home usually falls on one or m...

  4. A pragmatic approach to sonothrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke: the Norwegian randomised controlled sonothrombolysis in acute stroke study (NOR-SASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Aliona; Kvistad, Christopher E; Logallo, Nicola; Naess, Halvor; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike; Aamodt, Anne Hege; Solhoff, Ragnar; Lund, Christian; Tobro, Håkon; Rønning, Ole Morten; Salvesen, Rolf; Idicula, Titto T; Thomassen, Lars

    2015-07-11

    Ultrasound accelerates thrombolysis with tPA (sonothrombolysis). Ultrasound in the absence of tPA also accelerates clot break-up (sonolysis). Adding intravenous gaseous microbubbles may potentiate the effect of ultrasound in both sonothrombolysis and sonolysis. The Norwegian Sonothrombolysis in Acute Stroke Study aims in a pragmatic approach to assess the effect and safety of contrast enhanced ultrasound treatment in unselected acute ischaemic stroke patients. Acute ischaemic stroke patients ≥ 18 years, with or without visible arterial occlusion on computed tomography angiography (CTA) and treatable ≤ 4(½) hours after symptom onset, are included in NOR-SASS. NOR-SASS is superimposed on a separate trial randomising patients with acute ischemic stroke to either tenecteplase or alteplase (The Norwegian Tenecteplase Stroke Trial NOR-TEST). The NOR-SASS trial has two arms: 1) the thrombolysis-arms (NOR-SASS A and B) includes patients given intravenous thrombolysis (tenecteplase or alteplase), and 2) the no-thrombolysis-arm (NOR-SASS C) includes patients with contraindications to thrombolysis. First step randomisation of NOR-SASS A is embedded in NOR-TEST as a 1:1 randomisation to either tenecteplase or alteplase. Second step NOR-SASS randomisation is 1:1 to either contrast enhanced sonothrombolysis (CEST) or sham CEST. Randomisation in NOR-SASS B (routine alteplase group) is 1:1 to either CEST or sham CEST. Randomisation of NOR-SASS C is 1:1 to either contrast enhanced sonolysis (CES) or sham CES. Ultrasound is given for one hour using a 2-MHz pulsed-wave diagnostic ultrasound probe. Microbubble contrast (SonoVue®) is given as a continuous infusion for ~30 min. Recanalisation is assessed at 60 min after start of CEST/CES. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography is performed after 24 h of stroke onset. Primary study endpoints are 1) major neurological improvement measured with NIHSS score at 24 h and 2) favourable functional outcome defined as mRS 0-1 at 90 days

  5. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintensity in acute ischemic stroke may not predict hemorrhagic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bruce C V; Costello, Craig; Christensen, Søren; Ebinger, Martin; Parsons, Mark W; Desmond, Patricia M; Barber, P Alan; Butcher, Kenneth S; Levi, Christopher R; De Silva, Deidre A; Lansberg, Maarten G; Mlynash, Michael; Olivot, Jean-Marc; Straka, Matus; Bammer, Roland; Albers, Gregory W; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Davis, Stephen M

    2011-01-01

    Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensity within an acute cerebral infarct may reflect delayed onset time and increased risk of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Given the important implications for clinical practice, we examined the prevalence of FLAIR hyperintensity in patients 3-6 h from stroke onset and its relationship to parenchymal hematoma (PH). Baseline DWI and FLAIR imaging with subsequent hemorrhage detection (ECASS criteria) were prospectively obtained in patients 3-6 h after stroke onset from the pooled EPITHET and DEFUSE trials. FLAIR hyperintensity within the region of the acute DWI lesion was rated qualitatively (dichotomized as visually obvious or subtle (i.e. only visible after careful windowing)) and quantitatively (using relative signal intensity (RSI)). The association of FLAIR hyperintensity with hemorrhage was then tested alongside established predictors (very low cerebral blood volume (VLCBV) and diffusion (DWI) lesion volume) in logistic regression analysis. There were 49 patients with pre-treatment FLAIR imaging (38 received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), 5 developed PH). FLAIR hyperintensity within the region of acute DWI lesion occurred in 48/49 (98%) patients, was obvious in 18/49 (37%) and subtle in 30/49 (61%). Inter-rater agreement was 92% (κ = 0.82). The prevalence of obvious FLAIR hyperintensity did not differ between studies obtained in the 3-4.5 h and 4.5-6 h time periods (40% vs. 33%, p = 0.77). PH was poorly predicted by obvious FLAIR hyperintensity (sensitivity 40%, specificity 64%, positive predictive value 11%). In univariate logistic regression, VLCBV (p = 0.02) and DWI lesion volume (p = 0.03) predicted PH but FLAIR lesion volume (p = 0.87) and RSI (p = 0.11) did not. In ordinal logistic regression for hemorrhage grade adjusted for age and baseline stroke severity (NIHSS), increased VLCBV (p = 0.002) and DWI lesion volume (p = 0.003) were associated with hemorrhage but FLAIR lesion volume (p = 0.66) and

  6. Reliability and validity of the de Morton Mobility Index in individuals with sub-acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Tobias; Marks, Detlef; Thiel, Christian; Grüneberg, Christian

    2018-02-04

    To establish the validity and reliability of the de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) in patients with sub-acute stroke. This cross-sectional study was performed in a neurological rehabilitation hospital. We assessed unidimensionality, construct validity, internal consistency reliability, inter-rater reliability, minimal detectable change and possible floor and ceiling effects of the DEMMI in adult patients with sub-acute stroke. The study included a total sample of 121 patients with sub-acute stroke. We analysed validity (n = 109) and reliability (n = 51) in two sub-samples. Rasch analysis indicated unidimensionality with an overall fit to the model (chi-square = 12.37, p = 0.577). All hypotheses on construct validity were confirmed. Internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94) and inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.95; 95% confidence interval: 0.92-0.97) were excellent. The minimal detectable change with 90% confidence was 13 points. No floor or ceiling effects were evident. These results indicate unidimensionality, sufficient internal consistency reliability, inter-rater reliability, and construct validity of the DEMMI in patients with a sub-acute stroke. Advantages of the DEMMI in clinical application are the short administration time, no need for special equipment and interval level data. The de Morton Mobility Index, therefore, may be a useful performance-based bedside test to measure mobility in individuals with a sub-acute stroke across the whole mobility spectrum. Implications for Rehabilitation The de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) is an unidimensional measurement instrument of mobility in individuals with sub-acute stroke. The DEMMI has excellent internal consistency and inter-rater reliability, and sufficient construct validity. The minimal detectable change of the DEMMI with 90% confidence in stroke rehabilitation is 13 points. The lack of any floor or ceiling effects on hospital admission indicates

  7. Research progress of endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke: Chinese scholars' reports published abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji LIU

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Stroke has become the leading common cause of disability and the second most common cause of death in China. Endovascular treatment emerged in recent years as a promising treatment method with a higher recanalization rate and better functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large vessel occlusion. This paper selected 4 high-quality retrospective studies by Chinese scholars regarding endovascular treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke, which were published in foreign journals during past 3 years, and focused on study methods and results. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.11.003

  8. Use of acupuncture therapy as a supplement to conventional medical treatments for acute ischaemic stroke patients in an academic medical centre in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyejung; Kwon, Young Dae; Yoon, Sung Sang

    2011-10-01

    Acupuncture has served as a major complementary and alternative therapy that supplements conventional medicine and is the subject of growing public interest. This study was conducted to estimate the usage rate of acupuncture as a supplemental treatment in acute ischaemic stroke patients and to identify factors associated with the choice to use this therapy. Using the registry of stroke patients admitted to an academic medical centre in Korea, the use of acupuncture therapy was recorded and analysed, along with the patients' socio-demographic characteristics, hospital access variables, risk factors for ischaemic stroke and clinical characteristics. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression analyses. Of 2167 patients, 18% received acupuncture therapy. The choice of acupuncture therapy was significantly associated with stroke severity as well as gender, age, geographical residence and previous history of stroke. After controlling for other significant factors, there was an approximately 3.4-fold greater usage in patients with moderately severe strokes (95% confidence interval (CI)=2.5-4.6) and 4.1-fold greater usage in patients with severe strokes (95% CI=2.7-6.4). The findings provide a better understanding of patients' utilization of acupuncture therapy as a supplement to conventional medical treatments and of factors associated with the utilization of acupuncture in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Strategic implications of acupuncture therapy are suggested for both health-care providers and policy makers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Current Canadian And American Experiences In The Treatment Of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Dolati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke remains one of the main public health issues worldwide. It is the third leading cause of death in the United States, with more than 200,000 people dying from strokes each year. Approximately 80% of all acute ischemic strokes are due to intracranial artery occlusion, most commonly thromboembolic clot occlusion. Revascularization of occluded territories is the cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke and Thrombolysis for ischemic stroke has been systematically studied in large randomized trials only since the 1990s. To date, thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke has been investigated in 21 randomized controlled clinical trials enrolling more than 7,000 patients. The advent of modern imaging and endovascular tools and technology has revolutionized treatment of stroke. In this talk, I will review current clinical trials published in The NEJM (ESCAPE, MR Clean, EXTENDED IA, …. regarding superiority of the endovascular treatments, especially, the stent retrievers, over Iv tPA. I will also go over all endovascular techniques used in the endovascular treatment of acute stroke using my Canadian and American experiences.

  10. Current Canadian And American Experiences In The Treatment Of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Dolati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke remains one of the main public health issues worldwide. It is the third leading cause of death in the United States, with more than 200,000 people dying from strokes each year. Approximately 80% of all acute ischemic strokes are due to intracranial artery occlusion, most commonly thromboembolic clot occlusion. Revascularization of occluded territories is the cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke and Thrombolysis for ischemic stroke has been systematically studied in large randomized trials only since the 1990s. To date, thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke has been investigated in 21 randomized controlled clinical trials enrolling more than 7,000 patients. The advent of modern imaging and endovascular tools and technologyhas revolutionized treatment of stroke. In this talk, I will review current clinical trials published in The NEJM (ESCAPE, MR Clean, EXTENDED IA, …. regarding superiority of the endovascular treatments, especially, the stent retrievers, over Iv tPA. I will also go over all endovascular techniques used in the endovascular treatment of acute stroke using my Canadian and American experiences.

  11. Constraint-induced movement therapy for the upper paretic limb in acute or sub-acute stroke: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijland, Rinske; Kwakkel, Gert; Bakers, Japie; van Wegen, Erwin

    2011-10-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy is a commonly used intervention to improve upper limb function after stroke. However, the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy and its optimal dosage during acute or sub-acute stroke is still under debate. To examine the literature on the effects of constraint-induced movement therapy in acute or sub-acute stroke. A literature search was performed to identify randomized, controlled trials; studies with the same outcome measure were pooled by calculating the mean difference. Separate quantitative analyses for high-intensity and low-intensity constraint-induced movement therapy were applied when possible. Five randomized, controlled trials were included, comprising 106 participants. The meta-analysis demonstrated significant mean differences in favor of constraint-induced movement therapy for the Fugl-Meyer arm, the Action Research Arm Test, the Motor Activity Log, Quality of Movement and the Grooved Pegboard Test. Nonsignificant mean difference in favor of constraint-induced movement therapy were found for the Motor Activity Log, Amount of Use. Separate analyses for high-intensity and low-intensity constraint-induced movement therapy resulted in significant favorable mean differences for low-intensity constraint-induced movement therapy for all outcome measures, in contrast to high-intensity constraint-induced movement therapy. This meta-analysis demonstrates a trend toward positive effects of high-intensity and low-intensity constraint-induced movement therapy in acute or sub-acute stroke, but also suggests that low-intensity constraint-induced movement therapy may be more beneficial during this period than high-intensity constraint-induced movement therapy. However, these results were based on a small number of studies. Therefore, more trials are needed applying different doses of therapy early after stroke and a better understanding is needed about the different time windows in which underlying mechanisms of

  12. Cardiac myxoma causing acute ischemic stroke in a pediatric patient and a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Jennifer; Leszczyszyn, David; Mathew, Don

    2014-05-01

    Ischemic stroke in the pediatric population is a rare occurrence, and its possible causes span a wide differential that includes atrial myxomas. Myxomas are friable cardiac tumors that produce "showers" of emboli resulting in transient neurological deficits, cutaneous eruptions, and ophthalmologic deficits. We present an 11-year-old boy with a months-long history of an intermittent spotted "rash" who presented with acute ischemic stroke caused by a left atrial myxoma. We also review clinical features in all 16 other cases of cardiac myxoma causing pediatric stroke reported in the literature. Our case, along with the review of the literature, highlights the fact that myxomas often initially present as stroke with acute hemiplegia and transient cutaneous eruptions due to fragmentation of the tumor. Cardiac myxoma should be considered in any child presenting with ischemic stroke, and transient skin findings may provide an important diagnostic clue prior to onset of neurological symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Identifying palliative care issues in inpatients dying following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntlholang, O; Walsh, S; Bradley, D; Harbison, J

    2016-08-01

    Stroke leads to high mortality and morbidity but often there is a conflict between need for palliative care and avoidance of 'therapeutic nihilism'. We aimed to elicit the palliative care needs of stroke patients at the end of their lives in our unit with a low overall mortality rate (1 month: 8.8 %, inpatient: 12.9 %). We identified consecutive stroke patients who died over 2 years. Their clinical records were used for data collection. Of 54 deaths, 33 (61.1 %) were females, mean (SD) age at death was 79.3 ± 12.9 years. 41 (75.9 %) died after first stroke, 9 (16.7 %) were inpatient strokes, 7 (13.0 %) thrombolysed and 7 (13.0 %) had strokes as treatment complication. There were clear statements recorded in 26 (48.1 %) that patients were dying and death was thought to be due primarily to extent of brain injury in 24 (44.4 %). Palliative needs identified included dyspnoea 21 (38.9 %), pain 17 (31.5 %), respiratory secretions 17 (31.5 %), agitation 14 (25.9 %) and psychological distress 1 (1.9 %). Symptoms were due to premorbid diseases in 6 (11.1 %). Palliative care expertise were sought in 13 (24.1 %) and continuous subcutaneous infusion was used in 18 (33.3 %) to control symptoms. 4 (7.4 %) subjects underwent cardiac arrest calls and 9 (16.7 %) deaths occurred in ICU/HDU. The median Stroke-Death interval was 20 days (range 0-389). Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR) orders were in place in 86.8 % of patients. The median DNAR-Death interval was 7 days (range 0-311) with 7-day DNAR-Death rate of 53.2 % and 30-day of 78.7 % of the total deaths. Dyspnoea, pain and respiratory secretions were identified as the main palliative care needs.

  14. An Early Mobilization Protocol Successfully Delivers More and Earlier Therapy to Acute Stroke Patients: Further Results From Phase II of AVERT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Renske; Cumming, T.; Churilov, L.; Donnan, G.; Bernhardt, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The optimal physical therapy dose in acute stroke care is unknown. The authors hypothesized that physical therapy would be significantly different between treatment arms in a trial of very early and frequent mobilization (VEM) and that immobility-related adverse events would be

  15. Association of dimethylarginines and mediators of inflammation after acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shufen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA are accompanied by endothelial dysfunction and predict adverse outcome after ischemic stroke. Via induction of oxidative stress, dimethylarginines are possibly linked to the inflammatory cascade after stroke that is known to considerably contribute to secondary progression of brain injury. We sought to investigate the association between dimethylarginines and inflammatory mediators in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods Plasma levels of ADMA and SDMA were measured in prospectively collected blood samples of 58 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Blood samples were taken at 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days after onset of symptoms. Analyses of ADMA and SDMA were done by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP and S100B as markers of inflammation and brain damage were determined by commercially available immunometric assays. Patient data were compared with control data from 32 age-adjusted healthy volunteers. Baseline stroke severity was evaluated by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS (NIHSS 0 to 1: mild stroke; NIHSS 2 to 8: moderate stroke; NIHSS ≥9: severe stroke. Results Plasma ADMA and SDMA levels significantly correlated with blood levels of inflammatory mediators up to day 7 after stroke. On multiple stepwise linear regression analysis ADMA correlated with TIMP-1 at 6 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days, MMP-9 at 12 hours and IL-6 at 7 days (P P Conclusions The levels of the vasoactive compound ADMA as well as levels of its structural isomer SDMA are associated with levels of inflammatory mediators after acute ischemic stroke. Further studies need to elucidate the cause and effect relationship

  16. Spontaneous Low Frequency Oscillations in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillip, Dorte; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2014-01-01

    patients admitted to the stroke unit with symptoms of ischemic stroke. 11/29 patients received thrombolytic therapy. NIRS examination was conducted 2 days (median time) from stroke onset. NIRS optodes were placed on each side of the head with a 3 cm source-detector distance. Using transfer function.......09-0.11 Hz range are affected by changes in cerebral autoregulation (CA), which is altered following stroke. We examined oxyHb LFOs at bed-side as a marker of CA in the subacute phase in stroke patients with or without recombinant tissue plasminogen activator thrombolytic therapy. Methods: We recruited 29...... analysis, inter-hemispheric phase shift and amplitude ratio of the oxyHb oscillations in the 0.09-0.11 Hz range were assessed. Results: The correlation between NIHSS scores at admission and oxyHb parameters revealed a significant positive correlation between stroke severity at admission and inter...

  17. Preventive antibacterial therapy in acute ischemic stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Harms

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pneumonia is a major risk factor of death after acute stroke. In a mouse model, preventive antibacterial therapy with moxifloxacin not only prevents the development of post-stroke infections, it also reduces mortality, and improves neurological outcome significantly. In this study we investigate whether this approach is effective in stroke patients. METHODS: Preventive ANtibacterial THERapy in acute Ischemic Stroke (PANTHERIS is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 80 patients with severe, non-lacunar, ischemic stroke (NIHSS>11 in the middle cerebral artery (MCA territory. Patients received either intravenous moxifloxacin (400 mg daily or placebo for 5 days starting within 36 hours after stroke onset. Primary endpoint was infection within 11 days. Secondary endpoints included neurological outcome, survival, development of stroke-induced immunodepression, and induction of bacterial resistance. FINDINGS: On intention-to treat analysis (79 patients, the infection rate at day 11 in the moxifloxacin treated group was 15.4% compared to 32.5% in the placebo treated group (p = 0.114. On per protocol analysis (n = 66, moxifloxacin significantly reduced infection rate from 41.9% to 17.1% (p = 0.032. Stroke associated infections were associated with a lower survival rate. In this study, neurological outcome and survival were not significantly influenced by treatment with moxifloxacin. Frequency of fluoroquinolone resistance in both treatment groups did not differ. On logistic regression analysis, treatment arm as well as the interaction between treatment arm and monocytic HLA-DR expression (a marker for immunodepression at day 1 after stroke onset was independently and highly predictive for post-stroke infections. INTERPRETATION: PANTHERIS suggests that preventive administration of moxifloxacin is superior in reducing infections after severe non-lacunar ischemic stroke compared to placebo. In addition, the results emphasize

  18. Soluble CXCL16 and long-term outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ueland, T; Smedbakken, L M; Hallén, J

    2012-01-01

    CXCL16 is a chemokine involved in atherosclerosis by promoting inflammation, lipid accumulation and matrix degradation. The level of circulating CXCL16 has been proposed as a predictor of long-term mortality in acute coronary syndromes. We studied plasma CXCL16 in acute ischemic stroke and examin...

  19. Structural Integrity of Normal Appearing White Matter and Sex-Specific Outcomes After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etherton, Mark R; Wu, Ona; Cougo, Pedro; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Cloonan, Lisa; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin M; Kanakis, Allison S; Boulouis, Gregoire; Karadeli, Hasan H; Lauer, Arne; Rosand, Jonathan; Furie, Karen L; Rost, Natalia S

    2017-12-01

    Women have worse poststroke outcomes than men. We evaluated sex-specific clinical and neuroimaging characteristics of white matter in association with functional recovery after acute ischemic stroke. We performed a retrospective analysis of acute ischemic stroke patients with admission brain MRI and 3- to 6-month modified Rankin Scale score. White matter hyperintensity and acute infarct volume were quantified on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion tensor imaging MRI, respectively. Diffusivity anisotropy metrics were calculated in normal appearing white matter contralateral to the acute ischemia. Among 319 patients with acute ischemic stroke, women were older (68.0 versus 62.7 years; P =0.004), had increased incidence of atrial fibrillation (21.4% versus 12.2%; P =0.04), and lower rate of tobacco use (21.1% versus 35.9%; P =0.03). There was no sex-specific difference in white matter hyperintensity volume, acute infarct volume, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, prestroke modified Rankin Scale score, or normal appearing white matter diffusivity anisotropy metrics. However, women were less likely to have an excellent outcome (modified Rankin Scale score stroke. The correlation between markers of white matter integrity and functional outcomes in women, but not men, suggests a potential sex-specific mechanism. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Anticoagulation in acute ischemic stroke: A systematic search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayara L. Froio

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Stroke is one of the most important diseases worldwide. Several clinical scenarios demand full dose of anticoagulants primary to stroke etiology or to the treatment of comorbidity. However, controversy exists over many issues regarding anticoagulation treatment in stroke such as time for initiation, efficacy according to stroke etiology, the ideal dose of anticoagulants, and whether novel anticoagulants should be used. Method: Computerized search for clinical trials and randomized controlled clinical trials was done to the present date at Medline, Scielo, Embase, PsychInfo, and Cochrane Library using MeSH terms and the keywords stroke, ischemic stroke, anticoagulation, anticoagulants, heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, warfarin, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban. The PRISMA statement was used to evaluate clinical trials. Results: Fourteen clinical trials were selected based on inclusion criteria. No evidence was found supporting the early use of heparin, heparinoids or low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH early after stroke. No consistent evidence for the use of warfarin and the newer oral anticoagulants were found. Argatroban was the only anticoagulant with significant positive results early after large-artery ischemic stroke. Conclusion: The ideal time for initiating anticoagulation remains undefined, requiring further investigation. Early anticoagulation for ischemic stroke is not recommended, with few exceptions, such as that of argatroban.

  1. Acute ischemic stroke--from symptom recognition to thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, M W; Kurz, K D; Farbu, E

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of stroke has changed in the recent years from rehabilitation to an emergency approach. We review existing data from symptom recognition to thrombolysis and identify challenges in the different phases of patient treatment. Implementation of treatment in dedicated stroke units with a multidisciplinary team exclusively treating stroke patients has led to significant reduction of stroke morbidity and mortality. Yet, first the introduction of treatment with intravenous rtPA (IVT) has led to the 'time is brain' concept where stroke is conceived as an emergency. As neuronal death in stroke is time dependent, all effort should be laid on immediate symptom recognition, rapid transport to the nearest hospital with a stroke treatment facility and diagnosis and treatment as soon as possible. The main cause of prehospital delay is that patients do not recognize that they suffered a stroke or out of other reasons do not call the Emergency Medical Services immediately. Educational stroke awareness campaigns may have an impact in increasing the number of patients eligible for rtPA treatment and can decrease the prehospital times if they are directed both to the public and to the medical divisions treating stroke. Stroke transport times can be shortened by the use of helicopter and a stroke mobile--an ambulance equipped with a CT scanner--may be helpful to decrease time from onset to treatment start in the future. Yet, IVT has several limitations such as a narrow time window and a weak effect in ischemic strokes caused by large vessel occlusions. In these cases, interventional procedures and the concept of bridging therapy, a combined approach of IVT and intraarterial thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy, might improve recanalization rates and patient outcome. As neuronal death in stroke patients occurs in a time-dependent fashion, all effort should be made to decrease time from symptom onset to treatment start with rtPA: major challenges are stroke

  2. Evaluating an organized palliative care approach in patients with severe stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacquiere, Dylan P V; Gubitz, Gord J; Dupere, David; McLeod, Deborah; Phillips, Stephen

    2009-11-01

    A recent survey found few guidelines on the provision of palliative care following stroke; none examined the efficacy or results of any such process. The role of the patient's family in decision making and in conflicts with staff has not been evaluated. We sought to formally evaluate the use of locally-developed palliative care guidelines on our Acute Stroke Unit (ASU). We retrospectively examined records of 104 patients who died on our ASU over a two-year period to determine if our existing palliative guidelines were reflected in clinical practice, and to identify conflicts that arose. Data on medical and nursing care, palliative decisions, and medication use were compared to the ASU's existing palliative care guidelines. Family concerns about the palliative process were also reviewed. Of patients admitted to the stroke unit, 104 (16% of total admissions) died. Ninety-four (90.4%) of these were palliated; all received routine nursing and comfort care prior to death. Median time from admission to palliation was 3.6 days; median time from admission to death was 8.5 days. Most had vital signs (98.9%), investigations (100%) and non-palliative medications (95.7%) stopped, and had nasogastric feeding (96.8%) and intravenous fluids (87.2%) withdrawn or never begun. Most were treated with morphine (93.6%) and scopolamine (81.9%). Concerns raised by family members centered around hydration and feeding (45.7%), doubts about palliative care (27.8%) and patient comfort (18.2%). A formal approach to palliation results in timely decisions regarding end of life care with relatively few conflicts. Further work to address the specific concerns of families is needed.

  3. Emergency Medical Services Capacity for Prehospital Stroke Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-05

    In this audio podcast, lead author and Preventing Chronic Disease’s 2013 Student Research Contest Winner, Mehul D. Patel, talks about his article on stroke care and emergency medical services.  Created: 9/5/2013 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/5/2013.

  4. ADVANCE: An effective and feasible technique in acute stroke treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkas, Erdem; Akpinar, Cetin Kursad; Aytac, Emrah

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose Different techniques regarding efficient utilization of thrombectomy devices have been reported. Here, we described a novel technique named ADVANCE that is based on advancing a distal access catheter over the stent retriever. In this study, we aimed to report our initial results with this novel thrombectomy technique. Methods and results Sixty-seven consecutive acute anterior circulation ischemic stroke patients (35 male, 32 female) between January 2015 and January 2016 who were treated by mechanical thrombectomy were included in this prospective study. Patients were classified randomly into two groups: patients treated with either the ADVANCE technique or standard technique. Patients had a mean age of 61.1 ± 12.9 years. The average NIHSS score was 15.8 ± 3.8. In the ADVANCE group, the successful revascularization (mTICI 2b-3) rate was 87.1% and the 90-day good functional outcome rate (mRS 0-2) was 74.1%. The revascularization rate in the ADVANCE group was significantly ( p = 0.005) better than the standard technique group and good functional outcome at 90 days in the ADVANCE group was non-significantly better than the standard technique group ( p = 0.052). Conclusions ADVANCE is the first comparison of this technique to standard stent retriever thrombectomy with a higher rate of revascularization with no emboli to new territory and fewer distal emboli to target territory. This safe and efficient technique needs to be validated in large patient series in new thrombectomy trials.

  5. Low dose CT perfusion in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Amanda; Symons, Sean; Jakubovic, Raphael; Zhang, Liying; Aviv, Richard I. [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); So, Aaron; Lee, Ting-Yim [Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine if CT perfusion (CTP) measurements at low doses (LD = 20 or 50 mAs) are similar to those obtained at regular doses (RD = 100 mAs), with and without the addition of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). A single-center, prospective study was performed in patients with acute ischemic stroke (n = 37; 54 % male; age = 74 ± 15 years). Two CTP scans were performed on each subject: one at 100 mAs (RD) and one at either 50 or 20 mAs (LD). CTP parameters were compared between the RD and LD scans in regions of ischemia, infarction, and normal tissue. Differences were determined using a within-subjects ANOVA (p < 0.05) followed by a paired t test post hoc analysis (p < 0.01). At 50 mAs, there was no significant difference between cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), or time to maximum enhancement (Tmax) values for the RD and LD scans in the ischemic, infarcted, or normal contralateral regions (p < 0.05). At 20 mAs, there were significant differences between the RD and LD scans for all parameters in the ischemic and normal tissue regions (p > 0.05). CTP-derived CBF and CBV are not different at 50 mAs compared to 100 mAs, even without the addition of ASIR. Current CTP protocols can be modified to reduce the effective dose by 50 % without altering CTP measurements. (orig.)

  6. Trends in Recruitment Rates for Acute Stroke Trials, 1990-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, William B; Kim, Anthony S; Chiong, Winston

    2017-03-01

    Slow recruitment in acute stroke trials hampers the evaluation of new therapies and delays the adoption of effective therapies into clinical practice. This systematic review evaluates whether recruitment efficiency and rates have increased in acute stroke trials from 1990 to 2014. Acute stroke trials from 2010 to 2014 were identified by a search of PubMed, Medline, the Cochrane Database of Research in Stroke, and the Stroke Trials Registry. These trials were compared to a previously published data set of trials conducted from 1990 to 2004. The median recruitment efficiency of trials from 1990 to 2004 was 0.41 participants/site/month compared with 0.26 participants/site/month from 2010 to 2014 (P=0.14). The median recruitment rate of trials from 1990 to 2004 was 26.8 participants/month compared with 19.0 participants/month from 2010 to 2014 (P=0.13). For acute stroke trials, neither recruitment efficiency nor recruitment rates have increased over the past 25 years and, if anything, have declined. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. 2015 American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Focused Update of the 2013 Guidelines for the Early Management of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke Regarding Endovascular Treatment: A Guideline for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, William J; Derdeyn, Colin P; Biller, José; Coffey, Christopher S; Hoh, Brian L; Jauch, Edward C; Johnston, Karen C; Johnston, S Claiborne; Khalessi, Alexander A; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Meschia, James F; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a focused update of the current recommendations for the endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke. When there is overlap, the recommendations made here supersede those of previous guidelines. This focused update analyzes results from 8 randomized, clinical trials of endovascular treatment and other relevant data published since 2013. It is not intended to be a complete literature review from the date of the previous guideline publication but rather to include pivotal new evidence that justifies changes in current recommendations. Members of the writing committee were appointed by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Manuscript Oversight Committee. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained throughout the consensus process. Recommendations follow the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association methods of classifying the level of certainty of the treatment effect and the class of evidence. Prerelease review of the draft guideline was performed by 6 expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. Evidence-based guidelines are presented for the selection of patients with acute ischemic stroke for endovascular treatment, for the endovascular procedure, and for systems of care to facilitate endovascular treatment. Certain endovascular procedures have been demonstrated to provide clinical benefit in selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. Systems of care should be organized to facilitate the delivery of this care. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Improving transitions in acute stroke patients discharged to home: the Michigan stroke transitions trial (MISTT) protocol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathew J Reeves; Anne K Hughes; Amanda T Woodward; Paul P Freddolino; Constantinos K Coursaris; Sarah J Swierenga; Lee H Schwamm; Michele C Fritz

    2017-01-01

    Background For some stroke patients and caregivers, navigating the transition between hospital discharge and returning home is associated with substantial psychosocial and health-related challenges...

  9. Patterns of regional cerebral blood flow in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, T S; Skriver, E B

    1981-01-01

    In a consecutive group of 56 stroke patients the regional cerebral blood flow was measured within 84 hours after stroke. A 254 multidetector scintillation camera and the intracarotid Xenon-133 injection method was used to study rCBF. Typical rCBF-patterns are described and compared to the findings...

  10. Detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in acute stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizos, T.; Rasch, C.; Jenetzky, E.; Hametner, C.; Kathoefer, S.; Reinhardt, R.; Hepp, T.; Hacke, W.; Veltkamp, R.

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent cause of stroke, but detecting paroxysmal AF (pAF) poses a challenge. We investigated whether continuous bedside ECG monitoring in a stroke unit detects pAF more sensitively than 24-hour Holter ECG, and tested whether examining RR interval dynamics on

  11. Acute Stroke at The University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This was a prospective study of all stroke patients admitted to the University College Hospital Ibadan Nigeria between July 2002 and September 2003.The diagnosis of stroke was mainly clinical using the WHO clinical criteria. Only 21 patients had Cranial CT scans due to the frequent breakdown of the machine during the ...

  12. Multi-professional audit supports clinical governance in projecting and implementing a new stroke care area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Masina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute stroke have better outcomes in terms of survival or regaining independence if they receive organized inpatient care in a specific setting (Stroke Unit, SU where a coordinated multidisciplinary team can ensure the best level of care. The clinical governance of an SU requires a systematic monitoring of diagnostic, clinical and therapeutic processes through a structured audit. The entire project and set up of a new SU in Bentivoglio, Italy, were based on a model that focused on multidisciplinary teamwork and clinical governance. An audit based on the Benjamin audit cycle followed every step of the set up of the new SU. Markers from national and international guidelines and from the Italian Regional Audit, together with a specific database were used. The audit showed a high level of care and a significant improvement in the majority of clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic parameters. Only a few markers (i.e. waiting times for ultrasound tomography and prescription of oral anticoagulation therapy required specific projects in order to improve the results. Our experience confirmed that a structured audit can support clinical governance of an SU by monitoring clinical processes and quality of care. Such an audit involves the whole professional team and shows the effects of any single actions. It also helps integration and co-operation among staff. Furthermore, a structured audit is a useful instrument for professional accountability for both qualitative and quantitative aspects of care.

  13. Stroke

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pollack, Allan; Harrison, Christopher; Henderson, Joan; Miller, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, about 50,000 Australians had a stroke (cerebrovascular accident (CVA)). The risk of stroke is associated with increased age, previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack, hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus (DM...

  14. Effect of paracetamol (acetaminophen) on body temperature in acute stroke: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Junjie; Chen, Chensong; Cheng, Hongsen; Wang, Ren; Ma, Linhao

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of paracetamol (acetaminophen) on body temperature in acute stroke. Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched electronically. Relevant journals and references of studies included were hand-searched for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and controlled clinical trials (CCT) regarding the efficacy of paracetamol (acetaminophen) on body temperature in acute stroke. Two reviewers independently performed data extraction and quality assessment. Data were analyzed using RevMan 5.3 software by the Cochrane Collaboration. Five studies were included. To compare the efficacy of paracetamol (acetaminophen) in acute stroke, the pooled RR (Risk Ratio) and its 95% CI of body temperature reduction at 24h from the start of treatment were -0.3 (95% CI: -0.52 to -0.08), with statistical significance (P=0.007). Consistently, the pooled RR (Risk Ratio) and its 95% CI of body temperature at 24h from the start of treatment were -0.22 (-0.29, -0.15), with statistical significance (PParacetamol (acetaminophen) is one of the most commonly used antipyretic drugs and has some capability to reduce body temperature through acting on central nervous system. Acetaminophen showed some capability to decrease body temperature for acute stroke. Acetaminophen could not improve functional outcome and reduce adverse events of patients with acute stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Predictors of early arrival at the emergency department in acute ischaemic stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Curran, C

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: A requirement of an effective acute stroke service is the early arrival of patients to the hospital emergency department (ED). This will allow the possible use of thrombolytic therapy or other acute interventions within a limited time window. AIMS: We investigated the predictors of early arrival in a single hospital serving a mixed urban and rural catchment area. METHODS: A retrospective review of all case notes for 1 year was performed. RESULTS: Of 105 acute strokes, 91 were cerebral infarcts and a total of 71 cases presenting initially to the ED had timing available for analysis. 39.4% presented within 3 h, and 12.7% were potentially suitable for thrombolysis. Those living closer to the hospital were not more likely to arrive within 3 h (Z = -0.411, p = 0.68). Presenting directly to the hospital by emergency services (or private transport) was significantly associated with early arrival in a univariate comparison (p < 0.001), and in a multivariate model. CONCLUSION: The only independent predictor of early arrival to the ED is direct presentation. Improved public education of the importance of recognition of stroke symptoms and rapid contact with the emergency services will improve the early attendance following acute stroke, allowing increased use of acute stroke treatments.

  16. Depression in acute stroke: prevalence, dominant symptoms and associated factors. A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouwenhoven, Siren E; Kirkevold, Marit; Engedal, Knut; Kim, Hesook S

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive analysis of the state of knowledge about post-stroke depression (PSD) in the acute phase, focusing on: (a) the prevalence of depressive disorder and depressive symptoms, (b) the dominant depressive symptoms, (c) the factors associated with PSD and (d) the follow-up consequences. A computer-aided search in MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsychInfo, EMBASE, British Nursing index, Pub Med and Ovid Nursing Database was performed. We systematically searched for studies including depression within the first month after stroke. Forty articles including more than 5400 informants from 37 cohorts met the inclusion criteria. Only a few studies aimed to describe the nature of PSD. The prevalence of depressive disorder and depressive symptoms in the acute phase ranged widely from 5% to 54%. Multiple tools were used for measuring depressive symptoms in the acute phase. An association was found between early depressive symptoms and the continuation of PSD 12 months after stroke. There is a correlation between depressive symptoms and mortality at 12 and 24 months. Depressive symptoms are common in the acute phase after stroke and associated with persistency of depression and mortality after 12 months. A gold standard for the measurement of depressive symptoms in relation to stroke is missing. The knowledge of PSD in the acute phase is still limited, and there is a need for continued empirical research on its profile and patterns. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  17. The Role of Prestroke Glycemic Control on Severity and Outcome of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Hjalmarsson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Relatively few studies have investigated the association of prestroke glycemic control and clinical outcome in acute ischemic stroke (IS patients, regardless of presence of diabetes mellitus (DM. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of prestroke glycemic control on survival, stroke severity, and functional outcome of patients with acute IS. Methods. We performed a retrospective survival analysis of 501 patients with IS admitted to Sahlgrenska University Hospital from February 15, 2005, through May 31, 2009. The outcomes of interest were acute and long-term survival; the stroke severity (NIHSS and the functional outcome, mRS, at 12 months. Results. HbA1c was a good predictor of acute (HR 1.45; CI, 1.09 to 1.93, P=0.011 and long-term mortality (HR 1.29; CI 1.03 to 1.62; P=0.029. Furthermore, HbA1c >6% was significantly correlated with acute stroke severity (OR 1.29; CI 1.01 to 1.67; P=0.042 and predicted worse functional outcome at 12 months (OR 2.68; CI 1.14 to 6.03; P=0.024. Conclusions. Our study suggests that poor glycemic control (baseline HbA1c prior to IS is an independent risk factor for poor survival and a marker for increased stroke severity and unfavorable long-term functional outcome.

  18. Randomized Controlled Trial of Early Versus Delayed Statin Therapy in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: ASSORT Trial (Administration of Statin on Acute Ischemic Stroke Patient).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinichi; Uchida, Kazutaka; Daimon, Takashi; Takashima, Ryuzo; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Morimoto, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    Several studies suggested that statins during hospitalization were associated with better disability outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke, but only 1 small randomized trial is available. We conducted a multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled trial in patients with acute ischemic strokes in 11 hospitals in Japan. Patients with acute ischemic stroke and dyslipidemia randomly received statins within 24 hours after admission in the early group or on the seventh day in the delayed group, in a 1:1 ratio. Statins were administered for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was patient disability assessed by modified Rankin Scale at 90 days. A total of 257 patients were randomized and analyzed (early 131, delayed 126). At 90 days, modified Rankin Scale score distribution did not differ between groups ( P =0.68), and the adjusted common odds ratio of the early statin group was 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.53-1.3; P =0.46) compared with the delayed statin group. There were 3 deaths at 90 days (2 in the early group, 1 in the delayed group) because of malignancy. Ischemic stroke recurred in 9 patients (6.9%) in the early group and 5 patients (4.0%) in the delayed group. The safety profile was similar between groups. Our randomized trial involving patients with acute ischemic stroke and dyslipidemia did not show any superiority of early statin therapy within 24 hours of admission compared with delayed statin therapy 7 days after admission to alleviate the degree of disability at 90 days after onset. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02549846. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Thrombolysis outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients with prior stroke and diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, N K; Ahmed, N; Davalos, A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with concomitant diabetes mellitus (DM) and prior stroke (PS) were excluded from European approval of alteplase in stroke. We examined the influence of DM and PS on the outcomes of patients who received thrombolytic therapy (T; data from Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in...

  20. Fatigue in the acute phase after first stroke predicts poorer physical health 18 months later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerdal, Anners; Gay, Caryl L

    2013-10-29

    To determine whether fatigue in the acute phase following stroke predicts long-term patient-reported physical and mental health outcomes 18 months later. Patients (n = 96, mean age 67.8 years, SD 12.9) were assessed within 2 weeks of hospital admission for first-ever stroke (acute phase) and 18 months later. Measures included the Fatigue Severity Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory II. The Short Form-36 was used to assess self-reported physical and mental health. Multivariate regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between acute phase fatigue and later health outcomes, controlling for relevant covariates. Acute phase fatigue was associated with physical health at 18-month follow-up, but not with mental health. After adjusting for other potential predictors of health outcomes, including age, sex, cohabitation status, acute phase physical or mental health, and depressive symptoms, acute phase fatigue remained a significant predictor of later physical health but not of later mental health. The reverse relationships were also examined, but neither physical nor mental health in the acute phase predicted fatigue at 18 months; the best predictor of fatigue at 18-month follow-up was acute phase fatigue. These findings suggest that acute phase fatigue is an independent risk factor for poor physical health 18 months after stroke. Diagnosis and treatment of acute phase fatigue may improve physical health-related quality of life among stroke survivors. Effective treatments for poststroke fatigue, both in the acute phase and later in the recovery period, are needed.

  1. Developing complex interventions: lessons learned from a pilot study examining strategy training in acute stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Elizabeth R; Dawson, Deirdre R; Whyte, Ellen M; Butters, Meryl A; Dew, Mary Amanda; Grattan, Emily S; Becker, James T; Holm, Margo B

    2014-04-01

    To examine the feasibility of a strategy training clinical trial in a small group of adults with stroke-related cognitive impairments in inpatient rehabilitation, and to explore the impact of strategy training on disability. Non-randomized two-group intervention pilot study. Two inpatient rehabilitation units within an academic health centre. Individuals with a primary diagnosis of acute stroke, who were admitted to inpatient rehabilitation and demonstrated cognitive impairments were included. Individuals with severe aphasia; dementia; major depressive disorder, bipolar, or psychotic disorder; recent drug or alcohol abuse; and anticipated length of stay less than five days were excluded. Participants received strategy training or an attention control session in addition to usual rehabilitation care. Sessions in both groups were 30-40 minutes daily, five days per week, for the duration of inpatient rehabilitation. We assessed feasibility through participants' recruitment and retention; research intervention session number and duration; participants' comprehension and engagement; intervention fidelity; and participants' satisfaction. We assessed disability at study admission, inpatient rehabilitation discharge, 3 and 6 months using the Functional Independence Measure. Participants in both groups (5 per group) received the assigned intervention (>92% planned sessions; >94% fidelity) and completed follow-up testing. Strategy training participants in this small sample demonstrated significantly less disability at six months (M (SE) = 117 (3)) than attention control participants (M(SE) = 96 (14); t 8 = 7.87, P = 0.02). It is feasible and acceptable to administer both intervention protocols as an adjunct to acute inpatient rehabilitation, and strategy training shows promise for reducing disability.

  2. Vascular Pathology in the Extracranial Vertebral Arteries in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, L; Nygård, A; Ovesen, C

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular pathology in the extracranial vertebral arteries remains among the possible causes in cryptogenic stroke. However, the diagnosis is challenged by the great variety in the anatomy of the vertebral arteries, clinical symptoms and difficulties in the radiological assessments....... METHOD: The analysis was based on 657 consecutive patients with symptoms of acute stroke and a final diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. On admission, a noncontrast CT cerebrum and CTA were performed. A senior consultant neuroradiologist, blinded to clinical data, reviewed all CTA...... (2.8%) with pathological findings had an unknown cause of stroke, likely posterior symptoms and no clinical stroke symptoms from the anterior circuit. Of these, 3 cases were kinked arteries (0.5%) and 15 cases (2.3%) were possible dissections. CONCLUSION: We found that in approximately 3...

  3. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate: Can be a prognostic marker in acute ischemic stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Selçuk Çomoğlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR values and the severity of neurological findings on admission, short- term prognosis, risk factors and etiology of the patients with acute ischemic stroke. MATERIAL and METHODS: One hundred and fifty-eight consecutive patients who admitted to the hospital within 24 hours of stroke onset were retrospectively analyzed. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS and modified Rankin Scale (mRS scores on admission and mRS scores at discharge, brain imaging findings, stroke etiology and risk factors of the patients were recorded. Patients were classified into three groups according to ESR values on admission and compared in terms of severity of clinical symptoms on admission, short-term prognosis, risk factors and etiology of stroke. RESULTS: A total 158 patients with acute ischemic stroke including 89 women and 69 men were enrolled in the study. Patients with ESR≤10 mm/h were included in group 1 (n=49, ESR levels between 11-25 mm/h were included in group 2 (n=69 and ESR≥26 mm/h were included in group 3 (n=40. No significant difference was determined between the groups in terms of NIHSS and mRS scores on admission and mRS scores at discharge and etiology of stroke. While coronary artery disease was found more frequently in group 1 and 2 than group 3 (p=0.018, valvular heart disease was more frequently in group 2 than group 1 (p=0.037. CONCLUSION: The results of our study revealed that ESR levels on admission do not reflect the severity of stroke and can not be accepted as a useful predictor of short-term prognosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  4. Automated Decision-Support System For Prediction of Treatment Responders in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartheeban eNagenthiraja

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available MRI is widely used in the assessment of acute ischemic stroke. In particular, it identifies the mismatch between hypoperfused and the permanently damaged tissue, the PWI-DWI-mismatch volume. It is used to help triage patients into active or supportive treatment pathways. COMBAT Stroke is an automated software tool for estimating the mismatch volume and ratio based on MRI. Herein, we validate the decision made by the software with actual clinical decision rendered. Furthermore, we evaluate the association between treatment decisions (both automated and actual and outcomes.COMBAT Stroke was used to determine PWI-DWI mismatch volume and ratio in 228 patients from two European multicenter stroke databases. We performed confusion matrix analysis to summarize the agreement between the automated selection and the clinical decision. Finally, we evaluated the clinical and imaging outcomes of the patients in the four entries of the confusion matrix (true positive, true negative, false negative, and false positive. 186 of 228 patients with acute stroke underwent thrombolytic treatment, with the remaining 42 receiving supportive treatment only. Selection based on radiographic criteria using COMBAT Stroke classified 142 patients as potential candidates for thrombolytic treatment and 86 for supportive treatment; 60% sensitivity and 29% specificity. The patients deemed eligible for thrombolytic treatment by COMBAT Stroke demonstrated significantly higher rates of compromised tissue salvage, less neurological deficit, and were more likely to experience thrombus dissolving and reestablishment of normal blood flow at 24-hour follow-up compared to those who were treated without substantial PWI-DWI mismatch. These results provide evidence that COMBAT Stroke, in addition to clinical assessment, may offer an optimal framework for a fast, efficient, and standardized clinical support tool to select patients for thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke.

  5. Diffusion and Perfusion MR Imaging in Acute Stroke: Clinical Utility and Potential Limitations for Treatment Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, Mathew; Slater, Lee-Anne; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M

    2017-01-01

    extending the opportunity of reperfusion treatment to well beyond the current time-based treatment windows. This review examines the use of DWI and PWI in the major stroke trials, their current clinical utility, and potential limitations for reperfusion treatment selection. DWI and PWI continue...... to be investigated in ongoing randomized controlled trials, and continued research into these techniques will help achieve the goal of tissue-based decision making and individualized acute stroke treatment....

  6. Managing the interface between acute care and rehabilitation - can utilisation review assist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Christopher J; Eagar, Kathy; Poulos, Roslyn G

    2007-04-01

    We piloted the InterQual Criteria tool in a large regional acute hospital in NSW to determine the utility of this tool in the Australian context. In particular to compare the current "gold standard" of physician assessment for the selection of patients for rehabilitation and the timing of transfer, with the guidance provided by the tool. Consecutive acute care patients with a diagnosis of stroke, hip fracture or amputation, and patients referred for rehabilitation assessment, were followed using the InterQual Criteria. Results on 242 acute episodes, representing 2698 days in acute care, were analysed. In accordance with overseas studies, we found that high levels of inappropriate days of stay in acute care were suggested by the tool. Using the InterQual Criteria almost all patients were deemed appropriate for transfer to rehabilitation much earlier than current practice. We conclude that the InterQual Criteria may have a useful role in patient selection for rehabilitation, in facilitating the transfer of patients from acute to subacute care, and in improving patient flow within acute care. The reasons for the variation between the results obtained from the tool and current clinical practice requires further investigation, and may indicate a lack of validity of the tool in the Australian setting, inefficiencies in processes of acute care, or the lack of suitable alternative care settings or level of support available in these settings.

  7. Corticomuscular coherence in the acute and subacute phase after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lisbeth Hoejkjaer; Zibrandtsen, Ivan Chrilles; Wienecke, Troels

    2017-01-01

    cortex and muscles were evaluated from coupling in the frequency domain between EEG and EMG during movement of the paretic hand. Results Corticomuscular coherence (CMC) and intermuscular coherence (IMC) were reduced in patients as compared to controls. Paretic hand motor performance improved within 4......–6 weeks after stroke, but no change was observed in CMC or IMC. Conclusions CMC and IMC were reduced in patients in the early phase after stroke. However, changes in coherence do not appear to be an efficient marker for early recovery of hand function following stroke. Significance This is the first study...

  8. Effects of candesartan in acute stroke on cognitive function and quality of life: results from the Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornslien, Astrid G; Sandset, Else C; Bath, Philip M; Wyller, Torgeir B; Berge, Eivind

    2013-07-01

    High blood pressure is common in the acute phase of stroke and is associated with poor outcome. We examined whether blood pressure-lowering treatment with candesartan in the acute phase affects long-term cognitive function and quality of life. Scandinavian Candesartan Acute Stroke Trial was a randomized-controlled and placebo-controlled trial of candesartan in 2029 patients with acute stroke and raised blood pressure. At 6 months, cognitive function was assessed by the Mini Mental State Examination and quality of life by the EuroQol instrument. We used ordinal logistic and multiple linear regression for statistical analysis, adjusting for predefined key variables. Median Mini Mental State Examination score was 28 in both groups, and there was no significant difference between the distribution of Mini Mental State Examination scores in the 2 groups (common odds ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-1.34; P=0.32). Median EuroQol-5D index were 0.74 and 0.78 (P=0.034), and the mean EuroQol-visual analogue scale scores were 66.0 and 67.3 in the candesartan and placebo groups, respectively (P=0.11). Candesartan did not improve cognitive function or quality of life. Rather, there were signs of harmful effects. These findings support the conclusion from our previous report that there is no indication for routine blood pressure-lowering treatment with candesartan in the acute phase of stroke. www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00120003.

  9. Population-based study of blood biomarkers in prediction of sub-acute recurrent stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Helen C; Burgess, Annette I; Poole, Debbie L; Mehta, Ziyah; Silver, Louise E; Rothwell, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Risk of recurrent stroke is high in the first few weeks after TIA or stroke and clinic risk prediction tools have only limited accuracy, particularly after the hyper-acute phase. Previous studies of the predictive value of biomarkers have been small, been done in selected populations and have not concentrated on the acute phase or on intensively treated populations. We aimed to determine the predictive value of a panel of blood biomarkers in intensively treated patients early after TIA and stroke. Methods We studied 14 blood biomarkers related to inflammation, thrombosis, atherogenesis and cardiac or neuronal cell damage in early TIA or ischaemic stroke in a population-based study (Oxford Vascular Study). Biomarker levels were related to 90-day risk of recurrent stroke as Hazard Ratio (95%CI) per decile increase, adjusted for age and sex. Results Among 1292 eligible patients there were 53 recurrent ischaemic strokes within 90 days. There were moderate correlations (r>0.40; pstroke were weak, with significant associations limited to Interleukin-6 (HR=1.12, 1.01-1.24; p=0.035) and C-reactive protein (1.16, 1.02-1.30; p=0.019). When stratified by type of presenting event, P-selectin predicted stroke after TIA (1.31, 1.03-1.66; p=0.028) and C-reactive protein predicted stroke after stroke (1.16, 1.01-1.34; p=0.042). These associations remained after fully adjusting for other vascular risk factors. Conclusion In the largest study to date, we found very limited predictive utility for early recurrent stroke for a panel of inflammatory, thrombotic and cell damage biomarkers. PMID:25158774

  10. Upregulated Serum MiR-146b Serves as a Biomarker for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Stroke is a major cerebrovascular disease threatening human health and life with high morbidity, disability and mortality. It is aimed to find effective biomarkers for the early diagnosis on stroke. Methods: The expressions of 17 previously reported stroke-associated miRNAs were measured using quantitative RT-PCR and the expressions of plasma high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP and serum interleukin 6 (IL-6, the pro-inflammation markers in brain injury, were examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 128 acute ischemic stroke (AIS patients and control group. Results: Serum miR-146b expression was significantly increased within 24 hours after stroke onset in patients compared with control group. In addition, the upregulation of serum miR-146b was strong positively correlated with plasma hs-CRP, infarct volume and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score, and moderate positively correlated with serum IL-6 of patients. Importantly, the combination of plasma hs-CRP and serum miR-146b gained a better sensitivity/specificity for prediction of AIS (AUC from 0.782 to 0.863. Conclusion: Our preliminary findings suggested that upregulated serum miR-146b in acute ischemic stroke might be a potential biomarker for AIS evaluation.

  11. Treatment with intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke is associated with reduced bed day use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Thorkild; Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, Claus Z.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke. It is uncertain whether the improved neurological outcome also translates into less morbidity and lower need for hospi......Introduction: Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke. It is uncertain whether the improved neurological outcome also translates into less morbidity and lower need...... for hospital admissions during follow-up. Methods: We conducted a register-based nationwide propensity score-matched follow-up study among ischemic stroke patients in Denmark (2004-2011). IV-tPA-treated patients were propensity-score matched with IV-tPA eligible but non-treated ischemic stroke patients from...... stroke centers not offering tPA. The adjusted Hazard ratio (HR) for first readmission was estimated by multivariable Cox regression among patients who survived the initial stroke admission. Total all-cause bed day use in the first year after stroke admission was determined for patients with a potential...

  12. Arterial spin-labeled perfusion imaging to predict mismatch in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niibo, Takeya; Ohta, Hajime; Yonenaga, Kazuma; Ikushima, Ichiro; Miyata, Shirou; Takeshima, Hideo

    2013-09-01

    We assigned a threshold to arterial spin-labeling (ASL) perfusion-weighted images (PWI) from patients with acute ischemic stroke and compared them with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion images to examine whether mismatch can be determined. Pseudocontinuous ASL was combined with dynamic susceptibility contrast PWI in 23 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Scans were obtained within 24 hours of symptom onset. PWI volumes were defined by ASL cerebral blood flow (10 s) that show a strong association with cerebral blood flow PWI and the baseline diffusion-weighted imaging lesion, respectively, and the final infarct volume were assessed. The lesion volumes defined by MTT>10 s and ASL10 s and ASLPWI lesions defined by ASL10 s. In acute ischemic stroke, PWI lesions based on ASL threshold of 10 s.

  13. Risk factors for medical complications of acute hemorrhagic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jangala Mohan Sidhartha

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: Our study has assessed that hypertension followed by diabetes mellitus are the major risk factors for medical complications of hemorrhagic stroke. Female mortality rate was more when compared to males.

  14. RECAST (Remote Ischemic Conditioning After Stroke Trial): A Pilot Randomized Placebo Controlled Phase II Trial in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Timothy J; Hedstrom, Amanda; O'Sullivan, Saoirse; Donnelly, Richard; Barrett, David A; Sarmad, Sarir; Sprigg, Nikola; Bath, Philip M

    2017-05-01

    Repeated episodes of limb ischemia and reperfusion (remote ischemic conditioning [RIC]) may improve outcome after acute stroke. We performed a pilot blinded placebo-controlled trial in patients with acute ischemic stroke, randomized 1:1 to receive 4 cycles of RIC within 24 hours of ictus. The primary outcome was tolerability and feasibility. Secondary outcomes included safety, clinical efficacy (day 90), putative biomarkers (pre- and post-intervention, day 4), and exploratory hemodynamic measures. Twenty-six patients (13 RIC and 13 sham) were recruited 15.8 hours (SD 6.2) post-onset, age 76.2 years (SD 10.5), blood pressure 159/83 mm Hg (SD 25/11), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score 5 (interquartile range, 3.75-9.25). RIC was well tolerated with 49 out of 52 cycles completed in full. Three patients experienced vascular events in the sham group: 2 ischemic strokes and 2 myocardial infarcts versus none in the RIC group ( P =0.076, log-rank test). Compared with sham, there was a significant decrease in day 90 NIHSS score in the RIC group, median NIHSS score 1 (interquartile range, 0.5-5) versus 3 (interquartile range, 2-9.5; P =0.04); RIC augmented plasma HSP27 (heat shock protein 27; P stroke is well tolerated and appears safe and feasible. RIC may improve neurological outcome, and protective mechanisms may be mediated through HSP27. A larger trial is warranted. URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN86672015. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Race and Sex Disparities in Prehospital Recognition of Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Prasanthi; Friedman, Benjamin T.; Delgadillo, James Q.; Ghilarducci, David; Cook, Lawrence J.; Grimes, Barbara; McCulloch, Charles; Johnston, S. Claiborne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to examine prehospital provider recognition of stroke by race and sex. Methods Diagnoses at emergency department (ED) and hospital discharge from a statewide database in California were linked to prehospital diagnoses from an electronic database from two counties in Northern California from January 2005 to December 2007 using probabilistic linkage. All patients 18 years and older, transported by ambulances (n = 309,866) within the two counties, and patients with hospital-based discharge diagnoses of stroke (n = 10,719) were included in the study. Logistic regression was used to analyze the independent association of race and sex with the correct prehospital diagnosis of stroke. Results There were 10,719 patients discharged with primary diagnoses of stroke. Of those, 3,787 (35%) were transported by emergency medical services providers. Overall, 32% of patients ultimately diagnosed with stroke were identified prehospital. Correct prehospital recognition of stroke was lower among Hispanic patients (odds ratio [OR] = 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.61 to 0.96), Asians (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.55 to 0.80), and others (OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.53 to 0.94), when compared with non-Hispanic whites, and in women compared with men (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.71 to 0.94). Specificity for recognizing stroke was lower in females than males (OR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.90). Conclusions Significant disparities exist in prehospital stroke recognition. PMID:25728356

  16. Race and sex disparities in prehospital recognition of acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Prasanthi; Friedman, Benjamin T; Delgadillo, James Q; Ghilarducci, David; Cook, Lawrence J; Grimes, Barbara; McCulloch, Charles E; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine prehospital provider recognition of stroke by race and sex. Diagnoses at emergency department (ED) and hospital discharge from a statewide database in California were linked to prehospital diagnoses from an electronic database from two counties in Northern California from January 2005 to December 2007 using probabilistic linkage. All patients 18 years and older, transported by ambulances (n = 309,866) within the two counties, and patients with hospital-based discharge diagnoses of stroke (n = 10,719) were included in the study. Logistic regression was used to analyze the independent association of race and sex with the correct prehospital diagnosis of stroke. There were 10,719 patients discharged with primary diagnoses of stroke. Of those, 3,787 (35%) were transported by emergency medical services providers. Overall, 32% of patients ultimately diagnosed with stroke were identified in the prehospital setting. Correct prehospital recognition of stroke was lower among Hispanic patients (odds ratio [OR] = 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61 to 0.96), Asians (OR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.80), and others (OR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.53 to 0.94), when compared with non-Hispanic whites, and in women compared with men (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.71 to 0.94). Specificity for recognizing stroke was lower in females than males (OR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.90). Significant disparities exist in prehospital stroke recognition. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. Palliative Care and Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Lynne T; Grady, Kathleen L; Kutner, Jean S; Adler, Eric; Berlinger, Nancy; Boss, Renee; Butler, Javed; Enguidanos, Susan; Friebert, Sarah; Gardner, Timothy J; Higgins, Phil; Holloway, Robert; Konig, Madeleine; Meier, Diane; Morrissey, Mary Beth; Quest, Tammie E; Wiegand, Debra L; Coombs-Lee, Barbara; Fitchett, George; Gupta, Charu; Roach, William H

    2016-09-13

    The mission of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association includes increasing access to high-quality, evidence-based care that improves patient outcomes such as health-related quality of life and is consistent with the patients' values, preferences, and goals. Awareness of and access to palliative care interventions align with the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association mission. The purposes of this policy statement are to provide background on the importance of palliative care as it pertains to patients with advanced cardiovascular disease and stroke and their families and to make recommendations for policy decisions. Palliative care, defined as patient- and family-centered care that optimizes health-related quality of life by anticipating, preventing, and treating suffering, should be integrated into the care of all patients with advanced cardiovascular disease and stroke early in the disease trajectory. Palliative care focuses on communication, shared decision making about treatment options, advance care planning, and attention to physical, emotional, spiritual, and psychological distress with inclusion of the patient's family and care system. Our policy recommendations address the following: reimbursement for comprehensive delivery of palliative care services for patients with advanced cardiovascular disease and stroke; strong payer-provider relationships that involve data sharing to identify patients in need of palliative care, identification of better care and payment models, and establishment of quality standards and outcome measurements; healthcare system policies for the provision of comprehensive palliative care services during hospitalization, including goals of care, treatment decisions, needs of family caregivers, and transition to other care settings; and health professional education in palliative care as part of licensure requirements. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Quality of health information on acute myocardial infarction and stroke in the world wide web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Ana; Paiva, Dagmara; Azevedo, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The quality of health information in the Internet may be low. This is a concerning issue in cardiovascular diseases which warrant patient self-management. We aimed to assess the quality of Portuguese websites as a source of health information on acute myocardial infarction and stroke. We used the search terms 'enfarte miocardio' and 'acidente vascular cerebral' (Portuguese terms for myocardial infarction and stroke) on Google(®), on April 5th and 7th 2011, respectively, using Internet Explorer(®). The first 200 URL retrieved in each search were independently visited and Portuguese websites in Portuguese language were selected. We analysed and classified 121 websites for structural characteristics, information coverage and accuracy of the web pages with items defined a priori, trustworthiness in general according to the Health on the Net Foundation and regarding treatments using the DISCERN instrument (48 websites). Websites were most frequently commercial (49.5%), not exclusively dedicated to acute myocardial infarction/ stroke (94.2%), and with information on medical facts (59.5%), using images, video or animation (60.3%). Websites' trustworthiness was low. None of the websites displayed the Health on the Net Foundation seal. Acute myocardial infarction/ stroke websites differed in information coverage but the accuracy of the information was acceptable, although often incomplete. The quality of information on acute myocardial infarction/ stroke in Portuguese websites was acceptable. Trustworthiness was low, impairing users' capability of identifying potentially more reliable content.

  19. A prospective evaluation of labetalol versus nicardipine for blood pressure management in patients with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Levy, Phillip D; Parker, Dennis; Coplin, William; Rhoney, Denise H

    2013-08-01

    Acute hypertension is common following stroke and contributes to poor outcomes. Labetalol and nicardipine are often used for acute hypertension but there are little data comparing the two. This study is to evaluate the therapeutic response and tolerability of these two agents following acute stroke. This is a prospective, pseudo-randomized study comparing labetalol and nicardipine for blood pressure (BP) management in acute stroke patients. Patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) with confirmed hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke received either labetalol or nicardipine for 24 h from ED admission. Therapeutic response was assessed by achievement of goal BP, time spent within goal, and variability in BP. Clinical outcomes including length of stay, clinical status at discharge, and in-hospital mortality were recorded. 54 patients were enrolled (labetalol = 28; nicardipine = 26) with 25 ± 6 BP measurements per patient. Majority of patients had a hemorrhagic stroke and baseline characteristics were similar between groups. All patients who received nicardipine achieved goal BP compared to 17 (61 %) in the labetalol group (p labetalol group (p labetalol group (p labetalol group (p labetalol. Despite this, there was no demonstrable difference in clinical outcomes.

  20. Endovascular therapy in acute ischemic stroke: The way forward after results from the IMS 3, SYNTHESIS and MR Rescue trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijoy K Menon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular therapy (EVT has gained vogue in the management of patients with acute stroke. Newer stent-retriever devices have led to better recanalization rates. In many centers, EVT is slowly being used as an add on to or in some instances, even as an alternative to intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA. The publication of the results of the SYNTHESIS expansion, Interventional Management of Stroke III and Mechanical Retrieval Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy trials in 2013 has questioned the enthusiastic use of EVT in acute stroke. They demonstrate that EVT (using a variety of devices is no superior to IV tPA in the management of acute stroke. In the light of these controversial findings, we review the current status of EVT in the management of acute stroke.

  1. Observer reliability of CT angiography in the assessment of acute ischaemic stroke: data from the Third International Stroke Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mair, Grant; Farrall, Andrew J.; Sellar, Robin J.; Mollison, Daisy; Sakka, Eleni; Palmer, Jeb; Wardlaw, Joanna M. [University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Division of Neuroimaging Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kummer, Ruediger von [Dresden University Stroke Centre, University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Dresden (Germany); Adami, Alessandro [Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria Hospital, Stroke Center, Department of Neurology, Negrar (Italy); White, Philip M. [Stroke Research Group, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Adams, Matthew E. [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Department of Neuroradiology, London (United Kingdom); Yan, Bernard [Royal Melbourne Hospital, Neurovascular Research Group, Parkville (Australia); Demchuk, Andrew M. [Calgary Stroke Program, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Calgary (Canada); Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Rodrigues, Mark A.; Samji, Karim; Baird, Andrew J. [Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Department of Radiology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Boyd, Elena V. [Northwick Park Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harrow (United Kingdom); Cohen, Geoff; Perry, David; Sandercock, Peter A.G. [University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Lindley, Richard [University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital Clinical School and The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney (Australia); Collaboration: The IST-3 Collaborative Group

    2014-10-07

    CT angiography (CTA) is often used for assessing patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Only limited observer reliability data exist. We tested inter- and intra-observer reliability for the assessment of CTA in acute ischaemic stroke. We selected 15 cases from the Third International Stroke Trial (IST-3, ISRCTN25765518) with various degrees of arterial obstruction in different intracranial locations on CTA. To assess inter-observer reliability, seven members of the IST-3 expert image reading panel (>5 years experience reading CTA) and seven radiology trainees (<2 years experience) rated all 15 scans independently and blind to clinical data for: presence (versus absence) of any intracranial arterial abnormality (stenosis or occlusion), severity of arterial abnormality using relevant scales (IST-3 angiography score, Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) score, Clot Burden Score), collateral supply and visibility of a perfusion defect on CTA source images (CTA-SI). Intra-observer reliability was assessed using independently repeated expert panel scan ratings. We assessed observer agreement with Krippendorff's-alpha (K-alpha). Among experienced observers, inter-observer agreement was substantial for the identification of any angiographic abnormality (K-alpha = 0.70) and with an angiography assessment scale (K-alpha = 0.60-0.66). There was less agreement for grades of collateral supply (K-alpha = 0.56) or for identification of a perfusion defect on CTA-SI (K-alpha = 0.32). Radiology trainees performed as well as expert readers when additional training was undertaken (neuroradiology specialist trainees). Intra-observer agreement among experts provided similar results (K-alpha = 0.33-0.72). For most imaging characteristics assessed, CTA has moderate to substantial observer agreement in acute ischaemic stroke. Experienced readers and those with specialist training perform best. (orig.)

  2. Socioeconomic variations in the course of stroke: unequal health outcomes, equal care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, G.A.M. van den; Smits, J.P.J.M.; Westert, G.P.; Straten, A. van

    2002-01-01

    Study objective: The aim of this paper is to quantify the socioeconomic gap in long term health outcomes after stroke and related health care utilisation, in order to evaluate whether those in need of care do actually receive appropriate levels of care. Design: Stroke patients from the lower

  3. Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belagaje, Samir R

    2017-02-01

    Rehabilitation is an important aspect of the continuum of care in stroke. With advances in the acute treatment of stroke, more patients will survive stroke with varying degrees of disability. Research in the past decade has expanded our understanding of the mechanisms underlying stroke recovery and has led to the development of new treatment modalities. This article reviews and summarizes the key concepts related to poststroke recovery. Good data now exist by which one can predict recovery, especially motor recovery, very soon after stroke onset. Recent trials have not demonstrated a clear benefit associated with very early initiation of rehabilitative therapy after stroke in terms of improvement in poststroke outcomes. However, growing evidence suggests that shorter and more frequent sessions of therapy can be safely started in the first 24 to 48 hours after a stroke. The optimal amount or dose of therapy for stroke remains undetermined, as more intensive treatments have not been associated with better outcomes compared to standard intensities of therapy. Poststroke depression adversely affects recovery across a variety of measures and is an important target for therapy. Additionally, the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) appears to benefit motor recovery through pleiotropic mechanisms beyond their antidepressant effect. Other pharmacologic approaches also appear to have a benefit in stroke rehabilitation. A comprehensive rehabilitation program is essential to optimize poststroke outcomes. Rehabilitation is a process that uses three major principles of recovery: adaptation, restitution, and neuroplasticity. Based on these principles, multiple different approaches, both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic, exist to enhance rehabilitation. In addition to neurologists, a variety of health care professionals are involved in stroke rehabilitation. Successful rehabilitation involves understanding the natural history of stroke recovery and a

  4. Endovascular Treatment In Acute Ischemic Stroke: What Has Changed Over The Last One Year?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesna Bektaş

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of sufficent data from randomised controlled trials, endovascular treatment has always been considered as a therapeutic option in the setting of acute ischemic stroke. Our knowledge regarding in this field has dramatically expanded over the last three years. Following the initial dissapointing and negative trials, the subsequent positive results observed in a series of studies has consolidated the role of endovascular treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. In this review we will comment on the recent developments in the field of endovascular treatment and discuss the messages that underlie the controversial findings observed in these trials.

  5. Fatigue in the acute phase after first stroke predicts poorer physical health 18 months later

    OpenAIRE

    Lerdal, Anners; Gay, Caryl

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether fatigue in the acute phase following stroke predicts long-term patient-reported physical and mental health outcomes 18 months later. Methods: Patients (n = 96, mean age 67.8 years, SD 12.9) were assessed within 2 weeks of hospital admission for first-ever stroke (acute phase) and 18 months later. Measures included the Fatigue Severity Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory II. The Short Form?36 was used to assess self-reported physical and mental health. Multi...

  6. Regional variation in post-stroke multidisciplinary rehabilitation care among veteran residents in community nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia H

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Huanguang Jia,1 Qinglin Pei,1 Charles T Sullivan,1 Diane C Cowper Ripley,1 Samuel S Wu,1 W Bruce Vogel,1 Xinping Wang,1 Douglas E Bidelspach,2 Jennifer L Hale-Gallardo,1 Barbara E Bates3 1Center of Innovation on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL, 2Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC, 3Aleda E. Lutz VA Medical Center, Saginaw, MI, USA Introduction: Effective post-acute multidisciplinary rehabilitation therapy improves stroke survivors’ functional recovery and daily living activities. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA places veterans needing post-acute institutional care in private community nursing homes (CNHs. These placements are made under the same rules and regulations across the VA health care system and through individual per diem contracts between local VA facilities and CNHs. However, there is limited information about utilization of these veterans’ health services as well as the geographic variation of the service utilization. Aim: The aims of this study were to determine rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care utilization by veterans with stroke in VA-contracted CNHs and to assess risk-adjusted regional variations in the utilization of rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care. Methods: This retrospective study included all veterans diagnosed with stroke residing in VA-contracted CNHs between 2006 and 2009. Minimum Dataset (a health status assessment tool for CNH residents for the study CNHs was linked with veterans’ inpatient and outpatient data within the VA health care system. CNHs were grouped into five VA-defined geographic regions: the North Atlantic, Southeast, Midwest, Continental, and Pacific regions. A two-part model was applied estimating risk-adjusted utilization probability and average weekly utilization days. Two dependent variables were rehabilitation

  7. [Home care to the elderly who had stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira, Larissa Chaves; Lopes, Regina Lúcia Mendonça

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to Identify the knowledge production about the stroke in elderly under home care. Bibliographic research whose data were collected though the abstracts from 1997 to 2007, contained in LILACS and SciELO databases. The following key words were used: home assistance, aged people and cerebrovascular accident. Fifty-two references were found in the LILACS database, nine in the SciELO Brazil, and three in the SciELO Cuba. Most of the researches were carried out in 2000. Regarding the method, qualitative method predominance were observed, and central theme is related to the care giver, as well as to the clinical and epidemiologic aspects of the disease. It was observed that this knowledge is still established in Brazil, and the themes related to the person submitted to home care and violence to the aged are still little explored.

  8. Use of statistical process control charts in stroke medicine to determine if clinical evidence and changes in service delivery were associated with improvements in the quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, G R; Mead, G E; van Dijke, M L; Ramsay, S; McDowall, M A; Dennis, M

    2008-08-01

    Monitoring the effect of service changes on quality of care is essential. By using statistical process control (SPC) charts, this study aimed to explore the relationship between changes in the structure of stroke services and the process of care. Prospectively acquired data on the process of acute stroke care from three hospitals admitting 2962 patients (July 2001 to June 2004) were charted retrospectively on SPC charts for individual values (I charts) to determine whether or not "special cause variation" followed known changes in stroke service structure and publication of the Medical Research Council (MRC) Heart Protection Study. Unexpected signals of special cause variation were identified and reasons for observed patterns were sought by discussion with clinical teams. Improved brain imaging provision was followed by a reduction in time to imaging and earlier prescription of aspirin for ischaemic stroke. The MRC Heart Protection Study was followed by increased statin prescription. However, increasing beds allocated to stroke had no influence on the proportion of patients receiving stroke unit care. Some unexpected signals of special cause variation could be plausibly explained (eg, breakdown of brain scanner), but others could not. Anecdotal evidence from healthcare professionals suggests that charts may be acceptable in clinical practice. SPC charts have the potential to provide valuable insights into the impact of changes in structure of services and of clinical evidence on the process of stroke care. In the present study, the charts were generally well received by healthcare professionals.

  9. Atrophy of Swallowing Muscles Is Associated With Severity of Dysphagia and Age in Patients With Acute Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Peter B; Muhle, Paul; Hanning, Uta; Suntrup-Krueger, Sonja; Schwindt, Wolfram; Eversmann, Julian; Warnecke, Tobias; Wirth, Rainer; Zimmer, Sebastian; Dziewas, Rainer

    2017-07-01

    Sarcopenia has been identified as an independent risk factor for dysphagia. Dysphagia is one of the most important and prognostically relevant complications of acute stroke. The role of muscle atrophy as a contributing factor for the occurrence of poststroke dysphagia is yet unclear. To assess whether there is a correlation between age and muscle volume and whether muscle volume is related to dysphagia in acute stroke patients. This retrospective, single-center study included 73 patients with acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke who underwent computed tomography angiography on admission and an objective dysphagia assessment by Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing within 72 hours from admission. With the help of semiautomated muscle segmentation and 3-dimensional reconstruction volumetry of the digastric, temporal, and geniohyoid muscles was performed. For further analysis, participants were first divided into 4 groups according to their age (<61 years, n = 12; 61-75 years, n = 16; 76-85 years, n = 28; ≥86 years, n = 17), secondly into 3 different groups according to their dysphagia severity using the Fiberoptic Endoscopic Dysphagia Severity Scale (FEDSS) (FEDSS 1 and 2, n = 25; FEDSS 3 and 4, n = 32; FEDSS 5 and 6, n = 16). Correlation of muscle volumes with age and dysphagia severity. Muscle volumes of single muscles (except for geniohyoid and the right digastric muscles) as well as the sum muscle volume were significantly and inversely related to dysphagia severity. We found a significant decline of muscle volume with advancing age for most muscle groups and, in particular, for the total muscle volume. Apart from features being determined by the acute stroke itself (eg, site and size of stroke), also premorbid conditions, in particular age-related muscle atrophy, have an impact on the complex pathophysiology of swallowing disorders poststroke. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine

  10. The Relationship Between Baseline Blood Pressure and Computed Tomography Findings in Acute Stroke Data From the Tinzaparin in Acute Ischaemic Stroke Trial (TAIST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sare, G.M.; Bath, P.M.W.; Gray, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    controlled trial assessing 10 days of treatment with tinzaparin versus aspirin in 1489 patients with acute ischemic stroke (hr) with admission BP of ....06-1.17) at baseline, and signs of visible infarction at day 10 (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.00-1.13). A lower SBP was associated with signs of acute infarction (OR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.89-0.99). Hemorrhagic transformation, dense middle cerebral artery sign, mass effect, and cerebral edema at day 10 were not independently...... associated with baseline BP. Conclusion-Although high baseline BP is independently associated with a poor outcome after stroke, this was not shown to be through an association with increased hemorrhagic transformation, cerebral edema, or mass effect; trial design may be suboptimal to detect this. Higher SBP...

  11. Clinical Implications of Sulcal Enhancement on Postcontrast Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images in Patients with Acute Stroke Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyukjoon; Kim, Eunhee; Lee, Kyung Mi; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Bae, Yun Jung; Choi, Byoung Se; Jung, Cheolkyu

    2015-01-01

    Hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) without diffusion abnormalities is occasionally found in patients with an acute stroke. This study was to determine the prevalence and clinical implications of HARM without diffusion abnormalities. There was a retrospective review of magnetic resonance images 578 patients with acute strokes and identified those who did not have acute infarction lesions, as mapped by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). These patients were classified into an imaging-negative stroke and HARM without diffusion abnormalities groups, based on the DWI findings and postcontrast fluid attenuated inversion recovery images. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores at admission, 1 day, and 7 days after the event, as well as clinical data and risk factors, were compared between the imaging-negative stroke and HARM without diffusion abnormalities groups. Seventy-seven acute stroke patients without any DWI abnormalities were found. There were 63 patients with an imaging-negative stroke (accounting for 10.9% of 578) and 13 patients with HARM without diffusion abnormalities (accounting for 2.4% of 578). The NIHSS scores at admission were higher in HARM without diffusion abnormalities group than in the imaging-negative stroke group (median, 4.5 vs. 1.0; p imaging-negative stroke (mean, 73.1 years vs. 55.9 years; p imaging-negative stroke.

  12. Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification and vascular territory of ischemic stroke lesions diagnosed by diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jong-Won; Park, Su Hyun; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Wook-Joo; Park, Jung Hyun; Ko, Youngchai; Yang, Mi Hwa; Jang, Myung Suk; Han, Moon-Ku; Jung, Cheolkyu; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Oh, Chang Wan; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2014-08-11

    The association between the location and the mechanism of a stroke lesion remains unclear. A diffusion-weighted imaging study may help resolve this lack of clarity. We studied a consecutive series of 2702 acute ischemic stroke patients whose stroke lesions were confirmed by diffusion-weighted imaging and who underwent a thorough etiological investigation. The vascular territory in which an ischemic lesion was situated was identified using standard anatomic maps of the dominant arterial territories. Stroke subtype was based on the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment, or TOAST, classification. Large-artery atherosclerosis (37.3%) was the most common stroke subtype, and middle cerebral artery (49.6%) was the most frequently involved territory. Large-artery atherosclerosis was the most common subtype for anterior cerebral, middle cerebral, vertebral, and anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarctions. Small vessel occlusion was the leading subtype in basilar and posterior cerebral artery territories. Cardioembolism was the leading cause in superior cerebellar artery territory. Compared with carotid territory stroke, vertebrobasilar territory stroke was more likely to be caused by small vessel occlusion (21.4% versus 30.1%, Pterritory infarction was frequently caused by cardioembolism (44.2%) in carotid territory and by large-artery atherosclerosis (52.1%) in vertebrobasilar territory. Information on vascular territory of a stroke lesion may be helpful in timely investigation and accurate diagnosis of stroke etiology. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  13. Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) Classification and Vascular Territory of Ischemic Stroke Lesions Diagnosed by Diffusion‐Weighted Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jong‐Won; Park, Su Hyun; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Wook‐Joo; Park, Jung Hyun; Ko, Youngchai; Yang, Mi Hwa; Jang, Myung Suk; Han, Moon‐Ku; Jung, Cheolkyu; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Oh, Chang Wan; Bae, Hee‐Joon

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between the location and the mechanism of a stroke lesion remains unclear. A diffusion‐weighted imaging study may help resolve this lack of clarity. Methods and Results We studied a consecutive series of 2702 acute ischemic stroke patients whose stroke lesions were confirmed by diffusion‐weighted imaging and who underwent a thorough etiological investigation. The vascular territory in which an ischemic lesion was situated was identified using standard anatomic maps of the dominant arterial territories. Stroke subtype was based on the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment, or TOAST, classification. Large‐artery atherosclerosis (37.3%) was the most common stroke subtype, and middle cerebral artery (49.6%) was the most frequently involved territory. Large‐artery atherosclerosis was the most common subtype for anterior cerebral, middle cerebral, vertebral, and anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarctions. Small vessel occlusion was the leading subtype in basilar and posterior cerebral artery territories. Cardioembolism was the leading cause in superior cerebellar artery territory. Compared with carotid territory stroke, vertebrobasilar territory stroke was more likely to be caused by small vessel occlusion (21.4% versus 30.1%, Pterritory infarction was frequently caused by cardioembolism (44.2%) in carotid territory and by large‐artery atherosclerosis (52.1%) in vertebrobasilar territory. Conclusions Information on vascular territory of a stroke lesion may be helpful in timely investigation and accurate diagnosis of stroke etiology. PMID:25112556

  14. Combination of Thrombolysis and Statins in Acute Stroke Is Safe: Results of the STARS Randomized Trial (Stroke Treatment With Acute Reperfusion and Simvastatin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaner, Joan; Bustamante, Alejandro; García-Matas, Silvia; Martínez-Zabaleta, Maite; Jiménez, Carmen; de la Torre, Javier; Rubio, Francisco R; Segura, Tomás; Masjuán, Jaime; Cánovas, David; Freijo, Mar; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Tejada, Javier; Lago, Aida; Bravo, Yolanda; Corbeto, Natália; Giralt, Dolors; Vives-Pastor, Bárbara; de Arce, Anna; Moniche, Francisco; Delgado, Pilar; Ribó, Marc

    2016-11-01

    The STARS trial (Stroke Treatment With Acute Reperfusion and Simvastatin) was conducted to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of simvastatin treatment in acute stroke. STARS07 was a multicentre, phase IV, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Patients with Acute ischemic stroke recruited within 12 hours from symptom onset were randomized to oral simvastatin 40 mg or placebo, once daily for 90 days. Primary outcome was proportion of independent patients (modified Rankin Scale score of ≤2) at 90 days. Safety end points were hemorrhagic transformation, hemorrhagic events, death, infections, and serious adverse events. From April 2009 to March 2014, 104 patients were included. Fifty-five patients received intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator. No differences were found between treatment arms regarding the primary outcome (adjusted odds ratio, 0.99 [0.35-2.78]; P=0.98). Concerning safety, no significant differences were found in the rate of hemorrhagic transformation of any type, nor symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation. There were no differences in other predefined safety outcomes. In post hoc analyses, for patients receiving tissue-type plasminogen activator, a favorable effect for simvastatin treatment was noted with higher proportion of patients experiencing major neurological recovery (adjusted odds ratio, 4.14 [1.18-14.4]; P=0.02). Simvastatin plus tissue-type plasminogen activator combination seems safe in acute stroke, with low rates of bleeding complications. Because of the low recruitment, the STARS trial was underpowered to detect differences in simvastatin efficacy. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01073007. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Beta-blockers use and risk of hyperglycemia in acute stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Tomasz; Pera, Joanna; Zur-Wyrozumska, Kamila; Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, Aleksandra; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Slowik, Agnieszka

    2012-07-01

    Beta-adrenergic blockade prevents or diminishes stress-induced hyperglycemia in different experimental models. The aim of the study was to determine if the use of beta-blockers before stroke reduces the risk of acute hyperglycemia in stroke patients. We analyzed the data of 603 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke and without pre-stroke diagnosis of diabetes mellitus admitted to stroke unit within 24 h after symptoms onset. Plasma glucose level on admission (6.0 ± 1.4 vs 6.6 ± 1.9 mmol/L, P = 0.01) and fasting glucose on day 1 (5.2 ± 1.1 vs 5.7 ± 1.1 mmol/L, P = 0.02) were significantly lower in patients treated with beta-blockers before stroke than in those who did not receive such a treatment. On multivariate logistic analysis beta-blockers use before stroke was associated with reduced risk of glucose level on admission ≥7.8 mmol/L (OR: 0.22, 95%CI: 0.07-0.74) and fasting glucose on day 1 ≥ 7.0 mmol/L (OR: 0.21, 95%CI: 0.05-0.91). The risk of fasting hyperglycemia defined as glucose ≥6.1 mmol/L did not differ between groups. Beta-blockage before stroke onset may result in lower plasma glucose on admission and prevent early hyperglycemia in patients without pre-stroke diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Implementation of evidence-based stroke care: enablers, barriers, and the role of facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purvis T

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tara Purvis,1,2 Karen Moss,2 Sonia Denisenko,3 Chris Bladin,2,5 Dominique A Cadilhac1,2,4 1Translational Public Health Unit, Stroke and Ageing Research Centre, Department of Medicine, Monash Medical Centre, School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, Australia; 2Stroke Division, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne Brain Centre, Heidelberg, VIC, Australia; 3Commission for Hospital Improvement, Department of Health Victoria, VIC, Australia; 4Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 5Eastern Health Clinical School, Monash University, Box Hill, VIC, Australia Abstract: A stroke care strategy was developed in 2007 to improve stroke services in Victoria, Australia. Eight stroke network facilitators (SNFs were appointed in selected hospitals to enable the establishment of stroke units, develop thrombolysis services, and implement protocols. We aimed to explain the main issues being faced by clinicians in providing evidence-based stroke care, and to determine if the appointment of an SNF was perceived as an acceptable strategy to improve stroke care. Face-to-face semistructured interviews were used in a qualitative research design. Interview transcripts were verified by respondents prior to coding. Two researchers conducted thematic analysis of major themes and subthemes. Overall, 84 hospital staff participated in 33 interviews during 2008. The common factors found to impact on stroke care included staff and equipment availability, location of care, inconsistent use of clinical pathways, and professional beliefs. Other barriers included limited access to specialist clinicians and workload demands. The establishment of dedicated stroke units was considered essential to improve the quality of care. The SNF role was valued for identifying gaps in care and providing capacity to change clinical processes. This is the first large, qualitative multicenter study to

  17. The use of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Price, Susanna; Edvardsen, Thor

    2015-01-01

    of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care. In this document, we describe the practical applications of echocardiography in patients with acute cardiac conditions, in particular with acute chest pain, acute heart failure, suspected cardiac tamponade, complications of myocardial infarction, acute valvular heart...... disease including endocarditis, acute disease of the ascending aorta and post-intervention complications. Specific issues regarding echocardiography in other acute cardiac care scenarios are also described.......Echocardiography is one of the most powerful diagnostic and monitoring tools available to the modern emergency/critical care practitioner. Currently, there is a lack of specific European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Acute Cardiovascular Care Association recommendations for the use...

  18. The use of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Price, Susanna; Edvardsen, Thor

    2014-01-01

    of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care. In this document, we describe the practical applications of echocardiography in patients with acute cardiac conditions, in particular with acute chest pain, acute heart failure, suspected cardiac tamponade, complications of myocardial infarction, acute valvular heart...... disease including endocarditis, acute disease of the ascending aorta and post-intervention complications. Specific issues regarding echocardiography in other acute cardiovascular care scenarios are also described.......Echocardiography is one of the most powerful diagnostic and monitoring tools available to the modern emergency/critical care practitioner. Currently, there is a lack of specific European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Acute Cardiovascular Care Association recommendations for the use...

  19. The use of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Price, Susanna; Edvardsen, Thor

    2015-01-01

    of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care. In this document, we describe the practical applications of echocardiography in patients with acute cardiac conditions, in particular with acute chest pain, acute heart failure, suspected cardiac tamponade, complications of myocardial infarction, acute valvular heart...... disease including endocarditis, acute disease of the ascending aorta and post-intervention complications. Specific issues regarding echocardiography in other acute cardiovascular care scenarios are also described.......Echocardiography is one of the most powerful diagnostic and monitoring tools available to the modern emergency/ critical care practitioner. Currently, there is a lack of specific European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Acute Cardiovascular Care Association recommendations for the use...

  20. Onconeural Antibodies in Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæther, Sverre Georg; Schou, Morten; Stoecker, Winfried

    2017-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological disorders associated with onconeural antibodies often appear with neuropsychiatric symptoms. To study the prevalence of onconeural antibodies in patients admitted to acute psychiatric inpatient care, the serum of 585 such patients was tested for antibodies targeting MOG......, GLRA1B, DPPX, GRM1, GRM5, DNER, Yo, ZIC4, GAD67, amphiphysin, CV2, Hu, Ri, Ma2, and recoverin. Only one sample was positive (antirecoverin IgG). The present findings suggest that serum onconeural antibody positivity is rare among patients acutely admitted for inpatient psychiatric care. The clinical...

  1. Satisfaction with the quality of stroke care in the Russian Federation and the People's Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on comparing and analyzing the satisfaction of quality of medical care for patients with acute stroke in the Russian Federation (RF and the People’s Republic of China (PRC to identify major problems and the most successful organizational solutions in the system of medical care for patients with stroke. The analysis of differences was performed by the following parameters: quality of care in hospital assessed by patients; the attitude of the medical and nursing staff and the physician to patients (assessed by patients; timely diagnosis and treatment; the level of staff qualifications assessed by patients; satisfaction with the outcome of treatment; availability and volume of conversations held with the patient about the nature and causes of the disease; test results by the life quality scale EQ-5D.

  2. Integrated Care Pathways and Care Bundles for Dementia in Acute Care: Concept Versus Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Dawn O; Mannix, Mary; Timmons, Suzanne

    2017-06-01

    Caring for people with dementia in acute settings is challenging and confounded by multiple comorbidities and difficulties transitioning between community and acute care. Recently, there has been an increase in the development and use of integrated care pathways (ICPs) and care bundles for defined illnesses and medical procedures, and these are now being promoted for use in dementia care in acute settings. We present a review of the literature on ICPs and/or care bundles for dementia care in the acute sector. This includes a literature overview including "gray literature" such as relevant websites, reports, and government publications. Taken together, there is clearly a growing interest in and clinical use of ICPs and care bundles for dementia. However, there is currently insufficient evidence to support the effectiveness of ICPs for dementia care in acute settings and limited evidence for care bundles for dementia in this setting.

  3. Thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting in acute ischemic stroke management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steglich-Arnholm, Henrik; Holtmannspötter, Markus; Kondziella, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    because of procedural complexities and necessity of potent platelet inhibition-in particular following IVT. This study assesses the benefits and harms of thrombectomy assisted by carotid stenting and identifies factors associated with clinical outcome and procedural complications. Retrospective single......-center analysis of 47 consecutive stroke patients with carotid occlusion or high-grade stenosis and concomitant intracranial embolus treated between September 2011 and December 2014. Benefits included early improvement of stroke severity (NIHSS ≥ 10) or complete remission within 72 h and favorable long......-term outcome (mRS ≤ 2). Harms included complications during and following EVT. Mean age was 64.3 years (standard deviation ±12.5), 40 (85%) patients received IVT initially. Median NIHSS was 16 (inter-quartile range 14-19). Mean time from stroke onset to recanalization was 311 min (standard deviation ±78...

  4. Organization of acute stroke services in Poland - Polish Stroke Unit Network development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzyńska-Długosz, Iwona; Skowrońska, Marta; Członkowska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    According to the recommendations of stroke organizations, every stroke patient should be treated in a specialized stroke unit (SU). We aimed to evaluate the development of the SU network in Poland during the past decade. In Poland, stroke is treated mainly by neurologists. A questionnaire evaluating structure and staff of neurological departments was sent to all neurological departments in 2003, 2005 and 2007. In 2010, we collected data based on information from the National Health Fund. We divided departments into categories: with a comprehensive SU, with a primary SU unit, and departments without an SU. Primary SUs were further divided into class A SUs (fulfilling criteria of the National Programme of Prevention and Treatment of Stroke Experts - eligible for thrombolysis), class B (conditionally fulfilling criteria), and class C (not fulfilling criteria). Final analyses included 87.4% of departments (194/222) in 2003, 85.5% of departments (188/220) in 2005, and 83.1% of departments (182/219) in 2007. According to the above-mentioned classification there were 20 class A SUs in 2003, 58 in 2005 and 5 comprehensive and 51 class A SUs in 2007. In 2012, based on information from the National Health Fund there were 150 SUs, all fulfilling criteria for thrombolysis, 9 of them comprehensive SUs. The SU network in Poland is developing dynamically but thrombolysis and endovascular procedures are done too rarely. Now it is necessary to improve quality of stroke services and to make organizational changes in the in-hospital stroke pathways as well as to organize continuous education of medical staff.

  5. Secondary prevention after minor stroke and TIA - usual care and development of a support program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Leistner

    Full Text Available Effective methods of secondary prevention after stroke or TIA are available but adherence to recommended evidence-based treatments is often poor. The study aimed to determine the quality of secondary prevention in usual care and to develop a stepwise modeled support program.Two consecutive cohorts of patients with acute minor stroke or TIA undergoing usual outpatient care versus a secondary prevention program were compared. Risk factor control and medication adherence were assessed in 6-month follow-ups (6M-FU. Usual care consisted of detailed information concerning vascular risk factor targets given at discharge and regular outpatient care by primary care physicians. The stepwise modeled support program additionally employed up to four outpatient appointments. A combination of educational and behavioral strategies was employed.168 patients in the observational cohort who stated their openness to participate in a prevention program (mean age 64.7 y, admission blood pressure (BP: 155/84 mmHg and 173 patients participating in the support program (mean age 67.6 y, BP: 161/84 mmHg were assessed at 6 months. Proportions of patients with BP according to guidelines were 50% in usual-care and 77% in the support program (p<0.01. LDL<100 mg/dl was measured in 62 versus 71% (p = 0.12. Proportions of patients who stopped smoking were 50 versus 79% (p<0.01. 72 versus 89% of patients with atrial fibrillation were on oral anticoagulation (p = 0.09.Risk factor control remains unsatisfactory in usual care. Targets of secondary prevention were met more often within the supported cohort. Effects on (cerebro-vascular recurrence rates are going to be assessed in a multicenter randomized trial.

  6. Magnitude of and risk factors for in-hospital and postdischarge stroke in patients with acute coronary syndromes: findings from a Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaj, Andrzej; Flasinska, Katarzyna; Gore, Joel M; Anderson, Frederick A; Dabbous, Omar H; Spencer, Frederick A; Goldberg, Robert J; Fox, Keith A A

    2005-06-21

    Stroke is a recognized complication after acute myocardial infarction, but few studies have investigated the incidence and outcome of stroke in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This study examined the incidence and outcomes of hemorrhagic and nonhemorrhagic stroke and risk factors associated with stroke in patients with ACS. Data were obtained from 35,233 patients enrolled in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) with an ACS. In-hospital strokes occurred in 310 patients (0.9%), of which 100 (32.6%) were fatal. The incidence of in-hospital stroke was significantly higher in patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction than in non-ST-segment myocardial infarction or unstable angina (1.3%, 0.9%, 0.5%, respectively; P<0.001). Overall, 35.5% of in-hospital strokes occurred within 6 days of hospitalization. The strongest risk factor for in-hospital nonhemorrhagic stroke was in-hospital CABG, followed by in-hospital atrial fibrillation, previous stroke, initial enzyme elevation, and advanced age. Prior statin use was a protective factor. After controlling for potential confounders, in-hospital mortality was significantly higher among patients who experienced an in-hospital stroke (adjusted odds ratio, 8.3; 95% CI, 6.0 to 11.4). A total of 269 additional strokes (1.1%) occurred within 6 months after discharge from hospital, of which 56 (20.9%) were fatal. The most important risk factor for postdischarge stroke was the occurrence of an in-hospital stroke. Stroke is an uncommon event in patients with ACS but is associated with high mortality. Despite current therapy, the incidence of postdischarge stroke is not low. New approaches are warranted to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with ACS.

  7. Monitoring the implementation of the State-Regional Council agreement 03/02/2005 as to the management of acute stroke events: a comparison of the Italian regional legislations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, Donata; Spallazzi, Marco; Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola; Immovilli, Paolo; Toni, Danilo; Baldereschi, Marzia; Di Carlo, Antonio; Polizzi, Bianca M; Ferro, Salvatore; Inzitari, Domenico

    2013-09-01

    Access to effective acute stroke services is a crucial factor to reduce stroke-related death and disability, but is limited in different parts of Italy. Our study addresses this inequality across the Italian regions by examining the regional legislations issued to adopt and implement the State-Regional Council agreement 03/02/2005 as to the acute stroke management. All decrees and resolutions as to acute stroke were collected from each region and examined by the means of a check list including quantitative and qualitative characteristics, selected in accordance with the recommendations from the State-Regional Council document. Each completed check list was then sent to each regional reference person, who filled in the section on the implementation of the indications and compliance, with the collaboration of stroke specialists if necessary. The study was carried out from November 2009 to September 2010. The documents and information were collected from 19 regions. Our survey revealed disparities both in terms of number of decrees and resolutions and of topics covered by the regional legislations about stroke care. Most legislations lacked practical and economical details. This feedback from national and regional stroke regulations revealed a need of more concrete indications. Involvement of various stakeholders (legislators, consumers, providers) might possibly ensure that policies are actually adopted, implemented and maintained. Although considerable challenges are present to the development of standard and optimal stroke care more widely across Italian regions, the potential gains from such developments are substantial.

  8. Reliability of lower extremity muscle strength measurements with handheld dynamometry in stroke patients during the acute phase: a pilot reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Hsiao-Ching; Luh, Jer-Junn; Teng, Ting; Pan, Guan-Shuo; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Hsun, Chiang-Chang; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] No literature has described a suitable method for measuring muscle strength in a supine position during acute phase after stroke. This study investigated the feasibility and reliability of using a commercial handheld dynamometer to measure the muscle strengths of the hip flexor, knee extensor, and dorsiflexor in the supine position with a modified method for patients at a stroke intensive care center within 7 days of stroke onset. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen persons with acute stroke participated in this cross-sectional study. For each patient, the muscle strengths of the hip flexors, knee extensors, and dorsiflexors were measured twice by two testers on the same day. Each patient was re-tested at the same time of day one day later. Inter-rater and test-retest reliability were then determined by the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). [Results] For the three muscle groups, the inter-rater reliability ICCs were all 0.99 and the test-retest reliability ICCs were greater than 0.85. The investigated method thus has good inter-rater reliability and high agreement between the test-retest measurements, with acceptable measurement errors. [Conclusion] The modified method using a handheld dynamometer to test the muscle strength of acute stroke patients is a feasible and reliable method for clinical use.

  9. Economic burden of informal care attributable to stroke among those aged 65 years or older in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Heesoo; Liang, Di

    2017-02-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability in China, frequently resulting in the need for informal care. No information, however, is available on costs of informal care associated with stroke, required to understand the true cost of stroke in China. Using the 2011 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study, we identified 4447 respondents aged ≥65 years suitable for analyses, including 184 stroke survivors. We estimated the economic burden of informal care associated with stroke using a two-part model. The monthly number of hours of informal caregiving associated with stroke was 29.2 h/stroke survivor, and the average annual cost of informal care associated with stroke was 10,612 RMB per stroke survivor. The findings stress the necessity of proper interventions to prevent stroke and will be useful for estimating the economic burden of stroke.

  10. Post-stroke apathy and hypersomnia lead to worse outcomes from acute rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ari L.; Elder, Jessica; Schiff, Nicholas D.; Victor, Jonathan D.; Goldfine, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Apathy and hypersomnia occur after stroke and, by definition, reduce participation in rehabilitation, but their effect on outcome from acute rehabilitation is not known. We performed a retrospective review of 213 patients admitted to a stroke-specialized acute rehabilitation unit in the United States. All patients had ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, and no dementia or dependence on others pre-stroke. We diagnosed apathy and hypersomnia using standardized documentation by treating therapists. We used multiple regression analysis to control for overall impairment (combination of strength, cognitive and sensory measures), age, time since stroke, and stroke type (ischemic or hemorrhagic). 44 (21%) of patients had persistent apathy, and 12 (5.6%) had persistent hypersomnia. Both groups were more impaired in cognition, sustained attention, and more likely to be treated for depression. Patients with apathy were 2.4 times more likely to go to a nursing home, and had discharge FIM scores 12 points below the mean. Patients with hypersomnia were 10 times more likely to go to a nursing home, and had discharge FIM scores 16 points below the mean. These findings indicate that studies to prospectively define these clinical factors and potential confounds using standardized tools are indicated, and if confirmed, justify studies to identify these patients early and develop targeted interventions. PMID:24323716

  11. Predictors of pneumonia in acute stroke in patients in an emergency unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara R. M. Almeida

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the risk factors and comorbid conditions associated with the development of pneumonia in patients with acute stroke. To determine the independent predictors of pneumonia. Method Retrospective study from July to December 2011. We reviewed all medical charts with diagnosis of stroke. Results 159 patients (18-90 years were admitted. Prevalence of pneumonia was 32%. Pneumonia was more frequent in patients with hemorrhagic stroke (OR: 4.36; 95%CI: 1.9-10.01, p < 0.001, higher National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS (p = 0.047 and, lower Glasgow Coma Score (GCS (p < 0.0001. Patients with pneumonia had longer hospitalization (p < 0.0001. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified NIHSS as an independent predictor of pneumonia (95%CI: 1.049-1.246, p = 0.002. Conclusion Pneumonia was associated with severity and type of stroke and length of hospital stay. The severity of the deficit as evaluated by the NIHSS was shown to be the only independent risk factor for pneumonia in acute stroke patients.

  12. Ischemic Strokes (Clots)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Ischemic Strokes (Clots) Updated:Apr 26,2017 Ischemic stroke ... stroke. Let's Talk Numbers Updated Guidelines for Acute Ischemic Strokes Infographic : Attacking Brain Clots to Save Lives ...

  13. Clinical impact of MRI perfusion disturbances and normal diffusion in acute stroke patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondin, D. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: blondin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Seitz, R.J. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany); Biomedical Research Centre, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf (Germany); Brain Imaging Centre, Research Centre Julich (Germany); Rusch, O.; Janssen, H.; Andersen, K.; Wittsack, H.-J.; Turowski, B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: In acute ischemic stroke MR-imaging typically shows diffusion abnormalities surrounded by reduced perfusion signifying the so-called ischemic penumbra. Mismatch between diffusion and perfusion abnormalities gives indication for thrombolysis. But is there an indication for thrombolytic treatment, if there is no diffusion abnormality but pathologic perfusion combined with acute stroke symptoms?. Material and methods: MR-imaging of 1465 patients treated on our Stroke Unit between June 2004 and May 2007 retrospectively are analyzed. 6 patients met the inclusion criteria of severe neurological symptoms, large territorial perfusion disturbances, lack of diffusion abnormalities and complete neurological recovery after treatment. Results: In all six patients MTT measurements showed a significantly depressed perfusion in the symptomatic hemisphere (p < 0.02). Time-to-peak delay correlated with the mean transit time delay (0.949, p < 0.01). Indication for thrombolysis was based on perfusion abnormalities and clinical symptoms. Stroke symptoms could be reversed in all patients without any complication. Conclusion: Whereas diffusion imaging could not reveal any abnormality, perfusion analysis legitimated therapy with systemic thrombolysis in heavily affected patients. This work underlines the importance of multimodal MR imaging for guiding treatment decisions in acute stroke patients.

  14. Association of renal biomarkers with 3-month and 1-year outcomes among critically ill acute stroke patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chih Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The comparative relationships of widely recognized biomarkers of renal injury with short-term and long-term outcomes among critically ill acute stroke patients are unknown. We evaluated the impact of baseline albuminuria [urine albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR ≥ 30 mg/g] or low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2 on stroke patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU. METHODS: We reviewed data on consecutive stroke patients admitted to a hospital ICU in Taiwan from September 2007 to August 2010 and followed-up for 1 year. Baseline UACR was categorized into <30 mg/g (normal, 30-299 mg/g (microalbuminuria, and ≥ 300 mg/g (macroalbuminuria, while eGFR was divided into ≥ 60, 45-59, and <45 ml/min per 1.73 m(2. The outcome measure was death or disability at 3-month and 1-year after stroke onset, assessed by dichotomizing the modified Rankin Scale at 3-6 versus 0-2. RESULTS: Of 184 consecutive patients, 153 (83% met study entry criteria. Mean age was 67.9 years and median admission NIHSS score was 16. Among the renal biomarkers, only macroalbuminuria was associated with poorer 3-month outcome (OR 8.44, 95% CI 1.38 to 51.74, P = 0.021 and 1-year outcome (OR 18.06, 95% CI 2.59 to 125.94, P = 0.003 after adjustment of relevant covariates. When ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were analyzed separately, macroalbuminuria was associated with poorer 1-year outcome among ischemic (OR 17.10, 95% CI 1.04 to 280.07, P = 0.047 and hemorrhagic stroke patients (OR 1951.57, 95% CI 1.07 to 3561662.85, P = 0.048, respectively, after adjustment of relevant covariates and hematoma volume. CONCLUSIONS: Presence of macroalbuminuria indicates poor 3-month and 1-year outcomes among critically ill acute stroke patients.

  15. Trends and Regional Variation in Hospital Mortality, Length of Stay and Cost in Hospital of Ischemic Stroke Patients in Alberta Accompanying the Provincial Reorganization of Stroke Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohinmaa, Arto; Zheng, Yufei; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Klarenbach, Scott; Häkkinen, Unto; Nguyen, Thanh; Friesen, Dan; Ruseski, Jane; Kaul, Padma; Ariste, Ruolz; Jacobs, Philip

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the trends and regional variation of stroke hospital care in 30-day in-hospital mortality, hospital length of stay (LOS), and 1-year total hospitalization cost after implementation of the Alberta Provincial Stroke Strategy. New ischemic stroke patients (N = 7632) admitted to Alberta acute care hospitals between 2006 and 2011 were followed for 1 year. We analyzed in-hospital mortality with logistic regression, LOS with negative binomial regression, and the hospital costs with generalized gamma model (log link). The risk-adjusted results were compared over years and between zones using observed/expected results. The risk-adjusted mortality rates decre